Science.gov

Sample records for particle radii

  1. Evaluation of Particle Numbers via Two Root Mean Square Radii in a 2-Species Bose-Einstein Condensate*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yan-Zhang; Liu, Yi-Min; Bao, Cheng-Guang

    2017-08-01

    The coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations for two-species BEC have been solved analytically under the Thomas-Fermi approximation (TFA). Based on the analytical solution, two formulae are derived to relate the particle numbers NA and NB with the root mean square radii of the two kinds of atoms. Only the case that both kinds of atoms have nonzero distribution at the center of an isotropic trap is considered. In this case the TFA has been found to work nicely. Thus, the two formulae are applicable and are useful for the evaluation of NA and NB .

  2. Particle-number fluctuations and neutron-proton pairing effects on proton and neutron radii of even-even N Almost-Equal-To Z nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Douici, M.; Allal, N. H.; Fellah, M.; Benhamouda, N.; Oudih, M. R.

    2012-10-20

    The particle-number fluctuation effect on the root-mean-square (rms) proton and neutron radii of even-even N Almost-Equal-To Z nuclei is studied in the isovector neutron-proton (np) pairing case using an exact particle-number projection method and the Woods-Saxon model.

  3. Simulation of a multi-spacecraft detected gradual SEP event by using a shock-and-particle model starting at 4 solar radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Gasen, Rosa; Jacobs, Carla; Aran, Angels; Sanahuja, Blai; Poedts, Stefaan

    Particle intensity-time profiles of a gradual SEP event observed by spacecraft located a different heliolongitudes close to the ecliptic plane, even being at a similar distance from the Sun, have shown different shapes. To model this variability we present the simulation of an event observed by the Helios 1 and 2 and IMP8/ISEE-3 spacecraft. We have developed under the Solar Energetic Particle Event Modeling (SEPEM) project a new shock-and-particle model that combines a 2D MHD code (in the ecliptic plane) and a particle transport code. With this model we can track the traveling shock from 4 solar radii. This allows us to determine the injection rate of shock accelerated particles from close to the Sun, where the bulk of high energy particles often are accelerated. We have simulated the shock propagation by fitting the time of shock arrivals and jumps in plasma observed at each of the spacecraft and we have reproduced the proton intensities measured by these vantage observers. We draw conclusions on the influence of the relative position of the observer (with respect to the leading direction of the traveling shock), on the injection rate of shock-accelerated particles, and on the particles transport conditions found for each spacecraft. We also discuss the forecasting capability of the relation between the injection rate of shock accelerated particles and the jump in speed across the shock front that we have found in SEP events previously modeled.

  4. Microturbulence and Wesselink radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, N. R.

    1980-01-01

    Using the calibration of Bell and Parsons (1974), the effects of changes in microturbulence and surface gravity throughout the cycles of delta Cephei and eta Aquilae are estimated. When the changes in microturbulence are considered, Wesselink radii for these stars are reduced 20%.

  5. Sulfide bonded atomic radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, G. V.; Ross, N. L.; Cox, D. F.

    2017-03-01

    The bonded radius, r b(S), of the S atom, calculated for first- and second-row non-transition metal sulfide crystals and third-row transition metal sulfide molecules and crystals indicates that the radius of the sulfur atom is not fixed as traditionally assumed, but that it decreases systematically along the bond paths of the bonded atoms with decreasing bond length as observed in an earlier study of the bonded radius of the oxygen atom. When bonded to non-transition metal atoms, r b(S) decreases systematically with decreasing bond length from 1.68 Å when the S atom is bonded to the electropositive VINa atom to 1.25 Å when bonded to the more electronegative IVP atom. In the case of transition metal atoms, rb(S) likewise decreases with decreasing bond length from 1.82 Å when bonded to Cu and to 1.12 Å when bonded to Fe. As r b(S) is not fixed at a given value but varies substantially depending on the bond length and the field strength of the bonded atoms, it is apparent that sets of crystal and atomic sulfide atomic radii based on an assumed fixed radius for the sulfur atom are satisfactory in that they reproduce bond lengths, on the one hand, whereas on the other, they are unsatisfactory in that they fail to define the actual sizes of the bonded atoms determined in terms of the minima in the electron density between the atoms. As such, we urge that the crystal chemistry and the properties of sulfides be studied in terms of the bond lengths determined by adding the radii of either the atomic and crystal radii of the atoms but not in terms of existing sets of crystal and atomic radii. After all, the bond lengths were used to determine the radii that were experimentally determined, whereas the individual radii were determined on the basis of an assumed radius for the sulfur atom.

  6. Sulfide bonded atomic radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, G. V.; Ross, N. L.; Cox, D. F.

    2017-09-01

    The bonded radius, r b(S), of the S atom, calculated for first- and second-row non-transition metal sulfide crystals and third-row transition metal sulfide molecules and crystals indicates that the radius of the sulfur atom is not fixed as traditionally assumed, but that it decreases systematically along the bond paths of the bonded atoms with decreasing bond length as observed in an earlier study of the bonded radius of the oxygen atom. When bonded to non-transition metal atoms, r b(S) decreases systematically with decreasing bond length from 1.68 Å when the S atom is bonded to the electropositive VINa atom to 1.25 Å when bonded to the more electronegative IVP atom. In the case of transition metal atoms, rb(S) likewise decreases with decreasing bond length from 1.82 Å when bonded to Cu and to 1.12 Å when bonded to Fe. As r b(S) is not fixed at a given value but varies substantially depending on the bond length and the field strength of the bonded atoms, it is apparent that sets of crystal and atomic sulfide atomic radii based on an assumed fixed radius for the sulfur atom are satisfactory in that they reproduce bond lengths, on the one hand, whereas on the other, they are unsatisfactory in that they fail to define the actual sizes of the bonded atoms determined in terms of the minima in the electron density between the atoms. As such, we urge that the crystal chemistry and the properties of sulfides be studied in terms of the bond lengths determined by adding the radii of either the atomic and crystal radii of the atoms but not in terms of existing sets of crystal and atomic radii. After all, the bond lengths were used to determine the radii that were experimentally determined, whereas the individual radii were determined on the basis of an assumed radius for the sulfur atom.

  7. Integration of uniform design and quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization to the robust design for a railway vehicle suspension system under different wheel conicities and wheel rolling radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yung-Chang; Lee, Cheng-Kang

    2017-05-01

    This paper proposes a systematic method, integrating the uniform design (UD) of experiments and quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO), to solve the problem of a robust design for a railway vehicle suspension system. Based on the new nonlinear creep model derived from combining Hertz contact theory, Kalker's linear theory and a heuristic nonlinear creep model, the modeling and dynamic analysis of a 24 degree-of-freedom railway vehicle system were investigated. The Lyapunov indirect method was used to examine the effects of suspension parameters, wheel conicities and wheel rolling radii on critical hunting speeds. Generally, the critical hunting speeds of a vehicle system resulting from worn wheels with different wheel rolling radii are lower than those of a vehicle system having original wheels without different wheel rolling radii. Because of worn wheels, the critical hunting speed of a running railway vehicle substantially declines over the long term. For safety reasons, it is necessary to design the suspension system parameters to increase the robustness of the system and decrease the sensitive of wheel noises. By applying UD and QPSO, the nominal-the-best signal-to-noise ratio of the system was increased from -48.17 to -34.05 dB. The rate of improvement was 29.31%. This study has demonstrated that the integration of UD and QPSO can successfully reveal the optimal solution of suspension parameters for solving the robust design problem of a railway vehicle suspension system.

  8. Metal radii in surface science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Charles T.

    1986-03-01

    The saturation monolayer coverage of an adsorbed metal overlayer on a smooth metal surface is largely determined by the adsorbed metal's radius. Experimental maximum packing densities in two-dimensional metal overlayers are compared with predictions based on several different definitions of metal atom radii: atomic radii, covalent radii, minimum bulk interatomic distance (:2) and the Zachariasen [J. Inorg. Nucl. Chem. 35 (1973) 3487] metal radii. Best agreement is found with the last, which is obtained by assuming that the bulk, pure metal density is obtained from an ideal, hexagonal close-packed structure of spheres of that radius.

  9. Metal radii in surface science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Charles T.

    The saturation monolayer coverage of an adsorbed metal overlayer on a smooth metal surface is largely determined by the adsorbed metal's radius. Experimental maximum packing densities in two-dimensional metal overlayers are compared with predictions based on several different definitions of metal atom radii: atomic radii, covalent radii, minimum bulk interatomic distance (: 2) and the Zachariasen [J. Inorg. Nucl. Chem. 35 (1973) 3487] metal radii. Best agreement is found with the last, which is obtained by assuming that the bulk, pure metal density is obtained from an ideal, hexagonal close-packed structure of spheres of that radius.

  10. Predictions of nuclear charge radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, M.; Lu, Y.; Zhao, Y. M.; Arima, A.

    2016-12-01

    The nuclear charge radius is a fundamental property of an atomic nucleus. In this article we study the predictive power of empirical relations for experimental nuclear charge radii of neighboring nuclei and predict the unknown charge radii of 1085 nuclei based on the experimental CR2013 database within an uncertainty of 0.03 fm.

  11. Thermochemical Radii of Complex Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roobottom, Helen K.; Jenkins, H. Donald B.; Passmore, Jack; Glasser, Leslie

    1999-11-01

    Using rectilinear correlations of lattice energy with the inverse cubic root of the volume per molecule of complex salts of type MX (1:1), M2X (2:1), and MX2 (1:2) we have generated a comprehensive self-consistent tabulation of more than 400 thermochemical radii for complex ions. These radii can be used in the Kapustinskii equation to generate lattice energies and also as ion size parameters.

  12. Indirect Determinations of Atomic Radii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Noojin

    1976-01-01

    Describes laboratory activities which relate the mass, volume, density, and radii of atoms through the assumption that the smallest unit of matter is a cubic box containing one atom. From calculations based on macroscopic materials, the author feels that the concept of an atom may be better developed. (CP)

  13. Indirect Determinations of Atomic Radii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Noojin

    1976-01-01

    Describes laboratory activities which relate the mass, volume, density, and radii of atoms through the assumption that the smallest unit of matter is a cubic box containing one atom. From calculations based on macroscopic materials, the author feels that the concept of an atom may be better developed. (CP)

  14. DETERMINATION OF STELLAR RADII FROM ASTEROSEISMIC DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Sarbani; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne E-mail: w.j.chaplin@bham.ac.u

    2010-02-20

    The NASA Kepler mission is designed to find planets through transits. Accurate and precise radii of the detected planets depend on knowing the radius of the host star accurately, which is difficult unless the temperature and luminosity of the star are known precisely. Kepler, however, has an asteroseismology program that will provide seismic variables that can characterize stellar radii easily, accurately, and extremely precisely. In this paper, we describe the Yale-Birmingham (YB) method to determine stellar radii using a combination of seismic and conventional variables and analyze the effect of these variables on the result. We find that for main-sequence stars, a knowledge of the parallax is not important to get accurate radii using the YB method: we can get results to an accuracy and precision of better than a few percent if we know the effective temperature and the seismic parameters for these stars. Metallicity does not make much difference either. However, good estimates of the effective temperature and metallicity, along with those of the seismic parameters, are essential to determine radii of subgiants properly. On the other hand, for red giants we find that determining radii properly is not possible without a good estimate of the parallax. We find that the so-called 'surface term' in the seismic data has minimal effect on the inferred radii. Uncertainties in the convective mixing length can matter under some circumstances and can cause a systematic shift in the inferred radii. Blind tests with data simulated to match those expected from the asteroseismic survey phase of Kepler show that it will be possible to infer stellar radii successfully using our method.

  15. Determination of Stellar Radii from Asteroseismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sarbani; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne

    2010-02-01

    The NASA Kepler mission is designed to find planets through transits. Accurate and precise radii of the detected planets depend on knowing the radius of the host star accurately, which is difficult unless the temperature and luminosity of the star are known precisely. Kepler, however, has an asteroseismology program that will provide seismic variables that can characterize stellar radii easily, accurately, and extremely precisely. In this paper, we describe the Yale-Birmingham (YB) method to determine stellar radii using a combination of seismic and conventional variables and analyze the effect of these variables on the result. We find that for main-sequence stars, a knowledge of the parallax is not important to get accurate radii using the YB method: we can get results to an accuracy and precision of better than a few percent if we know the effective temperature and the seismic parameters for these stars. Metallicity does not make much difference either. However, good estimates of the effective temperature and metallicity, along with those of the seismic parameters, are essential to determine radii of subgiants properly. On the other hand, for red giants we find that determining radii properly is not possible without a good estimate of the parallax. We find that the so-called "surface term" in the seismic data has minimal effect on the inferred radii. Uncertainties in the convective mixing length can matter under some circumstances and can cause a systematic shift in the inferred radii. Blind tests with data simulated to match those expected from the asteroseismic survey phase of Kepler show that it will be possible to infer stellar radii successfully using our method.

  16. Photometric radii of Io and Europa.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, M. J.; Hall, J. S.; Boyce, P. B.; Albrecht, R.

    1971-01-01

    Simultaneous two-color photoelectric photometry of Io and Europa performed during their eclipse by Jupiter on the night of April 5/6, 1971, is reported and discussed. The results are compared with satellite radii obtained using other observational techniques. It is concluded that the eclipse technique can be used to infer satellite radii accurate to plus or minus 10 per cent. In principle the eclipse technique can also be applied to the satellites of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune for early objective determinations of their radii.

  17. van der Waals radii of noble gases.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Jürgen; Alvarez, Santiago

    2014-09-02

    Consistent van der Waals radii are deduced for Ne-Xe, based on the noble gas···oxygen intermolecular distances found in gas phase structures. The set of radii proposed is shown to provide van der Waals distances for a wide variety of noble gas···element atom pairs that represent properly the distribution of distances both in the gas phase and in the solid state. Moreover, these radii show a smooth periodic trend down the group which is parallel to that shown by the halogens.

  18. Hypervelocity, minimum-radii, coordinated turns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tauber, Michael E.

    1990-01-01

    An analytic solution is presented for the most basic powered-flight maneuver, consisting of a constant-altitude coordinated turn and expressions for minimum-turn radii; associated flight conditions are derived. It is shown that the formulation for hypervelocity turns differs from that for subsonic and hypersonic speeds. Illustrative calculations using approximate aerodynamics based on Newtonian theory are presented, and these demonstrate the differences of hypersonic flight conditions and their associated turning radii from those at lower speeds.

  19. Dislocation core radii near elastic stability limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, C. A.; Morris, J. W., Jr.; Chrzan, D. C.

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies of transition metal alloys with compositions that place them near their limits of elastic stability [e.g., near the body-centered-cubic (BCC) to hexagonal-close-packed (HCP) transition] suggest interesting behavior for the dislocation cores. Specifically, the dislocation core size is predicted to diverge as the stability limit is approached. Here a simple analysis rooted in elasticity theory and the computation of ideal strength is used to analyze this divergence. This analysis indicates that dislocation core radii should diverge as the elastic limits of stability are approached in the BCC, HCP, and face-centered-cubic (FCC) structures. Moreover, external stresses and dislocation-induced stresses also increase the core radii. Density functional theory based total-energy calculations are combined with anisotropic elasticity theory to compute numerical estimates of dislocation core radii.

  20. Internal machining accomplished at constant radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gollihugh, T. E.

    1966-01-01

    Device machines fluid passages in workpieces at constant radii through two adjacent surfaces that are at included angles up to approximately 120 degrees. This technique has been used extensively in fabricating engine parts where close control of fluid flow is a requirement.

  1. Hot Jupiter Radii: A Turbulent History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youdin, Andrew N.; Komacek, Thaddeus D.

    2014-11-01

    Many hot Jupiters, i.e. giant exoplanets with short orbital periods, are bloated, with radii that greatly exceed those of colder gas giants. In models that neglect atmospheric motion, the enhanced irradiation of hot Jupiters is insufficient to explain their large radii. However uneven surface irradiation drives atmospheric circulation. These atmospheric motions deposit heat at deeper layers than irradiation alone, and can explain their large radii. The specific dissipation mechanism for atmospheric circulation can involve a turbulent cascade and/or the driving of electric currents that undergo Ohmic dissipation. The “Mechanical Greenhouse” model (Youdin & Mitchell, 2010) showed that turbulence in hot Jupiter atmospheres does mechanical work against the stable stratification of upper radiative zones, thereby driving a heat flux deeper into the interior. This poster will describe the first efforts to include this turbulent heat flux in planetary structure models. The goal is to understand the effects of turbulent mixing on hot Jupiter radius evolution. To perform these calculations we modify the publicly available stellar structure code MESA. We show how the effects of turbulence can be included in MESA — and understood physically — as an effective dissipation profile. We compare the radius evolution of hot Jupiters for different dissipation prescriptions, including our turbulent mixing model and others from the literature. We find that turbulent mixing is an energetically efficient way to explain the bloated radii of hot Jupiters.

  2. Mean-square radii of two-component three-body systems in two spatial dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval, J. H.; Bellotti, F. F.; Jensen, A. S.; Yamashita, M. T.

    2016-08-01

    We calculate root-mean-square radii for a three-body system confined to two spatial dimensions and consisting of two identical bosons (A ) and one distinguishable particle (B ). We use zero-range two-body interactions between each of the pairs, and focus thereby directly on universal properties. We solve the Faddeev equations in momentum space and express the mean-square radii in terms of first-order derivatives of the Fourier transforms of densities. The strengths of the interactions are adjusted for each set of masses to produce equal two-body bound-state energies between different pairs. The mass ratio, A =mB/mA , between particles B and A are varied from 0.01 to 100, providing a number of bound states decreasing from 8 to 2. Energies and mean-square radii of these states are analyzed for small A by use of the Born-Oppenheimer potential between the two heavy A particles. For large A the radii of the two bound states are consistent with a slightly asymmetric three-body structure. When A approaches thresholds for binding of the three-body excited states, the corresponding mean-square radii diverge inversely proportional to the deviation of the three-body energy from the two-body thresholds. The structures at these three-body thresholds correspond to bound A B dimers and one loosely bound A particle.

  3. Near-global survey of effective droplet radii in liquid water clouds using ISCCP data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Qingyan; Rossow, William B.; Lacis, Andrew B.

    1994-01-01

    A global survey of cloud particle size variations can provide crucial constraints on how cloud processes determine cloud liquid water contents and their variation with temperature, and further, may indicate the magnitude of aerosol effects on clouds. A method, based on a complete radiative transfer model for Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)-measured radiances, is described for retrieving cloud particle radii in liquid water clouds from satellite data currently available from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project. Results of sensitivity tests and validation studies provide error estimates. AVHRR data from NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 have been analyzed for January, April, July and October in 1987 and 1988. The results of this first survey reveal systematic continental and maritime differences and hemispheric contrasts that are indicative of the effects of associated aerosol concentration differences: cloud droplet radii in continental water clouds are about 2-3 micrometers smaller than in marine clouds, and droplet radii are about 1 micrometer smaller in marine clouds of the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere. The height dependencies of cloud droplet radii in continental and marine clouds are also consistent with differences in the vertical profiles of aerosol concentration. Significant seasonal and diurnal variations of effective droplet radii are also observed, particularly at lower latitudes. Variations of the relationship between cloud optical thickness and droplet radii may indicate variations in cloud microphysical regimes.

  4. Reliable Radii for M Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Andrew; Feiden, Gregory A.; Gaidos, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Precise and accurate parameters for late-type (late K and M) dwarf stars are critical for characterizing their planets. A deluge of planets discovered by Kepler has driven the need for even more precise stellar radii. We present our efforts to better constrain the luminosity-radius and Teff-radius relations for late-type (K5-M6) stars, taking advantage of improved techniques to calculate bolometric fluxes and [Fe/H] for M dwarfs. We determine effective temperatures for these stars by comparing observed spectra to atmospheric models, and confirm the accuracy of these temperatures using stars with temperatures determined from long-baseline optical interferometry. Using the Stefan-Boltzmann law we can empirically determine radii for these stars to better than 5%. We find the Teff-radius relation depends strongly on [Fe/H], which was missed in earlier studies that used smaller samples or less precise methods. We expect our empirical relations to be increasingly useful with the arrival of Gaia parallaxes in the near future.

  5. Charge radii of exotic nuclei: nuclear results versus isotopic shift calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaselli, M.; Liu, L. C.; Fritzsche, S.; Kühl, T.; Ursescu, D.; Neumayer, P.; Wojtaszek, A.

    2004-12-01

    We study the charge radii of exotic nuclei through nuclear calculations and isotopic-shift evaluations. The computations are performed in the framework of the dynamic-correlation model DCM for nuclei with an odd number of valence particles and in the boson dynamic-correlation model (BCDM) for those with an even number of valence particles. These nuclear models take fully into consideration the correlation between valence particles as well as between valence and core particles. Consequently, these computations may reveal feature physics which is associated to the strong correlation between the valence and the core polarized states. Moreover,we propose to analyze the obtained charge radii within the isotopic shift theory in which the electronic transitions for lithium and lithium-like ions are calculated by considering the three correlated electrons described by a method similar to the nuclear DCM model.

  6. Fitted Hanbury-Brown-Twiss radii versus space-time variances in flow-dominated models

    SciTech Connect

    Frodermann, Evan; Heinz, Ulrich; Lisa, Michael Annan

    2006-04-15

    The inability of otherwise successful dynamical models to reproduce the Hanbury-Brown-Twiss (HBT) radii extracted from two-particle correlations measured at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is known as the RHIC HBT Puzzle. Most comparisons between models and experiment exploit the fact that for Gaussian sources the HBT radii agree with certain combinations of the space-time widths of the source that can be directly computed from the emission function without having to evaluate, at significant expense, the two-particle correlation function. We here study the validity of this approach for realistic emission function models, some of which exhibit significant deviations from simple Gaussian behavior. By Fourier transforming the emission function, we compute the two-particle correlation function, and fit it with a Gaussian to partially mimic the procedure used for measured correlation functions. We describe a novel algorithm to perform this Gaussian fit analytically. We find that for realistic hydrodynamic models the HBT radii extracted from this procedure agree better with the data than the values previously extracted from the space-time widths of the emission function. Although serious discrepancies between the calculated and the measured HBT radii remain, we show that a more apples-to-apples comparison of models with data can play an important role in any eventually successful theoretical description of RHIC HBT data.

  7. THERMAL PROCESSES GOVERNING HOT-JUPITER RADII

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, David S.; Burrows, Adam E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu

    2013-07-20

    There have been many proposed explanations for the larger-than-expected radii of some transiting hot Jupiters, including either stellar or orbital energy deposition deep in the atmosphere or deep in the interior. In this paper, we explore the important influences on hot-Jupiter radius evolution of (1) additional heat sources in the high atmosphere, the deep atmosphere, and deep in the convective interior; (2) consistent cooling of the deep interior through the planetary dayside, nightside, and poles; (3) the degree of heat redistribution to the nightside; and (4) the presence of an upper atmosphere absorber inferred to produce anomalously hot upper atmospheres and inversions in some close-in giant planets. In particular, we compare the radius expansion effects of atmospheric and deep-interior heating at the same power levels and derive the power required to achieve a given radius increase when night-side cooling is incorporated. We find that models that include consistent day/night cooling are more similar to isotropically irradiated models when there is more heat redistributed from the dayside to the nightside. In addition, we consider the efficacy of ohmic heating in the atmosphere and/or convective interior in inflating hot Jupiters. Among our conclusions are that (1) the most highly irradiated planets cannot stably have uB {approx}> 10 km s{sup -1} G over a large fraction of their daysides, where u is the zonal wind speed and B is the dipolar magnetic field strength in the atmosphere, and (2) that ohmic heating cannot in and of itself lead to a runaway in planet radius.

  8. Total Galaxy Magnitudes and Effective Radii from Petrosian Magnitudes and Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Alister W.; Driver, Simon P.; Petrosian, Vahé; Conselice, Christopher J.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Crawford, Steven M.; Goto, Tomotsugu

    2005-10-01

    Petrosian magnitudes were designed to help with the difficult task of determining a galaxy's total light. Although these magnitudes [taken here as the flux within 2RP, with the inverted Petrosian index 1/η(RP)=0.2] can represent most of an object's flux, they do of course miss the light outside the Petrosian aperture (2RP). The size of this flux deficit varies monotonically with the shape of a galaxy's light profile, i.e., its concentration. In the case of a de Vaucouleurs R1/4 profile, the deficit is 0.20 mag; for an R1/8 profile this figure rises to 0.50 mag. Here we provide a simple method for recovering total (Sérsic) magnitudes from Petrosian magnitudes using only the galaxy concentration (R90/R50 or R80/R20) within the Petrosian aperture. The corrections hold to the extent that Sérsic's model provides a good description of a galaxy's luminosity profile. We show how the concentration can also be used to convert Petrosian radii into effective half-light radii, enabling a robust measure of the mean effective surface brightness. Our technique is applied to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 2 (SDSS DR2) Petrosian parameters, yielding good agreement with the total magnitudes, effective radii, and mean effective surface brightnesses obtained from the New York University Value-Added Galaxy Catalog Sérsic R1/n fits by Blanton and coworkers. Although the corrective procedure described here is specifically applicable to the SDSS DR2 and DR3, it is generally applicable to all imaging data where any Petrosian index and concentration can be constructed.

  9. Modeling hardwood crown radii using circular data analysis

    Treesearch

    Paul F. Doruska; Hal O. Liechty; Douglas J. Marshall

    2003-01-01

    Cylindrical data are bivariate data composed of a linear and an angular component. One can use uniform, first-order (one maximum and one minimum) or second-order (two maxima and two minima) models to relate the linear component to the angular component. Crown radii can be treated as cylindrical data when the azimuths at which the radii are measured are also recorded....

  10. Atomic and Ionic Radii of Elements 1-96.

    PubMed

    Rahm, Martin; Hoffmann, Roald; Ashcroft, N W

    2016-10-04

    Atomic and cationic radii have been calculated for the first 96 elements, together with selected anionic radii. The metric adopted is the average distance from the nucleus where the electron density falls to 0.001 electrons per bohr(3) , following earlier work by Boyd. Our radii are derived using relativistic all-electron density functional theory calculations, close to the basis set limit. They offer a systematic quantitative measure of the sizes of non-interacting atoms, commonly invoked in the rationalization of chemical bonding, structure, and different properties. Remarkably, the atomic radii as defined in this way correlate well with van der Waals radii derived from crystal structures. A rationalization for trends and exceptions in those correlations is provided.

  11. Equation of state and radii of finite nuclei in the presence of a diffuse surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomietz, V. M.; Lukyanov, S. V.; Sanzhur, A. I.; Shlomo, S.

    2017-05-01

    The definitions of nuclear surface and nuclear radii are considered within the Gibbs-Tolman-Rowlinson-Widom (GTW) approach. We demonstrate the nonmonotonic behavior of the nuclear equimolar radii, which is due to the shell effects in the chemical potential of finite nuclei. The direct variational method within the extended Thomas-Fermi approximation is used to establish the equation of state for finite nuclei. We have studied the influence of the polarization effect caused by the neutron excess on the particle density and the nuclear radii. This effect increases with the asymmetry parameter X and can be responsible for the appearance of large neutron halos in nuclei well away from the β stability line. We have performed new calculations of the A dependence of the radii R (A ) of nucleon distribution, which are based on the use of the experimental data for the nuclear binding energy. We demonstrate the presence of the quantum shell effects in R (A ) . We have analyzed the value of the neutron-skin thickness Δ rn p in the isotopes of the Na, Sn, and Pb nuclei within the GTW approach and show the appearance of nonmonotonic behavior of Δ rn p as a function of the neutron excess. We discuss the relative contributions to the neutron-skin thickness Δ rn p from the skin and the halo effects.

  12. Hall Determination of Atomic Radii of Alkali Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houari, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    I will propose here an alternative method for determining atomic radii of alkali metals based on the Hall measurements of their free electron densities and the knowledge of their crystal structure. (Contains 2 figures.)

  13. Hall Determination of Atomic Radii of Alkali Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houari, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    I will propose here an alternative method for determining atomic radii of alkali metals based on the Hall measurements of their free electron densities and the knowledge of their crystal structure. (Contains 2 figures.)

  14. Table of experimental nuclear ground state charge radii: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Angeli, I.; Marinova, K.P.

    2013-01-15

    The present table contains experimental root-mean-square (rms) nuclear charge radii R obtained by combined analysis of two types of experimental data: (i) radii changes determined from optical and, to a lesser extent, K{sub α} X-ray isotope shifts and (ii) absolute radii measured by muonic spectra and electronic scattering experiments. The table combines the results of two working groups, using respectively two different methods of evaluation, published in ADNDT earlier. It presents an updated set of rms charge radii for 909 isotopes of 92 elements from {sub 1}H to {sub 96}Cm together, when available, with the radii changes from optical isotope shifts. Compared with the last published tables of R-values from 2004 (799 ground states), many new data are added due to progress recently achieved by laser spectroscopy up to early 2011. The radii changes in isotopic chains for He, Li, Be, Ne, Sc, Mn, Y, Nb, Bi have been first obtained in the last years and several isotopic sequences have been recently extended to regions far off stability, (e.g., Ar, Mo, Sn, Te, Pb, Po)

  15. Consistent van der Waals Radii for the Whole Main Group

    PubMed Central

    Mantina, Manjeera; Chamberlin, Adam C.; Valero, Rosendo; Cramer, Christopher J.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2013-01-01

    Atomic radii are not precisely defined but are nevertheless widely used parameters in modeling and understanding molecular structure and interactions. The van der Waals radii determined by Bondi from molecular crystals and noble gas crystals are the most widely used values, but Bondi recommended radius values for only 28 of the 44 main-group elements in the periodic table. In the present article we present atomic radii for the other 16; these new radii were determined in a way designed to be compatible with Bondi’s scale. The method chosen is a set of two-parameter correlations of Bondi’s radii with repulsive-wall distances calculated by relativistic coupled-cluster electronic structure calculations. The newly determined radii (in Å) are Be, 1.53; B, 1.92; Al, 1.84; Ca, 2.31; Ge, 2.11; Rb, 3.03; Sr, 2.50; Sb, 2.06; Cs, 3.43; Ba, 2.68; Bi, 2.07; Po, 1.97; At, 2.02; Rn, 2.20; Fr, 3.48; and Ra, 2.83. PMID:19382751

  16. Consistent van der Waals radii for the whole main group.

    PubMed

    Mantina, Manjeera; Chamberlin, Adam C; Valero, Rosendo; Cramer, Christopher J; Truhlar, Donald G

    2009-05-14

    Atomic radii are not precisely defined but are nevertheless widely used parameters in modeling and understanding molecular structure and interactions. The van der Waals radii determined by Bondi from molecular crystals and data for gases are the most widely used values, but Bondi recommended radius values for only 28 of the 44 main-group elements in the periodic table. In the present Article, we present atomic radii for the other 16; these new radii were determined in a way designed to be compatible with Bondi's scale. The method chosen is a set of two-parameter correlations of Bondi's radii with repulsive-wall distances calculated by relativistic coupled-cluster electronic structure calculations. The newly determined radii (in A) are Be, 1.53; B, 1.92; Al, 1.84; Ca, 2.31; Ge, 2.11; Rb, 3.03; Sr, 2.49; Sb, 2.06; Cs, 3.43; Ba, 2.68; Bi, 2.07; Po, 1.97; At, 2.02; Rn, 2.20; Fr, 3.48; and Ra, 2.83.

  17. Nuclear charge radii: density functional theory meets Bayesian neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utama, R.; Chen, Wei-Chia; Piekarewicz, J.

    2016-11-01

    The distribution of electric charge in atomic nuclei is fundamental to our understanding of the complex nuclear dynamics and a quintessential observable to validate nuclear structure models. The aim of this study is to explore a novel approach that combines sophisticated models of nuclear structure with Bayesian neural networks (BNN) to generate predictions for the charge radii of thousands of nuclei throughout the nuclear chart. A class of relativistic energy density functionals is used to provide robust predictions for nuclear charge radii. In turn, these predictions are refined through Bayesian learning for a neural network that is trained using residuals between theoretical predictions and the experimental data. Although predictions obtained with density functional theory provide a fairly good description of experiment, our results show significant improvement (better than 40%) after BNN refinement. Moreover, these improved results for nuclear charge radii are supplemented with theoretical error bars. We have successfully demonstrated the ability of the BNN approach to significantly increase the accuracy of nuclear models in the predictions of nuclear charge radii. However, as many before us, we failed to uncover the underlying physics behind the intriguing behavior of charge radii along the calcium isotopic chain.

  18. Physical properties of a polar coronal hole from 2 to 5 solar radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munro, R. H.; Jackson, B. V.

    1977-01-01

    Observations with a white-light coronagraph aboard Skylab are used to determine the boundaries of a coronal hole in the northern polar region and the three-dimensional density structure within the hole between heights of 2 and 5 solar radii. The boundary of the hole is found to be essentially axisymmetric about the polar axis, nearly radial from 3 to 6 solar radii, and located near 25 deg latitude at these heights. The radiances arising from the hole are interpreted as resulting from an axisymmetric density distribution whose logarithmic radial gradient is independent of position within the hole and whose magnitude increases with angular distance away from the hole's axis. The velocity distribution within the hole is obtained from the continuity equation by assuming that the particle flux flowing outward in the hole is similar to that measured for high-speed solar-wind streams at 1 AU, and it is shown that the transition from subsonic to supersonic flow occurs between 2.2 and 3 solar radii.

  19. Mirror Charge Radii and the Neutron Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, B. Alex

    2017-09-01

    The differences in the charge radii of mirror nuclei are shown to be proportional to the derivative of the neutron equation of state and the symmetry energy at nuclear matter saturation density. This derivative is important for constraining the neutron equation of state for use in astrophysics. The charge radii of several neutron-rich nuclei are already measured to the accuracy of about 0.005 fm. Experiments at isotope-separator and radioactive-beam facilities are needed to measure the charge radii of the corresponding proton-rich mirror nuclei to a similar accuracy. It is also shown that neutron skins of nuclei with N =Z depend upon the value of the symmetry energy at a density of 0.10 nucleons /fm3 .

  20. On the Anomalous Radii of the Transiting Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughlin, Gregory; Crismani, Matteo; Adams, Fred C.

    2011-03-01

    We present a systematic evaluation of the agreement between the observed radii of 90 well-characterized transiting extrasolar giant planets and their corresponding model radii. Our model radii are drawn from previously published calculations of coreless giant planets that have attained their asymptotic radii, and which have been tabulated for a range of planet masses and equilibrium temperatures. (We report a two-dimensional polynomial fitting function that accurately represents the models.) As expected, the model radii provide a statistically significant improvement over a null hypothesis that the sizes of giant planets are completely independent of mass and effective temperature. As is well known, however, fiducial models provide an insufficient explanation; the planetary radius anomalies, R ≡ R_obs-R_pred, are strongly correlated with planetary equilibrium temperature. We find that the radius anomalies have a best-fit dependence, R∝ T_eff^{α}, with α = 1.4 ± 0.6. Incorporating this relation into the model radii leads to substantially less scatter in the radius correlation. The extra temperature dependence represents an important constraint on theoretical models for hot Jupiters. Using simple scaling arguments, we find support for the hypothesis of Batygin & Stevenson that this correlation can be attributed to a planetary heating mechanism that is mediated by magnetohydrodynamic coupling between the planetary magnetic field and near-surface flow that is accompanied by ohmic dissipation at adiabatic depth. Additionally, we find that the temperature dependence is likely too strong to admit kinetic heating as the primary source of anomalous energy generation within the majority of the observed transiting planets.

  1. ON THE ANOMALOUS RADII OF THE TRANSITING EXTRASOLAR PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, Gregory; Crismani, Matteo

    2011-03-01

    We present a systematic evaluation of the agreement between the observed radii of 90 well-characterized transiting extrasolar giant planets and their corresponding model radii. Our model radii are drawn from previously published calculations of coreless giant planets that have attained their asymptotic radii, and which have been tabulated for a range of planet masses and equilibrium temperatures. (We report a two-dimensional polynomial fitting function that accurately represents the models.) As expected, the model radii provide a statistically significant improvement over a null hypothesis that the sizes of giant planets are completely independent of mass and effective temperature. As is well known, however, fiducial models provide an insufficient explanation; the planetary radius anomalies, R{identical_to}R{sub obs}-R{sub pred}, are strongly correlated with planetary equilibrium temperature. We find that the radius anomalies have a best-fit dependence, R{proportional_to}T{sub eff}{sup {alpha}}, with {alpha} = 1.4 {+-} 0.6. Incorporating this relation into the model radii leads to substantially less scatter in the radius correlation. The extra temperature dependence represents an important constraint on theoretical models for hot Jupiters. Using simple scaling arguments, we find support for the hypothesis of Batygin and Stevenson that this correlation can be attributed to a planetary heating mechanism that is mediated by magnetohydrodynamic coupling between the planetary magnetic field and near-surface flow that is accompanied by ohmic dissipation at adiabatic depth. Additionally, we find that the temperature dependence is likely too strong to admit kinetic heating as the primary source of anomalous energy generation within the majority of the observed transiting planets.

  2. Nuclear matter radii determined by interaction cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, A.

    2005-10-19

    Experimental studies on nuclear matter radii determined by the interaction cross sections ({sigma}I) are reviewed. In particular, the procedure to determine the root-mean square matter radii from the measured {sigma}I by Galuber model analysis is described. Future {sigma}I measurements at the RI beam factory (RIBF) in RIKEN are introduced. As new calculations, the sensitivity of the skin is discussed in the case with a proton target based on Glauber-model calculations. In the energy region of RIBF, {sigma}I is sensitive for the skin; however, measurements with high accuracies are needed.

  3. The quantization of the radii of coordination spheres cubic crystals and cluster systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, G.; Emelyanov, S.; Ignatenko, N.; Ignatenko, G.

    2016-02-01

    The article deals with the creation of an algorithm for calculating the radii of coordination spheres and coordination numbers cubic crystal structure and cluster systems in liquids. Solution has important theoretical value since it allows us to calculate the amount of coordination in the interparticle interaction potentials, to predict the processes of growth of the crystal structures and processes of self-organization of particles in the cluster system. One option accounting geometrical and quantum factors is the use of the Fibonacci series to construct a consistent number of focal areas for cubic crystals and cluster formation in the liquid.

  4. A differential equation for the Generalized Born radii.

    PubMed

    Fogolari, Federico; Corazza, Alessandra; Esposito, Gennaro

    2013-06-28

    The Generalized Born (GB) model offers a convenient way of representing electrostatics in complex macromolecules like proteins or nucleic acids. The computation of atomic GB radii is currently performed by different non-local approaches involving volume or surface integrals. Here we obtain a non-linear second-order partial differential equation for the Generalized Born radius, which may be solved using local iterative algorithms. The equation is derived under the assumption that the usual GB approximation to the reaction field obeys Laplace's equation. The equation admits as particular solutions the correct GB radii for the sphere and the plane. The tests performed on a set of 55 different proteins show an overall agreement with other reference GB models and "perfect" Poisson-Boltzmann based values.

  5. Accurate nuclear radii and binding energies from a chiral interaction

    DOE PAGES

    Ekstrom, Jan A.; Jansen, G. R.; Wendt, Kyle A.; ...

    2015-05-01

    With the goal of developing predictive ab initio capability for light and medium-mass nuclei, two-nucleon and three-nucleon forces from chiral effective field theory are optimized simultaneously to low-energy nucleon-nucleon scattering data, as well as binding energies and radii of few-nucleon systems and selected isotopes of carbon and oxygen. Coupled-cluster calculations based on this interaction, named NNLOsat, yield accurate binding energies and radii of nuclei up to 40Ca, and are consistent with the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter. In addition, the low-lying collective Jπ=3- states in 16O and 40Ca are described accurately, while spectra for selected p- and sd-shellmore » nuclei are in reasonable agreement with experiment.« less

  6. Estimates of the radii, masses, and luminosities of LAMOST stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sichevskij, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    Based on the spectral observations of the LAMOST (DR2) survey, the radii, masses, and luminosities of 700 481 stars were estimated. These stars belong to spectral types A, F, G, and K, and have metallicities between -0.845 and 0.0. To determine the properties of the stars, we used up-to-date models of the stellar interior structure, computed with account for the stellar evolution rate and the initial mass function. The use of evolutionary estimates for two types of stars—with and without rotation—allowed us to account for the uncertainty associated with the lack of data on the rotation velocity of the stars under consideration. The obtained stellar radii, together with the photometric estimates of interstellar extinction and angular diameters can be used to study the dependence of interstellar extinction on distance as well as to estimate the stellar distances.

  7. Accurate nuclear radii and binding energies from a chiral interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ekstrom, Jan A.; Jansen, G. R.; Wendt, Kyle A.; Hagen, Gaute; Papenbrock, Thomas F.; Carlsson, Boris; Forssen, Christian; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Navratil, Petr; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2015-05-01

    With the goal of developing predictive ab initio capability for light and medium-mass nuclei, two-nucleon and three-nucleon forces from chiral effective field theory are optimized simultaneously to low-energy nucleon-nucleon scattering data, as well as binding energies and radii of few-nucleon systems and selected isotopes of carbon and oxygen. Coupled-cluster calculations based on this interaction, named NNLOsat, yield accurate binding energies and radii of nuclei up to 40Ca, and are consistent with the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter. In addition, the low-lying collective Jπ=3- states in 16O and 40Ca are described accurately, while spectra for selected p- and sd-shell nuclei are in reasonable agreement with experiment.

  8. The radii of SU Cas and TU Cas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niva, G. D.; Schmidt, E. G.

    1980-01-01

    It is possible to obtain the masses of Cepheid variables by several methods involving the pulsation theory. However, these masses are frequently smaller than those indicated by the theory of stellar evolution. The cause of this discrepancy is not fully understood. Since the pulsation theory indicates that there is a relation among the mass, the radius and the period, the discrepancy also manifests itself in the radii of these stars. With this in mind, radius determinations for two Cepheids, SU Cas and TU Cas, were undertaken. It is concluded that because of the agreement between the present radius and the beat radius of TU Cas, the pulsation theory is giving correct information about the radii of beat Cepheids. This implies that the luminosities of short period Cepheids have been overestimated. Thus, the solution to the mass discrepancy should perhaps be sought in the theory of stellar evolution or in the possibility of mass loss.

  9. Silicon pore optics mirror modules for inner and outer radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wille, Eric; Bavdaz, Marcos; Oosterbroek, Tim; Collon, Maximilien; Ackermann, Marcelo; Günther, Ramses; Vacanti, Giuseppe; Vervest, Mark; Yanson, Alexei; van Baren, Coen; Haneveld, Jeroen; Koelewijn, Arenda; Leenstra, Anne; Wijnperle, Maurice; Pareschi, Giovanni; Civitani, Marta; Conconi, Paolo; Spiga, Daniele; Valsecchi, Giuseppe; Marioni, Fabio; Zuknik, Karl-Heinz; Schweitzer, Mario

    2015-09-01

    Athena (Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics) is an x-ray observatory using a Silicon Pore Optics telescope and was selected as ESA's second L-class science mission for a launch in 2028. The x-ray telescope consists of several hundreds of mirror modules distributed over about 15-20 radial rings. The radius of curvature and the module sizes vary among the different radial positions of the rings resulting in different technical challenges for mirror modules for inner and outer radii. We present first results of demonstrating Silicon Pore Optics for the extreme radial positions of the Athena telescope. For the inner most radii (0.25 m) a new mirror plate design is shown which overcomes the challenges of larger curvatures, higher stress values and bigger plates. Preliminary designs for the mounting system and its mechanical properties are discussed for mirror modules covering all other radial positions up to the most outer radius of the Athena telescope.

  10. Charge radii of neon isotopes across the sd neutron shell

    SciTech Connect

    Marinova, K.; Geithner, W.; Kappertz, S.; Kloos, S.; Kotrotsios, G.; Neugart, R.; Wilbert, S.; Kowalska, M.; Keim, M.; Blaum, K.; Lievens, P.; Simon, H.

    2011-09-15

    We report on the changes in mean square charge radii of unstable neon nuclei relative to the stable {sup 20}Ne, based on the measurement of optical isotope shifts. The studies were carried out using collinear laser spectroscopy on a fast beam of neutral neon atoms. High sensitivity on short-lived isotopes was achieved thanks to nonoptical detection based on optical pumping and state-selective collisional ionization, which was complemented by an accurate determination of the beam kinetic energy. The new results provide information on the structural changes in the sequence of neon isotopes all across the neutron sd shell, ranging from the proton drip line nucleus and halo candidate {sup 17}Ne up to the neutron-rich {sup 28}Ne in the vicinity of the ''island of inversion.'' Within this range the charge radius is smallest for {sup 24}Ne with N=14 corresponding to the closure of the neutron d{sub 5/2} shell, while it increases toward both neutron shell closures, N=8 and N=20. The general trend of the charge radii correlates well with the deformation effects which are known to be large for several neon isotopes. In the neutron-deficient isotopes, structural changes arise from the onset of proton-halo formation for {sup 17}Ne, shell closure in {sup 18}Ne, and clustering effects in {sup 20,21}Ne. On the neutron-rich side the transition to the island of inversion plays an important role, with the radii in the upper part of the sd shell confirming the weakening of the N=20 magic number. The results add new information to the radii systematics of light nuclei where data are scarce because of the small contribution of nuclear-size effects to the isotope shifts which are dominated by the finite-mass effect.

  11. The 3H-3He Charge Radii Difference

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Luke S.; Arrington, John R.; Higinbotham, Douglas W.

    2016-03-01

    The upcoming E12-14-009 [1] experiment at Jefferson Lab will determine the ratio of the electric form factors for the A=3 mirror nuclei 3He and 3H. The measurement will use a 1.1 GeV electron beam, a special collimator plate to allow for simultaneous optics measurements, and the low-activity tritium target being prepared for Jefferson Lab. By observing the dependence of the form factor ratio as a function of Q2 over 0.05–0.09 GeV2, the dependence of the radii extraction on the shape of the form factors is minimized. As a result, we anticipate the uncertainty of the extracted charge radii difference to be 0.03 fm, a reduction of 70% from the current measurement. Using precise measurements of the 3He charge radius from isotopic shift or μHe measurements [2–4], we can deduce the absolute 3H charge radius. The results will provide a direct comparison to recent calculations of the charge radii.

  12. Absolute radii of single and multiple stars from the Catalog of Apparent and Absolute Radii of Stars (CADARS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fracassini, M.; Pasinetti, L. E.

    1982-05-01

    A modification of the Chalonge and Divan method for computing the apparent diameters of stars is reported on. Correlation between the modified method and intensity interferometry is good, except for the double visual, spectroscopic binary system alpha CMi. Systematic differences between the absolute radii of single and double (spectroscopic and visual) stars were ascertained. In order to improve data, observation of single and double stars, drawn from CADARS, is proposed for the Hipparcos mission.

  13. Interaction cross sections and matter radii of oxygen isotopes using the Glauber model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Suhel; Usmani, A. A.; Ahmad, Shakeb; Khan, Z. A.

    2017-05-01

    Using the Coulomb modified correlation expansion for the Glauber model S matrix, we calculate the interaction cross sections of oxygen isotopes (O-2616) on 12C at 1.0 GeV/nucleon. The densities of O-2616 are obtained using (i) the Slater determinants consisting of the harmonic oscillator single-particle wave functions (SDHO) and (ii) the relativistic mean-field approach (RMF). Retaining up to the two-body density term in the correlation expansion, the calculations are performed employing the free as well as the in-medium nucleon-nucleon (N N ) scattering amplitude. The in-medium N N amplitude considers the effects arising due to phase variation, higher momentum transfer components, and Pauli blocking. Our main focus in this work is to reveal how could one make the best use of SDHO densities with reference to the RMF one. The results demonstrate that the SDHO densities, along with the in-medium N N amplitude, are able to provide satisfactory explanation of the experimental data. It is found that, except for O,2423, the predicted SDHO matter rms radii of oxygen isotopes closely agree with those obtained using the RMF densities. However, for O,2423, our results require reasonably larger SDHO matter rms radii than the RMF values, thereby predicting thicker neutron skins in 23O and 24O as compared to RMF ones. In conclusion, the results of the present analysis establish the utility of SDHO densities in predicting fairly reliable estimates of the matter rms radii of neutron-rich nuclei.

  14. Extracting temperature and transverse flow by fitting transverse mass spectra and HBT radii together

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ronghua; Qian, Jing; Chen, Jianyi; Wu, Qingxin; Huo, Lei

    2017-03-01

    Single particle transverse mass spectra and HBT radii of identical pion and identical kaon are analyzed with a blast-wave parametrization under the assumptions of local thermal equilibrium and transverse expansion. Under the assumptions, temperature parameter T and transverse expansion rapidity ρ are sensitive to the shapes of transverse mass mT spectrum and HBT radius Rs(KT). Negative and positive correlations between T and ρ are observed by fitting mT spectrum and HBT radius Rs(KT), respectively. For a Monte Carlo simulation using the blast-wave function, T and ρ are extracted by fitting mT spectra and HBT radii together utilizing a combined optimization function χ2. With this method, T and ρ of the Monte Carlo sources can be extracted. Using this method for A Multi-Phase Transport (AMPT) model at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energy, the differences of T and ρ between pion and kaon are observed obviously, and the tendencies of T and ρ versus collision energy sNN are similar with the results extracted directly from the AMPT model.

  15. Characteristics of Jovian trapped electrons and protons for the region within 20 Jupiter radii and their interaction with Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. A.; Hamilton, D. C.; Mckibben, R. B.; Mogro-Campero, A.; Pyle, K. R.; Tuzzolino, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    A brief summary is given of Pioneer 10 observations of trapped particles in the inner-core region (within 20 Jupiter radii) of the Jovian magnetosphere. The three sensor systems used to study trapped radiation in this region are described. Intensity profiles are plotted as a function of magnetic-shell parameter (L) for electrons with energies of at least 3 MeV, protons with energies of at least 35 MeV, and protons with energies between 0.5 and 1.8 MeV. The effect of trapped-particle absorption by Io is clearly seen in the intensity profiles of all the observed particle species, and evidence is presented for preferential absorption of small-pitch-angle particles by Io. Conclusive evidence is given for the fact that Jupiter's trapped radiation is maintained by the inward diffusion of particles across L shells.

  16. Matter radii of {sup 32-35}Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Kanungo, R.; Perro, C.; Prochazka, A.; Farinon, F.; Knoebel, R.; Horiuchi, W.; Nociforo, C.; Aumann, T.; Geissel, H.; Gerl, J.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Mahata, K.; Scheidenberger, C.; Weick, H.; Winkler, M.; Boutin, D.; Lenske, H.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Davids, B.

    2011-02-15

    The interaction cross sections of {sup 32-35}Mg at 900A MeV have been measured using the fragment separator at GSI. The deviation from the r{sub 0}A{sup 1/3} trend is slightly larger for {sup 35}Mg, signaling the possible formation of a longer tail in the neutron distribution for {sup 35}Mg. The radii extracted from a Glauber model analysis with Fermi densities are consistent with models predicting the development of neutron skins.

  17. A Technical Memorandum On Core Radii In Lens Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanek, Christopher S.

    Quantitative estimates of lensing probabilities must be self-consistent. In particular, for asymptotically isothermal models: (1) using the $(3/2)^{1/2}$ correction for the velocity dispersion overestimates the expected number of lenses by 150\\% and their average separations by 50\\%, thereby introducing large cosmological errors; (2) when a core radius is added to the SIS model, the velocity dispersion must be increased; and (3) cross sections and magnification bias cannot be separated when computing the lensing probability. When we self-consistently calculate the effects of finite core radii in flat cosmological models, we find that the cosmological limits are independent of the core radius.

  18. A novel instrumentation of study cavitation maximum radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rui; Xu, Rong-qing; Chen, Xiao; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2005-02-01

    Based on the optical beam deflection (OBD) technique, a fiber-optic diagnostic technique is applied to investigate the pulsation of a laser-induced cavitation bubble on the vicinity of an aluminum target in water. The sequence waveforms induced by the bubble pulsation is presented and analyzed in detail. The maximum radii corresponding to each pulsation are determined. Furthermore, by varying the acting laser energy, the variation of the maximum bubble radius and bubble energy with respect to acting laser energy is obtained. The theoretical and experimental results are in good agreement within a relative error.

  19. particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yu; Chen, Zhihong; Zhang, Zhengguo; Fang, Xiaoming; Liang, Guozheng

    2014-05-01

    We explore a facile and nontoxic hydrothermal route for synthesis of a Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material by using l-cysteine as the sulfur source and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as the complexing agent. The effects of the amount of EDTA, the mole ratio of the three metal ions, and the hydrothermal temperature and time on the phase composition of the obtained product have been systematically investigated. The addition of EDTA and an excessive dose of ZnCl2 in the hydrothermal reaction system favor the generation of kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4. Pure kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 has been synthesized at 180°C for 12 h from the reaction system containing 2 mmol of EDTA at 2:2:1 of Cu/Zn/Sn. It is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy that those binary and ternary phases are absent in the kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 product. The kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 material synthesized by the hydrothermal process consists of flower-like particles with 250 to 400 nm in size. It is revealed that the flower-like particles are assembled from single-crystal Cu2ZnSnS4 nanoflakes with ca. 20 nm in size. The band gap of the Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material is estimated to be 1.55 eV. The films fabricated from the hierarchical Cu2ZnSnS4 particles exhibit fast photocurrent responses under intermittent visible-light irradiation, implying that they show potentials for use in solar cells and photocatalysis.

  20. Correlating hydrodynamic radii with that of two-dimensional nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Yuan; Kan, Yuwei; Clearfield, Abraham; Choi, Hyunho; Liang, Hong

    2015-12-21

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is one of the most adapted methods to measure the size of nanoparticles, as referred to the hydrodynamic radii (R{sub h}). However, the R{sub h} represents only that of three-dimensional spherical nanoparticles. In the present research, the size of two-dimensional (2D) nanoparticles of yttrium oxide (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and zirconium phosphate (ZrP) was evaluated through comparing their hydrodynamic diameters via DLS with lateral sizes obtained using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. We demonstrate that the hydrodynamic radii are correlated with the lateral sizes of both square and circle shaped 2D nanoparticles. Two proportional coefficients, i.e., correcting factors, are proposed for the Brownian motion status of 2D nanoparticles. The correction is possible by simplifying the calculation of integrals in the case of small thickness approximation. The correcting factor has great significance for investigating the translational diffusion behavior of 2D nanoparticles in a liquid and in effective and low-cost measurement in terms of size and morphology of shape-specific nanoparticles.

  1. Unexpectedly large charge radii of neutron-rich calcium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Bissell, M. L.; Blaum, K.; Ekström, A.; Frömmgen, N.; Hagen, G.; Hammen, M.; Hebeler, K.; Holt, J. D.; Jansen, G. R.; Kowalska, M.; Kreim, K.; Nazarewicz, W.; Neugart, R.; Neyens, G.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Papenbrock, T.; Papuga, J.; Schwenk, A.; Simonis, J.; Wendt, K. A.; Yordanov, D. T.

    2016-06-01

    Despite being a complex many-body system, the atomic nucleus exhibits simple structures for certain `magic’ numbers of protons and neutrons. The calcium chain in particular is both unique and puzzling: evidence of doubly magic features are known in 40,48Ca, and recently suggested in two radioactive isotopes, 52,54Ca. Although many properties of experimentally known calcium isotopes have been successfully described by nuclear theory, it is still a challenge to predict the evolution of their charge radii. Here we present the first measurements of the charge radii of 49,51,52Ca, obtained from laser spectroscopy experiments at ISOLDE, CERN. The experimental results are complemented by state-of-the-art theoretical calculations. The large and unexpected increase of the size of the neutron-rich calcium isotopes beyond N = 28 challenges the doubly magic nature of 52Ca and opens new intriguing questions on the evolution of nuclear sizes away from stability, which are of importance for our understanding of neutron-rich atomic nuclei.

  2. Unexpectedly large charge radii of neutron-rich calcium isotopes

    DOE PAGES

    Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Bissell, M. L.; Blaum, K.; ...

    2016-02-08

    Here, despite being a complex many-body system, the atomic nucleus exhibits simple structures for certain ‘magic’ numbers of protons and neutrons. The calcium chain in particular is both unique and puzzling: evidence of doubly magic features are known in 40,48Ca, and recently suggested in two radioactive isotopes, 52,54Ca. Although many properties of experimentally known calcium isotopes have been successfully described by nuclear theory, it is still a challenge to predict the evolution of their charge radii. Here we present the first measurements of the charge radii of 49,51,52Ca, obtained from laser spectroscopy experiments at ISOLDE, CERN. The experimental results aremore » complemented by state-of-the-art theoretical calculations. The large and unexpected increase of the size of the neutron-rich calcium isotopes beyond N = 28 challenges the doubly magic nature of 52Ca and opens new intriguing questions on the evolution of nuclear sizes away from stability, which are of importance for our understanding of neutron-rich atomic nuclei.« less

  3. Unexpectedly large charge radii of neutron-rich calcium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Bissell, M. L.; Blaum, K.; Ekstrom, A.; Frommgen, N.; Hagen, G.; Hammen, M.; Hebeler, K.; Holt, J. D.; Jansen, G. R.; Kowalska, M.; Kreim, K.; Nazarewicz, W.; Neugart, R.; Neyens, G.; Nortershauser, W.; Papenbrock, T.; Papuga, J.; Schwenk, A.; Simonis, J.; Wendt, K. A.; Yordanov, D. T.

    2016-02-08

    Here, despite being a complex many-body system, the atomic nucleus exhibits simple structures for certain ‘magic’ numbers of protons and neutrons. The calcium chain in particular is both unique and puzzling: evidence of doubly magic features are known in 40,48Ca, and recently suggested in two radioactive isotopes, 52,54Ca. Although many properties of experimentally known calcium isotopes have been successfully described by nuclear theory, it is still a challenge to predict the evolution of their charge radii. Here we present the first measurements of the charge radii of 49,51,52Ca, obtained from laser spectroscopy experiments at ISOLDE, CERN. The experimental results are complemented by state-of-the-art theoretical calculations. The large and unexpected increase of the size of the neutron-rich calcium isotopes beyond N = 28 challenges the doubly magic nature of 52Ca and opens new intriguing questions on the evolution of nuclear sizes away from stability, which are of importance for our understanding of neutron-rich atomic nuclei.

  4. Masses, Radii, and the Equation of State of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özel, Feryal; Freire, Paulo

    2016-09-01

    We summarize our current knowledge of neutron-star masses and radii. Recent instrumentation and computational advances have resulted in a rapid increase in the discovery rate and precise timing of radio pulsars in binaries in the past few years, leading to a large number of mass measurements. These discoveries show that the neutron-star mass distribution is much wider than previously thought, with three known pulsars now firmly in the 1.9-2.0-M⊙ mass range. For radii, large, high-quality data sets from X-ray satellites as well as significant progress in theoretical modeling led to considerable progress in the measurements, placing them in the 10-11.5-km range and shrinking their uncertainties, owing to a better understanding of the sources of systematic errors. The combination of the massive-neutron-star discoveries, the tighter radius measurements, and improved laboratory constraints of the properties of dense matter has already made a substantial impact on our understanding of the composition and bulk properties of cold nuclear matter at densities higher than that of the atomic nucleus, a major unsolved problem in modern physics.

  5. Correlating hydrodynamic radii with that of two-dimensional nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yuan; Kan, Yuwei; Choi, Hyunho; Clearfield, Abraham; Liang, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is one of the most adapted methods to measure the size of nanoparticles, as referred to the hydrodynamic radii (Rh). However, the Rh represents only that of three-dimensional spherical nanoparticles. In the present research, the size of two-dimensional (2D) nanoparticles of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) and zirconium phosphate (ZrP) was evaluated through comparing their hydrodynamic diameters via DLS with lateral sizes obtained using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. We demonstrate that the hydrodynamic radii are correlated with the lateral sizes of both square and circle shaped 2D nanoparticles. Two proportional coefficients, i.e., correcting factors, are proposed for the Brownian motion status of 2D nanoparticles. The correction is possible by simplifying the calculation of integrals in the case of small thickness approximation. The correcting factor has great significance for investigating the translational diffusion behavior of 2D nanoparticles in a liquid and in effective and low-cost measurement in terms of size and morphology of shape-specific nanoparticles.

  6. Charge radii of neutron-deficient 52,53Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamisono, K.; Brown, B. A.; Miller, A. J.; Rossi, D. M.; Maa, B.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Garand, D.; Sumithrarachchi, C.; Mantica, P. F.; Beerwerth, R.; Fritzsche, S.; Klose, A.; Liu, Y.; Müller, P.; Pearson, M. R.

    2016-09-01

    Shell closures can be identified as ``kinks'' in the chain of charge radii, , which can be seen for the N = 28 neutron shell closure up to 25 Mn. The trends in the vicinity of 56Ni is of particular interest, since the 56Ni nucleus is known to be soft. The of neutron-deficient 52,53Fe were determined in the present study using the bunched beam collinear laser spectroscopy at BEam COoling and LAser spectroscopy (BECOLA) facility at NSCL/MSU. The presence of a kink in the chain of at N = 28 for the Fe isotopes was confirmed. The global behavior of the of Fe, and Ca thorough Ni isotopes, will be discussed. Work supported in part by NSF Grant PHY-11-02511 and U.S. DOE Grant DE-NA0002924.

  7. Diversity of Debris Disks - Constraining the Disk Outer Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, George; Smith, Paul; Su, Kate

    2008-03-01

    Existing Spitzer observations of debris disks show a wide range of diversity in disk morphologies and spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The majority of debris disks observed with Spitzer are not resolved, resulting in very few direct constraints on disk extent. In general, SEDs alone have little diagnostic power beyond some basic statistics. However, as demonstrated by some Spitzer observations of nearby systems (beta Leo and gamma Oph), the spectra of the excess emission in the IRS and MIPS-SED wavelength range can help to put tighter constraints on disk properties such as minimum/maximum grain sizes and inner/outer disk radii. The dust continuum slopes are very useful to differentiate between various disk structures and constrain the dust mass. We need to study sufficient numbers of disks to explore their characteristics systematically. Therefore, we propose to obtain MIPS-SED observations of 27 debris disks that already have IRS-LL spectra and MIPS 24 and 70 micron photometry.

  8. Masses and radii for thirteen chromospherically active ellipsoidal variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Douglas S.

    1990-01-01

    The amplitude of the ellipticity effect, the mass function, and the V sin i in ten long-period RS CVn SB1 binaries are used to compute limits on the masses of the two stars and the radius of the primary: zeta And, UV CrB, V1764 Cyg, V826 Her, V350 Lac, GX Lib, V1197 Ori, AP Psc, 33 Psc, and EE UMa. Explicit masses and radii are computed for three SB2 systems: BL CVn, V1817 Cyg, and TZ Tri. The primary in several is found to fill 95 percent or more of its Roche lobe. The two minima produced by the ellipticity effect are unequal in depth, with the effect largest when i is near 90 deg and the primary nearly fills its Roche lobe. The greatest inequality found, in UV CrB, was 0.08 mag.

  9. On the prompt gamma -ray emission radii of LGRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.-B.

    A simple method has been used to measure the prompt emission radii of 27 Swift and 37 pre-Swift long gamma-ray bursts with known redshift and jet break time. I find that the prompt gamma -rays are emitted from a beamed jet with dynamic open angle narrower than its geometric open angle. It is also found that both Swift and pre-Swift long bursts occurred at a similarly upper-limited radius of ˜ 1016 cm, although Swift/BAT is more sensitive to long bursts than pre-Swift detectors did. These results are consistent with some previous expectations based on Swift early afterglow data, spectral cut-off energy or turbulence model.

  10. Hypergravity effects on normal and avulsed developing avian radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negulesco, J. A.; Clark, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    Rhode Island red female chicks were subjected to complete closed fracture of the right radius at 2 weeks post-hatching. The animals were allowed to heal for 1 week at either earth-gravity or 2-G-hypergravity state with control and estrogen-injected groups. Intact and fractured radial length, weight, average epiphysial-diaphysial diameters, and length, width, and weight of healing fracture callus were measured. Daily 2000 IU estrogen administration for 7 d increased intact radial length. Estrogen augments the effects of the 2-G state by inhibiting growth and depleting the mass of both intact and fractured radii and by decreasing the average distal epiphysial diameter of fractured bones. Animals exposed to the hypergravity state without hormonal treatment showed decreased fractured radial length, weight, and smaller proximal epiphysial diameters. The measurable parameters of the fracture callus (width, length, and weight) were depressed by the hypergravity state regardless of whether the animal was untreated or supplemented with estrogen.

