Science.gov

Sample records for particle physics

  1. Particle physics: Axions exposed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Maria Paola

    2016-11-01

    Physicists are hunting for a particle called the axion that could solve two major puzzles in fundamental physics. An ambitious study calculates the expected mass of this particle, which might reshape the experimental searches. See Letter p.69

  2. Elementary particle physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Elementary particle physics is discussed. Status of the Standard Model of electroweak and strong interactions; phenomena beyond the Standard Model; new accelerator projects; and possible contributions from non-accelerator experiments are examined.

  3. RESEARCH IN PARTICLE PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Kearns, Edward

    2013-07-12

    This is the final report for the Department of Energy Grant to Principal Investigators in Experimental and Theoretical Particle Physics at Boston University. The research performed was in the Energy Frontier at the LHC, the Intensity Frontier at Super-Kamiokande and T2K, the Cosmic Frontier and detector R&D in dark matter detector development, and in particle theory.

  4. Review of Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beringer, J.; Arguin, J.-F.; Barnett, R. M.; Copic, K.; Dahl, O.; Groom, D. E.; Lin, C.-J.; Lys, J.; Murayama, H.; Wohl, C. G.; Yao, W.-M.; Zyla, P. A.; Amsler, C.; Antonelli, M.; Asner, D. M.; Baer, H.; Band, H. R.; Basaglia, T.; Bauer, C. W.; Beatty, J. J.; Belousov, V. I.; Bergren, E.; Bernardi, G.; Bertl, W.; Bethke, S.; Bichsel, H.; Biebel, O.; Blucher, E.; Blusk, S.; Brooijmans, G.; Buchmueller, O.; Cahn, R. N.; Carena, M.; Ceccucci, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chen, M.-C.; Chivukula, R. S.; Cowan, G.; D'Ambrosio, G.; Damour, T.; de Florian, D.; de Gouvêa, A.; DeGrand, T.; de Jong, P.; Dissertori, G.; Dobrescu, B.; Doser, M.; Drees, M.; Edwards, D. A.; Eidelman, S.; Erler, J.; Ezhela, V. V.; Fetscher, W.; Fields, B. D.; Foster, B.; Gaisser, T. K.; Garren, L.; Gerber, H.-J.; Gerbier, G.; Gherghetta, T.; Golwala, S.; Goodman, M.; Grab, C.; Gritsan, A. V.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grünewald, M.; Gurtu, A.; Gutsche, T.; Haber, H. E.; Hagiwara, K.; Hagmann, C.; Hanhart, C.; Hashimoto, S.; Hayes, K. G.; Heffner, M.; Heltsley, B.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hikasa, K.; Höcker, A.; Holder, J.; Holtkamp, A.; Huston, J.; Jackson, J. D.; Johnson, K. F.; Junk, T.; Karlen, D.; Kirkby, D.; Klein, S. R.; Klempt, E.; Kowalewski, R. V.; Krauss, F.; Kreps, M.; Krusche, B.; Kuyanov, Yu. V.; Kwon, Y.; Lahav, O.; Laiho, J.; Langacker, P.; Liddle, A.; Ligeti, Z.; Liss, T. M.; Littenberg, L.; Lugovsky, K. S.; Lugovsky, S. B.; Mannel, T.; Manohar, A. V.; Marciano, W. J.; Martin, A. D.; Masoni, A.; Matthews, J.; Milstead, D.; Miquel, R.; Mönig, K.; Moortgat, F.; Nakamura, K.; Narain, M.; Nason, P.; Navas, S.; Neubert, M.; Nevski, P.; Nir, Y.; Olive, K. A.; Pape, L.; Parsons, J.; Patrignani, C.; Peacock, J. A.; Petcov, S. T.; Piepke, A.; Pomarol, A.; Punzi, G.; Quadt, A.; Raby, S.; Raffelt, G.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Richardson, P.; Roesler, S.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Rosenberg, L. J.; Rosner, J. L.; Sachrajda, C. T.; Sakai, Y.; Salam, G. P.; Sarkar, S.; Sauli, F.; Schneider, O.; Scholberg, K.; Scott, D.; Seligman, W. G.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Sharpe, S. R.; Silari, M.; Sjöstrand, T.; Skands, P.; Smith, J. G.; Smoot, G. F.; Spanier, S.; Spieler, H.; Stahl, A.; Stanev, T.; Stone, S. L.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Syphers, M. J.; Takahashi, F.; Tanabashi, M.; Terning, J.; Titov, M.; Tkachenko, N. P.; Törnqvist, N. A.; Tovey, D.; Valencia, G.; van Bibber, K.; Venanzoni, G.; Vincter, M. G.; Vogel, P.; Vogt, A.; Walkowiak, W.; Walter, C. W.; Ward, D. R.; Watari, T.; Weiglein, G.; Weinberg, E. J.; Wiencke, L. R.; Wolfenstein, L.; Womersley, J.; Woody, C. L.; Workman, R. L.; Yamamoto, A.; Zeller, G. P.; Zenin, O. V.; Zhang, J.; Zhu, R.-Y.; Harper, G.; Lugovsky, V. S.; Schaffner, P.

    2012-07-01

    This biennial Review summarizes much of particle physics. Using data from previous editions, plus 2658 new measurements from 644 papers, we list, evaluate, and average measured properties of gauge bosons, leptons, quarks, mesons, and baryons. We summarize searches for hypothetical particles such as Higgs bosons, heavy neutrinos, and supersymmetric particles. All the particle properties and search limits are listed in Summary Tables. We also give numerous tables, figures, formulae, and reviews of topics such as the Standard Model, particle detectors, probability, and statistics. Among the 112 reviews are many that are new or heavily revised including those on Heavy-Quark and Soft-Collinear Effective Theory, Neutrino Cross Section Measurements, Monte Carlo Event Generators, Lattice QCD, Heavy Quarkonium Spectroscopy, Top Quark, Dark Matter, Vcb & Vub, Quantum Chromodynamics, High-Energy Collider Parameters, Astrophysical Constants, Cosmological Parameters, and Dark Matter.A booklet is available containing the Summary Tables and abbreviated versions of some of the other sections of this full Review. All tables, listings, and reviews (and errata) are also available on the Particle Data Group website: http://pdg.lbl.gov/.The 2012 edition of Review of Particle Physics is published for the Particle Data Group as article 010001 in volume 86 of Physical Review D.This edition should be cited as: J. Beringer et al. (Particle Data Group), Phys. Rev. D 86, 010001 (2012).

  5. Review of particle physics

    DOE PAGES

    Olive, K. A.

    2016-10-01

    The Review summarizes much of particle physics and cosmology. Using data from previous editions, plus 3,062 new measurements from 721 papers, we list, evaluate, and average measured properties of gauge bosons and the recently discovered Higgs boson, leptons, quarks, mesons, and baryons. We summarize searches for hypothetical particles such as supersymmetric particles, heavy bosons, axions, dark photons, etc. All the particle properties and search limits are listed in Summary Tables. We also give numerous tables, figures, formulae, and reviews of topics such as Higgs Boson Physics, Supersymmetry, Grand Unified Theories, Neutrino Mixing, Dark Energy, Dark Matter, Cosmology, Particle Detectors, Colliders,more » Probability and Statistics. As a result, among the 117 reviews are many that are new or heavily revised, including those on Pentaquarks and Inflation.« less

  6. Review of particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, K. A.

    2016-10-01

    The Review summarizes much of particle physics and cosmology. Using data from previous editions, plus 3,062 new measurements from 721 papers, we list, evaluate, and average measured properties of gauge bosons and the recently discovered Higgs boson, leptons, quarks, mesons, and baryons. We summarize searches for hypothetical particles such as supersymmetric particles, heavy bosons, axions, dark photons, etc. All the particle properties and search limits are listed in Summary Tables. We also give numerous tables, figures, formulae, and reviews of topics such as Higgs Boson Physics, Supersymmetry, Grand Unified Theories, Neutrino Mixing, Dark Energy, Dark Matter, Cosmology, Particle Detectors, Colliders, Probability and Statistics. As a result, among the 117 reviews are many that are new or heavily revised, including those on Pentaquarks and Inflation.

  7. Review of particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, K. A.

    2016-10-01

    The Review summarizes much of particle physics and cosmology. Using data from previous editions, plus 3,062 new measurements from 721 papers, we list, evaluate, and average measured properties of gauge bosons and the recently discovered Higgs boson, leptons, quarks, mesons, and baryons. We summarize searches for hypothetical particles such as supersymmetric particles, heavy bosons, axions, dark photons, etc. All the particle properties and search limits are listed in Summary Tables. We also give numerous tables, figures, formulae, and reviews of topics such as Higgs Boson Physics, Supersymmetry, Grand Unified Theories, Neutrino Mixing, Dark Energy, Dark Matter, Cosmology, Particle Detectors, Colliders, Probability and Statistics. As a result, among the 117 reviews are many that are new or heavily revised, including those on Pentaquarks and Inflation.

  8. Particle physics and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.W.

    1986-10-01

    This series of lectures is about the role of particle physics in physical processes that occurred in the very early stages of the bug gang. Of particular interest is the role of particle physics in determining the evolution of the early Universe, and the effect of particle physics on the present structure of the Universe. The use of the big bang as a laboratory for placing limits on new particle physics theories will also be discussed. Section 1 reviews the standard cosmology, including primordial nucleosynthesis. Section 2 reviews the decoupling of weakly interacting particles in the early Universe, and discusses neutrino cosmology and the resulting limits that may be placed on the mass and lifetime of massive neutrinos. Section 3 discusses the evolution of the vacuum through phase transitions in the early Universe and the formation of topological defects in the transitions. Section 4 covers recent work on the generation of the baryon asymmetry by baryon-number violating reactions in Grand Unified Theories, and mentions some recent work on baryon number violation effects at the electroweak transition. Section 5 is devoted to theories of cosmic inflation. Finally, Section 6 is a discussion of the role of extra spatial dimensions in the evolution of the early Universe. 78 refs., 32 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Cosmology and Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigman, G.

    1982-01-01

    The cosmic connections between physics on the very largest and very smallest scales are reviewed with an emphasis on the symbiotic relation between elementary particle physics and cosmology. After a review of the early Universe as a cosmic accelerator, various cosmological and astrophysical constraints on models of particle physics are outlined. To illustrate this approach to particle physics via cosmology, reference is made to several areas of current research: baryon non-conservation and baryon asymmetry; free quarks, heavy hadrons and other exotic relics; primordial nucleosynthesis and neutrino masses. In the last few years we have witnessed the birth and growth to healthy adolescence of a new collaboration between astrophysicists and particle physicists. The most notable success of this cooperative effort has been to provide the framework for understanding, within the context of GUTs and the hot big-bang cosmology, the universal baryon asymmetry. The most exciting new predictions this effort has spawned are that exotic relics may exist in detectable abundances. In particular, we may live in a neutrino-dominated Universe. In the next few years, accummulating laboratory data (for example proton decay, neutrino masses and oscillations) coupled with theoritical work in particle physics and cosmology will ensure the growth to maturity of this joint effort.

  10. Research in particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This proposal presents the research accomplishments and ongoing activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics. Some changes have been made in the structure of the program from the previous arrangement of tasks. Task B, Accelerator Design Physics, is being submitted as a separate proposal for an independent grant; this will be consistent with the nature of the research and the source of funding. We are active in seven principal areas which will be discussed in this report: Colliding Beams - physics of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {bar p}p collisions; MACRO Experiment - search for magnetic monopoles and study of cosmic rays; Proton Decay - search for nucleon instability and study of neutrino interactions; Particle Theory - theoretical high energy particle physics, including two Outstanding Junior Investigator awards; Muon G-2 - measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon; SSCintcal - calorimetry for the GEM Experiment; and Muon detectors for the GEM Experiment.

  11. Review of Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olive, K. A.; Particle Data Group; et al.

    2016-10-01

    The Review summarizes much of particle physics and cosmology. Using data from previous editions, plus 3,062 new measurements from 721 papers, we list, evaluate, and average measured properties of gauge bosons and the recently discovered Higgs boson, leptons, quarks, mesons, and baryons. We summarize searches for hypothetical particles such as supersymmetric particles, heavy bosons, axions, dark photons, etc. All the particle properties and search limits are listed in Summary Tables. We also give numerous tables, figures, formulae, and reviews of topics such as Higgs Boson Physics, Supersymmetry, Grand Unified Theories, Neutrino Mixing, Dark Energy, Dark Matter, Cosmology, Particle Detectors, Colliders, Probability and Statistics. Among the 117 reviews are many that are new or heavily revised, including those on Pentaquarks and Inflation. The complete Review is published online in a journal and on the website of the Particle Data Group (http://pdg.lbl.gov). The printed PDG Book contains the Summary Tables and all review articles but no longer includes the detailed tables from the Particle Listings. A Booklet with the Summary Tables and abbreviated versions of some of the review articles is also available. Contents Abstract, Contributors, Highlights and Table of ContentsAcrobat PDF (150 KB) IntroductionAcrobat PDF (456 KB) Particle Physics Summary Tables Gauge and Higgs bosonsAcrobat PDF (155 KB) LeptonsAcrobat PDF (134 KB) QuarksAcrobat PDF (84 KB) MesonsAcrobat PDF (871 KB) BaryonsAcrobat PDF (300 KB) Searches (Supersymmetry, Compositeness, etc.)Acrobat PDF (91 KB) Tests of conservation lawsAcrobat PDF (330 KB) Reviews, Tables, and Plots Detailed contents for this sectionAcrobat PDF (37 KB) Constants, Units, Atomic and Nuclear PropertiesAcrobat PDF (278 KB) Standard Model and Related TopicsAcrobat PDF (7.3 MB) Astrophysics and CosmologyAcrobat PDF (2.7 MB) Experimental Methods and CollidersAcrobat PDF (3.8 MB) Mathematical Tools or Statistics, Monte Carlo, Group

  12. Review of Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrignani, C.; Particle Data Group

    2016-10-01

    The Review summarizes much of particle physics and cosmology. Using data from previous editions, plus 3,062 new measurements from 721 papers, we list, evaluate, and average measured properties of gauge bosons and the recently discovered Higgs boson, leptons, quarks, mesons, and baryons. We summarize searches for hypothetical particles such as supersymmetric particles, heavy bosons, axions, dark photons, etc. All the particle properties and search limits are listed in Summary Tables. We also give numerous tables, figures, formulae, and reviews of topics such as Higgs Boson Physics, Supersymmetry, Grand Unified Theories, Neutrino Mixing, Dark Energy, Dark Matter, Cosmology, Particle Detectors, Colliders, Probability and Statistics. Among the 117 reviews are many that are new or heavily revised, including those on Pentaquarks and Inflation. The complete Review is published online in a journal and on the website of the Particle Data Group (http://pdg.lbl.gov). The printed PDG Book contains the Summary Tables and all review articles but no longer includes the detailed tables from the Particle Listings. A Booklet with the Summary Tables and abbreviated versions of some of the review articles is also available. Contents Abstract, Contributors, Highlights and Table of ContentsAcrobat PDF (150 KB) IntroductionAcrobat PDF (456 KB) Particle Physics Summary Tables Gauge and Higgs bosonsAcrobat PDF (155 KB) LeptonsAcrobat PDF (134 KB) QuarksAcrobat PDF (84 KB) MesonsAcrobat PDF (871 KB) BaryonsAcrobat PDF (300 KB) Searches (Supersymmetry, Compositeness, etc.)Acrobat PDF (91 KB) Tests of conservation lawsAcrobat PDF (330 KB) Reviews, Tables, and Plots Detailed contents for this sectionAcrobat PDF (37 KB) Constants, Units, Atomic and Nuclear PropertiesAcrobat PDF (278 KB) Standard Model and Related TopicsAcrobat PDF (7.3 MB) Astrophysics and CosmologyAcrobat PDF (2.7 MB) Experimental Methods and CollidersAcrobat PDF (3.8 MB) Mathematical Tools or Statistics, Monte Carlo, Group

  13. Particle physics -- Future directions

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Quigg

    2001-11-29

    Wonderful opportunities await particle physics over the next decade, with the coming of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN to explore the 1-TeV scale (extending efforts at LEP and the Tevatron to unravel the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking) and many initiatives to develop our understanding of the problem of identity: what makes a neutrino a neutrino and a top quark a top quark. Here I have in mind the work of the B factories and the Tevatron collider on CP violation and the weak interactions of the b quark; the wonderfully sensitive experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, Fermilab, and Frascati on CP violation and rare decays of kaons; the prospect of definitive accelerator experiments on neutrino oscillations and the nature of the neutrinos; and a host of new experiments on the sensitivity frontier. We might even learn to read experiment for clues about the dimensionality of spacetime. If we are inventive enough, we may be able to follow this rich menu with the physics opportunities offered by a linear collider and a (muon storage ring) neutrino factory. I expect a remarkable flowering of experimental particle physics, and of theoretical physics that engages with experiment. I describe some of the great questions before us and the challenges of providing the instruments that will be needed to define them more fully and eventually to answer them.

  14. Cosmology and particle physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Michael S.

    1988-01-01

    The interplay between cosmology and elementary particle physics is discussed. The standard cosmology is reviewed, concentrating on primordial nucleosynthesis and discussing how the standard cosmology has been used to place constraints on the properties of various particles. Baryogenesis is discussed, showing how a scenario in which the B-, C-, and CP-violating interactions in GUTs provide a dynamical explanation for the predominance of matter over antimatter and for the present baryon-to-photon ratio. It is shown how the very early dynamical evolution of a very weakly coupled scalar field which is initially displaced from the minimum of its potential may explain a handful of very fundamental cosmological facts which are not explained by the standard cosmology.

  15. Cosmology and particle physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Michael S.

    1988-01-01

    The interplay between cosmology and elementary particle physics is discussed. The standard cosmology is reviewed, concentrating on primordial nucleosynthesis and discussing how the standard cosmology has been used to place constraints on the properties of various particles. Baryogenesis is discussed, showing how a scenario in which the B-, C-, and CP-violating interactions in GUTs provide a dynamical explanation for the predominance of matter over antimatter and for the present baryon-to-photon ratio. It is shown how the very early dynamical evolution of a very weakly coupled scalar field which is initially displaced from the minimum of its potential may explain a handful of very fundamental cosmological facts which are not explained by the standard cosmology.

  16. Online Particle Physics Information

    SciTech Connect

    Kreitz, Patricia A

    2003-04-24

    This list describes a broad set of online resources that are of value to the particle physics community. It is prescreened and highly selective. It describes the scope, size, and organization of the resources so that efficient choices can be made amongst many sites which may appear similar. A resource is excluded if it provides information primarily of interest to only one institution. Because this list must be fixed in print, it is important to consult the updated version of this compilation which includes newly added resources and hypertext links to more complete information at: http://www.slac.stanford.edu/library/pdg/.

  17. Physics of windblown particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Leach, Rodman; Marshall, John R.; White, Bruce; Iversen, James D.; Nickling, William G.; Gillette, Dale; Sorensen, Michael

    1987-01-01

    A laboratory facility proposed for the Space Station to investigate fundamental aspects of windblown particles is described. The experiments would take advantage of the environment afforded in earth orbit and would be an extension of research currently being conducted on the geology and physics of windblown sediments on earth, Mars, and Venus. Aeolian (wind) processes are reviewed in the planetary context, the scientific rational is given for specific experiments to be conducted, the experiment apparatus (the Carousel Wind Tunnel, or CWT) is described, and a plan presented for implementing the proposed research program.

  18. Experimental Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Carl; Mishra, Sanjib R.; Petti, Roberto; Purohit, Milind V.

    2014-08-31

    The high energy physics group at the University of South Carolina, under the leadership of Profs. S.R. Mishra, R. Petti, M.V. Purohit, J.R. Wilson (co-PI's), and C. Rosenfeld (PI), engaged in studies in "Experimental Particle Physics." The group collaborated with similar groups at other universities and at national laboratories to conduct experimental studies of elementary particle properties. We utilized the particle accelerators at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Illinois, the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in California, and the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Switzerland. Mishra, Rosenfeld, and Petti worked predominantly on neutrino experiments. Experiments conducted in the last fifteen years that used cosmic rays and the core of the sun as a source of neutrinos showed conclusively that, contrary to the former conventional wisdom, the "flavor" of a neutrino is not immutable. A neutrino of flavor "e," "mu," or "tau," as determined from its provenance, may swap its identity with one of the other flavors -- in our jargon, they "oscillate." The oscillation phenomenon is extraordinarily difficult to study because neutrino interactions with our instruments are exceedingly rare -- they travel through the earth mostly unimpeded -- and because they must travel great distances before a substantial proportion have made the identity swap. Three of the experiments that we worked on, MINOS, NOvA, and LBNE utilize a beam of neutrinos from an accelerator at Fermilab to determine the parameters governing the oscillation. Two other experiments that we worked on, NOMAD and MIPP, provide measurements supportive of the oscillation experiments. Good measurements of the neutrino oscillation parameters may constitute a "low energy window" on related phenomena that are otherwise unobservable because they would occur only at energies way above the reach of conceivable accelerators. Purohit and Wilson participated in the BaBar experiment

  19. Modern Elementary Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Gordon

    2017-02-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Relativistic notation, Lagrangians, and interactions; 3. Gauge invariance; 4. Non-abelian gauge theories; 5. Dirac notation for spin; 6. The Standard Model Lagrangian; 7. The electroweak theory and quantum chromodynamics; 8. Masses and the Higgs mechanism; 9. Cross sections, decay widths, and lifetimes: W and Z decays; 10. Production and properties of W± and Zᴼ; 11. Measurement of electroweak and QCD parameters: the muon lifetime; 12. Accelerators - present and future; 13. Experiments and detectors; 14. Low energy and non-accelerator experiments; 15. Observation of the Higgs boson at the CERN LHC: is it the Higgs boson?; 16. Colliders and tests of the Standard Model: particles are pointlike; 17. Quarks and gluons, confinement and jets; 18. Hadrons, heavy quarks, and strong isospin invariance; 19. Coupling strengths depend on momentum transfer and on virtual particles; 20. Quark (and lepton) mixing angles; 21. CP violation; 22. Overview of physics beyond the Standard Model; 23. Grand unification; 24. Neutrino masses; 25. Dark matter; 26. Supersymmetry.

  20. Particle physics---Experimental

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, J.J.; Boynton, P.E.; Burnett, T.H.; Wilkes, R.J.

    1991-08-21

    We are continuing a research program in particle astrophysics and high energy experimental particle physics. We have joined the DUMAND Collaboration, which is constructing a deep undersea astrophysical neutrino detector near Hawaii. Studies of high energy hadronic interactions using emulsion chamber techniques were also continued, using balloon flight exposures to ultra-high cosmic ray nuclei (JACEE) and accelerator beams. As members of the DUMAND Collaboration, we have responsibility for development a construction of critical components for the deep undersea neutrino detector facility. We have designed and developed the acoustical positioning system required to permit reconstruction of muon tracks with sufficient precision to meet the astrophysical goals of the experiment. In addition, we are making significant contributions to the design of the database and triggering system to be used. Work has been continuing in other aspects of the study of multiparticle production processes in nuclei. We are participants in a joint US/Japan program to study nuclear interactions at energies two orders of magnitude greater than those of existing accelerators, using balloon-borne emulsion chambers. On one of the flights we found two nuclear interactions of multiplicity over 1000 -- one with a multiplicity of over 2000 and pseudorapidity density {approximately} 800 in the central region. At the statistical level of the JACEE experiment, the frequency of occurrence of such events is orders of magnitude too large. We have continued our ongoing program to study hadronic interactions in emulsions exposed to high energy accelerator beams.

  1. Particle Physics Masterclass

    ScienceCinema

    Helio Takai

    2016-07-12

    Students from six local high schools -- Farmingdale, Sachem East, Shoreham, Smithtown East, Ward Melville, and William Floyd -- came to Brookhaven National Laboratory to experience research with particle physicist Helio Takai. They were among more than 6,

  2. Particle Physics Masterclass

    SciTech Connect

    Helio Takai

    2009-04-10

    Students from six local high schools -- Farmingdale, Sachem East, Shoreham, Smithtown East, Ward Melville, and William Floyd -- came to Brookhaven National Laboratory to experience research with particle physicist Helio Takai. They were among more than 6,

  3. Theoretical particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-30

    This report discusses the following topics: heavy quark physics; Chiral Perturbation theory; Skyrmions; quarkonia and nuclear matter; parity violating nuclear matrix elements; how precisely can one determine M{sub U}/M{sub D}; weak scale baryogenesis; constraints of baryogenesis form neutrino masses; majorons, double beta decay, supernova 1987A; rare decays; chiral lattice fermions; Pauli-Villars regulator and the Higgs mass bound; and Higgs and Yukawa interactions.

  4. Nuclear physics and particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battistoni, G.

    2016-05-01

    The use of charged particles and nuclei in cancer therapy is one of the most successful cases of application of nuclear physics to medicine. The physical advantages in terms of precision and selectivity, combined with the biological properties of densely ionizing radiation, make charged particle approach an elective choice in a number of cases. Hadron therapy is in continuous development and nuclear physicists can give important contributions to this discipline. In this work some of the relevant aspects in nuclear physics will be reviewed, summarizing the most important directions of research and development.

  5. The Multiverse and Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donoghue, John F.

    2016-10-01

    The possibility of fundamental theories with very many ground states, each with different physical parameters, changes the way that we approach the major questions of particle physics. Most importantly, it raises the possibility that these different parameters could be realized in different domains in the larger universe. In this review, I survey the motivations for the multiverse and the impact of the idea of the multiverse on the search for new physics beyond the Standard Model.

  6. Elementary particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izen, Joseph M.

    1994-10-01

    The University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) is participating in two e(+)e(-), experiments, Beijing Spectrometer (BES) and BABAR, the PEP-11 B Factory detector. Associated production of tau and charmed mesons allow for absolute branching fraction measurements with good control of backgrounds. BES is uniquely positioned to study the leptonic and hadronic decays of quarkonia. The Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC) delivers luminosities an order of magnitude higher than earlier facilities. BES and BEPC will be upgraded following the 1994-5 run, and will resume data taking in Fall, 1996 with an improved detector and a Three-fold increase in luminosity. The raison d'etre of BABAR is the exploration of CP violation in the B meson system. An asymmetric storage ring is required to observe the time-dependence of the CP asymmetry. Other BABAR physics includes measurements of CKM matrix elements, rare B decays, penguin diagrams, B(sub s) decays, and precision measurements of tau and D meson decays. The scheduled BABAR turn-on in 1999 provides the UTD group with a natural evolution with continuous physics during this period.

  7. Research in theoretical particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, D.W.; Munczek, H.; Ralston, J.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses the following topics in high energy physics: dynamical symmetry breaking and Schwinger-Dyson equation; consistency bound on the minimal model Higgs mass; tests of physics beyond the standard model; particle astrophysics; the interface between perturbative and non-perturbative QCD; cosmology; anisotropy in quantum networks and integer quantum hall behavior; anomalous color transparency; quantum treatment of solitons; color transparency; quantum stabilization of skyrmions; and casimir effect. (LSP)

  8. The Future of Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, James

    2000-06-15

    After a very brief review of twentieth century elementary particle physics, prospects for the next century are discussed. First and most important are technological limits of opportunities; next, the future experimental program, and finally the status of the theory, in particular its limitations as well as its opportunities.

  9. Introduction to Elementary Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, C. J. Solano; Hurtado, K.; Romero, C.

    2009-04-01

    This is a short review of Particle Physics and the most widely accepted theory, the Standard Model, with its questions and limitations. We also show a quick review of some of te theories beyonf the Standard Model. It is based in the introductory talk given the Third School on Cosmic Rays and Astrophysics held in Arequipa, Peru.

  10. A research Program in Elementary Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel, Henry; Molzon, William; Lankford, Andrew; Taffard, Anyes; Whiteson, Daniel; Kirkby, David

    2013-07-25

    Work is reported in: Neutrino Physics, Cosmic Rays and Elementary Particles; Particle Physics and Charged Lepton Flavor Violation; Research in Collider Physics; Dark Energy Studies with BOSS and LSST.

  11. Supersymmetry in Elementary Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, Michael E.; /SLAC

    2008-02-05

    These lectures give a general introduction to supersymmetry, emphasizing its application to models of elementary particle physics at the 100 GeV energy scale. I discuss the following topics: the construction of supersymmetric Lagrangians with scalars, fermions, and gauge bosons, the structure and mass spectrum of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), the measurement of the parameters of the MSSM at high-energy colliders, and the solutions that the MSSM gives to the problems of electroweak symmetry breaking and dark matter.

  12. GPUs in experimental particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Niklaus

    2012-03-01

    Many applications in particle and nuclear physics demand vast computational power with high throughput and low latency. Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) provide such massively parallel floating point computing power at low cost. Indeed many problems are easily parallelized and can be sped up by orders of magnitude by the use of GPUs. The talk will discuss two very different examples, namely the use of GPUs for partial wave analysis and on-line track reconstruction. Partial wave analysis is a key tool in hadron spectroscopy. The unbinned likelihood fits employed are an almost perfect match for the architecture of GPUs. GPU based partial wave analysis was pioneered at the Beijing Spectrometer III experiment in order to deal with world's largest datasets from electron-positron collisions in the charm threshold energy region and is now employed by many groups in the field. The presentation will describe the challenges for implementing a GPU based partial wave analysis and how they were overcome. Usually the most time consuming part of analysing particle physics events is the reconstruction of tracks of charged particles. A new generation of high rate experiments running without a hardware trigger (e.g. the LHCb upgrade, PANDA, a proposed μ->eee search) will be relying on very fast on-line event reconstruction, including tracking. This in turn requires massive amounts of computing power, which is currently best provided by GPUs. The talk will describe the state of GPU based tracking efforts.

  13. Final Report: Particle Physics Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Karchin, Paul E.

    2011-09-01

    We describe recent progress in accelerator-based experiments in high-energy particle physics and progress in theoretical investigations in particle physics. We also describe future plans in these areas.

  14. Research in Elementary Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    White, Andrew Paul; De, Kaushik; Brandt, Andrew; Yu, Jaehoon; Farbin, Amir

    2015-02-02

    This report details the accomplishments and research results for the High Energy Physics Group at the University of Texas at Arlington at the Energy and Intensity Frontiers. For the Energy Frontier we have made fundamental contributions in the search for supersymmetric particles, proposed to explain the stabilization of the mass of the Higgs Boson – the agent giving mass to all known particles. We have also made major contributions to the search for additional Higgs Bosons and to the planning for future searches. This work has been carried out in the context of the ATLAS Experiment at CERN (European Nuclear Research Laboratory) and for which we have made major contributions to computing and data distribution and processing, and have worked to calibrate the detector and prepare upgraded electronics for the future. Our other contribution to the Energy Frontier has been to the International Linear Collider (ILC) project, potentially hosted by Japan, and to the Silicon Detector Concept (SiD) in particular. We have lead the development of the SiD Concept and have worked on a new form of precise energy measurement for particles from the high energy collisions of electrons and positrons at the ILC. For the Intensity Frontier, we have worked to develop the concept of Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment(s) (LBNE) at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Our contributions to detector development, neutrino beam studies, particle identification, software development will facilitate future studies of the oscillation of one type of neutrino into other type(s), establish the order of the neutrino masses, and, through an innovative new idea, allow us to create a beam of dark matter particles.

  15. Gravity, higher dimensions, nanotechnology and particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Masato

    2007-11-01

    The paper indicates that there is profound connection between the surface technology and the particle physics. Historically the Casimir effect tied up three different researches, the particle physics and nano/micro technology and number theory. Such as the Casimir effect, it is expected that the surface technologies are necessary for the experimental verification of the higher dimensional theories proposed by the particle physics. Recently, the particle physics is suffering from the experimental verifications. From the point of view of the elementary particle physics, let us explain the importance of the surface technologies.

  16. Cosmic Rays and Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaisser, Thomas K.; Engel, Ralph; Resconi, Elisa

    2016-06-01

    Preface to the first edition; Preface to the second edition; 1. Cosmic rays; 2. Cosmic ray data; 3. Particle physics; 4. Hadronic interactions and accelerator data; 5. Cascade equations; 6. Atmospheric muons and neutrinos; 7. Neutrino masses and oscillations; 8. Muons and neutrinos underground; 9. Cosmic rays in the Galaxy; 10. Extragalactic propagation of cosmic rays; 11. Astrophysical - rays and neutrinos; 12. Acceleration; 13. Supernovae in the Milky Way; 14. Astrophysical accelerators and beam dumps; 15. Electromagnetic cascades; 16. Extensive air showers; 17. Very high energy cosmic rays; 18. Neutrino astronomy; A.1. Units, constants and definitions; A.2. References to flux measurements; A.3. Particle flux, density, and interaction cross section; A.4. Fundamentals of scattering theory; A.5. Regge amplitude; A.6. Glauber model of nuclear cross sections; A.7. Earth's atmosphere; A.8. Longitudinal development of air showers; A.9. Secondary positrons and electrons; A.10. Liouville's theorem and cosmic ray propagation; A.11. Cosmology and distances measures; A.12. The Hillas splitting algorithm; References; Index.

  17. The dialogue between particle physics and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Sadoulet, B.

    1988-04-01

    In the last decade, a very close relationship has developed between particle physics and cosmology. The purpose of these lectures is to introduce particle physicists to the many scientific connections between the two fields. Before entering into the discussion of specific topics, it will first be shown that particle physics and cosmology are completely interdependent. 173 refs., 35 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Field theory and particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Eboli, O.J.P.; Gomes, M.; Santoro, A.

    1990-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the topics covered during the fifth Jorge Andre Swieca Summer School. The first part of the book collects the material devoted to quantum field theory. There were four courses on methods in Field Theory; H. O. Girotti lectured on constrained dynamics, R. Jackiw on the Schrodinger representation in Field Theory, S.-Y. Pi on the application of this representation to quantum fields in a Robertson-Walker spacetime, and L. Vinet on Berry Connections. There were three courses on Conformal Field Theory: I. Todorov focused on the problem of construction and classification of conformal field theories. Lattice models, two-dimensional S matrices and conformal field theory were looked from the unifying perspective of the Yang-Baxter algebras in the lectures given by M. Karowski. Parasupersymmetric quantum mechanics was discussed in the lectures by L. Vinet. Besides those courses, there was an introduction to string field theory given by G. Horowitz. There were also three seminars: F. Schaposnik reported on recent applications of topological methods in field theory, P. Gerbert gave a seminar on three dimensional gravity and V. Kurak talked on two dimensional parafermionic models. The second part of this proceedings is devoted to phenomenology. There were three courses on Particle Physics: Dan Green lectured on collider physics, E. Predrazzi on strong interactions and G. Cohen-Tanoudji on the use of strings in strong interactions.

  19. Elementary particle physics---Experimental

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, J.J.; Burnett, T.H.; Wilkes, R.J.

    1990-09-20

    We are continuing a research program in high energy experimental particle physics and particle astrophysics. Studies of high energy hadronic interactions were performed using several techniques, in addition, a high energy leptoproduction experiment was continued at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. We are participants in a joint US/Japan program to study nuclear interactions at energies two orders of magnitude greater than those of existing accelerators. The data are being collected with ballon-borne emulsion chambers. The properties of nuclear interactions at these high energies will reveal whether new production mechanisms come into play due to the high nuclear densities and temperatures obtained. We carried out closely related studies of hadronic interactions in emulsions exposed to high energy accelerator beams. We are members of a large international collaboration which has exposed emulsion chamber detectors to beams of {sup 32}S and {sup 16}O with energy 60 and 200 GeV/n at CERN and 15 GeV/n at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The primary objectives of this program are to determine the existence and properties of the hypothesized quark-gluon phase of matter, and its possible relation to a variety of anomalous observations. Studies of leptoproduction processes at high energies involve two separate experiments, one using the Tevatron 500 GeV muon beam and the other exploring the >TeV regime. We are participants in Fermilab experiment E665 employing a comprehensive counter/streamer chamber detector system. During the past year we joined the DUMAND Collaboration, and have been assigned responsibility for development and construction of critical components for the deep undersea neutrino detector facility, to be deployed in 1991. In addition, we are making significant contributions to the design of the triggering system to be used.

  20. Multi-physics/scale simulations using particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2006-03-01

    Particle simulations of continuum and discrete phenomena can be formulated by following the motion of interacting particles that carry the physical properties of the systems that is being approximated (continuum) or modeled (discrete) by the particles. We identify the common computational characteristics of particle methods and emphasize their key properties that enable the formulation of a novel, systematic framework for multiscale simulations, that can be applicable to the simulation of diverse physical problems. We present novel multiresolution particle methods for continuum (fluid/solid) simulations, using adaptive mesh refinement and wavelets, by relaxing the grid-free character of particle methods and discuss the coupling of scales in continuum-atomistic flow simulations.

  1. Studies in theoretical particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.B.

    1991-07-01

    This proposal focuses on research on three distinct areas of particle physics: (1) Nonperturbative QCD. I tend to continue work on analytic modelling of nonperturbative effects in the strong interactions. I have been investigating the theoretical connection between the nonrelativistic quark model and QCD. The primary motivation has been to understand the experimental observation of nonzero matrix elements involving current strange quarks in ordinary matter -- which in the quark model has no strange quark component. This has led to my present work on understanding constituent (quark model) quarks as collective excitations of QCD degrees of freedom. (2) Weak Scale Baryogenesis. A continuation of work on baryogenesis in the early universe from weak interactions. In particular, an investigation of baryogenesis occurring during the weak phase transition through anomalous baryon violating processes in the standard model of weak interactions. (3) Flavor and Compositeness. Further investigation of a new mechanism that I recently discovered for dynamical mass generation for fermions, which naturally leads to a family hierarchy structure. A discussion of recent past work is found in the next section, followed by an outline of the proposed research. A recent publication from each of these three areas is attached to this proposal.

  2. The Birth of Elementary-Particle Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Laurie M.; Hoddeson, Lillian

    1982-01-01

    Traces the origin and development of particle physics, concentrating on the roles of cosmic rays and theory. Includes charts highlighting significant events in the development of cosmic-ray physics and quantum field theory. (SK)

  3. The Birth of Elementary-Particle Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Laurie M.; Hoddeson, Lillian

    1982-01-01

    Traces the origin and development of particle physics, concentrating on the roles of cosmic rays and theory. Includes charts highlighting significant events in the development of cosmic-ray physics and quantum field theory. (SK)

  4. Topics in elementary particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiang

    The author of this thesis discusses two topics in elementary particle physics: n-ary algebras and their applications to M-theory (Part I), and functional evolution and Renormalization Group flows (Part II). In part I, Lie algebra is extended to four different n-ary algebraic structure: generalized Lie algebra, Filippov algebra, Nambu algebra and Nambu-Poisson tensor; though there are still many other n-ary algebras. A natural property of Generalized Lie algebras — the Bremner identity, is studied, and proved with a totally different method from its original version. We extend Bremner identity to n-bracket cases, where n is an arbitrary odd integer. Filippov algebras do not focus on associativity, and are defined by the Fundamental identity. We add associativity to Filippov algebras, and give examples of how to construct Filippov algebras from su(2), bosonic oscillator, Virasoro algebra. We try to include fermionic charges into the ternary Virasoro-Witt algebra, but the attempt fails because fermionic charges keep generating new charges that make the algebra not closed. We also study the Bremner identity restriction on Nambu algebras and Nambu-Poisson tensors. So far, the only example 3-algebra being used in physics is the BLG model with 3-algebra A4, describing two M2-branes interactions. Its extension with Nambu algebra, BLG-NB model, is believed to describe infinite M2-branes condensation. Also, there is another propose for M2-brane interactions, the ABJM model, which is constructed by ordinary Lie algebra. We compare the symmetry properties between them, and discuss the possible approaches to include these three models into a grand unification theory. In Part II, we give an approximate solution for Schroeder's equations, based on series and conjugation methods. We use the logistic map as an example, and demonstrate that this approximate

  5. Teaching Elementary Particle Physics: Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Art

    2011-01-01

    I'll outline suggestions for teaching elementary particle physics, often called "high energy physics," in high school or introductory college courses for non-scientists or scientists. Some presentations of this topic simply list the various particles along with their properties, with little overarching structure. Such a laundry list approach is a…

  6. Quarked!--Adventures in Particle Physics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Teresa; Bean, Alice

    2009-01-01

    Particle physics is a subject that can send shivers down the spines of students and educators alike--with visions of long mathematical equations and inscrutable ideas. This perception, along with a full curriculum, often leaves this topic the road less traveled until the latter years of school. Particle physics, including quarks, is typically not…

  7. Particle Physics: From School to University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Roger

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the teaching of particle physics as part of the A-level physics course in British secondary schools. Utilizes the quark model of hadrons and the conceptual kinematics of particle collisions, as examples, to demonstrate practical instructional possibilities in relation to student expectations. (JJK)

  8. Quarked!--Adventures in Particle Physics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Teresa; Bean, Alice

    2009-01-01

    Particle physics is a subject that can send shivers down the spines of students and educators alike--with visions of long mathematical equations and inscrutable ideas. This perception, along with a full curriculum, often leaves this topic the road less traveled until the latter years of school. Particle physics, including quarks, is typically not…

  9. Particle Physics: From School to University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Roger

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the teaching of particle physics as part of the A-level physics course in British secondary schools. Utilizes the quark model of hadrons and the conceptual kinematics of particle collisions, as examples, to demonstrate practical instructional possibilities in relation to student expectations. (JJK)

  10. Teaching Elementary Particle Physics: Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Art

    2011-01-01

    I'll outline suggestions for teaching elementary particle physics, often called "high energy physics," in high school or introductory college courses for non-scientists or scientists. Some presentations of this topic simply list the various particles along with their properties, with little overarching structure. Such a laundry list approach is a…

  11. Charged particle therapy: the physics of interaction.

    PubMed

    Lomax, Antony J

    2009-01-01

    Particle therapy has a long and distinguished history with more than 50,000 patients having been treated, mainly with high-energy proton therapy. Particularly, for proton therapy, there is an increasing interest in exploiting the physical characteristics of charged particles for further improving the potential of radiation therapy. In this article, we review the most important interactions of charged particles with matter and describe the basic physical principles that underlie why particle beams behave the way they do and why such a behavior could bring many benefits in radiation therapy.

  12. Standard Model of Particle Physics--a health physics perspective.

    PubMed

    Bevelacqua, J J

    2010-11-01

    The Standard Model of Particle Physics is reviewed with an emphasis on its relationship to the physics supporting the health physics profession. Concepts important to health physics are emphasized and specific applications are presented. The capability of the Standard Model to provide health physics relevant information is illustrated with application of conservation laws to neutron and muon decay and in the calculation of the neutron mean lifetime.

  13. Research program in particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sudarshan, E.C.G.; Dicus, D.A.; Ritchie, J.L.; Lang, K.

    1992-07-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Quantum Gravity and Mathematical Physics; Phenomenology; Quantum Mechanics and Quantum Field Theory; Status of BNL Expt. 791; BNL Expt. 791; BNL Expt. 888; and SSC Activities.

  14. Medium energy elementary particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: muon beam development at LAMPF; muon physics; a new precision measurement of the muon g-2 value; measurement of the spin-dependent structure functions of the neutron and proton; and meson factories. (LSP)

  15. Research in elementary particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kirsch, L.E.; Schnitzer, H.J.; Bensinger, J.R.; Blocker, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas of high energy physics: B meson mixing; CDF response to low energy jets; jet scaling behavior; search for pair produced leptoquarks at CDF; SSC program; quantum field theory; and neural networks. (LSP).

  16. Particle transport and deposition: basic physics of particle kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Akira; Henry, Frank S; Butler, James P

    2013-10-01

    The human body interacts with the environment in many different ways. The lungs interact with the external environment through breathing. The enormously large surface area of the lung with its extremely thin air-blood barrier is exposed to particles suspended in the inhaled air. The particle-lung interaction may cause deleterious effects on health if the inhaled pollutant aerosols are toxic. Conversely, this interaction can be beneficial for disease treatment if the inhaled particles are therapeutic aerosolized drugs. In either case, an accurate estimation of dose and sites of deposition in the respiratory tract is fundamental to understanding subsequent biological response, and the basic physics of particle motion and engineering knowledge needed to understand these subjects is the topic of this article. A large portion of this article deals with three fundamental areas necessary to the understanding of particle transport and deposition in the respiratory tract. These are: (i) the physical characteristics of particles, (ii) particle behavior in gas flow, and (iii) gas-flow patterns in the respiratory tract. Other areas, such as particle transport in the developing lung and in the diseased lung are also considered. The article concludes with a summary and a brief discussion of areas of future research.

  17. Particle transport and deposition: basic physics of particle kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Akira; Henry, Frank S.; Butler, James P.

    2015-01-01

    The human body interacts with the environment in many different ways. The lungs interact with the external environment through breathing. The enormously large surface area of the lung with its extremely thin air-blood barrier is exposed to particles suspended in the inhaled air. Whereas the particle-lung interaction may cause deleterious effects on health if the inhaled pollutant aerosols are toxic, this interaction can be beneficial for disease treatment if the inhaled particles are therapeutic aerosolized drug. In either case, an accurate estimation of dose and sites of deposition in the respiratory tract is fundamental to understanding subsequent biological response, and the basic physics of particle motion and engineering knowledge needed to understand these subjects is the topic of this chapter. A large portion of this chapter deals with three fundamental areas necessary to the understanding of particle transport and deposition in the respiratory tract. These are: 1) the physical characteristics of particles, 2) particle behavior in gas flow, and 3) gas flow patterns in the respiratory tract. Other areas, such as particle transport in the developing lung and in the diseased lung are also considered. The chapter concludes with a summary and a brief discussion of areas of future research. PMID:24265235

  18. Nuclear physics with strange particles

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1988-01-01

    Recent progress in the understanding of strange particle interactions with nuclear systems is reviewed. We discuss the relative merits of various reactions such as (K/sup -/, ..pi../sup +-/), (..pi../sup +/, K/sup +/), or (..gamma.., K/sup +/) for hypernuclear production. The structure of /sub ..lambda..//sup 13/C is analyzed in some detail, in order to illustrate the role of the ..lambda..N residual interaction and approximate dynamical symmetries in hypernuclear structure. Recent results on the single particle states of a ..lambda.. in heavy systems, as revealed by (..pi../sup +/, K/sup +/) reaction studies, are used to extract information on the density dependence and effective mass which characterize the ..lambda..-nucleus mean field. Finally, we develop the idea the K/sup +/-nucleus scattering at low energies is sensitive to the subtle ''swelling'' effects for nucleons bound in nuclei. 64 refs., 13 figs.

  19. Particle physics education in Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oláh, Éva; Ádám, Péter; Béni, Noémi; Hamar, Gergö; Horváth, Árpád; Horváth, Dezsö; Jancsó, Gábor; Jarosievitz, Beáta; Lévai, Péter; Péntek, Csilla; Sükösd, Csaba; Szillási, Zoltán; Trócsányi, Zoltán; Újvári, Balázs; Vámi, Tamás; Varga, Dezsö

    2016-04-01

    In recent years various educational activities have been pursued in Hungary with the aim to raise the interest of high school students in natural sciences, and especially in physics. This brief summary will present some of the key projects of broader interest for the scientific community.

  20. Small Particle May Answer Large Physics Questions

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A

    2005-09-20

    In one of those interesting intersections of particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the University of California at Berkeley (UCB), the University of Florida (UF), and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) have joined together to try to pin down an elusive particle. This particle, called the axion, if it is found to exist and is not just a hypothesis, would be a long-sought relic from the first fractional second of the birth of the universe and one of the most weakly interacting particles known. Experimental verification of the existence of the axion would not only help ''balance the budget'' for the missing mass of the universe but also clear up one of the thorniest issues in particle physics.

  1. Research on elementary particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, L.E.; O'Halloran, T.A.

    1992-05-01

    This report describes the activities of the University of Illinois Experimental High Energy Physics Group. The physicists in the University of Illinois High Energy Physics Group are engaged in a wide variety of experiments at current and future accelerator laboratories. These include: (1) The CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevetron p{bar p} collider. (2) Design and developmental work for the SDC group at SSCL. (3) Experiments at the wide band photon beam at Fermilab. (4) The SLD experiment at SLAC and design studies for a {tau}-charm factor. (5) CP violation experiments at Fermilab. (6) The HiRes cosmic ray experiment at Dugway Proving Grounds, Utah. (7) Computational facilities. (8) Electronics systems development.

  2. Elementary particle physics at the University of Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: theoretical elementary particle physics; experimental elementary particle physics; axion project; SSC detector development; and computer acquisition. (LSP).

  3. Plato's TIMAIOσ (TIMAEUS) and Modern Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machleidt, Ruprecht

    2005-04-01

    It is generally known that the question, ``What are the smallest particles (elementary particles) that all matter is made from?'', was posed already in the antiquity. The Greek natural philosophers Leucippus and Democritus were the first to suggest that all matter was made from atoms. Therefore, most people perceive them as the ancient fathers of elementary particle physics. It will be the purpose of my contribution to point out that this perception is wrong. Modern particle physics is not just a primitive atomism. More important than the materialistic particles are the underlying symmetries (e. g., SU(3) and SU(6)). A similar idea was first advanced by Plato in his dialog TIMAIOσ (Latin translation: TIMAEUS): Geometric symmetries generate the materialistic particles from a few even more elementary items. Plato's vision is amazingly close to the ideas of modern particle physics. This fact, which is unfortunately little known, has been pointed out repeatedly by Heisenberg (see, e. g., Werner Heisenberg, Across the Frontiers, Harper & Row, New York, 1974).

  4. Basics of particle therapy I: physics

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seo Hyun

    2011-01-01

    With the advance of modern radiation therapy technique, radiation dose conformation and dose distribution have improved dramatically. However, the progress does not completely fulfill the goal of cancer treatment such as improved local control or survival. The discordances with the clinical results are from the biophysical nature of photon, which is the main source of radiation therapy in current field, with the lower linear energy transfer to the target. As part of a natural progression, there recently has been a resurgence of interest in particle therapy, specifically using heavy charged particles, because these kinds of radiations serve theoretical advantages in both biological and physical aspects. The Korean government is to set up a heavy charged particle facility in Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences. This review introduces some of the elementary physics of the various particles for the sake of Korean radiation oncologists' interest. PMID:22984664

  5. Basics of particle therapy I: physics.

    PubMed

    Park, Seo Hyun; Kang, Jin Oh

    2011-09-01

    With the advance of modern radiation therapy technique, radiation dose conformation and dose distribution have improved dramatically. However, the progress does not completely fulfill the goal of cancer treatment such as improved local control or survival. The discordances with the clinical results are from the biophysical nature of photon, which is the main source of radiation therapy in current field, with the lower linear energy transfer to the target. As part of a natural progression, there recently has been a resurgence of interest in particle therapy, specifically using heavy charged particles, because these kinds of radiations serve theoretical advantages in both biological and physical aspects. The Korean government is to set up a heavy charged particle facility in Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences. This review introduces some of the elementary physics of the various particles for the sake of Korean radiation oncologists' interest.

  6. Flavor Democracy in Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sultansoy, Saleh

    2007-04-23

    The flavor democracy hypothesis (or, in other words, democratic mass matrix approach) was introduced in seventies taking in mind three Standard Model (SM) families. Later, this idea was disfavored by the large value of the t-quark mass. In nineties the hypothesis was revisited assuming that extra SM families exist. According to flavor democracy the fourth SM family should exist and there are serious arguments disfavoring the fifth SM family. The fourth SM family quarks lead to essential enhancement of the Higgs boson production cross-section at hadron colliders and the Tevatron can discover the Higgs boson before the LHC, if it mass is between 140 and 200 GeV. Then, one can handle 'massless' Dirac neutrinos without see-saw mechanism. Concerning BSM physics, flavor democracy leads to several consequences: tan{beta} {approx_equal} mt/mb {approx_equal} 40 if there are three MSSM families; super-partner of the right-handed neutrino can be the LSP; relatively light E(6)-inspired isosinglet quark etc. Finally, flavor democracy may give opportunity to handle ''massless'' composite objects within preonic models.

  7. Research in Theoretical Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, Hume A; Marfatia, Danny

    2014-09-24

    This document is the final report on activity supported under DOE Grant Number DE-FG02-13ER42024. The report covers the period July 15, 2013 – March 31, 2014. Faculty supported by the grant during the period were Danny Marfatia (1.0 FTE) and Hume Feldman (1% FTE). The grant partly supported University of Hawaii students, David Yaylali and Keita Fukushima, who are supervised by Jason Kumar. Both students are expected to graduate with Ph.D. degrees in 2014. Yaylali will be joining the University of Arizona theory group in Fall 2014 with a 3-year postdoctoral appointment under Keith Dienes. The group’s research covered topics subsumed under the Energy Frontier, the Intensity Frontier, and the Cosmic Frontier. Many theoretical results related to the Standard Model and models of new physics were published during the reporting period. The report contains brief project descriptions in Section 1. Sections 2 and 3 lists published and submitted work, respectively. Sections 4 and 5 summarize group activity including conferences, workshops and professional presentations.

  8. Flavor Democracy in Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultansoy, Saleh

    2007-04-01

    The flavor democracy hypothesis (or, in other words, democratic mass matrix approach) was introduced in seventies taking in mind three Standard Model (SM) families. Later, this idea was disfavored by the large value of the t-quark mass. In nineties the hypothesis was revisited assuming that extra SM families exist. According to flavor democracy the fourth SM family should exist and there are serious arguments disfavoring the fifth SM family. The fourth SM family quarks lead to essential enhancement of the Higgs boson production cross-section at hadron colliders and the Tevatron can discover the Higgs boson before the LHC, if it mass is between 140 and 200 GeV. Then, one can handle ``massless'' Dirac neutrinos without see-saw mechanism. Concerning BSM physics, flavor democracy leads to several consequences: tanβ ~ mt/mb ~ 40 if there are three MSSM families; super-partner of the right-handed neutrino can be the LSP; relatively light E(6)-inspired isosinglet quark etc. Finally, flavor democracy may give opportunity to handle ``massless'' composite objects within preonic models.

  9. Particle physics with the LHC data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Kaoru

    2012-07-01

    In this talk, I give reasons why we regard GUT as a part of the Standard Model of Elementary Particle Physics that explain all phenomena observed at high energy experiments and in the universe, with a few notable exceptions. It is based on my introduction-to-elementary-particle-physics lectures for the first year graduate students at Sokendai, Graduate University for Advanced Studies. No new observation is made, but I think that it is important for us to examine the LHC data from the GUT viewpoint together with our fresh students.

