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Sample records for particle induced reaction

  1. Nuclear reactions induced by high-energy alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear reactions induced by high energy protons and heavier ions are included. Fundamental data needed in the shielding, dosimetry, and radiobiology of high energy particles produced by accelerators were generated, along with data on cosmic ray interaction with matter. The mechanism of high energy nucleon-nucleus reactions is also examined, especially for light target nuclei of mass number comparable to that of biological tissue.

  2. Report of the Workshop on Light Particle-Induced Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The study meeting on light particle (mass number = 3 - 11) induced reaction was held for three days from 5-7 Dec. 1991 at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. This book records the reports based on the lectures presented at the meeting. In the new facility of the RCNP, the experiment on the nuclear reaction using 400 MeV polarized protons and 200 MeV polarized deuterons is about to begin. When the acceleration of polarized He-3 beam which is being developed becomes feasible, by combining it with the high resolution spectrometer GRAND RAIDEN, it is expected that the unique, high accuracy research using the polarized He-3 having intermediate energy (540 MeV) becomes possible. At this time, by focusing attention to what new physics is developed by the nuclear reaction induced by the composite particles having the intermediate energy of mass number 3 - 11, this study meeting was planned and held. As the result, 29 lectures collected were to cover wide fields, and active discussion was carried out.

  3. Experimental Study of the Cross Sections of {alpha}-Particle Induced Reactions on 209Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Hermanne, A.; Tarkanyi, F.; Takacs, S.; Szucs, Z.

    2005-05-24

    Alpha particle induced reactions for generation of 211At used in therapeutic nuclear medicine and possible contaminants were investigated with the stacked foil activation technique on natural bismuth targets up to E{alpha}=39 MeV. Excitation functions for the reactions 209Bi({alpha},2n)211At, 209Bi({alpha},3n)210At, 209Bi({alpha},x) 210Po obtained from direct alpha emission measurements and gamma spectra from decay products are compared with earlier literature values. Thick target yields have been deduced from the experimental cross sections.

  4. Experimental Study of the Cross Sections of α-Particle Induced Reactions on 209Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Szúcs, Z.

    2005-05-01

    Alpha particle induced reactions for generation of 211At used in therapeutic nuclear medicine and possible contaminants were investigated with the stacked foil activation technique on natural bismuth targets up to Eα=39 MeV. Excitation functions for the reactions 209Bi(α,2n)211At, 209Bi(α,3n)210At, 209Bi(α,x) 210Po obtained from direct alpha emission measurements and gamma spectra from decay products are compared with earlier literature values. Thick target yields have been deduced from the experimental cross sections.

  5. Light charged particles emitted in fission reactions induced by protons on 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Benlliure, J.; Paradela, C.; Ayyad, Y.; Casarejos, E.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Audouin, L.; Bélier, G.; Boutoux, G.; Chatillon, A.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Gorbinet, T.; Heinz, A.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Pellereau, E.; Pietras, B.; Ramos, D.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D. M.; Simon, H.; Taïeb, J.; Vargas, J.; Voss, B.

    2016-09-01

    Light charged particles emitted in proton-induced fission reactions on 208Pb have been measured at different kinetic energies: 370 A ,500 A , and 650 A MeV. The experiment was performed by the SOFIA Collaboration at the GSI facilities in Darmstadt (Germany). The inverse kinematics technique was combined with a setup especially designed to measure light charged particles in coincidence with fission fragments. This measurement allowed us, for the first time, to obtain correlations between the light charged particles emitted during the fission process and the charge distributions of the fission fragments. These correlations were compared with different model calculations to assess the ground-to-saddle dynamics. The results confirm that transient and dissipative effects are required for an accurate description of the fission observables.

  6. Investigation of the α-particle induced nuclear reactions on natural molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2012-08-01

    Cross-sections of alpha particle induced nuclear reactions on natural molybdenum have been studied in the frame of a systematic investigation of charged particle induced nuclear reactions on metals for different applications. The excitation functions of 93mTc, 93gTc(m+), 94mTc, 94gTc, 95mTc, 95gTc, 96gTc(m+), 99mTc, 93mMo, 99Mo(cum), 90Nb(m+), 94Ru, 95Ru,97Ru, 103Ru and 88Zr were measured up to 40 MeV alpha energy by using a stacked foil technique and activation method. The main goals of this work were to get experimental data for accelerator technology, for monitoring of alpha beam, for thin layer activation technique and for testing nuclear reaction theories. The experimental data were compared with critically analyzed published data and with the results of model calculations, obtained by using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE and TALYS codes (TENDL-2011).

  7. Production of medically useful bromine isotopes via alpha-particle induced nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, Katharina; Scholten, Bernhard; Spahn, Ingo; Hermanne, Alex; Spellerberg, Stefan; Coenen, Heinz H.; Neumaier, Bernd

    2017-09-01

    The cross sections of α-particle induced reactions on arsenic leading to the formation of 76,77,78Br were measured from their respective thresholds up to 37 MeV. Thin sediments of elemental arsenic powder were irradiated together with Al degrader and Cu monitor foils using the established stacked-foil technique. For determination of the effective α-particle energies and of the effective beam current through the stacks the cross-section ratios of the monitor nuclides 67Ga/66Ga were used. This should help resolve discrepancies in existing literature data. Comparison of the data with the available excitation functions shows some slight energy shifts as well as some differences in curve shapes. The calculated thick target yields indicate, that 77Br can be produced in the energy range Eα = 25 → 17 MeV free of isotopic impurities in quantities sufficient for medical application.

  8. Particle Generation by Pulsed Excimer Laser Ablation in Liquid: Hollow Structures and Laser-Induced Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zijie

    2011-12-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of solid targets in liquid media is a powerful method to fabricate micro-/nanoparticles, which has attracted much interest in the past decade. It represents a combinatorial library of constituents and interactions, and one can explore disparate regions of parameter space with outcomes that are impossible to envision a priori. In this work, a pulsed excimer laser (wavelength 248 nm, pulse width 30 ns) has been used to ablate targets in liquid media with varying laser fluences, frequencies, ablation times and surfactants. It is observed that hollow particles could be fabricated by excimer laser ablation of Al, Pt, Zn, Mg, Ag, Si, TiO2, and Nb2O5 in water or aqueous solutions. The hollow particles, with sizes from tens of nanometers to micrometers, may have smooth and continuous shells or have morphologies demonstrating that they were assembled from nanoparticles. A new mechanism has been proposed to explain the formation of these novel particle geometries. They were formed on laser-produced bubbles through bubble interface pinning by laser-produced solid species. Considering the bubble dynamics, thermodynamic and kinetic requirements have been discussed in the mechanism that can explain some phenomena associated with the formation of hollow particles, especially (1) larger particles are more likely to be hollow particles; (2) Mg and Al targets have stronger tendency to generate hollow particles; and (3) the 248 nm excimer laser is more beneficial to fabricate hollow particles in water than other lasers with longer wavelengths. The work has also demonstrated the possiblities to fabricate novel nanostructures through laser-induced reactions. Zn(OH)2/dodecyl sulfate flower-like nanostructures, AgCl cubes, and Ag2O cubes, pyramids, triangular plates, pentagonal rods and bars have been obtained via reactions between laser-produced species with water, electrolyes, or surfactant molecules. The underlying mechanisms of forming these structures have been

  9. Shear-induced reaction-limited aggregation kinetics of brownian particles at arbitrary concentrations.

    PubMed

    Zaccone, Alessio; Gentili, Daniele; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-04-07

    The aggregation of interacting brownian particles in sheared concentrated suspensions is an important issue in colloid and soft matter science per se. Also, it serves as a model to understand biochemical reactions occurring in vivo where both crowding and shear play an important role. We present an effective medium approach within the Smoluchowski equation with shear which allows one to calculate the encounter kinetics through a potential barrier under shear at arbitrary colloid concentrations. Experiments on a model colloidal system in simple shear flow support the validity of the model in the concentration range considered. By generalizing Kramers' rate theory to the presence of shear and collective hydrodynamics, our model explains the significant increase in the shear-induced reaction-limited aggregation kinetics upon increasing the colloid concentration.

  10. Nonthermal nuclear reactions induced by fast α particles in the solar core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronchev, Victor T.

    2015-02-01

    Nonthermal nuclear effects triggered in the solar carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) cycle by fast α particles—products of the p p chain reactions—are examined. The main attention is paid to 8.674-MeV α particles generated in the 7Li(p ,α ) α reaction. Nonthermal characteristics of these α particles and their influence on some nuclear processes are determined. It is found that the α -particle effective temperature is at a level of 1.1 MeV and exceeds the solar core temperature by 3 orders of magnitude. These fast particles are able to significantly enhance some endoergic (α ,p ) reactions neglected in standard solar model calculations. In particular, they can substantially affect the balance of the p +17O⇄α +14N reactions due to an appreciable increase of the reverse reaction rate. It is shown that in the region R =0.08 -0.25 R⊙ the reverse α +14N reaction can block the forward p +17O reaction, thus preventing closing of the CNO-II cycle, and increase the 17O abundance by a factor of 2-155 depending on R . This indicates that the fast α particles produced in the p p cycle can distort running of the CNO cycle, making it essentially different in the inner and outer core regions.

  11. Wear particles generated from studded tires and pavement induces inflammatory reactions in mouse macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Lindbom, John; Gustafsson, Mats; Blomqvist, Göran; Dahl, Andreas; Gudmundsson, Anders; Swietlicki, Erik; Ljungman, Anders G

    2007-06-01

    Health risks associated with exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) have been shown epidemiologically as well as experimentally, pointing to both respiratory and cardiovascular effects. These health risks are of increasing concern in society, and to protect public health, a clarification of the toxic properties of particles from different sources is of importance. Lately, wear particles generated from traffic have been recognized as a major contributing source to the overall particle load, especially in the Nordic countries where studded tires are used. The aim of this study was to further investigate and compare the ability to induce inflammatory mediators of different traffic-related wear particles collected from an urban street, a subway station, and studded tire-pavement wear. Inflammatory effects were measured as induction of nitric oxide (NO), IL-6, TNF-alpha, arachidonic acid (AA), and lipid peroxidation after exposure of the murine macrophage like cell line RAW 264.7. In addition, the redox potential of the particles was measured in a cell-free system. The results show that all particles tested induce IL-6, TNF-alpha, and NO, and those from the urban street were the most potent ones. In contrast, particles collected from a subway station were most potent to induce lipid peroxidation, AA release, and formation of ROS. Particles from studded tire-pavement wear, generated using a road simulator, were able to induce inflammatory cytokines, NO, lipid peroxidation, and ROS formation. Interestingly, particles generated from pavement containing granite as the main stone material were more potent than those generated from pavement containing quartzite as the main stone material.

  12. Study of excitation functions of alpha-particle induced nuclear reactions on holmium for 167Tm production.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Hermanne, A; Király, B; Takács, S; Ignatyuk, A V

    2010-03-01

    (167)Tm is a candidate radioisotope for both nuclear medicine diagnostics and therapy due to its emitted Auger-electrons, low energy X- and gamma-rays. In the frame of a systematic study of excitation functions for production of medically relevant radioisotopes by charged particle induced reactions on rare earths, the (165)Ho(alpha,2n)(167)Tm reaction and the (165)Ho(alpha,n)(168)Tm, (165)Ho(alpha,3n)(166)Tm, (165)Ho(alpha,4n)(165)Tm side reactions were measured up to 40 MeV by the stacked foil irradiation technique and gamma-ray spectroscopy. The measured results were compared to the ALICE-IPPE and EMPIRE-II theoretical curves. Thick target yields, impurity levels and specific activities were deduced and compared with the same parameters for other charged particle production routes of (167)Tm. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Visible light-induced photocatalytic reaction of gold-modified titanium(IV) oxide particles: action spectrum analysis.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Ewa; Abe, Ryu; Ohtani, Bunsho

    2009-01-08

    Action spectrum analyses showed that visible light-induced oxidation of 2-propanol by aerated gold-modified titanium(IV) oxide (titania) suspensions is initiated by excitation of gold surface plasmon, and polychromatic irradiation experiments revealed that the photocatalytic reaction rate depends strongly on properties of titania, such as particle size, surface area and crystalline form (anatase or rutile) and on properties of gold deposits, such as size and shape.

  14. Complementary optical-potential analysis of {alpha}-particle elastic scattering and induced reactions at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Avrigeanu, M. Obreja, A.C.; Roman, F.L.; Avrigeanu, V.; Oertzen, W. von

    2009-07-15

    A previously derived semi-microscopic analysis based on the Double Folding Model, for {alpha}-particle elastic scattering on A{approx}100 nuclei at energies below 32 MeV, is extended to medium mass A{approx}50-120 nuclei and energies from {approx}13 to 50 MeV. The energy-dependent phenomenological imaginary part for this semi-microscopic optical model potential was obtained including the dispersive correction to the microscopic real potential, and used within a concurrent phenomenological analysis of the same data basis. A regional parameter set for low-energy {alpha}-particles entirely based on elastic scattering data analysis was also obtained for nuclei within the above mentioned mass and energy ranges. Then, an ultimate assessment of ({alpha},{gamma}), ({alpha},n), and ({alpha},p) reaction cross sections considered target nuclei from {sup 45}Sc to {sup 118}Sn and incident energies below {approx}12 MeV. The former diffuseness of the real part of optical potential as well as the surface imaginary potential depth have been found to be responsible for the actual difficulties in the description of these data, and modified in order to obtain an optical potential which describes equally well both the low-energy elastic scattering and induced reaction data for {alpha}-particles.

  15. Early applications of the R-matrix SAMMY code for charged-particle induced reactions and related covariances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigni, Marco T.; Gauld, Ian C.; Croft, Stephen

    2017-09-01

    The SAMMY code system is mainly used in nuclear data evaluations for incident neutrons in the resolved resonance region (RRR), however, built-in capabilities also allow the code to describe the resonance structure produced by other incident particles, including charged particles. (α,n) data provide fundamental information that underpins nuclear modeling and simulation software, such as ORIGEN and SOURCES4C, used for the analysis of neutron emission and definition of source emission processes. The goal of this work is to carry out evaluations of charged-particle-induced reaction cross sections in the RRR. The SAMMY code was recently used in this regard to generate a Reich-Moore parameterization of the available 17,18O(α,n) experimental cross sections in order to estimate the uncertainty in the neutron generation rates for uranium oxide fuel types. This paper provides a brief description of the SAMMY evaluation procedure for the treatment of 17,18O(α,n) reaction cross sections. The results are used to generate neutron source rates for a plutonium oxide matrix.

  16. Variations of boundary reaction rate and particle size on the diffusion-induced stress in a phase separating electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; He, Linghui; Ni, Yong; Song, Yicheng

    2014-10-14

    In contrast to the case of single-phase delithiation wherein faster discharging leads to higher diffusion-induced stress (DIS), this paper reports nonmonotonous dependency of the boundary reaction rate on the DIS in nanosized spherical electrode accompanying phase separation. It is attributed to a transition from two-phase to single-phase delithiation driven by increase of the boundary reaction rate leading to narrowing and vanishing of the miscibility gap in a range of the particle size. The profiles of lithium concentration and the DIS are identified during the transition based on a continuum model. The resultant maximum DIS first decreases in the region of two-phase delithiation and later returns to increase in the region of single-phase delithiation with the increase of the boundary reaction rate. A map for the failure behavior in the spherical electrode particle is constructed based on the Tresca failure criterion. These results indicate that the failure caused by the DIS can be avoided by appropriate selection of the said parameters in such electrodes.

  17. Caltrop particles synthesized by photochemical reaction induced by X-ray radiolysis.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Akinobu; Fukuoka, Takao; Okada, Iukuo; Ishihara, Mari; Sakurai, Ikuya; Utsumi, Yuichi

    2017-05-01

    X-ray radiolysis of a Cu(CH3COO)2 solution was observed to produce caltrop-shaped particles of cupric oxide (CuO, Cu2O), which were characterized using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectrometry. X-ray irradiation from a synchrotron source drove the room-temperature synthesis of submicrometer- and micrometer-scale cupric oxide caltrop particles from an aqueous Cu(CH3COO)2 solution spiked with ethanol. The size of the caltrop particles depended on the ratio of ethanol in the stock solution and the surface of the substrate. The results indicated that there were several synthetic routes to obtain caltrop particles, each associated with electron donation. The technique of X-ray irradiation enables the rapid synthesis of caltrop cupric oxide particles compared with conventional synthetic methods.

  18. New potentialities of the Liège intranuclear cascade model for reactions induced by nucleons and light charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudard, A.; Cugnon, J.; David, J.-C.; Leray, S.; Mancusi, D.

    2013-01-01

    The new version (incl4.6) of the Liège intranuclear cascade (INC) model for the description of spallation reactions is presented in detail. Compared to the standard version (incl4.2), it incorporates several new features, the most important of which are: (i) the inclusion of cluster production through a dynamical phase space coalescence model, (ii) the Coulomb deflection for entering and outgoing charged particles, (iii) the improvement of the treatment of Pauli blocking and of soft collisions, (iv) the introduction of experimental threshold values for the emission of particles, (v) the improvement of pion dynamics, (vi) a detailed procedure for the treatment of light-cluster-induced reactions taking care of the effects of binding energy of the nucleons inside the incident cluster and of the possible fusion reaction at low energy. Performances of the new model concerning nucleon-induced reactions are illustrated by a comparison with experimental data covering total reaction cross sections, neutron, proton, pion, and composite double-differential cross-sections, neutron multiplicities, residue mass and charge distributions, and residue recoil velocity distributions. Whenever necessary, the incl4.6 model is coupled to the ABLA07 de-excitation model and the respective merits of the two models are then tentatively disentangled. Good agreement is generally obtained in the 200 MeV to 2 GeV range. Below 200 MeV and down to a few tens of MeV, the total reaction cross section is well reproduced and differential cross sections are reasonably well described. The model is also tested for light-ion induced reactions at low energy, below 100 MeV incident energy per nucleon. Beyond presenting the update of the incl4.2 model, attention has been paid to applications of the new model to three topics for which some particular aspects are discussed for the first time. The first topic is the production of clusters heavier than alpha particle. It is shown that the energy spectra of

  19. Recent insight into the mechanism of proton-induced composite particle emission in inclusive reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, A. A.; Dimitrova, S. S.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Lukyanov, K. V.; van Zyl, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent results for the inclusive reaction 93Nb(p,α) between incident energies of 65 and 160 MeV are shown to be consistent with a competition between knockout and pickup. The pre-equilibrium statistical multistep process terminates in either mechanism. The incident-energy dependence of the reaction reflects the dynamics of the participating reaction components. It is consequently not surprising to observe knockout to dominate at the lower and highest incident energies, with pickup very prominent in between.

  20. Light particle emission in 16O-induced reactions at 140, 215, and 310 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awes, T. C.; Saini, S.; Poggi, G.; Gelbke, C. K.; Cha, D.; Legrain, R.; Westfall, G. D.

    1982-05-01

    Double differential cross sections have been measured for energetic p, d, t, and α particles emitted in 16O-induced reactions on targets of A1, Zr, and Au at incident energies of 140, 215, and 310 MeV. The energy and angular distributions are well described by isotropic emission from a moving thermal source. The extracted temperature and velocity parameters are found to vary systematically with the incident energy per nucleon above the Coulomb barrier. The observed trends cannot be explained by compound nucleus emission but instead suggest emission from a source which consists of comparable contributions from target and projectile. Alternatively, the proton energy spectra are compared with a precompound model and with a simple knockout model. The d, t, and α-particle cross sections are also described in terms of a generalized coalescence relation which takes into account Coulomb repulsion from the target nucleus. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 27Al(16O,x), E=140, 215, and 310 MeV; 90Zr(16O,x), E=215 and 310 MeV; 197Au(16O,x), E=140, 215, and 310 MeV; x=p, d, t, and α. Measured σ(Ex,θx). Analysis in terms of moving source, precompound, knockout, and coalescence models.

  1. Special features of isomeric ratios in nuclear reactions induced by various projectile particles

    SciTech Connect

    Danagulyan, A. S.; Hovhannisyan, G. H. Bakhshiyan, T. M.; Martirosyan, G. V.

    2016-05-15

    Calculations for (p, n) and (α, p3n) reactions were performed with the aid of the TALYS-1.4 code. Reactions in which the mass numbers of target and product nuclei were identical were examined in the range of A = 44–124. Excitation functions were obtained for product nuclei in ground and isomeric states, and isomeric ratios were calculated. The calculated data reflect well the dependence of the isomeric ratios on the projectile type. A comparison of the calculated and experimental data reveals, that, for some nuclei in a high-spin state, the calculated data fall greatly short of their experimental counterparts. These discrepancies may be due to the presence of high-spin yrast states and rotational bands in these nuclei. Calculations involving various level-density models included in the TALYS-1.4 code with allowance for the enhancement of collective effects do not remove the discrepancies in the majority of cases.

  2. Special features of isomeric ratios in nuclear reactions induced by various projectile particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danagulyan, A. S.; Hovhannisyan, G. H.; Bakhshiyan, T. M.; Martirosyan, G. V.

    2016-05-01

    Calculations for ( p, n) and (α, p3 n) reactions were performed with the aid of the TALYS-1.4 code. Reactions in which the mass numbers of target and product nuclei were identical were examined in the range of A = 44-124. Excitation functions were obtained for product nuclei in ground and isomeric states, and isomeric ratios were calculated. The calculated data reflect well the dependence of the isomeric ratios on the projectile type. A comparison of the calculated and experimental data reveals, that, for some nuclei in a high-spin state, the calculated data fall greatly short of their experimental counterparts. These discrepancies may be due to the presence of high-spin yrast states and rotational bands in these nuclei. Calculations involving various level-density models included in the TALYS-1.4 code with allowance for the enhancement of collective effects do not remove the discrepancies in the majority of cases.

  3. NACRE II: an update of the NACRE compilation of charged-particle-induced thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei with mass number A<16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Goriely, S.; Arnould, M.; Ohta, M.; Utsunomiya, H.

    2013-11-01

    An update of the NACRE compilation [3] is presented. This new compilation, referred to as NACRE II, reports thermonuclear reaction rates for 34 charged-particle induced, two-body exoergic reactions on nuclides with mass number A<16, of which fifteen are particle-transfer reactions and the rest radiative capture reactions. When compared with NACRE, NACRE II features in particular (1) the addition to the experimental data collected in NACRE of those reported later, preferentially in the major journals of the field by early 2013, and (2) the adoption of potential models as the primary tool for extrapolation to very low energies of astrophysical S-factors, with a systematic evaluation of uncertainties.

  4. Measurement of double differential charged-particle emission cross sections for reactions induced by 26 MeV protons and FKK model analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Y.; Aoto, A.; Kashimoto, H.

    1994-06-01

    Double differential charged-particle emission cross sections of proton-induced reactions have been measured for {sup nat}C, {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Si, {sup 98}Mo, {sup 106}Pd, {sup 159}Tb and {sup 181}Ta at energies around 26 MeV. Several (p,p{prime}) and (p,n) data for {sup 98}Mo and {sup 106}Pd in the incident energy range from 12 to 26 MeV are analysed in terms of the Feshbach-Kerman-Koonin model, in order to study preequilibrium nucleon emission from nucleon-induced reactions.

  5. Experimental Study on Impact-Induced Reaction Characteristics of PTFE/Ti Composites Enhanced by W Particles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Wang, Zaicheng; Jiang, Chunlan; Niu, Haohao

    2017-01-01

    Metal/fluoropolymer composites are a category of energetic structural materials that release energy through exothermic chemical reactions initiated under highly dynamic loadings. In this paper, the chemical reaction mechanism of PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene)/Ti/W composites is investigated through thermal analysis and composition analysis. These composites undergo exothermic reactions at 510 °C to 600 °C, mainly producing TiFx. The tungsten significantly reduces the reaction heat due to its inertness. In addition, the dynamic compression properties and impact-induced reaction behaviors of PTFE/Ti/W composites with different W content prepared by pressing and sintering are studied using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar and high speed photography. The results show that both the mechanical strength and the reaction degree are significantly improved with the increasing strain rate. Moreover, as W content increases, the mechanical strength is enhanced, but the elasticity/plasticity is decreased. The PTFE/Ti/W composites tend to become more inert with the increasing W content, which is reflected by the reduced reaction degree and the increased reaction threshold for the impact ignition. PMID:28772534

  6. Experimental Study on Impact-Induced Reaction Characteristics of PTFE/Ti Composites Enhanced by W Particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wang, Zaicheng; Jiang, Chunlan; Niu, Haohao

    2017-02-13

    Metal/fluoropolymer composites are a category of energetic structural materials that release energy through exothermic chemical reactions initiated under highly dynamic loadings. In this paper, the chemical reaction mechanism of PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene)/Ti/W composites is investigated through thermal analysis and composition analysis. These composites undergo exothermic reactions at 510 °C to 600 °C, mainly producing TiFx. The tungsten significantly reduces the reaction heat due to its inertness. In addition, the dynamic compression properties and impact-induced reaction behaviors of PTFE/Ti/W composites with different W content prepared by pressing and sintering are studied using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar and high speed photography. The results show that both the mechanical strength and the reaction degree are significantly improved with the increasing strain rate. Moreover, as W content increases, the mechanical strength is enhanced, but the elasticity/plasticity is decreased. The PTFE/Ti/W composites tend to become more inert with the increasing W content, which is reflected by the reduced reaction degree and the increased reaction threshold for the impact ignition.

  7. The cross sections and energy spectra of the particle emission in proton induced reaction on 204,206,207,208Pb and 209Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengjun; Liang, Haiying; Xu, Yongli; Han, Yinlu; Cai, Chonghai; Shen, Qingbiao

    2017-09-01

    All cross sections of proton induced reactions, angular distributions, energy spectra and double differential cross sections of neutron, proton, deuteron, triton, helium and alpha-particle emissions for p+ 204,206,207,208Pb, 209Bi reactions are consistently calculated and analyzed at incident proton energies below 200 MeV. The optical model, the distorted wave Born approximation theory, the unified Hauser-Feshbach and exciton model which includes the improved Iwamoto-Harada model are used. Theoretically calculated results are compared with the existing experimental data.

  8. Implementation of a new energy-angular distribution of particles emitted by deuteron induced nuclear reaction in transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvan, Patrick; Koning, Arjan; Ogando, Francisco; Sanz, Javier

    2017-09-01

    MCUNED code is an MCNPX extension able to handle evaluated nuclear data library for light ion transport simulations. In this work the MCUNED code is improved to describe more accurately the neutron emission during deuteron induced nuclear reaction. This code update consists in introducing a new methodology to take into account the angular distribution of neutron produced by deuteron breakup reaction. To carry out this work a new formulation for the angular distribution of neutrons produced by breakup reaction has been proposed. The implementation of this new methodology requires the use of extra parameters which are provided by the nuclear code TALYS and stored in the ENDF file. This new methodology shows significant improvement in comparison with the former treatment of neutron emission kinematics, these results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  9. Cross sections for α-particle induced reactions on Sn115,116 around the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipescu, D.; Avrigeanu, V.; Glodariu, T.; Mihai, C.; Bucurescu, D.; Ivaşcu, M.; Căta-Danil, I.; Stroe, L.; Sima, O.; Căta-Danil, G.; Deleanu, D.; Ghiţă, D. G.; Mărginean, N.; Mărginean, R.; Negret, A.; Pascu, S.; Sava, T.; Suliman, G.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2011-06-01

    The cross sections of the Sn115(α,γ)Te119, Sn115(α,n)Te118, and Sn116(α,n)Te119 reactions (both on ground and isomeric states) have been measured at effective center-of-mass energies from 9.3 to 14.8 MeV. During a first experiment, enriched self-supporting Sn115 (51.2%) + Sn116 (24.4%) foils were bombarded with an α beam delivered by the Bucharest IFIN-HH Tandem Accelerator. In a second experiment, a highly enriched Sn116 target was irradiated in order to disentangle the experimental cross section contributions due to Sn115(α,γ)Te119 and Sn115(α,n)Te118 reactions obtained in the first measurement. The beam-induced activity was measured with two large volume HPGe detectors in close geometry. The experimental results were compared with theoretical predictions obtained in the framework of the statistical model.

  10. Evaluation of nuclear reaction cross section data for the production of (87)Y and (88)Y via proton, deuteron and alpha-particle induced transmutations.

    PubMed

    Zaneb, H; Hussain, M; Amjad, N; Qaim, S M

    2016-06-01

    Proton, deuteron and alpha-particle induced reactions on (87,88)Sr, (nat)Zr and (85)Rb targets were evaluated for the production of (87,88)Y. The literature data were compared with nuclear model calculations using the codes ALICE-IPPE, TALYS 1.6 and EMPIRE 3.2. The evaluated cross sections were generated; therefrom thick target yields of (87,88)Y were calculated. Analysis of radio-yttrium impurities and yield showed that the (87)Sr(p, n)(87)Y and (88)Sr(p, n)(88)Y reactions are the best routes for the production of (87)Y and (88)Y respectively. The calculated yield for the (87)Sr(p, n)(87)Y reaction is 104 MBq/μAh in the energy range of 14→2.7MeV. Similarly, the calculated yield for the (88)Sr(p, n)(88)Y reaction is 3.2 MBq/μAh in the energy range of 15→7MeV.

  11. Particle-gamma and particle-particle correlations in nuclear reactions using Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshback model

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Talou, Patrick; Watanabe, Takehito; Chadwick, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations for particle and {gamma}-ray emissions from an excited nucleus based on the Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory are performed to obtain correlated information between emitted particles and {gamma}-rays. We calculate neutron induced reactions on {sup 51}V to demonstrate unique advantages of the Monte Carlo method. which are the correlated {gamma}-rays in the neutron radiative capture reaction, the neutron and {gamma}-ray correlation, and the particle-particle correlations at higher energies. It is shown that properties in nuclear reactions that are difficult to study with a deterministic method can be obtained with the Monte Carlo simulations.

  12. Trojan Horse particle invariance in fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleril, C.; Bertulani, C.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Blokhintsev, L.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Spartá, R.; Tumino, A.

    2015-01-01

    Trojan Horse method plays an important part for the measurement of several charged particle induced reactions cross sections of astrophysical interest. In order to better understand its cornerstones and the related applications to different astrophysical scenarios several tests were performed to verify all its properties and the possible future perspectives. The Trojan Horse nucleus invariance for the binary reactions d(d,p)t, 6,7Li(p,α)3,4He was therefore tested using the appropriate quasi free break- ups, respectively. In the first cases results from 6Li and 3He break up were used, while for the lithium fusion reactions break-ups of 2H and 3He were compared. The astrophysical S(E)-factors for the different processes were then extracted in the framework of the PlaneWave Approximation applied to the different break-up schemes. The obtained results are compared with direct data as well as with previous indirect investigations. The very good agreement between data coming from different break-up schemes confirms the applicability of the plane wave approximation and suggests the independence of binary indirect cross section on the chosen Trojan Horse nucleus also for the present cases. Moreover the astrophysical implications of the results will also be discussed in details.

  13. An Improved Reaction Rate Formulation for Charged-Particle Induced Thermonuclear Reaction of {sup 2}H(d,{gamma}){sup 4}He

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Azni Abdul; Yusof, Norhasliza; Idris, Mahirah; Kassim, Hasan Abu

    2011-03-30

    The reaction rate formula utilized in compilations such as the Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of Reaction Rates (NACRE) uses low energy approximation due to temperatures in stars are in the region of a few keVs. Most nuclear reaction experiments were done in MeV range and the interior temperatures of massive stars are {approx}10{sup 9} K. Hence an improved formulation for calculating the nuclear reaction rate that is applicable to high temperatures is discussed in this work. The exact tunneling probability that is applicable for all energies is obtained by solving the Schroedinger equation. This yields an enhanced expression for the astrophysical S-factor for calculating the thermonuclear reaction rate at high temperature. The thermonuclear reaction rate from this work is applied to the {sup 2}H(d,{gamma}){sup 4}He reaction and is compared with the NACRE compilation. This improved reaction rate can be included in the nuclear reaction network in a Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) code or a stellar nuclear network code.

  14. Evaluation of excitation functions of 3He- and α-particle induced reactions on antimony isotopes with special relevance to the production of iodine-124.

    PubMed

    Aslam, M N; Sudár, S; Hussain, M; Malik, A A; Qaim, S M

    2011-01-01

    Cross section data were evaluated for the production of the medically important positron emitter (124)I (T(1/2)=4.18d) via (3)He- and α-particle induced reactions on Sb isotopes. The consistency in the measured data available in the literature was checked against the cross section calculations of three nuclear model codes (i.e. STAPRE, EMPIRE and TALYS). The recommended excitation functions obtained by a statistical procedure were used to derive the integral yields. An assessment of the (124)I yields and associated radioisotopic impurities suggests that the (123)Sb(α,3n)(124)I process over the energy range of E(α)=45 → 32 MeV could be of potential interest for the production of (124)I.

  15. Trace-element analysis by charged-particle-induced reactions as a tool for physicians and chemists.

    PubMed

    Mousavi-Yeganeh, S

    1987-04-01

    The object of this article is to apprise physicians and chemists of nuclear analytical techniques and, in particular, of ion beam analysis (PIXE and PIGE) for the purpose of application to the clinical diagnostic method.The feasibility of the technique, sampling, and sample preparation for trace element analysis in biological and biomedical samples has been described previously (1-3). Analysis data from normal human blood samples and biomedical samples by ion beam reactions have been compared at the end.Emphasis will be placed on the use of the analytical technique on determination of the range of trace and toxic elements in human blood samples.

  16. Activation cross sections of α-particle induced nuclear reactions on hafnium and deuteron induced nuclear reaction on tantalum: production of ¹⁷⁸W/(178m)Ta generator.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Ditrói, F; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V; Uddin, M S

    2014-09-01

    In the frame of a systematic study of charged particle production routes of medically relevant radionuclei, the excitation function for indirect production of (178m)Ta through (nat)Hf(α,xn)(178)W-(178m)Ta nuclear reaction was measured for the first time up to 40 MeV. In parallel, the side reactions (nat)Hf(α,x)(179,177,176,175)W, (183,182,178g,177,176,175)Ta, (179m,177m,175)Hf were also assessed. Stacked foil irradiation technique and γ-ray spectrometry were used. New experimental cross section data for the (nat)Ta(d,xn)(178)W reaction are also reported up to 40 MeV. The measured excitation functions are compared with the results of the ALICE-IPPE, and EMPIRE nuclear reaction model codes and with the TALYS 1.4 based data in the TENDL-2013 library. The thick target yields were deduced and compared with yields of other charged particle ((p,4n), (d,5n) and ((3)He,x)) production routes for (178)W. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Modeled Neutron and Charged-Particle Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the Region of Yttrium, Zirconium, Niobium, and Molybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R D; Kelley, K; Dietrich, F S; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M G

    2006-06-13

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron, proton, and deuteron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for targets ranging from strontium (Z = 38) to rhodium (Z = 45).

  18. Vibrational excitation induces double reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai; Leung, Lydie; Lim, Tingbin; Ning, Zhanyu; Polanyi, John C

    2014-12-23

    Electron-induced reaction at metal surfaces is currently the subject of extensive study. Here, we broaden the range of experimentation to a comparison of vibrational excitation with electronic excitation, for reaction of the same molecule at the same clean metal surface. In a previous study of electron-induced reaction by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we examined the dynamics of the concurrent breaking of the two C-I bonds of ortho-diiodobenzene physisorbed on Cu(110). The energy of the incident electron was near the electronic excitation threshold of E0=1.0 eV required to induce this single-electron process. STM has been employed in the present work to study the reaction dynamics at the substantially lower incident electron energies of 0.3 eV, well below the electronic excitation threshold. The observed increase in reaction rate with current was found to be fourth-order, indicative of multistep reagent vibrational excitation, in contrast to the first-order rate dependence found earlier for electronic excitation. The change in mode of excitation was accompanied by altered reaction dynamics, evidenced by a different pattern of binding of the chemisorbed products to the copper surface. We have modeled these altered reaction dynamics by exciting normal modes of vibration that distort the C-I bonds of the physisorbed reagent. Using the same ab initio ground potential-energy surface as in the prior work on electronic excitation, but with only vibrational excitation of the physisorbed reagent in the asymmetric stretch mode of C-I bonds, we obtained the observed alteration in reaction dynamics.

  19. Neutron-induced reaction studies using stored ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glorius, Jan; Litvinov, Yuri A.; Reifarth, René

    2015-11-01

    Storage rings provide unique possibilities for investigations of nuclear reactions. Radioactive ions can be stored if the ring is connected to an appropriate facility and reaction studies are feasible at low beam intensities because of the recycling of beam particles. Using gas jet or droplet targets, charged particle-induced reactions on short-lived isotopes can be studied in inverse kinematics. In such a system a high-flux reactor could serve as a neutron target extending the experimental spectrum to neutron-induced reactions. Those could be studied over a wide energy range covering the research fields of nuclear astrophysics and reactor safety, transmutation of nuclear waste and fusion.

  20. Excitation function of the alpha particle induced nuclear reactions on enriched 116Cd, production of the theranostic isotope 117mSn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Takács, S.; Haba, H.; Komori, Y.; Aikawa, M.; Szűcs, Z.; Saito, M.

    2016-10-01

    117mSn is one of the radioisotopes can be beneficially produced through alpha particle irradiation. The targets were prepared by deposition of 116Cd metal onto high purity 12 μm thick Cu backing. The average deposited thickness was 21.9 μm. The beam energy was thoroughly measured by Time of Flight (TOF) methods and proved to be 51.2 MeV. For the experiment the well-established stacked foil technique was used. In addition to the Cd targets, Ti foils were also inserted into the stacks for energy and intensity monitoring. The Cu backings were also used for monitoring and as recoil catcher of the reaction products from the cadmium layer. The activities of the irradiated foils were measured with HPGe detector for gamma-ray spectrometry and cross section values were determined. As a result excitation functions for the formation of 117mSn, 117m,gIn, 116mIn, 115mIn and 115m,gCd from enriched 116Cd were deduced and compared with the available literature data and with the results of the nuclear reaction model code calculations EMPIRE 3.2 and TALYS 1.8. Yield curves were also deduced for the measured nuclear reactions and compared with the literature.

  1. Spallation-induced fission reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benlliure, J.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.

    2017-03-01

    During the last decade spallation-induced fission reactions have received particular attention because of their impact in the design of spallation-neutron sources or radioactive beam facilities, but also in the understanding of the fission process at high excitation energy. In this paper, we review the main progress brought by modern experimental techniques, in particular those based in the inverse kinematic, as well as the achievements in modelling these reactions. We will also address future possibilities for improving the investigation of fission dynamics.

  2. Morphological changes of amphiphilic molecular assemblies induced by chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Koh M; Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2015-02-04

    Shape transformations of amphiphilic molecular assemblies induced by chemical reactions are studied using coarse-grained molecular simulations. A binding reaction between hydrophilic and hydrophobic molecules is considered. It is found that the reaction induces transformation of an oil droplet to a tubular vesicle via bicelles and vesicles with discoidal arms. The discoidal arms close into vesicles, which are subsequently fused into the tubular vesicle. Under the chemical reaction, the bicelle-to-vesicle transition occurs at smaller sizes than in the absence of the hydrophobic molecules. It is revealed that the enhancement of this transition is due to embedded hydrophobic particles that reduce the membrane bending rigidity.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of particle-induced bit upsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, Frédéric; Touboul, Antoine; Vaillé, Jean-Roch; Boch, Jérôme; Saigné, Frédéric

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the issue of radiation-induced failures in electronic devices by developing a Monte Carlo tool called MC-Oracle. It is able to transport the particles in device, to calculate the energy deposited in the sensitive region of the device and to calculate the transient current induced by the primary particle and the secondary particles produced during nuclear reactions. We compare our simulation results with SRAM experiments irradiated with neutrons, protons and ions. The agreement is very good and shows that it is possible to predict the soft error rate (SER) for a given device in a given environment.

  4. Heterogeneous Reaction of HO2 Radical with Dicarboxylic Acid Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketani, F.; Kanaya, Y.

    2010-12-01

    HOx(OH+ HO2) radical plays a central role in the tropospheric chemistry. Recently, the heterogeneous loss of HO2 by aerosol particles is a potentially important HOx sink in the troposphere suggested from observation study. However, there have been few studies for loss of HO2 by aerosols. In this study, we measured the HO2 uptake coefficients for four dicarboxylic acids (succinic acid, glutaric acid, adipic acid, and pimelic acid) aerosol particles under ambient conditions (760Torr and 296K) using an aerosol flow tube(AFT) coupled with a chemical conversion /laser-induced fluorescence(CC/LIF) technique. The CC/LIF technique enabled experiments to be performed at almost the same HO2 radical concentration as that in the atmosphere(-10^8 molecules/cm^3). In this system, the effect of the self-reaction of HO2 in the gas phase can be neglected. HO2 radicals were injected into the AFT through a vertically movable Pyrex tube. Injector position dependent profiles of LIF intensity were measured as a function of aerosol concentration at 30% and 70% of relative humilities (RH). Determined HO2 uptake coefficients by succinic acid, glutaric acid, adipic acid, and pimelic acid aerosol particles at 30% RH were 0.05 +/- 0.02, 0.07 +/- 0.03, 0.02 +/- 0.01, and 0.06 +/- 0.03, respectively, while the uptake coefficients by those particles at 70% RH were 0.13 +/- 0.05, 0.13 +/- 0.03, 0.06 +/- 0.01, and 0.11 +/- 0.03, respectively. These results suggest that compositions and relative humidity are significant to the HO2 uptake. We will discuss the potential HO2 loss processes.

  5. Nuclear Astrophysics and Neutron Induced Reactions: Quasi-Free Reactions and RIBs

    SciTech Connect

    Cherubini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Coc, A.; Kubono, S.; Binh, D. N.; Hayakawa, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Burjan, V.; Kroha, V.; De Sereville, N.

    2010-08-12

    The use of quasi-free reactions in studying nuclear reactions between charged particles of astrophysical interest has received much attention over the last two decades. The Trojan Horse Method is based on this approach and it has been used to study a number of reactions relevant for Nuclear Astrophysics. Recently we applied this method to the study of nuclear reactions that involve radioactive species, namely to the study of the {sup 18}F+p{yields}{sup 15}O+{alpha} process at temperatures corresponding to the energies available in the classical novae scenario. Quasi-free reactions can also be exploited to study processes induced by neutrons. This technique is particularly interesting when applied to reaction induced by neutrons on unstable short-lived nuclei. Such processes are very important in the nucleosynthesis of elements in the sand r-processes scenarios and this technique can give hints for solving key questions in nuclear astrophysics where direct measurements are practically impossible.

  6. Influence of neighboring reactive particles on diffusion-limited reactions

    PubMed Central

    Eun, Changsun; Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Competition between reactive species is commonplace in typical chemical reactions. Specifically the primary reaction between a substrate and its target enzyme may be altered when interactions with secondary species in the system are substantial. We explore this competition phenomenon for diffusion-limited reactions in the presence of neighboring particles through numerical solution of the diffusion equation. As a general model for globular proteins and small molecules, we consider spherical representations of the reactants and neighboring particles; these neighbors vary in local density, size, distribution, and relative distance from the primary target reaction, as well as their surface reactivity. Modulations of these model variables permit inquiry into the influence of excluded volume and competition on the primary reaction due to the presence of neighboring particles. We find that the surface reactivity effect is long-ranged and a strong determinant of reaction kinetics, whereas the excluded volume effect is relatively short-ranged and less influential in comparison. As a consequence, the effect of the excluded volume is only modestly dependent on the neighbor distribution and is approximately additive; this additivity permits a linear approximation to the many-body effect on the reaction kinetics. In contrast, the surface reactivity effect is non-additive, and thus it may require higher-order approximations to describe the reaction kinetics. Our model study has broad implications in the general understanding of competition and local crowding on diffusion-limited chemical reactions. PMID:23901970

  7. Arbitrarily Complex Chemical Reactions on Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, D. A.; Bolster, D.

    2016-12-01

    Previous particle-tracking (PT) algorithms for chemical reaction conceptualize each particle being composed of one species. Reactions occur by either complete or partial birth/death processes between interacting particles. Here we extend the method by placing any number of chemical species on each particle, thereby allowing the single-step calculation of arbitrarily complex reactions using standard methods. The algorithm relies on calculating the correct mass transfer of species between particles, which is exactly given by our previous probabilistic algorithm. The various novel components of the new method are verified against analytic solutions where possible. The potential benefits of the method have been discussed elsewhere in the context of simple bimolecular reactions: the PT method does not artificially mix constituents by numerical dispersion, the particles do not have a Courant number criterion for stability, and the number of particles is very often going to be smaller than the number of cells in a typical grid-based simulation, so that the number of numerical geochemical calculations is similarly smaller.

  8. Chemical composition and structure of particles synthesized on the surface of HHPC in nuclear reactions induced by bremstrahlung γ quanta with threshold energy of 10 MeV in molecular hydrogen at a pressure of 0.5 kbar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didyk, A. Yu.; Wiśniewski, R.

    2015-12-01

    A high-pressure chamber filled with molecular hydrogen (HHPC) at a pressure of 0.5 kbar with a Pd rod inside has been irradiated for 14 h with γ quanta with an energy of 9.7 kbar produced by an electron beam current of 20-21 μA. Postirradiation studies of the changes in the structure of the synthesized particle and other objects on the surface of a brass hub in the composition of HHPC revealed the presence of light elements from carbon to calcium. Multiple small particles of lead have also been found and studied. The detected synthesized particle has complex shape and composition. Also, thin-walled microtubes were detected on the inner surfaces inside HHPC. Based on fission reactions of intermediate mass nuclei (descending reactions), as well as the reactions of synthesis from hydrogen and heavier nuclei (ascending reactions), an attempt to explain the anomalies that were observed is made.

  9. Simultaneous tracking of particles and reaction fronts in mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Jesse; Kelley, Douglas

    2014-11-01

    In mixing problems, the effects of advection are often studied and relatively well understood. However, many real-life mixing problems--e.g. plankton bloom growth, the spread of oil spills--deal with a combination of advection, reaction, and diffusion. How does advection help--or hinder--the rate of reaction and propagation of the reaction fronts? We present an experimental method for producing consistent advection-reaction data sets via the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, and post-processing methods for simultaneously tracking particles (for advection) and tracking wave fronts (for reaction). By adjusting the rate of advection, we determine how advection affects the rate and location of the reaction.

  10. Intrinsic particle-induced lateral transport in microchannels

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Hamed; Sollier, Elodie; Weaver, Westbrook M.; Di Carlo, Dino

    2012-01-01

    In microfluidic systems at low Reynolds number, the flow field around a particle is assumed to maintain fore-aft symmetry, with fluid diverted by the presence of a particle, returning to its original streamline downstream. This current model considers particles as passive components of the system. However, we demonstrate that at finite Reynolds number, when inertia is taken into consideration, particles are not passive elements in the flow but significantly disturb and modify it. In response to the flow field, particles translate downstream while rotating. The combined effect of the flow of fluid around particles, particle rotation, channel confinement (i.e., particle dimensions approaching those of the channel), and finite fluid inertia creates a net recirculating flow perpendicular to the primary flow direction within straight channels that resembles the well-known Dean flow in curved channels. Significantly, the particle generating this flow remains laterally fixed as it translates downstream and only the fluid is laterally transferred. Therefore, as the particles remain inertially focused, operations can be performed around the particles in a way that is compatible with downstream assays such as flow cytometry. We apply this particle-induced transfer to perform fluid switching and mixing around rigid microparticles as well as deformable cells. This transport phenomenon, requiring only a simple channel geometry with no external forces to operate, offers a practical approach for fluid transfer at high flow rates with a wide range of applications, including sample preparation, flow reaction, and heat transfer. PMID:22761309

  11. Particle tracking and the diffusion-reaction equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paster, A.; Bolster, D.; Benson, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    Particle tracking algorithms are very useful methods to model conservative transport in surface and subsurface hydrological systems. Recently, a novel ad hoc particle-based method was proposed to account for multicomponent reactive transport by Benson and Meerschaert (2008). This one-dimensional particle method has been shown to match theoretical predictions, but, to date, there has been no rigorous demonstration that the particle method actually matches the governing equations for chemical transport. We generalize this particle method to two-dimensional and three-dimensional systems and rigorously demonstrate that this particle method converges to the diffusion-reaction equation at the limit of infinitely small time step. We also investigate the numerical error associated with the method.

  12. [Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions]. Annual progress report, [January 1992--February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1993-02-01

    Completed work is summarized on the topics of excitation energy division in deep-inelastic reactions and the onset of multifragmentation in La-induced reactions at E/A = 45 MeV. Magnetic fields are being calculated for the PHOBOS detector system, a two-arm multiparticle spectrometer for studying low-transverse-momentum particles produced at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The Maryland Forward Array is being developed for detection of the reaction products from very peripheral collisions; it consists of two individual units of detectors: the annular silicon detector in front and the plastic phoswich detector at back.

  13. Autonomous motion of semipermeable colloidal particles via chemical reactions: self-osmophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Misael; Cordova-Figueroa, Ubaldo

    2010-11-01

    While a large body of work exists on the design of catalytically-driven colloidal particles, little work exists on particles with the ability to permeate fluid through its surface that may be used for applications in lab-on-a-chip systems and drug delivery. We propose a model for the catalytically-driven motion of a semipermeable particle (e.g., non-motile microorganisms and vesicles) surrounded by reactant solutes in a Newtonian fluid. It is assumed that a first-order consumption reaction of surrounding reactants---which could be enzymatic or catalytic---occurs on half of the outer surface of the membrane. In equilibrium, the osmotic pressure inside the particle balances that of outside. The reaction creates an imbalance in osmotic pressure, causing outer fluid facing the catalytic side to permeate inside the particle as inner fluid permeates through the passive side. This fluid motion satisfies mass conservation inside the particle, causing particle motion towards regions of low reactant concentration by a mechanism known as osmophoresis. Preliminary results show that the particle velocity--defined as a P'eclet number--is a function of the permeability of the membrane, a "characteristic" osmotic velocity, and the Damköhler number--which is a measure of relative impacts of the diffusion and chemical reaction. The permeating fluid retards particle motion by dragging the solute against the induced osmotic imbalance.

  14. Reactions Induced by Platelet Transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Kiefel, Volker

    2008-01-01

    Summary Platelet transfusions play a central role in therapeutic regimens for patients with hematologic/oncologic diseases who develop severe thrombocytopenia either in the course of their disease or following cytostatic therapy. Like other blood components, platelet transfusions have achieved a high degree of safety as far as transmission of viral diseases is concerned. However, transfusion of platelet concentrates is accompanied by a high frequency of febrile and anaphylactoid reactions. In rare cases, recipients of platelet concentrates are threatened by severe reactions as septic complications due to bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates, transfusion-related acute lung injury and severe anaphylactic episodes. PMID:21512624

  15. Laser-induced tissue reactions and dermatology.

    PubMed

    Weber, Rebecca J; Taylor, Brent R; Engelman, Dendy E

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of laser tissue reactions and tissue properties allows the practitioner to tailor a treatment to an individual patient's need and goals. A laser's power, spot size and pulse duration may be manipulated to yield different tissue reactions. Five tissue reactions, each the result of varying laser pulse durations and energy densities, may be achieved. They are photochemical, photothermal, photoablation, plasma-induced ablation and photomechanical. Of these, photothermal reactions are most utilized in dermatology. When higher powered pulses are applied, tissue often undergoes multiple reactions simultaneously. An understanding of these reactions allows their effects to be predicted. In this chapter, the various reactions are reviewed, and the reactions caused by many of the most commonly used lasers in dermatology are discussed.

  16. Path Sampling Methods for Enzymatic Quantum Particle Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Dzierlenga, M W; Varga, M J; Schwartz, S D

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of enzymatic reactions are studied via a host of computational techniques. While previous methods have been used successfully, many fail to incorporate the full dynamical properties of enzymatic systems. This can lead to misleading results in cases where enzyme motion plays a significant role in the reaction coordinate, which is especially relevant in particle transfer reactions where nuclear tunneling may occur. In this chapter, we outline previous methods, as well as discuss newly developed dynamical methods to interrogate mechanisms of enzymatic particle transfer reactions. These new methods allow for the calculation of free energy barriers and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) with the incorporation of quantum effects through centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and the full complement of enzyme dynamics through transition path sampling (TPS). Recent work, summarized in this chapter, applied the method for calculation of free energy barriers to reaction in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH). We found that tunneling plays an insignificant role in YADH but plays a more significant role in LDH, though not dominant over classical transfer. Additionally, we summarize the application of a TPS algorithm for the calculation of reaction rates in tandem with CMD to calculate the primary H/D KIE of YADH from first principles. We found that the computationally obtained KIE is within the margin of error of experimentally determined KIEs and corresponds to the KIE of particle transfer in the enzyme. These methods provide new ways to investigate enzyme mechanism with the inclusion of protein and quantum dynamics.

  17. Dispersion Polymerization of Polystyrene Particles Using Alcohol as Reaction Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young-Sang; Shin, Cheol Hwan; Han, Sujin

    2016-02-01

    In this study, monodisperse polystyrene nanospheres were prepared by dispersion polymerization using alcohol as reaction medium to prepare colloidal clusters of the latex beads. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyltrimethylammonium chloride (MTC) were used as dispersion stabilizer and comonomer, respectively. The particle size could be controlled by adjusting the reactant compositions such as the amount of stabilizer, comonomer, and water in the reactant mixture. The size and monodispersity of the polymeric particles could be also controlled by changing the reaction medium with different alcohols other than ethanol or adjusting the polymerization temperature. The synthesized particles could be self-organized inside water-in-oil emulsion droplets by evaporation-driven self-assembly to produce colloidal clusters of the polymeric nanospheres.

  18. Reaction synthesis of Ni-Al based particle composite coatings

    SciTech Connect

    SUSAN,DONALD F.; MISIOLEK,WOICECK Z.; MARDER,ARNOLD R.

    2000-02-11

    Electrodeposited metal matrix/metal particle composite (EMMC) coatings were produced with a nickel matrix and aluminum particles. By optimizing the process parameters, coatings were deposited with 20 volume percent aluminum particles. Coating morphology and composition were characterized using light optical microscopy (LOM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Differential thermal analysis (DTA) was employed to study reactive phase formation. The effect of heat treatment on coating phase formation was studied in the temperature range 415 to 1,000 C. Long-time exposure at low temperature results in the formation of several intermetallic phases at the Ni matrix/Al particle interfaces and concentrically around the original Al particles. Upon heating to the 500--600 C range, the aluminum particles react with the nickel matrix to form NiAl islands within the Ni matrix. When exposed to higher temperatures (600--1,000 C), diffusional reaction between NiAl and nickel produces ({gamma})Ni{sub 3}Al. The final equilibrium microstructure consists of blocks of ({gamma}{prime})Ni{sub 3}Al in a {gamma}(Ni) solid solution matrix, with small pores also present. Pore formation is explained based on local density changes during intermetallic phase formation and microstructural development is discussed with reference to reaction synthesis of bulk nickel aluminides.

  19. Measuring Neutron-Induced Reaction Cross Sections without Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, L. A.; Schiller, A.; Cooper, J. R.; Hoffman, R. D.; McMahan, M. A.; Fallon, P.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Mitchell, G.; Tavukcu, E.; Guttormsen, M.

    2003-04-01

    Neutron-induced reactions on radioactive nuclei play a significant role in nuclear astrophysics and many other applied nuclear physics topics. However, the majority of these cross sections are impossible to measure due to the high-background of the targets and the low-intensity of neutron beams. We have explored the possibility of using charged-particle transfer reactions to form the same "pre-compound" nucleus as one formed in a neutron-induced reaction in order to measure the relative decay probabilities of the nucleus as a function of energy. Multiplying these decay probabilities by the neutron absorption cross section will then produce the equivalent neutron-induced reaction cross section. In this presentation I will explore the validity of this "surrogate reaction" technique by comparing results from the recent 157Gd(3He,axng)156-xGd experiment using STARS (Silicon Telescope Array for Reaction Studies) at GAMMASPHERE with reaction model calculations for the 155Gd(n,xng)156-xGd. This work was funded by the US Department of Energy under contracts number W-7405-ENG-48 (LLNL), AC03-76SF00098 (LBNL) and the Norwegian Research Council (Oslo).

  20. Particle velocity measurements of the reaction zone in nitromethane

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, S. A.; Engelke, R. P.; Alcon, R. R.; Gustavsen, R. L.; Robbins, D. L.; Stahl, D. B.; Stacy, H. L.; Whitehead, M.

    2002-01-01

    The detonation reaction-zone length in neat, deuterated, and chemically sensitized nitromethane (NM) has been measured by using several different laser-based velocity interferometry systems. The experiments involved measuring the particle velocity history at a NM/PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) window interface during the time a detonation in the NM interacted with the interface. Initially, Fabry-Perot interferometry was used, but, because of low time resolution (>5 ns), several different configurations of VISAR interferometry were subsequently used. Early work was done with VISARs with a time resolution of about 3 ns. By making changes to the recording system, we were able to improve this to {approx}1 ns. Profiles measured at the NM/PMMA interface agree with the ZND theory, in that a spike ({approx}2.45 mm/{micro}s) is measured that is consistent with an extrapolated reactant NM Hugoniot matched to the PMMA window. The spike is rather sharp, followed by a rapid drop in particle velocity over a time of 5 to 10 ns; this is evidence of early fast reactions. Over about 50 ns, a much slower particle velocity decrease occurs to the assumed CJ condition - indicating a total reaction zone length of {approx}300 {micro}m. When the NM is chemically changed, such as replacing the hydrogen atoms with deuterium or chemically sensitizing with a base, some changes are observed in the early part of the reaction zone.

  1. Quadrupole Induced Resonant Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilson, Erik; Fajans, Joel

    1999-11-01

    We have performed experiments that explore the effects of a magnetic quadrupole field on a pure electron plasma confined in a Malmberg-Penning trap. A model that we have developed describes the shape of the plasma and shows that a certain class of resonant particles follows trajectories that take them out of the plasma. Even though the quadrupole field destroys the cylindrical symmetry of the system, our theory predicts that if the electrons are off resonance, then the lifetime of the plasma will not be greatly affected by the quadrupole field. Our preliminary experimental results show that the shape of the plasma and the plasma lifetime agree with our model. We are investigating the scaling of this behavior with various experimental parameters such as the plasma length, density, and strength of the quadrupole field. In addition to being an example of resonant particle transport, this effect may find practical applications in experiments that plan to use magnetic quadrupole neutral atom traps to confine anti-hydrogen created in double-well positron/anti-proton Malmberg-Penning traps. (ATHENA Collaboration.)

  2. Quadrupole Induced Resonant Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilson, Erik; Fajans, Joel

    1998-11-01

    We have performed experiments that explore the effects of a magnetic quadrupole field on a pure electron plasma confined in a Penning-Malmberg trap. A model that we have developed describes the shape of the plasma and shows that a certain class of resonant particles follows trajectories that take them out of the plasma. Even though the quadrupole field destroys the cylindrical symmetry of the system, our theory predicts that if the electrons are off resonance, then the lifetime of the plasma will not be greatly affected by the quadrupole field. Our preliminary experimental results show that the shape of the plasma and the plasma lifetime agree with our model. We are investigating the scaling of this behavior with various experimental parameters such as the plasma length, density, and strength of the quadrupole field. In addition to being an example of resonant particle transport, this effect may find practical applications in experiments that plan to use magnetic quadrupole neutral atom traps to confine anti-hydrogen created in double-well positron/anti-proton Penning-Malmberg traps. (ATHENA Collaboration.)

  3. Reactions and mass spectra of complex particles using Aerosol CIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, John D.; Smith, Geoffrey D.

    2006-12-01

    Aerosol chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) is used both on- and off-line for the analysis of complex laboratory-generated and ambient particles. One of the primary advantages of Aerosol CIMS is the low degree of ion fragmentation, making this technique well suited for investigating the reactivity of complex particles. To demonstrate the usefulness of this "soft" ionization, particles generated from meat cooking were reacted with ozone and the composition was monitored as a function of reaction time. Two distinct kinetic regimes were observed with most of the oleic acid in these particles reacting quickly but with 30% appearing to be trapped in the complex mixture. Additionally, detection limits are measured to be sufficiently low (100-200 ng/m3) to detect some of the more abundant constituents in ambient particles, including sulfate, which is measured in real-time at 1.2 [mu]g/m3. To better characterize complex aerosols from a variety of sources, a novel off-line collection method was also developed in which non-volatile and semi-volatile organics are desorbed from particles and concentrated in a cold U-tube. Desorption from the U-tube followed by analysis with Aerosol CIMS revealed significant amounts of nicotine in cigarette smoke and levoglucosan in oak and pine smoke, suggesting that this may be a useful technique for monitoring particle tracer species. Additionally, secondary organic aerosol formed from the reaction of ozone with R-limonene and volatile organics from orange peel were analyzed off-line showing large molecular weight products (m/z > 300 amu) that may indicate the formation of oligomers. Finally, mass spectra of ambient aerosol collected offline reveal a complex mixture of what appears to be highly processed organics, some of which may contain nitrogen.

  4. Hybrid charged-particle guide for studying (n, charged particle) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, R.C.; White, R.M.; Zinkle, S.J.

    1982-08-25

    Charged-particle transport systems consisting of magnetic quadrupole lenses have been employed in recent years in the study of (n, charged particle) reactions. We have completed a new transport system that is based both on magnetic lenses as well as electrostatic fields. The magnetic focusing of this charged-particle guide is provided by six magnetic quadrupole lenses arranged in a CDCCDC sequence (in the vertical plane). The electrostatic field is produced by a wire at high voltage which stretches the length of the guide and is physically at the center of the magnetic axis. The magnetic lenses are used for charged particles above 5 MeV; the electrostatic guide is used for lower energies. This hybrid system possesses the excellent focusing and background rejection properties of other magnetic systems. For low energy charged-particles, the electrostatic transport avoids the narrow band-passes in charged-particle energy which are a problem with purely magnetic transport systems. This system is installed at the LLNL Cyclograaff facility for the study of (n, charged particle) reactions at neutron energies up to 35 MeV.

  5. Reactions between methanethiol and biologically produced sulfur particles.

    PubMed

    van Leerdam, R C; van den Bosch, P L F; Lens, P N L; Janssen, A J H

    2011-02-15

    Recently, new biotechnological processes have been developed to enable the sustainable removal of organic and inorganic sulfur compounds from liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon streams. In comparison to existing technologies (e.g., caustic scrubbing or iron based redox technologies) far less chemicals are consumed, while reusable elemental sulfur is formed as the main end-product. This research shows that in these processes a number of consecutive reactions occur between methanethiol (MT) from the hydrocarbon stream and the formed biosulfur particles, leading to the formation of (dimethyl) polysulfides. This is an important feature of this family of new bioprocesses as it improves the MT removal efficiency. The reaction kinetics depend on the MT and biosulfur concentration, temperature, and the nature of the biosulfur particles. The first reaction step involves a S8 ring-opening by nucleophilic attack of MT molecules to form CH3S9(-). This work shows that CH3S9(-) reacts to polysulfides (S3(2-), S4(2-), S5(2-)), dimethyl polysulfides [(CH3)2S2, (CH3)2S3], and dissociated H2S, while also some longer-chain dimethyl polysulfides [(CH3)2S4-7] are formed at μM levels. Control experiments using orthorhombic sulfur flower (S8) did not reveal these reactions.

  6. Induced-charge electroosmotic trapping of particles.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yukun; Liu, Weiyu; Jia, Yankai; Tao, Ye; Shao, Jinyou; Ding, Yucheng; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2015-05-21

    Position-controllable trapping of particles on the surface of a bipolar metal strip by induced-charge electroosmotic (ICEO) flow is presented herein. We demonstrate a nonlinear ICEO slip profile on the electrode surface accounting for stable particle trapping behaviors above the double-layer relaxation frequency, while no trapping occurs in the DC limit as a result of a strong upward fluidic drag induced by a linear ICEO slip profile. By extending an AC-flow field effect transistor from the DC limit to the AC field, we reveal that fixed-potential ICEO exceeding RC charging frequency can adjust the particle trapping position flexibly by generating controllable symmetry breaking in a vortex flow pattern. Our results open up new opportunities to manipulate microscopic objects in modern microfluidic systems by using ICEO.

  7. Extension of a Kinetic-Theory Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates to Reactions with Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Recently introduced molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction rate information) are extended to include reactions involving charged particles and electronic energy levels. The proposed extensions include ionization reactions, exothermic associative ionization reactions, endothermic and exothermic charge exchange reactions, and other exchange reactions involving ionized species. The extensions are shown to agree favorably with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions.

  8. Evaluation of charged-particle reactions for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.M.; Resler, D.A.; Warshaw, S.I.

    1991-01-01

    New evaluations of the total reaction cross sections for {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He, {sup 2}H(d,p){sup 3}H, {sup 3}H(t,2n){sup 4}He,{sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He, and {sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He have been completed. These evaluations are based on all known published data from 1946 to 1990 and include over 1150 measured data points from 67 references. The purpose of this work is to provide a consistent and well-documented set of cross sections for use in calculations relating to fusion energy research. A new thermonuclear data file, TDF, and a library of FORTRAN subprograms to read the file have been developed. Calculated from the new evaluations, the TDF file contains information on the Maxwellian-averaged reaction rates as a function of reaction and plasma temperature and the Maxwellian-averaged average energy of the interacting particles and reaction products. Routines are included that provide thermally-broadened spectral information for the secondary reaction products. 67 refs., 18 figs.

  9. Lost alpha-particle diagnostics from a D-T plasma by using nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sasao, Mamiko; Wada, Motoi; Isobe, Mitsutaka

    2014-08-21

    Among various methods proposed for alpha-particles loss measurement, we studied on those by measuring gamma rays of three cases, from (1) nuclear reactions induced by alpha particles, (2) those from short-life-time activities and (3) those from long-life-time activities induced by alpha particles. The time evolution of local alpha flux may possibly be measured by using the {sup 9}Be (a, n) {sup 12}C reaction (1). Using the same system, but with a target set up close to the first wall, activation measurement on site right after turning-off the discharge is possible (2). Nuclear reaction, {sup 25}Mg (a, p) {sup 28}Al, that produce radioisotopes of short lifetime of 2.2 minutes in one of the best candidates. As to the activation to a long lifetime (3), it is predicted that the gamma ray yield from {sup 19}F (a, n) {sup 22}Na reaction is enough for the measurement at the reactor site.