  11. Hypergravity effects on normal and avulsed developing avian radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negulesco, J. A.; Clark, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    Rhode Island red female chicks were subjected to complete closed fracture of the right radius at 2 weeks post-hatching. The animals were allowed to heal for 1 week at either earth-gravity or 2-G-hypergravity state with control and estrogen-injected groups. Intact and fractured radial length, weight, average epiphysial-diaphysial diameters, and length, width, and weight of healing fracture callus were measured. Daily 2000 IU estrogen administration for 7 d increased intact radial length. Estrogen augments the effects of the 2-G state by inhibiting growth and depleting the mass of both intact and fractured radii and by decreasing the average distal epiphysial diameter of fractured bones. Animals exposed to the hypergravity state without hormonal treatment showed decreased fractured radial length, weight, and smaller proximal epiphysial diameters. The measurable parameters of the fracture callus (width, length, and weight) were depressed by the hypergravity state regardless of whether the animal was untreated or supplemented with estrogen.

  12. Automatic differentiation for Fourier series and the radii polynomial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Mireles James, J. D.; Ransford, Julian

    2016-11-01

    In this work we develop a computer-assisted technique for proving existence of periodic solutions of nonlinear differential equations with non-polynomial nonlinearities. We exploit ideas from the theory of automatic differentiation in order to formulate an augmented polynomial system. We compute a numerical Fourier expansion of the periodic orbit for the augmented system, and prove the existence of a true solution nearby using an a-posteriori validation scheme (the radii polynomial approach). The problems considered here are given in terms of locally analytic vector fields (i.e. the field is analytic in a neighborhood of the periodic orbit) hence the computer-assisted proofs are formulated in a Banach space of sequences satisfying a geometric decay condition. In order to illustrate the use and utility of these ideas we implement a number of computer-assisted existence proofs for periodic orbits of the Planar Circular Restricted Three-Body Problem (PCRTBP).

  13. SEP events and wake region lunar dust charging with grain radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, S. B. Rakesh; Rajesh, S. R.; Abraham, A.; Renuka, G.; Venugopal, Chandu

    2017-01-01

    Our lunar surface is exposed to all kinds of radiations from the Sun, since it lacks a global magnetic field. Like lunar surface, dust particles are also exposed to plasmas and UV radiation and, consequently they carry electrostatic charges. During Solar Energetic Particle events (SEPs) secondary electron emission plays a vital role in charging of lunar dusts. To study the lunar dust charging during SEPs on lunar wake region, we derived an expression for lunar dust potential and analysed how it varies with different electron temperatures and grain radii. Because of high energetic solar fluxes, secondary yield (δ) values reach up to 2.3 for 0.5 μm dust grain. We got maximum yield at an energy of 550 eV which is in well agreement with lunar sample experimental observation (Anderegg et al., 1972). It is observed that yield value increases with electron energy, reaches to a maximum value and then decreases. During SEPs heavier dust grains show larger yield values because of the geometry of the grains. On the wake region, the dust potential reaches up to -497 V for 0.5 μm dust grain. The electric field of these grains could present a significant threat to manned and unmanned missions to the Moon.

  14. DNA stretching on the wall surfaces in curved microchannels with different radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Shou-Shing; Wu, Fong-He; Tsai, Ming-Ju

    2014-08-01

    DNA molecule conformation dynamics and stretching were made on semi-circular surfaces with different radii (500 to 5,000 μm) in microchannels measuring 200 μm × 200 μm in cross section. Five different buffer solutions - 1× Tris-acetate-EDTA (TAE), 1× Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE), 1× Tris-EDTA (TE), 1× Tris-phosphate-EDTA (TPE), and 1× Tris-buffered saline (TBS) solutions - were used with a variety of viscosity such as 40, 60, and 80 cP, with resultant 10-4 ≤ Re ≤ 10-3 and the corresponding 5 ≤ Wi ≤ 12. The test fluids were seeded with JOJO-1 tracer particles for flow visualization and driven through the test channels via a piezoelectric (PZT) micropump. Micro particle image velocimetry (μPIV) measuring technique was applied for the centered-plane velocity distribution measurements. It is found that the radius effect on the stretch ratio of DNA dependence is significant. The stretch ratio becomes larger as the radius becomes small due to the larger centrifugal force. Consequently, the maximum stretch was found at the center of the channel with a radius of 500 μm.

  15. Calculations of neutron and proton radii of cesium isotopes. Final report, April 23--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This task involved the calculation of neutron and proton radii of cesium isotopes. The author has written a computer code that calculates radii according to two models: Myers 1983 and FRDM 1992. Results of calculations in both these models for both cesium and francium isotopes are attached as figures. He is currently interpreting these results in collaboration with D. Vieira and J.R. Nix, and they expect to use the computer code for further studies of nuclear radii.

  16. On the Radii of Close-in Giant Planets.

    PubMed

    Burrows; Guillot; Hubbard; Marley; Saumon; Lunine; Sudarsky

    2000-05-01

    The recent discovery that the close-in extrasolar giant planet HD 209458b transits its star has provided a first-of-its-kind measurement of the planet's radius and mass. In addition, there is a provocative detection of the light reflected off of the giant planet tau Bootis b. Including the effects of stellar irradiation, we estimate the general behavior of radius/age trajectories for such planets and interpret the large measured radii of HD 209458b and tau Boo b in that context. We find that HD 209458b must be a hydrogen-rich gas giant. Furthermore, the large radius of a close-in gas giant is not due to the thermal expansion of its atmosphere but to the high residual entropy that remains throughout its bulk by dint of its early proximity to a luminous primary. The large stellar flux does not inflate the planet but retards its otherwise inexorable contraction from a more extended configuration at birth. This implies either that such a planet was formed near its current orbital distance or that it migrated in from larger distances (>/=0.5 AU), no later than a few times 107 yr of birth.

  17. Measuring Neutron Star Radii via Pulse Profile Modeling with NICER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Morsink, Sharon; Bauböck, Michi

    2016-11-01

    The Neutron-star Interior Composition Explorer is an X-ray astrophysics payload that will be placed on the International Space Station. Its primary science goal is to measure with high accuracy the pulse profiles that arise from the non-uniform thermal surface emission of rotation-powered pulsars. Modeling general relativistic effects on the profiles will lead to measuring the radii of these neutron stars and to constraining their equation of state. Achieving this goal will depend, among other things, on accurate knowledge of the source, sky, and instrument backgrounds. We use here simple analytic estimates to quantify the level at which these backgrounds need to be known in order for the upcoming measurements to provide significant constraints on the properties of neutron stars. We show that, even in the minimal-information scenario, knowledge of the background at a few percent level for a background-to-source countrate ratio of 0.2 allows for a measurement of the neutron star compactness to better than 10% uncertainty for most of the parameter space. These constraints improve further when more realistic assumptions are made about the neutron star emission and spin, and when additional information about the source itself, such as its mass or distance, are incorporated.

  18. CCD Photometry and Radii of Eight Jupiter-Family Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Choi, Y. J.; Lowry, S. C.

    2008-09-01

    We are conducting a program of CCD photometry of Jupiter-family comets (JFCs) when they are far from the Sun, in order to image the inactive nucleus. The photometry is used to estimate the nucleus sizes and shapes, assuming a typical cometary albedo of 0.04 and a phase coefficient of 0.035 magnitudes/degree. We used the Palomar 5m telescope and Large Format Camera to search for 12 distant JFCs on September 25-26, 2006 (UT). Of the 12, two were not detected (79P, 143P) and two were active (74P, 116P) at distances of 4.54 AU and 4.72 AU from the Sun, respectively. Measured magnitudes and estimated mean radii for the remaining eight comets are shown in the Table below. We will discuss the implications of the latest measurements for the size distribution of JFC nuclei. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with support from the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program.

  19. Baade-Wesselink radii for NGC 1866 Cepheids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cote, Patrick; Welch, Douglas L.; Fischer, Philippe; Mateo, Mario; Madore, Barry F.

    1991-01-01

    Radial velocities and CCD photometry suitable for a Baade-Wesselink analysis are now available for six short-period Cepheids (HV12198, HV12199, HV12202, HV12203, HV12204, and V4) in the LMC cluster NGC 1866. As a prerequisite for such an analysis, O-C diagrams have been constructed and examined for seven of the NGC 1866 Cepheids (HV12197, HV12198, HV12199, HV12200, HV12202, HV12203, and HV12204), yielding improved periods and estimates of the rate of period change in these coeval variables. One star, HV12198, shows possible evidence for period change, but the phase mismatch due to that change is small enough to have negligible effect on its Baade-Wesselink radius. The computed radii are in good agreement with the Baade-Wesselink, theoretical and cluster/association period-radius relations of Fernie (1984) and the Galactic relation of Coulson and Caldwell (1989). The Flower (1977) color-effective temperature relation and the Becker et al. (1977) mass-luminosity relation lead to mean masses of 4.9 + or - 0.5 solar masses and 4.6 + or - 0.5 solar masses for the respective metallicities of (Y,Z) = (0.0273,0.0016) and (0.026,0.02). Pulsation constants are also computed for these stars.

  20. Possible radii of compact stars: A relativistic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalam, Mehedi; Hossein, Sk Monowar; Molla, Sajahan

    2016-11-01

    The inner structure of compact stars is checked from theoretical as well as observational points of view. In this paper, we determine the possible radii of six compact stars: two binary millisecond pulsars, namely PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J1903+327, studied by [P. B. Demorest, T. Pennucci, S. M. Ransom, M. S. E. Roberts and W. T. Hessels, Nature 467, 1081 (2010)] and four X-ray binaries, namely Cen X-3, SMC X-1, Vela X-1 and Her X-1 studied by [M. L. Rawls et al., Astrophys. J. 730, 25 (2011)]. Interestingly, we see that density of the star does not vanishes at the boundary though it is maximum at the center which implies that these compact stars may be treated as strange stars rather than neutron stars. We propose a stiff equation of state (EoS) relating to pressure with matter density. We also obtain compactness (u) and surface redshift (Zs) for the above-mentioned stars and compare it with the recent observational data.

  1. Baade-Wesselink radii for NGC 1866 Cepheids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cote, Patrick; Welch, Douglas L.; Fischer, Philippe; Mateo, Mario; Madore, Barry F.

    1991-01-01

    Radial velocities and CCD photometry suitable for a Baade-Wesselink analysis are now available for six short-period Cepheids (HV12198, HV12199, HV12202, HV12203, HV12204, and V4) in the LMC cluster NGC 1866. As a prerequisite for such an analysis, O-C diagrams have been constructed and examined for seven of the NGC 1866 Cepheids (HV12197, HV12198, HV12199, HV12200, HV12202, HV12203, and HV12204), yielding improved periods and estimates of the rate of period change in these coeval variables. One star, HV12198, shows possible evidence for period change, but the phase mismatch due to that change is small enough to have negligible effect on its Baade-Wesselink radius. The computed radii are in good agreement with the Baade-Wesselink, theoretical and cluster/association period-radius relations of Fernie (1984) and the Galactic relation of Coulson and Caldwell (1989). The Flower (1977) color-effective temperature relation and the Becker et al. (1977) mass-luminosity relation lead to mean masses of 4.9 + or - 0.5 solar masses and 4.6 + or - 0.5 solar masses for the respective metallicities of (Y,Z) = (0.0273,0.0016) and (0.026,0.02). Pulsation constants are also computed for these stars.

  2. Proton Radii of B12-17 Define a Thick Neutron Surface in B17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estradé, A.; Kanungo, R.; Horiuchi, W.; Ameil, F.; Atkinson, J.; Ayyad, Y.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Dillmann, I.; Evdokimov, A.; Farinon, F.; Geissel, H.; Guastalla, G.; Janik, R.; Kimura, M.; Knöbel, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Marta, M.; Mostazo, M.; Mukha, I.; Nociforo, C.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Sitar, B.; Strmen, P.; Suzuki, Y.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, J.; Tanihata, I.; Terashima, S.; Vargas, J.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.

    2014-09-01

    The first determination of radii of point proton distribution (proton radii) of B12-17 from charge-changing cross sections (σCC) measurements at the FRS, GSI, Darmstadt is reported. The proton radii are deduced from a finite-range Glauber model analysis of the σCC. The radii show an increase from B13 to B17 and are consistent with predictions from the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics model for the neutron-rich nuclei. The measurements show the existence of a thick neutron surface with neutron-proton radius difference of 0.51(0.11) fm in B17.

  3. Bonded radii and the contraction of the electron density of the oxygen atom by bonded interactions.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Gerald V; Ross, Nancy L; Cox, David F; Rosso, Kevin M; Iversen, Bo B; Spackman, Mark A

    2013-02-21

    The bonded radii for more than 700 bonded pairs of atoms, comprising more than 50 oxide crystals, extracted from experimental and theoretical electron density distributions, are averaged and compared with the ionic radii for first, second, and third row atoms. At odds with the assumption of a "fixed" ionic radius of 1.40 Å for the oxide anion, the bonded radius for the anion, r(b)(O), decreases systematically from 1.40 to 0.65 Å as the electron density distribution of the atom is progressively polarized and contracted by its bonded interactions. The radii for the more electropositive metal atoms agree with the ionic radii when the electron density distribution of the anion is largely unpolarized by its bonded interactions. However, those for the more electronegative metal atoms are progressively larger than the ionic radii as the electron density distribution of the anion is progressively polarized and contracted along the bond vectors with decreasing bond length. The progressive decrease of r(b)(O) indicates that the compilation of sets of ionic radii, based on a fixed radius for the oxide anion, is problematic and impacts the accuracy of the ionic radii for the metal atoms. The assumption of a "fixed" radius for the anion, made in the derivation of sets of radii, not only results in unrealistic negative ionic radii for the more electronegative atoms but also in ionic radii that are as much as 0.5 Å smaller than the bonded radii, particularly for the more electronegative M atoms. The lack of agreement between the ionic and the bonded radii for the more shared bonded interactions is ascribed to the progressive increase in the polarization and contraction of the electron density of the oxide anion by the bonded interactions with a concomitant decrease in the radius of the anion, a factor that was largely neglected in the compilation of the ionic radii for fluoride, oxide, sulfide, and nitride crystals. The close agreement of the bonded radii and procrystal bonded

  4. MASSES, RADII, AND CLOUD PROPERTIES OF THE HR 8799 PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Cushing, Michael; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Freedman, Richard E-mail: dsaumon@lanl.gov E-mail: andrew.ackerman@nasa.gov E-mail: freedman@darkstar.arc.nasa.gov

    2012-08-01

    The near-infrared colors of the planets directly imaged around the A star HR 8799 are much redder than most field brown dwarfs of the same effective temperature. Previous theoretical studies of these objects have concluded that the atmospheres of planets b, c, and d are unusually cloudy or have unusual cloud properties. Some studies have also found that the inferred radii of some or all of the planets disagree with expectations of standard giant planet evolution models. Here, we compare the available data to the predictions of our own set of atmospheric and evolution models that have been extensively tested against observations of field L and T dwarfs, including the reddest L dwarfs. Unlike some previous studies, we require mutually consistent choices for effective temperature, gravity, cloud properties, and planetary radius. This procedure thus yields plausible values for the masses, effective temperatures, and cloud properties of all three planets. We find that the cloud properties of the HR 8799 planets are not unusual but rather follow previously recognized trends, including a gravity dependence on the temperature of the L to T spectral transition-some reasons for which we discuss. We find that the inferred mass of planet b is highly sensitive to whether or not we include the H- and the K-band spectrum in our analysis. Solutions for planets c and d are consistent with the generally accepted constraints on the age of the primary star and orbital dynamics. We also confirm that, like in L and T dwarfs and solar system giant planets, non-equilibrium chemistry driven by atmospheric mixing is also important for these objects. Given the preponderance of data suggesting that the L to T spectral type transition is gravity dependent, we present an exploratory evolution calculation that accounts for this effect. Finally we recompute the bolometric luminosity of all three planets.

  5. Electromagnetic moments and radii near N = 32,34

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Ruiz, Ronald Fernando

    2016-09-01

    On behalf of the COLLAPS and CRIS collaborations at ISOLDE-CERN. Nuclei in the neighborhood of calcium isotopes play a key role in the development of many-body methods and provide an important test for current descriptions of the nuclear force. The properties of stable nuclei in the vicinity of the two naturally occurring doubly-magic calcium (Z = 20) isotopes, 40Ca (N = 20) and 48Ca (N = 28), have been extensively studied, both experimentally and theoretically. Recently, special attention has been given to the evolution of nuclear structure in exotic neutron-rich isotopes beyond N = 28 , where evidence of doubly-magic features have been reported at N = 32 and N = 34. This contribution presents the latest results obtained with laser spectroscopy in the region. Measurements of the hyperfine structure spectra and isotope shifts for the potassium (Z = 19) and calcium (Z = 20) isotopic chains were obtained by using optical detection at COLLAPS, ISOLDE-CERN. From these measurements, our knowledge of nuclear ground-state spins, ground-state electromagnetic moments and changes in the root-mean-squared charge radii has been extended up to N = 32. With relatively low production yields, the isotopes 51K ( 4000 ions/s) and 52Ca ( 250 ions/s) are at the limit of optical detection techniques. In order to extend laser spectroscopy studies further away from stability, a highly sensitive experimental setup has been developed at the COLLAPS beam line. The current developments in this direction and the perspectives for future experiments using collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) in the region towards N = 34 will be discussed.

  6. Galaxy Structure: Core Radii, and Central Mass Deficits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, A. W.; Trujillo, I.; Erwin, P.

    2004-05-01

    We investigate the nuclear and global structure of elliptical galaxies, and the apparent disparity between the Nuker and Sérsic light-profile models. We show that the so-called ``power-law" galaxies in fact have Sérsic r1/n profiles over their entire observed radial range. Consequently, only three (Sérsic-profile) parameters are required to simultaneously describe both the inner (HST-resolved) and outer profiles of low-luminosity (M > -20.5 B-mag) elliptical galaxies. We also find that ``core galaxies" have Sérsic profiles with a (partially evacuated) single power-law core. We have developed a modified (5-parameter) Sérsic profile with a power-law core to model the complete radial extent of luminous galaxies with cores. In addition to quantifying the global stellar distribution in these systems, we have derived new estimates of their core radii and other central properties. Comparison of the central stellar deficits with the galaxies' black hole masses suggests that the number of (dissipationless) major mergers that have produced luminous elliptical galaxies is around 1-2, rather than 8-10, which agrees with theory and implies that the galactic merger history of the Universe is roughly an order of magnitude less violent than previous observational analyses had suggested. Support for proposal number HST-AR-09927.01-A was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  7. THE OBSERVATIONAL AND THEORETICAL TIDAL RADII OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN M87

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Jeremy J.; Sills, Alison; Harris, William E.

    2012-02-10

    Globular clusters have linear sizes (tidal radii) which theory tells us are determined by their masses and by the gravitational potential of their host galaxy. To explore the relationship between observed and expected radii, we utilize the globular cluster population of the Virgo giant M87. Unusually deep, high signal-to-noise images of M87 are used to measure the effective and limiting radii of approximately 2000 globular clusters. To compare with these observations, we simulate a globular cluster population that has the same characteristics as the observed M87 cluster population. Placing these simulated clusters in the well-studied tidal field of M87, the orbit of each cluster is solved and the theoretical tidal radius of each cluster is determined. We compare the predicted relationship between cluster size and projected galactocentric distance to observations. We find that for an isotropic distribution of cluster velocities, theoretical tidal radii are approximately equal to observed limiting radii for R{sub gc} < 10 kpc. However, the isotropic simulation predicts a steep increase in cluster size at larger radii, which is not observed in large galaxies beyond the Milky Way. To minimize the discrepancy between theory and observations, we explore the effects of orbital anisotropy on cluster sizes, and suggest a possible orbital anisotropy profile for M87 which yields a better match between theory and observations. Finally, we suggest future studies which will establish a stronger link between theoretical tidal radii and observed radii.

  8. Eccentric ringlet in the Maxwell gap at 1.45 Saturn radii Multi-instrument Voyager observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.; Borderies, N.; Goldreich, P.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Holberg, J. B.; Lane, A. L.; Pomphrey, R. B.; Terrile, R. J.; Lissauer, J. J.; Marouf, E. A.; Tyler, G. L.

    1983-10-01

    The Voyager spacecraft observed a narrow, eccentric ringlet in the Maxwell gap (1.45 Saturn radii) in Saturn's rings. Intercomparison of the Voyager imaging, photopolarimeter, ultraviolet spectrometer, and radio science observations yields results not available from individual observations. The shape and width of the ringlet are consistent with a set of uniformly precessing, confocal ellipses with foci at Saturn's center of mass. The ringlet precesses as a unit at a rate consistent with the known dynamical oblateness of Saturn; the lack of differential precession across the ringlet yields a ringlet mass of about 5×1018 grams. Comparison of the measured transmission of the ringlet at radio, visible, and ultraviolet wavelengths indicates that about half of the total extinction is due to particles smaller than 1 centimeter in radius, in contrast even with nearby regions of the C ring. However, the color and brightness of the ringlet material are not measurably different from those of nearby C ring particles.

  9. Masses, Radii, and Cloud Properties of the HR 8799 Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Cushing, Michael; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Freedman, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The near-infrared colors of the planets directly imaged around the A star HR 8799 are much redder than most field brown dwarfs of the same effective temperature. Previous theoretical studies of these objects have compared the photometric and limited spectral data of the planets to the predictions of various atmosphere and evolution models and concluded that the atmospheres of planets b, c, and d are unusually cloudy or have unusual cloud properties. Most studies have also found that the inferred radii of some or all of the planets disagree with expectations of standard giant planet evolution models. Here we compare the available data to the predictions of our own set of atmospheric and evolution models that have been extensively tested against field L and T dwarfs, including the reddest L dwarfs. Unlike almost all previous studies we specify mutually self-consistent choices for effective temperature, gravity, cloud properties, and planetary radius. This procedure yields plausible and self-consistent values for the masses, effective temperatures, and cloud properties of all three planets. We find that the cloud properties of the HR 8799 planets are in fact not unusual but rather follow previously recognized trends including a gravity dependence on the temperature of the L to T spectral transition, some reasons for which we discuss. We find that the inferred mass of planet b is highly sensitive to the H and K band spectrum. Solutions for planets c and particularly d are less certain but are consistent with the generally accepted constraints on the age of the primary star and orbital dynamics. We also confirm that as for L and T dwarfs and solar system giant planets, non-equilibrium chemistry driven by atmospheric mixing is also important for these objects. Given the preponderance of data suggesting that the L to T spectral type transition is gravity dependent, we present a new evolution calculation that predicts cooling tracks on the near-infrared color

  10. Accurate Empirical Radii and Masses of Planets and Their Host Stars with Gaia Parallaxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stassun, Keivan G.; Collins, Karen A.; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2017-03-01

    We present empirical measurements of the radii of 116 stars that host transiting planets. These radii are determined using only direct observables—the bolometric flux at Earth, the effective temperature, and the parallax provided by the Gaia first data release—and thus are virtually model independent, with extinction being the only free parameter. We also determine each star’s mass using our newly determined radius and the stellar density, a virtually model independent quantity itself from previously published transit analyses. These stellar radii and masses are in turn used to redetermine the transiting-planet radii and masses, again using only direct observables. The median uncertainties on the stellar radii and masses are 8% and 30%, respectively, and the resulting uncertainties on the planet radii and masses are 9% and 22%, respectively. These accuracies are generally larger than previously published model-dependent precisions of 5% and 6% on the planet radii and masses, respectively, but the newly determined values are purely empirical. We additionally report radii for 242 stars hosting radial-velocity (non-transiting) planets, with a median achieved accuracy of ≈2%. Using our empirical stellar masses we verify that the majority of putative “retired A stars” in the sample are indeed more massive than ˜1.2 {M}⊙ . Most importantly, the bolometric fluxes and angular radii reported here for a total of 498 planet host stars—with median accuracies of 1.7% and 1.8%, respectively—serve as a fundamental data set to permit the re-determination of transiting-planet radii and masses with the Gaia second data release to ≈3% and ≈5% accuracy, better than currently published precisions, and determined in an entirely empirical fashion.

  11. Charge Radii of Neutron Deficient Fe,5352 Produced by Projectile Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamisono, K.; Rossi, D. M.; Beerwerth, R.; Fritzsche, S.; Garand, D.; Klose, A.; Liu, Y.; Maaß, B.; Mantica, P. F.; Miller, A. J.; Müller, P.; Nazarewicz, W.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Olsen, E.; Pearson, M. R.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Saperstein, E. E.; Sumithrarachchi, C.; Tolokonnikov, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    Bunched-beam collinear laser spectroscopy is performed on neutron deficient Fe,5352 prepared through in-flight separation followed by a gas stopping. This novel scheme is a major step to reach nuclides far from the stability line in laser spectroscopy. Differential mean-square charge radii δ ⟨r2⟩ of Fe,5352 are determined relative to stable 56Fe as δ ⟨r2⟩56 ,52=-0.034 (13 ) fm2 and δ ⟨r2⟩56 ,53=-0.218 (13 ) fm2 , respectively, from the isotope shift of atomic hyperfine structures. The multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method is used to calculate atomic factors to deduce δ ⟨r2⟩. The values of δ ⟨r2⟩ exhibit a minimum at the N =28 neutron shell closure. The nuclear density functional theory with Fayans and Skyrme energy density functionals is used to interpret the data. The trend of δ ⟨r2⟩ along the Fe isotopic chain results from an interplay between single-particle shell structure, pairing, and polarization effects and provides important data for understanding the intricate trend in the δ ⟨r2⟩ of closed-shell Ca isotopes.

  12. Charge radii of neutron deficient Fe52,53 produced by projectile fragmentation

    DOE PAGES

    Minamisono, K.; Rossi, D. M.; Beerwerth, R.; ...

    2016-12-15

    Bunched-beam collinear laser spectroscopy is performed on neutron deficient 52,53Fe prepared through in-flight separation followed by a gas stopping. This novel scheme is a major step to reach nuclides far from the stability line in laser spectroscopy. Differential mean-square charge radii δmore » $$\\langle$$r2$$\\rangle$$ of 52,53Fe are determined relative to stable 56Fe as δ$$\\langle$$r2$$\\rangle$$56,52=$-$0.034(13) fm2 and δ$$\\langle$$r2$$\\rangle$$56,53=$-$0.218(13) fm2, respectively, from the isotope shift of atomic hyperfine structures. The multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method is used to calculate atomic factors to deduce δ$$\\langle$$r2$$\\rangle$$. The values of δ$$\\langle$$r2$$\\rangle$$ exhibit a minimum at the N=28 neutron shell closure. The nuclear density functional theory with Fayans and Skyrme energy density functionals is used to interpret the data. As a result, the trend of δ$$\\langle$$r2$$\\rangle$$ along the Fe isotopic chain results from an interplay between single-particle shell structure, pairing, and polarization effects and provides important data for understanding the intricate trend in the δ$$\\langle$$r2$$\\rangle$$ of closed-shell Ca isotopes« less

  13. Acceleration of protons at 32 Jovian radii in the outer magnetosphere of jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schardt, A. W.; Mcdonald, F. B.; Trainor, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    During the inbound pass of Pioneer 10, a rapid ten-fold increase of the 0.2 to MeV proton flux was observed at 32 Jovian radii (R sub J). The total event lasted for 30 minutes and was made up of a number of superimposed individual events. At the time, the spacecraft was in the outer magnetosphere about 7 R sub J below the magnetic equator. Before and after the event, the proton flux was characteristic of the low flux level normally encountered between crossings of the magnetic equator. Flux changes at different energies were coherent within 1 minute; a time comparable to the time resolution of the data. The angular distributions were highly anisotropic with protons streaming towards Jupiter. A field-aligned dumbbell distribution was observed initially, and a pancake distribution just before the flux decayed to its pre-event value. The alpha particle flux changed as rapidly as the proton flux but peaked at different times. The energetic electron flux behaved differently; it increased gradually throughout the period.

  14. Charge Radii of Neutron Deficient ^{52,53}Fe Produced by Projectile Fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Minamisono, K; Rossi, D M; Beerwerth, R; Fritzsche, S; Garand, D; Klose, A; Liu, Y; Maaß, B; Mantica, P F; Miller, A J; Müller, P; Nazarewicz, W; Nörtershäuser, W; Olsen, E; Pearson, M R; Reinhard, P-G; Saperstein, E E; Sumithrarachchi, C; Tolokonnikov, S V

    2016-12-16

    Bunched-beam collinear laser spectroscopy is performed on neutron deficient ^{52,53}Fe prepared through in-flight separation followed by a gas stopping. This novel scheme is a major step to reach nuclides far from the stability line in laser spectroscopy. Differential mean-square charge radii δ⟨r^{2}⟩ of ^{52,53}Fe are determined relative to stable ^{56}Fe as δ⟨r^{2}⟩^{56,52}=-0.034(13)  fm^{2} and δ⟨r^{2}⟩^{56,53}=-0.218(13)  fm^{2}, respectively, from the isotope shift of atomic hyperfine structures. The multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method is used to calculate atomic factors to deduce δ⟨r^{2}⟩. The values of δ⟨r^{2}⟩ exhibit a minimum at the N=28 neutron shell closure. The nuclear density functional theory with Fayans and Skyrme energy density functionals is used to interpret the data. The trend of δ⟨r^{2}⟩ along the Fe isotopic chain results from an interplay between single-particle shell structure, pairing, and polarization effects and provides important data for understanding the intricate trend in the δ⟨r^{2}⟩ of closed-shell Ca isotopes.

  15. The Masses and Radii of the Eclipsing Binary zeta Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Philip D.; Harper, Graham M.; Brown, Alexander; Hummel, Christian A.

    1996-11-01

    stellar flux plus an interstellar extinction model to the flux-calibrated GHRS data. We find MK = 5.8±0.2 Msun, MB = 4.8±0.2 Msun, RK = 148±3 Rsun, and RB = 4.5±0.3 Rsun for the masses and radii of the ζ Aur stars. We determine the distance to ζ Aur to be 261±3 pc. Additionally, we refine the stellar parameters of the B star secondary presented in the 1995 spectroscopic study of Bennett, Brown, & Linsky. We also determine the effective temperature of the K star primary using values of the bolometric flux, angular diameter, and interstellar extinction derived in this study. The positions of the ζ Aur stars on the theoretical H-R diagram are compared to current evolutionary model tracks, and the resulting good agreement provides a strong check of the internal self-consistency of this analysis and the accuracy of the theoretical models. The ζ Aurigae stars are confirmed to be coeval with an age of 80±15 Myr.

  16. Expected oscillation parameters for red giants from dynamical masses and radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Themeßl, Nathalie; Hekker, Saskia

    2017-09-01

    Stellar masses and radii of stars with stochastic (solar-like) oscillations can be derived using asteroseismic scaling relations. Here, we predict the asteroseismic observables using the dynamical masses and radii from red-giants in eclipsing binary systems. We show that the predicted frequency of maximum oscillation power (νmax) is generally lower than the observed one, while the predicted large frequency separation (Δν) is in most cases larger than the observed value. This shows that both the scaling relations for Δν and νmax used with solar references contribute to the observed differences between dynamical and asteroseismically determined masses and radii.

  17. Interaction radii of proton-rich radioactive nuclei at A=60-80

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, G. F.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Lichtenthaler, R.; Villari, A. C. C.; Mittig, W.; Casandjian, J. M.; Lewitowicz, M.; Chartier, M.; Hirata, D.; Angelique, J. C.; Orr, N. A.; Audi, G.; Cunsolo, A.; Foti, A.; Donzeaud, C.; MacCormick, M.; Stephan, C.; Suomijarvi, T.; Tassan-Got, L.; Gillibert, A.

    1998-12-21

    The interaction radii of proton-rich, radioactive {sub 31}Ga, {sub 32}Ge, {sub 33}As, {sub 34}Se, {sub 35}Br isotopes were measured using the direct method. The secondary beams were produced using a {sup 78}Kr primary beam of 73 MeV/nucleon in conjunction with SISSI and the SPEG spectrometers at GANIL. Most elements show reduced radii which vary with N, with a minimum around N=36-38. The experimental reduced radii are compared to theoretical values obtained from Glauber reaction cross-section calculations based on Relativistic Mean Field (RMF) nuclear densities.

  18. Upper bound on the radii of black-hole photonspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2013-11-01

    One of the most remarkable predictions of the general theory of relativity is the existence of black-hole “photonspheres”, compact null hypersurfaces on which massless particles can orbit the central black hole. We prove that every spherically-symmetric asymptotically flat black-hole spacetime is characterized by a photonsphere whose radius is bounded from above by rγ⩽3M, where M is the total ADM mass of the black-hole spacetime. It is shown that hairy black-hole configurations conform to this upper bound. In particular, the null circular geodesic of the (bald) Schwarzschild black-hole spacetime saturates the bound.

  19. Cathode fall thickness of abnormal glow discharges between parallel-plane electrodes in different radii at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yangyang; Luo, Haiyun; Zou, Xiaobing; Wang, Xinxin

    2015-02-15

    In order to investigate the influence of electrode radius on the characteristics of cathode fall thickness, experiments of low-pressure (20 Pa ≤ p ≤ 30 Pa) abnormal glow discharge were carried out between parallel-plane electrodes in different radii keeping gap distance unchanged. Axial distributions of light intensity were obtained from the discharge images captured using a Charge Coupled Device camera. The assumption that the position of the negative glow peak coincides with the edge of cathode fall layer was verified based on a two-dimensional model, and the cathode fall thicknesses, d{sub c}, were calculated from the axial distributions of light intensity. It was observed that the position of peak emission shifts closer to the cathode as current or pressure grows. The dependence of cathode fall thickness on the gas pressure and normalized current J/p{sup 2} was presented, and it was found that for discharges between electrodes in large radius the curves of pd{sub c} against J/p{sup 2} were superimposed on each other, however, this phenomenon will not hold for discharges between the smaller electrodes. The reason for this phenomenon is that the transverse diffusions of charged particles are not the same in two gaps between electrodes with different radii.

  20. Bluues: a program for the analysis of the electrostatic properties of proteins based on generalized Born radii

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation and its linear approximation have been widely used to describe biomolecular electrostatics. Generalized Born (GB) models offer a convenient computational approximation for the more fundamental approach based on the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, and allows estimation of pairwise contributions to electrostatic effects in the molecular context. Results We have implemented in a single program most common analyses of the electrostatic properties of proteins. The program first computes generalized Born radii, via a surface integral and then it uses generalized Born radii (using a finite radius test particle) to perform electrostic analyses. In particular the ouput of the program entails, depending on user's requirement: 1) the generalized Born radius of each atom; 2) the electrostatic solvation free energy; 3) the electrostatic forces on each atom (currently in a dvelopmental stage); 4) the pH-dependent properties (total charge and pH-dependent free energy of folding in the pH range -2 to 18; 5) the pKa of all ionizable groups; 6) the electrostatic potential at the surface of the molecule; 7) the electrostatic potential in a volume surrounding the molecule; Conclusions Although at the expense of limited flexibility the program provides most common analyses with requirement of a single input file in PQR format. The results obtained are comparable to those obtained using state-of-the-art Poisson-Boltzmann solvers. A Linux executable with example input and output files is provided as supplementary material. PMID:22536964

  1. Observable consequences of event-by-event fluctuations of HBT radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumberg, Christopher; Heinz, Ulrich

    2016-12-01

    We explore the effects of event-by-event fluctuations of Hanbury Brown-Twiss (HBT) radii and show how they can be observed experimentally. The relation of measured HBT radii extracted from ensemble-averaged correlation functions to the mean of their event-by-event probability distribution is clarified. We propose a method to experimentally determine the mean and variance of this distribution and test it on an ensemble of fluctuating events generated with the viscous hydrodynamic code VISH2+1. Using the same code, the sensitivity of the mean and variance of the HBT radii to the specific QGP shear viscosity η / s is studied. We report sensitivity of the mean pion HBT radii and their variances to the temperature dependence of η / s near the quark-hadron transition at a level similar (10-20%) to that which was previously observed for elliptic and quadrangular flow of charged hadrons [1].

  2. Correlations Between Charge Radii, E0 Transitions, and M1 Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Van Isacker, P.

    2014-06-15

    In the framework of the interacting boson model, relations are derived between nuclear charge radii, electric monopole transition rates, and summed magnetic dipole transition in even-even nuclei. The proposed correlations are tested in the rare-earth region.

  3. Radii and Binding Energies in Oxygen Isotopes: A Challenge for Nuclear Forces.

    PubMed

    Lapoux, V; Somà, V; Barbieri, C; Hergert, H; Holt, J D; Stroberg, S R

    2016-07-29

    We present a systematic study of both nuclear radii and binding energies in (even) oxygen isotopes from the valley of stability to the neutron drip line. Both charge and matter radii are compared to state-of-the-art ab initio calculations along with binding energy systematics. Experimental matter radii are obtained through a complete evaluation of the available elastic proton scattering data of oxygen isotopes. We show that, in spite of a good reproduction of binding energies, ab initio calculations with conventional nuclear interactions derived within chiral effective field theory fail to provide a realistic description of charge and matter radii. A novel version of two- and three-nucleon forces leads to considerable improvement of the simultaneous description of the three observables for stable isotopes but shows deficiencies for the most neutron-rich systems. Thus, crucial challenges related to the development of nuclear interactions remain.

  4. Radii, shapes, and topography of the satellites of Uranus from limb coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P. C.

    1988-01-01

    The present use of limb coordinates to ascertain radii, shape and local topographic characteristics for the five large Uranian satellites directly measured satellite ellipsoidal shapes, determining radii with subpixel accuracy. While Umbriel, Titania, and Oberon are spherical, Miranda and Ariel are noted to be ellipsoids whose equatorial bulges agree with previously determined mean densities. Miranda's topography exhibits substantial deformation of cratered terrain and the younger coronae, as well as uplift and complex faulting at coronae margins.

  5. Confined hydrogen atom by the Lagrange-mesh method: energies, mean radii, and dynamic polarizabilities.

    PubMed

    Baye, D; Sen, K D

    2008-08-01

    The Lagrange-mesh method is an approximate variational calculation which resembles a mesh calculation because of the use of a Gauss quadrature. The hydrogen atom confined in a sphere is studied with Lagrange-Legendre basis functions vanishing at the center and surface of the sphere. For various confinement radii, accurate energies and mean radii are obtained with small numbers of mesh points, as well as dynamic dipole polarizabilities. The wave functions satisfy the cusp condition with 11-digit accuracy.

  6. Eccentric ringlet in the maxwell gap at 1.45 saturn radii: multi-instrument voyager observations.

    PubMed

    Esposito, L W; Borderies, N; Goldreich, P; Cuzzi, J N; Holberg, J B; Lane, A L; Pomphrey, R B; Terrile, R J; Lissauer, J J; Marouf, E A; Tyler, G L

    1983-10-07

    The Voyager spacecraft observed a narrow, eccentric ringlet in the Maxwell gap (1.45 Saturn radii) in Saturn's rings. Intercomparison of the Voyager imaging, photopolarimeter, ultraviolet spectrometer, and radio science observations yields results not available from individual observations. The width of the ringlet varies from about 30 to about 100 kilometers, its edges are sharp on a radial scale < 1 kilometer, and its opacity exhibits a double peak near the center. The shape and width of the ringlet are consistent with a set of uniformly precessing, confocal ellipses with foci at Saturn's center of mass. The ringlet precesses as a unit at a rate consistent with the known dynamical oblateness of Saturn; the lack of differential precession across the ringlet yields a ringlet mass of about 5 x 10(18) grams. The ratio of surface mass density to particle cross-sectional area is about five times smaller than values obtained elsewhere in the Saturn ring system, indicating a relatively larger fraction of small particles. Also, comparison of the measured transmission of the ringlet at radio, visible, and ultraviolet wavelengths indicates that about half of the total extinction is due to particles smaller than 1 centimeter in radius, in contrast even with nearby regions of the C ring. However, the color and brightness of the ringlet material are not measurably different from those of nearby C ring particles. We find this ringlet is similar to several of the rings of Uranus.

  7. Magnetospheric ions and electrons in the distant magnetosheath at about 50 and 180 earth radii - ISEE-3 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Zwickl, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    Energetic particle data were obtained in the dawn magnetosheath at about 50 earth radii (ER), analyzed, and compared with data taken at 180 ER. Both data sets were acquired during the ISEE-3 geotail mission. The results of analyses of the 16 sec time profiles of 32 and 130 keV protons, 75-115 keV electrons, and some of the 30-36 keV proton angular distributions (PAD) are presented. No temporal dispersions were detected in the particle bursts, implying instead a spatial dispersion. The particles filled flux tubes of 6 ER, with the energetic electrons being beamed along magnetic field lines. PADs displayed anisotropy symmetric relative to the magnetic field. The electrons were not detected at 180 ER. The phenomena are modeled as flux tubes connected to the magnetotail magnetic field in the near-earth magnetopause. The particles leak out along connected field lines. Lion roars scatter the electrons, which escape into interplanetary space. Ions, however, may carry their intensity out to 200 ER, a factor which awaits verification by further data.

  8. The strongest gravitational lenses. III. The order statistics of the largest Einstein radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waizmann, J.-C.; Redlich, M.; Meneghetti, M.; Bartelmann, M.

    2014-05-01

    Context. The Einstein radius of a gravitational lens is a key characteristic. It encodes information about decisive quantities such as halo mass, concentration, triaxiality, and orientation with respect to the observer. Therefore, the largest Einstein radii can potentially be utilised to test the predictions of the ΛCDM model. Aims: Hitherto, studies have focussed on the single largest observed Einstein radius. We extend those studies by employing order statistics to formulate exclusion criteria based on the n largest Einstein radii and apply these criteria to the strong lensing analysis of 12 MACS clusters at z> 0.5. Methods: We obtain the order statistics of Einstein radii by a Monte Carlo approach, based on the semi-analytic modelling of the halo population on the past lightcone. After sampling the order statistics, we fit a general extreme value distribution to the first-order distribution, which allows us to derive analytic relations for the order statistics of the Einstein radii. Results: We find that the Einstein radii of the 12 MACS clusters are not in conflict with the ΛCDM expectations. Our exclusion criteria indicate that, in order to exhibit tension with the concordance model, one would need to observe approximately twenty Einstein radii with θeff ≳ 30″, ten with θeff ≳ 35″, five with θeff ≳ 42″, or one with θeff ≳ 74″ in the redshift range 0.5 ≤ z ≤ 1.0 on the full sky (assuming a source redshift of zs = 2). Furthermore, we find that, with increasing order, the haloes with the largest Einstein radii are on average less aligned along the line-of-sight and less triaxial. In general, the cumulative distribution functions steepen for higher orders, giving them better constraining power. Conclusions: A framework that allows the individual and joint order distributions of the n-largest Einstein radii to be derived is presented. From a statistical point of view, we do not see any evidence of an Einstein ring problem even for the

  9. Proton radii of neutron-rich B isotopes and neutron surface thickness in 17B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanungo, Rituparna; Estrade, Alfredo; Horiuchi, Wataru

    2014-09-01

    As the neutron to proton asymmetry increases nuclei develop exotic structures such as neutron skin and halo. It is important to investigate how this asymmetry affects the proton distribution. The matter and proton radii have started unfolding a complete picture of the halo. For two-neutron halos the correlation between the halo neutrons and their distance from the core can be derived to define the average halo geometry. The proton radii are crucial information to extract the neutron skin thickness to constrain the equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter. Very limited information is available on the proton radii of very neutron-rich nuclei. In this presentation, we will describe the new technique of extracting proton radii from charge changing cross sections using relativistic beams at GSI, Germany. The presentation will show first measurements of proton radii of the neutron-rich boron isotopes. The implications of the results in understanding the neutron surface thickness in the Borromean 17B and its possible halo structure will be discussed. As the neutron to proton asymmetry increases nuclei develop exotic structures such as neutron skin and halo. It is important to investigate how this asymmetry affects the proton distribution. The matter and proton radii have started unfolding a complete picture of the halo. For two-neutron halos the correlation between the halo neutrons and their distance from the core can be derived to define the average halo geometry. The proton radii are crucial information to extract the neutron skin thickness to constrain the equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter. Very limited information is available on the proton radii of very neutron-rich nuclei. In this presentation, we will describe the new technique of extracting proton radii from charge changing cross sections using relativistic beams at GSI, Germany. The presentation will show first measurements of proton radii of the neutron-rich boron isotopes. The implications

  10. Radii of neutron drops probed via the neutron skin thickness of nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, P. W.; Gandolfi, S.

    2016-10-10

    Multineutron systems are crucial to understanding the physics of neutron-rich nuclei and neutron stars. Neutron drops, neutrons confined in an external field, are investigated systematically in both nonrelativistic and relativistic density functional theories and with ab initio calculations. Here, we demonstrate a new strong linear correlation, which is universal in the realm of mean-field models, between the rms radii of neutron drops and the neutron skin thickness of 208 Pb and 48 Ca , i.e., the difference between the neutron and proton rms radii of a nucleus. This correlation can be used to deduce the radii of neutron drops frommore » the measured neutron skin thickness in a model-independent way, and the radii obtained for neutron drops can provide a useful constraint for realistic three-neutron forces, due to its high quality. Furthermore, we present a new correlation between the slope L of the symmetry energy and the radii of neutron drops, and provide the first validation of such a correlation by using density-functional models and ab initio calculations. These newly established correlations, together with more precise measurements of the neutron skin thicknesses of 208 Pb and 48 Ca and/or accurate determinations of L , will have an enduring impact on the understanding of multineutron interactions, neutron-rich nuclei, neutron stars, etc.« less

  11. Radii of neutron drops probed via the neutron skin thickness of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, P. W.; Gandolfi, S.

    2016-10-10

    Multineutron systems are crucial to understanding the physics of neutron-rich nuclei and neutron stars. Neutron drops, neutrons confined in an external field, are investigated systematically in both nonrelativistic and relativistic density functional theories and with ab initio calculations. Here, we demonstrate a new strong linear correlation, which is universal in the realm of mean-field models, between the rms radii of neutron drops and the neutron skin thickness of 208 Pb and 48 Ca , i.e., the difference between the neutron and proton rms radii of a nucleus. This correlation can be used to deduce the radii of neutron drops from the measured neutron skin thickness in a model-independent way, and the radii obtained for neutron drops can provide a useful constraint for realistic three-neutron forces, due to its high quality. Furthermore, we present a new correlation between the slope L of the symmetry energy and the radii of neutron drops, and provide the first validation of such a correlation by using density-functional models and ab initio calculations. These newly established correlations, together with more precise measurements of the neutron skin thicknesses of 208 Pb and 48 Ca and/or accurate determinations of L , will have an enduring impact on the understanding of multineutron interactions, neutron-rich nuclei, neutron stars, etc.

  12. Structural and isospin effects on balance energy and transition energy via different nuclear charge radii parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangeeta; Kaur, Varinderjit

    2017-10-01

    The structural and isospin effects have been studied through isospin dependent and independent nuclear charge radii parameterizations on the collective flow within the framework of Isospin-dependent Quantum Molecular Dynamics (IQMD) model. The calculations have been carried out by using two approaches: (i) for the reaction series having fixed N / Z ratio and (ii) for the isobaric reaction series with different N / Z ratio. Our results indicate that there is a considerable effect of radii parameterizations on the excitation function of reduced flow (∂v1/∂Yred) and elliptical flow (v2). Both balance energy (Ebal) and transition energy (Etrans) are enhanced with increase in radii of reacting nuclei and found to follow a power law with nuclear charge radii. The exponent τ values show that the elliptical flow is more sensitive towards different nuclear charge radii as compared to reduced flow. Moreover, we observe that our theoretical calculation of Ebal and Etrans are in agreement with the experimental data provided by GSI, INDRA and FOPI collaborations.

  13. Role of different nuclear charge radii parameterizations on the thermal equilibrium in nuclear reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangeeta; Kaur, Varinderjit

    2017-09-01

    We emphasize the role of nuclear charge radii parameterizations on the thermal equilibrium by studying the correlation between maximal value of average temperature achieved in highly interacting nuclear matter and nuclear stopping for mass symmetric and asymmetric reactions over the entire collision geometry within the framework of isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (IQMD) model. Our study reveals that the increase in available phase space at initial stage through different nuclear charge radii parameterizations, enhance the temperature of nuclear system and reduces the nuclear stopping for both types of reactions. The influence of nuclear charge radii on the thermalization is more pronounced for mass symmetric reactions compared to mass asymmetric reactions. Moreover, the lighter colliding pair are good probe to study the role of nuclear radius in thermalization.

  14. Gray and multigroup radiation transport through 3D binary stochastic media with different sphere radii distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Olson, Gordon Lee

    2016-12-06

    Here, gray and multigroup radiation is transported through 3D media consisting of spheres randomly placed in a uniform background. Comparisons are made between using constant radii spheres and three different distributions of sphere radii. Because of the computational cost of 3D calculations, only the lowest angle order, n=1, is tested. If the mean chord length is held constant, using different radii distributions makes little difference. This is true for both gray and multigroup solutions. 3D transport solutions are compared to 2D and 1D solutions with the same mean chord lengths. 2D disk and 3D sphere media give solutions that aremore » nearly identical while 1D slab solutions are fundamentally different.« less

  15. Gray and multigroup radiation transport through 3D binary stochastic media with different sphere radii distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Gordon Lee

    2016-12-06

    Here, gray and multigroup radiation is transported through 3D media consisting of spheres randomly placed in a uniform background. Comparisons are made between using constant radii spheres and three different distributions of sphere radii. Because of the computational cost of 3D calculations, only the lowest angle order, n=1, is tested. If the mean chord length is held constant, using different radii distributions makes little difference. This is true for both gray and multigroup solutions. 3D transport solutions are compared to 2D and 1D solutions with the same mean chord lengths. 2D disk and 3D sphere media give solutions that are nearly identical while 1D slab solutions are fundamentally different.

  16. Interaction radii of proton-rich radioactive nuclei at A=60{endash}80

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, G.F.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Villari, A.C.; Lichtenthaler, R.; Villari, A.C.; Mittig, W.; Chartier, M.; Casandjian, J.M.; Lewitowicz, M.; Ostrowski, A.N.; Hirata, D.; Angelique, J.C.; Orr, N.A.; Audi, G.; Cunsolo, A.; Foti, A.; Donzeaud, C.; MacCormick, M.; Stephan, C.; Suomijarvi, T.; Tassan-Got, L.; Gillibert, A.; Chartier, M.; Morrissey, D.J.; Sherrill, B.M.; Ostrowski, A.N.; Vieira, D.J.; Wouters, J.M.

    1998-12-01

    The interaction radii of proton-rich, radioactive {sub 31}Ga,thinsp{sub 32}Ge,thinsp{sub 33}As,thinsp{sub 34}Se,thinsp{sub 35}Br isotopes were measured using the direct method. The secondary beams were produced using a {sup 78}Kr primary beam of 73 MeV/nucleon in conjunction with SISSI and the SPEG spectrometers at GANIL. Most elements show reduced radii which vary with N, with a minimum around N=36{endash}38. The experimental reduced radii are compared to theoretical values obtained from Glauber reaction cross-section calculations based on Relativistic Mean Field (RMF) nuclear densities. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Gray and multigroup radiation transport through 3D binary stochastic media with different sphere radii distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Gordon L.

    2017-03-01

    Gray and multigroup radiation is transported through 3D media consisting of spheres randomly placed in a uniform background. Comparisons are made between using constant radii spheres and three different distributions of sphere radii. Because of the computational cost of 3D calculations, only the lowest angle order, n=1, is tested. If the mean chord length is held constant, using different radii distributions makes little difference. This is true for both gray and multigroup solutions. 3D transport solutions are compared to 2D and 1D solutions with the same mean chord lengths. 2D disk and 3D sphere media give solutions that are nearly identical while 1D slab solutions are fundamentally different.

  18. A new determination of radii and limb parameters for Pluto and Charon from mutual event lightcurves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Eliot F.; Binzel, Richard P.

    1994-01-01

    Over the past several years Pluto-Charon mutual events have yielded progressively more accurate estimates of Charon's orbital elements and the radii of Pluto and Charon (e.g., Buie, Tholen, and Horne, 1992). Analysis of the 1988 stellar occultation by Pluto indicates a radius for Pluto that is about 4%, or 50 km, larger than the mutual event radius of 1151 km. One possible explanation for the discrepancy is that the mutual event modeling treats Pluto and Charon as uniformly bright disks. If they are limb-darkened, the mutual event fits could underestimate their radii. In this paper we use an independent mutual event data set (Young and Binzel, 1992) to fit for Pluto and Charon's radii in a manner independent of either object's limb profile or albedo distribution. Our least-squares solution indicates that Pluto's radius is 1164 +/- 22.9 km and Charon's radius is 621 +/- 20.6 km.

  19. A new determination of radii and limb parameters for Pluto and Charon from mutual event lightcurves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Eliot F.; Binzel, Richard P.

    1994-01-01

    Over the past several years Pluto-Charon mutual events have yielded progressively more accurate estimates of Charon's orbital elements and the radii of Pluto and Charon (e.g., Buie, Tholen, and Horne, 1992). Analysis of the 1988 stellar occultation by Pluto indicates a radius for Pluto that is about 4%, or 50 km, larger than the mutual event radius of 1151 km. One possible explanation for the discrepancy is that the mutual event modeling treats Pluto and Charon as uniformly bright disks. If they are limb-darkened, the mutual event fits could underestimate their radii. In this paper we use an independent mutual event data set (Young and Binzel, 1992) to fit for Pluto and Charon's radii in a manner independent of either object's limb profile or albedo distribution. Our least-squares solution indicates that Pluto's radius is 1164 +/- 22.9 km and Charon's radius is 621 +/- 20.6 km.

  20. EFFECT OF UNCERTAINTIES IN STELLAR MODEL PARAMETERS ON ESTIMATED MASSES AND RADII OF SINGLE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Sarbani; Verner, Graham A.; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne E-mail: gav@bison.ph.bham.ac.uk E-mail: y.p.elsworth@bham.ac.uk

    2012-02-10

    Accurate and precise values of radii and masses of stars are needed to correctly estimate properties of extrasolar planets. We examine the effect of uncertainties in stellar model parameters on estimates of the masses, radii, and average densities of solar-type stars. We find that in the absence of seismic data on solar-like oscillations, stellar masses can be determined to a greater accuracy than either stellar radii or densities; but to get reasonably accurate results the effective temperature, log g, and metallicity must be measured to high precision. When seismic data are available, stellar density is the most well-determined property, followed by radius, with mass the least well-determined property. Uncertainties in stellar convection, quantified in terms of uncertainties in the value of the mixing length parameter, cause the most significant errors in the estimates of stellar properties.

  1. Energy losses in thermally cycled optical fibers constrained in small bend radii

    SciTech Connect

    Guild, Eric; Morelli, Gregg

    2012-09-23

    High energy laser pulses were fired into a 365μm diameter fiber optic cable constrained in small radii of curvature bends, resulting in a catastrophic failure. Q-switched laser pulses from a flashlamp pumped, Nd:YAG laser were injected into the cables, and the spatial intensity profile at the exit face of the fiber was observed using an infrared camera. The transmission of the radiation through the tight radii resulted in an asymmetric intensity profile with one half of the fiber core having a higher peak-to-average energy distribution. Prior to testing, the cables were thermally conditioned while constrained in the small radii of curvature bends. Single-bend, double-bend, and U-shaped eometries were tested to characterize various cable routing scenarios.

  2. Series-coupled double-ring resonators with asymmetric radii for use in channelizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xiaowen; Zhu, Dan; Zhao, Yongjiu; Pan, Shilong

    2014-10-01

    A series-coupled double-ring resonator with asymmetric radii is analyzed to achieve a filter response with a large free spectral range (FSR), a narrow passband of tens of MHz and a small shape factor simultaneously for use in microwave photonic channelizer. By introducing difference to the two radii, based on the vernier effect, the FSR of the resonator filter can be extended while maintaining the narrow passband and the small shape factor. A filter response with a FSR of 29.444 GHz, a 3-dB bandwidth of 96 MHz and a shape factor of 3.17 is realized by numerical analysis.

  3. Proton Distribution Radii of 12-19C Illuminate Features of Neutron Halos

    SciTech Connect

    Kanungo, R.; Horiuchi, W.; Hagen, Gaute; Jansen, Gustav R.; Navratil, Petr; Ameil, F.; Atkinson, J.; Ayyad, Y.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Dillmann, I.; Estradé, A.; Evdokimov, A.; Farinon, F.; Geissel, H.; Guastalla, G.; Janik, R.; Kimura, M.; Knöbel, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Marta, M.; Mostazo, M.; Mukha, I.; Nociforo, C.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Sitar, B.; Strmen, P.; Suzuki, Y.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, J.; Tanihata, I.; Terashima, S.; Vargas, J.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.

    2016-09-02

    We report proton radii of 12-19C densities derived from first accurate charge changing cross section measurements at 900A MeV with a carbon target. A thick neutron surface evolves from ~0.5 fm in 15C to ~1 fm in 19C. Also, the halo radius in 19C is found to be 6.4±0.7 fm as large as 11Li. Ab initio calculations based on chiral nucleon-nucleon and three-nucleon forces reproduce the radii well.

  4. On the Radii of Brown Dwarfs Measured with AKARI Near-infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorahana, S.; Yamamura, I.; Murakami, H.

    2013-04-01

    We derive the radii of 16 brown dwarfs observed by AKARI using their parallaxes and the ratios of observed to model fluxes. We find that the brown dwarf radius ranges between 0.64-1.13 RJ with an average radius of 0.83 RJ . We find a trend in the relation between radii and T eff; the radius is at a minimum at T eff ~ 1600 K, which corresponds to the spectral types of mid- to late-L. The result is interpreted by a combination of radius-mass and radius-age relations that are theoretically expected for brown dwarfs older than 108 yr.

  5. Proton Distribution Radii of ^{12-19}C Illuminate Features of Neutron Halos.

    PubMed

    Kanungo, R; Horiuchi, W; Hagen, G; Jansen, G R; Navratil, P; Ameil, F; Atkinson, J; Ayyad, Y; Cortina-Gil, D; Dillmann, I; Estradé, A; Evdokimov, A; Farinon, F; Geissel, H; Guastalla, G; Janik, R; Kimura, M; Knöbel, R; Kurcewicz, J; Litvinov, Yu A; Marta, M; Mostazo, M; Mukha, I; Nociforo, C; Ong, H J; Pietri, S; Prochazka, A; Scheidenberger, C; Sitar, B; Strmen, P; Suzuki, Y; Takechi, M; Tanaka, J; Tanihata, I; Terashima, S; Vargas, J; Weick, H; Winfield, J S

    2016-09-02

    Proton radii of ^{12-19}C densities derived from first accurate charge changing cross section measurements at 900A  MeV with a carbon target are reported. A thick neutron surface evolves from ∼0.5  fm in ^{15}C to ∼1  fm in ^{19}C. The halo radius in ^{19}C is found to be 6.4±0.7  fm as large as ^{11}Li. Ab initio calculations based on chiral nucleon-nucleon and three-nucleon forces reproduce the radii well.

  6. Neutrino Intensity Interferometry: Measuring Protoneutron Star Radii During Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Warren P.; Kneller, James P.

    2017-08-01

    Intensity interferometry is a technique that has been used to measure the size of sources ranging from the quark-gluon plasma formed in heavy ion collisions to the radii of stars. We investigate using the same technique to measure protoneutron star (PNS) radii with the neutrino signal received from a core-collapse supernovae. Using a full wave-packet analysis, including the neutrino mass for the first time, we derive criteria where the effect can be expected to provide the desired signal, and find that neutrinos from the next Galactic supernova should contain extractable PNS radius information.

  7. Nuclear moments and charge radii of neutron-deficient francium isotopes and isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, A.; Buchinger, F.; Cheal, B.; Crawford, J. E.; Dilling, J.; Kortelainen, M.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Leary, A.; Levy, C. D. P.; Mooshammer, F.; Ojeda, M. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Procter, T. J.; Tamimi, W. Al

    2015-04-01

    Collinear laser fluorescence spectroscopy has been performed on the ground and isomeric states of Fr,206204 in order to determine their spins, nuclear moments, and changes in mean-squared charge radii. A new experimental technique has been developed as part of this work which much enhances the data collection rate while maintaining the high resolution. This has permitted the extension of this study to the two isomeric states in each nucleus. The investigation of nuclear g factors and mean-squared charge radii indicates that the neutron-deficient Fr isotopes lie in a transitional region from spherical towards more collective structures.

  8. Proton Distribution Radii of 12-19C Illuminate Features of Neutron Halos

    SciTech Connect

    Kanungo, R.; Horiuchi, W.; Hagen, Gaute; Jansen, Gustav R.; Navratil, Petr; Ameil, F.; Atkinson, J.; Ayyad, Y.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Dillmann, I.; Estradé, A.; Evdokimov, A.; Farinon, F.; Geissel, H.; Guastalla, G.; Janik, R.; Kimura, M.; Knöbel, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Marta, M.; Mostazo, M.; Mukha, I.; Nociforo, C.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Sitar, B.; Strmen, P.; Suzuki, Y.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, J.; Tanihata, I.; Terashima, S.; Vargas, J.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.

    2016-09-02

    We report proton radii of 12-19C densities derived from first accurate charge changing cross section measurements at 900A MeV with a carbon target. A thick neutron surface evolves from ~0.5 fm in 15C to ~1 fm in 19C. Also, the halo radius in 19C is found to be 6.4±0.7 fm as large as 11Li. Ab initio calculations based on chiral nucleon-nucleon and three-nucleon forces reproduce the radii well.

  9. Proton Distribution Radii of 12-19C Illuminate Features of Neutron Halos

    DOE PAGES

    Kanungo, R.; Horiuchi, W.; Hagen, Gaute; ...

    2016-09-02

    We report proton radii of 12-19C densities derived from first accurate charge changing cross section measurements at 900A MeV with a carbon target. A thick neutron surface evolves from ~0.5 fm in 15C to ~1 fm in 19C. Also, the halo radius in 19C is found to be 6.4±0.7 fm as large as 11Li. Ab initio calculations based on chiral nucleon-nucleon and three-nucleon forces reproduce the radii well.

  10. Enormous yield of photoelectrons from small particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Ott, A.; Schurtenberger, P.; Siegmann, H. C.

    1980-10-01

    The paper reports a large enhancement of the yield of photoelectrons per incident photon if ultrafine particles with radii not greater than 50 A are chosen as photoemitters. The results are obtained with Ag and WO3 by the use of an ac bridge technique making it possible to study very small particles suspended in gases.

  11. Importance of realistic ice crystal radii for charge generation according to the Relative Diffusional Growth Rate theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Laura; Glassmeier, Franziska; Dietlicher, Remo; Paukert, Marco; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2017-04-01

    Collisional charge transfer between graupel and ice crystals in the presence of liquid water droplets is considered the dominant mechanism for charge generation in thunderclouds. The physical process of charge transfer and the sign of net charge generated on graupel and ice crystals under different cloud conditions are not yet understood. The Relative Diffusional Growth Rate (RDGR) theory suggests that the particle with the faster diffusional radius growth is charged positively. In this work, we calculate signs of charge according to the RDGR theory based on realistic parameter combinations that are generated by simulations of idealized thunderclouds with warm and cold two-moment cloud microphysics. Our analysis identifies the ice crystal radius as the most important parameter for the RDGR sign-of-charge calculations. In the simulated cloud, the average ice crystal size varies with altitude due to ice multiplication and the heterogeneous freezing of droplets and thus is correlated with temperature and liquid water content. As a consequence, missing or unrealistic variability of crystal radius with cloud temperature and effective water content in laboratory studies may limit the applicability of experimental results to thunderstorms. Due to the strong crystal-size sensitivity of the RDGR theory, we furthermore observe that the diffusional growth from the riming-related local vapor field as a key component of the RDGR theory is less important than variations of crystal size. Cloud microphysical processes and ice crystal radii vary with the abundance of ice-forming aerosol. Based on simulated profiles of crystal radii for different concentrations of ice-forming aerosol, we study aerosol effects on charge generation and discuss possible implications of cloud microphysics and aerosols for the charge structure in thunderclouds.