  10. The CMS Masterclass and Particle Physics Outreach

    SciTech Connect

    Cecire, Kenneth; Bardeen, Marjorie; McCauley, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The CMS Masterclass enables high school students to analyse authentic CMS data. Students can draw conclusions on key ratios and particle masses by combining their analyses. In particular, they can use the ratio of W^+ to W^- candidates to probe the structure of the proton, they can find the mass of the Z boson, and they can identify additional particles including, tentatively, the Higgs boson. In the United States, masterclasses are part of QuarkNet, a long-term program that enables students and teachers to use cosmic ray and particle physics data for learning with an emphasis on data from CMS.

  11. Nuclear physics in particle therapy: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, Marco; Paganetti, Harald

    2016-09-01

    Charged particle therapy has been largely driven and influenced by nuclear physics. The increase in energy deposition density along the ion path in the body allows reducing the dose to normal tissues during radiotherapy compared to photons. Clinical results of particle therapy support the physical rationale for this treatment, but the method remains controversial because of the high cost and of the lack of comparative clinical trials proving the benefit compared to x-rays. Research in applied nuclear physics, including nuclear interactions, dosimetry, image guidance, range verification, novel accelerators and beam delivery technologies, can significantly improve the clinical outcome in particle therapy. Measurements of fragmentation cross-sections, including those for the production of positron-emitting fragments, and attenuation curves are needed for tuning Monte Carlo codes, whose use in clinical environments is rapidly increasing thanks to fast calculation methods. Existing cross sections and codes are indeed not very accurate in the energy and target regions of interest for particle therapy. These measurements are especially urgent for new ions to be used in therapy, such as helium. Furthermore, nuclear physics hardware developments are frequently finding applications in ion therapy due to similar requirements concerning sensors and real-time data processing. In this review we will briefly describe the physics bases, and concentrate on the open issues.

  12. The Coming Revolutions in Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigg, Chris

    2006-12-01

    Wonderful opportunities await particle physics over the next decade, with new instruments and experiments poised to explore the frontiers of high energy, infinitesimal distances, and exquisite rarity. I will review the insights of the decade just past and show how they lead us to the brink of a new period of rapid and profound discovery. We expect answers to questions that speak to our understanding of the everyday world: why are there atoms? why chemistry? why stable structures? and even what makes life possible? We are probing the meaning of identity for the fundamental particles: what makes an electron an electron, a neutrino a neutrino, and a top quark a top quark? Important clues, including the remarkable neutrality of atoms, lead us to investigate the unity of the two main classes of matter, the quarks and leptons. Gravity and particle physics, long separate disciplines, are enjoying a stimulating reunion, and we are learning how to investigate—with experiments—new conceptions of spacetime. We look forward to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN to explore the a new and critical energy scale of one trillion electron volts. If we are inventive enough, we may be able to follow the LHC's rich menu with the physics opportunities offered by a linear electron-positron collider, a (muon storage ring) neutrino factory, and experiments that use natural sources. I expect a remarkable flowering of experimental particle physics, and of theoretical physics that engages with experiment.

  13. Nuclear physics in particle therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Durante, Marco; Paganetti, Harald

    2016-09-01

    Charged particle therapy has been largely driven and influenced by nuclear physics. The increase in energy deposition density along the ion path in the body allows reducing the dose to normal tissues during radiotherapy compared to photons. Clinical results of particle therapy support the physical rationale for this treatment, but the method remains controversial because of the high cost and of the lack of comparative clinical trials proving the benefit compared to x-rays. Research in applied nuclear physics, including nuclear interactions, dosimetry, image guidance, range verification, novel accelerators and beam delivery technologies, can significantly improve the clinical outcome in particle therapy. Measurements of fragmentation cross-sections, including those for the production of positron-emitting fragments, and attenuation curves are needed for tuning Monte Carlo codes, whose use in clinical environments is rapidly increasing thanks to fast calculation methods. Existing cross sections and codes are indeed not very accurate in the energy and target regions of interest for particle therapy. These measurements are especially urgent for new ions to be used in therapy, such as helium. Furthermore, nuclear physics hardware developments are frequently finding applications in ion therapy due to similar requirements concerning sensors and real-time data processing. In this review we will briefly describe the physics bases, and concentrate on the open issues.

  14. Particle Physics Outreach to Secondary Education

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, Marjorie G.; Johansson, K.Erik; Young, M.Jean

    2011-11-21

    This review summarizes exemplary secondary education and outreach programs of the particle physics community. We examine programs from the following areas: research experiences, high-energy physics data for students, informal learning for students, instructional resources, and professional development. We report findings about these programs' impact on students and teachers and provide suggestions for practices that create effective programs from those findings. We also include some methods for assessing programs.

  15. Particle physics in astrophysics and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, Martin J.

    1990-08-01

    This paper briefly outlines some topics of current interest on the interface between astrophysics/cosmology and particle physics. These include: the implications of the cosmic light element abundances; evidence for non-baryonic dark matter, and the prospects for experimental searches; cosmic strings; and `inflationary' cosmology.

  16. Visions: The coming revolutions in particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Quigg

    2002-04-11

    Wonderful opportunities await particle physics over the next decade, with the coming of the Large Hadron Collider to explore the 1-TeV scale (extending efforts at LEP and the Tevatron to unravel the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking) and many initiatives to develop the understanding of the problem of identity and the dimensionality of spacetime.

  17. Is Particle Physics Ready for the LHC

    ScienceCinema

    Lykken, Joseph

    2016-07-12

    The advent of the Large Hadron Collider in 2007 entails daunting challenges to particle physicists. The first set of challenges will arise from trying to separate new physics from old. The second set of challenges will come in trying to interpret the new discoveries. I will describe a few of the scariest examples.

  18. Theoretical Studies in Elementary Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, John C.; Roiban, Radu S

    2013-04-01

    This final report summarizes work at Penn State University from June 1, 1990 to April 30, 2012. The work was in theoretical elementary particle physics. Many new results in perturbative QCD, in string theory, and in related areas were obtained, with a substantial impact on the experimental program.

  19. A Vision of Nuclear and Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, Hugh E.

    2016-08-01

    This paper will consist of a selected, personal view of some of the issues associated with the intersections of nuclear and particle physics. As well as touching on the recent developments we will attempt to look at how those aspects of the subject might evolve over the next few years.

  20. Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    PPARC is the agency through which UK taxpayers' money flows to fund astronomy (as well as particle physics). PPARC supports the EUROPEAN SPACE AGENCY as well as the telescopes with UK involvement such as the 8 m Gemini Telescopes, UK Infra Red Telescope (UKIRT), James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), William Herschel Telescope (WHT) and the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) along with Jodrell Bank ...

  1. Current Experiments in Particle Physics (September 1996)

    SciTech Connect

    Galic, H.; Lehar, F.; Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Bilak, S.V.; Illarionova, N.S.; Khachaturov, B.A.; Strokovsky, E.A.; Hoffman, C.M.; Kettle, P.-R.; Olin, A.; Armstrong, F.E.

    1996-09-01

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. This report contains full summaries of 180 approved current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. The focus of the report is on selected experiments which directly contribute to our better understanding of elementary particles and their properties such as masses, widths or lifetimes, and branching fractions.

  2. Medical physics aspects of particle therapy.

    PubMed

    Jäkel, Oliver

    2009-11-01

    Charged particle beams offer an improved dose conformation to the target volume when compared with photon radiotherapy, with better sparing of normal tissue structures close to the target. In addition, beams of heavier ions exhibit a strong increase of the linear energy transfer in the Bragg peak when compared with the entrance region. These physical and biological properties make ion beams more favourable for radiation therapy of cancer than photon beams. As a consequence, particle therapy with protons and heavy ions has gained increasing interest worldwide. This contribution summarises the physical and biological principles of charged particle therapy with ion beams and highlights some of the developments in the field of beam delivery, the principles of treatment planning and the determination of absorbed dose in ion beams. The clinical experience gathered so far with carbon ion therapy is briefly reviewed.

  3. Beyond the standard model of particle physics.

    PubMed

    Virdee, T S

    2016-08-28

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and its experiments were conceived to tackle open questions in particle physics. The mechanism of the generation of mass of fundamental particles has been elucidated with the discovery of the Higgs boson. It is clear that the standard model is not the final theory. The open questions still awaiting clues or answers, from the LHC and other experiments, include: What is the composition of dark matter and of dark energy? Why is there more matter than anti-matter? Are there more space dimensions than the familiar three? What is the path to the unification of all the fundamental forces? This talk will discuss the status of, and prospects for, the search for new particles, symmetries and forces in order to address the open questions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Unifying physics and technology in light of Maxwell's equations'.

  4. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E., Oyanagi, Y.; Dodder, D.C.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Frosch, R.; Olin, A.; Lehar, F.; Moskalev, A.N.; Barkov, B.P.

    1987-03-01

    This report contains summaries of 720 recent and current experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1980 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, KEK, LAMPF, Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Saclay, Serpukhov, SIN, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also experiments on proton decay. Instructions are given for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized.

  5. Energetic particle physics issues for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Budny, R.; Fu, G.Y.

    1996-12-31

    This paper summarizes our present understanding of the following energetic/alpha particle physics issues for the 21 MA, 20 TF coil ITER Interim Design configuration and operational scenarios: (a) toroidal field ripple effects on alpha particle confinement, (b) energetic particle interaction with low frequency MHD modes, (c) energetic particle excitation of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes, and (d) energetic particle transport due to MHD modes. TF ripple effects on alpha loss in ITER under a number of different operating conditions are found to be small with a maximum loss of 1%. With careful plasma control in ITER reversed-shear operation, TF ripple induced alpha loss can be reduced to below the nominal ITER design limit of 5%. Fishbone modes are expected to be unstable for {beta}{sub {alpha}} > 1%, and sawtooth stabilization is lost if the ideal kink growth rate exceeds 10% of the deeply trapped alpha precessional drift frequency evaluated at the q = 1 surface. However, it is expected that the fishbone modes will lead only to a local flattening of the alpha profile due to small banana size. MHD modes observed during slow decrease of stored energy after fast partial electron temperature collapse in JT-60U reversed-shear experiments may be resonant type instabilities; they may have implications on the energetic particle confinement in ITER reversed-shear operation. From the results of various TAE stability code calculations, ITER equilibria appear to lie close to TAE linear stability thresholds. However, the prognosis depends strongly on q profile and profiles of alpha and other high energy particles species. If TAE modes are unstable in ITER, the stochastic diffusion is the main loss mechanism, which scales with ({delta}B{sub r}/B){sup 2}, because of the relatively small alpha particle banana orbit size. For isolated TAE modes the particle loss is very small, and TAE modes saturate via the resonant wave-particle trapping process at very small amplitude.

  6. Elementary Particles and the Laws of Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feynman, Richard P.; Weinberg, Steven

    1987-11-01

    Developing a theory that seamlessly combines relativity and quantum mechanics, the most important conceptual breakthroughs in twentieth century physics, has proved to be a difficult and ongoing challenge. This book details how two distinguished physicists and Nobel laureates have explored this theme in two lectures given in Cambridge, England, in 1986 to commemorate the famous British physicist Paul Dirac. Given for nonspecialists and undergraduates, the talks transcribed in Elementary Particles and the Laws of Physics focus on the fundamental problems of physics and the present state of our knowledge. Professor Feynman examines the nature of antiparticles, and in particular the relationship between quantum spin and statistics. Professor Weinberg speculates on how Einstein's theory of gravitation might be reconciled with quantum theory in the final law of physics. Highly accessible, deeply thought provoking, this book will appeal to all those interested in the development of modern physics.

  7. Particle identification methods in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Va'Vra, J.

    2000-01-27

    This paper deals with two major particle identification methods: dE/dx and Cherenkov detection. In the first method, the authors systematically compare existing dE/dx data with various predictions available in the literature, such as the Particle Data group recommendation, and judge the overall consistency. To my knowledge, such comparison was not done yet in a published form for the gaseous detectors used in High-Energy physics. As far as the second method, there are two major Cherenkov light detection techniques: the threshold and the Ring imaging methods. The authors discuss the recent trend in these techniques.

  8. Finite particle number approach to quantum physics

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P.

    1982-04-01

    Bridgman has contended that the inside of an electron cannot be given operational meaning. The basic reason for this is taken to be that when relativity is coupled to quantum mechanics the uncertainty principle in energy requires the existence of an indefinitely large number of particulate degrees of freedom corresponding to particles of finite mass when any system is examined at short distance, as was first pointed out by Wick. This principle is examined in the context of the nuclear force problem and shown to frustrate a precise theory of strong interactions using conventional approaches. However, once relativistic scattering theory is recast in the form of free particle wave functions and elementary scatterings, progress becomes possible. In particular, a unitary and covariant first approximation to the nuclear force problem using only two particles and one quantum can be formulated simply by postulating that particle (or anti-particle) can bind with the quantum to make a system of the same mass as the particle and physically indistinguishable from it.

  9. Modern Particle Physics Event Generation with WHIZARD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, J.; Bach, F.; Chokoufé, B.; Kilian, W.; Ohl, T.; Sekulla, M.; Weiss, C.

    2015-05-01

    We describe the multi-purpose Monte-Carlo event generator WHIZARD for the simulation of high-energy particle physics experiments. Besides the presentation of the general features of the program like SM physics, BSM physics, and QCD effects, special emphasis will be given to the support of the most accurate simulation of the collider environments at hadron colliders and especially at future linear lepton colliders. On the more technical side, the very recent code refactoring towards a completely object-oriented software package to improve maintainability, flexibility and code development will be discussed. Finally, we present ongoing work and future plans regarding higher-order corrections, more general model support including the setup to search for new physics in vector boson scattering at the LHC, as well as several lines of performance improvements.

  10. Advanced analysis methods in particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Pushpalatha C.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Each generation of high energy physics experiments is grander in scale than the previous - more powerful, more complex and more demanding in terms of data handling and analysis. The spectacular performance of the Tevatron and the beginning of operations of the Large Hadron Collider, have placed us at the threshold of a new era in particle physics. The discovery of the Higgs boson or another agent of electroweak symmetry breaking and evidence of new physics may be just around the corner. The greatest challenge in these pursuits is to extract the extremely rare signals, if any, from huge backgrounds arising from known physics processes. The use of advanced analysis techniques is crucial in achieving this goal. In this review, I discuss the concepts of optimal analysis, some important advanced analysis methods and a few examples. The judicious use of these advanced methods should enable new discoveries and produce results with better precision, robustness and clarity.

  11. Particle physics: recent successes and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcicki, S.

    1984-12-01

    There is no doubt that as yet we do not have an ultimate theory of matter and forces in spite of the remarkable successes of the past decade. In this talk the author attempts to summarize briefly the historical background that led us to the present level of understanding, or more specifically to the standard model of particle physics. Subsequently the author describes several difficulties with this picture, continues with some possible indications of new physics, and finally ends with the discussion of the prospects for the future. 32 references.

  12. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P. ); Oyanagi, Y. ); Dodder, D.C. ); Ryabov, Yu.G.; Slabospitsky, S.R. . Inst. Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij); Frosch, R. (Swiss Inst. for Nuclear Research, Villigen (Switzerla

    1989-09-01

    This report contains summaries of 736 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1982 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PSI/SIN, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground experiments. Also given are instructions for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized.

  13. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revised

    SciTech Connect

    Galic, H.; Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, B.; Dodder, D.C.; Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Illarionova, N.S.; Lehar, F.; Oyanagi, Y.; Olin, A.; Frosch, R.

    1992-06-01

    This report contains summaries of 584 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1986 are excluded. Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, SSCL, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  14. Semiconductor detectors in nuclear and particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.

    1992-12-31

    Semiconductor detectors for elementary particle physics and nuclear physics in the energy range above 1 GeV are briefly reviewed. In these two fields semiconductor detectors are used mainly for the precise position sensing. In a typical experiment, the position of a fast charged particle crossing a relatively thin semiconductor detector is measured. The position resolution achievable by semiconductor detectors is compared with the resolution achievable by gas filled position sensing detectors. Semiconductor detectors are divided into two groups: Classical semiconductor diode detectors and semiconductor memory detectors. Principles of the signal formation and the signal read-out for both groups of detectors are described. New developments of silicon detectors of both groups are reported.

  15. Particle Physics from Almost-Commutative Spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Dungen, Koen; van Suijlekom, Walter D.

    2012-10-01

    Our aim in this review paper is to present the applications of Connes' noncommutative geometry to elementary particle physics. Whereas the existing literature is mostly focused on a mathematical audience, in this paper we introduce the ideas and concepts from noncommutative geometry using physicists' terminology, gearing towards the predictions that can be derived from the noncommutative description. Focusing on a light package of noncommutative geometry (so-called "almost-commutative manifolds"), we shall introduce in steps: electrodynamics, the electroweak model, culminating in the full Standard Model. We hope that our approach helps in understanding the role noncommutative geometry could play in describing particle physics models, eventually unifying them with Einstein's (geometrical) theory of gravity.

  16. Recasting particle physics by entangling physics, history and philosophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertozzi, Eugenio; Levrini, Olivia

    2016-05-01

    -1The paper presents the design process we followed to recast particle physics so as to make it conceptually relevant for secondary school students. In this design process, the concept of symmetry was assumed as core-idea because of its structural and foundational role in particle physics, its crosscutting character and its epistemological and philosophical value. The first draft of the materials was tested in a pilot-study which involved 19 students of a regular class (grade 13) of an Italian school. The data analysis showed that the students were in their "regime of competence" for grasping subtle nuances of the materials and for providing important hints for revising them. In particular, students' reactions brought into light the need of clarifying the "foundational" character that symmetry attained in twentieth-century physics. The delicate step of re-thinking the materials required the researchers to articulate the complex relationship between researches on physics teaching, history and philosophy of physics. This analytic phase resulted in a version of the materials which implies the students to be guided to grasp the meaning of symmetry as normative principle in twentieth-century physics, throughout the exploration of the different meanings assumed by symmetry over time. The whole process led also to the production of an essential, on-line version, of the materials targeted to a wider audience.

  17. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Galic, H.; Armstrong, F.E.; von Przewoski, B.

    1994-08-01

    This report contains summaries of 568 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1988 are excluded. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, INS (Tokyo), ITEP (Moscow), IUCF (Bloomington), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  18. Current experiments in elementary-particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, C. G.; Armstrong, F. E.; Rittenberg, A.

    1983-03-01

    Microfiche are included which contain summaries of 479 experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments are included at the following laboratories: Brookhaven (ENL); CERN; DESY; Fermilab. (FNAL); Institute for Nuclear Studies (INS); KEK; LAMPF; Serpukhov (SERP); SIN; SLAC; and TRIUMP. Also, summries of proton decay experiments are included. A list of experiments and titles is included; and a beam-target-momentum index and a spokesperson index are given. Properties of beams at the facilities are tabulated.

  19. Current experiments in particle physics - particle data group

    SciTech Connect

    Galic, H.; Lehar, F.; Kettle, P.R.

    1996-09-01

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  20. Charting the Course for Elementary Particle Physics

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Richter, B.

    2007-02-16

    "It was the best of times; it was the worst of times" is the way Dickens begins the Tale of Two Cities. The line is appropriate to our time in particle physics. It is the best of times because we are in the midst of a revolution in understanding, the third to occur during my career. It is the worst of times because accelerator facilities are shutting down before new ones are opening, restricting the opportunity for experiments, and because of great uncertainty about future funding. My task today is to give you a view of the most important opportunities for our field under a scenario that is constrained by a tight budget. It is a time when we cannot afford the merely good, but must give first priority to the really important. The defining theme of particle physics is to learn what the universe is made of and how it all works. This definition spans the full range of size from the largest things to the smallest things. This particle physics revolution has its origins in experiments that look at both.

  1. Charting the Course for Elementary Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Burton

    2007-02-20

    ''It was the best of times; it was the worst of times'' is the way Dickens begins the Tale of Two Cities. The line is appropriate to our time in particle physics. It is the best of times because we are in the midst of a revolution in understanding, the third to occur during my career. It is the worst of times because accelerator facilities are shutting down before new ones are opening, restricting the opportunity for experiments, and because of great uncertainty about future funding. My task today is to give you a view of the most important opportunities for our field under a scenario that is constrained by a tight budget. It is a time when we cannot afford the merely good, but must give first priority to the really important. The defining theme of particle physics is to learn what the universe is made of and how it all works. This definition spans the full range of size from the largest things to the smallest things. This particle physics revolution has its origins in experiments that look at both.

  2. The Coming Revolutions in Particle Physics

    ScienceCinema

    Quigg, Chris

    2016-07-12

    Wonderful opportunities await particle physics over the next decade, with new instruments and experiments poised to explore the frontiers of high energy, infinitesimal distances, and exquisite rarity. We look forward to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN to explore the 1-TeV scale (extending efforts at LEP and the Tevatron to unravel the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking) and many initiatives to develop our understanding of the problem of identity: what makes a neutrino a neutrino and a top quark a top quark. We suspect that the detection of proton decay is only a few orders of magnitude away in sensitivity. Astronomical observations should help to tell us what kinds of matter and energy make up the universe. We might even learn to read experiment for clues about the dimensionality of spacetime. If we are inventive enough, we may be able to follow this rich menu with the physics opportunities offered by a linear electron-positron collider and a (muon storage ring) neutrino factory. I expect a remarkable flowering of experimental particle physics, and of theoretical physics that engages with experiment.

  3. Teaching Elementary Particle Physics: Part I1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, Art

    2011-01-01

    I'll outline suggestions for teaching elementary particle physics, often called high energy physics, in high school or introductory college courses for non-scientists or scientists. Some presentations of this topic simply list the various particles along with their properties, with little overarching structure. Such a laundry list approach is a great way to make a fascinating topic meaningless. Students need a conceptual framework from which to view the elementary particles. That conceptual framework is quantum field theory (QFT). Teachers and students alike tend to quake at this topic, but bear with me. We're talking here about concepts, not technicalities. My approach will be conceptual and suitable for non-scientists and scientists; if mathematical details are added in courses for future scientists, they should be simple and sparse. Introductory students should not be expected to do QFT, but only to understand its concepts. Those concepts take some getting used to, but they are simple and can be understood by any literate person, be she plumber, attorney, musician, or physicist.

  4. Summary of the particle physics and technology working group

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan Lammel et al.

    2002-12-10

    Progress in particle physics has been tightly related to technological advances during the past half century. Progress in technologies has been driven in many cases by the needs of particle physics. Often, these advances have benefited fields beyond particle physics: other scientific fields, medicine, industrial development, and even found commercial applications. The particle physics and technology working group of Snowmass 2001 reviewed leading-edge technologies recently developed or in the need of development for particle physics. The group has identified key areas where technological advances are vital for progress in the field, areas of opportunities where particle physics may play a principle role in fostering progress, and areas where advances in other fields may directly benefit particle physics. The group has also surveyed the technologies specifically developed or enhanced by research in particle physics that benefit other fields and/or society at large.

  5. The Underlying Physics in Wetted Particle Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, Carly; Hrenya, Christine; Davis, Robert

    2008-11-01

    Wetted granular particles are relevant in many industries including the pharmaceutical and chemical industries and has applications to granulation, filtration, coagulation, spray coating, drying and pneumatic transport. In our current focus, we investigate the dynamics of a three-body normal wetted particle collision. In order to conduct collisions we use an apparatus called a ``Stokes Cradle,'' similar to the Newton's Cradle (desktop toy) except that the target particles are covered with oil. Here, we are able to vary the oil thickness, oil viscosity, and material properties. With a three particle collision there are four possible outcomes: fully agglomerated (FA); Newton's Cradle (NC), the striker and the first target ball are agglomerated and the last target ball is separated; Reverse Newton's Cradle (RNC), the striker is separated and the two targets are agglomerated; and fully separated (FS). Varying the properties of the collisions, we have observed all four outcomes. We use elastohydrodynamics as a theoretical basis for modeling the system. We also have considered the glass transition of the oil as the pressure increases upon impact and the cavitation of the oil as the pressure drops below the vapor pressure upon rebound. A toy model has been developed where the collision is modeled as a series of two-body collisions. A qualitative agreement between the toy model and experiments gives insight into the underlying physics.

  6. TOPICS IN THE PHYSICS OF PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1984-07-01

    High energy physics, perhaps more than any other branch of science, is driven by technology. It is not the development of theory, or consideration of what measurements to make, which are the driving elements in our science. Rather it is the development of new technology which is the pacing item. Thus it is the development of new techniques, new computers, and new materials which allows one to develop new detectors and new particle-handling devices. It is the latter, the accelerators, which are at the heart of the science. Without particle accelerators there would be, essentially, no high energy physics. In fact. the advances in high energy physics can be directly tied to the advances in particle accelerators. Looking terribly briefly, and restricting one's self to recent history, the Bevatron made possible the discovery of the anti-proton and many of the resonances, on the AGS was found the {mu}-neutrino, the J-particle and time reversal non-invariance, on Spear was found the {psi}-particle, and, within the last year the Z{sub 0} and W{sup {+-}} were seen on the CERN SPS p-{bar p} collider. Of course one could, and should, go on in much more detail with this survey, but I think there is no need. It is clear that as better acceleration techniques were developed more and more powerful machines were built which, as a result, allowed high energy physics to advance. What are these techniques? They are very sophisticated and ever-developing. The science is very extensive and many individuals devote their whole lives to accelerator physics. As high energy experimental physicists your professional lives will be dominated by the performance of 'the machine'; i.e. the accelerator. Primarily you will be frustrated by the fact that it doesn't perform better. Why not? In these lectures, six in all, you should receive some appreciation of accelerator physics. We cannot, nor do we attempt, to make you into accelerator physicists, but we do hope to give you some insight into the

  7. Physical Particle Representation and Generalized Transformation Theory

    PubMed Central

    Prigogine, I.; George, Cl.; Henin, F.; Mandel, P.; Turner, J. W.

    1970-01-01

    The investigation of the recently described generalized transformation theory which leads to a non-Hamiltonian description of dynamics is pursued. The concept of generalized unitary transformations of superoperators is introduced and a specific class of transformations studied. For nondissipative systems it is equivalent to the usual unitary transformations that diagonalize the Hamiltonian. The important point is that this class of transformations remains meaningful for dissipative systems, hence a new representation of dynamics that we shall call the „physical particle” representation. It has the following properties: (a) The energy (or an arbitrary function of the energy) is represented by a diagonal matrix. (b) In the (0)II space (see these Proceedings, 65, 789 (1970)) corresponding to the coherent processes, the evolution can be described in terms of the changes in population of the physical particles. (c) At thermodynamic equilibrium, the physical particles are uncorrelated and behave as independent entities; the entropy has a purely combinatorial meaning. A full description of dynamics in this representation will be given in a forth-coming paper. PMID:16578707

  8. The Particle Physics Data Grid. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Livny, Miron

    2002-08-16

    The main objective of the Particle Physics Data Grid (PPDG) project has been to implement and evaluate distributed (Grid-enabled) data access and management technology for current and future particle and nuclear physics experiments. The specific goals of PPDG have been to design, implement, and deploy a Grid-based software infrastructure capable of supporting the data generation, processing and analysis needs common to the physics experiments represented by the participants, and to adapt experiment-specific software to operate in the Grid environment and to exploit this infrastructure. To accomplish these goals, the PPDG focused on the implementation and deployment of several critical services: reliable and efficient file replication service, high-speed data transfer services, multisite file caching and staging service, and reliable and recoverable job management services. The focus of the activity was the job management services and the interplay between these services and distributed data access in a Grid environment. Software was developed to study the interaction between HENP applications and distributed data storage fabric. One key conclusion was the need for a reliable and recoverable tool for managing large collections of interdependent jobs. An attached document provides an overview of the current status of the Directed Acyclic Graph Manager (DAGMan) with its main features and capabilities.

  9. Strange Particles and Heavy Ion Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bassalleck, Bernd; Fields, Douglas

    2016-04-28

    This very long-running grant has supported many experiments in nuclear and particle physics by a group from the University of New Mexico. The gamut of these experiments runs from many aspects of Strangeness Nuclear Physics, to rare Kaon decays, to searches for exotic Hadrons such as Pentaquark or H-Dibaryon, and finally to Spin Physics within the PHENIX collaboration at RHIC. These experiments were performed at a number of laboratories worldwide: first and foremost at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL), but also at CERN, KEK, and most recently at J-PARC. In this Final Technical Report we summarize progress and achievements for this award since our last Progress Report, i.e. for the period of fall 2013 until the award’s termination on November 30, 2015. The report consists of two parts, representing our two most recent experimental efforts, participation in the Nucleon Spin Physics program of the PHENIX experiment at RHIC, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL – Task 1, led by Douglas Fields; and participation in several Strangeness Nuclear Physics experiments at J-PARC, the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Center in Tokai-mura, Japan – Task 2, led by Bernd Bassalleck.

  10. Tests of the particle physics-physical cosmology interface

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N. |

    1993-01-01

    Three interrelated interfaces of particle physics and physical cosmology are discussed: (1) inflation and other phase transitions; (2) Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (and also the quark-hadron transition); and (3) structure formation (including dark matter). Recent observations that affect each of these topics are discussed. Topic number 1 is shown to be consistent with the COBE observations but not proven and it may be having problems with some age-expansion data. Topic number 2 has now been well-tested and is an established ``pillar`` of the Big Bang. Topic number 3 is the prime arena of current physical cosmological activity. Experiments to resolve the current exciting, but still ambiguous, situation following the COBE results are discussed.

  11. Tests of the particle physics-physical cosmology interface

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1993-01-01

    Three interrelated interfaces of particle physics and physical cosmology are discussed: (1) inflation and other phase transitions; (2) Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (and also the quark-hadron transition); and (3) structure formation (including dark matter). Recent observations that affect each of these topics are discussed. Topic number 1 is shown to be consistent with the COBE observations but not proven and it may be having problems with some age-expansion data. Topic number 2 has now been well-tested and is an established pillar'' of the Big Bang. Topic number 3 is the prime arena of current physical cosmological activity. Experiments to resolve the current exciting, but still ambiguous, situation following the COBE results are discussed.

  12. School on Particle Physics, Gravity and Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenberger, Robert

    These lectures present a brief review of inflationary cosmology, provide an overview of the theory of cosmological perturbations, and then focus on the conceptual problems of the current paradigm of early universe cosmology, thus motivating an exploration of the potential of string theory to provide a new paradigm. Specifically, the string gas cosmology model is introduced, and a resulting mechanism for structure formation which does not require a period of cosmological inflation is discussed. The School consisted of level-up courses intended for PhD students, as well as updating courses for postdocs and researchers. In addition, a few propaedeutical crash courses were organized to bridge the gaps in the attendance and to facilitate an active participation. The courses were held mostly on the blackboard. The audience was assumed to have at least a PhD student level either in phenomenological particle theory, in astroparticle physics or in field and string theory. One of the aims of the School was to bring together researchers of these different areas and to update them on one another's discipline. The School was divided in two workshops: Interface between Cosmology and Particle Physics Courses: W. GRIMUS and S. PETCOV: Neutrino Phenomenology A. MASIERO and F. FERUGLIO: Beyond the Standard Model P. ULLIO: Introduction to Dark Matter N. BILIC: Black holes phenomenology 2) Particle Physics, Gravity and String Theory Courses: R. BRANDENBERGER: Topics in Cosmology J. ZANELLI: Black holes physics C. NUNEZ: StringsGauge Correspondence A. JEVICKI: AdS/CFT G. DALL'AGATA: String vacua and moduli stabilization C. BURGESS: Cosmology and Strings G. CARDOSO: Black Holes and String Theory Seminars were held during the School: Seminars: D. DENEGRI: New physics at LHC D. WARK: Neutrino Experiments C. BACCIGALUPI: Review on Cosmological Experiments A. MUELLER: Experimental evidence of Black Holes S. LIBERATI: Astrophysical constraints on Lorentz violation In addition the following

  13. Particle Physics: A New Course for Schools and Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinbank, Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    Considers questions relating to the introduction of particle physics into post-GCSE (General Certificate of Secondary Education) courses. Describes a project that is producing teacher and student materials to support the teaching of particle physics at this level. Presents a proposed syllabus for a particle physics module. (KR)

  14. Particle Physics: A New Course for Schools and Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinbank, Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    Considers questions relating to the introduction of particle physics into post-GCSE (General Certificate of Secondary Education) courses. Describes a project that is producing teacher and student materials to support the teaching of particle physics at this level. Presents a proposed syllabus for a particle physics module. (KR)

  15. Particle Physics Probes of Extra Spacetime Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, JoAnne L

    2002-05-13

    The possibility that spacetime is extended beyond the familiar 3+1-dimensions has intrigued physicists for a century. Indeed, the consequences of a dimensionally richer spacetime would be profound. Recently, new theories with higher dimensional spacetimes have been developed to resolve the hierarchy problem in particle physics. These scenarios make distinct predictions which allow for experiment to probe the existence of extra dimensions in new ways. We review the conceptual framework of these scenarios, their implications in collider and short-range gravity experiments, their astrophysical and cosmological effects, as well as the constraints placed on these models from present data.

  16. Current Experiments in Particle Physics. 1996 Edition.

    SciTech Connect

    Galic, Hrvoje

    2003-06-27

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  17. (Medium energy particle physics): Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Nefkens, B.M.K.

    1985-10-01

    Investigations currently carried out by the UCLA Particle Physics Research Group can be arranged into four programs: Pion-Nucleon Scattering; Tests of Charge Symmetry and Isospin Invariance; Light Nuclei (Strong Form Factors of /sup 3/H, /sup 3/He, /sup 4/He; Detailed Balance in pd /r reversible/ /gamma//sup 3/H; Interaction Dynamics); and Search for the Rare Decay /Mu//sup +/ /yields/ e/sup +/ + /gamma/ (MEGA). The general considerations which led to the choice of physics problems investigated by our group are given in the next section. We also outline the scope of the research being done which includes over a dozen experiments. The main body of this report details the research carried out in the past year, the status of various experiments, and new projects.

  18. Particle physics in the very early universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, D. N.

    1981-01-01

    Events in the very early big bang universe in which elementary particle physics effects may have been dominant are discussed, with attention to the generation of a net baryon number by way of grand unification theory, and emphasis on the possible role of massive neutrinos in increasing current understanding of various cosmological properties and of the constraints placed on neutrino properties by cosmology. It is noted that when grand unification theories are used to describe very early universe interactions, an initially baryon-symmetrical universe can evolve a net baryon excess of 10 to the -9th to 10 to the -11th per photon, given reasonable parameters. If neutrinos have mass, the bulk of the mass of the universe may be in the form of leptons, implying that the form of matter most familiar to physical science may not be the dominant form of matter in the universe.

  19. Particle physics in the very early universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, D. N.

    1981-01-01

    Events in the very early big bang universe in which elementary particle physics effects may have been dominant are discussed, with attention to the generation of a net baryon number by way of grand unification theory, and emphasis on the possible role of massive neutrinos in increasing current understanding of various cosmological properties and of the constraints placed on neutrino properties by cosmology. It is noted that when grand unification theories are used to describe very early universe interactions, an initially baryon-symmetrical universe can evolve a net baryon excess of 10 to the -9th to 10 to the -11th per photon, given reasonable parameters. If neutrinos have mass, the bulk of the mass of the universe may be in the form of leptons, implying that the form of matter most familiar to physical science may not be the dominant form of matter in the universe.

  20. Physics through the 1990s: Elementary-particle physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The volume begins with a non-mathematical discussion of the motivation behind, and basic ideas of, elementary-particle physics theory and experiment. The progress over the past two decades with the quark model and unification of the electromagnetic and weak interactions is reviewed. Existing theoretical problems in the field, such as the origin of mass and the unification of the fundamental forces, are detailed, along with experimental programs to test the new theories. Accelerators, instrumentation, and detectors are described for both current and future facilities. Interactions with other areas of both theoretical and applied physics are presented. The sociology of the field is examined regarding the education of graduate students, the organization necessary in large-scale experiments, and the decision-making process involved in high-cost experiments. Finally, conclusions and recommendations for maintaining US excellence in theory and experiment are given. Appendices list both current and planned accelerators, and present statistical data on the US elementary-particle physics program. A glossary is included.

  1. Physics through the 1990s: Elementary-particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The volume begins with a non-mathematical discussion of the motivation behind, and basic ideas of, elementary-particle physics theory and experiment. The progress over the past two decades with the quark model and unification of the electromagnetic and weak interactions is reviewed. Existing theoretical problems in the field, such as the origin of mass and the unification of the fundamental forces, are detailed, along with experimental programs to test the new theories. Accelerators, instrumentation, and detectors are described for both current and future facilities. Interactions with other areas of both theoretical and applied physics are presented. The sociology of the field is examined regarding the education of graduate students, the organization necessary in large-scale experiments, and the decision-making process involved in high-cost experiments. Finally, conclusions and recommendations for maintaining US excellence in theory and experiment are given. Appendices list both current and planned accelerators, and present statistical data on the US elementary-particle physics program. A glossary is included.

  2. Particle physics and cosmology in supersymmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrissey, David Edgar

    The Standard Model (SM) of particle physics provides an excellent description of the elementary particle interactions observed in particle collider experiments, but the model does less well when it is applied to cosmology. Recent measurements of the Universe over very large distances indicate the existence of non-luminous dark matter and an excess of baryons over anti-baryons. The SM is unable to account for either of these results, implying that an extension of the SM description is needed. One such extension is supersymmetry. Within the minimal supersymmetric version of the SM, the MSSM, the lightest superpartner particle can make up the dark matter, and the baryon asymmetry can be generated by the mechanism of electroweak baryogenesis (EWBG). In this work, we examine these issues together in order to find out whether the MSSM can account for both of them simultaneously. We find that the MSSM can explain both the baryon asymmetry and the dark matter, but only over a very constrained region of the model parameter space. The strongest constraints on this scenario come from the lower bound on the Higgs boson mass, and the upper bound on the electric dipole moment of the electron. Moreover, upcoming experiments will probe the remaining allowed parameter space in the near future. Some of these constraints may be relaxed by going beyond the MSSM. With this in mind, we also investigate the nMSSM, a minimal singlet extension of the MSSM. We find that this model can also explain both the dark matter and the baryon asymmetry.

  3. Research in particle physics. [Dept. of Physics, Boston Univ

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, Scott J.

    1992-09-01

    Research accomplishments and current activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics are presented. Principal areas of activity include the following: detectors for studies of electron[endash]positron annihilation in colliding beams; advanced accelerator component design, including the superconducting beam inflector, electrostatic quadrupoles, and the electrostatic muon kicker''; the detector for the MACRO (Monopole, Astrophysics, and Cosmic Ray Observatory) experiment; neutrino astrophysics and the search for proton decay; theoretical particle physics (electroweak and flavor symmetry breaking, hadron collider phenomenology, cosmology and astrophysics, new field-theoretic models, nonperturbative investigations of quantum field theories, electroweak interactions); measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon; calorimetry for the GEM experiment; and muon detectors for the GEM experiment at the Superconducting Super Collider.

  4. Experimental particle physics. [Dept. of Physics, Drexel Univ

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, R.I.; Lane, C.E.

    1992-09-01

    The goals of this research are the experimental testing of fundamental theories of physics beyond the standard model and the exploration of cosmic phenomena through the techniques of particle physics. We are working on the MACRO experiment, which employs a large-area underground detector to search fore grand unification magnetic monopoles and dark matter candidates and to study cosmic ray muons as well as low- and high-energy neutrinos; the Chooz experiment to search for reactor neutrino oscillations at a distance of 1 km from the source; a new proposal (the Perry experiment) to construct a one-kiloton liquid scintillator in the Fairport, Ohio underground facility IMB to study neutrino oscillations with a 13 km baseline; and development of technology for improved liquid scintillators and for very-low-background materials in support of the MACRO and Perry experiments and for new solar neutrino experiments.

  5. Topics in particle physics and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Stephen D.H.

    1991-08-02

    The Standard Model of particle physics, together with the Big Bang model of the early universe, constitute a framework which encompasses our current understanding of fundamental laws and beginning of our universe. Despite recent speculative trends, quantum field theory remains the theoretical tool of choice for investigating new physics either at high energy colliders, or in the early universe. In this dissertation, several field theoretic phenomena relevant to cosmology or particle physics are explored. A common theme in these explorations is the structure of the vacuum state in quantum field theory. First, we discuss first-order phase transitions in the early universe, in which the effective vacuum state of the universe shifts discontinuously as the temperature drops below some critical point. We find that the dynamics of a certain type of first-order phase transition can lead to production of primordial black holes, which could constitute the dark matter of our universe. Alternatively, supercooled first-order phase transitions may be the cause of an extended inflationary epoch in the early universe, which is generally regarded as necessary to solve several cosmological puzzles. We derive limits on such scenarios based on nearly model-independent percolation properties of the transition. We also study some nonperturbative aspects of the field theory vacuum. We show that non-topological solitons of a single fermion and Higgs fields can only exist in strongly coupled theories. In particular, we find that at the lowest fermionic excitations in the Standard Model are single fermions, and not bound states of fermion plugs Higgs. Finally, we investigate the intriguing behavior of instanton-induced cross sections. We discover Higgs-Higgs cross sections which increase exponentially with center of mass energy due to the presence of instanton solutions related to vacuum instability.

  6. Matter and Interactions: A Particle Physics Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organtini, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    In classical mechanics, matter and fields are completely separated; matter interacts with fields. For particle physicists this is not the case; both matter and fields are represented by particles. Fundamental interactions are mediated by particles exchanged between matter particles. In this article we explain why particle physicists believe in…

  7. Matter and Interactions: A Particle Physics Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organtini, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    In classical mechanics, matter and fields are completely separated; matter interacts with fields. For particle physicists this is not the case; both matter and fields are represented by particles. Fundamental interactions are mediated by particles exchanged between matter particles. In this article we explain why particle physicists believe in…

  8. Exceptional quantum geometry and particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois-Violette, Michel

    2016-11-01

    Based on an interpretation of the quark-lepton symmetry in terms of the unimodularity of the color group SU (3) and on the existence of 3 generations, we develop an argumentation suggesting that the "finite quantum space" corresponding to the exceptional real Jordan algebra of dimension 27 (the Euclidean Albert algebra) is relevant for the description of internal spaces in the theory of particles. In particular, the triality which corresponds to the 3 off-diagonal octonionic elements of the exceptional algebra is associated to the 3 generations of the Standard Model while the representation of the octonions as a complex 4-dimensional space C ⊕C3 is associated to the quark-lepton symmetry (one complex for the lepton and 3 for the corresponding quark). More generally it is suggested that the replacement of the algebra of real functions on spacetime by the algebra of functions on spacetime with values in a finite-dimensional Euclidean Jordan algebra which plays the role of "the algebra of real functions" on the corresponding almost classical quantum spacetime is relevant in particle physics. This leads us to study the theory of Jordan modules and to develop the differential calculus over Jordan algebras (i.e. to introduce the appropriate notion of differential forms). We formulate the corresponding definition of connections on Jordan modules.

  9. Particle physics---Experimental. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, J.J.; Boynton, P.E.; Burnett, T.H.; Wilkes, R.J.

    1991-08-21

    We are continuing a research program in particle astrophysics and high energy experimental particle physics. We have joined the DUMAND Collaboration, which is constructing a deep undersea astrophysical neutrino detector near Hawaii. Studies of high energy hadronic interactions using emulsion chamber techniques were also continued, using balloon flight exposures to ultra-high cosmic ray nuclei (JACEE) and accelerator beams. As members of the DUMAND Collaboration, we have responsibility for development a construction of critical components for the deep undersea neutrino detector facility. We have designed and developed the acoustical positioning system required to permit reconstruction of muon tracks with sufficient precision to meet the astrophysical goals of the experiment. In addition, we are making significant contributions to the design of the database and triggering system to be used. Work has been continuing in other aspects of the study of multiparticle production processes in nuclei. We are participants in a joint US/Japan program to study nuclear interactions at energies two orders of magnitude greater than those of existing accelerators, using balloon-borne emulsion chambers. On one of the flights we found two nuclear interactions of multiplicity over 1000 -- one with a multiplicity of over 2000 and pseudorapidity density {approximately} 800 in the central region. At the statistical level of the JACEE experiment, the frequency of occurrence of such events is orders of magnitude too large. We have continued our ongoing program to study hadronic interactions in emulsions exposed to high energy accelerator beams.

  10. Particle Physics on the Eve of Lhc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studenikin, Alexander I.

    2009-01-01

    Fundamentals of particle physics. The quantum number of color, colored quarks and dynamic models of Hadrons composed of quasifree quarks / V. Matveev, A. Tavkhelidze. Discovery of the color degree of freedom in particle physics: a personal perspective / O. W. Greenberg. The evolution of the concepts of energy, momentum, and mass from Newton and Lomonosov to Einstein and Feynman / L. Okun -- Physics at accelerators and studies in SM and beyond. Search for new physics at LHC (CMS) / N. Krasnikov. Measuring the Higgs Boson(s) at ATLAS / C. Kourkoumelis. Beyond the standard model physics reach of the ATLAS experiment / G. Unel. The status of the International Linear Collider / B. Foster. Review of results of the electron-proton collider HERA / V. Chekelian. Recent results from the Tevatron on CKM matrix elements from Bs oscillations and single top production, and studies of CP violation in Bs Decays / J. P. Fernández. Direct observation of the strange b Barion [symbol] / L. Vertogradov. Search for new physics in rare B Decays at LHCb / V. Egorychev. CKM angle measurements at LHCb / S. Barsuk. Collider searches for extra spatial dimensions and black holes / G. Landsberg -- Neutrino Physics. Results of the MiniBooNE neutrino oscillation experiment / Z. Djurcic. MINOS results and prospects / J. P. Ochoa-Ricoux. The new result of the neutrino magnetic moment measurement in the GEMMA experiment / A. G. Beda ... [et al.]. The Baikal neutrino experiment: status, selected physics results, and perspectives / V. Aynutdinov ... [et al.]. Neutrino telescopes in the deep sea / V. Flaminio. Double beta decay: present status / A. S. Barabash. Beta-beams / C. Volpe. T2K experiment / K. Sakashita. Non-standard neutrino physics probed by Tokai-to-Kamioka-Korea two-detector complex / N. Cipriano Ribeiro ... [et al.]. Sterile neutrinos: from cosmology to the LHC / F. Vannucci. From Cuoricino to Cuore towards the inverted hierarchy region / C. Nones. The MARE experiment: calorimetric

  11. Particle astronomy and particle physics from the moon - The particle observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas L.

    1990-01-01

    Promising experiments from the moon using particle detectors are discussed, noting the advantage of the large flux collecting power Pc offered by the remote, stable environment of a lunar base. An observatory class of particle experiments is presented, based upon proposals at NASA's recent Stanford workshop. They vary from neutrino astronomy, particle astrophysics, and cosmic ray experiments to space physics and fundamental physics experiments such as proton decay and 'table-top' arrays. This research is background-limited on earth, and it is awkward and unrealistic in earth orbit, but is particularly suited for the moon where Pc can be quite large and the instrumentation is not subject to atmospheric erosion as it is (for large t) in low earth orbit.

  12. Particle astronomy and particle physics from the moon - The particle observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas L.

    1990-01-01

    Promising experiments from the moon using particle detectors are discussed, noting the advantage of the large flux collecting power Pc offered by the remote, stable environment of a lunar base. An observatory class of particle experiments is presented, based upon proposals at NASA's recent Stanford workshop. They vary from neutrino astronomy, particle astrophysics, and cosmic ray experiments to space physics and fundamental physics experiments such as proton decay and 'table-top' arrays. This research is background-limited on earth, and it is awkward and unrealistic in earth orbit, but is particularly suited for the moon where Pc can be quite large and the instrumentation is not subject to atmospheric erosion as it is (for large t) in low earth orbit.

  13. Particle Physics in a Season of Change

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2012-02-01

    A digest of the authors opening remarks at the 2011 Hadron Collider Physics Symposium. I have chosen my title to reflect the transitions we are living through, in particle physics overall and in hadron collider physics in particular. Data-taking has ended at the Tevatron, with {approx} 12 fb{sup -1} of {bar p}p interactions delivered to CDF and D0 at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The Large Hadron Collider has registered a spectacular first full-year run, with ATLAS and CMS seeing > 5 fb{sup -1}, LHCb recording {approx} 1 fb{sup -1}, and ALICE logging nearly 5 pb{sup -1} of pp data at {radical}s = 7 TeV, plus a healthy dose of Pb-Pb collisions. The transition to a new energy regime and new realms of instantaneous luminosity exceeding 3.5 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} has brought the advantage of enhanced physics reach and the challenge of pile-up reaching {approx} 15 interactions per beam crossing. I am happy to record that what the experiments have (not) found so far has roused some of my theoretical colleagues from years of complacency and stimulated them to think anew about what the TeV scale might hold. We theorists have had plenty of time to explore many proposals for electroweak symmetry breaking and for new physics that might lie beyond established knowledge. With so many different theoretical inventions in circulation, it is in the nature of things that most will be wrong. Keep in mind that we learn from what experiment tells us is not there, even if it is uncommon to throw a party for ruling something out. Some non-observations may be especially telling: the persistent absence of flavor-changing neutral currents, for example, seems to me more and more an important clue that we have not yet deciphered. It is natural that the search for the avatar of electroweak symmetry breaking preoccupies participants and spectators alike. But it is essential to conceive the physics opportunities before us in their full richness. I would advocate a three-fold approach

  14. The Physical Principles of Particle Detectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Goronwy Tudor

    1991-01-01

    Describes the use of a particle detector, an instrument that records the passage of particles through it, to determine the mass of a particle by measuring the particles momentum, speed, and kinetic energy. An appendix discusses the limits on the impact parameter. (MDH)

  15. Research accomplishments and future goals in particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, J.S.

    1990-01-05

    This document presents our proposal to continue the activities of Boston University researchers in eight projects in high energy physics research: Colliding Beams Physics; Accelerator Design Physics; MACRO Project; Proton Decay Project; Theoretical Particle Physics; Muon G-2 Project; and Hadron Collider Physics. The scope of each of these projects is presented in detail in this paper.

  16. Particle physics: CP violation in hyperon decays

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, Michael J.

    2000-10-31

    The primary research activities under this grant were in E871 (HyperCP) at Fermilab, a search for CP violation in hyperon decays which completed data taking in January, 2000. HyperCP is an experiment designed to perform a sensitive search for direct CP violation in the decays of cascade ({Xi}) and {Lambda} hyperons by looking for an asymmetry between particle and antiparticle decay parameters. The experiment is expected to achieve a sensitivity {approx}10{sup -4} in the decay parameters. Standard model predictions for this CP-violating asymmetry range from 0.3 to 5 x 10{sup -4}. A difference between the decay parameters for particle and antiparticle is direct evidence that CP symmetry is violated. A non-zero asymmetry would be the first evidence for CP violation outside of the K{sup o} system. Recent results from KTeV indicate a direct CP violation in K{sup o} decays, which suggests that CP violation will appear in other decays. In addition, we will look at a number of rare hyperon decays involving muons. These probe important new physics topics such as Majorana neutrinos and lepton number violating processes. The latter are of great current interest because new evidence for neutrino oscillations indicate lepton flavor violation does occur. Our data will lead to an improvement in the limits on branching ratios for these processes typically by three to four orders-of-magnitude. The muon detector construction and data resulting from it have been the responsibility of the Michigan group. We are now leading the analysis of the rare muon-related decay modes, and were responsible for the muon system and beam monitor upgrades for the 1999 run.

  17. Two Decades of Mexican Particle Physics at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, R.

    2003-06-01

    This report is a view from Fermilab of Mexican particle physics at the Laboratory since about 1980; it is not intended to be a history of Mexican particle physics: that topic is outside the expertise of the writer. The period 1980 to the present coincides with the growth of Mexican experimental particle physics from essentially no activity to its current state where Mexican groups take part in experiments at several of the world's major laboratories.

  18. Ring particles - Collisional interactions and physical nature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.; Chapman, C. R.; Davis, D. R.; Greenberg, R.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the properties of, and dynamical processes affecting individual particles of Saturn's rings. Because particles tend to be gravitationally bound when located on the surfaces of larger particles, and since net tidal stresses within the particles are small, particle collisions should produce accretion in Saturn's rings. Rapid accretionary processes within the rings are counterbalanced by tidal disruption of the larger accreted aggregates, which are presently designated 'dynamic ephemeral bodies'. The coefficient of restitution is probably very low, implying that the large particles containing most of the rings' mass are in a monolayer, although the small particles responsible for most of the rings' visible cross section form a layer many particles thick. Kinematic viscosity and interparticle erosive process models should incorporate these properties.

  19. Energy related applications of elementary particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rafelski, J.

    1989-10-30

    Study of muon catalysis of nuclear fusion and phenomena commonly referred to as cold fusion has been central to our effort. Muon catalyzed fusion research concentrated primarily on the identification of energy efficient production of muons, and the understanding and control of the density dependence of auto-poisoning (sticking) of the catalyst. We have also developed the in-flight fusion description of the t{mu}-d reaction, and work in progress shows promise in explaining the fusion cycle anomalies and smallness of sticking as a consequence of the dominant role of such reactions. Our cold fusion work involved the exploration of numerous environments for cold fusion reactions in materials used in the heavy water electrolysis, with emphasis on reactions consistent with the conventional knowledge of nuclear physics reactions. We then considered the possibility that a previously unobserved ultra-heavy particle X{sup {minus}} is a catalyst of dd fusion, explaining the low intensity neutrons observed by Jones et. al. 29 refs.

  20. The International Particle Physics Outreach Group (ippog):. Aims and Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barney, David

    2012-08-01

    The International Particle Physics Outreach Group, IPPOG, is a network of particle physics communication and education experts. IPPOG's principle aim is to maximize the impact of education and outreach efforts related to particle physics through information exchange and the sharing of expertise. IPPOG has initiated several major European and Worldwide activities, such as the "International Particle Physics Masterclasses" where each year thousands of high school students in more than 20 countries come to one of about 120 nearby universities or research centres for a day in order to unravel the mysteries of particle physics. IPPOG has also initiated a global database of education and outreach materials, aimed at supporting other particle physicists and education professionals. The aims and activities of IPPOG will be described, as well as plans to include more countries & laboratories in the network.

