Science.gov

Sample records for particle scavenging rates

  1. Spatial variations of particle scavenging rates within the central and northern Adriatic Sea: use of U--Th disequilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, T. F., LLNL

    1998-04-01

    Dissolved and particlulate Thorium-234 ({sup 234}Th) were measured in near surface waters from the Central and Northern Adriatic Sea in order to gain an insight into the intensity and variability of active scavenging and particle removal processes. Dissolved {sup 234}Th to Uranium-238 ({sup 238}U) activity ratios vary from 0.21 to 0.75 and clearly imply that {sup 234}Th is being actively scavenged from sea water on a timescale of <3 months. The scavenging rate of dissolved {sup 234}Th with respect to scavenging onto particles appears to correlate with primary productivity measurements. Scavenging and rapid removal of particulate {sup 234}Th from the water column is best explained by a mechanism of zooplankton grazing and fecal pellet production. At one sight in the Jabuka Pit, particulate {sup 234}Th residence times below the pycnocline are long (30-40 days) suggesting that particles are being more readily recycled at these depths. By comparison, in a seawater profile collected near the Po outflow region, {sup 234}Th is depleted with respect to {sup 238}U through the entire water column. We conclude from this assessment that particles in waters near the Po River outflow will be more efficiently transported to bottom sediments compared with those in deeper waters over the Jabuka Pit.

  2. Fluidized-Bed Particles Scavenge Silicon Fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.; Rohatgi, N.; Lutwack, R.; Hogle, R.

    1985-01-01

    Waste reduced, and silicon production rate improved. In new process silicon formed by thermal decomposition of SiH4. Part of silicon formed on silicon seed particles as result of surface chemical reaction. However, silicon formed by homogeneous reaction in gas phase tends to form aggregates of silicon atoms, which appear as fine particles (like dust). Believed that scavenging action of seed particles enables large fraction fines to be incorporated onto seed surface. This mode of growth confirmed by electron microscopy photographs.

  3. Microscope Image of Scavenged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Optical Microscope shows a strongly magnetic surface which has scavenged particles from within the microscope enclosure before a sample delivery from the lander's Robotic Arm. The particles correspond to the larger grains seen in fine orange material that makes up most of the soil at the Phoenix site. They vary in color, but are of similar size, about one-tenth of a millimeter.

    As the microscope's sample wheel moved during operation, these particles also shifted, clearing a thin layer of the finer orange particles that have also been collected. Together with the previous image, this shows that the larger grains are much more magnetic than the fine orange particles with a much larger volume of the grains being collected by the magnet. The image is 2 milimeters across.

    It is speculated that the orange material particles are a weathering product from the larger grains, with the weathering process both causing a color change and a loss of magnetism.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  4. Vapor scavenging by atmospheric aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, E.

    1996-05-01

    Particle growth due to vapor scavenging was studied using both experimental and computational techniques. Vapor scavenging by particles is an important physical process in the atmosphere because it can result in changes to particle properties (e.g., size, shape, composition, and activity) and, thus, influence atmospheric phenomena in which particles play a role, such as cloud formation and long range transport. The influence of organic vapor on the evolution of a particle mass size distribution was investigated using a modified version of MAEROS (a multicomponent aerosol dynamics code). The modeling study attempted to identify the sources of organic aerosol observed by Novakov and Penner (1993) in a field study in Puerto Rico. Experimentally, vapor scavenging and particle growth were investigated using two techniques. The influence of the presence of organic vapor on the particle`s hydroscopicity was investigated using an electrodynamic balance. The charge on a particle was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A prototype apparatus--the refractive index thermal diffusion chamber (RITDC)--was developed to study multiple particles in the same environment at the same time.

  5. Advanced Scavenge Systems for an Integrated Engine Inlet Particle Separator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-09-01

    INSTRUMENTAT10N............ .oooo.....& 117 TEST RIG FACILITY INSTALLAT ION ..................... 124 TEST PLA.N OUJTLINE. . ... . .. .. .. .. . ... IZ...CDD 40 - 00 COD 0 cc 0a co 0 im 0 00 0-4 < -i 4L B LA SECT ION I (HUB) I1- SECTION 2 2- SECTION 3 3- SECTION 4 4 SECTION 5 5 STACKING POINT L.o in...based on previous particle seoarator experienc*, the difference in separation ef~iciency from 20-percent scavenge to 25 percent scavenge is mall, and

  6. Protactinium-231 and thorium-230 abundances and high scavenging rates in the western arctic ocean

    PubMed

    Edmonds; Moran; Hoff; Smith; Edwards

    1998-04-17

    The Canadian Basin of the Arctic Ocean, largely ice covered and isolated from deep contact with the more dynamic Eurasian Basin by the Lomonosov Ridge, has historically been considered an area of low productivity and particle flux and sluggish circulation. High-sensitivity mass-spectrometric measurements of the naturally occurring radionuclides protactinium-231 and thorium-230 in the deep Canada Basin and on the adjacent shelf indicate high particle fluxes and scavenging rates in this region. The thorium-232 data suggest that offshore advection of particulate material from the shelves contributes to scavenging of reactive materials in areas of permanent ice cover.

  7. Particle scavenging in a cylindrical ultrasonic standing wave field using levitated drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrell, Tyler; Saylor, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    A cylindrical ultrasonic standing wave field was generated in a tube containing a flow of particles and fog. Both the particles and fog drops were concentrated in the nodes of the standing wave field where they combined and then grew large enough to fall out of the system. In this way particles were scavenged from the system, cleaning the air. While this approach has been attempted using a standing wave field established between disc-shaped transducers, a cylindrical resonator has not been used for this purpose heretofore. The resonator was constructed by bolting three Langevin transducers to an aluminum tube. The benefit of the cylindrical geometry is that the acoustic energy is focused. Furthermore, the residence time of the particle in the field can be increased by increasing the length of the resonator. An additional benefit of this approach is that tubes located downstream of the resonator were acoustically excited, acting as passive resonators that enhanced the scavenging process. The performance of this system on scavenging particles is presented as a function of particle diameter and volumetric flow rate. It is noted that, when operated without particles, the setup can be used to remove drops and shows promise for liquid aerosol retention from systems where these losses can be financially disadvantageous and/or hazardous.

  8. Scavenging Rate Ecoassay: A Potential Indicator of Estuary Condition

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Augustine G.; Scanes, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of estuary condition is essential due to the highly productive and often intensely impacted nature of these ecosystems. Assessment of the physico-chemical condition of estuaries is expensive and difficult due to naturally fluctuating water quality and biota. Assessing the vigour of ecosystem processes is an alternative method with potential to overcome much of the variability associated with physico-chemical measures. Indicators of estuary condition should have small spatial and temporal variability, have a predictable response to perturbation and be ecologically relevant. Here, we present tests of the first criterion, the spatio-temporal variability of a potential ecoassay measuring the rate of scavenging in estuaries. We hypothesised that the proposed scavenging ecoassay would not vary significantly among A) sites in an estuary, B) trips separated by weeks, or C) days in a trip. Because not all habitats are present in all estuaries, this test was undertaken in two habitats. When conducted over bare substrate there were occasional significant differences, but no discernible patterns, within levels of the experiment. When conducted over vegetated substrate, days within a trip did not vary significantly, but later trips experienced greater scavenging. This scavenging ecoassay shows potential as a tool for assessing the condition of estuarine ecosystems, and further exploration of this protocol is warranted by implementation in estuaries across a gradient of anthropogenic stress. PMID:26024225

  9. Scavenging rate ecoassay: a potential indicator of estuary condition.

    PubMed

    Porter, Augustine G; Scanes, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of estuary condition is essential due to the highly productive and often intensely impacted nature of these ecosystems. Assessment of the physico-chemical condition of estuaries is expensive and difficult due to naturally fluctuating water quality and biota. Assessing the vigour of ecosystem processes is an alternative method with potential to overcome much of the variability associated with physico-chemical measures. Indicators of estuary condition should have small spatial and temporal variability, have a predictable response to perturbation and be ecologically relevant. Here, we present tests of the first criterion, the spatio-temporal variability of a potential ecoassay measuring the rate of scavenging in estuaries. We hypothesised that the proposed scavenging ecoassay would not vary significantly among A) sites in an estuary, B) trips separated by weeks, or C) days in a trip. Because not all habitats are present in all estuaries, this test was undertaken in two habitats. When conducted over bare substrate there were occasional significant differences, but no discernible patterns, within levels of the experiment. When conducted over vegetated substrate, days within a trip did not vary significantly, but later trips experienced greater scavenging. This scavenging ecoassay shows potential as a tool for assessing the condition of estuarine ecosystems, and further exploration of this protocol is warranted by implementation in estuaries across a gradient of anthropogenic stress.

  10. Scavenging of Thorium and Protactinium by Particles from the East Pacific Rise Hydrothermal Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. F.; Fleisher, M. Q.; Pavia, F. J.; Vivancos, S. M.; Lu, Y.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    Concentrations of dissolved 230Th, 231Pa and 232Th measured along the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect between Peru and Tahiti illustrate the enhanced scavenging of trace elements by particles derived from the hydrothermal plume that spreads westward from the East Pacific Rise (EPR). Concentrations of dissolved 230Th and 231Pa increase linearly with depth in the upper 2 km of the water column, consistent with their removal by reversible scavenging. The intensity of scavenging by plume particles is quantified by comparing the predicted (extrapolated) concentration of dissolved 230Th at the core depth of the plume (30 to 35 fg/kg) with measured concentrations. Within the core of the plume, measured concentrations of dissolved 230Th are 8 fg/kg at a distance of approx. 1200 km to the west of the EPR, and 12 fg/kg at a distance approx 2500 km to the west of the ridge, much less than the predicted value. Particles derived from the EPR plume potentially impact the scavenging and removal of many trace elements from the deep ocean over a broad area of the eastern tropical South Pacific.

  11. Spatial variations of scavenging rates within the central and northern Adriatic Sea: Use of U-Th disequilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, T.; Heilmann, J.; Fowler, S.; Miquel, J.C.

    1996-04-01

    Dissolved and particulate concentrations of {sup 234}Th, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po were measured in surface waters of the central and northern Adriatic Sea. The half-lives and biogeochemistry of {sup 234}Th (t{sub 1/2} = 24.1 days), {sup 210}Po (t{sub 1/2} = 138.4 days) and {sup 210}Pb (t{sub 1/2} = 22.3 years) are ideal for studying particle dynamics in the upper water column. It has been observed that the residence time of dissolved {sup 234}Th with respect to removal on biogenic particles is inversely proportional to primary productivity and may be used to predict export from or new production in the euphotic zone. Model-derived {sup 234}Th fluxes can also be used to help validate sediment trap collections in the upper water column. The aim of the present study was to gain an insight into the intensity and variability of active scavenging and particle removal processes in the central and northern Adriatic Sea. This semi-enclosed sea is strongly influenced by fresh water runoff from rivers carrying large quantities of dissolved nutrients and suspended particles. These inputs of nutrients and suspended particles are expected to give rise to large biological and biogeochemical gradients across the Continental Shelf and offer a range of environments for studying particle scavenging and removal processes. The authors have examined the relationships between {sup 234}Th scavenging rates and residence times of dissolved and particulate phases as a function of other physical and biological parameters (primary productivity, POC, chlorophyll, C/N and total suspended matter). Particular reference is made to the two contrasting environments of the Adriatic--a eutrophic zone near the Po River outflow and in the largely oligotrophic waters of the Jabuka Pit.

  12. Fluorous reagents and scavengers versus solid-supported reagents and scavengers, a reaction rate and kinetic comparison.

    PubMed

    Chen, Christine Hiu-Tung; Zhang, Wei

    2005-01-01

    Reactions using fluorous reagents and scavengers are compared side-by-side with their solid-supported counterparts. Fluorous triphenylphosphine is used in the bromination reaction of alcohols, fluorous thiol is used as an electrophile scavenger for alpha-bromoketones, fluorous isatoic anhydride is used as a nucleophile scavenger for primary and secondary amines. Reactions involving fluorous reagents and scavengers occur in homogeneous media with solution-phase reaction kinetics. Reactions with solid-supported reagents and scavengers occur in a heterogeneous media, and the reaction kinetics are greatly affected by the nature of the solid-support and reaction environment. Significantly larger amounts of reagents and more time are usually required to complete the solid-supported reaction.

  13. Impacts of black carbon mixing state on black carbon nucleation scavenging: Insights from a particle-resolved model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, J.; Riemer, N.; West, M.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents an advancement of the recently developed particle-resolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC (Particle Monte Carlo-Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry) to investigate the impacts of mixing state on cloud droplet formation and to provide a tool for the quantification of errors in cloud properties introduced by simplifying mixing state assumptions. We coupled PartMC-MOSAIC with a cloud parcel model. We initialized the cloud parcel simulation with hourly PartMC-MOSAIC model output from a 48-hour urban plume simulation. The cloud parcel model then explicitly simulated activation and condensational growth of the particles as the parcel underwent cooling at a specified rate and the particles of the aerosol population competed for water vapor. We used this capability to quantify the relative importance of size information versus composition information for the prediction of the cloud droplet number fraction, mass fraction of black carbon that is nucleation-scavenged, cloud droplet effective radius, and relative dispersion of the droplet size distribution by introducing averaging of particle-resolved information within prescribed bins. For the cloud droplet number fraction, both composition averaging and size-bin averaging individually led to an error of less than 25% for all cloud parcel simulations, while averaging in both size bins and composition resulted in errors of up to 34% for the base case cooling rate of 0.5 K/min. In contrast, for the nucleation-scavenged black carbon mass fraction, the results for size-bin averaging tracked the reference case well, while composition averaging, with or without size-bin averaging, led to overestimation of this quantity by up to 600%.

  14. Empirical estimates of size-resolved precipitation scavenging coefficients for ultrafine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, S. C.; Joerger, V. M.; Sullivan, R. C.

    2016-10-01

    Below-cloud scavenging coefficients for ultrafine particles (UFP) exhibit comparatively large uncertainties in part because of the limited availability of observational data sets from which robust parameterizations can be derived or that can be used to evaluate output from numerical models. Long time series of measured near-surface UFP size distributions and precipitation intensity from the Midwestern USA are used here to explore uncertainties in scavenging coefficients and test both the generalizability of a previous empirical parameterization developed using similar data from a boreal forest in Finland (Laakso et al., 2003) and whether a more parsimonious formulation can be developed. Scavenging coefficients (λ) over an ensemble of 95 rain events (with a median intensity of 1.56 mm h-1) and 104 particle diameter (Dp) classes (from 10 to 400 nm) indicate a mean value of 3.4 × 10-5 s-1 (with a standard error of 1.1 × 10-6 s-1) and a median of 1.9 × 10-5 s-1 (interquartile range: -2.0 × 10-5 to 7.5 × 10-5 s-1). The median scavenging coefficients for Dp: 10-400 nm computed over all 95 rain events exhibit close agreement with the empirical parameterization proposed by (Laakso et al., 2003). They decline from ∼4.1 × 10-5 s-1 for Dp of 10-19 nm, to ∼1.6 × 10-5 s-1 for Dp of 80-113 nm, and show an increasing tendency for Dp > 200 nm.