  12. ISEE 3 observations during a plasma sheet encounter at 140 earth radii - Evidence for enhancement of reconnection at the distant neutral line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Terasawa, T.; Baker, D. N.; Zwickl, R. D.; Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1986-01-01

    A plasma sheet encounter of the ISEE-3 spacecraft in the distant tail at 140 earth radii on March 20, 1983 is studied using magnetic field, energetic particle, and plasma electron data sets. The H-component magnetograms from auroral magnetometer stations, intensity-time profiles, high resolution magnetic field measurements, and electron and proton angular distributions are analyzed. The dynamics of the plasma sheet displayed by the strong tailward and earthward directed ion beams, large northward and southward magnetic fields excursions, and short tailward and earthward plasma flows are described.

  13. Responses of articular and epiphyseal cartilage zones of developing avian radii to estrone treatment and a 2-G environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negulesco, J. A.; Kossler, T.

    1978-01-01

    Histological measurements of radii from chickens exposed to estrone and hypergravity are reported. Female chicks at two weeks post-hatch were maintained for two weeks at earth gravity or 2 G with daily injections of 0.2 or 0.4 mg estrone. Animals were sacrificed after the last injection, and the radii were processed by described histological techniques. The results suggest that proximal and distal epiphyses of developing radii show different morphological responses to estrone and hypergravity.

  14. Responses of articular and epiphyseal cartilage zones of developing avian radii to estrone treatment and a 2-G environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negulesco, J. A.; Kossler, T.

    1978-01-01

    Histological measurements of radii from chickens exposed to estrone and hypergravity are reported. Female chicks at two weeks post-hatch were maintained for two weeks at earth gravity or 2 G with daily injections of 0.2 or 0.4 mg estrone. Animals were sacrificed after the last injection, and the radii were processed by described histological techniques. The results suggest that proximal and distal epiphyses of developing radii show different morphological responses to estrone and hypergravity.

  15. Determination of mechanical properties of excised dog radii from lateral vibration experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, G. A.; Anliker, M.; Young, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental data which can be used as a guideline in developing a mathematical model for lateral vibrations of whole bone are reported. The study used wet and dry dog radii mounted in a cantilever configuration. Data are also given on the mechanical, geometric, and viscoelastic properties of bones.

  16. Relations among Five Radii of Circles in a Triangle, Its Sides and Other Segments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigler, Avi; Stupel, Moshe; Flores, Alfinio

    2017-01-01

    Students use GeoGebra to explore the mathematical relations among different radii of circles in a triangle (circumcircle, incircle, excircles) and the sides and other segments in the triangle. The more formal mathematical development of the relations that follows the explorations is based on known geometrical properties, different formulas…

  17. Effect of deformation and the neutron skin on RMS charge radii

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W.D.; Schmidt, K.H.

    1981-05-01

    Droplet Model predictions for nuclear RMS charge radii are compared with measured values in order to determine whether or not there is any evidence for volume shell effects. After corrections for deformation, diffuseness, and the central depression have been applied, some evidence for such effects remains, but it is at about the same level as the experimental uncertainty.

  18. Investigation of Possible Electromagnetic Disturbances caused by Spacecraft-Plasma Interactions at 4 Radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okada, M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Goldstein, G. E.; Matsumoto, H.; Brinca, A. L.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1995-01-01

    The proposed Small Solar Probe mission features a close approach to the sun with a perihelion of 4 radii. Carbon molecules emitted from the spacecraft's heat shield will become ionized by electron impact and photoionization. The newly created ions and electrons may generate electromagnetic and electrostatic plasma waves which are possible sources of interference with in-situ plasma measurements.

  19. The magnetic field of the equatorial magnetotail from 10 to 40 earth radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    A statistical study of IMP 6, 7, and 8 magnetotail magnetic field measurements near the equatorial plane reveals new information about various aspects of magnetospheric structure. More magnetic flux crosses the equatorial plane on the dawn and dusk flanks of the tail than near midnight, but no evidence is found for a dependence on the interplanetary magnetic field sector polarity. Field magnitudes within 3 earth radii of the equatorial plane near dawn are more than twice as large as those near dusk for Xsm = -20 to -10 earth radii. The frequency of occurrence of southward fields is greatest near midnight, and such fields are seen almost twice as often for Xsm = -20 to -10 earth radii as for Xsm beyond -20 earth radii. This latter result supports the idea that the midnight region of the tail between 10 and 20 is a special location where neutral lines are particularly apt to form. Such a neutral line will approach nearest the earth in the midnight and premidnight region, where substorms are thought to have their onset.

  20. The stellar accretion origin of stellar population gradients in massive galaxies at large radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, Michaela; Naab, Thorsten; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Davé, Romeel; Oser, Ludwig; Karabal, Emin

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the evolution of stellar population gradients from z = 2 to 0 in massive galaxies at large radii (r > 2Reff) using 10 cosmological zoom simulations of haloes with 6 × 1012 M⊙ < Mhalo < 2 × 1013 M⊙. The simulations follow metal cooling and enrichment from SNII, SNIa and asymptotic giant branch winds. We explore the differential impact of an empirical model for galactic winds that reproduces the mass-metallicity relation and its evolution with redshift. At larger radii the galaxies, for both models, become more dominated by stars accreted from satellite galaxies in major and minor mergers. In the wind model, fewer stars are accreted, but they are significantly more metal-poor resulting in steep global metallicity (<∇Zstars> = -0.35 dex dex-1) and colour (e.g. <∇g - r> = -0.13 dex dex-1) gradients in agreement with observations. In contrast, colour and metallicity gradients of the models without winds are inconsistent with observations. Age gradients are in general mildly positive at z = 0 (<∇Agestars> = 0.04 dex dex-1) with significant differences between the models at higher redshift. We demonstrate that for the wind model, stellar accretion is steepening existing in situ metallicity gradients by about 0.2 dex by the present day and helps to match observed gradients of massive early-type galaxies at large radii. Colour and metallicity gradients are significantly steeper for systems which have accreted stars in minor mergers, while galaxies with major mergers have relatively flat gradients, confirming previous results. The effect of stellar migration of in situ formed stars to large radii is discussed. This study highlights the importance of stellar accretion for stellar population properties of massive galaxies at large radii, which can provide important constraints for formation models.

  1. THE DEPENDENCE OF BROWN DWARF RADII ON ATMOSPHERIC METALLICITY AND CLOUDS: THEORY AND COMPARISON WITH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, Adam; Nampaisarn, Thane; Heng, Kevin E-mail: tnampais@astro.princeton.edu

    2011-07-20

    Employing realistic and consistent atmosphere boundary conditions, we have generated evolutionary models for brown dwarfs and very low mass stars (VLMs) for different atmospheric metallicities ([Fe/H]), with and without clouds. We find that the spread in radius at a given mass and age can be as large as {approx}10% to {approx}25%, with higher-metallicity, higher-cloud-thickness atmospheres resulting quite naturally in larger radii. For each 0.1 dex increase in [Fe/H], radii increase by {approx}1% to {approx}2.5%, depending upon the age and mass. We also find that, while for smaller masses and older ages brown dwarf radii decrease with increasing helium fraction (Y, as expected), for more massive brown dwarfs and a wide range of ages they increase with helium fraction. The increase in radius in going from Y = 0.25 to Y = 0.28 can be as large as {approx}0.025 R{sub J} ({approx}2.5%). Furthermore, we find that for VLMs an increase in atmospheric metallicity from 0.0 to 0.5 dex, increases radii by {approx}4%, and from -0.5 to 0.5 dex by {approx}10%. Therefore, we suggest that opacity due to higher metallicity might naturally account for the apparent radius anomalies in some eclipsing VLM systems. Ten to twenty-five percent variations in radius exceed errors stemming from uncertainties in the equation of state alone. This serves to emphasize that transit and eclipse measurements of brown dwarf radii constrain numerous effects collectively, importantly including the atmosphere and condensate cloud models, and not just the equation of state. At all times, one is testing a multi-parameter theory, and not a universal radius-mass relation.

  2. Effective Radii of Young, Massive Star Clusters in Two LEGUS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryon, J. E.; Gallagher, J. S.; Smith, L. J.; Adamo, A.; Calzetti, D.; Bright, S. N.; Cignoni, M.; Cook, D. O.; Dale, D. A.; Elmegreen, B. E.; Fumagalli, M.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Grasha, K.; Grebel, E. K.; Kim, H.; Messa, M.; Thilker, D.; Ubeda, L.

    2017-06-01

    We present a study of the effective (half-light) radii and other structural properties of a systematically selected sample of young, massive star clusters (≥5 × 103 {M}⊙ and ≤200 Myr) in two nearby spiral galaxies, NGC 628 and NGC 1313. We use Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFC3/UVIS and archival ACS/WFC data obtained by the Legacy Extragalactic UV Survey (LEGUS), an HST Treasury Program. We measure effective radii with GALFIT, a two-dimensional image-fitting package, and with a new technique to estimate effective radii from the concentration index of observed clusters. The distribution of effective radii from both techniques spans ˜0.5-10 pc and peaks at 2-3 pc for both galaxies. We find slight positive correlations between effective radius and cluster age in both galaxies, but no significant relationship between effective radius and galactocentric distance. Clusters in NGC 1313 display a mild increase in effective radius with cluster mass, but the trend disappears when the sample is divided into age bins. We show that the vast majority of the clusters in both galaxies are much older than their dynamical times, suggesting they are gravitationally bound objects. We find that about half of the clusters in NGC 628 are underfilling their Roche lobes, based on their Jacobi radii. Our results suggest that the young, massive clusters in NGC 628 and NGC 1313 are expanding, due to stellar mass loss or two-body relaxation, and are not significantly influenced by the tidal fields of their host galaxies. Based on observations obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program #13364.

  3. Absolute masses and radii determination in multiplanetary systems without stellar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almenara, J. M.; Díaz, R. F.; Mardling, R.; Barros, S. C. C.; Damiani, C.; Bruno, G.; Bonfils, X.; Deleuil, M.

    2015-11-01

    The masses and radii of extrasolar planets are key observables for understanding their interior, formation and evolution. While transit photometry and Doppler spectroscopy are used to measure the radii and masses respectively of planets relative to those of their host star, estimates for the true values of these quantities rely on theoretical models of the host star which are known to suffer from systematic differences with observations. When a system is composed of more than two bodies, extra information is contained in the transit photometry and radial velocity data. Velocity information (finite speed-of-light, Doppler) is needed to break the Newtonian MR-3 degeneracy. We performed a photodynamical modelling of the two-planet transiting system Kepler-117 using all photometric and spectroscopic data available. We demonstrate how absolute masses and radii of single-star planetary systems can be obtained without resorting to stellar models. Limited by the precision of available radial velocities (38 m s-1), we achieve accuracies of 20 per cent in the radii and 70 per cent in the masses, while simulated 1 m s-1 precision radial velocities lower these to 1 per cent for the radii and 2 per cent for the masses. Since transiting multiplanet systems are common, this technique can be used to measure precisely the mass and radius of a large sample of stars and planets. We anticipate these measurements will become common when the TESS and PLATO mission provide high-precision light curves of a large sample of bright stars. These determinations will improve our knowledge about stars and planets, and provide strong constraints on theoretical models.

  4. Ground-state energies and charge radii of medium-mass nuclei in the unitary-model-operator approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagi, Takayuki; Abe, Takashi; Okamoto, Ryoji; Otsuka, Takaharu

    2014-09-01

    In nuclear structure theory, one of the most fundamental problems is to understand the nuclear structure based on nuclear forces. This attempt has been enabled due to the progress of the computational power and nuclear many-body approaches. However, it is difficult to apply the first-principle methods to medium-mass region, because calculations demand the huge model space as increasing the number of nucleons. The unitary-model-operator approach (UMOA) is one of the methods which can be applied to medium-mass nuclei. The essential point of the UMOA is to construct the effective Hamiltonian which does not induce the two-particle-two-hole excitations. A many-body problem is reduced to the two-body subsystem problem in an entire many-body system with the two-body effective interaction and one-body potential determined self-consistently. In this presentation, we will report the numerical results of ground-state energies and charge radii of 16O, 40Ca, and 56Ni in the UMOA, and discuss the saturation property by comparing our results with those in the other many-body methods and also experimental data. In nuclear structure theory, one of the most fundamental problems is to understand the nuclear structure based on nuclear forces. This attempt has been enabled due to the progress of the computational power and nuclear many-body approaches. However, it is difficult to apply the first-principle methods to medium-mass region, because calculations demand the huge model space as increasing the number of nucleons. The unitary-model-operator approach (UMOA) is one of the methods which can be applied to medium-mass nuclei. The essential point of the UMOA is to construct the effective Hamiltonian which does not induce the two-particle-two-hole excitations. A many-body problem is reduced to the two-body subsystem problem in an entire many-body system with the two-body effective interaction and one-body potential determined self-consistently. In this presentation, we will report the

  5. Charge radii and nuclear moments of neutron-deficient potassium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamisono, K.; Barquest, B. R.; Bollen, G.; Hughes, M.; Strum, R.; Tarazona, D.; Asberry, H. B.; Cooper, K.; Hammerton, K.; Klose, A.; Mantica, P. F.; Morrissey, D. J.; Geppert, Ch.; Harris, J.; Ringle, R.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Rossi, D. M.; Ryder, C. A.; Smith, A.; Schwarz, S.; Sumithrarachchi, C.

    2014-09-01

    The monotonic change of charge radii of K isotopes across N = 20 suggests a reduction of the shell gap. A systematic study of the charge radii and ground state magnetic and quadrupole moments of neutron-deficient 35-37K isotopes is underway at the BEam COoling and LAser spectroscopy (BECOLA) facility at NSCL/MSU to investigate the anomalous trend in charge radii. The K isotopes were produced by fragmentation of a 40Ca beam, thermalized in a linear gas cell, extracted at an energy of 30 keV, and transported to BECOLA. The K ion beam was cooled and bunched, and neutralized in a Na vapor cell. Laser-induced fluorescence was detected as a function of the Doppler-tuned laser frequency and time relative to the release of the beam bunch. The beta-NMR technique was used to determine ground-state nuclear moments, where hyperfine splittings are too small to resolve using collinear laser spectroscopy. The monotonic change of charge radii of K isotopes across N = 20 suggests a reduction of the shell gap. A systematic study of the charge radii and ground state magnetic and quadrupole moments of neutron-deficient 35-37K isotopes is underway at the BEam COoling and LAser spectroscopy (BECOLA) facility at NSCL/MSU to investigate the anomalous trend in charge radii. The K isotopes were produced by fragmentation of a 40Ca beam, thermalized in a linear gas cell, extracted at an energy of 30 keV, and transported to BECOLA. The K ion beam was cooled and bunched, and neutralized in a Na vapor cell. Laser-induced fluorescence was detected as a function of the Doppler-tuned laser frequency and time relative to the release of the beam bunch. The beta-NMR technique was used to determine ground-state nuclear moments, where hyperfine splittings are too small to resolve using collinear laser spectroscopy. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant No. PHY-11-02511.

  6. Interferometric determination of the topographies of absolute sphere radii using the sphere interferometer of PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartl, Guido; Krystek, Michael; Nicolaus, Arnold; Giardini, Walter

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents a method to reconstruct the absolute shape of a sphere—i.e. a topography of radii—using the sphere interferometer of PTB in combination with a stitching approach. The method allows for the reconstruction of absolute radii instead of the relative shape deviations which result from conventional sphericity measurements. The sphere interferometer was developed for the volume determination of spherical material measures—in particular the spheres of the Avogadro project—by precise diameter measurements with an uncertainty of 1 nm or less. In the scope of the present work a procedure has been implemented that extends the applicability of the interferometer to fields where not the volume or diameter but the direction-dependent radii are of interest. The results of the reconstruction were compared quantitatively to the independent results of sphericity measurements from CSIRO.

  7. Nuclear radii calculations in various theoretical approaches for nucleus-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Merino, C.; Novikov, I. S.; Shabelski, Yu.

    2009-12-15

    The information about sizes and nuclear density distributions in unstable (radioactive) nuclei is usually extracted from the data on interaction of radioactive nuclear beams with a nuclear target. We show that in the case of nucleus-nucleus collisions the values of the parameters depend somewhat strongly on the considered theoretical approach and on the assumption about the parametrization of the nuclear density distribution. The obtained values of root-mean-square radii (R{sub rms}) for stable nuclei with atomic weights A=12-40 vary by approximately 0.1 fm when calculated in the optical approximation, in the rigid target approximation, and using the exact expression of the Glauber theory. We present several examples of R{sub rms} radii calculations using these three theoretical approaches and compare these results with the data obtained from electron-nucleus scattering.

  8. ON THE RADII OF BROWN DWARFS MEASURED WITH AKARI NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Sorahana, S.; Yamamura, I.; Murakami, H.

    2013-04-10

    We derive the radii of 16 brown dwarfs observed by AKARI using their parallaxes and the ratios of observed to model fluxes. We find that the brown dwarf radius ranges between 0.64-1.13 R{sub J} with an average radius of 0.83 R{sub J} . We find a trend in the relation between radii and T{sub eff}; the radius is at a minimum at T{sub eff} {approx} 1600 K, which corresponds to the spectral types of mid- to late-L. The result is interpreted by a combination of radius-mass and radius-age relations that are theoretically expected for brown dwarfs older than 10{sup 8} yr.

  9. Masses And Radii Of Neutron Stars Measured From Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guver, Tolga; Ozel, F.

    2011-09-01

    Low mass X-ray binaries that show thermonuclear bursts are ideal targets for constraining the equation of state of neutron star matter. The analysis of the time resolved, high count rate X-ray spectra allow a measurement of the Eddington limits and the apparent radii of neutron stars. Combined with an independent distance estimate, these spectroscopic quantities lead to the measurement of neutron star masses and radii. I will discuss the results of the application of this method to a number of X-ray binaries including EXO 1745-248, 4U 1820-30, 4U 1608-52,KS 1731-260, and SAX J1748.9-2021. I will also present the results from a comprehensive analysis of the entire RXTE archive of X-ray burst observations, which allows for a better quantification of the systematic uncertainties in these measurements.

  10. Counter-streaming electrons at the geomagnetic equator near 9 earth radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpar, D. M.; Quinn, J. M.; Shelley, E. G.

    1988-01-01

    AMPTE/CEE observations are used to study short-lived, highly anisotropic electron distributions in the region of the equatorial magnetosphere bewtween 6.6 earth radii and the CCE apogee at 8.8 earth radii. Intense bursts of highly collimated counterstreaming electrons were observed at keV energies with durations of a few tens of seconds to a few minutes near the geomagnetic equator on L-shells that intersect the high-latitude ionosphere in the region normally associated with the auroral zone. It is found that the counterstreaming electrons at energies below the peak energy are accompanied by simultaneous deep depressions of the locally mirroring fluxes. It is suggested that these equatorial electrons may result from the release of auroral electrons trapped beneath the auroral accelerating potentials at lower altitudes along the same magnetic flux tubes.

  11. First Leptonic Probe of Neutron Radii in Lead (Lead-82) at Low-Q Square

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Chun-Min

    Over the past decade, in Hall-A of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), both the HAPPEX and PREx collaborations have carried out various high-precision polarized elastic electron scattering experiments to explore the nuclear structure, the nucleon form factor and the weak charge of proton and electron. They have done so through the technique of the parity-violating asymmetry measurement with limited theoretical uncertainties. My dissertation focuses on the study of nuclear structure, namely the thickness of the neutron skin, using elastic electron scattering experiments. The direct measurement of the thickness of the neutron skin in heavy nuclei, where neutron are two-fold more than protons, constrains the slope of changes in binding energies of every single heavy nucleus with respect to the full nucleus density, including proton and neutron densities. In addition, a more precise description of the neutron density profile for each heavy nucleus can help us gain better understanding of nuclear binding energies and has astrophysical implications for neutron stars. As far as we know, the proton and charge RMS (root-mean-square) radii in heavy nuclei such as Lead ( P20882b ) have been measured with an accuracy of 0.02 fm and 0.002 fm, respectively. However, there is no clear picture of the neutron density profile through a high precision neutron RMS radii measurement free from the strong interaction until now. Through a series simulations, both theorists and experimentalists have studied the sensitivity of the parity-violating asymmetry to the extraction of the neutron radii in heavy nuclei. Under some specific conditions, for instance, a fixed scattering angle of 5 degrees and a fixed Q 2 of 0.0088 GeV2, a 3% statistic uncertainty of parity-violating asymmetries corresponds to a merely 1% error of the neutron radii in Lead ( P20882b ). That is, the uncertainties of neutron radii in Lead ( P20882b ) is three-fold smaller than the error of the

  12. Determination of radii of satellites and asteroids from radiometry and photometry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D.

    1973-01-01

    Visual photometry, which measures reflected solar radiation, can be combined with infrared radiometry, which measures absorbed and reradiated solar energy, to determine the albedo and hence the radius of small solar system objects. Equations and graphical solutions for radius and albedo are presented for cases where the object is at opposition, in equilibrium with the insolation, and has unit values for phase integral and infrared emissivities. Each of these assumptions is then discussed, and expressions are given for the dependence of the derived parameters on the assumptions. The Galilean satellites, whose radii are well known, provide a calibration of this technique. Applications are then discussed to Saturn's satellites Iapetus and Rhea and to asteroids (1) Ceres, (4) Vesta, and (324) Bamberga. It is shown that the technique is not subject to major systematic errors and that it is possible to derive radii, particularly for dark objects, with uncertainties of less than 10%.

  13. Temperature and flow velocity of the interplanetary gases along solar radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, F. M.; Judge, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The velocity distributions along solar radii for hydrogen and helium in interplanetary space are calculated by using the Danby-Camm formula modified with a loss function. From these distributions the radial temperature and radial flow velocity of the interplanetary gases are determined. The effects of solar gravitation and ionization loss, due to charge exchange and photoionization, on the gas temperature and velocity are described.

  14. New Baade-Wesselink distances and radii for four metal-rich Galactic Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedicelli, S.; Lemasle, B.; Groenewegen, M.; Romaniello, M.; Bono, G.; Laney, C. D.; François, P.; Buonanno, R.; Caputo, F.; Lub, J.; Pel, J. W.; Primas, F.; Pritchard, J.

    2010-07-01

    Aims: We provide accurate estimates of distances, radii, and iron abundances of four metal-rich Cepheids, namely V340 Ara, UZ Sct, AV Sgr, and VY Sgr. The main aim of this investigation is to constrain their pulsation properties and their location across the Galactic inner disk. Methods: We adopted new accurate NIR (J,H,K) light curves and new radial velocity measurements for the target Cepheids to determinate their distances and radii using the Baade-Wesselink technique. In particular, we adopted the most recent calibrations of both the IR surface brightness relation and the projection factor. We also provide accurate measurements of the iron abundance of the target Cepheids. Results: Current distance estimates agree to within one σ with similar distances based on either empirical or theoretical NIR Period-Luminosity (P-L) relations. However, the uncertainties in the Baade-Wesselink distances are on average a factor of 3-4 smaller than errors affecting other distance determinations. Mean Baade-Wesselink radii also agree at the one σ level with Cepheid radii based either on empirical or theoretical Period-Radius relations. Iron abundances are, within one σ, similar to those determined by Andrievsky and collaborators, thus confirming that the target Cepheids are super metal-rich. We also found that the luminosity amplitudes of classical Cepheids, at odds with RR Lyrae stars, do not exhibit a clear correlation with their metal content. This circumstantial evidence appears to be caused by the Hertzsprung progression and the dependence of the topology of the instability strip on metallicity, evolutionary effects, and binaries. Based on observations made with MPG/ESO 2.2 m telescope at La Silla Observatory under proposal IDs: 75.D-0676, 60.A-9120 and multi-epoch, multi-band NIR data at SAAO.

  15. Determining the nuclear equation of state from neutron-star masses and radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindblom, Lee

    1992-01-01

    A method is developed for determining the nuclear equation of state directly from a knowledge of the masses and radii of neutron stars. This analysis assumes only that equilibrium neutron-star matter has the stress-energy tensor of an isotropic fluid with a barotropic equation of state, and that general relativity describes a neutron star's internal gravitational field. We present numerical examples which illustrate how well this method will determine the equation of state when the appropriate observational data become available.

  16. Reexamination of proton rms radii from low-q power expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sick, Ingo; Trautmann, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Several recent publications claim that the proton charge rms radius resulting from the analysis of electron-scattering data restricted to low-momentum transfer agrees with the radius determined from muonic hydrogen, in contrast to the radius resulting from analyses of the full (e ,e ) data set which is 0.04 fm larger. Here we show why these publications erroneously arrive at the low radii.

  17. Charge radii of odd-A191-211Po isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliverstov, M. D.; Cocolios, T. E.; Dexters, W.; Andreyev, A. N.; Antalic, S.; Barzakh, A. E.; Bastin, B.; Büscher, J.; Darby, I. G.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedoseyev, V. N.; Flanagan, K. T.; Franchoo, S.; Fritzsche, S.; Huber, G.; Huyse, M.; Keupers, M.; Köster, U.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Marsh, B. A.; Molkanov, P. L.; Page, R. D.; Sjødin, A. M.; Stefan, I.; Van de Walle, J.; Van Duppen, P.; Venhart, M.; Zemlyanoy, S. G.

    2013-02-01

    Isotope shifts have been measured for the odd-A polonium isotopes 191-211Po and changes in the nuclear mean square charge radii δ have been deduced. The measurements were performed at CERN-ISOLDE using the in-source resonance-ionization spectroscopy technique. The combined analysis of these data and our recent results for even-A polonium isotopes indicates an onset of deformation already at 197,198Po, when going away from stability. This is significantly earlier than was suggested by previous theoretical and experimental studies of the polonium isotopes. Moreover and in contrast to the mercury isotopes, where a strong odd-even staggering of the charge radii of the ground states was observed by approaching the neutron mid-shell at N = 104, no such effect is present in polonium down to 191Po. Consequently the charge radii of both isomeric and ground states of the odd-A polonium isotopes follow the same trend as the even-A isotopes.

  18. The Radii and Oblateness of Pluto and Charon: Preliminary Results from the 2015 New Horizons Flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisse, Carey M.; Nimmo, Francis; McKinnon, William B.; Umurhan, Orkan M.; Buie, Marc W.; Lauer, Tod R.; Roberts, James H.; Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Hal A.; Young, Leslie A.; Ennico-Smith, Kimberly; Olkin, Cathy B.

    2015-11-01

    We present preliminary results for the radii and oblateness of Pluto and Charon. Accurate determinations of the mean radii of Pluto and Charon are important for establishing their densities and bulk composition. A fossil bulge, if present, would place constraints on the thermal and orbital evolution of these bodies [1,2]. The New Horizons LORRI imaging system [3] has provided global images of Pluto and Charon, with best resolutions of 3.8 and 2.3 km/pix, respectively. Three separate approaches have been used to determine mean radii and oblateness from the images, two using a threshold DN value [4,5] and one using a maximum gradient method. These approaches were validated using synthetic images having a range of photometric functions. Tradeoffs between the limb center location and the derived shape in individual images can be reduced by combining limb pixel locations obtained from different imaged rotational phases.This work was supported by NASA's New Horizons project.[1] Robuchon & Nimmo, Icarus 216, 426, 2011. [2] McKinnon & Singer, DPS 46, abs. no. 419.07, 2014. [3] Cheng et al., SSR 140, 189, 2008. [4] Dermott & Thomas, Icarus 73, 25, 1988. [5] Thomason & Nimmo, LPSC 46, abs. no. 1462, 2015.

  19. What shapes stellar metallicity gradients of massive galaxies at large radii?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, Michaela

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the differential impact of physical mechanisms, mergers and internal energetic phenomena, on the evolution of stellar metallicity gradients in massive, present-day galaxies employing sets of high-resolution, cosmological zoom simulations. We demonstrate that negative metallicity gradients at large radii (>2Reff) originate from the accretion of metal-poor stellar systems. At larger radii, galaxies become typically more dominated by stars accreted from satellite galaxies in major and minor mergers. However, only strong galactic, stellar-driven winds can sufficiently reduce the metallicity content of the accreted stars to realistically steepen the outer metallicity gradients in agreement with observations. In contrast, the gradients of the models without winds are inconsistent with observations. Moreover, we discuss the impact of additional AGN feedback. This analysis greatly highlights the importance of both energetic processes and merger events for stellar population properties of massive galaxies at large radii. Our results are expected to significantly contribute to the interpretation of current and up-coming IFU surveys (e.g. MaNGA, CALIFA).

  20. Probing the 2D kinematic structure of early-type galaxies out to three effective radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Robert N.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Strader, Jay; Spolaor, Max; Mendel, J. Trevor; Spitler, Lee

    2009-09-01

    We detail an innovative new technique for measuring the two-dimensional (2D) velocity moments (rotation velocity, velocity dispersion and Gauss-Hermite coefficients h3 and h4) of the stellar populations of galaxy haloes using spectra from Keck DEIMOS (Deep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph) multi-object spectroscopic observations. The data are used to reconstruct 2D rotation velocity maps. Here we present data for five nearby early-type galaxies to ~three effective radii. We provide significant insights into the global kinematic structure of these galaxies, and challenge the accepted morphological classification in several cases. We show that between one and three effective radii the velocity dispersion declines very slowly, if at all, in all five galaxies. For the two galaxies with velocity dispersion profiles available from planetary nebulae data we find very good agreement with our stellar profiles. We find a variety of rotation profiles beyond one effective radius, i.e. rotation speed remaining constant, decreasing and increasing with radius. These results are of particular importance to studies which attempt to classify galaxies by their kinematic structure within one effective radius, such as the recent definition of fast- and slow-rotator classes by the Spectrographic Areal Unit for Research on Optical Nebulae project. Our data suggest that the rotator class may change when larger galactocentric radii are probed. This has important implications for dynamical modelling of early-type galaxies. The data from this study are available on-line.

  1. LARGER PLANET RADII INFERRED FROM STELLAR ''FLICKER'' BRIGHTNESS VARIATIONS OF BRIGHT PLANET-HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua

    2014-06-10

    Most extrasolar planets have been detected by their influence on their parent star, typically either gravitationally (the Doppler method) or by the small dip in brightness as the planet blocks a portion of the star (the transit method). Therefore, the accuracy with which we know the masses and radii of extrasolar planets depends directly on how well we know those of the stars, the latter usually determined from the measured stellar surface gravity, log g. Recent work has demonstrated that the short-timescale brightness variations ({sup f}licker{sup )} of stars can be used to measure log g to a high accuracy of ∼0.1-0.2 dex. Here, we use flicker measurements of 289 bright (Kepmag < 13) candidate planet-hosting stars with T {sub eff} = 4500-6650 K to re-assess the stellar parameters and determine the resulting impact on derived planet properties. This re-assessment reveals that for the brightest planet-host stars, Malmquist bias contaminates the stellar sample with evolved stars: nearly 50% of the bright planet-host stars are subgiants. As a result, the stellar radii, and hence the radii of the planets orbiting these stars, are on average 20%-30% larger than previous measurements had suggested.

  2. Lightning energetics: Estimates of energy dissipation in channels, channel radii, and channel-heating risetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, J.E.

    1998-05-01

    In this report, several lightning-channel parameters are calculated with the aid of an electrodynamic model of lightning. The electrodynamic model describes dart leaders and return strokes as electromagnetic waves that are guided along conducting lightning channels. According to the model, electrostatic energy is delivered to the channel by a leader, where it is stored around the outside of the channel; subsequently, the return stroke dissipates this locally stored energy. In this report this lightning-energy-flow scenario is developed further. Then the energy dissipated per unit length in lightning channels is calculated, where this quantity is now related to the linear charge density on the channel, not to the cloud-to-ground electrostatic potential difference. Energy conservation is then used to calculate the radii of lightning channels: their initial radii at the onset of return strokes and their final radii after the channels have pressure expanded. Finally, the risetimes for channel heating during return strokes are calculated by defining an energy-storage radius around the channel and by estimating the radial velocity of energy flow toward the channel during a return stroke. In three appendices, values for the linear charge densities on lightning channels are calculated, estimates of the total length of branch channels are obtained, and values for the cloud-to-ground electrostatic potential difference are estimated. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  3. Planetary Radii Across Five Orders of Magnitude in Mass and Stellar Insolation: Application to Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortney, Jonathan J.; Barnes, J. W.; Marley, M. S.

    2006-09-01

    The forthcoming CoRoT and Kepler space missions promise to detect hundreds of transiting planets in the next several years. CoRoT may be able to detect planets as small at 2 Earth radii (13000 km) and Kepler as small as 1 Mercury radius (2500 km). Planetary systems for which radial velocity measurements can be made will allow for a determination of planetary mass, and hence, bulk density. However, obtaining radial velocities will often take years, and many planets will have no direct mass determination. Here we compute mass-radius relations for planets from 0.01 M_Earth to 10 M_Jupiter. We use high pressure equations of state for iron, rock, ice, helium, and hydrogen and make as few assumptions as necessary regarding composition to compute planetary radii over a significant phase space. For the hydrogen/helium-rich planets, we compute self-consistent model atmospheres at distances from 0.02 to 10 AU from the Sun, to correctly include the effects of stellar insolation on the contraction of planets with masses from 1 M_Neptune to 10 M_Jupiter. For all compositions we provide analytic fits to the derived mass-radius relations, which should allow for fast and useful mass estimates when only planetary radii are known. JJF is funded by a Spitzer Fellowship from NASA.

  4. Larger Planet Radii Inferred from Stellar "Flicker" Brightness Variations of Bright Planet-host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua

    2014-06-01

    Most extrasolar planets have been detected by their influence on their parent star, typically either gravitationally (the Doppler method) or by the small dip in brightness as the planet blocks a portion of the star (the transit method). Therefore, the accuracy with which we know the masses and radii of extrasolar planets depends directly on how well we know those of the stars, the latter usually determined from the measured stellar surface gravity, log g. Recent work has demonstrated that the short-timescale brightness variations ("flicker") of stars can be used to measure log g to a high accuracy of ~0.1-0.2 dex. Here, we use flicker measurements of 289 bright (Kepmag < 13) candidate planet-hosting stars with T eff = 4500-6650 K to re-assess the stellar parameters and determine the resulting impact on derived planet properties. This re-assessment reveals that for the brightest planet-host stars, Malmquist bias contaminates the stellar sample with evolved stars: nearly 50% of the bright planet-host stars are subgiants. As a result, the stellar radii, and hence the radii of the planets orbiting these stars, are on average 20%-30% larger than previous measurements had suggested.

  5. Which processes shape stellar population gradients of massive galaxies at large radii?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, Michaela

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the differential impact of physical mechanisms, mergers (stellar accretion) and internal energetic phenomena, on the evolution of stellar population gradients in massive, present-day galaxies employing a set of high-resolution, cosmological zoom simulations. We demonstrate that negative metallicity and color gradients at large radii (>2Reff) originate from the accretion of metal-poor stellar systems. At larger radii, galaxies become typically more dominated by stars accreted from satellite galaxies in major and minor mergers. However, only strong galactic winds can sufficiently reduce the metallicity content of the accreted stars to realistically steepen the outer metallicity and colour gradients in agreement with present-day observations. In contrast, the gradients of the models without winds are inconsistent with observations (too flat). In the wind model, colour and metallicity gradients are significantly steeper for systems which have accreted stars in minor mergers, while galaxies with major mergers have relatively flat gradients, confirming previous results. This analysis greatly highlights the importance of both energetic processes and merger events for stellar population properties of massive galaxies at large radii. Our results are expected to significantly contribute to the interpretation of current and up-coming IFU surveys (like MaNGA and Califa), which in turn can help to better constrain still uncertain models for energetic processes in simulations.

  6. STATISTICS OF MEASURING NEUTRON STAR RADII: ASSESSING A FREQUENTIST AND A BAYESIAN APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Özel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2015-09-10

    Measuring neutron star radii with spectroscopic and timing techniques relies on the combination of multiple observables to break the degeneracies between the mass and radius introduced by general relativistic effects. Here, we explore a previously used frequentist and a newly proposed Bayesian framework to obtain the most likely value and the uncertainty in such a measurement. We find that for the expected range of masses and radii and for realistic measurement errors, the frequentist approach suffers from biases that are larger than the accuracy in the radius measurement required to distinguish between the different equations of state. In contrast, in the Bayesian framework, the inferred uncertainties are larger, but the most likely values do not suffer from such biases. We also investigate ways of quantifying the degree of consistency between different spectroscopic measurements from a single source. We show that a careful assessment of the systematic uncertainties in the measurements eliminates the need for introducing ad hoc biases, which lead to artificially large inferred radii.

  7. Effects on the geomagnetic tail at 60 earth radii of the geomagnetic storm of April 9, 1971.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, W. J.; Rich, F. J.; Reasoner, D. L.; Colburn, D. S.; Goldstein, B. E.

    1973-01-01

    A geomagnetic storm beginning with an sc occurred on Apr. 9, 1971. During the storm the charged particle lunar environment experiment at the Apollo 14 site, the solar wind spectrometer experiment at the Apollo 12 site, and the Ames magnetometers on Explorer 35 took data in the magnetosheath, at the magnetopause, in the plasma sheet, and in the high-latitude geomagnetic tail. The MIT Faraday cup and Ames magnetometers on board Explorer 33 monitored the solar wind. The data show that the storm was caused by a corotating tangential discontinuity in the solar wind, the magnetopause position is strongly dependent on the attack angle of the solar wind, and the tail field strength was indirectly measured to increase from 10 to 14 gamma after the sc. During the main phase the field strength in the tail was observed to increase to between 28 and 34 gamma. This increase is consistent with a thermal and magnetic compression of the tail radius from about 26 to about 16 earth radii.

  8. RADII OF RAPIDLY ROTATING STARS, WITH APPLICATION TO TRANSITING-PLANET HOSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Timothy M.

    2010-01-20

    The currently favored method for estimating radii and other parameters of transiting-planet host stars is to match theoretical models to observations of the stellar mean density rho{sub *}, the effective temperature T{sub eff}, and the composition parameter [Z]. This explicitly model-dependent approach is based on readily available observations, and results in small formal errors. Its performance will be central to the reliability of results from ground-based transit surveys such as TrES, HAT, and SuperWASP, as well as to the space-borne missions MOST, CoRoT, and Kepler. Here, I use two calibration samples of stars (eclipsing binaries (EBs) and stars for which asteroseismic analyses are available) having well-determined masses and radii to estimate the accuracy and systematic errors inherent in the rho{sub *} method. When matching to the Yonsei-Yale stellar evolution models, I find the most important systematic error results from selection bias favoring rapidly rotating (hence probably magnetically active) stars among the EB sample. If unaccounted for, this bias leads to a mass-dependent underestimate of stellar radii by as much as 4% for stars of 0.4 M{sub sun}, decreasing to zero for masses above about 1.4 M{sub sun}. Relative errors in estimated stellar masses are three times larger than those in radii. The asteroseismic sample suggests (albeit with significant uncertainty) that systematic errors are small for slowly rotating, inactive stars. Systematic errors arising from failings of the Yonsei-Yale models of inactive stars probably exist, but are difficult to assess because of the small number of well-characterized comparison stars having low mass and slow rotation. Poor information about [Z] is an important source of random error, and may be a minor source of systematic error as well. With suitable corrections for rotation, it is likely that systematic errors in the rho{sub *} method can be comparable to or smaller than the random errors, yielding radii that

  9. Noninvasive microwave ablation zone radii estimation using x-ray CT image analysis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Noam; Goldberg, S Nahum; Nissenbaum, Yitzhak; Sosna, Jacob; Azhari, Haim

    2016-08-01

    The aims of this study were to noninvasively and automatically estimate both the radius of the ablated liver tissue and the radius encircling the treated zone, which also defines where the tissue is definitely untreated during a microwave (MW) thermal ablation procedure. Fourteen ex vivo bovine fresh liver specimens were ablated at 40 W using a 14 G microwave antenna, for durations of 3, 6, 8, and 10 min. The tissues were scanned every 5 s during the ablation using an x-ray CT scanner. In order to estimate the radius of the ablation zone, the acquired images were transformed into a polar presentation by displaying the Hounsfield units (HU) as a function of angle and radius. From this polar presentation, the average HU radial profile was analyzed at each time point and the ablation zone radius was estimated. In addition, textural analysis was applied to the original CT images. The proposed algorithm identified high entropy regions and estimated the treated zone radius per time. The estimated ablated zone radii as a function of treatment durations were compared, by means of correlation coefficient and root mean square error (RMSE) to gross pathology measurements taken immediately post-treatment from similarly ablated tissue. Both the estimated ablation radii and the treated zone radii demonstrated strong correlation with the measured gross pathology values (R(2) ≥ 0.89 and R(2) ≥ 0.86, respectively). The automated ablation radii estimation had an average discrepancy of less than 1 mm (RMSE = 0.65 mm) from the gross pathology measured values, while the treated zone radii showed a slight overestimation of approximately 1.5 mm (RMSE = 1.6 mm). Noninvasive monitoring of MW ablation using x-ray CT and image analysis is feasible. Automatic estimations of the ablation zone radius and the radius encompassing the treated zone that highly correlate with actual ablation measured values can be obtained. This technique can therefore potentially be used to obtain real time

  10. Effect of ionic radii on the Curie temperature in Ba1-x-ySrxCayTiO3 compounds.

    PubMed

    Berenov, A; Le Goupil, F; Alford, N

    2016-06-21

    A series of Ba1-x-ySrxCayTiO3 compounds were prepared with varying average ionic radii and cation disorder on A-site. All samples showed typical ferroelectric behavior. A simple empirical equation correlated Curie temperature, TC, with the values of ionic radii of A-site cations. This correlation was related to the distortion of TiO6 octahedra observed during neutron diffraction studies. The equation was used for the selection of compounds with predetermined values of TC. The effects of A-site ionic radii on the temperatures of phase transitions in Ba1-x-ySrxCayTiO3 were discussed.

  11. Effect of ionic radii on the Curie temperature in Ba1-x-ySrxCayTiO3 compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berenov, A.; Le Goupil, F.; Alford, N.

    2016-06-01

    A series of Ba1-x-ySrxCayTiO3 compounds were prepared with varying average ionic radii and cation disorder on A-site. All samples showed typical ferroelectric behavior. A simple empirical equation correlated Curie temperature, TC, with the values of ionic radii of A-site cations. This correlation was related to the distortion of TiO6 octahedra observed during neutron diffraction studies. The equation was used for the selection of compounds with predetermined values of TC. The effects of A-site ionic radii on the temperatures of phase transitions in Ba1-x-ySrxCayTiO3 were discussed.

  12. Theoretical study of the light pressure force acting on a spherical dielectric particle of an arbitrary size in the interference field of two plane monochromatic electromagnetic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Guzatov, D V; Gaida, L S; Afanas'ev, Anatolii A

    2008-12-31

    The light pressure force acting on a spherical dielectric particle in the interference field of two plane monochromatic electromagnetic waves is studied in detail for different particle radii and angles of incidence of waves. (light pressure)

  13. Freeze-out radii extracted from three-pion cumulants in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belmont, R.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kadyshevskiy, V.; Kalcher, S.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Luzzi, C.; Ma, R.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Okatan, A.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Sahoo, P.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palmeri, A.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Pohjoisaho, E. H. O.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Sánchez Rodríguez, F. J.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Vannucci, L.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, V.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Xiang, C.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yang, S.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-12-01

    In high-energy collisions, the spatio-temporal size of the particle production region can be measured using the Bose-Einstein correlations of identical bosons at low relative momentum. The source radii are typically extracted using two-pion correlations, and characterize the system at the last stage of interaction, called kinetic freeze-out. In low-multiplicity collisions, unlike in high-multiplicity collisions, two-pion correlations are substantially altered by background correlations, e.g. mini-jets. Such correlations can be suppressed using three-pion cumulant correlations. We present the first measurements of the size of the system at freeze-out extracted from three-pion cumulant correlations in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC with ALICE. At similar multiplicity, the invariant radii extracted in p-Pb collisions are found to be 5-15% larger than those in pp, while those in Pb-Pb are 35-55% larger than those in p-Pb. Our measurements disfavor models which incorporate substantially stronger collective expansion in p-Pb as compared to pp collisions at similar multiplicity.

  14. Improvement of energy conversion efficiency of thermoacoustic engine by a multistage stack with multiple pore radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagimoto, Kohei; Sakamoto, Shin-ichi; Kuroda, Kentaro; Nakano, Yosuke; Watanabe, Yoshiaki

    2012-09-01

    In the conventional thermoacoustic engine, the pore radius of stack is almost constant in the axial direction. Therefore, we focus on the improvement of energy conversion efficiency of thermoacoustic engine by proposing a new type of multistage stack with multiple pore radii. The stack is composed of several stages, each of which is a bundle of a number of narrow tubes with specified pore radii. The pore radius is determined so that its ratio to the thickness of boundary layer on the tube wall may be a suitable value for the enhancement of the thermoacoustic oscillation in the tube. Owing to the temperature gradient along the axis of the stack, however, the thickness of the boundary layer changes along the axis and hence the suitable pore radius also changes in the axial direction. We therefore introduce a multistage stack with multiple pore radii, thereby realizing a desired ratio of pore radius and boundary layer thickness everywhere in the stack. The energy conversion efficiency of the multistage stack is experimentally studied on a straight tube type thermoacoustic engine and compared with that of a conventional single-stage stack. In the experiments, in spite that a sufficiently large temperature difference from ambient temperature near low-temperature heat exchanger was not attained, we have been able to confirm a slight improvement of energy conversion efficiency. Furthermore, we used a numerical method with transmittance matrix to include the effect of multistage stack, and obtained a good agreement between the experimental and numerical results. They show the future possibilities of the stack design aiming to the higher efficiency of the thermoacoustic engine.

  15. Moving particle composition analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, S. O. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A mass spectrometry apparatus for analyzing the composition of moving microscopic particles is introduced. The apparatus includes a capacitor with a front electrode upon which the particles impinge, a back electrode, and a solid dielectric sandwiched between the front and back electrodes. In one embodiment, the electrodes and dielectric are arcuately shaped as concentric peripheral segments of different spheres having a common center and different radii. The front electrode and dielectric together have a thickness such that an impinging particle can penetrate them. In a second embodiment, the capacitor has planar, parallel electrodes, in which case the ejected positive ions are deflected downstream of a planar grid by a pair of spaced, arcuate capacitor plates having a region between them through which the ejected ions travel.

  16. Effect of the Electrode Radii on the Pump Discharge width and KrF Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, Yu. I.; Yampolskaya, S. A.; Yastremskii, A. G.

    2017-08-01

    The effect of the electrode shapes on the pump discharge width and the energy of radiation of the KrF laser with pulse duration of 30 ns is investigated by the method of computer modeling. The pump and laser power density distributions across the discharge cross section are obtained as functions of the electrode curvature radii. It is shown that an optimum is observed in the dependence of the laser radiation energy on the electrode radius given that the excitation parameters and the mixture composition remain unchanged. The optimum is reached with the electrodes for which the maximum excitation power density in the discharge does not exceed 8 MV/cm3.

  17. Disk radii and grain sizes in Herschel-resolved debris disks

    SciTech Connect

    Pawellek, Nicole; Krivov, Alexander V.; Marshall, Jonathan P.; Montesinos, Benjamin; Ábrahám, Péter; Moór, Attila; Bryden, Geoffrey; Eiroa, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    The radii of debris disks and the sizes of their dust grains are important tracers of the planetesimal formation mechanisms and physical processes operating in these systems. Here we use a representative sample of 34 debris disks resolved in various Herschel Space Observatory (Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA) programs to constrain the disk radii and the size distribution of their dust. While we modeled disks with both warm and cold components, and identified warm inner disks around about two-thirds of the stars, we focus our analysis only on the cold outer disks, i.e., Kuiper-belt analogs. We derive the disk radii from the resolved images and find a large dispersion for host stars of any spectral class, but no significant trend with the stellar luminosity. This argues against ice lines as a dominant player in setting the debris disk sizes, since the ice line location varies with the luminosity of the central star. Fixing the disk radii to those inferred from the resolved images, we model the spectral energy distribution to determine the dust temperature and the grain size distribution for each target. While the dust temperature systematically increases toward earlier spectral types, the ratio of the dust temperature to the blackbody temperature at the disk radius decreases with the stellar luminosity. This is explained by a clear trend of typical sizes increasing toward more luminous stars. The typical grain sizes are compared to the radiation pressure blowout limit s {sub blow} that is proportional to the stellar luminosity-to-mass ratio and thus also increases toward earlier spectral classes. The grain sizes in the disks of G- to A-stars are inferred to be several times s {sub blow} at all stellar luminosities, in agreement with collisional models of debris disks. The sizes, measured in the units of s {sub blow}, appear to decrease

  18. Relativistic calculations of screening parameters and atomic radii of neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, M.; Amaro, P.; Santos, J. P.; Indelicato, P.

    2017-09-01

    Calculations of the effective nuclear charge for elements with 1 ≤ Z ≤ 118 have been performed in a Dirac-Fock approach including all relativistic effects as well as contributions from quantum electrodynamics. Maximum charge density for every subshell of every element in the periodic table was also computed in the same framework as well as atomic radii based on the total charge density. Results were compared with the extensively cited works of Clementi et al., obtained in the 1960s with Roothan's self-consistent-field method.

  19. The Systematics of the Structures of Ternary Compounds Using Pseudopotential-Orbital Radii.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-11

    size in the periodic table . For the transition metals, the orbital radii are also independent of oxidation state. However, for the heavy elements which...covalent compounds are sorted successfully, but this 2 may be because the variation of r.- across a row of the periodic table can reflect the size and...size and electronegativity. The combination r =r +r is a measure of an average ’core size’ of an atom , and indeed,0-s p for each row of the Periodic

  20. Understanding the Rapidity Dependence of the Elliptic Flow and the HBT Radii at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Csanad, M.; Loerstad, B.

    2006-04-11

    The pseudo-rapidity dependence of the elliptic flow at various excitation energies measured by the PHOBOS Collaboration in Au+Au collisions at RHIC is one of the surprising results that has not been explained before in terms of hydrodynamical models. Here we show that these data are in agreement with theoretical predictions and satisfy the universal scaling relation predicted by the Buda-Lund hydrodynamical model, based on exact solutions of perfect fluid hydrodynamics. We also show a theoretical prediction on the rapidity and transverse momentum scaling of the HBT radii measured in heavy ion collisions, based on the Buda-Lund model.

  1. Performance Characteristics of Oil Lubricated Swing-Pad Thrust Bearings with Different Radii of Curvatures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    nique was developed and perfected with the assistance of the Center’s rubber labora- tory. The metallic components were fabricated in the machine shop...The laminates consisted of calendered sheets of Buna-N rubber that were vulcanized to the metal parts using a specially designed mold. The hardness of...the cured rubber is 55±5 on the Shore A scale. Bearings with four different radii of curvature were fabricated ; three were 2.54, 5.08, and 10.16 cm

  2. Possible octupole deformation in Cs and Ba nuclei from their differential radii

    SciTech Connect

    Sheline, R.K.; Jain, A.K.; Jain, K.

    1988-12-01

    The odd-even staggering of the differential radii of Fr and Ra and the Cs and Ba nuclei is compared. This staggering is inverted in the region of known octupole deformation in the Fr and Ra nuclei. The normal staggering is eliminated in the Cs nuclei and attenuated in the Ba nuclei for neutron numbers 85--88. This fact is used to suggest the possible existence of octupole deformation and its neutron number range in the Cs and Ba nuclear ground states.

  3. Plastic set of smooth large radii of curvature thermal conductance specimens at light loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinzie, D. J., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Thermal contact conductance test data at high vacuum were obtained from two Armco iron specimens having smooth, large radii of curvature, convex, one-half wave length surfaces. The data are compared with calculations based on two macroscopic elastic deformation theories and an empirical expression. Major disagreement with the theories and fair agreement with the empirical expression resulted. Plastic deformation of all the contacting surfaces was verified from surface analyzer statistics. These results indicate that the theoretical assumption of macroscopic elastic deformation is inadequate for accurate prediction of heat transfer with light loads for Armco iron specimens similar to those used in this investigation.

  4. Centrality and Transverse Momentum Dependence of HBT Radii in Au+Au Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweid, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    The expansion dynamics of relativistic heavy ion collisions is influenced by the transport properties of the created medium, as well as the path of the reaction trajectory in the (T ,μB)-plane. Such an influence can manifest as quantifiable changes in the magnitude of the space-time extent of the emission source, characterized by the so-called HBT radii Rout, Rside and Rlong. We will present and discuss recent HBT measurements which extend the upper momentum range of measurements that have been made in the STAR detector for Au+Au collisions at several collision centralities and beam energies.

  5. The magnetic field of the equatorial magnetotail - AMPTE/CCE observations at R less than 8.8 earth radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Acuna, M. H.; Zanetti, L. J.; Potemra, T. A.

    1987-01-01

    The MPTE/CCE magnetic field experiment has been used to obtain a quantitative evaluation of the frequency and extent of magnetic field distortion in the near-tail region at less than 8.8 earth radii. The variation of this distortion with Kp, radial distance, longitude, and near-equatorial latitude is reported. It has been found that taillike distortions from the dipole field direction may reach 80 deg near the MPTE/CE apogee of 8.8 earth radii. The Bz field component in dipole coordinates was always positive within 0.5 earth radii of the equatorial current sheet, indicating the neutral lines were never seen inside of 8.8 earth radii. Fields were most taillike near midnight and during times of high Kp. At 8.5 earth radii the equatorial field magnitude depressions were roughly half the dipole field strength of 51 nT. These depressions are larger at lesser distances, reaching -40 nT at 3.4 earth radii for Kp of 2- or less and -80 nT and Kp of 3+ and greater.

  6. Radii and Shape of Pluto and Charon: Preliminary Results from New Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.; Lisse, C. M.; Umurhan, O. M.; McKinnon, W. B.; Buie, M. W.; Lauer, T.; Beyer, R. A.; Moore, J. M.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Olkin, C.; Ennico Smith, K.; Young, L. A.; Bierson, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate determinations of the mean radii of Pluto and Charon are important for establishing their densities and thus bulk composition. A fossil bulge, if present, would place constraints on the thermal and orbital evolution of these bodies [1,2]. The New Horizons LORRI imaging system [3] has provided global images of Pluto and Charon, with best resolutions of 3.8 and 2.3 km/pix, respectively. Three separate approaches have been used to determine mean radii and shape from the images, two using a threshold DN value [4,5] and one using a maximum gradient method. These approaches were validated using synthetic images having a range of photometric functions. Tradeoffs between the limb center location and the derived shape in individual images can be reduced by combining limb picks from different images. Preliminary results for both Pluto and Charon will be presented. [1] Robuchon & Nimmo, Icarus 216, 426, 2011. [2] McKinnon & Singer, DPS 46, abs. no. 419.07, 2014. [3] Cheng et al., SSR 140, 189, 2008. [4] Dermott & Thomas, Icarus 73, 25, 1988. [5] Thomason & Nimmo, LPSC 46, abs. no. 1462, 2015.

  7. Changes in nuclear structure along the Mn isotopic chain studied via charge radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heylen, H.; Babcock, C.; Beerwerth, R.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Blaum, K.; Bonnard, J.; Campbell, P.; Cheal, B.; Day Goodacre, T.; Fedorov, D.; Fritzsche, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Geithner, W.; Geppert, Ch.; Gins, W.; Grob, L. K.; Kowalska, M.; Kreim, K.; Lenzi, S. M.; Moore, I. D.; Maass, B.; Malbrunot-Ettenauer, S.; Marsh, B.; Neugart, R.; Neyens, G.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Otsuka, T.; Papuga, J.; Rossel, R.; Rothe, S.; Sánchez, R.; Tsunoda, Y.; Wraith, C.; Xie, L.; Yang, X. F.; Yordanov, D. T.

    2016-11-01

    The hyperfine spectra of 51,53 -64Mn were measured in two experimental runs using collinear laser spectroscopy at ISOLDE, CERN. Laser spectroscopy was performed on the atomic 3 d54 s25/2 6S →3 d54 s 4 p 3/2 6P and ionic 3 d54 s 5S2→3 d54 p 5P3 transitions, yielding two sets of isotope shifts. The mass and field shift factors for both transitions have been calculated in the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock framework and were combined with a King plot analysis in order to obtain a consistent set of mean-square charge radii which, together with earlier work on neutron-deficient Mn, allow the study of nuclear structure changes from N =25 across N =28 up to N =39 . A clear development of deformation is observed towards N =40 , confirming the conclusions of the nuclear moments studies. From a Monte Carlo shell-model study of the shape in the Mn isotopic chain, it is suggested that the observed development of deformation is not only due to an increase in static prolate deformation but also due to shape fluctuations and triaxiality. The changes in mean-square charge radii are well reproduced using the Duflo-Zuker formula except in the case of large deformation.

  8. Impact of surface imperfections on the Casimir force for lenses of centimeter-size curvature radii

    SciTech Connect

    Bezerra, V. B.; Romero, C.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mohideen, U.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2011-02-15

    The impact of imperfections, which are always present on surfaces of lenses with centimeter-size curvature radii, on the Casimir force in the lens-plate geometry is investigated. It is shown that the commonly used formulation of the proximity force approximation is inapplicable for spherical lenses with surface imperfections, such as bubbles and pits. More general expressions for the Casimir force are derived that take surface imperfections into account. Using these expressions, we show that surface imperfections can both increase and decrease the magnitude of the Casimir force up to a few tens percent when compared with the case of a perfectly spherical lens. We demonstrate that the Casimir force between a perfectly spherical lens and a plate described by the Drude model can be made approximately equal to the force between a sphere with some surface imperfection and a plate described by the plasma model, and vice versa. In the case of a metallic sphere and a semiconductor plate, approximately the same Casimir forces are obtained for four different descriptions of charge carriers in the semiconductor if appropriate surface imperfections on the lens surface are present. The conclusion is made that there is a fundamental problem in the interpretation of measurement data for the Casimir force using spherical lenses of centimeter-size radii.

  9. Prediction of apatite lattice constants from their constituent elemental radii and artificial intelligence methods.

    PubMed

    Wu, P; Zeng, Y Z; Wang, C M

    2004-03-01

    Lattice constants (LCs) of all possible 96 apatite compounds, A(5)(BO(4))(3)C, constituted by A[double bond]Ba(2+), Ca(2+), Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Sr(2+), Mn(2+); B[double bond]As(5+), Cr(5+), P(5+), V(5+); and C[double bond]F(1-), Cl(1-), Br(1-), OH(1-), are predicted from their elemental ionic radii, using pattern recognition (PR) and artificial neural networks (ANN) techniques. In particular, by a PR study it is demonstrated that ionic radii predominantly govern the LCs of apatites. Furthermore, by using ANN techniques, prediction models of LCs a and c are developed, which reproduce well the measured LCs (R(2)=0.98). All the literature reported on 30 pure and 22 mixed apatite compounds are collected and used in the present work. LCs of all possible 66 new apatites (assuming they exist) are estimated by the developed ANN models. These proposed new apatites may be of interest to biomedical research especially in the design of new apatite biomaterials for bone remodeling. Similarly these techniques may also be applied in the study of interface growth behaviors involving other biomaterials.

  10. THE INFLUENCE OF ORBITAL ECCENTRICITY ON TIDAL RADII OF STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Jeremy J.; Harris, William E.; Sills, Alison; Hurley, Jarrod R.

    2013-02-20

    We have performed N-body simulations of star clusters orbiting in a spherically symmetric smooth galactic potential. The model clusters cover a range of initial half-mass radii and orbital eccentricities in order to test the historical assumption that the tidal radius of a cluster is imposed at perigalacticon. The traditional assumption for globular clusters is that since the internal relaxation time is larger than its orbital period, the cluster is tidally stripped at perigalacticon. Instead, our simulations show that a cluster with an eccentric orbit does not need to fully relax in order to expand. After a perigalactic pass, a cluster recaptures previously unbound stars, and the tidal shock at perigalacticon has the effect of energizing inner region stars to larger orbits. Therefore, instead of the limiting radius being imposed at perigalacticon, it more nearly traces the instantaneous tidal radius of the cluster at any point in the orbit. We present a numerical correction factor to theoretical tidal radii calculated at perigalacticon which takes into consideration both the orbital eccentricity and current orbital phase of the cluster.

  11. Absolute densities, masses, and radii of the WASP-47 system determined dynamically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almenara, J. M.; Díaz, R. F.; Bonfils, X.; Udry, S.

    2016-10-01

    We present a self-consistent modelling of the available light curve and radial velocity data of WASP-47 that takes into account the gravitational interactions between all known bodies in the system. The joint analysis of light curve and radial velocity data in a multi-planetary system allows deriving absolute densities, radii, and masses without the use of theoretical stellar models. For WASP-47 the precision is limited by the reduced dynamical information that is due to the short time span of the K2 light curve. We achieve a precision of around 22% for the radii of the star and the transiting planets, between 40% and 60% for their masses, and between 1.5% and 38% for their densities. All values agree with previously reported measurements. When theoretical stellar models are included, the system parameters are determined with a precision that exceeds that achieved by previous studies, thanks to the self-consistent modelling of light curve and radial velocity data.

  12. An implicit solvent model for SCC-DFTB with Charge-Dependent Radii

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Guanhua; Zhu, Xiao; Cui, Qiang

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by the need of rapidly exploring the potential energy surface of chemical reactions that involve highly charged species, we have developed an implicit solvent model for the approximate density functional theory, SCC-DFTB. The solvation free energy is calculated using the popular model that employs Poisson-Boltzmann for electrostatics and a surface-area term for non-polar contributions. To balance the treatment of species with different charge distributions, we make the atomic radii that define the dielectric boundary and solute cavity depend on the solute charge distribution. Specifically, the atomic radii are assumed to be linearly dependent on the Mulliken charges and solved self-consistently together with the solute electronic structure. Benchmark calculations indicate that the model leads to solvation free energies of comparable accuracy to the SM6 model (especially for ions), which requires much more expensive DFT calculations. With analytical first derivatives and favorable computational speed, the SCC-DFTB based solvation model can be effectively used, in conjunction with high-level QM calculations, to explore the mechanism of solution reactions. This is illustrated with a brief analysis of the hydrolysis of mono-methyl mono-phosphate ester (MMP) and tri-methyl mono-phosphate ester (TMP). Possible future improvements are also briefly discussed. PMID:20711513

  13. Capture of particles in soft porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louvet, N.; Höhler, R.; Pitois, O.

    2010-10-01

    We investigate the capture of particles in soft porous media. Liquid foam constitutes a model system for such a study, allowing the radii of passage in the pore space to be tuned over several orders of magnitude by adjusting the liquid volume fraction. We show how particle capture is determined by the coupling of interstitial liquid flow and network deformation, and present a simple model of the capture process that shows good agreement with our experimental data.

  14. Approximating proto-stellar structure without a computer (The proto-sun at 50 earth radii)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doorish, John F.

    1991-09-01

    An analytical method that facilitates the description of main-sequence stellar structure is applied to protostars to model the core in formation. The model is based on Motz dimensionless variables which permit the stellar interior equations to be converted into a linearly approximate form. Equations for the mass, pressure, and temperature gradients of the protosun's hydrostatic core at 50 earth radii are given, and an approximation is presented for a one-solar-mass protostar that is contracting down to the main sequence. Comparisons are made between the analytical values and values from observations and computer models, and IR data confirm some analytically derived protostellar characteristics. It is concluded that the core of a protostar is composed of a spherical ball of gas in hydrostatic equilibrium where accretion very gradually becomes a factor.