  10. Nuclear Reactions Induced by a Pyroelectric Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Geuther, Jeffrey; Danon, Yaron; Saglime, Frank

    2006-02-10

    This work demonstrates the use of pyroelectric crystals to induce nuclear reactions. A system based on a pair of pyroelectric crystals is used to ionize gas and accelerate the ions to energies of up to 200 keV. The system operates above room temperature by simply heating or cooling the pyroelectric crystals. A D-D fusion reaction was achieved with this technique, and 2.5 MeV neutrons were detected. The measured neutron yield is in good agreement with the calculated yield. This work also verifies the results published by Naranjo, Gimzewski, and Putterman [Nature (London) 434, 1115 (2005)].

  11. Systemic immunotoxicity reactions induced by adjuvanted vaccines.

    PubMed

    Batista-Duharte, Alexander; Portuondo, Deivys; Pérez, O; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2014-05-01

    Vaccine safety is a topic of concern for the treated individual, the family, the health care personnel, and the others involved in vaccination programs as recipients or providers. Adjuvants are necessary components to warrant the efficacy of vaccines, however the overstimulation of the immune system is also associated with adverse effects. Local reactions are the most frequent manifestation of toxicity induced by adjuvanted vaccines and, with the exception of the acute phase response (APR), much less is known about the systemic reactions that follow vaccination. Their low frequency or subclinical expression meant that this matter has been neglected. In this review, various systemic reactions associated with immune stimulation will be addressed, including: APR, hypersensitivity, induction or worsening of autoimmune diseases, modification of hepatic metabolism and vascular leak syndrome (VLS), with an emphasis on the mechanism involved. Finally, the authors analyze the current focus of discussion about vaccine safety and opportunities to improve the design of new adjuvanted vaccines in the future.

  12. Isomeric cross-section ratio for the formation of 58Com,g in neutron, proton, deuteron, and alpha-particle induced reactions in the energy region up to 25 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudár, S.; Qaim, S. M.

    1996-06-01

    Excitation functions were determined for 58Fe(p,n)58Com, natFe(d,xn)58Com, 55Mn(α,n)58Com, and 59Co(n,2n)58Com reactions from the respective thresholds to 14.12 MeV in work with protons, 12.97 MeV with deuterons, 13 MeV with neutrons, and 25.52 MeV with alpha particles. The radioactivity of the activation product 58Com(T1/2=9.15 h) was determined by high resolution γ-ray and x-ray spectrometry. Using the present σm results and the (σm+σg) data reported earlier, the isomeric cross-section ratio σm/(σm+σg) was determined for each reaction. Statistical model calculations taking into account the precompound effects were performed for the above-mentioned four reactions as well as for the 58Ni(n,p)58Com,g process. A consistent set of model parameters was used. The isomeric cross-section ratio for the pair 58Com,g strongly depends on the level scheme and branching ratios of the known levels of 58Co. Different reactions produced different angular momentum distributions of the compound nucleus, resulting in different isomeric cross-section ratio at the same excitation of the compound nucleus. The ratio was found to be relatively high for target nuclei with high spin values.

  13. Spin distribution in neutron induced preequilibrium reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D; Kawano, T; Chadwick, M; Devlin, M; Fotiades, N; Nelson, R O; Mitchell, G E; Garrett, P E; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Macri, R; Younes, W

    2005-10-04

    The preequilibrium reaction mechanism makes an important contribution to neutron-induced reactions above E{sub n} {approx} 10 MeV. The preequilibrium process has been studied exclusively via the characteristic high energy neutrons produced at bombarding energies greater than 10 MeV. They are expanding the study of the preequilibrium reaction mechanism through {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. Cross-section measurements were made of prompt {gamma}-ray production as a function of incident neutron energy (E{sub n} = 1 to 250 MeV) on a {sup 48}Ti sample. Energetic neutrons were delivered by the Los Alamos National Laboratory spallation neutron source located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center facility. The prompt-reaction {gamma} rays were detected with the large-scale Compton-suppressed Germanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE). Neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. The {gamma}-ray excitation functions were converted to partial {gamma}-ray cross sections taking into account the dead-time correction, target thickness, detector efficiency and neutron flux (monitored with an in-line fission chamber). Residual state population was predicted using the GNASH reaction code, enhanced for preequilibrium. The preequilibrium reaction spin distribution was calculated using the quantum mechanical theory of Feshback, Kerman, and Koonin (FKK). The multistep direct part of the FKK theory was calculated for a one-step process. The FKK preequilibrium spin distribution was incorporated into the GNASH calculations and the {gamma}-ray production cross sections were calculated and compared with experimental data. The difference in the partial {gamma}-ray cross sections using spin distributions with and without preequilibrium effects is significant.

  14. Fluid transport in reaction induced fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulven, Ole Ivar; Sun, WaiChing; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2015-04-01

    The process of fracture formation due to a volume increasing chemical reaction has been studied in a variety of different settings, e.g. weathering of dolerites by Røyne et al. te{royne}, serpentinization and carbonation of peridotite by Rudge et al. te{rudge} and replacement reactions in silica-poor igneous rocks by Jamtveit et al. te{jamtveit}. It is generally assumed that fracture formation will increase the net permeability of the rock, and thus increase the reactant transport rate and subsequently the total rate of material conversion, as summarised by Kelemen et al. te{kelemen}. Ulven et al. te{ulven_1} have shown that for fluid-mediated processes the ratio between chemical reaction rate and fluid transport rate in bulk rock controls the fracture pattern formed, and Ulven et al. te{ulven_2} have shown that instantaneous fluid transport in fractures lead to a significant increase in the total rate of the volume expanding process. However, instantaneous fluid transport in fractures is clearly an overestimate, and achievable fluid transport rates in fractures have apparently not been studied in any detail. Fractures cutting through an entire domain might experience relatively fast advective reactant transport, whereas dead-end fractures will be limited to diffusion of reactants in the fluid, internal fluid mixing in the fracture or capillary flow into newly formed fractures. Understanding the feedback process between fracture formation and permeability changes is essential in assessing industrial scale CO2 sequestration in ultramafic rock, but little is seemingly known about how large the permeability change will be in reaction-induced fracturing. In this work, we study the feedback between fracture formation during volume expansion and fluid transport in different fracture settings. We combine a discrete element model (DEM) describing a volume expanding process and the related fracture formation with different models that describe the fluid transport in the

  15. Synthesis of nanosized silicon particles by a rapid metathesis reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Won, C.W.; Nersisyan, H.H.; Won, H.I.; Lee, H.H.

    2009-11-15

    A solid-state rapid metathesis reaction was performed in a bed of sodium silicofluoride (Na{sub 2}SiF{sub 6}) and sodium azide (NaN{sub 3}) powders diluted with sodium fluoride (NaF), to produce silicon nanoparticles. After a local ignition of Na{sub 2}SiF{sub 6}+4NaN{sub 3}+kNaF mixture (here k is mole number of NaF), the reaction proceeded in a self-sustaining combustion mode developing high temperatures (950-1000 deg. C) on very short time scales (a few seconds). Silicon nanoparticles prepared by the combustion process was easily separated from the salt byproducts by simple washing with distilled water. The structural and morphological studies on the nanoparticles were carried out using X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). The mean size of silicon particles calculated from the FESEM image was about 37.75 nm. FESEM analysis also shows that the final purified product contains a noticeable amount of silicon fibers, dendrites and blocks, along with nanoparticles. The mechanism of Si nanostructures formation is discussed and a simple model for interpretation of experimental results is proposed. - Graphical abstract: Silicon nanoparticles 37.75 nm in mean diameter was obtained by rapid metathesis reaction performed in Na{sub 2}SiF{sub 6}+4NaN{sub 3} powder bed diluted with NaF.

  16. Modeling Proton- and Light Ion-Induced Reactions at Low Energies in the MARS15 Code

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, I. L.; Mokhov, N. V.; Gudima, K. K.

    2015-04-25

    An implementation of both ALICE code and TENDL evaluated nuclear data library in order to describe nuclear reactions induced by low-energy projectiles in the Monte Carlo code MARS15 is presented. Comparisons between results of modeling and experimental data on reaction cross sections and secondary particle distributions are shown.

  17. Self-Organization Induced by Self-Assembly in Microheterogeneous Reaction-Diffusion System.

    PubMed

    Cherkashin, Alexander A; Vanag, Vladimir K

    2017-03-09

    When acrylamide (AA) monomers are added to the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction incorporated into nanodroplets of water-in-oil aerosol OT (AOT) microemulsion (the BZ-AOT system), free radicals produced in the BZ reaction initiate polymerization of AA monomers and polyacrylamide particles are formed. These particles change the microstructure of the AOT microemulsion thus inducing the transition from Turing patterns to new dissipative patterns which can be either stationary "black" spots or waves.

  18. Particle size effect of redox reactions for Co species supported on silica

    SciTech Connect

    Chotiwan, Siwaruk; Tomiga, Hiroki; Katagiri, Masaki; Yamamoto, Yusaku; Yamashita, Shohei; Katayama, Misaki; Inada, Yasuhiro

    2016-09-15

    Conversions of chemical states during redox reactions of two silica-supported Co catalysts, which were prepared by the impregnation method, were evaluated by using an in situ XAFS technique. The addition of citric acid into the precursor solution led to the formation on silica of more homogeneous and smaller Co particles, with an average diameter of 4 nm. The supported Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} species were reduced to metallic Co via the divalent CoO species during a temperature-programmed reduction process. The reduced Co species were quantitatively oxidized with a temperature-programmed oxidation process. The higher observed reduction temperature of the smaller CoO particles and the lower observed oxidation temperature of the smaller metallic Co particles were induced by the higher dispersion of the Co oxide species, which apparently led to a stronger interaction with supporting silica. The redox temperature between CoO and Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} was found to be independent of the particle size. - Graphical abstract: Chemical state conversions of SiO{sub 2}-supported Co species and the particle size effect have been analyzed by means of in situ XAFS technique. The small CoO particles have endurance against the reduction and exist in a wide temperature range. Display Omitted - Highlights: • The conversions of the chemical state of supported Co species during redox reaction are evaluated. • In operando XAFS technique were applied to measure redox properties of small Co particles. • A small particle size affects to the redox temperatures of cobalt catalysts.

  19. Non-Markovian Model for Transport and Reactions of Particles in Spiny Dendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotov, Sergei; Méndez, Vicenç

    2008-11-01

    Motivated by the experiments [Santamaria , Neuron 52, 635 (2006)NERNET0896-627310.1016/j.neuron.2006.10.025] that indicated the possibility of subdiffusive transport of molecules along dendrites of cerebellar Purkinje cells, we develop a mesoscopic model for transport and chemical reactions of particles in spiny dendrites. The communication between spines and a parent dendrite is described by a non-Markovian random process and, as a result, the overall movement of particles can be subdiffusive. A system of integrodifferential equations is derived for the particles densities in dendrites and spines. This system involves the spine-dendrite interaction term which describes the memory effects and nonlocality in space. We consider the impact of power-law waiting time distributions on the transport of biochemical signals and mechanism of the accumulation of plasticity-inducing signals inside spines.

  20. Evolution of the alpha particle driven toroidicity induced Alfven mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; White, R.B.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1994-04-01

    The interaction of alpha particles with a toroidicity induced Alfven eigenmode is investigated self-consistently by using a kinetic dispersion relation. All important poloidal harmonics and their radial mode profiles are included. A Hamiltonian guiding center code is used to simulate the alpha particle motion. The simulations include particle orbit width, nonlinear particle dynamics and the effects of the modes on the particles. Modification of the particle distribution leading to mode saturation is observed. There is no significant alpha particle loss.

  1. Competing reaction channels in IR-laser-induced unimolecular reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, M.R.

    1981-01-01

    The competing reaction channels in the unimolecular decomposition of two molecules, formaldehyde and tetralin were studied. A TEA CO/sub 2/ laser was used as the excitation source in all experiments. The dissociation of D/sub 2/CO was studied by infrared multiphoton dissociation (MPD) and the small-molecule nature of formaldehyde with regard to MPD was explored. The effect of collisions in MPD were probed by the pressure dependence of the MPD yield and ir fluorescence from multiphoton excited D/sub 2/CO. MPD yield shows a near cubic dependence in pure D/sub 2/CO which is reduced to a 1.7 power dependence when 15 torr of NO is added. The peak amplitude of 5 ..mu..m ir fluorescence from D/sub 2/CO is proportional to the square of the D/sub 2/CO pressure in pure D/sub 2/CO or in the presence of 50 torr of Ar. Results are explained in terms of bottlenecks to excitation at the v = 1 level which are overcome by a combination of vibrational energy transfer and rotational relaxation. The radical/molecule branching ratio in D/sub 2/CO MPD was 0.10 +- 0.02 at a fluence of 125 J/cm/sup 2/ at 946.0 cm/sup -1/. The barrier height to molecular dissociation was calculated to be 3.6 +- 2.0 kcal/mole below the radical threshold or 85.0 +- 3.0 kcal/mole above the ground state of D/sub 2/CO. In H/sub 2/CO, this corresponds to 2.5 +- 2.0 kcal/mole below the radical threshold or 83.8 +- 3.0 kcal/mole above the ground state. Comparison with uv data indicate that RRKM theory is an acceptable description of formaldehyde dissociation in the 5 to 10 torr pressure range. The unimolecular decomposition of tetralin was studied by MPD and SiF/sub 4/ - sensitized pyrolysis. Both techniques induce decomposition without the interference of catalytic surfaces. Ethylene loss is identified as the lowest energy reaction channel. Dehydrogenation is found to result from step-wise H atom loss. Isomerization via disproportionation is also identified as a primary reaction channel.

  2. Multi-strangeness production in hadron induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitanos, T.; Moustakidis, Ch.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Lenske, H.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss in detail the formation and propagation of multi-strangeness particles in reactions induced by hadron beams relevant for the forthcoming experiments at FAIR. We focus the discussion on the production of the decuplet-particle Ω and study for the first time the production and propagation mechanism of this heavy hyperon inside hadronic environments. The transport calculations show the possibility of Ω-production in the forthcoming P ‾ANDA-experiment, which can be achieved with measurable probabilities using high-energy secondary Ξ-beams. We predict cross sections for Ω-production. The theoretical results are important in understanding the hyperon-nucleon and, in particular, the hyperon-hyperon interactions also in the high-strangeness sector. We emphasize the importance of our studies for the research plans at FAIR.

  3. Particle Catcher Using Induced-Charge Electroosmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2017-01-01

    Finding an innovative separation mechanism is a central task in future microfluidic systems. We propose a size-controllable microfluidic catching device that has a face-to-face structure consisting of elastic beams that change the acceptable particle size dynamically by hydrodynamic force due to induced charge electroosmosis (ICEO) in water and numerically examine the novel separation mechanism consisting of catching and releasing motions with size selectivity. By an implicit strongly coupled simulation technique between a fluid and an elastic structure based on the boundary element method, along with the thin double-layer approximation, we find that the catching device works effectively at low applied voltages in a realistic microfluidic channel and shows a wide range dynamic size selectivity. Furthermore, by modeling the ICEO phenomena with elastic motion, we successfully explain the acceptable particle size of the catching device. We believe that our proposed device will contribute to realizing innovative microfluidic systems in the future.

  4. Proton-induced knockout reactions with polarized and unpolarized beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakasa, T.; Ogata, K.; Noro, T.

    2017-09-01

    Proton-induced knockout reactions provide a direct means of studying the single particle or cluster structures of target nuclei. In addition, these knockout reactions are expected to play a unique role in investigations of the effects of the nuclear medium on nucleon-nucleon interactions as well as the properties of nucleons and mesons. However, due to the nature of hadron probes, these reactions can suffer significant disturbances from the nuclear surroundings and the quantitative theoretical treatment of such processes can also be challenging. In this article, we review the experimental and theoretical progress in this field, particularly focusing on the use of these reactions as a spectroscopic tool and as a way to examine the medium modification of nucleon-nucleon interactions. With regard to the former aspect, the review presents a semi-quantitative evaluation of these reactions based on existing experimental data. In terms of the latter point, we introduce a significant body of evidence that suggests, although does not conclusively prove, the existence of medium effects. In addition, this paper also provides information and comments on other related subjects.

  5. Electrokinetic locomotion due to Reaction Induced Charge Auto-Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Jeffrey; Posner, Jonathan

    2010-11-01

    Synthetic nanomotors, like their biological counterparts, propel themselves through aqueous solutions by harvesting chemical energy from their local environment and converting it to mechanical energy. We study bimetallic rod-shaped particles which move autonomously by catalytically decomposing hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water. We present a scaling analysis and computational simulations that describe the locomotion of bimetallic rod-shaped motors in hydrogen peroxide solutions due to reaction-induced charge auto-electrophoresis. The model shows that the locomotion results from electrical body forces in the surrounding fluid, which are generated by a coupling of an asymmetric dipolar charge density distribution and the electric field it generates. The simulations make the predictions, in agreement with experiment, that the rods' velocity depends linearly on both the surface charge and reaction rate.

  6. Theory of photon and electron induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Onley, D.S.; Wright, L.E.

    1992-01-01

    During the first year and half of the current grant from the Department of Energy we have made considerable progress on the following aspects of the general investigation of electron and photon induced reactions: (1) photo- and electro-production of mesons; (2) Coulomb distortion effects on (e,e{prime}{gamma}) and (e,e{prime}) and (e,e{prime}p) in the quasi-elastic region, (3) studies involving the relativistic shell model, and (4) quark models. We will report on each of these developments in this paper.

  7. Synthesis of nanosized silicon particles by a rapid metathesis reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, C. W.; Nersisyan, H. H.; Won, H. I.; Lee, H. H.

    2009-11-01

    A solid-state rapid metathesis reaction was performed in a bed of sodium silicofluoride (Na 2SiF 6) and sodium azide (NaN 3) powders diluted with sodium fluoride (NaF), to produce silicon nanoparticles. After a local ignition of Na 2SiF 6+4NaN 3+ kNaF mixture (here k is mole number of NaF), the reaction proceeded in a self-sustaining combustion mode developing high temperatures (950-1000 °C) on very short time scales (a few seconds). Silicon nanoparticles prepared by the combustion process was easily separated from the salt byproducts by simple washing with distilled water. The structural and morphological studies on the nanoparticles were carried out using X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). The mean size of silicon particles calculated from the FESEM image was about 37.75 nm. FESEM analysis also shows that the final purified product contains a noticeable amount of silicon fibers, dendrites and blocks, along with nanoparticles. The mechanism of Si nanostructures formation is discussed and a simple model for interpretation of experimental results is proposed.

  8. Alpha particle induced reactions on natCr up to 39 MeV: Experimental cross-sections, comparison with theoretical calculations and thick target yields for medically relevant 52gFe production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Adam Rebeles, R.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.

    2015-08-01

    Thin natCr targets were obtained by electroplating, using 23.75 μm Cu foils as backings. In five stacked foil irradiations, followed by high resolution gamma spectroscopy, the cross sections for production of 52gFe, 49,51cumCr, 52cum,54,56cumMn and 48cumV in Cr and 61Cu,68Ga in Cu were measured up to 39 MeV incident α-particle energy. Reduced uncertainty is obtained by simultaneous remeasurement of the natCu(α,x)67,66Ga monitor reactions over the whole energy range. Comparisons with the scarce literature values and results from the TENDL-2013 on-line library, based on the theoretical code family TALYS-1.6, were made. A discussion of the production routes for 52gFe with achievable yields and contamination rates was made.

  9. Investigation of activation cross section data of alpha particle induced nuclear reaction on molybdenum up to 40 MeV: Review of production routes of medically relevant 97,103Ru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárkányi, F.; Hermanne, A.; Ditrói, F.; Takács, S.; Ignatyuk, A.

    2017-05-01

    The main goals of this investigations were to expand and consolidate reliable activation cross-section data for the natMo(α,x) reactions in connection with production of medically relevant 97,103Ru and the use of the natMo(α,x)97Ru reaction for monitoring beam parameters. The excitation functions for formation of the gamma-emitting radionuclides 94Ru, 95Ru, 97Ru, 103Ru, 93mTc, 93gTc(m+), 94mTc, 94gTc, 95mTc, 95gTc, 96gTc(m+), 99mTc, 93mMo, 99Mo(cum), 90Nb(m+) and 88Zr were measured up to 40 MeV alpha-particle energy by using the stacked foil technique and activation method. Data of our earlier similar experiments were re-evaluated and resulted in corrections on the reported results. Our experimental data were compared with critically analyzed literature data and with the results of model calculations, obtained by using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE 3.1 (Rivoli) and TALYS codes (TENDL-2011 and TENDL-2015 on-line libraries). Nuclear data for different production routes of 97Ru and 103Ru are compiled and reviewed.

  10. [Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions]. [Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1993-02-01

    Completed work is summarized on the topics of excitation energy division in deep-inelastic reactions and the onset of multifragmentation in La-induced reactions at E/A = 45 MeV. Magnetic fields are being calculated for the PHOBOS detector system, a two-arm multiparticle spectrometer for studying low-transverse-momentum particles produced at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The Maryland Forward Array is being developed for detection of the reaction products from very peripheral collisions; it consists of two individual units of detectors: the annular silicon detector in front and the plastic phoswich detector at back.

  11. Neutrino-induced reactions on nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallmeister, K.; Mosel, U.; Weil, J.

    2016-09-01

    Background: Long-baseline experiments such as the planned deep underground neutrino experiment (DUNE) require theoretical descriptions of the complete event in a neutrino-nucleus reaction. Since nuclear targets are used this requires a good understanding of neutrino-nucleus interactions. Purpose: Develop a consistent theory and code framework for the description of lepton-nucleus interactions that can be used to describe not only inclusive cross sections, but also the complete final state of the reaction. Methods: The Giessen-Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) implementation of quantum-kinetic transport theory is used, with improvements in its treatment of the nuclear ground state and of 2p2h interactions. For the latter an empirical structure function from electron scattering data is used as a basis. Results: Results for electron-induced inclusive cross sections are given as a necessary check for the overall quality of this approach. The calculated neutrino-induced inclusive double-differential cross sections show good agreement data from neutrino and antineutrino reactions for different neutrino flavors at MiniBooNE and T2K. Inclusive double-differential cross sections for MicroBooNE, NOvA, MINERvA, and LBNF/DUNE are given. Conclusions: Based on the GiBUU model of lepton-nucleus interactions a good theoretical description of inclusive electron-, neutrino-, and antineutrino-nucleus data over a wide range of energies, different neutrino flavors, and different experiments is now possible. Since no tuning is involved this theory and code should be reliable also for new energy regimes and target masses.

  12. Reaction induced fractures in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulven, Ole Ivar; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2014-05-01

    The process of fracture formation due to volume changing processes has been studied numerically in a variety of different settings, e.g. fracture initiation in general volume increasing reactions by Ulven et al.[4], weathering of dolerites by Røyne et al.[2], and volume reduction during chemical decomposition prosesses by Malthe-Sørenssen et al.[1]. Common to many previous works is that the simulations were performed in a 2D setting, due to computational limitations. Fractures observed both in field studies and in experiments are in many cases three dimensional. It remains an open question in what cases the simplification to 2D systems is applicable, and when a full 3D simulation is necessary. In this study, we use a newly developed 3D code combining elements from the discrete element model (DEM) with elements from Peridynamics[3]. We study fracture formation in fully three dimensional simulations, and compare them with simulation results from 2D DEM, thus gaining insight in both qualitative and quantitative differences between results from 2D and 3D simulations. References [1] Malthe-Sørenssen, A., Jamtveit, B., and Meakin, P., 'Fracture Patterns Generated by Diffusion Controlled Volume Changing Reactions,' Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 2006, pp. 245501-1 - 245501-4. [2] Røyne, A., Jamtveit, B., and Malthe-Sørenssen, A., 'Controls on rock weathering rates by reaction-induced hierarchial fracturing,' Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 275, 2008, pp. 364 - 369. [3] Silling, S. A., 'Reformulation of elasticity theory for discontinuities and long-range forces,' J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 48, Issue 1, 2000, pp. 175 - 209 [4] Ulven, O. I., Storheim, H., Austrheim, H., and Malthe-Sørenssen, A., 'Fracture Initiation During Volume Increasing Reactions in Rocks and Applications for CO2 Sequestration', Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 389C, 2014, pp. 132 - 142.

  13. Cellular Chemotaxis Induced by Wear Particles from Joint Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Stuart B.; Ma, Ting

    2010-01-01

    The destruction of bone around joint replacements (periprosthetic osteolysis) is an adverse biological response associated with the generation of excessive wear particles. Wear debris from the materials used for joint replacements stimulate a chronic inflammatory and foreign body reaction that leads to increased osteoclast differentiation and maturation, and decreased bone formation. Wear debris induces both local and systemic trafficking of inflammatory cells to the site of particle generation. Recent studies have shown that this effect is mediated primarily by chemotactic cytokines (chemokines) including macrophage chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, also known as CCL2), macrophage inhibitory protein-1 (MIP-1), Interleukin-8 (IL-8 or CXCL8) and others. These ligands migrate along a concentration gradient to interact with G-protein-linked transmembrane receptors on the cell surface. Chemokines are involved in the innate and adaptive immune responses, angiogenesis, wound healing and tissue repair. In vitro, in vivo and tissue retrieval studies have shown that chemokine-directed systemic trafficking of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage to wear particles results in the release of pro-inflammatory factors and subsequent bone loss. Modulation of the chemokine ligand-receptor axis is a potential strategy to mitigate the adverse effects of wear particles from joint replacements. PMID:20398931

  14. Mutations induced by heavy charged particles.

    PubMed

    Yatagai, Fumio

    2004-12-01

    The relative biological-effectiveness of radiation is increased when cells or tissue are exposed to densely ionizing (high-LET) radiation. A large number of studies focus on the following aspects of the biological effects of high-LET radiation: (i) basic understanding of radiation damage and repair; (ii) developing radiotherapy protocols for accelerated charged particles; and (iii) estimation of human risks from exposure to high-LET heavy charged particles. The increased lethal effectiveness (cell inactivation) of high-LET radiation contributes to new methods for using radiation therapy, but it is also necessary to study the enhanced mutagenic effect of high LET radiation, because higher frequencies of mutation can be expected to provide higher rates of carcinogenicity with human exposure. It is important to note that both measures of biological effectiveness (lethality and mutagenicity) depend on the quality of radiation, the dose, dose-rate effects, and the biological endpoints studied. This paper is intended to provide a review of current research on the mutagenic effects of high-LET radiation, and is organized into three sections. First, are descriptions of the induced mutations studied with various detection systems (section 1) because the detectable mutations induced by ionizing radiation, including heavy-ions, depend largely on the detection system used. Second is a discussion of the biological significance of the dependence of induced mutations on LET (section 2). This is related to the molecular nature of radiation lesions and to the repair mechanisms used to help cells recover from such damage. Finally, applications of mutation detection systems for studies in space (section 3) are described, in which the carcinogenic effects of space environmental radiation are considered.

  15. The effects of back-reaction on turbulence modulation in shear flows: a new exact regularized point-particle method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, P.; Picano, F.; Sardina, G.; Casciola, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    Particles advected by turbulent flows spread non uniformly and form small scale aggregates known as clusters where their local concentration is much higher than it is in nearby rarefaction regions. Recently it has been shown that the addition of a mean flow, through its large scale anisotropy, induces a preferential orientation of the clusters whose directionality can even increase in the smallest scales. Such finding opens new issues in presence of large mass loads, when the momentum exchange between the two phases becomes significant and the back-reaction of the particles on the carrier flow cannot be neglected. These aspects are addressed by direct numerical simulations data of particle laden homogeneous shear flows in the two-way coupling regime. Particles with Stokes number of order one induce an energy depletion of the classical inertial scales and the amplitude increase of the smallest ones where the particle back-reaction pumps energy into the turbulent eddies. We find that increased mass loads results in a broadening of the energy co-spectrum extending the range of scales driven by anisotropic production mechanisms. Such results are obtained in the context of the classical "particle in cell" method. To go beyond this approach we propose a new methodology to model particle laden two phase flows. The method is based on the exact unsteady Stokes solution around a point-particle and is intended to provide a physically consistent picture of the momentum exchange between the carrier and disperse phase.

  16. Size effect on solid solid reaction growth between Cu film and Se particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaito, Chihiro; Nonaka, Akira; Kimura, Seiji; Suzuki, Nobuhiko; Saito, Yoshio

    1998-03-01

    A recently developed experimental method of producing a compound by making use of the reaction between thin film and ultrafine particles has been used for copper selenide crystal formation to elucidate the particle size effect on the reaction process. In the case of reaction between Cu film Se particles with size of μm order, CuSe crystals were grown on Se particles by the diffusion of predominantly Cu atoms. In the case of Se particles of the order of 100 nm, amorphous Se particles changed into copper selenide particles by the mutual diffusion of Cu and Se atoms. If the size of Se particles was less than 20 nm, a part of the Cu film changed to copper selenide crystal due to the diffusion of Se atoms to the Cu film. Morphological differences have also been shown and discussed to be the result of the particle size effect.

  17. Experimental investigations of mechanical and reaction responses for drop-weight impacted energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xiao-Wei; Wu, Yan-Qing; Wang, Ming-Yang; Huang, Feng-Lei

    2017-02-01

    Low-velocity drop-weight impact experiments on individual and multiple Cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) energetic particles were performed using a modified drop-weight machine equipped with high-speed photography components. Multiple particles experienced more severe burning reactions than an individual particle. Comparisons between impacted salt and HMX particle show that jetting in HMX is mainly due to the motion of fragmented particles driven by gaseous reaction products. Velocity of jetting, flame propagation, and area expansion were measured via image processing, making it possible to quantify the chemical reaction or mechanical deformation violence at different stages.

  18. Formation of the isomeric pairs {sup 139}Nd{sup m,g} and {sup 141}Nd{sup m,g} in proton and {sup 3}He-particle-induced nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hilgers, K.; Qaim, S. M.; Sudar, S.

    2007-12-15

    Cross sections were measured by the activation technique for the nuclear reactions {sup 141}Pr(p,n){sup 141}Nd{sup m},{sup 141}Pr(p,3n){sup 139}Nd{sup m},{sup nat}Ce({sup 3}He,xn){sup 141}Nd{sup m}, and {sup nat}Ce({sup 3}He,xn){sup 139}Nd{sup m} up to proton energies of 44 MeV and {sup 3}He-particle energies of 35 MeV. Using the present data and some of our earlier experimental results the isomeric cross-section ratios for the nuclide pairs {sup 139}Nd{sup m,g} and {sup 141}Nd{sup m,g} were calculated. The experimental data were compared with the results of nuclear model calculations using the code STAPRE, which combines the statistical and precompound formalisms. In general the experimentally determined excitation functions as well as the isomeric cross-section ratios could be described by the theory within the limits of experimental uncertainties, but using relatively low values of {eta} [i.e., the ratio of the effective moment of inertia to the rigid-body moment of inertia ({theta}{sub eff}/{theta}{sub rig})]. The mass dependence of {eta} could be confirmed.

  19. Isorefractive high internal phase emulsion organogels for light induced reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Guo, Qipeng

    2016-03-25

    Isorefractive high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) organogels have been fabricated and investigated for light induced reactions. High transparency facilitates both the UV and visible light induced reactions within HIPE organogels. Transparent HIPE organogels are advantageous for light induced polymerizations, accelerating such polymerizations and enabling the preparation of large polyHIPE monoliths.

  20. Analysis of Reaction Products and Conversion Time in the Pyrolisis of Cellulose and Wood Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. S.; Bellan, J.

    1996-01-01

    A detailed mathematical model is presented for the temporal and spatial accurate modeling of solid-fluid reactions in porous particles for which volumetric reaction rate data is known a priori and both the porosity and the permeability of the particle are large enough to allow for continuous gas flow.

  1. Analysis of Reaction Products and Conversion Time in the Pyrolisis of Cellulose and Wood Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. S.; Bellan, J.

    1996-01-01

    A detailed mathematical model is presented for the temporal and spatial accurate modeling of solid-fluid reactions in porous particles for which volumetric reaction rate data is known a priori and both the porosity and the permeability of the particle are large enough to allow for continuous gas flow.

  2. A new approach to determining gas-particle reaction probabilities and application to the heterogeneous reaction of deliquesced sodium chloride particles with gas-phase hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Laskin, Alexander; Wang, Hai; Robertson, William H; Cowin, James P; Ezell, Michael J; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2006-09-14

    The reaction kinetics for gaseous hydroxyl radicals (OH) with deliquesced sodium chloride particles (NaCl(aq)) were investigated using a novel experimental approach. The technique utilizes the exposure of substrate-deposited aerosol particles to reactive gases followed by chemical analysis of the particles using computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) capability. Experiments were performed at room temperature and atmospheric pressure with deliquesced NaCl particles in the micron size range at 70-80% RH and with OH concentrations in the range of 1 to 7 x 10(9) cm(-3). The apparent, pseudo first-order rate constant for the reaction was determined from measurements of changes in the chloride concentration of individual particles upon reaction with OH as a function of the particle loading on the substrate. Quantitative treatment of the data using a model that incorporates both diffusion and reaction kinetics yields a lower limit to the net reaction probability of gamma(net) > or = 0.1, with an overall uncertainty of a factor of 2.

  3. Particle size effect of redox reactions for Co species supported on silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chotiwan, Siwaruk; Tomiga, Hiroki; Katagiri, Masaki; Yamamoto, Yusaku; Yamashita, Shohei; Katayama, Misaki; Inada, Yasuhiro

    2016-09-01

    Conversions of chemical states during redox reactions of two silica-supported Co catalysts, which were prepared by the impregnation method, were evaluated by using an in situ XAFS technique. The addition of citric acid into the precursor solution led to the formation on silica of more homogeneous and smaller Co particles, with an average diameter of 4 nm. The supported Co3O4 species were reduced to metallic Co via the divalent CoO species during a temperature-programmed reduction process. The reduced Co species were quantitatively oxidized with a temperature-programmed oxidation process. The higher observed reduction temperature of the smaller CoO particles and the lower observed oxidation temperature of the smaller metallic Co particles were induced by the higher dispersion of the Co oxide species, which apparently led to a stronger interaction with supporting silica. The redox temperature between CoO and Co3O4 was found to be independent of the particle size.

  4. Mathematical model of reaction rate oscillations on a chain of nm-sized catalyst particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peskov, N. V.; Slinko, M. M.; Jaeger, N. I.

    2003-05-01

    The model of reaction rate oscillations over the surface of nanoparticles embedded into zeolite matrix is numerically investigated. The reaction rate oscillations on each particle are described by a lumped model. The reactions on separate particles interact via the gas diffusion through the pores, which is modeled in the frame of the Maxwell-Stefan approach. The reaction reveals a complex dynamical behavior if a nonhomogeneous distribution of reagent concentrations exists along the chain of particles with a sufficiently large gradient near the ends of the chain.

  5. Chemotherapy and biotherapy-induced hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Van Gerpen, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Nearly all chemotherapy and biotherapy drugs used in cancer treatment today can cause hypersensitivity reactions. Certain groups of drugs frequently associated with these reactions include the asparaginases, taxanes, platinum compounds, epipodophyllotoxins, and the monoclonal antibodies. Recognizing and managing hypersensitivity reactions are critical when caring for patients receiving these drugs because the reactions are potentially life-threatening. A thorough understanding of the drugs is necessary to assist the nurse in prevention, early recognition, and timely management.

  6. Ozone reaction with clothing and its initiated particle generation in an environmental chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Aakash C.; Guo, Bing; Lin, Chao-Hsin; Zhang, Jianshun; Pei, Jingjing; Chen, Qingyan

    2013-10-01

    Ozone-initiated chemistry in indoor air can produce sub-micron particles, which are potentially harmful for human health. Occupants in indoor spaces constitute potential sites for particle generation through ozone reactions with human skin and clothing. This investigation conducted chamber experiments to examine particle generation from ozone reactions with clothing (a T-shirt) under different indoor conditions. We studied the effect of various factors such as ozone concentration, relative humidity, soiling levels of T-shirt with human skin oils, and air change rate on particle generation. The results showed that ozone reactions with the T-shirt generated sub-micron particles, which were enhanced by the soiling of the T-shirt with human skin oils. In these reactions, a burst of ultrafine particles was observed about one hour after ozone injection, and then the particles grew to larger sizes. The particle generation from the ozone reactions with the soiled T-shirt was significantly affected by the different factors studied and these reactions were identified as another potential source for indoor ultrafine particles.

  7. Epidemiology of cutaneous drug-induced reactions.

    PubMed

    Naldi, L; Crotti, S

    2014-04-01

    Cutaneous reactions represent in many surveillance systems, the most frequent adverse events attributable to drugs. The spectrum of clinical manifestations is wide and virtually encompasses any known dermatological disease. The introduction of biological agents and so-called targeted therapies has further enlarged the number of reaction patterns especially linked with cytokine release or in balance. The frequency and clinical patterns of cutaneous reactions are influenced by drug use, prevalence of specific conditions (e.g., HIV infection) and pharmacogenetic traits of a population, and they may vary greatly among the different populations around the world. Studies of reaction rates in cohorts of hospitalized patients revealed incidence rates ranging from, 1 out 1000 to 2 out 100 of all hospitalized patients. For drugs such as aminopenicillines and sulfamides the incidence of skin reactions is in the order of 3-5 cases out of 100 exposed people. Although the majority of cutaneous reactions are mild and self-limiting, there are reactions such as Stevens Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), and drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) which are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Surveillance systems routed on sound epidemiologic methodology, are needed to raise signals and to assess risks associated with specific reactions and drug exposures. Identification of risk factors for adverse reactions and appropriate genetic screening of groups at higher risk may improve the outcomes of skin reactions.

  8. Differences between Drug-Induced and Contrast Media-Induced Adverse Reactions Based on Spontaneously Reported Adverse Drug Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Suh, JinUk; Yang, MyungSuk; Kang, WonKu; Kim, EunYoung

    2015-01-01

    Objective We analyzed differences between spontaneously reported drug-induced (not including contrast media) and contrast media-induced adverse reactions. Methods Adverse drug reactions reported by an in-hospital pharmacovigilance center (St. Mary’s teaching hospital, Daejeon, Korea) from 2010–2012 were classified as drug-induced or contrast media-induced. Clinical patterns, frequency, causality, severity, Schumock and Thornton’s preventability, and type A/B reactions were recorded. The trends among causality tools measuring drug and contrast-induced adverse reactions were analyzed. Results Of 1,335 reports, 636 drug-induced and contrast media-induced adverse reactions were identified. The prevalence of spontaneously reported adverse drug reaction-related admissions revealed a suspected adverse drug reaction-reporting rate of 20.9/100,000 (inpatient, 0.021%) and 3.9/100,000 (outpatients, 0.004%). The most common adverse drug reaction-associated drug classes included nervous system agents and anti-infectives. Dermatological and gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions were most frequently and similarly reported between drug and contrast media-induced adverse reactions. Compared to contrast media-induced adverse reactions, drug-induced adverse reactions were milder, more likely to be preventable (9.8% vs. 1.1%, p < 0.001), and more likely to be type A reactions (73.5% vs. 18.8%, p < 0.001). Females were over-represented among drug-induced adverse reactions (68.1%, p < 0.001) but not among contrast media-induced adverse reactions (56.6%, p = 0.066). Causality patterns differed between the two adverse reaction classes. The World Health Organization–Uppsala Monitoring Centre causality evaluation and Naranjo algorithm results significantly differed from those of the Korean algorithm version II (p < 0.001). Conclusions We found differences in sex, preventability, severity, and type A/B reactions between spontaneously reported drug and contrast media-induced adverse

  9. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux (invited).

    PubMed

    Ding, W X; Brower, D L; Yates, T Y

    2008-10-01

    Magnetic field fluctuation-induced particle transport has been directly measured in the high-temperature core of the MST reversed field pinch plasma. Measurement of radial particle transport is achieved by combining various interferometry techniques, including Faraday rotation, conventional interferometry, and differential interferometry. It is observed that electron convective particle flux and its divergence exhibit a significant increase during a sawtooth crash. In this paper, we describe the basic techniques employed to determine the particle flux.

  10. Pediatric bupropion-induced serum sicknesslike reaction.

    PubMed

    Hack, Sabine

    2004-01-01

    This reports the first 2 cases of serum sicknesslike reaction to bupropion in children (age 12 and 14). Serum sicknesslike reactions are an example of immune-complex medicated disease. The cardinal symptoms of serum sickness are fever, lymphadenopathy, arthralgias or arthritis, and urticaria. Symptoms usually resolve without long-term sequela following discontinuation of the exogenous antigen. It is likely that serum sicknesslike reactions to bupropion are either relatively rare or underrecognized and underreported. Between May 1998 and May 2001, GlaxoSmith Kline received 172 reports of seizures (a well-known adverse drug reaction) and only 37 reports of serum sicknesslike reactions (Wooltorton 2002). We do not know if children and adolescents are more prone than adults to develop serum sicknesslike reactions to bupropion. Luckily, the reported cases of serum sicknesslike reactions to bupropion have not caused irreversible morbidity or mortality. Nevertheless, the symptoms are painful, temporarily disfiguring and disabling, and warrant prompt medical attention. Parents and patients should be educated about this potential side effect at the onset of treatment, because symptoms are similar to many infectious childhood illnesses, and the treatment of serum sicknesslike reactions to bupropion should include the discontinuation of bupropion.

  11. Investigation of the shock-induced chemical reaction (SICR) in Ni + Al nanoparticle mixtures.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yongnan; Xiao, Shifang; Deng, Huiqiu; Zhu, Wenjun; Hu, Wangyu

    2017-07-21

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to investigate the shock-compression response of Ni + Al spherical nanoparticles arranged in a NaCl-like structure. The deformation and reaction characteristics are studied from the particle level to the atomic scale at various piston velocities. Shock-induced chemical reactions (SICRs) occur during non-equilibrium processes, accompanied by a sharp rise in temperature and rapid mixing of atoms. The preferentially deformed Al particles form a high-speed mass flow relative to the Ni at the shock front, which impinges on the Ni particles, and mixing of Ni and Al atoms occurs immediately at the interface. The particle velocity dispersion (PVD) that appears at the shock front has important implications for the initiation of shock-induced chemical reactions. We show that dislocations are mainly generated at the beginning of particle deformation or at the shock front, and do not directly affect the occurrence of SICRs. The intimate contact of the molten Al and the amorphous Ni is found to be critical to the subsequent reactions for the extensive mixing of Ni and Al. We conclude that the mechanisms of SICRs involve mechanochemical processes near the shock front and subsequent interdiffusion processes.

  12. Electron-induced hydration of an alkene: alternative reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Warneke, Jonas; Wang, Ziyan; Swiderek, Petra; Bredehöft, Jan Hendrik

    2015-03-27

    Electron-induced reactions in condensed mixtures of ethylene and water lead to the synthesis of ethanol, as shown by post-irradiation thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS). Interestingly, this synthesis is not only induced by soft electron impact ionization similar to a previously observed electron-induced hydroamination but also, at low electron energy, by electron attachment to ethylene and a subsequent acid/base reaction with water.

  13. Modeling bimolecular reactions and transport in porous media via particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Dong; Benson, David A.; Paster, Amir; Bolster, Diogo

    2013-03-01

    We use a particle-tracking method to simulate several one-dimensional bimolecular reactive transport experiments. In our numerical scheme, the reactants are represented by particles: advection and dispersion dominate the flow, and molecular diffusion dictates, in large part, the reactions. The particle/particle reactions are determined by a combination of two probabilities dictated by the physics of transport and energetics of reaction. The first is that reactant particles occupy the same volume over a short time interval. The second is the conditional probability that two collocated particles favorably transform into a reaction. The first probability is a direct physical representation of the degree of mixing in an advancing interface between dissimilar waters, and as such lacks empirical parameters except for the user-defined number of particles. This number can be determined analytically from concentration autocovariance, if this type of data is available. The simulations compare favorably to two physical experiments. In one, the concentration of product, 1,2-naphthoquinoe-4-aminobenzene (NQAB) from reaction between 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulfonic acid (NQS) and aniline (AN), was measured at the outflow of a column filled with glass beads at different times. In the other, the concentration distribution of reactants (CuSO and EDTA) and product (CuEDTA) were quantified by snapshots of light transmitted through a column packed with cryolite sand. These snapshots allow us to estimate concentration statistics and calculate the required number of particles. The experiments differ significantly due to a ˜107 difference in thermodynamic rate coefficients, making the latter experiment effectively instantaneous. When compared to the solution of the advection-dispersion-reaction equation (ADRE) with the well-mixed reaction coefficient, the experiments and the particle-tracking simulations showed on the order of 20-40% less overall product, which is attributed to poor mixing

  14. Adverse drug reactions induced by valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Nanau, Radu M; Neuman, Manuela G

    2013-10-01

    Valproic acid is a widely-used first-generation antiepileptic drug, prescribed predominantly in epilepsy and psychiatric disorders. VPA has good efficacy and pharmacoeconomic profiles, as well as a relatively favorable safety profile. However, adverse drug reactions have been reported in relation with valproic acid use, either as monotherapy or polytherapy with other antiepileptic drugs or antipsychotic drugs. This systematic review discusses valproic acid adverse drug reactions, in terms of hepatotoxicity, mitochondrial toxicity, hyperammonemic encephalopathy, hypersensitivity syndrome reactions, neurological toxicity, metabolic and endocrine adverse events, and teratogenicity. Copyright © 2013 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Erythropoietin-induced iritis-like reaction.

    PubMed

    Beiran, I; Krasnitz, I; Mezer, E; Meyer, E; Miller, B

    1996-01-01

    The present report describes an iritis-like reaction found in 13 patients treated with recombinant human erythropoietin (Eprex), a drug given to hemodialysis patients for their chronic anemia. Among 120 patients being treated by hemodialysis in two centers affiliated with our medical center, ten out of 30 Eprex-treated patients but none of 90 not being treated with Eprex developed this reaction. The observations described support a causal relation between Eprex treatment and the iritis-like reaction. Further investigative effort is needed to establish the mechanism.

  16. Simulation of chemical reaction via particle tracking: Diffusion-limited versus thermodynamic rate-limited regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, David A.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2008-12-01

    Chemical reactions may be simulated without regard to local concentrations by applying simple probabilistic rules of particle interaction and combination. The forward reaction A + B→ C is coded by calculating the probability that any A and B particles will occupy the same volume over some time interval. This becomes a convolution of the location densities of the two particles. The backward reaction is a simple exponential decay of C particles into A and B particles. When the mixing of reactants is not a limiting process, the classical thermodynamic reaction rates are reproduced. When low mixing (as by diffusion) limits the reaction probabilities, the reaction rates drop significantly, including the rate of approach to global equilibrium. At long enough times, the law of mass action is reproduced exactly in the mean, with some irreducible deviation in the local equilibrium saturations (the equilibrium constant divided by the mass action expression) away from unity. The saturation variability is not sensitive to numerical parameters but depends strongly on how far from equilibrium the system is initiated. This is simply due to a relative paucity of particles of some species as the reaction moves far to one side or the other.

  17. Reactions of buffers in cyanogen bromide-induced ligations.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Heike; Gerlach, Claudia; Richert, Clemens

    2013-01-01

    Rapid, template-directed ligation reactions between a phosphate-terminated oligonucleotide and an unphosphorylated reaction partner may be induced by cyanogen bromide (BrCN). Frequently, however, the reaction is low yielding, and even a large excess of the condensing agent can fail to induce quantitative conversions. In this study, we used BrCN to induce chemical primer extension reactions. Here, we report that buffers containing hydroxyl groups react with short oligodeoxynucleotides in the presence of BrCN. One stable adduct between HEPBS buffer and cytosine was characterized by mass spectrometry and NMR after HPLC purification, indicating that a side reaction occurred at this nucleobase. Further, a first example of a primer extension reaction between an unmodified oligodeoxynucleotide as primer and dGMP is reported. Together, our results shed light on the potency, as well as the drawbacks of BrCN as a highly reactive condensing reagent for the ligation of unmodified nucleic acids.

  18. Effects of amino acids on the formation of hematite particles in a forced hydrolysis reaction.

    PubMed

    Kandori, Kazuhiko; Sakai, Masaji; Inoue, Shoko; Ishikawa, Tatsuo

    2006-01-01

    The influence of amino acids on the formation of hematite particles from a forced hydrolysis reaction of acidic FeCl3 solution was examined. The spherical particles were produced on the systems with L-phenylalanine (L-Phe), L-serine (L-Ser) and L-alanine (L-Ala), though L-glutamine (L-Gln) and L-glutamic acid (L-Glu) gave ellipsoidal hematite particles. This morphological change in hematite particles is consistent with the order of stability constant of amino acids against to Fe3+ ions (K). The hematite particles produced with L-Glu, L-Gln and L-Ser were highly porous because they are formed by aggregation of cluster particles. These particles exhibited microporous behavior by outgassing the particles below 200 degrees C while they changed to mesoporous after treating above 300 degrees C by elimination of amino acids molecules remained between the cluster particles within the hematite particles. The hematite particles strongly depended on the nature of amino acids such as alternation of solution pH and adsorption affinity to beta-FeOOH and/or polynuclear primary (PN) particles. The systems on L-Ala and L-Phe, showing very rapid phase transformation from beta-FeOOH to hematite, exhibited the Ostwald ripening. A rotational particle preparation procedure suggested that the morphology of hematite particle is governed by the mode and strength of amino acid adsorption onto beta-FeOOH and/or PN particles.

  19. Effects of particles on stability of flow-induced precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Peng-Wei; Phillips, Andrew W.; Edward, Graham

    2012-02-01

    The effect of two colorant particles with different surface geometries on the stability of shear-induced precursors in isotactic polypropylene was studied after the cessation of shear flow at 140 °C. In the absence of particles, the shear-induced precursors survived for at least 100 s after the shear flow ended. The presence of particles was found to stabilize lower molecular weight chains assisting in the formation of additional shear-induced precursors. The precursors thus formed in the samples containing particles contained two oriented clusters with different molecular weights. Incorporation of lower molecular weight chains in the precursors led to increased dissolution rates of the shear-induced precursors. Particle surface geometry was found to influence precursor dissolution, with planar particles stabilizing the shear-induced precursors to a much greater extent than curved particles. The particles investigated thus act like structural probes to follow quantitatively the dissolution process of precursors after shear and importantly to infer the formation of precursors during shear.

  20. Modeling Bimolecular Reactions and Transport in Porous Media Via Particle Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Ding; David Benson; Amir Paster; Diogo Bolster

    2012-01-01

    We use a particle-tracking method to simulate several one-dimensional bimolecular reactive transport experiments. In this numerical method, the reactants are represented by particles: advection and dispersion dominate the flow, and molecular diffusion dictates, in large part, the reactions. The particle/particle reactions are determined by a combination of two probabilities dictated by the physics of transport and energetics of reaction. The first is that reactant particles occupy the same volume over a short time interval. The second is the conditional probability that two collocated particles favorably transform into a reaction. The first probability is a direct physical representation of the degree of mixing in an advancing displacement front, and as such lacks empirical parameters except for the user-defined number of particles. This number can be determined analytically from concentration autocovariance, if this type of data is available. The simulations compare favorably to two physical experiments. In one, the concentration of product, 1,2-naphthoquinoe-4-aminobenzene (NQAB) from reaction between 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulfonic acid (NQS) and aniline (AN), was measured at the outflow of a column filled with glass beads at different times. In the other, the concentration distribution of reactants (CuSO_4 and EDTA^{4-}) and products (CuEDTA^{4-}) were quantified by snapshots of transmitted light through a column packed with cryloite sand. The thermodynamic rate coefficient in the latter experiment was 10^7 times greater than the former experiment, making it essentially instantaneous. When compared to the solution of the advection-dispersion-reaction equation (ADRE) with the well-mixed reaction coefficient, the experiments and the particle-tracking simulations showed on the order of 20% to 40% less overall product, which is attributed to poor mixing. The poor mixing also leads to higher product concentrations on the edges of the mixing zones, which the particle

  1. Motion of a colloidal sphere with interfacial self-electrochemical reactions induced by a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Tzu H; Keh, Huan J

    2012-05-07

    The motion of a spherical colloidal particle with spontaneous electrochemical reactions occurring on its surface in an ionic solution subjected to an applied magnetic field is analyzed for an arbitrary zeta potential distribution. The thickness of the electric double layer adjacent to the particle surface is assumed to be much less than the particle radius. The solutions of the Laplace equations governing the magnetic scalar potential and electric potential, respectively, lead to the magnetic flux and electric current density distributions in the particle and fluid phases of arbitrary magnetic permeabilities and electric conductivities. The Stokes equations modified with the Lorentz force contribution for the fluid motion are dealt by using a generalized reciprocal theorem, and closed-form formulas for the translational and angular velocities of the colloidal sphere induced by the magnetohydrodynamic effect are obtained. The dipole and quadrupole moments of the zeta potential distribution over the particle surface cause the particle translation and rotation, respectively. The induced velocities of the particle are unexpectedly significant, and their dependence on the characteristics of the particle-fluid system is physically different from that for electromagnetophoretic particles or phoretic swimmers.

  2. Accelerating Calculations of Reaction Dissipative Particle Dynamics in LAMMPS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-17

    reaction kinetics to GPUs and investigating different matrix representations for the stoichiometric matrices in Eqs. 1 and 2. Finally, we summarize the...used for the stoichiometric matrices in Eqs. 1 and 2. 3. Analysis 3.1 Performance and Strong Scaling of Baseline DPD-RX The performance on Thunder

  3. Evaluation on thermal explosion induced by slightly exothermic interface reaction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ma-Hong; Li, Yong-Fu; Sun, Jin-Hua; Hasegawa, Kazutoshi

    2004-09-10

    An asphalt-salt mixture (ASM), which once caused a fire and explosion in a reprocessing plant, was prepared by imitating the real bituminization process of waste on a lab scale to evaluate its actual thermal hazards. Heat flux reaction calorimeters were used to measure the release of heat for the simulated ASM at a constant heating rate and at a constant temperature, respectively. Experimental results show that the reaction in the ASM below about 250 degrees C is a slightly exothermic interface reaction between the asphalt and the salt particles contained in the asphalt, and that the heat release rate increases sharply above about 250 degrees C due to melting of the salt particles. The reaction rates were formulated on the basis of an assumed reaction model, and the kinetic parameters were determined. Using the model with the kinetic parameters, temperature changes with time and drum-radius axes for the ASM-filled drum were numerically simulated assuming a one-dimensional infinite cylinder system, where the drum was being cooled at an ambient temperature of 50 degrees C. The minimum filling temperature, at which the runaway reaction (MFTRR) can occur for the simulated ASM in the drum is about 194 degrees C. Furthermore, a very good linear correlation exists between this MFTRR and the initial radius of salt particles formed in the bituminization product. The critical filling temperature to the runaway reaction is about 162 degrees C for the asphalt-salt mixture, containing zero-size salt particles, filled in the same drum at an ambient temperature of 50 degrees C. Thus, the runaway reaction will never occur in the drum filled with the asphalt-salt mixture under the conditions of the filling temperature below 162 degrees C and a constant ambient temperature of 50 degrees C. As a consequence, the ASM explosion occurred in the reprocessing plant likely was due to a slightly exothermically reaction and self heating.

  4. Numerical modeling of particle generation from ozone reactions with human-worn clothing in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Aakash C.; Lin, Chao-Hsin; Chen, Qingyan

    2015-02-01

    Ozone-terpene reactions are important sources of indoor ultrafine particles (UFPs), a potential health hazard for human beings. Humans themselves act as possible sites for ozone-initiated particle generation through reactions with squalene (a terpene) that is present in their skin, hair, and clothing. This investigation developed a numerical model to probe particle generation from ozone reactions with clothing worn by humans. The model was based on particle generation measured in an environmental chamber as well as physical formulations of particle nucleation, condensational growth, and deposition. In five out of the six test cases, the model was able to predict particle size distributions reasonably well. The failure in the remaining case demonstrated the fundamental limitations of nucleation models. The model that was developed was used to predict particle generation under various building and airliner cabin conditions. These predictions indicate that ozone reactions with human-worn clothing could be an important source of UFPs in densely occupied classrooms and airliner cabins. Those reactions could account for about 40% of the total UFPs measured on a Boeing 737-700 flight. The model predictions at this stage are indicative and should be improved further.

  5. Phoresis-induced clustering of particles in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Lukas; Fouxon, Itzhak; Krug, Dominik; van Reeuwijk, Maarten; Holzner, Markus

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate phoresis-induced clustering of non-inertial particles in turbulent flows. Phoretic mechanisms such as thermophoresis, chemotaxis or diffusiophroesis are known to create a particle drift with respect to the fluid. Theory, based on the framework of weakly compressible flow, predicts that particles in turbulence streaked by salinity gradients experience a diffusiophoretic drift and will thus form particle cluster. An inclined gravity current setup is used to analyse clustering due to the diffusiophoretic effect in turbulent flow experimentally. Simultaneous 3D particle tracking velocimetry and laser induced fluorescent measurements provide the full Lagrangian velocity field and the local salt concentration in the observed 3D domain. Two independent methods show consistent evidence of the theoretically predicted particle clustering in turbulence. This clustering mechanism can provide the key to the understanding of spontaneous clustering phenomena such as the formation of marine snow in the ocean.

  6. Ofloxacin Induced Cutaneous Reactions in Children.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Yerramalli Roja; Mishra, Sailen Kumar; Rath, Bandana; Rath, Saroj Sekhar

    2015-06-01

    Cutaneous adverse effects to antimicrobials are a major health problem. Though majority of them are mild and self-limiting, severe variants like Steven Johnson Syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are not uncommon. Ofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone widely used for the treatment of urinary tract infections, acute bacterial diarrheas, enteric fever, STDs and other soft tissue infections either as a single drug or in combination with other drugs. Earlier a case of mucocutaneous maculopapular rash with oral ofloxacin and was reported in an adult. In the present hospital set up there were few reports of such reactions to adults. Here we report three different variants of reactions associated with oral ofloxacin in chlidren. Early detection of cutaneous lesions and immediate withdrawal of the offending drug can prevent progression of such reactions to their severe variants as well as morbidity and mortality.

  7. Artificial Force Induced Reaction Method for Systematic Determination of Complex Reaction Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sameera, W M C; Kumar Sharma, Akhilesh; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays, computational studies are very important for the elucidation of reaction mechanisms and selectivity of complex reactions. However, traditional computational methods usually require an estimated reaction path, mainly driven by limited experimental implications, intuition, and assumptions of stationary points. However, the artificial force induced reaction (AFIR) method in the global reaction route mapping (GRRM) strategy can be used for unbiased and automatic reaction path searches for complex reactions. In this account, we highlight applications of the AFIR method to a variety of reactions (organic, organometallic, enzymatic, and photochemical) of complex molecular systems. In addition, the AFIR method has been successfully used to rationalise the origin of stereo- and regioselectivity. The AFIR method can be applied from small to large molecular systems, and will be a very useful tool for the study of complex molecular problems in many areas of chemistry, biology, and material sciences.

  8. [Adverse reactions induced by food additives: sulfites].

    PubMed

    Montaño García, M L

    1989-01-01

    Many chemicals are used to preserve, color and flavor foods and drugs. There have been numerous reports of adverse reactions, including urticaria, angioneurotic edema, asthma an anaphylaxis following the ingestion of food additives such as tartrazine, monosodium glutamate and benzoic acid. Recently the food and drug additives reaching medical awareness as a cause of sensitivity are the sulfiting agents. Sulfites are widely used in the food and beverage industry as preservatives and antioxidants. They are also used by the pharmaceutical industry. This work describes the common uses of sulfiting agents, the mechanisms of sulfite sensitivity, the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of adverse reactions to sulfites.

  9. The Status of Cross Section Measurements for Neutron-induced Reactions Needed for Cosmic Ray Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Cosmic ray interactions with lunar rocks and meteorites produce small amounts of radionuclides and stable isotopes. Advances in Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) allow production rates to be measured routinely in well-documented lunar rocks and meteorites. These measurements are analyzed using theoretical models to learn about the object itself and the history of the cosmic rays that fell on it. Good cross section measurements are essential input to the theoretical calculations. Most primary cosmic ray particles are protons so reliable cross sections for proton-induced reactions are essential. A cross section is deemed accurate if measurements made by different experimenters using different techniques result in consistent values. Most cross sections for proton induced reactions are now well measured. However, good cross section measurements for neutron-induced reactions are still needed. These cross sections are required to fully account for all galactic cosmic ray interactions at depth in an extraterrestrial object. When primary galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles interact with an object many secondary neutrons are produced, which also initiate spallation reactions. Thus, the total GCR contribution to the overall cosmogenic nuclide archive has to include the contribution from the secondary neutron interactions. Few relevant cross section measurements have been reported for neutron-induced reactions at neutron energies greater than approximately 20 MeV. The status of the cross section measurements using quasi-monoenergetic neutron energies at iThemba LABS, South Africa and white neutron beams at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), Los Alamos are reported here.

  10. The Status of Cross Section Measurements for Neutron-induced Reactions Needed for Cosmic Ray Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Cosmic ray interactions with lunar rocks and meteorites produce small amounts of radionuclides and stable isotopes. Advances in Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) allow production rates to be measured routinely in well-documented lunar rocks and meteorites. These measurements are analyzed using theoretical models to learn about the object itself and the history of the cosmic rays that fell on it. Good cross section measurements are essential input to the theoretical calculations. Most primary cosmic ray particles are protons so reliable cross sections for proton-induced reactions are essential. A cross section is deemed accurate if measurements made by different experimenters using different techniques result in consistent values. Most cross sections for proton induced reactions are now well measured. However, good cross section measurements for neutron-induced reactions are still needed. These cross sections are required to fully account for all galactic cosmic ray interactions at depth in an extraterrestrial object. When primary galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles interact with an object many secondary neutrons are produced, which also initiate spallation reactions. Thus, the total GCR contribution to the overall cosmogenic nuclide archive has to include the contribution from the secondary neutron interactions. Few relevant cross section measurements have been reported for neutron-induced reactions at neutron energies greater than approximately 20 MeV. The status of the cross section measurements using quasi-monoenergetic neutron energies at iThemba LABS, South Africa and white neutron beams at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), Los Alamos are reported here.

  11. Modeling shear-induced particle ordering and deformation in a dense soft particle suspension.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chih-Tang; Wu, Yi-Fan; Chien, Wei; Huang, Jung-Ren; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2017-08-08

    We apply the lattice Boltzmann method and the bead-spring network model of deformable particles (DPs) to study shear-induced particle ordering and deformation and the corresponding rheological behavior for dense DP suspensions confined in a narrow gap under steady external shear. The particle configuration is characterized with small-angle scattering intensity, the real-space 2D local order parameter, and the particle shape factors including deformation, stretching and tilt angles. We investigate how particle ordering and deformation vary with the particle volume fraction  (=0.45-0.65) and the external shear rate characterized with the capillary number Ca (=0.003-0.191). The degree of particle deformation increases mildly with  but significantly with Ca. Under moderate shear rate (Ca=0.105), the inter-particle structure evolves from string-like ordering to layered hexagonal close packing (HCP) as  increases. A long wavelength particle slithering motion emerges for sufficiently large ϕ. For  =0.61, the structure maintains layered HCP for Ca=0.031-0.143 but gradually becomes disordered for larger and smaller Ca. The correlation in particle zigzag movements depends sensitively on  and particle ordering. Layer-by-layer analysis reveals how the non-slippery hard walls affect particle ordering and deformation. The shear-induced reconfiguration of DPs observed in the simulation agrees qualitatively with experimental results of sheared uniform emulsions. The apparent suspension viscosity increases with  but exhibits much weaker dependence compared to hard-sphere suspensions, indicating that particle deformation and unjamming under shear can significantly reduce the viscous stress. Furthermore, the suspension shear-thins, corresponding to increased inter-DP ordering and particle deformation with Ca. This work provides useful insights into the microstructure-rheology relationship of concentrated deformable particle suspensions. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  12. Contractile reactions of guinea pig airway smooth muscles in the presence of stannum oxide nanosized particles.

    PubMed

    Kapilevich, L V; Zaytseva, T N; Nosarev, A V; Agev, B G; Dyakova, E Yu; Ogorodova, L M; Magaeva, A A; Terecova, O G; Itin, V I

    2012-05-01

    Contractile reactions of the guinea pig airway smooth muscles in the presence of stannum dioxide nanosized particles were studied. Contractile reactions to cholinergic and histaminergic stimulation were potentiated by inhalations of nanoparticle aerosol and by exposure of isolated smooth muscle segments to nanoparticle suspension.

  13. Influence of Particle Size on Reaction Selectivity in Cyclohexene Hydrogenation and Dehydrogenation over Silica-Supported Monodisperse Pt Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Rioux, R. M.; Hsu, B. B.; Grass, M. E.; Song, H.; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-07-11

    The role of particle size during the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of cyclohexene (10 Torr C{sub 6}H{sub 10}, 200-600 Torr H{sub 2}, and 273-650 K) was studied over a series of monodisperse Pt/SBA-15 catalysts. The conversion of cyclohexene in the presence of excess H{sub 2} (H{sub 2}:C{sub 6}H{sub 10} ratio = 20-60) is characterized by three regimes: hydrogenation of cyclohexene to cyclohexane at low temperature (< 423 K), an intermediate temperature range in which both hydrogenation and dehydrogenation occur; and a high temperature regime in which the dehydrogenation of cyclohexene dominates (> 573 K). The rate of both reactions demonstrated maxima with temperature, regardless of Pt particle size. For the hydrogenation of cyclohexene, a non-Arrhenius temperature dependence (apparent negative activation energy) was observed. Hydrogenation is structure insensitive at low temperatures, and apparently structure sensitive in the non-Arrhenius regime; the origin of the particle-size dependent reactivity with temperature is attributed to a change in the coverage of reactive hydrogen. Small particles were more active for dehydrogenation and had lower apparent activation energies than large particles. The selectivity can be controlled by changing the particle size, which is attributed to the structure sensitivity of both reactions in the temperature regime where hydrogenation and dehydrogenation are catalyzed simultaneously.

  14. A study on the grafting reaction of isocyanates with hydroxyapatite particles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; de Wijn, J R; van Blitterswijk, C A

    1998-06-05

    The surface grafting reactions of a series of isocyanates with hydroxyapatite particles at different temperatures were studied by Infrared spectrophotometry (IR) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The study results show that both hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI) and isocyanatoethyl methacrylate (ICEM) react readily with HA while ethyl isocyanate acetate (EIA) and butyl isocyanate (BIC) have lower reactivity towards HA particles. It also has been found that the reaction of ICEM with HA follows a second-order reaction mechanism, despite the heterogeneous nature of the reaction, while the reaction of HMDI with HA does not due to the complexity of the reaction. Based on this study, it is concluded that ICEM and HMDI are suitable agents for the coupling of polymers due to their reactivity towards HA.