  1. Teaching Elementary Particle Physics, Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Art

    2011-01-01

    In order to explain certain features of radioactive beta decay, Wolfgang Pauli suggested in 1930 that the nucleus emitted, in addition to a beta particle, another particle of an entirely new type. The hypothesized particle, dubbed the neutrino, would not be discovered experimentally for another 25 years. It's not easy to detect neutrinos, because…

  2. Teaching Elementary Particle Physics, Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Art

    2011-01-01

    In order to explain certain features of radioactive beta decay, Wolfgang Pauli suggested in 1930 that the nucleus emitted, in addition to a beta particle, another particle of an entirely new type. The hypothesized particle, dubbed the neutrino, would not be discovered experimentally for another 25 years. It's not easy to detect neutrinos, because…

  3. Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.J.; et al.

    1998-12-14

    Alpha particle physics experiments were done on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during its deuterium-tritium (DT) run from 1993-1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single-particle confinement model in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) quiescent discharges. Also, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE), and ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) waves were roughly consistent with theoretical modeling. This paper reviews what was learned and identifies what remains to be understood.

  4. Two decades of Mexican particle physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Roy Rubinstein

    2002-12-03

    This report is a view from Fermilab of Mexican particle physics at the Laboratory since about 1980; it is not intended to be a history of Mexican particle physics: that topic is outside the expertise of the writer. The period 1980 to the present coincides with the growth of Mexican experimental particle physics from essentially no activity to its current state where Mexican groups take part in experiments at several of the world's major laboratories. Soon after becoming Fermilab director in 1979, Leon Lederman initiated a program to encourage experimental physics, especially experimental particle physics, in Latin America. At the time, Mexico had significant theoretical particle physics activity, but none in experiment. Following a visit by Lederman to UNAM in 1981, a conference ''Panamerican Symposium on Particle Physics and Technology'' was held in January 1982 at Cocoyoc, Mexico, with about 50 attendees from Europe, North America, and Latin America; these included Lederman, M. Moshinsky, J. Flores, S. Glashow, J. Bjorken, and G. Charpak. Among the conference outcomes were four subsequent similar symposia over the next decade, and a formal Fermilab program to aid Latin American physics (particularly particle physics); it also influenced a decision by Mexican physicist Clicerio Avilez to switch from theoretical to experimental particle physics. The first physics collaboration between Fermilab and Mexico was in particle theory. Post-docs Rodrigo Huerta and Jose Luis Lucio spent 1-2 years at Fermilab starting in 1981, and other theorists (including Augusto Garcia, Arnulfo Zepeda, Matias Moreno and Miguel Angel Perez) also spent time at the Laboratory in the 1980s.

  5. PARTICLE PHYSICS: CERN Collider Glimpses Supersymmetry--Maybe.

    PubMed

    Seife, C

    2000-07-14

    Last week, particle physicists at the CERN laboratory in Switzerland announced that by smashing together matter and antimatter in four experiments, they detected an unexpected effect in the sprays of particles that ensued. The anomaly is subtle, and physicists caution that it might still be a statistical fluke. If confirmed, however, it could mark the long-sought discovery of a whole zoo of new particles--and the end of a long-standing model of particle physics.

  6. Symmetry, conservation laws, and theoretical particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumins, Andris Visvaldis

    In this work, we trace the role of symmetry throughout the history of theoretical particle physics, paying particular attention to the role of group theory, the formal mathematics of symmetry. After an analysis of the role of conservation laws and invariance in the theory of general relativity, we move on to Weyl's gauge theory of 1918, which was developed within the context of general relativity as an attempt to unify gravitation and electromagnetism. Weyl was trying to exploit an invariance of scale, and although his theory was experimentally refuted, it provided a formulation of the conservation of charge. After the advent of quantum mechanics, gauge theory was reinterpreted by London as an invariance of the wave-function. Weyl and Wigner studied group theory in the context of quantum mechanics, but the broadness of its application had yet to be appreciated. Symmetry was soon exploited in the nuclear interactions, however, and we examine the events leading to the discovery of SU(2) of isotopic spin. We analyze how the discovery of strangeness was linked to the generalization of SU(2) to SU(3), and also how it led to a differentiation between the strong interactions, which conserve isotopic spin and strangeness, and the weak interactions, which violate these conservation laws, along with the conservation of parity. Yang and Mills were impressed with gauge invariance, and in 1954, they took the bold step of imposing it upon the Lagrangian of the strong interactions, forcing the introduction of three new gauge fields. There was a problem, however, because although the short-range of the strong interactions implied that these gauge bosons should be massive, they needed to be massless in order to preserve gauge invariance. In addition, efforts were made to extend Yang-Mills theory to the weak interactions, but they also faced the same zero-mass problem. This problem was finally solved in 1967, when Weinberg and Salam showed how gauge boson masses could be generated

  7. Particle physics. Positrons ride the wave

    DOE PAGES

    Piot, Philippe

    2015-08-26

    Here, experiments reveal that positrons — the antimatter equivalents of electrons — can be rapidly accelerated using a plasma wave. The findings pave the way to high-energy electron–positron particle colliders.

  8. Particle physics. Positrons ride the wave

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, Philippe

    2015-08-26

    Here, experiments reveal that positrons — the antimatter equivalents of electrons — can be rapidly accelerated using a plasma wave. The findings pave the way to high-energy electron–positron particle colliders.

  9. Teaching Elementary Particle Physics, Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, Art

    2011-03-01

    In order to explain certain features of radioactive beta decay, Wolfgang Pauli suggested in 1930 that the nucleus emitted, in addition to a beta particle, another particle of an entirely new type. The hypothesized particle, dubbed the neutrino, would not be discovered experimentally for another 25 years. It's not easy to detect neutrinos, because they respond to neither the EM force nor the strong force. For example, the mean free path (average penetration distance before it interacts) of a typical beta-decay neutrino moving through solid lead is about 1.5 light years! Enrico Fermi argued that neutrinos indicated a new force was at work. During the 1930s, he quickly adapted ideas from the developing new theory of QED to this new force, dubbed the weak force. Fermi's theory was able to predict the half-lives of beta-emitting nuclei and the range of energies of the emitted beta particles.

  10. Particle Physics Meets Cosmology -- The Search for Decaying Neutrinos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Richard C.

    1982-01-01

    Detection of neutrino decay may have profound consequences for both particle physics and cosmology, providing a deep connection between physics of the very large and physics of the very small. Describes this link and discusses the nature and status of the search for decaying neutrinos. (Author/JN)

  11. Particle Physics Meets Cosmology -- The Search for Decaying Neutrinos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Richard C.

    1982-01-01

    Detection of neutrino decay may have profound consequences for both particle physics and cosmology, providing a deep connection between physics of the very large and physics of the very small. Describes this link and discusses the nature and status of the search for decaying neutrinos. (Author/JN)

  12. MEASUREMENTS OF BLACK CARBON PARTICLES CHEMICAL, PHYSICAL, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Onasch, T.B.; Sedlacek, A.; Cross, E. S.; Davidovits, P.; Worsnop, D. R.; Ahern, A.; Lack, D. A.; Cappa, C. D.; Trimborn, A.; Freedman, A.; Olfert, J. S.; Jayne, J. T.; Massoli, P.; Williams, L. R.; Mazzoleni, C.; Schwarz, J. P.; Thornhill, D. A.; Slowik, J. G.; Kok, G. L.; Brem, B. T.; Subramanian, R.; Spackman, J. R.; Freitag, S.; and Dubey, M. K.

    2009-12-14

    Accurate measurements of the chemical, physical, and optical properties of aerosol particles containing black carbon are necessary to improve current estimates of the radiative forcing in the atmosphere. A collaborative research effort between Aerodyne Research, Inc. and Boston College has focused on conducting field and laboratory experiments on carbonaceous particles and the development and characterization of new particulate instrumentation. This presentation will focus on the chemical, physical, and optical properties of black carbon particles measured in the laboratory in order to understand the effects of atmospheric processing on black carbon particles. Results from a three-week study during July 2008 of mass- and optical-based black carbon measurements will be presented. The project utilized the Boston College laboratory flame apparatus and aerosol conditioning and characterization equipment. A pre-mixed flat flame burner operating at controlled fuel-to-air ratios produced stable and reproducible concentrations of soot particles with known sizes, morphologies, and chemical compositions. In addition, other black carbon particle types, including fullerene soot, glassy carbon spheres, oxidized flame soot, Regal black, and Aquadag, were also atomized, size selected, and sampled. The study covered an experimental matrix that systematically selected particle mobility size (30 to 300 nm) and black carbon particle mass, particle number concentration, particle shape (dynamic shape factor and fractal dimension), and particle chemistry and density (changed via coatings). Particles were coated with a measured thickness (few nm to {approx}150 nm) of sulfuric acid or bis (2-ethylhexyl) sebacate and passed through a thermal denuder to remove the coatings. Highlights of the study to be presented include: (1) Characterization of the chemical and physical properties of various types of black carbon particles, (2) Mass specific absorption measurements as a function of fuel

  13. Physical properties of soft repulsive particle fluids.

    PubMed

    Heyes, D M; Brańka, A C

    2007-11-07

    Molecular dynamics computer simulation has been applied to inverse power or soft-sphere fluids, in which the particles interact through the soft-sphere pair potential, phi(r) = epsilon(sigma/r)(n), where n measures the steepness or stiffness of the potential, and epsilon and sigma are a characteristic energy and distance, respectively. The focus of the study is on very soft particles with n values down to 4 considered, at densities up to and along the fluid-solid co-existence density. It is shown that in the soft-particle limit the local structure is dominated by the lengthscale associated with the average nearest neighbour distance of a random structure, which is proportional, variantrho(-1/3) and increasingly only very weakly dependent on n. This scaling is also manifest in the behaviour of the average energy per particle with density. The self-diffusion coefficient and shear viscosity are computed along the fluid-solid co-existence line as a function of n, for the first time. The product Deta(s) steadily increases with softness for n < 10, whereas the modified Stokes-Einstein relationship of Zwanzig, Deta(s)/rho(1/3), where rho is the number density, is within statistics constant over the same softness range. This is consistent with our observation that the static properties are determined by a characteristic lengthscale (i.e., l) which is proportional, variantrho(-1/3) in the soft-particle limit. The high frequency elastic moduli of these fluids are examined, which reveals that the mechanical properties become more 'rubbery' as the particles get softer.

  14. Precision measurement for particle physics and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Axions and other light particles are strongly motivated. For example, the axion is the crucial element in the recently proposed solution to the hierarchy problem using dynamical relaxation in the early universe. However, such particles are challenging to search for experimentally. Precision measurement technologies such as atom interferometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, high precision magnetometry, and torsion balances allow novel, highly sensitive experiments for direct detection of such light dark matter and of gravitational waves. Thus precision measurement technologies open new avenues for probing the origin and composition of the universe.

  15. (Participation in high energy physics): Task C, Particle physics and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S.

    1992-05-01

    Over the past year or so the research of our group has spanned many topics at the boundary of particle physics and cosmology. The major focus has been in the general areas of inflation, cosmological phase transitions, astrophysical constraints to particle physics theories, and dark matter/structure formation as it relates to particle physics. Narrative summaries of the research of the individual group members are given in this paper.

  16. Uses of particle identification for supercollider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, C.

    1989-05-01

    I summarize the basic characteristics of the Superconducting Super Collider and describe the experimental environment of its high- luminosity interaction regions. I then review some of the discovery possibilities opened by the SSC, with special attention to the advantages conferred by particle identification. 16 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Particle Physics Aspects of Antihydrogen Studies with ALPHA at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, M. C.; Andresen, G. B.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Bray, C. C.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Funakoshi, R.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lai, W.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; El Nasr, S. Seif; Silveira, D. M.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wasilenko, L.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-08-01

    We discuss aspects of antihydrogen studies, that relate to particle physics ideas and techniques, within the context of the ALPHA experiment at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility. We review the fundamental physics motivations for antihydrogen studies, and their potential physics reach. We argue that initial spectroscopy measurements, once antihydrogen is trapped, could provide competitive tests of CPT, possibly probing physics at the Planck Scale. We discuss some of the particle detection techniques used in ALPHA. Preliminary results from commissioning studies of a partial system of the ALPHA Si vertex detector are presented, the results of which highlight the power of annihilation vertex detection capability in antihydrogen studies.

  18. State-of-the-Art Particle Physics Detector

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer is a state-of-the-art particle physics detector being operated by an international team composed of 60 institutes from 16 countries and organized under United States...

  19. The role of supersymmetry phenomenology in particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, James D.

    2000-12-14

    Supersymmetry phenomenology is an important component of particle physics today. I provide a definition of supersymmetry phenomenology, outline the scope of its activity, and argue its legitimacy. This essay derives from a presentation given at the 2000 SLAC Summer Institute.

  20. Effective theories and thresholds in particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillard, M.K.

    1991-06-07

    The role of effective theories in probing a more fundamental underlying theory and in indicating new physics thresholds is discussed, with examples from the standard model and more speculative applications to superstring theory. 38 refs.

  1. American particle and nuclear physics planning

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, Hugh E.

    2014-10-01

    In the United States the planning process relevant to future deep inelastic scattering involves both the high energy physics and nuclear physics funding and the two communities. In Canada there is no such split between the communities. Within the past two years there have been several planning initiatives and there may be more to come. We review the current status of both the planning and the plans.

  2. Elementary particle physics and high energy phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, A.R.; Cumalat, J.P.; de Alwis, S.P.; DeGrand, T.A.; Ford, W.T.; Mahanthappa, K.T.; Nauenberg, U.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses the following research in high energy physics: the properties of the z neutral boson with the SLD detector; the research and development program for the SDC muon detector; the fixed-target k-decay experiments; the Rocky Mountain Consortium for HEP; high energy photoproduction of states containing heavy quarks; and electron-positron physics with the CLEO II and Mark II detectors. (LSP).

  3. Energetic particle physics with applications in fusion and space plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1997-05-01

    Energetic particle physics is the study of the effects of energetic particles on collective electromagnetic (EM) instabilities and energetic particle transport in plasmas. Anomalously large energetic particle transport is often caused by low frequency MHD instabilities, which are driven by these energetic particles in the presence of a much denser background of thermal particles. The theory of collective energetic particle phenomena studies complex wave-particle interactions in which particle kinetic physics involving small spatial and fast temporal scales can strongly affect the MHD structure and long-time behavior of plasmas. The difficulty of modeling kinetic-MHD multiscale coupling processes stems from the disparate scales which are traditionally analyzed separately: the macroscale MHD phenomena are studied using the fluid MHD framework, while microscale kinetic phenomena are best described by complicated kinetic theories. The authors have developed a kinetic-MHD model that properly incorporates major particle kinetic effects into the MHD fluid description. For tokamak plasmas a nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code, the NOVA-K code, has been successfully developed and applied to study problems such as the excitation of fishbone and Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) and the sawtooth stabilization by energetic ions in tokamaks. In space plasmas the authors have employed the kinetic-MHD model to study the energetic particle effects on the ballooning-mirror instability which explains the multisatellite observation of the stability and field-aligned structure of compressional Pc 5 waves in the magnetospheric ring current plasma.

  4. Quarks, Leptons, and Bosons: A Particle Physics Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagoner, Robert; Goldsmith, Donald

    1983-01-01

    Presented is a non-technical introduction to particle physics. The material is adapted from chapter 3 of "Cosmic Horizons," (by Robert Wagoner and Don Goldsmith), a lay-person's introduction to cosmology. Among the topics considered are elementary particles, forces and motion, and higher level structures. (JN)

  5. Teaching Particle Physics in the Open University's Science Foundation Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmelo, Graham

    1992-01-01

    Discusses four topics presented in the science foundation course of the Open University that exemplify current developments in particle physics, in particular, and that describe important issues about the nature of science, in general. Topics include the omega minus particle, the diversity of quarks, the heavy lepton, and the discovery of the W…

  6. Future particle-physics projects in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, D. S.

    2015-08-25

    Basic proposals of experiments aimed at precision measurements of Standard Model parameters and at searches for new particles, including dark-matter particles, are described along with future experimental projects considered by American Physical Society at the meeting in the summer of 2013 and intended for implementation within the next ten to twenty years.

  7. Teaching Particle Physics in the Open University's Science Foundation Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmelo, Graham

    1992-01-01

    Discusses four topics presented in the science foundation course of the Open University that exemplify current developments in particle physics, in particular, and that describe important issues about the nature of science, in general. Topics include the omega minus particle, the diversity of quarks, the heavy lepton, and the discovery of the W…

  8. Quarks, Leptons, and Bosons: A Particle Physics Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagoner, Robert; Goldsmith, Donald

    1983-01-01

    Presented is a non-technical introduction to particle physics. The material is adapted from chapter 3 of "Cosmic Horizons," (by Robert Wagoner and Don Goldsmith), a lay-person's introduction to cosmology. Among the topics considered are elementary particles, forces and motion, and higher level structures. (JN)

  9. Physics of compaction of fine cohesive particles.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, A; Valverde, J M; Quintanilla, M A S

    2005-02-25

    Fluidized fractal clusters of fine particles display critical-like dynamics at the jamming transition, characterized by a power law relating consolidation stress with volume fraction increment [sigma--(c) proportional, variant(Deltaphi)(beta)]. At a critical stress clusters are disrupted and there is a crossover to a logarithmic law (Deltaphi = nu logsigma--(c)) resembling the phenomenology of soils. We measure lambda identical with- partial differentialDelta(1/phi)/ partial log(sigma--(c) proportional, variant Bo(0.2)(g), where Bo(g) is the ratio of interparticle attractive force (in the fluidlike regime) to particle weight. This law suggests that compaction is ruled by the internal packing structure of the jammed clusters at nearly zero consolidation.

  10. The engineering needed for particle physics.

    PubMed

    Myers, Steve

    2012-08-28

    Today's particle accelerators and detectors are among the most complicated and expensive scientific instruments ever built, and they exploit almost every aspect of today's cutting-edge engineering technologies. In many cases, accelerator needs have been the driving force behind these new technologies, necessity being the mother of invention. This paper gives an overview of some engineering requirements for the construction and operation of present-day accelerators and detectors.

  11. Resource Letter HEPP-1: History of elementary-particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovis, R. Corby; Kragh, Helge

    1991-09-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to literature on the history of modern elementary-particle physics. Histories that treat developments from the 1930s through the 1980s are focused on and a sampling is included of the historiography covering the period c. 1890-1930, the prehistory of elementary-particle physics as a discipline. Also included are collections of scientific papers, which might be especially valuable to individuals who wish to undertake historical research on particular scientists or subfields of elementary-particle physics. The introduction presents some statistical data and associated references for elementary-particle physics and surveys historiographical approaches and issues that are represented in historical accounts in the bibliography. All references are assigned a rating of E (Elementary), I (Intermediate), or A (Advanced) based on their technical or conceptual difficulty or their appropriateness for a person attempting a graduated study of the history of modern particle physics. That is, items labeled E are suitable for the layman or would be fundamental to a beginning exploration of the history of particle physics, whereas items labeled A are technically demanding (mathematically, historiographically, or philosophically) or would be most appropriate for specialized or advanced examinations of various topics.

  12. Foundations of Nuclear and Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, T. William; Formaggio, Joseph A.; Holstein, Barry R.; Milner, Richard G.; Surrow, Bernd

    2017-03-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Symmetries; 3. Building hadrons from quarks; 4. The standard model; 5. QCD and confinement; 6. Chiral symmetry and QCD; 7. Introduction to lepton scattering; 8. Elastic electron scattering from the nucleon; 9. Hadron structure via lepton-nucleon scattering; 10. High-energy QCD; 11. The nucleon-nucleon interaction; 12. The structure and properties of few-body nuclei; 13. Overview of many-body nuclei; 14. Models of many-body nuclei; 15. Electron scattering from discrete states; 16. Electroexcitation of high-lying excitations of the nucleus; 17. Beta decay; 18. Neutrino physics; 19. The physics of relativistic heavy-ions; 20. Astrophysics; 21. Beyond the standard model physics; Appendix A. Useful information; Appendix B. Quantum theory.

  13. Elementary Particle Physics at Baylor (Final Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmann, J.R.

    2012-08-25

    This report summarizes the activities of the Baylor University Experimental High Energy Physics (HEP) group on the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment from August 15, 2005 to May 31, 2012. Led by the Principal Investigator (Dr. Jay R. Dittmann), the Baylor HEP group has actively pursued a variety of cutting-edge measurements from proton-antiproton collisions at the energy frontier.

  14. Research in theoretical and elementary particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mitselmakher, G.

    1996-12-01

    In 1995 the University of Florida started a major expansion of the High Energy Experimental Physics group (HEE) with the goal of adding four new faculty level positions to the group in two years. This proposal covers the second year of operation of the new group and gives a projection of the planned research program for the next five years, when the group expects their activities to be broader and well defined. The expansion of the HEE group started in the Fall of 1995 when Guenakh Mitselmakher was hired from Fermilab as a Full Professor. A search was then performed for two junior faculty positions. The first being a Research Scientist/Scholar position which is supported for 9 months by the University on a faculty line at the same level as Assistant Professor but without the teaching duties. The second position is that of an Assistant Professor. The search has been successfully completed and Jacobo Konigsberg from Harvard University has accepted the position of Research Scientist and Andrey Korytov from MIT has accepted the position of Assistant Professor. They will join the group in August 1996. The physics program for the new group is focused on hadron collider physics. G. Mitselmakher has been leading the CMS endcap muon project since 1994. A Korytov is the coordinator of the endcap muon chamber effort for CMS and a member of the CDF collaboration and J. Konigsberg is a member of CDF where he has participated in various physics analyses and has been coordinator of the gas calorimetry group. The group at the U. of Florida has recently been accepted as an official collaborating institution on CDF. They have been assigned the responsibility of determining the collider beam luminosity at CDF and they will also be an active participant in the design and operation of the muon detectors for the intermediate rapidity region. In addition they expect to continue their strong participation in the present and future physics analysis of the CDF data.

  15. Quantum Optics, Diffraction Theory, and Elementary Particle Physics

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Physical optics has expanded greatly in recent years. Though it remains part of the ancestry of elementary particle physics, there are once again lessons to be learned from it. I shall discuss several of these, including some that have emerged at CERN and Brookhaven.

  16. Particle physics at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebr, Jan

    2014-11-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is the largest detector of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) in the world. These particles, presumably protons or heavier nuclei of energies up to 1020 eV, initiate extensive air showers which can be detected by sampling the particles that arrive at ground level or observing the fluorescence light generated during the passage of showers through the atmosphere - the Pierre Auger Observatory employs both these techniques. As the center-of-mass energies of the first interactions in the showers can be several orders of magnitude beyond the reach of the LHC, the UHECR provide an unique opportunity to study hadronic interactions. While the uncertainty in modeling these interactions is somewhat degenerate with the unknown composition of the primary beam, interaction models can be tested using data such as the depths of the maxima of the longitudinal development of the showers or their muon content. Particular sensitivity to interaction models is achieved when several observables are combined. Moreover, using careful data selection, proton-air cross section at the c.m.s. energy of 57 TeV per nucleon-nucleon pair can be obtained.

  17. FINAL REPORT: GEOMETRY AND ELEMENTARY PARTICLE PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Isadore M.

    2008-03-04

    The effect on mathematics of collaborations between high-energy theoretical physics and modern mathematics has been remarkable. Mirror symmetry has revolutionized enumerative geometry, and Seiberg-Witten invariants have greatly simplified the study of four manifolds. And because of their application to string theory, physicists now need to know cohomology theory, characteristic classes, index theory, K-theory, algebraic geometry, differential geometry, and non-commutative geometry. Much more is coming. We are experiencing a deeper contact between the two sciences, which will stimulate new mathematics essential to the physicists’ quest for the unification of quantum mechanics and relativity. Our grant, supported by the Department of Energy for twelve years, has been instrumental in promoting an effective interaction between geometry and string theory, by supporting the Mathematical Physics seminar, postdoc research, collaborations, graduate students and several research papers.

  18. Theoretical particle physics. Progress report, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-30

    This report discusses the following topics: heavy quark physics; Chiral Perturbation theory; Skyrmions; quarkonia and nuclear matter; parity violating nuclear matrix elements; how precisely can one determine M{sub U}/M{sub D}; weak scale baryogenesis; constraints of baryogenesis form neutrino masses; majorons, double beta decay, supernova 1987A; rare decays; chiral lattice fermions; Pauli-Villars regulator and the Higgs mass bound; and Higgs and Yukawa interactions.

  19. Chapter 1: Physics with Trapped Charged Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoop, Martina; Madsen, Niels; Thompson, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Ion traps, which were first introduced in the late 1950s and early 1960s, have established themselves as indispensable tools in many areas of physics, chemistry and technology. This chapter gives a brief survey of the operating principles and development of ion traps, together with a short description of how ions are loaded and detected. This is followed by a brief account of some of the current applications of ion traps.

  20. Mean particle diameters. From statistical definition to physical understanding.

    PubMed

    Alderliesten, Maarten

    2005-01-01

    Mean particle diameters may be used to describe and to model physical, chemical, or physiological properties of products or materials containing dispersed phases. There are different notation systems for these mean diameters, which may cause much confusion. This equally applies to their nomenclature. This article introduces the Moment-Ratio definition system and evaluates briefly the ISO definition system. The ISO system appears to have serious drawbacks. Mean particle diameters can be estimated from histograms of size distributions by Summation (M-R system) and by Integration (ISO system) over the histogram intervals. Summation tends to be more accurate than Integration and is less sensitive to low values of the lower limit of size distributions. The Summation method equations are straightforward and generally applicable. The mathematical formulas of the Integration method are difficult to apply in daily practice, and their complexity may easily hide the physical background of a mean particle diameter. A coherent nomenclature system for denoting mean particle diameters is recommended. This nomenclature system does not contain any ambiguities and clearly conveys the physical meanings of mean particle diameters. This article deals also with an empirical method to select the proper type of mean diameter to describe a physical, chemical, or physiological property of a product or material containing dispersed phases. After calculation of the mean diameters from experimental data, the relationships between the product property and these mean diameters are investigated statistically. The selection method has been illustrated by two examples. The dataset of each example consists of a set of particle size distributions and the corresponding physical product properties that are influenced by the particle sizes. Hypotheses are formulated to explain the types of selected mean diameters. Sharing results from all over the world of applications of the developed selection method

  1. Particle and nuclear physics instrumentation and its broad connections

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, Marcel; Lipton, Ron; Nicholson, Howard; Shipsey, Ian

    2016-12-20

    Subatomic physics shares with other basic sciences the need to innovate, invent, and develop tools, techniques, and technologies to carry out its mission to explore the nature of matter, energy, space, and time. In some cases, entire detectors or technologies developed specifically for particle physics research have been adopted by other fields of research or in commercial applications. In most cases, however, the development of new devices and technologies by particle physics for its own research has added value to other fields of research or to applications beneficial to society by integrating them in the existing technologies. Thus, detector research and development has not only advanced the current state of technology for particle physics, but has often advanced research in other fields of science and has underpinned progress in numerous applications in medicine and national security. At the same time particle physics has profited immensely from developments in industry and applied them to great benefit for the use of particle physics detectors. Finally, this symbiotic relationship has seen strong mutual benefits with sometimes unexpected far reach.

  2. Particle and nuclear physics instrumentation and its broad connections

    DOE PAGES

    Demarteau, Marcel; Lipton, Ron; Nicholson, Howard; ...

    2016-12-20

    Subatomic physics shares with other basic sciences the need to innovate, invent, and develop tools, techniques, and technologies to carry out its mission to explore the nature of matter, energy, space, and time. In some cases, entire detectors or technologies developed specifically for particle physics research have been adopted by other fields of research or in commercial applications. In most cases, however, the development of new devices and technologies by particle physics for its own research has added value to other fields of research or to applications beneficial to society by integrating them in the existing technologies. Thus, detector researchmore » and development has not only advanced the current state of technology for particle physics, but has often advanced research in other fields of science and has underpinned progress in numerous applications in medicine and national security. At the same time particle physics has profited immensely from developments in industry and applied them to great benefit for the use of particle physics detectors. Finally, this symbiotic relationship has seen strong mutual benefits with sometimes unexpected far reach.« less

  3. Particle and nuclear physics instrumentation and its broad connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demarteau, M.; Lipton, R.; Nicholson, H.; Shipsey, I.

    2016-10-01

    Subatomic physics shares with other basic sciences the need to innovate, invent, and develop tools, techniques, and technologies to carry out its mission to explore the nature of matter, energy, space, and time. In some cases, entire detectors or technologies developed specifically for particle physics research have been adopted by other fields of research or in commercial applications. In most cases, however, the development of new devices and technologies by particle physics for its own research has added value to other fields of research or to applications beneficial to society by integrating them in the existing technologies. Thus, detector research and development has not only advanced the current state of technology for particle physics, but has often advanced research in other fields of science and has underpinned progress in numerous applications in medicine and national security. At the same time particle physics has profited immensely from developments in industry and applied them to great benefit for the use of particle physics detectors. This symbiotic relationship has seen strong mutual benefits with sometimes unexpected far reach.

  4. Black hole bombs and explosions: from astrophysics to particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Vitor

    2013-11-01

    Black holes are the elementary particles of gravity, the final state of sufficiently massive stars and of energetic collisions. With a 40-year long history, black hole physics is a fully-blossomed field which promises to embrace several branches of theoretical physics. Here I review the main developments in highly dynamical black holes with an emphasis on high energy black hole collisions and probes of particle physics via superradiance. This write-up, rather than being a collection of well known results, is intended to highlight open issues and the most intriguing results.

  5. From Particle Physics to Astroparticle Physics: Proton Decay and the Rise of Non-accelerator Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Hinrich

    The search for proton decay was motivated by simple questions about the content of the observable universe. Why is matter so stable and why do we not see antimatter of primordial origin? The symmetry of the standard model of particle physics would have required that matter and antimatter annihilated in the early universe. In 1968, Sacharov showed that the matter-antimatter asymmetry could have formed in a state of thermal non-equilibrium of the universe, as given in big bang cosmology, together with the well-confirmed C and CP violations, and proton decay. The latter phenomenon could be only investigated in large none-accelerator experiments. The SU(5) extension of the standard model implied a proton lifetime of about 1029 years. With detectors consisting of 1 000 tons of matter and located deep under the Earth surface, such as the French-German Fréjus iron-calorimeter, in the mid 1980s one expected to detect several proton decays per year. Here, we report on the way leading from accelerator laboratories to underground physics, which paradoxically enough turned out to studying cosmic rays. There has not been any evidence for the instability of protons, and lifetime limits of more than 1034 years have been obtained. However, great progress in particle physics and in the physics of cosmic rays could be achieved with neutrinos.

  6. Elementary particle physics at the University of Florida. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: theoretical elementary particle physics; experimental elementary particle physics; axion project; SSC detector development; and computer acquisition. (LSP).

  7. Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics (SCIPP)

    SciTech Connect

    Burchat, P.; Dorfan, D.; Litke, A.; Heusch, C.; Sadrozinski, H.; Schalk, T.; Seiden, A.

    1992-11-01

    Work for the coming year is a logical continuation of the efforts of the past year. Some special highlights of this past year which are discusses in more detail in this report are: (1) The move onto beamline and start of ZEUS data taking. (2) The completion of the SDC technical proposal including a detailed long-term plan for construction. (3) Continuing publication of very detailed physics results from ALEPH concerning {tau} and b physics, and a precision measurement of electroweak and QCD parameters. (4) Completion of very successful data taking for E-791 at Fermilab, with nearly twice as many events recorded as initially proposed. (5) First measurement of beam polarization at the SLC. These efforts have led to about 15 physics publications this past year centered mainly on topics related to QCD, couplings of flavors to the Z{degrees}, and heavy flavor decays. Taken as a whole, the results in jets from LEP, the ratio of hadronic to leptonic decays of the {tau} the leptonic branching fraction of the J/{psi}, and the charmonium mass spectrum provide a very consistent set of values of {alpha}{sub s} at a variety of scales. In particular, they show the running of {alpha}{sub s} by a factor of about three from m{sub r} to m{sub z}. Results from LEP also provide evidence of the triple gluon vertex. Similarly, the measurement of the b{bar b} fraction of Z{degrees} decays, from the MARK II as well as LEP, provide increasingly better measurements of the Z{degree} coupling to b quarks. Combined with earlier precision measurements of the Z{degrees} mass, width, and leptonic branching fractions, the Z{degrees} decays continue to provide a very precise verification of the Standard Model.

  8. Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics (SCIPP)

    SciTech Connect

    Burchat, P.; Dorfan, D.; Litke, A.; Heusch, C.; Sadrozinski, H.; Schalk, T.; Seiden, A.

    1992-01-01

    Work for the coming year is a logical continuation of the efforts of the past year. Some special highlights of this past year which are discusses in more detail in this report are: (1) The move onto beamline and start of ZEUS data taking. (2) The completion of the SDC technical proposal including a detailed long-term plan for construction. (3) Continuing publication of very detailed physics results from ALEPH concerning [tau] and b physics, and a precision measurement of electroweak and QCD parameters. (4) Completion of very successful data taking for E-791 at Fermilab, with nearly twice as many events recorded as initially proposed. (5) First measurement of beam polarization at the SLC. These efforts have led to about 15 physics publications this past year centered mainly on topics related to QCD, couplings of flavors to the Z[degrees], and heavy flavor decays. Taken as a whole, the results in jets from LEP, the ratio of hadronic to leptonic decays of the [tau] the leptonic branching fraction of the J/[psi], and the charmonium mass spectrum provide a very consistent set of values of [alpha][sub s] at a variety of scales. In particular, they show the running of [alpha][sub s] by a factor of about three from m[sub r] to m[sub z]. Results from LEP also provide evidence of the triple gluon vertex. Similarly, the measurement of the b[bar b] fraction of Z[degrees] decays, from the MARK II as well as LEP, provide increasingly better measurements of the Z[degree] coupling to b quarks. Combined with earlier precision measurements of the Z[degrees] mass, width, and leptonic branching fractions, the Z[degrees] decays continue to provide a very precise verification of the Standard Model.

  9. Particle-physics constraints on multifractal spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcagni, Gianluca; Nardelli, Giuseppe; Rodríguez-Fernández, David

    2016-01-01

    We study electroweak interactions in the multiscale theory with q -derivatives, a framework where spacetime has the typical features of a multifractal. In the simplest case with only one characteristic time, length, and energy scale t* , ℓ* , and E* , we consider (i) the muon decay rate and (ii) the Lamb shift in the hydrogen atom, and constrain the corrections to the ordinary results. We obtain the independent absolute upper bounds (i) t*<1 0-13 s and (ii) E*>35 MeV . Under some mild theoretical assumptions, the Lamb shift alone yields the even tighter ranges t*<1 0-27 s , ℓ*<1 0-19 m , and E*>450 GeV . To date, these are the first robust constraints on the scales at which the multifractal features of the geometry can become important in a physical process.

  10. Finite-particle-number approach to physics

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P.

    1982-10-01

    Starting from a discrete, self-generating and self-organizing, recursive model and self-consistent interpretive rules we construct: the scale constants of physics (3,10,137,1.7x10/sup 38/); 3+1 Minkowski space with a discrete metric and the algebraic bound ..delta.. is an element of ..delta.. tau is greater than or equal to 1; the Einstein-deBroglie relation; algebraic double slit interference; a single-time momentum-space scattering theory connected to laboratory experience; an approximation to wave functions; local phase severance and hence both distant correlations and separability; baryon number, lepton number, charge and helicity; m/sub p//m/sub e/; a cosmology not in disagreement with current observations.

  11. Summation of power series in particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Jan

    1999-04-01

    The large-order behaviour of power series used in quantum theory (perturbation series and the operator-product expansion) is discussed and relevant summation methods are reviewed. It is emphasised that, in most physically interesting situations, the mere knowledge of the expansion coefficients is not sufficient for a unique determination of the function expanded, and the necessity of some additional, extra-perturbative, input is pointed out. Several possible nonperturbative inputs are suggested. Applications to various problems of quantum chromodynamics are considered. This lecture was presented on the special Memorial Day dedicated to Professor Ryszard R˛czka at this Workshop. The last section is devoted to my personal recollections of this remarkable personality.

  12. Physical and chemical characterization of tire-related particles: comparison of particles generated using different methodologies.

    PubMed

    Kreider, Marisa L; Panko, Julie M; McAtee, Britt L; Sweet, Leonard I; Finley, Brent L

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the physical and chemical properties of particles generated from the interaction of tires and road surfaces. Morphology, size distribution, and chemical composition were compared between particles generated using different methods, including on-road collection, laboratory generation under simulated driving conditions, and cryogenic breaking of tread rubber. Both on-road collected and laboratory generated particles exhibited the elongated shape typical of tire wear particles, whereas tread particles were more angular. Despite similar morphology for the on-road collected and the laboratory generated particles, the former were smaller on average. It is not clear at this stage if the difference is significant to the physical and chemical behavior of the particles. The chemical composition of the particles differed, with on-road generated particles containing chemical contributions from sources other than tires, such as pavement or particulates generated from other traffic-related sources. Understanding the differences between these particles is essential in apportioning contaminant contributions to the environment between tires, roadways, and other sources, and evaluating the representativeness of toxicity studies using different types of particulate generated.

  13. Particle physics for primary schools—enthusing future physicists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlidou, M.; Lazzeroni, C.

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the realisation that children make decisions and choices about subjects they like in primary school, became widely understood. For this reason academic establishments focus some of their public engagement activities towards the younger ages. Taking advantage of Professor Lazzeroni’s long-standing experience in particle physics research, during the last academic year we designed and trialled a particle physics workshop for primary schools. The workshop allows young children (ages 8-11) to learn the world of fundamental particles, use creative design to make particle models. The workshop has already been trialled in many primary schools, receiving very positive evaluation. The initial resources were reviewed and improved, based on the feedback received from school teachers and communicators.

  14. Beyond Standard Model Physics: At the Frontiers of Cosmology and Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Suarez, Alejandro O.

    I begin to write this thesis at a time of great excitement in the field of cosmology and particle physics. The aim of this thesis is to study and search for beyond the standard model (BSM) physics in the cosmological and high energy particle fields. There are two main questions, which this thesis aims to address: 1) what can we learn about the inflationary epoch utilizing the pioneer gravitational wave detector Adv. LIGO?, and 2) what are the dark matter particle properties and interactions with the standard model particles?. This thesis will focus on advances in answering both questions.

  15. Particle Physics: Will Britain Kill its Own Creation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus

    There is no question but that particle physics is a British invention. Of the four building blocks of matter that nuclear physics and cosmology deal with — electrons, neutrons, protons and neutrinos — two were discovered at Cambridge and one at Manchester. This was before the Second World War, but after the war the tradition continued. Cecil Powell's group at Bristol found the pion, which had been predicted by Hideki Yukawa; and the first of the so-called "strange" particles was discovered by Patrick Blackett, George Rochester and Clifford Butler working at Manchester…

  16. Nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology (NPAC) capability review

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The present document represents a summary self-assessment of the status of the Nuclear and Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology (NPAC) capability across Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). For the purpose of this review, we have divided the capability into four theme areas: Nuclear Physics, Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology, and Applied Physics. For each theme area we have given a general but brief description of the activities under the area, a list of the Laboratory divisions involved in the work, connections to the goals and mission of the Laboratory, a brief description of progress over the last three years, our opinion of the overall status of the theme area, and challenges and issues.

  17. Research accomplishments and future goals in particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-30

    This document presents our proposal to continue the activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics research. We have a broad program of participation in both non-accelerator and accelerator-based efforts. High energy research at Boston University has a special focus on the physics program of the Superconducting Supercollider. We are active in research and development for detector subsystems, in the design of experiments, and in study of the phenomenology of the very high energy interactions to be observed at the SSC. The particular areas discussed in this paper are: colliding beams physics; accelerator design physics; MACRO project; proton decay project; theoretical particle physics; muon G-2 project; fast liquid scintillators; SSCINTCAL project; TRD project; massively parallel processing for the SSC; and physics analysis and vertex detector upgrade at L3.

  18. Magnetic particle motions within living cells. Physical theory and techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Valberg, P A; Butler, J P

    1987-01-01

    Body tissues are not ferromagnetic, but ferromagnetic particles can be present as contaminants or as probes in the lungs and in other organs. The magnetic domains of these particles can be aligned by momentary application of an external magnetic field; the magnitude and time course of the resultant remanent field depend on the quantity of magnetic material and the degree of particle motion. The interpretation of magnetometric data requires an understanding of particle magnetization, agglomeration, random motion, and both rotation and translation in response to magnetic fields. We present physical principles relevant to magnetometry and suggest models for intracellular particle motion driven by thermal, elastic, or cellular forces. The design principles of instrumentation for magnetizing intracellular particles and for detecting weak remanent magnetic fields are described. Such magnetic measurements can be used for noninvasive studies of particle clearance from the body or of particle motion within body tissues and cells. Assumptions inherent to this experimental approach and possible sources of artifact are considered and evaluated. PMID:3676435

  19. The heavy particle hazard, what physical data are needed?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, S. B.; Wilkinson, M. C.

    1972-01-01

    The physical data required to evaluate the radiation hazard from heavy galactic cosmic rays to astronauts on extended missions are discussed. The spectral characteristics, nuclear interaction parameters, and track structure of particles are emphasized. The data on the lower energy portion of the differential spectrum of the iron group and nuclear fragmentation in tissue and aluminum are tested, and results are shown.

  20. Nobel physics prize to Charpak for inventing particle detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarzschild, B.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the work of Georges Charpak of France leading to his receipt of the 1992 Nobel Prize in Physics. The Nobel Prize was awarded to Charpak [open quotes]for his invention and development of particle detectors, in particular the multiwire proportional chamber.[close quotes] Historical aspects of Charpak's life and research are given.

  1. My 50 years of research in particle physics.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Hirotaka

    2010-01-01

    Some of my work of the last 50 years in the field of theoretical particle physics is described with particular emphasis on the motivation, the process of investigation, relationship to the work of others, and its impact. My judgment is unavoidably subjective, although I do present the comments of other researchers as much as possible.

  2. My 50 years of research in particle physics

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Hirotaka

    2010-01-01

    Some of my work of the last 50 years in the field of theoretical particle physics is described with particular emphasis on the motivation, the process of investigation, relationship to the work of others, and its impact. My judgment is unavoidably subjective, although I do present the comments of other researchers as much as possible. PMID:20431257

  3. Clue to the unification of gravitation and particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Wesson, P.S.

    1981-04-15

    Astrophysical data reveal the existence of a (broken) symmetry of the gravitational interaction implying the existence of a new dimensional constant papprox. =8 x 10/sup -16/ g/sup -1/ cm/sup 2/ sec/sup -1/. The existence of this constant provides a clue to the unification of gravitation and particle physics.

  4. Research in elementary particle physics. [Ohio State Univ. , Columbus

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical work on high energy physics is reviewed. Included are preparations to study high-energy electron-proton interactions at HERA, light-cone QCD, decays of charm and beauty particles, neutrino oscillation, electron-positron interactions at CLEO II, detector development, and astrophysics and cosmology.

  5. Quantum jumps: from foundational research to particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licata, Ignazio; Chiatti, Leonardo

    2017-08-01

    Since 1986 a vast body of experimental evidence has been accumulated of direct observation of quantum jumps in many physical systems. We can therefore assume that quantum jumps are genuine physical phenomena. On the other hand, substantial identity of ”quantum jumps” and ”collapses” induced by measurements can be admitted, both being represented by self-conjugate projection operators related to specific non-Hamiltonian aspects of micro-interactions. On this basis a model of quantum jump involving a single particle is discussed, and some consequences concerning hadronic physics (Hagedorn temperature, Regge trajectories) and quantum gravity are briefly sketched.

  6. Particle acceleration, transport and turbulence in cosmic and heliospheric physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W.

    1992-01-01

    In this progress report, the long term goals, recent scientific progress, and organizational activities are described. The scientific focus of this annual report is in three areas: first, the physics of particle acceleration and transport, including heliospheric modulation and transport, shock acceleration and galactic propagation and reacceleration of cosmic rays; second, the development of theories of the interaction of turbulence and large scale plasma and magnetic field structures, as in winds and shocks; third, the elucidation of the nature of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence processes and the role such turbulence processes might play in heliospheric, galactic, cosmic ray physics, and other space physics applications.

  7. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision 1-85

    SciTech Connect

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Rittenberg, A.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Oyanagi, Y.; Dodder, D.C.; Grudtsin, S.N.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Frosch, R.

    1985-01-01

    This report contains summaries of 551 approved experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1 January 1980 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, KEK, LAMPF, Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Saclay, Serpukhov, SIN, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also experiments on proton decay. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized. Instructions are given for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  8. Particle radiosurgery: a new frontier of physics in medicine.

    PubMed

    Bert, Christoph; Durante, Marco

    2014-07-01

    Radiosurgery was introduced over half a century ago for treatment of intracranial lesions. In more recent years, stereotactic radiotherapy has rapidly advanced and is now commonly used for treatments of both cranial and extracranial lesions with high doses delivered in a few, down to a single fraction. The results of a workshop on Particle radiosurgery: A new frontier of physics in medicine held at Obergurgl, Austria during August 25-29 2013 are summarized in this issue with an overview presented in this paper. The focus was laid on particle radiosurgery but the content also includes current practice in x-ray radiosurgery and the overarching research in radiobiology and motion management for extracranial lesions. The results and discussions showed that especially research in radiobiology of high-dose charged-particles and motion management are necessary for the success of particle radiosurgery.

  9. Integrating particle physical geometry into composting degradation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjiang; Ai, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The study was carried out to integrate physical geometry of compost particle with degradation kinetics to model biological reactions, which revealing additional dynamic approaches. A sphere and its circumscribing cube were used to represent compost particles. An inner sphere, representing anaerobic zone, was introduced to describe variations of substrate volume without sufficient oxygen supply. Degradation of soluble substrates and hydrolysis of insoluble substrates were associated with the particle geometry. Transportation of soluble substrates produced from hydrolysis was expressed using Fick's law. Through the integration of degradation kinetics with geometry models, degradation models could describe varying volume of composting materials involving aerobic or anaerobic digestion and transportation of soluble substrates in a unit compost particle.

  10. Particle Physics in High School: A Diagnose Study.

    PubMed

    Tuzón, Paula; Solbes, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    The science learning process improves when the contents are connected to students' lives. Particle physics has had a great impact in our society in the last years and has changed the theoretical picture about matter fundamental dynamics. Thus, we think that academic contents about matter components and interactions should be updated. With this study we aim to characterize the level of knowledge of high school students about this topic. We built a test with questions about classical atomic models, particle physics, recent discoveries, social implications and students opinions about it. Contrary to our first suspicion, students' answers show a high variability. They have new physics ideas and show a great interest towards modern concepts. We suggest including an updated view of this topic as part of the curriculum.

  11. Particle Physics in High School: A Diagnose Study

    PubMed Central

    Solbes, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    The science learning process improves when the contents are connected to students’ lives. Particle physics has had a great impact in our society in the last years and has changed the theoretical picture about matter fundamental dynamics. Thus, we think that academic contents about matter components and interactions should be updated. With this study we aim to characterize the level of knowledge of high school students about this topic. We built a test with questions about classical atomic models, particle physics, recent discoveries, social implications and students opinions about it. Contrary to our first suspicion, students’ answers show a high variability. They have new physics ideas and show a great interest towards modern concepts. We suggest including an updated view of this topic as part of the curriculum. PMID:27253377

  12. PREFACE: International Conference on Particle Physics and Astrophysics (ICPPA-2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-02-01

    The International Conference on Particle Physics and Astrophysics (ICPPA-2015) was held in Moscow, Russia, from October 5 to 10, 2015. The conference is organized by Center of Fundamental Research and Particle Physics of National Research Nuclear University ''MEPhI''. The aim of the Conference is to promote contacts between scientists and development of new ideas in fundamental research. We bring together experts and young scientists working on experimental and theoretical aspects of nuclear, particle, astroparticle physics and cosmology. The conference covers a wide range of topics such as accelerator physics, (astro) particle physics, cosmic rays, cosmology and methods of experimental physics - detectors and instruments. These directions are unified by development of the Standard Model (SM) which is evidently not complete. There are deviations from the Standard Model - neutrino oscillations, the dark matter existence. Together with strong interactions, they are main subjects of the Conference. New results from LHC collider as well as its future upgrade are discussed with the Higgs as the main point for discussion. Substantial development of experimental tools for astrophysical observations and new results from cosmic ray experiments is one of the main subjects of the conference. Various aspects of strong interaction are discussed. Among them: Charmonium and Bottomonium states, Flavor physics at Super B factories, Exotic Nuclei in Astrophysics. Another subject for discussion is the neutrino physics, promising and unique way to get new knowledge. In this content, several talks on BOREXINO experiment where new results in neutrino oscillations are presented. Special session is devoted to PAMELA experiment - 9 years in orbit and to the future GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope with following main scientific goals: indirect dark matter origin study by the gamma-ray astronomy methods, discrete astrophysical sources observations, diffuse background γ-emission analysis

  13. Physical facets of ultrasonic cavitational synthesis of zinc ferrite particles.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Bhaskar Rao; Sivasankar, Thirugnanasambandam; Sivakumar, Manickam; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2010-02-01

    This paper addresses the physical features of the ultrasonic cavitational synthesis of zinc ferrite particles and tries to establish the relationship between cavitation physics and sonochemistry of the zinc ferrite synthesis. A dual approach of coupling experimental results with simulations of radial motion of cavitation bubbles has been adopted. The precursors for the zinc ferrite, viz. ZnO and Fe(3)O(4) are produced in situ by the hydrolysis of Zn and Fe(II) acetates stimulated by (*)OH radicals produced from the transient collapse of the cavitation bubbles. Experiments performed under different conditions create significant variation in the production of (*)OH radicals, and hence, the rate of acetate hydrolysis. Correlation of the results of experiments and simulations sheds light on the important facets of the physical mechanism of ultrasonic cavitational zinc ferrite synthesis. It is revealed that too much or too little rate of acetate hydrolysis results in smaller particle size of zinc ferrite. The first effect of a higher rate of hydrolysis leads to excessively large growth of particles, due to which they become susceptible to the disruptive action of cavitation bubbles. Whereas, the second effect of too small rate of hydrolysis of Zn and Fe(II) acetates restricts the growth of particles. It has been observed that the initial reactant concentration does not influence the mean particle size or the size distribution of zinc ferrite particles. The present investigation clearly confirms that the rate-controlling step of zinc ferrite synthesis through ultrasonic cavitational route is the rate of formation of (*)OH radicals from cavitation bubbles.

  14. A guide to experimental particle physics literature, 1991-1996

    SciTech Connect

    Ezhela, V.V.; Filimonov, B.B.; Lugovsky, S.B.

    1996-10-01

    We present an indexed guide to experimental particle physics literature for the years 1991 - 1996. Approximately 4200 papers are indexed by (1) Beam/Target/Momentum (2) Reaction/Momentum/Data-Descriptor (including the final state) (3) Particle/Decay (4) Accelerator/Experiment/Detector. All indices are cross-referenced to the paper`s title and references in the ID/Reference/Title index. The information presented in this guide is also publicly available on a regularly-updated DATAGUIDE database from the World Wide Web.

  15. Research accomplishments and future goals in particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    Eight projects in high energy physics research are reviewed: study of high energy electron-positron annihilation, using SLD detector at SLAC. Development of integrated transition radiation detection and tracking for an SSC detector; Development of new concepts for particle accelerator components, including design and prototyping of high-precision electrostatic and magnetic elements; Development of a new underground detector facility in the Gran Saso Laboratory in Italy to search for magnetic monopoles and to study astrophysical muons and neutrinos; Search for proton decay and neutrinos from point astrophysical sources, and the study of cosmic ray muons and neutrinos in the IMB detector; Study of theoretical particle physics, including lattice gauge theories, string theories, phenomenology of the Standard Model and its extensions, and application of particle physics concepts to the early universe, cosmology and astrophysics, as well as the extension of these techniques into computational physics; Preparation of an experiment to measure the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon in a new superconducting storage ring and detector system at BNL; Fabrication (with M.I.T. and Princeton) of the BGO endcaps and associated tracking chambers for the L3 detector at LEP. Development of a central tracker for the SSC; and this new tasks requests support for research, development, and beam testing of a prototype SSC calorimeter featuring a tower geometry and composed of lead alloy and scintillating fibers.

  16. Impact of detector simulation in particle physics collider experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel Elvira, V.

    2017-06-01

    Through the last three decades, accurate simulation of the interactions of particles with matter and modeling of detector geometries has proven to be of critical importance to the success of the international high-energy physics (HEP) experimental programs. For example, the detailed detector modeling and accurate physics of the Geant4-based simulation software of the CMS and ATLAS particle physics experiments at the European Center of Nuclear Research (CERN) Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was a determinant factor for these collaborations to deliver physics results of outstanding quality faster than any hadron collider experiment ever before. This review article highlights the impact of detector simulation on particle physics collider experiments. It presents numerous examples of the use of simulation, from detector design and optimization, through software and computing development and testing, to cases where the use of simulation samples made a difference in the precision of the physics results and publication turnaround, from data-taking to submission. It also presents estimates of the cost and economic impact of simulation in the CMS experiment. Future experiments will collect orders of magnitude more data with increasingly complex detectors, taxing heavily the performance of simulation and reconstruction software. Consequently, exploring solutions to speed up simulation and reconstruction software to satisfy the growing demand of computing resources in a time of flat budgets is a matter that deserves immediate attention. The article ends with a short discussion on the potential solutions that are being considered, based on leveraging core count growth in multicore machines, using new generation coprocessors, and re-engineering HEP code for concurrency and parallel computing.

  17. Impact of detector simulation in particle physics collider experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Elvira, V. Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Through the last three decades, precise simulation of the interactions of particles with matter and modeling of detector geometries has proven to be of critical importance to the success of the international high-energy physics experimental programs. For example, the detailed detector modeling and accurate physics of the Geant4-based simulation software of the CMS and ATLAS particle physics experiments at the European Center of Nuclear Research (CERN) Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was a determinant factor for these collaborations to deliver physics results of outstanding quality faster than any hadron collider experiment ever before. This review article highlights the impact of detectormore » simulation on particle physics collider experiments. It presents numerous examples of the use of simulation, from detector design and optimization, through software and computing development and testing, to cases where the use of simulation samples made a difference in the accuracy of the physics results and publication turnaround, from data-taking to submission. It also presents the economic impact and cost of simulation in the CMS experiment. Future experiments will collect orders of magnitude more data, taxing heavily the performance of simulation and reconstruction software for increasingly complex detectors. Consequently, it becomes urgent to find solutions to speed up simulation software in order to cope with the increased demand in a time of flat budgets. The study ends with a short discussion on the potential solutions that are being explored, by leveraging core count growth in multicore machines, using new generation coprocessors, and re-engineering of HEP code for concurrency and parallel computing.« less

  18. Materials for Active Engagement in Nuclear and Particle Physics Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loats, Jeff; Schwarz, Cindy; Krane, Ken

    2013-04-01

    Physics education researchers have developed a rich variety of research-based instructional strategies that now permeate many introductory courses. Carrying these active-engagement techniques to upper-division courses requires effort and is bolstered by experience. Instructors interested in these methods thus face a large investment of time to start from scratch. This NSF-TUES grant, aims to develop, test and disseminate active-engagement materials for nuclear and particle physics topics. We will present examples of these materials, including: a) Conceptual discussion questions for use with Peer Instruction; b) warm-up questions for use with Just in Time Teaching, c) ``Back of the Envelope'' estimation questions and small-group case studies that will incorporate use of nuclear and particle databases, as well as d) conceptual exam questions.