  15. High Precision, Directly Determined Radii and Effective Temperatures for Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Belle, Gerard

    Mission Statement. The radius and temperature scale of giant stars across the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram from red giant branch stars to horizontal branch stars is understood well enough to enable an accurate prediction of temperature and size for a given star to no better than ~2.5% and ~20%, respectively, based upon photometry. The primary reason for this is the lack of empirically determined radii and temperatures across the giant branches. One of the long-running strengths of optical interferometry has been the empirical determination of fundamental stellar parameters. Through direct measurements of effective temperature and linear radius, methods such as photometric colors that indirectly predict such values can be calibrated. A substantial body of data on this topic collected for giant stars remains unpublished and stands to benefit from the advances in ancillary data sources and computational techniques of the last dozen years. Previous efforts in this regard have been limited by data sample breadth and depth. The Experiment. We will use multi-technique and multi-wavelength data available in NASA's Archives to directly measure angular sizes and bolometric fluxes for giant stars, establishing the radius-temperature scale across the giant branches. Interferometric data from NASA's Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI) Archive in conjunction with recent advances in calibration techniques will allow us to directly establish fundamental parameters of temperature and radius for 425 giant stars at unprecedented levels of accuracy. The majority of these objects was observed repeatedly over the 11-year run of this well- understood instrument, allowing for exquisite control of observational systematics. Optical, near-infrared and mid-infrared data from NASA Archives, including 2MASS, COBE, MSX, and WISE will constrain the bolometric fluxes; the recent reanalysis of the Hipparcos data will provide unparalleled distances to each of the 425 giant stars in the sample. We

  16. Changes in the mean square charge radii and electromagnetic moments of neutron-deficient Bi isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Barzakh, A. E. Batist, L. Kh.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Molkanov, P. L.; Moroz, F. V.; Orlov, S. Yu.; Panteleev, V. N.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2015-10-15

    In-source laser spectroscopy experiments for neutron deficient bismuth isotopes at the 306.77 nm atomic transition were carried out at the IRIS (Investigation of Radioactive Isotopes on Synchrocyclotron) facility of Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI). New data on isotope shifts and hyperfine structure for {sup 189–198,} {sup 211}Bi isotopes and isomers were obtained. The changes in the mean-square charge radii and the magnetic moment values were deduced. Marked deviation from the nearly spherical behavior for ground states of bismuth isotopes at N < 109 is demonstrated, in contrast to the lead and thallium isotopic chains. The big isomer shift between I = 1/2 (intruder) and I = 9/2 (normal) states for odd Bi isotopes (A = 193, 195, 197) was found.

  17. On the diamagnetic effect of the plasma sheet near 60 earth radii.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, C.-I.; Mihalov, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    The two-dimensional (YZ plane) spatial distribution of magnetic field magnitudes in the geomagnetic tail at the lunar distance is given in both the solar magnetospheric and the neutral-sheet coordinate systems by using three years of data from the Ames magnetometer on Explorer 35. The effect of changes in geomagnetic activity is also presented. In the magnetotail near 60 earth radii, a broad region in which the magnetic field intensity is relatively weak in comparison with that in the other region of the tail is located adjacent to the solar magnetospheric equatorial plane and the calculated neutral sheet. This depression of the field due to the diamagnetic effect of the plasma sheet is more evident during times of minimum geomagnetic activity.-

  18. Repeated sharp flux dropouts observed at 6.6 earth radii during a geomagnetic storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, S.-Y.; Fritz, T. A.; Konradi, A.

    1976-01-01

    A number of repeated rapid flux dropouts have been observed at 6.6 earth radii by the low-energy proton detectors on board the ATS 6 satellite during the July 4-6, 1974, geomagnetic storm period. These rapid flux changes are caused by the fact that the outer boundary of the trapped radiation region moves back and forth past the satellite. Although a tilting field line configuration can cause the boundary to pass the satellite, as has frequently been reported in the literature, the boundary is shown to be distorted by a large surface wave traveling eastward around the earth. The maximum velocity of the wave was observed to be about 40 km/s.

  19. Coronal activity below 2 solar radii - 1980 February 15-17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, R. R.; Poland, A. I.

    1981-01-01

    Coronal observations concerning the area between the solar surface and 2.0 solar radii can now be conducted by making use of a new ground-based K-coronameter and a prominence monitor on Mauna Loa in Hawaii. Observations made by the K-coronameter on three consecutive days surrounding the eclipse of 1980 February 16 show that the solar corona was very active during this time. Definite changes occurred between each day's observations. During one period of K-coronameter observations (1980 February 15) a coronal transient was observed to move through the coronameter's field of view. A description is presented of the general changes which occurred in the corona during this period, taking into account the coronal transient observed by the prominence monitor and K-coronameter. The most important aspects of these new observations pertain to the relationship between the H alpha prominence and the surrounding coronal material.

  20. Changes in the mean square charge radii and electromagnetic moments of neutron-deficient Bi isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzakh, A. E.; Batist, L. Kh.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Molkanov, P. L.; Moroz, F. V.; Orlov, S. Yu.; Panteleev, V. N.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2015-10-01

    In-source laser spectroscopy experiments for neutron deficient bismuth isotopes at the 306.77 nm atomic transition were carried out at the IRIS (Investigation of Radioactive Isotopes on Synchrocyclotron) facility of Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI). New data on isotope shifts and hyperfine structure for 189-198, 211Bi isotopes and isomers were obtained. The changes in the mean-square charge radii and the magnetic moment values were deduced. Marked deviation from the nearly spherical behavior for ground states of bismuth isotopes at N < 109 is demonstrated, in contrast to the lead and thallium isotopic chains. The big isomer shift between I = 1/2 (intruder) and I = 9/2 (normal) states for odd Bi isotopes (A = 193, 195, 197) was found.

  1. Retrievals and Comparisons of Various MODIS-Spectrum Inferred Water Cloud Droplet Effective Radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu-Lung, Chang; Minnis, Patrick; Lin, Bin; Sunny, Sun-Mack; Khaiyer, Mandana M.

    2007-01-01

    Cloud droplet effective radius retrievals from different Aqua MODIS nearinfrared channels (2.1- micrometer, 3.7- micrometer, and 1.6- micrometer) show considerable differences even among most confident QC pixels. Both Collection 004 and Collection 005 MOD06 show smaller mean effective radii at 3.7- micrometer wavelength than at 2.1- micrometer and 1.6- micrometer wavelengths. Differences in effective radius retrievals between Collection 004 and Collection 005 may be affected by cloud top height/temperature differences, which mainly occur for optically thin clouds. Changes in cloud top height and temperature for thin clouds have different impacts on the effective radius retrievals from 2.1- micrometer, 3.7- micrometer, and 1.6- micrometer channels. Independent retrievals (this study) show, on average, more consistency in the three effective radius retrievals. This study is for Aqua MODIS only.

  2. A finite element stress analysis of spur gears including fillet radii and rim thickness effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S. H.; Huston, R. L.; Coy, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Spur gear stress analysis results are presented for a variety of loading conditions, support conditions, fillet radii, and rim thickness. These results are obtained using the SAP IV finite-element code. The maximum stresses, occurring at the root surface, substantially increase with decreasing rim thickness for partially supported rims (that is, with loose-fitting hubs). For fully supported rims (that is, with tight-fitting hubs), the root surface stresses slightly decrease with decreasing rim thickness. The fillet radius is found to have a significant effect upon the maximum stresses at the root surface. These stresses increase with increasing fillet radius. The fillet radius has little effect upon the internal root section stresses.

  3. Probing the 2-D Kinematic Structure of Early-Type Galaxies Out to 3 Effective Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Robert N.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Strader, Jay; Spolaor, Max; Trevor Mendel, J.; Spitler, Lee

    2010-06-01

    We detail an innovative new technique for measuring the 2-D velocity moments (rotation velocity, velocity dispersion and Gauss-Hermite coefficients h3 and h4) using spectra from Keck DEIMOS multi-object spectroscopic observations. The data are used to reconstruct 2-D rotation velocity maps. Here we present data for one of five early-type galaxies whose kinematics we have measured out to ~3 effective radii (see [1]). From these data 2D kinematic maps are constructed. We show such analyses can provide significant insights into the global kinematic structure of galaxies, and, in some cases, challenge the accepted morphological classification. Our results are of particular importance to studies which attempt to classify galaxies by their kinematic structure within one effective radius, such as the recent definition of fast- and slow- rotator classes by the SAURON project.

  4. Rotational bursting of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paddack, S. J.; Rhee, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    Solar radiation pressure is discussed as a cause of rotational bursting, and of eventual elimination of asymmetric dust particles from the solar system, by a windmill effect. The predicted life span with this process for metallic particles with radii of 0.00001 to 0.01 cm ranges from 10 to 10,000 years. The effects of magnetic spin damping were considered. This depletion mechanism works faster than the traditional Poynting-Robertson effect by approximately one order of magnitude for metallic particles and about two orders of magnitude for nonmetallic particles.

  5. Fossil hominin radii from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Laura; Carretero, José Miguel; García-González, Rebeca; Lorenzo, Carlos; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Quam, Rolf; Martínez, Ignacio; Gracia-Téllez, Ana; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    Complete radii in the fossil record preceding recent humans and Neandertals are very scarce. Here we introduce the radial remains recovered from the Sima de los Huesos (SH) site in the Sierra de Atapuerca between 1976 and 2011 and which have been dated in excess of 430 ky (thousands of years) ago. The sample comprises 89 specimens, 49 of which are attributed to adults representing a minimum of seven individuals. All elements are described anatomically and metrically, and compared with other fossil hominins and recent humans in order to examine the phylogenetic polarity of certain radial features. Radial remains from SH have some traits that differentiate them from those of recent humans and make them more similar to Neandertals, including strongly curved shafts, anteroposterior expanded radial heads and both absolutely and relatively long necks. In contrast, the SH sample differs from Neandertals in showing a high overall gracility as well as a high frequency (80%) of an anteriorly oriented radial tuberosity. Thus, like the cranial and dental remains from the SH site, characteristic Neandertal radial morphology is not present fully in the SH radii. We also analyzed the cross-sectional properties of the SH radial sample at two different levels: mid-shaft and at the midpoint of the neck length. When standardized by shaft length, no difference in the mid-shaft cross-sectional properties were found between the SH hominins, Neandertals and recent humans. Nevertheless, due to their long neck length, the SH hominins show a higher lever efficiency than either Neandertals or recent humans. Functionally, the SH radial morphology is consistent with more efficient pronation-supination and flexion-extension movements. The particular trait composition in the SH sample and Neandertals resembles more closely morphology evident in recent human males.

  6. Measuring the masses, radii and orbital eccentricities of sub-Neptunes with transit timing variations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Lissauer, Jack J.; Rowe, Jason; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2014-05-01

    Outside our solar system, there is a small sample of planets with known masses and radii, mostly hot jupiters whose radii are known from transit depths, and whose masses are determined from radial velocity spectroscopy (RV). In the absence of mass determinations via RV observations, transit timing variations (TTVs) offer a chance to probe perturbations between planets that pass close to one another or are near resonance, and hence dynamical fits to observed transit times can measure planetary masses and orbital parameters. Such modeling can probe planetary masses at longer orbital periods than RV targets, although not without some challenges. For example, in modeling pairwise planetary perturbations near first order mean motion resonances, a degeneracy between eccentricity and mass exists that limits the accuracy of mass determinations. Nevertheless, in several compact multiplanet systems, fitting complex TTV signals can break the degeneracy, permitting useful mass constraints, and precise measures of small but non-zero eccentricity.The precision in measuring the radius of a transiting planet rests on the uncertainty in the stellar radius, which is typically ~10% for targets with spectral follow-up. With dynamical fits, however, solutions for the orbital parameters including the eccentricity vectors can, alongside the transit light curves, tightly constrain the stellar density and radius. Alongside spectroscopic data, our dynamical fits to TTVs reduced the stellar and hence planetary radius uncertainties at Kepler-11 and Kepler-79 to just 2%, permitting useful planetary density determinations. In the case of Kepler-79, planetary bulk densities are remarkably low given the planetary masses. Indeed, several multiplanet systems characterized by TTV show much lower planetary densities than typical RV determinations in the same mass range. While this reflects the detection biases of both techniques, it also represents a growing sample of characterized systems of

  7. Measuring the Masses and Radii of Sub-Neptunes with Transit Timing Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Lissauer, J. J.; Rowe, J. F.; Fabrycky, D.

    2013-10-01

    The bounty of sub-Neptunes discovered by Kepler enables us to study a regime in planetary size and mass that is absent from the Solar System. This regime includes a transition from rocky planets to those with substantial amounts of volatiles-- in either ice mantles or deep atmospheres. Characterizing these worlds by their bulk densities can probe this transition, and this requires mass and radius determinations. Outside our solar system, there is a small sample of planets with known masses and radii, mostly hot jupiters whose radii are known from transit depths, and whose masses are determined from radial velocity spectroscopy (RV). In the absence of mass determinations via RV observations, transit timing variations (TTVs) offer a chance to probe perturbations between planets that pass close to one another or are near resonance, and hence dynamical fits to observed transit times can measure planetary masses and orbital parameters. Such modelling can probe planetary masses at longer orbital periods than RV targets, although not without some challenges. For example, in modeling pairwise planetary perturbations, a degeneracy between eccentricity and mass exists that limits the accuracy of mass determinations. Nevertheless, in several compact multiplanet systems, fitting complex TTV signals can break the degeneracy, permitting useful mass determinations. The precision in measuring the radius of a transiting planet rests on the uncertainty in the stellar radius, which is typically ~10% for targets with spectral follow-up. With dynamical fits, however, solutions for the orbital parameters including the eccentricity vectors can, alongside the transit lightcurves, tightly constrain the stellar density and radius. Revisiting the six-planet system of Kepler-11, our dynamical fits to TTVs, alongside spectroscopic data on the host star, reduced the stellar and hence planetary radius uncertainties to just 2%, permitting useful planetary density determinations. In the case of

  8. THE MASS-RADIUS RELATION FOR 65 EXOPLANETS SMALLER THAN 4 EARTH RADII

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Lauren M.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    2014-03-01

    We study the masses and radii of 65 exoplanets smaller than 4 R {sub ⊕} with orbital periods shorter than 100 days. We calculate the weighted mean densities of planets in bins of 0.5 R {sub ⊕} and identify a density maximum of 7.6  g cm{sup –3} at 1.4 R {sub ⊕}. On average, planets with radii up to R {sub P} = 1.5 R {sub ⊕} increase in density with increasing radius. Above 1.5 R {sub ⊕}, the average planet density rapidly decreases with increasing radius, indicating that these planets have a large fraction of volatiles by volume overlying a rocky core. Including the solar system terrestrial planets with the exoplanets below 1.5 R {sub ⊕}, we find ρ{sub P} = 2.43 + 3.39(R {sub P}/R {sub ⊕}) g cm{sup –3} for R {sub P} < 1.5 R {sub ⊕}, which is consistent with rocky compositions. For 1.5 ≤ R {sub P}/R {sub ⊕} < 4, we find M {sub P}/M {sub ⊕} = 2.69(R {sub P}/R {sub ⊕}){sup 0.93}. The rms of planet masses to the fit between 1.5 and 4 R {sub ⊕} is 4.3 M {sub ⊕} with reduced χ{sup 2} = 6.2. The large scatter indicates a diversity in planet composition at a given radius. The compositional diversity can be due to planets of a given volume (as determined by their large H/He envelopes) containing rocky cores of different masses or compositions.

  9. Neutron star radii, universal relations, and the role of prior distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Steiner, Andrew W.; Lattimer, James M.; Brown, Edward F.

    2016-02-02

    We investigate constraints on neutron star structure arising from the assumptions that neutron stars have crusts, that recent calculations of pure neutron matter limit the equation of state of neutron star matter near the nuclear saturation density, that the high-density equation of state is limited by causality and the largest high-accuracy neutron star mass measurement, and that general relativity is the correct theory of gravity. We explore the role of prior assumptions by considering two classes of equation of state models. In a first, the intermediate- and high-density behavior of the equation of state is parameterized by piecewise polytropes. Inmore » the second class, the high-density behavior of the equation of state is parameterized by piecewise continuous line segments. The smallest density at which high-density matter appears is varied in order to allow for strong phase transitions above the nuclear saturation density. We critically examine correlations among the pressure of matter, radii, maximum masses, the binding energy, the moment of inertia, and the tidal deformability, paying special attention to the sensitivity of these correlations to prior assumptions about the equation of state. It is possible to constrain the radii of 1.4 solar mass neutron stars to be larger than 10 km, even without consideration of additional astrophysical observations, for example, those from photospheric radius expansion bursts or quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries. We are able to improve the accuracy of known correlations between the moment of inertia and compactness as well as the binding energy and compactness. Furthermore, we also demonstrate the existence of a correlation between the neutron star binding energy and the moment of inertia.« less

  10. Neutron star radii, universal relations, and the role of prior distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Andrew W.; Lattimer, James M.; Brown, Edward F.

    2016-02-02

    We investigate constraints on neutron star structure arising from the assumptions that neutron stars have crusts, that recent calculations of pure neutron matter limit the equation of state of neutron star matter near the nuclear saturation density, that the high-density equation of state is limited by causality and the largest high-accuracy neutron star mass measurement, and that general relativity is the correct theory of gravity. We explore the role of prior assumptions by considering two classes of equation of state models. In a first, the intermediate- and high-density behavior of the equation of state is parameterized by piecewise polytropes. In the second class, the high-density behavior of the equation of state is parameterized by piecewise continuous line segments. The smallest density at which high-density matter appears is varied in order to allow for strong phase transitions above the nuclear saturation density. We critically examine correlations among the pressure of matter, radii, maximum masses, the binding energy, the moment of inertia, and the tidal deformability, paying special attention to the sensitivity of these correlations to prior assumptions about the equation of state. It is possible to constrain the radii of 1.4 solar mass neutron stars to be larger than 10 km, even without consideration of additional astrophysical observations, for example, those from photospheric radius expansion bursts or quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries. We are able to improve the accuracy of known correlations between the moment of inertia and compactness as well as the binding energy and compactness. Furthermore, we also demonstrate the existence of a correlation between the neutron star binding energy and the moment of inertia.

  11. Neutron star masses and radii from quiescent low-mass x-ray binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimer, James M.; Steiner, Andrew W. E-mail: steiner3@uw.edu

    2014-04-01

    We perform a systematic analysis of neutron star radius constraints from five quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries and examine how they depend on measurements of their distances and amounts of intervening absorbing material, as well as their assumed atmospheric compositions. We construct and calibrate to published results a semi-analytic model of the neutron star atmosphere which approximates these effects for the predicted masses and radii. Starting from mass and radius probability distributions established from hydrogen-atmosphere spectral fits of quiescent sources, we apply this model to compute alternate sets of probability distributions. We perform Bayesian analyses to estimate neutron star mass-radius curves and equation of state (EOS) parameters that best-fit each set of distributions, assuming the existence of a known low-density neutron star crustal EOS, a simple model for the high-density EOS, causality, and the observation that the neutron star maximum mass exceeds 2 M {sub ☉}. We compute the posterior probabilities for each set of distance measurements and assumptions about absorption and composition. We find that, within the context of our assumptions and our parameterized EOS models, some absorption models are disfavored. We find that neutron stars composed of hadrons are favored relative to those with exotic matter with strong phase transitions. In addition, models in which all five stars have hydrogen atmospheres are found to be weakly disfavored. Our most likely models predict neutron star radii that are consistent with current experimental results concerning the nature of the nucleon-nucleon interaction near the nuclear saturation density.

  12. Nuclear charge and neutron radii and nuclear matter: Trend analysis in Skyrme density-functional-theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, P.-G.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Radii of charge and neutron distributions are fundamental nuclear properties. They depend on both nuclear interaction parameters related to the equation of state of infinite nuclear matter and on quantal shell effects, which are strongly impacted by the presence of nuclear surface. Purpose: In this work, by studying the correlation of charge and neutron radii, and neutron skin, with nuclear matter parameters, we assess different mechanisms that drive nuclear sizes. Method: We apply nuclear density functional theory using a family of Skyrme functionals obtained by means of optimization protocols, which do not include any radius information. By performing the Monte Carlo sampling of reasonable functionals around the optimal parametrization, we scan all correlations between nuclear matter properties and observables characterizing charge and neutron distributions of spherical closed-shell nuclei 48Ca,208Pb, and 298Fl. Results: By considering the influence of various nuclear matter properties on charge and neutron radii in a multidimensional parameter space of Skyrme functionals, we demonstrate the existence of two strong relationships: (i) between the nuclear charge radii and the saturation density of symmetric nuclear matter ρ0, and (ii) between the neutron skins and the slope of the symmetry energy L . The impact of other nuclear matter properties on nuclear radii is weak or nonexistent. For functionals optimized to experimental binding energies only, proton and neutron radii are found to be weakly correlated due to canceling trends from different nuclear matter characteristics. Conclusion: The existence of only two strong relations connecting nuclear radii with nuclear matter properties has important consequences. First, by requiring that the nuclear functional reproduces the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter practically fixes the charge (or proton) radii, and vice versa. This explains the recent results of ab initio calculations

  13. LIGHT PRESSURE: Theoretical study of the light pressure force acting on a spherical dielectric particle of an arbitrary size in the interference field of two plane monochromatic electromagnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzatov, D. V.; Gaida, L. S.; Afanas'ev, Anatolii A.

    2008-12-01

    The light pressure force acting on a spherical dielectric particle in the interference field of two plane monochromatic electromagnetic waves is studied in detail for different particle radii and angles of incidence of waves.

  14. Effect of ionic radii on the Curie temperature in Ba1-x-ySrxCayTiO3 compounds

    PubMed Central

    Berenov, A.; Le Goupil, F.; Alford, N.

    2016-01-01

    A series of Ba1-x-ySrxCayTiO3 compounds were prepared with varying average ionic radii and cation disorder on A-site. All samples showed typical ferroelectric behavior. A simple empirical equation correlated Curie temperature, TC, with the values of ionic radii of A-site cations. This correlation was related to the distortion of TiO6 octahedra observed during neutron diffraction studies. The equation was used for the selection of compounds with predetermined values of TC. The effects of A-site ionic radii on the temperatures of phase transitions in Ba1-x-ySrxCayTiO3 were discussed. PMID:27324841

  15. Systematics of binding energies and radii based on realistic two-nucleon plus phenomenological three-nucleon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, A.; Roth, R.; Reinhardt, S.; Hergert, H.

    2010-08-15

    We investigate the influence of phenomenological three-nucleon interactions on the systematics of ground-state energies and charge radii throughout the whole nuclear mass range from {sup 4}He to {sup 208}Pb. The three-nucleon interactions supplement unitarily transformed two-body interactions constructed within the unitary correlation operator method or the similarity renormalization group approach. To be able to address heavy nuclei as well, we treat the many-body problem in Hartree-Fock plus many-body perturbation theory, which is sufficient to assess the systematics of energies and radii, and limit ourselves to regularized three-body contact interactions. We show that even with such a simplistic three-nucleon interaction a simultaneous reproduction of the experimental ground-state energies and charge radii can be achieved, which is not possible with unitarily transformed two-body interactions alone.

  16. Determination of ion track radii in amorphous matrices via formation of nano-clusters by ion-beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Buljan, M.; Karlusic, M.; Bogdanovic-Radovic, I.; Jaksic, M.; Radic, N.; Salamon, K.; Bernstorff, S.

    2012-09-03

    We report on a method for the determination of ion track radii, formed in amorphous materials by ion-beam irradiation. The method is based on the addition to an amorphous matrix of a small amount of foreign atoms, which easily diffuse and form clusters when the temperature is sufficiently increased. The irradiation causes clustering of these atoms, and the final separations of the formed clusters are dependent on the parameters of the ion-beam. Comparison of the separations between the clusters that are formed by ions with different properties in the same type of material enables the determination of ion-track radii.

  17. Discovery of a Subparsec Jet 4000 Schwarzschild Radii Away from the Central Engine of NGC 4258: Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrnstein, J. R.; Moran, J. M.; Greenhill, L. J.; Diamond, P. J.; Miyoshi, M.; Nakai, N.; Inoue, M.

    1997-06-01

    As the result of an error in the process of publication, the title of the paper ``Discovery of a Subparsec Jet 4000 Schwarzschild Radii Away from the Central Engine of NGC 4258'' by J. R. Herrnstein, J. M. Moran, L. J. Greenhill, P. J. Diamond, M. Miyoshi, M. Nakai, and M. Inoue (ApJ, 475, L17 [1997]) appeared in print incorrectly as ``Discovery of a Subparsec Jet 4000 Radii away from the Central Schwarzschild Engine of NGC 4258.'' The Press apologizes for this error.

  18. Determination of ion track radii in amorphous matrices via formation of nano-clusters by ion-beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buljan, M.; Karlušić, M.; Bogdanović-Radović, I.; Jakšić, M.; Salamon, K.; Bernstorff, S.; Radić, N.

    2012-09-01

    We report on a method for the determination of ion track radii, formed in amorphous materials by ion-beam irradiation. The method is based on the addition to an amorphous matrix of a small amount of foreign atoms, which easily diffuse and form clusters when the temperature is sufficiently increased. The irradiation causes clustering of these atoms, and the final separations of the formed clusters are dependent on the parameters of the ion-beam. Comparison of the separations between the clusters that are formed by ions with different properties in the same type of material enables the determination of ion-track radii.

  19. Energetic Particles Investigation (EPI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, H. M.; Mihalov, J. D.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Wibberenz, G.; Rinnert, K.; Gliem, F. O.; Bach, J.

    1992-05-01

    The EPI instrument operates during the pre-entry phase of the Galileo Probe. The main objective is the study of the energetic particle population in the inner Jovian magnetosphere and in the upper atmosphere. This will be achieved through omnidirectional measurements of electrons, protons, alpha-particles and heavy ions (Z greater than 2) and recording intensity profiles with a spatial resolution of about 0.02 Jupiter radii. Sectored data will also be obtained for electrons, protons, and alpha-particles to determine directional anisotropies and particle pitch angle distributions. The detector assembly is a two-element telescope using totally depleted circular silicon surface-barrier detectors surrounded by cylindrical tungsten shielding. The lower energy threshold of the particle species investigated during the Probe's pre-entry phase is determined by the material thickness of the Probe's rear heat shield which is required for heat protection of the scientific payload during entry into the Jovian atmosphere. The EPI instrument is combined with the Lightning and Radio Emission Detector and both instruments share one interface of the Probe's power, command, and data unit.

  20. Radii, masses, and ages of 18 bright stars using interferometry and new estimations of exoplanetary parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligi, R.; Creevey, O.; Mourard, D.; Crida, A.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Nardetto, N.; Perraut, K.; Schultheis, M.; Tallon-Bosc, I.; ten Brummelaar, T.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Accurate stellar parameters are needed in numerous domains of astrophysics. The position of stars on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is an important indication of their structure and evolution, and it helps improve stellar models. Furthermore, the age and mass of stars hosting planets are required elements for studying exoplanetary systems. Aims: We aim at determining accurate parameters of a set of 18 bright exoplanet host and potential host stars from interferometric measurements, photometry, and stellar models. Methods: Using the VEGA/CHARA interferometer operating in the visible domain, we measured the angular diameters of 18 stars, ten of which host exoplanets. We combined them with their distances to estimate their radii. We used photometry to derive their bolometric flux and, then, their effective temperature and luminosity to place them on the H-R diagram. We then used the PARSEC models to derive their best fit ages and masses, with error bars derived from Monte Carlo calculations. Results: Our interferometric measurements lead to an average of 1.9% uncertainty on angular diameters and 3% on stellar radii. There is good agreement between measured and indirect estimations of angular diameters (either from SED fitting or from surface brightness relations) for main sequence (MS) stars, but not as good for more evolved stars. For each star, we provide a likelihood map in the mass-age plane; typically, two distinct sets of solutions appear (an old and a young age). The errors on the ages and masses that we provide account for the metallicity uncertainties, which are often neglected by other works. From measurements of its radius and density, we also provide the mass of 55 Cnc independently of models. From the stellar masses, we provide new estimates of semi-major axes and minimum masses of exoplanets with reliable uncertainties. We also derive the radius, density, and mass of 55 Cnc e, a super-Earth that transits its stellar host. Our exoplanetary

  1. Two-qubit separability probabilities as joint functions of the Bloch radii of the qubit subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Paul B.

    2016-11-01

    We detect a certain pattern of behavior of separability probabilities p(rA,rB) for two-qubit systems endowed with Hilbert-Schmidt (HS), and more generally, random induced measures, where rA and rB are the Bloch radii (0≤rA,rB≤1) of the qubit reduced states (A,B). We observe a relative repulsion of radii effect, that is p(rA,rA)

  2. Variability of Stellar and Solar Radii and Effect on Planetary Orbits and Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leubner, I. H.

    2006-05-01

    Based on a quantitative model, the planets are relatively loosely connected to the solar system. This was previously presented for the stability of the solar planetary system as a function of solar radiative and solar mass loss (Joint Assembly 2005). The model led to the prediction of the transition from water to ice about 3.6 billion years ago, in close agreement with experimental Mars explorations (AGU Fall meeting 2005). The model also revealed that the planetary orbits depend on the radii of their stellar parent, e.g., the Sun. The model assumes that stellar and solar radii are a function of the equilibrium between the stellar surface gravitational forces and intrasolar thermonuclear expansion forces. The model quantifies changes of planetary orbits, orbital periods, and planetary surface cooling and warming as a function of solar radius changes. The dependence on solar radius is super-linear. An increase of solar radius results in increasing planetary orbits, increasing orbital periods, and lowering of surface temperatures. At a critical solar radius, planets will separate from the solar system. The model shows that planetary orbits are highly sensitive to very small (<<1%) variations of solar radius. Solar radius and planetary orbit changes can be linked to the planetary global climate. This was evaluated for Earth. The model shows that relatively small decreases of solar radius can lead to significant increases of Earth global temperatures. These temperature increases are in addition and above to the much-studied greenhouse effects. Relatively small increases of solar radius can lead to significant lowering of Earth surface temperatures that may have been related to ages. The Earth global temperature is predicted to change at a rate of 0.29C per 0.001% solar radius change, and of 0.90C per 1.0E06 km (0.67%) orbital change. For the stability of planetary orbits as a function of solar radius, the model predicts that Pluto, Earth, and Mercury will separate from

  3. A Chronology of Annual-Mean Effective Radii of Stratospheric Aerosols from Volcanic Eruptions During the Twentieth Century as Derived From Ground-based Spectral Extinction Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strothers, Richard B.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Stratospheric extinction can be derived from ground-based spectral photometric observations of the Sun and other stars (as well as from satellite and aircraft measurements, available since 1979), and is found to increase after large volcanic eruptions. This increased extinction shows a characteristic wavelength dependence that gives information about the chemical composition and the effective (or area weighted mean) radius of the particles responsible for it. Known to be tiny aerosols constituted of sulfuric acid in a water solution, the stratospheric particles at midlatitudes exhibit a remarkable uniformity of their column-averaged effective radii r(sub eff) in the first few months after the eruption. Considering the seven largest eruptions of the twentieth century, r(sub eff) at this phase of peak aerosol abundance is approx. 0.3 micrometers in all cases. A year later, r(sub eff) either has remained about the same size (almost certainly in the case of the Katmai eruption of 1912) or has increased to approx. 0.5 micrometers (definitely so for the Pinatubo eruption of 1991). The reasons for this divergence in aerosol growth are unknown.

  4. Estimating the masses and radii of neutron stars using NICER pulse waveform data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Frederick K.; Miller, M. Coleman

    2017-08-01

    The key scientific objective of the Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) is to precisely and reliably measure the mass M and radius R of several neutron stars, in order to tightly constrain the properties of cold ultradense matter. M and R will be measured by fitting energy-dependent pulse waveform models to the observed soft X-ray pulse waveforms of selected rotation-powered millisecond pulsars. These waveforms are thought to be produced by rotation with the stellar surface of hot spots located near the pulsar's magnetic polar caps. We have explored the accuracies and precisions with which NICER should be able to determine M and R, by analyzing synthetic waveform data using Bayesian statistical methods. Here we describe the pulse waveform models that will be used by the NICER mission, the scaling of the uncertainties in M and R estimates with the total number of counts, and the dependence of the uncertainties in M and R estimates on the rotational colatitudes of the hot spots and the inclination of the observer. We show that the shapes of the hot spots and modest variations in the temperature of the emission across them are unlikely to produce significant systematic errors. We find that NICER should be able to measure the masses and radii of a few neutron stars to within 5%.

  5. Tracing the stellar halo of an early type galaxy out to 25 effective radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rejkuba, Marina

    2016-08-01

    We have used ACS and WFC3 cameras on board HST to resolve stars in the halo of NGC 5128 out to 140 kpc (25 effective radii, R eff) along the major axis and 70 kpc (13 R eff) along the minor axis. This dataset provides an unprecedented radial coverage of stellar halo properties in any galaxy. Color-magnitude diagrams clearly reveal the presence of the red giant branch stars belonging to the halo of NGC 5128 even in the most distant fields. The V-I colors of the red giants enable us to measure the metallicity distribution in each field and so map the metallicity gradient over the sampled area. The stellar metallicity follows a shallow gradient and even out at 140 kpc (25 R eff) its median value does not go below [M/H]~-1 dex. We observe significant field-to-field metallicity and stellar density variations. The star counts are higher along the major axis when compared to minor axis field located 90 kpc from the galaxy centre, indicating flattening in the outer halo. These observational results provide new important constraints for the assembly history of the halo and the formation of this gE galaxy.

  6. The zero gravity curve and surface and radii for geostationary and geosynchronous satellite orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöberg, L. E.; Grafarend, E. W.; Joud, M. S. S.

    2017-02-01

    A geosynchronous satellite orbits the Earth along a constant longitude. A special case is the geostationary satellite that is located at a constant position above the equator. The ideal position of a geostationary satellite is at the level of zero gravity, i.e. at the geocentric radius where the gravitational force of the Earth equals the centrifugal force. These forces must be compensated for several perturbing forces, in particular for the lunisolar tides. Considering that the gravity field of the Earth varies not only radially but also laterally, this study focuses on the variations of zero gravity not only on the equator (for geostationary satellites) but also for various latitudes. It is found that the radius of a geostationary satellite deviates from its mean value of 42164.2 km only within ±2 m, mainly due to the spherical harmonic coefficient J22, which is related with the equatorial flattening of the Earth. Away from the equator the zero gravity surface deviates from the ideal radius of a geosynchronous satellite, and more so for higher latitudes. While the radius of the former surface increases towards infinity towards the poles, the latter decreases about 520 m from the equator to the pole. Tidal effects vary these radii within ±2.3 km.

  7. New determinations of far-side lunar radii from Apollo photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohan, S. N.

    1979-01-01

    Determinations of far side lunar radii based on the reduction of photogrammetric measurements derived from Apollo 16 photographs obtained during the trans-earth phase of the spacecraft trajectory are presented. Reduction is accomplished by determining the Apollo 16 metric camera orientation relative to control points on the lunar surface whose coordinates are known exactly, than charting the surface on the basis of data coverage. The positions of 66 surface features in the area between longitudes 90 and 130 deg E and 10 and 60 deg N relative to the center of mass of the moon, with a relative accuracy of 500 km, are presented. A topographical map which can resolve basin-sized features has been derived from radius determinations. It is found that the craters Fabry, Riemann and Szilard comprise a topographically depressed region about 500 km in diameter with a floor 2.4 to 3.4 km below the 1730.0 km reference sphere and 4.8 to 5.8 km below the northern rim of the unfilled basin.

  8. Quantifying mass segregation and new core radii for 54 Milky Way globular clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsbury, Ryan; Heyl, Jeremy; Richer, Harvey E-mail: heyl@phas.ubc.ca

    2013-11-20

    We present core radii for 54 Milky Way globular clusters determined by fitting King-Michie models to cumulative projected star count distributions. We find that fitting star counts rather than surface brightness profiles produces results that differ significantly due to the presence of mass segregation. The sample in each cluster is further broken down into various mass groups, each of which is fit independently, allowing us to determine how the concentration of each cluster varies with mass. The majority of the clusters in our sample show general agreement with the standard picture that more massive stars will be more centrally concentrated. We find that core radius versus stellar mass can be fit with a two-parameter power law. The slope of this power law is a value that describes the amount of mass segregation present in the cluster, and is measured independently of our distance from the cluster. This value correlates strongly with the core relaxation time and physical size of each cluster. Supplementary figures are also included showing the best fits and likelihood contours of fit parameters for all 54 clusters.

  9. Effective temperatures, angular diameters, distances and linear radii for 160 O and B stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underhill, A. B.; Divan, L.; Prevot-Burnichon, M.-L.; Doazan, V.

    1979-01-01

    This paper discusses effective temperatures, angular diameters, distances, and linear diameters that have been determined for 160 O and B stars on the basis of published UV spectrophotometry, visible and near-IR intermediate-band photometry, and model-atmosphere fluxes. The results are compared with previous measurements and calculations for main-sequence and giant O and B stars. It is found that: (1) the flux effective temperatures of O and B supergiants are systematically lower than those of main-sequence and giant stars of the same subtype; (2) the effective temperatures and radii of Beta Cep stars are the same as those of nonvariable stars of the same spectral type; (3) Be stars that do not have two Balmer jumps have effective temperatures very similar to those of normal B stars of the same subtype; (4) O and B stars increase in size from the main sequence to supergiants; and (5) late B supergiants are approximately twice as large as O9 supergiants.

  10. Fabrication of large radii toroidal surfaces by single point diamond turning

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, J.P.; Marlar, T.A.; Miller, A.C.

    1995-12-31

    An unconventional machining technique has been developed for producing relatively large radii quasi-toroidal surfaces which could not normally be produced by conventional diamond turning technology. The maximum radial swing capacity of a diamond turning lathe is the limiting factor for the rotational radius of any toroid. A typical diamond turned toroidal surface is produced when a part is rotated about the spindle axis while the diamond tool contours the surface with any curved path. Toric surfaces sliced horizontally, have been used in laser resonator cavities. This paper will address the fabrication of a special case of toroids where a rotating tool path is a circle whose center is offset from the rotational axis of the toroid by a distance greater than the minor radius of the tool path. The quasi-toroidal surfaces produced by this technique approximate all asymmetrical combinations of concave/convex sections of a torus. Other machine configurations have been reported which offer alternative approaches to the fabrication of concave asymmetric aspheric surfaces.

  11. Protein diffusion through charged nanopores with different radii at low ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Stroeve, Pieter; Rahman, Masoud; Naidu, Lekkala Dev; Chu, Gilbert; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Ramirez, Patricio; Mafe, Salvador

    2014-10-21

    The diffusion of two similar molecular weight proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and bovine haemoglobin (BHb), through nanoporous charged membranes with a wide range of pore radii is studied at low ionic strength. The effects of the solution pH and the membrane pore diameter on the pore permeability allow quantifying the electrostatic interaction between the charged pore and the protein. Because of the large screening Debye length, both surface and bulk diffusion occur simultaneously. By increasing the pore diameter, the permeability tends to the bulk self-diffusion coefficient for each protein. By decreasing the pore diameter, the charges on the pore surface electrostatically hinder the transport even at the isoelectric point of the protein. Surprisingly, even at pore sizes 100 times larger than the protein, the electrostatic hindrance still plays a major role in the transport. The experimental data are qualitatively explained using a two-region model for the membrane pore and approximated equations for the pH dependence of the protein and pore charges. The experimental and theoretical results should be useful for designing protein separation processes based on nanoporous charged membranes.

  12. A study of free convection heat transfer in a horizontal annulus with a large radii ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Hessami, M.A.; Pollard, A.; Rowe, R.D.; Ruth, R.W.

    1983-07-01

    Steady laminar natural convection heat transfer in a horizontal annulus with a large radii ratio (R) of 11.4 (and inner-cylinder diameter, D /SUB i/ , of 1.27 cm) has been investigated. Experimental data for air, glycerin and mercury in the ranges 0.023 less than or equal to Pr less than or equal to 10,000 and 0.2 less than or equal to Gr /SUB D/ /SUB i/ less than or equal to X 10/sup 6/ are reported. The influence of the variation of fluid properties as compared to the usual assumption of constant fluid properties has been explored numerically for air and glycerin. The heat transfer computations for air do not change with variation of fluid properties, whereas for glycerin significant differences in the local heat transfer distributions and flow patterns are observed. The experimental data have been correlated with some other data from the literature for smaller values of R, and it has been shown that the heat transfer from the inner-cylinder should be almost the same as that in an infinite medium when R greater than or equal to 10.

  13. Hydrogen bond radii for the hydrogen halides and van der Waals radius of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Pankaj K.; Arunan, E.

    2001-03-01

    In this article, the effective size of hydrogen in the hydrogen halides forming hydrogen bonded complexes is estimated. The scheme proposed by Bhadane and Gadre [J. Chem. Phys. 107, 5625 (1997)] for estimating the size of hydrogen in HF is extended to the other hydrogen halides (HCl and HBr) and HCN. It is noted that the radius of H atom in HF, HCl, HBr, and HCN are, respectively, 0.55±0.07, 0.74±0.08, 0.80±0.11, and 0.93±0.07 Å. The radii found for HF, HCl, and HBr show a strong inverse correlation with the dipole moment of the HX. From this correlation the radius of H atom in HI is estimated to be 0.90±0.11 Å. By extrapolating to zero dipole moment, the van der Waals radius of H atom is determined to be 1.0±0.1 Å, reasonably close to the value proposed by Pauling, 1.2 Å.

  14. Radii of the bound states in 16N from the asymptotic normalization coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, E. T.; Guo, B.; Li, Z. H.; Wang, Y. B.; Li, Y. J.; Wu, Z. D.; Su, J.; Pang, D. Y.; Bai, X. X.; Du, X. C.; Fan, Q. W.; Gan, L.; Han, Z. Y.; Hao, X.; Hu, S. P.; He, J. J.; Jing, L.; Jin, S. J.; Li, L.; Li, X. Y.; Li, Z. C.; Lian, G.; Liu, J. C.; Luo, Q.; Qiao, L. H.; Shen, Y. P.; Sun, H. B.; Yan, S. Q.; Yu, X. Q.; Zeng, S.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, L. Y.; Zhang, W. J.; Zhou, Y.; Liu, W. P.

    2016-11-01

    The asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANCs) of the virtual decay 16N → 15N + n are extracted from the 15N(7Li, 6Li)16N reaction populating the ground and first three excited states in 16N. The root-mean-square (rms) radii of the valence neutron in these four low-lying 16N states are then derived by using the ANCs. The probabilities of the valence neutron staying out of the core potentials are found to be 31% ± 8%, 58% ± 12%, 32% ± 8%, and 60% ± 12%. The present results support the conclusion that a one-neutron halo may be formed in the 16N first and third excited states, while the ground and second excited states do not have a one-neutron halo structure. However, the core excitation effect has a strong influence on the one-neutron halo structure of the ground and first excited states in 16N. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11505117, 11490560, 11475264, 11321064, 11375269), Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province (2015A030310012), 973 program of China (2013CB834406) National key Research and Development Province (2016YFA0400502)

  15. Alfvenic Turbulence from the Sun to 65 Solar Radii: Numerical predictions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, J. C.; Chandran, B. D. G.

    2015-12-01

    The upcoming NASA Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission will fly to within 9 solar radii from the solar surface, about 7 times closer to the Sun than any previous spacecraft has ever reached. This historic mission will gather unprecedented remote-sensing data and the first in-situ measurements of the plasma in the solar atmosphere, which will revolutionize our knowledge and understanding of turbulence and other processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind. This close to the Sun the background solar-wind properties are highly inhomogeneous. As a result, outward-propagating Alfven waves (AWs) arising from the random motions of the photospheric magnetic-field footpoints undergo strong non-WKB reflections and trigger a vigorous turbulent cascade. In this talk I will discuss recent progress in the understanding of reflection-driven Alfven turbulence in this scenario by means of high-resolution numerical simulations, with the goal of predicting the detailed nature of the velocity and magnetic field fluctuations that the SPP mission will measure. In particular, I will place special emphasis on relating the simulations to relevant physical mechanisms that might govern the radial evolution of the turbulence spectra of outward/inward-propagating fluctuations and discuss the conditions that lead to universal power-laws.

  16. Flow in Thin Streamer Boundaries, Streamer Stalks, and Plumes Between 2 and 10 Solar Radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Nerney, S.

    2005-01-01

    Slow solar wind is believed to arise in the legs or near the cusp of streamers, inside the brightness boundary. In an earlier study, we used an analytic model of flow in this layer to analyze the effect of the magnetic field on the geometry of the flow. That study successfully described those conditions that can lead to a decrease of the flow speed with increasing height near the cusp of the closed magnetic helmet inside the streamer. We have generalized that model to describe outflow in an arbitrarily thin layer inside the brightness boundary. The flow geometry now can also be constructive or divergent above the cusp and we show solutions of this type. A diverging streamer or ray above 2-3 solar radii is shown to indicate the plasma beta is greater than unity inside the streamer and less than unity outside. The same argument can be used to discover the height above which the plasma beta in plumes, inside coronal holes, is greater than unity.

  17. Interferometric observation of the F-corona radial velocities fields between 3 and 7 solar radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheglov, P. V.; Shestakova, L. I.; Aimanov, A. K.

    During the July 31, 1981 solar eclipse, F-corona interferograms near Mg I 5184 A were obtained using a Fabry-Perot etalon with an FWHM of 0.5 A (corresponding to 30 km/sec) and an image tube. Radial velocities V(r) of the interplanetary dust (ID) were measured in different directions. Both prograde and retrograde motions of ID in the ecliptic region is discovered. Most of velocity values do not exceed 50 km/sec. A negative velocity component appears after averaging all V(r) for all directions. Its average increases to -20 km/sec toward the sun. Some ejections are observed. The strongest (+130 km/sec) is located at the north ecliptic pole at a distance of 6 to 7 solar radii. From the lack of unshifted Fraunhofer lines in the scattered sky light, it is concluded that the sky brigntness continuous component is predominant and its source is K-corona scattered light in the earth's atmosphere.

  18. Structure of the magnetic field at altitudes of 1-1.15 solar radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtemov, Z. S.; Stepanyan, N. N.; Fainshtein, V. G.; Rudenko, G. V.

    2016-09-01

    An analysis of the characteristics of unipolar structures detected at latitudes from -40° to +40°, longitudes of 0°-360°, and altitudes of 1-1.15 solar radii during the period from May 1996 (the 23rd solar minimum) to October 2000 (the 23rd solar maximum) has been carried out. Synoptic maps of the solar radial magnetic field calculated in a potential approximation are used. The boundaries between unipolar structures with opposite magnetic polarities ("+/-" and "-/+" polarities) form chains extending along meridians at all the considered latitudes and altitudes. Depending on the latitude, the single-peaked distributions of the number of structures found at the lowest altitudes are replaced by double-peaked distributions at higher altitudes. The time variations of the total number of structures are non-monotonic. The growth in the number of unipolar structures begins before the growth in the Wolf number. This indicates that new unipolar structures already appear together with flocculi, preceding the formation of sunspots. It is found that structures with positive field have larger mean sizes that do structures with negative field. The polar field in the northern hemisphere penetrates to middle latitudes of the southern hemisphere. The existence of sets of structures with typical sizes is shown. The sizes of the smallest structures vary little with latitude, but increase slightly with altitude.

  19. Molecular single-bond covalent radii for elements 1-118.

    PubMed

    Pyykkö, Pekka; Atsumi, Michiko

    2009-01-01

    A self-consistent system of additive covalent radii, R(AB)=r(A) + r(B), is set up for the entire periodic table, Groups 1-18, Z=1-118. The primary bond lengths, R, are taken from experimental or theoretical data corresponding to chosen group valencies. All r(E) values are obtained from the same fit. Both E-E, E-H, and E-CH(3) data are incorporated for most elements, E. Many E-E' data inside the same group are included. For the late main groups, the system is close to that of Pauling. For other elements it is close to the methyl-based one of Suresh and Koga [J. Phys. Chem. A 2001, 105, 5940] and its predecessors. For the diatomic alkalis MM' and halides XX', separate fits give a very high accuracy. These primary data are then absorbed with the rest. The most notable exclusion are the transition-metal halides and chalcogenides which are regarded as partial multiple bonds. Other anomalies include H(2) and F(2). The standard deviation for the 410 included data points is 2.8 pm.

  20. Observations of T Tauri Disks at Sub-AU Radii: Implications for Magnetospheric Accretion and Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisner, J. A.; Hillenbrand, L. A.; White, R. J.; Akeson, R. L.; Sargent, A. I.

    2005-04-01

    We determine inner disk sizes and temperatures for four solar-type (1-2 Msolar) classical T Tauri stars, AS 207A, V2508 Oph, AS 205A, and PX Vul, using 2.2 μm observations from the Keck Interferometer. Nearly contemporaneous near-IR adaptive optics imaging photometry, optical photometry, and high-dispersion optical spectroscopy are used to distinguish contributions from the inner disks and central stars in the interferometric observations. In addition, the spectroscopic and photometric data provide estimates of stellar properties, mass accretion rates, and disk corotation radii. We model our interferometric and photometric data in the context of geometrically flat accretion disk models with inner holes, and flared disks with puffed-up inner walls. Models incorporating puffed-up inner disk walls generally provide better fits to the data, similar to previous results for higher mass Herbig Ae stars. Our measured inner disk sizes are larger than disk truncation radii predicted by magnetospheric accretion models, with larger discrepancies for sources with higher mass accretion rates. We suggest that our measured sizes correspond to dust sublimation radii, and that optically thin gaseous material may extend farther inward to the magnetospheric truncation radii. Finally, our inner disk measurements constrain the location of terrestrial planet formation as well as potential mechanisms for halting giant planet migration.

  1. Two-Particle Interferometry of 200 GeV Au+Au Collisions at PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, M

    2004-04-19

    The PHENIX experiment has measured pion-pion, kaon-kaon, and proton-proton correlations in Au+Au collisions at {radical}S{sub NN} = 200GeV. The correlations are fit to extract radii using both the Bowler Coulomb correction and full calculation of the two-particle wave function. The resulting radii are similar for all three species and decrease with increasing k{sub t} as expected for collective flow. The R{sub out} and R{sub side} radii are approximately equal indicating a short emission duration.

  2. Research on the drag reduction performance induced by the counterflowing jet for waverider with variable blunt radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shi-bin; Wang, Zhen-guo; Barakos, George N.; Huang, Wei; Steijl, Rene

    2016-10-01

    Waverider will endure the huge aero-heating in the hypersonic flow, thus, it need be blunt for the leading edge. However, the aerodynamic performance will decrease for the blunt waverider because of the drag hoik. How to improve the aerodynamic performance and reduce the drag and aero-heating is very important. The variable blunt radii method will improve the aerodynamic performance, however, the huge aero-heating and bow shock wave at the head is still serious. In the current study, opposing jet is used in the waverider with variable blunt radii to improve its performance. The three-dimensional coupled implicit Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes(RANS) equation and the two equation SST k-ω turbulence model have been utilized to obtain the flow field properties. The numerical method has been validated against the available experimental data in the open literature. The obtained results show that the L/D will drop 7-8% when R changes from 2 to 8. The lift coefficient will increase, and the drag coefficient almost keeps the same when the variable blunt radii method is adopted, and the L/D will increase. The variable blunt radii method is very useful to improve the whole characteristics of blunt waverider and the L/D can improve 3%. The combination of the variable blunt radii method and opposing jet is a novel way to improve the whole performance of blunt waverider, and L/D can improve 4-5%. The aperture as a novel way of opposing jet is suitable for blunt waverider and also useful to improve the aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic characteristics of waverider in the hypersonic flow. There is the optimal P0in/P0 that can make the detached shock wave reattach the lower surface again so that the blunt waverider can get the better aerodynamic performance.

  3. Radii and Mass-loss Rates of Type IIb Supernova Progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouchi, Ryoma; Maeda, Keiichi

    2017-05-01

    Several Type IIb supernovae (SNe IIb) have been extensively studied, both in terms of the progenitor radius and the mass-loss rate in the final centuries before the explosion. While the sample is still limited, evidence has been accumulating that the final mass-loss rate tends to be larger for a more extended progenitor, with the difference exceeding an order of magnitude between the more and less extended progenitors. The high mass-loss rates inferred for the more extended progenitors are not readily explained by a prescription commonly used for a single stellar wind. In this paper, we calculate a grid of binary evolution models. We show that the observational relation in the progenitor radii and mass-loss rates may be a consequence of non-conservative mass transfer in the final phase of progenitor evolution without fine tuning. Further, we find a possible link between SNe IIb and SNe IIn. The binary scenario for SNe IIb inevitably leads to a population of SN progenitors surrounded by dense circumstellar matter (CSM) due to extensive mass loss (\\dot{M}≳ {10}-4 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1) in the binary origin. About 4% of all observed SNe IIn are predicted to have dense CSM, produced by binary non-conservative mass transfer, whose observed characteristics are distinguishable from SNe IIn from other scenarios. Indeed, such SNe may be observationally dominated by systems experiencing huge mass loss in the final 103 yr, leading to luminous SNe IIn or initially bright SNe IIP or IIL with characteristics of SNe IIn in their early spectra.

  4. Fabrication of large radii toroidal surfaces by single point diamond turning

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, J.P.; Marlar, T.A.; Miller, A.C.; Paterson, R. L.

    1995-12-31

    An unconventional machining technique has been developed for producing relatively large radii quasi-toroidal surfaces which could not normally be produced by conventional diamond turning technology. The maximum radial swing capacity of a diamond turning lathe is the limiting factor for the rotational radius of any toroid. A typical diamond turned toroidal surface is produced when a part is rotated about the spindle axis while the diamond tool contours the surface with any curved path. Toric surfaces sliced horizontally, have been used in laser resonator cavities. This paper will address the fabrication of a special case of toroids where a rotating tool path is a circle whose center is offset from the rotational axis of the toroid by a distance greater than the minor radius of the tool path. The quasi-toroidal surfaces produced by this technique approximate all asymmetrical combinations of concave/convex section of a torus. Other machine configurations have been reported which offer alternative approaches to the fabrication of concave asymmetric aspheric surfaces. Prototypes of unique lenses each having two quasi-toroidal surfaces were fabricated in the Ultraprecision Manufacturing Technology Center at form key components of a scanned laser focusing system. As an example of the problem faced, the specifications for one of the surfaces was equivalent to a section of a torus with a two meter diameter hole. The lenses were fabricated on a Nanoform 600 diamond turning lathe. This is a numerically controlled two axis T-base lathe with an air bearing spindle and oil hydrostatic slides. The maximum radial swing for this machine is approximately 0.3 meters.

  5. THE INNERMOST COLLIMATION STRUCTURE OF THE M87 JET DOWN TO ∼10 SCHWARZSCHILD RADII

    SciTech Connect

    Hada, Kazuhiro; Giroletti, Marcello; Giovannini, Gabriele; Kino, Motoki; Doi, Akihiro; Nagai, Hiroshi; Honma, Mareki; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki

    2013-09-20

    We investigated the detailed inner jet structure of M87 using Very Long Baseline Array data at 2, 5, 8.4, 15, 23.8, 43, and 86 GHz, especially focusing on the multi-frequency properties of the radio core at the jet base. First, we measured the size of the core region transverse to the jet axis, defined as W{sub c}, at each frequency ν, and found a relation between W{sub c} and ν: W{sub c}(ν)∝ν{sup –0.71±0.05}. Then, by combining W{sub c}(ν) and the frequency dependence of the core position r{sub c}(ν), which was obtained in our previous study, we constructed a collimation profile of the innermost jet W{sub c}(r) down to ∼10 Schwarzschild radii (R{sub s}) from the central black hole. We found that W{sub c}(r) smoothly connects with the width profile of the outer edge-brightened, parabolic jet and then follows a similar radial dependence down to several tens of R{sub s}. Closer to the black hole, the measured radial profile suggests a possible change in the jet collimation shape from the outer parabolic one, where the jet shape tends to become more radially oriented. This result could be related to a magnetic collimation process or/and interactions with surrounding materials at the jet base. The present results shed light on the importance of higher-sensitivity/resolution imaging studies of M87 at 86, 43, and 22 GHz; these studies should be examined more rigorously.

  6. Observations of solar energetic particles at a synchronous orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takenaka, T.; Ohi, Y.; Yanagimachi, T.; Ito, K.; Kohno, T.; Sakurai, K.

    1985-01-01

    The Space Environment Monitors (SEM) on board the Japanese geostationary meteorological satellites (GMS-1 and GMS-2) observed energetic protons, alpha particles and electrons continuously for February 1978 to September 1984. The satellites were at 6.6 Earth radii above 140 deg E equator.

  7. Determination of Particle Size by Diffraction of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinard, Phillip M.

    1974-01-01

    Describes a simplified diffraction experiment offered in a workshop with the purpose of illustrating to high school students the relation of science to society. The radii determined for cigarette smoke particles range from 0.2 to 0.5 micrometer in this experiment. Included is a description of the diffraction theory. (CC)

  8. Particle acceleration in axisymmetric pulsar current sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerutti, Benoît; Philippov, Alexander; Parfrey, Kyle; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2015-03-01

    The equatorial current sheet in pulsar magnetospheres is often regarded as an ideal site for particle acceleration via relativistic reconnection. Using 2D spherical particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate particle acceleration in the axisymmetric pulsar magnetosphere as a function of the injected plasma multiplicity and magnetization. We observe a clear transition from a highly charge-separated magnetosphere for low plasma injection with little current and spin-down power, to a nearly force-free solution for high plasma multiplicity characterized by a prominent equatorial current sheet and high spin-down power. We find significant magnetic dissipation in the current sheet, up to 30 per cent within 5 light-cylinder radii in the high-multiplicity regime. The simulations unambiguously demonstrate that the dissipated Poynting flux is efficiently channelled to the particles in the sheet, close to the Y-point within about 1-2 light-cylinder radii from the star. The mean particle energy in the sheet is given by the upstream plasma magnetization at the light cylinder. The study of particle orbits shows that all energetic particles originate from the boundary layer between the open and the closed field lines. Energetic positrons always stream outwards, while high-energy electrons precipitate back towards the star through the sheet and along the separatrices, which may result in auroral-like emission. Our results suggest that the current sheet and the separatrices may be the main source of high-energy radiation in young pulsars.

  9. Charge radii and electromagnetic moments of Li and Be isotopes from the ab initio no-core shell model

    SciTech Connect

    Forssen, C.; Caurier, E.; Navratil, P.

    2009-02-15

    Recently, charge radii and ground-state electromagnetic moments of Li and Be isotopes were measured precisely. We have performed large-scale ab initio no-core shell model calculations for these isotopes using high-precision nucleon-nucleon potentials. The isotopic trends of our computed charge radii and quadrupole and magnetic-dipole moments are in good agreement with experimental results with the exception of the {sup 11}Li charge radius. The magnetic moments are in particular well described, whereas the absolute magnitudes of the quadrupole moments are about 10% too small. The small magnitude of the {sup 6}Li quadrupole moment is reproduced, and with the CD-Bonn NN potential, also its correct sign.

  10. Proton radii of {sup 4,6,8}He isotopes from high-precision nucleon-nucleon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Caurier, E.; Navratil, P.

    2006-02-15

    Recently, precision laser spectroscopy on {sup 6}He atoms determined accurately the isotope shift between {sup 4}He and {sup 6}He and, consequently, the charge radius of {sup 6}He. A similar experiment for {sup 8}He is under way. We have performed large-scale ab initio calculations for {sup 4,6,8}He isotopes using high-precision nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions within the no-core shell model (NCSM) approach. With the CD-Bonn 2000 NN potential we found point-proton root-mean-square (rms) radii of {sup 4}He and {sup 6}He 1.45(1) fm and 1.89(4), respectively, in agreement with experiment and predict the {sup 8}He point-proton rms radius to be 1.88(6) fm. At the same time, our calculations show that the recently developed nonlocal INOY NN potential gives binding energies closer to experiment, but underestimates the charge radii.

  11. A Hard Look at Neutron Star Radii and Disks with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jon

    2013-10-01

    We request 40 ks observations of Cygnus X-2, 4U 1636-53, GX 17+2 and 4U 1705-44, jointly with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR. The primary goals are to test the ubiquity of relativistic lines in "Z" and "atoll" sources, and to obtain constraints on stellar radii and/or inner disk radii in cases where relativistic lines are found. With NuSTAR as a guide, we will determine when pile-up has been removed from the EPIC-pn ``timing'' mode observations via the exclusion of central pixels. We can then fully leverage the superior resolution of the EPIC-pn in the Fe K band in order to check for ionized disk winds that could distort disk reflection. The low energy coverage of XMM-Newton will give the best possible contraints on the direct continuum and the neutral line-of-sight absorption.

  12. Masses and Charge Radii of {sup 17-22}Ne and the Two-Proton-Halo Candidate {sup 17}Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Geithner, W.; Kappertz, S.; Keim, M.; Neugart, R.; Wilbert, S.; Neff, T.; Feldmeier, H.; Herfurth, F.; Yazidjian, C.; Audi, G.; Guenaut, C.; Lunney, D.; Blaum, K.; George, S.; Delahaye, P.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kowalska, M.; Herlert, A.; Kluge, H.-J.; Lievens, P.

    2008-12-19

    High-precision mass and charge radius measurements on {sup 17-22}Ne, including the proton-halo candidate {sup 17}Ne, have been performed with Penning trap mass spectrometry and collinear laser spectroscopy. The {sup 17}Ne mass uncertainty is improved by factor 50, and the charge radii of {sup 17-19}Ne are determined for the first time. The fermionic molecular dynamics model explains the pronounced changes in the ground-state structure. It attributes the large charge radius of {sup 17}Ne to an extended proton configuration with an s{sup 2} component of about 40%. In {sup 18}Ne the smaller radius is due to a significantly smaller s{sup 2} component. The radii increase again for {sup 19-22}Ne due to cluster admixtures.

  13. Charge radii and electromagnetic moments of Li and Be isotopes from the ab initio no-core shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forssén, C.; Caurier, E.; Navrátil, P.

    2009-02-01

    Recently, charge radii and ground-state electromagnetic moments of Li and Be isotopes were measured precisely. We have performed large-scale ab initio no-core shell model calculations for these isotopes using high-precision nucleon-nucleon potentials. The isotopic trends of our computed charge radii and quadrupole and magnetic-dipole moments are in good agreement with experimental results with the exception of the Li11 charge radius. The magnetic moments are in particular well described, whereas the absolute magnitudes of the quadrupole moments are about 10% too small. The small magnitude of the Li6 quadrupole moment is reproduced, and with the CD-Bonn NN potential, also its correct sign.

  14. Neutron star radii and crusts: Uncertainties and unified equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, M.; Providência, C.; Raduta, Ad. R.; Gulminelli, F.; Zdunik, J. L.; Haensel, P.; Bejger, M.