  15. Particle emission in the light heavy-ion fusion reactions: 14N, 16,18O+ 12C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlin Filho, N.; Coimbra, M. M.; Acquadro, J. C.; Liguori Neto, R.; Szanto, E. M.; Farrelly-Pessoa, E.; Szanto de Toledo, A.

    1985-01-01

    From the energy spectra of light particles produced in light-heavy-ion-induced reactions, level densities of the final nuclei as well as the critical angular momenta for fusion may be obtained. The 14N, 16,18O+ 12C reactions were investigated in the energy range 30 MeVparticles (p,d,t,3He,α) emitted in the process were obtained. Fits of the magnitude and shape of the spectra by means of statistical model calculations were used to extract final nuclei level densities. The shape of the spectra and the ratio σ(α)/σ(p) are shown to be sensitive to the fusion critical angular momentum (Jcr), offering an alternative method for the total fusion cross-section determination.

  16. Laser-induced reactions in energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Ping

    1999-07-01

    Several energetic materials have been investigated under shock wave loading, heating, and photodissociation. This dissertation highlights some efforts to understand energetic material from an angle of basic physical processes and elementary chemical reactions. The first series of experiments was performed to study laser-generated shock waves in energetic materials. Shock waves are generated by pulsed laser vaporization of thin aluminum films. The rapidly expanding aluminum plasma launches a shock wave into the adjacent layer of energetic material, initiating chemical reactions. The shock velocity has been measured by a velocity interferometer. Shock pressures as high as 8 GPa have been generated in this manner. A simple model is proposed to predict laser-generated shock pressure. Several energetic materials have been studied under laser- generated shock wave. The second series of experiments was conducted to study thermal decomposition and photodissociation of energetic materials. Glycidyl azide polymer (GAP) and poly(glycidyl nitrate) (PGN) have been investigated by pulsed infrared laser pyrolysis and ultraviolet laser photolysis of thin films at 17-77 K. Reactions are monitored by transmission infrared spectroscopy. Photolysis of GAP at 266 nm shows that the initial reaction steps are elimination of molecular nitrogen with subsequent formation of imines. Thermal decomposition of GAP by infrared laser pyrolysis reveals products similar to the UV experiments after warming. Laser pyrolysis of PGN indicated that the main steps of decomposition are elimination of NO2 and CH2O from the nitrate ester functional group. It seems that the initial thermal decomposition mechanism of GAP and PGN are the same from heating rate of several degrees per second to 107 oC/s. The third series of experiments is about detailed study of photodissociation mechanism of methyl nitrate. Photodissociation of methyl nitrate isolated in an argon matrix at 17 K has been investigated by 266 nm

  17. Method for ion implantation induced embedded particle formation via reduction

    DOEpatents

    Hampikian, Janet M; Hunt, Eden M

    2001-01-01

    A method for ion implantation induced embedded particle formation via reduction with the steps of ion implantation with an ion/element that will chemically reduce the chosen substrate material, implantation of the ion/element to a sufficient concentration and at a sufficient energy for particle formation, and control of the temperature of the substrate during implantation. A preferred embodiment includes the formation of particles which are nano-dimensional (<100 m-n in size). The phase of the particles may be affected by control of the substrate temperature during and/or after the ion implantation process.

  18. Computational Catalysis Using the Artificial Force Induced Reaction Method.

    PubMed

    Sameera, W M C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2016-04-19

    The artificial force induced reaction (AFIR) method in the global reaction route mapping (GRRM) strategy is an automatic approach to explore all important reaction paths of complex reactions. Most traditional methods in computational catalysis require guess reaction paths. On the other hand, the AFIR approach locates local minima (LMs) and transition states (TSs) of reaction paths without a guess, and therefore finds unanticipated as well as anticipated reaction paths. The AFIR method has been applied for multicomponent organic reactions, such as the aldol reaction, Passerini reaction, Biginelli reaction, and phase-transfer catalysis. In the presence of several reactants, many equilibrium structures are possible, leading to a number of reaction pathways. The AFIR method in the GRRM strategy determines all of the important equilibrium structures and subsequent reaction paths systematically. As the AFIR search is fully automatic, exhaustive trial-and-error and guess-and-check processes by the user can be eliminated. At the same time, the AFIR search is systematic, and therefore a more accurate and comprehensive description of the reaction mechanism can be determined. The AFIR method has been used for the study of full catalytic cycles and reaction steps in transition metal catalysis, such as cobalt-catalyzed hydroformylation and iron-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond formation reactions in aqueous media. Some AFIR applications have targeted the selectivity-determining step of transition-metal-catalyzed asymmetric reactions, including stereoselective water-tolerant lanthanide Lewis acid-catalyzed Mukaiyama aldol reactions. In terms of establishing the selectivity of a reaction, systematic sampling of the transition states is critical. In this direction, AFIR is very useful for performing a systematic and automatic determination of TSs. In the presence of a comprehensive description of the transition states, the selectivity of the reaction can be calculated more accurately

  19. Effect of particle size in a limestone-hydrochloric acid reaction system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Zhou, Qulan; Chen, Xi; Xu, Tongmo; Hui, Shien

    2010-07-15

    Experimental characterization of the wet flue gas desulfurization process is carried out using a model limestone-hydrochloric acid reaction system, with in-situ measurement of the dissolution rate and particle size distribution. The limestone source, initial particle size distribution, working temperature and pH value are varied in large ranges. The dissolution rate is found to be higher when the average particle size is smaller, the temperature is higher, or the pH is lower. An empirical equation is established to correlate the dissolution rate with the particle size and working conditions, which agrees well with measurements. The results may be useful for providing insights to improve the efficiency of the wet flue gas desulfurization process, as well as other solid particle-liquid solution reactions.

  20. Aeolian Induced Erosion and Particle Entrainment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saint, Brandon

    2007-01-01

    The Granular Physics Department at The Kennedy Space Center is addressing the problem of erosion on the lunar surface. The early stages of research required an instrument that would produce erosion at a specific rate with a specific sample variation. This paper focuses on the development and experimental procedures to measure and record erosion rates. This was done with the construction of an open air wind tunnel, and examining the relationship between airflow and particle motion.

  1. Trojan Horse Method for neutrons-induced reaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulino, M.; Asfin Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Neutron-induced reactions play an important role in nuclear astrophysics in several scenario, such as primordial Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, Inhomogeneous Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, heavy-element production during the weak component of the s-process, explosive stellar nucleosynthesis. To overcome the experimental problems arising from the production of a neutron beam, the possibility to use the Trojan Horse Method to study neutron-induced reactions has been investigated. The application is of particular interest for reactions involving radioactive nuclei having short lifetime.

  2. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of beta-induced Alfven eigenmode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H. S.; Lin, Z.; Holod, I.; Xiao, Y.; Wang, X.; Zhang, W. L.

    2010-11-15

    The beta-induced Alfven eigenmode (BAE) in toroidal plasmas is studied using global gyrokinetic particle simulations. The BAE real frequency and damping rate measured in the initial perturbation simulation and in the antenna excitation simulation agree well with each other. The real frequency is slightly higher than the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accumulation point frequency due to the kinetic effects of thermal ions. Simulations with energetic particle density gradient show exponential growth of BAE with a growth rate sensitive to the energetic particle temperature and density. The nonperturbative contributions by energetic particles modify the mode structure and reduce the frequency relative to the MHD theory. The finite Larmor radius effects of energetic particles reduce the BAE growth rate. Benchmarks between gyrokinetic particle simulation and hybrid MHD-gyrokinetic simulation show good agreement in BAE real frequency and mode structure.

  3. Noise-induced transition in human reaction times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, José M.; Díaz, José A.

    2016-09-01

    The human reaction/response time can be defined as the time elapsed from the onset of stimulus presentation until a response occurs in many sensory and cognitive processes. A reaction time model based on Piéron’s law is investigated. The model shows a noise-induced transition in the moments of reaction time distributions due to the presence of strong additive noise. The model also demonstrates that reaction times do not follow fluctuation scaling between the mean and the variance but follow a generalized version between the skewness and the kurtosis. The results indicate that noise-induced transitions in the moments govern fluctuations in sensory-motor transformations and open an insight into the macroscopic effects of noise in human perception and action. The conditions that lead to extreme reaction times are discussed based on the transfer of information in neurons.

  4. Inducing Lift on Spherical Particles by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Grugel, Richard N.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Gravity induced sedimentation of suspensions is a serious drawback to many materials and biotechnology processes, a factor that can, in principle, be overcome by utilizing an opposing Lorentz body force. In this work we demonstrate the utility of employing a traveling magnetic field (TMF) to induce a lifting force on particles dispersed in the fluid. Theoretically, a model has been developed to ascertain the net force, induced by TMF, acting on a spherical body as a function of the fluid medium's electrical conductivity and other parameters. Experimentally, the model is compared to optical observations of particle motion in the presence of TMF.

  5. Inducing Lift on Spherical Particles by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Grugel, Richard N.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Gravity induced sedimentation of suspensions is a serious drawback to many materials and biotechnology processes, a factor that can, in principle, be overcome by utilizing an opposing Lorentz body force. In this work we demonstrate the utility of employing a traveling magnetic field (TMF) to induce a lifting force on particles dispersed in the fluid. Theoretically, a model has been developed to ascertain the net force, induced by TMF, acting on a spherical body as a function of the fluid medium's electrical conductivity and other parameters. Experimentally, the model is compared to optical observations of particle motion in the presence of TMF.

  6. Inducing Lift on Spherical Particles by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Grugel, Richard N.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Gravity induced sedimentation of suspensions is a serious drawback to many materials and biotechnology processes, a factor that can, in principle, be overcome by utilizing an opposing Lorentz body force. In this work we demonstrate the utility of employing a traveling magnetic field (TMF) to induce a lifting force on particles dispersed in the fluid. Theoretically, a model has been developed to ascertain the net force, induced by TMF, acting on a spherical body as a function of the fluid medium's electrical conductivity and other parameters. Experimentally, the model is compared to optical observations of particle motion in the presence of TMF.

  7. On laser-induced harpooning reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, J.

    1980-05-01

    In the present paper, the switching of chemical reactivity by a nonresonant laser field in simple gas-phase collisions of the type A + BC to AB + C is discussed in terms of a second-order optical/collision perturbation. A simple expression relating laser-induced harpooning cross sections to the laser power density is derived and is applied to Hg/Cl2 collisions.

  8. Formation of Secondary Particulate Matter by Reactions of Gas Phase Hexanal with Sulfate Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.

    2003-12-01

    The formation of secondary particulate matter from the atmospheric oxidation of organic compounds can significantly contribute to the particulate burden, but the formation of organic secondary particulate matter is poorly understood. One way of producing organic secondary particulate matter is the oxidation of hydrocarbons with seven or more carbon atoms to get products with low vapor pressure. However, several recent reports suggest that relatively low molecular weight carbonyls can enter the particle phase by undergoing heterogeneous reactions. This may be a very important mechanism for the formation of organic secondary particulate matter. Atmospheric aldehydes are important carbonyls in the gas phase, which form via the oxidation of hydrocarbons emitted from anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In this poster, we report the results on particle growth by the heterogeneous reactions of hexanal. A 5 L Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) is set up to conduct the reactions in the presence of seed aerosol particles of deliquesced ammonia bisulfate. Hexanal is added into CSTR by syringe pump, meanwhile the concentrations of hexanal are monitored with High Pressure Liquid Chromatograph (HPLC 1050). A differential Mobility Analyzer (TSI 3071) set to an appropriate voltage is employed to obtain monodisperse aerosols, and another DMA associated with a Condensation Nuclear Counter (TSI 7610) is used to measure the secondary particle size distribution by the reaction in CSTR. This permits the sensitive determination of particle growth due to the heterogeneous reaction, very little growth occurs when hexanal added alone. Results for the simultaneous addition of hexanal and alcohols will also be presented.

  9. Cinnamon-induced Oral Mucosal Contact Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Vivas, Ana P. M; Migliari, Dante A

    2015-01-01

    Contact stomatitis associated with consumption of cinnamon flavoring agents is a relatively uncommon disorder. Of relevance, both clinical features and the histopathologic findings of this condition are nonspecific, and, more importantly, may resemble some other inflammatory oral mucosa disorders, eventually making diagnosis difficult. Usually a patient exhibits a combination of white and erythematous patches of abrupt onset, accompanied by a burning sensation. To shed some light on this subject, a case of a 64-year-old woman with hypersensitivity contact reaction on the oral mucosa due to cinnamon mints is presented, with emphasis on differential diagnosis and the process for confirmation of the diagnosis. The treatment consists of discontinuing the use of cinnamon products. Clinicians will be able to recognize this disorder following a careful clinical examination and detailed history. This recognition is important in order to avoid invasive and expensive diagnostic procedures. PMID:26312097

  10. Mesoscale simulation of polymer reaction equilibrium: Combining dissipative particle dynamics with reaction ensemble Monte Carlo. II. Supramolecular diblock copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lísal, Martin; Brennan, John K.; Smith, William R.

    2009-03-01

    We present an alternative formulation of the reaction ensemble dissipative particle dynamics (RxDPD) method [M. Lísal, J. K. Brennan, and W. R. Smith, J. Chem. Phys. 125, 16490 (2006)], a mesoscale simulation technique for studying polymer systems in reaction equilibrium. The RxDPD method combines elements of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and reaction ensemble Monte Carlo (RxMC), and is primarily targeted for the prediction of the system composition, thermodynamic properties, and phase behavior of reaction equilibrium polymer systems. The alternative formulation of the RxDPD method is demonstrated by considering a supramolecular diblock copolymer (SDC) melt in which two homopolymers, An and Bm, can reversibly bond at terminal binding sites to form a diblock copolymer, AnBm. We consider the effect of the terminal binding sites and the chemical incompatibility between A- and B-segments on the phase behavior. Both effects are found to strongly influence the resulting phase behavior. Due to the reversible nature of the binding, the SDC melt can be treated as the reaction equilibrium system An+Bm⇌AnBm. To simulate the An+Bm⇌AnBm melt, the system contains, in addition to full An, Bm, and AnBm polymers, two fractional polymers: one fractional polymer either fAn or fBm, and one fractional polymer fAnBm, which have fractional particles at the ends of the polymer chains. These fractional particles are coupled to the system via a coupling parameter. The time evolution of the system is governed by the DPD equations of motion, accompanied by random changes in the coupling parameter. Random changes in the coupling parameter mimic forward and reverse reaction steps as in the RxMC approach, and they are accepted with a probability derived from the expanded ensemble grand canonical partition function. Unlike the original RxDPD method that considers coupling of entire fractional polymers to the system, the expanded ensemble framework allows a stepwise coupling, thus

  11. Radiation reaction effect on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, P. K.

    2015-12-15

    The effects of radiation reaction force on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration scheme are studied using Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion. These studies are carried out for both linear and circularly polarized laser fields in the presence of static axial magnetic field. From the parametric study, a radiation reaction dominated region has been identified in which the particle dynamics is greatly effected by this force. In the radiation reaction dominated region, the two significant effects on particle dynamics are seen, viz., (1) saturation in energy gain by the initially resonant particle and (2) net energy gain by an initially non-resonant particle which is caused due to resonance broadening. It has been further shown that with the relaxation of resonance condition and with optimum choice of parameters, this scheme may become competitive with the other present-day laser driven particle acceleration schemes. The quantum corrections to the Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion have also been taken into account. The difference in the energy gain estimates of the particle by the quantum corrected and classical Landau-Lifshitz equation is found to be insignificant for the present day as well as upcoming laser facilities.

  12. Shear-induced interfacial assembly of Janus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezvantalab, Hossein; Connington, Kevin W.; Shojaei-Zadeh, Shahab

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the hydrodynamics of spherical Janus particles at the interface between two immiscible fluids using a multicomponent lattice-Boltzmann method. The Cahn-Hilliard model is used to evolve the composition for this binary system of incompressible fluids, while the particle-fluid interactions are taken into account by adding a supplemental force to recover the appropriate wettability at solid boundaries. We evaluate the capillary-induced interactions between multiple Janus particles at a sheared interface and demonstrate the possibility of directing their assembly. In response to the flow, all particles approach a steady orientation resulting from the balance between shear-induced torque and the resistance due to preferred wetting. At sufficiently large shear rates leading to strong capillary dipoles, the particles rearrange and form chains normal to the shear direction. For the particle sizes considered, an intermediate window of surface coverage between 32% and 65% is found to give effective alignment with order parameters in the range of 0.7-1.0. An interesting feature of this directed assembly method is that the structure is preserved after removing the flow field: Janus particles only rotate to upright orientation without disintegrating the chains. This approach can enable directing a randomly oriented or distributed cluster of Janus particles into an ordered structure with controllable rheological properties.

  13. Molecular Mechanisms of Particle Ration Induced Apoptosis in Lymphocyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yufang

    Space radiation, composed of high-energy charged nuclei (HZE particles) and protons, has been previously shown to severely impact immune homeostasis in mice. To determine the molecular mechanisms that mediate acute lymphocyte depletion following exposure to HZE particle radiation mice were exposed to particle radiation beams at Brookhaven National Laboratory. We found that mice given whole body 5 6Fe particle irradiation (1GeV /n) had dose-dependent losses in total lymphocyte numbers in the spleen and thymus (using 200, 100 and 50 cGy), with thymocytes being more sensitive than splenocytes. All phenotypic subsets were reduced in number. In general, T cells and B cells were equally sensitive, while CD8+ T cells were more senstive than CD4+ T cells. In the thymus, immature CD4+CD8+ double-positive thymocytes were exquisitely sensitive to radiation-induced losses, single-positive CD4 or CD8 cells were less sensitive, and the least mature double negative cells were resistant. Irradiation of mice deficient in genes encoding essential apoptosis-inducing proteins revealed that the mechanism of lymphocyte depletion is independent of Fas ligand and TRAIL (TNF-ralated apoptosis-inducing ligand), in contrast to γ-radiation-induced lymphocyte losses which require the Fas-FasL pathway. Using inhibitors in vitro, lymphocyte apoptosis induced by HZE particle radiation was found to be caspase dependent, and not involve nitric oxide or oxygen free radicals.

  14. Field and laboratory studies of reactions between atmospheric water soluble organic acids and inorganic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Sellon, Rachel; Shilling, John; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-05-01

    Atmospheric inorganic particles undergo complex heterogeneous reactions that change their physicochemical properties. Depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids [1-2]. Recently, we showed that NaCl can react with water soluble organic acids (WSOA) and release gaseous hydrochloric acid (HCl) resulting in formation of organic salts [3]. A similar mechanism is also applicable to mixed WSOA/nitrate particles where multi-phase reactions are driven by the volatility of nitric acid. Furthermore, secondary organic material, which is a complex mixture of carboxylic acids, exhibits the same reactivity towards chlorides and nitrates. Here, we present a systematic study of reactions between atmospheric relevant WSOA, SOM, and inorganic salts including NaCl, NaNO3, and Ca(NO3)2 using complementary micro-spectroscopy analysis.

  15. Field and Laboratory Studies of Reactions between Atmospheric Water Soluble Organic Acids and Inorganic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Sellon, Rachel E.; Shilling, John E.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-06-25

    Atmospheric inorganic particles undergo complex heterogeneous reactions that change their physicochemical properties. Depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids [1-2]. Recently, we showed that NaCl can react with water soluble organic acids (WSOA) and release gaseous hydrochloric acid (HCl) resulting in formation of organic salts [3]. A similar mechanism is also applicable to mixed WSOA/nitrate particles where multi-phase reactions are driven by the volatility of nitric acid. Furthermore, secondary organic material, which is a complex mixture of carboxylic acids, exhibits the same reactivity towards chlorides and nitrates. Here, we present a systematic study of reactions between atmospheric relevant WSOA, SOM, and inorganic salts including NaCl, NaNO3, and Ca(NO3)2 using complementary micro-spectroscopy analysis.

  16. Shock induced magnetic effects in fine particle iron dispersions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasilewski, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic effects associated with shock induced transformation of fcc antiferromagnetic iron precipitates in polycrystalline copper disks at levels up to 5 GPa in weak magnetic fields (H not greater than 0.5 Oe) were investigated. The demagnetization and anisotropy associated with second order transition, the effects of plastic deformation in imparting magnetic anisotropy and magnetic hardening, and the influence of post shock thermal transients on magnetization associated with recovery, recrystallization and grain growth were studied. It was found that on the microsecond time scale of the shock induced first order transformation, the field sense is recorded in the transformed iron particles. For a given particle size the degree of transformation of fcc iron depends on the level of the shock. For a given shock level the resultant magnetic properties depend on the particle size distribution, with maximum effects noted in specimens with 400 to 600 A particles.

  17. Gravitationally induced particle production and its impact on structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Rafael C.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we investigate the influence of a continuous particles creation processes on the linear and nonlinear matter clustering, and its consequences on the weak lensing effect induced by structure formation. We study the line of sight behavior of the contribution to the bispectrum signal at a given angular multipole l, showing that the scale where the nonlinear growth overcomes the linear effect depends strongly of particles creation rate.

  18. Low-energy electron-induced reactions in condensed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumainayagam, Christopher R.; Lee, Hsiao-Lu; Nelson, Rachel B.; Haines, David R.; Gunawardane, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this review is to discuss post-irradiation analysis of low-energy (≤50 eV) electron-induced processes in nanoscale thin films. Because electron-induced surface reactions in monolayer adsorbates have been extensively reviewed, we will instead focus on low-energy electron-induced reactions in multilayer adsorbates. The latter studies, involving nanoscale thin films, serve to elucidate the pivotal role that the low-energy electron-induced reactions play in high-energy radiation-induced chemical reactions in condensed matter. Although electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) experiments conducted during irradiation have yielded vital information relevant to primary or initial electron-induced processes, we wish to demonstrate in this review that analyzing the products following low-energy electron irradiation can provide new insights into radiation chemistry. This review presents studies of electron-induced reactions in nanoscale films of molecular species such as oxygen, nitrogen trifluoride, water, alkanes, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, nitriles, halocarbons, alkane and phenyl thiols, thiophenes, ferrocene, amino acids, nucleotides, and DNA using post-irradiation techniques such as temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), gel electrophoresis, and microarray fluorescence. Post-irradiation temperature-programmed desorption, in particular, has been shown to be useful in identifying labile radiolysis products as demonstrated by the first identification of methoxymethanol as a reaction product of methanol radiolysis. Results of post-irradiation studies have been used not only to identify radiolysis products, but also to determine the dynamics of electron-induced reactions. For example, studies of the radiolysis yield as a function of incident electron energy have shown that dissociative

  19. Acid-catalyzed reactions of hexanal on sulfuric acid particles: Identification of reaction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, Rebecca M.; Elrod, Matthew J.; Kincaid, Kristi; Beaver, Melinda R.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    While it is well established that organics compose a large fraction of the atmospheric aerosol mass, the mechanisms through which organics are incorporated into atmospheric aerosols are not well understood. Acid-catalyzed reactions of compounds with carbonyl groups have recently been suggested as important pathways for transfer of volatile organics into acidic aerosols. In the present study, we use the aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to probe the uptake of gas-phase hexanal into ammonium sulfate and sulfuric acid aerosols. While both deliquesced and dry non-acidic ammonium sulfate aerosols showed no organic uptake, the acidic aerosols took up substantial amounts of organic material when exposed to hexanal vapor. Further, we used 1H-NMR, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and GC-MS to identify the products of the acid-catalyzed reaction of hexanal in acidic aerosols. Both aldol condensation and hemiacetal products were identified, with the dominant reaction products dependent upon the initial acid concentration of the aerosol. The aldol condensation product was formed only at initial concentrations of 75-96 wt% sulfuric acid in water. The hemiacetal was produced at all sulfuric acid concentrations studied, 30-96 wt% sulfuric acid in water. Aerosols up to 88.4 wt% organic/11.1 wt% H 2SO 4/0.5 wt% water were produced via these two dimerization reaction pathways. The UV-VIS spectrum of the isolated aldol condensation product, 2-butyl 2-octenal, extends into the visible region, suggesting these reactions may impact aerosol optical properties as well as aerosol composition. In contrast to previous suggestions, no polymerization of hexanal or its products was observed at any sulfuric acid concentration studied, from 30 to 96 wt% in water.

  20. Radiation induces turbulence in particle-laden fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Zamansky, Rémi; Coletti, Filippo; Massot, Marc; Mani, Ali

    2014-07-15

    When a transparent fluid laden with solid particles is subject to radiative heating, non-uniformities in particle distribution result in local fluid temperature fluctuations. Under the influence of gravity, buoyancy induces vortical fluid motion which can lead to strong preferential concentration, enhancing the local heating and more non-uniformities in particle distribution. By employing direct numerical simulations this study shows that the described feedback loop can create and sustain turbulence. The velocity and length scale of the resulting turbulence is not known a priori, and is set by balance between viscous forces and buoyancy effects. When the particle response time is comparable to a viscous time scale, introduced in our analysis, the system exhibits intense fluctuations of turbulent kinetic energy and strong preferential concentration of particles.

  1. Magma mixing induced by particle settling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renggli, Christian J.; Wiesmaier, Sebastian; De Campos, Cristina P.; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-11-01

    A time series of experiments at high temperature have been performed to investigate the influence of particle settling on magma mixing. A natural rhyolite glass was held above a natural basalt glass in a platinum crucible. After melting of the glasses at superliquidus temperatures, a platinum sphere was placed on the upper surface of the rhyolitic melt and sank into the experimental column (rhyolitic melt above basaltic melt). Upon falling through the rhyolitic-basaltic melt interface, the Pt sphere entrained a filament of rhyolitic melt in its further fall. The quenched products of the experiments were imaged using X-ray microCT methods. The images of our time series of experiments document the formation of a rhyolite filament as it is entrained into the underlying basalt by the falling platinum sphere. When the Pt particle reached the bottom of the crucible, the entrained rhyolitic filament started to ascend buoyantly up to the initial rhyolitic-basaltic interface. This generated a significant thickness increase of a comingled "melange" layer at the interface due to "liquid rope coiling" and piling up of the filament. As a consequence, the basalt/rhyolite interface was greatly enlarged and diffusive hybridisation greatly accelerated. Further, bubbles, originating at the interface, are observed to have risen into the overlying rhyolite dragging basalt filaments with them. Upon crossing the basalt/rhyolite interface, the bubbles have non-spherical shapes as they adapt to the differing surface tensions of basaltic and rhyolitic melts. Major element profiles, measured across the rhyolite filaments, exhibit asymmetrical shapes from the rhyolite into the basalt. Na and Ti reveal uphill diffusion from the rhyolite towards the interface in the filament cross sections. These results reveal the potential qualitative complexity of the mingling process between rhyolitic and basaltic magmas in the presence of sinking crystals. They imply that crystal-rich magma mingling may

  2. Catalyst nano-particle size dependence of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction.

    PubMed

    van Santen, Rutger A; Markvoor, Albert J

    2013-01-01

    Computational catalytic studies indicate that the elementary reactions that constitute the Fischer-Tropsch reaction strongly dependent on the structure of the catalyst reaction center. Recent experimental evidence is available that, for metallic Fischer-Tropsch catalysts such as Co or Ru, the very small metallic particles show altered catalytic performance. To distinguish between changes in the relative concentration of reaction centres, changes in chemical reactivity, or rate controlling steps, transient SSITKA data are extremely useful. Here, we present kinetics simulations to extract molecular kinetic information from SSITKA data. We have applied such simulations to interpret published experimental SSITKA data on nano-particle size dependent Fischer-Tropsch (FT) kinetics. The FT catalytic cycle consists of four essential reaction steps. Their relative size determines activity as well as selectivity. The simulated SSITKA indicate three different regimes with different kinetic behaviour, where the two fundamental regimes to distinguish are the monomer-formation-limited and the chain-growth-limited regime. Particle size changes shift kinetics from one to the other regime. We note different effects of supports and choice of metal composition on changes in elementary rates or the relative number of reactive centres when the particle size is decreased in the nanometre regime.

  3. Application of a Particle Method to the Advection-Diffusion-Reaction Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paster, A.; Bolster, D.; Benson, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    A reaction between two chemical species can only happen if molecules collide and react. Thus, the mixing of a system can become a limiting factor in the onset of reaction. Solving for reaction rate in a well-mixed system is typically a straightforward task. However, when incomplete mixing kicks in, obtaining a solution becomes more challenging. Since reaction can only happen in regions where both reactants co-exist, the incomplete mixing may slow down the reaction rate, when compared to a well-mixed system. The effect of incomplete mixing upon reaction is a highly important aspect of various processes in natural and engineered systems, ranging from mineral precipitation in geological formations to groundwater remediation in aquifers. We study a relatively simple system with a bi-molecular irreversible kinetic reaction A+B → Ø where the underlying transport of reactants is governed by an advection-diffusion equation, and the initial concentrations are given in terms of an average and a perturbation. Such a system does not have an analytical solution to date, even for the zero advection case. We model the system by a Monte Carlo particle tracking method, where particles represent some reactant mass. In this method, diffusion is modeled by a random walk of the particles, and reaction is modeled by annihilation of particles. The probability of the annihilation is proportional to the reaction rate constant and the probability density associated with particle co-location. We study the numerical method in depth, characterizing typical numerical errors and time step restrictions. In particular, we show that the numerical method converges to the advection-diffusion-reaction equation at the limit Δt →0. We also rigorously derive the relationship between the initial number of particles in the system and the initial concentrations perturbations represented by that number. We then use the particle simulations of zero-advection system to demonstrate the well

  4. Preparation of Metalloporphyrin-Bound Superparamagnetic Silica Particles via "Click" Reaction.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Javoris V; Bhupathiraju, N V S Dinesh K; Sun, Jirun; Lochner, Eric; Vicente, M Graça H; Russo, Paul S

    2016-01-13

    A facile approach using click chemistry is demonstrated for immobilization of metalloporphyrins onto the surface of silica-coated iron oxide particles. Oleic-acid stabilized iron oxide nanocrystals were prepared by thermal decomposition of iron(III) acetylacetonate. Their crystallinity, morphology, and superparamagnetism were determined using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and a superconducting quantum interference device. Monodisperse core-shell particles were produced in the silica-coating of iron oxide via microemulsion synthesis. Surface modification of these particles was performed in two steps, which included the reaction of silica-coated iron oxide particles with 3-bromopropyltrichlorosilane, followed by azido-functionalization with sodium azide. Monoalkylated porphyrins were prepared using the Williamson ether synthesis of commercially available tetra(4-hydroxyphenyl) porphyrin with propargyl bromide in the presence of a base. (1)H NMR and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization confirmed the identity of the compounds. The prepared monoalkyne porphyrins were zinc-metalated prior to their introduction to azide-functionalized, silica-coated iron oxide particles in the click reaction. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the surface chemistry after each step in the reaction. In addition, particle size was determined using dynamic light scattering and microscopy. The presented methodology is versatile and can be extended to other photoreactive systems, such as phthalocyanines and boron-dipyrromethane, which may lead to new materials for optical, photonic, and biological applications.

  5. Particle-induced amorphization complex ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.; Wang, Lu-Min

    1996-02-16

    The presently funded three-year research program, supported by the Division of Materials Sciences of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, was initiated on August 1, 1993; during the period in which the grant will have been active, $249,561 of support have been provided to date with an additional $79,723 to be spent during the third, final year (ending July 30, 1996). The primary purpose of the program is to develop an understanding of heavy-particle radiation effects -- {alpha}-recoil nuclei, fission fragments, ion-irradiations -- on ceramic materials and the thermal annealing mechanisms by which crystallinity might be restored. During the past two years, we have completed major studies on zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}), olivine (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and ten other compositions), spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and four other compositions), and silica polymorphs (quartz, coesite and stishovite), as well as berlinite (AlPO{sub 4}) which is isomorphous with quartz. In addition, based on the above research, we propose the use of zircon as a host phase for the immobilization of plutonium resulting from weapons dismantlement.

  6. Deuterium separation by infrared-induced addition reaction

    DOEpatents

    Marling, John B.

    1977-01-01

    A method for deuterium enrichment by the infrared-induced addition reaction of a deuterium halide with an unsaturated aliphatic compound. A gaseous mixture of a hydrogen halide feedstock and an unsaturated aliphatic compound, particularly an olefin, is irradiated to selectively vibrationally excite the deuterium halide contained therein. The excited deuterium halide preferentially reacts with the unsaturated aliphatic compound to produce a deuterated addition product which is removed from the reaction mixture.

  7. Locomotion of electrocatalytic nanomotors due to reaction induced charge autoelectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J. L.; Wheat, P. M.; Posner, J. D.

    2010-06-01

    Bimetallic rod-shaped nanomotors swim autonomously in hydrogen peroxide solutions. Here, we present a scaling analysis, computational simulations, and experimental data that show that the nanomotor locomotion is driven by fluid slip around the nanomotor surface due to electrical body forces. The body forces are generated by a coupling of charge density and electric fields induced by electrochemical reactions occurring on the nanomotor surface. We describe the dependence of nanomotor motion on the nanomotor surface potential and reaction-driven flux.

  8. Quantum Tunneling Contribution for the Activation Energy in Microwave-Induced Reactions.

    PubMed

    Kuhnen, Carlos A; Dall'Oglio, Evandro L; de Sousa, Paulo T

    2017-08-03

    In this study, a quantum approach is presented to explain microwave-enhanced reaction rates by considering the tunneling effects in chemical reactions. In the Arrhenius equation, the part of the Hamiltonian relative to the interaction energy during tunneling, between the particle that tunnels and the electrical field defined in the medium, whose spatial component is specified by its rms value, is taken into account. An approximate evaluation of the interaction energy leads to a linear dependence of the effective activation energy on the applied field. The evaluation of the rms value of the field for pure liquids and reaction mixtures, through their known dielectric properties, leads to an appreciable reduction in the activation energies for the proton transfer process in these liquids. The results indicate the need to move toward the use of more refined methods of modern quantum chemistry to calculate more accurately field-induced reaction rates and effective activation energies.

  9. On reaction mechanisms involved in the deuteron–induced surrogate reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Mănăilescu, C.

    2015-02-24

    An extended analysis of the nuclear reaction mechanisms involved within deuteron interaction with nuclei, namely the breakup, stripping, pick-up, pre-equilibrium emission, and evaporation from fully equilibrated compound nucleus, is presented in order to highlight the importance of the direct mechanisms still neglected in the analysis of deuteron-induced surrogate reactions. Particularly, the dominance of the breakup mechanism at low energies around the Coulomb barrier should be considered in the case of (d,x) surrogate reactions on actinide target nuclei.

  10. Preparation for Spherical particles of Praseodymium doped Perovskite Red Phosphor by Hydrothermal Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaka, T.; Matsuda, A.; Mizunuma, M.; Tanaka, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Spherical particles of 0.5mol%Pr3+-doped CaTiO3 were prepared by hydrothermal reaction on dissolved CaCl2, Pr(NO3)3, and ammonium citratoperoxotitanate (IV) complex precursor solution with molar ratio of Ti/CA=1:2 and calcination in ambient atmosphere. The obtained particle exhibited red photoluminescence at 610nm. It is found that several particles have hollow structure. It is required that further investigation is needed to clarify the formation mechanism of these spherical hollow paricles.

  11. Correlation effects in single-particle overlap functions and one-nucleon removal reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidarov, M. K.; Pavlova, K. A.; Dimitrova, S. S.; Stoitsov, M. V.; Antonov, A. N.; van Neck, D.; Müther, H.

    1999-08-01

    Single-particle overlap functions and spectroscopic factors are calculated on the basis of the one-body density matrices (ODM) obtained for the nucleus 16O employing different approaches to account for the effects of correlations. The calculations use the relationship between the overlap functions related to bound states of the (A-1)-particle system and the ODM for the ground state of the A-particle system. The resulting bound-state overlap functions are compared and tested in the description of the experimental data from (p,d) reactions for which the shape of the overlap function is important.

  12. Dynamics of synchrotron VUV-induced intracluster reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, J.R.

    1993-12-01

    Photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) using the tunable vacuum ultraviolet radiation available at the National Synchrotron Light Source is being exploited to study photoionization-induced reactions in small van der Waals mixed complexes. The information gained includes the observation and classification of reaction paths, the measurement of onsets, and the determination of relative yields of competing reactions. Additional information is obtained by comparison of the properties of different reacting systems. Special attention is given to finding unexpected features, and most of the reactions investigated to date display such features. However, understanding these reactions demands dynamical information, in addition to what is provided by PIMS. Therefore the program has been expanded to include the measurement of kinetic energy release distributions.

  13. Growth behavior of LiMn2O4 particles formed by solid-state reactions in air and water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Yanagisawa, Kazumichi; Murakami, Takeshi; Naito, Makio

    2016-11-01

    Morphology control of particles formed during conventional solid-state reactions without any additives is a challenging task. Here, we propose a new strategy to control the morphology of LiMn2O4 particles based on water vapor-induced growth of particles during solid-state reactions. We have investigated the synthesis and microstructural evolution of LiMn2O4 particles in air and water vapor atmospheres as model reactions; LiMn2O4 is used as a low-cost cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. By using spherical MnCO3 precursor impregnated with LiOH, LiMn2O4 spheres with a hollow structure were obtained in air, while angulated particles with micrometer sizes were formed in water vapor. The pore structure of the particles synthesized in water vapor was found to be affected at temperatures below 700 °C. We also show that the solid-state reaction in water vapor is a simple and valuable method for the large-scale production of particles, where the shape, size, and microstructure can be controlled.

  14. Cavitation-induced reactions in high-pressure carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Kuijpers, M W A; van Eck, D; Kemmere, M F; Keurentjes, J T F

    2002-12-06

    The feasibility of ultrasound-induced in situ radical formation in liquid carbon dioxide was demonstrated. The required threshold pressure for cavitation could be exceeded at a relatively low acoustic intensity, as the high vapor pressure of CO2 counteracts the hydrostatic pressure. With the use of a dynamic bubble model, the formation of hot spots upon bubble collapse was predicted. Cavitation-induced radical formation was used for the polymerization of methyl methacrylate in CO2, yielding high-molecular-weight polymers. These results show that sonochemical reactions can be performed in dense-phase fluids, which allows the environmentally benign CO2 to replace conventional organic solvents in many reaction systems.

  15. Effect of reactivity loss on apparent reaction order of burning char particles

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Jeffrey J.; Shaddix, Christopher R.

    2010-03-15

    Considerable debate still exists in the char combustion community over the expected and observed reaction orders of carbon reacting with oxygen. In particular, very low values of the reaction order (approaching zero) are commonly observed in char combustion experiments. These observations appear to conflict with porous catalyst theory as first expressed by Thiele, which suggests that the apparent reaction order must be greater than 0.5. In this work, we propose that this conflict may be resolved by considering the decrease in char reactivity with burnout due to ash effects, thermal annealing, or other phenomena. Specifically, the influence of ash dilution of the available surface area on the apparent reaction order is explored. Equations describing the ash dilution effect are combined with a model for particle burnout based on single-film nth-order Arrhenius char combustion and yield an analytical expression for the effective reaction order. When this expression is applied for experimental conditions reflecting combustion of individual pulverized coal particles in an entrained flow reactor, the apparent reaction order is shown to be lower than the inherent char matrix reaction order, even for negligible extents of char conversion. As char conversion proceeds and approaches completion, the apparent reaction order drops precipitously past zero to negative values. Conversely, the inclusion of the ash dilution model has little effect on the char conversion profile or char particle temperature until significant burnout has occurred. Taken together, these results suggest that the common experimental observation of low apparent reaction orders during char combustion is a consequence of the lack of explicit modeling of the decrease in char reactivity with burnout. (author)

  16. Continuum effects in transfer reactions induced by heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Marta, H.D.; Donangelo, R.; Fernandez Niello, J.O.; Pacheco, A.J.

    2006-02-15

    In the usual treatment of transfer nuclear reactions, the continuum states of the transferred particle are neglected. Here we perform a semiclassical calculation that treats the continuum in an exact way. For comparison purposes, we perform a second calculation in which the continuum is completely disregarded. The results of these two calculations indicates that the influence of the continuum states may be very important in systems with weakly bound reactants.

  17. Timescale for hygroscopic conversion of calcite mineral particles through heterogeneous reaction with nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Ryan C; Moore, Meagan J K; Petters, Markus D; Kreidenweis, Sonia M; Roberts, Greg C; Prather, Kimberly A

    2009-09-28

    Atmospheric heterogeneous reactions can potentially change the hygroscopicity of atmospheric aerosols as they undergo chemical aging processes in the atmosphere. A particle's hygroscopicity influences its cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) properties with potential impacts on cloud formation and climate. In this study, size-selected calcite mineral particles were reacted with controlled amounts of nitric acid vapour over a wide range of relative humidities in an aerosol flow tube to study the conversion of insoluble and thus apparently non-hygroscopic calcium carbonate into soluble and hygroscopic calcium nitrate. The rate of hygroscopic change particles undergo during a heterogeneous reaction is derived from experimental measurements for the first time. The chemistry of the reacted particles was determined using an ultrafine aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (UF-ATOFMS) while the particles' hygroscopicity was determined through measuring CCN activation curves fit to a single parameter of hygroscopicity, kappa. The reaction is rapid, corresponding to atmospheric timescales of hours. At low to moderate HNO3 exposures, the increase in the hygroscopicity of the particles is a linear function of the HNO3(g) exposure. The experimentally observed conversion rate was used to constrain a simple but accurate kinetic model. This model predicts that calcite particles will be rapidly converted into hygroscopic particles (kappa>0.1) within 4 h for low HNO3 mixing ratios (10 pptv) and in less than 3 min for 1000 pptv HNO3. This suggests that the hygroscopic conversion of the calcite component of atmospheric mineral dust aerosol will be controlled by the availability of nitric acid and similar reactants, and not by the atmospheric residence time.

  18. A theoretical study of deuteron-induced surrogate reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, B. V.; Capote, R.; Sin, M.

    2017-09-01

    We use the zero-range post-form DWBA approximation to calculate deuteron elastic and nonelastic breakup cross sections and estimate the breakup-fusion cross section that could serve as a surrogate for a neutron-induced reaction cross section. We compare the angular momentum dependence of the breakup-fusion compound nucleus formation cross section with that of the corresponding neutron-induced cross section.

  19. A Theoretical Study of Deuteron-induced Surrogate Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, B. V.; Capote, R.; Sin, M.

    2017-06-01

    We use the zero-range post-form DWBA approximation to calculate deuteron elastic and nonelastic breakup cross sections and estimate the breakup-fusion cross section that could serve as a surrogate for a neutron-induced reaction cross section. We compare the angular momentum dependence of the breakup-fusion compound nucleus formation cross section with that of the corresponding neutron-induced cross section.

  20. Mechanisms of particle-induced activation of alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gercken, G; Berg, I; Dörger, M; Schlüter, T

    1996-11-01

    Bovine alveolar macrophages were exposed in vitro to quartz dusts, metal-containing dusts or silica particles coated with a single metal oxide. The release of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) was measured in short-term incubations (90 min). The secretion of both ROI was markedly enhanced by silica particles coated with vanadium oxide and lowered by copper oxide-coated particles. The particle-induced ROI release was significantly decreased by the inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) as well as phospholipase A2, suggesting the involvement of both enzymes in the NADPH oxidase activation. Quartz dusts induced a transient increase of free cytosolic calcium ion concentration, slight intracellular acidification, and depolarization of the plasma membrane. In the presence of EGTA or verapamil the rise of [Ca2+]i was diminished, suggesting an influx of extracellular calcium ions. The PKC inhibitor GF 109203X did not inhibit the quartz-induced calcium rise, while both the cytosolic acidification and depolarization were prevented. BSA-coating of the quartz particles abolished the calcium influx as well as the decrease of pHi, and possibly hyperpolarized the plasma membrane.

  1. A study of heavy-heavy nuclear reactions. [nuclear research/nuclear particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    Calculations are presented for the reaction products in high energy collisions and of the atmospheric transport of particles such as protons, neutrons and other nucleons. The magnetic moments of charmed baryons are examined. Total cross sections which are required for cosmic heavy ion transport and shielding studies are also examined.

  2. Coherent Light induced in Optical Fiber by a Charged Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artru, Xavier; Ray, Cédric

    2016-07-01

    Coherent light production in an optical fiber by a charged particle (named PIGL, for particle-induced guided, light) is reviewed. From the microscopic point of view, light is emitted by transient electric dipoles induced in the fiber medium by the Coulomb field of the particle. The phenomenon can also considered as the capture of virtual photons of the particle field by the fiber. Two types of captures are distinguished. Type-I takes place in a uniform part of the fiber; then the photon keeps its longitudinal momentum pz . Type-II takes place near an end or in a non-uniform part of the fiber; then pz is not conserved. Type-I PIGL is not affected by background lights external to the fiber. At grazing incidence it becomes nearly monochromatic. Its circular polarization depends on the angular momentum of the particle about the fiber and on the relative velocity between the particle and the guided wave. A general formula for the yield of Type-II radiation, based on the reciprocity theorem, is proposed. This radiation can be assisted by metallic objects stuck to the fiber, via plasmon excitation. A periodic structure leads to a guided Smith-Purcell radiation. Applications of PIGL in beam diagnostics are considered.

  3. Particle Dynamics in Asymmetry-Induced Transport: a Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2005-10-01

    We have developed a simple computer code as an aid to resolving the discrepanies between our experimentsootnotetextD.L. Eggleston and B. Carrillo, Phys. Plasmas 10, 1308 (2003). and the theoryootnotetextD.L. Eggleston and T.M. O'Neil, Phys. Plasmas 6, 2699 (1999). of asymmetry-induced transport. The code employs the fourth- order Runge-Kutta method to advance the particles in prescribed fields matching our experiment. For a single helical asymmety φ(r)(kz+lθ-φt), significant motion in the radial direction is restricted to those particles near the resonant velocity. Both the location and the width of this resonance are consistent with expectations. When a standing wave asymmetry is used (i.e., two counter-propagating helical waves), additional dynamical behaviors are observed. Stocastic motion occurs when the resonant regions of the two waves overlap, allowing a larger population of particles to undergo large radial excursions. There is also a class of particles with restricted axial motion, as in trapped particle modesootnotetextA.A. Kabantsev et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 245001 (2002).. These particles, which also make large radial excursions, are located near the radius where θ= φ/l. Further progress in understanding asymmetry-induced transport may require inclusion of these effects.

  4. In situ measurements of heterogeneous reactions on ambient aerosol particles: Impacts on atmospheric chemistry and climate

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, Timothy

    2015-02-11

    Aerosol particles play a critical role in the Earth’s energy budget through the absorption and scattering of radiation, and/or through their ability to form clouds and alter cloud lifetime. Heterogeneous and multi-phase reactions alter the climate-relevant properties of aerosol particles and catalyze reaction pathways that are energetically unfavorable in the gas phase. The chemical composition of aerosol particles dictates the kinetics of heterogeneous and multi-phase reactions. At present, the vast majority of the molecular level information on these processes has been determined in laboratory investigations on model aerosol systems. The work described here provides a comprehensive investigation into the reactivity of complex, ambient aerosol particles is proposed to determine: 1) how representative laboratory investigations of heterogeneous and multi-phase processes conducted on model, simple systems are of the real atmosphere, and 2) the impact of heterogeneous and multi-phase processes on ambient particle optical properties and their ability to nucleate clouds. This work has focused on the uptake kinetics for ammonia (NH3) and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5). The results of these investigations will be used to directly improve the representation of heterogeneous and multi-phase processes in global climate models, by identifying the key mechanistic drivers that control the variability in the observed kinetics.

  5. Tween-80 and impurity induce anaphylactoid reaction in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Lao, Qiao-Cong; Yu, Hang-Ping; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Hong-Cui; Luan, Lin; Sun, Hui-Min; Li, Chun-Qi

    2015-03-01

    A number of recent reports suspected that Tween-80 in injectable medicines, including traditional Chinese medicine injections could cause life-threatening anaphylactoid reaction, but no sound conclusion was drawn. A drug-induced anaphylactoid reaction is hard to be assayed in vitro and in conventional animal models. In this study, we developed a microplate-based quantitative in vivo zebrafish assay for assessing anaphylactoid reaction and live whole zebrafish mast cell tryptase activity was quantitatively measured at a wavelength of 405 nm using N-benzoyl-dl-arginine p-nitroanilide as a substrate. We assessed 10 batches of Tween-80 solutions from various national and international suppliers and three Tween-80 impurities (ethylene glycol, 2-chloroethanol and hydrogen peroxide) in this model and found that three batches of Tween-80 (nos 2, 20080709 and 20080616) and one Tween-80 impurity, hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ), induced anaphylactoid reactions in zebrafish. Furthermore, we found that H2 O2 residue and peroxide value were much higher in Tween-80 samples 2, 20080709 and 20080616. These findings suggest that H2 O2 residue in combination with oxidized fatty acid residues (measured as peroxide value) or more likely the oxidized fatty acid residues in Tween-80 samples, but not Tween-80 itself, may induce anaphylactoid reaction. High-throughput zebrafish tryptase assay developed in this report could be used for assessing safety of Tween-80-containing injectable medicines and potentially for screening novel mast cell-modulating drugs.

  6. CARDIAC MOLECULAR EFFECTS INDUCED BY AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Submitted to the American Thoracic Society 98th International Conference, May 17 - 22, 2002, Atlanta, GA

    CARDIAC MOLECULAR EFFECTS INDUCED BY AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES
    K. Dreher1, R. Jaskot1, J. Richards1, and T. Knuckles2. 1U. S. Environmental Protection Agency,...

  7. CARDIAC MOLECULAR EFFECTS INDUCED BY AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Submitted to the American Thoracic Society 98th International Conference, May 17 - 22, 2002, Atlanta, GA

    CARDIAC MOLECULAR EFFECTS INDUCED BY AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES
    K. Dreher1, R. Jaskot1, J. Richards1, and T. Knuckles2. 1U. S. Environmental Protection Agency,...

  8. Modeling Bimolecular Reactions and Transport in Porous Media via Particle Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, D.; Benson, D. A.; Paster, A.; Bolster, D.

    2012-12-01

    We use a particle-tracking model to simulate several one-dimensional bi-molecular reactive transport experiments. In this numerical method, the reactants are represented by particles; advection and dispersion dominate the flow of particles, and molecular diffusion dictates, in large part, the reactions. The reactions are determined by a combination of two probabilities; one is that reactant particles occupy the same volume over a short time interval, which is dictated by diffusion; the other is the conditional probability that two collocated particles favorably transform into a reaction. The first probability is a direct physical representation of the degree of mixing in an advancing displacement front, and as such lacks empirical parameters except for the user-defined number of particles. This number is theoretically correlated to the concentration statistics, which can be estimated from concentration autocovariance in the experiment if concentration data is properly collected. The simulations compare favorably to two physical experiments. In one, Raje and Kapoor (2000) [1] measured the product concentrations at the end of a column at different times (the breakthrough curve). In the other, Gramling et al. [2] measured the distribution of reactants and products within a translucent column (snapshots). In addition, one experiment used reactants with a well-mixed thermodynamic rate coefficient 107 times greater than the other. The higher rate can be considered an essentially instantaneous reaction. When compared to the solution of the classical advection-dispersion-reaction equation with the well-mixed reaction coefficient, both experiments showed on the order of 20% to 40% slower reaction attributed to poor mixing. The Lagrangian model in this study accurately simulated the incomplete mixing for both the breakthrough curves [1] and product concentration profile [2]. In addition to model performance, the advantage is the lack of empirical parameters or assumptions

  9. Crosschecking of alpha particle monitor reactions up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.; Szűcs, Z.; Haba, H.; Komori, Y.; Aikawa, M.; Saito, M.

    2017-04-01

    Selected reactions with well-defined excitation functions can be used to monitor the parameters of charged particle beams. The frequently used reactions for monitoring alpha particle beams are the 27Al(α,x)22,24Na, natTi(α,x)51Cr, natCu(α,x)66,67Ga and natCu(α,x)65Zn reactions. The excitation functions for these reactions were studied using the activation method and stacked target irradiation technique to crosscheck and to compare the above six reactions. Thin metallic foils with natural isotopic composition and well defined thickness were stacked together in sandwich targets and were irradiated at the AVF cyclotron of RIKEN with an alpha particle beam of 51.2 MeV. The activity of the target foils were assessed by using high-resolution gamma spectrometers of high purity Ge detectors. The data sets of the six processes were crosschecked with each other to provide consistent, cross-linked numerical cross section data.

  10. Alpha particle destabilization of the toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1990-10-01

    The high frequency, low mode number toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) are shown to be driven unstable by the circulating and/or trapped {alpha}-particles through the wave-particle resonances. Satisfying the resonance condition requires that the {alpha}-particle birth speed v{sub {alpha}} {ge} v{sub A}/2{vert bar}m-nq{vert bar}, where v{sub A} is the Alfven speed, m is the poloidal model number, and n is the toroidal mode number. To destabilize the TAE modes, the inverse Landau damping associated with the {alpha}-particle pressure gradient free energy must overcome the velocity space Landau damping due to both the {alpha}-particles and the core electrons and ions. The growth rate was studied analytically with a perturbative formula derived from the quadratic dispersion relation, and numerically with the aid of the NOVA-K code. Stability criteria in terms of the {alpha}-particle beta {beta}{sub {alpha}}, {alpha}-particle pressure gradient parameter ({omega}{sub {asterisk}}/{omega}{sub A}) ({omega}{sub {asterisk}} is the {alpha}-particle diamagnetic drift frequency), and (v{sub {alpha}}/v{sub A}) parameters will be presented for TFTR, CIT, and ITER tokamaks. The volume averaged {alpha}-particle beta threshold for TAE instability also depends sensitively on the core electron and ion temperature. Typically the volume averaged {alpha}-particle beta threshold is in the order of 10{sup {minus}4}. Typical growth rates of the n=1 TAE mode can be in the order of 10{sup {minus}2}{omega}{sub A}, where {omega}{sub A}=v{sub A}/qR. Other types of global Alfven waves are stable in D-T tokamaks due to toroidal coupling effects.

  11. Suppression of the chain nuclear fusion reaction based on the p+{sup 11}B reaction because of the deceleration of alpha particles

    SciTech Connect

    Shmatov, M. L.

    2016-09-15

    It is shown that a rapid deceleration of alpha particles in matter of electron temperature up to 100 keV leads a strong suppression of the chain nuclear fusion reaction on the basis of the p+{sup 11}B reaction with the reproduction of fast protons in the α+{sup 11}B and n+{sup 10}B reactions. The statement that the chain nuclear fusion reaction based on the p+{sup 11}B reaction with an acceleration of {sup 11}B nuclei because of elastic alpha-particle scattering manifests itself in experiments at the PALS (Prague Asterix Laser System) facility is analyzed.

  12. Phase transition of vortexlike self-propelled particles induced by a hostile particle.

    PubMed

    Duan, Haibin; Zhang, Xiangyin

    2015-07-01

    When encountering a hostile particle, the avoidance behaviors of the vortex state of self-propelled particles exhibit phase transition phenomena such that the vortex state can change into a crystal state. Based on the self-propelled particle model and a molecular dynamics simulation, the dynamic response of the vortex swarm induced by a hostile particle (predator or obstacle) is studied. Three parameters are defined to characterize the collective escaping behaviors, including the order parameter, the flock size, and the roundness parameter. If a predator moves slower with a larger risk radius, the vortex swarm cannot return to its original vortex state, but rather transforms into a crystal state. The critical phase transition radius, the maximum risk radius of a predator with which the transition from a vortex to crystal state cannot take place, is also examined by considering the influence of the model parameters. To some degree, the critical radius reflects the stability and robustness of the vortex swarm.

  13. Local effect of IL-4 delivery on polyethylene particle induced osteolysis in the murine calvarium

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Allison J.; Nich, Christophe; Dhulipala, Lakshmi S.; Gibon, Emmanuel; Valladares, Roberto; Zwingenberger, Stefan; Smith, R. Lane; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2014-01-01

    Wear particles generated with use of total joint replacements incite a chronic macrophage-mediated inflammatory reaction, which leads to implant failure. Macrophage activation may be polarized into two states, with an M1 proinflammatory state dominating an alternatively activated M2 anti-inflammatory state. We hypothesized that IL-4, an activator of M2 macrophages, could modulate polyethylene (PE) particle-induced osteolysis in an experimental murine model. Four animal groups included (a) calvarial saline injection with harvest at 14 days (b) single calvarial injection of PE particles subcutaneously (SC) without IL-4 (c) PE particles placed as in (b), then IL-4 given SC for 14 consecutive days and (d) PE particles as in (b) then IL-4 beginning 7 days after particle injection for 7 days. The calvarial bone volume to total tissue volume was measured using microCT and histomorphometry. Calvaria were cultured for 24 h to assess release of RANKL, OPG, TNF-α, and IL-1ra and isolation and identification of M1 and M2 specific proteins. MicroCT and histomorphometric analysis showed that bone loss was significantly decreased following IL-4 administration to PE treated calvaria for both 7 and 14 days. Western blot analysis showed an increased M1/M2 ratio in the PE treated calvaria, which decreased with addition of IL-4. Cytokine analysis showed that the RANKL/OPG ratio and TNF-α/IL-1ra ratio decreased in PE-treated calvaria following IL-4 addition for 14 days. IL-4 delivery mitigated PE particle-induced osteolysis through macrophage polarization. Modulation of macrophage polarization is a potential treatment strategy for wear particle induced periprosthetic osteolysis. PMID:23225668

  14. The significance of nanoparticles in particle-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, James D; Baugh, John A

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to airborne nanoparticles contributes to many chronic pulmonary diseases. Nanoparticles, classified as anthropogenic and natural particles, and fibers of diameters less than 100 nm, have unrestricted access to most areas of the lung due to their size. Size relates to the deposition efficiency of the particle, with particles in the nano-range having the highest efficiencies. The deposition of nanoparticles in the lung can lead to chronic inflammation, epithelial injury, and further to pulmonary fibrosis. Cases of particle-induced pulmonary fibrosis, namely pneumoconiosis, are mostly occupationally influenced, and continue to be documented around the world. The tremendous growth of nanotechnology, however, has spurred fears of increased rates of pulmonary diseases, especially fibrosis. The severity of toxicological consequences warrants further examination of the effects of nanoparticles in humans, possible treatments and increased regulatory measures. PMID:18523535

  15. Wetting-induced clustering and phoretic motions of colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Theyencheri; Semeraro, Enrico; Dattani, Rajiv

    In recent years, self-propelled colloidal systems have received considerable attention as models for active matter. Most commonly used synthetic self-propelled systems involve Janus particles with asymmetric chemical composition in a catalytic medium. An analogous behavior can be obtained when particles are suspended in a phase separating binary liquid mixture due to preferential adsorption of one of the liquid species on the colloidal particles. Above an aggregation temperature (TA), particles become attractive and aggregate to form compact colloidal clusters. In the two phase region of the binary mixture, particles partition into the phase rich in adsorbed component. We have used silica colloids suspended in a binary mixture of 3-methyl pyridine and heavy water to probe this adsorption-induced phoretic motion of particles. Using ultra small-angle X-ray scattering and photon correlation spectroscopy, we investigated the static and dynamic behavior of this system. In the one phase region below TA, particles display a repulsive structure factor with diffusive dynamics. In the two-phase region of the host liquid, the static structure is similar but the dynamics is strongly enhanced with the onset of phase separation reminiscent of self-propelled motion.

  16. Mechanisms of shock-induced reactions in high explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Jeffrey J.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which shock waves initiate chemical reactions in explosives is key to understanding their unique and defining property: the ability to undergo rapid explosive decomposition in response to mechanical stimulus. Although shock-induced reactions in explosives have been studied experimentally and computationally for decades, the nature of even the first chemical reactions that occur in response to shock remain elusive. To predictively understand how explosives respond to shock, the detailed sequence of events that occurs - mechanical deformation, energy transfer, bond breakage, and first chemical reactions - must be understood at the quantum-mechanical level. This paper reviews recent work in this field and ongoing experimental and theoretical work at Sandia National Laboratories in this important area of explosive science.

  17. Role of Background Electrolyte in Electrokinetic Locomotion by Reaction-Induced Charge Auto-Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Jeffrey L.; Posner, Jonathan D.

    2011-11-01

    Bimetallic particles propel themselves through aqueous solutions by harvesting chemical energy from hydrogen peroxide fuel and converting it to fluid motion through reaction-induced charge auto-electrophoresis. We present a scaling analysis and computational simulations that describe the physics underlying the locomotion of these particles. The model shows that the motion results from electrical body forces in the surrounding fluid, which are generated by a coupling of an asymmetric dipolar charge density distribution and the electric field it generates. The simulations and scaling analysis make the predictions, in agreement with experiments, that the speed of the autonomous motion depends linearly on fuel concentration and particle surface charge and inversely on solution conductivity.

  18. Formaldehyde Reactions with Amines and Ammonia: Particle Formation and Product Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, M. M.; Millage, K. D.; Rodriguez, A.; Sedehi, N.; Powelson, M. H.; De Haan, D. O.

    2012-12-01

    Aqueous phase reactions between carbonyls and amines or ammonium salts have recently been implicated in secondary organic aerosol and brown carbon formation processes. Formaldehyde is ubiquitous in the atmosphere, and is present in both the gas and aqueous phases. However, the reactions of formaldehyde in the aqueous phase have not been completely characterized. This study aims to determine the interactions between formaldehyde and amines or ammonium salts present in atmospheric droplets. Bulk phase reactions of formaldehyde with these reactive nitrogen-containing compounds were monitored with ESI-MS and NMR to determine reaction kinetics and for product characterization, while UV-Vis spectroscopy was used to monitor changes in light absorption over time. Hexamethylenetetramine was found to be a major product of the formaldehyde/ammonium sulfate reaction, appearing within minutes of mixing. No products were formed that absorbed light beyond 225 nm. Mono-disperse particles containing mixtures of formaldehyde and ammonium sulfate or an amine were dried and analyzed via SMPS to determine the non-volatile fraction of the reaction products. Similarly, aqueous droplets were dried in a humid atmosphere to determine residual aerosol sizes over time as a function of formaldehyde concentration. This work indicates that formaldehyde plays a key role in aqueous-phase organic processing, as it has been observed to contribute to both an increase and reduction in the diameter and volume of residual aerosol particles.

  19. Photo-induced chemical reaction of trans-resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Shi, Meng; Ye, Jian-Hui; Zheng, Xin-Qiang; Lu, Jian-Liang; Liang, Yue-Rong

    2015-03-15

    Photo-induced chemical reaction of trans-resveratrol has been studied. UV B, liquid state and sufficient exposure time are essential conditions to the photochemical change of trans-resveratrol. Three principal compounds, cis-resveratrol, 2,4,6-phenanthrenetriol and 2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5,6-benzofurandione, were successively generated in the reaction solution of trans-resveratrol (0.25 mM, 100% ethanol) under 100 μW cm(-2) UV B radiation for 4h. cis-Resveratrol, originated from isomerization of trans-resveratrol, resulted in 2,4,6-phenanthrenetriol through photocyclisation reaction meanwhile loss of 2 H. 2,4,6-Phenanthrenetriol played a role of photosensitizer producing singlet oxygen in the reaction pathway. The singlet oxygen triggered [4+2] cycloaddition reaction of trans-resveratrol, and then resulted in the generation of 2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5,6-benzofurandione through photorearrangement and oxidation reaction. The singlet oxygen reaction was closely related to the substrate concentration of trans-resveratrol in solution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermal reactions of mesocarbon microbead (MCMB) particles in LiPF 6-based electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ang; Li, Wentao; Lucht, Brett L.

    The thermal reaction of ternary electrolyte (1.0 M LiPF 6 in 1:1:1 ethylene carbonate/dimethyl carbonate/diethyl carbonate) with mesocarbon microbeads (MCMB) particles was investigated by the combined use of NMR, GC-MS, FTIR-ATR, TGA, XPS and SEM/EDS-element map. The thermal decomposition of ternary electrolyte is not inhibited by the presence of MCMB particles. The chemical composition and morphology of the surface of MCMB particles changes significantly upon storage in the presence of ternary electrolyte. Electrolyte decomposition products including oligocarbonates, oligoethylene oxides, polyethylene oxide (PEO), lithium fluorophosphates (Li xPO yF z), and lithium fluoride are deposited on the surface of MCMB particles. The concentration of decomposition products on the surface of MCMB increases with increased storage time and temperature. The addition of dimethyl acetamide (DMAc) impedes the thermal decomposition of the electrolyte and deposition of electrolyte decomposition products on the surface of MCMB.

  1. Direct measurements of astrophysically important α-induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Melina

    2016-03-01

    Understanding stellar evolution is one of the primary objectives of nuclear astrophysics. Reaction rates involving α-particles are often key nuclear physics inputs in stellar models. For instance, there are numerous (α , p) reactions fundamental for the understanding of X-ray bursts and the production of 44Ti in core-collapse supernovae. Furthermore, some (α , n) reactions are considered as one of the main neutron sources in the s-process. However, direct measurements of these reactions at relevant astrophysical energies are experimentally challenging because of their small cross section and intensity limitation of radioactive beams. The active target system MUSIC offers a unique opportunity to study (α , p) and (α , n) reactions because its segmented anode allows the investigation of a large energy range in the excitation function with a single measurement. Recent results on the direct measurement of (α , n) and (α , p) measurements in the MUSIC detector will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract Number DE-AC02-06CH11357. This research used resources of ANL's ATLAS facility, which is a DOE Office of Science User.

  2. High-spatial-resolution mapping of catalytic reactions on single particles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chung-Yeh; Wolf, William J; Levartovsky, Yehonatan; Bechtel, Hans A; Martin, Michael C; Toste, F Dean; Gross, Elad

    2017-01-26

    The critical role in surface reactions and heterogeneous catalysis of metal atoms with low coordination numbers, such as found at atomic steps and surface defects, is firmly established. But despite the growing availability of tools that enable detailed in situ characterization, so far it has not been possible to document this role directly. Surface properties can be mapped with high spatial resolution, and catalytic conversion can be tracked with a clear chemical signature; however, the combination of the two, which would enable high-spatial-resolution detection of reactions on catalytic surfaces, has rarely been achieved. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy has been used to image and characterize single turnover sites at catalytic surfaces, but is restricted to reactions that generate highly fluorescing product molecules. Herein the chemical conversion of N-heterocyclic carbene molecules attached to catalytic particles is mapped using synchrotron-radiation-based infrared nanospectroscopy with a spatial resolution of 25 nanometres, which enabled particle regions that differ in reactivity to be distinguished. These observations demonstrate that, compared to the flat regions on top of the particles, the peripheries of the particles-which contain metal atoms with low coordination numbers-are more active in catalysing oxidation and reduction of chemically active groups in surface-anchored N-heterocyclic carbene molecules.