  15. Enhanced single-particle brightness and photostability of semiconductor polymer dots by enzymatic oxygen scavenging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhihe; Yang, Yingkun; Sun, Zezhou; Wu, Changfeng

    2016-12-01

    Semiconductor polymer dots (Pdots) are emerging as an excellent fluorescent probe in biology and medicine. However, the photostability of Pdots can't meet the requirements of long term single-particle imaging and tracking applications. Here we describe the enhanced single-particle brightness and photostability of Pdots by using an efficient enzymatic oxygen scavenging system (OSS). Pdots with particle diameters of 21 nm and 43 nm (PFBT21 and PFBT43) were prepared by a nanoprecipitation method. Single-particle imaging and photobleaching were performed to investigate the effect of OSS on the per-particle brightness and photostability of Pdots. Our results indicate that the single-particle brightness of the PFBT21 Pdots in OSS was enhanced nearly two times as compare to the PFBT21 Pdots in water. The photobleaching percentages of PFBT21 and PFBT43 in OSS were determined to be 29% and 33%, respectively. These values are decreased by 2-3 times as compared to those of the same Pdots in water, indicating the significantly improved photostability of Pdots by OSS. This study provides a promising approach for enhancing photostability of Pdots in long term single-particle tracking.

  16. Potential nucleation scavenging of smoke particles over large fires: A parametric study

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, L L; Penner, J E

    1987-08-01

    During hypothesized nuclear exchanges massive fires may be ignited and inject large amounts of smoke into the atmosphere. Considerable evidence has been accumulated to suggest that nucleation scavenging where smoke particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) may be an important mechanism for incorporating these particles into cloud water. The fraction of smoke particles that act as CCN depends on the cloud environment as well as the affinity of the smoke particles to water. A numerical model of the detailed microphysics of condensation growth on aerosol and cloud drop distributions is employed to produce a parametric study of the dependence of nucleation to a range of conditions. We consider aerosol number concentrations of 10/sup 9//m/sup 3/ to 10/sup 13//m/sup 3/, updraft speeds from 1 to 100 m/s and aerosol particles from fully water soluble to insoluble but wettable. The study provides insight into how well we must characterize smoke particles in order to predict the fraction that act as CCN given the dynamical environment.

  17. Gas-particle partitioning and precipitation scavenging of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the free troposphere in southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng-hui; Wang, Yan; Li, Yu-hua; Wai, Ka-ming; Li, Hong-li; Tong, Lei

    2016-03-01

    Multi-phase (gaseous, particulate and rain) samples were collected simultaneously for the first time at a high-elevation mountain site in China during March to May 2009. The site, located in the free troposphere, is used to investigate the gas-particle partitioning, precipitation scavenging of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The total measured concentrations of 15 USEPA PAHs varied from 2.67 to 137.00 ng/m3 (average of 24.10 ng/m3). Partitioning of PAHs between gaseous and particulate phases (log Kp) was well-correlated with the supercooled liquid vapor pressure in all samples (R2 = 0.730-0.985), but the slopes (-0.154 to -0.424) were significantly deviated from the expected value of -1. The observed Kp values were better predicted by the Dual model than the Koa model, pointing to the importance of soot carbon for PAH partitioning. The scavenging ratios varied among the individual PAH compound, ranged from 4.47 × 103 (BaA) to 1.02 × 105 (ACY). Particle scavenging was the dominant removal process, accounting over 75% of the total scavenging (except for BbF) for individual PAH compound. Relationships of Wp-particle fraction, Wp-supercooled vapor pressure were analyzed. The results suggested the particle scavenging by precipitation is less efficient for PAHs with higher molecular weights, while more volatile PAHs with lower molecular weights deposited on larger atmospheric particles were scavenged more efficiently. The efficiency of Wp was found to be increased with rain intensity. For gas scavenging, the dissolution and adsorption mechanisms shift their relative importance with different supercooled vapor pressure.

  18. The importance of new collection efficiency values including the effect of rear capture for the below-cloud scavenging of aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quérel, Arnaud; Monier, Marie; Flossmann, Andrea I.; Lemaitre, Pascal; Porcheron, Emmanuel

    2014-06-01

    A numerical study is presented to evaluate the possible impact of recently measured collection scavenging efficiencies of aerosol particles by raindrops on the calculation of wet removal of pollution plumes by rain. These new collection efficiencies cover the previously undocumented range between 0.3 μm and 3.5 μm diameter for the aerosol particles and 2 to 2.6 mm diameter for the drops. They show for particles between 0.3 μm and 0.7 μm a region of an important increase of the efficiencies with decreasing particle size probably due to the capture of particles in the rear vortex developing behind the falling drop. This hypothesis was motivated by measurements using particle image velocimetry (PIV). Also for the particles larger than 1.5 μm the efficiencies exceed old approximations by up to a factor of two. Typical continental and maritime aerosol particle distributions were used for background and plume distributions and each time the deposited particle mass was calculated with the old and the new efficiencies for the different resulting precipitation rates. In the simulations the new efficiencies increased the calculated wet removal rate of pollution plume particles between 5% and 17%, with respect to the simulations with the old efficiencies, whereby one third of this increase could be attributed to rear capture. This phenomenon has not been observed in these size ranges before. The study also highlights the weakness of certain methods to determine the scavenging coefficient of a pollution plume by rain. Instead of linking the scavenging coefficient to the decrease of the particle spectrum in the air, an operational approach, e.g. in case of accidental releases, needs to be developed that links it to the rainfall intensity, as well as other variables like meteorological parameters, cloud size and plume characteristics. Considering the still persisting gaps of measurements in the collection efficiencies more laboratory measurements of collection scavenging

  19. Riparian reserves within oil palm plantations conserve logged forest leaf litter ant communities and maintain associated scavenging rates

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Claudia L; Lewis, Owen T; Chung, Arthur Y C; Fayle, Tom M

    2015-01-01

    The expansion of oil palm plantations at the expense of tropical forests is causing declines in many species and altering ecosystem functions. Maintaining forest-dependent species and processes in these landscapes may therefore limit the negative impacts of this economically important industry. Protecting riparian vegetation may be one such opportunity; forest buffer strips are commonly protected for hydrological reasons, but can also conserve functionally important taxa and the processes they support. We surveyed leaf litter ant communities within oil palm-dominated landscapes in Sabah, Malaysia, using protein baits. As the scavenging activity of ants influences important ecological characteristics such as nutrient cycling and soil structure, we quantified species-specific rates of bait removal to examine how this process may change across land uses and establish which changes in community structure underlie observed shifts in activity. Riparian reserves had similar ant species richness, community composition and scavenging rates to nearby continuous logged forest. Reserve width and vegetation structure did not affect ant species richness significantly. However, the number of foraging individuals decreased with increasing reserve width, and scavenging rate increased with vegetation complexity. Oil palm ant communities were characterized by significantly lower species richness than logged forest and riparian reserves and also by altered community composition and reduced scavenging rates. Reduced scavenging activity in oil palm was not explained by a reduction in ant species richness, nor by replacement of forest ant species by those with lower per species scavenging rates. There was also no significant effect of land use on the scavenging activity of the forest species that persisted in oil palm. Rather, changes in scavenging activity were best explained by a reduction in the mean rate of bait removal per individual ant across all species in the community

  20. Riparian reserves within oil palm plantations conserve logged forest leaf litter ant communities and maintain associated scavenging rates.

    PubMed

    Gray, Claudia L; Lewis, Owen T; Chung, Arthur Y C; Fayle, Tom M

    2015-02-01

    The expansion of oil palm plantations at the expense of tropical forests is causing declines in many species and altering ecosystem functions. Maintaining forest-dependent species and processes in these landscapes may therefore limit the negative impacts of this economically important industry. Protecting riparian vegetation may be one such opportunity; forest buffer strips are commonly protected for hydrological reasons, but can also conserve functionally important taxa and the processes they support.We surveyed leaf litter ant communities within oil palm-dominated landscapes in Sabah, Malaysia, using protein baits. As the scavenging activity of ants influences important ecological characteristics such as nutrient cycling and soil structure, we quantified species-specific rates of bait removal to examine how this process may change across land uses and establish which changes in community structure underlie observed shifts in activity.Riparian reserves had similar ant species richness, community composition and scavenging rates to nearby continuous logged forest. Reserve width and vegetation structure did not affect ant species richness significantly. However, the number of foraging individuals decreased with increasing reserve width, and scavenging rate increased with vegetation complexity.Oil palm ant communities were characterized by significantly lower species richness than logged forest and riparian reserves and also by altered community composition and reduced scavenging rates.Reduced scavenging activity in oil palm was not explained by a reduction in ant species richness, nor by replacement of forest ant species by those with lower per species scavenging rates. There was also no significant effect of land use on the scavenging activity of the forest species that persisted in oil palm. Rather, changes in scavenging activity were best explained by a reduction in the mean rate of bait removal per individual ant across all species in the community.Synthesis and

  1. Decomposition rate of carrion is dependent on composition not abundance of the assemblages of insect scavengers.

    PubMed

    Farwig, Nina; Brandl, Roland; Siemann, Stefen; Wiener, Franziska; Müller, Jörg

    2014-08-01

    Environmental factors and biodiversity affect ecosystem processes. As environmental change modifies also biodiversity it is unclear whether direct effects of environmental factors on ecosystem processes are more important than indirect effects mediated by changes in biodiversity. High-quality resources like carrion occur as heterogeneous pulses of energy and nutrients. Consequently, the distribution of scavenging insects is related to resource availability. Therefore, carrion decomposition represents a suitable process from which to unravel direct effects of environmental change from indirect biodiversity-related effects on ecosystem processes. During three field seasons in 2010 we exposed traps baited with small-mammal carrion at 21 sites along a temperature gradient to explore the insect carrion fauna and decomposition rate in the Bohemian Forest, Germany. The abundance component of beetle and fly assemblages decreased with decreasing temperature. Independently, the composition component of both taxa changed with temperature and season. The change in the composition component of beetles depicted a loss of larger species at higher temperatures. Decomposition rate did not change directly along the temperature gradient but was directly influenced by season. The composition component of beetles, and to a small extent of flies, but not their abundance component, directly affected carrion decomposition. Consequently, lower decomposition rates at lower temperatures can be explained by the absence of larger beetle species. Thus, we predict that future environmental change will modify carrion fauna composition and thereby indirectly decomposition rate. Moreover, reorganizations of the insect carrion composition will directly translate into modified decomposition rates, with potential consequences for nutrient availability and carbon storage.

  2. Predation or scavenging? Thoracic muscle pH and rates of water loss reveal cause of death in arthropods.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Erin E; Young, Christine V; Holway, David A

    2010-08-01

    The difficulty of directly observing predatory events hinders a complete understanding of how predation structures food webs. Indirect approaches such as PCR-based and isotopic analyses clarify patterns of resource consumption but fail to distinguish predation from scavenging. Given that facultative scavenging is a ubiquitous and phylogenetically widespread foraging strategy, an improved ability to discriminate prey from carrion is needed to enhance an understanding of the demographic effects of consumption and the true nature of trophic interactions. Using physiological properties of muscle tissue - specifically pH and rate of water loss - we develop a novel method to discriminate prey from carrion collected by scavenging hymenopteran predators. Our focal system is the western yellowjacket (Vespula pensylvanica), a common scavenging predator in Hawaii and western North America. Prior to consumption, the physical properties of hymenopteran muscle tissue change in a quantifiable and deterministic manner post mortem and can be used to estimate the time and putative cause of death of diet items. Applying this method in laboratory and field situations resulted in the correct identification of prey and carrion in 49 out of 56 cases (88%). Although further investigation is needed to determine how post-mortem physiology of diet items changes in the guts of consumers, the approaches developed in this study can be used to distinguish predation from scavenging by central-place foragers (particularly arthropods). Such information will provide a more definitive characterization of species interactions and food webs.

  3. Investigation of a Complex Technique of Smoke Particle Deposition on Scavengers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    where light extinction measurements were performed In a T--ClC cloud. Most effective scavengers were mesh type collectors and filter type material...consisting of electrete fibers. Their maximum collection efficiency surpassed l05 for collectors bearing no additional electrical charges. The effect of...assistance of the U.S. Army Research Office is highly appreciated for providing the funding for this research, which was effectively steered by Dr. E

  4. Variation in bird-window collision mortality and scavenging rates within an urban landscape

    EPA Science Inventory

    Annual avian mortality from collisions with windows and buildings is estimated to range from a million to a billion birds in the United States alone. However, estimates of mortality based on carcass counts suffer from bias due to imperfect detection and carcass scavenging. We stu...

  5. Scavenging and fractionation of particle-reactive radioisotopes 7Be, 210Pb and 210Po in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinfang; Luo, Shangde; Huang, Yipu

    2016-09-01

    The scavenging and fractionation of 7Be, 210Pb, and 210Po in the atmosphere are investigated by measuring their activities in rainwater collected from 68 rain events during March 2004 to April 2006 at a coastal station of Xiamen, southeastern China. In addition to documenting the large temporal variations in activities, fluxes, and isotope ratios of 7Be, 210Pb and 210Po in rainwater and the role of rainfall intensity in radionuclide scavenging, our results show that an enhanced deposition of 7Be and 210Pb occurs in the spring than in other seasons and is attributed to the "funnel effect" due to the increased atmospheric vertical convective mixing in the spring. This latter hypothesis is further supported by the observed seasonal and inter-annual variations in 7Be/210Pb and 210Po/210Pb ratios showing that the weakening of vertical convective mixing or stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) at the study site is linked with the enhancement of summer monsoons. It appears that the rainfall intensity, in connection with the vertical (e.g., STE) and horizontal (summer monsoons) air transport, exerts an important control on the activities, fluxes, and isotope ratios of 7Be, 210Pb, and 210Po in the atmosphere. Application of the observational data to a theoretical model shows that there are significant fractionations among 7Be, 210Pb, and 210Po in the atmosphere, with the scavenging rate constant or reciprocal of the residence time of radionuclide in the atmosphere being 210Pb > 7Be > 210Po. A revised Poet et al. (1972)'s method is proposed for quantitative constraint on the scavenging behavior of radionuclide, aerosols, and aerosol-associated trace pollutants in the atmosphere.

  6. Sedimentation in the Southern Okinawa Trough: enhanced particle scavenging and teleconnection between the Equatorial Pacific and western Pacific margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shih-Yu; Huh, Chih-An; Su, Chih-Chieh; You, Chen-Feng

    2004-11-01

    Owing to its location, geomorphology and hydrodynamic conditions, the southernmost part of the Southern Okinawa Trough (SOT) acts like an efficient receptacle for sediments from Taiwan and the East China Sea shelf. The high sediment flux coupled with the passage, bifurcation, upwelling, swirling and detour of Kuroshio in the SOT area result in intense particle scavenging, with sedimentary inventories of 210Pb and 239, 240Pu far greater than expected from local atmospheric input and in situ water column production. The unusually high inventories, as well as the deposition history of Pu isotopes must be explained by advective transport of Pu westward from the Marshall Islands, the largest source of Pu in the Pacific, by the North Equatorial Current (NEC) followed by northward transport of Kuroshio to the SOT area. The high sedimentation rate in the SOT area enabled us to differentiate the subsurface peak of 239, 240Pu resulting from the global fallout maximum in AD 1963 and the subsurface maximum of 240Pu/239Pu caused by close-in fallout from neutron-rich thermonuclear tests conducted by the US during AD 1952-1954 at the Enewetak and Bikini Atolls. The vertical offset between the subsurface peaks of 239, 240Pu and 240Pu/239Pu in sediments suggests that deposition of the 240Pu/239Pu maximum preceded that of the 239, 240Pu maximum by 3-5 yr and that the transit time of the 240Pu-enriched Pu from its source (at ∼12°N, 162°E) to the SOT area is ∼6 yr. The mean velocity of NEC thus calculated is ∼0.022 m s-1. The present is the key to the past. This study reveals teleconnection between the Equatorial Pacific and the western Pacific margins and suggests that ODP and IMAGES cores recently collected from the SOT area holds great promise for the reconstruction of high-resolution paleoceanographic records along the trajectories of NEC and Kuroshio.