    2016-09-01

    The uncertainties in neutron star radii and crust properties due to our limited knowledge of the equation of state are quantitatively analyzed. We first demonstrate the importance of a unified microscopic description for the different baryonic densities of the star. If the pressure functional is obtained matching a crust and a core equation of state based on models with different properties at nuclear matter saturation, the uncertainties can be as large as ˜30 % for the crust thickness and 4% for the radius. Necessary conditions for causal and thermodynamically consistent matchings between the core and the crust are formulated and their consequences examined. A large set of unified equations of state for purely nucleonic matter is obtained based on twenty-four Skyrme interactions and nine relativistic mean-field nuclear parametrizations. In addition, for relativistic models fifteen equations of state including a transition to hyperonic matter at high density are presented. All these equations of state have in common the property of describing a 2 M⊙ star and of being causal within stable neutron stars. Spans of ˜3 and ˜4 km are obtained for the radius of, respectively, 1.0 M⊙ and 2.0 M⊙ stars. Applying a set of nine further constraints from experiment and ab initio calculations the uncertainty is reduced to ˜1 and 2 km, respectively. These residual uncertainties reflect lack of constraints at large densities and insufficient information on the density dependence of the equation of state near the nuclear matter saturation point. The most important parameter to be constrained is shown to be the symmetry energy slope L . Indeed, this parameter exhibits a linear correlation with the stellar radius, which is particularly clear for small mass stars around 1.0 M⊙ . The other equation-of-state parameters do not show clear correlations with the radius, within the present uncertainties. Potential constraints on L , the neutron star radius, and the equation of

  15. Kinematics of the jet in M 87 on scales of 100-1000 Schwarzschild radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, F.; Lobanov, A. P.; Walker, R. C.; Hardee, P. E.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) imaging of radio emission from extragalactic jets provides a unique probe of physical mechanisms governing the launching, acceleration, and collimation of relativistic outflows. Aims: VLBI imaging of the jet in the nearby active galaxy M 87 enables morphological and kinematic studies to be done on linear scales down to 100 Schwarzschild radii (Rs). Methods: The two-dimensional structure and kinematics of the jet in M 87 (NGC 4486) have been studied by applying the wavelet-based image segmentation and evaluation (WISE) method to 11 images obtained from multi-epoch Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations made in January-August 2007 at 43 GHz (λ = 7 mm). Results: The WISE analysis recovers a detailed two-dimensional velocity field in the jet in M 87 at sub-parsec scales. The observed evolution of the flow velocity with distance from the jet base can be explained in the framework of MHD jet acceleration and Poynting flux conversion. A linear acceleration regime is observed up to zobs 2 mas. The acceleration is reduced at larger scales, which is consistent with saturation of Poynting flux conversion. Stacked cross correlation analysis of the images reveals a pronounced stratification of the flow. The flow consists of a slow, mildly relativistic layer (moving at β 0.5c), associated either with instability pattern speed or an outer wind, and a fast, accelerating stream line (with β 0.92, corresponding to a bulk Lorentz factor γ 2.5). A systematic difference of the apparent speeds in the northern and southern limbs of the jet is detected, providing evidence for jet rotation. The angular velocity of the magnetic field line associated with this rotation suggests that the jet in M 87 is launched in the inner part of the disk, at a distance r0 5Rs from the central engine. Conclusions: The combined results of the analysis imply that MHD acceleration and conversion of Poynting flux to kinetic energy play the dominant

  16. An improved algorithm for inferring neutron star masses and radii using NICER waveform data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Frederick K.; Miller, M. Coleman

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new, faster Bayesian analysis algorithm that enables us to use energy-resolved waveforms of X-ray burst oscillations, like those that will be obtained using NICER, to estimate quickly the masses and radii of rapidly rotating, oblate neutron stars and determine the uncertainties in these estimates. We use the oblate-Schwarzschild (OS) approximation, which Cadeau et al. (2007) showed provides a very accurate description of the waveforms produced by hot spots on rapidly rotating, oblate neutron stars. We show that the angular radius of the hot spot and a phase-independent but otherwise arbitrary background must be included as part of the fit; to do otherwise is observationally incorrect and leads to misleadingly tight constraints on the mass and radius. A simple, single-hot-spot waveform model with 30 energy channels has 38 parameters. If the waveform data is informative, i.e., if they tightly constrain the mass M and the equatorial radius R of the star, the high-probability regions of the full parameter space are small. A grid search of this space would therefore require a prohibitive number of waveform computations. Here we describe a different procedure that is much more efficient. This new procedure (1) generates waveforms by interpolating in a table of pre-computed waveforms and (2) computes bounding ellipsoids that encompass points in the waveform parameter space that have interestingly high likelihoods. Using these bounding ellipsoids typically reduces the volume of the Monte Carlo integration by a factor ~ 30. The net result of these improvements is that whereas the analysis procedure used in Lo et al. (2013) took 50-150 clock hours on a 150-core cluster and did not search the (M,R) volume of interest, the new analysis procedure takes 50-150 clock hours on a 5-core desktop computer to perform a completely blind search of the full volume, despite the additional complexity of the OS waveform model used in the new algorithm.

  17. On neutron stars in f(R) theories: Small radii, large masses and large energy emitted in a merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio Resco, Miguel; de la Cruz-Dombriz, Álvaro; Llanes Estrada, Felipe J.; Zapatero Castrillo, Víctor

    2016-09-01

    In the context of f(R) gravity theories, we show that the apparent mass of a neutron star as seen from an observer at infinity is numerically calculable but requires careful matching, first at the star's edge, between interior and exterior solutions, none of them being totally Schwarzschild-like but presenting instead small oscillations of the curvature scalar R; and second at large radii, where the Newtonian potential is used to identify the mass of the neutron star. We find that for the same equation of state, this mass definition is always larger than its general relativistic counterpart. We exemplify this with quadratic R2 and Hu-Sawicki-like modifications of the standard General Relativity action. Therefore, the finding of two-solar mass neutron stars basically imposes no constraint on stable f(R) theories. However, star radii are in general smaller than in General Relativity, which can give an observational handle on such classes of models at the astrophysical level. Both larger masses and smaller matter radii are due to much of the apparent effective energy residing in the outer metric for scalar-tensor theories. Finally, because the f(R) neutron star masses can be much larger than General Relativity counterparts, the total energy available for radiating gravitational waves could be of order several solar masses, and thus a merger of these stars constitutes an interesting wave source.

  18. The stellar accretion origin of stellar population gradients at large radii in massive, early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, Michaela; Naab, Thorsten

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the differential impact of physical mechanisms, mergers (stellar accretion) and internal energetic phenomena, on the evolution of stellar population gradients in massive, present-day galaxies employing a set of high-resolved, cosmological zoom simulations. We demonstrate that negative metallicity and color gradients at large radii (>2Reff) originate from the accretion of metal-poor stellar systems. At larger radii, galaxies become typically more dominated by stars accreted from satellite galaxies in major and minor mergers. However, only strong galactic winds can sufficiently reduce the metallicity content of the accreted stars to realistically steepen the outer metallicity and colour gradients in agreement with present-day observations. In contrast, the gradients of the models without winds are inconsistent with observations (too flat). In the wind model, colour and metallicity gradients are significantly steeper for systems which have accreted stars in minor mergers, while galaxies with major mergers have relatively flat gradients, confirming previous results. This analysis greatly highlights the importance of both energetic processes and merger events for stellar population properties of massive galaxies at large radii. Our results are expected to significantly contribute to the interpretation of current and up-coming IFU surveys (like MaNGA and Califa), which in turn can help to constrain models for energetic processes in simulations.

  19. Strong correlations of neutron star radii with the slopes of nuclear matter incompressibility and symmetry energy at saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, N.; Agrawal, B. K.; Fortin, M.; Pais, H.; Providência, C.; Raduta, Ad. R.; Sulaksono, A.

    2016-11-01

    We examine the correlations of neutron star radii with the nuclear matter incompressibility, symmetry energy, and their slopes, which are the key parameters of the equation of state (EoS) of asymmetric nuclear matter. The neutron star radii and the EoS parameters are evaluated using a representative set of 24 Skyrme-type effective forces and 18 relativistic mean field models, and two microscopic calculations, all describing 2 M⊙ neutron stars. Unified EoSs for the inner-crust-core region have been built for all the phenomenological models, both relativistic and nonrelativistic. Our investigation shows the existence of a strong correlation of the neutron star radii with the linear combination of the slopes of the nuclear matter incompressibility and the symmetry energy coefficients at the saturation density. Such correlations are found to be almost independent of the neutron star mass in the range 0.6 -1.8 M⊙ . This correlation can be linked to the empirical relation existing between the star radius and the pressure at a nucleonic density between one and two times saturation density, and the dependence of the pressure on the nuclear matter incompressibility, its slope, and the symmetry energy slope. The slopes of the nuclear matter incompressibility and the symmetry energy coefficients as estimated from the finite nuclei data yield the radius of a 1.4 M⊙ neutron star in the range 11.09 -12.86 km.

  20. Uniform spatial distribution of collagen fibril radii within tendon implies local activation of pC-collagen at individual fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutenberg, Andrew D.; Brown, Aidan I.; Kreplak, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    Collagen fibril cross-sectional radii show no systematic variation between the interior and the periphery of fibril bundles, indicating an effectively constant rate of collagen incorporation into fibrils throughout the bundle. Such spatially homogeneous incorporation constrains the extracellular diffusion of collagen precursors from sources at the bundle boundary to sinks at the growing fibrils. With a coarse-grained diffusion equation we determine stringent bounds, using parameters extracted from published experimental measurements of tendon development. From the lack of new fibril formation after birth, we further require that the concentration of diffusing precursors stays below the critical concentration for fibril nucleation. We find that the combination of the diffusive bound, which requires larger concentrations to ensure homogeneous fibril radii, and lack of nucleation, which requires lower concentrations, is only marginally consistent with fully processed collagen using conservative bounds. More realistic bounds may leave no consistent concentrations. Therefore, we propose that unprocessed pC-collagen diffuses from the bundle periphery followed by local C-proteinase activity and subsequent collagen incorporation at each fibril. We suggest that C-proteinase is localized within bundles, at fibril surfaces, during radial fibrillar growth. The much greater critical concentration of pC-collagen, as compared to fully processed collagen, then provides broad consistency between homogeneous fibril radii and the lack of fibril nucleation during fibril growth.

  1. Changes in mean-squared charge radii and magnetic moments of Tl-184179 measured by in-source laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzakh, A. E.; Andreyev, A. N.; Cocolios, T. E.; de Groote, R. P.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Ferrer, R.; Fink, D. A.; Ghys, L.; Huyse, M.; Köster, U.; Lane, J.; Liberati, V.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Molkanov, P. L.; Procter, T. J.; Rapisarda, E.; Rothe, S.; Sandhu, K.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Sjödin, A. M.; Van Beveren, C.; Van Duppen, P.; Venhart, M.; Veselský, M.

    2017-01-01

    Hyperfine structure and isotope shifts have been measured for the ground and isomeric states in the neutron-deficient isotopes Tl-184179 using the 276.9-nm transition. The experiment has been performed at the CERN-Isotope Separator On-Line facility using the in-source resonance-ionization laser spectroscopy technique. Spins for the ground states in 179,181,183Tl have been determined as I =1 /2 . Magnetic moments and changes in the nuclear mean-square charge radii have been deduced. By applying the additivity relation for magnetic moments of the odd-odd Tl nuclei the leading configuration assignments were confirmed. A deviation of magnetic moments for isomeric states in Tl,184182 from the trend of the heavier Tl nuclei is observed. The charge radii of the ground states of the isotopes Tl-184179 follow the trend for isotonic (spherical) lead nuclei. The noticeable difference in charge radii for ground and isomeric states of Tl,184183 has been observed, suggesting a larger deformation for the intruder-based 9 /2- and 10- states compared to the ground states. An unexpected growth of the isomer shift for 183Tl has been found.

  2. Fine separation of particles via the entropic splitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongge; Xu, Yong; Xu, Wei; Deng, Zichen; Kurths, Jürgen

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the fine separation of particles with different sizes in an asymmetric confined channel by directing them moving to the opposite directions. Besides redesigning the geometry of the channel, we add a general rectangular wave oscillating force to enlarge the velocity differences between particles with different radii, which is important to increase the separation speed and sort particles of similar radii. The separation process is guaranteed by choosing a small period of the oscillating force and a proper partition strategy of the device length sifting particles to the left and right. The optimal set of parameters for a fixed amplitude of the oscillating force is found by the above regime. We show that by this regime the separation efficiency is significantly improved compared to the classic square wave force.

  3. Radio evidence for interplanetary streamers in the range 10-170 solar radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fainberg, J.; Bougeret, J. L.; Stone, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    Type III radio storms are observed by the radio experiment on board the International Sun Earth Explorer 3 out to 0.5-0.8 AU from the Sun, at a rate of 2 to 3 storms per solar rotation near solar maximum. They correlate with the type I and type III radio storms observed at higher frequencies, originating closer to the Sun. They are associated with an almost continuous injection of suprathermal electrons into the interplanetary medium. Some of the properties of the regions where the particles propagate are discussed, using the radio emission as a tracer.

  4. Particle Acceleration in the Low Corona Over Broad Longitudes: Coupling MHD and 3D Particle Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorby, M.; Schwadron, N.; Torok, T.; Downs, C.; Lionello, R.; Linker, J.; Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Riley, P.; Desai, M. I.; Dayeh, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent work on the coupling between the Energetic Particle Radiation Environment Module (EPREM, a 3D energetic particle model) and Magnetohydrodynamics Around a Sphere (MAS, an MHD code developed at Predictive Science, Inc.) has demonstrated the efficacy of compression regions around fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) for particle acceleration low in the corona (˜ 3 - 6 solar radii). These couplings show rapid particle acceleration over a broad longitudinal extent (˜ 80 degrees) resulting from the pile-up of magnetic flux in the compression regions and their subsequent expansion. The challenge for forming large SEP events in such compression-acceleration scenarios is to have enhanced scattering within the acceleration region while also allowing for efficient escape of accelerated particles downstream (away from the Sun) from the compression region. We present here the most recent simulation results including energetic particle and CME plasma profiles, the subsequent flux and dosages at 1AU, and an analysis of the compressional regions as efficient accelerators.

  5. Characteristics of aerosol and cloud particle size distributions in the tropical tropopause layer measured with optical particle counter and lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, S.; Maruyama, K.; Hayashi, M.; Ogino, S.-Y.; Ishimoto, H.; Tachibana, Y.; Shimizu, A.; Matsui, I.; Sugimoto, N.; Yamashita, K.; Saga, K.; Iwamoto, K.; Kamiakito, Y.; Chabangborn, A.; Thana, B.; Hashizume, M.; Koike, T.; Oki, T.

    2007-07-01

    An optical particle counter (OPC) is used in conjunction with lidar measurements to examine the characteristics of the particle size distribution in cirrus cloud in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) over Thailand where the TTL is defined as the height at which temperature is lower than -75°C in this paper. Of 11 OPC launches, cirrus cloud was detected at 10-15 km high on 7 occasions, cirrus was detected in the TTL in 6 cases, and simultaneous OPC and lidar measurements were made on two occasions. Comparison of lidar and OPC measurements reveal that the cloud heights of cirrus in the TTL varies by several hundred meters over distances of tens kilometers; hence the height is not always horizontally uniform. The mode radii of particles constituting the clouds are estimated by lidar and OPC measurements to be less than approximately 10 μm. The regression lines of the particle size distribution with and without cirrus cloud exhibit similar features at equivalent radii of <0.8 μm. Enhancement in the integrated number concentration at radii greater than 0.8 μm indicates that liquid particles tend to be frozen at a radius of 0.8 μm, with cirrus clouds above 10 km exhibiting similar features. On the other hand, enhancement in the particle size distribution at radii greater than 0.9 μm and a peak at around 0.8 μm in the ratio of the standard deviation of count values to that of the Poisson distribution of the averaged count values are common features of cirrus clouds in the TTL, where the ratio shows the vertical homogeneity of the particle number. These typical features suggest that the transition from liquid, sulfuric acid aerosol, to ice is more observable in the TTL and the timing of freezing may vary with height in the TTL.

  6. [Experimental study of poly-DL-lactic acid membrane guided bone regeneration in rabbit radii bone defects].

    PubMed

    Duan, Hong; Fan, Yubo; Dou, Jun; Pei, Fuxing

    2004-10-01

    This study was conducted to observe bone regeneration guided by poly-DL-latic acid (PDLLA) membrane in rabbit radii bone defects and to explore the mechanism of the membrane guided bone regeneration (MGBR). The animal models of bony and periosteous defects were established in both radii of 40 adult New Zealand white rabbits. The left defect as the experimental side was bridged with PDLLA membrane tube, the right side as the controlled side was untreated. The specimens were collected at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks postoperatively. General observation, X-ray, histological observation and biomechanical examination were applied to the repair of the models of MGBR in both groups. Two weeks after operation, with much new bony callus formed outside the tube at both fragments, the membrane tube covered with connective tissues was filled with haematoma and fibrous callus. Twelve weeks after operation, the PDLLA membrane became white and its tube shape was still maintained. However, new bone callus outside the tube almost completely disappeared, and inside the tubes all radii bone defects were successfully repaired with bony union. On the controlled sides, bone defects were filled with connective tissues 2 weeks postoperatively. And 12 weeks after operation, the typical nonunion that had been formed after bone marrow canals were sealed with cortical bone. On the experimental side, the strength of the newly formed bone at the 12th week was higher than that at the 8th week (P<0.05), whereas the biomechanical examination could not be done on the controlled side. Therefore, these findings suggested that the bone regeneration could be successfully guided by PDLLA membrane, and this MGBR technique might be generally used in the treatment of bone defects and nonunion.

  7. Ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and ionic radii of element Uus (Z = 117) and astatine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhiwei; Li, Jiguang; Dong, Chenzhong

    2010-12-30

    Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method was employed to calculate the first five ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and radii for the element Uus and its homologue At. Main valence correlation effects were taken into account. The Breit interaction and QED effects were also estimated. The uncertainties of calculated IPs, EAs, and IR for Uus and At were reduced through an extrapolation procedure. The good consistency with available experimental and other theoretical values demonstrates the validity of the present results. These theoretical data therefore can be used to predict some unknown physicochemical properties of element Uus, Astatine, and their compounds.

  8. Geophysical disturbance environment during the NASA/MPE barium release at 5 earth radii on September 21, 1971.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. N.; Stanley, G. M.; Boyd, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    The geophysical disturbance environment was quiet during the NASA/MPE barium release at 5 earth radii on September 21, 1971. At the time of the release, the magnetosphere was in the late recovery phase of a principal magnetic storm, the provisional Dst value was -13 gammas, and the local horizontal disturbance at Great Whale River was near zero. Riometer and other observations indicated low-level widespread precipitation of high-energy electrons at Great Whale River before, during, and after the release. Cloudy sky at this station prevented optical observation of aurora. No magnetic or ionospheric effects attributable to the barium release were detected at Great Whale River.

  9. Shock driven multiphase flow with particle evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Jeevan; McFarland, Jacob

    2016-11-01

    The computational study of the shock driven instability of a multiphase system with particle evaporation is presented. The particle evaporation modifies the evolution of the interface due to the addition of the vapor phase to the gas. The effects can be quantitatively measured by studying various gas parameters like density, temperature, vorticity and particle properties like diameter and temperature. In addition, the size distribution of particles also modifies the development of instability as the larger size particles damp the evolution of interface in comparison to the smaller size particles. The simulation results are presented to study these effects using FLASH developed at the FLASH Center at the University of Chicago. The capabilities of FLASH for particle modeling were extended using the Particle in Cell (PIC) technique for coupling of mass, momentum, and energy between the particle and carrier gas. A seeded cylinder of gas with particles having either a single radius or a distribution of radii was studied. The enstrophy production and destruction mechanisms were explored to understand the reason for change in vorticity with particle size.

  10. ISEE 1 and 2 particle observations of outer plasma sheet boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, G. K.; Lin, C. S.; Anderson, K. A.; Lin, R. P.; Reme, H.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of particle structures by a medium-energy particle experiment on the ISEE 1 and 2 spacecraft at a distance of about 20 earth radii in the geomagnetic tail are presented. Comparison of these data with plasma data indicates the existence of a layer of energetic electrons and ions just outside the plasma sheet. The region outside the plasma sheet in the high-latitude lobe is permeated with low-intensity low-energy (about 1.5 KeV) ions. These particle structures have velocities of a few kilometers per second to at least about 60 km/s. Large-scale motions are observed with onset and recovery of substorms. The dimensions of the particle structures are estimated to range from about 200 to 10,000 km at 20 earth radii. The particle structures are dependent upon the energy as well as the species of the particles.

  11. A simple rotational pendulum method to measure the radii of gyration or mass moments of inertia of a rotor and other assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Andriulli, J.B.

    1997-01-01

    In mechanical dynamic problems, it is often necessary to know the radii of gyration or equivalent mass moments of inertia of components and assemblies. Using the rotational pendulum technique described, one can easily measure the radii of gyration about the polar and diametric axes of any rigid rotor without requiring a special fixture. The principals employed are also applicable to more complicated assemblies such as aircraft, boats, and cars, where the radius of gyration and vehicle maneuverability are of interest. This description focuses on rotors. The relative values of polar and diametric radii of gyration characterize some dynamic behavior and stability of spinning rotors. When the ratio of polar to diametric radii of gyration approaches unity, the spinning rotor may exhibit undesirable dynamic behavior. Consequently, prior to high-speed spin testing the rotor or otherwise operating the assembly, it is desirable to have a simple and inexpensive procedure to directly measure the radii of gyration of existing hardware. These data permit the technician to estimate the rotor dynamic behavior or identify potential problems prior to committing to operation. If sufficient part information is available, such as dimensions, geometry and material density, one can calculate the radii of gyration. For complicated parts, this can be time consuming. Often the technician does not have access to the rotor`s dimensional details to make the calculations. Hence, an inexpensive empirical technique such as the one described is valuable.

  12. Centrality dependence of pion freeze-out radii in Pb-Pb collisions at sNN=2.76  TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; ...

    2016-02-04

    Here, we report on the measurement of freeze-out radii for pairs of identical-charge pions measured in Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV as a function of collision centrality and the average transverse momentum of the pair kT. Three-dimensional sizes of the system (femtoscopic radii), as well as direction-averaged one-dimensional radii are extracted. The radii decrease with kT, following a power-law behavior. This is qualitatively consistent with expectations from a collectively expanding system, produced in hydrodynamic calculations. The radii also scale linearly with < dNch/d η >1/3. We compare this behavior to world data on femtoscopic radii in heavy-ion collisions.more » While the dependence is qualitatively similar to results at smaller √sNN, a decrease in the ratio Rout/Rside is seen, which is in qualitative agreement with a specific prediction from hydrodynamic models: a change from inside-out to outside-in freeze-out configuration. Furthermore, these results provide further evidence for the production of a collective, strongly coupled system in heavy-ion collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.« less

  13. Centrality dependence of pion freeze-out radii in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sN N}=2.76 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaraz, J. R. M.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Chunhui, Z.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; de, S.; de Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; de Falco, A.; de Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; de Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; di Bari, D.; di Mauro, A.; di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hilden, T. E.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jadlovska, S.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karayan, L.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Khan, K. H.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kopcik, M.; Kour, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, S.; Legrand, I.; Lehas, F.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Luz, P. H. F. N. D.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martinez Pedreira, M.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Masui, H.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; McDonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Melikyan, Y.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Minervini, L. M.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira de Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noris, J. C. C.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira da Silva, A. C.; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orava, R.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Pant, D.; Papcun, P.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Patra, R. N.; Paul, B.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira da Costa, H.; Pereira de Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perez Lezama, E.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sekihata, D.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, N.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tambave, G. J.; Tanaka, N.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarhini, M.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; van der Maarel, J.; van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.; Alice Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    We report on the measurement of freeze-out radii for pairs of identical-charge pions measured in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN}=2.76 TeV as a function of collision centrality and the average transverse momentum of the pair kT. Three-dimensional sizes of the system (femtoscopic radii), as well as direction-averaged one-dimensional radii are extracted. The radii decrease with kT, following a power-law behavior. This is qualitatively consistent with expectations from a collectively expanding system, produced in hydrodynamic calculations. The radii also scale linearly with 1 /3. This behavior is compared to world data on femtoscopic radii in heavy-ion collisions. While the dependence is qualitatively similar to results at smaller √{sNN}, a decrease in the ratio Rout/Rside is seen, which is in qualitative agreement with a specific prediction from hydrodynamic models: a change from inside-out to outside-in freeze-out configuration. The results provide further evidence for the production of a collective, strongly coupled system in heavy-ion collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  14. A new FFT-based algorithm to compute Born radii in the generalized Born theory of biomolecule solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Wei Xu Zhenli; Baumketner, Andrij

    2008-12-20

    In this paper, a new method for calculating effective atomic radii within the generalized Born (GB) model of implicit solvation is proposed, for use in computer simulations of biomolecules. First, a new formulation for the GB radii is developed, in which smooth kernels are used to eliminate the divergence in volume integrals intrinsic in the model. Next, the fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm is applied to integrate smoothed functions, taking advantage of the rapid spectral decay provided by the smoothing. The total cost of the proposed algorithm scales as O(N{sup 3}logN+M) where M is the number of atoms comprised in a molecule and N is the number of FFT grid points in one dimension, which depends only on the geometry of the molecule and the spectral decay of the smooth kernel but not on M. To validate our algorithm, numerical tests are performed for three solute models: one spherical object for which exact solutions exist and two protein molecules of differing size. The tests show that our algorithm is able to reach the accuracy of other existing GB implementations, while offering much lower computational cost.

  15. A new FFT-based algorithm to compute Born radii in the generalized Born theory of biomolecule solvation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wei; Xu, Zhenli; Baumketner, Andrij

    2008-12-20

    In this paper, a new method for calculating effective atomic radii within the generalized Born (GB) model of implicit solvation is proposed, for use in computer simulations of bio-molecules. First, a new formulation for the GB radii is developed, in which smooth kernels are used to eliminate the divergence in volume integrals intrinsic in the model. Next, the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm is applied to integrate smoothed functions, taking advantage of the rapid spectral decay provided by the smoothing. The total cost of the proposed algorithm scales as O(N(3)logN + M) where M is the number of atoms comprised in a molecule, and N is the number of FFT grid points in one dimension, which depends only on the geometry of the molecule and the spectral decay of the smooth kernel but not on M. To validate our algorithm, numerical tests are performed for three solute models: one spherical object for which exact solutions exist and two protein molecules of differing size. The tests show that our algorithm is able to reach the accuracy of other existing GB implementations, while offering much lower computational cost.

  16. A New Semi-Empirical Technique For Computing Effective Temperatures For Main Sequence Stars From Their Mass And Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslan, Gürkan; Soydugan, Faruk; Eker, Zeki; Bilir, Selçuk; Bakış, Volkan

    2016-07-01

    A semi-empirical technique of improving effective temperature for main sequence stars from their observed mass and radius based on the Stefan-Boltzmann law, was introduced and applied to 450 main-sequence stars with accurate parameters. The method requires a mass-luminosity relation (MLR) and theoretical predictions of radius and effective temperature for stars at zero age main-sequence and at terminal age main-sequence. The MLRs, which act as if a catalyst, are necessary but have no effect on the final result. The present sample of main-sequence stars, which are members of the detached double-lined eclipsing binaries in the solar neighborhood chosen from Eker et al. (2014), have an error histogram for the observed effective temperatures with a peak at 2-3%. Errors of refined effective temperatures by the present method are the propagated errors of the observed masses and radii, that is, the refined temperatures and associated errors are independent of the observational temperatures and their associated errors. The histogram of the refined temperature errors shows a peak at less than 1%. A refined sample of stars (270 out of 450) with masses and radii accurate up to 3% and their refined effective temperatures has been used in this study to improve the classical MLRs. One may prefer, however, to use improved classical MLRs, which allows one to compute effective temperatures as accurate as 3.5%.

  17. Changes in the mean-square charge radii and magnetic moments of neutron-deficient Tl isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzakh, A. E.; Batist, L. Kh.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Mezilev, K. A.; Molkanov, P. L.; Moroz, F. V.; Orlov, S. Yu.; Panteleev, V. N.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2013-08-01

    In-source laser spectroscopy experiments for neutron-deficient thallium isotopes at the 276.9-nm atomic transition have been carried out at the Investigation of Radioactive Isotopes on Synchrocyclotron facility of Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute. New data on isotope shifts and the hyperfine structure for 183-207Tl isotopes and isomers are presented. The changes in the mean-square charge radii and magnetic-moment values are deduced. It is shown that nuclear properties of Tl isotopes and isomers smoothly change at the neutron midshell and beyond without development of strong deformation in contrast to the adjacent Hg nuclei. A rather great isomer shift between I = 1/2 and I = 9/2 states for odd Tl isotopes is preserved for both sides of the previously investigated mass range. For the first time, a similar isomer shift is found for the odd-odd isotope 186Tl. The close resemblance of the charge radii isotopic behavior for the Tl and Pb ground states is demonstrated.

  18. Theoretical assessment of the disparity in the electrostatic forces between two point charges and two conductive spheres of equal radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolikov, Kiril

    2016-11-01

    The Coulomb's formula for the force FC of electrostatic interaction between two point charges is well known. In reality, however, interactions occur not between point charges, but between charged bodies of certain geometric form, size and physical structure. This leads to deviation of the estimated force FC from the real force F of electrostatic interaction, thus imposing the task to evaluate the disparity. In the present paper the problem is being solved theoretically for two charged conductive spheres of equal radii and arbitrary electric charges. Assessment of the deviation is given as a function of the ratio of the distance R between the spheres centers to the sum of their radii. For the purpose, relations between FC and F derived in a preceding work of ours, are employed to generalize the Coulomb's interactions. At relatively short distances between the spheres, the Coulomb force FC, as estimated to be induced by charges situated at the centers of the spheres, differ significantly from the real force F of interaction between the spheres. In the case of zero and non-zero charge we prove that with increasing the distance between the two spheres, the force F decrease rapidly, virtually to zero values, i.e. it appears to be short-acting force.

  19. Empirical Calibration of the P-Factor for Cepheid Radii Determined Using the IR Baade-Wesselink Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joner, Michael D.; Laney, C. D.

    2012-05-01

    We have used 41 galactic Cepheids for which parallax or cluster/association distances are available, and for which pulsation parallaxes can be calculated, to calibrate the p-factor to be used in K-band Baade-Wesselink radius calculations. Our sample includes the 10 Cepheids from Benedict et al. (2007), and three additional Cepheids with Hipparcos parallaxes derived from van Leeuwen et al. (2007). Turner and Burke (2002) list cluster distances for 33 Cepheids for which radii have been or (in a few cases) can be calculated. Revised cluster distances from Turner (2010), Turner and Majaess (2008, 2012), and Majaess and Turner (2011, 2012a, 2012b) have been used where possible. Radii have been calculated using the methods described in Laney and Stobie (1995) and converted to K-band absolute magnitudes using the methods described in van Leeuwen et al. (2007), Feast et al. (2008), and Laney and Joner (2009). The resulting pulsation parallaxes have been used to estimate the p-factor for each Cepheid. These new results stand in contradiction to those derived by Storm et al. (2011), but are in good agreement with theoretical predictions by Nardetto et al. (2009) and with interferometric estimates of the p-factor, as summarized in Groenewegen (2007). We acknowledge the Brigham Young University College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences for continued support of research done using the facilities and personnel at the West Mountain Observatory. This support is connected with NSF/AST grant #0618209.

  20. The direct cooling tail method for X-ray burst analysis to constrain neutron star masses and radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleimanov, Valery F.; Poutanen, Juri; Nättilä, Joonas; Kajava, Jari J. E.; Revnivtsev, Mikhail G.; Werner, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    Determining neutron star (NS) radii and masses can help to understand the properties of matter at supra-nuclear densities. Thermal emission during thermonuclear X-ray bursts from NSs in low-mass X-ray binaries provides a unique opportunity to study NS parameters, because of the high fluxes, large luminosity variations and the related changes in the spectral properties. The standard cooling tail method uses hot NS atmosphere models to convert the observed spectral evolution during cooling stages of X-ray bursts to the Eddington flux FEdd and the stellar angular size Ω. These are then translated to the constraints on the NS mass M and radius R. Here we present the improved, direct cooling tail method that generalizes the standard approach. First, we adjust the cooling tail method to account for the bolometric correction to the flux. Then, we fit the observed dependence of the blackbody normalization on flux with a theoretical model directly on the M-R plane by interpolating theoretical dependences to a given gravity, hence ensuring only weakly informative priors for M and R instead of FEdd and Ω. The direct cooling method is demonstrated using a photospheric radius expansion burst from SAX J1810.8-2609, which has happened when the system was in the hard state. Comparing to the standard cooling tail method, the confidence regions are shifted by 1σ towards larger radii, giving R = 11.5-13.0 km at M = 1.3-1.8 M⊙ for this NS.

  1. The Effect of Modified Gravity on the Odds of the Bound Violations of the Turn-around Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jounghun; Li, Baojiu

    2017-06-01

    The turn-around radii of the galaxy groups show the imprint of a long battle between their self-gravitational forces and the accelerating space. The standard ΛCDM cosmology based on the general relativity (GR) predicts the existence of an upper bound on the expectation value of the turn-around radius that is rarely violated by individual galaxy groups. We speculate that a deviation of the gravitational law from GR on the cosmological scale could cause an appreciable shift of the mean turn-around radius to higher values and make the occurrence of the bound violation more probable. Analyzing the data from high-resolution N-body simulations for two specific models with modified gravity (MG) and the standard GR+ΛCDM cosmology, we determine the turn-around radii of the massive Rockstar groups from the peculiar motions of the galactic halos located in the bound zone where the fifth force generated by MG is expected to be, at most, partially shielded. We detect a 4σ signal of difference in the odds of the bound violations between a fiducial MG and the GR models, which proves that the odds of the bound violations increase with the strength of the fifth force produced by the presence of MG. The advantage of using the odds of the bound violations as a complementary diagnostics to probe the nature of gravity is discussed.

  2. Constructing a statistical atlas of the radii of the optic nerve and cerebrospinal fluid sheath in young healthy adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrigan, Robert L.; Plassard, Andrew J.; Mawn, Louise A.; Galloway, Robert L.; Smith, Seth A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Optic neuritis is a sudden inflammation of the optic nerve (ON) and is marked by pain on eye movement, and visual symptoms such as a decrease in visual acuity, color vision, contrast and visual field defects. The ON is closely linked with multiple sclerosis (MS) and patients have a 50% chance of developing MS within 15 years. Recent advances in multi-atlas segmentation methods have omitted volumetric assessment. In the past, measuring the size of the ON has been done by hand. We utilize a new method of automatically segmenting the ON to measure the radii of both the ON and surrounding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sheath to develop a normative distribution of healthy young adults. We examine this distribution for any trends and find that ON and CSF sheath radii do not vary between 20-35 years of age and between sexes. We evaluate how six patients suffering from optic neuropathy compare to this distribution of controls. We find that of these six patients, five of them qualitatively differ from the normative distribution which suggests this technique could be used in the future to distinguish between optic neuritis patients and healthy controls

  3. Defect structure and percolation in the packing of bidispersed particles on a sphere.

    PubMed

    Mascioli, Andrew M; Burke, Christopher J; Giso, Mathew Q; Atherton, Timothy J

    2017-08-29

    We study packings of bidispersed spherical particles on a spherical surface. The presence of curvature necessitates defects even for monodispersed particles; bidispersity either leads to a more disordered packing for nearly equal radii, or a higher fill fraction when the smaller particles are accommodated in the interstices of the larger spheres. Variation in the packing fraction is explained by a percolation transition, as chains of defects or scars previously discovered in the monodispersed case grow and eventually disconnect the neighbor graph.

  4. Nanophotonics of isolated spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geints, Yu. É.; Zemlyanov, A. A.; Panina, E. K.

    2010-09-01

    The problem of extreme focusing of an optical beam into the spatial region with wavelength dimensions is considered with the use of the special features of radiation interaction with isolated spherical particles. Results of numerical computations of the optical field intensity at the surface of silver particles of different radii upon exposure to laser radiation with different wavelengths are presented. It is demonstrated that the relative intensity of the plasmon optical field on the nanoparticle surface increases and the field focusing region decreases with increasing particle radius. Results of numerical computations illustrating the influence of the shell of composite nanoparticles comprising a dielectric core and a metal shell on the optical field intensity in the vicinity of the particle are presented. The problem of local optical foci of a transparent microparticle (photonic nanojets) is investigated. It is established that variation of the micron particle size, its optical properties, and laser radiation parameters allows the amplitude and spatial characteristics of the photonic nanojet region to be controlled efficiently.

  5. Filling a SMBH accretion disk atmosphere at small and intermediate radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karas, Vladimir; Czerny, Bozena; Kunneriath, Devaky

    2017-08-01

    The medium above an accretion disk is highly diluted and hot. An efficient mechanism to deliver particles and dust grains is an open question; apparently, different processes must be in operation. We discuss an interplay of two different scenarios, where the material is elevated from the plane of an equatorial accretion disk into a corona near a supermassive black hole: (i) an electromagnetically induced transport, which can be driven by magnetic field of stars passing across an accretion disk (Karas et al., 2017); and (ii) radiatively driven acceleration by radiation emerging from the disk (Czerny et al 2015), which can launch a dusty wind near above the dust sublimation radius. The former process can operate in the vicinity of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) surrounded by a dense nuclear star-cluster. The latter process involves the effect of radiation pressure from various sources - stars, accretion disc, and the central accreting SMBH; it can help filling the Broad-Line Region against the vertical component of the black hole gravitational attraction and the accretion disk self-gravity at radius about a few $\\times 10^3 R_g$.

  6. The Splashback Radius of Halos from Particle Dynamics. I. The SPARTA Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diemer, Benedikt

    2017-07-01

    Motivated by the recent proposal of the splashback radius as a physical boundary of dark-matter halos, we present a parallel computer code for Subhalo and PARticle Trajectory Analysis (Sparta). The code analyzes the orbits of all simulation particles in all host halos, billions of orbits in the case of typical cosmological N-body simulations. Within this general framework, we develop an algorithm that accurately extracts the location of the first apocenter of particles after infall into a halo, or splashback. We define the splashback radius of a halo as the smoothed average of the apocenter radii of individual particles. This definition allows us to reliably measure the splashback radii of 95% of host halos above a resolution limit of 1000 particles. We show that, on average, the splashback radius and mass are converged to better than 5% accuracy with respect to mass resolution, snapshot spacing, and all free parameters of the method.

  7. Detailed heat transfer coefficient measurements and thermal analysis at engine conditions of a pedestal with fillet radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Ireland, P. T.; Jones, T. V.

    1995-04-01

    The heat transfer coefficient over the surface of a pedestal with fillet radii has been measured using thermochromic liquid crystals and the transient heat transfer method. The tests were performed at engine representative Reynolds numbers for a geometry typical of those used in turbine blade cooling systems. The heat conduction process that occurs in the engine was subsequently modeled numerically with a finite element discretization of the solid pedestal. The measured heat transfer coefficients were used to derive the exact boundary conditions applicable to the engine. The temperature field within the pedestal, calculated using the correct heat transfer coefficient distribution, is compared to that calculated using an area-averaged heat transfer coefficient. Metal temperature differences of 90 K are predicted across the blade wall.

  8. Synchrotron radiation from the winds of O supergiants - Tb = 10 to the 7. 6th K at 60 stellar radii

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.B.; Titus, M.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Results are presented on VLBI measurements of the nonthermal radio components around two O supergiant stars: Cyg OB2 No. 9 and HD 167971. The measurements were used to characterize the brightness temperature of the emission and to measure the size of compact 5-10 mJy components in these stars, reported by Bieging et al. (1989). The sizes found for the 5-10 mJy components are consistent with the free-free wind radii, indicating that the compact companions are not the sources of nonthermal radiation. Results suggest that there is a small fractional population (10 to the -4th to 10 to the -7th) of ultrarelativistic electrons (Teff of about 10 to the 11th K) coexisting with the stellar wind, which emit optically thin synchrotron radiation. This is in agreement with the synchrotron model of White (1985). 21 refs.

  9. Nuclear Charge Radii of Neutron-Deficient Lead Isotopes Beyond N=104 Midshell Investigated by In-Source Laser Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, H. de; Cocolios, T. E.; Dean, S.; Huyse, M.; Lesher, S. R.; Mukha, I.; Stefanescu, I.; Vel, K. van de; Walle, J. van de; Duppen, P. van; Andreyev, A. N.; Barre, N.; Roussiere, B.; Sauvage, J.; Bender, M.; Fedoseyev, V. N.; Fraile, L. M.; Jeppessen, H.

    2007-03-16

    The shape of exotic even-mass {sup 182-190}Pb isotopes was probed by measurement of optical isotope shifts providing mean square charge radii ({delta}). The experiment was carried out at the isolde (cern) on-line mass separator, using in-source laser spectroscopy. Small deviations from the spherical droplet model are observed, but when compared to model calculations, those are explained by high sensitivity of {delta} to beyond mean-field correlations and small admixtures of intruder configurations in the ground state. The data support the predominantly spherical shape of the ground state of the proton-magic Z=82 lead isotopes near neutron midshell (N=104)

  10. VR-SCOSMO: A smooth conductor-like screening model with charge-dependent radii for modeling chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Kuechler, Erich R; Giese, Timothy J; York, Darrin M

    2016-04-28

    To better represent the solvation effects observed along reaction pathways, and of ionic species in general, a charge-dependent variable-radii smooth conductor-like screening model (VR-SCOSMO) is developed. This model is implemented and parameterized with a third order density-functional tight binding quantum model, DFTB3/3OB-OPhyd, a quantum method which was developed for organic and biological compounds, utilizing a specific parameterization for phosphate hydrolysis reactions. Unlike most other applications with the DFTB3/3OB model, an auxiliary set of atomic multipoles is constructed from the underlying DFTB3 density matrix which is used to interact the solute with the solvent response surface. The resulting method is variational, produces smooth energies, and has analytic gradients. As a baseline, a conventional SCOSMO model with fixed radii is also parameterized. The SCOSMO and VR-SCOSMO models shown have comparable accuracy in reproducing neutral-molecule absolute solvation free energies; however, the VR-SCOSMO model is shown to reduce the mean unsigned errors (MUEs) of ionic compounds by half (about 2-3 kcal/mol). The VR-SCOSMO model presents similar accuracy as a charge-dependent Poisson-Boltzmann model introduced by Hou et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 6, 2303 (2010)]. VR-SCOSMO is then used to examine the hydrolysis of trimethylphosphate and seven other phosphoryl transesterification reactions with different leaving groups. Two-dimensional energy landscapes are constructed for these reactions and calculated barriers are compared to those obtained from ab initio polarizable continuum calculations and experiment. Results of the VR-SCOSMO model are in good agreement in both cases, capturing the rate-limiting reaction barrier and the nature of the transition state.

  11. Simulation of global sulfate distribution and the influence on effective cloud drop radii with a coupled photochemistry sulfur cycle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelofs, Geert-J. A. N.; Lelieveld, Jos; Ganzeveld, Laurens

    1998-07-01

    A sulfur cycle model is coupled to a global chemistry-climate model. The simulated surface sulfate concentrations are generally within a factor of 2 of observed concentrations, and display a realistic seasonality for most background locations. However, the model tends to underestimate sulfate and overestimate surface SO2 at relatively polluted locations. A possible explanation for this is that additional oxidation reactions not considered in the model, may be important. Calculated tropospheric sulfate column abundances exceed those of previous studies, which is predominantly associated with a less efficient nucleation scavenging in wet convective updrafts. Through the simultaneous calculation of the sulfur cycle and tropospheric photochemistry, simulated H2O2 and SO2 concentrations are strongly linked, especially in polluted areas. The coupled model simulates a stronger oxidant limitation and, consequently, a smaller contribution to sulfate formation by H2O2 oxidation of SO2 when compared to sulfur cycle models that use monthly averaged oxidant distributions as input. In the polluted NH, the differences in calculated sulfate columns are largest in winter and relatively small in summer. Therefore, the coupling between the sulfur cycle and the oxidant chemistry is expected to have a minor impact on the calculation of the indirect and direct radiative forcing by sulfate. An empirical relation between sulfate concentration and cloud drop number concentration, derived from cloud measurements at Grean Dun Fell (UK), is applied to the simulated cloud and sulfate fields to derive distributions of effective could drop radii. Additionally, a relation between wind speed and cloud drop number concentration is applied over marine regions to account for the effect of seasalt aerosol on cloud formation when sulfate concentrations are relatively low. Calculated droplet radii are systematically underestimated by about 10 20% in the NH compared to satellite derived values, but they

  12. VR-SCOSMO: A smooth conductor-like screening model with charge-dependent radii for modeling chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuechler, Erich R.; Giese, Timothy J.; York, Darrin M.

    2016-04-01

    To better represent the solvation effects observed along reaction pathways, and of ionic species in general, a charge-dependent variable-radii smooth conductor-like screening model (VR-SCOSMO) is developed. This model is implemented and parameterized with a third order density-functional tight binding quantum model, DFTB3/3OB-OPhyd, a quantum method which was developed for organic and biological compounds, utilizing a specific parameterization for phosphate hydrolysis reactions. Unlike most other applications with the DFTB3/3OB model, an auxiliary set of atomic multipoles is constructed from the underlying DFTB3 density matrix which is used to interact the solute with the solvent response surface. The resulting method is variational, produces smooth energies, and has analytic gradients. As a baseline, a conventional SCOSMO model with fixed radii is also parameterized. The SCOSMO and VR-SCOSMO models shown have comparable accuracy in reproducing neutral-molecule absolute solvation free energies; however, the VR-SCOSMO model is shown to reduce the mean unsigned errors (MUEs) of ionic compounds by half (about 2-3 kcal/mol). The VR-SCOSMO model presents similar accuracy as a charge-dependent Poisson-Boltzmann model introduced by Hou et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 6, 2303 (2010)]. VR-SCOSMO is then used to examine the hydrolysis of trimethylphosphate and seven other phosphoryl transesterification reactions with different leaving groups. Two-dimensional energy landscapes are constructed for these reactions and calculated barriers are compared to those obtained from ab initio polarizable continuum calculations and experiment. Results of the VR-SCOSMO model are in good agreement in both cases, capturing the rate-limiting reaction barrier and the nature of the transition state.

  13. Particle separation

    DOEpatents

    Moosmuller, Hans [Reno, NV; Chakrabarty, Rajan K [Reno, NV; Arnott, W Patrick [Reno, NV

    2011-04-26

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  14. Particle separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moosmuller, Hans (Inventor); Chakrabarty, Rajan K. (Inventor); Arnott, W. Patrick (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  15. Excluded volume in solvation: sensitivity of scaled-particle theory to solvent size and density.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, K E; Bloomfield, V A

    2000-01-01

    Changes in solvent environment greatly affect macromolecular structure and stability. To investigate the role of excluded volume in solvation, scaled-particle theory is often used to calculate delta G(tr)(ev), the excluded-volume portion of the solute transfer free energy, delta G(tr). The inputs to SPT are the solvent radii and molarities. Real molecules are not spheres. Hence, molecular radii are not uniquely defined and vary for any given species. Since delta G(tr)(ev) is extremely sensitive to solvent radii, uncertainty in these radii causes a large uncertainty in delta G(tr)(ev)-several kcal/mol for amino acid solutes transferring from water to aqueous mixtures. This uncertainty is larger than the experimental delta G(tr) values. Also, delta G(tr)(ev) can be either positive or negative. Adding neutral crowding molecules may not necessarily reduce solubility. Lastly, delta G(tr)(ev) is very sensitive to solvent density, rho. A few percent error in rho may even cause qualitative deviations in delta G(tr)(ev). For example, if rho is calculated by assuming the hard-sphere pressure to be constant, then delta G(tr)(ev) values and uncertainties are now only tenths of a kcal/mol and are positive. Because delta G(tr)(ev) values calculated by scaled-particle theory are strongly sensitive to solvent radii and densities, determining the excluded-volume contribution to transfer free energies using SPT may be problematic. PMID:11053104

  16. Transport of finite size particles in confined narrow channels: Diffusion, coherence, and particle separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Bao-Quan; Wu, Jian-Chun

    2013-07-01

    Transport of the finite size spherical Brownian particles is investigated in confined narrow channels with varying cross-section width. Applying the Fick-Jacobs approximation, we obtain the expressions of the particle current, the effective diffusion coefficient, and the coherence level of Brownian transport (the Péclet number). For the case of the biased constant force, the dependencies of the nonlinear mobility, the effective diffusion coefficient, and the Péclet number on the particle size exhibit striking behaviors. The Péclet number decreases with increasing the radius of the particle which shows that the big sizes of the particles reduce the coherence level of Brownian transport. There exists an optimized value of the radius at which the effective diffusion coefficient is maximal. For the case of the asymmetric unbiased force, due to the competition between the spatial asymmetry and the temporal asymmetry, the transport directions of the particles depend very sensitively on the size of the particle. Particles larger than a given threshold radius move to the left, whereas particles smaller than that move to the right. Therefore, one can separate particles of different radii and make them move towards opposite directions.

  17. Particles Growing in Solutions: Depletion Forces and Instability of Homogeneous Particle Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    Crystallites, droplets and amorphous precipitates growing from supersaturated solution are surrounded by zones, which are depleted with respect to the molecules they are built of. If two such particles of colloidal size are separated by a distance comparable to their diameters, then the depletion within the gap between particles is deeper than that at the outer portion of the particles. This will cause depletion attraction between the particles should appear. It may cause particle coagulation and decay of the originally homogeneous particle distribution into a system of clouds within which the particle number density is higher, separated by the region of the lower number density. Stability criterion, Q = 4 pi R(exp 3)c/3 >> 1, was analytically found along with typical particle density distribution wavevector q = (Q/I)(exp 1/2)(a/R)(exp 1/4). Here, R and a are the particle and molecular radii, respectively, c is the average molecular number density in solution and I is the squared diffusion length covered by a molecule during a typical time characterizing decay of molecular concentration in solution due to consumption of the molecules by the growing particles.

  18. Kramers escape of a self-propelled particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiseler, Alexander; Hänggi, Peter; Schmid, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the escape rate of an overdamped, self-propelled spherical Brownian particle on a surface from a metastable potential well. Within a modeling in terms of a 1D constant speed of the particle's active dynamics we consider the associated rate using both numerical and analytical approaches. Regarding the properties of the stationary state in the potential well, two major timescales exist, each governing the translational and the rotational dynamics of the particle, respectively. The particle radius is identified to present the essential quantity in charge of regulating the ratio between those timescales. For very small and very large particle radii, approximate analytic expressions for the particle's escape rate can be derived, which, within their respective range of validity, compare favorably with the precise escape numerics of the underlying full two-dimensional Fokker-Planck description.

  19. The charging processes of dust particles and the effects of Lorentz scattering in the circum-solar dust band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A. S.; Isobe, Syuzo

    1992-03-01

    An analysis is presented of the charging processes for the dust particles in the circumsolar dust band at 4 solar radii, as well as the effects of the interactions between these charged particles and the magnetized ambient solar wind plasma on the evolution of their orbits. It is concluded that due to the higher values of the potential on the dust particle and the ambient solar wind magnetic field, the Lorentz force affects a much wider size range of particles in the near-solar regions. Since the magnitude of the Lorentz force is much higher and its characteristic time to affect the particle's orbit is much lower than those for the Poynting-Robertson drag force, the Lorentz force is a major perturbing force for dust particles in the circumsolar dust band at 4 solar radii.

  20. Particle generator

    DOEpatents

    Hess, Wayne P.; Joly, Alan G.; Gerrity, Daniel P.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Sushko, Peter V.; Shlyuger, Alexander L.

    2005-06-28

    Energy tunable solid state sources of neutral particles are described. In a disclosed embodiment, a halogen particle source includes a solid halide sample, a photon source positioned to deliver photons to a surface of the halide, and a collimating means positioned to accept a spatially defined plume of hyperthermal halogen particles emitted from the sample surface.

  1. Impact of photo-evaporative mass loss on masses and radii of water-rich sub/super-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosaki, K.; Ikoma, M.; Hori, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Context. Recent progress in transit photometry opened a new window to the interior of super-Earths. From measured radii and masses, we can infer constraints on planetary internal compositions. It has been recently revealed that super-Earths orbiting close to host stars (i.e., hot super-Earths) are diverse in composition. This diversity is thought to arise from diversity in volatile content. Aims: The stability of the volatile components, which we call the envelopes, is to be examined, because hot super-Earths, which are exposed to strong irradiation, undergo photo-evaporative mass loss. While several studies investigated the impact of photo-evaporative mass loss on hydrogen-helium envelopes, there are few studies as to the impact on water-vapor envelopes, which we investigate in this study. To obtain theoretical prediction to future observations, we also investigate the relationships among masses, radii, and semi-major axes of water-rich super-Earths and also sub-Earths that have undergone photo-evaporative mass loss. Methods: We simulate the interior structure and evolution of highly-irradiated sub/super-Earths that consist of a rocky core surrounded by a water envelope, which include mass loss due to the stellar XUV-driven energy-limited hydrodynamic escape. Results: We find that the photo-evaporative mass loss has a significant impact on the evolution of hot sub/super-Earths. With a widely-used empirical formula for XUV flux from typical G-stars and the heating efficiency of 0.1 for example, the planets of less than 3 Earth masses orbiting 0.03 AU have their water envelopes completely stripped off. We then derive the threshold planetary mass and radius below which the planet loses its water envelope completely as a function of the initial water content and find that there are minimums of the threshold mass and radius. Conclusions: We constrain the domain in the parameter space of planetary mass, radius, and the semi-major axis in which sub/super-Earths never

  2. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Absorption of an electromagnetic wave by an inhomogeneous cylindrical particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavitaev, E. V.; Yushkanov, A. A.

    2005-06-01

    The absorption cross section is calculated for an electromagnetic wave whose field is directed along the symmetry axis of an inhomogeneous cylindrical particle. The general case of an arbitrary ratio of radii of a dielectric nucleus and a particle is considered. The condition of diffuse reflection of electrons from the internal and external surfaces of the metal particle layer is used as the boundary condition. The limiting cases are also analysed and the results are discussed.

  3. Determination of the charge radii of several light nuclei from precision, high-energy electron elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kabir, Al Amin

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of high-energy electron scattering has been used to determine the charge radii of nuclei for several decades. Recent analysis of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen found an r.m.s. radius significantly different than the electron scattering result. To understand this puzzle we have analyzed the "LEDEX" data for the (e, e'p) reaction. This experiment includes measurements on several light nuclei, hydrogen, deuterium, lithium, boron, and carbon. To test our ability to measure absolute cross sections, as well as our ability to extract the charge radius, we tested our technique against the extremely well-measured carbon case and found excellent agreement using the Fourier-Bessel parametrization. We then extended the procedure to boron and lithium, which show nice agreement with the latest theoretical calculations. For hydrogen, we see clearly the limits of this technique and therefore, the charge radius is determined from the traditional extrapolation to q2 = 0. We will show that there is a model dependence in extracting the charge radius of hydrogen and its unambiguous determination is very difficult with available electron-scattering measurements.

  4. Tidal radii and destruction rates of globular clusters in the Milky Way due to bulge-bar and disk shocking

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, Edmundo; Pichardo, Bárbara; Velázquez, Héctor

    2014-10-01

    We calculate orbits, tidal radii, and bulge-bar and disk shocking destruction rates for 63 globular clusters in our Galaxy. Orbits are integrated in both an axisymmetric and a nonaxisymmetric Galactic potential that includes a bar and a three-dimensional model for the spiral arms. With the use of a Monte Carlo scheme, we consider in our simulations observational uncertainties in the kinematical data of the clusters. In the analysis of destruction rates due to the bulge-bar, we consider the rigorous treatment of using the real Galactic cluster orbit instead of the usual linear trajectory employed in previous studies. We compare results in both treatments. We find that the theoretical tidal radius computed in the nonaxisymmetric Galactic potential compares better with the observed tidal radius than that obtained in the axisymmetric potential. In both Galactic potentials, bulge-shocking destruction rates computed with a linear trajectory of a cluster at its perigalacticons give a good approximation of the result obtained with the real trajectory of the cluster. Bulge-shocking destruction rates for clusters with perigalacticons in the inner Galactic region are smaller in the nonaxisymmetric potential than those in the axisymmetric potential. For the majority of clusters with high orbital eccentricities (e > 0.5), their total bulge+disk destruction rates are smaller in the nonaxisymmetric potential.

  5. Relativistic electrons and magnetic fields of the M87 jet on the ∼10 Schwarzschild radii scale

    SciTech Connect

    Kino, M.; Takahara, F.; Hada, K.; Doi, A.

    2014-05-01

    We explore energy densities of the magnetic fields and relativistic electrons in the M87 jet. Since the radio core at the jet base is identical to the optically thick surface against synchrotron self-absorption (SSA), the observing frequency is identical to the SSA turnover frequency. As a first step, we assume the radio core has a simple uniform sphere geometry. Using the observed angular size of the radio core measured by the Very Long Baseline Array at 43 GHz, we estimate the energy densities of magnetic fields (U{sub B} ) and relativistic electrons (U{sub e} ) on the basis of the standard SSA formula. Imposing the condition that the Poynting power and kinetic power of relativistic electrons should be smaller than the total power of the jet, we find that (1) the allowed range of the magnetic field strength (B {sub tot}) is 1 G ≤ B {sub tot} ≤ 15 G and that (2) 1 × 10{sup –5} ≤ U{sub e} /U{sub B} ≤ 6 × 10{sup 2} holds. The uncertainty of U{sub e} /U{sub B} comes from the strong dependence on the angular size of the radio core and the minimum Lorentz factor of non-thermal electrons (γ {sub e,min}) in the core. It is still unsettled whether resultant energetics are consistent with either the magnetohydrodynamic jet or the kinetic power dominated jet even on the ∼10 Schwarzschild radii scale.

  6. Group galaxy number density profiles far out: Is the `one-halo' term NFW out to >10 virial radii?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisan, M.; Mamon, G. A.; Stalder, D. H.

    2017-10-01

    While the density profiles (DPs) of $\\Lambda$CDM haloes obey the NFW law out to roughly one virial radius, $r_{\\rm vir}$, the structure of their outer parts is still poorly understood, since the 1-halo term describing the halo itself is dominated by the 2-halo term representing the other haloes picked up. Using a semi-analytical model, we measure the real-space `1-halo' number DP of groups out to $20\\,r_{\\rm vir}$ by assigning each galaxy to its nearest group with mass above $M_{\\rm a}$, in units of the group $r_{\\rm vir}$. If $M_{\\rm a}$ is small (large), the outer DP of groups falls rapidly (slowly). We find that there is an optimal $M_{\\rm a}$ for which the stacked DP resembles the NFW model to $0.1$ dex accuracy out to $\\simeq 13\\,r_{\\rm vir}$. We find similar long-range NFW surface DPs (out to $\\simeq 10\\,r_{\\rm vir}$) in the SDSS observations using a galaxy assignment scheme that combines the non-linear virialized regions of groups with their linear outer parts. The optimal $M_{\\rm a}$ scales as the minimum mass of the groups that are stacked to the power $0.25-0.3$. Our results suggest that the NFW model does not solely originate from violent relaxation. Moreover, populating haloes with galaxies using HOD models must proceed out to larger radii than usually done.

  7. Observations of magnetospheric bursts of high-energy protons and electrons at approximately 35 earth radii with Imp 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarris, E. T.; Krimigis, S. M.; Armstrong, T. P.

    1976-01-01

    Proton and electron bursts (above 0.29 MeV and above 0.22 MeV, respectively) in the vicinity of the magnetosphere are studied on the basis of a high-sensitivity experiment. Although the bursts are a permanent feature in the upstream solar wind, the range of observed intensities varies by at least 5 orders of magnitude, depending on magnetic activity. The bursts are typically associated with weak fluctuations in the interplanetary magnetic field, which suggests the presence of hydromagnetic waves. Burst are found in and about the magnetosheath, plasma sheet, and magnetotail boundary layer, and also outside the bow shock; however, they rarely appear at distances greater than 10 earth radii north or south of the neutral sheet. Dawn-dusk asymmetries are present in intensity but not necessarily in frequency of occurrence. Proton bursts are highly anisotropic upstream from the bow shock and in the magnetosheath, while electron bursts are anisotropic only in the upstream solar wind.

  8. Detailed heat transfer coefficient measurements and thermal analysis at engine conditions of a pedestal with fillet radii

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Ireland, P.T.; Jones, T.V.

    1995-04-01

    Short pin-fin and pin-fin arrays are frequently used in turbine blade internal cooling systems to enhance cooling and stiffen the structure. The present work has shown that a knowledge of the detailed heat transfer coefficient distribution is required to predict the cooling effect of such devices accurately. The heat flow process has been numerically modeled at typical engine conditions with the detailed heat transfer distribution measured by the transient heat transfer method being used as the thermal boundary conditions. The heat transfer coefficient over the surface of a pedestal with fillet radii has been measured using thermochromic liquid crystals and the transient heat transfer method. The tests were performed at engine representative Reynolds numbers for a geometry typical of those used in turbine blade cooling systems. The heat conduction process that occurs in the engine was subsequently modeled numerically with a finite element discretization of the solid pedestal. The measured heat transfer coefficients were used to derive the exact boundary conditions applicable to the engine. The temperature field within the pedestal, calculated using the correct heat transfer coefficient distribution, is compared to that calculated using an area-averaged heat transfer coefficient. Metal temperature differences of 90 K are predicted across the blade wall.

  9. Unusually sharp dependence of water exchange rate versus lanthanide ionic radii for a series of tetraamide complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanrong; Wu, Kuangcong; Sherry, A Dean

    2002-04-24

    The tetraamide ligand, DOTA-tetra(glycine ethyl ester), forms complexes with the lanthanide(III) cations that exist in solution predominantly as the square antiprism structure with single, slowly exchanging inner-sphere water molecule. Variable-temperature 1H and 17O NMR studies revealed that the bound water lifetimes in these complexes were sharply dependent upon the ionic radius of Ln3+ cation. A novel lanthanide-induced shift technique was used to unmask the bound water 17O resonance of SmL3+ and YL3+ complexes from the bulk water resonance. The bound water lifetime (tauM298) was approximately 800 mus in the EuL3+ complex but became much shorter (several microseconds) for Ln3+ cations with larger and smaller ionic radii. This demonstrates that water exchange is exquisitely fine-tuned in this macrocyclic tetraamide system and that a variety of Ln3+ complexes meet with the exchange requirement, Deltaomega*tauM >/= 1, necessary for an efficient MT agent.

  10. Standing on the Shoulders of Dwarfs: the Kepler Asteroseismic LEGACY Sample. II.Radii, Masses, and Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva Aguirre, Víctor; Lund, Mikkel N.; Antia, H. M.; Ball, Warrick H.; Basu, Sarbani; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Lebreton, Yveline; Reese, Daniel R.; Verma, Kuldeep; Casagrande, Luca; Justesen, Anders B.; Mosumgaard, Jakob R.; Chaplin, William J.; Bedding, Timothy R.; Davies, Guy R.; Handberg, Rasmus; Houdek, Günter; Huber, Daniel; Kjeldsen, Hans; Latham, David W.; White, Timothy R.; Coelho, Hugo R.; Miglio, Andrea; Rendle, Ben

    2017-02-01

    We use asteroseismic data from the Kepler satellite to determine fundamental stellar properties of the 66 main-sequence targets observed for at least one full year by the mission. We distributed tens of individual oscillation frequencies extracted from the time series of each star among seven modeling teams who applied different methods to determine radii, masses, and ages for all stars in the sample. Comparisons among the different results reveal a good level of agreement in all stellar properties, which is remarkable considering the variety of codes, input physics, and analysis methods employed by the different teams. Average uncertainties are of the order of ˜2% in radius, ˜4% in mass, and ˜10% in age, making this the best-characterized sample of main-sequence stars available to date. Our predicted initial abundances and mixing-length parameters are checked against inferences from chemical enrichment laws ΔY/ΔZ and predictions from 3D atmospheric simulations. We test the accuracy of the determined stellar properties by comparing them to the Sun, angular diameter measurements, Gaia parallaxes, and binary evolution, finding excellent agreement in all cases and further confirming the robustness of asteroseismically determined physical parameters of stars when individual frequencies of oscillation are available. Baptised as the Kepler dwarfs LEGACY sample, these stars are the solar-like oscillators with the best asteroseismic properties available for at least another decade. All data used in this analysis and the resulting stellar parameters are made publicly available for the community.

  11. Interferometry radii in heavy-ion collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV and 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, Piotr

    2011-04-15

    The expansion of the fireball created in Au-Au collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV and Pb-Pb collisions at 2.76 TeV is modelled using relativistic viscous hydrodynamics. The experimentally observed interferometry radii are well reproduced. Additional pre-equilibrium flow slightly improves the results for the lower energies studied.

  12. Particle therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  13. Particle separator

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    Method and apparatus (10) are provided for separating and classifying particles (48,50,56) by dispersing the particles within a fluid (52) that is upwardly flowing within a cone-shaped pipe (12) that has its large end (20) above its small end (18). Particles of similar size and shape (48,50) migrate to individual levels (A,B) within the flowing fluid. As the fluid is deflected by a plate (42) at the top end of the pipe (12), the smallest particles are collected on a shelf-like flange (40). Ever larger particles are collected as the flow rate of the fluid is increased. To prevent particle sticking on the walls (14) of the pipe (12), additional fluid is caused to flow into the pipe (12) through holes (68) that are specifically provided for that purpose. Sticking is further prevented by high frequency vibrators (70) that are positioned on the apparatus (10).

  14. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    1991-01-01

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  15. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  16. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.