  3. Effects of vinyl series polymers on the formation of hematite particles in a forced hydrolysis reaction.

    PubMed

    Kandori, Kazuhiko; Yamoto, Yukihiro; Ishikawa, Tatsuo

    2005-03-15

    The influence of polymers on the formation of hematite particles from forced hydrolysis of acidic FeCl(3) solution was investigated using vinyl series polymers with different functional groups. The disk-like hematite particles were produced from forced hydrolysis of acidic FeCl(3) solution in the presence of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA: 0-1 wt%). On the other hand, spherical particles were produced by addition of very small amounts of polyacrylamide (PAAm: 0-0.004 wt%). The size of spherical particles was slightly decreased with increase in the concentration of PAAm. The ellipsoidal particles were precipitated by addition of a very low concentration of polyacrylic acid (PAAc: 0-0.004 wt%). The effect of polymers on the hematite particle formation was expressed in the order of PVAparticles is a rate-determining step in the reaction sequence for the systems with polymers. A rotational particle preparation procedure suggested that the morphology of hematite particle is governed by the mode and strength of polymer adsorption onto beta-FeOOH and polynuclear primary particles.

  4. Systematic measurements of proton-induced reactions on enriched molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamere, Edward; Gilardy, Gwenaelle; Meisel, Zach; Moran, Michael; Seymore, Christopher; Skulski, Michael; Simonetti, Antonio; Couder, Manoel

    2016-09-01

    Between 2008 and 2010, shortages in the world-wide supply of Mo highlighted weaknesses in the current fission-based production method of mTc, a critical medical isotope. This crisis sparked interest in developing the direct production of mTc from proton-induced reactions on enriched Mo targets as an alternative. One complication with this method is that mTc must be chemically extracted from the irradiated target. Therefore, radiopharmaceuticals produced from proton bombardment will contain a mixture of all Tc-species with open production channels, affecting radiochemical purity, specific activity and total production yield of mTc-factors critical for the feasibility of this production method. Reactions on trace impurities in the enriched targets have been shown to impact these factors dramatically. Precise cross-section measurements for all Mo +p reactions that lead to Tc or Mo species are required for proper assessment of this production technique. Cross-section measurements for the main reaction of interest, mTc(p,2n), have been performed in recent years, however, other reactions producing Tc have been mostly neglected. We will introduce a systematic study of proton-induced reactionson 92, 94-98, 100 Mo currently being performed at Notre Dame. Preliminary results will be presented. NRC-HQ-12-G-38-0073.

  5. A particle-mesh algorithm for advection-reaction-diffusion equations with applications to plankton modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparella, F.; Oliveri, F.

    2009-04-01

    The interplay of advection, reaction and diffusion terms in ADR equations is a rather difficult one to be modeled numerically. The kind of spurious oscillations that is usually harmless for non-reacting scalars is often amplified without bounds by reaction terms. Furthermore, in most biogeochimical applications, such as mesoscale or global-scale plankton modeling, the diffusive fluxes may be smaller than the numerical ones. Inspired by the particle-mesh methods used by cosmologists, we propose to discretize on a grid only the diffusive term of the equation, and solve the advection-reaction terms as ordinary differential equations along the characteristic lines. Diffusion happens by letting the concentration field carried by each particle to relax towards the diffusive field known on the grid, without redistributing the particles. This method, in the limit of vanishing diffusivity and for a fixed mesh size, recovers the advection-reaction solution with no numerical diffusion. We show some example numerical solutions of the ADR equations stemming from a simple predator-prey model.

  6. Role of radiation reaction forces in the dynamics of centrifugally accelerated particles

    SciTech Connect

    Dalakishvili, G. T.; Rogava, A. D.; Berezhiani, V. I.

    2007-08-15

    In this paper we study the influence of radiation reaction (RR) forces on the dynamics of centrifugally accelerated particles. It is assumed that the particles move along magnetic field lines anchored in the rotating central object. The common 'bead-on-the-wire' approximation is used. The solutions are found and analyzed for cases when the form of the prescribed trajectory (rigidly rotating field line) is approximated by: (a) straight line, and (b) Archimedes spiral. Dynamics of neutral and charged particles are compared with the emphasis on the role of RR forces in the latter case. It is shown that for charged particles there exist locations of stable equilibrium. It is demonstrated that for particular initial conditions RR forces cause centripetal motion of the particles: their 'falling' on the central rotating object. It is found that in the case of Archimedes spiral both neutral and charged particles can reach infinity where their motion has asymptotically force-free character. The possible importance of these processes for the acceleration of relativistic, charged particles by rotating magnetospheres in the context of the generation of nonthermal, high-energy emission of AGN and pulsars is discussed.

  7. Oral Muscle Relaxant May Induce Immediate Allergic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Gyu-Young; Hwang, Eui Kyung; Moon, Jae-Young; Ye, Young-Min; Shim, Jae-Jeong; Kang, Kyung-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Eperisone and afloqualone act by relaxing both skeletal and vascular smooth muscles to improve circulation and suppress pain reflex. These drugs are typically prescribed with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as painkillers. However, there have been no reports on serious adverse reactions to oral muscle relaxants; and this is the first report to describe three allergic reactions caused by eperisone and afloqualone. All three patients had histories of allergic reactions after oral intake of multiple painkillers, including oral muscle relaxants and NSAIDs, for chronic muscle pain. An open-label oral challenge test was performed with each drug to confirm which drugs caused the systemic reactions. All patients experienced the same reactions within one hour after oral intake of eperisone or afloqualone. The severity of these reactions ranged from laryngeal edema to hypotension. To confirm that the systemic reaction was caused by eperisone or afloqualone, skin prick testing and intradermal skin tests were performed with eperisone or afloqualone extract in vivo, and basophil activity tests were performed after stimulation with these drugs in vitro. In one patient with laryngeal edema, the intradermal test with afloqualone extract had a positive result, and CD63 expression levels on basophils increased in a dose-dependent manner by stimulation with afloqualone. We report three allergic reactions caused by oral muscle relaxants that might be mediated by non-immunoglobulin E-mediated responses. Since oral muscle relaxants such as eperisone and afloqualone are commonly prescribed for chronic muscle pain and can induce severe allergic reactions, we should prescribe them carefully. PMID:22665359

  8. Control of serpentinisation rate by reaction-induced cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Brantut, Nicolas; Kaczmarek, Mary-Alix

    2017-10-01

    Serpentinisation of mantle rocks requires the generation and maintenance of transport pathways for water. The solid volume increase during serpentinisation can lead to stress build-up and trigger cracking, which ease fluid penetration into the rock. The quantitative effect of this reaction-induced cracking mechanism on reactive surface generation is poorly constrained, thus hampering our ability to predict serpentinisation rate in geological environments. Here we use a combined approach with numerical modelling and observations in natural samples to provide estimates of serpentinisation rate at mid-ocean ridges. We develop a micromechanical model to quantify the propagation of serpentinisation-induced cracks in olivine. The maximum crystallisation pressure deduced from thermodynamic calculations reaches several hundreds of megapascals but does not necessary lead to crack propagation if the olivine grain is subjected to high compressive stresses. The micromechanical model is then coupled to a simple geometrical model to predict reactive surface area formation during grain splitting, and thus bulk reaction rate. Our model reproduces quantitatively experimental kinetic data and the typical mesh texture formed during serpentinisation. We also compare the model results with olivine grain size distribution data obtained on natural serpentinised peridotites from the Marum ophiolite and the Papuan ultramafic belt (Papua New Guinea). The natural serpentinised peridotites show an increase of the number of olivine grains for a decrease of the mean grain size by one order of magnitude as reaction progresses from 5 to 40%. These results are in agreement with our model predictions, suggesting that reaction-induced cracking controls the serpentinisation rate. We use our model to estimate that, at mid-ocean ridges, serpentinisation occurs up to 12 km depth and reaction-induced cracking reduces the characteristic time of serpentinisation by one order of magnitude, down to values

  9. A Lagrangian particle method for reaction-diffusion systems on deforming surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bergdorf, Michael; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2010-11-01

    Reaction-diffusion processes on complex deforming surfaces are fundamental to a number of biological processes ranging from embryonic development to cancer tumor growth and angiogenesis. The simulation of these processes using continuum reaction-diffusion models requires computational methods capable of accurately tracking the geometric deformations and discretizing on them the governing equations. We employ a Lagrangian level-set formulation to capture the deformation of the geometry and use an embedding formulation and an adaptive particle method to discretize both the level-set equations and the corresponding reaction-diffusion. We validate the proposed method and discuss its advantages and drawbacks through simulations of reaction-diffusion equations on complex and deforming geometries.

  10. Synthesis of ZnO particles using water molecules generated in esterification reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šarić, Ankica; Gotić, Marijan; Štefanić, Goran; Dražić, Goran

    2017-07-01

    Zinc oxide particles were synthesized without the addition of water by autoclaving (anhydrous) zinc acetate/alcohol and zinc acetate/acetic acid/alcohol solutions at 160 °C. The solvothermal synthesis was performed in ethanol or octanol. The structural, optical and morphological characteristics of ZnO particles were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-Vis spectroscopy, FE-SEM and TEM/STEM microscopy. 13C NMR spectroscopy revealed the presence of ester (ethyl- or octyl-acetate) in the supernatants which directly indicate the reaction mechanism. The formation of ester in this esterification reaction generated water molecule in situ, which hydrolyzed anhydrous zinc acetate and initiated nucleation and formation of ZnO. It was found that the size and shape of ZnO particles depend on the type of alcohol used as a solvent and on the presence of acetic acid in solution. The presence of ethanol in the ;pure; system without acetic acid favoured the formation of fine and uniform spherical ZnO nanoparticles (∼20 nm). With the addition of small amount of acetic acid the size of these small nanoparticles increased significantly up to a few hundred nanometers. The addition of small amount of acetic acid in the presence of octanol caused even more radical changes in the shape of ZnO particles, favouring the growth of huge rod-like particles (∼3 μm).

  11. Evolution of a predator-induced, nonlinear reaction norm.

    PubMed

    Carter, Mauricio J; Lind, Martin I; Dennis, Stuart R; Hentley, William; Beckerman, Andrew P

    2017-08-30

    Inducible, anti-predator traits are a classic example of phenotypic plasticity. Their evolutionary dynamics depend on their genetic basis, the historical pattern of predation risk that populations have experienced and current selection gradients. When populations experience predators with contrasting hunting strategies and size preferences, theory suggests contrasting micro-evolutionary responses to selection. Daphnia pulex is an ideal species to explore the micro-evolutionary response of anti-predator traits because they face heterogeneous predation regimes, sometimes experiencing only invertebrate midge predators and other times experiencing vertebrate fish and invertebrate midge predators. We explored plausible patterns of adaptive evolution of a predator-induced morphological reaction norm. We combined estimates of selection gradients that characterize the various habitats that D. pulex experiences with detail on the quantitative genetic architecture of inducible morphological defences. Our data reveal a fine scale description of daphnid defensive reaction norms, and a strong covariance between the sensitivity to cues and the maximum response to cues. By analysing the response of the reaction norm to plausible, predator-specific selection gradients, we show how in the context of this covariance, micro-evolution may be more uniform than predicted from size-selective predation theory. Our results show how covariance between the sensitivity to cues and the maximum response to cues for morphological defence can shape the evolutionary trajectory of predator-induced defences in D. pulex. © 2017 The Authors.

  12. ReaDDyMM: Fast Interacting Particle Reaction-Diffusion Simulations Using Graphical Processing Units

    PubMed Central

    Biedermann, Johann; Ullrich, Alexander; Schöneberg, Johannes; Noé, Frank

    2015-01-01

    ReaDDy is a modular particle simulation package combining off-lattice reaction kinetics with arbitrary particle interaction forces. Here we present a graphical processing unit implementation of ReaDDy that employs the fast multiplatform molecular dynamics package OpenMM. A speedup of up to two orders of magnitude is demonstrated, giving us access to timescales of multiple seconds on single graphical processing units. This opens up the possibility of simulating cellular signal transduction events while resolving all protein copies. PMID:25650912

  13. Alteration of Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation Properties Induced by Particle Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. C.; Polen, M.; Beydoun, H.; Lawlis, E.; Ahern, A.; Jahn, L.; Hill, T. C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol particles that can serve as ice nuclei frequently experience rapid and extensive chemical aging during atmospheric transport. This is known to significantly alter some ice nucleation modes of the few types of ice nucleation particle systems where aging effects have been simulated, such as for mineral dust. Yet much of our understanding of atmospheric particle freezing properties is derived from measurements of fresh or unaged particles. We know almost nothing regarding how atmospheric aging might alter the freezing properties of biomass burning aerosol or biological particle nucleants. We have investigated the effects of simulated aging using a chamber reactor on the heterogeneous ice nucleation properties of biomass burning aerosol (BBA) and ice-active bacteria particles. Some types of aging were found to enhance the freezing ability of BBA, exhibited as a shift in a portion of the droplet freezing curve to warmer temperatures by a few °C. Ice-active bacteria were found to consistently loose their most ice-active nucleants after repeated aging cycles. The bacterial systems always retained significantly efficient ice active sites that still allowed them to induce freezing at mild/warm temperatures, despite this decrease in freezing ability. A comprehensive series of online single-particle mass spectrometry and offline spectromicroscopic analysis of individual particles was used to determine how the aging altered the aerosol's composition, and gain mechanistic insights into how this in turn altered the freezing properties. Our new ice nucleation framework that uses a continuous distribution of ice active site ability (contact angle) was used to interpret the droplet freezing spectra and understand how aging alters the internal and external variability, and rigidity, of the ice active sites.

  14. Chemical memory reactions induced bursting dynamics in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tianhai

    2013-01-01

    Memory is a ubiquitous phenomenon in biological systems in which the present system state is not entirely determined by the current conditions but also depends on the time evolutionary path of the system. Specifically, many memorial phenomena are characterized by chemical memory reactions that may fire under particular system conditions. These conditional chemical reactions contradict to the extant stochastic approaches for modeling chemical kinetics and have increasingly posed significant challenges to mathematical modeling and computer simulation. To tackle the challenge, I proposed a novel theory consisting of the memory chemical master equations and memory stochastic simulation algorithm. A stochastic model for single-gene expression was proposed to illustrate the key function of memory reactions in inducing bursting dynamics of gene expression that has been observed in experiments recently. The importance of memory reactions has been further validated by the stochastic model of the p53-MDM2 core module. Simulations showed that memory reactions is a major mechanism for realizing both sustained oscillations of p53 protein numbers in single cells and damped oscillations over a population of cells. These successful applications of the memory modeling framework suggested that this innovative theory is an effective and powerful tool to study memory process and conditional chemical reactions in a wide range of complex biological systems.

  15. A systematic review of drug induced ocular reactions in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hampson, J; Harvey, J

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To conduct a systematic review of drug induced adverse ocular effects in diabetes to determine if this approach identified any previously unrecognised adverse drug effects; to make a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of this approach in identifying adverse drug reactions; and to assess the current accessibility of this information to prescribing physicians.
METHODS—Literature search of online biomedical databases. The search strategy linked eye disorders with adverse drug reactions and diabetes. Source journals were classified as medical, pharmaceutical, diabetes related, or ophthalmological. It was determined whether the reactions identified were recorded in drug datasheets and the British National Formulary.
RESULTS—63 references fulfilled the selection criteria, of which 45 were considered to be relevant to the study. The majority of these were case reports but cross sectional surveys, case-control and cohort studies, and review articles were also identified. 61% of the reactions were not recorded in the British National Formulary and 41% were not recorded in the datasheets. 55% appeared in specialist ophthalmology journals.
CONCLUSIONS—This is a feasible approach to the identification of adverse drug reactions. Adverse reactions not listed in the most commonly used reference sources were found. The majority were published in specialist ophthalmology journals which might not be seen by prescribing physicians.

 PMID:10655188

  16. Neutron-induced reactions and secondary-ion mass spectrometry: complementary tools for depth profiling. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, G.; Fleming, R.; Simons, D.; Newbury, D.

    1982-01-01

    The technique of neutron depth profiling is based upon inducing nuclear reactions by bombardment with low-energy neutrons. The nuclear reactions result in the emission of high-energy alpha particles or protons. The energy spectrum of the emitted particles is used to derive a depth distribution by transforming the energy loss into an equivalent depth by stopping-power calculations. Depth profiles of bismuth distributions in silicon and tin have been measured by both neutron depth profiling and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Information from both techniques can be used synergistically to aid in a full characterization of the depth distribution.

  17. Noise-induced vortex reversal of self-propelled particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanshuang; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2012-10-01

    We report an interesting phenomenon of noise-induced vortex reversal in a two-dimensional system of self-propelled particles (SPPs) with soft-core interactions. With the aid of forward flux sampling, we analyze the configurations along the reversal pathway and thus identify the mechanism of vortex reversal. We find that the reversal exhibits a hierarchical process: those particles at the periphery first change their motion directions, and then more inner layers of particles reverse later on. Furthermore, we calculate the dependence of the average reversal rate on noise intensity D and the number N of SPPs. We find that the rate decreases exponentially with the reciprocal of D. Interestingly, the rate varies nonmonotonically with N and a local minimal rate exists for an intermediate value of N.

  18. The Effect of Particle Size on Hydrolysis Reaction Rates and Rheological Properties in Cellulosic Slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasari, Rajesh K.; Berson, R. Eric

    The effect of varying initial particle sizes on enzymatic hydrolysis rates and rheological properties of sawdust slurries is investigated. Slurries with four particle size ranges (33 μm < x ≤ 75 μm, 150 μm < x ≤ 180 μm 295 μm < x ≤ 425 μm, and 590 μm < x ≤ 850 μm) were subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis using an enzyme dosage of filter paper units per gram of cellulose at 50°C and 250 rpm in shaker flasks. At lower initial particle sizes, higher enzymatic reaction rates and conversions of cellulose to glucose were observed. After 72 h 50 and 55% more glucose was produced from the smallest size particles than the largest size ones, for initial solids concentration of 10 and 13% (w/w), respectively. The effect of initial particle size on viscosity over a range of shear was also investigated. For equivalent initial solids concentration, smaller particle sizes result in lower viscosities such that at a concentration of 10% (w/w), the viscosity decreased from 3000 cP for 150 μm < x ≤ 180 μm particle size slurries to 61.4 cP for 33 μm < x ≤ 75 μm particle size slurries. Results indicate particle size reduction may provide a means for reducing the long residence time required for the enzymatic hydrolysis step in the conversion of biomass to ethanol. Furthermore, the corresponding reduction in viscosity may allow for higher solids loading and reduced reactor sizes during large-scale processing.

  19. Can Silica Particles Reduce Air Pollution by Facilitating the Reactions of Aliphatic Aldehyde and NO2?

    PubMed

    Ji, Yuemeng; Wang, Honghong; Chen, Jiangyao; Li, Guiying; An, Taicheng; Zhao, Xiaolei

    2015-11-19

    This study investigated the heterogeneous atmospheric reactions of acetaldehyde, propanal, and butanal with NO2 onto silica (SiO2) clusters using a theoretical approach. By analyzing spectral features and adsorption parameters, the formation of hydrogen bonds and negative adsorption energies provide evidence that an efficient spontaneous uptake of aliphatic aldehydes onto SiO2 could occur. The atmospheric reaction mechanisms show that when aldehydes and NO2 react on the surface model, the H atom abstraction reaction from the aldehydic molecule by NO2 is an exclusive channel, forming nitrous acid and acyl radicals. This study included kinetics exploring the reaction of aldehydes with NO2 using a canonical variational transition state theory. The reaction rate constants are increased in the presence of SiO2 between the temperatures 217 and 298 K. This may explain how aldehydes can temporarily stay on mineral particles without chemical reactions. The results suggest that silica can depress the rate at which the studied aldehydes react with NO2 and possibly reduce air pollution generated by these atmospheric reactions.

  20. Direct-Reaction Studies by Particle-Gamma Coincidence Spectroscopy Using HPGe-CsI and HPGe-Si Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Allmond, James M

    2013-01-01

    Particle- and particle- - coincidence spectroscopy has several advantages in the study of direct reactions(particularly in inverse kinematics) since it can generally allow determination of: decay paths; high-precision level energies; multipolarities of transitions; and cross sections. Techniques for studying direct reactions by particle- coincidence spectroscopy are presented for two cases: (1) heavy-ion reactions with HPGe-CsI, and (2) light-ion reactions with HPGe-Si. Future direct-reaction studies with radioactive ion beams (RIBs) will mostly involve low beam intensities and inverse kinematics (i.e., Abeam>Atarget), which eliminates the traditional use of magnetic spectrometers. Particle- coincidence spectroscopy currently provides the most viable method to study direct reactions with nuclei of any level density. In the present study, the capabilities and limitations of the technique are explored.

  1. Direct-reaction studies by particle-{gamma} coincidence spectroscopy using Csi-Hpge and Si-Hpge arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Allmond, J. M.

    2013-04-19

    Particle-{gamma} and particle-{gamma}-{gamma} coincidence spectroscopy has several advantages in the study of direct reactions (particularly in inverse kinematics) since it can generally allow determination of: decay paths; high-precision level energies; multipolarities of transitions; and cross sections. Techniques for studying direct reactions by particle-{gamma} coincidence spectroscopy are presented for two cases: (1) heavy-ion reactions with CsI-HPGe, and (2) light-ion reactions with Si-HPGe. Future direct-reaction studies with radioactive ion beams (RIBs) will mostly involve low beam intensities and inverse kinematics (i.e., A{sub beam}>A{sub target}), which eliminates the traditional use of magnetic spectrometers. Particle-{gamma} coincidence spectroscopy currently provides the most viable method to study direct reactions with nuclei of any level density. In the present study, the capabilities and limitations of the technique are explored.

  2. Alpha Particles Induce Apoptosis through the Sphingomyelin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Seideman, Jonathan H.; Stancevic, Branka; Rotolo, Jimmy A.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Howell, Roger W.; Kolesnick, Richard N.; Scheinberg, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The sphingomyelin pathway involves the enzymatic cleavage of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide, a second messenger that serves as a key mediator in the rapid apoptotic response to various cell stressors. Low-linear energy transfer (LET) γ radiation can initiate this pathway, independent of DNA damage, via the cell membrane. Whether short-ranged, high-LET a particles, which are of interest as potent environmental carcinogens, radiotherapies and potential components of dirty bombs, can act through this mechanism to signal apoptosis is unknown. Here we show that irradiation of Jurkat cells with a particles emitted by the 225Ac-DOTA-anti-CD3 IgG antibody construct results in dose-dependent apoptosis. This apoptosis was significantly reduced by pretreating cells with cholesterol-depleting nystatin, a reagent known to inhibit ceramide signaling by interfering with membrane raft coalescence and ceramide-rich platform generation. The effects of nystatin on α-particle-induced apoptosis were related to disruption of the ceramide pathway and not to microdosimetry alterations, because similar results were obtained after external irradiation of the cells with a broad beam of collimated a particles using a planar 241Am source. External irradiation allowed for more precise control of the dosimetry and geometry of the irradiation, independent of antibody binding or cell internalization kinetics. Mechanistically consistent with these findings, Jurkat cells rapidly increased membrane concentrations of ceramide after external irradiation with an average of five α-particle traversals per cell. These data indicate that a particles can activate the sphingomyelin pathway to induce apoptosis. PMID:21631289

  3. Alpha particles induce apoptosis through the sphingomyelin pathway.

    PubMed

    Seideman, Jonathan H; Stancevic, Branka; Rotolo, Jimmy A; McDevitt, Michael R; Howell, Roger W; Kolesnick, Richard N; Scheinberg, David A

    2011-10-01

    The sphingomyelin pathway involves the enzymatic cleavage of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide, a second messenger that serves as a key mediator in the rapid apoptotic response to various cell stressors. Low-linear energy transfer (LET) γ radiation can initiate this pathway, independent of DNA damage, via the cell membrane. Whether short-ranged, high-LET α particles, which are of interest as potent environmental carcinogens, radiotherapies and potential components of dirty bombs, can act through this mechanism to signal apoptosis is unknown. Here we show that irradiation of Jurkat cells with α particles emitted by the ²²⁵Ac-DOTA-anti-CD3 IgG antibody construct results in dose-dependent apoptosis. This apoptosis was significantly reduced by pretreating cells with cholesterol-depleting nystatin, a reagent known to inhibit ceramide signaling by interfering with membrane raft coalescence and ceramide-rich platform generation. The effects of nystatin on α-particle-induced apoptosis were related to disruption of the ceramide pathway and not to microdosimetry alterations, because similar results were obtained after external irradiation of the cells with a broad beam of collimated α particles using a planar ²⁴¹Am source. External irradiation allowed for more precise control of the dosimetry and geometry of the irradiation, independent of antibody binding or cell internalization kinetics. Mechanistically consistent with these findings, Jurkat cells rapidly increased membrane concentrations of ceramide after external irradiation with an average of five α-particle traversals per cell. These data indicate that α particles can activate the sphingomyelin pathway to induce apoptosis.

  4. Ofloxacin Induced Angioedema: A Rare Adverse Drug Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sankalp; Kumar, Raj; Wani, Umar Rasool

    2016-01-01

    The Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR) to a commonly prescribed anti-microbial can pose a major public health problem. The authors report a rare case of 24-year-old young lady who presented with angioedema of lips after ingestion of Ofloxacin, prescribed to her for treatment of loose motions. Fluoroquinolones are widely prescribed antibiotics for various disease conditions. The history, clinical examination and normal laboratory parameters led to the diagnosis of ofloxacin induced hypersensitivity reaction and the patient was successfully treated with corticosteroids and antihistamines. The hypersensitivity reactions to fluoroquinolones are rare with an incidence of 0.4% to 2%. The pharmacovigilance program and self-reporting of all the ADR’s by the health care workers can help in ensuring the judicious use of the drug, drug safety and thus decrease the associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:28050397

  5. Heterogeneous kinetics, products, and mechanisms of ferulic acid particles in the reaction with NO3 radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changgeng; Zhang, Peng; Wen, Xiaoying; Wu, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Methoxyphenols, as an important component of wood burning, are produced by lignin pyrolysis and considered to be the potential tracers for wood smoke emissions. In this work, the heterogeneous reaction between ferulic acid particles and NO3 radicals was investigated. Six products including oxalic acid, 4-vinylguaiacol, vanillin, 5-nitrovanillin, 5-nitroferulic acid, and caffeic acid were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In addition, the reaction mechanisms were proposed and the main pathways were NO3 electrophilic addition to olefin and the meta-position to the hydroxyl group. The uptake coefficient of NO3 radicals on ferulic acid particles was 0.17 ± 0.02 and the effective rate constant under experimental conditions was (1.71 ± 0.08) × 10-12 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The results indicate that ferulic acid degradation by NO3 can be an important sink at night.

  6. Photo-induced electron-transfer reactions in heterogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J. M.

    1981-11-01

    The conversion of solar energy into chemical energy was pursued by two approaches. One is the photo-induced electron transfer reactions in heterogeneous media, and the other is the photo-decomposition of water with liquid-junction solar cells. Photo-induced electron-transfer reactions in heterogeneous media with colloidal silica or poly-acrylate were studied by flash photolysis. In an effort to illustrate that small band-gap semiconductors can be protected from photo-corrosion through surface modification, the surface of polycrystalline ZnO was chemically coated with zinc phthalocyanine and the electron-transfer process across the coated ZnO-electrolyte interface was studied by photo-electrochemical techniques.

  7. Dynamical isospin effects in nucleon-induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ou Li; Li Zhuxia; Wu Xizhen

    2008-10-15

    The isospin effects in proton-induced reactions on isotopes of {sup 112-132}Sn and the corresponding {beta}-stable isobars are studied by means of the improved quantum molecular dynamics model and some sensitive probes for the density dependence of the symmetry energy at subnormal densities are proposed. The beam energy range is chosen to be 100-300 MeV. Our study shows that the system size dependence of the reaction cross sections for p+{sup 112-132}Sn deviates from the Carlson's empirical expression obtained by fitting the reaction cross sections for proton on nuclei along the {beta}-stability line and sensitively depends on the stiffness of the symmetry energy. We also find that the angular distribution of elastic scattering for p+{sup 132}Sn at large impact parameters is very sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy, which is uniquely due to the effect of the symmetry potential with no mixture of the effect from the isospin dependence of the nucleon-nucleon cross sections. The isospin effects in neutron-induced reactions are also studied and it is found that the effects are just opposite to that in proton-induced reactions. We find that the difference between the peaks of the angular distributions of elastic scattering for p+{sup 132}Sn and n+{sup 132}Sn at E{sub p,n}=100 MeV and b=7.5 fm is positive for soft symmetry energy U{sub sym}{sup sf} and negative for super-stiff symmetry energy U{sub sym}{sup nlin} and close to zero for linear density dependent symmetry energy U{sub sym}{sup lin}, which seems very useful for constraining the density dependence of the symmetry energy at subnormal densities.

  8. Drift-induced Deceleration of Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla, S.; Marsh, M. S.; Laitinen, T.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the deceleration of solar energetic particles (SEPs) during their propagation from the Sun through interplanetary space, in the presence of weak to strong scattering in a Parker spiral configuration, using relativistic full orbit test particle simulations. The calculations retain all three spatial variables describing particles’ trajectories, allowing us to model any transport across the magnetic field. Large energy change is shown to occur for protons, due to the combined effect of standard adiabatic deceleration and a significant contribution from particle drift in the direction opposite to that of the solar wind electric field. The latter drift-induced deceleration is found to have a stronger effect for SEP energies than for galactic cosmic rays. The kinetic energy of protons injected at 1 MeV is found to be reduced by between 35% and 90% after four days, and for protons injected at 100 MeV by between 20% and 55%. The overall degree of deceleration is a weak function of the scattering mean free path, showing that, although adiabatic deceleration plays a role, a large contribution is due to particle drift. Current SEP transport models are found to account for drift-induced deceleration in an approximate way and their accuracy will need to be assessed in future work.

  9. DRIFT-INDUCED DECELERATION OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Dalla, S.; Marsh, M. S.; Laitinen, T.

    2015-07-20

    We investigate the deceleration of solar energetic particles (SEPs) during their propagation from the Sun through interplanetary space, in the presence of weak to strong scattering in a Parker spiral configuration, using relativistic full orbit test particle simulations. The calculations retain all three spatial variables describing particles’ trajectories, allowing us to model any transport across the magnetic field. Large energy change is shown to occur for protons, due to the combined effect of standard adiabatic deceleration and a significant contribution from particle drift in the direction opposite to that of the solar wind electric field. The latter drift-induced deceleration is found to have a stronger effect for SEP energies than for galactic cosmic rays. The kinetic energy of protons injected at 1 MeV is found to be reduced by between 35% and 90% after four days, and for protons injected at 100 MeV by between 20% and 55%. The overall degree of deceleration is a weak function of the scattering mean free path, showing that, although adiabatic deceleration plays a role, a large contribution is due to particle drift. Current SEP transport models are found to account for drift-induced deceleration in an approximate way and their accuracy will need to be assessed in future work.

  10. ICRH induced particle losses in Wendelstein 7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faustin, J. M.; Cooper, W. A.; Graves, J. P.; Pfefferlé, D.; Geiger, J.

    2016-07-01

    Fast ions in W7-X will be produced either by neutral beam injection (NBI) or by ion-cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH). The latter presents the advantage of depositing power locally and does not suffer from core accessibility issues (Drevlak et al 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 073002). This work assesses the possibility of using ICRH as a fast ion source in W7-X relevant conditions. The SCENIC package is used to resolve the full wave propagation and absorption in a three-dimensional plasma equilibrium. The source of the ion-cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) wave is modelled in this work by an antenna formulation allowing its localisation in both the poloidal and toroidal directions. The actual antenna dimension and localization is therefore approximated with good agreement. The local wave deposition breaks the five-fold periodicity of W7-X. It appears that generation of fast ions is hindered by high collisionality and significant particle losses. The particle trapping mechanism induced by ICRH is found to enhance drift induced losses caused by the finite orbit width of trapped particles. The inclusion of a neoclassically resolved radial electric field is also investigated and shows a significant reduction of particle losses.

  11. A laboratory study of the heterogeneous reaction of nitric acid on calcium carbonate particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, A. L.; Underwood, G. M.; Grassian, V. H.

    2000-12-01

    It has been postulated that the reaction of nitric acid with calcium carbonate, namely, CaCO3(s) + 2HNO3(g) → Ca(NO3)2(s) + CO2(g) + H2O(g), plays an important role in the atmosphere. In this study, transmission FTIR spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and a Knudsen cell reactor coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer have been used to investigate the heterogeneous reactivity of HNO3 on CaCO3 at 295 K as a function of relative humidity. Transmission FTIR spectroscopy was used to probe both gas-phase and adsorbed products and showed that the reaction of HNO3 and CaCO3 is limited to the surface of the CaCO3 particle in the absence of adsorbed water. However, in the presence of water vapor, the reaction is greatly enhanced and is not limited to the surface of the particle producing both solid calcium nitrate and gaseous carbon dioxide. The enhanced reactivity of the particles is attributed to the presence of a layer of adsorbed water on the particle surface. The amount of adsorbed water on the particle surface is strongly dependent on the extent of the reaction. This can be understood in terms of the increased hydrophilicity of calcium nitrate as compared to calcium carbonate. Data from experiments using a mass-calibrated Knudsen cell reactor showed the stoichiometry for the reaction determined from gas-phase species deviated from that expected from the balanced equation. Water adsorption on the particle surface and gases dissolved into the water layer appear to be the cause of this discrepancy. The measured uptake coefficient accounting for the BET area of the sample is determined to be 2.5±0.1×10-4 for HNO3 on CaCO3 under dry conditions and is found to increase in the presence of water vapor. Atmospheric implications of the results presented here are discussed.

  12. Flow-induced aggregation of colloidal particles in viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Donglin; Qiao, Greg G.; Dunstan, Dave E.

    2016-08-01

    The flow-induced aggregation of dilute colloidal polystyrene nanoparticles suspended in Newtonian and viscoelastic solutions is reported. A rheo-optical method has been used to detect real-time aggregation processes via measuring optical absorption or scattering in a quartz Couette cell. The observed absorbance decreases over time are attributed to the flow-induced coagulation. Numerical simulations show that the aggregation processes still follow the Smoluchowski coagulation equation in a revised version. Suspensions in a series of media are studied to evaluate the effect of the media rheological properties on the particle aggregation. The data shows that elasticity reduces the aggregation while the solution viscosity enhances the aggregation processes.

  13. Strain-Induced Segregation in Bimetallic Multiply Twinned Particles.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lingxuan; Van Duyne, Richard P; Marks, Laurence D

    2015-05-21

    We analyze the possibility of strain-induced segregation in bimetallic multiply twinned particles by an analytic first-order expansion within a continuum model. The results indicate that while the change in free energy may be small, there will be a noticeable segregation of larger atoms to the external surface and smaller ones to the core, which could have interesting effects when such nanoparticles are used as heterogeneous catalysts.

  14. Heterogeneous reactions of ozone with pyrene, 1-hydroxypyrene and 1-nitropyrene adsorbed on particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miet, K.; Le Menach, K.; Flaud, P. M.; Budzinski, H.; Villenave, E.

    This work deals with the kinetic study of the reactions of ozone with pyrene, 1-hydroxypyrene and 1-nitropyrene, adsorbed on model particles. Experiments were performed at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, using a quasi-static flow reactor in the absence of light. Compounds were extracted from particles using pressurized fluid extraction (PFE) and concentration measurements were performed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The pseudo-first order rate constants were obtained from the fit of the experimental decay of particulate polycyclic compound concentrations versus reaction time. Experiments were performed at three different O 3 concentrations from which second order rate constants were calculated. The following rate constant values were obtained at 293 K: k(O 3 + Pyrene) = (3.2 ± 0.7) × 10 -16 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1; k(O 3 + 1OHP) = (7.7 ± 1.4) ×10 -16 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1; and k(O 3 + 1NP) = (2.2 ± 0.5) × 10 -17 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1, for pyrene, 1-hydroxypyrene and 1-nitropyrene adsorbed on silica particles. The variation in the rate constants demonstrates the strong influence of the substituent (OH or NO 2) on the heterogeneous reactivity of pyrene. The pyrene particulate concentration was also varied in order to check how this parameter may influence the experiments. Finally, oxidation products were investigated for all reactions and some were detected and identified for the first time for ozone heterogeneous reaction with pyrene adsorbed on particles.

  15. Apparatus for studies of high-temperature chemical reactions in single particle systems.

    PubMed

    Andrzejak, Timothy A; Shafirovich, Evgeny; Taylor, David G; Varma, Arvind

    2007-08-01

    We report a compact microgravity flight apparatus for characterization of high-temperature chemical reactions in single particle systems. The apparatus employs an infrared CO(2) laser to ignite 1-5 mm samples while video images, thermocouple measurements, laser on/off status, and XYZ accelerometer signals are synchronously recorded. Different operating modes permit preignition quenching, ignition, and combustion experiments to be performed. The apparatus was successfully utilized during microgravity experiments on board NASA research aircraft.

  16. APOPTOTIC AND INFLAMMATORY EFFECTS INDUCED BY DIFFERENT PARTICLES IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pollutant particles induce apoptosis and inflammation, but the relationship between these two biological processes is not entirely clear. In this study, we compared the proapoptotic and proinflammatory effects of four particles: residual oil fly ash (ROFA), St. Louis particles SR...

  17. APOPTOTIC AND INFLAMMATORY EFFECTS INDUCED BY DIFFERENT PARTICLES IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pollutant particles induce apoptosis and inflammation, but the relationship between these two biological processes is not entirely clear. In this study, we compared the proapoptotic and proinflammatory effects of four particles: residual oil fly ash (ROFA), St. Louis particles SR...

  18. Excitation Functions of Helion-Induced Nuclear Reactions for the Production of the Medical Radioisotope 103Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skakun, Ye.; Qaim, S. M.

    2005-05-01

    Excitation functions were measured by the stacked-foil technique for the reactions 100Ru(α,n)103Pd, 101Ru(α,2n)103Pd, 101Ru(3He,n)103Pd, and 102Ru(3He,2n)103Pd for incident energies up to 25 and 34 MeV for α-particles and 3He ions, respectively. The integral thick target yields of the product radionuclide 103Pd calculated from the excitation functions of the above-named four reactions amount to 960, 1050, 50, and 725 KBq/μAh, respectively, at the maximum energy of the incident particle. The data are compared with the results of statistical model calculations and other charged particle induced reaction investigations.

  19. Theory of trapped-particle-induced resistive fluid turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H.; Diamond, P.H.

    1987-12-01

    A theory of anomalous electron heat transport, evolving from trapped-particle-induced resistive interchange modes, is proposed. The latter are a new branch of the resistive interchange-ballooning family of instabilities, destabilized when the pressure carried by the unfavorably drifting trapped particles is sufficiently large to overcome stabilizing contributions coming from favorable average curvature. Expressions for the turbulent heat diffusivity and anomalous electron thermal conductivity at saturation are derived for two regimes of trapped-particle energy: (I) a moderately energetic regime, which is ''fluidlike'' in the sense that the unstable mode grows faster than the time that it takes for particles in this energy range to precess once around the torus, and (II) a highly energetic regime, where the trapped species has sufficiently high energy as to be able to interact resonantly with the mode. Unlike previous theories of anomalous transport, the estimates of diffusion and transport obtained here are self-consistent since the trapped particles do not ''see'' the magnetic flutter due to their rapid bounce motion. The theory is valid for moderate electron-temperature, high ion-temperature (auxiliary heated) plasmas and as such, is relevant for present- and future-generation experimental fusion devices.

  20. Theory of trapped-particle-induced resistive fluid turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H.; Diamond, P.H.

    1987-05-01

    A theory of anomalous electron heat transport, evolving from trapped-particle-induced resistive interchange modes, is proposed. These latter are a new branch of the resistive interchange-ballooning family of instabilities, destabilized when the pressure carried by the unfavorably-drifting trapped particles is sufficiently large to overcome stabilizing contributions coming from favorable average curvature. Expressions for the turbulent heat diffusivity and anomalous electron thermal conductivity at saturation are derived for two regimes of trapped particle energy: (1) a moderately-energetic regime, which is ''fluid-like'' in the sense that the unstable mode grows faster than the time that it takes for particles in this energy range to precess once around the torus; and (2) a highly-energetic regime, where the trapped species has sufficiently high energy as to be able to resonantly interact with the mode. Unlike previous theories of anomalous transport, the estimates of diffusion and transport obtained here are self-consistent, since the trapped particles do not ''see'' the magnetic flutter due to their rapid bounce motion. The theory is valid for moderate electron-temperature, high ion-temperature (auxiliary-heated) plasmas, and as such, is relevant for present and future-generation experimental fusion devices.

  1. Ion-induced nucleation of pure biogenic particles.

    PubMed

    Kirkby, Jasper; Duplissy, Jonathan; Sengupta, Kamalika; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K; Wagner, Robert; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill; Dias, Antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Onnela, Antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Pringle, Kirsty; Rap, Alexandru; Richards, Nigel A D; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E; Seinfeld, John H; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander L; Wagner, Andrea C; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-05-26

    Atmospheric aerosols and their effect on clouds are thought to be important for anthropogenic radiative forcing of the climate, yet remain poorly understood. Globally, around half of cloud condensation nuclei originate from nucleation of atmospheric vapours. It is thought that sulfuric acid is essential to initiate most particle formation in the atmosphere, and that ions have a relatively minor role. Some laboratory studies, however, have reported organic particle formation without the intentional addition of sulfuric acid, although contamination could not be excluded. Here we present evidence for the formation of aerosol particles from highly oxidized biogenic vapours in the absence of sulfuric acid in a large chamber under atmospheric conditions. The highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) are produced by ozonolysis of α-pinene. We find that ions from Galactic cosmic rays increase the nucleation rate by one to two orders of magnitude compared with neutral nucleation. Our experimental findings are supported by quantum chemical calculations of the cluster binding energies of representative HOMs. Ion-induced nucleation of pure organic particles constitutes a potentially widespread source of aerosol particles in terrestrial environments with low sulfuric acid pollution.

  2. Ion-induced nucleation of pure biogenic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, Jasper; Duplissy, Jonathan; Sengupta, Kamalika; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K.; Wagner, Robert; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill; Dias, Antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Onnela, Antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Pringle, Kirsty; Rap, Alexandru; Richards, Nigel A. D.; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E.; Seinfeld, John H.; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander L.; Wagner, Andrea C.; Wagner, Paul E.; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosols and their effect on clouds are thought to be important for anthropogenic radiative forcing of the climate, yet remain poorly understood. Globally, around half of cloud condensation nuclei originate from nucleation of atmospheric vapours. It is thought that sulfuric acid is essential to initiate most particle formation in the atmosphere, and that ions have a relatively minor role. Some laboratory studies, however, have reported organic particle formation without the intentional addition of sulfuric acid, although contamination could not be excluded. Here we present evidence for the formation of aerosol particles from highly oxidized biogenic vapours in the absence of sulfuric acid in a large chamber under atmospheric conditions. The highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) are produced by ozonolysis of α-pinene. We find that ions from Galactic cosmic rays increase the nucleation rate by one to two orders of magnitude compared with neutral nucleation. Our experimental findings are supported by quantum chemical calculations of the cluster binding energies of representative HOMs. Ion-induced nucleation of pure organic particles constitutes a potentially widespread source of aerosol particles in terrestrial environments with low sulfuric acid pollution.

  3. Reaction invariance and stability in catalyst particles for production of methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Asbjornsen, O.A.; Hillestad, M.

    1997-04-01

    Industrial practice requires immediate and adequate responses to simple questions asked. For example, does a catalyst particle show any tendency to thermal oscillations in the form of a limit cycle? The root to such cycles is found in the eigenvalues of the Jacobian matrix to the reaction rate vector, applying the concept of reaction invariance, a direct consequence of Avogadro`s stoichiometric principle for homogeneous stirred tank reactors. However, this concept does not generally apply to heterogeneous reactor dynamics, because it is found in the heterogeneous transports of heat, reactants and products. The transport is an irreversible phenomenon that usually contributes to shifting the eigenvalues to the left and hence increases the stability. Still, effects of transport mechanisms, both internally and externally, on the catalyst particle are important to assess in such industrial analyses. A practical industrial reactor for methanol production was the subject for stability studies, which concluded that thermal oscillations are not likely to occur. During this study, a number of interesting details were examined such as rank deficiency of the reaction matrix and root loci for the temperature dependence of the Jacobian matrix eigenvalues. A practical consequence of eventual thermal cycling of the catalyst particles is a long-term degradation of the catalyst efficiency, as seen in the ammonia synthesis.

  4. Particle-scale CO2 adsorption kinetics modeling considering three reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Dong-Myung; Sun, Xin

    2013-09-01

    In the presence of water (H2O), dry and wet adsorptions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and physical adsorption of H2O happen concurrently in a sorbent particle. The three reactions depend on each other and have a complicated, but important, effect on CO2 capturing via a solid sorbent. In this study, transport phenomena in the sorbent were modeled, including the tree reactions, and a numerical solving procedure for the model also was explained. The reaction variable distribution in the sorbent and their average values were calculated, and simulation results were compared with experimental data to validate the proposed model. Some differences, caused by thermodynamic parameters, were observed between them. However, the developed model reasonably simulated the adsorption behaviors of a sorbent. The weight gained by each adsorbed species, CO2 and H2O, is difficult to determine experimentally. It is known that more CO2 can be captured in the presence of water. Still, it is not yet known quantitatively how much more CO2 the sorbent can capture, nor is it known how much dry and wet adsorptions separately account for CO2 capture. This study addresses those questions by modeling CO2 adsorption in a particle and simulating the adsorption process using the model. As adsorption temperature changed into several values, the adsorbed amount of each species was calculated. The captured CO2 in the sorbent particle was compared quantitatively between dry and wet conditions. As the adsorption temperature decreased, wet adsorption increased. However, dry adsorption was reduced.

  5. High-spatial-resolution mapping of catalytic reactions on single particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chung-Yeh; Wolf, William J.; Levartovsky, Yehonatan; Bechtel, Hans A.; Martin, Michael C.; Toste, F. Dean; Gross, Elad

    2017-01-01

    The critical role in surface reactions and heterogeneous catalysis of metal atoms with low coordination numbers, such as found at atomic steps and surface defects, is firmly established. But despite the growing availability of tools that enable detailed in situ characterization, so far it has not been possible to document this role directly. Surface properties can be mapped with high spatial resolution, and catalytic conversion can be tracked with a clear chemical signature; however, the combination of the two, which would enable high-spatial-resolution detection of reactions on catalytic surfaces, has rarely been achieved. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy has been used to image and characterize single turnover sites at catalytic surfaces, but is restricted to reactions that generate highly fluorescing product molecules. Herein the chemical conversion of N-heterocyclic carbene molecules attached to catalytic particles is mapped using synchrotron-radiation-based infrared nanospectroscopy with a spatial resolution of 25 nanometres, which enabled particle regions that differ in reactivity to be distinguished. These observations demonstrate that, compared to the flat regions on top of the particles, the peripheries of the particles—which contain metal atoms with low coordination numbers—are more active in catalysing oxidation and reduction of chemically active groups in surface-anchored N-heterocyclic carbene molecules.

  6. Oxygen reduction reaction over silver particles with various morphologies and surface chemical states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohyama, Junya; Okata, Yui; Watabe, Noriyuki; Katagiri, Makoto; Nakamura, Ayaka; Arikawa, Hidekazu; Shimizu, Ken-ichi; Takeguchi, Tatsuya; Ueda, Wataru; Satsuma, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in an alkaline solution was carried out using Ag powders having various particle morphologies and surface chemical states (Size: ca. 40-110 nm in crystalline size. Shape: spherical, worm like, and angular. Surface: smooth with easily reduced AgOx, defective with AgOx, and Ag2CO3 surface layer). The various Ag powders were well characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, N2 adsorption, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and stripping voltammetry of underpotential-deposited lead. Defective and oxidized surfaces enhanced the Ag active surface area during the ORR. The ORR activity was affected by the morphology and surface chemical state: Ag particles with defective and angular surfaces showed smaller electron exchange number between three and four but showed higher specific activity compared to Ag particles with smooth surfaces.

  7. Mechanochemical mechanism for reaction of aluminium nano- and micrometre-scale particles.

    PubMed

    Levitas, Valery I

    2013-11-28

    A recently suggested melt-dispersion mechanism (MDM) for fast reaction of aluminium (Al) nano- and a few micrometre-scale particles during fast heating is reviewed. Volume expansion of 6% during Al melting produces pressure of several GPa in a core and tensile hoop stresses of 10 GPa in an oxide shell. Such stresses cause dynamic fracture and spallation of the shell. After spallation, an unloading wave propagates to the centre of the particle and creates a tensile pressure of 3-8 GPa. Such a tensile pressure exceeds the cavitation strength of liquid Al and disperses the melt into small, bare clusters (fragments) that fly at a high velocity. Reaction of the clusters is not limited by diffusion through a pre-existing oxide shell. Some theoretical and experimental results related to the MDM are presented. Various theoretical predictions based on the MDM are in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiments, which resolves some basic puzzles in combustion of Al particles. Methods to control and improve reactivity of Al particles are formulated, which are exactly opposite to the current trends based on diffusion mechanism. Some of these suggestions have experimental confirmation.

  8. Bilateral activation of the abdominal muscles induces longer reaction time.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Henry; Overs, Michelle E; Wu, Jennifer C-Y; Galea, Mary P; Hodges, Paul W

    2008-05-01

    Bilateral deficit is the increase in reaction time during bilateral activation compared to unilateral activation. This has been reported extensively for the limb muscles and is argued to be due to concurrent inhibition through transcallosal pathways. Unlike the limb muscles, the axial muscles are commonly activated bilaterally during functional tasks and have bilateral projections to their motoneurones. Thus it is reasonable to hypothesise that there will be no bilateral deficit for these muscles. Recordings of electromyographic (EMG) activity were made using surface electrodes placed bilaterally over the abdominal muscles in eight healthy right-handed subjects. Subjects performed either right or left pelvic elevation (unilateral abdominal activation), or posterior pelvic tilt (bilateral abdominal activation) "as fast as possible" in response to an auditory tone. Movements were performed as either a simple or choice reaction time task. Bilateral activation induced significantly longer reaction time than unilateral activation, and was observed during both simple and choice reaction time tasks. The results demonstrate that reaction time is delayed during bilateral activation of the abdominal muscles. These findings suggest that bilateral deficit is present for the axial muscles. This could be mediated through inhibition at various levels of the nervous system or variations in postural demand.

  9. Surveillance of systemic trafficking of macrophages induced by UHMWPE particles in nude mice by noninvasive imaging.

    PubMed

    Ren, Pei-Gen; Huang, Zhinong; Ma, Ting; Biswal, Sandip; Smith, Robert L; Goodman, Stuart B

    2010-09-01

    Macrophages constitute a major part of the cell response to wear particles produced at articulating and nonarticulating interfaces of joint replacements. This foreign body reaction can result in periprosthetic osteolysis and implant loosening. We demonstrate that ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) particles induce systemic trafficking of macrophages by noninvasive in vivo imaging and immunohistochemistry. The distal femora of nude mice were injected with 60 mg/mL UHMWPE suspension or saline alone. Reporter RAW264.7 macrophages that stably expressed the bioluminescent reporter gene and the fluorescence reporter gene were injected intravenously. Bioluminescence imaging was performed using an in vivo imaging system immediately after macrophage injection and at 2-day intervals. Compared with the nonoperated contralateral femora, at day 4, 6, and 8, the bioluminescent signal of femora containing UHMWPE suspension increased 1.30 +/- 0.09-, 2.36 +/- 0.92-, and 10.32 +/- 7.61-fold, respectively. The values at same time points for saline-injected control group were 1.08 +/- 0.07-, 1.14 +/- 0.27-, and 1.14 +/- 0.35-fold, respectively. The relative bioluminescence of the UHMWPE group was higher at all postinjection days and significantly greater than the saline group at day 8 (p < 0.05). Histological analysis confirmed the presence of reporter macrophages within the medullary canal of mice with implanted UHMWPE particles. The presence of UHMWPE particles induced enhanced bone remodeling activity. Clinically relevant UHMWPE particles stimulated the systemic recruitment of macrophages during an early time course using the murine femoral implant model. Interference with systemic macrophage trafficking may potentially mitigate UHMWPE particle-induced periprosthetic osteolysis.

  10. Ligand and Tetrathiometalate Effects in Induced Internal Electron Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    McConnachie, C. A.; Stiefel, E. I.

    1999-03-08

    New rhenium sulfide complexes, [Re(IV)(2)(&mgr;-S)(2)(&mgr;-S(2))(&mgr;-S(2)COR)(S(2)COR)(2)](-) and [Re(IV)(2)(&mgr;-S)(2)(S(2)COR)(4)], and a new tungsten sulfide complex, [WS(S(2))(S(2)CC(6)H(5))(2)], have been synthesized and isolated via induced internal redox reactions involving the appropriate tetrathiometalate and 1,1-dithiolate disulfide. The red complex [Re(IV)(2)(&mgr;-S)(2)(&mgr;-S(2))(&mgr;-S(2)COR)(S(2)COR)(2)](-), 1, was isolated from the reaction of dialkylxanthogen disulfide, [(ROCS(2))(2)], and tetraethylammonium tetrathioperrhenate, [Et(4)N][Re(VII)S(4)]. Crystal structure analysis of 1 reveals an edge-sharing (&mgr;-S)(2) bioctahedron containing both bridging disulfide and xanthate ligands. This reaction is compared to the known reaction between tetraalkylthiuram disulfide, [(R(2)NCS(2))(2)], and [Et(4)N][ReS(4)], which produces the green complex [Re(IV)(2)(&mgr;-S)(2)(S(2)CNR(2))(4)]. The corresponding green alkyl xanthate analogue, [Re(IV)(2)(&mgr;-S)(2)(S(2)COR)(4)], 2, was synthesized by a simple redox reaction between rhenium pentachloride, ReCl(5), and potassium alkyl xanthate, [K(S(2)COR)]. Comparing 1 with other known [ReS(4)](-)/1,1-dithiolate disulfide reaction products, such as [Re(IV)(2)(&mgr;-S)(2)(S(2)CNR(2))(4)] and [Re(III)(S(2)CC(6)H(5))(S(3)CC(6)H(5))(2)], shows a correlation between the electron-donating ability of the ligand and the nature of the reaction product. Reactions of [Et(4)N](2)[Mo(VI)S(4)], [Et(4)N][Re(VII)S(4)], or [Et(4)N](2)[W(VI)S(4)] with dithiobenzoate disulfide, [(S(2)CC(6)H(5))(2)], reveal a correlation between the ligand-to-metal charge transfer energy band (LMCT(1)) of the tetrathiometalate and the reaction product. The known purple complex [Mo(IV)(S(2)CC(6)H(5))(4)] and two new green complexes, [Re(III)(S(2)CC(6)H(5))(S(3)CC(6)H(5))(2)] (recently communicated) and [W(VI)S(S(2))(S(2)CC(6)H(5))(2)], were isolated from related reactions.

  11. Heterogeneous reaction of particle-associated triphenylene with NO3 radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Shu, Jinian; Liu, Changgeng; Zhang, Yuanxun; Yang, Bo; Gan, Jie

    2013-04-01

    Although heterogeneous reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with atmospheric oxidants may be important loss processes for PAHs, our understanding of their kinetics and products is incomplete. The study of heterogeneous reaction of suspended triphenylene particles with NO3 radicals is undertaken in a flow-tube-reactor. The time-of-flight mass spectra of particulate triphenylene and its nitration products are obtained with vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer. 1- and 2-nitrotriphenylene are identified by GC-MS analysis of the products formed from the reaction of NO3 radicals with triphenylene coated on the inner bottom surface of a conical flask. 1-Nitrotriphenylene is formed in larger yield than 2-nitrotriphenylene. This phenomenon is different from what had been observed in previous studies of the gas-phase triphenylene nitration, showing that 2-nitrotriphenylene is the major nitration product. The experimental results may reveal the discrepancies between heterogeneous and homogeneous nitrations of triphenylene.

  12. Particle growth by acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reactions of organic carbonyls on preexisting aerosols.

    PubMed

    Jang, Myoseon; Carroll, Brian; Chandramouli, Bharadwaj; Kamens, Richard M

    2003-09-01

    Aerosol growth by the heterogeneous reactions of different aliphatic and alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyls in the presence/absence of acidified seed aerosols was studied in a 2 m long flow reactor (2.5 cm i.d.) and a 0.5-m3 Teflon film bag under darkness. For the flow reactor experiments, 2,4-hexadienal, 5-methyl-3-hexen-2-one, 2-cyclohexenone, 3-methyl-2-cyclopentenone, 3-methyl-2-cyclohexenone, and octanal were studied. The carbonyls were selected based on their reactivity for acid-catalyzed reactions, their proton affinity, and their similarity to the ring-opening products from the atmospheric oxidation of aromatics. To facilitate acid-catalyzed heterogeneous hemiacetal/acetal formation, glycerol was injected along with inorganic seed aerosols into the flow reactor system. Carbonyl heterogeneous reactions were accelerated in the presence of acid catalysts (H2SO4), leading to higher aerosol yields than in their absence. Aldehydes were more reactive than ketones for acid-catalyzed reactions. The conjugated functionality also resulted in higher organic aerosol yieldsthan saturated aliphatic carbonyls because conjugation with the olefinic bond increases the basicity of the carbonyl leading to increased stability of the protonated carbonyl. Aerosol population was measured from a series of sampling ports along the length of the flow reactor using a scanning mobility particle sizer. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry of either an impacted liquid aerosol layer or direct reaction of carbonyls as a thin liquid layer on a zinc selenide FTIR disk was employed to demonstrate the direct transformation of chemical functional groups via the acid-catalyzed reactions. These results strongly indicate that atmospheric multifunctional organic carbonyls, which are created by atmospheric photooxidation reactions, can contribute significantly to secondary organic aerosol formation through acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reactions. Exploratory studies in 25- and 190-m3 outdoor chambers

  13. The 18F(n,α ) Reaction: First Study of n-Induced Reaction on a Radioactive Nucleus Using the Trojan Horse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulino, Marisa; Cherubini, Silvio; Spitaleri, Claudio; Rapisarda, Giuseppe Gabriele; La Cognata, Marco; Lamia, Livio; Gianluca Pizzone, Rosario; Romano, Stefano; Kubono, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Hayakawa, Seya; Wakabayashi, Yasuo; Iwasa, Naohito; Kato, Seigo; Komatsubara, Tetsuro; Teranishi, Takashi; Coc, Alain; de Séréville, Nicolas; Hammache, Fairouz; Kiss, Gabor; Bishop, Shawn; Nguyen Binh, Dam

    For the first time the Trojan Horse Method was applied to infer information about a neutron induced reaction on a radioactive nucleus at low energies relevant for astrophysics. In particular, the 18F(n, α )15N reaction has been studied by using the 18F+d reaction. A 18F beam was produced at the CRIB facility at RIKEN, Japan, and was focused onto a CD2 target. The beam had energy of 48 MeV, an average intensity of 105 pps and an average purity of 80%. A new designed experimental set-up covering a large solid angle was used to detect the ejected particles. The reaction cross section has been for the first time investigated in the energy range from 0 up to 2.5 MeV and several resonant states of 19F have been populated.

  14. Effect of dexmedetomidine priming on convulsion reaction induced by lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi-Feng; Luo, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Wei-Cheng; Hou, Ben-Chao; Huang, Jian; Zhan, Yan-Ping; Chen, Shi-Biao

    2016-10-01

    To study the effect of dexmedetomidine priming on convulsion reaction induced by lidocaine.The New Zealand white rabbits were applied for the mechanism study of dexmedetomidine priming for preventing convulsion reaction induced by lidocaine. The influence of dexmedetomidine priming with different doses on the time for convulsion occurrence and the duration time of convulsion induced by lidocaine, as well as contents of excitatory amino acids (aspartate [Asp], glutamate [Glu]) and inhibitory amino acids (glycine [Gly], γ-aminobutyric acid [GABA]) in the brain tissue were investigated.With 3 and 5 μg/kg dexmedetomidine priming, the occurrence times of convulsion were prolonged from 196 seconds to 349 and 414 seconds, respectively. With dexmedetomidine priming, the contents of excitatory amino acids (Asp, Glu) were much reduced at occurrence time of convulsion comparing with that without dexmedetomidine priming, while content of inhibitory amino acids Gly was much enhanced.The application of dexmedetomidine before local anesthetics can improve intoxication dose threshold of the lidocaine, delay occurrence of the convulsion, and helped for the recovery of convulsion induced by lidocaine. The positive effect of dexmedetomidine on preventing convulsion would owe to not only the inhibition of excitatory amino acids (Asp, Glu), but also the promotion of inhibitory amino acids Gly secretion.

  15. Effect of dexmedetomidine priming on convulsion reaction induced by lidocaine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi-Feng; Luo, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Wei-Cheng; Hou, Ben-Chao; Huang, Jian; Zhan, Yan-Ping; Chen, Shi-Biao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To study the effect of dexmedetomidine priming on convulsion reaction induced by lidocaine. The New Zealand white rabbits were applied for the mechanism study of dexmedetomidine priming for preventing convulsion reaction induced by lidocaine. The influence of dexmedetomidine priming with different doses on the time for convulsion occurrence and the duration time of convulsion induced by lidocaine, as well as contents of excitatory amino acids (aspartate [Asp], glutamate [Glu]) and inhibitory amino acids (glycine [Gly], γ-aminobutyric acid [GABA]) in the brain tissue were investigated. With 3 and 5 μg/kg dexmedetomidine priming, the occurrence times of convulsion were prolonged from 196 seconds to 349 and 414 seconds, respectively. With dexmedetomidine priming, the contents of excitatory amino acids (Asp, Glu) were much reduced at occurrence time of convulsion comparing with that without dexmedetomidine priming, while content of inhibitory amino acids Gly was much enhanced. The application of dexmedetomidine before local anesthetics can improve intoxication dose threshold of the lidocaine, delay occurrence of the convulsion, and helped for the recovery of convulsion induced by lidocaine. The positive effect of dexmedetomidine on preventing convulsion would owe to not only the inhibition of excitatory amino acids (Asp, Glu), but also the promotion of inhibitory amino acids Gly secretion. PMID:27787355

  16. Fundamental study of ammonia-sulfur dioxide reactions to form solid particles. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, P.; Bai, H.

    1994-01-18

    The effects of reaction residence time, presence of inert particles and moisture content on the SO{sub 2} removal and the product particle size distributions have been determined. Results indicated that both gas phase and particle phase reach equilibria in a very short time. The presence of inert particles increases the SO{sub 2} removal efficiency slightly, with a greater increase in removal efficiency at higher surface areas. Moisture content is the most important parameter affecting SO{sub 2} removal. Increasing the moisture content from 1.6% to 6.4% by volume results in a 30% increase of the SO{sub 2} removal at a reaction temperature of 51{degree}C. The products at near anhydrous conditions were concluded to be NH{sub 3}SO{sub 2}, (NH{sub 3}){sub 2}SO{sub 2} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 5}. While the products at humid conditions could be either the 1:1 sulfites, NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 3} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 5}, or the 2:1 sulfites, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 3} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 3} {minus}H{sub 2}O, or a mixture of the 1:1 and 2:1 sulfite. Those sulfite particles could subsequently oxidize to form the more stable sulfate particles. A gas-to-particle formation model has been developed to simulate the NH{sub 3}-SO{sub 2} system in the presence and absence of seed aerosols at trace water conditions. This model accounts for simultaneous nucleation, coagulation, condensation and chemical reaction. The applicability of utilizing ammonia injection to a flue gas system has been discussed in terms of two possible removal schemes. One utilizes ammonia injection alone and the other is in conjunction with the injection of Ca(OH){sub 2} slurry in a spray dryer system. Both schemes have the potential of achieving over 90% SO{sub 2} removal from power plants burning high-sulfur coals.

  17. Deuteron-induced reactions on Ni isotopes up to 60 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrigeanu, M.; Šimečková, E.; Fischer, U.; Mrázek, J.; Novak, J.; Štefánik, M.; Costache, C.; Avrigeanu, V.

    2016-07-01

    Background: The high complexity of the deuteron-nucleus interaction from the deuteron weak binding energy of 2.224 MeV is also related to a variety of reactions induced by the deuteron-breakup (BU) nucleons. Thus, specific noncompound processes as BU and direct reactions (DR) make the deuteron-induced reactions so different from reactions with other incident particles. The scarce consideration of only pre-equilibrium emission (PE) and compound-nucleus (CN) mechanisms led to significant discrepancies with experimental results so that recommended reaction cross sections of high-priority elements as, e.g., Ni have mainly been obtained by fit of the data. Purpose: The unitary and consistent BU and DR account in deuteron-induced reactions on natural nickel may take advantage of an extended database for this element, including new accurate measurements of particular reaction cross sections. Method: The activation cross sections of 64,61,60Cu, Ni,5765, and 55,56,57,58,59m,60Co nuclei for deuterons incident on natural Ni at energies up to 20 MeV, were measured by the stacked-foil technique and high-resolution gamma spectrometry using U-120M cyclotron of CANAM, NPI CAS. Then, within an extended analysis of deuteron interactions with Ni isotopes up to 60 MeV, all processes from elastic scattering until the evaporation from fully equilibrated compound system have been taken into account while an increased attention is paid especially to the BU and DR mechanisms. Results: The deuteron activation cross-section analysis, completed by consideration of the PE and CN contributions corrected for decrease of the total-reaction cross section from the leakage of the initial deuteron flux towards BU and DR processes, is proved satisfactory for the first time to all available data. Conclusions: The overall agreement of the measured data and model calculations validates the description of nuclear mechanisms taken into account for deuteron-induced reactions on Ni, particularly the BU and

  18. Particle-Gamma Studies of Transitional Gd Nuclei Via Light-Ion Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, R. O.; Ross, T. J.; Beausang, C. W.; Allmond, J. M.; Burke, J. T.; Phair, L.; Angell, C. T.; Basunia, M. S.; Bleuel, D. L.; Casperson, R. J.; Fallon, P.; Hatarik, R.; Munson, J.; Paschalis, S.; Petri, M.; Ressler, J. J.; Scielzo, N. D.