  19. UCLA Particle Physics Research Group annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Nefkens, B.M.K.

    1983-11-01

    The objectives, basic research programs, recent results, and continuing activities of the UCLA Particle Physics Research Group are presented. The objectives of the research are to discover, to formulate, and to elucidate the physics laws that govern the elementary constituents of matter and to determine basic properties of particles. The research carried out by the Group last year may be divided into three separate programs: (1) baryon spectroscopy, (2) investigations of charge symmetry and isospin invariance, and (3) tests of time reversal invariance. The main body of this report is the account of the techniques used in our investigations, the results obtained, and the plans for continuing and new research. An update of the group bibliography is given at the end.

  20. MAJOR DETECOTRS IN ELEMENTARY PARTICLE PHYSICS - May 1985 Suppl.

    SciTech Connect

    Gidal, G.; Armstrong, B.; Rittenberg, A.

    1985-05-01

    This report is the second edition of a loose-leaf compendium of the properties and performance characteristics of the major detectors of elementary particle physics. This introduces the second edition of the LBL-91 Supplement 'Major Detectors in Elementary Particle Physics.' For some detectors the update merely documents minor modifications or provides additional references. Others have undergone major rebuilding or have been augmented with new subsystems. The new LEP, SLC, TRISTAN, BEPC, and FNAL detectors have had their designs fixed and are now under construction. Some detectors have completed their programs since the last edition and so are omitted. The use of colored loose-leaf paper should allow users to maintain a historical record of each detector. We again thank those physicists working with each detector who took the time to summarize its properties and supply us with the appropriate drawings.

  1. Physical sputtering of metallic systems by charged-particle impact

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.

    1989-12-01

    The present paper provides a brief overview of our current understanding of physical sputtering by charged-particle impact, with the emphasis on sputtering of metals and alloys under bombardment with particles that produce knock-on collisions. Fundamental aspects of ion-solid interactions, and recent developments in the study of sputtering of elemental targets and preferential sputtering in multicomponent materials are reviewed. We concentrate only on a few specific topics of sputter emission, including the various properties of the sputtered flux and depth of origin, and on connections between sputtering and other radiation-induced and -enhanced phenomena that modify the near-surface composition of the target. The synergistic effects of these diverse processes in changing the composition of the integrated sputtered-atom flux is described in simple physical terms, using selected examples of recent important progress. 325 refs., 27 figs.

  2. Physical qubits from charged particles: Infrared divergences in quantum information

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, Juan; Martin-Martinez, Eduardo

    2009-05-15

    We consider soft-photon effects (ir structure of QED) on the construction of physical qubits. Soft photons appear when we build charged qubits from the asymptotic states of QED. This construction is necessary in order to include the effect of soft photons on entanglement measures. The nonexistence of free charged particles (due to the long range of QED interactions) leads us to question the sense of the very concept of free charged qubit. In this work, using the ''dressing'' formalism, we build physical charged qubits from dressed fields which have the correct asymptotic behavior, are gauge invariant, have propagators with a particle pole structure, and are free from infrared divergences. Finally, we discuss the impact of the soft corrections on the entanglement measures.

  3. Particle physics catalysis of thermal big bang nucleosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pospelov, Maxim

    2007-06-08

    We point out that the existence of metastable, tau>10(3) s, negatively charged electroweak-scale particles (X-) alters the predictions for lithium and other primordial elemental abundances for A>4 via the formation of bound states with nuclei during big bang nucleosynthesis. In particular, we show that the bound states of X- with helium, formed at temperatures of about T=10(8) K, lead to the catalytic enhancement of 6Li production, which is 8 orders of magnitude more efficient than the standard channel. In particle physics models where subsequent decay of X- does not lead to large nonthermal big bang nucleosynthesis effects, this directly translates to the level of sensitivity to the number density of long-lived X- particles (tau>10(5) s) relative to entropy of nX-/s less, approximately <3x10(-17), which is one of the most stringent probes of electroweak scale remnants known to date.

  4. Current experiments in elementary-particle physics - March 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Rittenberg, A.

    1983-03-01

    Microfiche are included which contain summaries of 479 experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments are included at the following laboratories: Brookhaven (BNL); CERN; CESR; DESY; Fermilab (FNAL); Institute for Nuclear Studies (INS); KEK; LAMPF; Serpukhov (SERP); SIN; SLAC; and TRIUMF. Also, summaries of proton decay experiments are included. A list of experiments and titles is included; and a beam-target-momentum index and a spokesperson index are given. Properties of beams at the facilities are tabulated. (WHK)

  5. The use of minimal spanning trees in particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelace Rainbolt, J.; Schmitt, M.

    2017-02-01

    Minimal spanning trees (MSTs) have been used in cosmology and astronomy to distinguish distributions of points in a multi-dimensional space. They are essentially unknown in particle physics, however. We briefly define MSTs and illustrate their properties through a series of examples. We show how they might be applied to study a typical event sample from a collider experiment and conclude that MSTs may prove useful in distinguishing different classes of events.

  6. What is a Particle in Classical Physics? A Wave?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickens, Ronald E.

    2005-11-01

    The concepts of ``particle" and ``wave" play important roles in quantum mechanics in that a given microscopic system can, under the proper circumstances, display properties of each.ootnotetextA Messiah, Quantum Mechanics, Vols. I and II (Wiley, 1961). However, these categories have their genesis in classical mechanicsootnotetextH. Goldstein, Classical Mechanics (Addison-Wesley, 1980, 2nd edition). and we must turn to this area to understand what they mean. In particular, it must be clearly understood that these concepts are idealistic representations of physical phenomena and, as a consequence, each may not correspond to any actual physical system. We discuss the definition of ``particle'' from the perspective of how it has been defined in standard textbooks and carry out a similar analysis for the notion of ``wave.'' We then define ``particle'' and ``wave'' within the context of classical mechanics by means of their respective equations of motion. The general (tentative) conclusion is that within the framework of classical mechanics the concepts of ``particle'' and ``wave'' systems may be unambiguously defined.

  7. Object Oriented Design and the Standard Model of particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovaca, Samir

    2007-04-01

    Inspired by the computer as both tool and metaphor, a new path emerges toward understanding life, physics, and existence. The path leads throughout all of nature, from the interior of cells to inside black holes. This view of science is based on the idea that information is the ultimate ``substance'' from which all things are made. Exploring this view, we will focus on Object - Oriented (OO) design as one of the most important designs in software development. The OO design views the world as composed of objects with well defined properties. The dynamics is pictured as interactions among objects. Interactions are mediated by messages that objects exchange with each other. This description closely resembles the view of the elementary particles world created by the Standard Model of particle physics. The object model (OM) provides a theoretical foundation upon which the OO design is built. The OM is based on the principles of abstraction, encapsulation, modularity and hierarchy. We will show that the Standard Model of particle physics follows the OM principles.

  8. Cherenkov light imaging in astro-particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoyan, Razmik

    2014-12-01

    Cherenkov light emission plays a key role in contemporary science; it is widely used in high energy, nuclear, and numerous astro-particle physics experiments. Most astro-particle physics experiments are based on the detection of light, and a vast majority of them on the measurement of Cherenkov light. Cherenkov light emission is measured in gases (used in air-Cherenkov technique), in water (for example, neutrino experiments BAIKAL, Super-Kamiokande, NESTOR, ANTARES, future KM3NeT; cosmic and γ-ray experiments Milagro, HAWC, AUGER) and in ice (IceCube). In this report our goal is not limited to simply listing the multitude of experiments that are based on using Cherenkov emission, but we will clarify the reasons making this emission so important and so frequently used. For completeness we will first give a short historical overview on the discovery and evolution of Cherenkov emission and then we will dwell on its main features and numerous applications in astro-particle physics experiments.

  9. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Elementary Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Harold G; Kostelecky, V Alan; Musser, James A

    2013-07-29

    The elementary particle physics research program at Indiana University spans a broad range of the most interesting topics in this fundamental field, including important contributions to each of the frontiers identified in the recent report of HEPAP's Particle Physics Prioritization Panel: the Energy Frontier, the Intensity Frontier, and the Cosmic Frontier. Experimentally, we contribute to knowledge at the Energy Frontier through our work on the D0 and ATLAS collaborations. We work at the Intensity Frontier on the MINOS and NOvA experiments and participate in R&D for LBNE. We are also very active on the theoretical side of each of these areas with internationally recognized efforts in phenomenology both in and beyond the Standard Model and in lattice QCD. Finally, although not part of this grant, members of the Indiana University particle physics group have strong involvement in several astrophysics projects at the Cosmic Frontier. Our research efforts are divided into three task areas. The Task A group works on D0 and ATLAS; Task B is our theory group; and Task C contains our MINOS, NOvA, and LBNE (LArTPC) research. Each task includes contributions from faculty, senior scientists, postdocs, graduate and undergraduate students, engineers, technicians, and administrative personnel. This work was supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-91ER40661. In the following, we describe progress made in the research of each task during the final period of the grant, from November 1, 2009 to April 30, 2013.

  10. The neutron and its role in cosmology and particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Dubbers, Dirk; Schmidt, Michael G.

    2011-10-01

    Experiments with cold and ultracold neutrons have reached a level of precision such that problems far beyond the scale of the present standard model of particle physics become accessible to experimental investigation. Because of the close links between particle physics and cosmology, these studies also permit a deep look into the very first instances of our Universe. First addressed in this article, in both theory and experiment, is the problem of baryogenesis, the mechanism behind the evident dominance of matter over antimatter in the Universe. The question of how baryogenesis could have happened is open to experimental tests, and it turns out that this problem can be curbed by the very stringent limits on an electric dipole moment of the neutron, a quantity that also has deep implications for particle physics. Then the recent spectacular observation of neutron quantization in the Earth's gravitational field and of resonance transitions between such gravitational energy states is discussed. These measurements, together with new evaluations of neutron scattering data, set new constraints on deviations from Newton's gravitational law at the picometer scale. Such deviations are predicted in modern theories with extra dimensions that propose unification of the Planck scale with the scale of the standard model. These experiments start closing the remaining ''axion window'' on new spin-dependent forces in the submillimeter range. Another main topic is the weak-interaction parameters in various fields of physics and astrophysics that must all be derived from measured neutron-decay data. Up until now, about 10 different neutron-decay observables have been measured, much more than needed in the electroweak standard model. This allows various precise tests for new physics beyond the standard model, competing with or surpassing similar tests at high energy. The review ends with a discussion of neutron and nuclear data required in the synthesis of the elements during the

  11. EDITORIAL: Focus on Dark Matter and Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprile, Elena; Profumo, Stefano

    2009-10-01

    The quest for the nature of dark matter has reached a historical point in time, with several different and complementary experiments on the verge of conclusively exploring large portions of the parameter space of the most theoretically compelling particle dark matter models. This focus issue on dark matter and particle physics brings together a broad selection of invited articles from the leading experimental and theoretical groups in the field. The leitmotif of the collection is the need for a multi-faceted search strategy that includes complementary experimental and theoretical techniques with the common goal of a sound understanding of the fundamental particle physical nature of dark matter. These include theoretical modelling, high-energy colliders and direct and indirect searches. We are confident that the works collected here present the state of the art of this rapidly changing field and will be of interest to both experts in the topic of dark matter as well as to those new to this exciting field. Focus on Dark Matter and Particle Physics Contents DARK MATTER AND ASTROPHYSICS Scintillator-based detectors for dark matter searches I S K Kim, H J Kim and Y D Kim Cosmology: small-scale issues Joel R Primack Big Bang nucleosynthesis and particle dark matter Karsten Jedamzik and Maxim Pospelov Particle models and the small-scale structure of dark matter Torsten Bringmann DARK MATTER AND COLLIDERS Dark matter in the MSSM R C Cotta, J S Gainer, J L Hewett and T G Rizzo The role of an e+e- linear collider in the study of cosmic dark matter M Battaglia Collider, direct and indirect detection of supersymmetric dark matter Howard Baer, Eun-Kyung Park and Xerxes Tata INDIRECT PARTICLE DARK MATTER SEARCHES:EXPERIMENTS PAMELA and indirect dark matter searches M Boezio et al An indirect search for dark matter using antideuterons: the GAPS experiment C J Hailey Perspectives for indirect dark matter search with AMS-2 using cosmic-ray electrons and positrons B Beischer, P von

  12. Life at the interface of particle physics and string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellekens, A. N.

    2013-10-01

    If the results of the first LHC run are not betraying us, many decades of particle physics are culminating in a complete and consistent theory for all nongravitational physics: the standard model. But despite this monumental achievement there is a clear sense of disappointment: many questions remain unanswered. Remarkably, most unanswered questions could just be environmental, and disturbingly to some the existence of life may depend on that environment. Meanwhile there has been increasing evidence that the seemingly ideal candidate for answering these questions, string theory, gives an answer few people initially expected: a large “landscape” of possibilities that can be realized in a multiverse and populated by eternal inflation. At the interface of “bottom-up” and “top-down” physics, a discussion of anthropic arguments becomes unavoidable. Developments in this area are reviewed, focusing especially on the last decade.

  13. Physics of the Blues: Music, Fourier and Wave - Particle Duality

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, J. Murray

    2003-10-15

    Art and science are intimately connected. There is probably no art that reveals this more than music. Music can be used as a tool to teach physics and engineering to non-scientists, illustrating such diverse concepts as Fourier analysis and quantum mechanics. This colloquium is aimed in reverse, to explain some interesting aspects of music to physicists. Topics include: What determines the frequency of notes on a musical scale? What is harmony and why would Fourier care? Where did the blues come from? (We' re talking the 'physics of the blues', and not 'the blues of physics' - that's another colloquium). Is there a musical particle? The presentation will be accompanied by live keyboard demonstrations. The presenter will attempt to draw tenuous connections between the subject of his talk and his day job as Director of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory.

  14. Future directions in particle and nuclear physics at multi-GeV hadron beam facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Geesaman, D.F.

    1993-11-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics in particle and nuclear physics: hadron dynamics; lepton physics; spin physics; hadron and nuclear spectroscopy; hadronic weak interactions; and Eta physics. These papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  15. XXII SLAC summer institute on particle physics: Proceedings. Particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, J.; DePorcel, L.

    1996-02-01

    The seven-day school portion of the Institute revolved around the question of dark matter: where is it and what is it? Reviews were given of microlensing searches for baryonic dark matter, of dark matter candidates in the form of neutrinos and exotic particles, and of low-noise detection techniques used to search for the latter. The history of the universe, from the Big Bang to the role of dark matter in the formation of large-scale structure, was also covered. Other lecture series described the astrophysics that might be done with x-ray timing experiments and through the detection of gravitational radiation. As in past years, the lectures each morning were followed by stimulating afternoon discussion sessions, in which students could pursue with the lecturers the topics that most interested them. The Institute concluded with a three-day topical conference covering recent developments in theory and experiment. Highlights from the astrophysical and cosmological arenas included observations of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background, and of the mysterious gamma-ray bursters. From terrestrial accelerators came tantalizing hints of the top quark and marked improvements in precision electroweak measurements, among many other results. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  16. 22nd SLAC Summer Institute on Particle Physics: Particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, J.; Deporcel, L.

    The seven-day school portion of the Institute revolved around the question of dark matter: where is it and what is it? Reviews were given of microlensing searches for baryonic dark matter, of dark matter candidates in the form of neutrinos and exotic particles, and of low-noise detection techniques used to search for the latter. The history of the universe, from the Big Bang to the role of dark matter in the formation of large-scale structure, was also covered. Other lecture series described the astrophysics that might be done with x-ray timing experiments and through the detection of gravitational radiation. As in past years, the lectures each morning were followed by stimulating afternoon discussion sessions, in which students could pursue with the lecturers the topics that most interested them. The Institute concluded with a three-day topical conference covering recent developments in theory and experiment. Highlights from the astrophysical and cosmological arenas included observations of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background, and of the mysterious gamma-ray bursters. From terrestrial accelerators came tantalizing hints of the top quark and marked improvements in precision electroweak measurements, among many other results. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  17. Energetic Particle Instrumentation for Future Space Physics Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, C. H.; Griffin, D. K.; Dunlop, M. W.; Davies, J. A.; Hapgood, M. A.

    2009-04-01

    Collisionless plasmas frequently exhibit strong fluxes of electrons and ions at energies well above the mean plasma energy. These suprathermal particles play an important role in the identification and interpretation of the fundamental properties and physical processes within space plasmas. Investigations of these energetic populations require both good angular and temporal resolution measurements. Large geometric factors and fast electronics are vital to ensure adequate sampling of the tail of the particle distribution. We present the status of the energetic particle instrument development activity that is currently underway at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. This is in preparation for both the proposed HEP instrument for Cross-Scale mission, which is currently undergoing assessment for the ESA's Cosmic Vision programme, and the IEPS instrument for the Chinese KuaFu mission. The activities are based on the heritage of instruments already successfully flown on the NASA/Polar and ESA/Cluster spacecraft. The design consists of a simple ‘pin-hole' aperture and segmented silicon solid state detector array capable of measuring energetic particle distributions in the range 30-1000 keV. Key features of the activities include the development of 1) a modular mechanical design that can easily support different spacecraft accommodation constraints and scientific requirements, 2) combined detector configurations for ions and electrons, and 3) multi-channel hybrid ASICs for the sensor electronics which is crucial for low mass and power.

  18. A physics-motivated Centroidal Voronoi Particle domain decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Lin; Hu, Xiangyu Y.; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel domain decomposition method for large-scale simulations in continuum mechanics by merging the concepts of Centroidal Voronoi Tessellation (CVT) and Voronoi Particle dynamics (VP). The CVT is introduced to achieve a high-level compactness of the partitioning subdomains by the Lloyd algorithm which monotonically decreases the CVT energy. The number of computational elements between neighboring partitioning subdomains, which scales the communication effort for parallel simulations, is optimized implicitly as the generated partitioning subdomains are convex and simply connected with small aspect-ratios. Moreover, Voronoi Particle dynamics employing physical analogy with a tailored equation of state is developed, which relaxes the particle system towards the target partition with good load balance. Since the equilibrium is computed by an iterative approach, the partitioning subdomains exhibit locality and the incremental property. Numerical experiments reveal that the proposed Centroidal Voronoi Particle (CVP) based algorithm produces high-quality partitioning with high efficiency, independently of computational-element types. Thus it can be used for a wide range of applications in computational science and engineering.

  19. Research in Neutrino Physics and Particle Astrophysics: Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kearns, Edward

    2016-06-30

    The Boston University Neutrino Physics and Particle Astrophysics Group investigates the fundamental laws of particle physics using natural and man-made neutrinos and rare processes such as proton decay. The primary instrument for this research is the massive Super-Kamiokande (SK) water Cherenkov detector, operating since 1996 at the Kamioka Neutrino Observatory, one kilometer underground in a mine in Japan. We study atmospheric neutrinos from cosmic rays, which were first used to discover that neutrinos have mass, as recognized by the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics. Our latest measurements with atmospheric neutrinos are giving valuable information, complementary to longbaseline experiments, on the ordering of massive neutrino states and as to whether neutrinos violate CP symmetry. We have studied a variety of proton decay modes, including the most frequently predicted modes such as p → e+π0 and p → ν K+, as well as more exotic baryon number violating processes such as dinucleon decay and neutronantineutron oscillation. We search for neutrinos from dark matter annihilation or decay in the universe. Our group has made significant contributions to detector operation, particularly in the area of electronics. Most recently, we have contributed to planning for an upgrade to the SK detector by the addition of gadolinium to the water, which will enable efficient neutron capture detection.

  20. A system for designing and simulating particle physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żelazny, Roman; Strzałkowski, Piotr

    1987-01-01

    In view of the rapid development of experimental facilities and their costs, the systematic design and preparation of particle physics experiments have become crucial. A software system is proposed as an aid for the experimental designer, mainly for experimental geometry analysis and experimental simulation. The following model is adopted: the description of an experiment is formulated in a language (here called XL) and put by its processor in a data base. The language is based on the entity-relationship-attribute approach. The information contained in the data base can be reported and analysed by an analyser (called XA) and modifications can be made at any time. In particular, the Monte Carlo methods can be used in experiment simulation for both physical phenomena in experimental set-up and detection analysis. The general idea of the system is based on the design concept of ISDOS project information systems. The characteristics of the simulation module are similar to those of the CERN Geant system, but some extensions are proposed. The system could be treated as a component of a greater, integrated software environment for the design of particle physics experiments, their monitoring and data processing.

  1. Liquid xenon detectors for particle physics and astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Aprile, E.; Doke, T.

    2010-07-15

    This article reviews the progress made over the last 20 years in the development and applications of liquid xenon detectors in particle physics, astrophysics, and medical imaging experiments. A summary of the fundamental properties of liquid xenon as radiation detection medium, in light of the most current theoretical and experimental information is first provided. After an introduction of the different type of liquid xenon detectors, a review of past, current, and future experiments using liquid xenon to search for rare processes and to image radiation in space and in medicine is given. Each application is introduced with a survey of the underlying scientific motivation and experimental requirements before reviewing the basic characteristics and expected performance of each experiment. Within this decade it appears likely that large volume liquid xenon detectors operated in different modes will contribute to answering some of the most fundamental questions in particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology, fulfilling the most demanding detection challenges. From detectors based solely on liquid xenon (LXe) scintillation, such as in the MEG experiment for the search of the rare ''{mu}{yields}e{gamma}'' decay, currently the largest liquid xenon detector in operation, and in the XMASS experiment for dark matter detection, to the class of time projection chambers which exploit both scintillation and ionization of LXe, such as in the XENON dark matter search experiment and in the Enriched Xenon Observatory for neutrinoless double beta decay, unrivaled performance and important contributions to physics in the next few years are anticipated.

  2. IViPP: A Tool for Visualization in Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Hieu; Skiba, Elizabeth; Baldwin, Doug

    2011-10-01

    Experiments and simulations in physics generate a lot of data; visualization is helpful to prepare that data for analysis. IViPP (Interactive Visualizations in Particle Physics) is an interactive computer program that visualizes results of particle physics simulations or experiments. IViPP can handle data from different simulators, such as SRIM or MCNP. It can display relevant geometry and measured scalar data; it can do simple selection from the visualized data. In order to be an effective visualization tool, IViPP must have a software architecture that can flexibly adapt to new data sources and display styles. It must be able to display complicated geometry and measured data with a high dynamic range. We therefore organize it in a highly modular structure, we develop libraries to describe geometry algorithmically, use rendering algorithms running on the powerful GPU to display 3-D geometry at interactive rates, and we represent scalar values in a visual form of scientific notation that shows both mantissa and exponent. This work was supported in part by the US Department of Energy through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), with special thanks to Craig Sangster at LLE.

  3. Marietta Blau: Pioneer of Photographic Nuclear Emulsions and Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sime, Ruth Lewin

    2013-03-01

    During the 1920s and 1930s, Viennese physicist Marietta Blau (1894-1970) pioneered the use of photographic methods for imaging high-energy nuclear particles and events. In 1937 she and Hertha Wambacher discovered "disintegration stars" - the tracks of massive nuclear disintegrations - in emulsions exposed to cosmic radiation. This discovery launched the field of particle physics, but Blau's contributions were underrecognized and she herself was nearly forgotten. I trace Blau's career at the Institut für Radiumforschung in Vienna and the causes of this "forgetting," including her forced emigration from Austria in 1938, the behavior of her colleagues in Vienna during and after the National Socialist period, and the flawed Nobel decision process that excluded her from a Nobel Prize.

  4. Elementary particle physics at the University of Florida. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.D.; Ramond, P.M.; Sikivie, P.

    1995-12-01

    This is the annual progress report of the University of Florida`s elementary particle physics group. The theoretical high energy physics group`s research covers a broad range of topics, including both theory and phenomenology. Present work of the experimental high energy physics group is directed toward the CLEO detector, with some effort going to B physics at Fermilab. The Axion Search project is participating in the operation of a large-scale axion detector at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, with the University of Florida taking responsibility for this experiment`s high-resolution spectrometer`s assembly, programming, and installation, and planning to take shifts during operation of the detector in FY96. The report also includes a continuation of the University`s three-year proposal to the United States Department of Energy to upgrade the University`s high-energy physics computing equipment and to continue student support, system manager/programmer support, and maintenance. Report includes lists of presentations and publications by members of the group.

  5. Computational particle physics for event generators and data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret-Gallix, Denis

    2013-08-01

    High-energy physics data analysis relies heavily on the comparison between experimental and simulated data as stressed lately by the Higgs search at LHC and the recent identification of a Higgs-like new boson. The first link in the full simulation chain is the event generation both for background and for expected signals. Nowadays event generators are based on the automatic computation of matrix element or amplitude for each process of interest. Moreover, recent analysis techniques based on the matrix element likelihood method assign probabilities for every event to belong to any of a given set of possible processes. This method originally used for the top mass measurement, although computing intensive, has shown its efficiency at LHC to extract the new boson signal from the background. Serving both needs, the automatic calculation of matrix element is therefore more than ever of prime importance for particle physics. Initiated in the 80's, the techniques have matured for the lowest order calculations (tree-level), but become complex and CPU time consuming when higher order calculations involving loop diagrams are necessary like for QCD processes at LHC. New calculation techniques for next-to-leading order (NLO) have surfaced making possible the generation of processes with many final state particles (up to 6). If NLO calculations are in many cases under control, although not yet fully automatic, even higher precision calculations involving processes at 2-loops or more remain a big challenge. After a short introduction to particle physics and to the related theoretical framework, we will review some of the computing techniques that have been developed to make these calculations automatic. The main available packages and some of the most important applications for simulation and data analysis, in particular at LHC will also be summarized (see CCP2012 slides [1]).

  6. A Summer Research Experience in Particle Physics Using Skype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Curran; Alexander, Steven; Mahmood, A. K.

    2012-10-01

    This last summer I did research in particle physics as part of a ``remote REU.'' This poster will describe that experience and the results of my project which was to experimentally verify the mass ranges of the Z' boson. Data from the LHC's Atlas detector was filtered by computers to select for likely Z boson decays; my work was in noting all instances of Z or Z' boson decays in one thousand events and their masses, separating the Z from Z' bosons, and generating histograms of the masses.

  7. Nuclear and Particle Physics Simulations: The Consortium of Upper-Level Physics Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Roberta; Moloney, Michael J.; Philpott, John; Rothberg, Joseph

    1995-06-01

    The Consortium for Upper Level Physics Software (CUPS) has developed a comprehensive series of Nine Book/Software packages that Wiley will publish in FY `95 and `96. CUPS is an international group of 27 physicists, all with extensive backgrounds in the research, teaching, and development of instructional software. The project is being supported by the National Science Foundation (PHY-9014548), and it has received other support from the IBM Corp., Apple Computer Corp., and George Mason University. The Simulations being developed are: Astrophysics, Classical Mechanics, Electricity & Magnetism, Modern Physics, Nuclear and Particle Physics, Quantum Mechanics, Solid State, Thermal and Statistical, and Wave and Optics.

  8. Applications of gaseous particle detectors in physics and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauli, Fabio

    1995-08-01

    The multi-wire proportional chamber, introduced in 1967 by Georges Charpak (recipient of the 1992 Nobel prize for physics) allows to achieve high-rate, fully electronics detection and localization of ionizing radiation. The myriad of devices inspired by this initial work generated a revolution in the conception of detectors for elementary particle physics experiments; examples are the time projection chamber, the drift chamber, the micro-strip gas chamber. After a brief introduction on the basic operating principles of the device, I will describe several examples of application of advanced gas detectors in medicine and biology and analyze the operating characteristics that make the new devices attractive when confronted with classic detectors.

  9. Nuclear and particle physics in the early universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, D. N.

    1981-01-01

    Basic principles and implications of Big Bang cosmology are reviewed, noting the physical evidence of a previous universe temperature of 10,000 K and theoretical arguments such as grand unification decoupling indicating a primal temperature of 10 to the 15th eV. The Planck time of 10 to the -43rd sec after the Big Bang is set as the limit before which gravity was quantized and nothing is known. Gauge theories of elementary particle physics are reviewed for successful predictions of similarity in weak and electromagnetic interactions and quantum chromodynamic predictions for strong interactions. The large number of photons in the universe relative to the baryons is considered and the grand unified theories are cited as showing the existence of baryon nonconservation as an explanation. Further attention is given to quark-hadron phase transition, the decoupling for the weak interaction and relic neutrinos, and Big Bang nucleosynthesis.

  10. A Data Acquisition System for Elementary Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crittenden, J. A.; Benenson, G.; Cunitz, H.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Kaplan, D. M.; Sippach, W.; Stern, B.

    1984-10-01

    The data acquisition system experiment 605 at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory employs a set of data transfer protocols developed at Columbia University and implemented in the Nevis Laboratories Data Transport System. We describe the logical design of the Transport System, its physical realization, and its particular application during the Spring, 1982 data run of experiment 605. During that run it served as the interface between the data latches and a megabyte of fast memory, operating at a data transfer rate of 200 nsec/16-bit word. Up to two thousand events were read out during the one second beam spill, each event consisting of about 250 words. We include details of proposed improvements to the data acquisition system and append a brief comment of the need for inexpensive, versatile readout systems in experimental elementary particle physics.

  11. Nuclear and particle physics in the early universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, D. N.

    1981-01-01

    Basic principles and implications of Big Bang cosmology are reviewed, noting the physical evidence of a previous universe temperature of 10,000 K and theoretical arguments such as grand unification decoupling indicating a primal temperature of 10 to the 15th eV. The Planck time of 10 to the -43rd sec after the Big Bang is set as the limit before which gravity was quantized and nothing is known. Gauge theories of elementary particle physics are reviewed for successful predictions of similarity in weak and electromagnetic interactions and quantum chromodynamic predictions for strong interactions. The large number of photons in the universe relative to the baryons is considered and the grand unified theories are cited as showing the existence of baryon nonconservation as an explanation. Further attention is given to quark-hadron phase transition, the decoupling for the weak interaction and relic neutrinos, and Big Bang nucleosynthesis.

  12. A problem in particle physics and its Bayesian analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landon, Joshua

    An up and coming field in contemporary nuclear and particle physics is "Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics", henceforth Lattice QCD. Indeed the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics went to the developers of equations that describe QCD. In this dissertation, following a layperson's introduction to the structure of matter, we outline the statistical aspects of a problem in Lattice QCD faced by particle physicists, and point out the difficulties encountered by them in trying to address the problem. The difficulties stem from the fact that one is required to estimate a large -- conceptually infinite -- number of parameters based on a finite number of non-linear equations, each of which is a sum of exponential functions. We then present a plausible approach for solving the problem. Our approach is Bayesian and is driven by a computationally intensive Markov Chain Monte Carlo based solution. However, in order to invoke our approach we first look at the underlying anatomy of the problem and synthesize its essentials. These essentials reveal a pattern that can be harnessed via some assumptions, and this in turn enables us to outline a pathway towards a solution. We demonstrate the viability of our approach via simulated data, followed by its validation against real data provided to us by our physicist colleagues. Our approach yields results that in the past were not obtainable via alternate approaches. The contribution of this dissertation is two-fold. The first is a use of computationally intensive statistical technology to produce results in physics that could not be obtained using physics based techniques. Since the statistical architecture of the problem considered here can arise in other contexts as well, the second contribution of this dissertation is to indicate a plausible approach for addressing a generic class of problems wherein the number of parameters to be estimated exceeds the number of constraints, each constraint being a non-linear equation that is the sum of

  13. Molecular Rotation Signals: Molecule Chemistry and Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2015-06-01

    Molecules - large or small - are attractive academic resources, with numerous questions on their chemical behaviour as well as problems in fundamental physics now (or still) waiting to be answered: Targeted by high-resolution spectroscopy, a rotating molecular top can turn into a laboratory for molecule chemistry or a laboratory for particle physics. Once successfully entrained (many species - depending on size and chemical composition - have insufficient vapour pressures or are of transient nature, such that specifically designed pulsed-jet sources are required for their transfer into the gas phase or in-situ generation) into the collision-free environment of a supersonic-jet expansion, each molecular top comes with its own set of challenges, theoretically and experimentally: Multiple internal interactions are causing complicated energy level schemes and the resulting spectra will be rather difficult to predict theoretically. Experimentally, these spectra are difficult to assess and assign. With today's broad-banded chirp microwave techniques, finding and identifying such spectral features have lost their major drawback of being very time consuming for many molecules. For other molecules, the unrivalled resolution and sensitivity of the narrow-banded impulse microwave techniques provide a window to tackle - at the highest precision available to date - fundamental questions in physics, even particle physics - potentially beyond the standard model. Molecular charge distribution, properties of the chemical bond, details on internal dynamics and intermolecular interaction, the (stereo-chemical) molecular structure (including the possibility of their spatial separation) as well as potential evidence for tiny yet significant interactions encode their signature in pure molecular rotation subjected to time-domain microwave spectroscopic techniques. Ongoing exciting technical developments promise rapid progress. We present recent examples from Hannover, new directions, and

  14. Early developments: Particle physics aspects of cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic rays is the birthplace of elementary particle physics. The 1936 Nobel prize was shared between Victor Hess and Carl Anderson. Anderson discovered the positron in a cloud chamber. The positron was predicted by Dirac several years earlier. In subsequent cloud chamber investigations Anderson and Neddermeyer saw the muon, which for some time was considered to be a candidate for the Yukawa particle responsible for nuclear binding. Measurements with nuclear emulsions by Lattes, Powell, Occhialini and Muirhead clarified the situation by the discovery of the charged pions in cosmic rays. The cloud chamber continued to be a powerful instrument in cosmic ray studies. Rochester and Butler found V's, which turned out to be shortlived neutral kaons decaying into a pair of charged pions. Also Λ's, Σ's, and Ξ's were found in cosmic rays. But after that accelerators and storage rings took over. The unexpected renaissance of cosmic rays started with the search for solar neutrinos and the observation of the supernova 1987A. Cosmic ray neutrino results were best explained by the assumption of neutrino oscillations opening a view beyond the standard model of elementary particles. After 100 years of cosmic ray research we are again at the beginning of a new era, and cosmic rays may contribute to solve the many open questions, like dark matter and dark energy, by providing energies well beyond those of accelerators.

  15. High resolution micro-pattern gas detectors for particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhtman, L.; Aulchenko, V.; Bobrovnikov, V.; Bondar, A.; Fedotovich, G.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Maltsev, T.; Nikolenko, D.; Rachek, I.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.

    2017-07-01

    Micro-pattern gaseous detectors (MPGDs) allow operation at very high background particle flux with high efficiency and spatial resolution. This combination of parameters determines the main application of these detectors in particle physics experiments: precise tracking in the areas close to the beam and in the end-cap regions of general-purpose detectors. MPGDs of different configurations have been developed and are under development for several experiments in the Budker INP. The system of eight two-coordinate detectors based on a cascade of Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM) is working in the KEDR experiment at the VEPP-4M collider in the tagging system that detects electrons and positrons that lost their energy in two-photon interactions and left the equilibrium orbit due to a dedicated magnetic system. Another set of cascaded GEM detectors is developed for the almost-real Photon Tagging System (PTS) of the DEUTRON facility at the VEPP-3 storage ring. The PTS contains three very light detectors with very high spatial resolution (below 50 μm). Dedicated detectors based on cascaded GEMs are developed for the extracted electron beam facility at the VEPP-4M collider. These devices will allow precise particle tracking with minimal multiple scattering due to very low material content. An upgrade of the coordinate system of the CMD-3 detector at the VEPP-2000 collider is proposed on the basis of the resistive micro-WELL (μ-rWELL). A research activity on this subject has just started.

  16. [Participation in high energy physics]: Task C, Particle physics and cosmology. Progress report, January 1991--April 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S.

    1992-05-01

    Over the past year or so the research of our group has spanned many topics at the boundary of particle physics and cosmology. The major focus has been in the general areas of inflation, cosmological phase transitions, astrophysical constraints to particle physics theories, and dark matter/structure formation as it relates to particle physics. Narrative summaries of the research of the individual group members are given in this paper.

  17. Trends in integrated circuit design for particle physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkin, E. V.

    2017-01-01

    Integrated circuits are one of the key complex units available to designers of multichannel detector setups. A whole number of factors makes Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) valuable for Particle Physics and Astrophysics experiments. Among them the most important ones are: integration scale, low power dissipation, radiation tolerance. In order to make possible future experiments in the intensity, cosmic, and energy frontiers today ASICs should provide new level of functionality at a new set of constraints and trade-offs, like low-noise high-dynamic range amplification and pulse shaping, high-speed waveform sampling, low power digitization, fast digital data processing, serialization and data transmission. All integrated circuits, necessary for physical instrumentation, should be radiation tolerant at an earlier not reached level (hundreds of Mrad) of total ionizing dose and allow minute almost 3D assemblies. The paper is based on literary source analysis and presents an overview of the state of the art and trends in nowadays chip design, using partially own ASIC lab experience. That shows a next stage of ising micro- and nanoelectronics in physical instrumentation.

  18. Particle physics and cosmology, Task C. Progress report, January 1992--April 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S.

    1993-05-01

    The research has spanned many topics at the boundary of particle physics and cosmology. The major focus has been in the general areas of inflationary cosmology, cosmological phase transitions, astrophysical constraints to particle physics theories, and dark matter/structure formation as it relates to particle physics. Some attention is given to axion physics. Narrative summaries of the research of the individual group members are given, followed by a list of publications.

  19. Cross-platform validation and analysis environment for particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Chekanov, S. V.; Pogrebnyak, I.; Wilbern, D.

    2017-01-01

    A multi-platform validation and analysis framework for public Monte Carlo simulation for high-energy particle collisions is discussed. The front-end of this framework uses the Python programming language, while the back-end is written in Java, which provides a multi-platform environment that can be run from a web browser and can easily be deployed at the grid sites. The analysis package includes all major software tools used in high-energy physics, such as Lorentz vectors, jet algorithms, histogram packages, graphic canvases, and tools for providing data access. This multi-platform software suite, designed to minimize OS-specific maintenance and deployment time, is used for online validation of Monte Carlo event samples through a web interface.

  20. [Research in theoretical and experimental elementary particle physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    This report gives summaries of particle physics research conducted by different group members for Task A. A summary of work on the CLEO experiment and detector is included for Task B along with a list of CLEO publications. During the present grant period for Task C, the authors had responsibility for the design, assembly, and programming of the high-resolution spectrometer which looks for narrow peaks in the output of the cavity in the LLNL experiment. They successfully carried out this task. Velocity peaks are expected in the spectrum of dark matter axions on Earth. The computing proposal (Task S) is submitted in support of the High Energy Experiment (CLEO, Fermilab, CMS) and the Theory tasks.

  1. Superconducting Kinetic Inductance Detectors for astronomy and particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, M.; Goupy, J.; D`Addabbo, A.; Benoit, A.; Bourrion, O.; Catalano, A.; Monfardini, A.

    2016-07-01

    Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID) represent a novel detector technology based on superconducting resonators. Since their first demonstration in 2003, they have been rapidly developed and are today a strong candidate for present and future experiments in the different bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. This has been possible thanks to the unique features of such devices: in particular, they couple a very high sensitivity to their intrinsic suitability for frequency domain multiplexed readout, making the fabrication of large arrays of ultrasensitive detectors possible. There are many fields of application that can profit of such detectors. Here, we will briefly review the principle of operation of a KID, and give two sample applications, to mm-wave astronomy and to particle physics.

  2. FOREWORD: Corfu Summer Institute on Elementary Particle Physics (CORFU2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulos, Konstantinos; Antoniadis, Ignatios; Fanourakis, George; Kehagias, Alexandros; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Wess, Julius; Zoupanos, George

    2006-12-01

    These are the Proceedings of the Corfu Summer Institute on Elementary Particle Physics (CORFU2005) (http://corfu2005.physics.uoi.gr), which took place in Corfu, Greece from 4 - 26 September 2005. The Corfu Summer Institute has a very long, interesting and successful history, some elements of which can be found in http://www.corfu-summer-institute.gr. In short, the Corfu Meeting started as a Summer School on Elementary Particle Physics (EPP) mostly for Greek graduate students in 1982 and has developed into a leading international Summer Institute in the field of EPP, both experimental and theoretical, providing in addition a very rich outreach programme to teachers and school students. The CORFU2005 Summer Institute on EPP, although based on the general format that has been developed and established in the Corfu Meetings during previous years, is characterized by the fact that it was a full realization of a new idea, which started experimentally in the previous two Corfu Meetings. The successful new ingredient was that three European Marie Curie Research Training Networks decided to hold their Workshops in Corfu during September 2005 and they managed to coordinate the educational part of their meetings to a huge Summer School called `The 8th Hellenic School on Elementary Particle Physics' (4 - 11 September). The European Networks which joined forces to materialize this project and the corresponding dates of their own Workshops are:

  3. The Third Generation as a Probe for New Physics: Experimental and Technological Approach (4 - 11 September)
  4. The Quest for Unification Theory Confronts Experiment (11 - 18 September)
  5. Constituents Fundamental Forces and Symmetries of the Universe (20 - 26 September)
  6. To these Workshops has been added a Satellite one called `Noncommutative Geometry in Field and String Theory', and some extra speakers have been invited to complement the full programme of CORFU2005, some of whom have integrated into the Workshop

  7. European Particle Physics Masterclasses Make Students into Scientists for a Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, K. E.; Kobel, M.; Hillebrandt, D.; Engeln, K.; Euler, M.

    2007-01-01

    In 2005 the European particle physics masterclasses attracted 3000 students from 18 European countries to visit one of 58 universities and education centres. The participants worked with data from real high energy particle collisions, learned about particle physics, and experienced research and education environments at European universities. In…

  8. European Particle Physics Masterclasses Make Students into Scientists for a Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, K. E.; Kobel, M.; Hillebrandt, D.; Engeln, K.; Euler, M.

    2007-01-01

    In 2005 the European particle physics masterclasses attracted 3000 students from 18 European countries to visit one of 58 universities and education centres. The participants worked with data from real high energy particle collisions, learned about particle physics, and experienced research and education environments at European universities. In…

  9. PREFACE: High Energy Particle Physics Workshop (HEPPW2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornell, Alan S.; Mellado, B.

    2015-10-01

    The motivation for this workshop began with the discovery of the Higgs boson three years ago, and the realisation that many problems remain in particle physics, such as why there is more matter than anti-matter, better determining the still poorly measured parameters of the strong force, explaining possible sources for dark matter, naturalness etc. While the newly discovered Higgs boson seems to be compatible with the Standard Model, current experimental accuracy is far from providing a definitive statement with regards to the nature of this new particle. There is a lot of room for physics beyond the Standard Model to emerge in the exploration of the Higgs boson. Recent measurements in high-energy heavy ion collisions at the LHC have shed light on the complex dynamics that govern high-density quark-gluon interactions. An array of results from the ALICE collaboration have been highlighted in a recent issue of CERN courier. The physics program of high-energy heavy ion collisions promises to further unveil the intricacies of high-density quark-gluon plasma physics. The great topicality of high energy physics research has also seen a rapid increase in the number of researchers in South Africa pursuing such studies, both experimentally through the ATLAS and ALICE colliders at CERN, and theoretically. Young researchers and graduate students largely populate these research groups, with little experience in presenting their work, and few support structures (to their knowledge) to share experiences with. Whilst many schools and workshops have sought to educate these students on the theories and tools they will need to pursue their research, few have provided them with a platform to present their work. As such, this workshop discussed the various projects being pursued by graduate students and young researchers in South Africa, enabling them to develop networks for future collaboration and discussion. The workshop took place at the iThemba Laboratories - North facility, in

  10. [High energy particle physics at Purdue, 1990--1991]. [Dept. of Physics, Purdue Univ. , West Lafayette, Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Gaidos, J.A.; Loeffler, F.J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Palfrey, T.R.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.

    1991-05-01

    Progress made in the experimental and theoretical high energy physics program is reviewed. The CLEO experiment, particle astrophysics, dynamical symmetry breaking in gauge theories, the Collider Detector at Fermilab, the TOPAZ Experiment, and elementary particle physics beyond the standard model are included.

  11. Review of lattice results concerning low-energy particle physics.

    PubMed

    Aoki, S; Aoki, Y; Bernard, C; Blum, T; Colangelo, G; Della Morte, M; Dürr, S; El-Khadra, A X; Fukaya, H; Horsley, R; Jüttner, A; Kaneko, T; Laiho, J; Lellouch, L; Leutwyler, H; Lubicz, V; Lunghi, E; Necco, S; Onogi, T; Pena, C; Sachrajda, C T; Sharpe, S R; Simula, S; Sommer, R; Van de Water, R S; Vladikas, A; Wenger, U; Wittig, H

    We review lattice results related to pion, kaon, [Formula: see text]- and [Formula: see text]-meson physics with the aim of making them easily accessible to the particle-physics community. More specifically, we report on the determination of the light-quark masses, the form factor [Formula: see text], arising in semileptonic [Formula: see text] transition at zero momentum transfer, as well as the decay-constant ratio [Formula: see text] of decay constants and its consequences for the CKM matrix elements [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. Furthermore, we describe the results obtained on the lattice for some of the low-energy constants of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] Chiral Perturbation Theory and review the determination of the [Formula: see text] parameter of neutral kaon mixing. The inclusion of heavy-quark quantities significantly expands the FLAG scope with respect to the previous review. Therefore, we focus here on [Formula: see text]- and [Formula: see text]-meson decay constants, form factors, and mixing parameters, since these are most relevant for the determination of CKM matrix elements and the global CKM unitarity-triangle fit. In addition we review the status of lattice determinations of the strong coupling constant [Formula: see text].

  12. Review of lattice results concerning low-energy particle physics

    DOE PAGES

    Aoki, S.; Aoki, Y.; Bernard, C.; ...

    2014-09-01

    We review lattice results related to pion, kaon, D- and B-meson physics with the aim of making them easily accessible to the particle physics community. More specifically, we report on the determination of the light-quark masses, the form factor f+(0), arising in semileptonic K -> pi transition at zero momentum transfer, as well as the decay constant ratio fK/fpi of decay constants and its consequences for the CKM matrix elements Vus and Vud. Furthermore, we describe the results obtained on the lattice for some of the low-energy constants of SU(2)LxSU(2)R and SU(3)LxSU(3)R Chiral Perturbation Theory and review the determination ofmore » the BK parameter of neutral kaon mixing. The inclusion of heavy-quark quantities significantly expands the FLAG scope with respect to the previous review. Therefore, for this review, we focus on D- and B-meson decay constants, form factors, and mixing parameters, since these are most relevant for the determination of CKM matrix elements and the global CKM unitarity-triangle fit. In addition we review the status of lattice determinations of the strong coupling constant alpha_s.« less

  13. Review of lattice results concerning low-energy particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, S.; Aoki, Y.; Bernard, C.; Blum, T.; Colangelo, G.; Della Morte, M.; Dürr, S.; El-Khadra, A. X.; Fukaya, H.; Horsley, R.; Jüttner, A.; Kaneko, T.; Laiho, J.; Lellouch, L.; Leutwyler, H.; Lubicz, V.; Lunghi, E.; Necco, S.; Onogi, T.; Pena, C.; Sachrajda, C. T.; Sharpe, S. R.; Simula, S.; Sommer, R.; Van de Water, R. S.; Vladikas, A.; Wenger, U.; Wittig, H.

    2014-09-01

    We review lattice results related to pion, kaon, D- and B-meson physics with the aim of making them easily accessible to the particle physics community. More specifically, we report on the determination of the light-quark masses, the form factor f+(0), arising in semileptonic K -> pi transition at zero momentum transfer, as well as the decay constant ratio fK/fpi of decay constants and its consequences for the CKM matrix elements Vus and Vud. Furthermore, we describe the results obtained on the lattice for some of the low-energy constants of SU(2)LxSU(2)R and SU(3)LxSU(3)R Chiral Perturbation Theory and review the determination of the BK parameter of neutral kaon mixing. The inclusion of heavy-quark quantities significantly expands the FLAG scope with respect to the previous review. Therefore, for this review, we focus on D- and B-meson decay constants, form factors, and mixing parameters, since these are most relevant for the determination of CKM matrix elements and the global CKM unitarity-triangle fit. In addition we review the status of lattice determinations of the strong coupling constant alpha_s.

  14. Probing the Vacuum of Particle Physics with Precise Laser Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consoli, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson at LHC confirms that what we experience as empty space should actually be thought as a condensate of elementary quanta. This condensate characterizes the physically realized form of relativity and could play the role of preferred reference frame in a modern Lorentzian approach. This observation suggests a new interpretative scheme to understand the unexplained residuals in the old ether-drift experiments where light was still propagating in gaseous systems. Differently from present vacuum experiments, where anyhow deviations from Special Relativity are expected to be at the limit of visibility, these now acquire a crucial importance and become consistent with the Earth's velocity of 370 km/s which characterizes the CMB anisotropy. In the same scheme, one can also understand the difference with the other experiments where light propagates in strongly bound systems such as solid or liquid transparent media. This non-trivial level of consistency motivates a new generation of precise laser interferometry experiments which explore the same particle physics vacuum and, in this sense, are complementary to those with high-energy accelerators.

  15. Data acquisition and control in particle physics and astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Gilbert

    To help understand the nature of matter and energy, Man has built sophisticated instruments with which to study the interactions of particles that have been accelerated to very high energies, creating, in microcosm, conditions thought to have existed at the time of origin of the universe (according to the big bang theory). These so-called particle colliders have been developed over a number of years to yield increasing interaction energies and energy resolution, resulting in improved particle identification. In this way, scientists have been able to detect particles produced as interaction products, leading to a 'standard model' of the structure of matter. At the same time the greatest laboratory of all, the universe itself, has been yielding ever increasing amounts of information. New telescopes such as the 'Hubble" and a new generation of 8-10 metre ground-based telescopes are already opening up new vistas of space, promising a much more detailed picture of the universe than hitherto. This thesis is about data acquisition and control in the two areas of research mentioned above. The first part deals with the design and construction of two data readout controllers for high energy physics experiments. Of these, the former was intended (and has been adopted in essence) for the data acquisition system of the ZEUS central tracking detector at DESY, Hamburg, and is based on the use of transputers for both controlling and data processing functions. The latter was developed with the much more demanding requirements of the projected Large Hadron Collider experiments in mind, and uses transputers as system controllers alongside other, more specialised, processors used for data reduction and trigger formation. The second part of the thesis concerns the use of an embedded processor in a totally different environment, namely, as the controlling element of an active polishing device intended for the production of highly aspherical optical mirrors for astronomical telescopes

  16. Guide to QSPIRES and the particle physics databases on SLACVM

    SciTech Connect

    Galic, H.

    1992-06-01

    SLAC, in collarboration with DESY, LBL, and several other institutions, maintains many databases of interest to the high energy physics community. You do not to have a computer account at SLAC to search through some of these databases, they can be reached via the remote server QSPIRES, set at the BITNET node SLACVM. This text describes, in great detail, how to search in the popular HEP database via QSPIRES, HEP contains bibliographic summaries of more than 200,000 particle physics papers. Other databases available remotely are also reviewed, and the registration procedure for those who would like to use QSPIRES is explained. To utilize QSPIRES, you must have access to a large computer network. It is not necessary that the network be BITNET; it may be a different one. However, a gateway must exist between your network and BITNET. It should be mentioned at BITNET users have some advantages in searching, e.g., the possibility of interactive communication with QSPIRES. Therefore, if you have a choice, let a BITNET machine be your base for QSPIRES searches. You will also need an authorization to use HEP and other databases; and should know the set of relevant commands and rules. The authorization is free, the commands are simple, and BITNET can be reached from all over the world. Join, therefore, the group of thousands of satisfied users, log on to your local computer, and from the comfort of your office or home fine, e.g., the number of citations of your most famous high energy physics paper.

  17. Guide to QSPIRES and the particle physics databases on SLACVM

    SciTech Connect

    Galic, H.

    1992-06-01

    SLAC, in collarboration with DESY, LBL, and several other institutions, maintains many databases of interest to the high energy physics community. You do not to have a computer account at SLAC to search through some of these databases, they can be reached via the remote server QSPIRES, set at the BITNET node SLACVM. This text describes, in great detail, how to search in the popular HEP database via QSPIRES, HEP contains bibliographic summaries of more than 200,000 particle physics papers. Other databases available remotely are also reviewed, and the registration procedure for those who would like to use QSPIRES is explained. To utilize QSPIRES, you must have access to a large computer network. It is not necessary that the network be BITNET; it may be a different one. However, a gateway must exist between your network and BITNET. It should be mentioned at BITNET users have some advantages in searching, e.g., the possibility of interactive communication with QSPIRES. Therefore, if you have a choice, let a BITNET machine be your base for QSPIRES searches. You will also need an authorization to use HEP and other databases; and should know the set of relevant commands and rules. The authorization is free, the commands are simple, and BITNET can be reached from all over the world. Join, therefore, the group of thousands of satisfied users, log on to your local computer, and from the comfort of your office or home fine, e.g., the number of citations of your most famous high energy physics paper.

  18. Elementary particle physics at the University of Florida. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Task A: theoretical elementary particle physics; Task B: experimental elementary particle physics; Task C: axion project; Task G: experimental research in collider physics; and Task S: computer acquisition. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  19. Learning about A level physics students’ understandings of particle physics using concept mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourlay, H.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a small-scale piece of research using concept mapping to elicit A level students’ understandings of particle physics. Fifty-nine year 12 (16- and 17 year-old) students from two London schools participated. The exercise took place during school physics lessons. Students were instructed how to make a concept map and were provided with 24 topic-specific key words. Students’ concept maps were analysed by identifying the knowledge propositions they represented, enumerating how many students had made each one, and by identifying errors and potential misconceptions, with reference to the specification they were studying. The only correct statement made by a majority of students in both schools was that annihilation takes place when matter and antimatter collide, although there was evidence that some students were unable to distinguish between annihilation and pair production. A high proportion of students knew of up, down and strange quarks, and that the electron is a lepton. However, some students appeared to have a misconception that everything is made of quarks. Students found it harder to classify tau particles than they did electrons and muons. Where students made incorrect links about muons and tau particles their concept maps suggested that they thought they were mesons or quarks.