  7. Natural radionuclides (210)Po and (210)Pb in the Delaware and Chesapeake Estuaries: modeling scavenging rates and residence times.

    PubMed

    Marsan, D; Rigaud, S; Church, T

    2014-12-01

    During the spring and summer months of 2012, (210)Po and (210)Pb activity were measured in the dissolved and particulate phases from the Delaware and upper Chesapeake estuaries. The upper Delaware estuary, near the freshwater end member, was characterized by high-suspended matter concentrations that scavenged dissolved (210)Po and (210)Pb. Box models were applied using mass balance calculations to assess the nuclides residence times in each estuary. Only 60% of the dissolved (210)Po and 55% of the dissolved (210)Pb from the Delaware estuary were exported to coastal waters. A large fraction of soluble (210)Po and (210)Pb within the estuary was either reversibly adsorbed onto suspended particles, trapped in sediment accumulation zones (such as intertidal marshes), bioaccumulated into phytoplankton and discharged to the coastal ocean. The upper Chesapeake estuary was largely characterized by sub-oxic bottom waters that contained higher concentrations of dissolved (210)Po and (210)Pb, hypothesized to be subjected to redox cycling of manganese. The Delaware and Chesapeake estuary mean residence times for (210)Po differed significantly at 86 ± 7 and 126 ± 10 days respectively, while they were similar for (210)Pb (67 ± 6-55 ± 5 days). The difference in residence times corresponds to the greater extent of biogeochemical scavenging and regeneration processes within the upper Chesapeake.

  8. Evaluation of scavenging rate constants of DOPA and tyrosine enantiomers against multiple reactive oxygen species and methyl radical as measured with ESR trapping method.

    PubMed

    Sueishi, Yoshimi; Takemoto, Tsubasa

    2015-04-15

    The scavenging rates of DOPA (dl- and l-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine) and Tyr (tyrosine (dl- and l-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)alanine)) against five reactive oxygen species (ROS) and methyl radical were measured with the use of electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping method and the scavenging rate constants of DOPA and Tyr were determined. The scavenging rate constants for multiple active species increased in the order of O2(-)scavenging abilities for l-enantiomers and dl-mixtures of DOPA and Tyr were shown. Further, based on the redox potentials, we have suggested that the primary chemical process of antioxidant reactions with O2(-) and (1)O2 can be characterized with the electron transfer of antioxidants (DOPA and Tyr).

  9. Intercomparison between Individual Particles Scavenged as CCN and Those Collected at Ground-based Site on West Coast of Japan During Asian Dust Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C. J.; Tohno, S.; Kasahara, M.; Hayakawa, S.

    2002-12-01

    Asian dust storm particles can affect precipitation composition because they are either incorporated into cloud via condensation of water vapour (nucleation) or due to the uptake of particles by existing droplets. And subsequently they affect aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. In order to study the intercorrelation between the chemical natures of both the particles collected at ground-based site and those scavenged as CCN, the intensive field measurement was carried out on west coast of Japan (Yasaka, Tango Peninsula, 35.62°N; 135.07°E) during dense Asian dust storm event on March 22, 2002. Due to the size dependence of the chemical composition of aerosol particle, size-segregated aerosol particles were collect using Low pressure Andersen impactor sampler. Also, to collect cloud droplets individually, a particular method for the cloud droplet replication was newly applied using collodion (nitrocellulose) film. Sampling of cloud droplets was performed at summit of a mountain (680 m) in Yasaka. To analyze the ambient individual aerosol particles and individual retained particles in cloud droplet, X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analytical method set at SPring-8 on BL39XU was applied. Analytical result enables us not only to compare the characteristics of individual particles scavenged as CCN and those collected at ground-based site, but also to estimate the influence of long-range transport.

  10. Particle creation rate for dynamical black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzjaee, Javad T.; Ellis, George F. R.

    2016-11-01

    We present the particle creation probability rate around a general black hole as an outcome of quantum fluctuations. Using the uncertainty principle for these fluctuation, we derive a new ultraviolet frequency cutoff for the radiation spectrum of a dynamical black hole. Using this frequency cutoff, we define the probability creation rate function for such black holes. We consider a dynamical Vaidya model and calculate the probability creation rate for this case when its horizon is in a slowly evolving phase. Our results show that one can expect the usual Hawking radiation emission process in the case of a dynamical black hole when it has a slowly evolving horizon. Moreover, calculating the probability rate for a dynamical black hole gives a measure of when Hawking radiation can be killed off by an incoming flux of matter or radiation. Our result strictly suggests that we have to revise the Hawking radiation expectation for primordial black holes that have grown substantially since they were created in the early universe. We also infer that this frequency cut off can be a parameter that shows the primordial black hole growth at the emission moment.

  11. Clade age and diversification rate variation explain disparity in species richness among water scavenger beetle (Hydrophilidae) lineages.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Devin D; Fikáček, Martin; Short, Andrew E Z

    2014-01-01

    Explaining the disparity of species richness across the tree of life is one of the great challenges in evolutionary biology. Some lineages are exceptionally species rich, while others are relatively species poor. One explanation for heterogeneity among clade richness is that older clades are more species rich because they have had more time to accrue diversity than younger clades. Alternatively, disparity in species richness may be due to among-lineage diversification rate variation. Here we investigate diversification in water scavenger beetles (Hydrophilidae), which vary in species richness among major lineages by as much as 20 fold. Using a time-calibrated phylogeny and comparative methods, we test for a relationship between clade age and species richness and for shifts in diversification rate in hydrophilids. We detected a single diversification rate increase in Megasternini, a relatively young and species rich clade whose diversity might be explained by the stunning diversity of ecological niches occupied by this clade. We find that Amphiopini, an old clade, is significantly more species poor than expected, possibly due to its restricted geographic range. The remaining lineages show a correlation between species richness and clade age, suggesting that both clade age and variation in diversification rates explain the disparity in species richness in hydrophilids. We find little evidence that transitions between aquatic, semiaquatic, and terrestrial habitats are linked to shifts in diversification rates.

  12. Clade Age and Diversification Rate Variation Explain Disparity in Species Richness among Water Scavenger Beetle (Hydrophilidae) Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Devin D.; Fikáček, Martin; Short, Andrew E. Z.

    2014-01-01

    Explaining the disparity of species richness across the tree of life is one of the great challenges in evolutionary biology. Some lineages are exceptionally species rich, while others are relatively species poor. One explanation for heterogeneity among clade richness is that older clades are more species rich because they have had more time to accrue diversity than younger clades. Alternatively, disparity in species richness may be due to among-lineage diversification rate variation. Here we investigate diversification in water scavenger beetles (Hydrophilidae), which vary in species richness among major lineages by as much as 20 fold. Using a time-calibrated phylogeny and comparative methods, we test for a relationship between clade age and species richness and for shifts in diversification rate in hydrophilids. We detected a single diversification rate increase in Megasternini, a relatively young and species rich clade whose diversity might be explained by the stunning diversity of ecological niches occupied by this clade. We find that Amphiopini, an old clade, is significantly more species poor than expected, possibly due to its restricted geographic range. The remaining lineages show a correlation between species richness and clade age, suggesting that both clade age and variation in diversification rates explain the disparity in species richness in hydrophilids. We find little evidence that transitions between aquatic, semiaquatic, and terrestrial habitats are linked to shifts in diversification rates. PMID:24887453

  13. Estimation of Particle Flux and Remineralization Rate from Radioactive Disequilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Michael P. Bacon; Roger Francois

    2004-05-24

    Reactive radionuclides, such as the thorium isotopes, show measurable deficiencies in the oceanic water column because of their removal by chemical scavenging due to the particle flux. Measurement of the deficiency, coupled with measurement of the radionuclide concentration in particles, allows a determination of the effective particle sinking velocity. Results to date suggest that the effective particle sinking velocity is remarkably invariant with depth. This leads to the tentative suggestion that POC concentration profiles may, to a good approximation, be used directly to determine length scales for the remineralization of sinking organic matter. Further measurements are in progress to test this idea and to evaluate its limitations. Knowledge of the remineralization length scale is essential to an evaluation of the efficiency of the biological pump as a means for deep sequestering of carbon in the ocean.

  14. Erythrocyte storage increases rates of NO and nitrite scavenging: implications for transfusion-related toxicity.

    PubMed

    Stapley, Ryan; Owusu, Benjamin Y; Brandon, Angela; Cusick, Marianne; Rodriguez, Cilina; Marques, Marisa B; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Barnum, Scott R; Weinberg, Jordan A; Lancaster, Jack R; Patel, Rakesh P

    2012-09-15

    Storage of erythrocytes in blood banks is associated with biochemical and morphological changes to RBCs (red blood cells). It has been suggested that these changes have potential negative clinical effects characterized by inflammation and microcirculatory dysfunction which add to other transfusion-related toxicities. However, the mechanisms linking RBC storage and toxicity remain unclear. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that storage of leucodepleted RBCs results in cells that inhibit NO (nitric oxide) signalling more so than younger cells. Using competition kinetic analyses and protocols that minimized contributions from haemolysis or microparticles, our data indicate that the consumption rates of NO increased ~40-fold and NO-dependent vasodilation was inhibited 2-4-fold comparing 42-day-old with 0-day-old RBCs. These results are probably due to the formation of smaller RBCs with increased surface area: volume as a consequence of membrane loss during storage. The potential for older RBCs to affect NO formation via deoxygenated RBC-mediated nitrite reduction was also tested. RBC storage did not affect deoxygenated RBC-dependent stimulation of nitrite-induced vasodilation. However, stored RBCs did increase the rates of nitrite oxidation to nitrate in vitro. Significant loss of whole-blood nitrite was also observed in stable trauma patients after transfusion with 1 RBC unit, with the decrease in nitrite occurring after transfusion with RBCs stored for >25 days, but not with younger RBCs. Collectively, these data suggest that increased rates of reactions between intact RBCs and NO and nitrite may contribute to mechanisms that lead to storage-lesion-related transfusion risk.

  15. Erythrocyte storage increases rates of NO- and Nitrite scavenging: Implications for transfusion related toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Stapley, Ryan; Owusu, Benjamin Y.; Brandon, Angela; Cusick, Marianne; Rodriguez, Cilina; Marques, Marisa B.; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Barnum, Scott R.; Weinberg, Jordan A.; Lancaster, Jack R.; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Storage of erythrocytes in blood banks is associated with biochemical and morphological changes to the RBC. It has been suggested that these changes have a potential negative clinical effects characterized by inflammation and microcirculatory dysfunction which add to other transfusion related toxicities. However, mechanisms linking RBC storage and toxicity remain unclear. In this study we tested the hypothesis that storage of leukodepleted RBC result in cells that inhibit nitric oxide (NO)-signaling more so than younger cells. Using competition kinetic analyses and protocols that minimized contributions from hemolysis or microparticles, our data indicate that NO-consumption rates increased ~40-fold and NO-dependent vasodilation was inhibited 2-4 fold with 42d old vs. 0d RBC. These results are likely due to the formation of smaller RBC with increased surface area: volume as a consequence of membrane loss during storage. The potential for older RBC to affect NO-formation via deoxygenated RBC mediated nitrite reduction was also tested. RBC storage did not affect deoxygenated RBC-dependent stimulation of nitrite-induced vasodilation. However, stored RBC did increase the rates of nitrite oxidation to nitrate in vitro. Significant loss of whole blood nitrite was also observed in stable trauma patients after transfusion with 1 RBC unit, with the decrease in nitrite occurring after transfusion with RBC stored for >25d, but not with younger RBC. Collectively, these data suggest that increased rates of reactions between intact RBC and NO and nitrite may contribute to mechanisms that lead to storage lesion-related transfusion risk PMID:22720637

  16. Radical scavenging ability of gallic acid toward OH and OOH radicals. Reaction mechanism and rate constants from the density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Marino, Tiziana; Galano, Annia; Russo, Nino

    2014-09-04

    Gallic acid is a ubiquitous compound, widely distributed in the vegetal kingdom and frequently found in the human diet. In the present work, its primary antioxidant activity has been investigated using the density functional theory (DFT), and the quantum mechanics-based test for overall free radical scavenging activity (QM-ORSA) protocol. It was found that gallic acid is a better antioxidant than the reference compound, Trolox, regardless of the polarity of the environment. In addition, gallic acid is predicted to be among the best peroxyl radical scavengers identified so far in nonpolar (lipid) media. This compound is capable of scavenging hydroxyl radicals at diffusion-limited rates, and hydroperoxyl radicals with rate constants in the order of 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). The deprotonation of gallic acid, in aqueous solution, is predicted to increase the protective action of this compound against oxidative stress. Gallic acid was also identified as a versatile scavenger, capable of rapidly deactivating a wide variety of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) via electron transfer at physiological pH.

  17. Process for scavenging hydrogen sulfide from hydrocarbon gases

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, I.

    1981-01-20

    A process for scavenging hydrogen sulfide from hydrocarbon gases utilizes iron oxide particles of unique chemical and physical properties. These particles have large surface area, and are comprised substantially of amorphous Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ containing a crystalline phase of Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ and combinations thereof. In scavenging hydrogen sulfide, the iron oxide particles are suspended in a liquid which enters into intimate mixing contact with hydrocarbon gases; the hydrogen sulfide is reacted at an exceptional rate and only acid-stable reaction products are formed. Thereafter, the sweetened hydrocarbon gases are collected.

  18. Criteria for significance of simultaneous presence of both condensible vapors and aerosol particles on mass transfer (deposition) rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.

    1987-01-01

    The simultaneous presence of aerosol particles and condensible vapors in a saturated boundary layer which may affect deposition rates to subcooled surfaces because of vapor-particle interactions is discussed. Scavenging of condensible vapors by aerosol particles may lead to increased particle size and decreased vapor mass fraction, which alters both vapor and particle deposition rates. Particles, if sufficiently concentrated, may also coagulate. Criteria are provided to assess the significance of such phenomena when particles are already present in the mainstream and are not created inside the boundary layer via homogeneous nucleation. It is determined that there is direct proportionality with: (1) the mass concentration of both condensible vapors and aerosol particles; and (2) the square of the boundary layer thickness to particle diameter ratio (delta d sub p) square. Inverse proportionality was found for mainstream to surface temperature difference if thermophoresis dominates particle transport. It is concluded that the square of the boundary layer thickness to particle diameter ratio is the most critical factor to consider in deciding when to neglect vapor-particle interactions.