  17. Determination of time zero from a charged particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Green, Jesse Andrew [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-15

    A method, system and computer program is used to determine a linear track having a good fit to a most likely or expected path of charged particle passing through a charged particle detector having a plurality of drift cells. Hit signals from the charged particle detector are associated with a particular charged particle track. An initial estimate of time zero is made from these hit signals and linear tracks are then fit to drift radii for each particular time-zero estimate. The linear track having the best fit is then searched and selected and errors in fit and tracking parameters computed. The use of large and expensive fast detectors needed to time zero in the charged particle detectors can be avoided by adopting this method and system.

  18. Solar Energetic Particle Acceleration by a Shock Wave Accompanying a Coronal Mass Ejection in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhova, A. S.; Petukhov, I. S.; Petukhov, S. I.; Ksenofontov, L. T.

    2017-02-01

    Solar energetic particle acceleration by a shock wave accompanying a coronal mass ejection (CME) is studied. The description of the accelerated particle spectrum evolution is based on the numerical calculation of the diffusive transport equation with a set of realistic parameters. The relation between the CME and shock speeds, which depend on the initial CME radius, is determined. Depending on the initial CME radius, its speed, and the magnetic energy of the scattering Alfvén waves, the accelerated particle spectrum is established 10–60 minutes from the beginning of CME motion. The maximum energies of particles reach 0.1–10 GeV. The CME radii of 3–5 {R}ȯ and the shock radii of 5–10 {R}ȯ agree with observations. The calculated particle spectra agree with the observed ones in events registered by ground-based detectors if the turbulence spectrum in the solar corona significantly differs from the Kolmogorov one.

  19. Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; Lal, Nand; McGuire, Robert E.; Szabo, Adam; Narock, Thomas W.; Armstrong, Thomas P.; Manweiler, Jerry W.; Patterson, J. Douglas; Hill, Matthew E.; Vandergriff, Jon D.; McKibben, Robert B.; Lopate, Clifford; Tranquille, Cecil

    2008-01-01

    The Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO) focuses on improved discovery, access, and usability of heliospheric energetic particle and ancillary data products from selected spacecraft and sub-orbital instruments of the heliophysics data environment. The energy range of interest extends over the full range of particle acceleration from keV energies of suprathermal seed particles to GeV energies of galactic cosmic ray particles. Present spatial coverage is for operational and legacy spacecraft operating from the inner to the outer heliosphere, e.g. from measurements by the two Helios spacecraft to 0.3 AU to the inner heliosheath region now being traversed by the two Voyager spacecraft. This coverage will eventually be extended inward to ten solar radii by the planned NASA solar probe mission and at the same time beyond the heliopause into the outer heliosheath by continued Voyager operations. The geospace fleet of spacecraft providing near-Earth interplanetary measurements, selected magnetospheric spacecraft providing direct measurements of penetrating interplanetary energetic particles, and interplanetary cruise measurements from planetary spacecraft missions further extend VEPO resources to the domain of geospace and planetary interactions. Ground-based (e.g., neutron monitor) and high-altitude suborbital measurements can expand coverage to the highest energies of galactic cosmic rays affected by heliospheric interaction and of solar energetic particles. Science applications include investigation of solar flare and coronal mass ejection events. acceleration and transport of interplanetary particles within the inner heliosphere, cosmic ray interactions with planetary surfaces and atmospheres, sources of suprathermal and anomalous cosmic ray ions in the outer heliosphere, and solar cycle modulation of galactic cosmic rays. Robotic and human exploration, and eventual habitation, of planetary and space environments beyond the Earth require knowledge of radiation

  20. Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; Lal, Nand; McGuire, Robert E.; Szabo, Adam; Narock, Thomas W.; Armstrong, Thomas P.; Manweiler, Jerry W.; Patterson, J. Douglas; Hill, Matthew E.; Vandergriff, Jon D.; hide

    2008-01-01

    The Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO) focuses on improved discovery, access, and usability of heliospheric energetic particle and ancillary data products from selected spacecraft and sub-orbital instruments of the heliophysics data environment. The energy range of interest extends over the full range of particle acceleration from keV energies of suprathermal seed particles to GeV energies of galactic cosmic ray particles. Present spatial coverage is for operational and legacy spacecraft operating from the inner to the outer heliosphere, e.g. from measurements by the two Helios spacecraft to 0.3 AU to the inner heliosheath region now being traversed by the two Voyager spacecraft. This coverage will eventually be extended inward to ten solar radii by the planned NASA solar probe mission and at the same time beyond the heliopause into the outer heliosheath by continued Voyager operations. The geospace fleet of spacecraft providing near-Earth interplanetary measurements, selected magnetospheric spacecraft providing direct measurements of penetrating interplanetary energetic particles, and interplanetary cruise measurements from planetary spacecraft missions further extend VEPO resources to the domain of geospace and planetary interactions. Ground-based (e.g., neutron monitor) and high-altitude suborbital measurements can expand coverage to the highest energies of galactic cosmic rays affected by heliospheric interaction and of solar energetic particles. Science applications include investigation of solar flare and coronal mass ejection events. acceleration and transport of interplanetary particles within the inner heliosphere, cosmic ray interactions with planetary surfaces and atmospheres, sources of suprathermal and anomalous cosmic ray ions in the outer heliosphere, and solar cycle modulation of galactic cosmic rays. Robotic and human exploration, and eventual habitation, of planetary and space environments beyond the Earth require knowledge of radiation

  1. Effect of collisions on dust particle charging via particle-in-cell Monte-Carlo collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovagnati, B.; Davoudabadi, M.; Lapenta, G.; Mashayek, F.

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, the effect of collisions on the charging and shielding of a single dust particle immersed in an infinite plasma is studied. A Monte-Carlo collision (MCC) algorithm is implemented in the particle-in-cell DEMOCRITUS code to account for the collisional phenomena which are typical of dusty plasmas in plasma processing, namely, electron-neutral elastic scattering, ion-neutral elastic scattering, and ion-neutral charge exchange. Both small and large dust particle radii, as compared to the characteristic Debye lengths, are considered. The trends of the steady-state dust particle potential at increasing collisionality are presented and discussed. The ions and electron energy distributions at various locations and at increasing collisionality in the case of large particle radius are shown and compared to their local Maxwellians. The ion-neutral charge-exchange collision is found to be by far the most important collisional phenomenon. For small particle radius, collisional effects are found to be important also at low level of collisionality, as more ions are collected by the dust particle due to the destruction of trapped ion orbits. For large particle radius, the major collisional effect is observed to take place in proximity of the presheath. Finally, the species energy distribution functions are found to approach their local Maxwellians at increasing collisionality.

  2. Distribution of radii of curvature of anterior and posterior best fit sphere in a normal population: the Tehran Eye Study.

    PubMed

    Mehravaran, Shiva; Hashemi, Hassan; KhabazKhoob, Mehdi; Fotouhi, Akbar

    2013-08-01

    To determine the distribution and determinants of the radii of curvature of the anterior and posterior best fit spheres (ABFS and PBFS) of the cornea in a sample from the general normal population of Tehran. A stratified random cluster sampling was used to select samples from the first 4 districts of Tehran proportionate to the population of each stratum. We examined the distribution of the ABFS and PBFS, as measured with the Orbscan II in different groups of age, sex, and refractive error, and determined their relationship with other variables by using both univariate and multiple regression analyses. Valid data was collected from 800 eyes, and analyses were done with data from 399 right eyes only. Mean ABFS and PBFS in the studied sample were 43.31±1.79D and 52.67±3.04D, respectively. ABFS increased with age while PBFS showed no significant association; both showed significant inter-sex differences. In the multiple linear regression model, both ABFS and PBFS significantly correlated directly with age and average keratometry, and inversely with corneal diameter; PBFS correlated directly with anterior chamber depth as well. Mean PBFS/ABFS ratio was 1.22±0.05 which significantly decreased with age and was significantly higher in females. Knowledge of normal ranges of ABFS and PBFS and their determinants, including age, mean keratometry, and corneal diameter, as well as the choice of measurement device, is necessary for comparing information from different populations and interpreting results. Copyright © 2013 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The NuSTAR spectrum of Mrk 335: extreme relativistic effects within two gravitational radii of the event horizon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, M. L.; Wilkins, D. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Grupe, D.; Dauser, T.; Matt, G.; Harrison, F. A.; Brenneman, L.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Gallo, L. C.; Hailey, C. J.; Kara, E.; Komossa, S.; Marinucci, A.; Miller, J. M.; Risaliti, G.; Stern, D.; Walton, D. J.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-09-01

    We present 3-50 keV NuSTAR observations of the active galactic nuclei Mrk 335 in a very low flux state. The spectrum is dominated by very strong features at the energies of the iron line at 5-7 keV and Compton hump from 10-30 keV. The source is variable during the observation, with the variability concentrated at low energies, which suggesting either a relativistic reflection or a variable absorption scenario. In this work, we focus on the reflection interpretation, making use of new relativistic reflection models that self consistently calculate the reflection fraction, relativistic blurring and angle-dependent reflection spectrum for different coronal heights to model the spectra. We find that the spectra can be well fitted with relativistic reflection, and that the lowest flux state spectrum is described by reflection alone, suggesting the effects of extreme light-bending occurring within ˜2 gravitational radii (RG) of the event horizon. The reflection fraction decreases sharply with increasing flux, consistent with a point source moving up to above 10 RG as the source brightens. We constrain the spin parameter to greater than 0.9 at the 3σ confidence level. By adding a spin-dependent upper limit on the reflection fraction to our models, we demonstrate that this can be a powerful way of constraining the spin parameter, particularly in reflection dominated states. We also calculate a detailed emissivity profile for the iron line, and find that it closely matches theoretical predictions for a compact source within a few RG of the black hole.

  4. The Nustar Spectrum of Mrk 335: Extreme Relativistic Effects Within Two Gravitational Radii of the Event Horizon?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, M. L.; Wilkins, D. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Grupe, D.; Dauser, T.; Matt, G.; Harrison, F. A.; Brenneman, L.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present 3-50 keV NuSTAR observations of the active galactic nuclei Mrk 335 in a very low flux state. The spectrum is dominated by very strong features at the energies of the iron line at 5-7 keV and Compton hump from 10-30 keV. The source is variable during the observation, with the variability concentrated at low energies, which suggesting either a relativistic reflection or a variable absorption scenario. In this work, we focus on the reflection interpretation, making use of new relativistic reflection models that self consistently calculate the reflection fraction, relativistic blurring and angle-dependent reflection spectrum for different coronal heights to model the spectra. We find that the spectra can be well fitted with relativistic reflection, and that the lowest flux state spectrum is described by reflection alone, suggesting the effects of extreme light-bending occurring within approx. 2 gravitational radii (RG) of the event horizon. The reflection fraction decreases sharply with increasing flux, consistent with a point source moving up to above 10 RG as the source brightens. We constrain the spin parameter to greater than 0.9 at the 3(sigma) confidence level. By adding a spin-dependent upper limit on the reflection fraction to our models, we demonstrate that this can be a powerful way of constraining the spin parameter, particularly in reflection dominated states. We also calculate a detailed emissivity profile for the iron line, and find that it closely matches theoretical predictions for a compact source within a few RG of the black hole.

  5. Spatial distribution of osteocyte lacunae in equine radii and third metacarpals: considerations for cellular communication, microdamage detection and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Skedros, John G; Grunander, Todd R; Hamrick, Mark W

    2005-01-01

    Osteocytes, which are embedded in bone matrix, are the most abundant cells in bone. Despite the ideal location of osteocytes to sense the local environment and influence bone remodeling, their functions, and the relative importance of these functions, remain controversial. In this study, we tested several hypotheses that address the possibilities that population densities of osteocyte lacunae (Ot.Lc.N/B.Ar) correlate with strain-, remodeling- or metabolism-related aspects of the local biomechanical environments of mid-third diaphyseal equine radii and third metacarpals from skeletally mature animals. Ot.Lc.N/B.Ar data, quantified in multiple cortical locations, were analyzed for possible correlations with (1) structural and material characteristics (e.g., cortical thickness, percent ash, secondary osteon population density, mean osteon cross-sectional area, and predominant collagen fiber orientation), (2) strain characteristics, including prevalent/predominant strain magnitude and mode (tension, compression, shear), (3) hypothesized strain-mode-related microdamage characteristics, which might be perceived by osteocyte 'operational' networks, and (4) variations in remodeling dynamics and/or metabolism (i.e. presumably higher in endocortical regions than in other transcortical locations). Results showed relatively uniform Ot.Lc.N/B.Ar between regions with highly non-uniform strain and strain-related environments and markedly heterogeneous structural and material organization. These results suggest that population densities of these cells are poorly correlated with mechanobiological characteristics, including local variations in metabolic rate and strain magnitude/mode. Although osteocytes hypothetically evolved both as strain sensors and fatigue damage sensors able to direct the removal of damage as needed, the mechanisms that govern the distribution of these cells remain unclear. The results of this study provide little or no evidence that the number of osteocyte

  6. Expected constraints on the masses and radii of J0437-4715 and J0030+0451 using NICER data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. Coleman; Lamb, Frederick K.

    2017-08-01

    An important goal of the Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) is to precisely and reliably measure the mass M and radius R of selected neutron stars, to constrain the properties of cold matter at supranuclear densities. As the poster to the left describes, NICER will measure M and R by fitting pulse waveform models to the observed soft X-ray pulse waveforms of several rotation-powered millisecond pulsars. These waveforms are thought to be produced by the rotation of hot spots located near the pulsar's magnetic polar caps. Key NICER targets are the 174-Hz pulsar PSR J0437-4715 and the 205-Hz pulsar PSR J0030+0451. We have explored the accuracies and precisions with which NICER should be able to determine the masses and radii of these pulsars, by analyzing synthetic waveform data using Bayesian statistical methods. Using the current knowledge of the mass and distance of PSR J0437-4715 as priors, we find that NICER should be able to measure the mass of this pulsar to within 6% (1 sigma) and its radius to within 4% by combining observations lasting a total of 1 Ms. Other properties of this pulsar, such as the colatitudes and azimuthal separation of its hot spots, can also be measured fairly precisely by fitting its pulse waveform. We find that by combining observations lasting 3 Ms, NICER should be able to measure the mass of PSR J0030+0451 to within 9% and its radius to within 6%, if the spot colatitudes and the observer's inclination are not known independently of the pulse waveform analysis, or to within 5% and 3%, respectively, if these angles are independently known.

  7. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr

    2000-07-11

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a previous screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  8. Particle preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr.

    1998-12-29

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents. 3 figs.

  9. Particle preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  10. Particle preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  11. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2005-09-20

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  12. WISE Constraints on the Particle Properties in Saturn's Phoebe Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Verbiscer, A. J.

    2012-05-01

    Saturn's diffuse outer Phoebe Ring is an immense disk-like structure oriented edge-on as viewed from Earth; it is 30 million km (500 Saturn radii) wide and 2.5 million km (40 Saturn radii) thick. The ring's particles are thought to originate from the planet's dark irregular satellites, primarily Phoebe (mean radius 107km) but also a handful of other moonlets with radii smaller than 10km. The ring was discovered by 24 micron imaging by Spitzer (Verbiscer et al., Nature 2009) and recently recovered by WISE (Skrutskie et al., DPS 2011) at 22 microns. The WISE images, which show the full extent of the ring for the first time, nicely complement the Spitzer data, which has better signal to noise. Usually, ring particle populations can be determined observationally from spectral and phase angle information, but as these observations are extremely limited, we instead rely on dynamical arguments. Small particles in the Phoebe ring are expected to be driven to eccentricities in excess of Phoebe's e=0.16 by radiation pressure over 30-year timescales. Over million-year timescales, the dust distribution migrates inward via Poynting-Robertson drag, and most of the material is delivered to Iapetus' dark side. We model these processes numerically and build up synthetic ring profiles, making various assumptions about the unknown particle size distribution. We produce radial intensity profiles which we compare to the WISE data as well as vertical profiles which are most constrained by Spitzer. Our procedure is more robust than the onion-peeling technique used by ring scientists because it does not require the assumption of circular orbits. We find that the ring is made up of particles between 10 microns and a few centimeters in radius and will report on further constraints that arise from more detailed modeling of size distributions as well as potential asymmetries seen in the data.

  13. Energetic Charged Particles in Saturn's Magnetosphere: Voyager 2 Results.

    PubMed

    Vogt, R E; Chenette, D L; Cummings, A C; Garrard, T L; Stone, E C; Schardt, A W; Trainor, J H; Lal, N; McDonald, F B

    1982-01-29

    Results from the cosmic-ray system on Voyager 2 in Saturn's magnetosphere are presented. During the inbound pass through the outer magnetosphere, the >/= 0.43-million-electron-volt proton flux was more intense, and both the proton and electron fluxes were more variable, than previously observed. These changes are attributed to the influence on the magnetosphere of variations in the solar wind conditions. Outbound, beyond 18 Saturn radii, impulsive bursts of 0.14- to > 1.0- million-electron-volt electrons were observed. In the inner magnetosphere, the charged particle absorption signatures of Mimas, Enceladus, and Tethys are used to constrain the possible tilt and offset of Saturn's internal magnetic dipole. At approximately 3 Saturn radii, a transient decrease was observed in the electron flux which was not due to Mimas. Characteristics of this decrease suggest the existence of additional material, perhaps another satellite, in the orbit of Mimas.

  14. Energetic charged particles in Saturn's magnetosphere: Voyager 2 results

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R.E.; Chenette, D.L.; Cummings, A.C.; Garrard, T.L.; Stone, E.C.; Schardt, A.W.; Trainor, J.H.; Lal, N.; McDonald, F.B.

    1982-01-29

    Results from the cosmic-ray system on Voyager 2 in Saturn's magnetosphere are presented. During the inbound pass through the outer magnetosphere, the greater than or equal to 0.43-million-electron-volt proton flux was more intense, and both the proton and electron fluxes were more varible, than previously observed. These changes are attributed to the influence on the magnetosphere of variations in the solar wind conditions. Outbound, beyond 18 Saturn radii, impulsive bursts of 0.14- to > 1.0-million-electron-volt electrons were observed. In the inner magnetosphere, the charged particle absorption signatures of Mimas, Enceladus, and Tethys are used to constrain the possible tilt and offset of Saturn's internal magnetic dipole. At approx. 3 Saturn radii, a transient decrease was observed in the electron flux which was not due to Mimas. Characteristics of this decrease suggest the existence of additional material, perhaps another satellite, in the orbit of Mimas.

  15. Energetic charged particles in Saturn's magnetosphere - Voyager 1 results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, R. E.; Chenette, D. L.; Cummings, A. C.; Garrard, T. L.; Stone, E. C.; Schardt, A. W.; Trainor, J. H.; Lal, N.; McDonald, F. B.

    1981-04-01

    Voyager 1 provided the first look at Saturn's magnetotail and magnetosphere during relatively quiet interplanetary conditions. This report discusses the energetic particle populations of the outer magnetosphere of Saturn and absorption features associated with Titan and Rhea, and compares these observations with Pioneer 11 data of a year earlier. The trapped proton fluxes had soft spectra, represented by power laws in kinetic energy with an exponent of 7 in the outer magnetosphere and 9 in the magnetotail. Structure associated with the magnetotail was observed as close as 10 Saturn radii on the outbound trajectory. The proton and electron fluxes in the outer magnetosphere and in the magnetotail were variable and appeared to respond to changes in interplanetary conditions. Protons with energies greater than or approximately equal to 2 MeV had free access to the magnetosphere from interplanetary space and were not stably trapped outside about 7.5 Saturn radii.

  16. Energetic charged particles in Saturn's magnetosphere - Voyager 2 results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, R. E.; Chenette, D. L.; Cummings, A. C.; Garrard, T. L.; Stone, E. C.; Schardt, A. W.; Trainor, J. H.; Lal, N.; McDonald, F. B.

    1982-01-01

    Results from the cosmic-ray system on Voyager 2 in Saturn's magnetosphere are presented. During the inbound pass through the outer magnetosphere, the not less than 0.43-million-electron-volt proton flux was more intense, and both the proton and electron fluxes were more variable, than previously observed. These changes are attributed to the influence on the magnetosphere of variations in the solar wind conditions. Outbound, beyond 18 Saturn radii, impulsive bursts of 0.14to greater than 1.0-million-electron-volt electrons were observed. In the inner magnetosphere, the charged particle absorption signatures of Mimas, Enceladus, and Tethys are used to constrain the possible tilt and offset of Saturn's internal magnetic dipole. At approximately 3 Saturn radii, a transient decrease was observed in the electron flux which was not due to Mimas. Characteristics of this decrease suggest the existence of additional material, perhaps another satellite, in the orbit of Mimas.

  17. Measurements of size and composition of particles in polar stratospheric clouds from infrared solar absorption spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinne, S.; Toon, O. B.; Toon, G. C.; Farmer, C. B.; Browell, E. V.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented on polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) observations, based on IR measurements of solar extinction, made by the airborne JPL Mark IV interferometer during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Expedition in 1987, together with the instrumentation and the theoretical aspects of data analysis. Thirty-three PSC cases were analyzed and categorized into two types, I and II, which were found to occur at different altitudes during September. Type I clouds, seen at altitudes above 15 km, contained particles with radii of about 0.5 micarons and nitric acid concentrations greater than 40 percent, while type II clouds, found usually below 15 km, contained particles with radii of 6 microns and larger, composed of water ice. In addition, particles of larger than the 15-micron-size detection limit were encounterd.

  18. A COMPARISON BETWEEN THE HALF-LIGHT RADII, LUMINOSITIES, AND UBV COLORS OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN M31 AND THE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Bergh, Sidney

    2010-10-15

    The Milky Way system and the Andromeda galaxy experienced radically different evolutionary histories. Nevertheless, it is found that these two galaxies ended up with globular cluster systems in which individual clusters have indistinguishable distributions of half-light radii. Furthermore, globulars in both M31 and the Galaxy are found to have radii that are independent of their luminosities. In this respect, globular clusters differ drastically from early-type galaxies in which half-light radius and luminosity are tightly correlated. Metal-rich globular clusters in M31 occupy a slightly larger volume than do those in the Galaxy. The specific globular cluster frequency in the Andromeda galaxy is found to be significantly higher than it is in the Milky Way system. The present discussion is based on the 107 Galactic globular clusters, and 200 putative globulars in M31, for which UBV photometry was available.

  19. A revised set of values of single-bond radii derived from the observed interatomic distances in metals by correction for bond number and resonance energy

    PubMed Central

    Pauling, Linus; Kamb, Barclay

    1986-01-01

    An earlier discussion [Pauling, L. (1947) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 69, 542] of observed bond lengths in elemental metals with correction for bond number and resonance energy led to a set of single-bond metallic radii with values usually somewhat less than the corresponding values obtained from molecules and complex ions. A theory of resonating covalent bonds has now been developed that permits calculation of the number of resonance structures per atom and of the effective resonance energy per bond. With this refined method of correcting the observed bond lengths for the effect of resonance energy, a new set of single-bond covalent radii, in better agreement with values from molecules and complex ions, has been constructed. PMID:16593698

  20. Determining Empirical Stellar Masses and Radii from Transits and Gaia Parallaxes as Illustrated by Spitzer Observations of KELT-11b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beatty, Thomas G.; Stevens, Daniel J.; Collins, Karen A.; Colón, Knicole D.; James, David J.; Kreidberg, Laura; Pepper, Joshua; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Siverd, Robert J.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Kielkopf, John F.

    2017-07-01

    Using the Spitzer Space Telescope, we observed a transit at 3.6 μm of KELT-11b. We also observed three partial planetary transits from the ground. We simultaneously fit these observations, ground-based photometry from Pepper et al., radial velocity data from Pepper et al., and a spectral energy distribution (SED) model using catalog magnitudes and the Hipparcos parallax to the system. The only significant difference between our results and those of Pepper et al. is that we find the orbital period to be shorter by 37 s, 4.73610 ± 0.00003 versus 4.73653 ± 0.00006 days, and we measure a transit center time of {{BJD}}{TDB} 2457483.4310 ± 0.0007, which is 42 minutes earlier than predicted. Using our new photometry, we precisely measure the density of the star KELT-11 to 4%. By combining the parallax and catalog magnitudes of the system, we are able to measure the radius of KELT-11b essentially empirically. Coupled with the stellar density, this gives a parallactic mass and radius of 1.8 {M}⊙ and 2.9 {R}⊙ , which are each approximately 1σ higher than the adopted model-estimated mass and radius. If we conduct the same fit using the expected parallax uncertainty from the final Gaia data release, this difference increases to 4σ. The differences between the model and parallactic masses and radii for KELT-11 demonstrate the role that precise Gaia parallaxes, coupled with simultaneous photometric, radial velocity, and SED fitting, can play in determining stellar and planetary parameters. With high-precision photometry of transiting planets and high-precision Gaia parallaxes, the parallactic mass and radius uncertainties of stars become 1% and 3%, respectively. TESS is expected to discover 60-80 systems where these measurements will be possible. These parallactic mass and radius measurements have uncertainties small enough that they may provide observational input into the stellar models themselves.

  1. LOCAL GROUP DWARF ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES. II. STELLAR KINEMATICS TO LARGE RADII IN NGC 147 AND NGC 185

    SciTech Connect

    Geha, M.; Van der Marel, R. P.; Kalirai, J.; Guhathakurta, P.; Kirby, E. N.

    2010-03-01

    We present kinematic and metallicity profiles for the M 31 dwarf elliptical (dE) satellite galaxies NGC 147 and NGC 185. The profiles represent the most extensive spectroscopic radial coverage for any dE galaxy, extending to a projected distance of 8 half-light radii (8r{sub eff} {approx} 14'). We achieve this coverage via Keck/DEIMOS multislit spectroscopic observations of 520 and 442 member red giant branch stars in NGC 147 and NGC 185, respectively. In contrast to previous studies, we find that both dEs have significant internal rotation. We measure a maximum rotational velocity of 17 +- 2 km s{sup -1} for NGC 147 and 15 +- 5 km s{sup -1} for NGC 185. While both rotation profiles suggest a flattening in the outer regions, there is no indication that we have reached the radius of maximum rotation velocity. The velocity dispersions decrease gently with radius with average dispersions of 16 +- 1 km s{sup -1} and 24 +- 1 km s{sup -1} for NGC 147 and NGC 185, respectively. The average metallicities for NGC 147 and NGC 185 are [Fe/H] = -1.1 +- 0.1 and [Fe/H] = -1.3 +- 0.1, respectively; both dEs have internal metallicity dispersions of 0.5 dex, but show no evidence for a radial metallicity gradient. We construct two-{integral} axisymmetric dynamical models and find that the observed kinematical profiles cannot be explained without modest amounts of non-baryonic dark matter. We measure central mass-to-light ratios of M/L{sub V} = 4.2 +- 0.6 and M/L{sub V} = 4.6 +- 0.6 for NGC 147 and NGC 185, respectively. Both dE galaxies are consistent with being primarily flattened by their rotational motions, although some anisotropic velocity dispersion is needed to fully explain their observed shapes. The velocity profiles of all three Local Group dEs (NGC 147, NGC 185, and NGC 205) suggest that rotation is more prevalent in the dE galaxy class than previously assumed, but often manifests only at several times the effective radius. Since all dEs outside the Local Group have been

  2. The radii and limb darkenings of α Centauri A and B . Interferometric measurements with VLTI/PIONIER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervella, P.; Bigot, L.; Gallenne, A.; Thévenin, F.

    2017-01-01

    The photospheric radius is one of the fundamental parameters governing the radiative equilibrium of a star. We report new observations of the nearest solar-type stars α Centauri A (G2V) and B (K1V) with the VLTI/PIONIER optical interferometer. The combination of four configurations of the VLTI enable us to measure simultaneously the limb darkened angular diameter θLD and the limb darkening parameters of the two solar-type stars in the near-infrared H band (λ = 1.65 μm). We obtain photospheric angular diameters of θLD(A) = 8.502 ± 0.038 mas (0.43%) and θLD(B) = 5.999 ± 0.025 mas (0.42%), through the adjustment of a power law limb darkening model. We find H band power law exponents of α(A) = 0.1404 ± 0.0050 (3.6%) and α(B) = 0.1545 ± 0.0044 (2.8%), which closely bracket the observed solar value (α⊙ = 0.15027). Combined with the parallax π = 747.17 ± 0.61 mas previously determined, we derive linear radii of RA = 1.2234 ± 0.0053 R⊙ (0.43%) and RB = 0.8632 ± 0.0037 R⊙ (0.43%). The power law exponents that we derive for the two stars indicate a significantly weaker limb darkening than predicted by both 1D and 3D stellar atmosphere models. As this discrepancy is also observed on the near-infrared limb darkening profile of the Sun, an improvement of the calibration of stellar atmosphere models is clearly needed. The reported PIONIER visibility measurements of α Cen A and B provide a robust basis to validate the future evolutions of these models. The calibrated visibility data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/597/A137

  3. Elementary particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsch, Harald; Heusch, Karin

    Introduction -- Electrons and atomic nuclei -- Quantum properties of atoms and particles -- The knives of Democritus -- Quarks inside atomic nuclei -- Quantum electrodynamics -- Quantum chromodynamics -- Mesons, baryons, and quarks -- Electroweak interactions -- Grand unification -- Conclusion.

  4. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Metal oxide containing polymers and particularly styrene, acrylic or protein polymers containing fine, magnetic iron oxide particles are formed by combining a NO.sub.2 -substituted polymer with an acid such as hydrochloric acid in the presence of metal, particularly iron particles. The iron is oxidized to fine, black Fe.sub.3 O.sub.4 particles which deposit selectively on the polymer particles. Nitrated polymers are formed by reacting functionally substituted, nitrated organic compounds such as trinitrobenzene sulfonate or dinitrofluoro benzene with a functionally coreactive polymer such as an amine modified acrylic polymer or a protein. Other transition metals such as cobalt can also be incorporated into polymers using this method.

  5. CHARACTERIZING THE COOL KEPLER OBJECTS OF INTERESTS. NEW EFFECTIVE TEMPERATURES, METALLICITIES, MASSES, AND RADII OF LOW-MASS KEPLER PLANET-CANDIDATE HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Muirhead, Philip S.; Hamren, Katherine; Schlawin, Everett; Lloyd, James P.; Rojas-Ayala, Barbara; Covey, Kevin R.

    2012-05-10

    We report stellar parameters for late-K and M-type planet-candidate host stars announced by the Kepler Mission. We obtained medium-resolution, K-band spectra of 84 cool (T{sub eff} {approx}< 4400 K) Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) from Borucki et al. We identified one object as a giant (KOI 977); for the remaining dwarfs, we measured effective temperatures (T{sub eff}) and metallicities [M/H] using the K-band spectral indices of Rojas-Ayala et al. We determine the masses (M{sub *}) and radii (R{sub *}) of the cool KOIs by interpolation onto the Dartmouth evolutionary isochrones. The resultant stellar radii are significantly less than the values reported in the Kepler Input Catalog and, by construction, correlate better with T{sub eff}. Applying the published KOI transit parameters to our stellar radius measurements, we report new physical radii for the planet candidates. Recalculating the equilibrium temperatures of the planet-candidates assuming Earth's albedo and re-radiation fraction, we find that three of the planet-candidates are terrestrial sized with orbital semimajor axes that lie within the habitable zones of their host stars (KOI 463.01, KOI 812.03, and KOI 854.01). The stellar parameters presented in this Letter serve as a resource for prioritization of future follow-up efforts to validate and characterize the cool KOI planet candidates.

  6. On the development of polarizable and Lennard-Jones force fields to study hydration structure and dynamics of actinide(III) ions based on effective ionic radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spezia, Riccardo; Migliorati, Valentina; D'Angelo, Paola

    2017-10-01

    In this contribution, we show how it is possible to develop polarizable and non-polarizable force fields to study hydration properties of a whole chemical series based on atomic properties such as ionic radii. In particular, we have addressed the actinide(III) ion series, from U3+ to Cf3+, for which X-ray absorption data and effective ionic radii are available. A polarizable force field has been re-parameterized improving the original one [M. Duvail et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 044503 (2011)] which was based on solid state ionic radii. The new force field does not depend on solid state properties but directly on the liquid phase ones, and it can be used to study these ions in liquid water without any ambiguity. Furthermore, we have shown that it is possible to parameterize also a non-polarizable potential using standard Lennard-Jones and Coulombic forces, which can be transferred to other systems in condensed phase. The structural and dynamical properties of these two force fields are compared to each other and with data available in the literature, providing a good agreement. Moreover, we show the comparison with experimental X-ray absorption data that are very well reproduced by both force fields.

  7. Auroral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David S.

    1987-06-01

    The problems concerning the aurora posed prior to the war are now either solved in principle or were restated in a more fundamental form. The pre-war hypothesis concerning the nature of the auroral particles and their energies was fully confirmed, with the exception that helium and oxygen ions were identified as participating in the auroral particle precipitation in addition to the protons. The nature of the near-Earth energization processes affecting auroral particles was clarified. Charged particle trajectories in various electric field geometries were modeled. The physical problems have now moved from determining the nature and geometry of the electric fields, which accelerate charged particles near the Earth, to accounting for the existence of these electric fields as a natural consequence of the solar wind's interaction with Earth. Ultimately the reward in continuing the work in auroral and magnetospheric particle dynamics will be a deeper understanding of the subtleties of classical electricity and magnetism as applied to situations not blessed with well-defined and invariant geometries.

  8. Auroral particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, David S.

    1987-01-01

    The problems concerning the aurora posed prior to the war are now either solved in principle or were restated in a more fundamental form. The pre-war hypothesis concerning the nature of the auroral particles and their energies was fully confirmed, with the exception that helium and oxygen ions were identified as participating in the auroral particle precipitation in addition to the protons. The nature of the near-Earth energization processes affecting auroral particles was clarified. Charged particle trajectories in various electric field geometries were modeled. The physical problems have now moved from determining the nature and geometry of the electric fields, which accelerate charged particles near the Earth, to accounting for the existence of these electric fields as a natural consequence of the solar wind's interaction with Earth. Ultimately the reward in continuing the work in auroral and magnetospheric particle dynamics will be a deeper understanding of the subtleties of classical electricity and magnetism as applied to situations not blessed with well-defined and invariant geometries.

  9. Femtoscopy of identified particles in Pb-Pb collisions with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinina, L. V.

    2016-12-01

    Femtoscopy provides information on system size and its dynamics due to the effects of quantum statistics and final-state interactions. The results of femtoscopic correlations of different identified particles measured by ALICE in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV are presented. Hydrodynamic models predict a decrease of the radii with increasing pair transverse mass (mT) due to radial flow. Correlation measurements of heavy particles extend the range over which the transverse mass dependence of the source radii can be studied and thus can serve as a tool to learn about the dynamics of the deconfined medium. In particular, the measured three-dimensional radii of kaons are compared with a model where the hydrodynamic phase is succeeded by a hadronic rescattering phase and a purely hydrodynamical calculation. The latter predicts an approximate mT scaling of source radii obtained from pion and kaon correlations. This mT scaling appears to be broken in the data. The breaking of scaling is well reproduced by the full hydro-kinetic model calculations, thereby indicating the importance of the rescattering phase at LHC energies. The emission duration and the decoupling time of the system are also estimated for kaons and pions.

  10. Charge radii of neutron deficient Fe52,53 produced by projectile fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Minamisono, K.; Rossi, D. M.; Beerwerth, R.; Fritzsche, S.; Garand, D.; Klose, A.; Liu, Y.; MaaB, B.; Mantica, P. F.; Miller, A. J.; Muller, P.; Nazarewicz, W.; Nortershauser, W.; Olsen, E.; Pearson, M. R.; Reinhard, P. -G.; Saperstein, E. E.; Sumithrarachchi, C.; Tolokonnikov, S. V.

    2016-12-15

    Bunched-beam collinear laser spectroscopy is performed on neutron deficient 52,53Fe prepared through in-flight separation followed by a gas stopping. This novel scheme is a major step to reach nuclides far from the stability line in laser spectroscopy. Differential mean-square charge radii δ$\\langle$r2$\\rangle$ of 52,53Fe are determined relative to stable 56Fe as δ$\\langle$r2$\\rangle$56,52=$-$0.034(13) fm2 and δ$\\langle$r2$\\rangle$56,53=$-$0.218(13) fm2, respectively, from the isotope shift of atomic hyperfine structures. The multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method is used to calculate atomic factors to deduce δ$\\langle$r2$\\rangle$. The values of δ$\\langle$r2$\\rangle$ exhibit a minimum at the N=28 neutron shell closure. The nuclear density functional theory with Fayans and Skyrme energy density functionals is used to interpret the data. As a result, the trend of δ$\\langle$r2$\\rangle$ along the Fe isotopic chain results from an interplay between single-particle shell structure, pairing, and polarization effects and provides important data for understanding the intricate trend in the δ$\\langle$r2$\\rangle$ of closed-shell Ca isotopes

  11. Dirac-Hartree-Bogoliubov calculation for spherical and deformed hot nuclei: Temperature dependence of the pairing energy and gaps, nuclear deformation, nuclear radii, excitation energy, and entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisboa, R.; Malheiro, M.; Carlson, B. V.

    2016-02-01

    Background: Unbound single-particle states become important in determining the properties of a hot nucleus as its temperature increases. We present relativistic mean field (RMF) for hot nuclei considering not only the self-consistent temperature and density dependence of the self-consistent relativistic mean fields but also the vapor phase that takes into account the unbound nucleon states. Purpose: The temperature dependence of the pairing gaps, nuclear deformation, radii, binding energies, entropy, and caloric curves of spherical and deformed nuclei are obtained in self-consistent RMF calculations up to the limit of existence of the nucleus. Method: We perform Dirac-Hartree-Bogoliubov (DHB) calculations for hot nuclei using a zero-range approximation to the relativistic pairing interaction to calculate proton-proton and neutron-neutron pairing energies and gaps. A vapor subtraction procedure is used to account for unbound states and to remove long range Coulomb repulsion between the hot nucleus and the gas as well as the contribution of the external nucleon gas. Results: We show that p -p and n -n pairing gaps in the S10 channel vanish for low critical temperatures in the range Tcp≈0.6 -1.1 MeV for spherical nuclei such as 90Zr, 124Sn, and 140Ce and for both deformed nuclei 150Sm and 168Er. We found that superconducting phase transition occurs at Tcp=1.03 Δp p(0 ) for 90Zr, Tcp=1.16 Δp p(0 ) for 140Ce, Tcp=0.92 Δp p(0 ) for 150Sm, and Tcp=0.97 Δp p(0 ) for 168Er. The superfluidity phase transition occurs at Tcp=0.72 Δn n(0 ) for 124Sn, Tcp=1.22 Δn n(0 ) for 150Sm, and Tcp=1.13 Δn n(0 ) for 168Er. Thus, the nuclear superfluidity phase—at least for this channel—can only survive at very low nuclear temperatures and this phase transition (when the neutron gap vanishes) always occurs before the superconducting one, where the proton gap is zero. For deformed nuclei the nuclear deformation disappear at temperatures of about Tcs=2.0 -4.0 MeV , well above the

  12. The Outer Regions of the Nearby Sc Galaxies NGC 2403 and M33: Evidence for an Intermediate-Age Population at Large Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidge, T. J.

    2003-06-01

    Deep g'r'i'z' images obtained with the Gemini Multiobject Spectrograph (GMOS) on Gemini North are used to investigate the stellar content in the outer regions of the nearby Sc galaxies NGC 2403 and M33. The field observed in NGC 2403 covers galactocentric distances between 5 and 11 kpc perpendicular to the line of sight (RLOSGC) and 7 and 19 kpc along the plane of the disk (RdiskGC). The red giant branch (RGB) tip occurs at i'=23.6+/-0.1, and the Cepheid and RGB-tip distance scales for NGC 2403 are in good agreement. The number density of bright main-sequence stars in this field experiences a steep cutoff at RdiskGC~10 kpc, which is consistent with the expected truncation radius of the disk predicted from studies of edge-on spiral galaxies. While very young stars are restricted to RdiskGC<10 kpc, a population of bright asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is present throughout the entire GMOS field, indicating that star formation occurred outside of the present-day star-forming disk of NGC 2403 during intermediate epochs. The AGB stars are not in a tidal stream; in fact, the ratio of AGB stars above the RGB tip to those below the RGB tip does not change with radius, indicating that the bright AGB stars are uniformly mixed with the fainter stellar content throughout the field. The AGB luminosity function (LF) scales with r-band surface brightness over a wide range of radii throughout the main body of NGC 2403, indicating that the age distribution of stars in the outer regions of the present-day star-forming disk is not skewed to younger values than in the inner disk. Based on the color of stars on the upper portions of the RGB, it is concluded that metallicity changes across the field, with [Fe/H]=-0.8+/-0.1(random)+/-0.3(systematic) at RLOSGC=5 kpc, and [Fe/H]=-2.2+/-0.2(random)+/-0.8(systematic) at RLOSGC=11 kpc. The M33 field samples RLOSGC between 8 and 10 kpc and RdiskGC between 14 and 17 kpc. Bright AGB stars are detected in this field, and the ratio of bright

  13. ACCRETION RATES OF MOONLETS EMBEDDED IN CIRCUMPLANETARY PARTICLE DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsuki, Keiji; Yasui, Yuki; Daisaka, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    We examine the gravitational capture probability of colliding particles in circumplanetary particle disks and accretion rates of small particles onto an embedded moonlet, using analytic calculation, three-body orbital integrations, and N-body simulations. Expanding our previous work, we take into account the Rayleigh distribution of particles' orbital eccentricities and inclinations in our analytic calculation and orbital integration and confirm agreement between them when the particle velocity dispersion is comparable to or larger than their mutual escape velocity and the ratio of the sum of the physical radii of colliding particles to their mutual Hill radius (r-tilde{sub p}) is much smaller than unity. As shown by our previous work, the capture probability decreases significantly when the velocity dispersion is larger than the escape velocity and/or r-tilde{sub p}{approx}>0.7. Rough surfaces of particles can enhance the capture probability. We compare the results of three-body calculations with N-body simulations for accretion of small particles by an embedded moonlet and find agreement at the initial stage of accretion. However, when particles forming an aggregate on the moonlet surface nearly fill the Hill sphere, the aggregate reaches a quasi-steady state with a nearly constant number of particles covering the moonlet, and the accretion rate is significantly reduced compared to the three-body results.

  14. Carbon particles

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  15. Stable particles

    SciTech Connect

    Samios, N.P.

    1993-12-31

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets. with a few more additions -- with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers-exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the forte of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc.

  16. Particle Sizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Microspheres are tiny plastic beads that represent the first commercial products manufactured in orbit. An example of how they are used is a new aerodynamic particle sizer designated APS 33B produced by TSI Incorporated. TSI purchased the microspheres from the National Bureau of Standards which certified their exact size and the company uses them in calibration of the APS 33B* instrument, latest in a line of TSI systems for generating counting and weighing minute particles of submicron size. Instruments are used for evaluating air pollution control devices, quantifying environments, meteorological research, testing filters, inhalation, toxicology and other areas where generation or analysis of small airborne particles is required. * The APS 33B is no longer being manufactured. An improved version, APS 3320, is now being manufactured. 2/28/97

  17. The effect of injection location on the spectrum of energetic magnetospheric particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birmingham, T. J.

    1980-01-01

    The role of local particle injections and accelerations in determining energetic particle spectra used as an indication of the radial diffusion of trapped magnetospheric particles is assessed. An idealized one-dimensional steady-state model of magnetospheric radial transport in which diffusion is balanced against particle sources and sinks is used to illustrate the effects of particle injection at a point and over a band of radii in which the observation point is immersed in particle spectra. For an injection spectrum uniformly distributed in space and a step function in energy, it is shown that the energy dependence of the measured spectrum is determined not only by adiabatic energization of the input spectrum but by the spatial structure of the injection and the radial dependence of the diffusion coefficient as well. The relevance of the results for observations of particle spectra in the terrestrial and Jovian magnetospheres is also considered

  18. Particle Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki K. M.

    2014-05-01

    Geophysics research has long been dominated by classical mechanics, largely disregarding the potential of particle physics to augment existing techniques. The purpose of this article is to review recent progress in probing Earth's interior with muons and neutrinos. Existing results for various volcanological targets are reviewed. Geoneutrinos are also highlighted as examples in which the neutrino probes elucidate the composition of Earth's deep interior. Particle geophysics has the potential to serve as a useful paradigm to transform our understanding of Earth as dramatically as the X-ray transformed our understanding of medicine and the body.

  19. FDTD approach to optical forces of tightly focused vector beams on metal particles.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jian-Qi; Wang, Xi-Lin; Jia, Ding; Chen, Jing; Fan, Ya-Xian; Ding, Jianping; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2009-05-11

    We propose an improved FDTD method to calculate the optical forces of tightly focused beams on microscopic metal particles. Comparison study on different kinds of tightly focused beams indicates that trapping efficiency can be altered by adjusting the polarization of the incident field. The results also show the size-dependence of trapping forces exerted on metal particles. Transverse tapping forces produced by different illumination wavelengths are also evaluated. The numeric simulation demonstrates the possibility of trapping moderate-sized metal particles whose radii are comparable to wavelength.

  20. Particle blender

    DOEpatents

    Willey, Melvin G.

    1981-01-01

    An infinite blender that achieves a homogeneous mixture of fuel microspheres is provided. Blending is accomplished by directing respective groups of desired particles onto the apex of a stationary coaxial cone. The particles progress downward over the cone surface and deposit in a space at the base of the cone that is described by a flexible band provided with a wide portion traversing and in continuous contact with the circumference of the cone base and extending upwardly therefrom. The band, being attached to the cone at a narrow inner end thereof, causes the cone to rotate on its arbor when the band is subsequently pulled onto a take-up spool. As a point at the end of the wide portion of the band passes the point where it is tangent to the cone, the blended particles are released into a delivery tube leading directly into a mold, and a plate mounted on the lower portion of the cone and positioned between the end of the wide portion of the band and the cone assures release of the particles only at the tangent point.

  1. Airborne Particles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojala, Carl F.; Ojala, Eric J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students collect airborne particles using a common vacuum cleaner. Suggests ways for the students to convert their data into information related to air pollution and human health. Urges consideration of weather patterns when analyzing the results of the investigation. (TW)

  2. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  3. Towards nanoscale composite particles of dual complexity.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Claudia Simone; Shehata, Samuel; Henzler, Katja; Yuan, Jiayin; Wittemann, Alexander

    2011-03-01

    The fabrication of heteroaggregates comprising inorganic and organic nanoparticles of different sizes is reported. Control over the assembly of nanoscale functional building units is of great significance to many practical applications. Joining together different spherical nanoparticles in a defined manner allows control over the shape of the composites. If two types of constituents are chosen that differ in size, the surfaces of the composites exhibit two specific radii of curvature, yielding aggregates of dual surface roughness. Moreover, if the constituents consist of different materials, the resulting heteroaggregates feature both compositional and interfacial anisotropy, offering unprecedented perspectives for custom-tailored colloids. This study describes a two-step approach towards such designer particles. At first, amine-modified polystyrene particles with 154 nm diameter were assembled into clusters of well-defined configurations. Onto these, oppositely charged inorganic particles with diameters of only a few nanometres were deposited by direct uptake from solution, resulting in numerous functional entities all over the surface of the polymer clusters. Despite the fact that oppositely charged constituents are brought together, charge reversal by uptake of nanoparticles allows for stable suspensions of heterocomposites. Hence, the possibility to assemble particles into nanoscale heterocomposites with full control over shape, composition, and surface roughness is demonstrated.

  4. The radii of the nearby K5V and K7V stars 61 Cygni A & B. CHARA/FLUOR interferometry and CESAM2k modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervella, P.; Mérand, A.; Pichon, B.; Thévenin, F.; Heiter, U.; Bigot, L.; ten Brummelaar, T. A.; McAlister, H. A.; Ridgway, S. T.; Turner, N.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Goldfinger, P. J.; Farrington, C.

    2008-09-01

    Context: The main sequence binary star 61 Cyg (K5V+K7V) is our nearest stellar neighbour in the northern hemisphere. This proximity makes it a particularly well suited system for very high accuracy interferometric radius measurements. Aims: Our goal is to constrain the poorly known evolutionary status and age of this bright binary star. Methods: We obtained high accuracy interferometric observations in the infrared K' band, using the CHARA/FLUOR instrument. We then computed evolutionary models of 61 Cyg A & B with the CESAM2k code. As model constraints, we used a combination of observational parameters from classical observation methods (photometry, spectroscopy) as well as our new interferometric radii. Results: The measured limb darkened disk angular diameters are θ_LD(A) = 1.775 ± 0.013 mas and θ_LD(B) = 1.581 ± 0.022 mas, respectively for 61 Cyg A and B. Considering the high accuracy parallaxes available, these values translate into photospheric radii of R(A) = 0.665 ± 0.005 R⊙ and R(B) = 0.595 ± 0.008 R⊙. The new radii constrain efficiently the physical parameters adopted for the modeling of both stars, allowing us to predict asteroseismic frequencies based on our best-fit models. Conclusions: The CESAM2k evolutionary models indicate an age around 6 Gyr and are compatible with small values of the mixing length parameter. The measurement of asteroseismic oscillation frequencies in 61 Cyg A & B would be of great value to improve the modeling of this important fiducial stellar system, in particular to better constrain the masses.

  5. On the Sizes of the North Atlantic Basin Tropical Cyclones Based on 34- and 64-kt Wind Radii Data, 2004-2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    At end of the 2012 hurricane season the National Hurricane Center retired the original HURDAT dataset and replaced it with the newer version HURDAT2, which reformatted the original data and included additional information, in particular, estimates of the 34-, 50, and 64-kt wind radii for the interval 2004-2013. During the brief 10-year interval, some 164 tropical cyclones are noted to have formed in the North Atlantic basin, with 77 becoming hurricanes. Hurricane Sandy (2012) stands out as being the largest individual storm that occurred in the North Atlantic basin during the 2004 -2013 timeframe, both in terms of its 34- and 64-kt wind radii and wind areas, having maximum 34- and 64-kt wind radii, maximum wind areas, and average wind areas each more than 2 standard deviations larger than the corresponding means. In terms of the largest yearly total 34-kt wind area (i.e., the sum of all individual storm 34-kt wind areas during the year), the year 2010 stands out as being the largest (about 423 × 10(exp 6) nmi(exp 2)), compared to the mean of about 174 × 10(exp 6) nmi(exp 2)), surpassing the year 2005 (353 x 10(exp 6) nmi(exp 2)) that had the largest number of individual storms (28). However, in terms of the largest yearly total 64-kt wind area, the year 2005 was the largest (about 9 × 10(exp 6) nmi(exp 2)), compared to the mean of about 3 × 106 nmi(exp 2)). Interesting is that the ratio of total 64-kt wind area to total 34-kt wind area has decreased over time, from 0.034 in 2004 to 0.008 in 2013.

  6. On the ring-to-chain ratios of radii of gyration and sedimentation coefficients of polymers of the freely jointed model: Monte Carlo calculations and the ɛ method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-der

    1983-04-01

    The configurations of ring polymers of the freely jointed model (with excluded-volume effect) are generated on a computer using an efficient ring-generation method recently developed by us. The ring-to-chain ratios of radii of gyration and sedimentation coefficients are calculated using the generated configurations of chains and rings for a number of polymer sizes. The limiting ratios at infinite molecular weight are obtained by extrapolation and compared with those obtained by the ɛ method of Bloomfield and Zimm, Sharp and Bloomfield, and Yu and Fujita. It is found that all three treatments do not agree with the Monte Carlo results.

  7. Turbulence Evolution and Shock Acceleration of Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chee, Ng K.

    2007-01-01

    We model the effects of self-excitation/damping and shock transmission of Alfven waves on solar-energetic-particle (SEP) acceleration at a coronal-mass-ejection (CME) driven parallel shock. SEP-excited outward upstream waves speedily bootstrap acceleration. Shock transmission further raises the SEP-excited wave intensities at high wavenumbers but lowers them at low wavenumbers through wavenumber shift. Downstream, SEP excitation of inward waves and damping of outward waves tend to slow acceleration. Nevertheless, > 2000 km/s parallel shocks at approx. 3.5 solar radii can accelerate SEPs to 100 MeV in < 5 minutes.

  8. Investigating the Impacts of Particle Size and Wind Speed on Brownout

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    Wing Brownout Definition Helicopter brownout is a phenomenon that occurs during takeoff, landing, and near-ground hover when spinning rotor blades...radii up to 2 mm; it feels gritty and doesn’t retain water easily. The large spacing between grains allows for drainage and drying and causes the...smallest soil component is clay, with particle sizes less than 0.002 mm. Ultra-fine in texture, clay feels sticky when wet , is extremely cohesive, and does

  9. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  10. Particle classifier

    SciTech Connect

    Etkin, B.

    1987-04-14

    This patent describes a classifier for particulate material comprising a housing having an inlet to receive a classifying air flow flowing in a given direction, collection means downstream of the inlet to receive material classified by the air flow, and material introduction means intermediate the inlet and the collection means to introduce particles entrained in a secondary air stream into the housing in a direction other than the given direction. The material introduction means includes a material outlet aperture in a wall of the housing extending generally perpendicular to the given direction, conveying means to convey material and the secondary air stream to the material outlet and diverting means to divert the secondary air stream to a direction generally parallel to the classifying air flow flowing in the given direction. The diverting means includes a surface extending downstream from the outlet and adjacent thereto and being dimensioned to divert the secondary airstream by a Coanda effect generally parallel to the given direction and thereby segregate the secondary air/stream from the particles and permit continued movement of the particles along predictable trajectories.

  11. Calculated limits for particle fluxes in Jupiter's Van Allen belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haffner, J.

    1972-01-01

    Electron and proton fluxes in Jupiter's radiation belts are calculated, along with the envelopes of dose rates. The following assumptions are made: the particles in the Jupiter belts are influenced only by the magnetic field of the planet; the particles act correspondingly to the particles in the Earth's belts and the Earth's belts can be used as a model; the magnetic field of Jupiter is essentially a dipole; the radiation of a decimetric nature received from Jupiter is synchrotron radiation due to the electrons, and to a first approximation it is emitted isotropically; and the strength of the emission in the decimetric wavelength range gives an upper bound considering how strong the field can be and how many electrons there are. The point dose rates for tissue and 0.1 gram/cm aluminum shielding at about 3 Jupiter radii are 10000 rads/hr for electrons and 1000 rads/hr for protons.

  12. Catalyst-particle configurations: From nanowires to carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Davis, Stephen H.; Voorhees, Peter W.

    2017-08-01

    Surface-energy minimization is used to study capillary effects that determine the stable configurations of (liquid or solid) particles atop tubes or wires. The results give allowable ranges for the volume (Vc) of the particles as a function of the inner and outer radii of the tubes, RI and Ro, respectively. When RI/Ro=0 , the object is a nanowire. When RI/Ro=1 , it is a single-wall carbon nanotube. When 0 particles in carbon nanotubes that oscillate across local energy-maximum points with respect to the position of the lower interface in the inner wall.

  13. Impact of Saturn ring particles on Pioneer 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humes, D. H.; Oneal, R. L.; Kinard, W. H.; Alvarez, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    The detection of particles near the rings of Saturn by the meteoroid detection instrument on board Pioneer 11 is discussed. The instrument consists of 234 penetration detectors, distributed between two independent data channels each of which is designed to become inhibited for a period of 77 min after the registration of a penetration event in that channel. At least four particles penetrated the detectors in the 4.5 h period around Saturn periapsis at radial distances between 1.36 and 3.1 Saturn radii, a radial distribution inconsistent with the gravitational focusing of meteoroids. The detection of particles which may have been part of the E ring before the crossing of the ring plane suggests that this ring may be 1800 km thick, with an optical thickness greater than 10 to the -8th.

  14. Particle size characterization by quadruple-detector hydrodynamic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Amandaa K; Striegel, André M

    2009-01-01

    Particle size and shape and their distribution directly influence a variety of end-use material properties related to packing, mixing, and transport of powders, solutions, and suspensions. Many of the techniques currently employed for particle size characterization have found limited applicability for broadly polydisperse and/or nonspherical particles. Here, we introduce a quadruple-detector hydrodynamic chromatography (HDC) method utilizing static multiangle light scattering (MALS), quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS), differential viscometry (VISC), and differential refractometry (DRI), and apply the technique to characterizing a series of solid and hollow polystyrene latexes with diameters in the approximate range of 40-400 nm. Using HDC/MALS/QELS/VISC/DRI, we were able to determine a multiplicity of size parameters and their polydispersity and to monitor the size of the particles across the elution profile of each sample. Using self-similarity scaling relationships between the molar mass and the various particle radii, we were also able to ascertain the shape of the latexes and the shape constancy as a function of particle size. The particle shape for each latex was confirmed by the dimensionless ratio rho identical with R (G,z )/R (H,z ) which, in addition, provided information on the structure (compactness) of the latexes as a function of particle size. Solid and hollow polystyrene latex samples were also differentiable using these methods. Extension of this method to nonspherical, fractal objects should be possible.

  15. Statistical radii associated with amino acids to determine the contact map: fixing the structure of a type I cohesin domain in the Clostridium thermocellum cellulosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwastyk, Mateusz; Poma Bernaola, Adolfo; Cieplak, Marek

    2015-07-01

    We propose to improve and simplify protein refinement procedures through consideration of which pairs of amino acid residues should form native contacts. We first consider 11 330 proteins from the CATH database to determine statistical distributions of contacts associated with a given type of amino acid. The distributions are set across the distances between the α-C atoms that are in contact. Based on this data, we determine typical radii of effective spheres that can be placed on the α-C atoms in order to reconstruct the distribution of the contact lengths. This is done by checking for overlaps with enlarged van der Waals spheres associated with heavy atoms on other amino acids. The resulting contacts can be used to identify non-native contacts that may arise during the time evolution of structure-based models. Here, the radii are used to guide reconstruction of nine missing side chains in a type I cohesin domain with the Protein Data Bank code 1AOH. We first identify the likely missing contacts and then sculpt the corresponding side chains by standard refinement tools to achieve consistency with the expected contact map. One ambiguity in refinement is resolved by determining all-atom conformational energies.

  16. SYSTEMATIC UNCERTAINTIES IN THE SPECTROSCOPIC MEASUREMENTS OF NEUTRON-STAR MASSES AND RADII FROM THERMONUCLEAR X-RAY BURSTS. II. EDDINGTON LIMIT

    SciTech Connect

    Guever, Tolga; Oezel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2012-03-01

    Time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of thermonuclear bursts observed from low-mass X-ray binaries offer a unique tool to measure neutron-star masses and radii. In this paper, we continue our systematic analysis of all the X-ray bursts observed with Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer from X-ray binaries. We determine the events that show clear evidence for photospheric radius expansion and measure the Eddington limits for these accreting neutron stars using the bolometric fluxes attained at the touchdown moments of each X-ray burst. We employ a Bayesian technique to investigate the degree to which the Eddington limit for each source remains constant between bursts. We find that for sources with a large number of radius expansion bursts, systematic uncertainties are at a 5%-10% level. Moreover, in six sources with only pairs of Eddington-limited bursts, the distribution of fluxes is consistent with a {approx}10% fractional dispersion. This indicates that the spectroscopic measurements of neutron-star masses and radii using thermonuclear X-ray bursts can reach the level of accuracy required to distinguish between different neutron-star equations of state, provided that uncertainties related to the overall flux calibration of X-ray detectors are of comparable magnitude.

  17. The Detection of Coronal Suprathermal Particles Required to Seed Acceleration of Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, J.; Laming, J. M.; Tylka, A.; Ko, Y.; Rakowski, C.; Ng, C. K.

    2012-12-01

    An extensive body of evidence identifies shocks driven by very fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) starting within a few solar radii of the Sun as the primary particle accelerators in large, gradual solar energetic particles (SEP) events. These large SEP events are major radiation hazards for astronauts and for space borne instrumentation, making a reliable SEP predictive capability a high priority for Heliophysics research. Diverse lines of evidence indicate that the rapid production of large intensities of high-energy particles is greatly enhanced when the pre-event environment has been primed with a population of suprathermal ions having energies well above the typical thermal particle energy, usually in the range from a few to tens of keV in the solar corona. However, at present we have no direct evidence that suprathermal ions actually exist in the corona in numbers sufficient to serve as "seed particles" for diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). We will review the evidence indicating seed particles are required to produce energetic SEPs on the observed time scales. One technique with the potential for directly observing these seed particles is the use of high-throughput UV spectroscopy to quantify broadening of the Ly-α line resulting from charge exchange between suprathermal protons and neutral atoms in the corona. Attempts to use this technique with SOHO UVCS have not produced clear evidence for the detection of coronal suprathermals. We will present revised spectroscopic computations of the influence of seed particles on the Ly-α line spectrum and describe the instrumental requirements for observing this line broadening.

  18. Modeling the Solar Dust Environment at 9.5 Solar Radii: Revealing Radiance Trends with MESSENGER Star Tracker Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, S. B.; Strikwerda, T.; Lario, D.; Raouafi, N.; Decker, R.

    2010-12-01

    The main components of interplanetary dust are created through destruction, erosion, and collision of asteroids and comets (e.g. Mann et al. 2006). Solar radiation forces distribute these interplanetary dust particles throughout the solar system. The percent contribution of these source particulates to the net interplanetary dust distribution can reveal information about solar nebula conditions, within which these objects are formed. In the absence of observational data (e.g. Helios, Pioneer), specifically at distances less than 0.3 AU, the precise dust distributions remain unknown and limited to 1 AU extrapolative models (e.g. Mann et al. 2003). We have developed a model suitable for the investigation of scattered dust and electron irradiance incident on a sensor for distances inward of 1 AU. The model utilizes the Grün et al. (1985) and Mann et al. (2004) dust distribution theory combined with Mie theory and Thomson electron scattering to determine the magnitude of solar irradiance scattered towards an optical sensor as a function of helio-ecliptic latitude and longitude. MESSENGER star tracker observations (launch to 2010) of the ambient celestial background combined with Helios data (Lienert et al. 1982) reveal trends in support of the model predictions. This analysis further emphasizes the need to characterize the inner solar system dust environment in anticipation of near-Solar missions.

  19. Martian Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of Martian soil was taken by the Phoenix Lander's atomic force microscope on Sol 74 of the mission, which began on May 25, 2008. This image of a flat, smooth-surfaced particle is consistent with the appearance of soil from Earth containing the mineral phyllosilicate.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  20. Spectrometer for neutron and gamma-ray detection at the distances less than 100 solar radii from the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, S.; Panasyuk, M.; Ryumin, S.; Sobolevsky, N.; Ufimtsev, M.

    2001-08-01

    Solar neutrons with energies <5 MeV can't be detected in the near-Earth space due to the both its decay and decreasing of its fluxes with distance from the Sun. So solar neutron observations near the Sun compared with near-Earth ones allow studying acceleration of ions up to significantly smaller energies, what occurs considerably more often. Besides that near-Sun low energy neutron observations are important for search for non-flare ion acceleration on the Sun. For project InterHelioProbe we have proposed spectrometer of neutrons with energies 0.055 MeV. LiI(Eu) crystal 4*3 cm enriched in 6 Li , surrounded by a plastic scintillator 1-3 cm thick loaded with 10 B is used as a detector. Neutrons will undergo elastic scattering with the hydrogen in the plastic. A delayed coincidence within a window of 0.1 - 10 µs in either scintillator is a signature of a neutron, with the initial fast plastic signal pulse height being a direct measure of the incident neutron's energy. A fast charged particle will be vetoed as simultaneous signals in both scintillators. Gamma's with energies 0.03-10 MeV will be identified too as signals in LiI alone. Calculated effective area for normal neutron incidence is 0.3-5.6 cm2 . Estimated effective area for gamma detection is 3-12 cm2 . Mass of the instrument is <1.5 kg. Power of the detector is about 1.5 watt, needing telemetry - 40 b/s.