  20. Experimental particle physics at the University of Pittsburgh

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, E. Jr.; Perera, U.; Shepard, P.F.; Thompson, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    During the past year Task A completed the HELIOS single and pair electron analyses and found no anomalous production or multiplicity dependence. The HELIOS electron-muon pair analysis continued in its search for lepton physics beyond the expected charm yields. Data taking began at the CMD2 detector at Novosibirsk. Measurements of the U. V. reflectivity and photomultiplier tests for the first Cerenkov counter to be used in the E865 experiment at BNL were carried out, along with the development of a general ray-tracing code. The design of the Cerenkov counter for E865 along with development of light mirror fabrication techniques were a major part of the Task A program. The principal efforts of Task B, the Fermilab program, have been the completion of the analysis of the 1987--1988 data with resulting publications, completion of the 1990--1991 data run, and the beginning of the analysis of the 1990--1991 data. In addition, the Task B group is taking a leadership role in developing a proposal to Fermilab for the upgrade of the CDF silicon vertex detector in preparation for the 1995 data run. This proposal is to be presented to the laboratory management in time for the fall Fermilab Program Advisory Committee meeting. Task C has recently submitted results of its fractionally charged particle searches, placing new upper limits on the abundance of naturally-occurring fractionally-charged particles in various materials. This group has recently been approved by the Brookhaven management for an exposure of their p-i-n diodes in a high intensity proton beam. This measurement, along with its subsequent analysis, will complete the program.

  21. Experimental particle physics at the University of Pittsburgh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, E., Jr.; Perera, U.; Shepard, P. F.; Thompson, J. A.

    1992-04-01

    During the past year, task A completed the HELIOS single and pair electron analyses and found no anomalous production or multiplicity dependence. The HELIOS electron-muon pair analysis continued in its search for lepton physics beyond the expected charm yields. Data taking began at the CMD2 detector at Novosibirsk. Measurements of the UV reflectivity and photomultiplier tests for the first Cerenkov counter to be used in the E865 experiment at BNL were carried out, along with the development of a general ray-tracing code. The design of the Cerenkov counter for E865 along with development of light mirror fabrication techniques were a major part of the task A program. The principal efforts of task B, the Fermilab program, have been the completion of the analysis of the 1987-1988 data with resulting publications, completion of the 1990-1991 data run, and the beginning of the analysis of the 1990-1991 data. In addition, the task B group is taking a leadership role in developing a proposal to Fermilab for the upgrade of the CDF silicon vertex detector in preparation for the 1995 data run. This proposal is to be presented to the laboratory management in time for the fall Fermilab Program Advisory Committee meeting. Task C has recently submitted results of its fractionally charged particle searches, placing new upper limits on the abundance of naturally-occurring fractionally-charged particles in various materials. This group has recently been approved by the Brookhaven management for an exposure of their p-i-n diodes in a high intensity proton beam. This measurement, along with its subsequent analysis, will complete the program.

  22. Missing experimental challenges to the Standard Model of particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perovic, Slobodan

    The success of particle detection in high energy physics colliders critically depends on the criteria for selecting a small number of interactions from an overwhelming number that occur in the detector. It also depends on the selection of the exact data to be analyzed and the techniques of analysis. The introduction of automation into the detection process has traded the direct involvement of the physicist at each stage of selection and analysis for the efficient handling of vast amounts of data. This tradeoff, in combination with the organizational changes in laboratories of increasing size and complexity, has resulted in automated and semi-automated systems of detection. Various aspects of the semi-automated regime were greatly diminished in more generic automated systems, but turned out to be essential to a number of surprising discoveries of anomalous processes that led to theoretical breakthroughs, notably the establishment of the Standard Model of particle physics. The automated systems are much more efficient in confirming specific hypothesis in narrow energy domains than in performing broad exploratory searches. Thus, in the main, detection processes relying excessively on automation are more likely to miss potential anomalies and impede potential theoretical advances. I suggest that putting substantially more effort into the study of electron-positron colliders and increasing its funding could minimize the likelihood of missing potential anomalies, because detection in such an environment can be handled by the semi-automated regime-unlike detection in hadron colliders. Despite virtually unavoidable excessive reliance on automated detection in hadron colliders, their development has been deemed a priority because they can operate at currently highest energy levels. I suggest, however, that a focus on collisions at the highest achievable energy levels diverts funds from searches for potential anomalies overlooked due to tradeoffs at the previous energy

  23. Essay: the tau lepton and thirty years of changes in elementary particle physics research.

    PubMed

    Perl, M L

    2008-02-22

    Starting with the 1975 discovery of the tau lepton, I look back on the last three decades of change in the substance and style of experimental and theoretical research in elementary particle physics. I recount the major accomplishments of those decades and predict a bright future for particle physics in the next two decades. Turning to three problems, I lament the change in theoretical style and taste, I discuss the growth in the complexity, size, and cost of particle physics experiments, and I conclude with a pessimistic comment on the size of particle physics collaborations.

  24. NEW APPROACHES: The nature of force in particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allday, J.

    1997-09-01

    The interaction between particles can be pictured as an exchange of virtual particles, but this view creates doubts in many people. Feynman diagrams can help in this but a consideration of fields is important.

  1. Particle physics meets cosmology - The search for decaying neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    The fundamental physical implications of the possible detection of massive neutrinos are discussed, with an emphasis on the Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) of matter. The Newtonian and general-relativistic pictures of the fundamental forces are compared, and the reduction of electromagnetic and weak forces to one force in the GUTs is explained. The cosmological consequences of the curved-spacetime gravitation concept are considered. Quarks, leptons, and neutrinos are characterized in a general treatment of elementary quantum mechanics. The universe is described in terms of quantized fields, the noninteractive 'particle' fields and the force fields, and cosmology becomes the study of the interaction of gravitation with the other fields, of the 'freezing out' of successive fields with the expansion and cooling of the universe. While the visible universe is the result of the clustering of the quark and electron fields, the distribution of the large number of quanta in neutrino field, like the mass of the neutrino, are unknown. Cosmological models which attribute anomalies in the observed motions of galaxies and stars to clusters or shells of massive neutrinos are shown to be consistent with a small but nonzero neutrino mass and a universe near the open/closed transition point, but direct detection of the presence of massive neutrinos by the UV emission of their decay is required to verify these hypotheses.

  2. A Reconfigurable Instrument System for Nuclear and Particle Physics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Ziru; Li, Feng; Jiang, Xiao; Jin, Ge

    2014-04-01

    We developed a reconfigurable nuclear instrument system (RNIS) that could satisfy the requirements of diverse nuclear and particle physics experiments, and the inertial confinement fusion diagnostic. Benefiting from the reconfigurable hardware structure and digital pulse processing technology, RNIS shakes off the restrictions of cumbersome crates and miscellaneous modules. It retains all the advantages of conventional nuclear instruments and is more flexible and portable. RNIS is primarily composed of a field programmable hardware board and relevant PC software. Separate analog channels are designed to provide different functions, such as amplifiers, ADC, fast discriminators and Schmitt discriminators for diverse experimental purposes. The high-performance field programmable gate array could complete high-precision time interval measurement, histogram accumulation, counting, and coincidence anticoincidence measurement. To illustrate the prospects of RNIS, a series of applications to the experiments are described in this paper. The first, for which RNIS was originally developed, involves nuclear energy spectrum measurement with a scintillation detector and photomultiplier. The second experiment applies RNIS to a G-M tube counting experiment, and in the third, it is applied to a quantum communication experiment through reconfiguration.

  3. Particle physics models of inflation and curvaton scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumdar, Anupam; Rocher, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    We review the particle theory origin of inflation and curvaton mechanisms for generating large scale structures and the observed temperature anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. Since inflaton or curvaton energy density creates all matter, it is important to understand the process of reheating and preheating into the relevant degrees of freedom required for the success of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. We discuss two distinct classes of models, one where inflaton and curvaton belong to the hidden sector, which are coupled to the Standard Model gauge sector very weakly. There is another class of models of inflaton and curvaton, which are embedded within Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) gauge group and beyond, and whose origins lie within gauge invariant combinations of supersymmetric quarks and leptons. Their masses and couplings are all well motivated from low energy physics, therefore such models provide us with a unique opportunity that they can be verified/falsified by the CMB data and also by the future collider and non-collider based experiments. We then briefly discuss the stringy origin of inflation, alternative cosmological scenarios, and bouncing universes.

  4. Particle physics meets cosmology - The search for decaying neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    The fundamental physical implications of the possible detection of massive neutrinos are discussed, with an emphasis on the Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) of matter. The Newtonian and general-relativistic pictures of the fundamental forces are compared, and the reduction of electromagnetic and weak forces to one force in the GUTs is explained. The cosmological consequences of the curved-spacetime gravitation concept are considered. Quarks, leptons, and neutrinos are characterized in a general treatment of elementary quantum mechanics. The universe is described in terms of quantized fields, the noninteractive 'particle' fields and the force fields, and cosmology becomes the study of the interaction of gravitation with the other fields, of the 'freezing out' of successive fields with the expansion and cooling of the universe. While the visible universe is the result of the clustering of the quark and electron fields, the distribution of the large number of quanta in neutrino field, like the mass of the neutrino, are unknown. Cosmological models which attribute anomalies in the observed motions of galaxies and stars to clusters or shells of massive neutrinos are shown to be consistent with a small but nonzero neutrino mass and a universe near the open/closed transition point, but direct detection of the presence of massive neutrinos by the UV emission of their decay is required to verify these hypotheses.

  5. Studies in theoretical particle physics. Progress report, 1990--1991

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.B.

    1991-07-01

    This proposal focuses on research on three distinct areas of particle physics: (1) Nonperturbative QCD. I tend to continue work on analytic modelling of nonperturbative effects in the strong interactions. I have been investigating the theoretical connection between the nonrelativistic quark model and QCD. The primary motivation has been to understand the experimental observation of nonzero matrix elements involving current strange quarks in ordinary matter -- which in the quark model has no strange quark component. This has led to my present work on understanding constituent (quark model) quarks as collective excitations of QCD degrees of freedom. (2) Weak Scale Baryogenesis. A continuation of work on baryogenesis in the early universe from weak interactions. In particular, an investigation of baryogenesis occurring during the weak phase transition through anomalous baryon violating processes in the standard model of weak interactions. (3) Flavor and Compositeness. Further investigation of a new mechanism that I recently discovered for dynamical mass generation for fermions, which naturally leads to a family hierarchy structure. A discussion of recent past work is found in the next section, followed by an outline of the proposed research. A recent publication from each of these three areas is attached to this proposal.

  6. Alginate gel particles-A review of production techniques and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Ching, Su Hung; Bansal, Nidhi; Bhandari, Bhesh

    2017-04-13

    The application of hydrocolloid gel particles is potentially useful in food, chemical, and pharmaceutical industries. Alginate gel particles are one of the more commonly used hydrocolloid gel particles due to them being biocompatible, nontoxic, biodegradable, cheap, and simple to produce. They are particularly valued for their application in encapsulation. Encapsulation in alginate gel particles confers protective benefits to cells, DNA, nutrients, and microbes. Slow release of flavors, minerals, and drugs can also be achieved by encapsulation in gel particles. The particle size and shape of the gel particles are crucial for specific applications. In this review, current methods of producing alginate gel particles will be discussed, taking into account their advantages, disadvantages, scalability, and impact on particle size. The physical properties of alginate gel particles will determine the effectiveness in different application conditions. This review will cover the current understanding of the alginate biopolymer, gelation mechanisms and factors affecting release properties, gel strength, and rheology of the alginate gel particle systems.

  7. PREFACE: The EPS High Energy Particle Physics Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Roger

    2008-03-01

    HEPP2007, the EPS High Energy Particle Physics Conference, was held in Manchester from July 19-26 2007. It brought together 580 delegates across the whole subject: from string theorists to detector technologists, from young postgraduate students to senior professors. Geographically they came from the UK, from the rest of Europe, from North America, and from the rest of the world. It covered the whole spectrum of the subject, not only accelerator-based experiments but also its astrophysical and cosmological aspects. The parallel and plenary talks can be found in these proceedings. A key feature of the conference, as always, was the award of the prizes: this year the EPS prize was awarded to Makoto Kobayashi and Toshihide Maskawa for their explanation of CP violation with a 6 quark model—Kobayashi came to accept it in person. The Gribov medal went to Niklas Beisert, the outreach prize to Richard Jacobsson and Charles Timmermans and the Young Physicist prizer to I Furic, G Gomez-Ceballos and S Menzemer. Parallel sessions were held in Manchester University, and plenary talks were held in the Bridgewater Hall in Manchester Town centre, a magnificent modern venue whose positive and co-operative staff enabled the conference to make the most of the impressive surroundings. We were able to put the hall to its proper purpose one evening with a concert by the Fairey Band—one of the distinctive brass bands who form part of the rich musical tradition of the North of England, and came as something new and different to many of the delegates. The conference ran smoothly and successfully, thanks largely to hard work by the local organising committee who devoted a lot of time to planning, producing ideas, and anticipating potential problems. Many of them were not from Manchester itself but from other universities and laboratories in the North of England, so their dedication was especially appreciated. The EPS committee also played a major part, by the selection of plenary

  8. A data transmission method for particle physics experiments based on Ethernet physical layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xi-Ru; Cao, Ping; Zheng, Jia-Jun

    2015-11-01

    Due to its advantages of universality, flexibility and high performance, fast Ethernet is widely used in readout system design for modern particle physics experiments. However, Ethernet is usually used together with the TCP/IP protocol stack, which makes it difficult to implement readout systems because designers have to use the operating system to process this protocol. Furthermore, TCP/IP degrades the transmission efficiency and real-time performance. To maximize the performance of Ethernet in physics experiment applications, a data readout method based on the physical layer (PHY) is proposed. In this method, TCP/IP is replaced with a customized and simple protocol, which makes it easier to implement. On each readout module, data from the front-end electronics is first fed into an FPGA for protocol processing and then sent out to a PHY chip controlled by this FPGA for transmission. This kind of data path is fully implemented by hardware. From the side of the data acquisition system (DAQ), however, the absence of a standard protocol causes problems for the network related applications. To solve this problem, in the operating system kernel space, data received by the network interface card is redirected from the traditional flow to a specified memory space by a customized program. This memory space can easily be accessed by applications in user space. For the purpose of verification, a prototype system has been designed and implemented. Preliminary test results show that this method can meet the requirements of data transmission from the readout module to the DAQ with an efficient and simple manner. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11005107) and Independent Projects of State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics (201301)

  9. Let's Have a Coffee with the Standard Model of Particle Physics!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woithe, Julia; Wiener, Gerfried J.; Van der Veken, Frederik F.

    2017-01-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics is one of the most successful theories in physics and describes the fundamental interactions between elementary particles. It is encoded in a compact description, the so-called "Lagrangian," which even fits on t-shirts and coffee mugs. This mathematical formulation, however, is complex and only…

  10. [High energy particle physics at Purdue, 1990--1991]. Progress report, January 1990--May 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Gaidos, J.A.; Loeffler, F.J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Palfrey, T.R.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.

    1991-05-01

    Progress made in the experimental and theoretical high energy physics program is reviewed. The CLEO experiment, particle astrophysics, dynamical symmetry breaking in gauge theories, the Collider Detector at Fermilab, the TOPAZ Experiment, and elementary particle physics beyond the standard model are included.

  11. Annihilation physics of exotic galactic dark matter particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1990-01-01

    Various theoretical arguments make exotic heavy neutral weakly interacting fermions, particularly those predicted by supersymmetry theory, attractive candidates for making up the large amount of unseen gravitating mass in galactic halos. Such particles can annihilate with each other, producing secondary particles of cosmic-ray energies, among which are antiprotons, positrons, neutrinos, and gamma-rays. Spectra and fluxes of these annihilation products can be calculated, partly by making use of positron electron collider data and quantum chromodynamic models of particle production derived therefrom. These spectra may provide detectable signatures of exotic particle remnants of the big bang.

  12. Planning the Future of U.S. Particle Physics (Snowmass 2013): Chapter 8: Instrumentation Frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.; et al.

    2014-01-23

    These reports present the results of the 2013 Community Summer Study of the APS Division of Particles and Fields ("Snowmass 2013") on the future program of particle physics in the U.S. Chapter 8, on the Instrumentation Frontier, discusses the instrumentation needs of future experiments in the Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic Frontiers, promising new technologies for particle physics research, and issues of gathering resources for long-term research in this area.

  13. Let’s have a coffee with the Standard Model of particle physics!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woithe, Julia; Wiener, Gerfried J.; Van der Veken, Frederik F.

    2017-05-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics is one of the most successful theories in physics and describes the fundamental interactions between elementary particles. It is encoded in a compact description, the so-called ‘Lagrangian’, which even fits on t-shirts and coffee mugs. This mathematical formulation, however, is complex and only rarely makes it into the physics classroom. Therefore, to support high school teachers in their challenging endeavour of introducing particle physics in the classroom, we provide a qualitative explanation of the terms of the Lagrangian and discuss their interpretation based on associated Feynman diagrams.

  14. Proceedings of the sixth international conference on electronics for particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Blanar, G.J.; Sumner, R.L.

    1997-12-31

    The Sixth Conference on Electronics for Particle Physics continued the LeCroy tradition of providing a unique forum for the leaders in the field to meet, report and compare notes on what has become one of the most important (and expensive) components of a particle physics physics experiments today. As our field continues to depend on special electronics developed for particle physics to even make the experiments possible, this conference, along with the IEEE National Science Symposium and the LHC Electronics Conference have become essential if we are to meet the experiment`s severe time and financial commitments.

  15. J. J. Sakurai Prize for Theoretical Particle Physics Talk: The Boundless Horizons of Supercollider Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigg, Chris

    2011-04-01

    The Large Hadron Collider at CERN is moving the experimental frontier of particle physics to the domain of electroweak symmetry breaking, reaching energies around one trillion electron volts for collisions among the basic constituents of matter. We do not know what the new wave of exploration will find, but the discoveries we make and the new puzzles we encounter are certain to change the face of particle physics and echo through neighboring sciences. In this new world, we confidently expect to learn what sets electromagnetism apart from the weak interactions, with profound implications for deceptively simple questions: Why are there atoms? Why chemistry? What makes stable structures possible? A pivotal step will be finding the Higgs boson-or whatever takes its place -and exploring its properties. But we hope for much more. More predictive extensions of the electroweak theory, including dynamical symmetry breaking and supersymmetry, imply new kinds of matter that would be within reach of LHC experiments. We suspect that candidates for the dark matter of the Universe could also await discovery on the TeV scale. The strong interactions may hold their own surprises. As we unravel the riddle of electroweak symmetry breaking, prospects arise for other new insights: into the different forms of matter, the unity of quarks and leptons, and the nature of spacetime. The questions in play all seem linked to one another-and to the kinship of the weak and electromagnetic interactions. I will speak of the evolving dialogue between theory and experiment, highlighting the work before us. Fermilab is operated by the Fermi Research Alliance under contract no. DE-AC02-07CH11359 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  16. Fluorescent eco-particles for surface flow physics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauro, F.; Porfiri, M.; Grimaldi, S.

    2013-03-01

    In this letter, we describe a novel methodology for fabricating inexpensive environmentally-friendly fluorescent microparticles for quantitative surface flow visualization. Particles are synthesized from natural white beeswax and a highly diluted solution of a nontoxic fluorescent red dye. Bead fluorescence exhibits a long lifetime in adverse conditions, such as exposure to weathering agents, and is enhanced by Ultra Violet radiation. The fluorescent eco-particles are integrated in a particle image velocimetry study of circular hydraulic jump to demonstrate their feasibility in tracing complex surface flows.

  17. Particle Physics Primer: Explaining the Standard Model of Matter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vondracek, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Standard Model, a basic model of the universe that describes electromagnetic force, weak nuclear force radioactivity, and the strong nuclear force responsible for holding particles within the nucleus together. (YDS)

  18. Particle Physics Primer: Explaining the Standard Model of Matter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vondracek, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Standard Model, a basic model of the universe that describes electromagnetic force, weak nuclear force radioactivity, and the strong nuclear force responsible for holding particles within the nucleus together. (YDS)

  19. Physics at the Frontier HS Teacher Workshop: bringing particle physics and cloud chambers into the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, Alyx; Bedard, Jamie; Bellis, Matthew; CMS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    In the summer of 2015, we hosted 10 high school teachers for a three-day ``Physics at the Frontier'' Workshop. The mornings were spent learning about particle physics, CMS and the LHC, and radiation safety while the afternoons were spent building turn-key cloud chambers for use in their classrooms. The basic cloud chamber design uses Peltier thermoelectric coolers, rather than dry ice, and instructions can be found in multiple places online. For a robust build procedure and for easy use in the classroom, we redesigned parts of the construction process to make it easier to put together while holding costs below 200 per chamber. In addition to this new design, we also created a website with instructions for those who are interested in building their own using this design. This workshop was funded in part by a minigrant for Outreach and Education from the USCMS collaboration. Our experience with the workshop and the lessons learned from the cloud chamber design will be discussed. This work was funded in part by NSF Grants PHY-1307562 and a USCMS-administered minigrant for Outreach and Education.

  20. Physics in ordered and disordered colloidal matter composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) microgel particles.

    PubMed

    Yunker, Peter J; Chen, Ke; Gratale, Matthew D; Lohr, Matthew A; Still, Tim; Yodh, A G

    2014-05-01

    This review collects and describes experiments that employ colloidal suspensions to probe physics in ordered and disordered solids and related complex fluids. The unifying feature of this body of work is its clever usage of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) microgel particles. These temperature-sensitive colloidal particles provide experimenters with a 'knob' for in situ control of particle size, particle interaction and particle packing fraction that, in turn, influence the structural and dynamical behavior of the complex fluids and solids. A brief summary of PNIPAM particle synthesis and properties is given, followed by a synopsis of current activity in the field. The latter discussion describes a variety of soft matter investigations including those that explore formation and melting of crystals and clusters, and those that probe structure, rearrangement and rheology of disordered (jammed/glassy) and partially ordered matter. The review, therefore, provides a snapshot of a broad range of physics phenomenology which benefits from the unique properties of responsive microgel particles.

  1. Final Report for Studies in Elementary Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Piilonen, Leo; Takeuchi, Tatsu; Minic, Djordje; Link, Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    This is the final report of DOE Grant DE-FG05-92ER40709 awarded to the Virginia Tech high energy physics group. It covers the period February 1, 2010 through April 30, 2013. The high energy physics program at Virginia Tech supported by this grant is organized into three tasks: A for theory (Profs. Tatsu Takeuchi and Djordje Minic), B for heavy flavor physics with the Belle and Belle II experiments (Prof. Leo Piilonen), and N for neutrino physics (Profs. Jonathan Link and Piilonen).

  2. [Meta-analyses of quarks, baryons and mesons--a "Cochrane Collaboration" in particle physics].

    PubMed

    Sauerland, Stefan; Sauerland, Thankmar; Antes, Gerd; Barnett, R Michael

    2002-02-01

    Within the last 20 years meta-analysis has become an important research technique in medicine for integrating the results of independent studies. Meta-analytical techniques, however, are much older. In particle physics for 50 years now the properties of huge numbers of particles have been assessed in meta-analyses. The Cochrane Collaboration's counterpart in physics is the Particle Data Group. This article compares methodological and organisational aspects of meta-analyses in medicine and physics. Several interesting parallels exist, especially with regard to methodology.

  3. Laser induced x-ray `RADAR' particle physics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockley, D.; Deas, R.; Moss, R.; Wilson, L. A.; Rusby, D.; Neely, D.

    2016-05-01

    The technique of high-power laser-induced plasma acceleration can be used to generate a variety of diverse effects including the emission of X-rays, electrons, neutrons, protons and radio-frequency radiation. A compact variable source of this nature could support a wide range of potential applications including single-sided through-barrier imaging, cargo and vehicle screening, infrastructure inspection, oncology and structural failure analysis. This paper presents a verified particle physics simulation which replicates recent results from experiments conducted at the Central Laser Facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), Didcot, UK. The RAL experiment demonstrated the generation of backscattered X-rays from test objects via the bremsstrahlung of an incident electron beam, the electron beam itself being produced by Laser Wakefield Acceleration. A key initial objective of the computer simulation was to inform the experimental planning phase on the predicted magnitude of the backscattered X-rays likely from the test objects. This objective was achieved and the computer simulation was used to show the viability of the proposed concept (Laser-induced X-ray `RADAR'). At the more advanced stages of the experimental planning phase, the simulation was used to gain critical knowledge of where it would be technically feasible to locate key diagnostic equipment within the experiment. The experiment successfully demonstrated the concept of X-ray `RADAR' imaging, achieved by using the accurate timing information of the backscattered X-rays relative to the ultra-short laser pulse used to generate the electron beam. By using fast response X-ray detectors it was possible to derive range information for the test objects being scanned. An X-ray radar `image' (equivalent to a RADAR B-scan slice) was produced by combining individual X-ray temporal profiles collected at different points along a horizontal distance line scan. The same image formation process was used to generate

  4. The influence of human physical activity and contaminated clothing type on particle resuspension.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, A; Byrne, M A

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to experimentally quantify the influence of three variables on the level of resuspension of hazardous aerosol particles from clothing. Variables investigated include physical activity level (two levels, low and high), surface type (four different clothing material types), and time i.e. the rate at which particles resuspend. A mixture of three monodisperse tracer-labelled powders, with median diameters of 3, 5, and 10 microns, was used to "contaminate" the samples, and the resuspended particles were analysed in real-time using an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS), and also by Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). The overall finding was that physical activity resulted in up to 67% of the contamination deposited on clothing being resuspended back into the air. A detailed examination of the influence of physical activity level on resuspension, from NAA, revealed that the average resuspended fraction (RF) of particles at low physical activity was 28 ± 8%, and at high physical activity was 30 ± 7%, while the APS data revealed a tenfold increase in the cumulative mass of airborne particles during high physical activity in comparison to that during low physical activity. The results also suggest that it is not the contaminated clothing's fibre type which influences particle resuspension, but the material's weave pattern (and hence the material's surface texture). Investigation of the time variation in resuspended particle concentrations indicated that the data were separable into two distinct regimes: the first (occurring within the first 1.5 min) having a high, positive rate of change of airborne particle concentration relative to the second regime. The second regime revealed a slower rate of change of particle concentration and remained relatively unchanged for the remainder of each resuspension event. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Elementary particle physics. Progress report, 1993--1995

    SciTech Connect

    Izen, J.M.

    1997-10-01

    A brief summary is given for each of the following topics: (1) Beijing Spectrometer (BES) run history and plans; (2) BES physics topics; (3) UTD BES personnel; (4) UTD physics analysis of 4.03 GeV data; (5) BES software and data processing; (5) UTD computing upgrade; (6) PEPII b Factory; and (7) budget justification.

  6. Physical dynamics of quasi-particles in nonlinear wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christov, Ivan; Christov, C. I.

    2008-02-01

    By treating the centers of solitons as point particles and studying their discrete dynamics, we demonstrate a new approach to the quantization of the soliton solutions of the sine-Gordon equation, one of the first model nonlinear field equations. In particular, we show that a linear superposition of the non-interacting shapes of two solitons offers a qualitative (and to a good approximation quantitative) description of the true two-soliton solution, provided that the trajectories of the centers of the superimposed solitons are considered unknown. Via variational calculus, we establish that the dynamics of the quasi-particles obey a pseudo-Newtonian law, which includes cross-mass terms. The successful identification of the governing equations of the (discrete) quasi-particles from the (continuous) field equation shows that the proposed approach provides a basis for the passage from the continuous to a discrete description of the field.

  7. Probing the frontiers of particle physics with tabletop-scale experiments.

    PubMed

    DeMille, David; Doyle, John M; Sushkov, Alexander O

    2017-09-08

    The field of particle physics is in a peculiar state. The standard model of particle theory successfully describes every fundamental particle and force observed in laboratories, yet fails to explain properties of the universe such as the existence of dark matter, the amount of dark energy, and the preponderance of matter over antimatter. Huge experiments, of increasing scale and cost, continue to search for new particles and forces that might explain these phenomena. However, these frontiers also are explored in certain smaller, laboratory-scale "tabletop" experiments. This approach uses precision measurement techniques and devices from atomic, quantum, and condensed-matter physics to detect tiny signals due to new particles or forces. Discoveries in fundamental physics may well come first from small-scale experiments of this type. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  8. Physical Models for Particle Tracking Simulations in the RF Gap

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P.; Holmes, Jeffrey A.

    2015-06-01

    This document describes the algorithms that are used in the PyORBIT code to track the particles accelerated in the Radio-Frequency cavities. It gives the mathematical description of the algorithms and the assumptions made in each case. The derived formulas have been implemented in the PyORBIT code. The necessary data for each algorithm are described in detail.

  9. The Higgs Particle: A Useful Analogy for Physics Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cid, Xabier; Cid, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    In November 2009, the largest experiment in history was restarted. Its prime target is the Higgs particle--the last remaining undiscovered piece of our current theory of matter. We present a very simple way to introduce this topic to senior secondary school students, using a comparison with the refractive index of light.

  10. The cosmic microwave background - A probe of particle physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    The current status of spectral distortions and angular anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background is reviewed, with emphasis on the role played by weakly interacting particle dark matter. Theoretical predictions and recent observational results are described, and prospects for future progress are summarized.

  11. The Higgs Particle: A Useful Analogy for Physics Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cid, Xabier; Cid, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    In November 2009, the largest experiment in history was restarted. Its prime target is the Higgs particle--the last remaining undiscovered piece of our current theory of matter. We present a very simple way to introduce this topic to senior secondary school students, using a comparison with the refractive index of light.

  12. The cosmic microwave background - A probe of particle physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    The current status of spectral distortions and angular anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background is reviewed, with emphasis on the role played by weakly interacting particle dark matter. Theoretical predictions and recent observational results are described, and prospects for future progress are summarized.

  13. European particle physics masterclasses make students into scientists for a day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, K. E.; Kobel, M.; Hillebrandt, D.; Engeln, K.; Euler, M.

    2007-11-01

    In 2005 the European particle physics masterclasses attracted 3000 students from 18 European countries to visit one of 58 universities and education centres. The participants worked with data from real high energy particle collisions, learned about particle physics, and experienced research and education environments at European universities. In an evaluation of the masterclasses 70% of the participants reported that they learned 'much' or 'very much' about the organization of scientific research and more than 80% of the participants, in some countries more than 95%, highly appreciated the masterclass programme in general. The appreciation of the masterclasses was independent of gender, pre-knowledge of particle physics and computer knowledge. An event like the masterclasses, where the students are engaged in an experimental research process, has the potential to add valuable experiences to physics education in school environments.

  14. Plato's Ideas and the Theories of Modern Particle Physics: Amazing Parallels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machleidt, Ruprecht

    2006-05-01

    It is generally known that the question, ``What are the most elementary particles that all matter is made from?'', was already posed in the antiquity. The Greek natural philosophers Leucippus and Democritus were the first to suggest that all matter was made from atoms. Therefore, most people perceive them as the ancient fathers of elementary particle physics. However, this perception is wrong. Modern particle physics is not just a simple atomism. The characteristic point of modern particle theory is that it is concerned with the symmetries underlying the particles we discover in experiment. More than 2000 years ago, a similar idea was already advanced by the Greek philosopher Plato in his dialogue Timaeus: Geometric symmetries generate the atoms from just a few even more elementary items. Plato's vision is amazingly close to the ideas of modern particle theory. This fact, which is unfortunately little known, has been pointed out repeatedly by Werner Heisenberg.

  15. Physical Investigations of Small Particles: (I) Aerosol Particle Charging and Flux Enhancement and (II) Whispering Gallery Mode Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Yglesias, Xerxes

    Part I: Particles are a key feature of planetary atmospheres. On Earth they represent the greatest source of uncertainty in the global energy budget. This uncertainty can be addressed by making more measurement, by improving the theoretical analysis of measurements, and by better modeling basic particle nucleation and initial particle growth within an atmosphere. This work will focus on the latter two methods of improvement. Uncertainty in measurements is largely due to particle charging. Accurate descriptions of particle charging are challenging because one deals with particles in a gas as opposed to a vacuum, so different length scales come into play. Previous studies have considered the effects of transition between the continuum and kinetic regime and the effects of two and three body interactions within the kinetic regime. These studies, however, use questionable assumptions about the charging process which resulted in skewed observations, and bias in the proposed dynamics of aerosol particles. These assumptions affect both the ions and particles in the system. Ions are assumed to be point monopoles that have a single characteristic speed rather than follow a distribution. Particles are assumed to be perfect conductors that have up to five elementary charges on them. The effects of three body interaction, ion-molecule-particle, are also overestimated. By revising this theory so that the basic physical attributes of both ions and particles and their interactions are better represented, we are able to make more accurate predictions of particle charging in both the kinetic and continuum regimes. The same revised theory that was used above to model ion charging can also be applied to the flux of neutral vapor phase molecules to a particle or initial cluster. Using these results we can model the vapor flux to a neutral or charged particle due to diffusion and electromagnetic interactions. In many classical theories currently applied to these models, the finite size

  16. U.C. Davis high energy particle physics research: Technical progress report -- 1990

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-31

    Summaries of progress made for this period is given for each of the following areas: (1) Task A--Experiment, H1 detector at DESY; (2) Task C--Experiment, AMY detector at KEK; (3) Task D--Experiment, fixed target detectors at Fermilab; (4) Task F--Experiment, PEP detector at SLAC and pixel detector; (5) Task B--Theory, particle physics; and (6) Task E--Theory, particle physics.

  17. Planning the Future of U.S. Particle Physics (Snowmass 2013): Chapter 4: Cosmic Frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, J. L.; Ritz, S.; Beatty, J. J.; Buckley, J.; Cowen, D. F.; Cushman, P.; Dodelson, S.; Galbiati, C.; Honscheid, K.; Hooper, D.; Kaplinghat, M.; Kusenko, A.; Matchev, K.; McKinsey, D.; Nelson, A. E.; Olinto, A.; Profumo, S.; Robertson, H.; Rosenberg, L.; Sinnis, G.; Tait, T. M.P.

    2014-01-23

    These reports present the results of the 2013 Community Summer Study of the APS Division of Particles and Fields ("Snowmass 2013") on the future program of particle physics in the U.S. Chapter 4, on the Cosmic Frontier, discusses the program of research relevant to cosmology and the early universe. This area includes the study of dark matter and the search for its particle nature, the study of dark energy and inflation, and cosmic probes of fundamental symmetries.

  18. Planning the Future of U.S. Particle Physics (Snowmass 2013): Chapter 3: Energy Frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, R.; et al.

    2014-01-23

    These reports present the results of the 2013 Community Summer Study of the APS Division of Particles and Fields ("Snowmass 2013") on the future program of particle physics in the U.S. Chapter 3, on the Energy Frontier, discusses the program of research with high-energy colliders. This area includes experiments on the Higgs boson, the electroweak and strong interactions, and the top quark. It also encompasses direct searches for new particles and interactions at high energy.

  19. Planning the Future of U.S. Particle Physics (Snowmass 2013): Chapter 1: Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, J.L.; et al.

    2014-01-23

    These reports present the results of the 2013 Community Summer Study of the APS Division of Particles and Fields ("Snowmass 2013") on the future program of particle physics in the U.S. Chapter 1 contains the Executive Summary and the summaries of the reports of the nine working groups.

  20. Meta-Analysis inside and outside Particle Physics: Two Traditions That Should Converge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Rose D.; Jackson, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The use of meta-analysis in medicine and epidemiology really took off in the 1970s. However, in high-energy physics, the Particle Data Group has been carrying out meta-analyses of measurements of particle masses and other properties since 1957. Curiously, there has been virtually no interaction between those working inside and outside particle…

  1. Meta-Analysis inside and outside Particle Physics: Two Traditions That Should Converge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Rose D.; Jackson, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The use of meta-analysis in medicine and epidemiology really took off in the 1970s. However, in high-energy physics, the Particle Data Group has been carrying out meta-analyses of measurements of particle masses and other properties since 1957. Curiously, there has been virtually no interaction between those working inside and outside particle…

  2. Physical principles and models describing intracellular virus particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lagache, T; Dauty, E; Holcman, D

    2009-08-01

    Modeling in cellular biology benefits greatly from quantitative analysis that arise from the theory of diffusion and chemical reactions. Recent progress in single particle imaging enables the visualization of viral trajectories evolving in the cytoplasm. Biophysical models and mathematical analysis have been developed to unravel the complexity of single viral trajectories. We review here models of active motion of viruses along the cytoskeleton as well as their diffusion. We present resent efforts to estimate global trafficking properties, such as the probability and the mean time for a viral particle to reach a small nuclear pore. However, most signaling pathways involved in controlling viral motion remain undescribed and should be the goal of future modeling efforts.

  3. Birth Of 'Atometry' - Particle Physics Applied To Saving Human Lives

    SciTech Connect

    Maglich, Bogdan C.

    2005-10-26

    Atometer, the first non-invasive stoichiometric explosive detector system is described here. We define atometry as stoichiometry by means of elementary particles. Atometry compares with the currently used 'explosive detection systems' (EDS) like color photography with Black and White. The technique retrieves images of concealed objects and it also deciphers their stoichiometry i.e. their empirical chemical formulas, CaNbOc, where a, b, and c are the atomic proportions of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, with a 97.5% statistical probability. Atometric analysis is performed through steel and other barriers by a combined action of fast neutrons, {gamma} rays and {alpha} particles. Atometry has many potential medical and industrial applications, yet unexplored.

  4. Medical physics--particle accelerators--the beginning.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Jeremy C

    2014-01-01

    This chapter outlines the early development of particle accelerators with the redesign from linear accelerator to cyclotron by Ernest Lawrence with a view to reducing the size of the machines as the power increased. There are minibiographies of Ernest Lawrence and his brother John. The concept of artificial radiation is outlined and the early attempts at patient treatment are mentioned. The reasons for trying and abandoning neutron therapy are discussed, and the early use of protons is described.

  5. Majorana Fermions in Particle Physics, Solid State and Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsten, L.; Duff, M. J.

    This review is based on lectures given by M. J. Duff summarising the far reaching contributions of Ettore Majorana to fundamental physics, with special focus on Majorana fermions in all their guises. The theoretical discovery of the eponymous fcrmion in 1937 has since had profound implications for particlc physics, solid state and quantum computation. The breadth of these disciplines is testimony to Majorana's genius, which continues to permeate physics today. These lectures offer a whistle-stop tour through some limited subset of the key ideas. In addition to touching on these various applications, we will draw out some fascinating relations connecting the normed division algebras R, ℂ, H, O to spinors, trialities. K-theory and the classification of stable topological states of symmetry-protected gapped free-fermion systems.

  6. Elementary Particle Physics Experiment at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, Benjamin; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Willocq, Stephane

    2013-07-30

    In this progress report we summarize the activities of the University of Massachusetts- Amherst group for the three years of this research project. We are fully engaged in research at the energy frontier with the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We have made leading contributions in software development and performance studies for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer, as well as on physics analysis with an emphasis on Standard Model measurements and searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. In addition, we have increased our contributions to the Muon Spectrometer New Small Wheel upgrade project.

  7. Latest Developments in Nuclear, Particle, and Astroparticle Physics at Jyfl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henryk Trzaska, Wladyslaw

    2015-06-01

    Accelerator Laboratory at the Physics Department of the University of Jyväskylä (JYFL) has a long tradition in development, construction, and implementation of new instruments and detection techniques. This line of research has been recently extended from Nuclear- and Relativistic Heavy Ion collisions to Astroparticle and Neutrino Physics. In my presentation I briefly review the latest developments and provide the highlights of the measurements conducted over the period since EXON 2012 [1]. Special emphasis is given to the research conducted in collaboration with JINR Dubna, Kurchatov Institute, INR, and Khloplin Radium Institute.

  8. Yoichiro Nambu: Visionary theorist who shaped modern particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Michael S.

    Yoichiro Nambu was one of the most influential theoretical physicists of the twentieth century. His deep and unexpected insights often took years for others to understand and fully appreciate. They include: spontaneous symmetry breaking, for which he was awarded half of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physics; the theory of quarks and gluons; and string theory...

  9. (A research program in neutrino physics, cosmic rays and elementary particles: Tasks A, B, C, D)

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel, H.W.

    1991-08-06

    A Summary of the DOE Supported High Energy Physics Research at The University of California, Irvine. Physics interests of the group are focused primarily on tests of conservation laws and studies of fundamental interactions between particles. There is also a significant interest in astrophysics and cosmic rays. The DOE support has been divided into four tasks briefly describes in this paper.

  10. [A research program in neutrino physics, cosmic rays and elementary particles: Tasks A, B, C, D

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel, H.W.

    1991-08-06

    A Summary of the DOE Supported High Energy Physics Research at The University of California, Irvine. Physics interests of the group are focused primarily on tests of conservation laws and studies of fundamental interactions between particles. There is also a significant interest in astrophysics and cosmic rays. The DOE support has been divided into four tasks briefly describes in this paper.

  11. An Evaluation of the Particle Physics Masterclass as a Context for Student Learning about the Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadness, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the research question: To what extent do secondary school science students attending the U.S. Particle Physics Masterclass change their view of the nature of science (NOS)? The U.S. Particle Physics Masterclass is a physics outreach program run by QuarkNet, a national organization of secondary school physics teachers…

  12. An Evaluation of the Particle Physics Masterclass as a Context for Student Learning about the Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadness, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the research question: To what extent do secondary school science students attending the U.S. Particle Physics Masterclass change their view of the nature of science (NOS)? The U.S. Particle Physics Masterclass is a physics outreach program run by QuarkNet, a national organization of secondary school physics teachers…

  13. Chemical physics of DNA packaging in a nucleosome core particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spakowitz, Andrew; Sudhanshu, Bariz

    2008-03-01

    The fundamental unit of packaged DNA, the nucleosome core particle, contains 146 base pairs of DNA wrapped 1.7 times around a cationic protein complex called the histone octamer. A string of nucleosomes is organized into higher-order structures at several hierarchical levels to form chromatin, a remarkable complex that is compact yet maintains accessibility for gene expression. We develop a theoretical model of the nucleosome core particle in order to extract detailed quantitative information from single-molecule measurements of a single nucleosome under tension. We employ the wormlike chain model to describe the DNA strand as a thermally fluctuating polymer chain. The chain adsorbs on a spool that represents the histone octamer. This model is directly compared to single-molecule experiments conducted in Carlos Bustamante's lab; we find good agreement between our theory and the experimental data. Our model reveals the mechanism that underlies structural transitions that are apparent in the experimental measurements and predicts the conditions where these transitions occur. We proceed to construct a free energy surface to predict the dynamic response in a single-molecule experiment with a time-dependent rate of unwinding the nucleosome. The combination of single-molecule experiments and our theoretical modeling gives detailed information about the specific interactions between DNA and histone proteins.

  14. Review of Physics Results from the Tevatron: Searches for New Particles and Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Toback, David; ŽIvković, Lidija

    2015-02-17

    We present a summary of results for searches for new particles and interactions at the Fermilab Tevatron collider by the CDF and the D0 experiments. These include results from Run I as well as Run II for the time period up to July 2014. We focus on searches for supersymmetry, as well as other models of new physics such as new fermions and bosons, various models of excited fermions, leptoquarks, technicolor, hidden-valley model particles, long-lived particles, extra dimensions, dark matter particles, and signature-based searches.

  15. MCPLOTS: a particle physics resource based on volunteer computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karneyeu, A.; Mijovic, L.; Prestel, S.; Skands, P. Z.

    2014-02-01

    The mcplots.cern.ch web site ( mcplots) provides a simple online repository of plots made with high-energy-physics event generators, comparing them to a wide variety of experimental data. The repository is based on the hepdata online database of experimental results and on the rivet Monte Carlo analysis tool. The repository is continually updated and relies on computing power donated by volunteers, via the lhc@home 2.0 platform.

  16. Physical Properties of Saturn's Ring Particles from Cassini VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. M.; Vims Team

    predicts that the peak angular width depends on the transport mean free path (TMFP) in the medium. We find that the OE is caused by coherent interactions between sub-particles in the outer layers of the ring particles, and that these sub-particles are of the order of 10 µm in size. A portion of this work was performed at JPL under contract with NASA 2

  17. Physics of sub-micron cosmic dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, N. L.

    1974-01-01

    Laboratory tests with simulated micrometeoroids to measure the heat transfer coefficient are discussed. Equations for ablation path length for electrically accelerated micrometeoroids entering a gas target are developed which yield guidelines for the laboratory measurement of the heat transfer coefficient. Test results are presented for lanthanum hexaboride (LaB sub 6) microparticles in air, argon, and oxygen targets. The tests indicate the heat transfer coefficient has a value of approximately 0.9 at 30 km/sec, and that it increases to approximately unity at 50 km/sec and above. Test results extend to over 100 km/sec. Results are also given for two types of small particle detectors. A solid state capacitor type detector was tested from 0.61 km/sec to 50 km/sec. An impact ionization type detector was tested from 1.0 to 150 km/sec using LaB sub 6 microparticles.

  18. The Tau Lepton and the Search for New Elementary Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, Martin L.

    1998-11-18

    This Fifth International WEIN Symposium is devoted to physics beyond the standard model. This talk is about tau lepton physics, but I begin with the question: do we know how to find new physics in the world of elementary particles? This question is interwoven with the various tau physics topics. These topics are: searching for unexpected tau decay modes; searching for additional tau decay mechanisms; radiative tau decays; tau decay modes of the W, B, and D; decay of the Z{sup 0} to tau pairs; searching for CP violation in tau decay; the tau neutrino, dreams and odd ideas in tau physics; and tau research facilities in the next decades.

  19. Sensitivity of dispersion model forecasts of volcanic ash clouds to the physical characteristics of the particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckett, F. M.; Witham, C. S.; Hort, M. C.; Stevenson, J. A.; Bonadonna, C.; Millington, S. C.

    2015-11-01

    This study examines the sensitivity of atmospheric dispersion model forecasts of volcanic ash clouds to the physical characteristics assigned to the particles. We show that the particle size distribution (PSD) used to initialise a dispersion model has a significant impact on the forecast of the mass loading of the ash particles in the atmosphere. This is because the modeled fall velocity of the particles is sensitive to the particle diameter. Forecasts of the long-range transport of the ash cloud consider particles with diameters between 0.1 μm and 100 μm. The fall velocity of particles with diameter 100 μm is over 5 orders of magnitude greater than a particle with diameter 0.1 μm, and 30 μm particles fall 88% slower and travel up to 5× further than a 100 μm particle. Identifying the PSD of the ash cloud at the source, which is required to initialise a model, is difficult. Further, aggregation processes are currently not explicitly modeled in operational dispersion models due to the high computational costs associated with aggregation schemes. We show that using a modified total grain size distribution (TGSD) that effectively accounts for aggregation processes improves the modeled PSD of the ash cloud and deposits from the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010. Knowledge of the TGSD of an eruption is therefore critical for reducing uncertainty in quantitative forecasts of ash cloud dispersion. The density and shape assigned to the model particles have a lesser but still significant impact on the calculated fall velocity. Accounting for the density distribution and sphericity of ash from the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010, modeled particles can travel up to 84% further than particles with default particle characteristics that assume the particles are spherical and have a fixed density.

  20. Center for Theoretical Underground Physics and Related Fields. CETUP2015/ Particle Physics and Cosmology Conference. PPC2015)

    SciTech Connect

    Szczerbinska, Barbara

    2016-02-22

    For last five years Center for Theoretical Underground Physics and Related Areas (CETUP*) serves as a collaboration point for scientists from around the world interested in theoretical and experimental aspects of underground science. The mission of CETUP* is to promote an organized research in physics, astrophysics, geoscience, geomicrobiology and other fields related to the underground science and provide a stimulating environment for creative thinking and open communication between researches of varying ages and nationalities in dynamic atmosphere of intense scientific interactions. Scientists invited to participate in the program will not only provide theoretical support to the underground science, but they will also examine core questions of the 21st century including: What is dark matter? How well do we know the neutrino parameters?, How have neutrinos shaped the evolution of the universe?, How were the heavy elements made?, What are the fundamental underlying symmetries of the Universe? Is there a Grand Unified Theory of the Universe? How do supernovae explode? Studies of Neutrino Physics and Dark Matter are of high interest to particle and nuclear physicists, astrophysicists and cosmologists. Ongoing and proposed Neutrino and Dark Matter experiments are expected to unveil the answers to fundamental questions about the Universe. This year summer program was focused exactly on these subjects bringing together experts in dark matter, neutrino physics, particle physics, nuclear physics and astrophysics and cosmology. CETUP*2015 consisted of 5 week long program (June 14 – July 18, 2015) covering various theoretical and experimental aspects in these research areas. The two week long session on Dark Matter physics (June 14 – June 26) was followed by two week long program on Neutrino physics (July 6 – July 18). The international conference entitled IXth International Conference on Interconnection Between Particle Physics and Cosmology (PPC) was hosted at CETUP

  1. Elementary particle physics. Progress report, July 1992--October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Izen, J.M.

    1994-10-01

    The University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) is participating in two e{sup +}e{sup -}, experiments, Beijing Spectrometer (BES) and BABAR, the PEP-11 B Factory detector. The UTD group consists of Profs. Joseph M. Izen and Xinchou Lou, seven Ph.D. students. A post-doc is requested to join them in this work. BES explores the physics of the {tau}-charm threshold region. Associated production of {tau} and charmed mesons allow for absolute branching fraction measurements with good control of backgrounds. BES is uniquely positioned to study the leptonic and hadronic decays of quarkonia. The Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC) delivers luminosities an order of magnitude higher than earlier facilities. BES and BEPC will be upgraded following the 1994-5 run, and will resume data taking in Fall, 1996 with an improved detector and a Three-fold increase in luminosity. The raison d`etre of BABAR is the exploration of CP violation in the B meson system. An asymmetric storage ring is required to observe the time-dependence of the CP asymmetry. Other BABAR physics includes measurements of CKM matrix elements, rare B decays, penguin diagrams, B{sub s} decays, and precision measurements of {tau} and D meson decays. The scheduled BABAR turn-on in 1999 provides the UTD group with a natural evolution with continuous physics during this period. Professors Joseph M. Izen and Xinchou Lou are leading the BES and BABAR program at UTD. Both have specialized in e{sup +}e{sup -} collider experiments and share 22 years of experience at the SPEAR, BEPC, CESR, PETRA, SLC and LEP rings.

  2. Theoretical Studies of Drift-Alfven and Energetic Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    CHEN, L.

    2014-05-14

    The research program supported by this DOE grant has been rather successful and productive in terms of both scientific investigations as well as human resources development; as demonstrated by the large number (60) of journal articles, 6 doctoral degrees, and 3 postdocs. This PI is particularly grateful to the generous support and flexible management of the DOE–SC-OFES Program. He has received three award/prize (APS Excellence in Plasma Physics Research Award, 2004; EPS Alfven Prize, 2008; APS Maxwell Prize, 2012) as the results of research accomplishments supported by this grant.

  3. From Particle Physics to Education: The Role of Tinkering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selen, Mats

    The love of tinkering is perhaps the single most universal trait among scientists. From designing an experiment to building a computer application to solving a differential equation, the cycle of ''observe - explain - test - revise'' is at the root of the scientific creative process. Driven by the love of tinkering, we have developed a small low-cost wireless lab system with the goal of putting real scientific instrumentation in the hands of anyone with a desire to innovate and explore. I will describe how this came about and how it has changed our view of introductory physics labs at the University of Illinois.

  4. Theoretical studies in elementary particle physics. Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.

    1994-07-01

    This is a report on research conducted at Penn State University under grant number DE-FG02-90ER-40577, from November 1992 to present. The author is a member of the CTEQ collaboration (Coordinated Theoretical and Experimental Project on Quantitative QCD). Some of the work in CTEQ is described in this report. Topics which the authors work has touched include: polarized hard scattering; hard diffraction; small x and perturbative pomeron physics; gauge-invariant operators; fundamental QCD; heavy quarks; instantons and deep inelastic scattering; non-perturbative corrections to {tau} decay.

  5. The Relation between Fundamental Constants and Particle Physics Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Rodger

    2017-01-01

    The observed constraints on the variability of the proton to electron mass ratio $\\mu$ and the fine structure constant $\\alpha$ are used to establish constraints on the variability of the Quantum Chromodynamic Scale and a combination of the Higgs Vacuum Expectation Value and the Yukawa couplings. Further model dependent assumptions provide constraints on the Higgs VEV and the Yukawa couplings separately. A primary conclusion is that limits on the variability of dimensionless fundamental constants such as $\\mu$ and $\\alpha$ provide important constraints on the parameter space of new physics and cosmologies.

  6. Particle physics and condensed matter: the saga continues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczek, Frank

    2016-12-01

    Ideas from quantum field theory and topology have proved remarkably fertile in suggesting new phenomena in the quantum physics of condensed matter. Here I will supply some broad, unifying context, both conceptual and historical, for the abundance of results reported at the Nobel Symposium on ‘New Forms of Matter, Topological Insulators and Superconductors’. Since they distill some most basic ideas in their simplest forms, these concluding remarks might also serve, for non-specialists, as an introduction. Invited presentation of concluding remarks at Nobel Symposium 156 on New Forms of Matter, Topological Insulators and Superconductors, 13-15 June 2014, Högberga Gård, Stockholm.

  7. Group theory and the gravitation and physics of elementary particles

    SciTech Connect

    Komar, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    This volume contains articles and surveys on such modern problems in physics as gravitation issues and scenarios for the development of an oscillating universe, quantum effects in the powerful gravitational fields near black holes, the Aharonov-Bohm effect, quantum theory of nonsteady-state open and closed systems based on Wigner function, the theory of quantum integrals of motion and their relation to a density matrix and the probabilities of parametric excitation of the system as well as the problem of the quantization of systems with constraints. A number of articles demonstrate the use of group theory and dynamic symmetry methods in analyzing the dynamics of quantum systems.