  19. Criteria for significance of simultaneous presence of both condensible vapors and aerosol particles on mass transfer (deposition) rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    The simultaneous presence of aerosol particles and condensible vapors in a saturated boundary layer which may affect deposition rates to subcooled surfaces because of vapor-particle interactions is discussed. Scavenging of condensible vapors by aerosol particles may lead to increased particle size and decreased vapor mass fraction, which alters both vapor and particle deposition rates. Particles, if sufficiently concentrated, may also coagulate. Criteria are provided to assess the significance of such phenomena when particles are already present in the mainstream and are not created inside the boundary layer via homogeneous nucleation. It is determined that there is direct proportionality with: (1) the mass concentration of both condensible vapors and aerosol particles; and (2) the square of the boundary layer thickness to particle diameter ratio (delta d sub p) square. Inverse proportionality was found for mainstream to surface temperature difference if thermophoresis dominates particle transport. It is concluded that the square of the boundary layer thickness to particle diameter ratio is the most critical factor to consider in deciding when to neglect vapor-particle interactions.

  20. Hydrogen scavengers

    DOEpatents

    Carroll, David W.; Salazar, Kenneth V.; Trkula, Mitchell; Sandoval, Cynthia W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented a codeposition process for fabricating hydrogen scavengers. First, a .pi.-bonded allylic organometallic complex is prepared by reacting an allylic transition metal halide with an organic ligand complexed with an alkali metal; and then, in a second step, a vapor of the .pi.-bonded allylic organometallic complex is combined with the vapor of an acetylenic compound, irradiated with UV light, and codeposited on a substrate.

  1. Particle In-Flight Velocity and Dispersion Measurements at Increasing Particle Feed Rates in Cold Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, M.; Yin, S.; Lupoi, R.

    2017-01-01

    Cold spray (CS) is attracting interest of research and industry due to its rapid, solid-state particle deposition process and respective advantages over conventional deposition technologies. The acceleration of the particles is critical to the efficiency of CS, and previous investigations rarely consider the particle feed rate. However, because higher particle loadings are typically used in the process, the effect of this cannot be assumed negligible. This study therefore investigates the particle velocities in the supersonic jet of an advanced CS system at low- and high pressure levels and varying particle feed rates using particle image velocimetry. The particle dispersion and velocity evolution along the jet axis were investigated for several feedstock materials. It was found that the average particle velocity noticeably decreases with increasing particulate loading in all cases. The velocity distribution and particle dispersion were also observed to be influenced by the feed rate. Effects are driven by both mass loading and volume fraction, depending on the feedstock's particle velocity parameter. Increased particle feed rates hence affect the magnitude and distribution of impact velocity and consequently the efficiency of CS. In particular, numerical models neglecting this interconnection are required to be further improved, based on these experimental studies.

  2. Escape rate and diffusion of a Stochastically Driven particle

    PubMed Central

    Piscitelli, Antonio; Pica Ciamarra, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    The dynamical properties of a tracer repeatedly colliding with heat bath particles can be described within a Langevin framework provided that the tracer is more massive than the bath particles, and that the collisions are frequent. Here we consider the escape of a particle from a potential well, and the diffusion coefficient in a periodic potential, without making these assumptions. We have thus investigated the dynamical properties of a Stochastically Driven particle that moves under the influence of the confining potential in between successive collisions with the heat bath. In the overdamped limit, both the escape rate and the diffusion coefficient coincide with those of a Langevin particle. Conversely, in the underdamped limit the two dynamics have a different temperature dependence. In particular, at low temperature the Stochastically Driven particle has a smaller escape rate, but a larger diffusion coefficient. PMID:28120904

  3. ACCRETION RATES OF MOONLETS EMBEDDED IN CIRCUMPLANETARY PARTICLE DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsuki, Keiji; Yasui, Yuki; Daisaka, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    We examine the gravitational capture probability of colliding particles in circumplanetary particle disks and accretion rates of small particles onto an embedded moonlet, using analytic calculation, three-body orbital integrations, and N-body simulations. Expanding our previous work, we take into account the Rayleigh distribution of particles' orbital eccentricities and inclinations in our analytic calculation and orbital integration and confirm agreement between them when the particle velocity dispersion is comparable to or larger than their mutual escape velocity and the ratio of the sum of the physical radii of colliding particles to their mutual Hill radius (r-tilde{sub p}) is much smaller than unity. As shown by our previous work, the capture probability decreases significantly when the velocity dispersion is larger than the escape velocity and/or r-tilde{sub p}{approx}>0.7. Rough surfaces of particles can enhance the capture probability. We compare the results of three-body calculations with N-body simulations for accretion of small particles by an embedded moonlet and find agreement at the initial stage of accretion. However, when particles forming an aggregate on the moonlet surface nearly fill the Hill sphere, the aggregate reaches a quasi-steady state with a nearly constant number of particles covering the moonlet, and the accretion rate is significantly reduced compared to the three-body results.

  4. Evaluation of Drying Rates of Lignite Particles in Superheated Steam Using Single-Particle Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiriyama, Tsuyoshi; Sasaki, Hideaki; Hashimoto, Akira; Kaneko, Shozo; Maeda, Masafumi

    2016-12-01

    Drying rates of lignite particle groups in superheated steam are evaluated using a single-particle model developed for Australian lignite. Size distributions of the particles are assumed to obey the Rosin-Rammler equation with the maximum particle diameters defined as 100, 50, and 6 mm. The results show the drying rate of a lignite group depends strongly on the maximum particle size, and removal of large particles prior to drying is shown to be effective to reduce the drying time. The calculation model is available for simulations of drying behaviors of lignite in various dryers when an appropriate heat transfer coefficient is given. This study simulates the drying of particles smaller than 6 mm using a heat transfer coefficient in a fluidized bed dryer reported elsewhere. The required drying time estimated from the calculation is comparable to the processing time reported in an actual fluidized bed dryer, supporting the validity of the calculation model.

  5. Escape rate of active particles in the effective equilibrium approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Wittmann, R.; Brader, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    The escape rate of a Brownian particle over a potential barrier is accurately described by the Kramers theory. A quantitative theory explicitly taking the activity of Brownian particles into account has been lacking due to the inherently out-of-equilibrium nature of these particles. Using an effective equilibrium approach [Farage et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 042310 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.91.042310] we study the escape rate of active particles over a potential barrier and compare our analytical results with data from direct numerical simulation of the colored noise Langevin equation. The effective equilibrium approach generates an effective potential that, when used as input to Kramers rate theory, provides results in excellent agreement with the simulation data.

  6. Morphological Evolution of Block Copolymer Particles: Effect of Solvent Evaporation Rate on Particle Shape and Morphology.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae Man; Kim, YongJoo; Yun, Hongseok; Yi, Gi-Ra; Kim, Bumjoon J

    2017-02-28

    Shape and morphology of polymeric particles are of great importance in controlling their optical properties or self-assembly into unusual superstructures. Confinement of block copolymers (BCPs) in evaporative emulsions affords particles with diverse structures, including prolate ellipsoids, onion-like spheres, oblate ellipsoids, and others. Herein, we report that the evaporation rate of solvent from emulsions encapsulating symmetric polystyrene-b-polybutadiene (PS-b-PB) determines the shape and internal nanostructure of micron-sized BCP particles. A distinct morphological transition from the ellipsoids with striped lamellae to the onion-like spheres was observed with decreasing evaporation rate. Experiments and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations showed that the evaporation rate affected the organization of BCPs at the particle surface, which determined the final shape and internal nanostructure of the particles. Differences in the solvent diffusion rates in PS and PB at rapid evaporation rates induced alignment of both domains perpendicular to the particle surface, resulting in ellipsoids with axial lamellar stripes. Slower evaporation rates provided sufficient time for BCP organization into onion-like structures with PB as the outermost layer, owing to the preferential interaction of PB with the surroundings. BCP molecular weight was found to influence the critical evaporation rate corresponding to the morphological transition from ellipsoid to onion-like particles, as well as the ellipsoid aspect ratio. DPD simulations produced morphologies similar to those obtained from experiments and thus elucidated the mechanism and driving forces responsible for the evaporation-induced assembly of BCPs into particles with well-defined shapes and morphologies.

  7. Solid Hydrogen Particles and Flow Rates Analyzed for Atomic Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    2003-01-01

    The experiments were conducted at Glenn's Small Multipurpose Research Facility (SMIRF, ref. 5). The experimental setup was placed in the facility's vacuum tank to prevent heat leaks and subsequent boiloff of the liquid helium. Supporting systems maintained the temperature and pressure of the liquid helium bath where the solid particles were created. Solid hydrogen particle formation was tested from February 23 to April 2, 2001. Millimeter-sized solid-hydrogen particles were formed in a Dewar of liquid helium as a prelude to creating atomic fuels and propellants for aerospace vehicles. Atomic fuels or propellants are created when atomic boron, carbon, or hydrogen is stored in solid hydrogen particles. The current testing characterized the solid hydrogen particles without the atomic species, as a first step to creating a feed system for the atomic fuels and propellants. This testing did not create atomic species, but only sought to understand the solid hydrogen particle formation and behavior in the liquid helium. In these tests, video images of the solid particle formation were recorded, and the total mass flow rate of the hydrogen was measured. The mass of hydrogen that went into the gaseous phase was also recorded using a commercially available residual gas analyzer. The temperatures, pressures, and flow rates of the liquids and gases in the test apparatus were recorded as well. Testing conducted in 1999 recorded particles as small as 2 to 5 mm in diameter. The current testing extended the testing conditions to a very cold Dewar ullage gas of about 20 to 90 K above the 4 K liquid helium. With the very cold Dewar gas, the hydrogen freezing process took on new dimensions, in some cases creating particles so small that they seemed to be microscopic, appearing as infinitesimally small scintillations on the videotaped images.

  8. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  9. Single Event Rates for Devices Sensitive to Particle Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, L. D.; Scheick, L. Z.; Banker, M. W.

    2012-01-01

    Single event rates (SER) can include contributions from low-energy particles such that the linear energy transfer (LET) is not constant. Previous work found that the environmental description that is most relevant to the low-energy contribution to the rate is a "stopping rate per unit volume" even when the physical mechanisms for a single-event effect do not require an ion to stop in some device region. Stopping rate tables are presented for four heavy-ion environments that are commonly used to assess device suitability for space applications. A conservative rate estimate utilizing limited test data is derived, and the example of SEGR rate in a power MOSFET is presented.

  10. Enhancement of the Coulomb collision rate by individual particle wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baalrud, Scott; Scheiner, Brett

    2013-09-01

    Charged particles moving in a plasma leave a trailing wake in their electric potential profile associated with the response function of the medium. For superthermal particles, these wakes can cause significant departures from the oft-assumed screened Coulomb potential profile. The wakes extend the interaction length scale beyond the Debye screening length for collisions between fast test particles and field particles in their wake. This can increase the Coulomb collision rate for velocities beyond the thermal speed. To demonstrate this effect, we consider the relaxation rate due to electron-electron collisions of an electron distribution function with initially depleted tails, as is common near boundary sheaths or double layers. This problem is related to Langmuir's paradox. We compare the standard Landau (Fokker-Planck) collision operator, which does not account for wakes, with the Lenard-Balescu collision operator, which includes wake effects through the linear dielectric response function. For this distribution, the linear dielectric is described by the incomplete plasma dispersion function. We compare the collision operators directly as well as the relaxation rate determined from a hybrid kinetic-fluid model. S. D. Baalrud, Phys. Plasmas 20, 012118 (2013).

  11. Determination of particle sedimentation rate by ultrasonic interferometry: role of particle size, density and volume fraction.

    PubMed

    Razavian, S M; Wenby, R B; Fisher, T C; Meiselman, J H

    1997-01-01

    The sedimentation rate (SR) of non-aggregated spherical particles in suspension was determined using an ultrasonic interferometry technique (Echo-Cell); this method is based on A-mode echography and measures the rate of formation of a sediment on a solid plate during settling. The particle accumulation rate, which is related to SR, is obtained from the interference of two waves reflected by two interfaces: one between the plate and the sediment and the other between the sediment and the suspension. Studies were carried out at 25 degrees C using latex spheres of different diameters (7 to 20 micron) and densities (1.062 to 1.190 g/cm3) suspended in distilled water at various volume fractions (1% to 5%). As anticipated by the Stokes model, linear relations were found between SR and both particle density and the square of particle radius. Experimental SR values decreased with increasing suspension particle concentration; these concentration effects were in good agreement with those predicted by the Steinour model. Our results thus serve to validate the theoretical aspects of the Echo-Cell method and suggest its usefulness as a tool for studies of RBC interaction and RBC aggregation.

  12. Energy deposition rates by charged particles. [in upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torkar, K. M.; Urban, A.; Bjordal, J.; Lundblad, J. A.; Soraas, F.; Smith, L. G.; Dumbs, A.; Grandal, B.; Ulwick, J. C.; Vancour, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of measurements of the precipitation of electrons and positive ions (in the keV-MeV range) detected aboard eight rockets launched within the Energy Budget Campaign from Northern Scandinavia is given, together with corresponding satellite data. In some cases strong temporal variations of the downgoing integral fluxes were observed. The fluxes provide the background for the calculated ion production rates and altitude profiles of the energy deposition into the atmosphere at different levels of geomagnetic disturbance and cosmic noise absorption. The derived ion production rates by eneretic particles are compared to other night-time ionisation sources.

  13. Modelling the effect of boundary scavenging on Thorium and Protactinium profiles in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy-Barman, M.

    2009-07-01

    The "boundary scavenging" box model is a cornerstone of our understanding of the particle-reactive radionuclide fluxes between the open ocean and the ocean margins. However, it does not describe the radionuclide profiles in the water column. Here, I present the transport-reaction equations for radionuclides transported vertically by reversible scavenging on settling particles and laterally by horizontal currents between the margin and the open ocean. Analytical solutions of these equations are compared with existing data. In the Pacific Ocean, the model produces "almost" linear 230Th profiles (as observed in the data) despite lateral transport. However, omitting lateral transport biased the 230Th based particle flux estimates by as much as 50%. 231Pa profiles are well reproduced in the whole water column of the Pacific Margin and from the surface down to 3000 m in the Pacific subtropical gyre. Enhanced bottom scavenging or inflow of 231Pa-poor equatorial water may account for the model-data discrepancy below 3000 m. The lithogenic 232Th is modelled using the same transport parameters as 230Th but a different source function. The main source of 232Th scavenged in the open Pacific is advection from the ocean margin, whereas a net flux of 230Th produced in the open Pacific is advected and scavenged at the margin, illustrating boundary exchange. In the Arctic Ocean, the model reproduces 230Th measured profiles that the uni-dimensional scavenging model or the scavenging-ventilation model failed to explain. Moreover, if lateral transport is ignored, the 230Th based particle settling speed may by underestimated by a factor 4 at the Arctic Ocean margin. The very low scavenging rate in the open Arctic Ocean combined with the enhanced scavenging at the margin accounts for the lack of high 231Pa/230Th ratio in arctic sediments.

  14. Modelling the effect of boundary scavenging on Thorium and Protactinium profiles in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy-Barman, M.