    2010-11-01

    Gd nuclei with N ˜ 90 are of great interest due to a rapid change from vibrational to rotational character. Numerous experiments that have studied these nuclei were limited to either pure γ-ray or pure charged-particle studies. Recently, a series of experiments have been carried out at the 88-Inch cyclotron at LBNL, which combine relatively high-efficiency γ-ray and charged-particle spectroscopy in the same experiment. A beam of 25 MeV protons was incident on enriched ^154Gd, ^155Gd, ^156Gd and ^158Gd targets. Charged particles from the (p,p'), (p,d), and (p,t) reaction channels were detected using a Si-telescope array (STARS) and the coincident gamma-rays (in ^152-158Gd) were detected using the Liberace HPGe clover array. The relatively high particle-gamma efficiency, precise energy resolution (via the γ rays), and particle-γ angular information provides a precision tool for spectroscopic studies. Preliminary results will be presented. This work was supported in part by the DOE under grant Nos. DE-FG02-05 ER41379 & DE-FG52-06 NA26206 (UR), DE-AC52 07NA27344 (LLNL), DE-AC02 05CH11231 (LBNL).

  19. Therapeutic effects of OP-1 on metal wear particle induced osteoblasts injury in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guojing; Chen, Jianmin; Yang, Shufeng; Parker, Thomas Mn; Goodman, Gary Mp; Hasama, Jack M; Zhao, Jianning

    2015-01-01

    Aseptic lossening is a main reason for the revision of total joint arthroplasty. Metal-wear particles induced deregulation of bone resorption or formation has been considered as the major process of aseptic lossening. Osteogenic protein-1 (OP-1) can be used to improve bone formation. However, such effect is not clearly understood after the metal-wear particles injury. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which OP-1 regulates the activity of bone formation and anti-inflammatory after injury. Results showed that OP-1 increased cell viability and bone formation ability of impaired osteoblast cells at 72 hours after being injured by cobalt particles. Pathway analyses revealed that both mRNA and protein levels of Smad1 and Smad5 were significantly increased upon the treatment of OP-1 in the cell injury model. Similarly, runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) was also significantly upregulated in the OP-1 treated cells. Moreover, treatment with OP-1 inhibited the secretion of interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and IL-18 in cobalt impaired cells. Collectively, these results suggest that OP-1 could inhibit cobalt particles induced cell injury by activating Smad1, Smad5, and Runx2, and such procedure is accompanied by anti-inflammatory reaction.

  20. Hydrogen peroxide maintains the heterogeneous reaction of sulfur dioxide on mineral dust proxy particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liubin; Zhao, Yue; Li, Huan; Chen, Zhongming

    2016-09-01

    The heterogeneous oxidation of sulfur dioxide (SO2) on α-Al2O3 particles was investigated using a flow reactor coupled with a transmission-Fourier transform infrared (T-FTIR) spectrometer at different relative humidities (RH) in the absence or presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), with an emphasis on the saturation coverage of SO2 and the timescale on which the reaction reaches saturation. It is found that the saturation coverage of SO2 in the absence of H2O2 increases with rising RH due to the hydrolysis of SO2 by surface adsorbed water. However, the reaction ultimately reaches saturation since the produced sulfite/bisulfite cannot be further converted to sulfate/bisulfate in the absence of oxidants. In addition, the presence of H2O2 can significantly increase the saturation coverage of SO2 by efficiently oxidizing sulfite/bisulfite to sulfate/bisulfate. Under humid conditions, adsorbed water facilitates the hydrolysis of SO2 and mitigates the increase of surface acidity, which can inhibit the hydrolysis of SO2. Hence, in the presence of H2O2, the saturation coverage of SO2 as well as the time of reaction reaching saturation increases with rising RH and the surface is not saturated on the timescale of the experiments (40 h) at 60% RH. Furthermore, the increase of saturation coverage of SO2 in the presence of H2O2 was observed on chemically inactive SiO2 particles, indicating that the hydrolysis of SO2 and subsequent oxidation by H2O2 likely occurs on other types of particles. Our findings are of importance for understanding the role of water vapor and trace gases (e.g., H2O2) in the heterogeneous reaction of SO2 in the atmosphere.

  1. The EPIC-MOS Particle-Induced Background Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, K. D.; Snowden, S. L.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a method for constructing a spectrum of the particle-induced instrumental background of the XMM-Newton EPIC MOS detectors that can be used for observations of the diffuse background and extended sources that fill a significant fraction of the instrument field of view. The strength and spectrum of the particle-induced background, that is, the background due to the interaction of particles with the detector and the detector surroundings, is temporally variable as well as spatially variable over individual chips. Our method uses a combination of the filter-wheel-closed data and a database of unexposed-region data to construct a spectrum of the "quiescent" background. We show that, using this method of background subtraction, the differences between independent observations of the same region of "blank sky" are consistent with the statistical uncertainties except when there is clear evidence of solar wind charge exchange emission. We use the blank sky observations to show that contamination by SWCX emission is a strong function of the solar wind proton flux, and that observations through the flanks of the magnetosheath appear to be contaminated only at much higher solar wind fluxes. We have also developed a spectral model of the residual soft proton flares, which allows their effects to be removed to a substantial degree during spectral fitting.

  2. Production and decay of baryonic resonances in pion induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przygoda, Witold

    2016-11-01

    Pion induced reactions give unique opportunities for an unambiguous description of baryonic resonances and their coupling channels. A systematic energy scan and high precision data, in conjunction with a partial wave analysis, allow for the study of the excitation function of the various contributions. A review of available world data unravels strong need for modern facilities delivering measurements with a pion beam. Recently, HADES collaboration collected data in pion-induced reactions on light (12C) and heavy (74W) nuclei at a beam momentum of 1.7 GeV/c dedicated to strangeness production. It was followed by a systematic scan at four different pion beam momenta (0.656, 0.69, 0.748 and 0.8 GeV/c) in π- - p reaction in order to tackle the role of N(1520) resonance in conjunction with the intermediate ρ production. First results on exclusive channels with one pion (π- p) and two pions (nπ+π-, pπ-π0) in the final state are discussed.

  3. Direct numerical simulation of evaporation-induced particle motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hochan; Son, Gihun

    2015-11-01

    A sharp-interface level-set (LS) method is presented for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of evaporation-induced particle motion. The liquid surface is tracked by the LS function, which is defined as a signed distance from the liquid-gas interface. The conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy for the liquid and gas phases and vapor mass fraction for the gas phase are solved accurately imposing the coupled temperature and vapor fraction conditions at the evaporating liquid-gas interface. A dynamic contact angle model is also incorporated into the LS method to account for the change between advancing and receding contact angles at the liquid-gas-solid contact line. The solid surface is tracked by another LS function, which is defined as a signed distance from the fluid-solid interface. The conservation equations for multiphase flows are extended to treat the solid particle as a high-viscosity non-evaporating fluid phase. The velocity inside the solid domain is modified to enforce the rigid body motion using the translational velocity and angular velocity of the particle centroid. The DNS results demonstrate the particle accumulation near the evaporating interface and the contact line pinning and stick-slip motion near the evaporating contact line.

  4. Trojan horse method with neutrons induced reactions: The 17O(n,α)14C reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guardo, G. L.; Spitaleri, C.; Lamia, L.; Gulino, M.; Tang, X.; Bucher, B.; Burjan, V.; Couder, M.; Davies, P.; deBoer, R.; Fang, X.; Kroha, V.; La Cognata, M.; Ma, C.; Mrazek, J.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Notani, M.; O'Brien, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Roberson, D.; Sergi, M. L.; Tan, W.; Wiescher, M.

    2017-06-01

    The experimental study of the 17O(n,α)14C reaction has been performed in the energy range 0-350 keV. This reaction could play an important role in explaining heavy elements (s-process) nucleosynthesis in various astrophysical scenario. To over-come the practical problems arising from the neutrons production, a new application of the Trojan Horse Method has been recently suggested. In more details, the 17O(n,α)14C reaction has been studied using the quasi-free 2H(17O,α14C)1H reaction, induced at an energy of 43.5 MeV. The measurement allows one to investigate the ℓ=3, 75 keV resonance (E*=8.125 MeV, Jπ=5-), absent in the available direct measurements because of centrifugal suppression effects. Moreover, the results show that the contribution of the 166 keV and 236 keV resonances is in energy agreement with the available direct data. A clear contribution of the -7 keV subthreshold level is also present.

  5. Magnetic resonance studies of photo-induced electron transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    van Willigen, H.

    1992-11-01

    Fourier Transform Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (FT EPR) is useful in study of photochemical reactions: a microwave pulse rotates the electron spin magnetization vector from z (magnetic field) into xy plane ([pi]/2 pulse); the time evolution of magnetization in xy plane, the free induction decay (FID), is sampled. Fourier transform of FID gives the frequency domain EPR spectrum of the free radicals, and the method is ideal for time-resolved studies of free radicals produced by pulsed-laser excitation. Investigations of electron transfer reactions focused on porphyrin (donor) - quinone (acceptor) systems. First, two hydrogen abstraction reactions were studied with FT EPR: photoreduction of acetone with 2-propanol, yielding the acetone ketyl radical, and the reaction of 2-propanol with t-butoxy radicals. Then, the FT EPR study of benzoquinone or duroquinone anion radicals generated by pulsed-laser induced electron transfer from zinc tetraphenylporphyrin (ZnTPP) or tetrasulfonated Zn(TPP), was carried out in homogeneous solution, micellar solutions, and silica gel. Finally, FT EPR was used to study electron transfer quenching of triplet C[sub 60] by electron donors.

  6. The effect of energetic particle induced geodesic acoustic modes on microturbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneller, Mirjam; Fu, Guoyong; Wang, Weixing; Chavdarovski, Ilija; Lauber, Philipp

    2016-10-01

    The control of turbulent transport reveals essential to achieve a successful fusion reactor. Together with turbulence, energetic particles are ubiquitous in present and future tokamaks due to heating systems and fusion reactions. Anisotropy in the distribution function of the energetic particle population is able to excite oscillations from the continuous spectrum of geodesic acoustic modes, which cannot be driven by plasma pressure gradients due to their toroidally and nearly poloidally symmetric structures. These oscillations are known as energetic particle-induced geodesic acoustic modes (EGAMs) [G.Y.Fu'08] and have been observed in recent experiments [R.Nazikian'08]. EGAMs are particularly attractive in the framework of turbulence regulation, since they lead to an oscillatory radial electric shear which can potentially saturate the turbulence. In recent years, numerical simulations have shown however, that turbulent transport could also be enhanced in the presence of EGAMs [D.Zarzoso'13]. For the presented work, the nonlinear gyrokinetic, electrostatic, particle-in-cell code GTS [W.X.Wang'06] has been extended to include an energetic particle population. With this new tool, the interaction of EGAMs with microturbulence is investigated in more detail. NERSC computing time is greatfully acknowledged.

  7. Kinetics and mechanisms of heterogeneous reaction of gaseous hydrogen peroxide on mineral oxide particles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Chen, Zhongming; Shen, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xuan

    2011-04-15

    Recent studies have shown that heterogeneous reactions of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) on aerosol surfaces may play an important role in tropospheric chemistry. The data concerning the kinetics and mechanisms of these reactions, however, are quite scarce so far. Here, we investigated, for the first time, the heterogeneous reactions of gaseous H(2)O(2) on SiO(2) and α-Al(2)O(3) particles, two major components of mineral dust aerosol, using transmission-Fourier Transform Infrared (T-FTIR) spectroscopy, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). It is found that H(2)O(2) molecularly adsorbs on SiO(2), and a small amount of molecularly adsorbed H(2)O(2) decomposes due to its thermal instability. For α-Al(2)O(3), catalytic decomposition of H(2)O(2) evidently occurs, but there is also a small amount of H(2)O(2) molecularly adsorbed on the particle surface. The BET uptake coefficients of H(2)O(2) on both particles appear to be independent of gaseous H(2)O(2) concentration (1.27-13.8 ppmv) and particle sample mass (2.8-6.5 mg for SiO(2) and 8.6-18.9 mg for α-Al(2)O(3)), but are strongly dependent on relative humidity with the values ranging from (1.55 ± 0.14) × 10(-8) and (1.21 ± 0.04) × 10(-7) at 2% RH to (0.61 ± 0.06) × 10(-8) and (0.76 ± 0.09) × 10(-7) at 76% RH for SiO(2) and α-Al(2)O(3), respectively. On the basis of the experimental results and literature data, the potential mechanisms for heterogeneous decomposition of H(2)O(2) were proposed, and the atmospheric implications of these reactions were discussed. It is found that heterogeneous reaction of H(2)O(2) on both mineral oxides plays a significant role in processing mineral aerosols, although its role as a sink for ambient H(2)O(2) is probably limited.

  8. Charged particle decay of hot and rotating 88Mo nuclei in fusion-evaporation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdré, S.; Piantelli, S.; Casini, G.; Barlini, S.; Carboni, S.; Ciemała, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Mazurek, K.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Morelli, L.; Marchi, T.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Bednarczyk, P.; Benzoni, G.; Bini, M.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Bruno, M.; Camera, F.; Chbihi, A.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; D'Agostino, M.; Degerlier, M.; Fabris, D.; Fornal, B.; Giaz, A.; Krzysiek, M.; Leoni, S.; Matejska-Minda, M.; Mazumdar, I.; MÈ©czyński, W.; Million, B.; Montanari, D.; Myalski, S.; Nicolini, R.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Prete, G.; Roberts, O. J.; Styczeń, J.; Szpak, B.; Wasilewska, B.; Wieland, O.; Wieleczko, J. P.; ZiÈ©bliński, M.

    2016-03-01

    A study of fusion-evaporation and (partly) fusion-fission channels for the 88Mo compound nucleus, produced at different excitation energies in the reaction 48Ti+40Ca at 300, 450, and 600 MeV beam energies, is presented. Fusion-evaporation and fusion-fission cross sections have been extracted and compared with the existing systematics. Experimental data concerning light charged particles have been compared with the prediction of the statistical model in its implementation in the gemini++ code, well suited even for high spin systems, in order to tune the main model parameters in a mass region not abundantly covered by exclusive experimental data. Multiplicities for light charged particles emitted in fusion evaporation events are also presented. Some discrepancies with respect to the prediction of the statistical model have been found for forward emitted α particles; they may be due both to pre-equilibrium emission and to reaction channels (such as deep inelastic collisions or quasifission/quasifusion) different from the compound nucleus formation.

  9. Preparation of fine silicon particles from amorphous silicon monoxide by the disproportionation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamiya, Mikito; Takei, Humihiko; Kikuchi, Masae; Uyeda, Chiaki

    2001-07-01

    Fine Si particles have been prepared by the disproportionation reaction of silicon monoxide (SiO), that is: 2SiO→Si+SiO 2. Amorphous powders of SiO are heated between 900°C and 1400°C in a flow of Ar and the obtained specimens are analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The treatments between 1000°C and 1300°C for more than 0.5 h result in origination of Si particles dispersed in amorphous oxide media. The particle size varies from 1-3 to 20-40 nm, depending on the heating temperature. Kinetic analyses of the reaction reveal that the activation energy is 1.1 eV (82.1 kJ mol -1). The specimens annealed above 1350°C changes into a mixture of Si and cristobalite, suggesting a solid state transformation in the surrounding oxides from the amorphous to crystalline states.

  10. Collective effects in deuteron induced reactions of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canbula, Bora

    2017-01-01

    Cross sections of 27 Al (d,x)22 Na , 27 Al (d,x)24 Na , and 27 Al (d,x)27 Mg reactions are calculated by using TALYS 1.6 computer code with different nuclear level density models, which are composite Gilbert-Cameron model, back-shifted Fermi gas model, generalized superfluid model, and recently proposed collective semi-classical Fermi gas model in the energy range of 3-180 MeV. The results are compared with the experimental data taken from EXFOR library. In these deuteron induced reactions, collective effects are investigated by means of nuclear level density models. Collective semi-classical Fermi gas model including the collective effects via the level density parameter represents the best agreement with the experimental data compared to the other level density models, especially in the low deuteron bombarding energies where the collective effects dominate.

  11. Granulomatous tattoo reaction induced by intense pulse light treatment.

    PubMed

    Tourlaki, Athanasia; Boneschi, Vinicio; Tosi, Diego; Pigatto, Paolo; Brambilla, Lucia

    2010-10-01

    Cosmetic tattooing involves implantation of pigments into the dermis in order to create a permanent makeup. Here, we report a case of sarcoidal granulomatous reaction to old cosmetic tattoos after an intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment for facial skin rejuvenation. We consider this case as a peculiar example of photo-induced reaction to tattoo. In addition, we hypothesize that an underlying immune dysfunction was present, and acted as a predisposing factor for this unusual response, as the patient had suffered from an episode of acute pulmonary sarcoidosis 15 years before. Overall, our observation suggests that IPL treatment should be used cautiously in patients with tattoos, especially when a history of autoimmune disease is present. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Adsorption and reactions of atmospheric constituents and pollutants on ice particles: an FTIR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudakova, A. V.; Marinov, I. L.; Poretskiy, M. S.; Tsyganenko, A. A.

    2009-04-01

    , which act as adsorption sites either as a proton-donor or as a donor of the lone pair of electrons. Such adsorption-induced relaxation explains the dependence of physico-chemical properties of icy particles on the presence of atmospheric gases. Spectra HCN/D2O and ND3/D2O mixed icy films with low (1:10) dopant/water ratios do not manifest any changes in the acidic or basic properties of dangling hydroxyl groups or surface oxygen atoms, but reveal a difference in the proportion between the concentrations of these sites as compared with that for pure water ice. For high dopant concentrations (1:1), the dangling hydroxyls were not observed; the dominant adsorption sites for CO are likely to be the unsaturated oxygen atoms, while serious structural changes occur in the bulk of ices. Ecologically important reactions of atmospheric pollutants such as ozonolysis of ethene, chlorinated ethenes, hydrogen cyanide, and methyl bromide adsorbed on water ice film as well as the influence of UV radiation on this process have been studied in 77 - 200 K temperature range by FTIR spectroscopy. Ozone co-adsorption with ethene or C2H3Cl readily leads to ozonolysis reaction, which also starts for C2H2Cl2 isomers but only at temperatures elevated up to 120 - 150 K. Co-adsorption of O3 with HCN or CH3Br molecules in the dark does not lead to any noticeable spectral changes. Irradiation of HCN or CH3Br deposited on ice films in the presence of ozone leads to appearance of new bands revealing the formation of ozonolysis products. The same "synergetic effect" of simultaneous action of ozone and UV radiation at 77 K, was found for C2H2Cl2 isomers and C2Cl4, which are resistant against O3 even at higher temperatures. The obtained spectral dependence of photo-ozonolysis of C2Cl4 and HCN at 77 K shows that photoexcitation or photodissociation of ozone, evidently, accounts for the observed processes. The surface of ice particles, thus, plays the role of a condenser of atmospheric pollutants and acts

  13. Yield from Proton-Induced Reaction on Light Element Isotopes in the Hydrogen Plasma Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udovičić, V.; Dragić, A.; Banjanac, R.; Joković, D.; Veselinović, N.; Aničin, I.; Savić, M.; Puzović, J.

    2011-12-01

    The high Q-value of some (p,α) fusion reactions is very important in the investigation that can lead to power production with controlled fusion using advanced fuels (hydrogen-lithium-7, hydrogen-boron-11). For this reason, it is crucial to know the rates of these fusion reactions. Unfortunately, in the fusion machines such as plasma focus device, the interaction energy is usually far below the Coulomb barrier. Because of that, direct measurements of the relevant reaction cross sections are practically impossible. A few different indirect approaches have been proposed. In this work the Trojan Horse Method (THM) will be described. On the basis of the results obtained from the THM method and data, which are well-known from our previous work (Banjanac et al. in Radiat Meas 40:483-485, 2005), the reaction rate for proton-induced reaction 7Li(p,α)α produced in the hydrogen plasma focus is calculated. This calculation will be compared with the measurements of α particles production rate using CR-39 detectors.

  14. Effect of temperature gradient on zinc oxide nano particles synthesized at low reaction temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutu, Vaibhav; Shastri, Lokesh; Malik, M. M.

    2017-03-01

    Zinc oxide samples were synthesized at different reaction temperatures (70 °C–110 °C) by surfactant-free co-precipitation method using temperature gradient. Formation of hexagonal wurtzite structure of the ZnO samples is confirmed from x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. This study further suggests reduction in crystallite size from 33 nm to 24 nm with increase in reaction temperature which is reconfirmed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Optical spectroscopy studies of these samples show significant peak shift towards higher energy with maximum photoluminescence (PL) emissions between 390 nm to 575 nm region of the visible spectrum. This evident inverse relationship between optical properties of ZnO nano particles and reaction temperature may be attributed to the temperature gradient causing rapid nucleation during the synthesis process. With these notable properties this study suggests that, ZnO nano particles may be useful for making Nano electronic devices, Sensors, Nano medicines, GATE Dielectrics, Photovoltaic devices etc.

  15. Establishing a theory for deuteron induced surrogate reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Potel, G.; Nunes, F. M.; Thompson, I. J.

    2015-09-18

    Background: Deuteron-induced reactions serve as surrogates for neutron capture into compound states. Although these reactions are of great applicability, no theoretical efforts have been invested in this direction over the last decade. Purpose: The goal of this work is to establish on firm grounds a theory for deuteron-induced neutron-capture reactions. This includes formulating elastic and inelastic breakup in a consistent manner. Method: We describe this process both in post- and prior-form distorted wave Born approximation following previous works and discuss the differences in the formulation. While the convergence issues arising in the post formulation can be overcome in the priormore » formulation, in this case one still needs to take into account additional terms due to nonorthogonality. Results: We apply our method to the Nb93(d,p)X at Ed=15 and 25 MeV and are able to obtain a good description of the data. We then look at the various partial wave contributions, as well as elastic versus inelastic contributions. We also connect our formulation with transfer to neutron bound states.Conclusions: Our calculations demonstrate that the nonorthogonality term arising in the prior formulation is significant and is at the heart of the long-standing controversy between the post and the prior formulations of the theory. We also show that the cross sections for these reactions are angular-momentum dependent and therefore the commonly used Weisskopf limit is inadequate. We finally make important predictions for the relative contributions of elastic breakup and nonelastic breakup and call for elastic-breakup measurements to further constrain our model.« less

  16. Establishing a theory for deuteron induced surrogate reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Potel, G.; Nunes, F. M.; Thompson, I. J.

    2015-09-18

    Background: Deuteron-induced reactions serve as surrogates for neutron capture into compound states. Although these reactions are of great applicability, no theoretical efforts have been invested in this direction over the last decade. Purpose: The goal of this work is to establish on firm grounds a theory for deuteron-induced neutron-capture reactions. This includes formulating elastic and inelastic breakup in a consistent manner. Method: We describe this process both in post- and prior-form distorted wave Born approximation following previous works and discuss the differences in the formulation. While the convergence issues arising in the post formulation can be overcome in the prior formulation, in this case one still needs to take into account additional terms due to nonorthogonality. Results: We apply our method to the Nb93(d,p)X at Ed=15 and 25 MeV and are able to obtain a good description of the data. We then look at the various partial wave contributions, as well as elastic versus inelastic contributions. We also connect our formulation with transfer to neutron bound states.Conclusions: Our calculations demonstrate that the nonorthogonality term arising in the prior formulation is significant and is at the heart of the long-standing controversy between the post and the prior formulations of the theory. We also show that the cross sections for these reactions are angular-momentum dependent and therefore the commonly used Weisskopf limit is inadequate. We finally make important predictions for the relative contributions of elastic breakup and nonelastic breakup and call for elastic-breakup measurements to further constrain our model.

  17. DNA damage response induced by HZE particles in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, David; Aroumougame, Asaithamby

    Convincing evidences indicate that high-linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation (IR) induced complex DNA lesions are more difficult to repair than isolated DNA lesions induced by low-LET IR; this has been associated with the increased RBE for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in high energy charged-particle irradiated human cells. We have employed an in situ method to directly monitor induction and repair of clustered DNA lesions at the single-cell level. We showed, consistent with biophysical modeling, that the kinetics of loss of clustered DNA lesions was substantially compromised in human fibroblasts. The unique spatial distribution of different types of DNA lesions within the clustered damages determined the cellular ability to repair these damages. Importantly, examination of metaphase cells derived from HZE particle irradiated cells revealed that the extent of chromosome aberrations directly correlated with the levels of unrepaired clustered DNA lesions. In addition, we used a novel organotypic human lung three-dimensional (3D) model to investigate the biological significance of unrepaired DNA lesions in differentiated lung epithelial cells. We found that complex DNA lesions induced by HZE particles were even more difficult to be repaired in organotypic 3D culture, resulting enhanced cell killing and chromosome aberrations. Our data suggest that DNA repair capability in differentiated cells renders them vulnerable to DSBs, promoting genome instability that may lead to carcinogenesis. As the organotypic 3D model mimics human lung, it opens up new experimental approaches to explore the effect of radiation in vivo and will have important implications for evaluating radiation risk in human tissues.

  18. Revised Production Rates for Na-22 and Mn-54 in Meteorites Using Cross Sections Measured for Neutron-induced Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.; Kim, K. J.; Reedy, R. C.

    2004-01-01

    The interactions of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with extraterrestrial bodies produce small amounts of radionuclides and stable isotopes. The production rates of many relatively short-lived radionuclides, including 2.6-year Na-22 and 312-day Mn-54, have been measured in several meteorites collected very soon after they fell. Theoretical models used to calculate production rates for comparison with the measured values rely on input data containing good cross section measurements for all relevant reactions. Most GCR particles are protons, but secondary neutrons make most cosmogenic nuclides. Calculated production rates using only cross sections for proton-induced reactions do not agree well with measurements. One possible explanation is that the contribution to the production rate from reactions initiated by secondary neutrons produced in primary GCR interactions should be included explicitly. This, however, is difficult to do because so few of the relevant cross sections for neutron-induced reactions have been measured.

  19. Revised Production Rates for Na-22 and Mn-54 in Meteorites Using Cross Sections Measured for Neutron-induced Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.; Kim, K. J.; Reedy, R. C.

    2004-01-01

    The interactions of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with extraterrestrial bodies produce small amounts of radionuclides and stable isotopes. The production rates of many relatively short-lived radionuclides, including 2.6-year Na-22 and 312-day Mn-54, have been measured in several meteorites collected very soon after they fell. Theoretical models used to calculate production rates for comparison with the measured values rely on input data containing good cross section measurements for all relevant reactions. Most GCR particles are protons, but secondary neutrons make most cosmogenic nuclides. Calculated production rates using only cross sections for proton-induced reactions do not agree well with measurements. One possible explanation is that the contribution to the production rate from reactions initiated by secondary neutrons produced in primary GCR interactions should be included explicitly. This, however, is difficult to do because so few of the relevant cross sections for neutron-induced reactions have been measured.

  20. Generation of sub-micron particles and secondary pollutants from building materials by ozone reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Taisuke; Tanabe, Shin-ichi

    This study reports results from two different experiments examining reactions between ozone and common building materials that can lead to the formation of secondary products and particulate-phase materials. Monitored species include sub-micron particles and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In the first set of experiments, various building materials were placed in a 20 L stainless-steel chamber and exposed to ozone. The materials included expanded polystyrene, a natural rubber adhesive, cedar board, Japanese Cyprus board and silver fir board, as well as d-limonene, which is a known constituent of certain woods and cleaning products. The combination of ozone and either d-limonene, cedar board or cypress board produced sub-micron particles, with most of the increase occurring in the size range of 0.01- 0.5μm diameter. This was not observed for the other materials. In the case of cedar board, the consequence of ozone exposure over an extended time interval was monitored. As the exposure time elapsed, the concentration of sub-micron particles moderately decreased. In the second set of experiments, unwaxed or waxed plastic tiles were placed in the 20 L chamber and exposed to ozone. Sub-micron particles and organic compounds were measured during the course of the experiments. In the case of the waxed tile, the number of 0.01- 1.0μm size particles grew about 50×108particlesm-3; particle growth was significantly less for the un-waxed tile. For both the waxed and un-waxed tiles, the emission rates of heptane, nonane, nonanal, and decanal increased after ozone was added to the supply air. (However, it is not clear if some or all of this production was due to ozone reacting with the sorbent used for sampling or with compounds captured by the sorbent.) This study provides further evidence that ozone-initiated reactions with building materials can be a significant source of both sub-micron particles and secondary organic compounds in indoor environments.

  1. Spin Modes, Neutrino-Induced Reactions and Nucleosynthesis in Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio; Otsuka, Takaharu; Honma, Michio; Higashiyama, Koji

    2008-11-11

    Recent advances in shell model calculations of spin modes in nuclei with the use of new shell model Hamiltonians are discussed. Important roles of tensor interaction in shell evolutions toward drip-lines are pointed out. Electromagnetic transitions in exotic carbon isotopes are investigated. Anomalous supressions of transition strengths in the isotopes are found to be rather well explained. Neutrino-induced reactions on {sup 56}Fe and {sup 56}Ni are studied, and implications on production yields of heavy elements in stars are discussed.

  2. Development of a Reference Database for Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriou, P.; Becker, H.-W.; Bogdanović-Radović, I.; Chiari, M.; Goncharov, A.; Jesus, A. P.; Kakuee, O.; Kiss, A. Z.; Lagoyannis, A.; Räisänen, J.; Strivay, D.; Zucchiatti, A.

    2016-03-01

    Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) is a powerful analytical technique that exploits the interactions of rapid charged particles with nuclei located near a sample surface to determine the composition and structure of the surface regions of solids by measurement of characteristic prompt γ rays. The potential for depth profiling of this technique has long been recognized, however, the implementation has been limited owing to insufficient knowledge of the physical data and lack of suitable user-friendly computer codes for the applications. Although a considerable body of published data exists in the nuclear physics literature for nuclear reaction cross sections with γ rays in the exit channel, there is no up-to-date, comprehensive compilation specifically dedicated to IBA applications. A number of PIGE cross-section data had already been uploaded to the Ion Beam Analysis Nuclear Data Library (IBANDL)

  3. Kinetics of heterogeneous reaction of CaCO3 particles with gaseous HNO3 over a wide range of humidity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Gibson, E R; Cain, J P; Wang, H; Grassian, V H; Laskin, A

    2008-02-21

    Heterogeneous reaction kinetics of gaseous nitric acid (HNO3) with calcium carbonate (CaCO3) particles was investigated using a particle-on-substrate stagnation flow reactor (PS-SFR). This technique utilizes the exposure of substrate deposited, isolated, and narrowly dispersed particles to a gas mixture of HNO3/H2O/N2, followed by microanalysis of individual reacted particles using computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (CCSEM/EDX). The first series of experiments were conducted at atmospheric pressure, room temperature and constant relative humidity (40%) with a median dry particle diameter of Dp = 0.85 mum, particle loading densities 2 x 104 reaction was determined from oxygen enrichment in individual particles as a function of particle loading. Quantitative treatment of the data using a diffusion-kinetic model yields a lower limit to the net reaction probability gammanet >/= 0.06 (x3//2). In a second series of experiments, HNO3 uptake on CaCO3 particles of the same size was examined over a wide range of relative humidity, from 10 to 80%. The net reaction probability was found to increase with increasing relative humidity, from gammanet >/= 0.003 at RH = 10% to 0.21 at 80%.

  4. Investigation of proton induced reactions on niobium at low and medium energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Hermanne, A.; Corniani, E.; Takács, S.; Tárkányi, F.; Csikai, J.; Shubin, Yu. N.

    2009-10-01

    Niobium is a metal with important technological applications: use as alloying element to increase strength of super alloys, as thin layer for tribological applications, as superconductive material, in high temperature engineering systems, etc. In the frame of a systematic study of activation cross-sections of charged particle induced reactions on structural materials proton induced excitation functions on Nb targets were determined with the aim of applications in accelerator and reactor technology and for thin layer activation (TLA). The charged particle activation cross-sections on this element are also important for yield calculation of medical isotope production ( 88,89Zr, 86,87,88Y) and for dose estimation in PET targetry. As niobium is a monoisotopic element it is an ideal target material to test nuclear reaction theories. We present here the experimental excitation functions of 93Nb(p,x) 90,93mMo, 92m,91m,90Nb, 88,89Zr and 88Y in the energy range 0-37 MeV. The results were compared with the theoretical cross-sections calculated by means of the code ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE-3, TALYS and with the literature data. The theory reproduces the shape of the measured results well and magnitude is also acceptable. Thick target yields calculated from our fitted cross-section give reliable estimations for production of medically relevant radioisotopes and for dose estimation in accelerator technology.

  5. A deterministic particle method for one-dimensional reaction-diffusion equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mascagni, Michael

    1995-01-01

    We derive a deterministic particle method for the solution of nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations in one spatial dimension. This deterministic method is an analog of a Monte Carlo method for the solution of these problems that has been previously investigated by the author. The deterministic method leads to the consideration of a system of ordinary differential equations for the positions of suitably defined particles. We then consider the time explicit and implicit methods for this system of ordinary differential equations and we study a Picard and Newton iteration for the solution of the implicit system. Next we solve numerically this system and study the discretization error both analytically and numerically. Numerical computation shows that this deterministic method is automatically adaptive to large gradients in the solution.

  6. Reaction kinetics of diffusing particles injected into a d-dimensional reactive substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larralde, H.; Lereah, Y.; Trunfio, P.; Dror, J.; Havlin, S.; Rosenbaum, R.; Stanley, H. E.

    1993-03-01

    We study a system in which diffusing particles (species A) are injected into a reactive d-dimensional substrate (species B) at rate λ, with the rule that A+B-->C (inert). The amount of species C, C(t), and the number of surviving A particles, A(t), are calculated for substrate dimensions d=1, 2, and 3. We find the surprising results A(t)~t2/3 for d=3 and C(t)~ √t lnt for d=1. We confirm our predictions by performing Monte Carlo simulations for d=1, 2, and 3 and experiments for the reaction I2(gas)+2Ag(solid)-->2AgI(solid) for d=2.

  7. Interplay between single-particle and collective excitations in argon isotopes populated by transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Szilner, S.; Jelavic-Malenica, D.; Soic, N.; Corradi, L.; Fioretto, E.; Sahin, E.; Silvestri, R.; Stefanini, A. M.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Haas, F.; Lebhertz, D.; Bouhelal, M.; Caurier, E.; Courtin, S.; Goasduff, A.; Nowacki, F.; Ur, C. A.; Beghini, S.; Farnea, E.

    2011-07-15

    New {gamma} transitions have been identified in argon isotopes in {sup 40}Ar + {sup 208}Pb multiple transfer reactions by exploiting, in a fragment-{gamma} measurement, the new generation of magnetic spectrometers based on trajectory reconstruction coupled to large {gamma} arrays. The coupling of single-particle degrees of freedom to nuclear vibration quanta was discussed. The interpretation of the newly observed states within a particle-phonon coupling picture was used to consistently follow, via their excitation energies, the evolution of collectivity in odd Ar isotopes. The proposed level schemes are supported by the results of sd-pf shell-model calculations, which have been also employed to evaluate the strength functions of the populated states.

  8. Theoretical and experimental examination of particle-particle interaction effects on induced dipole moments and dielectrophoretic responses of multiple particle chains.

    PubMed

    Moncada-Hernandez, Hector; Nagler, Eliot; Minerick, Adrienne R

    2014-07-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP), an electrokinetic phenomenon based on particle polarizations in nonuniform electric fields, is increasingly employed for particle and cell characterizations and manipulations in microdevices. However, particle number densities are rarely varied and particle-particle interactions are largely overlooked, but both affect particle's effective polarizations by changing the local electric field, which directly impacts particle assembly into chains. This work examines theoretical and experimental particle-particle interactions and dielectrophoretic responses in nonuniform electric fields, then presents individual and chain velocities of spherical polystyrene microparticles and red blood cells (RBCs) under DEP forces in a modified quadruple electrode microdevice. Velocities are independently compared between 1, 2, 3, and 4 polystyrene beads and RBCs assembled into chains aligned with the electric field. Simulations compared induced dipole moments for particles experiencing the same (single point) and changing (multiple points) electric fields. Experiments and simulations are compared by plotting DEP velocities versus applied signal frequency from 1 kHz to 80 MHz. Simulations indicate differences in the DEP force exerted on each particle according to chain position. Simulations and experiments show excellent qualitative agreement; chains with more particles experienced a decrease in the DEP response for both polystyrene beads and RBCs. These results advance understanding of the extent that induced dipole polarizations with multiple particle chains affect observed behaviors in electrokinetic cellular diagnostic systems.

  9. The lasting effect of limonene-induced particle formation on air quality in a genuine indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Rösch, Carolin; Wissenbach, Dirk K; von Bergen, Martin; Franck, Ulrich; Wendisch, Manfred; Schlink, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric ozone-terpene reactions, which form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, can affect indoor air quality when outdoor air mixes with indoor air during ventilation. This study, conducted in Leipzig, Germany, focused on limonene-induced particle formation in a genuine indoor environment (24 m(3)). Particle number, limonene and ozone concentrations were monitored during the whole experimental period. After manual ventilation for 30 min, during which indoor ozone levels reached up to 22.7 ppb, limonene was introduced into the room at concentrations of approximately 180 to 250 μg m(-3). We observed strong particle formation and growth within a diameter range of 9 to 50 nm under real-room conditions. Larger particles with diameters above 100 nm were less affected by limonene introduction. The total particle number concentrations (TPNCs) after limonene introduction clearly exceed outdoor values by a factor of 4.5 to 41 reaching maximum concentrations of up to 267,000 particles cm(-3). The formation strength was influenced by background particles, which attenuated the formation of new SOA with increasing concentration, and by ozone levels, an increase of which by 10 ppb will result in a six times higher TPNC. This study emphasizes indoor environments to be preferred locations for particle formation and growth after ventilation events. As a consequence, SOA formation can produce significantly higher amounts of particles than transported by ventilation into the indoor air.

  10. MHD-Induced Alpha Particle Loss in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Taylor, G.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.; von Goeler, S.

    1999-03-01

    MHD-induced increases in alpha particle loss to the wall were observed for both coherent modes and transient reconnection events using an array of scintillator detectors near the wall of Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The magnitude of the coherent MHD-induced alpha loss as seen by these detectors was normally comparable to the MHD-quiescent first-orbit or toroidal-field ripple loss, but the magnitude of the alpha loss during reconnection events was up to 1000 times higher than this for a short time. Modeling suggest that the coherent MHD loss mechanism will be even less significant for future reactor-scale deuterium-tritium tokamaks due to the smaller ratio of the alpha gyroradius to minor radius.

  11. Multiscale simulations of anisotropic particles combining molecular dynamics and Green's function reaction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaykumar, Adithya; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2017-03-01

    The modeling of complex reaction-diffusion processes in, for instance, cellular biochemical networks or self-assembling soft matter can be tremendously sped up by employing a multiscale algorithm which combines the mesoscopic Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method with explicit stochastic Brownian, Langevin, or deterministic molecular dynamics to treat reactants at the microscopic scale [A. Vijaykumar, P. G. Bolhuis, and P. R. ten Wolde, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 214102 (2015)]. Here we extend this multiscale MD-GFRD approach to include the orientational dynamics that is crucial to describe the anisotropic interactions often prevalent in biomolecular systems. We present the novel algorithm focusing on Brownian dynamics only, although the methodology is generic. We illustrate the novel algorithm using a simple patchy particle model. After validation of the algorithm, we discuss its performance. The rotational Brownian dynamics MD-GFRD multiscale method will open up the possibility for large scale simulations of protein signalling networks.

  12. The TDF System for Thermonuclear Plasma Reaction Rates, Mean Energies and Two-Body Final State Particle Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Warshaw, S I

    2001-07-11

    The rate of thermonuclear reactions in hot plasmas as a function of local plasma temperature determines the way in which thermonuclear ignition and burning proceeds in the plasma. The conventional model approach to calculating these rates is to assume that the reacting nuclei in the plasma are in Maxwellian equilibrium at some well-defined plasma temperature, over which the statistical average of the reaction rate quantity {sigma}v is calculated, where {sigma} is the cross-section for the reaction to proceed at the relative velocity v between the reacting particles. This approach is well-understood and is the basis for much nuclear fusion and astrophysical nuclear reaction rate data. The Thermonuclear Data File (TDF) system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Warshaw 1991), which is the topic of this report, contains data on the Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates for various light nuclear reactions and the correspondingly Maxwellian-averaged energy spectra of the particles in the final state of those reactions as well. This spectral information closely models the output particle and energy distributions in a burning plasma, and therefore leads to more accurate computational treatments of thermonuclear burn, output particle energy deposition and diagnostics, in various contexts. In this report we review and derive the theoretical basis for calculating Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates, mean particle energies, and output particle spectral energy distributions for these reactions in the TDF system. The treatment of the kinematics is non-relativistic. The current version of the TDF system provides exit particle energy spectrum distributions for two-body final state reactions only. In a future report we will discuss and describe how output particle energy spectra for three- and four-body final states can be developed for the TDF system. We also include in this report a description of the algorithmic implementation of the

  13. Investigation of the reaction mechanism for the four-particle photodisintegration of a carbon nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanas'ev, S. N.; Gorbenko, E. S.; Khodyachikh, A. F.

    2007-05-01

    The four-particle photodisintegration of a carbon nucleus in the reactions 12C(γ, p)3H2α and 12C(γ, n)3H2α is investigated by a method that employs a diffusion chamber in a magnetic field. It is shown that these reactions proceed according a sequential-type scheme: excited states of 11B and 11C nuclei decay to weakly excited states of 8Be, 7Li, and 7Be nuclei. It is concluded that nucleons are knocked out from the s shell. In the excitation curve for the 2α system in the reaction 12C(γ, p)3H2α, a resonance is found between the maxima corresponding to the ground and the first excited state of the 8Be nucleus, and this resonance is identified as a ghost anomaly. The branching fractions of the decay modes are determined. The angular distributions of nucleons in the reaction c.m. frame are measured. The energy dependence of the asymmetry coefficient for the angular distributions is obtained. A fast increase in this coefficient is observed in the energy range 38 40 MeV. It is concluded that the asymmetry coefficient depends on the excitation energy of the final nucleus in the region of intermediate photon energies.

  14. [Adverse skin reactions induced by BRAF inhibitors: a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Sibaud, V; Lamant, L; Maisongrosse, V; Delord, J-P

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments and therapeutic use of selective BRAF inhibitors (e.g. dabrafenib and vemurafenib) have significantly improved overall survival and disease-free survival of patients with BRAF V600 mutation-positive metastatic melanoma. Despite their survival benefits, small-molecule inhibitors of BRAF are associated with significant and sometimes severe treatment-related dermatological toxicity. The most common adverse skin reactions include photosensitivity, induced malignant lesions of the skin such as keratoacanthomas, squamous cell carcinoma and new primary melanomas, as well as keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation dysfunctions that can manifest as skin papillomas, hand-foot skin reaction, keratosis pilaris-like rash, acantholytic dyskeratosis and cysts of the milia type. In this article, we describe the clinical and histological features of the cutaneous manifestations induced by vemurafenib and dabrafenib on the basis of our clinical experience and a literature review. The crucial role of dermatologists in patient management is also highlighted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Reaction-induced fracturing in a hot pressed calcite-periclase aggregate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleci, H.; Ulven, O. I.; Rybacki, E.; Wunder, B.; Abart, R.

    2017-01-01

    The chemo-mechanical feedbacks associated with hydration of periclase immersed in a calcite matrix were investigated experimentally. Dense calcite-periclase aggregates with <5% porosity and with a calcite to periclase ratio of 90/10 and 95/5 by volume were prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Subsequent hydration experiments were performed in a hydrothermal apparatus at temperatures of 580-610 °C and a pressure of 200 MPa for run durations of 5-60 min. The rate of the periclase to brucite transformation was primarily controlled by the access of fluid. Where fluid was present, the reaction was too fast for the associated positive volume increase of the solids of about 100% to be accommodated by creep of the calcite matrix, and fracturing was induced. The newly formed cracks greatly enhanced the access of fluid leading to a positive feedback between hydration and fracturing. Mostly the newly formed cracks follow pre-existing grain boundaries in the calcite matrix. Comparison of experimental results with numerical 2D discrete element modelling (DEM) of crack formation revealed that the geometry of the crack pattern around a reacting particle depends on the shape of the original periclase particle, on the mechanical strength of the particle-matrix interface and on the mechanical strength and arrangement of grain boundaries in the calcite matrix in the immediate vicinity of the swelling particle.

  16. Fireworks induced particle pollution: A spatio-temporal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M.; Singh, R. K.; Murari, V.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, R. S.; Banerjee, T.

    2016-11-01

    Diwali-specific firework induced particle pollution was measured in terms of aerosol mass loading, type, optical properties and vertical distribution. Entire nation exhibited an increase in particulate concentrations specifically in Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). Aerosol surface mass loading at middle IGP revealed an increase of 56-121% during festival days in comparison to their background concentrations. Space-borne measurements (Aqua and Terra-MODIS) typically identified IGP with moderate to high AOD (0.3-0.8) during pre-festive days which transmutes to very high AOD (0.4-1.8) during Diwali-day with accumulation of aerosol fine mode fractions (0.3-1.0). Most of the aerosol surface monitoring stations exhibited increase in PM2.5 especially on Diwali-day while PM10 exhibited increase on subsequent days. Elemental compositions strongly support K, Ba, Sr, Cd, S and P to be considered as firework tracers. The upper and middle IGP revealed dominance of absorbing aerosols (OMI-AI: 0.80-1.40) while CALIPSO altitude-orbit-cross-section profiles established the presence of polluted dust which eventually modified with association of smoke and polluted continental during extreme fireworks. Diwali-specific these observations have implications on associating fireworks induced particle pollution and human health while inclusion of these observations should improve regional air quality model.

  17. Induced radioactivity in and around high-energy particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Vincke, Helmut; Theis, Chris; Roesler, Stefan

    2011-07-01

    Particle accelerators and their surroundings are locations of residual radioactivity production that is induced by the interaction of high-energy particles with matter. This paper gives an overview of the principles of activation caused at proton accelerators, which are the main machines operated at Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire. It describes the parameters defining radio-nuclide production caused by beam losses. The second part of the paper concentrates on the analytic calculation of activation and the Monte Carlo approach as it is implemented in the FLUKA code. Techniques used to obtain, on the one hand, estimates of radioactivity in Becquerel and, on the other hand, residual dose rates caused by the activated material are discussed. The last part of the paper focuses on experiments that allow for benchmarking FLUKA activation calculations and on simulations used to predict activation in and around high-energy proton machines. In that respect, the paper addresses the residual dose rate that will be induced by proton-proton collisions at an energy of two times 7 TeV in and around the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector. Besides activation of solid materials, the air activation expected in the CMS cavern caused by this beam operation is also discussed.

  18. Particle transport model sensitivity on wave-induced processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staneva, Joanna; Ricker, Marcel; Krüger, Oliver; Breivik, Oyvind; Stanev, Emil; Schrum, Corinna

    2017-04-01

    Different effects of wind waves on the hydrodynamics in the North Sea are investigated using a coupled wave (WAM) and circulation (NEMO) model system. The terms accounting for the wave-current interaction are: the Stokes-Coriolis force, the sea-state dependent momentum and energy flux. The role of the different Stokes drift parameterizations is investigated using a particle-drift model. Those particles can be considered as simple representations of either oil fractions, or fish larvae. In the ocean circulation models the momentum flux from the atmosphere, which is related to the wind speed, is passed directly to the ocean and this is controlled by the drag coefficient. However, in the real ocean, the waves play also the role of a reservoir for momentum and energy because different amounts of the momentum flux from the atmosphere is taken up by the waves. In the coupled model system the momentum transferred into the ocean model is estimated as the fraction of the total flux that goes directly to the currents plus the momentum lost from wave dissipation. Additionally, we demonstrate that the wave-induced Stokes-Coriolis force leads to a deflection of the current. During the extreme events the Stokes velocity is comparable in magnitude to the current velocity. The resulting wave-induced drift is crucial for the transport of particles in the upper ocean. The performed sensitivity analyses demonstrate that the model skill depends on the chosen processes. The results are validated using surface drifters, ADCP, HF radar data and other in-situ measurements in different regions of the North Sea with a focus on the coastal areas. The using of a coupled model system reveals that the newly introduced wave effects are important for the drift-model performance, especially during extremes. Those effects cannot be neglected by search and rescue, oil-spill, transport of biological material, or larva drift modelling.

  19. Macromolecular prodrug of dexamethasone prevents particle-induced peri-implant osteolysis with reduced systemic side effects

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Ke; Dusad, Anand; Yuan, Fang; Yuan, Hongjiang; Purdue, P. Edward; Fehringer, Edward V.; Garvin, Kevin L.; Goldring, Steven R.; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Aseptic implant loosening related to implant wear particle-induced inflammation is the most common cause of failure after joint replacement. Modulation of the inflammatory reaction to the wear products represents a rational approach for preventing aseptic implant failure. Long-term treatment using anti-inflammatory agents, however, can be associated with significant systemic side effects due to the drugs' lack of tissue specificity. To address this issue, N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer-dexamethasone conjugate (P-Dex) was developed and evaluated for prevention of wear particle-induced osteolysis and the loss of fixation in a murine prosthesis failure model. Daily administration of free dexamethasone (Dex) was able to prevent wear particle-induced osteolysis, as assessed by micro-CT and histological analysis. Remarkably, monthly P-Dex administration (dose equivalent to free Dex treatment) was equally effective as free dexamethasone, but was not associated with systemic bone loss (a major adverse side effect of glucocorticoids). The reduced systemic toxicity of P-Dex is related to preferential targeting of the sites of wear particle-induced inflammation and its subcellular sequestration and retention by local inflammatory cell populations, resulting in sustained therapeutic action. These results demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing a macromolecular prodrug with reduced systemic toxicity to prevent wear particle-induced osteolysis. PMID:24326124

  20. Eugenol attenuates pulmonary damage induced by diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Zin, Walter A; Silva, Ana G L S; Magalhães, Clarissa B; Carvalho, Giovanna M C; Riva, Douglas R; Lima, Crystianne C; Leal-Cardoso, Jose H; Takiya, Christina M; Valença, Samuel S; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Faffe, Débora S

    2012-03-01

    Environmentally relevant doses of inhaled diesel particles elicit pulmonary inflammation and impair lung mechanics. Eugenol, a methoxyphenol component of clove oil, presents in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Our aim was to examine a possible protective role of eugenol against lung injuries induced by diesel particles. Male BALB/c mice were divided into four groups. Mice received saline (10 μl in; CTRL group) or 15 μg of diesel particles DEP (15 μg in; DIE and DEUG groups). After 1 h, mice received saline (10 μl; CTRL and DIE groups) or eugenol (164 mg/kg; EUG and DEUG group) by gavage. Twenty-four hours after gavage, pulmonary resistive (ΔP1), viscoelastic (ΔP2) and total (ΔPtot) pressures, static elastance (Est), and viscoelastic component of elastance (ΔE) were measured. We also determined the fraction areas of normal and collapsed alveoli, amounts of polymorpho- (PMN) and mononuclear cells in lung parenchyma, apoptosis, and oxidative stress. Est, ΔP2, ΔPtot, and ΔE were significantly higher in the DIE than in the other groups. DIE also showed significantly more PMN, airspace collapse, and apoptosis than the other groups. However, no beneficial effect on lipid peroxidation was observed in DEUG group. In conclusion, eugenol avoided changes in lung mechanics, pulmonary inflammation, and alveolar collapse elicited by diesel particles. It attenuated the activation signal of caspase-3 by DEP, but apoptosis evaluated by TUNEL was avoided. Finally, it could not avoid oxidative stress as indicated by malondialdehyde.

  1. 2p1v states populated in 135Te from 9Be induced reactions with a 132Sn beam

    SciTech Connect

    Allmond, James M; Stuchbery, Andrew E; Brown, Alex; Beene, James R; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Gross, Carl J; Liang, J Felix; Padilla-Rodal, Elizabeth; Radford, David C; Varner Jr, Robert L; Ayres, A.; Batchelder, J. C.; Bey, A.; Bingham, C. R.; Howard, Meredith E; Jones, K. L.; Manning, Brett M; Mueller, Paul Edward; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Pain, Steven D; Peters, William A; Ratkiewicz, Andrew J; Schmitt, Kyle; Shapira, Dan; Smith, Michael Scott; Stone, N. J.; Stracener, Daniel W; Yu, Chang-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-ray transitions in $^{134}$\\textrm{Te}, $^{135}$\\textrm{Te}, and $^{136}$\\textrm{Te} were measured from $^{9}$\\textrm{Be} induced reactions with a radioactive $^{132}$\\textrm{Sn} beam at a sub-Coulomb barrier energy of $3$~MeV per nucleon using particle-$\\gamma$ coincidence spectroscopy. The transitions were selected by gating on alpha-like particles in a \\textrm{CsI} detector following a combination of ($^{9}$\\textrm{Be},$\\alpha 1n$), ($^{9}$\\textrm{Be},$\\alpha 2n$), and ($^{9}$\\textrm{Be},$\\alpha 3n$) reactions. Distorted wave Born approximation calculations suggest little to no contribution from the ($^{9}$\\textrm{Be},$^{7}$\\textrm{He}), ($^{9}$\\textrm{Be},$^{6}$\\textrm{He}), and ($^{9}$\\textrm{Be},$^{5}$\\textrm{He}) direct reactions. Gamma-ray transitions from previously known $2^+\\otimes \

  2. Projectile-breakup-induced fission-fragment angular distributions in the 6Li+232Th reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, A.; Santra, S.; Chattopadhyay, D.; Kundu, A.; Ramachandran, K.; Tripathi, R.; Roy, B. J.; Nag, T. N.; Sawant, Y.; Sarkar, D.; Nayak, B. K.; Saxena, A.; Kailas, S.

    2017-08-01

    Background: Experimental anisotropy in fission-fragment (FF) angular distribution in reactions involving weakly bound stable projectiles with actinide targets are enhanced compared to statistical saddle-point model (SSPM) predictions. Contributions from breakup- or transfer-induced fission to total fission are cited as possible reasons for such enhancement. Purpose: To identify the breakup- or transfer-induced fission channels in 6Li+232Th reaction and to investigate their effects on FF angular anisotropy. Methods: The FF angular distributions have been measured exclusively at three beam energies (28, 32, and 36 MeV) around the Coulomb barrier in coincidence with projectile breakup fragments like α , d , and p using Si strip detectors. The angular anisotropy obtained for different exclusive breakup- or transfer-induced fission channels are compared with that for total fission. SSPM and pre-equilibrium fission models have been employed to obtain theoretical FF angular anisotropy. Results: Angular anisotropy of the fission fragments produced by different transfer- or breakup-induced fission reactions have been obtained separately in the rest frame of respective recoiling nuclei. Some of these anisotropies were found to be stronger than those of the inclusive fission. Overall angular distributions of transfer or breakup fission, integrated over all possible recoil angles with weight factor proportional to differential cross section of the complementary breakup fragment emitted in coincidence in all possible directions, were obtained. It was observed that the overall FF angular anisotropy for each of these fission channels is less than or equal to the anisotropy of total fission at all the measured energies. Assuming isotropic out-of-plane correlations between the fission fragments and light-charged particles, the overall breakup- or transfer-induced fission fragment angular distributions do not explain the observed enhancement in FF anisotropy of total fission. Pre

  3. Single particle refuse-derived fuel devolatilization: Experimental measurements of reaction products

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Weichuan; Krieger-Brockett, B. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    The authors present experimentally measured devolatilization product yields from single particles of refuse-derived fuel (RDF), a more uniform, transportable municipal solid waste. Disposal costs and environmental concerns have stimulated interest in thermochemical conversion of this material to chemicals and fuels. The composition, reaction conditions, and particle properties were systematically varied over the range found in practice to develop quantitative measures that rank the process controllables' influence on altering the product slate. Specialized regression methods and experimental designs enhanced the accuracy in view of the feed heterogeneity and offer a general method to extract real effects from experimental and sample noise''. The results have been verified successfully using actual commercial RDF and fabricated compositions that surpass those normally found in municipal waste to anticipate the influence of trends in recycling. The results show that the reaction conditions have a greater influence on altering fuel utilization and the relative yields of char, condensibles, and gases than does the composition over the range found in MSW and RDF.

  4. Microwave Assisted Synthesis of Ferrite Nanoparticles: Effect of Reaction Temperature on Particle Size and Magnetic Properties.

    PubMed

    Kalyani, S; Sangeetha, J; Philip, John

    2015-08-01

    The preparation of ferrite magnetic nanoparticles of different particle sizes by controlling the reaction temperature using microwave assisted synthesis is reported. The iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized at two different temperatures viz., 45 and 85 °C were characterized using techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The average size of iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized at 45 and 85 °C is found to be 10 and 13.8 nm, respectively, and the nanoparticles exhibited superparamagantic behavior at room temperature. The saturation magnetization values of nanoparticles synthesized at 45 and 85 °C were found to be 67 and 72 emu/g, respectively. The increase in particle size and saturation magnetization values with increase in incubation temperature is attributed to a decrease in supersaturation at elevated temperature. The Curie temperature was found to be 561 and 566 0C for the iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized at 45 and 85 °C, respectively. The FTIR spectrum of the iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized at different temperatures exhibited the characteristic peaks that corresponded to the stretching of bonds between octahedral and tetrahedral metal ions to oxide ions. Our results showed that the ferrite nanoparticle size can be varied by controlling the reaction temperature inside a microwave reactor.

  5. Synthesis and luminescence of silicon remnants formed by truncated glassmelt-particle reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risbud, Subhash H.; Liu, Li-Chi; Shackelford, James F.

    1993-09-01

    We have obtained nanometer sized silicon remnants sequestered in glass matrices by terminating the reaction of pure silicon powders dispersed in the viscous melt at a temperature of 1400 °C. Repeated use of this truncated melt-particle reaction process dilutes the amount and size of silicon remnants, and bulk samples containing nanosize silicon crystallites embedded in a glass matrix were eventually obtained. These quantum dot sized silicon-in-glass materials emit greenish luminescence with peak wavelengths from ≊480 to 530 nm, considerably shorter than the reddish luminescence (at about 700-850 nm) observed in porous silicon structures prepared by electrochemical etching techniques; upon complete digestion of Si particles by the melt, the luminescence peaks disappear. Since our silicon-in-glass preparation method does not involve etching, the origin of the luminescence is not likely to be due to Si-O-H compounds (e.g., siloxene) postulated recently. The location of the luminescence peaks and the observed silicon crystallite size suggest quantum confinement leading to a widened silicon band gap arising from remnants in the glass matrix smaller than the exciton diameter of bulk silicon (10 nm).

  6. Overall kinetics of heterogeneous elemental mercury reactions on TiO2 sorbent particles with UV radiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A system consisting of a photochemical reaction was used to evaluate the kinetic parameters, such as reaction order and rate constant for the elemental mercury uptake by TiO2 in the presence of uv irradiation. TiO2 particles generated by an aerosol route were used in a fixed bed...

  7. Parameterization of N2O5 Reaction Probabilities on the Surface of Particles Containing Ammonium, Sulfate, and Nitrate

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comprehensive parameterization was developed for the heterogeneous reaction probability (γ) of N2O5 as a function of temperature, relative humidity, particle composition, and phase state, for use in advanced air quality models. The reaction probabilities o...

  8. Overall kinetics of heterogeneous elemental mercury reactions on TiO2 sorbent particles with UV radiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A system consisting of a photochemical reaction was used to evaluate the kinetic parameters, such as reaction order and rate constant for the elemental mercury uptake by TiO2 in the presence of uv irradiation. TiO2 particles generated by an aerosol route were used in a fixed bed...

  9. Parameterization of N2O5 Reaction Probabilities on the Surface of Particles Containing Ammonium, Sulfate, and Nitrate

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comprehensive parameterization was developed for the heterogeneous reaction probability (γ) of N2O5 as a function of temperature, relative humidity, particle composition, and phase state, for use in advanced air quality models. The reaction probabilities o...

  10. Effect of xylose on the molecular and particle size distribution of peanut hydrolysate in Maillard reaction system.

    PubMed

    Su, Guowan; Cui, Chun; Ren, Jiaoyan; Yang, Bao; Zhao, Mouming

    2011-10-01

    The Maillard reaction is a complex series of reactions between reducing sugars and amino groups. Changing any of reaction parameters would alter the reaction pathway. This study investigated the effect of xylose concentration on the molecular and particle size distribution of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) derived from peanut hydrolysate and xylose to discuss their formation mechanism. Molecular weight and particle size distribution analyses indicated that both peptide degradation and peptide cross-linking occurred during the Maillard reaction. Heat treatment would make the high-molecular-weight peptides degrade into low-molecular-weight peptides and free amino acids. Maillard reaction increased the molecular weight and particle sizes of products as the xylose concentration increased from 1% to 4%. The study shows that both peptide degradation and peptide cross-linking occurred during the Maillard reaction. The thermal degradation product (TDP) and MRPs had significantly different molecular size distribution, and the particle size distribution of TDPs and MRPs had similar change tendency to that of the molecular size distribution. These would provide an insight into the formation mechanism of MRPs. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Integrating Geochemical Reactions with a Particle-Tracking Approach to Simulate Nitrogen Transport and Transformation in Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Z.; Welty, C.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    Lagrangian, particle-tracking models are commonly used to simulate solute advection and dispersion in aquifers. They are computationally efficient and suffer from much less numerical dispersion than grid-based techniques, especially in heterogeneous and advectively-dominated systems. Although particle-tracking models are capable of simulating geochemical reactions, these reactions are often simplified to first-order decay and/or linear, first-order kinetics. Nitrogen transport and transformation in aquifers involves both biodegradation and higher-order geochemical reactions. In order to take advantage of the particle-tracking approach, we have enhanced an existing particle-tracking code SLIM-FAST, to simulate nitrogen transport and transformation in aquifers. The approach we are taking is a hybrid one: the reactive multispecies transport process is operator split into two steps: (1) the physical movement of the particles including the attachment/detachment to solid surfaces, which is modeled by a Lagrangian random-walk algorithm; and (2) multispecies reactions including biodegradation are modeled by coupling multiple Monod equations with other geochemical reactions. The coupled reaction system is solved by an ordinary differential equation solver. In order to solve the coupled system of equations, after step 1, the particles are converted to grid-based concentrations based on the mass and position of the particles, and after step 2 the newly calculated concentration values are mapped back to particles. The enhanced particle-tracking code is capable of simulating subsurface nitrogen transport and transformation in a three-dimensional domain with variably saturated conditions. Potential application of the enhanced code is to simulate subsurface nitrogen loading to the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. Implementation details, verification results of the enhanced code with one-dimensional analytical solutions and other existing numerical models will be presented in

  12. Calculated differential and double differential cross section of DT neutron induced reactions on natural chromium (Cr)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajput, Mayank; Vala, Sudhirsinh; Srinivasan, R.; Abhangi, M.; Subhash, P. V.; Pandey, B.; Rao, C. V. S.; Bora, D.

    2017-07-01

    Chromium is an important alloying element of stainless steel (SS) and SS is the main constituent of structural material proposed for fusion reactors. Energy and double differential cross section data will be required to estimate nuclear responses in the materials used in fusion reactors. There are no experimental data of energy and double differential cross section, available for neutron induced reactions on natural chromium at 14 MeV neutron energy. In this study, energy and double differential cross section data of (n,p) and (n,α) reactions for all the stable isotopes of chromium have been estimated, using appropriate nuclear models in TALYS code. The cross section data of stable isotopes are later converted into the energy and double differential cross section data of natural Cr using the isotopic abundance. The contribution from compound, pre-equilibrium and direct nuclear reaction to total reaction have also been calculated for 52,50Cr(n,p) and 52Cr(n,α). The calculation of energy differential cross section shows that most of emitted protons and alpha particles are of 3 and 8 MeV respectively. The calculated data is compared with the data from EXFOR data library and is found to be in good agreement.

  13. Detecting and Number Counting of Single Engineered Nanoparticles by Digital Particle Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Paunescu, Daniela; Mora, Carlos A; Querci, Lorenzo; Heckel, Reinhard; Puddu, Michela; Hattendorf, Bodo; Günther, Detlef; Grass, Robert N

    2015-10-27

    The concentrations of nanoparticles present in colloidal dispersions are usually measured and given in mass concentration (e.g. mg/mL), and number concentrations can only be obtained by making assumptions about nanoparticle size and morphology. Additionally traditional nanoparticle concentration measures are not very sensitive, and only the presence/absence of millions/billions of particles occurring together can be obtained. Here, we describe a method, which not only intrinsically results in number concentrations, but is also sensitive enough to count individual nanoparticles, one by one. To make this possible, the sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was combined with a binary (=0/1, yes/no) measurement arrangement, binomial statistics and DNA comprising monodisperse silica nanoparticles. With this method, individual tagged particles in the range of 60-250 nm could be detected and counted in drinking water in absolute number, utilizing a standard qPCR device within 1.5 h of measurement time. For comparison, the method was validated with single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (sp-ICPMS).

  14. Photochemical reactions of divalent mercury with thioglycolic acid: formation of mercuric sulfide particles.

    PubMed

    Si, Lin; Ariya, Parisa A

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a key toxic global pollutant. Studies in aquatic environment have suggested that thiols could be important for mercury speciation. Thioglycolic acid has been detected in various natural water systems and used as a model compound to study the complicated interaction between mercury and polyfunctional dissolved organic matter (DOM). We herein presented the first evidence for mercury particle formation during kinetic and product studies on the photochemistry of divalent mercury (Hg(2+)) with thioglycolic acid at near environmental conditions. Mercuric sulfide (HgS) particles formed upon photolysis were identified by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry and select area electron diffraction. Kinetic data were obtained using UV-visible spectrophotometry and cold vapour atomic fluorescent spectrometry. The apparent first-order reaction rate constant under our experimental conditions was calculated to be (2.3±0.4)×10(-5) s(-1) at T=296±2 K and pH 4.0. It was found that (89±3)% of the reactants undergo photoreduction to generate elemental mercury (Hg(0)). The effects of ionic strengths, pH and potassium ion were also investigated. The formation of HgS particles pointed to the possible involvement of heterogeneous processes. Our kinetic results indicated the importance of weak binding sites on DOM to Hg in photoreduction of Hg(2+) to Hg(0). The potential implications of our data on environmental mercury transformation were discussed.