  8. Elementary particle physics. Progress report, July 1993--January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Izen, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Much of the work was connected with experimental measurements made at the Beijing Spectrometer operating at {radical}s = 4.03 GeV. The effort has now moved to investigating the physics derived from the {radical}s = 4.03 GeV data, including D{sub s} production, absolute D{sub s} branching fractions (hadronic, leptonic, and inclusive semileptonic), D*D and D*D* production, absolute D hadronic branching fractions, D* branching fractions, and an upper limit on the {nu}{sub {tau}} mass. 2 figs., 11 refs.

  9. [Investigations in dynamics of gauge theories in theoretical particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The major theme of the theoretical physics research conducted under DOE support over the past several years has been within the rubric of the standard model, and concerned the interplay between symmetries and dynamics. The research was thus carried out mostly in the context of gauge field theories, and usually in the presence of chiral fermions. Dynamical symmetry breaking was examined both from the point of view of perturbation theory, as well as from non-perturbative techniques associated with certain characteristic features of specific theories. Among the topics of research were: the implications of abelian and non-abelian anomalies on the spectrum and possible dynamical symmetry breaking in any theory, topological and conformal properties of quantum fields in two and higher dimensions, the breaking of global chiral symmetries by vector-like gauge theories such as QCD, the phenomenological implications of a strongly interacting Higgs sector in the standard model, and the application of soliton ideas to the physics to be explored at the SSC.

  10. On some physical and dynamical properties of microplastic particles in marine environment.

    PubMed

    Chubarenko, I; Bagaev, A; Zobkov, M; Esiukova, E

    2016-07-15

    Simplified physical models and geometrical considerations reveal general physical and dynamical properties of microplastic particles (0.5-5mm) of different density, shape and size in marine environment. Windage of extremely light foamed particles, surface area and fouling rate of slightly positively buoyant microplastic spheres, films and fibres and settling velocities of negatively buoyant particles are analysed. For the Baltic Sea dimensions and under the considered idealised external conditions, (i) only one day is required for a foamed polystyrene particle to cross the sea (ca. 250km); (ii) polyethylene fibres should spend about 6-8months in the euphotic zone before sinking due to bio-fouling, whilst spherical particles can be retained on the surface up to 10-15years; (iii) for heavy microplastic particles, the time of settling through the water column in the central Gotland basin (ca. 250m) is less than 18h. Proper physical setting of the problem of microplastics transport and developing of physically-based parameterisations are seen as applications.

  11. Limiting technologies for particle beams and high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Panofsky, W.K.H.

    1985-07-01

    Since 1930 the energy of accelerators had grown by an order of magnitude roughly every 7 years. Like all exponential growths, be they human population, the size of computers, or anything else, this eventually will have to come to an end. When will this happen to the growth of the energy of particle accelerators and colliders. Fortunately, as the energy of accelerators has grown the cost per unit energy has decreased almost as fast as has the increase in energy. The result is that while the energy has increased so dramatically the cost per new installation has increased only by roughly an order of magnitude since the 1930's (corrected for inflation), while the number of accelerators operating at the frontier of the field has shrunk. As is shown in the by now familiar Livingston chart this dramatic decrease in cost has been achieved largely by a succession of new technologies, in addition to the more moderate gains in efficiency due to improved design, economies of scale, etc. We are therefore facing two questions: (1) Is there good reason scientifically to maintain the exponential growth, and (2) Are there new technologies in sight which promise continued decreases in unit costs. The answer to the first question is definitely yes; the answer to the second question is maybe.

  12. Programmable physical parameter optimization for particle plasma simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragan-Kelley, Benjamin; Verboncoeur, John; Lin, Ming-Chieh

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a scheme for interactive and programmable optimization of physical parameters for plasma simulations. The simulation code Object-Oriented Plasma Device 1-D (OOPD1) has been adapted to a Python interface, allowing sophisticated user or program interaction with simulations, and detailed numerical analysis via numpy. Because the analysis/diagnostic interface is the same as the input mechanism (the Python programming language), it is straightforward to optimize simulation parameters based on analysis of previous runs and automate the optimization process using a user-determined scheme and criteria. An example use case of the Child-Langmuir space charge limit in bipolar flow is demonstrated, where the beam current is iterated upon by measuring the relationship of the measured current and the injected current.

  13. J.J. Sakurai Prize for Theoretical Particle Physics: 40 Years of Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepage, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Lattice QCD was invented in 1973-74 by Ken Wilson, who passed away in 2013. This talk will describe the evolution of lattice QCD through the past 40 years with particular emphasis on its first years, and on the past decade, when lattice QCD simulations finally came of age. Thanks to theoretical breakthroughs in the late 1990s and early 2000s, lattice QCD simulations now produce the most accurate theoretical calculations in the history of strong-interaction physics. They play an essential role in high-precision experimental studies of physics within and beyond the Standard Model of Particle Physics. The talk will include a non-technical review of the conceptual ideas behind this revolutionary development in (highly) nonlinear quantum physics, together with a survey of its current impact on theoretical and experimental particle physics, and prospects for the future. Work supported by the National Science Foundation.

  14. The Learning Reconstruction of Particle System and Linear Momentum Conservation in Introductory Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, S.; Saepuzaman, D.; Sriyansyah, S. P.

    2016-08-01

    This study is initiated by low achievement of prospective teachers in understanding concepts in introductory physics course. In this case, a problem has been identified that students cannot develop their thinking skills required for building physics concepts. Therefore, this study will reconstruct a learning process, emphasizing a physics concept building. The outcome will design physics lesson plans for the concepts of particle system as well as linear momentum conservation. A descriptive analysis method will be used in order to investigate the process of learning reconstruction carried out by students. In this process, the students’ conceptual understanding will be evaluated using essay tests for concepts of particle system and linear momentum conservation. The result shows that the learning reconstruction has successfully supported the students’ understanding of physics concept.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Nascent Soot Physical Properties and The Influence on Particle Morphology and Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieb, Sydnie Marie

    Soot released to the atmosphere is a dangerous pollutant for human health and the environment. Understanding the physical properties and surface properties of these particles is important to properly explaining the growth of soot particles in flames as well as their interactions with other particles and gases in the environment. Particles below 15 nm in diameter, nascent soot particles, dominate the early growth stages of soot formation; previously these particles were characterized as hard graphitic spheres. New evidence derived from the current dissertation work, to a large extent, challenges this prior characterization. This dissertation study begins by revisiting the use of atomic force microscope (AFM) as a tool to investigate the structural properties of nascent soot. The impact of tip artifacts, which are known to complicate measurements of features below 10 nm in diameter, are carefully considered so as to provide a concise interpretation of the morphology of nascent soot as seen by AFM. The results of the AFM morphology collaborate with earlier photo- and thermal-fragmentation particle mass spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy that nascent soot is not a graphitized carbon material and that they are not spherical. Furthermore, phase mode imaging is introduced as a method to investigate the physical properties of nascent soot particles in a greater detail and finer resolution. The helium ion microscope (HIM) has been identified as a useful technique for the imaging of nascent soot. Using this imaging method nascent soot particles were imaged with a high resolution that had not been obtained by prior techniques. The increased contrast provides a closer look at the nascent soot particles and further suggested that these particles are not as structurally homogeneous as previously thought. Geometric shape analysis was performed to characterize the particles in terms of sphericity, circularity, and fractal dimension. The geometric analysis

  16. Energetic Particle Physics In Fusion Research In Preparation For Burning Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelenkov, Nikolai N

    2013-06-01

    The area of energetic particle (EP) physics of fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by W.W. Heidbrink and G.J. Sadler [1]. That review coincided with the start of deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the "sea" of Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in particular by the toroidicityinduced AEs (TAE) modes and reversed shear Alfven (RSAE). In present paper we attempt a broad review of EP physics progress in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus) including helical/stellarator devices. Introductory discussions on basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e. particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others are given to help understanding the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues toward the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

  17. Experimental particle physics research at Texas Tech University

    SciTech Connect

    Akchurin, Nural; Lee, Sung-Won; Volobouev, Igor; Wigmans, Richard

    2016-06-22

    The high energy physics group at Texas Tech University (TTU) concentrates its research efforts on the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and on generic detector R&D for future applications. Our research programs have been continuously supported by the US Department of Energy for over two decades, and this final report summarizes our achievements during the last grant period from May 1, 2012 to March 31, 2016. After having completed the Run 1 data analyses from the CMS detector, including the discovery of the Higgs boson in July 2012, we concentrated on commissioning the CMS hadron calorimeter (HCAL) for Run 2, performing analyses of Run 2 data, and making initial studies and plans for the second phase of upgrades in CMS. Our research has primarily focused on searches for Beyond Standard Model (BSM) physics via dijets, monophotons, and monojets. We also made significant contributions to the analyses of the semileptonic Higgs decays and Standard Model (SM) measurements in Run 1. Our work on the operations of the CMS detector, especially the performance monitoring of the HCAL in Run 1, was indispensable to the experiment. Our team members, holding leadership positions in HCAL, have played key roles in the R&D, construction, and commissioning of these detectors in the last decade. We also maintained an active program in jet studies that builds on our expertise in calorimetry and algorithm development. In Run 2, we extended some of our analyses at 8 TeV to 13 TeV, and we also started to investigate new territory, e.g., dark matter searches with unexplored signatures. The objective of dual-readout calorimetry R&D was intended to explore (and, if possible, eliminate) the obstacles that prevent calorimetric detection of hadrons and jets with a comparable level of precision as we have grown accustomed to for electrons and photons. The initial prototype detector was successfully tested at the SPS/CERN in 2003-2004 and evolved over the

  18. Experimental investigations in particle physics at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, L.B.; Highland, V.L.; Martoff, C.J.; McFarlane, K.W.; Guss, C.; Kettell, S.

    1991-09-30

    The major elements of this project continues to be on fundamental symmetries and parameters of the Standard Model. The projects in the current period have been BNL E791 (a search for the decay K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}e, which would violate the rule of separate lepton number conservation), test of an upgrade proposal (E871), and LSND, a neutrino experiment at LAMPF. For E791, data taking was completed in June 1990, and preliminary results are now available for the decays K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}e and K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{mu}from the entire data set. The data for decay K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} ee are still being analysed. These are an upper limit for the branching fraction for K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}e of 3.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} (90% C.L.). From the 1990 data alone, we have a new (preliminary) value of the branching fraction for K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{mu} of (6.96{plus minus}0. 4{plus minus}0.22) {times} 10{sup {minus}9}, with a sample of 349 events. Combining this with earlier data gives (6.96{plus minus}0.34) {times} 10{sup 9}, by far the most precise value. The limit on the decay K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}e places a lower limit on the mass of a new particle mediating such decays of 85 TeV. The LSND (Large Scintillator Neutrino Detector), a search for neutrino oscillations at LAMPF, has been approved, and is now underway. Other neutrino work at Los Alamos, E764, has resulted in a final publication. This includes the best, measurement of {nu}-nuclear scattering, in {nu}{sub mu} {sup 12}C inclusive cross sections. The measurement of the cross section for the exclusive reaction {nu}{sup mu}{sup 12}C {yields} {mu}{sup {minus}12} N is unique. In a new development, Dr. Martoff has established a facility for fabrication of superconducting detectors of nuclear radiation; the equipment has been funded and is partly installed. Planned uses include scattering for Dark Matter.' In summary, the objectives for this year have been met.

  19. RESEARCH NOTE FROM COLLABORATION: GridPP: development of the UK computing Grid for particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grid PP Collaboration; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Lowe, L. S.; Tan, C. L. A.; Watkins, P. M.; Bailey, D. S.; Barrass, T. A.; Brook, N. H.; Croft, R. J. H.; Kelly, M. P.; Mackay, C. K.; Metson, S.; Maroney, O. J. E.; Newbold, D. M.; Wilson, F. F.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Nebrensky, J. J.; Bly, M.; Brew, C.; Burke, S.; Byrom, R.; Coles, J.; Cornwall, L. A.; Djaoui, A.; Field, L.; Fisher, S. M.; Folkes, G. T.; Geddes, N. I.; Gordon, J. C.; Hicks, S. J. C.; Jensen, J. G.; Johnson, G.; Kant, D.; Kelsey, D. P.; Kuznetsov, G.; Leake, J.; Middleton, R. P.; Patrick, G. N.; Prassas, G.; Saunders, B. J.; Ross, D.; Sansum, R. A.; Shah, T.; Strong, B.; Synge, O.; Tam, R.; Thorpe, M.; Traylen, S.; Wheeler, J. F.; White, N. G. H.; Wilson, A. J.; Antcheva, I.; Artiaga, E.; Beringer, J.; Bird, I. G.; Casey, J.; Cass, A. J.; Chytracek, R.; Gallas Torreira, M. V.; Generowicz, J.; Girone, M.; Govi, G.; Harris, F.; Heikkurinen, M.; Horvath, A.; Knezo, E.; Litmaath, M.; Lubeck, M.; Moscicki, J.; Neilson, I.; Poinsignon, E.; Pokorski, W.; Ribon, A.; Sekera, Z.; Smith, D. H.; Tomlin, W. L.; van Eldik, J. E.; Wojcieszuk, J.; Brochu, F. M.; Das, S.; Harrison, K.; Hayes, M.; Hill, J. C.; Lester, C. G.; Palmer, M. J.; Parker, M. A.; Nelson, M.; Whalley, M. R.; Glover, E. W. N.; Anderson, P.; Clark, P. J.; Earl, A. D.; Holt, A.; Jackson, A.; Joo, B.; Kenway, R. D.; Maynard, C. M.; Perry, J.; Smith, L.; Thorn, S.; Trew, A. S.; Bell, W. H.; Burgon-Lyon, M.; Cameron, D. G.; Doyle, A. T.; Flavell, A.; Hanlon, S. J.; Martin, D. J.; McCance, G.; Millar, A. P.; Nicholson, C.; Paterson, S. K.; Pickford, A.; Soler, P.; Speirs, F.; St. Denis, R.; Thompson, A. S.; Britton, D.; Cameron, W.; Colling, D.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P.; Egede, U.; Georgiou, K.; Lewis, P.; MacEvoy, B.; Marr, S.; Martyniak, J.; Tallini, H.; Wakefield, S.; Walker, R.; Bertram, I. A.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Evans, D.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Jones, R. W. L.; Love, P.; Downing, S.; George, M. P.; Irving, A. C.; McNeile, C.; Sroczynski, Z.; Tobin, M.; Washbrook, A. J.; Barlow, R. J.; Dallison, S.; Fairey, G.; Forti, A.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Jones, M. A. S.; Kaushal, S.; Marshall, R.; McNab, A.; Salih, S.; Werner, J. C.; Bartsch, V.; Cioffi, C.; Gronbech, P.; Harnew, N.; Harris, J. F.; Huffman, B. T.; Leslie, M.; McArthur, I.; Newman, R.; Soroko, A.; Stokes-Rees, I.; Stonjek, S.; Tseng, J.; Waters, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Arter, T. R.; Cordenonsi, R. A.; Datta, A. S.; Hartin, T.; Lloyd, S. L.; Martin, A. J.; Pearce, S. E.; Williams, C. J.; Gardner, M.; George, S.; Green, B. J.; Johal, S.; Rybkine, G.; Strong, J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Hodgson, P.; Robinson, M.; Tovey, D. R.; Spooner, N. J. C.; Allton, C. R.; Armour, W.; Clarke, P.; Mealor, P.; Waters, D.; Waugh, B.; West, B.

    2006-01-01

    The GridPP Collaboration is building a UK computing Grid for particle physics, as part of the international effort towards computing for the Large Hadron Collider. The project, funded by the UK Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC), began in September 2001 and completed its first phase 3 years later. GridPP is a collaboration of approximately 100 researchers in 19 UK university particle physics groups, the Council for the Central Laboratory of the Research Councils and CERN, reflecting the strategic importance of the project. In collaboration with other European and US efforts, the first phase of the project demonstrated the feasibility of developing, deploying and operating a Grid-based computing system to meet the UK needs of the Large Hadron Collider experiments. This note describes the work undertaken to achieve this goal.

  20. A guide to experimental elementary particle physics literature, 1988--1992. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Alekhin, S.I.; Ezhela, V.V.; Filimonov, B.B.

    1993-09-01

    We present an indexed guide to the literature experimental particle physics for the years 1988--1992. About 4,000 papers are indexed by Beam/Target/Momentum, Reaction Momentum (including the final state), Final State Particle, and Accelerator/Detector/Experiment. All indices are cross-referenced to the paper`s title and reference in the ID/Reference/Title Index. The information in this guide is also publicly available from a regularly updated computer database.

  1. Physical Methods for the Preparation of Hybrid Nanocomposite Polymer Latex Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Roberto F. A.; Bon, Stefan A. F.

    In this chapter, we will highlight conceptual physical approaches towards the fabrication of nanocomposite polymer latexes in which each individual latex particle contains one or more "hard" nanoparticles, such as clays, silicates, titanates, or other metal(oxides). By "physical approaches" we mean that the "hard" nanoparticles are added as pre-existing entities, and are not synthesized in situ as part of the nanocomposite polymer latex fabrication process. We will narrow our discussion to focus on physical methods that rely on the assembly of nanoparticles onto the latex particles after the latex particles have been formed, or its reciprocal analogue, the adhesion of polymer onto an inorganic nanoparticle. First, will discuss the phenomenon of heterocoagulation and its various driving forces, such as electrostatic interactions, the hydrophobic effect, and secondary molecular interactions. We will then address methods that involve assembly of nanoparticles onto or around the more liquid precursors (i.e., swollen/growing latex particles or monomer droplets). We will focus on the phenomenon of Pickering stabilization. We will then discuss features of particle interaction with soft interfaces, and see how the adhesion of particles onto emulsion droplets can be applied in suspension, miniemulsion, and emulsion polymerization. Finally, we will very briefly mention some interesting methods that make use of interface-driven templating for making well-defined assembled clusters and supracolloidal structures.

  2. Incorporation of mesoporous silica particles in gelatine gels: effect of particle type and surface modification on physical properties.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Esteve, Édgar; Oliver, Laura; García, Laura; Nieuwland, Maaike; de Jongh, Harmen H J; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón; Barat, José Manuel

    2014-06-17

    The aim of this work was to investigate the impact of mesoporous silica particles (MSPs) on the physicochemical properties of filled protein gels. We have studied the effect of the addition of different mesoporous silica particles, either bare or functionalized with amines or carboxylates, on the physical properties of gelatine gels (5% w/v). Textural properties of the filled gels were investigated by uniaxial compression, while optical properties were investigated by turbidity. The MSPs were characterized with the objective of correlating particle features with their impact on the corresponding filled-gel properties. The addition of MSPs (both with and without functionalization) increased the stiffness of the gelatine gels. Furthermore, functionalized MSPs showed a remarkable increase in the strength of the gels and a slight reduction in the brittleness of the gels, in contrast with nonfunctionalized MSPs which showed no effect on these two properties. The turbidity of the gels was also affected by the addition of all tested MSPs, showing that the particles that formed smaller aggregates resulted in a higher contribution to turbidity. MSPs are promising candidates for the development of functional food containing smart delivery systems, also being able to modulate the functionality of protein gels.

  3. Influence of particle size on physical and sensory attributes of mango pulp powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M.; Kadam, D. M.; Chadha, S.; Wilson, R. A.; Gupta, R. K.

    2013-09-01

    The present investigation was aimed to observe the effect of particle size on physical, sensory and thermal properties of foam-mat dried mango pulp powder. Mango pulp of Dussehri variety was foam-mat dried using 3% egg white at 65ºC. Dried foam-mats were pulverized and passed through a sieve shaker for obtaining three grades of powder with 50, 60, and 85 mesh size sieves. The particle size of these samples measured using laser diffraction particle size analyzer ranged from 191.26 to 296.19 μm. The data was analysed statistically using ANOVA of SAS. There was a linear increase in lightness (`L' value) with a decrease in particle size, however, `a' value decreased with a decrease in particle size, indicating the decrease in redness. An increase in bulk density and decrease in water solubility index and water absorption index % were observed with a decrease in particle size. Particle size had a significant effect on sensory parameters. Particle size in the range of 258.01 to 264.60μmwas found most acceptable with respect to sensory characteristics. This finding can be exploited for various commercial applicationswhere powder quality is dependent on the particle size and has foremost priority for end users.

  4. Physical and environmental factors affecting the persistence of explosives particles (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papantonakis, Michael R.; Nguyen, Viet K.; Furstenberg, Robert; White, Caitlyn; Shuey, Melissa; Kendziora, Christopher A.; McGill, R. Andrew

    2017-05-01

    Knowledge of the persistence of trace explosives materials is critical to aid the security community in designing detection methods and equipment. The physical and environmental factors affecting the lifetimes of particles include temperature, airflow, interparticle distance, adlayers, humidity, particle field size and vapor pressure. We are working towards a complete particle persistence model that captures the relative importance of these effects to allow the user, with known environmental conditions, to predict particle lifetimes for explosives or other chemicals. In this work, particles of explosives are sieved onto smooth glass substrates using particle sizes and loadings relevant to those deposited by fingerprint deposition. The coupon is introduced into a custom flow cell and monitored under controlled airflow, humidity and temperature. Photomicroscopy images of the sample taken at fixed time intervals are analyzed to monitor particle sublimation and characterized as a size-independent radial sublimation velocity for each particle in the ensemble. In this paper we build on previous work by comparing the relationship between sublimation of different materials and their vapor pressures. We also describe the influence of a sebum adlayer on particle sublimation, allowing us to better model `real world' samples.

  5. Experiment and theory in particle physics: Reflections on the discovery of the tau lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1996-08-01

    This article is thoughts from the author on particle physics work from his perspective. It is not a summary of his work on the tau lepton, but rather a look at what makes good science, experimental and theoretical, from his experiences in the field. The section titles give a good summary on the topics the author chooses to touch upon. They are: the state of elementary particle physics; getting good ideas in experimental science; a difficult field; experiments and experimenting; 10% of the money and 30% of the time; the dictatorship of theory; technological dreams; last words.

  6. The Main Injector Particle Physics Experiment (MIPP FNAL E-907) at Fermilab status and plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Rajendran

    2008-01-01

    We describe the status of the Main Injector particle production Experiment (MIPP) at Fermilab which has to date acquired 18 million events of particle interactions using ( 5 GeV/c-120 GeV/c) π, K and p beams on various targets. We describe plans to upgrade the data acquisition speed of MIPP to make it run 100 times faster which will enable us to obtain particle production data of unprecdented quality and statistics on a wide variety of nuclear targets including nitrogen which is of importance to cosmic ray physics.

  7. Free Particle in Very Special Relativity, Gauge Symmetry and Two-Time Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Juan M.; Escobar-Aguilar, Eric S.; Vázquez, Etelberto

    2013-02-01

    The action for a (3+1)-dimensional particle in very special relativity (VSR) is studied. It is proved that massless particles only travel in effective (2+1)-dimensional spacetime. It is remarkable that this action can be written as an action for a relativistic particle in a background gauge field and it is shown that this field causes the dimensional reduction. A new symmetry for this system is found. Furthermore, a general action with restored Lorentz symmetry is proposed for this system. It is shown that this new action contains VSR and two-time physics.

  8. UCLA Intermediate Energy Nuclear and Particle Physics Research: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nefkens, B M.K.; Goetz, J; Lapik, A; Korolija, M; Prakhov, S; Starostin, A

    2011-05-18

    skin" of {sup 208}Pb, which is of great interest to astroparticle physics for determining the properties of neutron stars. Processes of study are coherent and noncoherent 0 photoproduction. The Crystal Ball is uniquely suited for these studies because of the large acceptance, good direction and energy resolution and it is an inclusive detector for the {pi}{sup 0} final state and exclusive for background such as 2 {pi}{sup 0}.

  9. Physics in ordered and disordered colloidal matter composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) microgel particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunker, Peter J.; Chen, Ke; Gratale, Matthew D.; Lohr, Matthew A.; Still, Tim; Yodh, A. G.

    2014-05-01

    This review collects and describes experiments that employ colloidal suspensions to probe physics in ordered and disordered solids and related complex fluids. The unifying feature of this body of work is its clever usage of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) microgel particles. These temperature-sensitive colloidal particles provide experimenters with a ‘knob’ for in situ control of particle size, particle interaction and particle packing fraction that, in turn, influence the structural and dynamical behavior of the complex fluids and solids. A brief summary of PNIPAM particle synthesis and properties is given, followed by a synopsis of current activity in the field. The latter discussion describes a variety of soft matter investigations including those that explore formation and melting of crystals and clusters, and those that probe structure, rearrangement and rheology of disordered (jammed/glassy) and partially ordered matter. The review, therefore, provides a snapshot of a broad range of physics phenomenology which benefits from the unique properties of responsive microgel particles.

  10. Development of students' interest in particle physics as effect of participating in a Masterclass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedigk, Kerstin; Pospiech, Gesche

    2016-05-01

    The International Hands On Particle Physics Masterclasses are enjoying increasing popularity worldwide every year. In Germany a national program was brought to live in 2010, which offers these appreciated events to whole classes or courses of high school students all over the year. These events were evaluated concerning the issues of students' interest in particle physics and their perception of the events. How several interest variables interact with each other and the perception of the events is answered by structural equation modelling (sect. 5.2). The results give information about the events' effects on the students' interest development in particle physics, show which event features are important ( e.g. the authenticity) and give information about practical approaches to improve the effects of the Masterclasses. Section 5.3 deals with a group of participants which have a high interest in particle physics 6-8 weeks after the participation. The number of these students is remarkable large, with 26% of all participants. The investigation of this group shows that the Masterclass participation has the same positive effect on both sexes and all levels of physics education.

  11. A Physics Show Performed by Students for Kids: "From Mechanics to Elementary Particle Physics"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dreiner, Herbi K.

    2008-01-01

    Physics students spend the early part of their training attending physics and mathematics lectures, solving problem sets, and experimenting in laboratory courses. The program is typically intensive and fairly rigid. They have little opportunity to follow their own curiosity or apply their knowledge. There have been many attempts to address this…

  12. A Physics Show Performed by Students for Kids: "From Mechanics to Elementary Particle Physics"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dreiner, Herbi K.

    2008-01-01

    Physics students spend the early part of their training attending physics and mathematics lectures, solving problem sets, and experimenting in laboratory courses. The program is typically intensive and fairly rigid. They have little opportunity to follow their own curiosity or apply their knowledge. There have been many attempts to address this…

  13. Elementary-particle physics: revealing the secrets of energy and matter

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This book is part of a decadal survey series ''Physics in a New Era.'' The volume addresses the role that the U.S. should play in research in the field of Elementary Particle Physics in the next two decades. In this endeavor, it (1) describes the current state of the field, and (2) identifies the elements of a research program for the next two decades.

  14. Research in theoretical particle physics. Technical progress report, May 1, 1991--April 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, D.W.; Munczek, H.; Ralston, J.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses the following topics in high energy physics: dynamical symmetry breaking and Schwinger-Dyson equation; consistency bound on the minimal model Higgs mass; tests of physics beyond the standard model; particle astrophysics; the interface between perturbative and non-perturbative QCD; cosmology; anisotropy in quantum networks and integer quantum hall behavior; anomalous color transparency; quantum treatment of solitons; color transparency; quantum stabilization of skyrmions; and casimir effect. (LSP)

  15. Differences in physical chemistry and dissolution rate of solid particle aerosols from solution pressurised inhalers.

    PubMed

    Buttini, Francesca; Miozzi, Michele; Balducci, Anna Giulia; Royall, Paul G; Brambilla, Gaetano; Colombo, Paolo; Bettini, Ruggero; Forbes, Ben

    2014-04-25

    Solution composition alters the dynamics of beclomethasone diproprionate (BDP) particle formation from droplets emitted by pressurised metered dose inhalers (pMDIs). The hypothesis that differences in inhaler solutions result in different solid particle physical chemistry was tested using a suite of complementary calorimetric techniques. The atomisation of BDP-ethanol solutions from commercial HFA-pMDI produced aerodynamically-equivalent solid particle aerosols. However, differences in particle physico-chemistry (morphology and solvate/clathrate formation) were detected by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and supported by hot stage microscopy (HSM). Increasing the ethanol content of the formulation from 8 to 12% (w/w), which retards the evaporation of propellant and slows the increase in droplet surface viscosity, enhanced the likelihood of particles drying with a smooth surface. The dissolution rate of BDP from the 12% (w/w) ethanol formulation-derived particles (63% dissolved over 120 min) was reduced compared to the 8% (w/w) ethanol formulation-derived particles (86% dissolved over 120 min). The addition of 0.01% (w/w) formoterol fumarate or 1.3% (w/w) glycerol to the inhaler solution modified the particles and reduced the BDP dissolution rate further to 34% and 16% dissolved in 120 min, respectively. These data provide evidence that therapeutic aerosols from apparently similar inhaler products, including those with similar aerodynamic performance, may behave non-equivalently after deposition in the lungs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Drug release characteristics of physically cross-linked thermosensitive poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) hydrogel particles.

    PubMed

    Vihola, Henna; Laukkanen, Antti; Tenhu, Heikki; Hirvonen, Jouni

    2008-11-01

    The effect of physical cross-linking was studied on the formation and properties of thermosensitive polymer particles of poly(N-vinylcaprolactam), PVCL, and PVCL grafted with poly(ethylene oxide) macromonomer, PVCL-graft-C(11)EO(42). Loading and release of model drugs into/from the hydrogel particles were evaluated. Thermosensitive particles were stabilized by cross-linkers, the most feasible of which was salicylic acid (SA). At 23 degrees C, below the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the thermosensitive polymers, stability of the hydrogels was poor, whereas at 37 degrees C stable hydrogel particles were formed. All the drugs and also the cross-linker (SA) were released more efficiently from the PVCL particles compared to the PVCL-graft-C(11)EO(42) particles. Drug concentration and pH affected clearly the rate and extent of drug release in physiological buffer. The higher drug release from the PVCL was based on the more open gel-like structure as opposed to PVCL-graft-C(11)EO(42) particles. Complex formation between the cross-linker and the polymers was due to the hydrogen bonding between the hydroxyl groups of SA and H-bond acceptors of the PVCL. In the case of PVCL-graft-C(11)EO(42), the ethylene oxide chain provided more opportunities for H-bonding in comparison to the pure PVCL, creating more stable complexes (more tightly packed particles) leading to sustained drug release.

  17. J. J. Sakurai Prize for Theoretical Particle Physics Talk: Collider Physics: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichten, Estia

    2011-04-01

    More than a quarter century ago, theoretical issues with the Standard Model scalar boson sector inspired theorists to develop alternative models of electroweak symmetry breaking. The goal of the EHLQ study of hadron collider physics was to help determine the basic parameters of a supercollider that could distinguish these alternatives. Now we await data from the CMS and ATLAS experiments at CERN's Large Hadron Collider to solve this mystery. Does the Standard Model survive or, as theorists generally expect, does new physics appear (Strong Dynamics, SUSY, Extra Dimensions,...)? Even well into the LHC era it is likely that questions about the origin of fermion mass and mixings will remain and new physics will bring new puzzles. This time, the associated new scales are unknown. The opportunity to address new physics at a future multi-TeV lepton collider is briefly addressed.

  18. Meta-analysis inside and outside particle physics: two traditions that should converge?

    PubMed

    Baker, Rose D; Jackson, Dan

    2013-06-01

    The use of meta-analysis in medicine and epidemiology really took off in the 1970s. However, in high-energy physics, the Particle Data Group has been carrying out meta-analyses of measurements of particle masses and other properties since 1957. Curiously, there has been virtually no interaction between those working inside and outside particle physics. In this paper, we use statistical models to study two major differences in practice. The first is the usefulness of systematic errors, which physicists are now beginning to quote in addition to statistical errors. The second is whether it is better to treat heterogeneity by scaling up errors as do the Particle Data Group or by adding a random effect as does the rest of the community. Besides fitting models, we derive and use an exact test of the error-scaling hypothesis. We also discuss the other methodological differences between the two streams of meta-analysis. Our conclusion is that systematic errors are not currently very useful and that the conventional random effects model, as routinely used in meta-analysis, has a useful role to play in particle physics. The moral we draw for statisticians is that we should be more willing to explore 'grassroots' areas of statistical application, so that good statistical practice can flow both from and back to the statistical mainstream. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. In situ real-time measurement of physical characteristics of airborne bacterial particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jae Hee; Lee, Jung Eun

    2013-12-01

    Bioaerosols, including aerosolized bacteria, viruses, and fungi, are associated with public health and environmental problems. One promising control method to reduce the harmful effects of bioaerosols is thermal inactivation via a continuous-flow high-temperature short-time (HTST) system. However, variations in bioaerosol physical characteristics - for example, the particle size and shape - during the continuous-flow inactivation process can change the transport properties in the air, which can affect particle deposition in the human respiratory system or the filtration efficiency of ventilation systems. Real-time particle monitoring techniques are a desirable alternative to the time-consuming process of microscopic analysis that is conventionally used in sampling and particle characterization. Here, we report in situ real-time optical scattering measurements of the physical characteristics of airborne bacteria particles following an HTST process in a continuous-flow system. Our results demonstrate that the aerodynamic diameter of bacterial aerosols decreases when exposed to a high-temperature environment, and that the shape of the bacterial cells is significantly altered. These variations in physical characteristics using optical scattering measurements were found to be in agreement with the results of scanning electron microscopy analysis.

  20. Review of Basic Physics of Laser-Accelerated Charged-Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Suk, H.; Hur, M. S.; Jang, H.; Kim, J.

    2007-07-11

    Laser-plasma wake wave can accelerate charged particles, especially electrons with an enormously large acceleration gradient. The electrons in the plasma wake wave have complicated motions in the longitudinal and transverse directions. In this paper, basic physics of the laser-accelerated electron beam is reviewed.

  1. Final Report May 1, 2012 to May 31, 2015: "Theoretical Studies in Elementary Particle Physics"

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, John C.; Roiban, Radu

    2015-08-19

    This final report summarizes work at Penn State University from May 1, 2012 to May 31, 2015. The work was in theoretical elementary particle physics. Many new results in perturbative QCD, in string theory, and in related areas were obtained, with a substantial impact on the experimental program.

  2. A guide to experimental elementary particle physics literature, 1985--1989

    SciTech Connect

    Alekhin, S.I.; Bazeeva, V.V.; Ezhela, V.V.; Filimonov, B.B.; Lugovsky, S.B.; Nikolaev, A.S.; Petrova, N.L.; Slabospitsky, S.R.; Striganov, S.I.; Stroganov, Y.G.; Shelkovenko, A.N.; Yuschenko, O.P. . Inst. Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij); Yost, G.P.; Rittenberg, A.; Armstrong, F.E.; Barnett, R.M.; Simpson, K.H.; Trippe, T.G.; Wagman, G.S.; W

    1990-11-01

    We present an indexed guide to experimental high energy physics literature for the years 1985--1989. No actual data are given, but approximately 3500 papers are indexed by Beam/Target/Momentum, Reaction/Momentum (including the final stare), Final State Particle, and Accelerator/Experiment/ Detector.

  3. Particle physics with slow neutrons at the institute Laue-Langevin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbers, D.

    1988-02-01

    We give an overview over the particle and fundamental physics program at the European High Flux Reactor of the Institut Max von Laue-Paul Langevin at Grenoble, France. The experiments on neutron-antineutron oscillations, the neutron electric dipole moment, and on free neutron beta decay are reviewed in more detail.

  4. Research in elementary particle physics. Annual report, January 1--October 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    Experimental and theoretical work on high energy physics is reviewed. Included are preparations to study high-energy electron-proton interactions at HERA, light-cone QCD, decays of charm and beauty particles, neutrino oscillation, electron-positron interactions at CLEO II, detector development, and astrophysics and cosmology.

  5. Effects of particle size distribution on some physical, chemical and functional properties of unripe banana flour.

    PubMed

    Savlak, Nazlı; Türker, Burcu; Yeşilkanat, Nazlıcan

    2016-12-15

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of particle size distribution on physical, chemical and functional properties of unripe banana flour for the first time. A pure triploid (AAA group) of Musa acuminata subgroup Cavendish (°Brix;0.2, pH;4.73, titratable acidity; 0.56g/100g malic acid, total solids; 27.42%) which was supplied from Gazipaşa, Antalya, Turkey from October 2014 to October 2015 was used. Size fractions of <212, 212-315, 316-500 and 501-700μm were characterized for their physical, functional and antioxidant properties. Particle size significantly effected color, water absorbtion index and wettability. L(∗) value decreased, a(∗) and b(∗) values decreased by increasing particle size (r(2)=-0.94, r(2)=0.72, r(2)=0.73 respectively). Particles under 212μm had the lowest rate of wettability (83.40s). A negative correlation between particle size and wettability (r(2)=-0.75) and positive correlation between particle size and water absorption index (r(2)=0.94) was observed.

  6. The Gibbs paradox and the physical criteria for indistinguishability of identical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unnikrishnan, C. S.

    2016-08-01

    Gibbs paradox in the context of statistical mechanics addresses the issue of additivity of entropy of mixing gases. The usual discussion attributes the paradoxical situation to classical distinguishability of identical particles and credits quantum theory for enabling indistinguishability of identical particles to solve the problem. We argue that indistinguishability of identical particles is already a feature in classical mechanics and this is clearly brought out when the problem is treated in the language of information and associated entropy. We pinpoint the physical criteria for indistinguishability that is crucial for the treatment of the Gibbs’ problem and the consistency of its solution with conventional thermodynamics. Quantum mechanics provides a quantitative criterion, not possible in the classical picture, for the degree of indistinguishability in terms of visibility of quantum interference, or overlap of the states as pointed out by von Neumann, thereby endowing the entropy expression with mathematical continuity and physical reasonableness.

  7. Physical properties of elongated magnetic particles: magnetization and friction coefficient anisotropies.

    PubMed

    Vereda, Fernando; de Vicente, Juan; Hidalgo-Alvarez, Roque

    2009-06-02

    Anisotropy counts: A brief review of the main physical properties of elongated magnetic particles (EMPs) is presented. The most important characteristic of an EMP is the additional contribution of shape anisotropy to the total anisotropy energy of the particle, when compared to spherical magnetic particles. The electron micrograph shows Ni-ferrite microrods fabricated by the authors.We present an overview of the main physical properties of elongated magnetic particles (EMPs), including some of their more relevant properties in suspension. When compared to a spherical magnetic particle, the most important characteristic of an EMP is an additional contribution of shape anisotropy to the total anisotropy energy of the particle. Increasing aspect ratios also lead to an increase in both the critical single-domain size of a magnetic particle and its resistance to thermally activated spontaneous reversal of the magnetization. For single-domain EMPs, magnetization reversal occurs primarily by one of two modes, coherent rotation or curling, the latter being facilitated by larger aspect ratios. When EMPs are used to prepare colloidal suspensions, other physical properties come into play, such as their anisotropic friction coefficient and the consequent enhanced torque they experience in a shear flow, their tendency to align in the direction of an external field, to form less dense sediments and to entangle into more intricate aggregates. From a more practical point of view, EMPs are discussed in connection with two interesting types of magnetic colloids: magnetorheological fluids and suspensions for magnetic hyperthermia. Advances reported in the literature regarding the use of EMPs in these two systems are included. In the final section, we present a summary of the most relevant methods documented in the literature for the fabrication of EMPs, together with a list of the most common ferromagnetic materials that have been synthesized in the form of EMPs.

  8. Effect of carbonyl iron particles composition on the physical characteristics of MR grease

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamad, Norzilawati Mazlan, Saiful Amri; Ubaidillah

    2016-03-29

    Magnetorheological (MR) grease is an extension of the study of magnetorheological materials. The MR grease can help to reduce the particles sedimentation problem occurred in the MR fluids. Within this study, an effort has been taken to investigate the effect of different weight compositions of carbonyl iron particles on the physical and chemical characteristics of the MR grease under off-state condition (no magnetic field). The MR grease is prepared by mixing carbonyl iron particles having a size range of 1 to 10 µm with commercial NPC Highrex HD-3 grease. Characterizations of MR grease are investigated using Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM), Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM), Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) and rheometer. The dependency of carbonyl iron particles weight towards the magnetic properties of MR grease and other characterizations are investigated.

  9. Physical characterization and in silico modeling of inulin polymer conformation during vaccine adjuvant particle formation.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Thomas G; Rajapaksha, Harinda; Thilagam, Alagu; Qian, Gujie; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Cooper, Peter D; Gerson, Andrea; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2016-06-05

    This study combined physical data from synchrotron SAXS, FTIR and microscopy with in-silico molecular structure predictions and mathematical modeling to examine inulin adjuvant particle formation and structure. The results show that inulin polymer chains adopt swollen random coil in solution. As precipitation occurs from solution, interactions between the glucose end group of one chain and a fructose group of an adjacent chain help drive organized assembly, initially forming inulin ribbons with helical organization of the chains orthogonal to the long-axis of the ribbon. Subsequent aggregation of the ribbons results in the layered semicrystalline particles previously shown to act as potent vaccine adjuvants. γ-Inulin adjuvant particles consist of crystalline layers 8.5 nm thick comprising helically organized inulin chains orthogonal to the plane of the layer. These crystalline layers alternate with amorphous layers 2.4 nm thick, to give overall particle crystallinity of 78%.

  10. Physical characterization and in silico modeling of inulin polymer conformation during vaccine adjuvant particle formation

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, Thomas G.; Rajapaksha, Harinda; Thilagam, Alagu; Qian, Gujie; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Cooper, Peter D.; Gerson, Andrea; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    This study combined physical data from synchrotron SAXS, FTIR and microscopy with in-silico molecular structure predictions and mathematical modeling to examine inulin adjuvant particle formation and structure. The results show that inulin polymer chains adopt swollen random coil in solution. As precipitation occurs from solution, interactions between the glucose end group of one chain and a fructose group of an adjacent chain help drive organized assembly, initially forming inulin ribbons with helical organization of the chains orthogonal to the long-axis of the ribbon. Subsequent aggregation of the ribbons results in the layered semicrystalline particles previously shown to act as potent vaccine adjuvants. γ-inulin adjuvant particles consist of crystalline layers 8.5 nm thick comprising helically organized inulin chains orthogonal to the plane of the layer. These crystalline layers alternate with amorphous layers 2.4 nm thick, to give overall particle crystallinity of 78%. PMID:27083349

  11. Particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.

    1994-05-01

    This report discusses the following topics: The standard model -- synthesis and overview; accelerators and other facilities; mapping the SM constituents onto the detectors; a model pp/{bar p}p collider detector; and other experimental techniques.

  12. Particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Nefkens, B.M.K.

    1991-10-01

    This report discusses: rare and forbidden decays of eta mesons and muons to test the standard model; tests of charge symmetry and isospin invariance; studies of baryon resonances; and exploratory investigations in support of the new programs under consideration. (LSP)

  13. Instrumentation in Elementary Particle Physics: Proceedings of 4rd Icfa School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjos, J. C.; Hartill, D.; Sauli, F.; Sheaff, M.

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Foreword * Preface * Acknowledgements * LECTURES * Basic Processes in Particle Detection * Front-End Electronic for High Energy Physics * Solid State Detectors * Experimental System in High Energy Physics * SPECIAL TALKS * New Ideas in Detectors for High Energy Physics * The Development of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) Counters and Their Application in DELPHI at LEP. * Use of Transition Radiation Detectors (TRD's) for Particle Identification * Experimental Status of the Search for the Quark-Gluon Plasma in Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Interactions * LABORATORY SESSIONS * Silicon Detector and Signal Processing Experiment * Laboratory Session on Drift Chambers * Detecting uv-Photons in a Drift Chamber * A Small MWPC for Pedagogical USE * Principles of Position Sensitive Proportional Chambers * Imaging Detector for X-Ray Radiography * Lifetime of Cosmic Ray Muons (including Notes on Statistics for Physicists, Revised, by J. Orear) * List of Participants

  14. Elementary particle physics and high energy phenomena. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, A.R.; Cumalat, J.P.; De Alwis, S.P.; DeGrand, T.A.; Ford, W.T.; Mahanthappa, K.T.; Nauenberg, U.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.

    1992-06-01

    Experimental and theoretical high-energy physics programs at the University of Colorado are reported. Areas of concentration include the following: study of the properties of the Z[sup 0] with the SLD detector; fixed-target K-decay experiments; the R D program for the muon system: the SDC detector; high-energy photoproduction of states containing heavy quarks; electron--positron physics with the CLEO II detector at CESR; lattice QCD; and spin models and dynamically triangulated random surfaces. 24 figs., 2 tabs., 117 refs.

  15. Characteristics of the Contact between Regolith Particles: Their Influence on the Physical Properties of Regoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starukhina, L. V.

    The relationships for estimation of the physical properties of regolith-type media, such as the strength, thermal conductivity, and maximum curvature of particles, which depend on the particle-contact area, have been obtained from the consideration of two regolith particles in contact. A comparison of the calculated characteristics with experimental data for the lunar regolith has shown the applicability of the relations obtained. This paper presents the estimates of the time taken to form a contact and to smooth microirregularities on the particle surface by diffusion. These estimates account for the deficit of particles smaller than 1 μm in the lunar soil and show that the smoothing of regolith-particle sharp edges does not depend on the solar-wind irra- diation and takes as short a time as in the case of radiative smoothing. Therefore, this time cannot be used for the determination of the exposure age of the surface. The relationship for estimating the threshold micromete- orite mass that is sufficient to break the contact of the target particle with its neighbors has been obtained. It is shown that the breaking of single interparticle contacts under micrometeorite bombardment cannot be consid- ered as an effective mechanism of lunar resurfacing.

  16. Experimental particle physics at the University of Pittsburgh. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, W.E.; Engels, E. Jr.; Humanic, T.J.; Perera, U.; Shepard, P.F.; Thompson, J.A.

    1993-04-01

    During the past year on Task A, the HELIOS work drew to a close with first results from the electron-muon pair studies (no anomalous sources are seen, and the final results and uncertainties are being set). First data from CMD2 will allow improvement of some phi branching ratios, including some improved limits on forbidden decays. The engineering run for E865 is scheduled for June and July of 1993. The principal efforts of Task B, the Fermilab program, have been the completion of the analysis of the 1987--88 data with resulting publications, completion of the 1990--91 data run, and the beginning of the analysis of the 1990--91 data. In addition, the Task B group is taking a leadership role in developing a proposal to Fermilab for the upgrade of the CDF silicon vertex detector in preparation for the 1995 data run. Task C has recently submitted results of its fractionally charged particle searches, placing new upper limits on the abundance of naturally-occurring fractionally-charged particles in various materials. This group has recently been approved by the Brookhaven management for an exposure of their p-i-n diodes in a high intensity proton beam. This measurement, along with its subsequent analysis, will complete the program. Task D concerned itself with silicon drift chamber studies for the SSC. Task E was devoted to studies of electronics for the GEM Level 1 liquid Ar calorimeter trigger.

  17. Gauge bosons and heavy quarks: Proceedings of Summer Institute on Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Z decays and tests of the standard model; future possibilities for LEP; studies of the interactions of electroweak gauge bosons; top quark topics; the next linear collider; electroweak processes in hadron colliders; theoretical topics in B-physics; experimental aspects of B-physics; B-factory storage ring design; rare kaon decays; CP violation in K{sup 0} decays at CERN; recent K{sup 0} decay results from Fermilab E-731; results from LEP on heavy quark physics; review of recent results on heavy flavor production; weak matrix elements and the determination of the weak mixing angles; recent results from CLEO I and a glance at CLEO II data; recent results from ARGUS; neutrino lepton physics with the CHARM 2 detector; recent results from the three TRISTAN experiments; baryon number violation at high energy in the standard model: fact or fiction New particle searches at LEP; review of QCD at LEP; electroweak interactions at LEP; recent results on W physics from the UA2 experiment at the CERN {rho}{bar {rho}} collider; B physics at CDF; and review of particle astrophysics.

  18. Gauge bosons and heavy quarks: Proceedings of Summer Institute on Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawthorne, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Z decays and tests of the standard model; future possibilities for LEP; studies of the interactions of electroweak gauge bosons; top quark topics; the next linear collider; electroweak processes in hadron colliders; theoretical topics in B-physics; experimental aspects of B-physics; B-factory storage ring design; rare kaon decays; CP violation in K(sup 0) decays at CERN; recent K(sup 0) decay results from Fermilab E-731; results from LEP on heavy quark physics; review of recent results on heavy flavor production; weak matrix elements and the determination of the weak mixing angles; recent results from CLEO I and a glance at CLEO II data; recent results from ARGUS; neutrino lepton physics with the CHARM 2 detector; recent results from the three TRISTAN experiments; baryon number violation at high energy in the standard model: fact or fiction? New particle searches at LEP; review of QCD at LEP; electroweak interactions at LEP; recent results on W physics from the UA2 experiment at the CERN rho(bar rho) collider; B physics at CDF; and review of particle astrophysics.

  19. Physical properties and lung deposition of particles emitted from five major indoor sources.

    PubMed

    Vu, Tuan V; Ondracek, Jakub; Zdímal, Vladimir; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Delgado-Saborit, Juana Maria; Harrison, Roy M

    2017-01-01

    The physical properties of indoor particles were measured with an Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) system (14.6-850 nm), an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS, 0.54-18 μm) and an Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (H-TDMA) in an apartment located in an urban background site in Prague (Czech Republic) from 15 August to 8 September, 2014. The total particle maximum number concentration was 9.38 × 10(4), 1.46 × 10(5), 2.89 × 10(4), 2.25 × 10(5) and 1.57 × 10(6) particles cm(-3) for particles released from vacuum cleaning, soap/W5 cleaning spray, smoking, incense burning and cooking (frying) activities, respectively. Particles emitted from cleaning activities showed unimodal number size distributions, with the majority of particles (>98.2 %) in the ultrafine size range (Dp <100 nm) and modes at a diameter of 19.8 nm for vacuum cleaning and 30.6 nm for soap/W5 cleaning. Smoking and incense burning predominantly generated particles in the accumulation mode with a count median diameter around 90-150 nm while cooking emissions showed a bimodal structure with a main mode at 47.8 nm. Particles from vacuum cleaning, incense burning, smoking and cooking emissions were found to be "nearly hydrophobic" with an average growth factor (Gf) around 1.01-1.10, while particles emitted from desk cleaning using organic compounds were found to be "less-hygroscopic" (Gf ∼1.12-1.16). Based on an adjusted MPPD model with a consideration of the hygroscopic properties of particles, the total lung deposition fractions of these particles by number when they penetrate into the human lung were 0.73 ± 0.02, 0.62 ± 0.03, 0.37 ± 0.03, 0.32 ± 0.03 and 0.49 ± 0.02 for vacuum cleaning, desk cleaning, smoking, incense burning and cooking, respectively.

  20. Innovative experimental particle physics through technological advances: Past, present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Harry W.K.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    This mini-course gives an introduction to the techniques used in experimental particle physics with an emphasis on the impact of technological advances. The basic detector types and particle accelerator facilities will be briefly covered with examples of their use and with comparisons. The mini-course ends with what can be expected in the near future from current technology advances. The mini-course is intended for graduate students and post-docs and as an introduction to experimental techniques for theorists.

  1. Physical Fidelity in Particle-In-Cell Modeling of Small Debye-Length Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shadwick, B. A.; Schroeder, C. B.

    2009-01-22

    The connection between macro-particle shape functions and non-physical phase-space 'heating' in the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm is examined. The development of fine-scale phase-space structures starting from a cold initial condition is shown to be related to spatial correlations in the interpolated fields used in the Lorentz force. It is shown that the plasma evolution via the PIC algorithm from a cold initial condition leads to a state that is not consistent with that of a thermal plasma.

  2. Physical Fidelity in Particle-In-Cell Modeling of Small Debye-Length Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shadwick, B.A.; Schroeder, C.B.

    2008-08-01

    The connection between macro-particle shape functions and non-physical phase-space"heating" in the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm is examined. The development of fine-scale phasespace structures starting from a cold initial condition is shown to be related to spatial correlations in the interpolated fields used in the Lorentz force. It is shown that the plasma evolution via the PIC algorithm from a cold initial condition leads to a state that is not consistent with that of a thermal plasma.

  3. PARTICLE PHYSICS: CERN Gives Higgs Hunters Extra Month to Collect Data.

    PubMed

    Morton, O

    2000-09-22

    After 11 years of banging electrons and positrons together at higher energies than any other machine in the world, CERN, the European laboratory for particle physics, had decided to shut down the Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP) and install a new machine, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), in its 27-kilometer tunnel. In 2005, the LHC will start bashing protons together at even higher energies. But tantalizing hints of a long-sought fundamental particle have forced CERN managers to grant LEP a month's reprieve.

  4. Fundamental physical processes in coronae: Waves, turbulence, reconnection, and particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2008-05-01

    Our understanding of fundamental processes in the solar corona has been greatly progressed based on the space observations of SMM, Yohkoh, Compton GRO, SOHO, TRACE, RHESSI, and STEREO. We observe now acoustic waves, MHD oscillations, turbulence-related line broadening, magnetic configurations related to reconnection processes, and radiation from high-energy particles on a routine basis. We review a number of key observations in EUV, soft X-rays, and hard X-rays that innovated our physical understanding of the solar corona, in terms of hydrodynamics, MHD, plasma heating, and particle acceleration processes.

  5. New concepts in particle physics from the solution of an old problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroer, Bert

    2000-07-01

    Recent ideas on modular localization in local quantum physics are used to clarify the relation between on- and off-shell quantities in particle physics; in particular, the relation between on-shell crossing symmetry and off-shell Einstein causality. Among the collateral results of this new non-perturbative approach are profound relations between crossing symmetry of particle physics and Hawking-Unruh-like thermal aspects (KMS property, entropy attached to horizons) of quantum matter behind causal horizons, aspects which hitherto were exclusively related to Killing horizons in curved spacetime rather than with localization aspects in Minkowski space particle physics. The scope of this modular framework is amazingly wide and ranges from providing a conceptual basis for the d = 1 + 1 bootstrap-formfactor programme for factorizable d = 1 + 1 models to a decomposition theory of quantum field theories in terms of a finite collection of unitarily equivalent chiral conformal theories placed a specified relative position within a common Hilbert space (in d = 1 + 1 a holographic relation and in higher dimensions more like a scanning). The new framework gives a spacetime interpretation to the Zamolodchikov algebra and explains its thermal aspects.

  6. Modeling Gas-Particle Partitioning of SOA: Effects of Aerosol Physical State and RH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Seinfeld, J.