    2009-12-01

    The "boundary scavenging" box model is a cornerstone of our understanding of the particle-reactive radionuclide fluxes between the open ocean and the ocean margins. However, it does not describe the radionuclide profiles in the water column. Here, I present the transport-reaction equations for radionuclides transported vertically by reversible scavenging on settling particles and laterally by horizontal currents between the margin and the open ocean. Analytical solutions of these equations are compared with existing data. In the Pacific Ocean, the model produces "almost" linear 230Th profiles (as observed in the data) despite lateral transport. However, omitting lateral transport biaises the 230Th based particle flux estimates by as much as 50%. 231Pa profiles are well reproduced in the whole water column of the Pacific Margin and from the surface down to 3000 m in the Pacific subtropical gyre. Enhanced bottom scavenging or inflow of 231Pa-poor equatorial water may account for the model-data discrepancy below 3000 m. The lithogenic 232Th is modelled using the same transport parameters as 230Th but a different source function. The main source of the 232Th scavenged in the open Pacific is advection from the ocean margin, whereas a net flux of 230Th produced in the open Pacific is advected and scavenged at the margin, illustrating boundary exchange. In the Arctic Ocean, the model reproduces 230Th measured profiles that the uni-dimensional scavenging model or the scavenging-ventilation model failed to explain. Moreover, if lateral transport is ignored, the 230Th based particle settling speed may by underestimated by a factor 4 at the Arctic Ocean margin. The very low scavenging rate in the open Arctic Ocean combined with the enhanced scavenging at the margin accounts for the lack of high 231Pa/230Th ratio in arctic sediments.

  15. SCAVENGER AND PROCESS OF SCAVENGING

    DOEpatents

    Olson, C.M.

    1960-04-26

    Carrier precipitation processes are given for the separation and recovery of plutonium from aqueous acidic solutions containing plutonium and fission products. Bismuth phosphate is precipitated in the acidic solution while plutonlum is maintained in the hexavalent oxidation state. Preformed, uncalcined, granular titanium dioxide is then added to the solution and the fission product-carrying bismuth phosphate and titanium dioxide are separated from the resulting mixture. Fluosilicic acid, which dissolves any remaining titanium dioxide particles, is then added to the purified plutonium-containing solution.

  16. Adsorption and photocatalysis of nanocrystalline TiO2 particles for Reactive Red 195 removal: effect of humic acids, anions and scavengers.

    PubMed

    Chládková, B; Evgenidou, E; Kvítek, L; Panáček, A; Zbořil, R; Kovář, P; Lambropoulou, D

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, the coupling of adsorption capacity and photocatalytic efficiency of two different industrially produced titania catalysts was investigated and compared. The azo dye Reactive Red 195 was selected as a model compound. The tested catalysts, PK-10 and PK-180, exhibited different adsorption capacities due to their significant difference in their specific surface, but both have proven to be effective photocatalysts for photodegradation of the studied dye. PK-10 exhibited strong adsorption of the studied dye due to its high specific surface area, while the second studied catalyst, PK-180, demonstrated negligible adsorption of Reactive Red 195. The effect of the pH, the concentration of the catalyst and the initial concentration of the dye appear to affect the photocatalytic rate. The effect of the presence of humic acids and inorganic ions was also examined, while the contribution of various reactive species was indirectly evaluated through the addition of various scavengers. To evaluate the extent of mineralisation of the studied dye, total organic carbon (TOC) measurements during the experiment were also conducted. Besides total colour removal, evident reduction of TOC was also achieved using both catalysts.

  17. Phototransformation rate constants of PAHs associated with soot particles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daekyun; Young, Thomas M; Anastasio, Cort

    2013-01-15

    Photodegradation is a key process governing the residence time and fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in particles, both in the atmosphere and after deposition. We have measured photodegradation rate constants of PAHs in bulk deposits of soot particles illuminated with simulated sunlight. The photodegradation rate constants at the surface (k(p)(0)), the effective diffusion coefficients (D(eff)), and the light penetration depths (z(0.5)) for PAHs on soot layers of variable thickness were determined by fitting experimental data with a model of coupled photolysis and diffusion. The overall disappearance rates of irradiated low molecular weight PAHs (with 2-3 rings) on soot particles were influenced by fast photodegradation and fast diffusion kinetics, while those of high molecular weight PAHs (with 4 or more rings) were apparently controlled by either the combination of slow photodegradation and slow diffusion kinetics or by very slow diffusion kinetics alone. The value of z(0.5) is more sensitive to the soot layer thickness than the k(p)(0) value. As the thickness of the soot layer increases, the z(0.5) values increase, but the k(p)(0) values are almost constant. The effective diffusion coefficients calculated from dark experiments are generally higher than those from the model fitting method for illumination experiments. Due to the correlation between k(p)(0) and z(0.5) in thinner layers, D(eff) should be estimated by an independent method for better accuracy. Despite some limitations of the model used in this study, the fitted parameters were useful for describing empirical results of photodegradation of soot-associated PAHs.

  18. New cooling-rate indicator for metal particles in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. W.; Williams, D. B.; Goldstein, J. I.

    1994-07-01

    It has been proposed that the size variation of the constituents of the cloudy zone in metal particles can be used to estimate the low-temperature cooling rate of the host meteorite. The cloudy zone ion the retained taenite of meteoritic metal is mainly composed of two phases, the high-Ni island phase and the low-Ni honeycomb phase. The width of the island phase is governed by the cooling rate and Ni concentration. Since the Ni concentration is almost constant at the outermost region of the cloudy zone, only the cooling rate controls the size of the island phase. The purpose of this study is to further develop the relationship between the size of the island phase of the cloudy zone and the cooling rate of meteorites. The cloudy zone microstructure was studied using a JEOL 6300F high-resolution scanning electron microscope (HRSEM). The island phase size variation was measured using a Micro-Plan II image analysis system. In this study, 21 meteorites including 6 mesosiderites, 4 pallasites, 8 iron meteorites, and 3 chondrites were investigated. The size variation of the island phase at the outermost region of the cloudy zone vs. the cooling rate of meteorites is presented. The size of the biggest island phase clearly decreases with increasing cooling rate without regard to whether the host is an iron, stony-iron, or stony meteorite. Those meteorites that have cooled extremely fast (the IVA irons) have a very fine microstructure, which cannot be easily resolved even by employing a HRSEM. The metallographic cooling rates of the meteorites that we studied were taken from previous measurements Saikumar and Goldstein have evaluated the methods to determine the cooling rates of iron meteorites considering impingement effects.

  19. The Scientist Scavenger Hunt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morphew, Valerie N.; Key, Kathleen

    1994-01-01

    Using a well-planned scavenger hunt, students' awareness of the significance of minorities and women in science is enhanced. Provides a sample scavenger hunt and resource list as well as activities for extension. (ZWH)

  20. The fate of cetacean carcasses in the deep sea: observations on consumption rates and succession of scavenging species in the abyssal north-east Atlantic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Jones, E. G.; Collins, M. A.; Bagley, P. M.; Addison, S.; Priede, I. G.

    1998-01-01

    The fate of cetacean carcasses in the deep sea was investigated using autonomous deep-sea lander vehicles incorporating time-lapse camera systems, fish and amphipod traps. Three lander deployments placed cetacean carcasses at depths of 4000 to 4800 m in the north-east Atlantic for periods of 36 h, 152 h and 276 h before being recovered. The photographic sequences revealed that carcasses were rapidly consumed by fish and invertebrate scavengers with removal rates ranging from 0.05 to 0.4 kg h-1. In the longest experiment the carcass was skeletonized within five days. In each deployment, approximately an hour after emplacement, the grenadier Coryphaenoides (Nematonurus) armatus and large numbers of lysianassid amphipods had arrived at the food-fall. The initially high numbers of grenadiers declined once the majority of the bait had been consumed and a variety of other fish and invertebrates were then observed, some taking up residence at the site. None of the fish species appeared to consume the carcass directly, but preyed upon amphipods instead. Funnel traps recovered with the carcass indicated a succession in the species composition of amphipods, with the specialist necrophages such as Paralicella spp. being replaced by more generalist feeders of the Orchomene species complex.

  1. Scavenging for the Past.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Sue; Strubbe, Mary

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the goals and planning of a scavenger hunt which was designed to increase enthusiasm in students and promote active learning. States that a scavenger hunt instills a sense of community pride in students and that the community cooperation fosters a positive relationship with the school. Provides a sample scavenger hunt checklist. (GEA)

  2. Calculating the Annihilation Rate of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Matthew; Rothstein, Ira Z.; Vaidya, Varun

    2015-05-01

    We develop a formalism that allows one to systematically calculate the weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) annihilation rate into gamma rays whose energy far exceeds the weak scale. A factorization theorem is presented which separates the radiative corrections stemming from initial-state potential interactions from loops involving the final state. This separation allows us to go beyond the fixed order calculation, which is polluted by large infrared logarithms. For the case of Majorana WIMPs transforming in the adjoint representation of SU(2), we present the result for the resummed rate at leading double-log accuracy in terms of two initial-state partial-wave matrix elements and one hard matching coefficient. For a given model, one may calculate the cross section by finding the tree level matching coefficient and determining the value of a local four-fermion operator. The effects of resummation can be as large as 100% for a 20 TeV WIMP. However, for lighter WIMP masses relevant for the thermal relic scenario, leading-log resummation modifies the Sudakov factors only at the 10% level. Furthermore, given comparably sized Sommerfeld factors, the total effect of radiative corrections on the semi-inclusive photon annihilation rate is found to be percent level. The generalization of the formalism to other types of WIMPs is discussed.

  3. Skeletal manifestations of bear scavenging.

    PubMed

    Carson, E A; Stefan, V H; Powell, J F

    2000-05-01

    In many partially or fully skeletonized forensic cases, postmortem animal damage is simply attributed to rodents or carnivores; little effort is made to determine the general size or assign a genus to the scavenger. As one of the largest wild carnivores to inhabit mountainous and forested areas throughout the continental United States, Alaska, and Canada, black bears (Ursus americanus) must be considered possible suspects when skeletonized remains are located showing marks of carnivore damage. Since 1995, three cases of known bear scavenging have been referred to the Maxwell Museum's Laboratory of Human Osteology by the New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator for skeletal analysis. These cases comprise a total of seven individuals, and all of the remains were deposited in high altitude forests of New Mexico along the western border with Arizona with a minimum of 4 months exposure before recovery. When analyzed, all cases shared a similar pattern of element survivorship and damage. We suggest that bears can be distinguished from members of the canid family, the other common scavenger of human remains, based on the representation of skeletal elements at the scene. Rates and patterns of damage are not as accurate as element recovery in the discrimination of scavenger genus. Use of this information should allow forensic anthropologists to better understand the postmortem taphonomic processes that shaped the skeletal remains, and hopefully prevent misdiagnoses of perimortem trauma on elements not typically scavenged by canids.

  4. Experimental particle formation rates spanning tropospheric sulfuric acid and ammonia abundances, ion production rates, and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürten, Andreas; Bianchi, Federico; Almeida, Joao; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Dunne, Eimear M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Williamson, Christina; Barmet, Peter; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Gordon, Hamish; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Ickes, Luisa; Jokinen, Tuija; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Onnela, Antti; Ortega, Ismael K.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Smith, James N.; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Wagner, Paul E.; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Ken; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-10-01

    Binary nucleation of sulfuric acid and water as well as ternary nucleation involving ammonia are thought to be the dominant processes responsible for new particle formation (NPF) in the cold temperatures of the middle and upper troposphere. Ions are also thought to be important for particle nucleation in these regions. However, global models presently lack experimentally measured NPF rates under controlled laboratory conditions and so at present must rely on theoretical or empirical parameterizations. Here with data obtained in the European Organization for Nuclear Research CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber, we present the first experimental survey of NPF rates spanning free tropospheric conditions. The conditions during nucleation cover a temperature range from 208 to 298 K, sulfuric acid concentrations between 5 × 105 and 1 × 109 cm-3, and ammonia mixing ratios from zero added ammonia, i.e., nominally pure binary, to a maximum of 1400 parts per trillion by volume (pptv). We performed nucleation studies under pure neutral conditions with zero ions being present in the chamber and at ionization rates of up to 75 ion pairs cm-3 s-1 to study neutral and ion-induced nucleation. We found that the contribution from ion-induced nucleation is small at temperatures between 208 and 248 K when ammonia is present at several pptv or higher. However, the presence of charges significantly enhances the nucleation rates, especially at 248 K with zero added ammonia, and for higher temperatures independent of NH3 levels. We compare these experimental data with calculated cluster formation rates from the Atmospheric Cluster Dynamics Code with cluster evaporation rates obtained from quantum chemistry.

  5. Atmospheric scavenging exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenton, D. L.; Purcell, R. Y.

    1977-01-01

    Solid propellant rocket exhaust was directly utilized to ascertain raindrop scavenging rates for hydrogen chloride. The airborne HCl concentration varied from 0.2 to 10.0 ppm and the raindrop sizes tested included 0.55 mm, 1.1 mm, and 3.0 mm. Two chambers were used to conduct the experiments. A large, rigid walled, spherical chamber stored the exhaust constituents while the smaller chamber housing all the experiments was charged as required with rocket exhaust HCl. Surface uptake experiments demonstrated an HCl concentration dependence for distilled water. Sea water and brackish water HCl uptake was below the detection limit of the chlorine-ion analysis technique employed. Plant life HCl uptake experiments were limited to corn and soybeans. Plant age effectively correlated the HCl uptake data. Metallic corrosion was not significant for single 20 minute exposures to the exhaust HCl under varying relative humidity.

  6. Standardizing scavenger receptor nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Prabhudas, Mercy; Bowdish, Dawn; Drickamer, Kurt; Febbraio, Maria; Herz, Joachim; Kobzik, Lester; Krieger, Monty; Loike, John; Means, Terry K; Moestrup, Soren K; Post, Steven; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Silverstein, Samuel; Wang, Xiang-Yang; El Khoury, Joseph

    2014-03-01

    Scavenger receptors constitute a large family of proteins that are structurally diverse and participate in a wide range of biological functions. These receptors are expressed predominantly by myeloid cells and recognize a variety of ligands, including endogenous and modified host-derived molecules and microbial pathogens. There are currently eight classes of scavenger receptors, many of which have multiple names, leading to inconsistencies and confusion in the literature. To address this problem, a workshop was organized by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health to help develop a clear definition of scavenger receptors and a standardized nomenclature based on that definition. Fifteen experts in the scavenger receptor field attended the workshop and, after extensive discussion, reached a consensus regarding the definition of scavenger receptors and a proposed scavenger receptor nomenclature. Scavenger receptors were defined as cell surface receptors that typically bind multiple ligands and promote the removal of non-self or altered-self targets. They often function by mechanisms that include endocytosis, phagocytosis, adhesion, and signaling that ultimately lead to the elimination of degraded or harmful substances. Based on this definition, nomenclature and classification of these receptors into 10 classes were proposed. The discussion and nomenclature recommendations described in this report only refer to mammalian scavenger receptors. The purpose of this article is to describe the proposed mammalian nomenclature and classification developed at the workshop and to solicit additional feedback from the broader research community.