  15. Modeling of advection-diffusion-reaction processes using transport dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-11-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. In particular, the transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of Lagrangian particles. To validate the proposed tDPD model and the boundary conditions, three benchmark simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions are performed, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. Also, two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems are performed and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, an application of tDPD to the spatio-temporal dynamics of blood coagulation involving twenty-five reacting species is performed to demonstrate the promising biological applications of the tDPD model. Supported by the DOE Center on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials (CM4) and an INCITE grant.

  16. [Effect of immunization on the in vivo immunocytes reaction to foreign particles in the larvae of the flesh fly Calliphora vomitoria].

    PubMed

    Kind, T V

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial immunization of Calliphora vomitoria larvae induces hemocytic defense reaction in response to abiotic foreign particles injections. This reaction depends on the larval age and, consequently, the immunocytes composition. The juvenile plasmatocytes which are abundantly present in the end feeding and crop emptying larvae are initially very active and their reaction rate does not depend on the immunization. The plasmatocytes I appear after crop emptying. Immunization has a positive effect on their differentiation rate and, correspondently, the rapid progress in the defense response. The proportion of competent plasmatocytes in immunized larvae increases. The stable hyaline cells formation also depends on immunization, although elements of this response vary at different age steps. immunization of the end feeding and crop emptying larvae induces an increase in the percentage of hyaline cells, but alien particles injection does not provide additional stimulating effect. After crop emptying, immunization of wandering larvae ceases to exert an obvious direct influence, but significantly increases the sensitivity to charcoal injection. The emergence of foreign particles in the hemolymph of immunized wandering larvae causes a rapid increase in the number of hyaline cells due to prohemocytes and undifferentiated plasmatocytes differentiation.

  17. The single-particle structure around ^132Sn explored through the (d,p) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Kate

    2007-04-01

    The nuclear shell model^1, originally developed by Maria Geoppert Mayer in 1949 (Nobel Prize 1963) has been used extensively to explain the structure of nuclei. The atomic shell model describes the increased stability observed when an electron shell is filled. Correspondingly, nuclei with magic numbers of protons or neutrons (2, 8, 20, 28, 50, 82, 126) display additional stability. Only ten nuclei to date have been observed which have these standard magic numbers for both neutrons and protons, of these, half are stable or very long-lived. Many changes have been observed in nuclei as we move away from the valley of stability and it is important, both to nuclear structure physics and to understanding the synthesis of nuclei in the cosmos, to understand how these changes affect single-particle states.One exotic doubly-magic nucleus which can be produced with sufficient intensity to perform reactions on it is ^132Sn. Recent calculations^2 have shown that the structure around ^132Sn may affect the freeze out of the rapid neutron capture (r-)process, believed to occur in supernovae, which is responsible for the production of about half the nuclear species heavier than iron. By adding a neutron to a beam of ^132Sn via a transfer reaction, it is possible to study single-particle states beyond the double-shell closure. I will present results from a recent measurement of ^133Sn via the ^132Sn(d,p) reaction in inverse kinematics. [1] Maria Goeppert Mayer, Science 145 999 (1964). [2] R. Surman and J. Engel, Phys. Rev. C 64, 035801 (2001).

  18. Polyethylene and titanium particles induce osteolysis by similar, lymphocyte-independent, mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Taki, Naoya; Tatro, Joscelyn M; Nalepka, Jennifer L; Togawa, Daisuke; Goldberg, Victor M; Rimnac, Clare M; Greenfield, Edward M

    2005-03-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis is a major clinical problem that limits the long-term survival of total joint arthroplasties. Osteolysis is induced by implant-derived wear particles, primarily from the polyethylene bearing surfaces. This study examined two hypotheses. First, that similar mechanisms are responsible for osteolysis induced by polyethylene and titanium particles. Second, that lymphocytes do not play a major role in particle-induced osteolysis. To test these hypotheses, we used the murine calvarial model that we have previously used to examine titanium-induced osteolysis. Polyethylene particles rapidly induced osteolysis in the murine calvaria 5-7 days after implantation. The polyethylene-induced osteolysis was associated with large numbers of osteoclasts as well as the formation of a thick periosteal fibrous tissue layer with numerous macrophages containing phagocytosed polyethylene particles. Polyethylene-induced osteolysis was rapidly repaired and was undetectable by day 21 after implantation. Lymphocytes were noted in the fibrous layer of wild-type mice. However, the amount of osteolysis and cytokine production induced by polyethylene particles was not substantially affected by the lack of lymphocytes in Pfp/Rag2 double knock out mice. All of these findings are similar to our observations of osteolysis induced by titanium particles. These results provide strong support for both of our hypotheses: that similar mechanisms are responsible for osteolysis induced by polyethylene and titanium particles and that lymphocytes do not play a major role in particle-induced osteolysis.

  19. Reactions induced by low energy electrons in cryogenic films (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, A. D.; Sanche, L.

    2003-03-01

    We review recent research on reactions (including dissociation) initiated by low-energy electron bombardment of monolayer and multilayer molecular solids at cryogenic temperatures. With incident electrons of energies below 20 eV, dissociation is observed by the electron stimulated desorption (ESD) of anions from target films and is attributed to the processes of dissociative electron attachment (DEA) and to dipolar dissociation. It is shown that DEA to condensed molecules is sensitive to environmental factors such as the identity of co-adsorbed species and film morphology. The effects of image-charge induced polarization on cross sections for DEA to CH3Cl are also discussed. Taking as example, the electron-induced production of CO within multilayer films of methanol and acetone, it is shown that the detection of electronic excited states by high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy can be used to monitor electron beam damage. In particular, the incident energy dependence of the CO indicates that below 19 eV, dissociation proceeds via the decay of transient negative ions (TNI) into electronically excited dissociative states. The electron-induced dissociation of biomolecular targets is also considered, taking as examples the ribose analog tetrahydrofuran and DNA bases adenine and thymine, cytosine and guanine. The ESD of anions from such films also show dissociation via the formation of TNI. In multilayer molecular solids, fragment species resulting from dissociation, may react with neighboring molecules, as is demonstrated in anion ESD measurements from films containing O2 and various hydrocarbon molecules. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements reported for electron-irradiated monolayers of H2O and CF4 on a Si-H passivated surface further show that DEA is an important initial step in the electron-induced chemisorption of fragment species.

  20. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection-diffusion-reaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-07-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of these Lagrangian particles. An analytical formula is proposed to relate the tDPD parameters to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the conventional DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers.

  1. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection-diffusion-reaction problems

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-01-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of these Lagrangian particles. An analytical formula is proposed to relate the tDPD parameters to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the conventional DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers. PMID:26156459

  2. Laser induced sonofusion: A new road toward thermonuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadighi-Bonabi, Rasoul; Gheshlaghi, Maryam

    2016-03-01

    The Possibility of the laser assisted sonofusion is studied via single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) in Deuterated acetone (C3D6O) using quasi-adiabatic and hydro-chemical simulations at the ambient temperatures of 0 and -28.5 °C. The interior temperature of the produced bubbles in Deuterated acetone is 1.6 × 106 K in hydro-chemical model and it is reached up to 1.9 × 106 K in the laser induced SBSL bubbles. Under these circumstances, temperature up to 107 K can be produced in the center of the bubble in which the thermonuclear D-D fusion reactions are promising under the controlled conditions.

  3. Dynamics of adsorbate rotation in electron-induced reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhixin; Anggara, Kelvin; Polanyi, John C.

    2017-09-01

    Molecular rotors at surfaces are of current interest. Here we employ molecular dynamics to examine rotation in the chemisorbed product, meta-iodophenyl, from electron-induced reaction of meta-diiodobenzene at a noble metal (M(1 1 0)). Electron attachment gives iodophenyl that rotates unidirectionally ('clockwise') around a carbon-metal (C-M) 'pivot bond', due to I-M attractions. Mobility is enhanced by tilting the phenyl. During rotation the I-atom of iodophenyl bounces off successive M-atoms. As M changes from Cu to Ag to Au, the surface increasingly damps the bounce, diminishing rotation. Reconstruction of the gold can cause the atomic pivot-point to shift substantially, thereby giving opposite 'anticlockwise' rotation.

  4. Laser induced sonofusion: A new road toward thermonuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sadighi-Bonabi, Rasoul; Gheshlaghi, Maryam

    2016-03-15

    The Possibility of the laser assisted sonofusion is studied via single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) in Deuterated acetone (C{sub 3}D{sub 6}O) using quasi-adiabatic and hydro-chemical simulations at the ambient temperatures of 0 and −28.5 °C. The interior temperature of the produced bubbles in Deuterated acetone is 1.6 × 10{sup 6} K in hydro-chemical model and it is reached up to 1.9 × 10{sup 6} K in the laser induced SBSL bubbles. Under these circumstances, temperature up to 10{sup 7} K can be produced in the center of the bubble in which the thermonuclear D-D fusion reactions are promising under the controlled conditions.

  5. A Transport Model for Nuclear Reactions Induced by Radioactive Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li Baoan; Chen Liewen; Das, Champak B.; Das Gupta, Subal; Gale, Charles; Ko, C.M.; Yong, G.-C.; Zuo Wei

    2005-10-14

    Major ingredients of an isospin and momentum dependent transport model for nuclear reactions induced by radioactive beams are outlined. Within the IBUU04 version of this model we study several experimental probes of the equation of state of neutron-rich matter, especially the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. Comparing with the recent experimental data from NSCL/MSU on isospin diffusion, we found a nuclear symmetry energy of Esym({rho}) {approx_equal} 31.6({rho}/{rho}0)1.05 at subnormal densities. Predictions on several observables sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy at supranormal densities accessible at GSI and the planned Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) are also made.

  6. Structure effects on reaction mechanisms in collisions induced by radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Pietro, A. Di Figuera, P.; Scuderi, V.; Amorini, F.; Angulo, C.; Cardella, G.; Casarejos, E.; Cherubini, S.; Lu, J.; Marchetta, C.; Musumarra, A.; Papa, M.; Pellegriti, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Raabe, R.; Rizzo, F.; Sida, J. L.; Tian, W.

    2006-08-15

    The present paper concerns the study of reactions induced by radioactive beams of halo and weakly bound nuclei at energies around and above the Coulomb barrier. The results obtained for the reaction induced by the halo nucleus {sup 6}He on {sup 64}Zn have been compared with the results for the reaction induced by {sup 4}He on the same target. The results of the reaction induced by the weakly bound unstable {sup 13}N on the weakly bound {sup 9}Be have been compared with those for the reaction {sup 10}B + {sup 12}C.

  7. particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yu; Chen, Zhihong; Zhang, Zhengguo; Fang, Xiaoming; Liang, Guozheng

    2014-05-01

    We explore a facile and nontoxic hydrothermal route for synthesis of a Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material by using l-cysteine as the sulfur source and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as the complexing agent. The effects of the amount of EDTA, the mole ratio of the three metal ions, and the hydrothermal temperature and time on the phase composition of the obtained product have been systematically investigated. The addition of EDTA and an excessive dose of ZnCl2 in the hydrothermal reaction system favor the generation of kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4. Pure kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 has been synthesized at 180°C for 12 h from the reaction system containing 2 mmol of EDTA at 2:2:1 of Cu/Zn/Sn. It is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy that those binary and ternary phases are absent in the kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 product. The kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 material synthesized by the hydrothermal process consists of flower-like particles with 250 to 400 nm in size. It is revealed that the flower-like particles are assembled from single-crystal Cu2ZnSnS4 nanoflakes with ca. 20 nm in size. The band gap of the Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material is estimated to be 1.55 eV. The films fabricated from the hierarchical Cu2ZnSnS4 particles exhibit fast photocurrent responses under intermittent visible-light irradiation, implying that they show potentials for use in solar cells and photocatalysis.

  8. UV-induced reaction kinetics of dilinoleoylphosphatidylethanolamine monolayers.

    PubMed Central

    Viitala, T; Peltonen, J

    1999-01-01

    The UV-induced reactivity of dilinoleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DLiPE) Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett films has been studied by in situ measurements of the changes in the mean molecular area, UV-vis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Optimum orientation and packing density of the DLiPE molecules in the monolayer were achieved by adding uranyl acetate to the subphase. A first-order reaction kinetic model was successfully fitted to the experimental reaction kinetics data obtained at a surface pressure of 30 mN/m. Topographical studies of LB films by AFM were performed on bilayer structures as a function of subphase composition and UV irradiation time. The orientational effect of the uranyl ions on the monolayer molecules was observed as an enhanced homogeneity of the freshly prepared monomeric LB films. However, the long-term stability of these films proved to be bad; clear reorganization and loss of a true monolayer structure were evidenced by the AFM images. This instability was inhibited for the UV-irradiated films, indicating that the UV irradiation gave rise to a cross-linked structure. PMID:10233096

  9. Neutron-Induced Reactions and Spectroscopy with GEANIE

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, J A; Nelson, R O

    2005-01-11

    A large number of partial {gamma}-ray cross sections produced in neutron-induced reactions with neutrons in the energy range 1 < E{sub n}(MeV) < 200 have been measured over the past eight years. Partial {gamma}-ray cross sections are measured as a function of incident neutron energy using the time-of-flight technique. Reaction channel cross sections were deduced from these measurements with the aid of nuclear modeling. Enabling facilities are the intense 'white' source of neutrons at the LANSCE/WNR 60R 20-meter flight path, and the precision {gamma}-ray spectrometry of the Compton-suppressed Ge detector array GEANIE. The first focus of the measurements was on the {sup 239}Pu(n,2n) cross section, followed by a series of other experiments on nuclei throughout the periodic table, with an emphasis on neutron-fluence activation detectors (or 'RadChem detectors'). Representative measurements will be presented, along with the techniques. Experiments in progress and future plans are mentioned.

  10. Neutron-Induced Reactions and Spectroscopy with GEANIE

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, J.A.; Nelson, R.O.

    2005-05-24

    A large number of partial {gamma}-ray cross sections produced in neutron-induced reactions with neutrons in the energy range 1 < En (MeV) < 200 have been measured over the past eight years. Partial {gamma}-ray cross sections are measured as a function of incident neutron energy using the time-of-flight technique. Reaction channel cross sections were deduced from these measurements with the aid of nuclear modeling. Enabling facilities are the intense 'white' source of neutrons at the LANSCE/WNR 60R 20-meter flight path, and the precision {gamma}-ray spectrometry of the Compton-suppressed Ge detector array GEANIE. The first focus of the measurements was on the 239Pu(n,2n) cross section, followed by a series of other experiments on nuclei throughout the periodic table, with an emphasis on neutron-fluence activation detectors (or 'RadChem detectors'). Representative measurements will be presented, along with the techniques. Experiments in progress and future plans are mentioned.

  11. Visual phenomena induced by cosmic rays and accelerated particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, C. A.; Budinger, T. F.; Leith, J. T.; Mamoon, A.; Chapman, P. K.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments, conducted at cyclotrons together with observations by Apollo astronauts, suggest with little doubt that cosmic nuclei interacting with the visual apparatus cause the phenomenon of light flashes seen on translunar and transearth coast over the past four Apollo missions. Other experiments with high and low energy neutrons and a helium ion beam suggest that slow protons and helium ions with a stopping power greater than 10 to the 8th power eV/gram sq cm can cause the phenomenon in the dark adapted eye. It was demonstrated that charged particles induced by neutrons and helium ions can stimulate the visual apparatus. Some approaches to understanding the long term mission effects of galactic cosmic nuclei interacting with man and his nervous system are outlined.

  12. Particle simulation of fluctuation-induced anomalous plasma diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sydora, R.D.

    1995-04-01

    In present toroidal magnetic confinement devices for fusion such as the tokamak, classical transport theory and Monte Carlo simulations both predict energy and particle confinement times longer than those measured by factors of about 30-50 for electrons and about 3-10 for the ions. Fluctuation-induced anomalous transport mechanisms can fully account for these collisionless losses and a detailed study of microinstabilities and plasma turbulence in the core plasma region requires a kinetic treatment. In this talk recent progress in particle-based simulation models using finite-gyroradius modified drift equations of motion coupled to Maxwell`s equations is outlined. Two classes of models are described; local models designed to simulate annular slice regions of the plasma and global models which include the full thermal and density inhomogeneity profiles. Results of turbulence calculations are presented from current topics of active theoretical and experimental interest, namely, the Bohm versus gyroradius-reduced Bohm thermal diffusivity scaling based on long wavelength microinstabilities, spatial intermittency development in core plasma turbulence, and mean flow generation and damping from long wavelength fluctuations. The impact of massive parallel computers on this area of research is also addressed as well as the future outlook.

  13. Excitation of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes by energetic particles and fusion alpha particles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1992-07-01

    The stability of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) in the presence of fusion alpha particles or energetic ions in tokamaks is investigated. The TAE modes are discrete in nature and thus can easily tap the free energy associated with energetic particle pressure gradient through wave particle resonant interaction. A quadratic form is derived for the high-n TAE modes using gyro-kinetic equation. The kinetic effects of energetic particles are calculated perturbatively using the ideal MHD solution as the lowest order eigenfunction. The finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects and the finite drift orbit width (FDW) effects are included for both circulating and trapped energetic particles. It is shown that, for circulating particles, FLR and FDW effects have two opposite influences on the stability of the high-n TAE modes. First, they have the usual stabilizing effects by reducing the wave particle interaction strength. Second, they also have destabilizing effects by allowing more particles to resonate with the TAE modes. It is found that the growth rate induced by the circulating alpha particles increase linearly with toroidal mode number n for small {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}}, and decreases as 1/n for {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} {much_gt} 1. The maximum growth rate is obtained at {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} on the order of unity and is nearly constant for the range of 0.7 < {upsilon}{sub {alpha}}/{upsilon}{sub A} < 2.5. On the other hand, the trapped particle response is dominated by the precessional drift resonance. The bounce resonant contribution is negligible. The growth rate peaks sharply at the value of {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} such that the precessional drift resonance occurs for the most energetic trapped particles. The maximum growth rate due to the energetic trapped particles is comparable to that of circulating particles.

  14. Excitation of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes by energetic particles and fusion alpha particles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1992-07-01

    The stability of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) in the presence of fusion alpha particles or energetic ions in tokamaks is investigated. The TAE modes are discrete in nature and thus can easily tap the free energy associated with energetic particle pressure gradient through wave particle resonant interaction. A quadratic form is derived for the high-n TAE modes using gyro-kinetic equation. The kinetic effects of energetic particles are calculated perturbatively using the ideal MHD solution as the lowest order eigenfunction. The finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects and the finite drift orbit width (FDW) effects are included for both circulating and trapped energetic particles. It is shown that, for circulating particles, FLR and FDW effects have two opposite influences on the stability of the high-n TAE modes. First, they have the usual stabilizing effects by reducing the wave particle interaction strength. Second, they also have destabilizing effects by allowing more particles to resonate with the TAE modes. It is found that the growth rate induced by the circulating alpha particles increase linearly with toroidal mode number n for small {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}}, and decreases as 1/n for {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} {much gt} 1. The maximum growth rate is obtained at {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} on the order of unity and is nearly constant for the range of 0.7 < {upsilon}{sub {alpha}}/{upsilon}{sub A} < 2.5. On the other hand, the trapped particle response is dominated by the precessional drift resonance. The bounce resonant contribution is negligible. The growth rate peaks sharply at the value of {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} such that the precessional drift resonance occurs for the most energetic trapped particles. The maximum growth rate due to the energetic trapped particles is comparable to that of circulating particles.

  15. The Troublemaker In The Back: Equilibrium And Sources Of Particle Back-reaction In FRW Universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Benoit Julien

    We explore various aspects of inflationary cosmologies with later work focusing on the back-reaction due to the universe's particle content. The background during the period over which inflation occurs being correctly approximated by the so-called quasi-de Sitter space, we examine the equilibration properties of a quantum scalar field placed in a spacetime which abruptly switches from a Minkowski universe to a de Sitter one. We show that the overall field's perception of the background, characterizing the equilibration procedure, is not unlike other familiar systems, provided a coarse graining incorporating enough modes. Having discussed the nature of equilibration in an inflationary background, we pursue our analysis by studying the back-reaction of numerous types of fields in assorted successful models of inflation. We first consider the back-reaction of modes with tachyonic masses in the context of Natural Inflation. Such modes are said to present the spinodal instability. Decomposing the effective potential via the Hartree approximation, we demonstrate how the tachyonic modes give rise to a second phase of inflation. Moreover, we display how accounting for the back-reaction of the tachyonic modes lifts the ban on sub-Planckian field excursions, while maintaining Natural Inflation's concordance with the data. We further the previous analysis to additional inflationary models. In the process, we elaborate a scheme to transform the potentials pertaining to the theories at hand, so as to incorporate the effect of long-wavelength modes. The latter are the ones that possess the spinodal instability and, as such, are responsible for the back-reaction onto the background. Our method allows us to obtain two-field effective potentials which are ultimately used to observe how the long-wavelength modes affect two cosmological parameters: the tensor-to-scalar ratio and the spectral tilt. We end with a discussion of the back-reaction due to the existence of fermions. We

  16. Radiation reaction on a classical charged particle: a modified form of the equation of motion.

    PubMed

    Alcaine, Guillermo García; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J

    2013-09-01

    We present and numerically solve a modified form of the equation of motion for a charged particle under the influence of an external force, taking into account the radiation reaction. This covariant equation is integro-differential, as Dirac-Röhrlich's, but has several technical improvements. First, the equation has the form of Newton's second law, with acceleration isolated on the left hand side and the force depending only on positions and velocities: Thus, the equation is linear in the highest derivative. Second, the total four-force is by construction perpendicular to the four-velocity. Third, if the external force vanishes for all future times, the total force and the acceleration automatically vanish at the present time. We show the advantages of this equation by solving it numerically for several examples of external force.

  17. Radiation reaction on a classical charged particle: A modified form of the equation of motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaine, Guillermo García; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.

    2013-09-01

    We present and numerically solve a modified form of the equation of motion for a charged particle under the influence of an external force, taking into account the radiation reaction. This covariant equation is integro-differential, as Dirac-Röhrlich's, but has several technical improvements. First, the equation has the form of Newton's second law, with acceleration isolated on the left hand side and the force depending only on positions and velocities: Thus, the equation is linear in the highest derivative. Second, the total four-force is by construction perpendicular to the four-velocity. Third, if the external force vanishes for all future times, the total force and the acceleration automatically vanish at the present time. We show the advantages of this equation by solving it numerically for several examples of external force.

  18. Expanded cumuli induce acrosome reaction in boar sperm.

    PubMed

    Mattioli, M; Lucidi, P; Barboni, B

    1998-12-01

    The authors investigated acrosomal changes occurring in boar sperm that interact with the expanded cumulus matrix surrounding ovulated pig oocytes. Samples of washed boar sperm obtained from six donors were incubated for 4 hr under capacitating conditions and exposed either to solubilized zonae pellucidae (ZP) or solubilized expanded pig cumuli (SEC) obtained from IVM oocytes. Alternatively, hyaluronic acid, laminin, or fibronectin, components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) were added to capacitated sperm. Acrosomal integrity was evaluated 1 hr later by using FITC-PSA staining. Solubilized cumuli induced acrosome reaction (AR) in a dose-dependent manner with a saturating effect exerted at 2.5 SEC/50 microl. Both 500 nM fibronectin and 500 nM laminin stimulated acrosomal exocytosis, the latter being more effective and inducing saturating levels of AR. By contrast, hyaluronic acid did not affect acrosomal status. Preincubation with anti-laminin antibodies completely prevented the inducing activity of SEC without affecting the activity of solubilized ZP. Consistent with these data, the integrin VLA-6, a receptor with high affinity for laminin, was detected by immunoblotting on the plasma membrane of capacitated boar spermatozoa. In addition, its immunoneutralization, obtained with the preincubation of capacitated sperm with the antibody raised against the alpha chain of VLA-6 integrin, prevented AR upon exposure to laminin or SEC (10.7+/-3.2 and 10.2+/-1.0% respectively), while the samples retained their responsiveness to ZP (29.6+/-1.2%). The results demonstrate that the interaction between laminin, entrapped in the expanded cumuli, and specific integrins present on the sperm membrane can initiate AR, thus taking part in the process of sperm-egg recognition.

  19. Understanding the synthesis of mesoporous silica particles by evaporation induced self assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathod, Shailendra B.

    2007-12-01

    Evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA) of amphiphilic molecules within aerosol droplets is an attractive method for synthesis of mesoporous silica particles. The aim of this research was to demonstrate synthetic methodologies to develop novel particle architectures using this technique, and to understand the influence of the competing dynamics within an evaporating droplet undergoing EISA on the particle morphology and mesostructure. Experiments were conducted to control particle characteristics. Particle size and distribution was varied by varying the size and distribution of starting droplets. The compressed gas atomizer, TSI 3076, gave a roughly micron-sized droplets with a polydisperse population, whereas the vibrating orifice aerosol generator (VOAG), TSI 3450, gave a highly monodisperse droplet population when orifices of diameters 10 mum and 20 mum were used. The mesopore size and mesostructure ordering were varied by employing amphiphiles of different geometry and by the use of 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene, a pore-swelling agent. The extent of ordering was influenced by factors that govern the rates of reactions of the silica precursors relative to the rates of amphiphile self-assembly. These factors included acid concentration, the alkyl group in the tetraalkoxysilane precursor, the time for which the sol was aged before droplet generation, and CTAB/Si ratio in the starting sol. Experiments and simulation studies were carried out for particles made using CTAB as the templating agent and TMB as a pore-swelling agent. Analysis of these experiments was used to get insight into the three main dynamic processes occurring inside these droplets: evaporation of the volatile species, amphiphile self-assembly and phase transformation, and hydrolysis and condensation reactions of the silica precursor species. Pore swelling was observed for particles made using the VOAG. Particles made using the 10 mum orifice retained their hexagonal mesostructure upon addition of TMB in

  20. Influence of exothermic chemical reactions on laser-induced shock waves.

    PubMed

    Gottfried, Jennifer L

    2014-10-21

    Differences in the excitation of non-energetic and energetic residues with a 900 mJ, 6 ns laser pulse (1064 nm) have been investigated. Emission from the laser-induced plasma of energetic materials (e.g. triaminotrinitrobenzene [TATB], cyclotrimethylene trinitramine [RDX], and hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane [CL-20]) is significantly reduced compared to non-energetic materials (e.g. sugar, melamine, and l-glutamine). Expansion of the resulting laser-induced shock wave into the air above the sample surface was imaged on a microsecond timescale with a high-speed camera recording multiple frames from each laser shot; the excitation of energetic materials produces larger heat-affected zones in the surrounding atmosphere (facilitating deflagration of particles ejected from the sample surface), results in the formation of additional shock fronts, and generates faster external shock front velocities (>750 m s(-1)) compared to non-energetic materials (550-600 m s(-1)). Non-explosive materials that undergo exothermic chemical reactions in air at high temperatures such as ammonium nitrate and magnesium sulfate produce shock velocities which exceed those of the inert materials but are less than those generated by the exothermic reactions of explosive materials (650-700 m s(-1)). The most powerful explosives produced the highest shock velocities. A comparison to several existing shock models demonstrated that no single model describes the shock propagation for both non-energetic and energetic materials. The influence of the exothermic chemical reactions initiated by the pulsed laser on the velocity of the laser-induced shock waves has thus been demonstrated for the first time.

  1. Heat-induced versus particle-beam-induced chemistry in polyimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marletta, Giovanni; Iacona, Fabio

    1993-06-01

    In the present paper the relationship between chemical reactions and energy deposition mechanisms is investigated for PMDA-ODA thin films. The chemical reactions at the polymer surface and near-surface are studied by XPS technique. The effects induced by using 5 keV Ar 0 and 3 keV electrons are compared with those produced by heat treatments up to about 1000°C. In particular, we found that Ar 0 bombardment induces some simultaneous chemical mechanisms of decomposition, involving the random destruction of the monomer units. A specific reaction involving recoiling oxygen atoms has been identified. Contrary to this, the deposition of the same amount of total energy by electron irradiation seems to induce only one decomposition mechanism, consisting in the elimination of the whole imidic ring. Finally, thermal pyrolysis promotes several consecutive reactions, mainly involving decarbonylation of the imidic rings, while the phenyl rings and the ether linkages are relatively stable. The experiments show the existence of recognizable "nonconventional" chemical reactivity, whose character, in this case, seems mainly related to the collisional term of the energy loss.

  2. Influence of fragment reaction of relativistic heavy charged particles on heavy-ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Fukumura, Akifumi; Komori, Masataka; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2003-06-01

    The production of projectile fragments is one of the most important, but not yet perfectly understood, problems to be considered when planning for the utilization of high-energy heavy charged particles for radiotherapy. This paper reports our investigation of the fragments' fluence and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra produced from various incident ions using an experimental approach to reveal these physical qualities of the beams. Polymethyl methacrylate, as a substitute for the human body, was used as a target. A ΔE-E counter telescope with a plastic scintillator and a BGO scintillator made it possible to identify the species of fragments based on differences of various elements. By combining a gas-flow proportional counter with a counter telescope system, LET spectra as well as fluence spectra of the fragments were derived for each element down from the primary particles to hydrogen. Among them, the information on hydrogen and helium fragments was derived for the first time. The result revealed that the number of light fragments, such as hydrogen and helium, became larger than the number of primaries in the vicinity of the range end. However, the greater part of the dose delivered to a cell was still governed by the primaries. The calculated result of a simulation used for heavy-ion radiotherapy indicated room for improving the reaction model.

  3. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection- diffusion-reaction problems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, Li; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Karniadakis, George E.

    2015-07-07

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic DPD framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between particles, and an analytical formula is proposed to relate the mesoscopic concentration friction to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers.

  4. Feasibility of Photosensitized Reactions with Secondary Organic Aerosol Particles in the Presence of Volatile Organic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Malecha, Kurtis T; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2017-07-06

    The ability of a complex mixture of organic compounds found in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) to act as a photosensitizer in the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was investigated. Different types of SOAs were produced in a smog chamber by oxidation of various biogenic and anthropogenic VOCs. The SOA particles were collected from the chamber onto an inert substrate, and the resulting material was exposed to 365 nm radiation in an air flow containing ∼200 ppbv of limonene vapor. The mixing ratio of limonene and other VOCs in the flow was observed with a proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS). The photosensitized uptake of limonene was observed for several SOA materials, with a lower limit for the reactive uptake coefficient on the scale of ∼10(-5). The lower limit for the uptake coefficient under conditions of Los Angeles, California on the summer solstice at noon was estimated to be on the order of ∼10(-6). Photoproduction of oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) resulting from photodegradation of the SOA material also occurred in parallel with the photosensitized uptake of limonene. The estimated photosensitized limonene uptake rates by atmospheric SOA particles and vegetation surfaces appear to be too small to compete with the atmospheric oxidation of limonene by the hydroxyl radical or ozone. However, these processes could play a role in the leaf boundary layer where concentrations of oxidants are depleted and concentrations of VOCs are enhanced relative to the free atmosphere.

  5. Liquid-phase reactions induced by atmospheric pressure glow discharge with liquid electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi; Shirai, Naoki; Uchida, Satoshi

    2014-12-01

    We experimentally investigated some of the initial reactions in a liquid induced by electron or positive-ion irradiation from an atmospheric-pressure dc glow discharge in contact with the liquid. We used an H-shaped glass reactor to observe the effects of electron irradiation and positive-ion irradiation on the liquid-phase reaction separately and simultaneously. Aqueous solutions of NaCl, AgNO3, HAuCl4, and FeCl2 are used as the electrolyte. Solutions of AgNO3 and HAuCl4 are used for the generation of Ag and Au nanoparticles, respectively. Solution of FeCl2 is used for the generation of ferromagnetic particles. Experimental results showed that electron irradiation of the liquid surface generates OH- in water and that positive-ion irradiation of the liquid surface generates H+ in water even without the dissolution of gas-phase nitrogen oxide. A possible reaction process is qualitatively discussed. We also showed that the control of reductive and oxidative environment in the liquid is possible not only by the gas composition for the plasma generation but also by the liquid composition.

  6. Alpha particle induced gamma yields in uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Stephen; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Miller, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorine has a relatively large (α,n) production cross-section in the MeV range, the energy range of interest for special nuclear materials. In the uranium fuel cycle enriched UF6 in particular is a reasonably prolific source of (α,n) neutrons because along with 235U, 234U becomes enriched and it has a relatively short half-life. This enables the mass content of storage cylinders containing UF6 to be verified by neutron counting methods. In association with such measurements high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry (HRGS) measurements using a high-purity Ge detector are often undertaken to determine the 235U enrichment based off the intensity of the direct 186 keV line. The specific (α,n) neutron production, neutrons per second per gram of U, is sensitive to the relative isotopic composition, particularly the 234U concentration, and the traditional gross neutron counting approach is needed to quantitatively interpret the data. In addition to F(α,n) neutrons, α-induced reaction γ-rays are generated, notably at 110, 197, 582, 891, 1236 and 1275 keV. If one could observe 19F(α,xγ) gamma-lines in the HRGS spectra the thought was that perhaps the α-activity could be estimated directly, and in turn the 234U abundance obtained. For example, by utilizing the ratio of the detected 197-186 keV full energy peaks. However, until now there has been no readily available estimate of the expected strength of the reaction gamma-rays nor any serious consideration as to whether they might be diagnostic or not. In this work we compute the thick target yields of the chief reaction gamma-rays in UF6 using published thin target data. Comparisons are made to the neutron production rates to obtain γ/n estimates, and also to the 235U decay line at 186 keV which we take as a fiducial line. It is shown that the reaction gamma-rays are produced but are far too weak for practical safeguards purposes. Now that the underlying numerical data is readily available however, it can be used to

  7. ReaDDy--a software for particle-based reaction-diffusion dynamics in crowded cellular environments.

    PubMed

    Schöneberg, Johannes; Noé, Frank

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the software package ReaDDy for simulation of detailed spatiotemporal mechanisms of dynamical processes in the cell, based on reaction-diffusion dynamics with particle resolution. In contrast to other particle-based reaction kinetics programs, ReaDDy supports particle interaction potentials. This permits effects such as space exclusion, molecular crowding and aggregation to be modeled. The biomolecules simulated can be represented as a sphere, or as a more complex geometry such as a domain structure or polymer chain. ReaDDy bridges the gap between small-scale but highly detailed molecular dynamics or Brownian dynamics simulations and large-scale but little-detailed reaction kinetics simulations. ReaDDy has a modular design that enables the exchange of the computing core by efficient platform-specific implementations or dynamical models that are different from Brownian dynamics.

  8. ReaDDy - A Software for Particle-Based Reaction-Diffusion Dynamics in Crowded Cellular Environments

    PubMed Central

    Schöneberg, Johannes; Noé, Frank

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the software package ReaDDy for simulation of detailed spatiotemporal mechanisms of dynamical processes in the cell, based on reaction-diffusion dynamics with particle resolution. In contrast to other particle-based reaction kinetics programs, ReaDDy supports particle interaction potentials. This permits effects such as space exclusion, molecular crowding and aggregation to be modeled. The biomolecules simulated can be represented as a sphere, or as a more complex geometry such as a domain structure or polymer chain. ReaDDy bridges the gap between small-scale but highly detailed molecular dynamics or Brownian dynamics simulations and large-scale but little-detailed reaction kinetics simulations. ReaDDy has a modular design that enables the exchange of the computing core by efficient platform-specific implementations or dynamical models that are different from Brownian dynamics. PMID:24040218

  9. Study of proton induced reactions on niobium targets up to 70 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Takács, S.; Tárkányi, F.; Baba, M.; Corniani, E.; Shubin, Yu. N.

    2008-12-01

    Niobium is a metal with important technological applications: use as alloying element to increase strength of super alloys, as thin layer for tribological applications, as superconductive material, in high temperature engineering systems, etc. In the frame of a systematic study of activation cross-sections of charged particle induced reactions on structural materials proton induced excitation functions on Nb targets were determined with the aim of applications in accelerator and reactor technology and for thin layer activation (TLA). The charged particle activation cross-sections on this element are also important for yield calculation of medical isotope production ( 88,89Zr, 86,87,88Y) and for dose estimation in PET targetry. As Niobium is a monoisotopic element it is an ideal target material to test nuclear reaction theories. We present here the integral excitation functions of 93Nb(p,x) 90,93mMo, 92m,91m,90Nb, 86,88,89Zr, 86,87mg,88Y and 85Sr in the energy range 30-70 MeV, some measured for the first time at this energy range. The results were compared with the theoretical cross-sections calculated by means of the code ALICE-IPPE and with the literature data. The calculations have been carried out without any parameter adjustment. The theory reproduces the shape of the measured results well and magnitude is also acceptable. Thick target yields calculated from our fitted cross-section give reliable estimations for production of medically relevant radioisotopes and for dose estimation in accelerator technology.

  10. An insight into polymerization-induced self-assembly by dissipative particle dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Feng; Lv, Yisheng; Wang, Liquan; Xu, Pengxiang; Lin, Jiaping; Lin, Shaoliang

    2016-08-14

    Polymerization-induced self-assembly is a one-pot route to produce concentrated dispersions of block copolymer nano-objects. Herein, dissipative particle dynamics simulations with a reaction model were employed to investigate the behaviors of polymerization-induced self-assembly. The polymerization kinetics in the polymerization-induced self-assembly were analyzed by comparing with solution polymerization. It was found that the polymerization rate enhances in the initial stage and decreases in the later stage. In addition, the effects of polymerization rate, length of macromolecular initiators, and concentration on the aggregate morphologies and formation pathway were studied. The polymerization rate and the length of the macromolecular initiators are found to have a marked influence on the pathway of the aggregate formations and the final structures. Morphology diagrams were mapped correspondingly. A comparison between simulation results and experimental findings is also made and an agreement is shown. This work can enrich our knowledge about polymerization-induced self-assembly.

  11. Kinetic Study of Radiation-Reaction-Limited Particle Acceleration During the Relaxation of Force-Free Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yajie; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Blandford, Roger D.; East, William E.; Zrake, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Many powerful and variable gamma-ray sources, including pulsar wind nebulae, active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts, seem capable of accelerating particles to gamma-ray emitting energies efficiently over short time scales. This might be due to prodigal dissipation in a highly magnetized outflow. In order to understand the generic behavior of relativistic plasma with high magnetization, we consider a class of prototypical force-free equilibria which are shown to be unstable to ideal modes (East et al 2015 PRL 115, 095002). Kinetic simulations are carried out to follow the evolution of the instability and to study the basic mechanisms of particle acceleration, especially in the radiation-reaction-limited regime. We find that the instability naturally produces current layers and these are sites for efficient particle acceleration. Detailed calculations of the gamma ray spectrum, the evolution of the particle distribution function and the dynamical consequences of radiation reaction will be presented.

  12. R-Matrix Codes for Charged-particle Induced Reactionsin the Resolved Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect

    Leeb, Helmut; Dimitriou, Paraskevi; Thompson, Ian J.

    2017-01-01

    A Consultant’s Meeting was held at the IAEA Headquarters, from 5 to 7 December 2016, to discuss the status of R-matrix codes currently used in calculations of charged-particle induced reaction cross sections at low energies. The meeting was a follow-up to the R-matrix Codes meeting held in December 2015, and served the purpose of monitoring progress in: the development of a translation code to enable exchange of input/output parameters between the various codes in different formats, fitting procedures and treatment of uncertainties, the evaluation methodology, and finally dissemination. The details of the presentations and technical discussions, as well as additional actions that were proposed to achieve all the goals of the meeting are summarized in this report.

  13. Phase-field study of electrochemical reactions at exterior and interior interfaces in Li-ion battery electrode particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ying; Xu, Bai-Xiang; Stein, Peter; Gross, Dietmar

    2016-12-01

    To study the electrochemical reaction on surfaces, phase interfaces, and crack surfaces in the lithium ion battery electrode particles, a phase-field model is developed, which describes fracture in large strains and anisotropic Cahn-Hilliard-Reaction. Thereby the concentration-dependency of the elastic properties and the anisotropy of diffusivity are also considered. The implementation in 3D is carried out by isogeometric finite element methods in order to treat the high order terms in a straightforward sense. The electrochemical reaction is modeled through a modified Butler-Volmer equation to account for the influence of the phase change on the reaction on exterior surfaces. The reaction on the crack surfaces is considered through a volume source term weighted by a term related to the fracture order parameter. Based on the model, three characteristic examples are considered to reveal the electrochemical reactions on particle surfaces, phase interfaces, and crack surfaces, as well as their influence on the particle material behavior. Results show that the ratio between the timescale of reaction and the diffusion can have a significant influence on phase segregation behavior, as well as the anisotropy of diffusivity. In turn, the distribution of the lithium concentration greatly influences the reaction on the surface, especially when the phase interfaces appear on exterior surfaces or crack surfaces. The reaction rate increases considerably at phase interfaces, due to the large lithium concentration gradient. Moreover, simulations demonstrate that the segregation of a Li-rich and a Li-poor phase during delithiation can drive the cracks to propagate. Results indicate that the model can capture the electrochemical reaction on the freshly cracked surfaces.

  14. Theoretical modeling of hydroxyl-radical-induced lipid peroxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Tejero, Ismael; Gonzalez-Lafont, Angels; Lluch, José M; Eriksson, Leif A

    2007-05-24

    The OH-radical-induced mechanism of lipid peroxidation, involving hydrogen abstraction followed by O2 addition, is explored using the kinetically corrected hybrid density functional MPWB1K in conjunction with the MG3S basis set and a polarized continuum model to mimic the membrane interior. Using a small nonadiene model of linoleic acid, it is found that hydrogen abstraction preferentially occurs at the mono-allylic methylene groups at the ends of the conjugated segment rather than at the central bis-allylic carbon, in disagreement with experimental data. Using a full linoleic acid, however, abstraction is correctly predicted to occur at the central carbon, giving a pentadienyl radical. The Gibbs free energy for abstraction at the central C11 is approximately 8 kcal/mol, compared to 9 kcal/mol at the end points (giving an allyl radical). Subsequent oxygen addition will occur at one of the terminal atoms of the pentadienyl radical fragment, giving a localized peroxy radical and a conjugated butadiene fragment, but is associated with rather high free energy barriers and low exergonicity at the CPCM-MPWB1K/MG3S level. The ZPE-corrected potential energy surfaces obtained without solvent effects, on the other hand, display considerably lower barriers and more exergonic reactions.

  15. Effect of reaction atmosphere on particle morphology of TiO2 produced by thermal decomposition of titanium tetraisopropoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae Gil; Park, Kyun Young

    2006-04-01

    Thermal decomposition of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) was carried out in varying reaction atmospheres: nitrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen plus water vapor. The effect of reaction atmosphere on the morphology, size, and crystalline structure of produced TiO2 particles was studied. The reactor used was similar to the microreactor proposed earlier by Park et al. (2001, J. Nanopart. Res., 3, 309-319), but for a modification in the precursor evaporator. The reactor temperature was varied from 300 to 700°C and the TTIP concentration in the evaporator from 1.0 to 7.0 mol%, holding the reactor residence time at 0.7 s. The primary-particle size was in the range 25-250 nm, varying with operating condition. The crystalline structure was amorphous in nitrogen, a mixture of rutile and anatase in nitrogen plus water vapor, and anatase in oxygen atmospheres. In nitrogen, agglomerates composed of very small particles whose individual boundaries are not clearly distinguished were produced. In oxygen, the particles composing an agglomerate became larger and were clearly spherical. As the atmosphere was varied to the nitrogen plus water vapor, the particle size increased further. The variation of primary particle size with reaction atmosphere was discussed in comparison with previous experimental data.

  16. Investigation of shock-induced and shock-assisted chemical reactions in molybdenum-silicon powder mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandersall, Kevin Stewart

    1999-10-01

    In this research, chemical reactions occurring in molybdenum and silicon powder mixtures under "shock-induced" (those occurring during the high-pressure shock state) and "shock-assisted" (those occurring subsequent to the shock event, but due to bulk temperature increases) conditions were investigated. Differences in the densities and yield strengths of the two constituents, in addition to the large heat of reaction associated with molybdenum disilicide (MoSi2) formation can lead to shock-induced as well as shock-assisted reactions, which make this an ideal system to delineate the kinetics and mechanisms of reactions occurring in shock-compressed powder mixtures. Shock recovery experiments performed on Mo + 2 Si powder mixtures employing cylindrical implosion geometry showed thermally initiated reactions. A mixed phase eutectic type microstructure of MoSi2 and Mo 5Si3, resulting from reaction occurring due to melting of both reactants, was observed in axial regions of the cylindrical compacts. In regions surrounding the mach stem, melting of only silicon and reaction occurring via dissolution and re-precipitation forming MoSi2 spherules surrounding molybdenum particles in a melted and solidified silicon matrix was observed. The planar pressure shock recovery geometry showed a single phase MoSi2, microstructure formed due to a solid-state pressure-induced reaction process. The time-resolved instrumented experiments were performed using a single stage gas gun in the velocity range of 500 m/s to 1 km/s, and employed poly-vinyl di-flouride (PVDF) stress gauges placed at the front and rear surfaces of the powder to determine the crush strength, densification history, and reaction initiation threshold conditions. Time-resolved experiments performed on ˜58% dense Mo + 2 Si powder mixtures at input stresses less than 4 GPa, showed characteristics of powder densification and dispersed propagated wave stress profiles with rise time >˜40 nanoseconds. At input stress between

  17. Experimental particle acceleration by water evaporation induced by shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scolamacchia, T.; Alatorre Ibarguengoitia, M.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.; Cimarelli, C.

    2010-12-01

    Shock waves are commonly generated during volcanic eruptions. They induce sudden changes in pressure and temperature causing phase changes. Nevertheless, their effects on flowfield properties are not well understood. Here we investigate the role of gas expansion generated by shock wave propagation in the acceleration of ash particles. We used a shock tube facility consisting of a high-pressure (HP) steel autoclave (450 mm long, 28 mm in internal diameter), pressurized with Ar gas, and a low-pressure tank at atmospheric conditions (LP). A copper diaphragm separated the HP autoclave from a 180 mm tube (PVC or acrylic glass) at ambient P, with the same internal diameter of the HP reservoir. Around the tube, a 30 cm-high acrylic glass cylinder, with the same section of the LP tank (40 cm), allowed the observation of the processes occurring downstream from the nozzle throat, and was large enough to act as an unconfined volume in which the initial diffracting shock and gas jet expand. All experiments were performed at Pres/Pamb ratios of 150:1. Two ambient conditions were used: dry air and air saturated with steam. Carbon fibers and glass spheres in a size range between 150 and 210 μm, were placed on a metal wire at the exit of the PVC tube. The sudden decompression of the Ar gas, due to the failure of the diaphragm, generated an initial air shock wave. A high-speed camera recorded the processes between the first 100 μsec and several ms after the diaphragm failure at frame rates ranging between 30,000 and 50,000 fps. In the experiments with ambient air saturated with steam, the high-speed camera allowed to visualize the condensation front associated with the initial air shock; a maximum velocity of 788 m/s was recorded, which decreases to 524 m/s at distance of 0.5 ±0.2 cm, 1.1 ms after the diaphragm rupture. The condensation front preceded the Ar jet front exhausting from the reservoir, by 0.2-0.5 ms. In all experiments particles velocities following the initial

  18. Laser-induced incandescence measurements of particles in aeroengine exhausts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, John D.

    1999-09-01

    Laser Induced Incandescence (LII) has been demonstrated as a non-intrusive technique for measurement of particle concentration in the exhausts of aero-engines on sea level test beds as part of a European Union collaborative program (AEROJET) aimed at replacing gas sampling rakes behind development engines with non-intrusive instrumentation. Currently emissions of CO, NOx, unburned hydrocarbon, and smoke from aero-engines must be shown to be less than internationally specified limits. Measurements are made on development engines on sea level test beds by applying a number of standard analytical methods to extracted exhaust gas samples. The hardware required for exhaust gas sampling is heavy and complex and is expensive to build and install. As a result, only the minimum number of emissions tests are conducted during an engine development program, and emissions data is only available to combustion engineers late in the program. Hence, there is a need for more versatile and less costly non-intrusive measurement techniques. Molecular species can be measured using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, while LII is a promising smoke measuring technique. The development of an LII system specifically designed for exhaust applications is described.

  19. Single particle fluorescence burst analysis of epsin induced membrane fission.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Arielle; Shoup, Daniel; Kustigian, Lauren; Puchalla, Jason; Carr, Chavela M; Rye, Hays S

    2015-01-01

    Vital cellular processes, from cell growth to synaptic transmission, rely on membrane-bounded carriers and vesicles to transport molecular cargo to and from specific intracellular compartments throughout the cell. Compartment-specific proteins are required for the final step, membrane fission, which releases the transport carrier from the intracellular compartment. The role of fission proteins, especially at intracellular locations and in non-neuronal cells, while informed by the dynamin-1 paradigm, remains to be resolved. In this study, we introduce a highly sensitive approach for the identification and analysis of membrane fission machinery, called burst analysis spectroscopy (BAS). BAS is a single particle, free-solution approach, well suited for quantitative measurements of membrane dynamics. Here, we use BAS to analyze membrane fission induced by the potent, fission-active ENTH domain of epsin. Using this method, we obtained temperature-dependent, time-resolved measurements of liposome size and concentration changes, even at sub-micromolar concentration of the epsin ENTH domain. We also uncovered, at 37°C, fission activity for the full-length epsin protein, supporting the argument that the membrane-fission activity observed with the ENTH domain represents a native function of the full-length epsin protein.

  20. Ternary phase diagram for the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction-induced mechanical oscillation of intelligent PNIPAM colloids.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jingyi; Pullela, Srinivasa; Marquez, Manuel; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2007-12-06

    Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction-induced mechanical oscillation of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) gel particles was investigated by the systematic variation of BZ substrate concentrations. The correlation between the dynamic behavior and substrate concentrations was presented in a ternary phase diagram. Both oscillatory and steady-state regimes exist on the phase diagram and are separated by a high-frequency oscillation band. Dependence of oscillation frequency and induction time on the substrate concentrations was also studied. To achieve size uniformity, these PNIPAM gel particles with covalently bound tris(bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) were synthesized via the coordination chemistry between a ruthenium complex and the monodispersed PNIPAM gel particles bearing bipyridine ligands.

  1. Heterogeneous Reactions of Gaseous Hydrogen Peroxide on Clean and Coated Mineral Particles: Dependence on Relative Humidity and Surface Coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Chen, Z.; Shen, X.; Huang, D.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a significant atmospheric oxidant, playing an important role in secondary sulfate formation and HOx radical chemistry. Recent studies have shown that heterogeneous reactions on atmospheric aerosol particles seem to be an important sink for gaseous H2O2. The data concerning the kinetics and mechanisms of these reactions, however, are quite scarce so far. Here we investigated, for the first time, the heterogeneous reactions of gaseous H2O2 on the surface of clean and coated silica and alumina particles, two major components of mineral dust particles, as a function of relative humidity (RH) and surface coverage of coatings using transmission-Fourier Transform Infrared (T-FTIR) spectroscopy and online high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). It is found that H2O2 molecularly adsorbs on SiO2, and a small amount of molecularly adsorbed H2O2 decomposes due to its thermal instability. For α-Al2O3, catalytic decomposition of H2O2 evidently occurs, but there is also a small amount of H2O2 molecularly adsorbed on the particle surface. The measured uptake coefficients of H2O2 on both particles largely decrease with increasing RH. Pretreatment of the alumina surfaces with gaseous SO2 or HNO3 to simulate atmospheric aging of mineral particles has a strong impact on its reactivity toward H2O2. On SO2-processed particles, the presence of adsorbed S(IV) appears to enhance the intrinsic reactivity of the alumina surface and the uptake of H2O2 increases compared to that on unprocessed particles, in particular, at high RH, whereas the alumina surface is significantly deactivated when the S(IV) is completely transformed to S(VI), and the measured uptake of H2O2 apparently decreased. For HNO3-processed particles, the presence of nitrate coatings seems to decrease or increase the reactivity of the alumina particles toward H2O2, with a strong dependence on RH and surface nitrate coverage. For example, as the surface nitrate coverage increases, the uptake

  2. Induced-charge electroosmotic flow around dielectric particles in uniform electric field.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Li, Dongqing

    2013-11-15

    The current research of induced-charge electroosmotic flow (ICEOF) is mostly confined to systems with ideally or fully polarizable surfaces (e.g., metal). However, most materials in nature have various degrees of polarizability, which directly affects the induced charges and subsequently the induced-charge electroosmotic flow. This paper studied the effect of the polarizability of the materials on the ICEOF. An analytical expression of the induced potential on the surface of a dielectric particle in a uniform electrical field was derived. Three-dimensional transient numerical simulations of the ICEOF and the motion of dielectric particles were performed to study the effect of the polarizability. Simulation results show that the transportation of the dielectric particle in a microchannel is not affected by the polarizability of the particle; however, the interaction of two dielectric particles is sensitive to the polarizability of the particles.

  3. Comprehensive analysis of large α yields observed in 6Li-induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jin; Moro, Antonio M.

    2017-04-01

    Background: Large α yields have been reported over the years in reactions with 6Li and 7Li projectiles. Previous theoretical analyses have shown that the elastic breakup (EBU) mechanism (i.e., projectile breakup leaving the target in its ground state) is able to account only for a small fraction of the total α -inclusive breakup cross sections, pointing toward the dominance of nonelastic breakup (NEB) mechanisms. Purpose: We aim to provide a systematic study of the α -inclusive cross sections observed in nuclear reactions induced by 6Li projectiles. In addition to estimating the total α singles' cross sections, it is our goal to evaluate angular and energy distributions of these α particles and compare them with experimental data, when available. Method: We compute separately the EBU and NEB components of the inclusive breakup cross sections. For the former, we use the continuum-discretized coupled-channels (CDCC) method, which treats this mechanism to all orders. For the NEB part, we employ the model proposed by Ichimura et al. [Phys. Rev. C 32, 431 (1985)], 10.1103/PhysRevC.32.431, within the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA). Results: Overall, the sum of the computed EBU and NEB cross sections is found to reproduce very well the measured singles' cross sections. In all cases analyzed, we find that the inclusive breakup cross section is largely dominated by the NEB component. Conclusions: The presented method provides a global and systematic description of inclusive breakup reactions induced by 6Li projectiles. It provides also a natural explanation of the previously observed underestimation of the measured α yields by CDCC calculations. The method used here can be extended to other weakly bound projectiles, including halo nuclei.

  4. Shear-induced alignment and dynamics of elongated granular particles.

    PubMed

    Börzsönyi, Tamás; Szabó, Balázs; Wegner, Sandra; Harth, Kirsten; Török, János; Somfai, Ellák; Bien, Tomasz; Stannarius, Ralf

    2012-11-01

    The alignment, ordering, and rotation of elongated granular particles was studied in shear flow. The time evolution of the orientation of a large number of particles was monitored in laboratory experiments by particle tracking using optical imaging and x-ray computed tomography. The experiments were complemented by discrete element simulations. The particles develop an orientational order. In the steady state the time- and ensemble-averaged direction of the main axis of the particles encloses a small angle with the streamlines. This shear alignment angle is independent of the applied shear rate, and it decreases with increasing grain aspect ratio. At the grain level the steady state is characterized by a net rotation of the particles, as dictated by the shear flow. The distribution of particle rotational velocities was measured both in the steady state and also during the initial transients. The average rotation speed of particles with their long axis perpendicular to the shear alignment angle is larger, while shear aligned particles rotate slower. The ratio of this fast/slow rotation increases with particle aspect ratio. During the initial transient starting from an unaligned initial condition, particles having an orientation just beyond the shear alignment angle rotate opposite to the direction dictated by the shear flow.

  5. Chitosan functionalized magnetic particle-assisted detection of genetically modified soybeans based on polymerase chain reaction and capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Cheng; Xu, Shen; Zhang, Sheng; Jia, Li

    2012-01-01

    The high quality of DNA template is one of the key factors to ensure the successful execution of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Therefore, development of DNA extraction methods is very important. In this work, chitosan modified magnetic particles (MPs) were synthesized and employed for extraction of genomic DNA from genetically modified (GM) soybeans. The extraction protocol used aqueous buffers for DNA binding to and releasing from the surface of the MPs based on the pH inducing the charge switch of amino groups in chitosan modified MPs. The extracted DNA was pure enough (A(260)/A(280)=1.85) to be directly used as templates for PCR amplification. In addition, the PCR products were separated by capillary electrophoresis for screening of GM organisms. The developed DNA extraction method using chitosan modified MPs was capable of preparation of DNA templates, which were PCR inhibitor free and ready for downstream analysis. The whole process for DNA extraction and detection was preferable to conventional methods (phenol-chloroform extraction, PCR, and gel electrophoresis) due to its simplicity and rapidity as well as its avoiding the use of toxic reagents and PCR inhibitors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The GILL study: glycerin-induced local reactions in immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Christopher W; Coop, Christopher A; Tankersley, Michael S

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of local reactions is not well defined. Glycerin, an excellent preservative used commonly in immunotherapy extracts, is a recognized irritant. This study was undertaken to examine whether higher glycerin concentration in immunotherapy extracts is associated with an increase in local reaction rates during immunotherapy. A retrospective analysis of electronic immunotherapy records over a 12-month period was performed from a single site. A small local reaction was defined as induration and/or erythema at the injection site smaller than or equal to the size of the patient's palm. A large local reaction was defined as a reaction larger than the patient's palm. Over the 12-month period, 360 patients received a total of 9678 immunotherapy injections. For all injections, the total local reaction rate was 16.3% (1574/9678), the small local reaction rate was 15.9% (1536/9678), and the large local reaction rate was 0.4% (38/9678). For aeroallergens, small local reaction rates increased significantly with increasing allergen concentrations, from 7.3% (1:1000 vol/vol) to 23.0% (1:1 vol/vol; P < .001). The small local reaction rate was higher with increasing allergen content but not higher glycerin concentration. Large local reactions were infrequent and did not significantly increase with allergen or glycerin concentration. Small local, but not large local, reaction rates increase with higher allergen concentration, number, and volume. Higher glycerin concentrations (even 50%) are not associated with significantly higher small or large local reaction rates.

  7. Shear-induced segregation of particles by material density.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yi; Hill, K M

    2015-08-01

    Recently, shear rate gradients and associated gradients in velocity fluctuations (e.g., granular temperatures or kinetic stresses) have been shown to drive segregation of different-sized particles in a manner that reverses at relatively high solids fractions (〈f〉>0.50). Here we investigate these effects in mixtures of particles differing in material density through computational and theoretical studies of particles sheared in a vertical chute where we vary the solids fraction from 〈f〉=0.2 to 0.6. We find that in sparse flows, 〈f〉=0.2 to 0.4, the heavier (denser) particles segregate to lower shear rates similarly to the heavier (larger) particles in mixtures of particles differing only in size. However, there is no segregation reversal at high f in mixtures of particles differing in density. At all solids fractions, heavier (denser) particles segregate to regions of lower shear rates and lower granular temperatures, in contrast with segregation of different-sized particles at high f, where the heavier (larger) particles segregate to the region of higher shear rates. Kinetic theory predicts well the segregation for both types of systems at low f but breaks down at higher f's. Our recently proposed mixture theory for high f granular mixtures captures the segregation trends well via the independent partitioning of kinetic and contact stresses between the two species. In light of these results, we discuss possible directions forward for a model framework that encompasses segregation effects more broadly in these systems.

  8. Light-particle emission as a probe of the rotational degrees of freedom in deep-inelastic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sobotka, L.G.

    1982-05-01

    The emission of alpha particles in coincidence with the most deeply inelastic heavy-ion reactions has been studied for /sup 181/Ta/sup +/ /sup 165/Ho at 1354 MeV laboratory energy and /sup nat/Ag + /sup 84/Kr at 664 MeV. Alpha particle energy spectra and angular distributions, in coincidence with a projectile-like fragment, were acquired both in the reaction plane and out of the reaction plane at a fixed in-plane angle. The in-plane data for both systems are employed to show that the bulk of the alpha particles in coincidence with the deep-inelastic exit channel can be explained by evaporation from the fully accelerated fragments. Average velocity diagrams, ..cap alpha..-particle energy spectra as a function of angle in several rest frames, and ..cap alpha..-particle angular distributions are presented. The out-of-plane alpha particle angular distributions and the gamma-ray multiplicities are used to study the transfer and partitioning of angular momentum between the two fragments. For the /sup nat/Ag + /sup 84/Kr system, individual fragment spins are extracted form the alpha particle angular distributions as a function of mass asymmetry while the sum of the fragment spins is derived from the gamma-ray multiplicities. These data, together with the fragment kinetic energies, are consistent with rigid rotation of an intermediate complex consisting of two substantially deformed spheroids in near proximity. These data also indicate that some angular momentum fractionation exists at the largest asymmetries examined. Out-of-plane alpha particle distributions, gamma-ray multiplicities, fragment spins as well as the formalism for the spin evaluation at various levels of sophistication are presented.

  9. Mechanisms of laser induced reactions in opaque heterogeneous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, F.

    1993-11-01

    The technique of laser flash photolysis has been applied to both heterogeneous and homogeneous samples in order to increase understanding of the mechanisms of laser induced reactions at surfaces. Nanosecond diffuse reflectance laser flash photolysis has been used to study triplet state absorption and fluorescence emission of monomers and dimers of acridine orange and other dyes which are shown to aggregate when adsorbed on microcrystalline cellulose and on other surfaces. The properties of excited states within dyed fabrics have been evaluated in several cases. The mechanism of the yellowing of thermomechanical paper pulp has also been investigated and transients studied on nanosecond timescales for the first time. Triplet-triplet energy transfer from benzophenone to oxazine dyes, from eosin to anthracene, and from anthracene to azomethine dyes has been studied on both cellulose and silica surfaces. This work demonstrates the occurrence of energy transfer by static and dynamic mechanisms depending on both the nature of the surface and the adsorbed species. The first picosecond studies exciting directly into the charge transfer absorption bands of aromatic hydrocarbon/oxygen complexes formed in the presence of high pressures of oxygen have been carried out to demonstrate the role of charge-transfer interactions in determining the singlet oxygen formation efficiencies during quenching of electronically excited states by molecular oxygen. Nanosecond laser excitation of a series of naphthalene and anthracene derivatives in the presence and absence of oxygen has clearly demonstrated for the first time the importance of charge transfer interactions in determining oxygen quenching constants and singlet oxygen formation efficiencies.

  10. Persistent Skin Reactions and Aluminium Hypersensitivity Induced by Childhood Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Salik, Elaha; Løvik, Ida; Andersen, Klaus E; Bygum, Anette

    2016-11-02

    There is increasing awareness of reactions to vaccination that include persistent skin reactions. We present here a retrospective investigation of long-lasting skin reactions and aluminium hypersensitivity in children, based on medical records and questionnaires sent to the parents. In the 10-year period 2003 to 2013 we identified 47 children with persistent skin reactions caused by childhood vaccinations. Most patients had a typical presentation of persisting pruritic subcutaneous nodules. Five children had a complex diagnostic process involving paediatricians, orthopaedics and plastic surgeons. Two patients had skin biopsies performed from their skin lesions, and 2 patients had the nodules surgically removed. Forty-two children had a patch-test performed with 2% aluminium chloride hexahydrate in petrolatum and 39 of them (92%) had a positive reaction. The persistent skin reactions were treated with potent topical corticosteroids and disappeared slowly. Although we advised families to continue vaccination of their children, one-third of parents omitted or postponed further vaccinations.

  11. Identification of MHC Haplotypes Associated with Drug-induced Hypersensitivity Reactions in Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Whritenour, Jessica; Sanford, Jonathan C; Houle, Christopher; Adkins, Karissa K

    2017-01-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions can significantly impact drug development and use. Studies to understand risk factors for drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions have identified genetic association with specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. Interestingly, drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions can occur in nonhuman primates; however, association between drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles has not been described. In this study, tissue samples were collected from 62 cynomolgus monkeys from preclinical studies in which 9 animals had evidence of drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions. Microsatellite analysis was used to determine MHC haplotypes for each animal. A total of 7 haplotypes and recombinant MHC haplotypes were observed, with distribution frequency comparable to known MHC I allele frequency in cynomolgus monkeys. Genetic association analysis identified alleles from the M3 haplotype of the MHC I B region (B*011:01, B*075:01, B*079:01, B*070:02, B*098:05, and B*165:01) to be significantly associated (χ(2) test for trend, p < 0.05) with occurrence of drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions. Sequence similarity from alignment of alleles in the M3 haplotype B region and HLA alleles associated with drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions in humans was 86% to 93%. These data demonstrate that MHC alleles in cynomolgus monkeys are associated with drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions, similar to HLA alleles in humans.

  12. EFFECTS OF PARTICLE EVAPORATION ON THE ANGULAR MOMENTUM OF THE EMITTING NUCLEUS FOR DEEP INELASTIC AND COMPOUND NUCLEAR REACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, S.K.; Moretto, L.G.

    1980-09-01

    A model is developed which allows one to calculate analytically the angular momentum removed, and the angular momentum misalignment created by the evaporation of light particles from an excited nucleus. The mass, temperature, and angular momentum of the emitting nucleus are explicitly considered. The formalism applies equally well to heavy ion and compound nuclear reactions.

  13. Particle size dependence on oxygen reduction reaction activity of electrodeposited TaO(x) catalysts in acidic media.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeongsuk; Cha, Dongkyu; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Kubota, Jun; Domen, Kazunari

    2014-01-21

    The size dependence of the oxygen reduction reaction activity was studied for TaO(x) nanoparticles electrodeposited on carbon black for application to polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Compared with a commercial Ta2O5 material, the ultrafine oxide nanoparticles exhibited a distinctively high onset potential different from that of the bulky oxide particles.

  14. Syntheses of Anthracyclines and Fredericamycin A via Strong Base-Induced Cycloaddition Reaction of Homophthalic Anhydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Yasuyuki; Fujioka, Hiromichi

    Strong base-induced cycloaddition reactions of homophthalic anhydrides with quinone derivatives afford peri-hydroxyl aromatic compounds in a regioselective manner. The reactions have been applied to the syntheses of biologically important natural products. This review focuses on the following topics: (i) preparation of homophthalic anhydrides from homophthalic acids using (trimethylsilyl)ethoxyacetylene, (ii) strong base-induced cycloaddition of homophthalic anhydrides with the carbon-carbon double bond and the reaction mechanism, especially addressing the regiochemistry of the reaction, and (iii) application of the reaction to the efficient asymmetric syntheses of anthracyclines and fredericamycin A.