    2011-12-01

    Aged tropospheric aerosol particles contain mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water, and a large variety of organic compounds. In liquid aerosol particles non-ideal mixing of all species determines whether the condensed phase undergoes liquid-liquid phase separation or whether it is stable in a single mixed phase, and whether it contains solid salts in equilibrium with their saturated solution. The extended thermodynamic model AIOMFAC is able to predict such phase states by representing the variety of organic components using functional groups within a group-contribution concept. The number and composition of different condensed phases impacts the diversity of reaction media for multiphase chemistry and the gas-particle partitioning of semivolatile species. Recent studies show that under certain conditions biogenic and other organic-rich particles can be present in a highly viscous, semisolid or amorphous solid physical state, with consequences regarding reaction kinetics and mass transfer limitations. We present results of new gas-particle partitioning computations for aerosol chamber data using a model based on AIOMFAC activity coefficients and state-of-the-art vapor pressure estimation methods. Different environmental conditions in terms of temperature, relative humidity (RH), salt content, amount of precursor VOCs, and physical state of the particles are considered. We show how modifications of absorptive and adsorptive gas-particle mass transfer affects the total aerosol mass in the calculations and how the results of these modeling approaches compare to data of aerosol chamber experiments, such as alpha-pinene oxidation SOA. For a condensed phase in a mixed liquid state containing ammonium sulfate, the model predicts liquid-liquid phase separation up to high RH in case of, on average, moderately hydrophilic organic compounds, such as first generation oxidation products of alpha-pinene. The computations also reveal that treating liquid phases as ideal

  7. Range Verification Methods in Particle Therapy: Underlying Physics and Monte Carlo Modeling.

    PubMed

    Kraan, Aafke Christine

    2015-01-01

    Hadron therapy allows for highly conformal dose distributions and better sparing of organs-at-risk, thanks to the characteristic dose deposition as function of depth. However, the quality of hadron therapy treatments is closely connected with the ability to predict and achieve a given beam range in the patient. Currently, uncertainties in particle range lead to the employment of safety margins, at the expense of treatment quality. Much research in particle therapy is therefore aimed at developing methods to verify the particle range in patients. Non-invasive in vivo monitoring of the particle range can be performed by detecting secondary radiation, emitted from the patient as a result of nuclear interactions of charged hadrons with tissue, including β (+) emitters, prompt photons, and charged fragments. The correctness of the dose delivery can be verified by comparing measured and pre-calculated distributions of the secondary particles. The reliability of Monte Carlo (MC) predictions is a key issue. Correctly modeling the production of secondaries is a non-trivial task, because it involves nuclear physics interactions at energies, where no rigorous theories exist to describe them. The goal of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of various aspects in modeling the physics processes for range verification with secondary particles produced in proton, carbon, and heavier ion irradiation. We discuss electromagnetic and nuclear interactions of charged hadrons in matter, which is followed by a summary of some widely used MC codes in hadron therapy. Then, we describe selected examples of how these codes have been validated and used in three range verification techniques: PET, prompt gamma, and charged particle detection. We include research studies and clinically applied methods. For each of the techniques, we point out advantages and disadvantages, as well as clinical challenges still to be addressed, focusing on MC simulation aspects.

  8. Range Verification Methods in Particle Therapy: Underlying Physics and Monte Carlo Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kraan, Aafke Christine

    2015-01-01

    Hadron therapy allows for highly conformal dose distributions and better sparing of organs-at-risk, thanks to the characteristic dose deposition as function of depth. However, the quality of hadron therapy treatments is closely connected with the ability to predict and achieve a given beam range in the patient. Currently, uncertainties in particle range lead to the employment of safety margins, at the expense of treatment quality. Much research in particle therapy is therefore aimed at developing methods to verify the particle range in patients. Non-invasive in vivo monitoring of the particle range can be performed by detecting secondary radiation, emitted from the patient as a result of nuclear interactions of charged hadrons with tissue, including β+ emitters, prompt photons, and charged fragments. The correctness of the dose delivery can be verified by comparing measured and pre-calculated distributions of the secondary particles. The reliability of Monte Carlo (MC) predictions is a key issue. Correctly modeling the production of secondaries is a non-trivial task, because it involves nuclear physics interactions at energies, where no rigorous theories exist to describe them. The goal of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of various aspects in modeling the physics processes for range verification with secondary particles produced in proton, carbon, and heavier ion irradiation. We discuss electromagnetic and nuclear interactions of charged hadrons in matter, which is followed by a summary of some widely used MC codes in hadron therapy. Then, we describe selected examples of how these codes have been validated and used in three range verification techniques: PET, prompt gamma, and charged particle detection. We include research studies and clinically applied methods. For each of the techniques, we point out advantages and disadvantages, as well as clinical challenges still to be addressed, focusing on MC simulation aspects. PMID:26217586

  9. Computing for particle physics. Report of the HEPAP Subpanel on Computer Needs for the Next Decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-08-01

    The increasing importance of computation to the future progress in high energy physics is documented. Experimental computing demands are analyzed for the near future (four to ten years). The computer industry's plans for the near term and long term are surveyed as they relate to the solution of high energy physics computing problems. This survey includes large processors and the future role of alternatives to commercial mainframes. The needs for low speed and high speed networking are assessed, and the need for an integrated network for high energy physics is evaluated. Software requirements are analyzed. The role to be played by multiple processor systems is examined. The computing needs associated with elementary particle theory are briefly summarized. Computing needs associated with the Superconducting Super Collider are analyzed. Recommendations are offered for expanding computing capabilities in high energy physics and for networking between the laboratories.

  10. Computing for particle physics. Report of the HEPAP subpanel on computer needs for the next decade

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    The increasing importance of computation to the future progress in high energy physics is documented. Experimental computing demands are analyzed for the near future (four to ten years). The computer industry's plans for the near term and long term are surveyed as they relate to the solution of high energy physics computing problems. This survey includes large processors and the future role of alternatives to commercial mainframes. The needs for low speed and high speed networking are assessed, and the need for an integrated network for high energy physics is evaluated. Software requirements are analyzed. The role to be played by multiple processor systems is examined. The computing needs associated with elementary particle theory are briefly summarized. Computing needs associated with the Superconducting Super Collider are analyzed. Recommendations are offered for expanding computing capabilities in high energy physics and for networking between the laboratories. (LEW)

  11. Proceedings of Summer Institute of Particle Physics, July 27-August 7, 1981: the strong interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, A.

    1982-01-01

    The ninth SLAC Summer Institute on Particle Physics was held in the period July 27 to August 7, 1981. The central topic was the strong interactions with the first seven days spent in a pedagogic mode and the last three in a topical conference. In addition to the morning lectures on experimental and theoretical aspects of the strong interactions, three were lectures on machine physics; this year it was electron-positron colliding beam machines, both storage rings and linear colliders. Twenty-three individual items from the meeting were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  12. Final Report 10th Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Marshak, Marvin L.

    2013-11-03

    The 10th Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics was held in LaJolla, California on May 26 to May 31, 2009. The Conference Proceedings are published by the American Institute of Physics in Volume 1182 of the AIP Conference Proceedings (ISBN: 978-0-7354-0723-7). The Proceedings include papers from each of the Conference Presenters and a detailed schedule of talks at the Conference. The Table of Contents of the Conference Proceedings is available at http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/proceeding/aipcp/1182. Support by the U.S. Department of Energy and by DOE Laboratories was essential to the success of the Conference.

  13. Research program in particle physics. Progress report, January 1, 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Sudarshan, E.C.G.; Dicus, D.A.; Ritchie, J.L.; Lang, K.

    1993-05-01

    This report is the progress report for DOE funded support of particle physics work at the University of Texas, Austin. Support was divided between theoretical and experimental programs, and each is reviewed separately in the report. Theoretical effort was divided between three general areas: quantum gravity and mathematical physics; phenomenology; and quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. Experimental effort was primarily directed toward AGS experiments at Brookhaven, to look for rare kaon decays. AGS experiments 791 and 871 are described, along with BNL experiment 888.

  14. ART@CMS and SCIENCE&ART@SCHOOL: Novel Education and Communication Channels for Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, Michael; Alexopoulos, Angelos

    2014-06-01

    This document presents new outreach projects set up by the CMS Collaboration at the intersection of science and the arts to act as a creative springboard for the inspiration and engagement of public and students in particle physics research. Two programmes, Art@CMS and Science&Art@School, aim to reach and engage via multiple channels, different from those traditionally used for scientific outreach events. Art@CMS is a collaboration with professional artists to trigger a dialogue between the LHC scientific community and the art world. Science&Art@School brings high-school students from arts and sciences curricula together during extended learning periods by exploring how researchers and artists work and view each other's world. Results of events, workshops and collaborations are presented to demonstrate the concept in practice and to suggest avenues for strengthening further the educational and societal impact of particle physics research.

  15. On inducing finite dimensional physical field representations for massless particles in even dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhansali, Vineer

    1993-01-01

    Assuming trivial action of Euclidean translations, the method of induced representations is used to derive a correspondence between massless field representations transforming under the full generalized even dimensional Lorentz group, and highest weight states of the relevant little group. This gives a connection between 'helicity' and 'chirality' in all dimensions. Restrictions on 'gauge independent' representations for physical particles that this induction imposes are also stated.

  16. A research program in neutrino physics, cosmic rays and elementary particles. Progress report for Task A

    SciTech Connect

    Reines, F.; Sobel, H.W.

    1991-08-01

    Physics interests of the group are focused primarily on tests of conservation laws and studies of fundamental interactions between particles. There is also a significant interest in astrophysics and cosmic rays. Task A consists of three experimental programs; a Double-Beta Decay study (currently at the Hoover Dam), a Reactor Neutrino program (until this year at Savannah River), and the IMB Proton Decay experiment in a Cleveland salt mine. Discussion of the research in each area is given.

  17. Baryon isocurvature scenario in inflationary cosmology - A particle physics model and its astrophysical implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokoyama, Jun'ichi; Suto, Yasushi

    1991-01-01

    A phenomenological model to produce isocurvature baryon-number fluctuations is proposed in the framework of inflationary cosmology. The resulting spectrum of density fluctuation is very different from the conventional Harrison-Zel'dovich shape. The model, with the parameters satisfying several requirements from particle physics and cosmology, provides an appropriate initial condition for the minimal baryon isocurvature scenario of galaxy formation discussed by Peebles.

  18. Baryon isocurvature scenario in inflationary cosmology - A particle physics model and its astrophysical implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokoyama, Jun'ichi; Suto, Yasushi

    1991-01-01

    A phenomenological model to produce isocurvature baryon-number fluctuations is proposed in the framework of inflationary cosmology. The resulting spectrum of density fluctuation is very different from the conventional Harrison-Zel'dovich shape. The model, with the parameters satisfying several requirements from particle physics and cosmology, provides an appropriate initial condition for the minimal baryon isocurvature scenario of galaxy formation discussed by Peebles.

  19. Quantum Physics of Atoms, Molecules, Solids, Nuclei, and Particles, 2nd Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisberg, Robert; Resnick, Robert

    1985-01-01

    A revision of a successful junior/senior level text, this introduction to elementary quantum mechanics clearly explains the properties of the most important quantum systems. Emphasizes the applications of theory, and contains new material on particle physics, electron-positron annihilation in solids and the Mossbauer effect. Includes new appendices on such topics as crystallography, Fourier Integral Description of a Wave Group, and Time-Independent Perturbation Theory.

  20. Degeneracies of particle and nuclear physics uncertainties in neutrinoless β β decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisi, E.; Rotunno, A. M.; Šimkovic, F.

    2015-11-01

    Theoretical estimates for the half-life of neutrinoless double beta decay (0 ν β β ) in candidate nuclei are affected by both particle and nuclear physics uncertainties, which may complicate the interpretation of decay signals or limits. We study such uncertainties and their degeneracies in the following context: three 0 ν β β nuclei of great interest for large-scale experiments (Ge 76 , Te 130 , Xe 136 ), two representative particle physics mechanisms (light and heavy Majorana neutrino exchange), and a large set of nuclear matrix elements (NME), computed within the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA). It turns out that the main theoretical uncertainties, associated with the effective axial coupling gA and with the nucleon-nucleon potential, can be parametrized in terms of NME rescaling factors, up to small residuals. From this parametrization, the following QRPA features emerge: (1) the NME dependence on gA is milder than quadratic, (2) in each of the two mechanisms, the relevant lepton number violating parameter is largely degenerate with the NME rescaling factors, and (3) the light and heavy neutrino exchange mechanisms are basically degenerate in the above three nuclei. We comment on the challenging theoretical and experimental improvements required to reduce such particle and nuclear physics uncertainties and their degeneracies.

  1. The Particle Physics Playground website: tutorials and activities using real experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellis, Matthew; CMS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The CERN Open Data Portal provides access to data from the LHC experiments to anyone with the time and inclination to learn the analysis procedures. The CMS experiment has made a significant amount of data availible in basically the same format the collaboration itself uses, along with software tools and a virtual enviroment in which to run those tools. These same data have also been mined for educational exercises that range from very simple .csv files that can be analyzed in a spreadsheet to more sophisticated formats that use ROOT, a dominant software package in experimental particle physics but not used as much in the general computing community. This talk will present the Particle Physics Playground website (http://particle-physics-playground.github.io/), a project that uses data from the CMS experiment, as well as the older CLEO experiment, in tutorials and exercises aimed at high school and undergraduate students and other science enthusiasts. The data are stored as text files and the users are provided with starter Python/Jupyter notebook programs and accessor functions which can be modified to perform fairly high-level analyses. The status of the project, success stories, and future plans for the website will be presented. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant PHY-1307562.

  2. Review of the Elementary Particles Physics in the External Electromagnetic Fields Studies at KEK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinova, O. Tanaka

    2017-03-01

    High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK [1]) is a world class accelerator-based research laboratory. The field of its scientific interests spreads widely from the study of fundamental properties of matter, particle physics, nuclear physics to materials science, life science, technical researches, and industrial applications. Research outcomes from the laboratory achieved making use of high-energy particle beams and synchrotron radiation. Two synchrotron facilities of KEK, the Photon Factory (PF) ring and the Photon Factory Advanced Ring (PF-AR) are the second biggest synchrotron light source in Japan. A very wide range of the radiated light, from visible light to X-ray, is provided for a variety of materials science, biology, and life science [2]. KEK strives to work closely with national and international research institutions, promoting collaborative research activities. Advanced research and facilities provision are key factors to be at the frontier of the accelerator science. In this review I am going to discuss KEK overall accelerator-based science, and to consider light sources research and development. The state of arts of the current projects with respect to the elementary particles physics in the external electromagnetic fields is also stressed here.

  3. Review of the Elementary Particles Physics in the External Electromagnetic Fields Studies at KEK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    (Konstantinova), O. Tanaka

    2017-03-01

    High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK [1]) is a world class accelerator-based research laboratory. The field of its scientific interests spreads widely from the study of fundamental properties of matter, particle physics, nuclear physics to materials science, life science, technical researches, and industrial applications. Research outcomes from the laboratory achieved making use of high-energy particle beams and synchrotron radiation. Two synchrotron facilities of KEK, the Photon Factory (PF) ring and the Photon Factory Advanced Ring (PF-AR) are the second biggest synchrotron light source in Japan. A very wide range of the radiated light, from visible light to X-ray, is provided for a variety of materials science, biology, and life science [2]. KEK strives to work closely with national and international research institutions, promoting collaborative research activities. Advanced research and facilities provision are key factors to be at the frontier of the accelerator science. In this review I am going to discuss KEK overall accelerator-based science, and to consider light sources research and development. The state of arts of the current projects with respect to the elementary particles physics in the external electromagnetic fields is also stressed here.

  4. State of particle accelerators and high energy physics (Fermilab Summer School, 1981). Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, R.A. Jr.; Huson, F.R.; Month, M.

    1982-01-01

    The material gathered in this volume covers the seminars given at the Summer School on High Energy Particle Accelerators, sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Science Foundation, held at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois, July 13 to 24, 1981. The school was organized as a response to a recent appeal by a subpanel of the DOE High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) for more scientists and more students to work in the field of high energy particle accelerators. The committee set a number of objectives for the school: (1) to present in a thorough and up-to-date manner the entire spectrum of knowledge relating to accelerators; (2) to disseminate that knowledge to audiences that can best make use of it; (3) to encourage, by providing text materials and training to potential instructors, the development of accelerator physics education as part of university programs in high-energy physics; and (4) to foster a more extensive dialogue between particle and accelerator physicists. Separate entries were prepared for the data base for the papers included. (WHK)

  5. Cascade Outreach Competitions for schools - an efficient way to introduce Particle Physics to many students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Peter; Long, Lynne

    2016-04-01

    The Particle Physics group at the University of Birmingham has tried many different formats for Outreach competitions over recent years. We have found that a Cascade competition is a very efficient way to introduce Particle Physics concepts and experiments to a wide range of students. Small groups of students research, prepare and deliver a short presentation to other students. We will describe variations on the format of this type of competition and include some examples from our winning entries. All the material that we have used for these competitions is freely available on the web which we hope will make it easier for more groups to try similar competitions in the future. The name Cascade emphasises that the competition aims to introduce and inform many students about Particle Physics. However relatively limited time is required from researchers and teachers to enable this. The students research the material themselves and give their presentations, which often include novel demonstrations well matched to the target age group, to younger students or students of their own age. The participants also gain valuable experience in teamwork from the challenge of producing and delivering a clear and interesting talk by all members of the team, as well as improving their own understanding of the subject during the process.

  6. Analysing the health effects of simultaneous exposure to physical and chemical properties of airborne particles.

    PubMed

    Pirani, Monica; Best, Nicky; Blangiardo, Marta; Liverani, Silvia; Atkinson, Richard W; Fuller, Gary W

    2015-06-01

    Airborne particles are a complex mix of organic and inorganic compounds, with a range of physical and chemical properties. Estimation of how simultaneous exposure to air particles affects the risk of adverse health response represents a challenge for scientific research and air quality management. In this paper, we present a Bayesian approach that can tackle this problem within the framework of time series analysis. We used Dirichlet process mixture models to cluster time points with similar multipollutant and response profiles, while adjusting for seasonal cycles, trends and temporal components. Inference was carried out via Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. We illustrated our approach using daily data of a range of particle metrics and respiratory mortality for London (UK) 2002-2005. To better quantify the average health impact of these particles, we measured the same set of metrics in 2012, and we computed and compared the posterior predictive distributions of mortality under the exposure scenario in 2012 vs 2005. The model resulted in a partition of the days into three clusters. We found a relative risk of 1.02 (95% credible intervals (CI): 1.00, 1.04) for respiratory mortality associated with days characterised by high posterior estimates of non-primary particles, especially nitrate and sulphate. We found a consistent reduction in the airborne particles in 2012 vs 2005 and the analysis of the posterior predictive distributions of respiratory mortality suggested an average annual decrease of -3.5% (95% CI: -0.12%, -5.74%). We proposed an effective approach that enabled the better understanding of hidden structures in multipollutant health effects within time series analysis. It allowed the identification of exposure metrics associated with respiratory mortality and provided a tool to assess the changes in health effects from various policies to control the ambient particle matter mixtures. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Analysing the health effects of simultaneous exposure to physical and chemical properties of airborne particles

    PubMed Central

    Pirani, Monica; Best, Nicky; Blangiardo, Marta; Liverani, Silvia; Atkinson, Richard W.; Fuller, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Airborne particles are a complex mix of organic and inorganic compounds, with a range of physical and chemical properties. Estimation of how simultaneous exposure to air particles affects the risk of adverse health response represents a challenge for scientific research and air quality management. In this paper, we present a Bayesian approach that can tackle this problem within the framework of time series analysis. Methods We used Dirichlet process mixture models to cluster time points with similar multipollutant and response profiles, while adjusting for seasonal cycles, trends and temporal components. Inference was carried out via Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. We illustrated our approach using daily data of a range of particle metrics and respiratory mortality for London (UK) 2002–2005. To better quantify the average health impact of these particles, we measured the same set of metrics in 2012, and we computed and compared the posterior predictive distributions of mortality under the exposure scenario in 2012 vs 2005. Results The model resulted in a partition of the days into three clusters. We found a relative risk of 1.02 (95% credible intervals (CI): 1.00, 1.04) for respiratory mortality associated with days characterised by high posterior estimates of non-primary particles, especially nitrate and sulphate. We found a consistent reduction in the airborne particles in 2012 vs 2005 and the analysis of the posterior predictive distributions of respiratory mortality suggested an average annual decrease of − 3.5% (95% CI: − 0.12%, − 5.74%). Conclusions We proposed an effective approach that enabled the better understanding of hidden structures in multipollutant health effects within time series analysis. It allowed the identification of exposure metrics associated with respiratory mortality and provided a tool to assess the changes in health effects from various policies to control the ambient particle matter mixtures. PMID:25795926

  8. Proceedings of the Summer institute on particle physics: The top quark and the electroweak interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.; Dixon, L.; Leith, D.W.G.S.

    1997-01-01

    The XXIII SLAC Summer Institute on Particle Physics addressed the physics of the recently discovered top quark, and its connection to the electroweak interaction and to physics beyond the Standard Model. The seven-day school portion of the Institute covered many avenues for studying the top quark, from its direct production at hadron colliders and at future electron-positron colliders, to its virtual effects in precision electroweak quantities, in heavy flavor physics, and in the renormalization of supersymmetric theories, Vertex detectors - critical for identifying the b quark decay products of the top - and Cherenkov techniques for particle identification were also reviewed. The Institute concluded with a three-day topical conference covering recent developments in theory and experiment; this year, the highlights were the CDF and D0 top quark discovery. Also featured were updated precision electroweak measurements from SLC, LEP, and the Tevatron, heavy quark results from these facilities as well as CLEO, and new photoproduction and deep-inelastic scattering data from HERA. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the energy database for articles from this proceedings.

  9. Research accomplishments and future goals in particle physics. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This proposal presents the research accomplishments and ongoing activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics. Some changes have been made in the structure of the program from the previous arrangement of tasks. Task B, Accelerator Design Physics, is being submitted as a separate proposal for an independent grant; this will be consistent with the nature of the research and the source of funding. Boston University is active in seven principal areas: (1) Task A: Colliding Beams -- physics of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {anti p}p collisions; (2) Task C: MACRO Experiment -- search for magnetic monopoles and study of cosmic rays; (3) Task D: Proton Decay -- search for nucleon instability and study of neutrino interactions; (4) Tasks E, J, and N: Particle Theory -- theoretical high energy particle physics, including two Outstanding Junior Investigator awards; (5) Task F: Muon G-2 -- measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon; (6) Task K: SSCintcal -- calorimetry for the GEM Experiment; (7) Task L: Muon Detectors for the GEM Experiment. The body of the proposal is devoted to detailed discussions of each of the tasks. The total budget request for the program appears in a summary chapter that includes a general budget discussion and individual budget requests and explanations for each of the tasks.

  10. Radiopacifier Particle Size Impacts the Physical Properties of Tricalcium Silicate–based Cements

    PubMed Central

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Gutmann, James L.; Orangi, Jafar; Asatourian, Armen; Sheibani, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of radiopaque additive, bismuth oxide, particle size on the physical properties, and radiopacity of tricalcium silicate–based cements. Methods Six types of tricalcium silicate cement (CSC) including CSC without bismuth oxide, CSC + 10% (wt%) regular bismuth oxide (particle size 10 μm), CSC + 20% regular bismuth oxide (simulating white mineral trioxide aggregate [WMTA]) as a control, CSC + 10% nano bismuth oxide (particle size 50–80 nm), CSC + 20% nano-size bismuth oxide, and nano WMTA (a nano modification of WMTA comprising nanoparticles in the range of 40–100 nm) were prepared. Twenty-four samples from each group were divided into 4 groups and subjected to push-out, surface microhardness, radiopacity, and compressive strength tests. Data were analyzed by 1-way analysis of variance with the post hoc Tukey test. Results The push-out and compressive strength of CSC without bismuth oxide and CSC with 10% and 20% nano bismuth oxide were significantly higher than CSC with 10% or 20% regular bismuth oxide (P < .05). The surface micro-hardness of CSC without bismuth oxide and CSC with 10% regular bismuth oxide had the lowest values (P < .05). The lowest radiopacity values were seen in CSC without bismuth oxide and CSC with 10% nano bismuth oxide (P < .05). Nano WMTA samples showed the highest values for all tested properties (P < .05) except for radiopacity. Conclusions The addition of 20% nano bismuth oxide enhanced the physical properties of CSC without any significant changes in radiopacity. Regular particle-size bismuth oxide reduced the physical properties of CSC material for tested parameters. PMID:25492489

  11. Radiopacifier particle size impacts the physical properties of tricalcium silicate-based cements.

    PubMed

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Gutmann, James L; Orangi, Jafar; Asatourian, Armen; Sheibani, Nader

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of radiopaque additive, bismuth oxide, particle size on the physical properties, and radiopacity of tricalcium silicate-based cements. Six types of tricalcium silicate cement (CSC) including CSC without bismuth oxide, CSC + 10% (wt%) regular bismuth oxide (particle size 10 μm), CSC + 20% regular bismuth oxide (simulating white mineral trioxide aggregate [WMTA]) as a control, CSC + 10% nano bismuth oxide (particle size 50-80 nm), CSC + 20% nano-size bismuth oxide, and nano WMTA (a nano modification of WMTA comprising nanoparticles in the range of 40-100 nm) were prepared. Twenty-four samples from each group were divided into 4 groups and subjected to push-out, surface microhardness, radiopacity, and compressive strength tests. Data were analyzed by 1-way analysis of variance with the post hoc Tukey test. The push-out and compressive strength of CSC without bismuth oxide and CSC with 10% and 20% nano bismuth oxide were significantly higher than CSC with 10% or 20% regular bismuth oxide (P < .05). The surface microhardness of CSC without bismuth oxide and CSC with 10% regular bismuth oxide had the lowest values (P < .05). The lowest radiopacity values were seen in CSC without bismuth oxide and CSC with 10% nano bismuth oxide (P < .05). Nano WMTA samples showed the highest values for all tested properties (P < .05) except for radiopacity. The addition of 20% nano bismuth oxide enhanced the physical properties of CSC without any significant changes in radiopacity. Regular particle-size bismuth oxide reduced the physical properties of CSC material for tested parameters. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. The photon angular momentum controversy: Resolution of a conflict between laser optics and particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leader, Elliot

    2016-05-01

    The claim some years ago, contrary to all textbooks, that the angular momentum of a photon (and gluon) can be split in a gauge-invariant way into an orbital and spin term, sparked a major controversy in the Particle Physics community, exacerbated by the realization that many different forms of the angular momentum operators are, in principle, possible. A further cause of upset was the realization that the gluon polarization in a nucleon, a supposedly physically meaningful quantity, corresponds only to the gauge-variant gluon spin derived from Noether's theorem, evaluated in a particular gauge. On the contrary, Laser Physicists have, for decades, been happily measuring physical quantities which correspond to photon orbital and spin angular momentum evaluated in a particular gauge. This paper reconciles the two points of view, and shows that it is the gauge invariant version of the canonical angular momentum which agrees with the results of a host of laser optics experiments.

  13. Particle physics models for the 17 MeV anomaly in beryllium nuclear decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jonathan L.; Fornal, Bartosz; Galon, Iftah; Gardner, Susan; Smolinsky, Jordan; Tait, Tim M. P.; Tanedo, Philip

    2017-02-01

    The 6.8 σ anomaly in excited Be 8 nuclear decays via internal pair creation is fit well by a new particle interpretation. In a previous analysis, we showed that a 17 MeV protophobic gauge boson provides a particle physics explanation of the anomaly consistent with all existing constraints. Here we begin with a review of the physics of internal pair creation in Be 8 decays and the characteristics of the observed anomaly. To develop its particle interpretation, we provide an effective operator analysis for excited Be 8 decays to particles with a variety of spins and parities and show that these considerations exclude simple models with scalar particles. We discuss the required couplings for a gauge boson to give the observed signal, highlighting the significant dependence on the precise mass of the boson and isospin mixing and breaking effects. We present anomaly-free extensions of the Standard Model that contain protophobic gauge bosons with the desired couplings to explain the Be 8 anomaly. In the first model, the new force carrier is a U(1 ) B gauge boson that kinetically mixes with the photon; in the second model, it is a U (1 )B -L gauge boson with a similar kinetic mixing. In both cases, the models predict relatively large charged lepton couplings ˜0.001 that can resolve the discrepancy in the muon anomalous magnetic moment and are amenable to many experimental probes. The models also contain vectorlike leptons at the weak scale that may be accessible to near future LHC searches.

  14. Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics: A Brief Introduction for the Non-Expert

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Travis C.; /SLAC

    2007-06-06

    Open Access to particle physics literature does not sound particularly new or exciting, since particle physicists have been reading preprints for decades, and arXiv.org for 15 years. However new movements in Europe are attempting to make the peer-reviewed literature of the field fully Open Access. This is not a new movement, nor is it restricted to this field. However, given the field's history of preprints and eprints, it is well suited to a change to a fully Open Access publishing model. Data shows that 90% of HEP published literature is freely available online, meaning that HEP libraries have little need for expensive journal subscriptions. As libraries begin to cancel journal subscriptions, the peer review process will lose its primary source of funding. Open Access publishing models can potentially address this issue. European physicists and funding agencies are proposing a consortium, SCOAP3, that might solve many of the objections to traditional Open Access publishing models in Particle Physics. These proposed changes should be viewed as a starting point for a serious look at the field's publication model, and are at least worthy of attention, if not adoption.

  15. What we know and what we do not (yet) know in particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvini, G.

    Introduction. The colliders The standard model. Basic elements Some recent discoveries B0 anti-B0 mixing Experimental results Evidence for Bd anti-Bd mixing What about Bs mixing? CP violation in B-decay The number of neutrino families. Decay modes of the Z0 The Z widdth and the number of neutrino species Recent particle searches at p anti-p colliders Search for the top quark Looking for a fourth generation Mass limits for supersymmetric particles Perpectives with LEP and SLC Cross-section for Z0 production Mass and width of the Z0 Z0 decay Counting neutrinos with Mv> M_{z0}/2 Measurement of sin2θw with LEP/SLC New-particle searches at LEP/SLC. Higgs search Perspectives with LEP II. W^{+/-}physics and W^{+/-}mass Particle searches at LEP II. Higgs search Detectors for LEP/SLC Summary Future colliders. Why higher-energy machines, or why we are not yet happy Proton-proton colliders

  16. Preparation and characterization of latex particles as potential physical shale stabilizer in water-based drilling fluids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junyi; Qiu, Zhengsong; Huang, Wei'an; Song, Dingding; Bao, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The poly(styrene-methyl methacrylate) latex particles as potential physical shale stabilizer were successfully synthesized with potassium persulfate as an initiator in isopropanol-water medium. The synthesized latex particles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), particle size distribution measurement (PSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). FT-IR and TGA analysis confirmed that the latex particles were prepared by polymerization of styrene and methyl methacrylate and maintained good thermal stability. TEM and PSD analysis indicated that the spherical latex particles possessed unimodal distribution from 80 nm to 345 nm with the D90 value of 276 nm. The factors influencing particle size distribution (PSD) of latex particles were also discussed in detail. The interaction between latex particles and natural shale cores was investigated quantitatively via pore pressure transmission tests. The results indicated that the latex particles as potential physical shale stabilizer could be deformable to bridge and seal the nanopores and microfractures of shale to reduce the shale permeability and prevent pore pressure transmission. What is more, the latex particles as potential physical shale stabilizer work synergistically with chemical shale stabilizer to impart superior shale stability.

  17. Preparation and Characterization of Latex Particles as Potential Physical Shale Stabilizer in Water-Based Drilling Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junyi; Qiu, Zhengsong; Huang, Wei'an; Song, Dingding; Bao, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The poly(styrene-methyl methacrylate) latex particles as potential physical shale stabilizer were successfully synthesized with potassium persulfate as an initiator in isopropanol-water medium. The synthesized latex particles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), particle size distribution measurement (PSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). FT-IR and TGA analysis confirmed that the latex particles were prepared by polymerization of styrene and methyl methacrylate and maintained good thermal stability. TEM and PSD analysis indicated that the spherical latex particles possessed unimodal distribution from 80 nm to 345 nm with the D90 value of 276 nm. The factors influencing particle size distribution (PSD) of latex particles were also discussed in detail. The interaction between latex particles and natural shale cores was investigated quantitatively via pore pressure transmission tests. The results indicated that the latex particles as potential physical shale stabilizer could be deformable to bridge and seal the nanopores and microfractures of shale to reduce the shale permeability and prevent pore pressure transmission. What is more, the latex particles as potential physical shale stabilizer work synergistically with chemical shale stabilizer to impart superior shale stability. PMID:25302336

  18. Tertiary particle physics with ELI: from challenge to chance (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drska, Ladislav

    2017-05-01

    nteraction of high-intensity laser pulses with solid state targets results in generation of intense pulses of secondary particles via electromagnetic interaction : electrons, ions, hard x-rays. The beams of these particles can be used to produce various types of third-generation particles, beyond electromagnetic also other types of fundamental interactions can be involved in this process [1]. As the most interesting tertiary particles could be mentioned positrons, neutron, muons. This paper shall extend our previous analysis of this topic [2]: it discusses selected technical problems of design and realization of applicable sources of these particles and presents some more elaborated proposals for potential meaningful / hopefuly realistic exploitations of this technology. (1)Tertiary Sources (TS) : First Development Steps. This part of the presentation includes the topics as follows: (11) Pulsed positron sources: Verified solutions of laser-driven positron sources [3] [4] [5], development towards applicable facilities. Some unconventional concepts of application of lasers for positron production [6]. Techniques for realization of low/very-low energy positrons. (12) Taylored neutron sources [7]: Neutron sources with demanded space distribution, strongly beamed and isotropic solutions [8] [9]. Neutron generation with taylored energy distribution. Problem of the direct production of neutrons with very low energy [10] [11]. (13) Potential muon sources: Proof-of-principle laser experiment on electron / photon driven muon production [12] [13]. Study of the possibility of effective generation of surface muons. Problems of the production of muons with very low energy. (2) Fundamental & Applied Physics with TS: This part of the talk presents the themes: (21) Diagnostic potential of TS: Lepton emission as a signature of processes in extreme systems. Passive and active diagnostics using positrons, problems of detection and evaluation. Potential diagnostic applications of muons

  19. Data Portfolio: instructional materials provide particle physics data in high school classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardeen, Marjorie G.

    2016-04-01

    We discuss Data Portfolio (DP), a new suite of activities that provide experimental particle physics data to high school students and a professional development program for their teachers. DP is a website resource with a broad range of instructional materials that allows teachers to select activities of the correct level and scope for their students. Activities range from introductory to survey, investigation and exploration. DP incorporates existing elements such as masterclasses and e-Labs along with new ways of introducing students to physics concepts that underlie the data measurements and investigations. Evaluators have determined that these elements are in line with the latest standards and effective instructional models. To be successful, teachers need to be confident to use the materials, comfortable to step back so students can guide their own learning, and clever to convince administrators that they are meeting school and district requirements. Professional development workshops accompany the DP where participants experience some of these activities as their students would and plan how to use them in their classes. The first weeklong DP workshop was held in July at Fermilab. We have also held outreach workshops in conjunction with ILC workshops around the world. DP is a product of QuarkNet, a long-term professional development program embedded in the U.S. particle physics research community and funded by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by universities and labs across the country.

  20. Physical Immobilization Liposomes in Uniform Zwitterionic Microgel Particles Fabricated in Microcapillary Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Eun Seon; Byun, Aram; Kim, Jin Woong

    2014-03-01

    Lipid molecules have both hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties. Since their packing parameter ranges from 0.5 to 1, they self-assemble to form a vesicle structure, liposome. Thanks to the vesicle structure, liposome is able to encapsulate both hydrophilic and hydrophobic active ingredients, thus widening its applicability to pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and food industry. However, its vesicular structure is readily transferred to micelle in the presence of amphiphilic additives with low packing parameters. Therefore, it is critical to developing a technique to overcome this drawback. This study introduces a microfluidic approach to physically immobilize liposome in microgel particles. For this, we generate a uniform liposome-in-oil-in-water emulsion in a capillary-based microfluidic device. Basically, we observe how the flows in micro-channels affect generation of embryo emulsion drops. Then, the uniform emulsion is solidified by using photo-polymerization. Finally, we characterize the particle morphology, membrane fluidity, and mesh property, encapsulation efficiency and releasing.

  1. Optical and physical requirements for fluid particles marking trailing vortices from aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical study of the optical and physical requirements of marking trailing vortices that emanate from aircraft wings was carried out by considering particulate light-scattering properties, ability of particles to follow trailing vortices, and survival time of particles to vortex dissipation. Liquid droplets undergoing evaporation and molecular dispersion were investigated. Droplets should have lifetimes of about 300 sec. Droplet size should be about 1 micron to maximize light scattering with the minimum mass of liquid required. Droplets of this small size would spiral outward very slowly and essentially remain in the vortex cores. Nontoxic hygroscopic liquids, having an affinity for moisture in the air, have been identified. These liquids have relatively low vapor pressures of order 10 to the -5 mm Hg that would insure droplet persistence long enough to mark trailing vortices.

  2. Task A: Research in theoretical elementary particle physics at the University of Florida; Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.D.; Ramond, P.M.; Sikivie, P.; Thorn, C.B.

    1993-11-01

    This is the Annual Progress Report of the theoretical particle theory group at the University of Florida under DoE Grant DE-FG05-86ER40272. At present our group consists of four Full Professors (Field, Ramond, Thorn, Sikivie) and three Assistant Professors (Qiu, Woodard, Kennedy). Dallas Kennedy recently joined our group increasing the Particle Theory faculty to seven. In addition, we have three postdoctoral research associates, an SSC fellow, and eight graduate students. The research of our group covers a broad range of topics in theoretical high energy physics with balance between theory and phenomenology. Included in this report is a summary of the last several years of operation of the group and an outline of our current research program.

  3. Particle physics and polyedra proximity calculation for hazard simulations in large-scale industrial plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plebe, Alice; Grasso, Giorgio

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes a system developed for the simulation of flames inside an open-source 3D computer graphic software, Blender, with the aim of analyzing in virtual reality scenarios of hazards in large-scale industrial plants. The advantages of Blender are of rendering at high resolution the very complex structure of large industrial plants, and of embedding a physical engine based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics. This particle system is used to evolve a simulated fire. The interaction of this fire with the components of the plant is computed using polyhedron separation distance, adopting a Voronoi-based strategy that optimizes the number of feature distance computations. Results on a real oil and gas refining industry are presented.

  4. The Frontier of Modern Calorimetry: Hardware Advances and Application in Particle Physics Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedeva, Tatiana

    While the last missing components of the SM puzzle seem to be successfully found, particle physicists remain hungry for what might be there, beyond the cosy boundaries of the well studies elementary particle world. However, the sophisticated technique of data analysis and acute Monte Carlo simulations remain fruitless. It appears that the successful intrusion into the realm, in which we were not welcome so far, may require a very different implication of effort. All those results might suggest, though banal, that we need an improvement on the hardware side. Indeed, the hadronic calorimeter of CMS is no competitor to its other state-of-art components. This obstacle in many cases significantly complicates the flow of the physics analysis. Besides, the era of high luminosity LHC operation in the offing is calling for the same. After exploration of the analysis debri with 8TeV collision data, we investigate various approaches for better calorimetry for the CMS detector.

  5. Extended particle-in-cell schemes for physics in ultrastrong laser fields: Review and developments.

    PubMed

    Gonoskov, A; Bastrakov, S; Efimenko, E; Ilderton, A; Marklund, M; Meyerov, I; Muraviev, A; Sergeev, A; Surmin, I; Wallin, E

    2015-08-01

    We review common extensions of particle-in-cell (PIC) schemes which account for strong field phenomena in laser-plasma interactions. After describing the physical processes of interest and their numerical implementation, we provide solutions for several associated methodological and algorithmic problems. We propose a modified event generator that precisely models the entire spectrum of incoherent particle emission without any low-energy cutoff, and which imposes close to the weakest possible demands on the numerical time step. Based on this, we also develop an adaptive event generator that subdivides the time step for locally resolving QED events, allowing for efficient simulation of cascades. Further, we present a unified technical interface for including the processes of interest in different PIC implementations. Two PIC codes which support this interface, PICADOR and ELMIS, are also briefly reviewed.

  6. Significant effects of second Kaluza-Klein particles on dark matter physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kakizaki, Mitsuru; Senami, Masato; Matsumoto, Shigeki; Sato, Yoshio

    2005-06-15

    We point out that Kaluza-Klein (KK) dark matter physics is drastically affected by second KK particles. In this work various interesting phenomena caused by the second KK modes are discussed. In particular, we reevaluate the annihilation cross section relevant to the thermal relic density of KK dark matter in universal extra dimension models. In these models, the first KK mode of a B boson is a viable dark matter candidate by virtue of KK parity. We demonstrate that the KK dark matter annihilation cross section can be enhanced, compared with the tree-level cross section mediated only by first KK particles. The mass of the first KK mode of the B boson consistent with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe observation is increased.

  7. Extended particle-in-cell schemes for physics in ultrastrong laser fields: Review and developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonoskov, A.; Bastrakov, S.; Efimenko, E.; Ilderton, A.; Marklund, M.; Meyerov, I.; Muraviev, A.; Sergeev, A.; Surmin, I.; Wallin, E.

    2015-08-01

    We review common extensions of particle-in-cell (PIC) schemes which account for strong field phenomena in laser-plasma interactions. After describing the physical processes of interest and their numerical implementation, we provide solutions for several associated methodological and algorithmic problems. We propose a modified event generator that precisely models the entire spectrum of incoherent particle emission without any low-energy cutoff, and which imposes close to the weakest possible demands on the numerical time step. Based on this, we also develop an adaptive event generator that subdivides the time step for locally resolving QED events, allowing for efficient simulation of cascades. Further, we present a unified technical interface for including the processes of interest in different PIC implementations. Two PIC codes which support this interface, picador and elmis, are also briefly reviewed.

  8. MPPhys—A many-particle simulation package for computational physics education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    In a first course to classical mechanics elementary physical processes like elastic two-body collisions, the mass-spring model, or the gravitational two-body problem are discussed in detail. The continuation to many-body systems, however, is deferred to graduate courses although the underlying equations of motion are essentially the same and although there is a strong motivation for high-school students in particular because of the use of particle systems in computer games. The missing link between the simple and the more complex problem is a basic introduction to solve the equations of motion numerically which could be illustrated, however, by means of the Euler method. The many-particle physics simulation package MPPhys offers a platform to experiment with simple particle simulations. The aim is to give a principle idea how to implement many-particle simulations and how simulation and visualization can be combined for interactive visual explorations. Catalogue identifier: AERR_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AERR_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 111327 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 608411 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++, OpenGL, GLSL, OpenCL. Computer: Linux and Windows platforms with OpenGL support. Operating system: Linux and Windows. RAM: Source Code 4.5 MB Complete package 242 MB Classification: 14, 16.9. External routines: OpenGL, OpenCL Nature of problem: Integrate N-body simulations, mass-spring models Solution method: Numerical integration of N-body-simulations, 3D-Rendering via OpenGL. Running time: Problem dependent

  9. String Theory, the Crisis in Particle Physics and the Ascent of Metaphoric Arguments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroer, Bert

    This essay presents a critical evaluation of the concepts of string theory and its impact on particle physics. The point of departure is a historical review of four decades of string theory within the broader context of six decades of failed attempts at an autonomous S matrix approach to particle theory. The central message, contained in Secs. 5 and 6, is that string theory is not what its name suggests, namely a theory of objects in space-time whose localization is string-instead of pointlike. Contrary to popular opinion, the oscillators corresponding to the Fourier models of a quantum-mechanical string do not become embedded in space-time and neither does the "range space" of a chiral conformal QFT acquire the interpretation of stringlike-localized quantum matter. Rather, string theory represents a solution to a problem which enjoyed some popularity in the 1960s: find a principle which, similar to the SO(4,2) group in the case of the hydrogen spectrum, determines an infinite component wave function with a (realistic) mass/spin spectrum. Instead of the group theory used in the old failed attempts, it creates this mass/spin spectrum by combining an internal oscillator quantum mechanics with a pointlike-localized quantum-field-theoretic object, i.e. the mass/spin tower "sits" over one point and does not arise from a wiggling string in space-time. The widespread acceptance of a theory whose interpretation has been based on metaphoric reasoning had a corroding influence on particle theory, a point which will be illustrated in the last section with some remarks of a more sociological nature. These remarks also lend additional support to observations on connections between the discourse in particle physics and the present Zeitgeist of the post-Cold War period that are made in the introduction.

  10. Resolving Changing Chemical and Physical Properties of SSA Particle Types during Laboratory Phytoplankton Blooms using Online Single Particle Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, C. M.; Prather, K. A.; Richardson, R.; Wang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of sea spray aerosols (SSA) can modify their climate-relevant properties. Recent studies have shown a diverse set of distinct SSA particle types, however there are conflicting reports on how and whether biological activity controls the organic fraction and mixing state of SSA. This study leverages an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer to give an accounting of the temporally resolved mixing state of primary SSA (0.4 - 3 µm vacuum aerodynamic diameter), encompassing 97% of particles detected over the course of laboratory phytoplankton blooms. The influence of biological activity on the climate relevant properties of defined particle types is also investigated. Spatial chemical particle heterogeneity and particularly the surface chemical composition of particles are described along with particle type specific water-particle interactions. These online measurements in tandem with chemical composition could give new insight on the link between seawater chemistry, marine aerosols, and climate properties.

  11. Late time cosmological phase transitions 1: Particle physics models and cosmic evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Hill, Christopher T.; Watkins, Richard

    1991-01-01

    We described a natural particle physics basis for late-time phase transitions in the universe. Such a transition can seed the formation of large-scale structure while leaving a minimal imprint upon the microwave background anisotropy. The key ingredient is an ultra-light pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson with an astronomically large (O(kpc-Mpc)) Compton wavelength. We analyze the cosmological signatures of and constraints upon a wide class of scenarios which do not involve domain walls. In addition to seeding structure, coherent ultra-light bosons may also provide unclustered dark matter in a spatially flat universe, omega sub phi approx. = 1.

  12. The Chicagoland Observatory Underground for Particle Physics cosmic ray veto system

    SciTech Connect

    Crisler, M.; Hall, J.; Ramberg, E.; Kiper, T.; /Fermilab

    2010-11-01

    A photomultiplier (PMT) readout system has been designed for use by the cosmic ray veto systems of two warm liquid bubble chambers built at Fermilab by the Chicagoland Observatory Underground for Particle Physics (COUPP) collaboration. The systems are designed to minimize the infrastructure necessary for installation. Up to five PMTs can be daisy-chained on a single data link using standard Category 5 network cable. The cables is also serve distribute to low voltage power. High voltage is generated locally on each PMT base. Analog and digital signal processing is also performed locally. The PMT base and system controller design and performance measurements are presented.

  13. Research in theoretical elementary particle physics at the University of Florida: Task A. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.D.; Ramond, P.M.; Sikivie, P.; Thorn, C.B.

    1994-12-01

    This is the Annual Progress Report of the theoretical particle theory group at the University of Florida under DOE Grant DE-FG05-86ER40272. At present our group consists of four Full Professors (Field, Ramond, Thorn, Sikivie), one Associate Professor (Woodard), and two Assistant Professors (Qiu, Kennedy). In addition, we have four postdoctoral research associates and seven graduate students. The research of our group covers a broad range of topics in theoretical high energy physics including both theory and phenomenology. Included in this report is a summary of the last several years, an outline of our current research program.

  14. Effects of physical activity on the deposition of traffic-related particles into the human lungs in silico.

    PubMed

    Oravisjärvi, Kati; Pietikäinen, Mari; Ruuskanen, Juhani; Rautio, Arja; Voutilainen, Arto; Keiski, Riitta L

    2011-10-01

    Traffic-related particle emissions have been a great concern over a number of years due to their adverse health effects. In this research project, traffic-related particle deposition in the human lungs is studied using lung deposition estimates based on the ICRP 66 model. This study covers four human groups, i.e. adult males, adult females and two groups of children aged 5 and 10 years. The study examines particle deposition in the human lungs in relation to four different physical exercise levels, i.e. sleeping, sitting, light exercise and heavy exercise. To conduct the study, the particle size distributions of diesel and compressed natural gas (CNG) busses were monitored in field laboratory conditions. The study indicates that the total number of diesel particles measured is greater than the total number of CNG particles. The results further display that most of the diesel particles measured are smaller than 0.2 μm, whereas the CNG particles are smaller than 0.05 μm in aerodynamic diameter. The level of physical exercise, as well as the age and gender of a person affects the deposition of particles in the lungs. An increase in the physical activity results in larger amounts of small-size particles penetrating deeper into the respiratory system. The lung deposition of particles in males was substantially different compared to that of females and children. The deposited dose of particles was generally lower for females than for males and further lower for children than for females. This article argues that these groups should be discussed separately when conducting exposure assessments and that the level of physical activity should be taken into account when assessing potential health consequences.

  15. Research in particle physics. Progress report, June 1, 1992--January 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Research accomplishments and current activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics are presented. Principal areas of activity include the following: detectors for studies of electron{endash}positron annihilation in colliding beams; advanced accelerator component design, including the superconducting beam inflector, electrostatic quadrupoles, and the ``electrostatic muon kicker``; the detector for the MACRO (Monopole, Astrophysics, and Cosmic Ray Observatory) experiment; neutrino astrophysics and the search for proton decay; theoretical particle physics (electroweak and flavor symmetry breaking, hadron collider phenomenology, cosmology and astrophysics, new field-theoretic models, nonperturbative investigations of quantum field theories, electroweak interactions); measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon; calorimetry for the GEM experiment; and muon detectors for the GEM experiment at the Superconducting Super Collider.

  16. Experimental particle physics. Progress report, September 16, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, R.I.; Lane, C.E.

    1992-09-01

    The goals of this research are the experimental testing of fundamental theories of physics beyond the standard model and the exploration of cosmic phenomena through the techniques of particle physics. We are working on the MACRO experiment, which employs a large-area underground detector to search fore grand unification magnetic monopoles and dark matter candidates and to study cosmic ray muons as well as low- and high-energy neutrinos; the Chooz experiment to search for reactor neutrino oscillations at a distance of 1 km from the source; a new proposal (the Perry experiment) to construct a one-kiloton liquid scintillator in the Fairport, Ohio underground facility IMB to study neutrino oscillations with a 13 km baseline; and development of technology for improved liquid scintillators and for very-low-background materials in support of the MACRO and Perry experiments and for new solar neutrino experiments.

  17. Physical, Chemical, and Mineralogical Properties of Comet 81P/Wild 2 Particles Collected by Stardust

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, G.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft collected dust from the coma of Comet 81P/Wild 2 by impact into aerogel capture cells or into Al-foils. The first direct, laboratory measurement of the physical, chemical, and mineralogical properties of cometary dust grains ranging from <10-15 to ?10-4 g were made on this dust. Deposition of material along the entry tracks in aerogel and the presence of compound craters in the Al-foils both indicate that many of the Wild 2 particles in the size range sampled by Stardust are weakly bound aggregates of a diverse range of minerals. Mineralogical characterization of fragments extracted from tracks indicates that most tracks were dominated by olivine, low-Ca pyroxene, or Fe-sulfides, although one track was dominated by refractory minerals similar to Ca-Al inclusions in primitive meteorites. Minor mineral phases, including Cu-Fe-sulfide, Fe-Zn-sulfide, carbonate and metal oxides, were found along some tracks. The high degree of variability of the element/Fe ratios for S, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Ga among the 23 tracks from aerogel capture cells analyzed during Stardust Preliminary Examination is consistent with the mineralogical variability. This indicates Wild 2 particles have widely varying compositions at the largest size analyzed (>10 ?m). Because Stardust collected particles from several jets, sampling material from different regions of the interior of Wild 2, these particles are expected to be representative of the non-volatile component of the comet over the size range sampled. Thus, the stream of particles associated with Comet Wild 2 contains individual grains of diverse elemental and mineralogical compositions, some rich in Fe and S, some in Mg, and others in Ca and Al. The mean refractory element abundance pattern in the Wild 2 particles that were examined is consistent with the CI meteorite pattern for Mg, Si, Cr, Fe, and Ni to 35%, and for Ca, Ti and Mn to 60%, but S/Si and Fe/Si both show a statistically significant

  18. QCD Intersections of Nuclear and Particle Physics at the High-Energy Frontier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitev, Ivan

    2010-11-01

    The connection between nuclear and particle physics is, arguably, most strongly manifested at the high-energy frontier. In recent years, advances in QCD theory have allowed one to describe with a high degree of accuracy the energetic final states that are experimentally accessible at today's premier hadronic and heavy ion collider facilities. These production processes include jets, heavy flavor, and electroweak bosons and are known at least up to next-to-leading order. Concurrent advances in many-body QCD theory of in-medium parton and hadron dynamics have shed light on a multitude of open questions that range from the wavefunction properties of large nuclei to the stopping power and medium response of strongly-interacting plasmas. Today these theoretical developments come together to provide the foundation for the ongoing and future searches for new forms of matter: from the elusive dark matter that is believed to make up the fabric of our universe to the quark-gluon plasma phase that RHIC and LHC aim to recreate and study under controlled laboratory conditions. In this talk, I will discuss recent progress in the QCD theory of hard probes in light of the exciting upcoming experimental opportunities in particle and nuclear physics to discover new forms of matter and/or to quantify their properties.

  19. High speed optical wireless data transmission system for particle sensors in high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, W.; Corsini, R.; Ciaramella, E.; Dell'Orso, R.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.

    2015-08-01

    High speed optical fiber or copper wire communication systems are frequently deployed for readout data links used in particle physics detectors. Future detector upgrades will need more bandwidth for data transfer, but routing requirements for new cables or optical fiber will be challenging due to space limitations. Optical wireless communication (OWC) can provide high bandwidth connectivity with an advantage of reduced material budget and complexity of cable installation and management. In a collaborative effort, Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna and INFN Pisa are pursuing the development of a free-space optical link that could be installed in a future particle physics detector or upgrade. We describe initial studies of an OWC link using the inner tracker of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector as a reference architecture. The results of two experiments are described: the first to verify that the laser source transmission wavelength of 1550 nm will not introduce fake signals in silicon strip sensors while the second was to study the source beam diameter and its tolerance to misalignment. For data rates of 2.5 Gb/s and 10 Gb/s over a 10 cm working distance it was observed that a tolerance limit of ±0.25 mm to ±0.8 mm can be obtained for misaligned systems with source beam diameters of 0.38 mm to 3.5 mm, respectively.