  7. Botanical Scavenger Hunt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker-Livingston, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Why not combine the use of technology with the excitement of a scavenger hunt that moves middle-level students out into the "wilds" of their school campus to classify plants? In the lesson plan described here, students embark on a botanical scavenger hunt and then document their findings using a digital camera. This project was designed to allow…

  8. Atmospheric scavenging of solid rocket exhaust effluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenton, D. L.; Purcell, R. Y.

    1978-01-01

    Solid propellant rocket exhaust was directly utilized to ascertain raindrop scavenging rates for hydrogen chloride. Two chambers were used to conduct the experiments; a large, rigid walled, spherical chamber stored the exhaust constituents, while the smaller chamber housing all the experiments was charged as required with rocket exhaust HCl. Surface uptake experiments demonstrated an HCl concentration dependence for distilled water. Sea water and brackish water HCl uptake was below the detection limit of the chlorine-ion analysis technique used. Plant life HCl uptake experiments were limited to corn and soybeans. Plant age effectively correlated the HCl uptake data. Metallic corrosion was not significant for single 20 minute exposures to the exhaust HCl under varying relative humidity. Characterization of the aluminum oxide particles substantiated the similarity between the constituents of the small scale rocket and the full size vehicles.

  9. Bi-modal hetero-aggregation rate response to particle dosage.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Aaron; Franks, George; Biggs, Simon; Jameson, Graeme J

    2005-11-22

    The rate of flocculation of cationic polystyrene latex (PSL) particles by smaller, anionic PSL particles has been measured using a low-angle static light scattering technique. The rate of aggregate growth has been investigated as a function of particle size ratio and relative concentration of each particle species (for a constant dose of cationic particles). Contrary to many previous reports, two peaks in the flocculation rate were observed as a function of dose. It is speculated that the peak observed at the lower particle concentration coincides with the dose yielding maximum constant collision efficiency in the steady-state regime, a condition which is attained only after complete adsorption of the smaller particles onto the larger particle species. The peak at the higher particle concentration is believed to be related to the maximum collision rate constant upon reaching the steady-state regime, the value of which corresponds to maximum degree of aggregation and therefore the maximum mean collision efficiency prior to reaching this condition. From classical collision kinetics, the rate of aggregate growth may be represented as being proportional to the product of the collision rate constant and collision efficiency at any given time. Given then that the maximum value of these two variables coincides with different particle concentrations, the product of the response of each to particle dosage can in some cases yield a net bi-modal aggregation rate response to particle dosage.

  10. REACTOR FUEL SCAVENGING MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1962-04-10

    A process for removing fission products from reactor liquid fuel without interfering with the reactor's normal operation or causing a significant change in its fuel composition is described. The process consists of mixing a liquid scavenger alloy composed of about 44 at.% plutoniunm, 33 at.% lanthanum, and 23 at.% nickel or cobalt with a plutonium alloy reactor fuel containing about 3 at.% lanthanum; removing a portion of the fuel and scavenger alloy from the reactor core and replacing it with an equal amount of the fresh scavenger alloy; transferring the portion to a quiescent zone where the scavenger and the plutonium fuel form two distinct liquid layers with the fission products being dissolved in the lanthanum-rich scavenger layer; and the clean plutonium-rich fuel layer being returned to the reactor core. (AEC)

  11. Agglomeration rate and action forces between atomized particles of agglomerator and inhaled-particles from coal combustion.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feng; Zhang, Jun-ying; Zheng, Chu-guang

    2005-01-01

    In order to remove efficiently haled-particles emissions from coal combustions, a new way was used to put forward the process of agglomeration and the atomization was produced by the nozzle and then sprayed into the flue before precipitation devices of power station boiler in order to make inhaled-particles agglomerate into bigger particles, which can be easily removed but not change existing running conditions of boiler. According to this idea, a model is set up to study agglomeration rate and effect forces between fly ash inhaled-particles and atomized agglomerator particles. The developed agglomeration rate was expressed by relative particle number decreasing speed per unit volume. The result showed that viscosity force and flow resistance force give main influences on agglomeration effect of inhaled-particles, while springiness force and gravity have little effect on agglomeration effect of theirs. Factors influencing the agglomeration rate and effect forces are studied, including agglomerator concentration, agglomerator flux and agglomerator density, atomized-particles diameters and inhaled-particles diameter and so on.

  12. Mouse Liver Sinusoidal Endothelium Eliminates HIV-Like Particles from Blood at a Rate of 100 Million per Minute by a Second-Order Kinetic Process

    PubMed Central

    Mates, Jessica M.; Yao, Zhili; Cheplowitz, Alana M.; Suer, Ozan; Phillips, Gary S.; Kwiek, Jesse J.; Rajaram, Murugesan V. S.; Kim, Jonghan; Robinson, John M.; Ganesan, Latha P.; Anderson, Clark L.

    2017-01-01

    We crafted human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-like particles of diameter about 140 nm, which expressed two major HIV-1 proteins, namely, env and gag gene products, and used this reagent to simulate the rate of decay of HIV from the blood stream of BALB/c male mice. We found that most (~90%) of the particles were eliminated (cleared) from the blood by the liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs), the remainder from Kupffer cells; suggesting that LSECs are the major liver scavengers for HIV clearance from blood. Decay was rapid with kinetics suggesting second order with respect to particles, which infers dimerization of a putative receptor on LSEC. The number of HIV-like particles required for saturating the clearance mechanism was approximated. The capacity for elimination of blood-borne HIV-like particles by the sinusoid was 112 million particles per minute. Assuming that the sinusoid endothelial cells were about the size of glass-adherent macrophages, then elimination capacity was more than 540 particles per hour per endothelial cell. PMID:28167948

  13. P2X7 Receptor-mediated Scavenger Activity of Mononuclear Phagocytes toward Non-opsonized Particles and Apoptotic Cells Is Inhibited by Serum Glycoproteins but Remains Active in Cerebrospinal Fluid*

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ben J.; Duce, James A.; Valova, Valentina A.; Wong, Bruce; Bush, Ashley I.; Petrou, Steven; Wiley, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid phagocytosis of non-opsonized particles including apoptotic cells is an important process that involves direct recognition of the target by multiple scavenger receptors including P2X7 on the phagocyte surface. Using a real-time phagocytosis assay, we studied the effect of serum proteins on this phagocytic process. Inclusion of 1–5% serum completely abolished phagocytosis of non-opsonized YG beads by human monocytes. Inhibition was reversed by pretreatment of serum with 1–10 mm tetraethylenepentamine, a copper/zinc chelator. Inhibitory proteins from the serum were determined as negatively charged glycoproteins (pI < 6) with molecular masses between 100 and 300 kDa. A glycoprotein-rich inhibitory fraction of serum not only abolished YG bead uptake but also inhibited phagocytosis of apoptotic lymphocytes or neuronal cells by human monocyte-derived macrophages. Three copper- and/or zinc-containing serum glycoproteins, ceruloplasmin, serum amyloid P-component, and amyloid precursor protein, were identified, and the purified proteins were shown to inhibit the phagocytosis of beads by monocytes as well as phagocytosis of apoptotic neuronal cells by macrophages. Human adult cerebrospinal fluid, which contains very little glycoprotein, had no inhibitory effect on phagocytosis of either beads or apoptotic cells. These data suggest for the first time that metal-interacting glycoproteins present within serum are able to inhibit the scavenger activity of mononuclear phagocytes toward insoluble debris and apoptotic cells. PMID:22461619

  14. Effects of Surface Slope on Erosion Rates of Quartz Particles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) University Of...California Santa Barbara 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S...including bulk density, particle size, mineralogy, time after deposition, and organic content have been studied. The present investigation emphasizes the

  15. The Effect of Particle Concentration on the Heating Rate of Ferrofluids for Magnetic Hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaescu, I.; Marin, C. N.; Bunoiu, M.; Fannin, P. C.; Stefu, N.; Iordaconiu, L.

    2015-12-01

    The complex magnetic susceptibility χ(f) = χ'(f) - i χ″(f), of a ferrofluid sample with magnetite particles dispersed in kerosene and stabilized with oleic acid, over the range 0.1 GHz to 6 GHz, was determined. The initial sample has been successively diluted with kerosene (with a dilution rate of 2/3), thus obtaining further three samples. Using the complex magnetic susceptibility measurements of each sample, the frequency field and particle concentration dependencies of the heating rate of the ferrofluid samples, were analyzed. The results show the possibility of using the heating rate of ferrofluid samples with different particle concentrations, in hyperthermia applications.

  16. Effects of shear rate, confinement, and particle parameters on margination in blood flow.

    PubMed

    Mehrabadi, Marmar; Ku, David N; Aidun, Cyrus K

    2016-02-01

    The effects of flow and particle properties on margination of particles in red blood cell (RBC) suspensions is investigated using direct numerical simulation (DNS) of cellar blood flow. We focus on margination of particles in the flow of moderately dense suspensions of RBCs. We hypothesize that margination rate in nondilute suspensions is mainly driven by the RBC-enhanced diffusion of marginating particles in the RBC-filled region. We derive a scaling law for margination length in a straight channel. Margination length increases cubically with channel height and is independent of shear rate. We verify this scaling law for margination length by DNS of flowing RBCs and marginating particles. We also show that rigidity and size both lead to particle margination with rigidity having a more significant effect compared to size within the range of parameters in this study.

  17. The dissolution rates of SiO2 nanoparticles as a function of particle size.

    PubMed

    Diedrich, Tamara; Dybowska, Agnieszka; Schott, Jacques; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Oelkers, Eric H

    2012-05-01

    There is a critical need to better define the relationship among particle size, surface area, and dissolution rate for nanoscale materials to determine their role in the environment, their toxicity, and their technological utility. Although some previous studies concluded that nanoparticles dissolve faster than their bulk analogs, contradictory evidence suggests that nanoparticles dissolve more slowly. Furthermore, insufficient characterization of the nanoparticulate samples and the solution chemistry in past studies obscures the relationship between particle size, surface area, and dissolution rate. Here we report amorphous SiO(2) dissolution rates in aqueous solutions determined from complementary mixed-flow and closed reactor experiments at 6.9 ≥ pH ≥ 11.2 and 25 °C as a function of particle diameter from 25 to 177 nm. Experiments were performed at far-from-equilibrium conditions to isolate kinetic effects from those of changing the reaction driving force on overall dissolution rates. Measured far-from-equilibrium mass normalized dissolution rates are nearly independent of particle size, but corresponding BET surface area normalized rates decrease substantially with decreasing particle size. Combining these observations with existing established kinetic rate equations allows the prediction of nanoparticle dissolution rates as a function of both particle size and aqueous fluid saturation state.

  18. A Geospatial Scavenger Hunt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Adriana E.; Williams, Nikki A.; Metoyer, Sandra K.; Morris, Jennifer N.; Berhane, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    With the use of technology such as Global Positioning System (GPS) units and Google Earth for a simple-machine scavenger hunt, you will transform a standard identification activity into an exciting learning experience that motivates students, incorporates practical skills in technology, and enhances students' spatial-thinking skills. In the…

  19. A Geometric Scavenger Hunt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Julie; Marshall, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Children possess a genuine curiosity for exploring the natural world around them. One third grade teacher capitalized on this inherent trait by leading her students on "A Geometric Scavenger Hunt." The four-lesson inquiry investigation described in this article integrates mathematics and science. Among the students' discoveries was the fact that…

  20. Spatial patterning of vulture scavenged human remains.

    PubMed

    Spradley, M Katherine; Hamilton, Michelle D; Giordano, Alberto

    2012-06-10

    This article presents the results of a pilot study on the effects of vulture modification to human remains. A donated body from the Willed Body Donation Program was placed at the Forensic Anthropology Research Facility (FARF), an outdoor human decomposition laboratory located at Texas State University-San Marcos. The effects of vulture scavenging on the timing and sequence, and the rate of skeletonization, disarticulation, and dispersal were observed via a motion sensing camera and direct observation. Using GIS (Geographic Information Systems) and GPS (Global Positioning System) technologies and spatial analytical methods, the transport of skeletal elements was mapped in order to analyze dispersal and terrain-influenced patterns of active vulture scavenging. Results showed that the initial scavenging took place 37 days after placement at FARF. This delay in scavenging differs from previous research. After the initial appearance of the vultures, the body was reduced from a fully-fleshed individual to a skeleton within only 5h. This underscores the potential for errors in postmortem interval estimations made at vulture scavenged scenes. Additionally, spatial analysis showed that skeletal elements were dispersed by vultures to lower elevations, and that the disarticulation and dispersal of the skeletal elements occurs early in the scavenging sequence.

  1. Corrosion rate estimations of microscale zerovalent iron particles via direct hydrogen production measurements.

    PubMed

    Velimirovic, Milica; Carniato, Luca; Simons, Queenie; Schoups, Gerrit; Seuntjens, Piet; Bastiaens, Leen

    2014-04-15

    In this study, the aging behavior of microscale zerovalent iron (mZVI) particles was investigated by quantifying the hydrogen gas generated by anaerobic mZVI corrosion in batch degradation experiments. Granular iron and nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) particles were included in this study as controls. Firstly, experiments in liquid medium (without aquifer material) were performed and revealed that mZVI particles have approximately a 10-30 times lower corrosion rate than nZVI particles. A good correlation was found between surface area normalized corrosion rate (RSA) and reaction rate constants (kSA) of PCE, TCE, cDCE and 1,1,1-TCA. Generally, particles with higher degradation rates also have faster corrosion rates, but exceptions do exists. In a second phase, the hydrogen evolution was also monitored during batch tests in the presence of aquifer material and real groundwater. A 4-9 times higher corrosion rate of mZVI particles was observed under the natural environment in comparison with the aquifer free artificial condition, which can be attributed to the low pH of the aquifer and its buffer capacity. A corrosion model was calibrated on the batch experiments to take into account the inhibitory effects of the corrosion products (dissolved iron, hydrogen and OH(-)) on the iron corrosion rate.

  2. Studying biofuel aerosol evaporation rates with single particle manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsetti, S.; Miles, R. E. H.; Reid, J. P.; Kiefer, J.; McGloin, D.

    2014-09-01

    The significant increase in the air pollution, and the impact on climate change due to the burning of fossil fuel has led to the research of alternative energies. Bio-ethanol obtained from a variety of feedstocks can provide a feasible solution. Mixing bio-ethanol with gasoline leads to a reduction in CO emission and in NOx emissions compared with the use of gasoline alone. However, adding ethanol leads to a change in the fuel evaporation. Here we present a preliminary investigation of evaporation times of single ethanol-gasoline droplets. In particular, we investigated the different evaporation rate of the droplets depending on the variation in the percentage of ethanol inside them. Two different techniques have been used to trap the droplets. One makes use of a 532nm optical tweezers set up, the other of an electrodynamics balance (EDB). The droplets decreasing size was measured using video analysis and elastic light scattering respectively. In the first case measurements were conducted at 293.15 K and ambient humidity. In the second case at 280.5 K and a controlled environment has been preserved by flowing nitrogen into the chamber. Binary phase droplets with a higher percentage of ethanol resulted in longer droplet lifetimes. Our work also highlights the advantages and disadvantages of each technique for such studies. In particular it is challenging to trap droplets with low ethanol content (such as pure gasoline) by the use of EDB. Conversely such droplets are trivial to trap using optical tweezers.