  15. NELL1 promotes bone regeneration in polyethylene particle-induced osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xu; Peng, Jiang; Wang, Yu; Wang, Aiyuan; Zhang, Xinli; Yuan, Mei; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Bin; Liu, Bin; Fan, Meng; Xue, Jing; Guo, Quanyi; Xu, Wenjing; Lu, Qiang; Ting, Kang; Lu, Shibi

    2012-07-01

    We investigated the therapeutic effects of a craniosynostosis-associated molecule, NEL-like molecule-1 (NELL1; NEL [a protein strongly expressed in neural tissue encoding the epidermal growth factor-like domain]), on osteolysis induced by polyethylene (PE)-particle debris. We used a murine calvarial osteolysis model with in vivo adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene transfer. In total, 76 female Balb/c mice were randomly assigned to four groups for treatment 1 day postoperation: SHAM (injected with 0.1 mL saline without implantation of particles); PE control (injected with 0.1 mL saline after implantation of particles); PE+(Ad-GFP-NELL1) (injected with 0.1 mL Ad-GFP-NELL1 in saline after implantation of particles); and PE+(Ad-GFP) group (injected with 0.1 mL Ad-GFP in saline after implantation of particles). Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and NELL1 delivery in vivo after the injection were validated by optical imaging at 10 day postop, and then, all mice were sacrificed for analysis by three-dimensional (3D) microcomputed tomography (micro-CT), real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), histology, and biomechanical testing. Exogenous NELL1 and GFP were expressed in the osteolysis area for at least 9 days after the Ad-GFP-NELL1 injection. Serial 3D micro-CT images and testing of bone volume, bone mineral density, trabecular thickness, bone surface density, and connectivity density revealed that the new bone promoted with the Ad-GFP-NELL1 injection could almost compensate the PE-induced osteolysis and regenerate significantly better than with the Ad-GFP treatment. The expression of osteopontin (OPN) was significantly higher with Ad-GFP-NELL1 transduction among all the samples. Real-time PCR examination confirmed the augmented expression of OPN, Runx-2, and receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL). The elastic modulus was significantly greater with Ad-GFP-NELL1 than with the PE and/or Ad-GFP group (p<0.01). We found no transgene-associated toxic

  16. Deriving reaction-diffusion models in ecology from interacting particle systems.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, R S; Cosner, C

    2004-02-01

    We use a scaling procedure based on averaging Poisson distributed random variables to derive population level models from local models of interactions between individuals. The procedure is suggested by using the idea of hydrodynamic limits to derive reaction-diffusion models for population interactions from interacting particle systems. The scaling procedure is formal in the sense that we do not address the issue of proving that it converges; instead we focus on methods for computing the results of the scaling or deriving properties of rescaled systems. To that end we treat the scaling procedure as a transform, in analogy with the Laplace or Fourier transform, and derive operational formulas to aid in the computation of rescaled systems or the derivation of their properties. Since the limiting procedure is adapted from work by Durrett and Levin, we refer to the transform as the Durrett-Levin transform. We examine the effects of rescaling in various standard models, including Lotka-Volterra models, Holling type predator-prey models, and ratio-dependent models. The effects of scaling are mostly quantitative in models with smooth interaction terms, but ratio-dependent models are profoundly affected by the scaling. The scaling transforms ratio-dependent terms that are singular at the origin into smooth terms. Removing the singularity at the origin eliminates some of the unique dynamics that can arise in ratio-dependent models.

  17. Indirect determination of Li via 74Ge(n,γ)75mGe activation reaction induced by neutrons from 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Reddy, G. L. N.; Rao, Pritty; Verma, Rakesh; Ramana, J. V.; Vikramkumar, S.; Raju, V. S.

    2012-03-01

    An indirect method to determine Li by 74Ge(n,γ)75mGe activation reaction induced in a high purity Ge (detector) crystal by neutrons from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction in a typical particle-induced γ-ray emission (PIGE) spectroscopy experimental set-up is described. Performed with proton beams of energies in excess of 1.88 MeV, the threshold energy (Eth) of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction, the determination involves the activity measurement of 75mGe isotope that has a half-life of 47.7 s and decays with the emission of 139 keV γ-rays. Rapidity, selectivity and sensitivity down to ppm levels are the attractive features of the method. It is a suitable alternative to 7Li(p,p'γ)7Li reaction based PIGE technique in the analyses of matrices that contain light elements such as Be, B, F, Na and Al in significant proportions. Interferences can arise from elements, for example V and Ti, that have Eth ⩽ 1.88 MeV for (p,n) reaction. In the case of elements such as Cu, Mo which have with Eth > 1.88 MeV, the incident proton beam energy can be judiciously selected to avoid or minimize an interference. The method, under optimized irradiation conditions, does not entail a risk of neutron stimulated degradation of the performance of the detector. Besides analytical purposes, the measurement of the 75mGe activity can serve as a powerful tool to monitor even low (˜25 n/cm2 s) thermal neutron fluxes.

  18. Kinetic study of heterogeneous reaction of deliquesced NaCl particles with gaseous HNO3 using particle-on-substrate stagnation flow reactor approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Cain, J P; Wang, H; Laskin, A

    2007-10-11

    Heterogeneous reaction kinetics of gaseous nitric acid with deliquesced sodium chloride particles NaCl(aq) + HNO3(g) --> NaNO3(aq) + HCl(g) were investigated with a novel particle-on-substrate stagnation flow reactor (PS-SFR) approach under conditions, including particle size, relative humidity, and reaction time, directly relevant to the atmospheric chemistry of sea salt particles. Particles deposited onto an electron microscopy grid substrate were exposed to the reacting gas at atmospheric pressure and room temperature by impingement via a stagnation flow inside the reactor. The reactor design and choice of flow parameters were guided by computational fluid dynamics to ensure uniformity of the diffusion flux to all particles undergoing reaction. The reaction kinetics was followed by observing chloride depletion in the particles by computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (CCSEM/EDX). The validity of the current approach was examined first by conducting experiments with median dry particle diameter D(p) = 0.82 microm, 80% relative humidity, particle loading densities 4 x 10(4) particle loading and HNO3 concentration in a manner consistent with a diffusion-kinetic analysis reported earlier (Laskin, A.; Wang, H.; Robertson, W. H.; Cowin, J. P.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J. J. Phys. Chem. A 2006, 110, 10619). The intrinsic, second-order rate constant was obtained as kII = 5.7 x 10(-15) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) in the limit of zero particle loading and by assuming that the substrate is inert to HNO3. Under this loading condition the experimental, net reaction uptake coefficient was found to be gamma(net) = 0.11 with an uncertainty factor of 3. Additional experiments examined

  19. A characterisation of the magnetically induced movement of NdFeB-particles in magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schümann, M.; Borin, D. Y.; Huang, S.; Auernhammer, G. K.; Müller, R.; Odenbach, S.

    2017-09-01

    Magnetorheological elastomers are a type of smart hybrid material where elastic properties of a soft elastomer matrix are combined with magnetic properties of magnetic micro particles. This combination leads to a complex interplay of magnetic and elastic phenomena, of which the magnetorheological effect is the best described. In this paper, magnetically hard NdFeB-particles were used to obtain remanent magnetic properties. X-ray microtomography has been utilised to analyse the particle movement induced by magnetic fields. A particle tracking was performed; thus, it was possible to characterise the movement of individual particles. Beyond that, a comprehensive analysis of the orientation of all particles was performed at different states of magnetisation and global particle arrangements. For the first time, this method was successfully applied to a magnetorheological material with a technically relevant amount of magnetic NdFeB-particles. A significant impact of the magnetic field on the rotation and translation of the particles was shown.

  20. Double differential cross section for light mass fragment production on tens of MeV proton, deuteron, helium and carbon induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanami, Toshiya; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Uozumi, Yusuke; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Koba, Yusuke

    2017-09-01

    Double differential cross sections (DDXs) of light mass fragment (LMFs - Li,Be,B,C,N and O) productions were measured for tens of MeV proton, deuteron helium and carbon induced reactions on Be, C, Al, Ti and Cu targets. The incident energies for the measurements were chosen to allow us to compare DDXs with same incident energy but different projectiles on various targets. Systematic data were obtained to see the differences between projectile energies, particles, targets and emitted particles. From the comparison, reaction processes of not only evaporation from complete fusion nucleus, but also scattering, pickup, stripping and projectile fragmentation were observed.

  1. Lectin staining and flow cytometry reveals female-induced sperm acrosome reaction and surface carbohydrate reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Kekäläinen, Jukka; Larma, Irma; Linden, Matthew; Evans, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    All cells are covered by glycans, an individually unique layer of oligo- and polysaccharides that are critical moderators of self-recognition and other cellular-level interactions (e.g. fertilization). The functional similarity between these processes suggests that gamete surface glycans may also have an important, but currently overlooked, role in sexual selection. Here we develop a user-friendly methodological approach designed to facilitate future tests of this possibility. Our proposed method is based on flow cytometric quantification of female-induced sperm acrosome reaction and sperm surface glycan modifications in the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. In this species, as with many other taxa, eggs release water-soluble factors that attract conspecific sperm (chemoattraction) and promote potentially measurable changes in sperm behavior and physiology. We demonstrate that flow cytometry is able to identify sperm from other seawater particles as well as accurately measure both acrosome reaction and structural modifications in sperm glycans. This methodological approach can increase our understanding of chemically-moderated gamete-level interactions and individual-specific gamete recognition in Mytilus sp. and other taxa with similar, easily identifiable acrosome structure. Our approach is also likely to be applicable to several other species, since carbohydrate-mediated cellular-level interactions between gametes are universal among externally and internally fertilizing species. PMID:26470849

  2. Nitrofurantoin-induced acute, subacute and chronic pulmonary reactions.

    PubMed

    Sovijärvi, A R; Lemola, M; Stenius, B; Idänpään-Heikkilä, J

    1977-01-01

    The clinical histories of 81 patients with hypersensitivity reactions to nitrofurantoin, 66 of whom had pulmonary reactions, were studied. Of all patients, 94% were women and of these, 43% were between 40 and 59 years of age. The nitrofurantoin preparation that contained vitamin c caused significantly fewer hypersensitivity reactions than the others. Acute pulmonary reactions appeared a mean of 8.7 days after the start of nitrofurantoin treatment. Typical for these were high fever, dyspnoea, cough, blood eosinophilia, bilateral pneumonic or pleuro-pneumonic infiltrations, a reduced transfer factor of the lung and, as revealed in pulmonary biopsy specimens, vasculitis, interstitial inflammation and alveolar exudation. Symptoms of subacute and chronic pulmonary reactions developed after at least 1 and 6 months of treatment, respectively. Findings of interest were anti-nuclear antibodies in serum, capillary sclerosis, interstitial fibrosis and inflammation in pulmonary tissue. Most patients with an acute pulmonary reaction recovered within 15 days, but in more than half of those with chronic reactions slight signs of pulmonary fibrosis persisted on follow-up. The findings suggest that the interstitial pulmonary changes caused by nitrofurantoin are largely the result of an Arthus-type immune complex-mediated reaction.

  3. [Adverse cutaneous reactions induced by exposure to woods].

    PubMed

    Chomiczewska-Skóra, Dorota

    2013-01-01

    Various adverse cutaneous reactions may occur as a result of exposure to wood dust or solid woods. These include allergic contact dermatitis, irritant contact dermatitis and, more rarely, contact urticaria, photoallergic and phototoxic reactions. Also cases of erythema multiforme-like reactions have been reported. Contact dermatitis, both allergic and irritant, is most frequently provoked by exotic woods, e.g. wood of the Dalbergia spp., Machaerium scleroxylon or Tectona grandis. Cutaneous reactions are usually associated with manual or machine woodworking, in occupational setting or as a hobby. As a result of exposure to wood dust, airborne contact dermatitis is often diagnosed. Cases of allergic contact dermatitis due to solid woods of finished articles as jewelry or musical instruments have also been reported. The aim of the paper is to present various adverse skin reactions related to exposure to woods, their causal factors and sources of exposure, based on the review of literature.

  4. Passing particle toroidal precession induced by electric field in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, V. V.; Ilgisonis, V. I.; Sorokina, E. A.

    2013-12-15

    Characteristics of a rotation of passing particles in a tokamak with radial electric field are calculated. The expression for time-averaged toroidal velocity of the passing particle induced by the electric field is derived. The electric-field-induced additive to the toroidal velocity of the passing particle appears to be much smaller than the velocity of the electric drift calculated for the poloidal magnetic field typical for the trapped particle. This quantity can even have the different sign depending on the azimuthal position of the particle starting point. The unified approach for the calculation of the bounce period and of the time-averaged toroidal velocity of both trapped and passing particles in the whole volume of plasma column is presented. The results are obtained analytically and are confirmed by 3D numerical calculations of the trajectories of charged particles.

  5. Optically induced rotation of Rayleigh particles by vortex beams with different states of polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Manman; Yan, Shaohui; Yao, Baoli; Liang, Yansheng; Lei, Ming; Yang, Yanlong

    2016-01-01

    Optical vortex beams carry optical orbital angular momentum (OAM) and can induce an orbital motion of trapped particles in optical trapping. We show that the state of polarization (SOP) of vortex beams will affect the details of this optically induced orbital motion to some extent. Numerical results demonstrate that focusing the vortex beams with circular, radial or azimuthal polarizations can induce a uniform orbital motion on a trapped Rayleigh particle, while in the focal field of the vortex beam with linear polarization the particle experiences a non-uniform orbital motion. Among the formers, the vortex beam with circular polarization induces a maximum optical torque on the particle. Furthermore, by varying the topological charge of the vortex beams, the vortex beam with circular polarization gives rise to an optimum torque superior to those given by the other three vortex beams. These facts suggest that the circularly polarized vortex beam is more suitable for rotating particles.

  6. Numerical study of particle-induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability: Effects of particle settling and entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yi-Ju; Shao, Yun-Chuan

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigate Rayleigh-Taylor instability in which the density stratification is caused by the suspension of particles in liquid flows using the conventional single-phase model and Euler-Lagrange (EL) two-phase model. The single-phase model is valid only when the particles are small and number densities are large, such that the continuum approximation applies. The present single-phase results show that the constant settling of the particle concentration restricts the lateral development of the vortex ring, which results in a decrease of the rising speed of the Rayleigh-Taylor bubbles. The EL model enables the investigation of particle-flow interaction and the influence of particle entrainment, resulting from local non-uniformity in the particle distribution. We compare bubble dynamics in the single-phase and EL cases, and our results show that the deviation between the two cases becomes more pronounced when the particle size increases. The main mechanism responsible for the deviation is particle entrainment, which can only be resolved in the EL model. We provide a theoretical argument for the small-scale local entrainment resulting from the local velocity shear and non-uniformity of the particle concentration. The theoretical argument is supported by numerical evidence. Energy budget analysis is also performed and shows that potential energy is released due to the interphase drag and buoyant effect. The buoyant effect, which results in the transformation of potential energy into kinetic energy and shear dissipation, plays a key role in settling enhancement. We also find that particle entrainment increases the shear dissipation, which in turn enhances the release of potential energy.

  7. Neutron-Induced Reactions in Tissue-Resident Elements,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-08

    135 (1973). 2. R.B. Theus, Conf on Particle Accelerators in Radiation Therapy, LA-5 180-C, 82 (1973). 3. P.R. Almond , Conf. on Particle Accelerators...Richardson, W.T.- ;1 Oers, and JW. Verba , Phys. Rev. 167, 908 (1968). 35. N. Baron, R.F. Leonard, and D.A. Lind, NASA TN-D4932 (1968). 36. M. Pignanelli, S

  8. Progranulin suppresses titanium particle induced inflammatory osteolysis by targeting TNFα signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yun-peng; Wei, Jian-lu; Tian, Qing-yun; Liu, Alexander Tianxing; Yi, Young-Su; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Liu, Chuan-ju

    2016-01-01

    Aseptic loosening is a major complication of prosthetic joint surgery, characterized by chronic inflammation, pain, and osteolysis surrounding the bone-implant interface. Progranulin (PGRN) is known to have anti-inflammatory action by binding to Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) receptors and antagonizing TNFα. Here we report that titanium particles significantly induced PGRN expression in RAW264.7 cells and also in a mouse air-pouch model of inflammation. PGRN-deficiency enhanced, whereas administration of recombinant PGRN effectively inhibited, titanium particle-induced inflammation in an air pouch model. In addition, PGRN also significantly inhibited titanium particle-induced osteoclastogenesis and calvarial osteolysis in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the inhibition of PGRN on titanium particle induced-inflammation is primarily via neutralizing the titanium particle-activated TNFα/NF-κB signaling pathway and this is evidenced by the suppression of particle-induced IκB phosphorylation, NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, and activity of the NF-κB-specific reporter gene. Collectively, these findings not only demonstrate that PGRN plays an important role in inhibiting titanium particle-induced inflammation, but also provide a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention of wear debris-induced inflammation and osteolysis. PMID:26864916

  9. Progranulin suppresses titanium particle induced inflammatory osteolysis by targeting TNFα signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun-peng; Wei, Jian-lu; Tian, Qing-yun; Liu, Alexander Tianxing; Yi, Young-su; Einhorn, Thomas A; Liu, Chuan-ju

    2016-02-11

    Aseptic loosening is a major complication of prosthetic joint surgery, characterized by chronic inflammation, pain, and osteolysis surrounding the bone-implant interface. Progranulin (PGRN) is known to have anti-inflammatory action by binding to Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) receptors and antagonizing TNFα. Here we report that titanium particles significantly induced PGRN expression in RAW264.7 cells and also in a mouse air-pouch model of inflammation. PGRN-deficiency enhanced, whereas administration of recombinant PGRN effectively inhibited, titanium particle-induced inflammation in an air pouch model. In addition, PGRN also significantly inhibited titanium particle-induced osteoclastogenesis and calvarial osteolysis in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the inhibition of PGRN on titanium particle induced-inflammation is primarily via neutralizing the titanium particle-activated TNFα/NF-κB signaling pathway and this is evidenced by the suppression of particle-induced IκB phosphorylation, NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, and activity of the NF-κB-specific reporter gene. Collectively, these findings not only demonstrate that PGRN plays an important role in inhibiting titanium particle-induced inflammation, but also provide a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention of wear debris-induced inflammation and osteolysis.

  10. Single-particle detection of products from atomic and molecular reactions in a cryogenic ion storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krantz, C.; Novotný, O.; Becker, A.; George, S.; Grieser, M.; Hahn, R. von; Meyer, C.; Schippers, S.; Spruck, K.; Vogel, S.; Wolf, A.

    2017-04-01

    We have used a single-particle detector system, based on secondary electron emission, for counting low-energetic (∼keV/u) massive products originating from atomic and molecular ion reactions in the electrostatic Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR). The detector is movable within the cryogenic vacuum chamber of CSR, and was used to measure production rates of a variety of charged and neutral daughter particles. In operation at a temperature of ∼ 6 K , the detector is characterised by a high dynamic range, combining a low dark event rate with good high-rate particle counting capability. On-line measurement of the pulse height distributions proved to be an important monitor of the detector response at low temperature. Statistical pulse-height analysis allows to infer the particle detection efficiency of the detector, which has been found to be close to unity also in cryogenic operation at 6 K.

  11. Geraniin suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and ameliorates wear particle-induced osteolysis in mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Fei; Zhai, Zanjing; Jiang, Chuan; Liu, Xuqiang; Li, Haowei; Qu, Xinhua; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Fan, Qiming; Tang, Tingting; Qin, An; Gu, Dongyun

    2015-01-01

    Wear particle-induced osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening remains the most common complication that limits the longevity of prostheses. Wear particle-induced osteoclastogenesis is known to be responsible for extensive bone erosion that leads to prosthesis failure. Thus, inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption may serve as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that geraniin, an active natural compound derived from Geranium thunbergii, ameliorated particle-induced osteolysis in a Ti particle-induced mouse calvaria model in vivo. We also investigated the mechanism by which geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclasts. Geraniin inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in a dose-dependent manner, evidenced by reduced osteoclast formation and suppressed osteoclast specific gene expression. Specially, geraniin inhibited actin ring formation and bone resorption in vitro. Further molecular investigation demonstrated geraniin impaired osteoclast differentiation via the inhibition of the RANKL-induced NF-κB and ERK signaling pathways, as well as suppressed the expression of key osteoclast transcriptional factors NFATc1 and c-Fos. Collectively, our data suggested that geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclast differentiation in vitro and suppresses Ti particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. Geraniin is therefore a potential natural compound for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis in prostheses failure. - Highlights: • Geraniin suppresses osteoclasts formation and function in vitro. • Geraniin impairs RANKL-induced nuclear factor-κB and ERK signaling pathway. • Geraniin suppresses osteolysis in vivo. • Geraniin may be used for treating osteoclast related diseases.

  12. Severe infusion reaction induced by trastuzumab: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tada, Keiichiro; Ito, Yoshinori; Hatake, Kiyohiko; Okudaira, Taeko; Watanabe, Jun-ichiro; Arakawa, Masahiro; Miyazato, Masayo; Irie, Tetsuya; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Syunji; Aiba, Keisuke; Horikoshi, Noboru; Kasumi, Fujio

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of a severe infusion reaction caused by trastuzumab. A 59-year-old woman with metastatic breast cancer was treated with trastuzumab. During the first infusion, initial symptoms such as severe headache and general fatigue developed. Blood pressure fell 90 minutes after these initial symptoms. A collapsed lung was demonstrated by chest X-ray and computed tomography. Steroid therapy was successfully used for these reactions. Careful monitoring of vital signs, examination of the respiratory system, and the use of steroids are recommended for severe infusion reaction.

  13. Ciprofloxacin induced bullous fixed drug reaction: three case reports

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Pragya A.

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are seen in about 1–2% cases. Fixed drug reaction (FDR) is responsible for about 10% of all ADRs. It is a delayed type of hypersensitivity reaction that occurs as lesions recurs at the same skin site due to repeated intake of an offending drug. The most common drugs causing fixed drug eruption (FDE) are analgesics, antibiotics, muscle relaxants and anticonvulsants. FDE due to ciprofloxacin has been reported earlier also, but bullous variant of FDR is rare. We hereby report three case reports of bullous FDR caused due to ciprofloxacin. PMID:25949980

  14. Varenicline-induced acute dystonic reaction: a case report.

    PubMed

    Uca, Ali Ulvi; Kozak, Hasan Hüseyin; Uguz, Faruk

    2014-01-01

    Dystonia is a syndrome characterized by sustained muscle contractions frequently causing twisting and repetitive movements or abnormal postures. Dystonic reactions may be a complication of many drugs such as antipsychotics, anti-emetics and antidepressants. This report presents a 25-year-old patient who was admitted to an emergency department with acute dystonia following the use of varenicline, a pharmacological agent used for the treatment of nicotine addiction. Dystonic reactions may be related to the dopaminergic deficiency caused by the use of varenicline. In conclusion, this report suggests that varenicline can cause dystonic reaction in at least some patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Vertical motion of particles in vibration-induced granular capillarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Fengxian; Liu, Ju; Parteli, Eric J. R.; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2017-06-01

    When a narrow tube inserted into a static container filled with particles is subjected to vertical vibration, the particles rise in the tube, much resembling the ascending motion of a liquid column in a capillary tube. To gain insights on the particle dynamics dictating this phenomenon - which we term granular capillarity - we numerically investigate the system using the Discrete Element Method (DEM). We reproduce the dynamical process of the granular capillarity and analyze the vertical motion of the individual particles in the tube, as well as the average vertical velocities of the particles. Our simulations show that the height of the granular column fluctuates in a periodic or period-doubling manner as the tube vibrates, until a steady-state (capillary) height is reached. Moreover, our results for the average vertical velocity of the particles in the tube at different radial positions suggest that granular convection is one major factor underlying the particle-based dynamics that lead to the granular capillarity phenomenon.

  16. Aloe vera Induced Biomimetic Assemblage of Nucleobase into Nanosized Particles

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Arun; Zubair, Swaleha; Sherwani, Asif; Owais, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Aim Biomimetic nano-assembly formation offers a convenient and bio friendly approach to fabricate complex structures from simple components with sub-nanometer precision. Recently, biomimetic (employing microorganism/plants) synthesis of metal and inorganic materials nano-particles has emerged as a simple and viable strategy. In the present study, we have extended biological synthesis of nano-particles to organic molecules, namely the anticancer agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), using Aloe vera leaf extract. Methodology The 5-FU nano- particles synthesized by using Aloe vera leaf extract were characterized by UV, FT-IR and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. The size and shape of the synthesized nanoparticles were determined by TEM, while crystalline nature of 5-FU particles was established by X-ray diffraction study. The cytotoxic effects of 5-FU nanoparticles were assessed against HT-29 and Caco-2 (human adenocarcinoma colorectal) cell lines. Results Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopic techniques confirmed nano-size of the synthesized particles. Importantly, the nano-assembled 5-FU retained its anticancer action against various cancerous cell lines. Conclusion In the present study, we have explored the potential of biomimetic synthesis of nanoparticles employing organic molecules with the hope that such developments will be helpful to introduce novel nano-particle formulations that will not only be more effective but would also be devoid of nano-particle associated putative toxicity constraints. PMID:22403622

  17. Surveillance of systemic trafficking of macrophages induced by UHMWPE particles in nude mice by non-invasive imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Pei-Gen; Huang, Zhinong; Ma, Ting; Biswal, Sandip; Smith, Robert L.; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2010-01-01

    Macrophages constitute a major part of the cell response to wear particles produced at articulating and non-articulating interfaces of joint replacements. This foreign body reaction can result in periprosthetic osteolysis and implant loosening. We demonstrate that ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) particles induce systemic trafficking of macrophages by non-invasive in vivo imaging and immunohistochemistry. The distal femora of nude mice were injected with 60 mg/ml UHMWPE suspension, or saline alone. Reporter RAW264.7 macrophages which stably expressed the bioluminescent reporter gene and the fluorescence reporter gene were injected intravenously. Bioluminescence imaging was performed using an in vivo imaging system immediately after macrophage injection, and at 2-day intervals. Compared to the non-operated contralateral femora, at day 4, 6, and 8, the bioluminescent signal of femora containing UHMWPE suspension increased 1.30 ± 0.09, 2.36 ± 0.92, and 10.32 ± 7.61 fold, respectively. The values at same time points for saline injected control group were 1.08 ± 0.07, 1.14 ± 0.27, and 1.14 ± 0.35 fold, respectively. The relative bioluminescence of the UHMWPE group was higher at all post-injection days and significantly greater than the saline group at day 8 (p < 0.05). Histological analysis confirmed the presence of reporter macrophages within the medullary canal of mice with implanted UHMWPE particles. The presence of UHMWPE particles induced enhanced bone remodeling activity. Clinically relevant UHMWPE particles stimulated the systemic recruitment of macrophages during an early time course using the murine femoral implant model. Interference with systemic macrophage trafficking may potentially mitigate UHMWPE particle-induced periprosthetic osteolysis. PMID:20213815

  18. Importance of airway inflammation for late asthmatic reactions induced by toluene diisocyanate in sensitized subjects.

    PubMed

    Boschetto, P; Zocca, E; Bruchi, O; Cappellazzo, G; Milani, G F; Pivirotto, F; Mapp, C E; Fabbri, L M

    1987-01-01

    To determine the importance of airway inflammation for late asthmatic reactions and increased airway responsiveness induced by TDI, we investigated whether late asthmatic reactions and increased responsiveness induced by TDI are associated with airway inflammation and whether steroids prevent them by modifying the inflammatory response within the airways. We measured FEV1 before and at regular intervals after exposure to TDI and performed dose-response curves to methacholine and bronchoalveolar lavage 8 hr after TDI in two subjects with previously documented late asthmatic reaction; then we repeated the same procedure a few weeks after treatment with steroids. Airway responsiveness and polymorphonuclear cells were increased in both subjects after the late asthmatic reaction; treatment with steroids prevented late asthmatic reaction and the increase in airway responsiveness and polymorphonuclear cells in bronchoalveolar lavage. These results suggest that late asthmatic reaction induced by TDI may be caused by airway inflammation.

  19. Multifragmentation in intermediate energy 129Xe-induced heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tso, Kin

    1996-05-01

    The 129Xe-induced reactions on natCu, 89Y, 165Ho, and 197Au at bombarding energies of E/A = 40 & 60 MeV have been studied theoretically and experimentally in order to establish the underlying mechanism of multifragmentation at intermediate energy heavy-Ion collisions. Nuclear disks formed in central heavy-ion collisions, as simulated by means of Boltzmann-like kinetic equations, break up into several fragments due to a new kind of Rayleigh-like surface instability. A sheet of liquid, stable in the limit of non-interacting surfaces, is shown to become unstable due to surface-surface interactions. The onset of this instability is determined analytically. A thin bubble behaves like a sheet and is susceptible to the surface instability through the crispation mode. The Coulomb effects associated with the depletion of charges in the central cavity of nuclear bubbles are investigated. The onset of Coulomb instability is demonstrated for perturbations of the radial mode. Experimental intermediate-mass-fragment multiplicity distributions for the 129Xe-induced reactions are shown to be binomial at each transverse energy. From these distributions, independent of the specific target, an elementary binary decay probability p can be extracted that has a thermal dependence. Thus it is inferred that multifragmentation is reducible to a combination of nearly independent emission processes. If sequential decay is assumed, the increase of p with transverse energy implies a contraction of the emission time scale. The sensitivity of p to the lower Z threshold in the definition of intermediate-mass-fragments points to a physical Poisson simulations of the particle multiplicities show that the weak auto-correlation between the fragment multiplicity and the transverse energy does not distort a Poisson distribution into a binomial distribution. The effect of device efficiency on the experimental results has also been studied.

  20. Radiotherapy-induced skin reactions: assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Glover, Deborah; Harmer, Victoria

    Radiotherapy, the use of high-energy rays to either kill cancer cells or treat some benign tumours, is undoubtedly a positive intervention. However, as the primary mode of action in radiotherapy treatment is the killing of cells to prevent replication, other non-cancerous cells may be affected. For example, up to 85% of patients will experience some form of skin reaction, which will range from local erythema to moist desquamation. Such reactions are not only distressing and painful for the patient, if severe enough, they may warrant a halt in treatment. This article outlines the aims and nature of radiotherapy, and then discusses the aetiology of skin reactions, risk factors for reaction, and assessment tools. Management interventions will also be shown, with emphasis on silicone dressings.

  1. Characterization of inherent particles and mechanism of thermal stress induced particle formation in HSV-2 viral vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Li, Lillian; Kirkitadze, Marina; Bhandal, Kamaljit; Roque, Cristopher; Yang, Eric; Carpick, Bruce; Rahman, Nausheen

    2017-09-14

    Vaccine formulations may contain visible and/or subvisible particles, which can vary in both size and morphology. Extrinsic particles, which are particles not part of the product such as foreign contaminants, are generally considered undesirable and should be eliminated or controlled in injectable products. However, biological products, in particular vaccines, may also contain particles that are inherent to the product. Here we focus on the characterization of visible and subvisible particles in a live, replication-deficient viral vaccine candidate against HSV genital herpes in an early developmental stage. HSV-2 viral vaccine were characterized using a panel of analytical methods, including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), Western blot, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), micro-flow imaging (MFI), dynamic light scattering (DLS), right angle light scattering (RALS), and intrinsic fluorescence. Particles in HSV-2 vaccine typically ranged from hundreds of nanometers to hundreds of micrometers in size and were determined to be inherent to the product. The infectious titer did not correlate with any trend in subvisible particle concentration and size distribution as shown by DLS, MFI, and TEM under stressed conditions. This suggested that particle changes in the submicron range were related to HSV-2 virion structure and had direct impact on biological activity. It was also observed that subvisible and visible particles could induce aggregation in the viral product. The temperature induced aggregation was observed by RALS, intrinsic fluorescence, and DLS. The increase of subvisible particle size with temperature could be fitted to a two-step thermokinetic model. Visible and subvisible particles were found to be inherent to the HSV-2 viral vaccine product. The mechanism of protein aggregation was discussed and a two

  2. Studies of alpha-induced astrophysical reactions at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Binh, D. N.; Kahl, D.; Kubono, S.

    2010-08-12

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. Using the RI beams at CRIB, many measurements on proton alpha resonance scatterings, ({alpha},p) reactions, and others were performed in recent years mainly for studying astrophysical reactions and exotic nuclear structure. Among them, the results on the {sup 7}Li+{alpha} resonance scatterings are presented.

  3. [DRUG INDUCED EXANTHEMA AND SEVERE CUTANEOUS DRUG REACTIONS].

    PubMed

    Bensaïd, Benoît; Valeyrie-Allanore, Laurence; Lebrun-Vignes, Bénédicte; Nicolas, Jean-François

    2015-09-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) are delayed hypersensivities. Their clinical presentation and severity are very diverse ranging from the frequent and benign exanthemas to the rare but severe CADR involving deep organs in the case of drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or leading to skin bulla and epidermal detachment in toxic epidermal necrolysis. The main differential diagnoses are infections, especially viral ones, which could give clinical symptoms identical to those occurring in CADR.

  4. Metoclopramide induced acute dystonic reaction: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tianyi, Frank-Leonel; Agbor, Valirie Ndip; Njim, Tsi

    2017-01-07

    Metoclopramide is a commonly used anti-emetic drug known to cause extrapyramidal symptoms as adverse effects, amongst which are dystonic reactions. These reactions are more frequent at high doses of metoclopramide, in female patients, children and adults less than 30 years of age. We hereby present the case of a 16 year old female who had dystonic reactions from metoclopramide, highlighting its unpredictable nature and the shortcomings of the management in resource-limited settings. A 16 year old female Muslim from the Extreme North of Cameroon with no significant past history, was treated for severe malaria and associated refractory vomiting using intravenous quinine and metoclopramide respectively. She developed dystonic reactions after being administered her second dose of metoclopramide. The drug was discontinued and she was administered 8 mg of chlorpheniramine by mouth. Her symptoms resolved after 4 h. She was discharged 2 days later with no further complaints. Metoclopramide causes dystonic reactions which are often unpredictable and is frequently prescribed by health providers. This creates an environment of anxiety for the patient and the caregiver, and can result in life threatening consequences. Patients on metoclopramide should be monitored closely to detect these reactions early, and health facilities should be equipped to cope with the adverse effects before administration.

  5. Synthesis of Metal Oxide Particles Using Reaction Route from Rare-Earth Metal-EDTA Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Keiji; Tsuchiya, Takaaki; Hasebe, Yasuhiro; Sekiya, Tetsuo; Toyama, Ayumu; Nakamura, Atsushi; Akasaka, Hiroki; Saitoh, Hidetoshi

    2014-06-01

    Highly dense, spherical yttria (Y2O3) and erbia (Er2O3) particles were synthesized from their corresponding metal-ethylenediaminetetraacetic (EDTA) complexes. The EDTA·Y·H and EDTA·Er·H complexes were prepared in powdered form. These complexes were used as the staring materials for synthesis of the Y2O3 and Er2O3 particles. The particles were synthesized using an H2-O2 flame produced with a commercial flame spray apparatus. Crystalline structure, surface and cross-sectional morphologies, and elemental distribution of the synthesized particles were investigated. It was confirmed that the crystalline phases of the Y2O3 and Er2O3 particles were homogeneous. In addition, the elemental distribution of the particles was uniform. These results indicate that dense, spherical particles of Y2O3 and Er2O3 have been synthesized with EDTA·Y·H and EDTA·Er·H complexes, respectively.

  6. Aging induced changes on NEXAFS fingerprints in individual combustion particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenay, V.; Mooser, R.; Tritscher, T.; Křepelová, A.; Heringa, M. F.; Chirico, R.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Dommen, J.; Watts, B.; Raabe, J.; Huthwelker, T.; Ammann, M.

    2011-11-01

    Soot particles can significantly influence the Earth's climate by absorbing and scattering solar radiation as well as by acting as cloud condensation nuclei. However, despite their environmental (as well as economic and political) importance, the way these properties are affected by atmospheric processing of the combustion exhaust gases is still a subject of discussion. In this work, individual soot particles emitted from two different vehicles, a EURO 2 transporter, a EURO 3 passenger car, and a wood stove were investigated on a single-particle basis. The emitted exhaust, including the particulate and the gas phase, was processed in a smog chamber with artificial solar radiation. Single particle specimens of both unprocessed and aged soot were characterized using near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and scanning electron microscopy. Comparison of NEXAFS spectra from the unprocessed particles and those resulting from exhaust photooxidation in the chamber revealed changes in the carbon functional group content. For the wood stove emissions, these changes were minor, related to the relatively mild oxidation conditions. For the EURO 2 transporter emissions, the most apparent change was that of carboxylic carbon from oxidized organic compounds condensing on the primary soot particles. For the EURO 3 car emissions oxidation of primary soot particles upon photochemical aging has likely contributed as well. Overall, the changes in the NEXAFS fingerprints were in qualitative agreement with data from an aerosol mass spectrometer. Furthermore, by taking full advantage of our in situ microreactor concept, we show that the soot particles from all three combustion sources changed their ability to take up water under humid conditions upon photochemical aging of the exhaust. Due to the selectivity and sensitivity of the NEXAFS technique for the water mass, also small amounts of water taken up into the internal voids of agglomerated particles could be

  7. Filler particles used in dental biomaterials induce production and release of inflammatory mediators in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ansteinsson, Vibeke E; Samuelsen, Jan Tore; Dahl, Jon E

    2009-04-01

    Although dental composites are in extensive use today, little is known about the biological effects of the filler particles. As composite materials are gradually broken down in the aggressive environment of the oral cavity, the filler particles may leak and induce toxic effects on the surrounding tissue and cells. The aim of this study was to elucidate possible adverse biological effects of commonly used dental filler particles; bariumaluminiumsilica (BaAlSi) and bariumaluminiumfluorosilica (BaAlFSi) with mean size of 1 microm. BEAS-2B cells were used as a model system. Particle morphology, mean particle size in solution, and particle surface charge were determined by scanning electron microscopy and Malvern zetasizer technology, respectively. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect secretion of cytokine and chemokine (IL-8 and IL-6) and quantitative PCR for detection of gene activity. Both types of particle increased the release of IL-6 and IL-8 in a dose-dependent manner. BaAlFSi particles induced a more marked IL-8 response compared to BaAlSi particles, whereas no significant difference was observed for the IL-6 response. Mechanistic studies using specific inhibitors and activators indicated that cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A is partly involved in the observed IL-8 response. In conclusion, we consider dental filler particles to have potential to induce adverse biological response in cell cultures.

  8. Development of a code system DEURACS for theoretical analysis and prediction of deuteron-induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Shinsuke; Kouno, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yukinobu; Iwamoto, Osamu; Ye, Tao; Ogata, Kazuyuki

    2017-09-01

    We have developed an integrated code system dedicated for theoretical analysis and prediction of deuteron-induced reactions, which is called DEUteron-induced Reaction Analysis Code System (DEURACS). DEURACS consists of several calculation codes based on theoretical models to describe respective reaction mechanisms and it was successfully applied to (d,xp) and (d,xn) reactions. In the present work, the analysis of (d,xn) reactions is extended to higher incident energy up to nearly 100 MeV and also DEURACS is applied to (d,xd) reactions at 80 and 100 MeV. The DEURACS calculations reproduce the experimental double-differential cross sections for the (d,xn) and (d,xd) reactions well.

  9. Laser induced x-ray `RADAR' particle physics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockley, D.; Deas, R.; Moss, R.; Wilson, L. A.; Rusby, D.; Neely, D.

    2016-05-01

    The technique of high-power laser-induced plasma acceleration can be used to generate a variety of diverse effects including the emission of X-rays, electrons, neutrons, protons and radio-frequency radiation. A compact variable source of this nature could support a wide range of potential applications including single-sided through-barrier imaging, cargo and vehicle screening, infrastructure inspection, oncology and structural failure analysis. This paper presents a verified particle physics simulation which replicates recent results from experiments conducted at the Central Laser Facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), Didcot, UK. The RAL experiment demonstrated the generation of backscattered X-rays from test objects via the bremsstrahlung of an incident electron beam, the electron beam itself being produced by Laser Wakefield Acceleration. A key initial objective of the computer simulation was to inform the experimental planning phase on the predicted magnitude of the backscattered X-rays likely from the test objects. This objective was achieved and the computer simulation was used to show the viability of the proposed concept (Laser-induced X-ray `RADAR'). At the more advanced stages of the experimental planning phase, the simulation was used to gain critical knowledge of where it would be technically feasible to locate key diagnostic equipment within the experiment. The experiment successfully demonstrated the concept of X-ray `RADAR' imaging, achieved by using the accurate timing information of the backscattered X-rays relative to the ultra-short laser pulse used to generate the electron beam. By using fast response X-ray detectors it was possible to derive range information for the test objects being scanned. An X-ray radar `image' (equivalent to a RADAR B-scan slice) was produced by combining individual X-ray temporal profiles collected at different points along a horizontal distance line scan. The same image formation process was used to generate

  10. Perspective: Vibrational-induced steric effects in bimolecular reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kopin

    2015-02-01

    The concept of preferred collision geometry in a bimolecular reaction is at the heart of reaction dynamics. Exemplified by a series of crossed molecular beam studies on the reactions of a C-H stretch-excited CHD3(v1 = 1) with F, Cl, and O(3P) atoms, two types of steric control of chemical reactivity will be highlighted. A passive control is governed in a reaction with strong anisotropic entry valley that can significantly steer the incoming trajectories. This disorientation effect is illustrated by the F and O(3P) + CHD3(v1 = 1) reactions. In the former case, the long-range anisotropic interaction acts like an optical "negative" lens by deflecting the trajectories away from the favored transition-state geometry, and thus inhibiting the bond rupture of the stretch-excited CHD3. On the contrary, the interaction between O(3P) and CHD3(v1 = 1) behaves as a "positive" lens by funneling the large impact-parameter collisions into the cone of acceptance, and thereby enhances the reactivity. As for reactions with relatively weak anisotropic interactions in the entry valley, an active control can be performed by exploiting the polarization property of the infrared excitation laser to polarize the reactants in space, as demonstrated in the reaction of Cl with a pre-aligned CHD3(v1 = 1) reactant. A simpler case, the end-on versus side-on collisions, will be elucidated for demonstrating a means to disentangle the impact-parameter averaging. A few general remarks about some closely related issues, such as mode-, bond-selectivity, and Polanyi's rules, are made.

  11. Perspective: Vibrational-induced steric effects in bimolecular reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kopin

    2015-02-28

    The concept of preferred collision geometry in a bimolecular reaction is at the heart of reaction dynamics. Exemplified by a series of crossed molecular beam studies on the reactions of a C–H stretch-excited CHD{sub 3}(v{sub 1} = 1) with F, Cl, and O({sup 3}P) atoms, two types of steric control of chemical reactivity will be highlighted. A passive control is governed in a reaction with strong anisotropic entry valley that can significantly steer the incoming trajectories. This disorientation effect is illustrated by the F and O({sup 3}P) + CHD{sub 3}(v{sub 1} = 1) reactions. In the former case, the long-range anisotropic interaction acts like an optical “negative” lens by deflecting the trajectories away from the favored transition-state geometry, and thus inhibiting the bond rupture of the stretch-excited CHD{sub 3}. On the contrary, the interaction between O({sup 3}P) and CHD{sub 3}(v{sub 1} = 1) behaves as a “positive” lens by funneling the large impact-parameter collisions into the cone of acceptance, and thereby enhances the reactivity. As for reactions with relatively weak anisotropic interactions in the entry valley, an active control can be performed by exploiting the polarization property of the infrared excitation laser to polarize the reactants in space, as demonstrated in the reaction of Cl with a pre-aligned CHD{sub 3}(v{sub 1} = 1) reactant. A simpler case, the end-on versus side-on collisions, will be elucidated for demonstrating a means to disentangle the impact-parameter averaging. A few general remarks about some closely related issues, such as mode-, bond-selectivity, and Polanyi’s rules, are made.

  12. Augmentation of pulmonary reactions to quartz inhalation by trace amounts of iron-containing particles.

    PubMed Central

    Castranova, V; Vallyathan, V; Ramsey, D M; McLaurin, J L; Pack, D; Leonard, S; Barger, M W; Ma, J Y; Dalal, N S; Teass, A

    1997-01-01

    Fracturing quartz produces silica-based radicals on the fracture planes and generates hydroxyl radicals (.OH) in aqueous media. .OH production has been shown to be directly associated with quartz-induced cell damage and phagocyte activation in vitro. This .OH production in vitro is inhibited by desferrioxamine mesylate, an Fe chelator, indicating involvement of a Fenton-like reaction. Our objective was to determine if Fe contamination increased the ability of inhaled quartz to cause inflammation and lung injury. Male Fischer 344 rats were exposed 5 hr/day for 10 days to filtered air, 20 mg/m3 freshly milled quartz (57 ppm Fe), or 20 mg/m3 freshly milled quartz contaminated with Fe (430 ppm Fe). High Fe contamination of quartz produced approximately 57% more reactive species in water than quartz with low Fe contamination. Compared to inhalation of quartz with low Fe contamination, high Fe contamination of quartz resulted in increases in the following responses: leukocyte recruitment (537%), lavageable red blood cells (157%), macrophage production of oxygen radicals measured by electron spin resonance or chemiluminescence (32 or 90%, respectively), nitric oxide production by macrophages (71%), and lipid peroxidation of lung tissue (38%). These results suggest that inhalation of freshly fractured quartz contaminated with trace levels of Fe may be more pathogenic than inhalation of quartz alone. PMID:9400745

  13. Comparison of toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes and energetic particle modes by gyrokinetic particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chenxi; Zhang, Wenlu; Lin, Zhihong; Li, Ding

    2013-05-01

    This work reports on linear global gyrokinetic particle simulations of the excitation of toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE) and energetic particle modes (EPM), and the comparison between these two modes. The TAE excitation by antenna clarifies the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mode structure and the discrete eigenmode exists in the gap between the upper and lower accumulation points. The TAE excitation by fast ions modifies the MHD mode structure because of radial symmetry breaking and the eigenmode frequency moves towards the lower accumulation point. The phase space structure of fast ions shows that both passing and trapped particles contribute to the TAE excitation and that trapped particles dominate the wave-particle resonance in our simulations. The growth rate of TAE is sensitive to the fast ion energy, density, and density gradient, which are also important factors contributing to the transition of the TAE to the EPM. The gyrokinetic particle simulations also confirm the excitation of EPM when the drive is stronger. The frequency of the EPM is determined by the characteristic frequencies of fast ion motion in toroidal geometry.

  14. Comparison of toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes and energetic particle modes by gyrokinetic particle simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chenxi; Li, Ding; Zhang, Wenlu; Lin, Zhihong

    2013-05-15

    This work reports on linear global gyrokinetic particle simulations of the excitation of toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE) and energetic particle modes (EPM), and the comparison between these two modes. The TAE excitation by antenna clarifies the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mode structure and the discrete eigenmode exists in the gap between the upper and lower accumulation points. The TAE excitation by fast ions modifies the MHD mode structure because of radial symmetry breaking and the eigenmode frequency moves towards the lower accumulation point. The phase space structure of fast ions shows that both passing and trapped particles contribute to the TAE excitation and that trapped particles dominate the wave-particle resonance in our simulations. The growth rate of TAE is sensitive to the fast ion energy, density, and density gradient, which are also important factors contributing to the transition of the TAE to the EPM. The gyrokinetic particle simulations also confirm the excitation of EPM when the drive is stronger. The frequency of the EPM is determined by the characteristic frequencies of fast ion motion in toroidal geometry.

  15. Surface modification of Cu metal particles by the chemical reaction between the surface oxide layer and a halogen surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Shun; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Itoh, Takashi; Motomiya, Kenichi; Tohji, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Surface oxides on small (2-5 μm) copper metal particles can be removed by chemical reaction with tris(2,3-dibromopropyl) isocyanurate (TIC) in diethylene glycol mono-n-hexyl ether (DGHE) solution under mild conditions where metal particles are not damaged. Surface oxides convert to copper bromide species and subsequently dissolve into the solvent. It was found that resultant surface species are resistant to re-oxidation due to remaining surface bromides. This finding opens up a possibility to create microclines based on cheap copper nanoparticles.

  16. Development of an inertial confinement fusion platform to study charged-particle-producing nuclear reactions relevant to nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Bacher, A.; Brune, C. R.; Casey, D. T.; Forrest, C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hohenberger, M.; Sayre, D. B.; Bionta, R. M.; Bourgade, J.-L.; Caggiano, J. A.; Cerjan, C.; Craxton, R. S.; Dearborn, D.; Farrell, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Garcia, E. M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hale, G.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hohensee, M.; Holunga, D. M.; Hoppe, M.; Janezic, R.; Khan, S. F.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kim, Y. H.; Knauer, J. P.; Kohut, T. R.; Lahmann, B.; Landoas, O.; Li, C. K.; Marshall, F. J.; Masse, L.; McEvoy, A.; McKenty, P.; McNabb, D. P.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T. G.; Paris, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Pino, J.; Radha, P. B.; Remington, B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Robey, H.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rosse, B.; Rubery, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Sanchez, J.; Schmitt, M.; Schoff, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Seka, W.; Sio, H.; Stoeckl, C.; Tipton, R. E.

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes the development of a platform to study astrophysically relevant nuclear reactions using inertial-confinement fusion implosions on the OMEGA and National Ignition Facility laser facilities, with a particular focus on optimizing the implosions to study charged-particle-producing reactions. Primary requirements on the platform are high yield, for high statistics in the fusion product measurements, combined with low areal density, to allow the charged fusion products to escape. This is optimally achieved with direct-drive exploding pusher implosions using thin-glass-shell capsules. Mitigation strategies to eliminate a possible target sheath potential which would accelerate the emitted ions are discussed. The potential impact of kinetic effects on the implosions is also considered. The platform is initially employed to study the complementary T(t,2n)α, T(3He,np)α and 3He(3He,2p)α reactions. Proof-of-principle results from the first experiments demonstrating the ability to accurately measure the energy and yields of charged particles are presented. Lessons learned from these experiments will be used in studies of other reactions. The goals are to explore thermonuclear reaction rates and fundamental nuclear physics in stellar-like plasma environments, and to push this new frontier of nuclear astrophysics into unique regimes not reachable through existing platforms, with thermal ion velocity distributions, plasma screening, and low reactant energies.

  17. Development of an inertial confinement fusion platform to study charged-particle-producing nuclear reactions relevant to nuclear astrophysics

    DOE PAGES

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Bacher, A.; ...

    2017-03-28

    Here, this paper describes the development of a platform to study astrophysically relevant nuclear reactions using inertial-confinement fusion implosions on the OMEGA and National Ignition Facility laser facilities, with a particular focus on optimizing the implosions to study charged-particle- producing reactions. Primary requirements on the platform are high yield, for high statistics in the fusion product measurements, combined with low areal density, to allow the charged fusion products to escape. This is optimally achieved with direct-drive exploding pusher implosions using thin-glass-shell capsules. Mitigation strategies to eliminate a possible target sheath potential which would accelerate the emitted ions are discussed. Themore » potential impact of kinetic effects on the implosions is also considered. The platform is initially employed to study the complementary T(t,2n)α, T(3He,np)α and 3He(3He,2p)α reactions. Proof-of-principle results from the first experiments demonstrating the ability to accurately measure the energy and yields of charged particles are presented. Lessons learned from these experiments will be used in studies of other reactions. Ultimately, the goals are to explore thermonuclear reaction rates and fundamental nuclear physics in stellarlike plasma environments, and to push this new frontier of nuclear astrophysics into unique regimes not reachable through existing platforms, with thermal ion velocity distributions, plasma screening, and low reactant energies.« less

  18. Walking-induced particle resuspension in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jing; Peccia, Jordan; Ferro, Andrea R.

    2014-06-01

    Resuspension of particles indoors increases the risk of consequent exposure through inhalation and non-dietary ingestion. Studies have been conducted to characterize indoor particle resuspension but results do not always agree, and there are still many open questions in this field. This paper reviews the recent research of indoor resuspension and summarizes findings to answer six critical questions: 1) How does the resuspension sources compared to other indoor sources; 2) How is resuspension determined and how does the resuspension measure change as a function of particle size; 3) What are the primary resuspension mechanisms; 4) What are the factors affecting resuspension; 5) What are the knowledge gaps and future research directions in this area; and 6) How can what we know about resuspension guide better exposure mitigation strategies? From synthesized results, we conclude that resuspension is an important source for indoor particulate matter, compared with other indoor sources. Among all existing quantification terms of resuspension, resuspension fraction has the least variation in its estimates by explicitly defining surface loading and walking frequency, and thus is recommended to be adopted in future research over other terms. Resuspension increases with particle size in the range of 0.7-10 μm, although differences exist in resuspension estimates by orders of magnitude. The primary mechanism of particle resuspension involves rolling detachment, and the adhesive forces can be greatly reduced by microscopic surface roughness. Particle resuspension is by nature complicated, affected by various factors and their interactions. There are still many open questions to be answered to achieve an understanding of resuspension fundamentals. Given the complex and multidisciplinary nature of resuspension, understanding indoor particle resuspension behavior requires cross-disciplinary participation from experts in aerosol science, textile science, surface chemistry

  19. PAHs, PAH-induced carcinogenic potency, and particle-extract-Induced cytotoxicity of traffic-related nano/ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Chung; Chen, Shui-Jen; Huang, Kuo-Lin; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Lin, Wen-Yinn; Tsai, Jen-Hsiung; Chaung, Hso-Chi

    2008-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) bound in nano/ ultrafine particles from vehicle emissions may cause adverse health effects. However, little is known about the characteristics of the nanoparticle-bound PAHs and the PAH-associated carcinogenic potency/cytotoxicity; therefore, traffic-related nano/ultrafine particles were collected in this study using a microorifice uniform deposition impactor(MOUDI) and a nano-MOUDI. For PM0.056--18, the difference in size-distribution of particulate total-PAHs between non-after-rain and after-rain samples was statistically significant at alpha = 0.05; however, this difference was not significant for PM0.01--0.056. The PAH correlation between PM0.01--0.1 and PM0.1--1.8 was lower for the after-rain samples than forthe non-after-rain samples. The average particulate total-PAHs in five samplings displayed a trimodal distribution with a major peak in the Aitken mode (0.032--0.056 microm). About half of the particulate total-PAHs were in the ultrafine size range. The BaPeq sums of BaP, IND, and DBA (with toxic equivalence factors > or = 0.1) accounted for approximately 90% of the total-BaPeq in the nano/ultrafine particles, although these three compounds contributed little to the mass of the sampled particles. The mean content of the particle-bound total-PAHs/-BaPeqs and the PAH/BaPeq-derived carcinogenic potency followed the order nano > ultrafine > fine > coarse. For a sunny day sample, the cytotoxicity of particle extracts (using 1:1 (v/v) n-hexane/dichloromethane) was significantly higher (p < 0.05) for the nano (particularly the 10-18 nm)/ultrafine particles than for the coarser particles and bleomycin. Therefore, traffic-related nano and ultrafine particles are possibly cytotoxic.

  20. Heterogeneous reaction of gaseous hydrogen peroxide and its role in the oxidation of organic compounds on mineral dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Chen, Z.; Huang, D.

    2012-12-01

    As a significant atmospheric oxidant, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plays an important role in the formation of secondary sulfate, HOx radical chemistry, as well as the formation of secondary organic aerosol. Recent field and model combined studies have revealed that heterogeneous reaction on mineral dust seems to be an important sink for gaseous H2O2. However, available kinetic data concerning this reaction are quite scarce and is mainly limited to the reaction on mineral oxide surfaces. In addition, H2O2 may act as a source of surface reactive species (e.g., OH and HO2 radicals) on mineral dust particles, and thus may favor the oxidation of surface co-adsorbed organics. However, little is known about this potential role that H2O2 may play. In this study, we have investigated heterogeneous reactions of gaseous H2O2 with two different authentic mineral dusts, Asian dust storm particles and Tengger Desert sand, using a filter-based flow tube reactor. The BET uptake coefficients of H2O2 were measured to be on the order of 10^-4 for both dust samples. Additionally, the potential role of H2O2 in the oxidation of organic compounds on mineral dust particles were studied by investigating the reactions of methacrolein (MAC) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) with alumina oxide, a major reactive components of mineral dust, in the absence and presence of H2O2. We found that in the presence of H2O2, the yield of organic acid products exhibits a marked enhancement relative to that in the absence of H2O2, that is, a factor of 2 for acetic acid and a factor of 3 for formic acid in MAC reaction system, and up to a factor of 10 for acetic acid in MVK reaction system. These data indicate a significant role of H2O2 in oxidation of MAC and MVK, probably related to formation of surface OH and HO2 radicals from H2O2 decomposition on the particles. Our results suggest that uptake by mineral dust can be an important removal process of gaseous H2O2, comparable to the loss due to the photolysis or

  1. Hydrodynamic fingering instability induced by a precipitation reaction.

    PubMed

    Nagatsu, Y; Ishii, Y; Tada, Y; De Wit, A

    2014-07-11

    We experimentally demonstrate that a precipitation reaction at the miscible interface between two reactive solutions can trigger a hydrodynamic instability due to the buildup of a locally adverse mobility gradient related to a decrease in permeability. The precipitate results from an A+B→C type of reaction when a solution containing one of the reactants is injected into a solution of the other reactant in a porous medium or a Hele-Shaw cell. Fingerlike precipitation patterns are observed upon displacement, the properties of which depend on whether A displaces B or vice versa. A mathematical modeling of the underlying mobility profile confirms that the instability originates from a local decrease in mobility driven by the localized precipitation. Nonlinear simulations of the related reaction-diffusion-convection model reproduce the properties of the instability observed experimentally. In particular, the simulations suggest that differences in diffusivity between A and B may contribute to the asymmetric characteristics of the fingering precipitation patterns.

  2. Population of Nuclei Via 7Li-Induced Binary Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Rodney M.; Phair, Larry W.; Descovich, M.; Cromaz, Mario; Deleplanque, M.A.; Fall on, Paul; Lee, I-Yang; Macchiavelli, A.O.; McMahan, Margaret A.; Moretto, Luciano G.; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E.; Sinha,Shrabani; Stephens, Frank S.; Ward, David; Wiedeking, Mathis

    2005-08-08

    The authors have investigated the population of nuclei formed in binary reactions involving {sup 7}Li beams on targets of {sup 160}Gd and {sup 184}W. The {sup 7}Li + {sup 184}W data were taken in the first experiment using the LIBERACE Ge-array in combination with the STARS Si {Delta}E-E telescope system at the 88-Inch Cyclotron of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. By using the Wilczynski binary transfer model, in combination with a standard evaporation model, they are able to reproduce the experimental results. This is a useful method for predicting the population of neutron-rich heavy nuclei formed in binary reactions involving beams of weakly bound nuclei formed in binary reactions involving beams of weakly bound nuclei and will be of use in future spectroscopic studies.

  3. (α, γ) reaction induced background events for rare event experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Ashok; Zhang, Chao; Mei, Dongming

    2016-09-01

    We report an observation of (α, γ) reaction at the Soudan mine. With a 12-Liter scintillation neutron detector at Soudan mine for about 5 years of data taking, we have observed (α, γ) reaction, which can generate potential background events for dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. We have simulated the alpha flux from radon decay using the measured radon concentration in Soudan mine. The convolution of the alpha flux and the cross-section of (α, γ) allows us to determine the rate of high energy gamma from (α, γ) reaction. This rate is compared to the measured event rate. We demonstrate that the modulation of (α, γ) event rate has similar pattern as the radon modulation observed independently in Soudan mine. This work is supported by NSF in part by the NSF PHY-0758120, DOE Grant DE-FG02-10ER46709, and the State of South Dakota.

  4. Anaphylactic reaction induced by Toxoplasma gondii-derived heat shock protein 70.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hao; Aosai, Fumie; Mun, Hye-Seong; Norose, Kazumi; Ahmed, Azza Kamal; Furuya, Mitsuko; Yano, Akihiko

    2006-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii-derived heat shock protein 70 (T.g.HSP70) is a virulent molecule specific for tachyzoites of T. gondii. The expression of T.g.HSP70 rapidly increases just before death of the host, indicating that T.g.HSP70 functions as a danger signal during lethal acute T. gondii infection. In the present study, T.g.HSP70 was proven to be capable of inducing lethal anaphylactic reaction in T. gondii-infected wild-type (WT) mice. Anaphylactic reaction appeared within the first hour after intraperitoneal injection of T.g.HSP70 and was characterized by a series of consequent symptoms until death. T.g.HSP70-induced anaphylactic reaction was not observed in IFN-gamma knockout (GKO) mice, indicating the involvement of IFN-gamma in the reaction. The anaphylactic reaction was transferable to GKO mice by splenocytes but not serum from infected WT mice. Also, this reaction occurred in B cell-deficient mice, indicating that T.g.HSP70-induced anaphylactic reaction occurred through an Ig-independent pathway. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of IFN-gamma increased significantly in splenocytes from T. gondii-infected WT mice after T.g.HSP70 injection. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase in WT, but not GKO mice, distinctly increased during the occurrence of T.g.HSP70-induced anaphylactic reaction, indicating the involvement of PAF in T.g.HSP70-induced anaphylactic reaction. Treatment with PAF receptor antagonist rescued WT mice from the anaphylactic reaction. These data demonstrated the involvement of IFN-gamma-dependent PAF activation in T.g.HSP70-induced anaphylactic reaction.

  5. Physiological Environment Induces Quick Response – Slow Exhaustion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Hiroi, Noriko; Lu, James; Iba, Keisuke; Tabira, Akito; Yamashita, Shuji; Okada, Yasunori; Flamm, Christoph; Oka, Kotaro; Köhler, Gottfried; Funahashi, Akira

    2011-01-01

    In vivo environments are highly crowded and inhomogeneous, which may affect reaction processes in cells. In this study we examined the effects of intracellular crowding and an inhomogeneity on the behavior of in vivo reactions by calculating the spectral dimension (ds), which can be translated into the reaction rate function. We compared estimates of anomaly parameters obtained from fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) data with fractal dimensions derived from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image analysis. FCS analysis indicated that the anomalous property was linked to physiological structure. Subsequent TEM analysis provided an in vivo illustration; soluble molecules likely percolate between intracellular clusters, which are constructed in a self-organizing manner. We estimated a cytoplasmic spectral dimension ds to be 1.39 ± 0.084. This result suggests that in vivo reactions initially run faster than the same reactions in a homogeneous space; this conclusion is consistent with the anomalous character indicated by FCS analysis. We further showed that these results were compatible with our Monte-Carlo simulation in which the anomalous behavior of mobile molecules correlates with the intracellular environment, leading to description as a percolation cluster, as demonstrated using TEM analysis. We confirmed by the simulation that the above-mentioned in vivo like properties are different from those of homogeneously concentrated environments. Additionally, simulation results indicated that crowding level of an environment might affect diffusion rate of reactant. Such knowledge of the spatial information enables us to construct realistic models for in vivo diffusion and reaction systems. PMID:21960972

  6. Influence of changing particle structure on the rate of gas-solid gasification reactions. Final report, July 1981-March 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-04-04

    The objetive of this work is to determine the changes in the particle structure of coal as it undergoes the carbon/carbon dioxide reaction (C + CO/sub 2/ ..-->.. 2CO). Char was produced by heating the coal at a rate of 25/sup 0/C/min to the reaction temperatures of 800/sup 0/C, 900/sup 0/C, 1000/sup 0/C and 1100/sup 0/C. The changes in surface area and effective diffusivity as a result of devolitization were determined. Changes in effective diffusivity and surface area as a function of conversion have been measured for reactions conducted at 800, 900, 1000 and 1100/sup 0/C for Wyodak coal char. The surface areas exhibit a maximum as a function of conversion in all cases. For the reaction at 1000/sup 0/C the maximum in surface area is greater than the maxima determined at all other reaction temperatures. Thermogravimetric rate data were obtained for five coal chars; Wyodak, Wilcox, Cimmeron, Illinois number 6 and Pittsburgh number 6 over the temperature range 800-1100/sup 0/C. All coal chars exhibit a maximum in reaction rate. Five different models for gas-solid reactions were evaluated. The Bhatia/Perlmutter model seems to best represent the data. 129 references, 67 figures, 37 tables.

  7. Reaction Mechanisms and Particle Interaction in Burning Two-Phase Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreizin, Edward L.; Shoshin, Yuriy L.; Murdyy, Ruslan S.; Hoffmann, Vern K.

    2001-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to understand the mechanisms by which particle interactions affect ignition and combustion in the two-phase systems. Combustion of metal aerosols representing the two-phase systems is carried out in the microgravity environment enabling one to avoid the buoyant flows that mask the particle motion due to the particle-particle interaction effects. In addition, relatively large, e.g., 100 micron diameter particles can be used, that remain aerosolized (i.e., do not fall down as they would at normal gravity) so that their behavior ahead, behind, and within the propagating flame can be resolved optically. An experimental apparatus exploiting this approach has been designed for the 2.2-s drop tower microgravity experiments. A typical experiment includes fluidizing metal particles under microgravity in an acoustic field, turning off the acoustic exciter, and igniting the created aerosol at a constant pressure using a hot wire igniter. The flame propagation and details of the individual particle combustion and particle interactions are studied using high-speed movie and video cameras coupled with microscope lenses to resolve individual particles. Recorded flame images are digitized and various image processing techniques including flame position tracking, color separation, and pixel by pixel image comparisons are employed to understand the processes occurring in the burning aerosols. Condensed combustion products are collected after each experiment for the phase, composition, and morphology analyses. New experiments described in this paper address combustion of Ti and Al particle clouds in air and combustion of Mg particle clouds in CO2. In addition, microgravity combustion experiments have been conducted with the particles of the newly produced Al-Mg mechanical alloys aerosolized in air.

  8. Light induced electron transfer reactions of metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Sutin, N; Creutz, C

    1980-01-01

    Properties of the excited states of tris(2,2'-bipyridine) and tris(1,10-phenanthroline) complexes of chromium(III), iron(II), ruthenium(II), osmium(II), rhodium(III), and iridium(III) are described. The electron transfer reactions of the ground and excited states are discussed and interpreted in terms of the driving force for the reaction and the distortions of the excited states relative to the corresponding ground states. General considerations relevant to the conversion of light into chemical energy are presented and progress in the use of polypyridine complexes to effect the light decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen is reviewed.