  1. Interaction between two spherical particles in a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Jun-Ichi; Stark, Holger; Yoneya, Makoto; Yokoyama, Hiroshi

    2004-04-01

    We numerically investigate the interaction between two spherical particles in a nematic liquid crystal mediated by elastic distortions in the orientational order. We pay attention to the cases where two particles with equal radii R0 impose rigid normal anchoring on their surfaces and carry a pointlike topological defect referred to as a hyperbolic hedgehog. To describe the geometry of our system, we use bispherical coordinates, which prove useful in the implementation of boundary conditions at the particle surfaces and at infinity. We adopt the Landau de Gennes continuum theory in terms of a second-rank tensor order parameter Qij for the description of the orientational order of a nematic liquid crystal. We also utilize an adaptive mesh refinement scheme that has proven to be an efficient way of dealing with topological defects whose core size is much smaller than the particle size. When the two “dipoles,” composed of a particle and a hyperbolic hedgehog, are in parallel directions, the two-particle interaction potential is attractive for large interparticle distances D and proportional to D-3 as expected from the form of the dipole-dipole interaction, until the well-defined potential minimum at D≃2.46 R0 is reached. For the antiparallel configuration with no hedgehogs between the two particles, the interaction potential is repulsive and behaves as D-2 for D≲10 R0 , which is stronger than the dipole-dipole repulsion ( ˜ D-3 ) expected theoretically as an asymptotic behavior for large D .

  2. Kinetics of ice particles growth in the polar summer mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasetsky, A. Y.; Petelina, S. V.

    2009-05-01

    The growth kinetics of ice particles in the polar summer mesosphere is discussed. The particle growth time is calculated using the temperature, water vapor density, and ice number density simultaneously measured by the infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer on the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE-FTS) satellite. The formation rate for ice particles is a very strong function of temperature and water vapor concentration. We found the equilibrium radius of ice particles to be in the range from 20 to 70 nm, and the formation time - from about 2 hours at 150 K to about 18 hours at 125 K. Our results imply that in addition to the commonly accepted particle growth during their sedimentation from higher altitudes, in-situ growth to radii of 50-70 nm at mesospheric temperatures near 150 K in two hours or less may also be possible. Our analysis of possible shapes for mesospheric ice particles using the band shape of ice absorption feature measured by ACE-FTS suggests that cubes or compact hexagonal prisms (with an aspect ratio of 1.1) are the best candidates to represent the crystalline ice particles in the polar summer mesosphere.

  3. Constraints on PSC Particle Microphysics Derived From Lidar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Li; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2001-01-01

    Based on extensive T-matrix computations of light scattering by polydispersions of randomly oriented, rotationally symmetric nonspherical particles, we analyze existing lidar observations of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) and derive several constraints on PSC particle microphysical properties. We show that sharp-edged nonspherical particles (finite circular cylinders) exhibit less variability of lidar backscattering characteristics with particle size and aspect ratio than particles with smooth surfaces (spheroids). For PSC particles significantly smaller than the wavelength, the backscatter color index Alpha and the depolarization color index Beta are essentially shape-independent. Observations for type Ia PSCs can be reproduced by spheroids with aspect ratios larger than 1.2, oblate cylinders with diameter-to-length ratios greater than 1.6, and prolate cylinders with length-to-diameter ratios greater than 1.4. The effective equal-volume-sphere radius for type la PSCs is about 0.8 microns or larger. Type Ib PSCs are likely to be composed of spheres or nearly spherical particles with effective radii smaller than 0.8 microns. Observations for type II PSCs are consistent with large ice crystals (effective radius greater than 1 micron modeled as cylinders or prolate spheroids.

  4. Particle Size Distribution in Saturn’s Ring C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, Essam A.; Wong, K.; French, R.; Rappaport, N.

    2012-10-01

    Information about particle sizes in Saturn’s rings is provided by two complementary types of Cassini radio occultation measurements. The first is differential extinction of three coherent sinusoidal signals transmitted by Cassini through the rings back to Earth (wavelength = 0.94, 3.6, and 13 cm, respectively). The differential measurements strongly constraint three parameters of an assumed power-law size distribution n(a) = n0 (a/a0)q, amin ≤ a ≤ amax: namely, the power law index q, the minimum radius amin, and reference abundance n0 at reference radius a0. The differential measurements are particularly sensitive to radii in the range 0.1 mm < a < 1 m. Complementing this capability, is a second type of measurements that is particularly sensitive to the larger radii 1 m < a < 20 m and their abundance. Signature of the collective near-forward scattering by these particles is captured in power spectrum measurements as broadened component of width, shape, and strength that depend on ring particle sizes, their spatial distribution, and observation geometry. Contributions of ring features of width as small several hundred kilometers can be identified and isolated in the measured spectra for a small subset of Cassini orbits of favorable geometry. We use three inverse scattering algorithms (Bayes, constrained linear inversion, generalized singular-value-decomposition) to recover the size distribution of particles of resolved ring features over the size range 1 m < a < 20 m without assuming an explicit size distribution model. We also investigate consistency of the results with a single power-law model extending over 0.1 mm < a < 20 m and implications to the spatial distribution of ring particles normal to the ring plane (vertical ring thickness). We present example results for selected features across Saturn’s Ring C where little evidence for gravitational wakes is present, hence the approaches above are applicable.

  5. Monte Carlo N-Particle Tracking of Ultrafine Particle Flow in Bent Micro-Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Casella, Andrew M.; Loyalka, Sudarsham K.

    2016-02-16

    The problem of large pressure-differential driven laminar convective-diffusive ultrafine aerosol flow through bent micro-tubes is of interest in several contemporary research areas including; release of contents from pressurized containment vessels, aerosol sampling equipment, advanced scientific instruments, gas-phase micro-heat exchangers, and microfluidic devices. In each of these areas, the predominant problem is the determination of the fraction of particles entering the micro-tube that is deposited within the tube and the fraction that is transmitted through. Due to the extensive parameter restrictions of this class of problems, a Lagrangian particle tracking method making use of the coupling of the analytical stream line solutions of Dean and the simplified Langevin equation is quite a useful tool in problem characterization. This method is a direct analog to the Monte Carlo N-Particle method of particle transport extensively used in nuclear physics and engineering. In this work, 10 nm diameter particles with a density of 1 g/cm3 are tracked within micro-tubes with toroidal bends with pressure differentials ranging between 0.2175 and 0.87 atmospheres. The tubes have radii of 25 microns and 50 microns and the radius of curvature is between 1 m and 0.3183 cm. The carrier gas is helium, and temperatures of 298 K and 558 K are considered. Numerical convergence is considered as a function of time step size and of the number of particles per simulation. Particle transmission rates and deposition patterns within the bent micro-tubes are calculated.

  6. COMPARATIVE MORPHOLOGY OF SOLAR RELATIVISTIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kocharov, Leon; Usoskin, Ilya; Klassen, Andreas; Valtonen, Eino; Ryan, James M.

    2015-09-20

    Time profiles of the 0.25–10 MeV electrons and the ∼(0.1–1) GeV nucleon{sup −1} protons and helium associated with two solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are analyzed with a newly formulated method based on modeling of the particle transport in the interplanetary medium. With the modeling, we fit the observed angular distribution of solar particles and infer, for a particular particle instrument and magnetic field orientation, the time delay of the particle registration at 1 AU in respect to the solar source. Then, after the time offset removal, intensity re-normalization and background equalization, the time–intensity profiles of high-energy protons, helium and electrons in different energy channels are superposed and compared. The comparison reveals episodes of remarkable coincidence of different profiles, as well as episodes of essentially different behavior. It implies at least three sources of solar high-energy particles operating in a single event. The first, short-duration source emits electrons next to the flare's impulsive phase and CME liftoff. The second source gradually rises and continues for more than an hour, emitting electrons and lower energy protons, which is consistent with shock acceleration on open magnetic field lines extending to solar wind. An another, third source is the main source of relativistic ions in space. It is retarded in respect to the flare's impulsive phase and may be associated with a structure encountered by the shock within a few solar radii from the Sun.

  7. THE TRANSIT LIGHT-CURVE PROJECT. XIV. CONFIRMATION OF ANOMALOUS RADII FOR THE EXOPLANETS TrES-4b, HAT-P-3b, AND WASP-12b

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Tucker; Ingemyr, Mikael; Winn, Joshua N.; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Holman, Matthew J.; Esquerdo, Gil; Everett, Mark

    2011-06-15

    We present transit photometry of three exoplanets, TrES-4b, HAT-P-3b, and WASP-12b, allowing for refined estimates of the systems' parameters. TrES-4b and WASP-12b were confirmed to be 'bloated' planets, with radii of 1.706 {+-} 0.056R{sub Jup} and 1.736 {+-} 0.092R{sub Jup}, respectively. These planets are too large to be explained with standard models of gas giant planets. In contrast, HAT-P-3b has a radius of 0.827 {+-} 0.055R{sub Jup}, smaller than a pure hydrogen-helium planet and indicative of a highly metal-enriched composition. Analyses of the transit timings revealed no significant departures from strict periodicity. For TrES-4, our relatively recent observations allow for improvement in the orbital ephemerides, which is useful for planning future observations.

  8. Kepler-62: a five-planet system with planets of 1.4 and 1.6 Earth radii in the habitable zone.

    PubMed

    Borucki, William J; Agol, Eric; Fressin, Francois; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Rowe, Jason; Isaacson, Howard; Fischer, Debra; Batalha, Natalie; Lissauer, Jack J; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Fabrycky, Daniel; Désert, Jean-Michel; Bryson, Stephen T; Barclay, Thomas; Bastien, Fabienne; Boss, Alan; Brugamyer, Erik; Buchhave, Lars A; Burke, Chris; Caldwell, Douglas A; Carter, Josh; Charbonneau, David; Crepp, Justin R; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Christiansen, Jessie L; Ciardi, David; Cochran, William D; DeVore, Edna; Doyle, Laurance; Dupree, Andrea K; Endl, Michael; Everett, Mark E; Ford, Eric B; Fortney, Jonathan; Gautier, Thomas N; Geary, John C; Gould, Alan; Haas, Michael; Henze, Christopher; Howard, Andrew W; Howell, Steve B; Huber, Daniel; Jenkins, Jon M; Kjeldsen, Hans; Kolbl, Rea; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery; Latham, David W; Lee, Brian L; Lopez, Eric; Mullally, Fergal; Orosz, Jerome A; Prsa, Andrej; Quintana, Elisa V; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Sasselov, Dimitar; Seader, Shawn; Shporer, Avi; Steffen, Jason H; Still, Martin; Tenenbaum, Peter; Thompson, Susan E; Torres, Guillermo; Twicken, Joseph D; Welsh, William F; Winn, Joshua N

    2013-05-03

    We present the detection of five planets--Kepler-62b, c, d, e, and f--of size 1.31, 0.54, 1.95, 1.61 and 1.41 Earth radii (R⊕), orbiting a K2V star at periods of 5.7, 12.4, 18.2, 122.4, and 267.3 days, respectively. The outermost planets, Kepler-62e and -62f, are super-Earth-size (1.25 R⊕ < planet radius ≤ 2.0 R⊕) planets in the habitable zone of their host star, respectively receiving 1.2 ± 0.2 times and 0.41 ± 0.05 times the solar flux at Earth's orbit. Theoretical models of Kepler-62e and -62f for a stellar age of ~7 billion years suggest that both planets could be solid, either with a rocky composition or composed of mostly solid water in their bulk.

  9. Microfabricated particle focusing device

    DOEpatents

    Ravula, Surendra K.; Arrington, Christian L.; Sigman, Jennifer K.; Branch, Darren W.; Brener, Igal; Clem, Paul G.; James, Conrad D.; Hill, Martyn; Boltryk, Rosemary June

    2013-04-23

    A microfabricated particle focusing device comprises an acoustic portion to preconcentrate particles over large spatial dimensions into particle streams and a dielectrophoretic portion for finer particle focusing into single-file columns. The device can be used for high throughput assays for which it is necessary to isolate and investigate small bundles of particles and single particles.

  10. Particle image velocimetry of a flow at a vaulted wall.

    PubMed

    Kertzscher, U; Berthe, A; Goubergrits, L; Affeld, K

    2008-05-01

    The assessment of flow along a vaulted wall (with two main finite radii of curvature) is of general interest; in biofluid mechanics, it is of special interest. Unlike the geometry of flows in engineering, flow geometry in nature is often determined by vaulted walls. Specifically the flow adjacent to the wall of blood vessels is particularly interesting since this is where either thrombi are formed or atherosclerosis develops. Current measurement methods have problems assessing the flow along vaulted walls. In contrast with conventional particle image velocimetry (PIV), this new method, called wall PIV, allows the investigation of a flow adjacent to transparent flexible surfaces with two finite radii of curvature. Using an optical method which allows the observation of particles up to a predefined depth enables the visualization solely of the boundary layer flow. This is accomplished by adding a specific dye to the fluid which absorbs the monochromatic light used to illuminate the region of observation. The obtained images can be analysed with the methods of conventional PIV and result in a vector field of the velocities along the wall. With wall PIV, the steady flow adjacent to the vaulted wall of a blood pump was investigated and the resulting velocity field as well as the velocity fluctuations were assessed.

  11. Shape evolution of a core-shell spherical particle under hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Colin, Jérôme

    2012-03-01

    The morphological evolution by surface diffusion of a core-shell spherical particle has been investigated theoretically under hydrostatic pressure when the shear modulii of the core and shell are different. A linear stability analysis has demonstrated that depending on the pressure, shear modulii, and radii of both phases, the free surface of the composite particle may be unstable with respect to a shape perturbation. A stability diagram finally emphasizes that the roughness development is favored in the case of a hard shell with a soft core.

  12. THE STELLAR MASS STRUCTURE OF MASSIVE GALAXIES FROM z = 0 TO z = 2.5: SURFACE DENSITY PROFILES AND HALF-MASS RADII

    SciTech Connect

    Szomoru, Daniel; Franx, Marijn; Labbe, Ivo; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Trenti, Michele; Illingworth, Garth D.; Oesch, Pascal

    2013-02-15

    We present stellar mass surface density profiles of a mass-selected sample of 177 galaxies at 0.5 < z < 2.5, obtained using very deep Hubble Space Telescope optical and near-infrared data over the GOODS-South field, including recent CANDELS data. Accurate stellar mass surface density profiles have been measured for the first time for a complete sample of high-redshift galaxies more massive than 10{sup 10.7} M {sub Sun }. The key advantage of this study compared to previous work is that the surface brightness profiles are deconvolved for point-spread function smoothing, allowing accurate measurements of the structure of the galaxies. The surface brightness profiles account for contributions from complex galaxy structures such as rings and faint outer disks. Mass profiles are derived using radial rest-frame ug color profiles and a well-established empirical relation between these colors and the stellar mass-to-light ratio. We derive stellar half-mass radii from the mass profiles, and find that these are on average {approx}25% smaller than rest-frame g-band half-light radii. This average size difference of 25% is the same at all redshifts, and does not correlate with stellar mass, specific star formation rate, effective surface density, Sersic index, or galaxy size. Although on average the difference between half-mass size and half-light size is modest, for approximately 10% of massive galaxies this difference is more than a factor of two. These extreme galaxies are mostly extended, disk-like systems with large central bulges. These results are robust, but could be impacted if the central dust extinction becomes high. ALMA observations can be used to explore this possibility. These results provide added support for galaxy growth scenarios wherein massive galaxies at these epochs grow by accretion onto their outer regions.

  13. The SLUGGS Survey: stellar masses and effective radii of early-type galaxies from Spitzer Space Telescope 3.6 μm imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Duncan A.; Sinpetru, Luciana; Savorgnan, Giulia; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Usher, Christopher; Brodie, Jean

    2017-02-01

    Galaxy starlight at 3.6 μm is an excellent tracer of stellar mass. Here we use the latest 3.6 μm imaging from the Spitzer Space Telescope to measure the total stellar mass and effective radii in a homogeneous way for a sample of galaxies from the SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and GalaxieS (SLUGGS) survey. These galaxies are representative of nearby early-type galaxies in the stellar mass range of 10 < log M*/M⊙ < 11.7 and our methodology can be applied to other samples of early-type galaxies. We model each galaxy in 2D and estimate its total asymptotic magnitude from a 1D curve-of-growth. Magnitudes are converted into stellar masses using a 3.6 μm mass-to-light ratio from the latest stellar population models of Röck et al., assuming a Kroupa initial mass function. We apply a ratio based on each galaxy's mean mass-weighted stellar age within one effective radius (the mass-to-light ratio is insensitive to galaxy metallicity for the generally old stellar ages and high metallicities found in massive early-type galaxies). Our 3.6 μm stellar masses agree well with masses derived from 2.2 μm data. From the 1D surface brightness profile, we fit a single Sérsic law, excluding the very central regions. We measure the effective radius, Sérsic n parameter and effective surface brightness for each galaxy. We find that galaxy sizes derived from shallow optical imaging and the 2MASS survey tend to underestimate the true size of the largest, most massive galaxies in our sample. We adopt the 3.6 μm stellar masses and effective radii for the SLUGGS survey galaxies.

  14. Determining sex by bone volume from 3D images: discriminating analysis of the tali and radii in a contemporary Spanish reference collection.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Mediavilla, Elena; Perea Pérez, Bernardo; Labajo González, Elena; Sánchez Sánchez, José Antonio; Santiago Sáez, Andrés; Dorado Fernández, Enrique

    2012-07-01

    The discriminant power of bone volume for determining sex has not been possible to determine due to the difficulty in its calculation. At present, new advancements based on 3D technology make it possible to reproduce the bone digitally and calculate its volume using computerized tools, which opens up a new window to ascertaining the discriminant power of this variable. With this objective in mind, the tali and radii of 101 individuals (48 males and 53 females) of a contemporary Spanish reference collection (twentieth century) (EML 1) were scanned using the Picza 3D Laser Scanner. Calculated for the tali were total volume, the volume of the posterior region, which includes the posterior calcaneal facet and other three volumes of the anterior region. Calculated for the radius were total volume, volume of the radius head, volume of the diaphysis, and volume of the distal end. The data are presented for all of the variables, distinguishing between the right and left side. The data were processed using the statistical program PASW Statistics 18, thereby obtaining classification functions for sex which accurately classify 90.9 % of tali and 93.9 % of radii on the basis of their total left and right volume, respectively. Studying the volume in different regions of the bone shows that the diaphysis of the right radius possesses a high level of discriminant power, offering classification functions which accurately classify 96.9 % of the sample. The validation test performed on a sample of 20 individuals from another contemporary Spanish reference collection (EML 2) confirms the high discriminant power of the volume obtaining an accurate classification rate of 80-95 % depending on the variable studied.

  15. Rocky Worlds Limited to ˜1.8 Earth Radii by Atmospheric Escape during a Star’s Extreme UV Saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmer, Owen R.; Catling, David C.

    2017-08-01

    Recent observations and analysis of low-mass (<10 M ⊕) exoplanets have found that rocky planets only have radii up to 1.5-2 R ⊕. Two general hypotheses exist for the cause of the dichotomy between rocky and gas-enveloped planets (or possible water worlds): either low-mass planets do not necessarily form thick atmospheres of a few wt.%, or the thick atmospheres on these planets easily escape, driven by X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) emissions from young parent stars. Here, we show that a cutoff between rocky and gas-enveloped planets due to hydrodynamic escape is most likely to occur at a mean radius of 1.76 ± 0.38 (2σ) R ⊕ around Sun-like stars. We examine the limit in rocky planet radii predicted by hydrodynamic escape across a wide range of possible model inputs, using 10,000 parameter combinations drawn randomly from plausible parameter ranges. We find a cutoff between rocky and gas-enveloped planets that agrees with the observed cutoff. The large cross-section available for XUV absorption in the extremely distended primitive atmospheres of low-mass planets results in complete loss of atmospheres during the ˜100 Myr phase of stellar XUV saturation. In contrast, more-massive planets have less-distended atmospheres and less escape, and so retain thick atmospheres through XUV saturation—and then indefinitely as the XUV and escape fluxes drop over time. The agreement between our model and exoplanet data leads us to conclude that hydrodynamic escape plausibly explains the observed upper limit on rocky planet size and few planets (a “valley”, or “radius gap”) in the 1.5-2 R ⊕ range.

  16. Lateral migration of particles in the Newtonian fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, M.

    2014-04-01

    Studying of lateral migration of particles has a long history in fluid mechanics. In the Stokes approximation, noncharged rigid spherical particle in dilute solution does not migrate to a direction perpendicular to external field. For example, the spherical particle is placed in the vicinity of the wall. The particle doesn't move when a flow field, which is parallel to the wall, is applied. However, the lateral migrations are observed in dispersions of non-spherical and deformable particles. Blood is a multi-phase dispersion and is composed of red blood cells, leukocytes, platelets and so on dispersed in plasma. The leukocytes and the platelets move to the vicinity of the wall when the blood flows in tube. It is called `margination'. In this study, the migrations of binary droplet dispersion with different radii and surface tension coefficient are examined by computer simulations. The interaction among droplets causes a segregation of some kind of particles. The binary droplets dispersion system under Couette flow is simulated and the mean positions of the droplets are evaluated. The margination of small droplets is observed when the surface tension coefficient of the large droplets is small. On the other hand, the margination of large droplets is not observed when the large droplet is stiff.

  17. A Dissipative Particle Dynamics model for two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Anupam

    2005-11-01

    A Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) model for two-phase flows is presented. The new model, unlike existing models [1, 2], uses different cut-off radii for the attractive and repulsive components of the inter-particle interaction potential and allows for larger density ratios between the phases. Surface tension arises due to the attractive component and a forcing term that depends on higher order density gradients. The model is shown to reproduce the Laplace law and analytical results for drop oscillations. A new method that couples a Lennard-Jones type potential with a coarse-grained potential is also presented. References: [1] Pagonabarraga, I. and Frenkel, D. (2001). Journal of Chemical Physics, 115(11): 5015-5026. [2] Warren, P.B. (2003). Physical Review E. 68. 066702: 1-8.

  18. Observations of a Coronal Shock Wave and the Production of Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z. G.; Li, C.; Ding, M. D.

    2017-05-01

    We present a study that clarifies the acceleration source/mechanism of the solar energetic particle (SEP) event on 2011 August 9. Based on the assumption of scatter-free propagation of charged particles along the interplanetary magnetic field, the solar particle release times of the electrons and protons are derived and both found to be in the decay phase of the flare emission. Furthermore, we compare the peak-flux spectra of the in situ particles and the remote-sensing hard X-ray photons and find a weak correlation between them. In particular, we note that an extreme ultraviolet shock wave, presumed to be a signature of coronal mass ejection (CME) shock front on the solar surface, and an associated type II radio burst were observed alongside this event. Under the framework of diffusive shock acceleration, the derived shock compression ratio can accelerate particles with a theoretical spectral index γ ={2.14}-0.02+0.01, which is comparable to the observational index of ˜2.0. Our results appear to support the notion that the coronal shock wave was most likely responsible for the SEP event. Specifically, we find that the electrons were released in a low coronal site at ˜0.58 solar radii, and protons were released when the CME-driven shock propagated to ˜1.38 solar radii. The multi-spacecraft observations, in addition, reveal the connection between the acceleration of shock waves and the release of SEPs.

  19. Influence of injector geometry on particle trajectories: Analysis of particle dynamics in the injector and plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Vardelle, M.; Vardelle, A.; Dussoubs, B.; Fauchais, P.; Roemer, T.S.; Neiser, R.A.; Smith, M.F.

    1998-11-01

    The conditions of particle injection into the side of plasma jets play an important role in determining the microstructure and properties of sprayed deposits. However, few investigations have been carried out on this topic. The current work presents the results of an experimental and computational study of the influence of injector geometry and gas mass flow rate on particle dynamics at injector exit and in the plasma jet. Two injector geometries were tested: a straight tube and a curved tube with various radii of curvature. Zirconia powders with different particle size range and morphology were used. A possible size segregation effect in the injector was analyzed from the space distribution of particles collected on a stick tape. The spray patterns in the plasma jet was monitored from the thermal radiation emitted by particles. An analysis of the particle behavior in the injector and mixing of the carrier-gas flow with the plasma jet was carried out using a 3-D computational fluids dynamics code.

  20. Physical and Optical/Radiative Characteristics of Small Particles in Tropical Cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Ferry, G. V.; Strawa, Anthony W.; Allen, D. A.; Howard, S. D.; Foster, T. C.; Hallett, J.; Arnott, W. P.

    1995-01-01

    Whether cirrus clouds heat or cool the Earth-atmosphere system depends on the relative importance of the cloud shortwave albedo effect and the cloud thermal greenhouse effect. Both an determined by the distribution of ice condensate with cloud particle size. The microphysics instrument package flown aboard the DC-8 In TOGA/COARE included an ice crystal replicator, a 2D Greyscale Cloud Particle Probe and a Forward Scattering Spectrometer Aerosol Probe. In combination. these instruments permitted particle size measurements between 0.5 micrometers and 2.6 mm diameter. Ice crystal replicas were used to validate signals from the electro-optical instruments. Typical results show a prevalence in tropical cirrus clouds of micron-sized particles, in addition to cloud particles that exceed 100 micrometer radius. The mechanism of their formation is growth of (hygroscopic, possibly ocean-derived) aerosol particles along the Kohler curves. The concentration of small particles is higher and less variable in space and time, and their tropospheric residence time is longer, than those of large cloud particles because of lower sedimentation velocities. Small particles shift effective cloud particle radii to sizes much smaller than the mean diameter of the cloud particles. This causes an increase in shortwave reflectivity and IR emissivity. and a decrease in transmissivity. In the cirrus outflow of tropical cyclone Oliver on 8 February, 1993, the reflectivity increases with altitude (decreasing temperature) stronger than does cloud emissivity, yielding enhanced radiative cooling at higher altitudes.

  1. A possible mechanism for the capture of microparticles by the earth and other planets of the solar system. [planetary gravitation effects on cosmic dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibenedetto, F.

    1973-01-01

    By application of Lyttleton's theory for the formation of comets, it is shown that a possible mechanism for the origin and formation of a concentration of cosmic particles around the earth and the other planets of the solar system exists. In the vicinity of the neutral point, where the velocity of colliding particles is not greater than 6 km/s, it is found that if the solid particles after collision must remain in a solid state, there can be no possibility of accretion for Mercury, Mars, and the Moon, where the maximum value of the distance of the center of the planet to the asymptotic trajectory is less than the radius of the planet. On the other hand, the capture radii of microparticles in solid form varies from a minimum of 2.95 planetary radii for Venus and 3.47 for the Earth, to about 986 for Jupiter.

  2. Absorption of trapped particles by Jupiter's moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, W. N.; Birmingham, T. J.; Mead, G. D.

    1974-01-01

    Inclusion of absorption effects of the four innermost moons in the radial transport equations for electrons and protons in Jupiter's magnetosphere. It is found that the phase space density n at 2 Jupiter radii for electrons with equatorial pitch angles less than 69 deg is reduced by a factor of 42,000 when lunar absorption is included in the calculation. For protons with equatorial pitch angles less than 69 deg the corresponding reduction factor is 2,300,000. The effect of the satellites becomes progressively weaker for both electrons and protons as equatorial pitch angles of 90 deg are approached, because the likelihood of impacting a satellite becomes progressively smaller. The large density decreases found at the orbits of Io, Europa, and Ganymede result in corresponding particle flux decreases that should be observed by spacecraft making particle measurements in Jupiter's magnetosphere. The characteristic signature of satellite absorption should be a downward-pointing vertex in the flux versus radius curve at the L value corresponding to each satellite.

  3. Trapped particles in the polar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demars, H. G.; Barakat, A. R.; Schunk, R. W.

    1998-01-01

    The flow of plasma along open field lines at high latitudes is highly variable and depends both on conditions in the underlying ionosphere and thermosphere and on the transport of particles and energy from the magnetosphere. Past attempts to model this time variability have, for the most part, examined the response of the plasma on a stationary field line to certain prespecified boundary conditions and heat sources. While such prespecified conditions may bear some resemblance to what occurs naturally, they are artificial and cannot be expected to yield a truly quantitative understanding of the various physical processes that interact to produce the dynamic polar wind. The present study is one in a series of studies that attempts to eliminate this artificiality by coupling the mathematical description of the polar wind to a three-dimensional time-dependent model of the high-latitude ionosphere. In this study, an individual flux tube of plasma is followed as it moves under the influence of combined corotation and convection electric fields. Boundary conditions at the lower end of the flux tube are obtained from the ionosphere model, which takes into account all significant particle species, chemical reactions, and heat sources that contribute to the state of the ionosphere. A multi-ion macroscopic particle-in-cell code is used to model the plasma in the flux tube. A description of the behavior of H+ and O+ for the altitude range from 2000 km to about 8 Earth radii is obtained as the flux tube moves along the trajectory, which traverses regions of the subauroral ionosphere, dayside and nightside ovals, and polar cap. The goal of the study is to determine the extent to which ion trapping can occur in the polar wind and the effects that collisions, wave-particle interactions, centrifugal acceleration, and varying ionospheric conditions have on the trapped ions. The main conclusion of the study is that O+ trapping is important and it acts to increase the O+ density at

  4. Charging of mesospheric particles - Implications for electron density and particle coagulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Thomas, Gary E.

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between N(e) and mesospheric aerosols near the mesopause is studied. The full distribution of charges on mesospheric aerosols is calculated, including dust and ice particles with radii ranging from 1 to 400 nm. The N(e) and ion density N(i) are obtained and ionization height profiles are calculated. The effects of dust and ice particles on N(e) and N(i) are studied for a wide range of assumed conditions. The results indicate that aerosol concentrations associated with visible polar mesospheric clouds are unlikely to cause a severe N(e) depletion. The pronounced 'bite-out' of N(e) at about 87 km in the summertime may be caused by a large concentration of small ice particles in a narrow cold layer near the mesosphere. Net negative charge on mesospheric aerosols may severely inihibit coagulation, so that mesospheric dust would not grow significantly. A higher supersaturation with respect to water vapor would be needed for heterogeneous nucleation of ice crystals.

  5. Classification automation of thermoplastic particles in a cured epoxy matrix according to their size on microscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sablina, Victoria A.; Varnavsky, Alexander N.; Varnavsky, Andrei N.

    2016-12-01

    Epoxy resins have wide applications in modern industries. To improve the properties of such resins the thermoplastic component is often used. This component dissolves in the epoxy resin at a high temperature. To determine the properties of the obtained cured epoxy matrix with thermoplastic particles it is important to estimate and classify this particle sizes. In this paper we investigate methods for solving these tasks automatically. The thermoplastic particle sizes are analyzed using the microscopy images of the cured epoxy matrix. The digital image processing methods for the thermoplastic particle detection are discussed. The Otsu's method is implemented for microscopic images with homogeneous background. The Circular Hough Transform method is implemented for microscopic images with big visible particle radii. The results of both methods for the considered images are represented. The parameters of the Gaussian distribution for the thermoplastic particle sizes in a cured epoxy matrix are estimated from the analyzed microscopic images.

  6. Insight into the structure and physics of M dwarf stars through determination of the rotation, metallicities, and radii of the nearby population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Elisabeth R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of M dwarfs, their fundamental properties--their sizes, compositions, and ages--are not well-constrained. Empirical determination of these properties is important for gaining insight into their stellar structure, magnetic field generation, and angular momentum evolution. Knowledge of the stellar parameters is also key to characterizing planetary systems. I used observations to empirically constrain the properties of nearby, mid-to-late M dwarfs targeted by the MEarth transiting planet survey. I obtained low-resolution (R=2000) NIR spectra of 450 M dwarfs using SpeX on IRTF. I measured their absolute radial velocities with an accuracy of 4 km/s by exploiting telluric lines to establish an absolute wavelength calibration, and developed techniques to estimate M dwarf metallicities from K-band spectral line equivalent widths (EWs) or 2MASS colors to 0.15 dex. Using stars with interferometric radii, I showed that H-band EWs can be used to infer K and M dwarf temperatures to 69K, and radii to 0.027Rsun. I applied these relations to planet-hosting stars from Kepler, showing that the typical planet is 15% larger than is inferred if adopting other stellar parameters. Using photometry from the MEarth-North Observatory, I measured rotation periods from 0.1 to 150 days for 350 M dwarfs. There is a prevalence of stable spot patterns, and no correlation between period and amplitude for fully-convective stars. Using galactic kinematics as a proxy for age, I demonstrated a smooth age-rotation relation. I found that rapid rotators (P<10 days) are <2 Gyr, and that the slowest are on average 5+-3 Gyr old. I will discuss the extension of this work to the southern hemisphere, which utilizes FIRE on Magellan and the MEarth-South Observatory. MEarth acknowledges funding from the NSF, the David and Lucile Packard Foundation and the John Templeton Foundation. ERN was supported by the NSF GRFP. This work includes observations obtained at the Infrared Telescope

  7. Dynamics of Carroll particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergshoeff, Eric; Gomis, Joaquim; Longhi, Giorgio

    2014-10-01

    We investigate particles whose dynamics are invariant under the Carroll group. Although a single, free such Carroll particle has no non-trivial dynamics (the Carroll particle does not move), we show that non-trivial dynamics exists for a set of interacting Carroll particles. Furthermore, we gauge the Carroll algebra and couple the Carroll particle to these gauge fields. It turns out that for such a coupled system, even a single Carroll particle can have non-trivial dynamics.

  8. Surface impacts and collisions of particle-laden nanodrops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koplik, Joel

    2015-08-01

    The surface impact and collisions of particle-laden nanodrops are studied using molecular dynamics computer simulations. The drops are composed of Lennard-Jones dimers and the particles are rigid spherical sections of a cubic lattice, with radii about 11 nm and 0.6 nm, respectively. Uniform suspensions of 21% and 42% particle concentrations and particle-coated drops are studied, and their behavior is compared to that of pure fluid drops of the same size. The relative velocities studied span the transition to splashing, and both wetting/miscible and non-wetting/immiscible cases are considered. Impacts normal to the surface and head-on collisions are studied and compared. In surface impact, the behavior of low-density suspensions and liquid marble drops is qualitatively similar to that of pure liquid, while the concentrated drops are solid-like on impact. Collisions produce a splash only at velocities significantly higher than in impact, but the resulting drop morphology shows a similar dependence on solid concentration as in impact. In all cases, the collision or impact produces a strong local enhancement in the kinetic energy density and temperature but not in the particle or potential energy densities. Mixing of the two colliding species is not enhanced by collisions, unless the velocity is so high as to cause drop disintegration.

  9. Effect of metal particles in cermets on spectral selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, J. D.; Zhao, C. Y.; Wang, B. X.

    2017-03-01

    Most cermet-based coatings achieve their solar selectivities by the tandem interference effect, which has been widely studied. This study focused on the spectral selectivity achieved by the scattering effect of metal particles in cermet-based coatings. Previous research proved that reasonable solar selectivities can be obtained for cermets in the regime of particles with a radius of the order of 100 nm, but their solar absorptance is low (<90%). In our research, the effect of metal particles on the spectral selectivity of cermets was studied by the Mie theory and Monte Carlo simulation for Cr, Ni, and W particles with radii of 10 nm, 50 nm, 100 nm, and 200 nm, which were embedded in Al2O3 and occupied 5% of the volume fraction. It was found that by arranging different particles in different layers, a very high solar absorptance (95.6%) could be achieved. Since their thermal emittance (˜25% at 600 °C) was higher than that of normal coatings, these coatings are recommended to be used in solar absorbers that have a high concentration factor. Finally, the dependent scattering effect was qualitatively considered by the coupled-dipole approach. With a metal volume fraction of 5%, it was found that the effect of dependent scattering was small and should not change the conclusions made based on independent scattering.

  10. Forming parts over small radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, S. K.; Hughes, D. J.; Pereira, M. P.; Rolfe, B. F.

    2016-08-01

    Stamping simulations usually make the plane stress simplifying assumption. However, this becomes less valid when material draws around features with radius to sheet thickness ratios less than 20. Pereira, Yan & Rolfe (Wear, Vol.265, p.1687 (2008)) predicted that out-of-plane stress equivalent to material yield can occur because a line contact forms briefly at the start of the draw process. The high transient stress can cause high rates of tool wear and may cause the ‘die impact line’ cosmetic defect. In this work, we present residual strain results of a channel section that was drawn over a small radius. Using the neutron source at the Institut Laue-Langevin, in-plane and out-of-plane strains were measured in the channel part to show some support for the conclusions of Pereira et. al.

  11. A distribution of large particles in the coma of Comet 103P/Hartley 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Michael S.; Lindler, Don J.; Bodewits, Dennis; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Lisse, Carey M.; Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Kissel, Jochen; Hermalyn, Brendan

    2013-02-01

    The coma of Comet 103P/Hartley 2 has a significant population of large particles observed as point sources in images taken by the Deep Impact spacecraft. We measure their spatial and flux distributions, and attempt to constrain their composition. The flux distribution of these particles implies a very steep size distribution with power-law slopes ranging from -6.6 to -4.7. The radii of the particles extend up to 20 cm, and perhaps up to 2 m, but their exact sizes depend on their unknown light scattering properties. We consider two cases: bright icy material, and dark dusty material. The icy case better describes the particles if water sublimation from the particles causes a significant rocket force, which we propose as the best method to account for the observed spatial distribution. Solar radiation is a plausible alternative, but only if the particles are very low density aggregates. If we treat the particles as mini-nuclei, we estimate they account for <16-80% of the comet's total water production rate (within 20.6 km). Dark dusty particles, however, are not favored based on mass arguments. The water production rate from bright icy particles is constrained with an upper limit of 0.1-0.5% of the total water production rate of the comet. If indeed icy with a high albedo, these particles do not appear to account for the comet's large water production rate.

  12. A fluorescence spectroscopy assay for real-time monitoring of enzyme immobilization into mesoporous silica particles.

    PubMed

    Nabavi Zadeh, Pegah S; Mallak, Kassam Abdel; Carlsson, Nils; Åkerman, Björn

    2015-05-01

    Mesoporous silica particles are used as support material for immobilization of enzymes. Here we investigated a fluorescence-based assay for real-time monitoring of the immobilization of lipase, bovine serum albumin, and glucose oxidase into micrometer-sized mesoporous silica particles. The proteins are labeled with the dye epicocconone, and the interaction with the particles is observed as an increase in emission intensity of the protein-dye conjugates that can be quantified if correcting for a comparatively slow photobleaching. The immobilization occurs in tens of minutes to hours depending on particle concentration and type of protein. In the limit of excess particles over proteins, the formation of the particle-protein complexes can be described by a single exponential growth for all three investigated proteins, and the fitted pseudo-first-order rate constant increases linearly with particle concentration for each protein type. The derived second-order rate constant k varies with the protein hydrodynamic radius according to k∼RH(-4.70±0.01), indicating that the rate-limiting step at high particle concentrations is not the diffusional encounter between proteins and particles but rather the entry into the pores, consistent with the hydrodynamic radii of the three proteins being smaller but comparable to the pore radius of the particles.

  13. Nuclear magnetization distribution radii determined by hyperfine transitions in the 1s level of H-like ions 185Re74+ and 187Re74+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Widmann, K.; Birkett, B. B.; Mårtensson-Pendrill, A.-M.; Gustavsson, M. G. H.

    1998-02-01

    The F=3 to F=2 hyperfine transitions in the 1s ground state of the two isotopes 185Re74+ and 187Re74+ were measured to be (4560.5+/-3) Å and (4516.9+/-3) Å, respectively, using emission spectroscopy in an electron beam ion trap. After applying appropriate corrections for the nuclear charge distribution and QED effects, a Bohr-Weisskopf effect of ɛ=2.23(9)% and 2.30(9)% are found for 185Re and 187Re, respectively. This value is almost twice that of a previous theoretical estimate, and indicates a distribution of the nuclear magnetization far more extended than that of the nuclear charge. A radius of the magnetization distribution of 1/2=7.57(32) fm and 1/2=7.69(32) fm for 185Re and 187Re, respectively, is inferred from the data. These radii are larger than the nuclear charge distribution radius [1/2=5.39(1) fm] for both isotopes by factors 1.40(6) and 1.43(6), respectively. We find that the Bohr-Weisskopf effect in H-like ions is a sensitive probe of nuclear magnetization distribution, especially for cases where the charge distribution and magnetic moments are accurately known.

  14. Physicochemical studies on turnip-yellow-mosaic virus. Homogeneity, relative molecular masses, hydrodynamic radii and concentration-dependence of parameters in non-dissociating solvents.

    PubMed Central

    Harding, S E; Johnson, P

    1985-01-01

    Turnip-yellow-mosaic virus, with its stable, highly spherical and monodisperse character, was chosen as a suitable model substance with which to test hydrodynamic theories of transport. Sedimentation coefficients, diffusion coefficients (obtained through photon correlation spectroscopy) and viscosities were measured accurately as a function of concentration in well-defined and nearly neutral buffer systems. Ancillary information was also obtained from very-low-speed sedimentation-equilibrium experiments. The coefficients expressing the variation in sedimentation and diffusion coefficients with weight concentration were obtained, and by combination with other data it was possible to avoid assumptions concerning solvation and transform such regression coefficients into the form appropriate to volume fractions. Some measure of support for Batchelor's [(1972) J. Fluid Mech. 52, 245-268] calculations was thus obtained, but over most of the pH range the coefficients were significantly smaller than those calculated from his theory. It seems likely that electrostatic interactions are responsible for the discrepancies. Hydrodynamic radii (from diffusion coefficients) were in very fair agreement with those calculated from the thermodynamic excluded-volume term, but were higher than indicated by electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, a discrepancy ascribable to solvation. Images Fig. 1. PMID:4074323

  15. Simultaneous analysis of matter radii, transition probabilities, and excitation energies of Mg isotopes by angular-momentum-projected configuration-mixing calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Mitsuhiro; Watanabe, Shin; Tagami, Shingo; Matsumoto, Takuma; Shimizu, Yoshifumi R.; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2016-06-01

    We perform simultaneous analysis of (1) matter radii, (2) B (E 2 ;0+→2+) transition probabilities, and (3) excitation energies, E (2+) and E (4+) , for Mg-4024 by using the beyond-mean-field (BMF) framework with angular-momentum-projected configuration mixing with respect to the axially symmetric β2 deformation with infinitesimal cranking. The BMF calculations successfully reproduce all of the data for rm,B (E 2 ) , and E (2+) and E (4+) , indicating that it is quite useful for data analysis; particularly for low-lying states. We also discuss the absolute value of the deformation parameter β2 deduced from measured values of B (E 2 ) and rm. This framework makes it possible to investigate the effects of β2 deformation, the change in β2 due to restoration of rotational symmetry, β2 configuration mixing, and the inclusion of time-odd components by infinitesimal cranking. Under the assumption of axial deformation and parity conservation, we clarify which effect is important for each of the three measurements and propose the kinds of BMF calculations that are practical for each of the three kinds of observables.

  16. From laminar to fully-developed turbulence in a 500 radii long Osborne Reynolds pipe flow: A direct numerical simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrian, Ronald; Wu, Xiaohua; Moinn, Parviz

    2016-11-01

    We report our new direct numerical simulation results of the Osborne Reynolds' pipe transition problem in a 500 radii long configuration. The inlet disturbance is generated through a three degree narrow wedge. The present radial-mode inlet disturbance is in contrast to our earlier simulation design using a wire-ring at the inlet, which is circumferential-mode in nature. The current mesh size is 16384 x 201 x 512, and the simulation Reynolds number is 6500 based on the pipe diameter and bulk velocity. Statistics in the fully-developed turbulent region are in good agreement with those sampled from an auxiliary short turbulent pipe simulation using the streamwise periodic boundary condition. Frequency spectra of the turbulence kinetic energy are computed at six streamwise stations, namely, 30R, 60R, 90R, 350R, 400R and 450R downstream of the inlet. Surprisingly, spectra in the late transitional region (60R and 90R) exhibit stronger high frequency content than those in the fully-developed turbulent region. Contours of a passive scalar indicate the existence of patchy turbulent spot structures, even in the fully-developed turbulent region. We acknowledge partial support from NSF Award Number CBET-1335731.

  17. Sound scattering from rough bubbly ocean surface based on modified sea surface acoustic simulator and consideration of various incident angles and sub-surface bubbles' radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolghasi, Alireza; Ghadimi, Parviz; Chekab, Mohammad A. Feizi

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to improve the capabilities and precision of a recently introduced Sea Surface Acoustic Simulator (SSAS) developed based on optimization of the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff-Fresnel (HKF) method. The improved acoustic simulator, hereby known as the Modified SSAS (MSSAS), is capable of determining sound scattering from the sea surface and includes an extended Hall-Novarini model and optimized HKF method. The extended Hall-Novarini model is used for considering the effects of sub-surface bubbles over a wider range of radii of sub-surface bubbles compared to the previous SSAS version. Furthermore, MSSAS has the capability of making a three-dimensional simulation of scattered sound from the rough bubbly sea surface with less error than that of the Critical Sea Tests (CST) experiments. Also, it presents scattered pressure levels from the rough bubbly sea surface based on various incident angles of sound. Wind speed, frequency, incident angle, and pressure level of the sound source are considered as input data, and scattered pressure levels and scattering coefficients are provided. Finally, different parametric studies were conducted on wind speeds, frequencies, and incident angles to indicate that MSSAS is quite capable of simulating sound scattering from the rough bubbly sea surface, according to the scattering mechanisms determined by Ogden and Erskine. Therefore, it is concluded that MSSAS is valid for both scattering mechanisms and the transition region between them that are defined by Ogden and Erskine.

  18. Determination of the Mass Moments and Radii of Inertia of the Sections of a Tapered Wing and the Center-of-Gravity Line along the Wing Span

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savelyev, V. V.

    1943-01-01

    For computing the critical flutter velocity of a wing among the data required are the position of the line of centers of gravity of the wing sections along the span and the mass moments and radii of inertia of any section of the wing about the axis passing through the center of gravity of the section. A sufficiently detailed computation of these magnitudes even if the weights of all the wing elements are known, requires a great deal of time expenditure. Thus a rapid competent worker would require from 70 to 100 hours for the preceding computations for one wing only, while hundreds of hours would be required if all the weights were included. With the aid of the formulas derived in the present paper, the preceding work can be performed with a degree of accuracy sufficient for practical purposes in from one to two hours, the only required data being the geometric dimensions of the outer wing (tapered part), the position of its longerons, the total weight of the outer wing, and the approximate weight of the longerons, The entire material presented in this paper is applicable mainly to wings of longeron construction of the CAHI type and investigations are therefore being conducted by CAHI for the derivation of formulas for the determination of the preceding data for wings of other types.

  19. Systematic Uncertainties in the Spectroscopic Measurements of Neutron-star Masses and Radii from Thermonuclear X-Ray Bursts. III. Absolute Flux Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güver, Tolga; Özel, Feryal; Marshall, Herman; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Guainazzi, Matteo; Díaz-Trigo, Maria

    2016-09-01

    Many techniques for measuring neutron star radii rely on absolute flux measurements in the X-rays. As a result, one of the fundamental uncertainties in these spectroscopic measurements arises from the absolute flux calibrations of the detectors being used. Using the stable X-ray burster, GS 1826-238, and its simultaneous observations by Chandra HETG/ACIS-S and RXTE/PCA as well as by XMM-Newton EPIC-pn and RXTE/PCA, we quantify the degree of uncertainty in the flux calibration by assessing the differences between the measured fluxes during bursts. We find that the RXTE/PCA and the Chandra gratings measurements agree with each other within their formal uncertainties, increasing our confidence in these flux measurements. In contrast, XMM-Newton EPIC-pn measures 14.0 ± 0.3% less flux than the RXTE/PCA. This is consistent with the previously reported discrepancy with the flux measurements of EPIC-pn, compared with EPIC MOS1, MOS2, and ACIS-S detectors. We also show that any intrinsic time-dependent systematic uncertainty that may exist in the calibration of the satellites has already been implicity taken into account in the neutron star radius measurements.

  20. Syntheses, structures, and spectroscopic properties of plutonium and americium phosphites and the redetermination of the ionic radii of Pu(III) and Am(III).

    PubMed

    Cross, Justin N; Villa, Eric M; Wang, Shuao; Diwu, Juan; Polinski, Matthew J; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2012-08-06

    A series of isotypic rare earth phosphites (RE = Ce(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Pu(III), or Am(III)) with the general formulas RE(2)(HPO(3))(3)(H(2)O) along with a Pu(IV) phosphite, Pu[(HPO(3))(2)(H(2)O)(2)], have been prepared hydrothermally via reactions of RECl(3) with phosphorous acid. The structure of RE(2)(HPO(3))(3)(H(2)O) features a face-sharing interaction of eight- and nine-coordinate rare earth polyhedra. By use of the crystallographic data from the isotypic series along with data from previously reported isotypic series, the ionic radii for higher coordinate Pu(III) and Am(III) were calculated. The (VIII)Pu(III) radius was calculated as 1.112 ± 0.004 Å, and the (IX)Pu(III) radius was calculated to be 1.165 ± 0.002 Å. The (VIII)Am(III) radius was calculated as 1.108 ± 0.004 Å, and the (IX)Am(III) radius was calculated as 1.162 ± 0.002 Å.

  1. Charged particle dynamics in the presence of non-Gaussian Lévy electrostatic fluctuations

    DOE PAGES

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B.; Moradi, Sara; Anderson, Johan

    2016-09-01

    Full orbit dynamics of charged particles in a 3-dimensional helical magnetic field in the presence of -stable Levy electrostatic fluctuations and linear friction modeling collisional Coulomb drag is studied via Monte Carlo numerical simulations. The Levy fluctuations are introduced to model the effect of non-local transport due to fractional diffusion in velocity space resulting from intermittent electrostatic turbulence. The probability distribution functions of energy, particle displacements, and Larmor radii are computed and showed to exhibit a transition from exponential decay, in the case of Gaussian fluctuations, to power law decay in the case of Levy fluctuations. The absolute value ofmore » the power law decay exponents are linearly proportional to the Levy index. Furthermore, the observed anomalous non-Gaussian statistics of the particles' Larmor radii (resulting from outlier transport events) indicate that, when electrostatic turbulent fluctuations exhibit non-Gaussian Levy statistics, gyro-averaging and guiding centre approximations might face limitations and full particle orbit effects should be taken into account.« less

  2. Charged particle dynamics in the presence of non-Gaussian Lévy electrostatic fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B.; Moradi, Sara; Anderson, Johan

    2016-09-01

    Full orbit dynamics of charged particles in a 3-dimensional helical magnetic field in the presence of -stable Levy electrostatic fluctuations and linear friction modeling collisional Coulomb drag is studied via Monte Carlo numerical simulations. The Levy fluctuations are introduced to model the effect of non-local transport due to fractional diffusion in velocity space resulting from intermittent electrostatic turbulence. The probability distribution functions of energy, particle displacements, and Larmor radii are computed and showed to exhibit a transition from exponential decay, in the case of Gaussian fluctuations, to power law decay in the case of Levy fluctuations. The absolute value of the power law decay exponents are linearly proportional to the Levy index. Furthermore, the observed anomalous non-Gaussian statistics of the particles' Larmor radii (resulting from outlier transport events) indicate that, when electrostatic turbulent fluctuations exhibit non-Gaussian Levy statistics, gyro-averaging and guiding centre approximations might face limitations and full particle orbit effects should be taken into account.

  3. Solar Energetic-Particle Release Times in Historic Ground-Level Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    2009-11-01

    Ground-level events (GLEs) are large solar energetic-particle events with sufficiently hard spectra for GeV protons to be detected by neutron monitors at ground level. For each of 30 well-observed historic GLEs from four solar cycles, extending back to 1973, I have plotted onset times versus velocity-1 for particles observed on the IMP-7 and 8, ISEE-3, Wind, and GOES spacecraft and by neutron monitors. A linear fit on such a plot for each GLE determines the initial solar particle release (SPR) time, as the intercept, and the magnetic path length traversed, as the slope, of the fitted line. Magnetic path lengths and SPR times are well determined by the fits and cannot be used as adjustable parameters to make particle and photon emission times coincide. SPR times follow the onsets of shock-induced type II radio bursts and the coronal height of the coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven shock at SPR time can be determined for GLEs spanning an interval of solar longitude of ~140 deg. For a given GLE, all particle species and energies diverge from a single SPR point at a given coronal height and footpoint longitude of the field line to the Earth. These heights tend to increase with longitudinal distance away from the source, a pattern expected for shock acceleration. Acceleration for magnetically well-connected large GLEs begins at ~2 solar radii, in contrast to non-GLEs that have been found to be strongly associated with shocks above ~3 solar radii. The higher densities and magnetic field strengths at lower altitudes may be responsible for the acceleration of higher-energy particles in GLEs, while those GLEs that begin above 3R S may compensate by having higher shock speeds. These results support the joint dependence of maximum particle energy on magnetic field strength, injected particle density, and shock speed, all predicted theoretically.

  4. SOLAR ENERGETIC-PARTICLE RELEASE TIMES IN HISTORIC GROUND-LEVEL EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reames, Donald V.

    2009-11-20

    Ground-level events (GLEs) are large solar energetic-particle events with sufficiently hard spectra for GeV protons to be detected by neutron monitors at ground level. For each of 30 well-observed historic GLEs from four solar cycles, extending back to 1973, I have plotted onset times versus velocity{sup -1} for particles observed on the IMP-7 and 8, ISEE-3, Wind, and GOES spacecraft and by neutron monitors. A linear fit on such a plot for each GLE determines the initial solar particle release (SPR) time, as the intercept, and the magnetic path length traversed, as the slope, of the fitted line. Magnetic path lengths and SPR times are well determined by the fits and cannot be used as adjustable parameters to make particle and photon emission times coincide. SPR times follow the onsets of shock-induced type II radio bursts and the coronal height of the coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven shock at SPR time can be determined for GLEs spanning an interval of solar longitude of approx140 deg. For a given GLE, all particle species and energies diverge from a single SPR point at a given coronal height and footpoint longitude of the field line to the Earth. These heights tend to increase with longitudinal distance away from the source, a pattern expected for shock acceleration. Acceleration for magnetically well-connected large GLEs begins at approx2 solar radii, in contrast to non-GLEs that have been found to be strongly associated with shocks above approx3 solar radii. The higher densities and magnetic field strengths at lower altitudes may be responsible for the acceleration of higher-energy particles in GLEs, while those GLEs that begin above 3R {sub S} may compensate by having higher shock speeds. These results support the joint dependence of maximum particle energy on magnetic field strength, injected particle density, and shock speed, all predicted theoretically.

  5. Characterizing Single-Scattering Properties of Snow Aggregate Particles Integrated over Size Distributions in the Microwave Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, K.; Van Aartsen, B.; Haddad, Z. S.; Tanelli, S.; Skofronick Jackson, G.; Olson, W. S.

    2012-12-01

    Approximately 7000 snow aggregate particles have been synthesized, using a heuristic aggregation algorithm, from 9 realistic snowflake habits simulated using the now famous Snowfake ice crystal growth model. These particles exhibit mass-dimension relations consistent with those derived from observations. In addition, ranging from 0.1 to 3.5 mm in liquid-equivalent diameter, the sizes of these particle cover ranges wide enough for assemblies of realistic particle size distributions. The single-scattering properties, such as scattering/absorption/extinction/backscatter cross sections, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry factor, as well as the scattering matrix, are obtained for each aggregate particle using the discrete-dipole approximation (DDA) code DDSCAT at 13 microwave frequencies, ranging from 10 to 190 GHz. Preliminary radiative transfer calculations show that the single-scattering properties so obtained yield much more reasonable brightness temperatures than those derived from "fluffy sphere" Mie approximations. However, in order to achieve better retrievals involving these complex particles, we need to be able to characterize their single-scattering with only a few parameters. In this study, we present such an attempt using a pair of generalized effective radii, expressed as ratios of particle volume to particle surface area and to orientation-averaged particle cross section, in addition to mass content. It is shown that these effective radii are indeed effective in characterizing the PSD-integrated single-scattering properties of these complex particles. Pristine ice crystals simulated using the "Snowfake" ice crystal growth mode (3rd row from top) and example aggregates generated using the corresponding pristine particles (bottom 3 rows, i.e. 4th to 6th rows from top).

  6. The time dependence of the surface-force-induced contact radius between glass particles and polyurethane substrates: Effects of substrate viscoelasticity on particle adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, R. C.; DeMejo, L. P.; Rimai, D. S.; Vreeland, W. B.

    1991-09-01

    Glass particles having mean diameters of 20 μm were deposited onto substrates consisting of cross-linked polyurethane having Young's moduli of 2.5 and 32 MPa. The surface-force-induced contact radii were then determined, as a function of time for periods between 20 and 3600 min, using scanning electron microscopy. No changes in the contact radius with time was found with either substrate. This suggests that the 0.75 power dependence of the contact radius on particle radius, for particles in contact with polyurethane substrates, previously reported [D. S. Rimai, L. P. DeMejo, and R. C. Bowen, J. Appl. Phys. 66, 3574 (1989)] was not caused by viscous response of the substrate.

  7. Microwave absorption in powders of small conducting particles for heating applications.

    PubMed

    Porch, Adrian; Slocombe, Daniel; Edwards, Peter P

    2013-02-28

    In microwave chemistry there is a common misconception that small, highly conducting particles heat profusely when placed in a large microwave electric field. However, this is not the case; with the simple physical explanation that the electric field (which drives the heating) within a highly conducting particle is highly screened. Instead, it is the magnetic absorption associated with induction that accounts for the large experimental heating rates observed for small metal particles. We present simple principles for the effective heating of particles in microwave fields from calculations of electric and magnetic dipole absorptions for a range of practical values of particle size and conductivity. For highly conducting particles, magnetic absorption dominates electric absorption over a wide range of particle radii, with an optimum absorption set by the ratio of mean particle radius a to the skin depth δ (specifically, by the condition a = 2.41δ). This means that for particles of any conductivity, optimized magnetic absorption (and hence microwave heating by magnetic induction) can be achieved by simple selection of the mean particle size. For weakly conducting samples, electric dipole absorption dominates, and is maximized when the conductivity is approximately σ ≈ 3ωε(0) ≈ 0.4 S m(-1), independent of particle radius. Therefore, although electric dipole heating can be as effective as magnetic dipole heating for a powder sample of the same volume, it is harder to obtain optimized conditions at a fixed frequency of microwave field. The absorption of sub-micron particles is ineffective in both magnetic and electric fields. However, if the particles are magnetic, with a lossy part to their complex permeability, then magnetic dipole losses are dramatically enhanced compared to their values for non-magnetic particles. An interesting application of this is the use of very small magnetic particles for the selective microwave heating of biological samples.

  8. Particle Tracks in Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    In an experiment using a special air gun, particles are shot into aerogel at high velocities. Closeup of particles that have been captured in aerogel are shown here. The particles leave a carrot-shaped trail in the aerogel. Aerogel was used on the Stardust spacecraft to capture comet particles from Comet Wild 2.

  9. Thermocapillary Interaction between a Solid Particle and a Liquid-Gas Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, A. A.; Leshansky, A. M.; Nir, A.

    1996-11-01

    Interaction between solid particles and a free liquid-gas interface is very important for flotation processes and for various processes involving multiphase flows. In the present contribution, interaction between a hot solid particle submerged into an ambient fluid, and a free liquid-gas interface is considered. A non-uniform temperature field around the solid particle produces surface tension gradients at the liquid-gas interface which generate a thermocapillary flow in the surrounding fluid. This flow yields the motion of the solid particle itself. Three cases are considered: (i) interaction between a solid particle and a spherical gas bubble at a finite separation distance; (ii) thermocapillary motion of a solid particle and an attached gas bubble; (iii) interaction between a solid particle and a plane undeformable liquid-gas interface. In all cases the velocity of the thermocapillarity induced motion of the solid particle is calculated in the approximation of the Stokes flow and a low Peclet number as a function of the separation distance and the bubble-to-particle radii ratio. Some preliminary results of the present work have been published in (A.A.Golovin, Int. J. Multiphase Flow 21), 715 (1995)..

  10. Evidence for a nuclear radio jet and its structure down to ≲100 Schwarzschild radii in the center of the Sombrero galaxy (M 104, NGC 4594)

    SciTech Connect

    Hada, Kazuhiro; Giroletti, Marcello; Giovannini, Gabriele; Doi, Akihiro; Nagai, Hiroshi; Honma, Mareki; Inoue, Makoto

    2013-12-10

    The Sombrero galaxy (M 104, NGC 4594) is associated with one of the nearest low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We investigated the detailed radio structure of the Sombrero nucleus using high-resolution, quasi-simultaneous, multi-frequency, phase-referencing Very Long Baseline Array observations. We obtained high-quality images of this nucleus at seven frequencies, where those at 15, 24, and 43 GHz are the first clear very long baseline interferometry detections. At 43 GHz, the nuclear structure was imaged on a linear scale under 0.01 pc or 100 Schwarzschild radii, revealing a compact, high-brightness-temperature (≳ 3 × 10{sup 9} K) radio core. We discovered the presence of the extended structure emanating from the core on two sides in the northwest and southeast directions. The nuclear radio spectra show a clear spatial gradient, which is similar to that seen in more luminous AGNs with powerful relativistic jets. Moreover, the size and position of the core tend to be frequency dependent. These findings provide evidence that the central engine of the Sombrero is powering radio jets and the jets are overwhelming the emission from the underlying radiatively inefficient accretion flow over the observed frequencies. Based on these radio characteristics, we constrained the following physical parameters for the M 104 jets: (1) the northern side is approaching, whereas the southern one is receding; (2) the jet viewing angle is relatively close to our line-of-sight (≲ 25°); and (3) the intrinsic jet velocity is highly sub-relativistic (≲ 0.2c). The derived pole-on nature of the M 104 jets is consistent with the previous argument that this nucleus contains a true type II AGN, i.e., the broad line region is actually absent or intrinsically weak if the plane of the circumnuclear torus is perpendicular to the jet axis.

  11. The Gaia-ESO Survey: lithium depletion in the Gamma Velorum cluster and inflated radii in low-mass pre-main-sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffries, R. D.; Jackson, R. J.; Franciosini, E.; Randich, S.; Barrado, D.; Frasca, A.; Klutsch, A.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Prisinzano, L.; Sacco, G. G.; Gilmore, G.; Vallenari, A.; Alfaro, E. J.; Koposov, S. E.; Pancino, E.; Bayo, A.; Casey, A. R.; Costado, M. T.; Damiani, F.; Hourihane, A.; Lewis, J.; Jofre, P.; Magrini, L.; Monaco, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Worley, C. C.; Zaggia, S.; Zwitter, T.

    2017-01-01

    We show that non-magnetic models for the evolution of pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars cannot simultaneously describe the colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) and the pattern of lithium depletion seen in the cluster of young, low-mass stars surrounding γ2 Velorum. The age of 7.5 ± 1 Myr inferred from the CMD is much younger than that implied by the strong Li depletion seen in the cluster M-dwarfs, and the Li depletion occurs at much redder colours than predicted. The epoch at which a star of a given mass depletes its Li and the surface temperature of that star are both dependent on its radius. We demonstrate that if the low-mass stars have radii ˜10 per cent larger at a given mass and age, then both the CMD and the Li-depletion pattern of the Gamma Velorum cluster are explained at a common age of ≃18-21 Myr. This radius inflation could be produced by some combination of magnetic suppression of convection and extensive cool starspots. Models that incorporate radius inflation suggest that PMS stars, similar to those in the Gamma Velorum cluster, in the range 0.2 < M/M⊙ < 0.7, are at least a factor of 2 older and ˜7 per cent cooler than previously thought and that their masses are much larger (by >30 per cent) than inferred from conventional, non-magnetic models in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Systematic changes of this size may be of great importance in understanding the evolution of young stars, disc lifetimes and the formation of planetary systems.

  12. The SLUGGS survey: dark matter fractions at large radii and assembly epochs of early-type galaxies from globular cluster kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alabi, Adebusola B.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Strader, Jay; Janz, Joachim; Usher, Christopher; Spitler, Lee R.; Bellstedt, Sabine; Ferré-Mateu, Anna

    2017-07-01

    We use globular cluster kinematics data, primarily from the SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and GalaxieS (SLUGGS) survey, to measure the dark matter fraction (fDM) and the average dark matter density (<ρDM>) within the inner 5 effective radii (Re) for 32 nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs) with stellar mass log (M*/M⊙) ranging from 10.1 to 11.8. We compare our results with a simple galaxy model based on scaling relations as well as with cosmological hydrodynamical simulations where the dark matter profile has been modified through various physical processes. We find a high fDM (≥0.6) within 5 Re in most of our sample, which we interpret as a signature of a late mass assembly history that is largely devoid of gas-rich major mergers. However, around log (M*/M⊙) ˜ 11, there is a wide range of fDM which may be challenging to explain with any single cosmological model. We find tentative evidence that lenticulars (S0s), unlike ellipticals, have mass distributions that are similar to spiral galaxies, with decreasing fDM within 5 Re as galaxy luminosity increases. However, we do not find any difference between the <ρDM> of S0s and ellipticals in our sample, despite the differences in their stellar populations. We have also used <ρDM> to infer the epoch of halo assembly (z ˜ 2-4). By comparing the age of their central stars with the inferred epoch of halo formation, we are able to gain more insight into their mass assembly histories. Our results suggest a fundamental difference in the dominant late-phase mass assembly channel between lenticulars and elliptical galaxies.