  3. Collision limited reaction rates for arbitrarily shaped particles across the entire diffusive Knudsen number range.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Ranganathan; Thajudeen, Thaseem; Hogan, Christopher J

    2011-08-07

    Aerosol particle reactions with vapor molecules and molecular clusters are often collision rate limited, hence determination of particle-vapor molecule and particle-molecular cluster collision rates are of fundamental importance. These collisions typically occur in the mass transfer transition regime, wherein the collision kernel (collision rate coefficient) is dependent upon the diffusive Knudsen number, Kn(D). While this alone prohibits analytical determination of the collision kernel, aerosol particle- vapor molecule collisions are further complicated when particles are non-spherical, as is often the case for particles formed in high temperature processes (combustion). Recently, through a combination of mean first passage time simulations and dimensional analysis, it was shown that the collision kernel for spherical particles and vapor molecules could be expressed as a dimensionless number, H, which is solely a function of Kn(D). In this work, it is shown through similar mean first passage times and redefinitions of H and Kn(D) that the H(Kn(D)) relationship found for spherical particles applies for particles of arbitrary shape, including commonly encountered agglomerate particles. Specifically, it is shown that to appropriately define H and Kn(D), two geometric descriptors for a particle are necessary: its Smoluchowski radius, which defines the collision kernel in the continuum regime (Kn(D)→0) and its orientationally averaged projected area, which defines the collision kernel in the free molecular regime (Kn(D)→∞). With these two parameters, as well as the properties of the colliding vapor molecule (mass and diffusion coefficient), the particle-vapor molecule collision kernel in the continuum, transition, and free molecular regimes can be simply calculated using the H(Kn(D)) relationship.

  4. Mathematical model of reaction rate oscillations on a chain of nm-sized catalyst particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peskov, N. V.; Slinko, M. M.; Jaeger, N. I.

    2003-05-01

    The model of reaction rate oscillations over the surface of nanoparticles embedded into zeolite matrix is numerically investigated. The reaction rate oscillations on each particle are described by a lumped model. The reactions on separate particles interact via the gas diffusion through the pores, which is modeled in the frame of the Maxwell-Stefan approach. The reaction reveals a complex dynamical behavior if a nonhomogeneous distribution of reagent concentrations exists along the chain of particles with a sufficiently large gradient near the ends of the chain.

  5. Influence of the feeding rate on the packing properties of faceted particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, R. C.; Acevedo, M.; Zuriguel, I.; Pagonabarra, I.; Maza, D.

    2013-06-01

    The effect of the filling mechanism on the packing of faceted particles with different aspect ratios has been examined. We have experimentally measured the particle angular distribution and the packing fraction of ensembles of faceted particles deposited in a bidimensional box. The granular system has been numerically simulated using a two-dimensional model of faceted particles. We found that increasing the feeding rate results in an enhancement of the disorder in the final deposit and, consequently, in a reduction of the number of particles oriented in their most stable configuration. In this regime, the final packing fraction monotonically decreases as the feeding rate increases. The correlations between the final packing morphology and the stress transmission were examined by describing the micromechanical properties of the deposits. For the case of elongated particles, increasing the feeding rate leads to an enhancement of the stress transmission towards the sides of the box. On the contrary, for the case of square particles, increasing the feeding rate promotes vertical transmission of the stress.

  6. Scavenging and fractionation of thorium vs. protactinium in the ocean, as determined from particle-water partitioning experiments with sediment trap material from the Gulf of Mexico and Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Kimberly A.; Xu, Chen; Hung, Chin-Chang; Conte, Maureen H.; Santschi, Peter H.

    2009-08-01

    Particle-water partition coefficients (Kd) for thorium (Th) and protactinium (Pa) were calculated for sediment trap material collected from the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) in the upper 140 m and archived sediment trap material collected in the mesopelagic and bathypelagic Sargasso Sea (500, 1500 and 3200 m sediment trap samples from the Oceanic Flux Program (OFP) site off Bermuda). Results showed that Kd values for Th were generally greater than for Pa when values were smaller, but converging to a 1:1 line at higher values. Furthermore, results showed that, though the contents of polysaccharides and calcium carbonate are significantly correlated for all samples, log Kd of Th (and Pa) values are correlated with the polysaccharide content while no correlation is apparent with CaCO 3, Mn and Fe. Since polysaccharides are not generally regarded as strongly chelating agents for actinides, we hypothesize that other co-occurring organic phases originating from the matrix of carbohydrate-rich extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), could be responsible for binding the actinides. These data provide, for the first time, direct evidence for the role of carbohydrate-rich EPS being responsible for the differential scavenging of these two radioisotopes, i.e., their fractionation.

  7. Inhalation of ultrafine carbon particles alters heart rate and heart rate variability in people with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes may confer an increased risk for the cardiovascular health effects of particulate air pollution, but few human clinical studies of air pollution have included people with diabetes. Ultrafine particles (UFP, ≤100 nm in diameter) have been hypothesized to be an important component of particulate air pollution with regard to cardiovascular health effects. Methods 17 never-smoker subjects 30–60 years of age, with stable type 2 diabetes but otherwise healthy, inhaled either filtered air (0–10 particles/cm3) or elemental carbon UFP (~107 particles/cm3, ~50 ug/m3, count median diameter 32 nm) by mouthpiece, for 2 hours at rest, in a double-blind, randomized, crossover study design. A digital 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) was recorded continuously for 48 hours, beginning 1 hour prior to exposure. Results Analysis of 5-minute segments of the ECG during quiet rest showed reduced high-frequency heart rate variability with UFP relative to air exposure (p = 0.014), paralleled by non-significant reductions in time-domain heart rate variability parameters. In the analysis of longer durations of the ECG, we found that UFP exposure increased the heart rate relative to air exposure. During the 21- to 45-hour interval after exposure, the average heart rate increased approximately 8 beats per minute with UFP, compared to 5 beats per minute with air (p = 0.045). There were no UFP effects on cardiac rhythm or repolarization. Conclusions Inhalation of elemental carbon ultrafine particles alters heart rate and heart rate variability in people with type 2 diabetes. Our findings suggest that effects may occur and persist hours after a single 2-hour exposure. PMID:25028096

  8. Differences in physical chemistry and dissolution rate of solid particle aerosols from solution pressurised inhalers.

    PubMed

    Buttini, Francesca; Miozzi, Michele; Balducci, Anna Giulia; Royall, Paul G; Brambilla, Gaetano; Colombo, Paolo; Bettini, Ruggero; Forbes, Ben

    2014-04-25

    Solution composition alters the dynamics of beclomethasone diproprionate (BDP) particle formation from droplets emitted by pressurised metered dose inhalers (pMDIs). The hypothesis that differences in inhaler solutions result in different solid particle physical chemistry was tested using a suite of complementary calorimetric techniques. The atomisation of BDP-ethanol solutions from commercial HFA-pMDI produced aerodynamically-equivalent solid particle aerosols. However, differences in particle physico-chemistry (morphology and solvate/clathrate formation) were detected by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and supported by hot stage microscopy (HSM). Increasing the ethanol content of the formulation from 8 to 12% (w/w), which retards the evaporation of propellant and slows the increase in droplet surface viscosity, enhanced the likelihood of particles drying with a smooth surface. The dissolution rate of BDP from the 12% (w/w) ethanol formulation-derived particles (63% dissolved over 120 min) was reduced compared to the 8% (w/w) ethanol formulation-derived particles (86% dissolved over 120 min). The addition of 0.01% (w/w) formoterol fumarate or 1.3% (w/w) glycerol to the inhaler solution modified the particles and reduced the BDP dissolution rate further to 34% and 16% dissolved in 120 min, respectively. These data provide evidence that therapeutic aerosols from apparently similar inhaler products, including those with similar aerodynamic performance, may behave non-equivalently after deposition in the lungs.

  9. Achieving Size Independent Hit-Rate in Single Particle Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Yang, Juan; Imre, Dan G.; Choi, Eric Y.

    2009-04-01

    Recent improvements in single particle mass spectrometers make it possible to optically detect, size, and characterize the compositions of individual particles with diameters larger than a micron and smaller than 100 nm. Based on particle detection in two stages of optical detection these instruments generate a precisely timed trigger pulse, which is used to fire the ion generation laser or lasers. Practical experience shows that the wide size range results in small, but significant differences in laser trigger timing between small and large particles. If not treated, the instrument hit-rate becomes size dependent and instrument operator is forced to optimize the instrument for the desired size range, while having to contend with a lower hit-rate for the other. The present paper presents an analysis of the problem, demonstrating that size dependence of laser trigger timing stems from the differences in the particle position within the detection laser beam at the instant of detection. It shows that it is possible to compensate for these differences by generation a laser trigger delay coefficient for individual particles as a function of particle time of flight, i.e. its size. The study also shows that a single function can be used to characterize particles with a wide range of densities.

  10. Sterile endophthalmitis rates and particle size analyses of different formulations of triamcinolone acetonide

    PubMed Central

    Dodwell, David G; Krimmel, Darrel A; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the rate of sterile endophthalmitis (SE) following intravitreal injection of three different formulations of triamcinolone acetonide (TA) in a single physician practice and also to assess the mean diameter and concentration of particles of the two TA formulations currently available commercially in the USA. It was hypothesized that TA formulations with smaller particles and/or greater concentrations would have a higher incidence of SE. Methods Single-site, interventional case series in which the medical records of 392 consecutive eyes receiving intravitreal TA as Triesence®, Kenalog®-40, or preservative-free TA between September 2008 and October 2013 were retrospectively reviewed for the incidence of SE. Particle sizing of TA formulations was conducted by an independent commercial laboratory. Results Five cases of SE were identified. The four cases of SE following Triesence® (4.6%) represented a rate significantly higher than the one case of SE following preservative-free TA (0.6%; P=0.049) and the 0% incidence rate of SE following Kenalog®-40 (P=0.0210). Triesence® had significantly smaller particles than Kenalog®-40 (P<0.0001). Conclusion The rate of SE was the highest with the formulation of TA that had the smallest particle size and highest particle load (number of particles injected). The lowest rate of SE was seen with Kenalog®-40, the only TA formulation that contained a benzyl alcohol preservative. The data do not support a principal causative role of benzyl alcohol in the development of TA-induced SE. Instead, the data support the particle theory of TA-induced SE; however, larger-scale, multicenter studies are needed to confirm and expand on these findings. PMID:26089635

  11. Variation of the track etch rates of alpha-particle trajectory in PADC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, M. F.; Hegazy, T. M.; Seddik, U.; Morsy, A. A.

    2005-01-01

    The formation of etched tracks in solid-state nuclear track detectors is usually described by assuming an unequivocal correlation of the etch-rate ratio with the energy loss of charged particles. For alpha particles, this assumption could be verified within the scatter of the experimental data. In this article, the dependence of the depth (x) on the track etch rate (V-T) was determined experimentally by track length measurement. It is found that the track etch rate as a function of the depth within the detector follows the Bragg curve. The track etch rate has been found to be described by a generalization of the restricted energy loss, in good approximation along the trajectories of alpha particles.

  12. On the optimization of the solid core radius of superficially porous particles for finite adsorption rate.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarski, Krzysztof

    2011-02-18

    Packed chromatographic columns with the superficially porous particles (porous shell particles) guarantee higher efficiency. The theoretical equation of the Height Equivalent to a Theoretical Plate (HETP), for columns packed with spherical superficially porous particles, was used for the analysis of the column efficiency for finite rate of adsorption-desorption process. The HETP equation was calculated by the application of the moment analysis to elution peaks evaluated with the General Rate (GR) model. The optimal solid core radius for maximum column efficiency was estimated for a wide spectrum of internal and external mass transfer resistances, adsorption kinetic rate and axial dispersion. The separation power of the shell adsorbent for two component mixture, in analytical and preparative chromatography, was discussed. The conditions of the equivalence between the solutions of the General Rate model with slow adsorption kinetic and the Lumped Kinetic Model (LKM) or the Equilibrium Dispersive (ED) model were formulated.

  13. Exposure assessment and heart rate variability monitoring in workers handling titanium dioxide particles: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihara, Sahoko; Li, Weihua; Omura, Seiichi; Fujitani, Yuji; Liu, Ying; Wang, Qiangyi; Hiraku, Yusuke; Hisanaga, Naomi; Wakai, Kenji; Ding, Xuncheng; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Ichihara, Gaku

    2016-03-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles are used for surface coating and in a variety of products such as inks, fibers, food, and cosmetics. The present study investigated possible respiratory and cardiovascular effects of TiO2 particles in workers exposed to this particle at high concentration in a factory in China. The diameter of particles collected on filters was measured by scanning electron microscopy. Real-time size-dependent particle number concentration was monitored in the nostrils of four workers using condensation particle counter and optical particle counter. Electrocardiogram was recorded using Holter monitors for the same four workers to record heart rate variability. Sixteen workers underwent assessment of the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. Mass-based individual exposure levels were also measured with personal cascade impactors. The primary particle diameter ranged from 46 to 562 nm. Analysis of covariance of the pooled data of the four workers showed that number of particles with a diameter <300 nm was associated positively with total number of N-N and negatively with total number of increase or decrease in successive RR intervals greater than 50 ms (RR50+/-) or percentage of RR 50+/- that were parameters of parasympathetic function. The total mass concentration was 9.58-30.8 mg/m3 during work, but significantly less before work (0.36 mg/m3). The clear abnormality in respiratory function was not observed in sixteen workers who had worked for 10 months to 13 years in the factory. The study showed that exposure to particles with a diameter <300 nm might affect HRV in workers handling TiO2 particles. The results highlight the need to investigate the possible impact of exposure to nano-scaled particles on the autonomic nervous system.

  14. Final Report: "Collaborative Project. Understanding the Chemical Processes That Affect Growth Rates of Freshly Nucleated Particles"

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, James N.; McMurry, Peter H.

    2015-11-12

    This final technical report describes our research activities that have, as the ultimate goal, the development of a model that explains growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The research activities, which combine field observations with laboratory experiments, explore the relationship between concentrations of gas-phase species that contribute to growth and the rates at which those species are taken up. We also describe measurements of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles in a variety of locales, as well as properties (especially hygroscopicity) that influence their effects on climate. Our measurements include a self-organized, DOE-ARM funded project at the Southern Great Plains site, the New Particle Formation Study (NPFS), which took place during spring 2013. NPFS data are available to the research community on the ARM data archive, providing a unique suite observations of trace gas and aerosols that are associated with the formation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles.

  15. Effective rates from thermodynamically consistent coarse-graining of models for molecular motors with probe particles.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Eva; Seifert, Udo

    2015-02-01

    Many single-molecule experiments for molecular motors comprise not only the motor but also large probe particles coupled to it. The theoretical analysis of these assays, however, often takes into account only the degrees of freedom representing the motor. We present a coarse-graining method that maps a model comprising two coupled degrees of freedom which represent motor and probe particle to such an effective one-particle model by eliminating the dynamics of the probe particle in a thermodynamically and dynamically consistent way. The coarse-grained rates obey a local detailed balance condition and reproduce the net currents. Moreover, the average entropy production as well as the thermodynamic efficiency is invariant under this coarse-graining procedure. Our analysis reveals that only by assuming unrealistically fast probe particles, the coarse-grained transition rates coincide with the transition rates of the traditionally used one-particle motor models. Additionally, we find that for multicyclic motors the stall force can depend on the probe size. We apply this coarse-graining method to specific case studies of the F(1)-ATPase and the kinesin motor.