  9. Shear-induced particle diffusion and its effects on the flow of concentrated suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Acrivos, A.

    1996-12-31

    The mechanism underlying shear-induced particle diffusion in concentrated suspensions is clarified. Examples are then presented where this diffusion process plays a crucial role in determining the manner by which such suspensions flow under laminar conditions.

  10. Measurement of secondary particle production induced by particle therapy ion beams impinging on a PMMA target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppi, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bellini, F.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Durante, M.; Faccini, R.; Frallicciardi, P. M.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Morganti, S.; Muraro, S.; Paramatti, R.; Patera, V.; Pinci, D.; Piersanti, L.; Rucinski, A.; Russomando, A.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Senzacqua, M.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Traini, G.; Voena, C.

    2016-05-01

    Particle therapy is a technique that uses accelerated charged ions for cancer treatment and combines a high irradiation precision with a high biological effectiveness in killing tumor cells [1]. Informations about the secondary particles emitted in the interaction of an ion beam with the patient during a treatment can be of great interest in order to monitor the dose deposition. For this purpose an experiment at the HIT (Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center) beam facility has been performed in order to measure fluxes and emission profiles of secondary particles produced in the interaction of therapeutic beams with a PMMA target. In this contribution some preliminary results about the emission profiles and the energy spectra of the detected secondaries will be presented.

  11. Decomposition of nuclear response functions for neutrino-induced reactions on 12C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byungjick; Kim, K. S.; Kim, Hungchong; So, W. Y.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the nuclear response functions in neutrino-induced reaction via a neutral current (NC) on 12C, which functions are comprised of Coulomb, longitudinal, magnetic and electric transitions. Those response functions in the NC reaction are closely related to those extracted from other types of NC reactions by electrons, protons and other light nuclei, such as A( e, e')A *, A( p, p')A *, A( d, d')A *, and A(6Li,6Li')A *. For example, the magnetic response function for the J π = 1+ state (M1) which is associated with the spin transfer reaction can be measured in inelastic scattering and may give us valuable information for the NC neutrino-induced reaction. Therefore, if we exploit response functions deduced by using other nuclear reactions, neutrino reactions could be estimated indirectly without relying on neutrino-induced reaction experiments. For the purpose, in this work, we decompose every response function in the neutrino reaction 12C( ν e , ν' e )12C*( J π = 1+) and address the role of each response function in the reaction.

  12. A rotating disk electrode study of the particle size effects of Pt for the hydrogen oxidation reaction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Dai, Yu; Liu, Yuwen; Chen, Shengli

    2012-02-21

    By using a catalyst-lean thin-film RDE method, the fast kinetics of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) on highly dispersed Pt nanoparticle electrocatalysts can be determined, free from the interference of the mass transport of H(2) molecules in solution. Measurements with carbon-supported Pt nanoparticles of different sizes thus allow revealing the particle size effect of Pt for the HOR. It is shown that there is a "negative" particle size effect of Pt on the kinetics of HOR, i.e., the exchange current density j(0) decreases with the increased dispersion (i.e. decreased mean particle size). A maximum mass activity of Pt for the HOR is found at particle sizes of 3-3.5 nm. The observed particle size effect is interpreted in terms of the size dependent distribution of surface atoms on the facets and edges, which is implied by the voltammetric responses of Pt/C catalysts with differently sized Pt particles. The accompanied decrease in the HOR activity with the increase in the edge atom fraction suggests that the edge atoms on the surface of Pt nanoparticles are less active for the HOR than those on the facets.

  13. Analysis of {alpha}-induced reactions on {sup 151}Eu below the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Avrigeanu, V.; Avrigeanu, M.

    2011-01-15

    Novel measurements of ({alpha},{gamma}) and ({alpha},n) reaction cross sections on the target nucleus {sup 151}Eu, close to the reaction thresholds, support the choice of recently proposed parameters of the {alpha}-particle optical model potential below the Coulomb barrier. A better understanding of the {alpha}-particle optical potential at these energies leads to a statistical model analysis of additional partial cross sections that were measured but not considered within a former model analysis. On this basis we have tentatively assigned a modified J{sup {pi}}=9{sup -} spin and parity to the 22.7-h isomer in {sup 154}Tb.

  14. Pulmonary reactions caused by welding-induced decomposed trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoegren, B.P.; Plato, N.; Alexandersson, R.; Eklund, A.; Falkenberg, C. )

    1991-01-01

    This is the report of a welder who performed argon-shielded electric arc welding in an atmosphere containing trichloroethylene. He developed immediate respiratory symptoms, pulmonary edema 12 hours after exposure, and recurring dyspnea ten days after exposure. These pulmonary reactions might be explained by inhalation of decomposition products of trichloroethylene such as dichloroacetyl chloride and phosgene.

  15. Low-energy deuteron-induced reactions on 93Nb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Bém, P.; Fischer, U.; Honusek, M.; Koning, A. J.; Mrázek, J.; Šimečková, E.; Štefánik, M.; Závorka, L.

    2013-07-01

    The activation cross sections of (d,p), (d,2n), (d,2np+nd+t), (d,2nα), and (d,pα) reactions on 93Nb were measured in the energy range from 1 to 20 MeV using the stacked-foil technique. Then, within a simultaneous analysis of elastic scattering and reaction data, the available elastic-scattering data analysis was carried out in order to obtain the optical potential for reaction cross-section calculations. Particular attention was paid to the description of the breakup mechanism and direct reaction stripping and pick-up, followed by pre-equilibrium and compound-nucleus calculations. The measured cross sections as well as all available deuteron activation data of 93Nb were compared with results of local model calculations carried out using the codes fresco and stapre-h and both default and particular predictions of the code talys-1.4 and tendl-2012-evaluated data.

  16. Particle-induced pulmonary acute phase response may be the causal link between particle inhalation and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Anne T; Jacobsen, Nicklas R; Jackson, Petra; Poulsen, Sarah Søs; Kyjovska, Zdenka O; Halappanavar, Sabina; Yauk, Carole L; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of ambient and workplace particulate air pollution is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. One proposed mechanism for this association is that pulmonary inflammation induces a hepatic acute phase response, which increases risk of cardiovascular disease. Induction of the acute phase response is intimately linked to risk of cardiovascular disease as shown in both epidemiological and animal studies. Indeed, blood levels of acute phase proteins, such as C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A, are independent predictors of risk of cardiovascular disease in prospective epidemiological studies. In this review, we present and review emerging evidence that inhalation of particles (e.g., air diesel exhaust particles and nanoparticles) induces a pulmonary acute phase response, and propose that this induction constitutes the causal link between particle inhalation and risk of cardiovascular disease. Increased levels of acute phase mRNA and proteins in lung tissues, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma clearly indicate pulmonary acute phase response following pulmonary deposition of different kinds of particles including diesel exhaust particles, nanoparticles, and carbon nanotubes. The pulmonary acute phase response is dose-dependent and long lasting. Conversely, the hepatic acute phase response is reduced relative to lung or entirely absent. We also provide evidence that pulmonary inflammation, as measured by neutrophil influx, is a predictor of the acute phase response and that the total surface area of deposited particles correlates with the pulmonary acute phase response. We discuss the implications of these findings in relation to occupational exposure to nanoparticles. How to cite this article: WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2014, 6:517–531. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1279 PMID:24920450

  17. Macrophage integrins modulate response to ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene particles and direct particle-induced osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Zaveri, Toral D; Dolgova, Natalia V; Lewis, Jamal S; Hamaker, Kiri; Clare-Salzler, Michael J; Keselowsky, Benjamin G

    2017-01-01

    Aseptic loosening due to peri-prosthetic osteolysis is one of the primary causes for failure of artificial joint replacements. Implant-derived wear particles, often ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) microparticles, initiate an inflammatory cascade upon phagocytosis by macrophages, which leads to osteoclast recruitment and activation, ultimately resulting in osteolysis. Investigation into integrin receptors, involved in cellular interactions with biomaterial-adsorbed adhesive proteins, is of interest to understand and modulate inflammatory processes. In this work, we investigate the role of macrophage integrins Mac-1 and RGD-binding integrins in response to UHMWPE wear particles. Using integrin knockout mice as well as integrin blocking techniques, reduction in macrophage phagocytosis and inflammatory cytokine secretion is demonstrated when these receptors are either absent or blocked. Along this line, various opsonizing proteins are shown to differentially modulate microparticle uptake and macrophage secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, using a calvarial osteolysis model it is demonstrated that both Mac-1 integrin and RGD-binding integrins modulate the particle induced osteolysis response to UHMWPE microparticles, with a 40% decrease in the area of osteolysis by the absence or blocking of these integrins, in vivo. Altogether, these findings indicate Mac-1 and RGD-binding integrins are involved in macrophage-directed inflammatory responses to UHMWPE and may serve as therapeutic targets to mitigate wear particle induced peri-prosthetic osteolysis for improved performance of implanted joints.

  18. Unexpected death due to cefuroxime-induced disulfiram-like reaction

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongmei; Zhang, Ji; Ren, Liang; Liu, Qian; Zhu, Shaohua

    2013-01-01

    Cefuoxime, a second-generation cephalosporin, is used in the treatment of Gram-positive infections. Here, we report a case cefuroxime-induced disulfiram-like reaction which led to sudden death of the patient. PMID:24014919

  19. The modeling of chemical reactions and thermochemical nonequilibrium in particle simulation computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallis, Michael A.; Harvey, John K.

    1998-06-01

    The treatment of chemical reactions and nonequilibrium energy exchange in Direct Simulation Monte Carlo calculations is examined. Details of a Maximum Entropy chemical reaction model are presented that is based on the classical scheme devised by Levine and Bernstein. Data are given for all of the significant reactions that occur in hypersonic reentry flight into the atmospheres of the Earth, Mars, and Venus. The method is an extension of that described and used previously by the authors (Gallis and Harvey [J. Fluid Mech. 312, 149 (1996); AIAA J. 34(7), 1378 (1996)]) and now includes carbon dioxide/nitrogen and ionic reactions. The model allows an appropriate dependence of each reaction on its controlling energy mode and avoids inappropriate use of equilibrium distributions to determine the reaction probabilities and post-collision energy reallocation. Sample flow solutions are given and comparisons are made with results obtained using continuum solvers.

  20. Inhibition of osteolysis after local administration of osthole in a TCP particles-induced osteolysis model.

    PubMed

    Lv, Shumin; Zhang, Yun; Yan, Ming; Mao, Hongjiao; Pan, Cailing; Gan, Mingxiao; Fan, Jiawen; Wang, Guoxia

    2016-07-01

    Wear debris-induced osteolysis and aseptic loosening are the most frequent late complications of total joint arthroplasty leading to revision of the prosthesis. However, no effective measures for the prevention and treatment of particles-induced osteolysis currently exist. Here, we investigated the efficacy of local administration of osthole on tricalcium phosphate (TCP) particles-induced osteolysis in a murine calvarial model. TCP particles were implanted over the calvaria of ICR mice, and established TCP particles-induced osteolysis model. On days one, four, seven, ten and thirteen post-surgery, osthole (10 mg/kg) or phosphate buffer saline (PBS) were subcutaneously injected into the calvaria of TCP particles-implanted or sham-operated mice. Two weeks later, blood, the periosteum and the calvaria were collected and processed for bone turnover markers, pro-inflammatory cytokine, histomorphometric and molecular analysis. Osthole (10 mg/kg) markedly prevented TCP particles-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption in a mouse calvarial model. Osthole also inhibited the decrease of serum osteocalcin level and calvarial alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and prevented the increase in the activity of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K in the mouse calvaria. Furthermore, osthole obviously reduced the release of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) into the periosteum. Western blotting demonstrated TCP particles caused a remarkable endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response in the mouse calvaria, which was obviously blocked by osthole treatment. These results suggest that local administration of osthole inhibits TCP particles-induced osteolysis in the mouse calvarial in vivo, which may be mediated by inhibition of the ER stress signaling pathway, and it will be developed as a new drug in the prevention and treatment of destructive diseases caused by prosthetic wear particles.

  1. Modeled Neutron Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the region of Iriduim and Gold

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R D; Dietrich, F S; Kelley, K; Escher, J; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M

    2008-02-26

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for targets ranging from osmium (Z = 76) to gold (Z = 79). Of particular interest are the cross sections on Ir and Au including reactions on isomeric targets.

  2. Reaction-induced rheological weakening enables oceanic plate subduction.

    PubMed

    Hirauchi, Ken-Ichi; Fukushima, Kumi; Kido, Masanori; Muto, Jun; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2016-08-26

    Earth is the only terrestrial planet in our solar system where an oceanic plate subducts beneath an overriding plate. Although the initiation of plate subduction requires extremely weak boundaries between strong plates, the way in which oceanic mantle rheologically weakens remains unknown. Here we show that shear-enhanced hydration reactions contribute to the generation and maintenance of weak mantle shear zones at mid-lithospheric depths. High-pressure friction experiments on peridotite gouge reveal that in the presence of hydrothermal water, increasing strain and reactions lead to an order-of-magnitude reduction in strength. The rate of deformation is controlled by pressure-solution-accommodated frictional sliding on weak hydrous phyllosilicate (talc), providing a mechanism for the 'cutoff' of the high peak strength at the brittle-plastic transition. Our findings suggest that infiltration of seawater into transform faults with long lengths and low slip rates is an important controlling factor on the initiation of plate tectonics on terrestrial planets.

  3. Population of Nuclei Via 7Li-Induced Binary Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R M; Phair, L W; Descovich, M; Cromaz, M; Deleplanque, M A; Fallon, P; Lee, I Y; Macchiavelli, A O; McMahan, M A; Moretto, L G; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E; Sinha, S; Stephens, F S; Ward, D; Wiedeking, M; Bernstein, L A; Burke, J T; Church, J A

    2005-08-09

    The authors have investigated the population of nuclei formed in binary reactions involving {sup 7}Li beams on targets of {sup 160}Gd and {sup 184}W. The {sup 7}Li + {sup 184}W data were taken in the first experiment using the LIBERACE Ge-array in combination with the STARS Si {Delta}E-E telescope system at the 88-Inch Cyclotron of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. By using the Wilczynski binary transfer model, in combination with a standard evaporation model, they are able to reproduce the experimental results. This is a useful method for predicting the population of neutron-rich heavy nuclei formed in binary reactions involving beams of weakly bound nuclei and will be of use in future spectroscopic studies.

  4. Multimodal Fission in Heavy-Ion Induced Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pokrovskiy, I. V.; Bogachev, A. A.; Iitkis, M. G.; Iitkis, J. M.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Dorvaux, O.; Rowley, N.; Schmitt, Ch.; Stuttge, L.

    2006-08-14

    Mass, energy and folding angle distributions of the fission fragments as well as multiplicities of neutron and gamma-quanta emissions accompanying the fission process were measured for fission of 226Th, 227Pa and 234Pu compound nuclei produced in reactions with 18O and 26Mg projectiles over a wide energy range. Data were analyzed with respect to the presence of fission modes. Asymmetric fission was observed even at very high initial excitation for all the measured systems. The so-called fission mode S1 (caused by the proton shell Z{approx}50 and neutron shell N{approx}82 in heavy fragment) was found to be dominant in asymmetric fission of 234Pu. Reactions with not full linear momentum transfer were observed in the folding spectra for all the measured systems.

  5. Reaction-induced rheological weakening enables oceanic plate subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirauchi, Ken-Ichi; Fukushima, Kumi; Kido, Masanori; Muto, Jun; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    Earth is the only terrestrial planet in our solar system where an oceanic plate subducts beneath an overriding plate. Although the initiation of plate subduction requires extremely weak boundaries between strong plates, the way in which oceanic mantle rheologically weakens remains unknown. Here we show that shear-enhanced hydration reactions contribute to the generation and maintenance of weak mantle shear zones at mid-lithospheric depths. High-pressure friction experiments on peridotite gouge reveal that in the presence of hydrothermal water, increasing strain and reactions lead to an order-of-magnitude reduction in strength. The rate of deformation is controlled by pressure-solution-accommodated frictional sliding on weak hydrous phyllosilicate (talc), providing a mechanism for the `cutoff' of the high peak strength at the brittle-plastic transition. Our findings suggest that infiltration of seawater into transform faults with long lengths and low slip rates is an important controlling factor on the initiation of plate tectonics on terrestrial planets.

  6. Cardiopulmonary arrest induced by anaphylactoid reaction with contrast media.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Iwao; Hori, Shingo; Funabiki, Tomohiro; Sekine, Kazuhiko; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Fujishima, Seitaro; Aoki, Katsunori; Kuribayashi, Sachio; Aikawa, Naoki

    2002-05-01

    Anaphylactoid reactions to iodinated contrast media can cause life-threatening events and even death. A 44-year-old woman presented with cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) immediately following the administration of nonionic iodinated contrast media for an intravenous pyelography. Her cardiac rhythm during CPA was asystole. She was successfully resuscitated by the radiologists supported by paged emergency physicians using the prompt intravenous administration of 1 mg of epinephrine. Neither laryngeal edema nor bronchial spasm was observed during the course of treatment, and she was discharged on the 4th day without any complications. The patient did not have a history of allergy, but had experienced a myocardial infarction and aortitis. She had undergone 11 angiographies and had been taking a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist. Planned emergency medical backup is advisable to ensure resuscitation in the event of an anaphylactoid reaction to the use of contrast media in-hospital settings.

  7. Direct Reactions at Relativistic Energies: A New Insight into the Single-Particle Structure of Exotic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortina-Gil, Dolores

    Direct reactions proceed in a single step, allowing to disentangle structural properties of nuclei from the reaction mechanism. The availability of radioactive beams gives rise to a renewed activity in this field enlarging the opportunities to explore the single-particle properties of exotic nuclei. Different kinds of direct reactions have been employed in different energy regimes. At high energies, the removal of one(two)-nucleon(s) (referred to as nucleon knockout in this text) from a fast exotic projectile has been extensively investigated, exploring the nuclear structure of the peripheral tail of wave functions and providing a direct insight into the single-particle properties. More than 25 years of experimental and theoretical work will be reviewed in this lecture. This exploration has recently been rejuvenated with the possibility of quasi-free scattering applied to rare isotopes. This method will be a substantial part of the program of future experimental facilities, with the results of pilot experiments now coming to light. Quasi-free scattering will complement the information gained with nucleon knockout studies, exploring deeper regions in the wave function and allowing the determination of spectral functions for both weakly and deeply bound nucleons. This lecture provides a general overview of the experimental achievements reached so far using both complementary techniques. A brief introduction to the reaction mechanisms and a simplified interpretation of the observables obtained will be presented.

  8. Robotic reactions: delay-induced patterns in autonomous vehicle systems.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Gábor; Moehlis, Jeff; Bullo, Francesco

    2010-02-01

    Fundamental design principles are presented for vehicle systems governed by autonomous cruise control devices. By analyzing the corresponding delay differential equations, it is shown that for any car-following model short-wavelength oscillations can appear due to robotic reaction times, and that there are tradeoffs between the time delay and the control gains. The analytical findings are demonstrated on an optimal velocity model using numerical continuation and numerical simulation.

  9. Shock-Induced Chemical Reactions in Condensed Matter.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    Technical, 4/1/78 - 6/30/82 Matter 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMUER(e) George E. Duvall, Principal Investigator...CHEMICAL REACTIONS IN CONDENSED MATTER George E. Duvall, Principal Investigator Stephen A. Sheffield* Kendal M. OgilvieT 4 C. Robert Wilson Paul...Temperture," in Sixth Symposium (International on Detonation (Office of Naval Research, Arlington, 1976), ACR-Z21, p. 36. 24. G. Gamow , "Tentative

  10. Robotic reactions: Delay-induced patterns in autonomous vehicle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orosz, Gábor; Moehlis, Jeff; Bullo, Francesco

    2010-02-01

    Fundamental design principles are presented for vehicle systems governed by autonomous cruise control devices. By analyzing the corresponding delay differential equations, it is shown that for any car-following model short-wavelength oscillations can appear due to robotic reaction times, and that there are tradeoffs between the time delay and the control gains. The analytical findings are demonstrated on an optimal velocity model using numerical continuation and numerical simulation.

  11. Electron induced reactions in condensed mixtures of methane and ammonia.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Sramana; Prabhudesai, Vaibhav S; Krishnakumar, E

    2017-09-27

    We demonstrate the efficient formation of carbon-nitrogen bonds starting from CH4 and NH3 on a metal surface at cryogenic temperatures. Electrons in the energy range of 1-90 eV are used to initiate chemical reactions in mixed molecular films of CH4 and NH3 at ∼15 K, and the products are detected by performing temperature programmed desorption (TPD). Extensive dehydrogenation occurs at all energies giving the products CH2NH and HCN in preference to CH3NH2. This is likely to do with the energetics of the reactions and the subsequent stability of these species in the condensed film. Thermal processing of the irradiated mixture favours dehydrogenation as indicated by the results of using different desorption rates. Electron impact excitation and subsequent dissociation into radicals is the reaction-initiating step rather than ionization of CH4 and NH3, as inferred from the yield of products as a function of electron energy. This could give insight into the important catalytic process of the industrial scale synthesis of HCN from CH4 and NH3 over Pt. This may also be a relevant pathway in the astrochemical environment where CN and HCN are abundant and low-energy electrons are found ubiquitously.

  12. Kinetics of nitrosamine and amine reactions with NO3 radical and ozone related to aqueous particle and cloud droplet chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Christian; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Aqueous phase reactivity experiments with the amines dimethylamine (DMA), diethanolamine (DEA) and pyrrolidine (PYL) and their corresponding nitrosamines nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), nitrosodiethanolamine (NDEA) and nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYL) have been performed. NO3 radical reaction rate coefficients for DMA, DEA and PYL were measured for the first time and are 3.7 × 105, 8.2 × 105 and 8.7 × 105 M-1 s-1, respectively. Rate coefficients for NO3 + NDMA, NDEA and NPYL are 1.2 × 108, 2.3 × 108 and 2.4 × 108 M-1 s-1. Compared to OH radical rate coefficients for reactions with amines, the NO3 radical will most likely not be an important oxidant but it is a potential nighttime oxidant for nitrosamines in cloud droplets or deliquescent particles. Ozone is unreactive towards amines and nitrosamines and upper limits of rate coefficients suggest that aqueous ozone reactions are not important in atmospheric waters.

  13. Diethyl pyrocarbonate reaction with the lactose repressor protein affects both inducer and DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, C.F.; Matthews, K.S.

    1988-04-05

    Modification of the lactose repressor protein of Escherichia coli with diethyl pyrocarbonate (DPC) results in decreased inducer binding as well as operator and nonspecific DNA binding. Spectrophotometric measurements indicated a maximum of three histidines per subunit was modified, and quantitation of lysine residues with trinitrobenzenesulfonate revealed the modification of one lysine residue. The loss of DNA binding, both operator and nonspecific, was correlated with histidine modification; removal of the carbethoxy groups from the histidines by hydroxylamine was accompanied by significant recovery of DNA binding function. The presence of inducing sugars during the DPC reaction had no effect on histidine modification or the loss of DNA binding activity. In contrast, inducer binding was not recovered upon reversal of the histidine modification. However, the presence of inducer during reaction protected lysine from reaction and also prevented the decrease in inducer binding; these results indicate that reaction of the lysine residue(s) may correlate to the loss of sugar binding activity. Since no difference in incorporation of radiolabeled carbethoxy was observed following reaction with diethyl pyrocarbonate in the presence or absence of inducer, the reagent appears to function as a catalyst in the modification of the lysine. The formation of an amide bond between the affected lysine and a nearby carboxylic acid moiety provides a possible mechanism for the activity loss. Reaction of the isolated NH2-terminal domain resulted in loss of DNA binding with modification of the single histidine at position 29. Results from the modification of core domain paralleled observations with intact repressor.

  14. A self-consistent theory of collective alpha particle losses induced by Alfvenic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Diamond, P.H. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of kinetic Alfven waves, resonantly excited by energetic ions/alpha particles, is investigated. It is shown that {alpha}-particles govern both linear instability and nonlinear saturation dynamics, while the background MHD turbulence results only in a nonlinear real frequency shift. The most efficient saturation mechanism is found to be self-induced profile modification. Expressions for the fluctuation amplitudes and the {alpha}-particle radial flux are self-consistently derived. The work represents the first self-consistent, turbulent treatment of collective {alpha}-particle losses by Alfvenic fluctuations.

  15. Stochastic electrodynamics with particle structure Part I: Zero-point induced Brownian behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, A.

    1993-02-01

    If ordinary views on particle structure are introduced in a simple classical particle model in replacement of the point particles of standard use in stochastic electrodynamics, it can be shown that an internal Zitterbewegung induced by the zero-point field background gives rise to a Brownian movement for the whole particle with a diffusion constant of the form D = ħ/2mD , where mD is a modeldependent mass. Since the days of Madeleung and Fuhr brownian behaviour has often been associated with quantization. We discuss this from the viewpoint of stochastic electrodynamics.

  16. Reaction-induced grain boundary cracking and anisotropic fluid flow during prograde devolatilization reactions within subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Atsushi; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Jun-ichi; Muto, Jun; Okudaira, Takamoto

    2017-09-01

    Devolatilization reactions during prograde metamorphism are a key control on the fluid distribution within subduction zones. Garnets in Mn-rich quartz schist within the Sanbagawa metamorphic belt of Japan are characterized by skeletal structures containing abundant quartz inclusions. Each quartz inclusion was angular-shaped, and showed random crystallographic orientations, suggesting that these quartz inclusions were trapped via grain boundary cracking during garnet growth. Such skeletal garnet within the quartz schist formed related to decarbonation reactions with a positive total volume change (Δ V t > 0), whereas the euhedral garnet within the pelitic schists formed as a result of dehydration reaction with negative Δ V t values. Coupled hydrological-chemical-mechanical processes during metamorphic devolatilization reactions were investigated by a distinct element method (DEM) numerical simulation on a foliated rock that contained reactive minerals and non-reactive matrix minerals. Negative Δ V t reactions cause a decrease in fluid pressure and do not produce fractures within the matrix. In contrast, a fluid pressure increase by positive Δ V t reactions results in hydrofracturing of the matrix. This fracturing preferentially occurs along grain boundaries and causes episodic fluid pulses associated with the development of the fracture network. The precipitation of garnet within grain boundary fractures could explain the formation of the skeletal garnet. Our DEM model also suggests a strong influence of reaction-induced fracturing on anisotropic fluid flow, meaning that dominant fluid flow directions could easily change in response to changes in stress configuration and the magnitude of differential stress during prograde metamorphism within a subduction zone.

  17. Dominant particles and reactions in a two-temperature chemical kinetic model of a decaying SF6 arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaohua; Gao, Qingqing; Fu, Yuwei; Yang, Aijun; Rong, Mingzhe; Wu, Yi; Niu, Chunping; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2016-03-01

    This paper is devoted to the computation of the non-equilibrium composition of an SF6 plasma, and determination of the dominant particles and reactions, at conditions relevant to high-voltage circuit breakers after current zero (temperatures from 12 000 K to 1000 K and a pressure of 4 atm). The non-equilibrium composition is characterized by departures from both thermal and chemical equilibrium. In thermal non-equilibrium process, the electron temperature (T e) is not equal to the heavy-particle temperature (T h), while for chemical non-equilibrium, a chemical kinetic model is adopted. In order to evaluate the reasonableness and reliability of the non-equilibrium composition, calculation methods for equilibrium composition based on Gibbs free energy minimization and kinetic composition in a one-temperature kinetic model are first considered. Based on the one-temperature kinetic model, a two-temperature kinetic model with the ratio T e/T h varying as a function of the logarithm of electron density ratio (n e/n\\text{e}\\max ) was established. In this model, T* is introduced to allow a smooth transition between T h and T e and to determine the temperatures for the rate constants. The initial composition in the kinetic models is obtained from the asymptotic composition as infinite time is approached at 12 000 K. The molar fractions of neutral particles and ions in the two-temperature kinetic model are consistent with the equilibrium composition and the composition obtained from the one-temperature kinetic model above 10 000 K, while significant differences appear below 10 000 K. Based on the dependence of the particle distributions on temperature in the two-temperature kinetic model, three temperature ranges, and the dominant particles and reactions in the respective ranges, are determined. The full model is then simplified into three models and the accuracy of the simplified models is assessed. The simplified models reduce the number of species and

  18. Enhanced homologous recombination is induced by alpha-particle radiation in somatic cells of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Po; Liu, Ping; Wu, Yuejin

    Almost 9 percent of cosmic rays which strike the earth's atmosphere are alpha particles. As one of the ionizing radiations (IR), its biological effects have been widely studied. However, the plant genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation was not largely known. In this research, the Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic for GUS recombination substrate was used to evaluate the genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation (3.3MeV). The pronounced effects of systemic exposure to alpha-particle radiation on the somatic homologous recombination frequency (HRF) were found at different doses. The 10Gy dose of radiation induced the maximal HRF which was 1.9-fold higher than the control. The local radiation of alpha-particle (10Gy) on root also resulted in a 2.5-fold increase of somatic HRF in non-radiated aerial plant, indicating that the signal(s) of genomic instability was transferred to non-radiated parts and initiated their genomic instability. Concurrent treatment of seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana with alpha-particle and DMSO(ROS scavenger) both in systemic and local radiation signifi- cantly suppressed the somatic HR, indicating that the free radicals produced by alpha-particle radiation took part in the production of signal of genomic instability rather than the signal transfer. Key words: alpha-particle radiation, somatic homologous recombination, genomic instability

  19. Effect of competition between catalytic particles C on the rate of the reversible diffusion-controlled reaction A+C⇌B+C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felderhof, B. U.; Jones, R. B.

    1999-11-01

    The effect of competition between catalytic particles C on the rate of the reversible diffusion-controlled reaction A+C⇌B+C is studied in a self-consistent approximation. The C-particles are assumed static with random configuration. The A- and B-particles diffuse in a fluid or solid background medium. Frequency-dependent effective rate coefficients are calculated as a function of the volume fraction of C-particles.

  20. Surfactant-induced detachment of monodispersed hematite particles adhered on glass.

    PubMed

    Zelenev, Andrei; Matijević, Egon

    2006-07-01

    The effects of an anionic (sodium 4-octylbenzenesulfonate, NaOBS) and a cationic (1-dodecylpyridinium chloride, DPC) surfactant on the detachment of colloidal hematite particles adhered to glass beads was studied using the packed column technique. Both additives induced particle removal at concentrations above those necessary for the reversal of charge either on particles or on beads, in order to induce a repulsion between interacting surfaces. The amount of detached hematite was substantially increased as the surfactant concentrations exceeded the corresponding critical micellization concentrations (CMC). Particle removal was shown to follow first order kinetics with two distinctively different rate constants. The value of the constant for rapid removal, k(r), was substantially higher than that established in earlier studies for detachment of the same particles with NaOH solutions.

  1. Particle roughness in magnetorheology: effect on the strength of the field-induced structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereda, F.; Segovia-Gutiérrez, J. P.; de Vicente, J.; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R.

    2015-01-01

    We report a study on the effect of particle roughness on the strength of the field-induced structures of magnetorheological (MR) fluids in the quasi-static regime. We prepared one set of MR fluids with carbonyl iron particles and another set with magnetite particles, and in both sets we had particles with different degrees of surface roughness. Small amplitude oscillatory shear (SAOS) magnetosweeps and steady shear (SS) tests were carried out on the suspensions to measure their elastic modulus (G‧) and static yield stress (τstatic). Results for both the iron and the magnetite sets of suspensions were consistent: for the MR fluids prepared with rougher particles, G‧ increased at smaller fields and τstatic was ca. 20% larger than for the suspensions prepared with relatively smooth particles. In addition to the experimental study, we carried out finite element method calculations to assess the effect of particle roughness on the magnetic interaction between particles. These calculations showed that roughness can facilitate the magnetization of the particles, thus increasing the magnetic energy of the system for a given field, but that this effect depends on the concrete morphology of the surface. For our real systems, no major differences were observed between the magnetization cycles of the MR fluids prepared with particles with different degree of roughness, which implied that the effect of roughness on the measured G‧ and τstatic was due mainly to friction between the solid surfaces of adjacent particles.

  2. Energetic particle-induced enhancements of stratospheric nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1994-01-01

    Inclusion of complete ion chemistry in the calculation of minor species production during energetic particle deposition events leads to significant enhancement in the calculated nitric acid concentration during precipitation. An ionization rate of 1.2 x 10(exp 3)/cu cm/s imposed for 1 day increases HNO3 from 3 x 10(exp 5) to 6 x 10(exp 7)/cu cm at 50 km. With an ionization rate of 600 cu cm/s, the maximum HNO3 is 3 x 10(exp 7)/cu cm. Calculations which neglect negative ions predict the nitric acid will fall during precipitation events. The decay time for converting HNO3 into odd nitrogen and hydrogen is more than 1 day for equinoctial periods at 70 deg latitude. Examination of nitric acid data should yield important information on the magnitude and frequency of charged particle events.

  3. Crater-ray formation by impact-induced ejecta particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadono, T.; Suzuki, A. I.; Wada, K.; Mitani, N. K.; Yamamoto, S.; Arakawa, M.; Sugita, S.; Haruyama, J.; Nakamura, A. M.

    2015-04-01

    We performed impact experiments with granular targets to reveal the formation process of crater "rays", the non-uniform ejecta distributions around some fresh craters on the Moon and planets. We found mesh patterns, loosely woven with spaces like a net, as ejecta. A characteristic length of spaces between meshes was evaluated, and an angle, defined as the ratio of the characteristic length to the distance from the ejection point, was obtained as ∼a few degrees. These features are similar to the results of the analyses of the ray patterns around two lunar craters, Glushko and Kepler. Numerical simulations of granular material showed that clear mesh pattern appeared at lower coefficients of restitution between particles but was less clear at larger one, suggesting that the inelastic collisions between particles cause the clear mesh-pattern formation of impact ejecta.

  4. Ripple-induced energetic particle loss in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. B.; Goldston, R. J.; Redi, M. H.; Budny, R. V.

    1996-08-01

    The threshold for stochastic transport of high energy trapped particles in a tokamak due to toroidal field ripple is calculated by explicit construction of primary resonances, and a numerical examination of the route to chaos. Critical field ripple amplitude is determined for loss. The expression is given in magnetic coordinates and makes no assumptions regarding shape or up-down symmetry. An algorithm is developed including the effects of prompt axisymmetic orbit loss, ripple trapping, convective banana flow, and stochastic ripple loss, which gives accurate ripple loss predictions for representative Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [R. Hawryluk, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 33, 1509 (1991)] and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor [K. Tomabechi, Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1989), Vol. 3, p. 214] equilibria. The algorithm is extended to include the effects of collisions and drag, allowing rapid estimation of alpha particle loss in tokamaks.

  5. Disorder-induced breakdown of soliton and polaron particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, A.R.; Cai, D.; Gronbech-Jensen, N.; Salkola, M.I.

    1995-12-31

    Using examples of the perturbed (1+1) dimensional sine-Gordon, the continuous and discrete nonlinear Schroedinger systems, and a three-site quantum polaron problem, the authors briefly review some phenomena related to the fascinating interplays between nonlinearity, disorder, noise, nonadiabaticity, and lattice discreteness. The concept of competing length-scales and time-scales is emphasized as they pertain to the common concept of solitons and polarons behaving as {open_quotes}particles.{close_quotes}

  6. Heterogeneous reaction of NO2 on the surface of montmorillonite particles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zefeng; Shang, Jing; Zhu, Tong; Li, Hongjun; Zhao, Defeng; Liu, Yingju; Ye, Chunxiang

    2012-01-01

    The studies on heterogeneous reactions over montmorillonite, which is a typical 2:1 layered aluminosilicate, will benefit to the understanding of heterogeneous reactions on clay minerals. Montmorillonite can be classified as sodium montmorillonite or calcium montmorillonite depending on the cation presented between the different layers. Using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), the heterogeneous reaction mechanism of NO2 on the surface of montmorillonite was firstly investigated. Results showed that the reaction of NO2 on the surface of sodium and calcium montmorillonite fit a first-order kinetics, and the reaction duration of calcium montmorillonite was longer than that of sodium montmorillonite under the dry condition. For either sodium or calcium montmorillonite, the uptake coefficient decreased as humidify increased.

  7. Role of direct estrogen receptor signaling in wear particle-induced osteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Nich, Christophe; Rao, Allison J.; Valladares, Roberto D.; Li, Chenguang; Christman, Jane E.; Antonios, Joseph K.; Yao, Zhenyu; Zwingenberger, Stefan; Petite, Hervé; Hamadouche, Moussa; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen withdrawal following surgical ovariectomy was recently shown to mitigate particle-induced osteolysis in the murine calvarial model. Currently, we hypothesize that estrogen receptors (ERs) were involved in this paradoxical phenomenon. To test this hypothesis, we first evaluated polyethylene (PE) particle-induced osteolysis in the murine calvarial model, using wild type (WT) C57BL6J female mice, ERα deficient (ERαKO) mice, and WT mice either treated with 17β-estradiol (E2) or with the ER pan-antagonist ICI 182,780. According to micro-CT and histomorphometry, we showed that bone resorption was consistently altered in both ERαKO and ICI 182,780 treated mice as compared to WT and E2 groups. Then, we demonstrated that ER disruption consistently decreased both PE and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) particle-induced production of TNF-α by murine macrophages in vitro. Similar results were obtained following ER blockade using ICI 182,780 in RAW 264.7 and WT macrophages. ER disruption and pre treatment with ICI 182,780 resulted in a consistent down-regulation of particle-induced TNF-α mRNA expression relative to WT macrophages or untreated RAW cells. These results indicate that the response to wear particles involves estrogen receptors in female mice, as part of macrophage activation. Estrogen receptors may be considered as a future therapeutic target for particle-induced osteolysis. PMID:23113918

  8. Role of direct estrogen receptor signaling in wear particle-induced osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Nich, Christophe; Rao, Allison J; Valladares, Roberto D; Li, Chenguang; Christman, Jane E; Antonios, Joseph K; Yao, Zhenyu; Zwingenberger, Stefan; Petite, Hervé; Hamadouche, Moussa; Goodman, Stuart B

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen withdrawal following surgical ovariectomy was recently shown to mitigate particle-induced osteolysis in the murine calvarial model. Currently, we hypothesize that estrogen receptors (ERs) were involved in this paradoxical phenomenon. To test this hypothesis, we first evaluated polyethylene (PE) particle-induced osteolysis in the murine calvarial model, using wild type (WT) C57BL6J female mice, ERα deficient (ERαKO) mice, and WT mice either treated with 17β-estradiol (E2) or with the ER pan-antagonist ICI 182,780. According to micro-CT and histomorphometry, we showed that bone resorption was consistently altered in both ERαKO and ICI 182,780 treated mice as compared to WT and E2 groups. Then, we demonstrated that ER disruption consistently decreased both PE and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) particle-induced production of TNF-α by murine macrophages in vitro. Similar results were obtained following ER blockade using ICI 182,780 in RAW 264.7 and WT macrophages. ER disruption and pre treatment with ICI 182,780 resulted in a consistent down-regulation of particle-induced TNF-α mRNA expression relative to WT macrophages or untreated RAW cells. These results indicate that the response to wear particles involves estrogen receptors in female mice, as part of macrophage activation. Estrogen receptors may be considered as a future therapeutic target for particle-induced osteolysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis: an enigmatic drug-induced reaction.

    PubMed

    Momin, Saira B; Del Rosso, James Q; Michaels, Brent; Mobini, Narciss

    2009-06-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a diffuse pustular disorder that is primarily drug induced and characterized by acute, extensive, small, nonfollicular, sterile pustules that usually begin in intertriginous folds with widespread edema and erythema. This article reports a case in which thalidomide, dexamethasone, or meloxicam may have been the etiologic agent to induce AGEP and the skin condition may have worsened with administration of additional medications during hospital admission. A good thorough medical history, including a drug history, along with clinicopathologic correlation is extremely important in a patient presenting with acute diffuse pustular lesions.

  10. Systematic review of NSAID-induced adverse reactions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Tetsuya; Ochi, Takahiro; Sugano, Kentaro; Uemura, Shinichi; Makuch, Robert W

    2003-06-01

    Abstract A systematic review of randomized controlled clinical trials of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients was conducted to evaluate the risk of NSAID-induced adverse reactions. Double-blind, randomized, controlled trials with 6-week treatments for RA patients were included in the study. The endpoints for the analysis included any adverse reactions, digestive adverse reactions, and upper gastrointestinal (GI) adverse reactions. A fixed-effect model was used for estimation of the risk. Time-to-event analysis of the incidence of adverse reactions was also conducted. A total of 28 trials was included for the analysis, and a total of 30 NSAIDs were used in the trials. The proportion of patients who experienced any adverse reaction was as follows: piroxicam 18.9% (3 trials), diclofenac 18.8% (4 trials), indomethacin 22.1% (14 trials), and aspirin 25.0% (4 trials). The proportion of patients who experienced digestive adverse reactions was as follows: piroxicam 10.2%, diclofenac 10.6%, indomethacin 13.1%, and aspirin 14.1%. Most withdrawals due to adverse reaction occurred during the first 3 weeks after administration of the NSAID. Although the risk of NSAID-induced adverse reaction was different from drug to drug, the risk of adverse reaction was clinically significant.

  11. Solar Particle Induced Upsets in the TDRS-1 Attitude Control System RAM During the October 1989 Solar Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croley, D. R.; Garrett, H. B.; Murphy, G. B.; Garrard,T. L.

    1995-01-01

    The three large solar particle events, beginning on October 19, 1989 and lasting approximately six days, were characterized by high fluences of solar protons and heavy ions at 1 AU. During these events, an abnormally large number of upsets (243) were observed in the random access memory of the attitude control system (ACS) control processing electronics (CPE) on-board the geosynchronous TDRS-1 (Telemetry and Data Relay Satellite). The RAM unit affected was composed of eight Fairchild 93L422 memory chips. The Galileo spacecraft, launched on October 18, 1989 (one day prior to the solar particle events) observed the fluxes of heavy ions experienced by TDRS-1. Two solid-state detector telescopes on-board Galileo, designed to measure heavy ion species and energy, were turned on during time periods within each of the three separate events. The heavy ion data have been modeled and the time history of the events reconstructed to estimate heavy ion fluences. These fluences were converted to effective LET spectra after transport through the estimated shielding distribution around the TDRS-1 ACS system. The number of single event upsets (SEU) expected was calculated by integrating the measured cross section for the Fairchild 93L422 memory chip with average effective LET spectrum. The expected number of heavy ion induced SEU's calculated was 176. GOES-7 proton data, observed during the solar particle events, were used to estimate the number of proton-induced SEU's by integrating the proton fluence spectrum incident on the memory chips, with the two-parameter Bendel cross section for proton SEU'S. The proton fluence spectrum at the device level was gotten by transporting the protons through the estimated shielding distribution. The number of calculated proton-induced SEU's was 72, yielding a total of 248 predicted SEU'S, very dose to the 243 observed SEU'S. These calculations uniquely demonstrate the roles that solar heavy ions and protons played in the production of SEU

  12. Solar Particle Induced Upsets in the TDRS-1 Attitude Control System RAM During the October 1989 Solar Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croley, D. R.; Garrett, H. B.; Murphy, G. B.; Garrard,T. L.

    1995-01-01

    The three large solar particle events, beginning on October 19, 1989 and lasting approximately six days, were characterized by high fluences of solar protons and heavy ions at 1 AU. During these events, an abnormally large number of upsets (243) were observed in the random access memory of the attitude control system (ACS) control processing electronics (CPE) on-board the geosynchronous TDRS-1 (Telemetry and Data Relay Satellite). The RAM unit affected was composed of eight Fairchild 93L422 memory chips. The Galileo spacecraft, launched on October 18, 1989 (one day prior to the solar particle events) observed the fluxes of heavy ions experienced by TDRS-1. Two solid-state detector telescopes on-board Galileo, designed to measure heavy ion species and energy, were turned on during time periods within each of the three separate events. The heavy ion data have been modeled and the time history of the events reconstructed to estimate heavy ion fluences. These fluences were converted to effective LET spectra after transport through the estimated shielding distribution around the TDRS-1 ACS system. The number of single event upsets (SEU) expected was calculated by integrating the measured cross section for the Fairchild 93L422 memory chip with average effective LET spectrum. The expected number of heavy ion induced SEU's calculated was 176. GOES-7 proton data, observed during the solar particle events, were used to estimate the number of proton-induced SEU's by integrating the proton fluence spectrum incident on the memory chips, with the two-parameter Bendel cross section for proton SEU'S. The proton fluence spectrum at the device level was gotten by transporting the protons through the estimated shielding distribution. The number of calculated proton-induced SEU's was 72, yielding a total of 248 predicted SEU'S, very dose to the 243 observed SEU'S. These calculations uniquely demonstrate the roles that solar heavy ions and protons played in the production of SEU

  13. Different particle determinants induce apoptosis and cytokine release in primary alveolar macrophage cultures.

    PubMed

    Refsnes, Magne; Hetland, Ragna B; Øvrevik, Johan; Sundfør, Idunn; Schwarze, Per E; Låg, Marit

    2006-06-14

    Particles are known to induce both cytokine release (MIP-2, TNF-alpha), a reduction in cell viability and an increased apoptosis in alveolar macrophages. To examine whether these responses are triggered by the same particle determinants, alveolar macrophages were exposed in vitro to mineral particles of different physical-chemical properties. The crystalline particles of the different stone types mylonite, gabbro, basalt, feldspar, quartz, hornfels and fine grain syenite porphyr (porphyr), with a relatively equal size distribution (< or = 10 microm), but different chemical/mineral composition, all induced low and relatively similar levels of apoptosis. In contrast, mylonite and gabbro induced a marked MIP-2 response compared to the other particles. For particles of smaller size, quartz (< or = 2 microm) seemed to induce a somewhat stronger apoptotic response than even smaller quartz (< or = 0.5 microm) and larger quartz (< or = 10 microm) in relation to surface area, and was more potent than hornfels and porphyr (< or = 2 microm). The reduction in cell viability induced by quartz of the different sizes was roughly similar when adjusted to surface area. With respect to cytokines, the release was more marked after exposure to quartz < or = 0.5 microm than to quartz < or = 2 microm and < or = 10 microm. Furthermore, hornfels (< or = 2 microm) was more potent than the corresponding hornfels (< or = 10 microm) and quartz (< or = 2 microm) to induce cytokine responses. Pre-treatment of hornfels and quartz particles < or = 2 microm with aluminium lactate, to diminish the surface reactivity, did significantly reduce the MIP-2 response to hornfels. In contrast, the apoptotic responses to the particles were not affected. These results indicate that different determinants of mineral/stone particles are critical for inducing cytokine responses, reduction in cell viability and apoptosis in alveolar macrophages. The data suggest that the particle surface reactivity was critical

  14. Different particle determinants induce apoptosis and cytokine release in primary alveolar macrophage cultures

    PubMed Central

    Refsnes, Magne; Hetland, Ragna B; Øvrevik, Johan; Sundfør, Idunn; Schwarze, Per E; Låg, Marit

    2006-01-01

    Background Particles are known to induce both cytokine release (MIP-2, TNF-α), a reduction in cell viability and an increased apoptosis in alveolar macrophages. To examine whether these responses are triggered by the same particle determinants, alveolar macrophages were exposed in vitro to mineral particles of different physical-chemical properties. Results The crystalline particles of the different stone types mylonite, gabbro, basalt, feldspar, quartz, hornfels and fine grain syenite porphyr (porphyr), with a relatively equal size distribution (≤ 10 μm), but different chemical/mineral composition, all induced low and relatively similar levels of apoptosis. In contrast, mylonite and gabbro induced a marked MIP-2 response compared to the other particles. For particles of smaller size, quartz (≤ 2 μm) seemed to induce a somewhat stronger apoptotic response than even smaller quartz (≤ 0.5 μm) and larger quartz (≤ 10 μm) in relation to surface area, and was more potent than hornfels and porphyr (≤ 2 μm). The reduction in cell viability induced by quartz of the different sizes was roughly similar when adjusted to surface area. With respect to cytokines, the release was more marked after exposure to quartz ≤ 0.5 μm than to quartz ≤ 2 μm and ≤ 10 μm. Furthermore, hornfels (≤ 2 μm) was more potent than the corresponding hornfels (≤ 10 μm) and quartz (≤ 2 μm) to induce cytokine responses. Pre-treatment of hornfels and quartz particles ≤ 2 μm with aluminium lactate, to diminish the surface reactivity, did significantly reduce the MIP-2 response to hornfels. In contrast, the apoptotic responses to the particles were not affected. Conclusion These results indicate that different determinants of mineral/stone particles are critical for inducing cytokine responses, reduction in cell viability and apoptosis in alveolar macrophages. The data suggest that the particle surface reactivity was critical for cytokine responses, but contributed less

  15. Theoretical and experimental study on the effects of particle size and temperature on the reaction kinetics of cubic nano-Cu2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Huanfeng; Huang, Zaiyin; Xiao, Ming; Liang, Min; Chen, Liying; Tan, XueCai

    2017-09-01

    The activities, selectivities, and stabilities of nanoparticles in heterogeneous reactions are size-dependent. In order to investigate the influencing laws of particle size and temperature on kinetic parameters in heterogeneous reactions, cubic nano-Cu2O particles of four different sizes in the range of 40-120 nm have been controllably synthesized. In situ microcalorimetry has been used to attain thermodynamic data on the reaction of Cu2O with aqueous HNO3 and, combined with thermodynamic principles and kinetic transition-state theory, the relevant reaction kinetic parameters have been evaluated. The size dependences of the kinetic parameters are discussed in terms of the established kinetic model and the experimental results. It was found that the reaction rate constants increased with decreasing particle size. Accordingly, the apparent activation energy, pre-exponential factor, activation enthalpy, activation entropy, and activation Gibbs energy decreased with decreasing particle size. The reaction rate constants and activation Gibbs energies increased with increasing temperature. Moreover, the logarithms of the apparent activation energies, pre-exponential factors, and rate constants were found to be linearly related to the reciprocal of particle size, consistent with the kinetic models. The influence of particle size on these reaction kinetic parameters may be explained as follows: the apparent activation energy is affected by the partial molar enthalpy, the pre-exponential factor is affected by the partial molar entropy, and the reaction rate constant is affected by the partial molar Gibbs energy. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Mass and charge distributions in chlorine-induced nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, A.A.

    1991-12-31

    Projectile-like fragments were detected and characterized in terms of A, Z, and energy for the reactions {sup 37}Cl on {sup 40}Ca and {sup 209}Bi at E/A = 7.3 MeV, and {sup 35}Cl, on {sup 209}Bi at E/A = 15 MeV, at angles close to the grazing angle. Mass and charge distributions were generated in the N-Z plane as a function of energy loss, and have been parameterized in terms of their centroids, variances, and coefficients of correlation. Due to experimental problems, the mass resolution corresponding to the {sup 31}Cl on {sup 209}Bi reaction was very poor. This prompted the study and application of a deconvolution technique for peak enhancement. The drifts of the charge and mass centroids for the system {sup 37}Cl on {sup 40}Ca are consistent with a process of mass and charge equilibration mediated by nucleon exchange between the two partners, followed by evaporation. The asymmetric systems show a strong drift towards larger asymmetry, with the production of neutron-rich nuclei. It was concluded that this is indicative of a net transfer of protons from the light to the heavy partner, and a net flow of neutrons in the opposite direction. The variances for all systems increase with energy loss, as it would be expected from a nucleon exchange mechanism; however, the variances for the reaction {sup 37}Cl on {sup 40}Ca are higher than those expected from that mechanism. The coefficients of correlation indicate that the transfer of nucleons between projectile and target is correlated. The results were compared to the predictions of two current models based on a stochastic nucleon exchange mechanism. In general, the comparisons between experimental and predicted variances support this mechanism; however, the need for more realistic driving forces in the model calculations is indicated by the disagreement between predicted and experimental centroids.

  17. Kinetics of Reactions of Monomeric Nitrosomethane Induced by Flash Photolysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozubek, H.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which the kinetics of dimerization of nitrosamine induced by a flash of light is measured. The experiment can be performed with a commercial ultraviolet-VIS spetrophotometer with easy to make modifications. The experiment demonstrates a flash photolysis system not always available in university chemistry laboratories.…

  18. α scattering and α -induced reaction cross sections of 64Zn at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ornelas, A.; Mohr, P.; Gyürky, Gy.; Elekes, Z.; Fülöp, Zs.; Halász, Z.; Kiss, G. G.; Somorjai, E.; Szücs, T.; Takács, M. P.; Galaviz, D.; Güray, R. T.; Korkulu, Z.; Özkan, N.; Yalçın, C.

    2016-11-01

    Background: α -nucleus potentials play an essential role for the calculation of α -induced reaction cross sections at low energies in the statistical model. Uncertainties of these calculations are related to ambiguities in the adjustment of the potential parameters to experimental elastic scattering angular distributions and to the energy dependence of the effective α -nucleus potentials. Purpose: The present work studies the total reaction cross section σreac of α -induced reactions at low energies which can be determined from the elastic scattering angular distribution or from the sum over the cross sections of all open nonelastic channels. Method: Elastic and inelastic 64Zn(α ,α )64Zn angular distributions were measured at two energies around the Coulomb barrier, at 12.1 and 16.1 MeV. Reaction cross sections of the (α ,γ ) , (α ,n ) , and (α ,p ) reactions were measured at the same energies using the activation technique. The contributions of missing nonelastic channels were estimated from statistical model calculations. Results: The total reaction cross sections from elastic scattering and from the sum of the cross sections over all open nonelastic channels agree well within the uncertainties. This finding confirms the consistency of the experimental data. At the higher energy of 16.1 MeV, the predicted significant contribution of compound-inelastic scattering to the total reaction cross section is confirmed experimentally. As a by-product it is found that most recent global α -nucleus potentials are able to describe the reaction cross sections for 64Zn around the Coulomb barrier. Conclusions: Total reaction cross sections of α -induced reactions can be well determined from elastic scattering angular distributions. The present study proves experimentally that the total cross section from elastic scattering is identical to the sum of nonelastic reaction cross sections. Thus, the statistical model can reliably be used to distribute the total reaction

  19. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of the beta-induced Alfven eigen mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huasen; Lin, Zhihong; Holod, Ihor; Wang, Xin; Xiao, Yong; Zhang, Wenlu

    2010-11-01

    The beta-induced Alfven eigen mode (BAE) is studied using the global gyrokinetic particle code GTC. In our simulation, BAE is successfully excited by antenna and energetic particle density gradient. Through the antenna frequency scan, we can measure the BAE frequency and damping rate by numerical fitting the saturation amplitude. BAE excitation by energetic particles shows that the BAE propagates in the ion diamagnetic direction and the frequency has a little downshift, which is due to modification of the energetic particles. The frequency and growth rate in gyrokinetic simulation is a little different from drift kinetic simulation, which is expected due to the finite larmor radius effect. We also find that the BAE frequency is related to the wavelength and the plasma beta while the growth rate is sensitive to the energetic particle properties. Benchmarks between GTC and HMGC are also done through initial perturbation, antenna excitation and energetic particle excitation. The simulation results agree with each other very well.

  20. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of beta-induced Alfvén eigenmode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. S.; Lin, Z.; Holod, I.; Wang, X.; Xiao, Y.; Zhang, W. L.

    2010-11-01

    The beta-induced Alfvén eigenmode (BAE) in toroidal plasmas is studied using global gyrokinetic particle simulations. The BAE real frequency and damping rate measured in the initial perturbation simulation and in the antenna excitation simulation agree well with each other. The real frequency is slightly higher than the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accumulation point frequency due to the kinetic effects of thermal ions. Simulations with energetic particle density gradient show exponential growth of BAE with a growth rate sensitive to the energetic particle temperature and density. The nonperturbative contributions by energetic particles modify the mode structure and reduce the frequency relative to the MHD theory. The finite Larmor radius effects of energetic particles reduce the BAE growth rate. Benchmarks between gyrokinetic particle simulation and hybrid MHD-gyrokinetic simulation show good agreement in BAE real frequency and mode structure.

  1. Reaction-induced rheological weakening enables oceanic plate subduction

    PubMed Central

    Hirauchi, Ken-ichi; Fukushima, Kumi; Kido, Masanori; Muto, Jun; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Earth is the only terrestrial planet in our solar system where an oceanic plate subducts beneath an overriding plate. Although the initiation of plate subduction requires extremely weak boundaries between strong plates, the way in which oceanic mantle rheologically weakens remains unknown. Here we show that shear-enhanced hydration reactions contribute to the generation and maintenance of weak mantle shear zones at mid-lithospheric depths. High-pressure friction experiments on peridotite gouge reveal that in the presence of hydrothermal water, increasing strain and reactions lead to an order-of-magnitude reduction in strength. The rate of deformation is controlled by pressure-solution-accommodated frictional sliding on weak hydrous phyllosilicate (talc), providing a mechanism for the ‘cutoff' of the high peak strength at the brittle-plastic transition. Our findings suggest that infiltration of seawater into transform faults with long lengths and low slip rates is an important controlling factor on the initiation of plate tectonics on terrestrial planets. PMID:27562366

  2. Recurrence of drug-induced reactions in DRESS patients.

    PubMed

    Picard, D; Vellar, M; Janela, B; Roussel, A; Joly, P; Musette, P

    2015-04-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) may relapse following introduction of drugs structurally unrelated to the initial culprit drug. To assess the frequency and characteristics of recurrent drug eruptions in patients with history of DRESS. Patients who had developed adverse cutaneous reaction after DRESS occurrence were recruited from the regional database of Upper Normandy in France. Rate of recurrences were compared with patients with Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN) and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) patients during the same time frame. Of the 60 cases of DRESS collected, 15 (25%) with recurrences were retained for analysis. Seven patients had a single recurrence, whereas eight patients had several relapses. In the patients with pre-existing DRESS, recurrences were incomplete, corresponding to cutaneous rash in 13 cases and associated with eosinophilia in seven cases. Internal organ involvement was observed in two cases. In contrast, a single recurrence was found out of 61 patients with TEN/SJS. Incomplete recurrences with structurally unrelated culprit drugs are a frequent phenomenon in DRESS patients. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  3. Does Observation of Postural Imbalance Induce a Postural Reaction?

    PubMed Central

    Tia, Banty; Saimpont, Arnaud; Paizis, Christos; Mourey, France; Fadiga, Luciano; Pozzo, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Background Several studies bring evidence that action observation elicits contagious responses during social interactions. However automatic imitative tendencies are generally inhibited and it remains unclear in which conditions mere action observation triggers motor behaviours. In this study, we addressed the question of contagious postural responses when observing human imbalance. Methodology/Principal Findings We recorded participants' body sway while they observed a fixation cross (control condition), an upright point-light display of a gymnast balancing on a rope, and the same point-light display presented upside down. Our results showed that, when the upright stimulus was displayed prior to the inverted one, centre of pressure area and antero-posterior path length were significantly greater in the upright condition compared to the control and upside down conditions. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate a contagious postural reaction suggesting a partial inefficiency of inhibitory processes. Further, kinematic information was sufficient to trigger this reaction. The difference recorded between the upright and upside down conditions indicates that the contagion effect was dependent on the integration of gravity constraints by body kinematics. Interestingly, the postural response was sensitive to habituation, and seemed to disappear when the observer was previously shown an inverted display. The motor contagion recorded here is consistent with previous work showing vegetative output during observation of an effortful movement and could indicate that lower level control facilitates contagion effects. PMID:21423622

  4. Structural characterizaiton and gas reactions of small metal particles by high-resolution, in-situ TEM and TED

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The existing in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) facility was improved by adding a separately pumped mini-specimen chamber. The chamber contains wire-evaporation sources for three metals and a specimen heater for moderate substrate temperatures. A sample introduction device was constructed, installed, and tested, facilitating rapid introduction of a specimen into the mini-chamber while maintaining the background pressure in that chamber in the 10(-9) millibar range. Small particles and clusters of Pd, grown by deposition from the vapor phase in an in-situ TEM facility on amorphous and crystalline support films of alumina and on ultra-thin carbon films, were analyzed by conventional high-resolution TEM and image analysis in terms of detectability, number density, and size distribution. The smallest particles that could be detected and counted contained no more than 6 atoms; size determinations could be made for particles 1 nm in diameter. The influence of various oxygen plasma treatments, annealing treatments, and of increasing the substrate temperature during deposition was investigated. The TEM technique was employed to demonstrate that under otherwise identica l conditions the lattice parameter of Pd particles in the 1 to 2 nm size range and supported in random orientation on ex-situ prepared mica films is expanded by some 3% when compared to 5 nm size particles. It is believed that this expansion is neither a small-particle diffraction effect nor due to pseudomorphism, but that it is due to a annealing-induced transformation of the small as-deposited particles with predominantly composite crystal structures into larger particles with true f.c.c. structure and thus inherently smaller lattice parameter.

  5. Towards the core structure of Strychnos alkaloids using samarium diiodide-induced reactions of indole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Beemelmanns, Christine; Gross, Steffen; Reissig, Hans-Ulrich

    2013-12-23

    This report describes the development of a first and second generation approach towards the synthesis of the ABCEG pentacyclic core structure of Strychnos alkaloids. First, we discuss a sequential approach applying a series of functional group transformations to prepare suitable precursors for cyclization reactions. These include attempts of samarium diiodide-induced cyclizations or a Barbier-type reaction of a transient lithium organyl, which successfully led to a tetracyclic key building block earlier used for the synthesis of strychnine. Secondly, we account our first steps towards the development of an atom-economical samarium diiodide-induced cascade reaction using "dimeric" indolyl ketones as cyclization precursors. In this context, we discuss plausible mechanisms for the samarium diiodide-induced cascade reaction as well as transformations of the obtained tetracyclic dihydroindoline derivatives. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. SET-Induced Biaryl Cross-Coupling: An SRN1 Reaction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The SET-induced biaryl cross-coupling reaction is established as the first example of a Grignard SRN1 reaction. The reaction is examined within the mechanistic framework of dissociative electron transfer in the presence of a Lewis acid. DFT calculations show that the reaction proceeds through a radical intermediate in the form of an Mg ion-radical cage, which eludes detection in trapping experiments by reacting quickly to form an MgPh2 radical anion intermediate. A new mechanism is proposed. PMID:24564385

  7. Interdiffusion and reaction of metals: The influence and relaxation of mismatch-induced stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartung, F.; Schmitz, G.

    2001-12-01

    The early interdiffusion stages in epitaxially grown Ag/Au and Cu/Au reaction couples are investigated by high-resolution and Z-contrast electron microscopy. While the interdiffusion in the lattice-matched system Ag/Au follows Fick's diffusion laws from the very beginning, a complex two-stage reaction is observed in the lattice-mismatched Cu/Au samples. A fast diffusion at the beginning of the heat treatment produces a planar zone of lattice defects along the interface, which release most of the induced stress. This first reaction stage stops after reaching a diffusion length of about 15 nm. Subsequent interdiffusion takes place by a recrystallization mechanism comprising heterogeneous nucleation of new grains and diffusion-induced grain boundary migration. During this second reaction stage, discontinuous composition profiles are determined, evidencing stress release at high-angle grain boundaries. The recrystallization mechanism also dominates the formation of ordered intermetallics at lower reaction temperatures.

  8. Induced phagocytic particle uptake into a giant unilamellar vesicle.

    PubMed

    Meinel, Andreas; Tränkle, Benjamin; Römer, Winfried; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2014-05-28

    Phagocytosis, the uptake and ingestion of solid particles into living cells, is a central mechanism of our immune system. Due to the complexity of the uptake mechanism, the different forces involved in this process are only partly understood. Therefore the usage of a giant unilamellar vesicle (GUV) as the simplest biomimetic model for a cell allows one to investigate the influence of the lipid membrane on the energetics of the uptake process. Here, a photonic force microscope (PFM) is used to approach an optically trapped 1 μm latex bead to an immobilized GUV to finally insert the particle into the GUV. By analysing the mean displacement and the position fluctuations of the trapped particle during the uptake process in 3D with nanometre precision, we are able to record force and energy profiles, as well as changes in the viscous drag and the stiffness. After observing a global followed by a local deformation of the GUV, we measured uptake energies of 2000 kT to 5500 kT and uptake forces of 4 pN to 16 pN for Egg-PC GUVs with sizes of 18-26 μm and varying membrane tension. The measured energy profiles, which are compared to a Helfrich energy model for local and global deformation, show good coincidence with the theoretical results. Our proof-of-principle study opens the door to a large number of similar experiments with GUVs containing more biochemical components and complexity. This bottom-up strategy should allow for a better understanding of the physics of phagocytosis.

  9. [Photo-induced processes and reaction dynamics in bacteriorhodopsin].

    PubMed

    Terpugov, E L; Degtyareva, O V

    2015-01-01

    In this review we have focused on the advances madein observing the photo-induced response in bacteriorhodopsin and understanding the mechanisms of retinal-protein interactions which are still obscure. We discuss our recent data obtained on the wild type of bacteriorhodopsin and model compounds. This paper presents our new spectroscopic data on amino acids obtained using FT-IR emission spectroscopy. Based on the characteristics of the structure and optical properties of glycine and L-lysine that simulate a photo-induced behaviour of an opsin under natural conditions we tried to find an answer to one of the most important questions concerning the role of protein in the primary processes in bacteriorhodopsin.

  10. Collective two-particle resonances induced by photon entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Marten; Mukamel, Shaul

    2011-06-15

    An assembly of noninteracting atoms may become correlated upon interaction with entangled photons, and certain elements of their joint density matrix can then show collective resonances. We explore experimental signatures of these resonances in the nonlinear response of a pair of two-level atoms. We find that these resonances are canceled out in stimulated signals such as pump-probe and two-photon absorption due to the destructive interference of two-photon-absorption and emission pathways in the joint two-particle space. However, they may be observed in photon statistics (Hanbury-Brown-Twiss) measurements through the attenuation of two-time intensity correlations.

  11. Theoretical cross sections of tantalum on neutron induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddik, Tarik

    2016-11-01

    Neutron-induced cross-sections for the stable isotope 181Ta, in the energy region up to 20 MeV have been calculated. Statistical model calculations, based on the Hauser-Feshbach formalism, have been carried out using the TALYS-1.0 and were compared with available experimental data in the literature and with ENDF/B-VII, T = 300 K; J