  13. Evidence for a Nuclear Radio Jet and its Structure down to lsim100 Schwarzschild Radii in the Center of the Sombrero Galaxy (M 104, NGC 4594)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hada, Kazuhiro; Doi, Akihiro; Nagai, Hiroshi; Inoue, Makoto; Honma, Mareki; Giroletti, Marcello; Giovannini, Gabriele

    2013-12-01

    The Sombrero galaxy (M 104, NGC 4594) is associated with one of the nearest low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We investigated the detailed radio structure of the Sombrero nucleus using high-resolution, quasi-simultaneous, multi-frequency, phase-referencing Very Long Baseline Array observations. We obtained high-quality images of this nucleus at seven frequencies, where those at 15, 24, and 43 GHz are the first clear very long baseline interferometry detections. At 43 GHz, the nuclear structure was imaged on a linear scale under 0.01 pc or 100 Schwarzschild radii, revealing a compact, high-brightness-temperature (gsim 3 × 109 K) radio core. We discovered the presence of the extended structure emanating from the core on two sides in the northwest and southeast directions. The nuclear radio spectra show a clear spatial gradient, which is similar to that seen in more luminous AGNs with powerful relativistic jets. Moreover, the size and position of the core tend to be frequency dependent. These findings provide evidence that the central engine of the Sombrero is powering radio jets and the jets are overwhelming the emission from the underlying radiatively inefficient accretion flow over the observed frequencies. Based on these radio characteristics, we constrained the following physical parameters for the M 104 jets: (1) the northern side is approaching, whereas the southern one is receding; (2) the jet viewing angle is relatively close to our line-of-sight (lsim 25°) and (3) the intrinsic jet velocity is highly sub-relativistic (lsim 0.2c). The derived pole-on nature of the M 104 jets is consistent with the previous argument that this nucleus contains a true type II AGN, i.e., the broad line region is actually absent or intrinsically weak if the plane of the circumnuclear torus is perpendicular to the jet axis.

  14. Single particle maximum likelihood reconstruction from superresolution microscopy images

    PubMed Central

    Verdier, Timothée; Gunzenhauser, Julia; Manley, Suliana; Castelnovo, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Point localization superresolution microscopy enables fluorescently tagged molecules to be imaged beyond the optical diffraction limit, reaching single molecule localization precisions down to a few nanometers. For small objects whose sizes are few times this precision, localization uncertainty prevents the straightforward extraction of a structural model from the reconstructed images. We demonstrate in the present work that this limitation can be overcome at the single particle level, requiring no particle averaging, by using a maximum likelihood reconstruction (MLR) method perfectly suited to the stochastic nature of such superresolution imaging. We validate this method by extracting structural information from both simulated and experimental PALM data of immature virus-like particles of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1). MLR allows us to measure the radii of individual viruses with precision of a few nanometers and confirms the incomplete closure of the viral protein lattice. The quantitative results of our analysis are consistent with previous cryoelectron microscopy characterizations. Our study establishes the framework for a method that can be broadly applied to PALM data to determine the structural parameters for an existing structural model, and is particularly well suited to heterogeneous features due to its single particle implementation. PMID:28253349

  15. Solid State Neutral Particle Analyzer Array on NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Shinohara, K.; Darrow, D. S.; Roquemore, A. L.; Medley, S. S.; Cecil, F. E.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2004-11-01

    A Solid State Neutral Particle Analyzer (SSNPA) array has been installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to measure the energy distribution of charge exchange fast neutral particles. The array consists of four Si diode detectors on chords with fixed tangency radii (60, 90, 100, and 120 cm), which view across the three co-injection neutral beam (NB) lines. The calibrated energy range is 40 120KeV and its energy resolution is about 10KeV. Time resolved measurements have been obtained and compared with the E//B Neutral Particle Analyzer (NPA) results. It is observed that particle fluxes increase strongly and then decay rapidly to a steady level just after NB injection commences. Though this temporal behavior is also observed in the E//B NPA, it is not predicted in TRANSP simulations. In addition, the increase and decay rates in the two NPA systems are different. Example data from plasma discharges will be presented with explanations of these differences.

  16. Single particle maximum likelihood reconstruction from superresolution microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Verdier, Timothée; Gunzenhauser, Julia; Manley, Suliana; Castelnovo, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Point localization superresolution microscopy enables fluorescently tagged molecules to be imaged beyond the optical diffraction limit, reaching single molecule localization precisions down to a few nanometers. For small objects whose sizes are few times this precision, localization uncertainty prevents the straightforward extraction of a structural model from the reconstructed images. We demonstrate in the present work that this limitation can be overcome at the single particle level, requiring no particle averaging, by using a maximum likelihood reconstruction (MLR) method perfectly suited to the stochastic nature of such superresolution imaging. We validate this method by extracting structural information from both simulated and experimental PALM data of immature virus-like particles of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1). MLR allows us to measure the radii of individual viruses with precision of a few nanometers and confirms the incomplete closure of the viral protein lattice. The quantitative results of our analysis are consistent with previous cryoelectron microscopy characterizations. Our study establishes the framework for a method that can be broadly applied to PALM data to determine the structural parameters for an existing structural model, and is particularly well suited to heterogeneous features due to its single particle implementation.

  17. Particle capture device

    DOEpatents

    Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2016-02-23

    In example embodiments, particle collection efficiency in aerosol analyzers and other particle measuring instruments is improved by a particle capture device that employs multiple collisions to decrease momentum of particles until the particles are collected (e.g., vaporized or come to rest). The particle collection device includes an aperture through which a focused particle beam enters. A collection enclosure is coupled to the aperture and has one or more internal surfaces against which particles of the focused beam collide. One or more features are employed in the collection enclosure to promote particles to collide multiple times within the enclosure, and thereby be vaporized or come to rest, rather than escape through the aperture.

  18. Laser particle sorter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, J.C.; Buican, T.N.

    1987-11-30

    Method and apparatus are provided for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser is used to define an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam is provided for interrogating the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam is provided to intersect the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis. 2 figs.

  19. Laser particle sorter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, John C.; Buican, Tudor N.

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser defines an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam interrogates the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam intersects the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis.

  20. Adhesion between thermoplastic polymer particles and carbon and glass fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, J.S.

    1996-12-31

    High performance composites consist of polymer matrices reinforced with continuous fibers. Polymer powders can be coated and fused onto the fibers by various techniques to produce these composites. One such technique consists of spreading the fibers with an air banding jet, and then running the fibers through a fluidized bed of the powder. The fluidizing air is typically charged, imparting a charge to the powder particles. The fibers are grounded which leads to an attraction between the particles and the fibers. The particle-coated fibers then go through a tunnel oven, sintering the particles onto the fibers, leaving a flexible {open_quotes}tow-preg{close_quotes} which can then be processed into a preform for manufacture into a final part. To develop an initial understanding of the powder coating process, the adhesion of uncharged particles and fibers was studied. Contact mechanics predicts that the adhesion force between uncharged particles depends on the mutual (or equivalent) radius of curvature between the contacting objects, as well as their surface energies. For the materials of interest, the Derjaguin approximation is appropriate and is applied. PEEK (poly ether ether ketone) and PET (poly ethylene terephthalate) particles, cryogenically ground to nominal diameters of 10 to 100 {mu}m were brought into contact with themselves, with E-glass fibers (nominal diameter of 20 {mu}m), carbon fibers (nominal diameter of 8 {mu}m), and glass microscope slides using an AFM. Adhesion forces were measured and compared to predictions using Derjaguin`s approximation. SEM micrographs were used to determine the scale of the radii of curvature of contacting sites.

  1. Energetic Charged Particles in Saturn's Magnetosphere: Voyager 1 Results.

    PubMed

    Vogt, R E; Chenette, D L; Cummings, A C; Garrard, T L; Stone, E C; Schardt, A W; Trainor, J H; Lal, N; McDonald, F B

    1981-04-10

    Voyager 1 provided the first look at Saturn's magnetotail and magnetosphere during relatively quiet interplanetary conditions. This report discusses the energetic particle populations of the outer magnetosphere of Saturn and absorption features associated with Titan and Rhea, and compares these observations with Pioneer 11 data of a year earlier. The trapped proton fluxes had soft spectra, represented by power laws E(-gamma) in kinetic energy E, with gamma approximately 7 in the outer magnetosphere and gamma approximately 9 in the magnetotail. Structure associated with the magnetotial was observed as close as 10 Saturn radii (R(s)) on the outbound trajectory. The proton and electron fluxes in the outer magnetosphere and in the magnetotail were variable and appeared to respond to changes in interplanetary conditions. Protons with energies >/= 2 million electron volts had free access to the magnetosphere from interplanetary space and were not stably trapped outside approximately 7.5 R(s).

  2. Modeling Single Particle Transport in Stochastic Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Ben; Fiksel, Gennady; Prager, Stewart

    2001-10-01

    Single particle transport in a stochastic magnetic field is simulated via code ION and RIO. Developed in collaboration with a group in Novosibirsk, Russia, they simulate both single ion and multiple ion trajectories in a stochastic magnetic field. A sharp decrease in the relative diffusion of ions to magnetic field lines is seen in two gyro-radii regimes. One is explainable from the unbroken flux surfaces near the edge of the plasma. The other is thought to be due to a "gyro-averaging" effect that occurs when the gyro-radius exceeds the radial correlation length of the field lines. The simulations indicate a decrease in expected transport, most strongly as a function of gyro-radius, which will be tested experimentally with the MST neutral beam injector.

  3. Possible emittance growth induced by nonlinear space charge fields for arbitrary particle distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Takashi; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    A procedure to obtain a ratio of beam radii at final and initial states in arbitrary particle distributions is proposed, and is applied to the estimation of possible emittance growth for Gaussian and thermal equilibrium distributions. The ratios are estimated for Gaussian and thermal equilibrium distributions as a function of tune depression. The possible emittance growth as a function of tune depression and nonlinear field energy factor is also estimated with and without a constant radius ratio approximation. It is confirmed that the possible emittance growths are almost the same in comparison to the cases with and without the constant radius ratio approximation at each distribution.

  4. A lower limit on the dark particle mass from dSphs

    SciTech Connect

    Angus, G.W.

    2010-03-01

    We use dwarf spheroidal galaxies as a tool to attempt to put precise lower limits on the mass of the dark matter particle, assuming it is a sterile neutrino. We begin by making cored dark halo fits to the line of sight velocity dispersions as a function of projected radius (taken from Walker et al. 2007) for six of the Milky Way's dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We test Osipkov-Merritt velocity anisotropy profiles, but find that no benefit is gained over constant velocity anisotropy. In contrast to previous attempts, we do not assume any relation between the stellar velocity dispersions and the dark matter ones, but instead we solve directly for the sterile neutrino velocity dispersion at all radii by using the equation of state for a partially degenerate neutrino gas (which ensures hydrostatic equilibrium of the sterile neutrino halo). This yields a 1:1 relation between the sterile neutrino density profile and the velocity dispersion profile, and therefore gives us an accurate estimate of the Tremaine-Gunn limit at all radii. By varying the sterile neutrino particle mass, we locate the minimum mass for all six dwarf spheroidals such that the Tremaine-Gunn limit is not exceeded at any radius (in particular at the centre). We find sizeable differences between the ranges of feasible sterile neutrino particle mass for each dwarf, but interestingly there exists a small range 270-280eV which is consistent with all dSphs at the 1-σ level.

  5. ON THE RELATIVISTIC PRECESSION AND OSCILLATION FREQUENCIES OF TEST PARTICLES AROUND RAPIDLY ROTATING COMPACT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Pachon, Leonardo A.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Valenzuela-Toledo, Cesar A. E-mail: jorge.rueda@icra.it

    2012-09-01

    Whether or not analytic exact vacuum (electrovacuum) solutions of the Einstein (Einstein-Maxwell) field equations can accurately describe the exterior space-time of compact stars still remains an interesting open question in relativistic astrophysics. As an attempt to establish their level of accuracy, the radii of the innermost stable circular orbits (ISCOs) of test particles given by analytic exterior space-time geometries have been compared with those given by numerical solutions for neutron stars (NSs) obeying a realistic equation of state (EOS). It has been so shown that the six-parametric solution of Pachon et al. (PRS) more accurately describes the NS ISCO radii than other analytic models do. We propose here an additional test of accuracy for analytic exterior geometries based on the comparison of orbital frequencies of neutral test particles. We compute the Keplerian, frame-dragging, and precession and oscillation frequencies of the radial and vertical motions of neutral test particles for the Kerr and PRS geometries and then compare them with the numerical values obtained by Morsink and Stella for realistic NSs. We identify the role of high-order multipole moments such as the mass quadrupole and current octupole in the determination of the orbital frequencies, especially in the rapid rotation regime. The results of this work are relevant to cast a separatrix between black hole and NS signatures and to probe the nuclear-matter EOS and NS parameters from the quasi-periodic oscillations observed in low-mass X-ray binaries.

  6. INTERACTION BETWEEN TWO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS IN THE 2013 MAY 22 LARGE SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Liu-Guan; Xu, Fei; Gu, Bin; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Li, Gang; Jiang, Yong; Le, Gui-Ming; Shen, Cheng-Long; Wang, Yu-Ming; Chen, Yao

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the eruption and interaction of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the large 2013 May 22 solar energetic particle event using multiple spacecraft observations. Two CMEs, having similar propagation directions, were found to erupt from two nearby active regions (ARs), AR11748 and AR11745, at ∼08:48 UT and ∼13:25 UT, respectively. The second CME was faster than the first CME. Using the graduated cylindrical shell model, we reconstructed the propagation of these two CMEs and found that the leading edge of the second CME caught up with the trailing edge of the first CME at a height of ∼6 solar radii. After about two hours, the leading edges of the two CMEs merged at a height of ∼20 solar radii. Type II solar radio bursts showed strong enhancement during this two hour period. Using the velocity dispersion method, we obtained the solar particle release (SPR) time and the path length for energetic electrons. Further assuming that energetic protons propagated along the same interplanetary magnetic field, we also obtained the SPR time for energetic protons, which were close to that of electrons. These release times agreed with the time when the second CME caught up with the trailing edge of the first CME, indicating that the CME-CME interaction (and shock-CME interaction) plays an important role in the process of particle acceleration in this event.

  7. A lower limit on the dark particle mass from dSphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, G. W.

    2010-03-01

    We use dwarf spheroidal galaxies as a tool to attempt to put precise lower limits on the mass of the dark matter particle, assuming it is a sterile neutrino. We begin by making cored dark halo fits to the line of sight velocity dispersions as a function of projected radius (taken from Walker et al. 2007) for six of the Milky Way's dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We test Osipkov-Merritt velocity anisotropy profiles, but find that no benefit is gained over constant velocity anisotropy. In contrast to previous attempts, we do not assume any relation between the stellar velocity dispersions and the dark matter ones, but instead we solve directly for the sterile neutrino velocity dispersion at all radii by using the equation of state for a partially degenerate neutrino gas (which ensures hydrostatic equilibrium of the sterile neutrino halo). This yields a 1:1 relation between the sterile neutrino density profile and the velocity dispersion profile, and therefore gives us an accurate estimate of the Tremaine-Gunn limit at all radii. By varying the sterile neutrino particle mass, we locate the minimum mass for all six dwarf spheroidals such that the Tremaine-Gunn limit is not exceeded at any radius (in particular at the centre). We find sizeable differences between the ranges of feasible sterile neutrino particle mass for each dwarf, but interestingly there exists a small range 270-280eV which is consistent with all dSphs at the 1-σ level.

  8. A model for GCR-particle fluxes in stony meteorites and production rates of cosmogenic nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reedy, R. C.

    1985-02-01

    A model is presented for the differential fluxes of galactic-cosmic-ray (GCR) particles with energies above 1 MeV inside any spherical stony meteorite as a function of the meteorite's radius and the sample's depth. This model is based on the Reedy-Arnold equations for the energy-dependent fluxes of GCR particles in the moon and is an extension of flux parameters that were derived for several meteorites of various sizes. This flux is used to calculate the production rates of many cosmogenic nuclides as a function of radius and depth. The peak production rates for most nuclides made by the reactions and energetic GCR particles occur near the centers of meteorites with radii of 40 to 70 g/cm (2). Although the model has some limitations, it reproduces well the basic trends for the depth-dependent production of cosmogenic nuclides in stony meteorites of various radii. These production profiles agree fairly well with measurments of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites. Some of these production profiles are different than those calculated by others. The chemical dependence of the production rates for several nuclides varies with size and depth.

  9. Model for GCR-particle fluxes in stony meteorites and production rates of cosmogenic nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    A model is presented for the differential fluxes of galactic-cosmic-ray (GCR) particles with energies above 1 MeV inside any spherical stony meteorite as a function of the meteorite's radius and the sample's depth. This model is based on the Reedy-Arnold equations for the energy-dependent fluxes of GCR particles in the moon and is an extension of flux parameters that were derived for several meteorites of various sizes. This flux is used to calculate the production rates of many cosmogenic nuclides as a function of radius and depth. The peak production rates for most nuclides made by the reactions of energetic GCR particles occur near the centers of meteorites with radii of 40 to 70 g cm/sup -2/. Although the model has some limitations, it reproduces well the basic trends for the depth-dependent production of cosmogenic nuclides in stony meteorites of various radii. These production profiles agree fairly well with measurements of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites. Some of these production profiles are different than those calculated by others. The chemical dependence of the production rates for several nuclides varies with size and depth. 25 references, 8 figures.

  10. Synthesis of cadmium sulfide Q particles in water-in-CO{sub 2} microemulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, J.D.; Bhargava, P.A.; Korgel, B.A.; Johnston, K.P.

    1999-09-28

    Semiconductor nanoparticles of cadmium sulfide were synthesized in ammonium perfluoropolyether (PFPE-NH{sub 4}) stabilized water-in-CO{sub 2} microemulsions. The particle size was tuned by varying the water-to-surfactant molar ratio ({omega}{sub 0}): {omega}{sub 0} ratios of 5 and 10 yielded nanocrystals with exciton energies of 3.86 and 3.09 eV, corresponding to mean particle radii of 0.9 and 1.8 nm, respectively. These exciton energies are significantly higher than the bulk band gap energy for CdS (2.45 eV) due to quantum confinement effects. Effectively, {omega}{sub 0} controls the size of the compartmentalized water droplets in which the particles grow.

  11. Eddy covariance measurements of sea spray particles over the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, S. J.; Brooks, I. M.; de Leeuw, G.; Smith, M. H.; Moerman, M.; Lingard, J. J. N.

    2008-02-01

    Most estimates of sea spray aerosol source functions have used indirect means to infer the rate of production as a function of wind speed. Only recently has the technology become available to make high frequency measurements of aerosol spectra suitable for direct eddy correlation determination of the sea spray particle flux. This was accomplished in this study by combining a newly developed fast aerosol particle counter with an ultrasonic anemometer which allowed for eddy covariance measurements of size-segregated particle fluxes. The aerosol instrument is the Compact Lightweight Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (CLASP) - capable of measuring 8-channel size spectra for mean radii between 0.15 and 3.5 µm at 10 Hz. The first successful measurements were made during the Waves, Air Sea Fluxes, Aerosol and Bubbles (WASFAB) field campaign in October 2005 in Duck (NC, USA). The method and initial results are presented and comparisons are made with recent sea spray source functions from the literature.

  12. Adhesion and aerodynamic forces for the resuspension of non-spherical particles in outdoor environments

    DOE PAGES

    Brambilla, Sara; Speckart, Scott; Brown, Michael J.

    2017-07-26

    Particles deposited on an outdoor surface can be resuspended by wind gusts, become airborne, and be inhaled if small enough. If toxic or infectious, these particles may be dangerous for the populace health. It is therefore important to determine under which weather conditions a deposit of particle could be resuspended to implement the best response actions and plan clean-up. To this scope, one needs to consider the competing forces acting on the particle keeping it attached to the surface (gravity and adhesion) or trying to remove it (aerodynamic forces, i.e., lift and drag). Here, this article reviews the current understandingmore » of the aforementioned forces for colloidal spherical particles and extends the existing theories to rod-shaped particles, representative for instance of Bacillus spores. In particular, for the adhesion force, the Derjaguin approximation was used and the adhesion force was computed from the radii of curvature of the particle and the surface at the point of closest approach. For the aerodynamic forces, we re-derived the equations for the drag and lift forces accounting for the shape of the particle. Both smooth and rough surfaces will be discussed, the former as idealized cases, the latter as more representative of real outdoor surfaces.« less

  13. Results from the HARPS-N 2014 Campaign to Estimate Accurately the Densities of Planets Smaller than 2.5 Earth Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, David; Harps-N Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Although the NASA Kepler Mission has determined the physical sizes of hundreds of small planets, and we have in many cases characterized the star in detail, we know virtually nothing about the planetary masses: There are only 7 planets smaller than 2.5 Earth radii for which there exist published mass estimates with a precision better than 20 percent, the bare minimum value required to begin to distinguish between different models of composition.HARPS-N is an ultra-stable fiber-fed high-resolution spectrograph optimized for the measurement of very precise radial velocities. We have 80 nights of guaranteed time per year, of which half are dedicated to the study of small Kepler planets.In preparation for the 2014 season, we compared all available Kepler Objects of Interest to identify the ones for which our 40 nights could be used most profitably. We analyzed the Kepler light curves to constrain the stellar rotation periods, the lifetimes of active regions on the stellar surface, and the noise that would result in our radial velocities. We assumed various mass-radius relations to estimate the observing time required to achieve a mass measurement with a precision of 15%, giving preference to stars that had been well characterized through asteroseismology. We began by monitoring our long list of targets. Based on preliminary results we then selected our final short list, gathering typically 70 observations per target during summer 2014.These resulting mass measurements will have a signifcant impact on our understanding of these so-called super-Earths and small Neptunes. They would form a core dataset with which the international astronomical community can meaningfully seek to understand these objects and their formation in a quantitative fashion.HARPS-N was funded by the Swiss Space Office, the Harvard Origin of Life Initiative, the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, the University of Geneva, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, the Italian National

  14. Particle Tracks in Aerogel

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-11-03

    In an experiment using a special air gun, particles are shot into aerogel at high velocities. Closeup of particles leaving a carrot-shaped trail in the aerogel are shown here. Aerogel was used on NASA Stardust spacecraft.

  15. Charged Particle Flux Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, D. A.; Stocks, C. D.

    1983-01-01

    Improved version of Faraday cup increases accuracy of measurements of flux density of charged particles incident along axis through collection aperture. Geometry of cone-and-sensing cup combination assures most particles are trapped.

  16. Composite powder particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Donald S. (Inventor); MacDowell, Louis G. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A liquid coating composition including a coating vehicle and composite powder particles disposed within the coating vehicle. Each composite powder particle may include a magnesium component, a zinc component, and an indium component.

  17. Particle exposures and infections

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particle exposures increase the risk for human infections. Particles can deposit in the nose, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, and distal lung and, accordingly, the respiratory tract is the system most frequently infected after such exposure; however, meningitis also occurs. Ci...

  18. Solar Neutral Particles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animation shows a neutral solar particle's path leaving the sun, following the magnetic field lines out to the heliosheath. The solar particle hits a hydrogen atom, stealing its electron, and ...

  19. Particle physics: Axions exposed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Maria Paola

    2016-11-01

    Physicists are hunting for a particle called the axion that could solve two major puzzles in fundamental physics. An ambitious study calculates the expected mass of this particle, which might reshape the experimental searches. See Letter p.69

  20. Particle exposures and infections

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particle exposures increase the risk for human infections. Particles can deposit in the nose, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, and distal lung and, accordingly, the respiratory tract is the system most frequently infected after such exposure; however, meningitis also occurs. Ci...

  1. Axionlike particle assisted strongly interacting massive particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Ayuki; Kim, Hyungjin; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu

    2017-07-01

    We propose a new realization of strongly interacting massive particles (SIMPs) as self-interacting dark matter, where SIMPs couple to the standard model (SM) sector through an axionlike particle. Our model overcomes major obstacles accompanying the original SIMP model, such as a missing mechanism of kinetically equilibrating SIMPs with the SM plasma as well as marginal perturbativity of the chiral Lagrangian density. Remarkably, the parameter region realizing σself/mDM≃0.1 - 1 cm2/g is within the reach of future beam dump experiments such as the Search for Hidden Particles experiment.

  2. Solar flare particle radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of the solar particles accelerated by solar flares and subsequently observed near the orbit of the earth are studied. Considered are solar particle intensity-time profiles, the composition and spectra of solar flare events, and the propagation of solar particles in interplanetary space. The effects of solar particles at the earth, riometer observations of polar cap cosmic noise absorption events, and the production of solar cell damage at synchronous altitudes by solar protons are also discussed.

  3. Classical confined particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horzela, Andrzej; Kapuscik, Edward

    1993-01-01

    An alternative picture of classical many body mechanics is proposed. In this picture particles possess individual kinematics but are deprived from individual dynamics. Dynamics exists only for the many particle system as a whole. The theory is complete and allows to determine the trajectories of each particle. It is proposed to use our picture as a classical prototype for a realistic theory of confined particles.

  4. Anatomy of Particle Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringuier, E.

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses particle diffusion from a thermodynamic standpoint. The main goal of the paper is to highlight the conceptual connection between particle diffusion, which belongs to non-equilibrium statistical physics, and mechanics, which deals with particle motion, at the level of third-year university courses. We start out from the fact…

  5. When is a Particle?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drell, Sidney D.

    1978-01-01

    Gives a new definition for the concept of the elementary particle in nuclear physics. Explains why the existance of the quark as an elementary particle could be an accepted fact even though it lacks what traditionally identifies a particle. Compares this with the development which took place during the discovery of the neutrino in the early…

  6. Particle charge spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuerstenau, Stephen D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An airflow through a tube is used to guide a charged particle through the tube. A detector may be used to detect charge passing through the tube on the particle. The movement of the particle through the tube may be used to both detect its charge and size.

  7. Anatomy of Particle Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringuier, E.

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses particle diffusion from a thermodynamic standpoint. The main goal of the paper is to highlight the conceptual connection between particle diffusion, which belongs to non-equilibrium statistical physics, and mechanics, which deals with particle motion, at the level of third-year university courses. We start out from the fact…

  8. When is a Particle?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drell, Sidney D.

    1978-01-01

    Gives a new definition for the concept of the elementary particle in nuclear physics. Explains why the existance of the quark as an elementary particle could be an accepted fact even though it lacks what traditionally identifies a particle. Compares this with the development which took place during the discovery of the neutrino in the early…

  9. High energy particle astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffington, A.; Muller, R. A.; Smith, L. H.; Smoot, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of techniques currently used in high energy particle astronomy for measuring charged and neutral cosmic rays and their isotope and momentum distribution. Derived from methods developed for accelerator experiments in particle physics, these techniques help perform important particle astronomy experiments pertaining to nuclear cosmic ray and gamma ray research, electron and position probes, and antimatter searches.

  10. High energy particle astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffington, A.; Muller, R. A.; Smith, L. H.; Smoot, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of techniques currently used in high energy particle astronomy for measuring charged and neutral cosmic rays and their isotope and momentum distribution. Derived from methods developed for accelerator experiments in particle physics, these techniques help perform important particle astronomy experiments pertaining to nuclear cosmic ray and gamma ray research, electron and position probes, and antimatter searches.

  11. WISE Constraints on the Particle Properties in Saturn's Phoebe Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Skrutskie, M. F.

    2012-05-01

    Saturn's diffuse outer Phoebe Ring is an immense disk-like structure oriented edge-on as viewed from Earth; it is 30 million km (500 Saturn ra dii) wide and 2.5 million km (40 Saturn radii) thick. The ring's particles are thought to originate primarily from the planet's dark irregular satellite Phoebe (mean radius 107km). The ring was discovered by Spitzer 24-micron imaging (Verbiscer et al., Nature 2009) and recently recovered by WISE (Skrutskie et al., DPS 2011) at 22 microns. The WISE images, which show the full extent of the ring for the first time, nicely complement the more sensitive but spatially-limited Spitzer data. Usually, ring particle populations can be determined observationally from spectral and phase angle information, but as observations of the Phoebe ring are extremely limited, we instead rely on dynamical arguments. Small particles in the Phoebe ring are expected to be driven to eccentricities in excess of Phoebe's e=0.16 by radiation pressure over 30-year timescales. Over million-year timescales, the dust distribution migrates inward via Poynting-Robertson drag, and most of the material finds its way onto the dark side of Iapetus. We model these processes numerically and build up synthetic ring profiles, making various assumptions about the unknown particle size distribution. We produce radial intensity profiles which we compare to the WISE data as well as vertical profiles which are most constrained by Spitzer. Our procedure is more robust than the onion-peeling technique used by ring scientists because it does not require the assumption of circular orbits. We find that the WISE data cannot be fit by a simple power law particle size distribution as is commonly assumed for rings. Instead, we show that the majority of the flux in the outer parts of the ring is be due to a significant excess of particles with sizes larger than several centimeters.

  12. Primordial Particles; Collisions of Inelastic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagi, George

    2011-03-01

    Three-dimensional matter is not defined by Euclidian or Cartesian geometries. Newton's and Einstein's laws are related to the motions of elastic masses. The study of collisions of inelastic particles opens up new vistas in physics. The present article reveals how such particles create clusters composed of various numbers of particles. The Probability of each formation, duplets, triplets, etc. can be calculated. The particles are held together by a binding force, and depending upon the angles of collisions they may also rotate around their center of geometry. Because of these unique properties such inelastic particles are referred to as primordial particles, Pp. When a given density of Pp per cubic space is given, then random collisions create a field. The calculation of the properties of such primordial field is very complex and beyond the present study. However, the angles of collisions are infinite in principle, but the probabilities of various cluster sizes are quantum dependent. Consequently, field calculations will require new complex mathematical methods to be discovered yet.

  13. Particle Accelerators in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuang; Fang, Shouxian

    As the special machines that can accelerate charged particle beams to high energy by using electromagnetic fields, particle accelerators have been widely applied in scientific research and various areas of society. The development of particle accelerators in China started in the early 1950s. After a brief review of the history of accelerators, this article describes in the following sections: particle colliders, heavy-ion accelerators, high-intensity proton accelerators, accelerator-based light sources, pulsed power accelerators, small scale accelerators, accelerators for applications, accelerator technology development and advanced accelerator concepts. The prospects of particle accelerators in China are also presented.

  14. Advanced analysis of polymer emulsions: Particle size and particle size distribution by field-flow fractionation and dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Makan, Ashwell C; Spallek, Markus J; du Toit, Madeleine; Klein, Thorsten; Pasch, Harald

    2016-04-15

    Field flow fractionation (FFF) is an advanced fractionation technique for the analyses of very sensitive particles. In this study, different FFF techniques were used for the fractionation and analysis of polymer emulsions/latexes. As model systems, a pure acrylic emulsion and emulsions containing titanium dioxide were prepared and analyzed. An acrylic emulsion polymerization was conducted, continuously sampled from the reactor and subsequently analyzed to determine the particle size, radius of gyration in specific, of the latex particles throughout the polymerization reaction. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF), coupled to a multidetector system, multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS), ultraviolet (UV) and refractive index (RI), respectively, were used to investigate the evolution of particle sizes and particle size distributions (PSDs) as the polymerization progressed. The obtained particle sizes were compared against batch-mode dynamic light scattering (DLS). Results indicated differences between AF4 and DLS results due to DLS taking hydration layers into account, whereas both AF4 and SdFFF were coupled to MALLS detection, hence not taking the hydration layer into account for size determination. SdFFF has additional separation capabilities with a much higher resolution compared to AF4. The calculated radii values were 5 nm larger for SdFFF measurements for each analyzed sample against the corresponding AF4 values. Additionally a low particle size shoulder was observed for SdFFF indicating bimodality in the reactor very early during the polymerization reaction. Furthermore, different emulsions were mixed with inorganic species used as additives in cosmetics and coatings such as TiO2. These complex mixtures of species were analyzed to investigate the retention and particle interaction behavior under different AF4 experimental conditions, such as the mobile phase. The AF4 system was coupled online

  15. Fluidization of spherocylindrical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Vinay V.; Nijssen, Tim M. J.; Fitzgerald, Barry W.; Hofman, Jeroen; Kuipers, Hans; Padding, Johan T.

    2017-06-01

    Multiphase (gas-solid) flows are encountered in numerous industrial applications such as pharmaceutical, food, agricultural processing and energy generation. A coupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and discrete element method (DEM) approach is a popular way to study such flows at a particle scale. However, most of these studies deal with spherical particles while in reality, the particles are rarely spherical. The particle shape can have significant effect on hydrodynamics in a fluidized bed. Moreover, most studies in literature use inaccurate drag laws because accurate laws are not readily available. The drag force acting on a non-spherical particle can vary considerably with particle shape, orientation with the flow, Reynolds number and packing fraction. In this work, the CFD-DEM approach is extended to model a laboratory scale fluidized bed of spherocylinder (rod-like) particles. These rod-like particles can be classified as Geldart D particles and have an aspect ratio of 4. Experiments are performed to study the particle flow behavior in a quasi-2D fluidized bed. Numerically obtained results for pressure drop and bed height are compared with experiments. The capability of CFD-DEM approach to efficiently describe the global bed dynamics for fluidized bed of rod-like particles is demonstrated.

  16. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  17. Effect of electric-field-induced capillary attraction on the motion of particles at an oil-water interface.

    PubMed

    Boneva, Mariana P; Christov, Nikolay C; Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A

    2007-12-28

    Here, we investigate experimentally and theoretically the motion of spherical glass particles of radii 240-310 microm attached to a tetradecane-water interface. Pairs of particles, which are moving toward each other under the action of lateral capillary force, are observed by optical microscopy. The purpose is to check whether the particle electric charges influence the particle motion, and whether an electric-field-induced capillary attraction could be detected. The particles have been hydrophobized by using two different procedures, which allow one to prepare charged and uncharged particles. To quantify the hydrodynamic viscous effects, we developed a semiempirical quantitative approach, whose validity was verified by control experiments with uncharged particles. An appropriate trajectory function was defined, which should increase linearly with time if the particle motion is driven solely by the gravity-induced capillary force. The analysis of the experimental results evidences for the existence of an additional attraction between two like-charged particles at the oil-water interface. This attraction exceeds the direct electrostatic repulsion between the two particles and leads to a noticeable acceleration of their motion.

  18. The growth of ramified clusters by particle evaporation and condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meakin, Paul; Matsushita, M.; Hayakawa, Y.

    1989-12-01

    A reversible cluster growth model in which particles (sites) at singly bonded tip positions can evaporate with equal probability and condense on another (or the same) cluster has been investigated using computer simulations. Both two-dimensional (square lattice) and three-dimensional (cubic lattice) models have been investigated in which particles can follow random walk or ballistic trajectories or can move to any vacant site in the system ( Dw = 2.1 or 0, where Dw is the dimensionality of the particle trajectory). At low densities (ϱ) the clusters are fractal with fractal dimensionalities that are equal (or almost equal) to those associated with lattice animals irrespective of the value of Dw. The exponents z and z‧ that describe the growth of the mean cluster size S( t) and the decay of the number of clusters respectively have values that increases (slightly) as Dw decreases. In the high density limit the clusters are compact (with rough surfaces). In both the π → 0 and π → 1 limits the cluster size distribution Ns( t) is broad and can be described in terms of the scaling form N s(t) ∼ s -2f( {s}/{S(t)}) . The dependence of the cluster radii of gyration ( Rg) on their sizes ( s) can be described by the simple scaling form Rg = s1/ Dg( pD/( d- D) s), where d is the dimensionality of the lattice and D is the fractal dimensionality of the clusters.

  19. NICA-MPD: Azimuthal and femtoscopic particle correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okorokov, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    The discussion is focused on the study of the fundamental symmetries ( P/ CP) of QCD and geometry of the particle source. The combination of correlators corresponding to the absolute asymmetry of distribution of electrically charged particles with respect to the reaction plane in heavy-ion collisions is studied. A significant decrease of the absolute asymmetry is observed in the intermediate energy range which can be considered as indication of possible transition to predominance of hadronic states over quark-gluon degrees of freedom in the mixed phase created in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies. For the investigation of the energy evolution of the geometric properties of the particle source the use of femtoscopic radii scaled on the averaged radius of colliding ions is suggested. This approach allows the expansion of the set of interaction types, in particular, on the collisions of non-symmetrical ion beams which can be studied within the framework of common treatment. There is no sharp changing of femtoscopic parameter values with increasing of the initial energy. The suggestions are made for future advancement of these studies on NICA-MPD.

  20. Dust Impact Monitor DIM onboard Rosetta/Philae: Calibration experiments with ice particles as cometary analogue materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, H.; Albin, T.; Flandes, A.; Fischer, H.; Hirn, A.; Loose, A.; Seidensticker, K.; Arnold, W.

    2014-07-01

    The Rosetta lander spacecraft Philae will land on the nucleus surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in November 2014. Philae is equipped with the Dust Impact Monitor (DIM). DIM is part of the SESAME instrument package onboard Philae and employs piezoelectric PZT sensors to detect impacts by sub-millimetre and millimetre-sized ice and dust particles that are emitted from the nucleus and transported into the cometary coma by the escaping gas flow. DIM will measure fluxes, impact directions, as well as the speed and size of the impacting particles. We studied the performance of DIM based on impact experiments and compared the measurements with the sensor's expected theoretical behaviour as derived from the Hertz theory of elastic impacts. We simulated impacts onto the DIM sensor with spherical ice particles with radii of approximately 0.7 mm and porous particles of other materials with radii up to 4 mm. Impact speeds range up to 2 m s^{-1}. Cometary grains on ballistic trajectories will have impact speeds below the escape speed from the nucleus surface (approximately 1.5 m s^{-1}), thus the impact speeds achievable by our experiments cover the range expected at the comet. Our results show that the signal strength and the contact durations measured with the DIM PZT sensors can be well approximated by the Hertz contact mechanics.

  1. Three-dimensional particle migration in a bubble-driven acoustic streaming flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, Andreas; Rossi, Massimiliano; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Kaehler, Christian J.; Marin, Alvaro

    2016-11-01

    Oscillations of hemicylindrical bubbles in microchannels generate streaming flows with characteristic toroidal structures. Over long times, a passive tracer in such a flow typically explores a large fluid volume extending several bubble radii away from the bubble center and covering the whole height of the microchannel parallel to the bubble axis. In contrast, finite-sized particles are observed to migrate to specific confined locations along the axial direction while being confined to orbits of much smaller radial extent. The size of the orbits and the axial location not only depend on the particle size, but also on the relative particle density with the surrounding fluid. In this work we will show three-dimensional measurements that reveal the size- and density-sensitive migration of the particles. A simple way to emulate the migration is to solve numerically the trajectory of a particle including only steric interactions with the bubble and the walls due to its finite size (no penetration). By comparing the experimental results with this simplistic numerical model, we will show that additional forces are necessary to explain the particle dynamics. Finally, we will discuss the effect of hydrodynamic and acoustic forces experienced by the particle in the vicinity of the bubble.

  2. On the response of quasi-adiabatic particles to magnetotail reconfigurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcourt, Dominique C.; Malova, Helmi V.; Zelenyi, Lev M.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the response of quasi-adiabatic particles to dynamical reconfigurations of the magnetotail field lines. Although they travel through a sharp field reversal with a characteristic length scale smaller than their Larmor radii, these quasi-adiabatic particles experience a negligible net change in magnetic moment. We examine the robustness of such a quasi-adiabatic behavior in the presence of a large surging electric field induced by magnetic field line reconfiguration as observed during the expansion phase of substorms. We demonstrate that, although such a short-lived electric field can lead to substantial nonadiabatic heating, quasi-adiabaticity is conserved for particles with velocities larger than the peak ExB drift speed. Because of the time-varying character of the magnetic field, it is not possible to use the adiabaticity parameter κ in a straightforward manner to characterize the particle behavior. We rather consider a κ parameter that is averaged over equatorial crossings. We demonstrate that particles intercepting the field reversal in the early stage of the magnetic transition may experience significant energization and enhanced oscillating motion in the direction normal to the midplane. In contrast, particles interacting with the field reversal in the late stage of the magnetic transition experience weaker energization and slower oscillations about the midplane. We show that quasi-adiabatic particles accelerated during such events can lead to energy-time dispersion signatures at low altitudes as is observed in the plasma sheet boundary layer.

  3. Fuzzy Logic Particle Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    A new all-electronic Particle Image Velocimetry technique that can efficiently map high speed gas flows has been developed in-house at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Particle Image Velocimetry is an optical technique for measuring the instantaneous two component velocity field across a planar region of a seeded flow field. A pulsed laser light sheet is used to illuminate the seed particles entrained in the flow field at two instances in time. One or more charged coupled device (CCD) cameras can be used to record the instantaneous positions of particles. Using the time between light sheet pulses and determining either the individual particle displacements or the average displacement of particles over a small subregion of the recorded image enables the calculation of the fluid velocity. Fuzzy logic minimizes the required operator intervention in identifying particles and computing velocity. Using two cameras that have the same view of the illumination plane yields two single exposure image frames. Two competing techniques that yield unambiguous velocity vector direction information have been widely used for reducing the single-exposure, multiple image frame data: (1) cross-correlation and (2) particle tracking. Correlation techniques yield averaged velocity estimates over subregions of the flow, whereas particle tracking techniques give individual particle velocity estimates. For the correlation technique, the correlation peak corresponding to the average displacement of particles across the subregion must be identified. Noise on the images and particle dropout result in misidentification of the true correlation peak. The subsequent velocity vector maps contain spurious vectors where the displacement peaks have been improperly identified. Typically these spurious vectors are replaced by a weighted average of the neighboring vectors, thereby decreasing the independence of the measurements. In this work, fuzzy logic techniques are used to determine the true

  4. CLASHING BEAM PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Burleigh, R.J.

    1961-04-11

    A charged-particle accelerator of the proton synchrotron class having means for simultaneously accelerating two separate contra-rotating particle beams within a single annular magnet structure is reported. The magnet provides two concentric circular field regions of opposite magnetic polarity with one field region being of slightly less diameter than the other. The accelerator includes a deflector means straddling the two particle orbits and acting to collide the two particle beams after each has been accelerated to a desired energy. The deflector has the further property of returning particles which do not undergo collision to the regular orbits whereby the particles recirculate with the possibility of colliding upon subsequent passages through the deflector.

  5. Methods for forming particles

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Robert V.; Zhang, Fengyan; Rodriguez, Rene G.; Pak, Joshua J.; Sun, Chivin

    2016-06-21

    Single source precursors or pre-copolymers of single source precursors are subjected to microwave radiation to form particles of a I-III-VI.sub.2 material. Such particles may be formed in a wurtzite phase and may be converted to a chalcopyrite phase by, for example, exposure to heat. The particles in the wurtzite phase may have a substantially hexagonal shape that enables stacking into ordered layers. The particles in the wurtzite phase may be mixed with particles in the chalcopyrite phase (i.e., chalcopyrite nanoparticles) that may fill voids within the ordered layers of the particles in the wurtzite phase thus produce films with good coverage. In some embodiments, the methods are used to form layers of semiconductor materials comprising a I-III-VI.sub.2 material. Devices such as, for example, thin-film solar cells may be fabricated using such methods.

  6. Precision gap particle separator

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Miles, Robin; Jones, II., Leslie M.; Stockton, Cheryl

    2004-06-08

    A system for separating particles entrained in a fluid includes a base with a first channel and a second channel. A precision gap connects the first channel and the second channel. The precision gap is of a size that allows small particles to pass from the first channel into the second channel and prevents large particles from the first channel into the second channel. A cover is positioned over the base unit, the first channel, the precision gap, and the second channel. An port directs the fluid containing the entrained particles into the first channel. An output port directs the large particles out of the first channel. A port connected to the second channel directs the small particles out of the second channel.

  7. Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venter, Gerhard; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski Jaroslaw

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show how the search algorithm known as particle swarm optimization performs. Here, particle swarm optimization is applied to structural design problems, but the method has a much wider range of possible applications. The paper's new contributions are improvements to the particle swarm optimization algorithm and conclusions and recommendations as to the utility of the algorithm, Results of numerical experiments for both continuous and discrete applications are presented in the paper. The results indicate that the particle swarm optimization algorithm does locate the constrained minimum design in continuous applications with very good precision, albeit at a much higher computational cost than that of a typical gradient based optimizer. However, the true potential of particle swarm optimization is primarily in applications with discrete and/or discontinuous functions and variables. Additionally, particle swarm optimization has the potential of efficient computation with very large numbers of concurrently operating processors.

  8. The Sisyphus particle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soberman, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    The particle measurement subsystem planned for the MJS 77 mission is described. Scientific objectives with respect to Saturn's rings are as follows: (1) measure particles outside the visible rings, including particulates orbiting in more distant rings and particles scattered out of visible rings, (2) measure meteoroid environment in vicinity of Saturn, and (3) develop an understanding of the dynamics of the rings with respect to their collisional interaction with the environment.

  9. A statistical study of plasma sheet dynamics using ISEE 1 and 2 energetic particle flux data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dandouras, J.; Reme, H.; Saint-Marc, A.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Parks, G. K.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma sheet dynamics during substorms are studied by analyzing 461 cases of transient dropout events of the 1.5 and 6-keV particle fluxes detected by ISEE 1 and 2 satellites. The instruments for detecting low- and high-energy particles are described. The spatial distribution of flux dropout events, and the events' relationship to magnetospheric activity level are examined. Substorm events without observed flux dropout events are investigated. The data reveal that the flux dropout distribution is isotropic, between 12-23 earth radii, and is present in the entire nightside plasma sheet; and the substorms without flux dropout are more frequent near earth and magnetospheric flanks. It is observed that tailward of 12 earth radii the flux dropout events and substorms without flux dropout are similar. The Chao et al. (1977) MHD rarefaction wave propagation model and the Hones (1973, 1980) near-tail, X-type magnetic neutral line formation model are discussed and compared to the experimental data. It is noted that neither model explains the plasma sheet dynamics observed.

  10. Pluto's interaction with its space environment: Solar wind, energetic particles, and dust.

    PubMed

    Bagenal, F; Horányi, M; McComas, D J; McNutt, R L; Elliott, H A; Hill, M E; Brown, L E; Delamere, P A; Kollmann, P; Krimigis, S M; Kusterer, M; Lisse, C M; Mitchell, D G; Piquette, M; Poppe, A R; Strobel, D F; Szalay, J R; Valek, P; Vandegriff, J; Weidner, S; Zirnstein, E J; Stern, S A; Ennico, K; Olkin, C B; Weaver, H A; Young, L A

    2016-03-18

    The New Horizons spacecraft carried three instruments that measured the space environment near Pluto as it flew by on 14 July 2015. The Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument revealed an interaction region confined sunward of Pluto to within about 6 Pluto radii. The region's surprisingly small size is consistent with a reduced atmospheric escape rate, as well as a particularly high solar wind flux. Observations from the Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) instrument suggest that ions are accelerated and/or deflected around Pluto. In the wake of the interaction region, PEPSSI observed suprathermal particle fluxes equal to about 1/10 of the flux in the interplanetary medium and increasing with distance downstream. The Venetia Burney Student Dust Counter, which measures grains with radii larger than 1.4 micrometers, detected one candidate impact in ±5 days around New Horizons' closest approach, indicating an upper limit of <4.6 kilometers(-3) for the dust density in the Pluto system. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Pluto' interaction with its space environment: Solar wind, energetic particles, and dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagenal, F.; Horányi, M.; McComas, D. J.; McNutt, R. L.; Elliott, H. A.; Hill, M. E.; Brown, L. E.; Delamere, P. A.; Kollmann, P.; Krimigis, S. M.; Kusterer, M.; Lisse, C. M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Piquette, M.; Poppe, A. R.; Strobel, D. F.; Szalay, J. R.; Valek, P.; Vandegriff, J.; Weidner, S.; Zirnstein, E. J.; Stern, S. A.; Ennico, K.; Olkin, C. B.; Weaver, H. A.; Young, L. A.; Gladstone, G. R.; Grundy, W. M.; McKinnon, W. B.; Moore, J. M.; Spencer, J. R.; Andert, T.; Andrews, J.; Banks, M.; Bauer, B.; Bauman, J.; Barnouin, O. S.; Bedini, P.; Beisser, K.; Beyer, R. A.; Bhaskaran, S.; Binzel, R. P.; Birath, E.; Bird, M.; Bogan, D. J.; Bowman, A.; Bray, V. J.; Brozovic, M.; Bryan, C.; Buckley, M. R.; Buie, M. W.; Buratti, B. J.; Bushman, S. S.; Calloway, A.; Carcich, B.; Cheng, A. F.; Conard, S.; Conrad, C. A.; Cook, J. C.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Custodio, O. S.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Deboy, C.; Dischner, Z. J. B.; Dumont, P.; Earle, A. M.; Ercol, J.; Ernst, C. M.; Finley, T.; Flanigan, S. H.; Fountain, G.; Freeze, M. J.; Greathouse, T.; Green, J. L.; Guo, Y.; Hahn, M.; Hamilton, D. P.; Hamilton, S. A.; Hanley, J.; Harch, A.; Hart, H. M.; Hersman, C. B.; Hill, A.; Hinson, D. P.; Holdridge, M. E.; Howard, A. D.; Howett, C. J. A.; Jackman, C.; Jacobson, R. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Kammer, J. A.; Kang, H. K.; Kaufmann, D. E.; Kusnierkiewicz, D.; Lauer, T. R.; Lee, J. E.; Lindstrom, K. L.; Linscott, I. R.; Lunsford, A. W.; Mallder, V. A.; Martin, N.; Mehoke, D.; Mehoke, T.; Melin, E. D.; Mutchler, M.; Nelson, D.; Nimmo, F.; Nunez, J. I.; Ocampo, A.; Owen, W. M.; Paetzold, M.; Page, B.; Parker, A. H.; Parker, J. W.; Pelletier, F.; Peterson, J.; Pinkine, N.; Porter, S. B.; Protopapa, S.; Redfern, J.; Reitsema, H. J.; Reuter, D. C.; Roberts, J. H.; Robbins, S. J.; Rogers, G.; Rose, D.; Runyon, K.; Retherford, K. D.; Ryschkewitsch, M. G.; Schenk, P.; Schindhelm, E.; Sepan, B.; Showalter, M. R.; Singer, K. N.; Soluri, M.; Stanbridge, D.; Steffl, A. J.; Stryk, T.; Summers, M. E.; Tapley, M.; Taylor, A.; Taylor, H.; Throop, H. B.; Tsang, C. C. C.; Tyler, G. L.; Umurhan, O. M.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Versteeg, M. H.; Vincent, M.; Webbert, R.; Weigle, G. E.; White, O. L.; Whittenburg, K.; Williams, B. G.; Williams, K.; Williams, S.; Woods, W. W.; Zangari, A. M.

    2016-03-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft carried three instruments that measured the space environment near Pluto as it flew by on 14 July 2015. The Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument revealed an interaction region confined sunward of Pluto to within about 6 Pluto radii. The region's surprisingly small size is consistent with a reduced atmospheric escape rate, as well as a particularly high solar wind flux. Observations from the Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) instrument suggest that ions are accelerated and/or deflected around Pluto. In the wake of the interaction region, PEPSSI observed suprathermal particle fluxes equal to about 1/10 of the flux in the interplanetary medium and increasing with distance downstream. The Venetia Burney Student Dust Counter, which measures grains with radii larger than 1.4 micrometers, detected one candidate impact in ±5 days around New Horizons' closest approach, indicating an upper limit of <4.6 kilometers-3 for the dust density in the Pluto system.

  12. Ground Level Enhancement in the 2014 January 6 Solar Energetic Particle Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakur, N.; Gopalswamy, N.; Xie, H.; Makela, P.; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.; Davila, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the 2014 January 6 solar energetic particle event which produced a small ground level enhancement (GLE), making it the second GLE of this unusual solar cycle 24. This event was primarily observed by the South Pole neutron monitors (increase of approximately 2.5 percent) while a few other neutron monitors recorded smaller increases. The associated coronal mass ejection (CME) originated behind the western limb and had a speed of 1960 kilometers per second. The height of the CME at the start of the associated metric type II radio burst, which indicates the formation of a strong shock, was measured to be 1.61 solar radii using a direct image from STEREO-A/EUVI. The CME height at the time of the GLE particle release (determined using the South Pole neutron monitor data) was directly measured as 2.96 solar radii based on STEREO-A/COR1 white-light observations. These CME heights are consistent with those obtained for GLE71, the only other GLE of the current cycle, as well as cycle-23 GLEs derived using back-extrapolation. GLE72 is of special interest because it is one of only two GLEs of cycle 24, one of two behind-the-limb GLEs, and one of the two smallest GLEs of cycles 23 and 24.

  13. Detecting Space Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinard, William H.; Humes, Donald H.; Kassel, Philip C., Jr.; Wortman, Jim; Singer, S. Fred; Stanley, John

    1988-01-01

    Technique records times specific craters formed in targets exposed in space and permits determination of direction in which impacting particles traveled at times of impacts. MOS capacitor is short-circuited by impact of particle striking at high speed. After recovery of targets from space, compositions of impacting particles established through post-flight laboratory analyses of residual materials in craters. On earth technique has industrial and military uses in detection of fragments driven by explosions. Studies of orbital dynamics of particles produced by solid-propellant rocket-motor firings in space made using technique.

  14. Vaporizing particle velocimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A velocimeter measures flow characteristics of a flow traveling through a chamber in a given direction. Tracer particles are entrained in the flow and a source of radiant energy produces an output stream directed transversely to the chamber, having a sufficient intensity to vaporize the particles as they pass through the output stream. Each of the vaporized particles explodes to produce a shock wave and a hot core, and a flow visualization system tracks the motion of the hot cores and shock waves to measure the velocity of each tracer particle and the temperature of the flow around the tracer.

  15. Review of Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beringer, J.; Arguin, J.-F.; Barnett, R. M.; Copic, K.; Dahl, O.; Groom, D. E.; Lin, C.-J.; Lys, J.; Murayama, H.; Wohl, C. G.; Yao, W.-M.; Zyla, P. A.; Amsler, C.; Antonelli, M.; Asner, D. M.; Baer, H.; Band, H. R.; Basaglia, T.; Bauer, C. W.; Beatty, J. J.; Belousov, V. I.; Bergren, E.; Bernardi, G.; Bertl, W.; Bethke, S.; Bichsel, H.; Biebel, O.; Blucher, E.; Blusk, S.; Brooijmans, G.; Buchmueller, O.; Cahn, R. N.; Carena, M.; Ceccucci, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chen, M.-C.; Chivukula, R. S.; Cowan, G.; D'Ambrosio, G.; Damour, T.; de Florian, D.; de Gouvêa, A.; DeGrand, T.; de Jong, P.; Dissertori, G.; Dobrescu, B.; Doser, M.; Drees, M.; Edwards, D. A.; Eidelman, S.; Erler, J.; Ezhela, V. V.; Fetscher, W.; Fields, B. D.; Foster, B.; Gaisser, T. K.; Garren, L.; Gerber, H.-J.; Gerbier, G.; Gherghetta, T.; Golwala, S.; Goodman, M.; Grab, C.; Gritsan, A. V.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grünewald, M.; Gurtu, A.; Gutsche, T.; Haber, H. E.; Hagiwara, K.; Hagmann, C.; Hanhart, C.; Hashimoto, S.; Hayes, K. G.; Heffner, M.; Heltsley, B.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hikasa, K.; Höcker, A.; Holder, J.; Holtkamp, A.; Huston, J.; Jackson, J. D.; Johnson, K. F.; Junk, T.; Karlen, D.; Kirkby, D.; Klein, S. R.; Klempt, E.; Kowalewski, R. V.; Krauss, F.; Kreps, M.; Krusche, B.; Kuyanov, Yu. V.; Kwon, Y.; Lahav, O.; Laiho, J.; Langacker, P.; Liddle, A.; Ligeti, Z.; Liss, T. M.; Littenberg, L.; Lugovsky, K. S.; Lugovsky, S. B.; Mannel, T.; Manohar, A. V.; Marciano, W. J.; Martin, A. D.; Masoni, A.; Matthews, J.; Milstead, D.; Miquel, R.; Mönig, K.; Moortgat, F.; Nakamura, K.; Narain, M.; Nason, P.; Navas, S.; Neubert, M.; Nevski, P.; Nir, Y.; Olive, K. A.; Pape, L.; Parsons, J.; Patrignani, C.; Peacock, J. A.; Petcov, S. T.; Piepke, A.; Pomarol, A.; Punzi, G.; Quadt, A.; Raby, S.; Raffelt, G.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Richardson, P.; Roesler, S.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Rosenberg, L. J.; Rosner, J. L.; Sachrajda, C. T.; Sakai, Y.; Salam, G. P.; Sarkar, S.; Sauli, F.; Schneider, O.; Scholberg, K.; Scott, D.; Seligman, W. G.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Sharpe, S. R.; Silari, M.; Sjöstrand, T.; Skands, P.; Smith, J. G.; Smoot, G. F.; Spanier, S.; Spieler, H.; Stahl, A.; Stanev, T.; Stone, S. L.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Syphers, M. J.; Takahashi, F.; Tanabashi, M.; Terning, J.; Titov, M.; Tkachenko, N. P.; Törnqvist, N. A.; Tovey, D.; Valencia, G.; van Bibber, K.; Venanzoni, G.; Vincter, M. G.; Vogel, P.; Vogt, A.; Walkowiak, W.; Walter, C. W.; Ward, D. R.; Watari, T.; Weiglein, G.; Weinberg, E. J.; Wiencke, L. R.; Wolfenstein, L.; Womersley, J.; Woody, C. L.; Workman, R. L.; Yamamoto, A.; Zeller, G. P.; Zenin, O. V.; Zhang, J.; Zhu, R.-Y.; Harper, G.; Lugovsky, V. S.; Schaffner, P.

    2012-07-01

    This biennial Review summarizes much of particle physics. Using data from previous editions, plus 2658 new measurements from 644 papers, we list, evaluate, and average measured properties of gauge bosons, leptons, quarks, mesons, and baryons. We summarize searches for hypothetical particles such as Higgs bosons, heavy neutrinos, and supersymmetric particles. All the particle properties and search limits are listed in Summary Tables. We also give numerous tables, figures, formulae, and reviews of topics such as the Standard Model, particle detectors, probability, and statistics. Among the 112 reviews are many that are new or heavily revised including those on Heavy-Quark and Soft-Collinear Effective Theory, Neutrino Cross Section Measurements, Monte Carlo Event Generators, Lattice QCD, Heavy Quarkonium Spectroscopy, Top Quark, Dark Matter, Vcb & Vub, Quantum Chromodynamics, High-Energy Collider Parameters, Astrophysical Constants, Cosmological Parameters, and Dark Matter.A booklet is available containing the Summary Tables and abbreviated versions of some of the other sections of this full Review. All tables, listings, and reviews (and errata) are also available on the Particle Data Group website: http://pdg.lbl.gov/.The 2012 edition of Review of Particle Physics is published for the Particle Data Group as article 010001 in volume 86 of Physical Review D.This edition should be cited as: J. Beringer et al. (Particle Data Group), Phys. Rev. D 86, 010001 (2012).

  16. Ice particle collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampara, Naresh; Turnbull, Barbara; Hill, Richard; Swift, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Granular interactions of ice occur in a range of geophysical, astrophysical and industrial applications. For example, Saturn's Rings are composed of icy particles from micrometers to kilometres in size - inertial and yet too small to interact gravitationally. In clouds, ice crystals are smashed to pieces before they re-aggregate to for snow floccules in a process that is very much open to interpretation. In a granular flow of ice particles, the energy spent in collisions can lead to localized surface changes and wetting, which in turn can promote aggregation. To understand the induced wetting and its effects, we present two novel experimental methods which provide snippets of insight into the collisional behaviour of macroscopic ice particles. Experiment 1: Microgravity experiments provide minute details of the contact between the ice particles during the collision. A diamagnetic levitation technique, as alternative to the parabolic flight or falling tower experiments, was used to understand the collisional behaviour of individual macroscopic icy bodies. A refrigerated cylinder, that can control ambient conditions, was inserted into the bore of an 18 Tesla superconducting magnet and cooled to -10°C. Initial binary collisions were created, where one 4 mm ice particle was levitated in the magnet bore whilst another particle was dropped vertically from the top of the bore. The trajectories of both particles were captured by high speed video to provide the three-dimensional particle velocities and track the collision outcome. Introducing complexity, multiple particles were levitated in the bore and an azimuthal turbulent air flow introduced, allowing the particles to collide with other particles within a coherent fluid structure (mimicking Saturn's rings, or an eddy in a cloud). In these experiments, a sequence of collisions occur, each one different to the previous one due to the changes in surface characteristics created by the collisions themselves. Aggregation

  17. Bioactivation of particles

    DOEpatents

    Pinaud, Fabien; King, David; Weiss, Shimon

    2011-08-16

    Particles are bioactivated by attaching bioactivation peptides to the particle surface. The bioactivation peptides are peptide-based compounds that impart one or more biologically important functions to the particles. Each bioactivation peptide includes a molecular or surface recognition part that binds with the surface of the particle and one or more functional parts. The surface recognition part includes an amino-end and a carboxy-end and is composed of one or more hydrophobic spacers and one or more binding clusters. The functional part(s) is attached to the surface recognition part at the amino-end and/or said carboxy-end.

  18. Restoring particle phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    No-go theorems are known in the literature to the effect that, in relativistic quantum field theory, particle localizability in the strict sense violates relativistic causality. In order to account for particle phenomenology without particle ontology, Halvorson and Clifton (2002) proposed an approximate localization scheme. In a recent paper, Arageorgis and Stergiou (2013) proved a no-go result that suggests that, even within such a scheme, there would arise act-outcome correlations over the entire spacetime, thereby violating relativistic causality. Here, we show that this conclusion is untenable. In particular, we argue that one can recover particle phenomenology without having to give up relativistic causality.

  19. Dielectrophoretic particle-particle interaction under AC electrohydrodynamic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doh-Hyoung; Yu, Chengjie; Papazoglou, Elisabeth; Farouk, Bakhtier; Noh, Hongseok M

    2011-09-01

    We used the Maxwell stress tensor method to understand dielectrophoretic particle-particle interactions and applied the results to the interpretation of particle behaviors under alternating current (AC) electrohydrodynamic conditions such as AC electroosmosis (ACEO) and electrothermal flow (ETF). Distinct particle behaviors were observed under ACEO and ETF. Diverse particle-particle interactions observed in experiments such as particle clustering, particles keeping a certain distance from each other, chain and disc formation and their rotation, are explained based on the numerical simulation data. The improved understanding of particle behaviors in AC electrohydrodynamic flows presented here will enable researchers to design better particle manipulation strategies for lab-on-a-chip applications.

  20. Behavior of microwave-heated silicon carbide particles at frequencies of 2.0–13.5 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Sugawara, H.; Hayashi, M.; Ishihara, S.; Kashimura, K.; Mitani, T.; Shinohara, N.

    2014-07-21

    Silicon carbide is a key material in microwave (MW) processing and is used widely as a thermal insulator and catalytic agent. In this study, we experimentally investigated the temperature dependence of the MW-absorption properties of SiC particles at frequencies of 2.0–13.5 GHz. We heated SiC particles of different sizes using MW radiation. The heating behaviors of the particles were then compared with their MW-absorption properties. The heating behavior of the particles was dependent on their radii; this result was in keeping with theoretical predictions. Furthermore, the β-SiC particles exhibited anomalous behaviors when subjected to microwave heating at temperatures of 1100 °C and higher. These behaviors were attributable to the transformation of β-SiC into the α-phase. The underlying mechanism for this transformation is discussed on the basis of the results of X-ray diffraction analysis.