  20. Alfv'en instabilities and energetic particle physics in toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spong, Donald

    2012-03-01

    Modeling capabilities and experimental diagnostics for energetic particle-driven Alfv'en instabilities have advanced significantly in recent years. Simulation tools now range from rapidly applied reduced-dimensionality models and hybrid fluid particle models to more comprehensive gyrokinetic approaches. Alfv'en mode theory has been applied not only to tokamaks, but also to stellarators and reversed field pinches. Current diagnostic techniques allow direct imaging of the mode structure, fast ion density and loss patterns at the plasma edge, allowing theory/experiment comparisons in greater depth than previously possible. Examples from a variety of tokamak, stellarator and reversed field pinch experiments and the associated theory will be described. These activities are preparing the way for future ignited devices, such as ITER, where energetic alpha particles will provide the dominant plasma heating mechanism. High fidelity models of alpha behavior will be required for predicting their effects on the alpha heating profile, non-diffusive transport, nonlinear feedback loops and localized wall heat loads; in addition, understanding Alfv'en spectral emissions can provide diagnostic opportunities. Projections of the current models to ITER and future physics needs will be discussed.

  1. The Effect of Oat Fibre Powder Particle Size on the Physical Properties of Wheat Bread Rolls

    PubMed Central

    Kurek, Marcin; Wyrwisz, Jarosław; Piwińska, Monika; Wierzbicka, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Summary In response to the growing interest of modern society in functional food products, this study attempts to develop a bakery product with high dietary fibre content added in the form of an oat fibre powder. Oat fibre powder with particle sizes of 75 µm (OFP1) and 150 µm (OFP2) was used, substituting 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20% of the flour. The physical properties of the dough and the final bakery products were then measured. Results indicated that dough with added fibre had higher elasticity than the control group. The storage modulus values of dough with OFP1 most closely approximated those of the control group. The addition of OFP1 did not affect significantly the colour compared to the other samples. Increasing the proportion of oat fibre powder resulted in increased firmness, which was most prominent in wheat bread rolls with oat fibre powder of smaller particle sizes. The addition of oat fibre powder with smaller particles resulted in a product with the rheological and colour parameters that more closely resembled control sample. PMID:27904392

  2. Cometary Evolution: Clues on Physical Properties from Chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitmeijer, Frans J. M.; Mackinnon, Ian D. R.

    1997-01-01

    The degree of diversity or similarity detected in comets depends primarily on the lifetimes of the individual cometary nuclei at the time of analysis. It is inherent in our understanding of cometary orbital dynamics and the seminal model of comet origins that cometary evolution is the natural order of events in our Solar System. Thus, predictions of cometary behaviour in terms of bulk physical, mineralogical or chemical parameters should contain an appreciation of temporal variation(s). Previously, Rietmeijer and Mackinnon [1987] developed mineralogical bases for the chemical evolution of cometary nuclei primarily with regard to the predominantly silicate fraction of comet nuclei. We suggested that alteration of solids in cometary nuclei should be expected and that indications of likely reactants and products can be derived from judicious comparison with terrestrial diagenetic environments which include hydrocryogenic and low-temperature aqueous alterations. In a further development of this concept, Rietmeijer [1988] provides indirect evidence for the formation of sulfides and oxides in comet nuclei. Furthermore, Rietmeijer [1988] noted that timescales for hydrocryogenic and low-temperature reactions involving liquid water are probably adequate for relatively mature comets, e.g. P/comet Halley. In this paper, we will address the evolution of comet nuclei physical parameters such as solid particle grain size, porosity and density. In natural environments, chemical evolution (e.g. mineral reactions) is often accompanied by changes in physical properties. These concurrent changes are well-documented in the terrestrial geological literature, especially in studies of sediment diagenesis and we suggest that similar basic principles apply within the upper few meters of active comet nuclei. The database for prediction of comet nuclei physical parameters is, in principle, the same as used for the proposition of chemical evolution. We use detailed mineralogical studies of

  3. Cometary Evolution: Clues on Physical Properties from Chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Mackinnon, Ian D. R.

    1989-01-01

    The degree of diversity or similarity detected in comets depends primarily on the lifetimes of the individual cometary nuclei at the time of analysis. It is inherent in our understanding of cometary orbital dynamics and the seminal model of comet origins by Oort that cometary evolution is the natural order of events in our Solar System. Thus, predictions of cometary behaviour in terms of bulk physical, mineralogical or chemical parameters should contain an appreciation of temporal variation(s). Previously, Rietmeijer and Mackinnon developed mineralogical bases for the chemical evolution of cometary nuclei primarily with regard to the predominantly silicate fraction of comet nuclei. We suggested that alteration of solids in cometary nuclei should be expected and that indications of likely reactants and products can be derived from judicious comparison with terrestrial diagenetic environments which include hydrocryogenic and low-temperature aqueous alterations. In a further development of this concept, Rietmeijer provides indirect evidence for the formation of sulfides and oxides in comet nuclei. Furthermore, Rietmeijer noted that timescales for hydrocryogenic and low-temperature reactions involving liquid water are probably adequate for relatively mature comets, e.g. P/comet Halley. In this paper, we will address the evolution of comet nuclei physical parameters such as solid particle grain size, porosity and density. In natural environments, chemical evolution (e.g. mineral reactions) is often accompanied by changes in physical properties. These concurrent changes are well-documented in the terrestrial geological literature, especially in studies of sediment diagenesis and we suggest that similar basic principles apply within the upper few meters of active comet nuclei. The database for prediction of comet nuclei physical parameters is, in principle, the same as used for the proposition of chemical evolution. We use detailed mineralogical studies of chondritic

  4. Cometary Evolution: Clues on Physical Properties from Chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitmeijer, Frans J. M.; Mackinnon, Ian D. R.

    1997-01-01

    The degree of diversity or similarity detected in comets depends primarily on the lifetimes of the individual cometary nuclei at the time of analysis. It is inherent in our understanding of cometary orbital dynamics and the seminal model of comet origins that cometary evolution is the natural order of events in our Solar System. Thus, predictions of cometary behaviour in terms of bulk physical, mineralogical or chemical parameters should contain an appreciation of temporal variation(s). Previously, Rietmeijer and Mackinnon [1987] developed mineralogical bases for the chemical evolution of cometary nuclei primarily with regard to the predominantly silicate fraction of comet nuclei. We suggested that alteration of solids in cometary nuclei should be expected and that indications of likely reactants and products can be derived from judicious comparison with terrestrial diagenetic environments which include hydrocryogenic and low-temperature aqueous alterations. In a further development of this concept, Rietmeijer [1988] provides indirect evidence for the formation of sulfides and oxides in comet nuclei. Furthermore, Rietmeijer [1988] noted that timescales for hydrocryogenic and low-temperature reactions involving liquid water are probably adequate for relatively mature comets, e.g. P/comet Halley. In this paper, we will address the evolution of comet nuclei physical parameters such as solid particle grain size, porosity and density. In natural environments, chemical evolution (e.g. mineral reactions) is often accompanied by changes in physical properties. These concurrent changes are well-documented in the terrestrial geological literature, especially in studies of sediment diagenesis and we suggest that similar basic principles apply within the upper few meters of active comet nuclei. The database for prediction of comet nuclei physical parameters is, in principle, the same as used for the proposition of chemical evolution. We use detailed mineralogical studies of

  5. News Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-05-01

    Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

  6. Methods for organizing the interaction of circulating particle beams with internal targets in nuclear physics experiments at synchrotrons and storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artiomov, A. S.

    2017-05-01

    The first methods for using internal targets and their further development for organization of nuclear physics experiments at synchrotrons and storage rings are reviewed. With these methods, new results are obtained and discoveries are made in physics of interactions of elementary particles and nuclei. Current uses of various internal targets and circulating particle beams in ongoing and projected research in particle physics, relativistic nuclear and spin physics, and physics of interactions of exotic and radioactive nuclei and for producing fluxes of secondary particles (mesons, neutrons, exotic and radioactive nuclei, etc.) for physics experiments are described.

  7. Review of lattice results concerning low-energy particle physics. Flavour Lattice Averaging Group (FLAG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, S.; Aoki, Y.; Bečirević, D.; Bernard, C.; Blum, T.; Colangelo, G.; Della Morte, M.; Dimopoulos, P.; Dürr, S.; Fukaya, H.; Golterman, M.; Gottlieb, Steven; Hashimoto, S.; Heller, U. M.; Horsley, R.; Jüttner, A.; Kaneko, T.; Lellouch, L.; Leutwyler, H.; Lin, C.-J. D.; Lubicz, V.; Lunghi, E.; Mawhinney, R.; Onogi, T.; Pena, C.; Sachrajda, C. T.; Sharpe, S. R.; Simula, S.; Sommer, R.; Vladikas, A.; Wenger, U.; Wittig, H.

    2017-02-01

    We review lattice results related to pion, kaon, D- and B-meson physics with the aim of making them easily accessible to the particle-physics community. More specifically, we report on the determination of the light-quark masses, the form factor f_+(0), arising in the semileptonic K → π transition at zero momentum transfer, as well as the decay constant ratio f_K/f_π and its consequences for the CKM matrix elements V_{us} and V_{ud}. Furthermore, we describe the results obtained on the lattice for some of the low-energy constants of SU(2)_L× SU(2)_R and SU(3)_L× SU(3)_R Chiral Perturbation Theory. We review the determination of the B_K parameter of neutral kaon mixing as well as the additional four B parameters that arise in theories of physics beyond the Standard Model. The latter quantities are an addition compared to the previous review. For the heavy-quark sector, we provide results for m_c and m_b (also new compared to the previous review), as well as those for D- and B-meson-decay constants, form factors, and mixing parameters. These are the heavy-quark quantities most relevant for the determination of CKM matrix elements and the global CKM unitarity-triangle fit. Finally, we review the status of lattice determinations of the strong coupling constant α _s.

  8. The Development and Assessment of Particle Physics Summer Program for High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prefontaine, Brean; Kurahashi Neilson, Naoko, , Dr.; Love, Christina, , Dr.

    2017-01-01

    A four week immersive summer program for high school students was developed and implemented to promote awareness of university level research. The program was completely directed by an undergraduate physics major and included a hands-on and student-led capstone project for the high school students. The goal was to create an adaptive and shareable curriculum in order to influence high school students' views of university level research and what it means to be a scientist. The program was assessed through various methods including a survey developed for this program, a scientific attitudes survey, weekly blog posts, and an oral exit interview. The curriculum included visits to local laboratories, an introduction to particle physics and the IceCube collaboration, an introduction to electronics and computer programming, and their capstone project: planning and building a scale model of the IceCube detector. At the conclusion of the program, the students participated an informal outreach event for the general public and gave an oral presentation to the Department of Physics at Drexel University. Assessment results and details concerning the curriculum and its development will be discussed.

  9. Report of the HEPAP Subpanel on Major Detectors in Non-Accelerator Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-05-01

    The subpanel on Major Detectors in Non-Accelerator Particle Physics was formed in February 1989 as the result of a letter from Robert Hunter, Director, Office of Energy Research, to Francis Low, Chairman of HEPAP. A copy of the letter is included in the Appendix to this report. The letter referred to the previous report of HEPAP Subpanel on High Energy Gamma Ray and Neutrino Astronomy which had found that several groups of scientists were working on promising new ideas and proposals in non-accelerator high energy physics and astrophysics; this report recommended that panel be formed to evaluate large projects in these areas of science when specific proposals were received by the funding agencies. In concurring with the recommendation, the request to establish this new Subpanel included the following specific charge: Within the context of changing world wide high energy physics activities and opportunities, review as necessary and evaluate the following major research proposals which have been submitted to the Department of Energy and/or to the National Science foundation: DUMAND II, GRANDE, and the Fly's Eye Upgrade.

  10. Report of the HEPAP subpanel on major detectors in non-accelerator particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-05-01

    The subpanel on Major Detectors in Non-Accelerator Particle Physics was formed in February 1989 as the result of a letter from Robert Hunter, Director, Office of Energy Research, to Francis Low, Chairman of HEPAP. A copy of the letter is included in the Appendix to this report. The letter referred to the previous report of HEPAP Subpanel on High Energy Gamma Ray and Neutrino Astronomy which had found that several groups of scientists were working on promising new ideas and proposals in non-accelerator high energy physics and astrophysics; this report recommended that panel be formed to evaluate large projects in these areas of science when specific proposals were received by the funding agencies. In concurring with the recommendation, the request to establish this new Subpanel included the following specific charge: Within the context of changing world wide high energy physics activities and opportunities, review as necessary and evaluate the following major research proposals which have been submitted to the Department of Energy and/or to the National Science foundation: DUMAND II, GRANDE, and the Fly's Eye Upgrade.

  11. Apar-T: code, validation, and physical interpretation of particle-in-cell results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melzani, Mickaël; Winisdoerffer, Christophe; Walder, Rolf; Folini, Doris; Favre, Jean M.; Krastanov, Stefan; Messmer, Peter

    2013-10-01

    We present the parallel particle-in-cell (PIC) code Apar-T and, more importantly, address the fundamental question of the relations between the PIC model, the Vlasov-Maxwell theory, and real plasmas. First, we present four validation tests: spectra from simulations of thermal plasmas, linear growth rates of the relativistic tearing instability and of the filamentation instability, and nonlinear filamentation merging phase. For the filamentation instability we show that the effective growth rates measured on the total energy can differ by more than 50% from the linear cold predictions and from the fastest modes of the simulation. We link these discrepancies to the superparticle number per cell and to the level of field fluctuations. Second, we detail a new method for initial loading of Maxwell-Jüttner particle distributions with relativistic bulk velocity and relativistic temperature, and explain why the traditional method with individual particle boosting fails. The formulation of the relativistic Harris equilibrium is generalized to arbitrary temperature and mass ratios. Both are required for the tearing instability setup. Third, we turn to the key point of this paper and scrutinize the question of what description of (weakly coupled) physical plasmas is obtained by PIC models. These models rely on two building blocks: coarse-graining, i.e., grouping of the order of p ~ 1010 real particles into a single computer superparticle, and field storage on a grid with its subsequent finite superparticle size. We introduce the notion of coarse-graining dependent quantities, i.e., quantities depending on p. They derive from the PIC plasma parameter ΛPIC, which we show to behave as ΛPIC ∝ 1/p. We explore two important implications. One is that PIC collision- and fluctuation-induced thermalization times are expected to scale with the number of superparticles per grid cell, and thus to be a factor p ~ 1010 smaller than in real plasmas, a fact that we confirm with

  12. Technical Challenges and Scientific Payoffs of Muon BeamAccelerators for Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2007-09-25

    Historically, progress in particle physics has largely beendetermined by development of more capable particle accelerators. Thistrend continues today with the recent advent of high-luminosityelectron-positron colliders at KEK and SLAC operating as "B factories,"the imminent commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and theworldwide development effort toward the International Linear Collider.Looking to the future, one of the most promising approaches is thedevelopment of muon-beam accelerators. Such machines have very highscientific potential, and would substantially advance thestate-of-the-art in accelerator design. A 20-50 GeV muon storage ringcould serve as a copious source of well-characterized electron neutrinosor antineutrinos (a Neutrino Factory), providing beams aimed at detectorslocated 3000-7500 km from the ring. Such long baseline experiments areexpected to be able to observe and characterize the phenomenon ofcharge-conjugation-parity (CP) violation in the lepton sector, and thusprovide an answer to one of the most fundamental questions in science,namely, why the matter-dominated universe in which we reside exists atall. By accelerating muons to even higher energies of several TeV, we canenvision a Muon Collider. In contrast with composite particles likeprotons, muons are point particles. This means that the full collisionenergy is available to create new particles. A Muon Collider has roughlyten times the energy reach of a proton collider at the same collisionenergy, and has a much smaller footprint. Indeed, an energy frontier MuonCollider could fit on the site of an existing laboratory, such asFermilab or BNL. The challenges of muon-beam accelerators are related tothe facts that i) muons are produced as a tertiary beam, with very large6D phase space, and ii) muons are unstable, with a lifetime at rest ofonly 2 microseconds. How these challenges are accommodated in theaccelerator design will be described. Both a Neutrino Factory and a Muon

  13. Physical and chemical study of single aerosol particles using optical trapping cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-30

    display time-, particle-, or wavelength-resolved chemical properties such as single aerosol particle extinction . We demonstrate the scope by trapping...chemical properties such as single aerosol particle extinction . We demonstrate the scope by trapping and walking single carbon-nanotube particles of...well-defined single aerosol particles for spatial resolution in a single aerosol manipulation, detection limit of extinction coefficient, detection

  14. A facility to search for hidden particles at the CERN SPS: the SHiP physics case.

    PubMed

    Alekhin, Sergey; Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Asaka, Takehiko; Batell, Brian; Bezrukov, Fedor; Bondarenko, Kyrylo; Boyarsky, Alexey; Choi, Ki-Young; Corral, Cristóbal; Craig, Nathaniel; Curtin, David; Davidson, Sacha; de Gouvêa, André; Dell'Oro, Stefano; deNiverville, Patrick; Bhupal Dev, P S; Dreiner, Herbi; Drewes, Marco; Eijima, Shintaro; Essig, Rouven; Fradette, Anthony; Garbrecht, Björn; Gavela, Belen; Giudice, Gian F; Goodsell, Mark D; Gorbunov, Dmitry; Gori, Stefania; Grojean, Christophe; Guffanti, Alberto; Hambye, Thomas; Hansen, Steen H; Helo, Juan Carlos; Hernandez, Pilar; Ibarra, Alejandro; Ivashko, Artem; Izaguirre, Eder; Jaeckel, Joerg; Jeong, Yu Seon; Kahlhoefer, Felix; Kahn, Yonatan; Katz, Andrey; Kim, Choong Sun; Kovalenko, Sergey; Krnjaic, Gordan; Lyubovitskij, Valery E; Marcocci, Simone; Mccullough, Matthew; McKeen, David; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Moch, Sven-Olaf; Mohapatra, Rabindra N; Morrissey, David E; Ovchynnikov, Maksym; Paschos, Emmanuel; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Pospelov, Maxim; Reno, Mary Hall; Ringwald, Andreas; Ritz, Adam; Roszkowski, Leszek; Rubakov, Valery; Ruchayskiy, Oleg; Schienbein, Ingo; Schmeier, Daniel; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai; Schwaller, Pedro; Senjanovic, Goran; Seto, Osamu; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Shchutska, Lesya; Shelton, Jessie; Shrock, Robert; Shuve, Brian; Spannowsky, Michael; Spray, Andy; Staub, Florian; Stolarski, Daniel; Strassler, Matt; Tello, Vladimir; Tramontano, Francesco; Tripathi, Anurag; Tulin, Sean; Vissani, Francesco; Winkler, Martin W; Zurek, Kathryn M

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes the physics case for a new fixed target facility at CERN SPS. The SHiP (search for hidden particles) experiment is intended to hunt for new physics in the largely unexplored domain of very weakly interacting particles with masses below the Fermi scale, inaccessible to the LHC experiments, and to study tau neutrino physics. The same proton beam setup can be used later to look for decays of tau-leptons with lepton flavour number non-conservation, [Formula: see text] and to search for weakly-interacting sub-GeV dark matter candidates. We discuss the evidence for physics beyond the standard model and describe interactions between new particles and four different portals-scalars, vectors, fermions or axion-like particles. We discuss motivations for different models, manifesting themselves via these interactions, and how they can be probed with the SHiP experiment and present several case studies. The prospects to search for relatively light SUSY and composite particles at SHiP are also discussed. We demonstrate that the SHiP experiment has a unique potential to discover new physics and can directly probe a number of solutions of beyond the standard model puzzles, such as neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the Universe, dark matter, and inflation.

  15. A facility to search for hidden particles at the CERN SPS: the SHiP physics case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekhin, Sergey; Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Asaka, Takehiko; Batell, Brian; Bezrukov, Fedor; Bondarenko, Kyrylo; Boyarsky, Alexey; Choi, Ki-Young; Corral, Cristóbal; Craig, Nathaniel; Curtin, David; Davidson, Sacha; de Gouvêa, André; Dell'Oro, Stefano; deNiverville, Patrick; Bhupal Dev, P. S.; Dreiner, Herbi; Drewes, Marco; Eijima, Shintaro; Essig, Rouven; Fradette, Anthony; Garbrecht, Björn; Gavela, Belen; Giudice, Gian F.; Goodsell, Mark D.; Gorbunov, Dmitry; Gori, Stefania; Grojean, Christophe; Guffanti, Alberto; Hambye, Thomas; Hansen, Steen H.; Helo, Juan Carlos; Hernandez, Pilar; Ibarra, Alejandro; Ivashko, Artem; Izaguirre, Eder; Jaeckel, Joerg; Jeong, Yu Seon; Kahlhoefer, Felix; Kahn, Yonatan; Katz, Andrey; Kim, Choong Sun; Kovalenko, Sergey; Krnjaic, Gordan; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Marcocci, Simone; Mccullough, Matthew; McKeen, David; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Moch, Sven-Olaf; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.; Morrissey, David E.; Ovchynnikov, Maksym; Paschos, Emmanuel; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Pospelov, Maxim; Hall Reno, Mary; Ringwald, Andreas; Ritz, Adam; Roszkowski, Leszek; Rubakov, Valery; Ruchayskiy, Oleg; Schienbein, Ingo; Schmeier, Daniel; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai; Schwaller, Pedro; Senjanovic, Goran; Seto, Osamu; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Shchutska, Lesya; Shelton, Jessie; Shrock, Robert; Shuve, Brian; Spannowsky, Michael; Spray, Andy; Staub, Florian; Stolarski, Daniel; Strassler, Matt; Tello, Vladimir; Tramontano, Francesco; Tripathi, Anurag; Tulin, Sean; Vissani, Francesco; Winkler, Martin W.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes the physics case for a new fixed target facility at CERN SPS. The SHiP (search for hidden particles) experiment is intended to hunt for new physics in the largely unexplored domain of very weakly interacting particles with masses below the Fermi scale, inaccessible to the LHC experiments, and to study tau neutrino physics. The same proton beam setup can be used later to look for decays of tau-leptons with lepton flavour number non-conservation, τ \\to 3μ and to search for weakly-interacting sub-GeV dark matter candidates. We discuss the evidence for physics beyond the standard model and describe interactions between new particles and four different portals—scalars, vectors, fermions or axion-like particles. We discuss motivations for different models, manifesting themselves via these interactions, and how they can be probed with the SHiP experiment and present several case studies. The prospects to search for relatively light SUSY and composite particles at SHiP are also discussed. We demonstrate that the SHiP experiment has a unique potential to discover new physics and can directly probe a number of solutions of beyond the standard model puzzles, such as neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the Universe, dark matter, and inflation.

  16. Impact on Astrophysics and Elementary Particle Physics of recent and future Solar Neutrino data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, V.; Miramonti, L.

    2014-06-01

    The study of neutrinos is fundamental to connect astrophysics and elementary particle physics. In this last decade solar neutrino experiments and Kam-LAND confirmed the LMA solution and further clarified the oscillation pattern. Borexino attacked also the study of the low energy neutrino spectrum. However, important points still need clarification, like the apparent anomaly in the vacuum to matter transition region. Besides, a more detailed study of the low energy components of the pp cycle, combined with a measurement of CNO fluxes, is compulsory, also to discriminate between the low and the high Z versions of the Solar Standard Models and solve the metallicity problem. We discuss the main recent advancements and the possibilities of studying these open problems with Borexino, SNO+ and the future experiments, like the next generation of scintillators.

  17. Effect of PMMA filler particles addition on the physical properties of resin composite.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yoshiko; Takagaki, Tomohiro; Okuda, Makoto; Ikeda, Masaomi; Kadoma, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Junichi; Okada, Koichi; Sadr, Alireza; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of additional polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) fillers on the physical properties of experimental resin composites. PMMA particles (d=30 µm) were added to an experimental methacrylate-based resin composite in five concentrations of 0, 2.0, 4.8, 9.1, and 23.1 wt%. Properties such as contact angle, water sorption and compressive strength were measured and the fractured specimens were observed with a scanning electron microscope. The results showed that a small amount (2 wt%) of additional PMMA fillers inhibited the crack propagation and enhanced compressive strengths of the resin composites, without a significant change in water contact angle of surface or increased water sorption. However, in higher portions, the mechanical properties were not improved as a debonding at the interface between untreated fillers and the matrix, or failure within the organic filler could reduce the compressive yield strength of the composite.

  18. REFLECTIONS ON MY CONTRIBUTIONS TO PARTICLE PHYSICS AND RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    SAMIOS,N.P.

    2002-01-18

    My talk today will be composed of two parts. The first part will consist of a summary of some of my experimental contributions over the years. It will not be exhaustive but will highlight the findings that had relevance to the progress of our understanding of particle physics as it has evolved over the years. This section will be divided into three periods: Early, Intermediate and Late, with an in depth discussion of a few of the more significant results. The second part will consist of a discussion of the recently completed Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) machine at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). This will encompass the parameters of the accelerator and some of the interesting and exciting early experimental results emanating from this machine.

  19. Physical properties and structure of fine core-shell particles used as packing materials for chromatography relationships between particle characteristics and column performance

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2010-01-01

    The recent development of new brands of packing materials made of fine porous-shell particles, e.g., Halo and Kinetex, has brought great improvements in potential column efficiency, demanding considerable progress in the design of chromatographic instruments. Columns packed with Halo and Kinetex particles provide minimum values of their reduced plate heights of nearly 1.5 and 1.2, respectively. These packing materials have physical properties that set them apart from conventional porous particles. The kinetic performance of 4.6 mm I.D. columns packed with these two new materials is analyzed based on the results of a series of nine independent and complementary experiments: low-temperature nitrogen adsorption (LTNA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), inverse size-exclusion chromatography (ISEC), Coulter counter particle size distributions, pycnometry, height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP), peak parking method (PP), total pore blocking method (TPB), and local electrochemical detection across the column exit section (LED). The results of this work establish links between the physical properties of these superficially porous particles and the excellent kinetic performance of columns packed with them. It clarifies the fundamental origin of the difference in the chromatographic performances of the Halo and the Kinetex columns.

  20. Physical properties and structure of fine core-shell particles used as packing materials for chromatography Relationships between particle characteristics and column performance.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Leonardis, Irene; Abia, Jude; Guiochon, Georges

    2010-06-11

    The recent development of new brands of packing materials made of fine porous-shell particles, e.g., Halo and Kinetex, has brought great improvements in potential column efficiency, demanding considerable progress in the design of chromatographic instruments. Columns packed with Halo and Kinetex particles provide minimum values of their reduced plate heights of nearly 1.5 and 1.2, respectively. These packing materials have physical properties that set them apart from conventional porous particles. The kinetic performance of 4.6mm I.D. columns packed with these two new materials is analyzed based on the results of a series of nine independent and complementary experiments: low-temperature nitrogen adsorption (LTNA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), inverse size-exclusion chromatography (ISEC), Coulter counter particle size distributions, pycnometry, height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP), peak parking method (PP), total pore blocking method (TPB), and local electrochemical detection across the column exit section (LED). The results of this work establish links between the physical properties of these superficially porous particles and the excellent kinetic performance of columns packed with them. It clarifies the fundamental origin of the difference in the chromatographic performances of the Halo and the Kinetex columns. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Wave-particle duality and uncertainty principle: Phenomenographic categories of description of tertiary physics students' depictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayene, Mengesha; Kriek, Jeanne; Damtie, Baylie

    2011-12-01

    Quantum mechanics is often thought to be a difficult subject to understand, not only in the complexity of its mathematics but also in its conceptual foundation. In this paper we emphasize students’ depictions of the uncertainty principle and wave-particle duality of quantum events, phenomena that could serve as a foundation in building an understanding of quantum mechanics. A phenomenographic study was carried out to categorize a picture of students’ descriptions of these key quantum concepts. Data for this study were obtained from a semistructured in-depth interview conducted with undergraduate physics students (N=25) from Bahir Dar, Ethiopia. The phenomenographic data analysis revealed that it is possible to construct three qualitatively different categories to map students’ depictions of the concept wave-particle duality, namely, (1) classical description, (2) mixed classical-quantum description, and (3) quasiquantum description. Similarly, it is proposed that students’ depictions of the concept uncertainty can be described with four different categories of description, which are (1) uncertainty as an extrinsic property of measurement, (2) uncertainty principle as measurement error or uncertainty, (3) uncertainty as measurement disturbance, and (4) uncertainty as a quantum mechanics uncertainty principle. Overall, we found students are more likely to prefer a classical picture of interpretations of quantum mechanics. However, few students in the quasiquantum category applied typical wave phenomena such as interference and diffraction that cannot be explained within the framework classical physics for depicting the wavelike properties of quantum entities. Despite inhospitable conceptions of the uncertainty principle and wave- and particlelike properties of quantum entities in our investigation, the findings presented in this paper are highly consistent with those reported in previous studies. New findings and some implications for instruction and the

  2. Characterization and Physical Explanation of Energetic Particles on Planck HFI Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, A.; Ade, P.; Atik, Y.; Benoit, A.; Bréele, E.; Bock, J. J.; Camus, P.; Charra, M.; Crill, B. P.; Coron, N.; Coulais, A.; Désert, F.-X.; Fauvet, L.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Guillaudin, O.; Holmes, W.; Jones, W. C.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Macías-Pérez, J.; Martinez, M.; Miniussi, A.; Monfardini, A.; Pajot, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pelissier, A.; Piat, M.; Puget, J.-L.; Renault, C.; Rosset, C.; Santos, D.; Sauvé, A.; Spencer, L.; Sudiwala, R.

    2014-09-01

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) has been surveying the sky continuously from the second Lagrangian point (L2) between August 2009 and January 2012. It operates with 52 high impedance bolometers cooled at 100 mK in a range of frequency between 100 GHz and 1 THz with unprecedented sensitivity, but strong coupling with cosmic radiation. At L2, the particle flux is about 5 and is dominated by protons incident on the spacecraft. Protons with an energy above 40 MeV can penetrate the focal plane unit box causing two different effects: glitches in the raw data from direct interaction of cosmic rays with detectors (producing a data loss of about 15 % at the end of the mission) and thermal drifts in the bolometer plate at 100 mK adding non-Gaussian noise at frequencies below 0.1 Hz. The HFI consortium has made strong efforts in order to correct for this effect on the time ordered data and final Planck maps. This work intends to give a view of the physical explanation of the glitches observed in the HFI instrument in-flight. To reach this goal, we performed several ground-based experiments using protons and particles to test the impact of particles on the HFI spare bolometers with a better control of the environmental conditions with respect to the in-flight data. We have shown that the dominant part of glitches observed in the data comes from the impact of cosmic rays in the silicon die frame supporting the micro-machined bolometric detectors propagating energy mainly by ballistic phonons and by thermal diffusion. The implications of these results for future satellite missions will be discussed.

  3. Aircraft observations of the physical and radiative properties of biomass aerosol particles during SAFARI-2000.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, S. R.; Haywood, J. M.

    2001-12-01

    An initial analysis will be shown from the ~80 h of data collected between 2--18 September 2000 by the UK Met Office C-130 aircraft during the dry season campaign of the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI-2000). The talk will concentrate on the physical and optical properties of the biomass aerosol. The evolution of the particle size spectrum and its optical properties at emission and after ageing will be shown. The vertical distribution of the biomass plume over the land and sea will be compared in view of the local meteorology. A generalised three log-normal model is shown to represent aged biomass aerosol over the sea areas, both in terms of the number and mass particle size spectra, but also derived optical properties (e.g. asymmetry factor, single scatter albedo (ω 0) and extinction coefficient) as calculated using Mie theory and appropriate refractive indices. ω 0 was determined independently using a particle soot absorption photometer (giving the absorption coefficient at a wavelength of 0.567 μ m) and a nephelometer (giving the scattering coefficients at 0.45, 0.55 and 0.65 μ m). Good agreement was found between the measurements and those obtained from the Mie calculations and observed size distributions. A typical value of ω 0 at 0.55 μ m for aged biomass aerosol was 0.90. The radiative properties of the biomass aerosol over both land and sea will be summarised. Stratocumulus cloud was present on some of the days over the sea and the surprising lack of interaction between the elevated biomass plume (containing significant levels of cloud condensation nuclei) and the cloud capping the marine boundary layer will be illustrated. Using the cloud-free and cloudy case studies we can begin to elucidate the levels of direct and indirect forcing of the biomass aerosol on a regional scale. >http://www.mrfnet.demon.co.uk/africa/SAFARI2000.htm

  4. AMS-02 Capabilities in Solar Energetic Particle Measurements for Space Weather Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolandi, Cristina; Bindi, Veronica; Corti, Claudio; Hoffman, Julia; Whitman, Kathryn

    2016-04-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02), thanks to its large acceptance of about 0.45 m2 sr, is the biggest Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) detector ever flown in space. AMS-02 was installed on the International Space Station (ISS) on May 19, 2011, where it will measure cosmic rays from 1 GV up to a few TV, for the duration of the ISS, currently extended till 2024. During these years of operation, AMS-02 measured several increases of the protons flux over the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) background associated to the strongest solar events. AMS-02 has observed the related SEP accelerated during M- and X-class flares and fast coronal mass ejections measuring an increase of the proton flux near 1 GV and above. Some of these solar events were also followed by the typical GCR suppression i.e. Forbush decrease, which makes even more evident the measurement of the SEP flux over the GCR background. Thanks to its large acceptance and particle detection capabilities, AMS-02 is able to perform precise measurements in a short period of time which is typical of these transient phenomena and to collect enough statistics to measure fine structures and time evolution of particle spectra. The events observed by AMS-02 since the beginning of its mission will be presented and some of the more interesting events will be shown. AMS-02 observations with their unprecedented resolution and high statistics, will improve the understanding of SEP behavior at high energies to constrain models of SEP production used in space weather physics.

  5. Study of energetic particle physics with advanced ECEI system on the HL-2A tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhongbing; Jiang, Min; Yu, Liming; Chen, Wei; Shi, Peiwan; Zhong, Wulyu; Yang, Zengchen; Zhang, Boyu; Ji, Xiaoquan; Li, Yonggao; Zhou, Yan; Song, Shaodong; Huang, Mei; Song, Xianming; Li, Jiaxuan; Yuan, Baoshan; Fu, Bingzhong; Liu, Zetian; Ding, Xuantong; Xu, Yuhong; Yang, Qingwei; Duan, Xuru

    2017-07-01

    Understanding the physics of energetic particles (EP) is crucial for the burning plasmas in next generation fusion devices such as ITER. In this work, three types of internal kink modes (a saturated internal kink mode (SK), a resonant internal kink mode (RK), and a double e-fishbone) excited by energetic particles in the low density discharges during ECRH/ECCD heating have been studied by the newly developed 24(poloidal) × 16(radial) = 384 channel ECEI system on the HL-2A tokamak. The SK and RK rotate in the electron diamagnetic direction poloidally and are destabilized by the energetic trapped electrons. The SK is destabilized in the case of qmin > 1, while the RK is destabilized in the case of qmin < 1. The double e-fishbone, which has two m/n = 1/1 modes propagating in the opposite directions poloidally, has been observed during plasma current ramp-up with counter-ECCD. Strong thermal transfer and mode coupling between the two m/n = 1/1 modes have been studied.

  6. Effects of humic acid on physical and hydrodynamic properties of kaolin flocs by particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Runsheng; Zhang, Xihui; Xiao, Feng; Li, Xiaoyan; Cai, Zhonghua

    2011-07-01

    The physical and hydrodynamic properties of kaolin flocs including floc size, strength, regrowth, fractal structure and settling velocity were investigated by in situ particle image velocimetry technique at different humic acid concentration. Jar-test experimental results showed that the adsorbed humic acid had a significant influence on the coagulation process for alum and ferric chloride. Kaolin flocs formed with the ferric chloride were larger and stronger than those for alum at same humic acid concentration. Floc strength and regrowth were estimated by strength factor and recovery factor at different humic acid concentration. It was found that the increased humic acid concentration had a slight influence on the strength of kaolin flocs and resulted in much worse floc regrowth. In addition, the floc regrowth after breakage depended on the shear history and coagulants under investigation. The changes in fractal structure recorded continuously by in situ particle image velocimetry technique during the growth-breakage-regrowth processes provided a supporting information that the kaolin flocs exhibited a multilevel structure. It was proved that the increased humic acid concentration resulted in decrease in mass fractal dimension of kaolin flocs and consequently worse sedimentation performance through free-settling and microbalance techniques. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Physics based optimization of Particle-in-Cell simulations on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Stephen; D'Azevedo, Ed

    2016-10-01

    We present progress in improving the performance of the gyrokinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code XGC-1 on NVIDIA GPUs, as well as enhancements made to portability and developer productivity using OpenACC directives. Increasingly simulation codes are required to use heterogeneous accelerator resources on the most powerful supercomputing systems. PIC methods are well suited to these massively parallel accelerator architectures, as particles can largely be advanced independently within a time-step. Their advance must still, however, reference field data on underlying grid structures, which presents a significant performance bottleneck. Even ported to GPUs using CUDA Fortran, the XGC-1 electron push routine accounts for a significant portion of the code execution time. By applying physical insight to the motion of electrons across the device (and therefore field grids) we have developed techniques that increase performance of this kernel by up to 5X, compared to the original CUDA Fortran implementation. Architecture specific optimizations can be isolated in small `leaf' routines, which allows for a portable OpenACC implementation that performs nearly as well as the optimized CUDA.

  8. A Particle Model Explaining Mass and Relativity in a Physical Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, Albrecht

    Physicists' understanding of relativity and the way it is handled is up to present days dominated by the interpretation of Albert Einstein, who related relativity to specific properties of space and time. The principal alternative to Einstein's interpretation is based on a concept proposed by Hendrik A. Lorentz, which uses knowledge of classical physics alone to explain relativistic phenomena. In this paper, we will show that on the one hand the Lorentz-based interpretation provides a simpler mathematical way of arriving at the known results for both Special and General Relativity. On the other hand, it is able to solve problems which have remained open to this day. Furthermore, a particle model will be presented, based on Lorentzian relativity and the quantum mechanical concept of Louis de Broglie, which explains the origin of mass without the use of the Higgs mechanism. It is based on the finiteness of the speed of light and provides classical results for particle properties which are currently only accessible through quantum mechanics.

  9. Reactor Physics Parametric and Depletion Studies in Support of TRISO Particle Fuel Specification for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    James W. Sterbentz; Bren Phillips; Robert L. Sant; Gray S. Chang; Paul D. Bayless

    2003-09-01

    Reactor physics calculations were initiated to answer several major questions related to the proposed TRISO-coated particle fuel that is to be used in the prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) or the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). These preliminary design evaluation calculations help ensure that the upcoming fuel irradiation tests will test appropriate size and type of fuel particles for a future NGNP reactor design. Conclusions from these calculations are expected to confirm and suggest possible modifications to the current particle fuel parameters specified in the evolving Fuel Specification. Calculated results dispel the need for a binary fuel particle system, which is proposed in the General Atomics GT-MHR concept. The GT-MHR binary system is composed of both a fissile and fertile particle with 350- and 500- micron kernel diameters, respectively. For the NGNP reactor, a single fissile particle system (single UCO kernel size) can meet the reactivity and power cycle length requirements demanded of the NGNP. At the same time, it will provide substantial programmatic cost savings by eliminating the need for dual particle fabrication process lines and dual fuel particle irradiation tests required of a binary system. Use of a larger 425-micron kernel diameter single fissile particle (proposed here), as opposed to the 350-micron GT-MHR fissile particle size, helps alleviate current compact particle packing fractions fabrication limitations (<35%), improves fuel block loading for higher n-batch reload options, and tracks the historical correlation between particle size and enrichment (10 and 14 wt% U-235 particle enrichments are proposed for the NGNP). Overall, the use of the slightly larger kernel significantly broadens the NGNP reactor core design envelope and provides increased design margin to accommodate the (as yet) unknown final NGNP reactor design. Maximum power-peaking factors are calculated for both the initial and equilibrium NGNP cores

  10. Physical Explanation of Coupled Cell-Cell Rotational Behavior and Interfacial Morphology: A Particle Dynamics Model

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Fong Yew

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have reported persistent rotational behavior between adherent cell-cell pairs cultured on micropatterned substrates, and this rotation is often accompanied by a sigmoidal deflection of the cell-cell interface. Interestingly, the cell-cell rotation runs in the opposite reference frame from what could be expected of single cell locomotion. Specifically, the rotation of the cell pair consists of each individual cell protruding from the inwardly regressive arm of the cell-cell interface, and retracting from the other outwardly protrusive arm. To this author’s knowledge, the cause of this elusive behavior has not yet been clarified. Here, we propose a physical model based on particle dynamics, accounting for actomyosin forcing, viscous dissipation, and cortical tension. The results show that a correlation in actomyosin force vectors leads to both persistent rotational behavior and interfacial deflection in a simulated cell cluster. Significantly, the model, without any artificial cues, spontaneously and consistently reproduces the same rotational reference frame as experimentally observed. Further analyses show that the interfacial deflection depends predominantly on cortical tension, whereas the cluster rotation depends predominantly on actomyosin forcing. Together, these results corroborate the hypothesis that both rotational and morphological phenomena are, in fact, physically coupled by an intracellular torque of a common origin. PMID:24268142

  11. Physical explanation of coupled cell-cell rotational behavior and interfacial morphology: a particle dynamics model.

    PubMed

    Leong, Fong Yew

    2013-11-19

    Previous studies have reported persistent rotational behavior between adherent cell-cell pairs cultured on micropatterned substrates, and this rotation is often accompanied by a sigmoidal deflection of the cell-cell interface. Interestingly, the cell-cell rotation runs in the opposite reference frame from what could be expected of single cell locomotion. Specifically, the rotation of the cell pair consists of each individual cell protruding from the inwardly regressive arm of the cell-cell interface, and retracting from the other outwardly protrusive arm. To this author's knowledge, the cause of this elusive behavior has not yet been clarified. Here, we propose a physical model based on particle dynamics, accounting for actomyosin forcing, viscous dissipation, and cortical tension. The results show that a correlation in actomyosin force vectors leads to both persistent rotational behavior and interfacial deflection in a simulated cell cluster. Significantly, the model, without any artificial cues, spontaneously and consistently reproduces the same rotational reference frame as experimentally observed. Further analyses show that the interfacial deflection depends predominantly on cortical tension, whereas the cluster rotation depends predominantly on actomyosin forcing. Together, these results corroborate the hypothesis that both rotational and morphological phenomena are, in fact, physically coupled by an intracellular torque of a common origin.

  12. Optimizing physical parameters in 1-D particle-in-cell simulations with Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragan-Kelley, Benjamin; Verboncoeur, John P.; Lin, Ming-Chieh

    2014-10-01

    A particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation tool, OOPD1, is wrapped in the Python programming language, enabling automated algorithmic optimization of physical and numerical parameters. The Python-based environment exposes internal variables, enabling modification of simulation parameters, as well as run-time generation of new diagnostics based on calculations with internal data. For problems requiring an iterative optimization approach, this enables a programmable interactive feedback loop style simulation model, where the input to one simulation is a programmable function of the output of the previous one. This approach is applied to field-emission of electrons in a diode, in order to explore space charge effects in bipolar flow. We find an analytical solution for maximizing the space-charge limited current through a diode with an upstream ion current, and confirm the result with simulations, demonstrating the efficacy of the feedback scheme. We also demonstrate and analyze a modeling approach for scaling the ion mass, which can shorten simulation time without changing the ultimate result. The methods presented can be generalized to handle other applications where it is desirable to evolve simulation parameters based on algorithmic results from the simulation, including models in which physical or numerical parameter tuning is used to converge or optimize a system in one or more variables.

  13. The order of the quantum chromodynamics transition predicted by the standard model of particle physics.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Y; Endrodi, G; Fodor, Z; Katz, S D; Szabó, K K

    2006-10-12

    Quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is the theory of the strong interaction, explaining (for example) the binding of three almost massless quarks into a much heavier proton or neutron--and thus most of the mass of the visible Universe. The standard model of particle physics predicts a QCD-related transition that is relevant for the evolution of the early Universe. At low temperatures, the dominant degrees of freedom are colourless bound states of hadrons (such as protons and pions). However, QCD is asymptotically free, meaning that at high energies or temperatures the interaction gets weaker and weaker, causing hadrons to break up. This behaviour underlies the predicted cosmological transition between the low-temperature hadronic phase and a high-temperature quark-gluon plasma phase (for simplicity, we use the word 'phase' to characterize regions with different dominant degrees of freedom). Despite enormous theoretical effort, the nature of this finite-temperature QCD transition (that is, first-order, second-order or analytic crossover) remains ambiguous. Here we determine the nature of the QCD transition using computationally demanding lattice calculations for physical quark masses. Susceptibilities are extrapolated to vanishing lattice spacing for three physical volumes, the smallest and largest of which differ by a factor of five. This ensures that a true transition should result in a dramatic increase of the susceptibilities. No such behaviour is observed: our finite-size scaling analysis shows that the finite-temperature QCD transition in the hot early Universe was not a real phase transition, but an analytic crossover (involving a rapid change, as opposed to a jump, as the temperature varied). As such, it will be difficult to find experimental evidence of this transition from astronomical observations.

  14. particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yu; Chen, Zhihong; Zhang, Zhengguo; Fang, Xiaoming; Liang, Guozheng

    2014-05-01

    We explore a facile and nontoxic hydrothermal route for synthesis of a Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material by using l-cysteine as the sulfur source and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as the complexing agent. The effects of the amount of EDTA, the mole ratio of the three metal ions, and the hydrothermal temperature and time on the phase composition of the obtained product have been systematically investigated. The addition of EDTA and an excessive dose of ZnCl2 in the hydrothermal reaction system favor the generation of kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4. Pure kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 has been synthesized at 180°C for 12 h from the reaction system containing 2 mmol of EDTA at 2:2:1 of Cu/Zn/Sn. It is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy that those binary and ternary phases are absent in the kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 product. The kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 material synthesized by the hydrothermal process consists of flower-like particles with 250 to 400 nm in size. It is revealed that the flower-like particles are assembled from single-crystal Cu2ZnSnS4 nanoflakes with ca. 20 nm in size. The band gap of the Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material is estimated to be 1.55 eV. The films fabricated from the hierarchical Cu2ZnSnS4 particles exhibit fast photocurrent responses under intermittent visible-light irradiation, implying that they show potentials for use in solar cells and photocatalysis.

  15. ETHOS—an effective theory of structure formation: From dark particle physics to the matter distribution of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; Sigurdson, Kris; Zavala, Jesús; Bringmann, Torsten; Vogelsberger, Mark; Pfrommer, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    We formulate an effective theory of structure formation (ETHOS) that enables cosmological structure formation to be computed in almost any microphysical model of dark matter physics. This framework maps the detailed microphysical theories of particle dark matter interactions into the physical effective parameters that shape the linear matter power spectrum and the self-interaction transfer cross section of nonrelativistic dark matter. These are the input to structure formation simulations, which follow the evolution of the cosmological and galactic dark matter distributions. Models with similar effective parameters in ETHOS but with different dark particle physics would nevertheless result in similar dark matter distributions. We present a general method to map an ultraviolet complete or effective field theory of low-energy dark matter physics into parameters that affect the linear matter power spectrum and carry out this mapping for several representative particle models. We further propose a simple but useful choice for characterizing the dark matter self-interaction transfer cross section that parametrizes self-scattering in structure formation simulations. Taken together, these effective parameters in ETHOS allow the classification of dark matter theories according to their structure formation properties rather than their intrinsic particle properties, paving the way for future simulations to span the space of viable dark matter physics relevant for structure formation.

  16. Experimental particle physics at the University of Pittsburgh. Progress report, November 1, 1991--October 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, E. Jr.; Perera, U.; Shepard, P.F.; Thompson, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    During the past year Task A completed the HELIOS single and pair electron analyses and found no anomalous production or multiplicity dependence. The HELIOS electron-muon pair analysis continued in its search for lepton physics beyond the expected charm yields. Data taking began at the CMD2 detector at Novosibirsk. Measurements of the U. V. reflectivity and photomultiplier tests for the first Cerenkov counter to be used in the E865 experiment at BNL were carried out, along with the development of a general ray-tracing code. The design of the Cerenkov counter for E865 along with development of light mirror fabrication techniques were a major part of the Task A program. The principal efforts of Task B, the Fermilab program, have been the completion of the analysis of the 1987--1988 data with resulting publications, completion of the 1990--1991 data run, and the beginning of the analysis of the 1990--1991 data. In addition, the Task B group is taking a leadership role in developing a proposal to Fermilab for the upgrade of the CDF silicon vertex detector in preparation for the 1995 data run. This proposal is to be presented to the laboratory management in time for the fall Fermilab Program Advisory Committee meeting. Task C has recently submitted results of its fractionally charged particle searches, placing new upper limits on the abundance of naturally-occurring fractionally-charged particles in various materials. This group has recently been approved by the Brookhaven management for an exposure of their p-i-n diodes in a high intensity proton beam. This measurement, along with its subsequent analysis, will complete the program.

  17. Reactor physics behavior of transuranic-bearing TRISO-particle fuel in a pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, M. A.; Sen, R. S.; Ougouag, A. M.; Youinou, G.; Boer, B.

    2012-07-01

    Calculations have been performed to assess the neutronic behavior of pins of Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel in otherwise-conventional Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel pins. The FCM fuel contains transuranic (TRU) - only oxide fuel in tri-isotropic (TRISO) particles with the TRU loading coming from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Use of the TRISO particle fuel would provide an additional barrier to fission product release in the event of cladding failure. Depletion calculations were performed to evaluate reactivity-limited burnup of the TRU-only FCM fuel. These calculations showed that due to relatively little space available for fuel, the achievable burnup with these pins alone is quite small. Various reactivity parameters were also evaluated at each burnup step including moderator temperature coefficient (MTC), Doppler, and soluble boron worth. These were compared to reference UO{sub 2} and MOX unit cells. The TRU-only FCM fuel exhibits degraded MTC and Doppler coefficients relative to UO{sub 2} and MOX. Also, the reactivity effects of coolant voiding suggest that the behavior of this fuel would be similar to a MOX fuel of very high plutonium fraction, which are known to have positive void reactivity. In general, loading of TRU-only FCM fuel into an assembly without significant quantities of uranium presents challenges to the reactor design. However, if such FCM fuel pins are included in a heterogeneous assembly alongside LEU fuel pins, the overall reactivity behavior would be dominated by the uranium pins while attractive TRU destruction performance levels in the TRU-only FCM fuel pins is retained. From this work, it is concluded that use of heterogeneous assemblies such as these appears feasible from a preliminary reactor physics standpoint. (authors)

  18. Reactor Physics Behavior of Transuranic-Bearing TRISO-Particle Fuel in a Pressurized Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Pope; R. Sonat Sen; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Gilles Youinou; Brian Boer

    2012-04-01

    Calculations have been performed to assess the neutronic behavior of pins of Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel in otherwise-conventional Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel pins. The FCM fuel contains transuranic (TRU)-only oxide fuel in tri-isotropic (TRISO) particles with the TRU loading coming from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Use of the TRISO particle fuel would provide an additional barrier to fission product release in the event of cladding failure. Depletion calculations were performed to evaluate reactivity-limited burnup of the TRU-only FCM fuel. These calculations showed that due to relatively little space available for fuel, the achievable burnup with these pins alone is quite small. Various reactivity parameters were also evaluated at each burnup step including moderator temperature coefficient (MTC), Doppler, and soluble boron worth. These were compared to reference UO{sub 2} and MOX unit cells. The TRU-only FCM fuel exhibits degraded MTC and Doppler coefficients relative to UO{sub 2} and MOX. Also, the reactivity effects of coolant voiding suggest that the behavior of this fuel would be similar to a MOX fuel of very high plutonium fraction, which are known to have positive void reactivity. In general, loading of TRU-only FCM fuel into an assembly without significant quantities of uranium presents challenges to the reactor design. However, if such FCM fuel pins are included in a heterogeneous assembly alongside LEU fuel pins, the overall reactivity behavior would be dominated by the uranium pins while attractive TRU destruction performance levels in the TRU-only FCM fuel pins is. From this work, it is concluded that use of heterogeneous assemblies such as these appears feasible from a preliminary reactor physics standpoint.

  19. Physical and Chemical Characterization of Particles in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere: Microanalysis of Aerosol Impactor Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, Patrick J.

    1999-01-01

    according to the major fraction. Thus, many of the particles classified as sulfate may have contained significant mass fractions of carbonaceous or other material. These particles for the most part did not show two physical phases, however. Nonsulfate particles were classified according to the physical and chemical characteristics of each particle, and were grouped into the major nonsulfate particle classes, including C-rich, crustal, metallic, and salts. Our UT and LS sample analyses indicate a maximum for crustal and C-rich particle abundance in the Northern Hemisphere upper troposphere, and a salt particle maximum in the Southern Hemisphere upper troposphere. Metallic particles are clearly more prevalent in the troposphere than in the stratosphere, but interhemispheric differences appear small.

  20. Internet end-to-end performance monitoring for the High Energy Nuclear and Particle Physics community

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, W.

    2000-02-22

    Modern High Energy Nuclear and Particle Physics (HENP) experiments at Laboratories around the world present a significant challenge to wide area networks. Petabytes (1015) or exabytes (1018) of data will be generated during the lifetime of the experiment. Much of this data will be distributed via the Internet to the experiment's collaborators at Universities and Institutes throughout the world for analysis. In order to assess the feasibility of the computing goals of these and future experiments, the HENP networking community is actively monitoring performance across a large part of the Internet used by its collaborators. Since 1995, the pingER project has been collecting data on ping packet loss and round trip times. In January 2000, there are 28 monitoring sites in 15 countries gathering data on over 2,000 end-to-end pairs. HENP labs such as SLAC, Fermi Lab and CERN are using Advanced Network's Surveyor project and monitoring performance from one-way delay of UDP packets. More recently several HENP sites have become involved with NLANR's active measurement program (AMP). In addition SLAC and CERN are part of the RIPE test-traffic project and SLAC is home for a NIMI machine. The large End-to-end performance monitoring infrastructure allows the HENP networking community to chart long term trends and closely examine short term glitches across a wide range of networks and connections. The different methodologies provide opportunities to compare results based on different protocols and statistical samples. Understanding agreement and discrepancies between results provides particular insight into the nature of the network. This paper will highlight the practical side of monitoring by reviewing the special needs of High Energy Nuclear and Particle Physics experiments and provide an overview of the experience of measuring performance across a large number of interconnected networks throughout the world with various methodologies. In particular, results from each project