  16. Simulation of chemical reaction via particle tracking: Diffusion-limited versus thermodynamic rate-limited regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, David A.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2008-12-01

    Chemical reactions may be simulated without regard to local concentrations by applying simple probabilistic rules of particle interaction and combination. The forward reaction A + B→ C is coded by calculating the probability that any A and B particles will occupy the same volume over some time interval. This becomes a convolution of the location densities of the two particles. The backward reaction is a simple exponential decay of C particles into A and B particles. When the mixing of reactants is not a limiting process, the classical thermodynamic reaction rates are reproduced. When low mixing (as by diffusion) limits the reaction probabilities, the reaction rates drop significantly, including the rate of approach to global equilibrium. At long enough times, the law of mass action is reproduced exactly in the mean, with some irreducible deviation in the local equilibrium saturations (the equilibrium constant divided by the mass action expression) away from unity. The saturation variability is not sensitive to numerical parameters but depends strongly on how far from equilibrium the system is initiated. This is simply due to a relative paucity of particles of some species as the reaction moves far to one side or the other.

  17. Cryogenic Propellant Scavenging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louie, B.; Kemp, N. J.; Daney, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed description of a computer model that has been developed for assessing the feasibility of low g cryogen propellant scavenging from the space shuttle External Tank (ET) is given. Either pump-assisted or pressure-induced propellant transfer may be selected. The program will accept a wide range of input variables, including the fuel to be transferred (LOX or LH2), heat leaks, tank temperatures, and piping and equipment specifications. The model has been parametrically analyzed to determine initial design specification for the system.

  18. Escape rate of Lévy particles from truncated confined and unconfined potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhan-Wu; Hu, Meng

    2015-06-01

    For a double-well potential consisting of a truncated quartic potential and a truncated harmonic potential, the inter-well escape rates of Lévy particles are investigated numerically, and analytically for the Cauchy case, with focus on the former. The escape rate of Lévy particles from the truncated confined quartic potential well possesses qualitatively different characteristics compared with that from the truncated harmonic potential well, as reflected in the noise intensity dependence and Lévy index dependence of the escape rate. Two kinds of different escape mechanisms exist for low noise and high noise intensities. As the noise intensity increases, the escaping particles in quasi-stationary state present a noise-induced phase transition phenomenon, wherein the distribution of Lévy particles transits from a bimodal narrow distribution to a unimodal wide distribution. The characteristics of the escape rate in low and high noise intensities can be understood by the distributions of Lévy particles and the features of Lévy noise.

  19. A study of precipitation scavenging of semivolatile organic compounds in a tropical area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2009-06-01

    Rain samples were collected concurrently with gas phase and particulate samples from June 2007 to May 2008 in Singapore and processed to investigate precipitation scavenging of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). A comprehensive atmospheric scavenging model has been developed with inclusion of major atmospheric deposition processes such as particle scavenging, dissolution (Henry's law), and surface adsorption affecting the total scavenging ratio of SVOCs. This model was subsequently used in this study to calculate precipitation ratios. Total scavenging ratios ranged from (8.9 ± 4.3) × 104 to (1.2 ± 0.4) × 106 for PAHs and from (8.3 ± 5.1) × 104 to (4.9 ± 1.5) × 105 for OCPs. Particle scavenging rather than gas scavenging was the dominant removal mechanism, accounting for 86-99% for PAHs and 98-99% for OCPs in terms of the particle contribution to the total scavenging. The variation of both total and particle scavenging ratios over the study period is smaller compared to those reported in the literature, which might be attributed to uniform ambient temperature prevailing throughout the year in this tropical area. The effects of particle fraction, supercooled vapor pressure, and rainfall intensity on particle scavenging of SVOCs were assessed. The relationship between gas scavenging ratio and supercooled vapor pressure implied that the domination of gas scavenging might switch from dissolution to adsorption at supercooled vapor pressures around 10-3.5-10-4 Pa, especially for PAHs with five or more aromatic rings. The equations used to estimate total scavenging (WT) based on the particle fraction (Φ) can be summarized as log WT = 0.94 log Φ + 6.09 (R2 = 0.74) for PAHs and log WT = 0.82 log Φ + 6.34 (R2 = 0.62) for OCPs.

  20. The Effect of Particle Size on Hydrolysis Reaction Rates and Rheological Properties in Cellulosic Slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasari, Rajesh K.; Berson, R. Eric

    The effect of varying initial particle sizes on enzymatic hydrolysis rates and rheological properties of sawdust slurries is investigated. Slurries with four particle size ranges (33 μm < x ≤ 75 μm, 150 μm < x ≤ 180 μm 295 μm < x ≤ 425 μm, and 590 μm < x ≤ 850 μm) were subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis using an enzyme dosage of filter paper units per gram of cellulose at 50°C and 250 rpm in shaker flasks. At lower initial particle sizes, higher enzymatic reaction rates and conversions of cellulose to glucose were observed. After 72 h 50 and 55% more glucose was produced from the smallest size particles than the largest size ones, for initial solids concentration of 10 and 13% (w/w), respectively. The effect of initial particle size on viscosity over a range of shear was also investigated. For equivalent initial solids concentration, smaller particle sizes result in lower viscosities such that at a concentration of 10% (w/w), the viscosity decreased from 3000 cP for 150 μm < x ≤ 180 μm particle size slurries to 61.4 cP for 33 μm < x ≤ 75 μm particle size slurries. Results indicate particle size reduction may provide a means for reducing the long residence time required for the enzymatic hydrolysis step in the conversion of biomass to ethanol. Furthermore, the corresponding reduction in viscosity may allow for higher solids loading and reduced reactor sizes during large-scale processing.

  1. Collaborative Project: Understanding the Chemical Processes tat Affect Growth rates of Freshly Nucleated Particles

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, Peter; Smuth, James

    2015-11-12

    This final technical report describes our research activities that have, as the ultimate goal, the development of a model that explains growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The research activities, which combine field observations with laboratory experiments, explore the relationship between concentrations of gas-phase species that contribute to growth and the rates at which those species are taken up. We also describe measurements of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles in a variety of locales, as well as properties (especially hygroscopicity) that influence their effects on climate.

  2. Construction of a fast ionization chamber for high-rate particle identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, K. Y.; Ahn, S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Chipps, K. A.; Manning, B.; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Strauss, S. Y.

    2014-07-01

    A new gas-filled ionization chamber for high count rate particle identification has been constructed and commissioned at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). To enhance the response time of the ionization chamber, a design utilizing a tilted entrance window and tilted electrodes was adopted, which is modified from an original design by Kimura et al. [1]. A maximum counting rate of 700 , 000 particles per second has been achieved. The detector has been used for several radioactive beam measurements performed at the HRIBF.

  3. Filter feeders and plankton increase particle encounter rates through flow regime control

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    Collisions between particles or between particles and other objects are fundamental to many processes that we take for granted. They drive the functioning of aquatic ecosystems, the onset of rain and snow precipitation, and the manufacture of pharmaceuticals, powders and crystals. Here, I show that the traditional assumption that viscosity dominates these situations leads to consistent and large-scale underestimation of encounter rates between particles and of deposition rates on surfaces. Numerical simulations reveal that the encounter rate is Reynolds number dependent and that encounter efficiencies are consistent with the sparse experimental data. This extension of aerosol theory has great implications for understanding of selection pressure on the physiology and ecology of organisms, for example filter feeders able to gather food at rates up to 5 times higher than expected. I provide evidence that filter feeders have been strongly selected to take advantage of this flow regime and show that both the predicted peak concentration and the steady-state concentrations of plankton during blooms are ≈33% of that predicted by the current models of particle encounter. Many ecological and industrial processes may be operating at substantially greater rates than currently assumed. PMID:19416879

  4. Purification and characterization of retrovirus vector particles by rate zonal ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Segura, María de las Mercedes; Garnier, Alain; Kamen, Amine

    2006-04-01

    Sucrose equilibrium density ultracentrifugation remains the most widely used technique for retrovirus purification. However, purified virus preparations obtained by this routine method usually contain considerable amounts of contaminating cell membrane vesicles. In addition, sucrose solutions are highly viscous and hyperosmotic which jeopardizes the integrity and functionality of the retrovirus particle. In order to overcome these limitations, an alternative purification technique using rate zonal ultracentrifugation and iodixanol as gradient medium was developed. Recombinant retrovirus particles were produced by 293-GPG packaging cells grown in suspension in the presence of 10% FBS. Concentrated supernatants were purified by rate zonal sedimentation on a 10-30% continuous iodixanol gradient. Virus particles were recovered intact and active from the central fractions of the gradient. By using this strategy, high levels of purification were achieved, with no evident contamination with cell membrane vesicles as indicated by subtilisin treatment studies. The level of purity of the retrovirus preparation is over 95% as shown by SDS-PAGE analysis and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified particles appear homogenous in size and morphology according to negative stain electron microscopy. In addition, large amounts of defective retrovirus particles produced by 293-GPG packaging cells can be separated from functional retrovirus particles using this purification strategy.

  5. Impact Of Particle Agglomeration On Accumulation Rates In The Glass Discharge Riser Of HLW Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, A. A.; Rodriguez, C. A.; Matyas, J.; Owen, A. T.; Jansik, D. P.; Lang, J. B.

    2012-11-12

    The major factor limiting waste loading in continuous high-level radioactive waste (HLW) melters is an accumulation of particles in the glass discharge riser during a frequent and periodic idling of more than 20 days. An excessive accumulation can produce robust layers a few centimeters thick, which may clog the riser, preventing molten glass from being poured into canisters. Since the accumulation rate is driven by the size of particles we investigated with x-ray microtomography, scanning electron microscopy, and image analysis the impact of spinel forming components, noble metals, and alumina on the size, concentration, and spatial distribution of particles, and on the accumulation rate. Increased concentrations of Fe and Ni in the baseline glass resulted in the formation of large agglomerates that grew over the time to an average size of ~185+-155 {mu}m, and produced >3 mm thick layer after 120 h at 850 deg C. The noble metals decreased the particle size, and therefore significantly slowed down the accumulation rate. Addition of alumina resulted in the formation of a network of spinel dendrites which prevented accumulation of particles into compact layers.

  6. Online monitoring of particle mass flow rate in bottom spray fluid bed coating--development and application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li Kun; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Liew, Celine Valeria

    2010-08-16

    The primary purpose of this study is to develop a visiometric process analyzer for online monitoring of particle mass flow rate in the bottom spray fluid bed coating process. The secondary purpose is to investigate the influences of partition gap and air accelerator insert size on particle mass flow rate using the developed visiometric process analyzer. Particle movement in the region between the product chamber and partition column was captured using a high speed camera. Mean particle velocity and number of particles in the images were determined by particle image velocimetry and morphological image processing method respectively. Mass flow rate was calculated using particle velocity, number of particles in the images, particle density and size information. Particle velocity and number findings were validated using image tracking and manual particle counting techniques respectively. Validation experiments showed that the proposed method was accurate. Partition gap was found to influence particle mass flow rate by limiting the rate of solids flux into the partition column; the air accelerator insert was found to influence particle mass flow rate by a Venturi effect. Partition gap and air accelerator insert diameter needed to be adjusted accordingly in relation to the other variability sources and diameter of coating cores respectively. The potential, challenges and possible solutions of the proposed visiometric process analyzer were further discussed.

  7. Calculation of energy relaxation rates of fast particles by phonons in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prange, Micah; Campbell, Luke; Wu, Dangxin; Kerisit, Sebastien

    2015-03-01

    We present ab initio calculations of the temperature-dependent exchange of energy between a classical charged point-particle and the phonons of a crystalline material. The phonons, which are computed using density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) methods, interact with the moving particle via the Coulomb interaction between the density induced in the material by phonon excitation and the charge of the classical particle. Energy relaxation rates are computed using time-dependent perturbation theory. The method, which is applicable wherever DFPT is, is illustrated with results for several important scintillators whose performance is affected by electron thermalization. We discuss the influence of the form assumed for quasiparticle dispersion on theoretical estimates of electron cooling rates. This research was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of DNN R&D, of the DOE. PNNL is operated by Battelle Memorial Institute under Contract DE-AC0576RL01830.

  8. Particle Rate and Host Accelerator Beam Loss on the MICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, Adam James

    2011-10-01

    A study is presented of particle rates in the MICE Muon Beamline and their relationship to beam loss produced in ISIS. A brief overview of neutrino physics is presented, together with a discussion on the Neutrino Factory as a motivation for MICE. An overview of MICE itself is then presented, highlighting the need for a systematic understanding of the relationship between the MICE target parameters, ISIS beam loss, and MICE particle rate. The variation of beam loss with target depth is examined and observed to be non-linear. The variation of beam loss with respect to the target dip time in the ISIS cycle is examined and observed to be approximately linear for dip times between 11.1 ms and 12.6 ms after ISIS injection, before tailing at earlier dip times. The variation of beam loss with particle rate is also observed to follow an approximately linear relationship from 0.05 V.ms to 4.7 V.ms beam loss, with a further strong indication that this continues up to 7.1 V.ms. Particle identification using time-of-flight data is used to give an insight into the relative abundances of each particle species present in the MICE beam. Estimates of muon rate are then produced as a function of beam loss. At a level of 2 V.ms beam loss ~10.9 muons per spill for a 3.2 ms spill with negative π → μ optics, and ~31.1 muons per 1 ms spill with positive π → μ optics are observed. Simulations using the ORBIT particle tracking code of the beam loss distributions around the ISIS ring, caused by the MICE target, are also presented and the implications for MICE running discussed.

  9. The Measurement and Analysis of Brownian Particle Fall Rates in a New Regime of Dense Gases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Paul David

    Millikan's law of fall is an empirical relationship describing the dependence of the fall rate of submicron particles in gases in terms of the particle radius and the gas density. It had been long thought that the physics of slip, embodied in the law, gave a complete description of the phenomenon. During measurements of the velocity autocorrelation function for a single Brownian particle at different gas densities, we have discovered that for sufficiently small particles the fall rate increases with increasing density, in contrast to the prediction of Millikan's law. Vertical displacements during a 10 sec interval of a single oil drop have been measured as a function of nitrogen gas density in the range of one to 22 atm at room temperature by retaining the particle for up to 15 hours. Altogether 24 particles in the radius range of 0.1 to 0.4 (mu)m have been analyzed. The density dependence of the average fall rate undergoes a smooth transition from the Millikan behavior in the large size limit to the newly observed behavior in the small size limit. No anomalies are seen, however, in the density dependence of the rms displacement. In attempts to explain the observations we have examined a model based on the fact that Brownian fluctuation increases with decreasing particle size at a given gas density that the contributions of the vorticity field about such a Brownian particle on the fluctuation increases with density and that gravity sustains the entire system of the host gas and the test particle in a steady non-equilibrium state. The modified Langevin equation with gravity has been numerically solved under varying conditions. The fluctuating force is modeled by means of a series of randomly applied impulsive velocities of the test particle. The results are that while there is no sufficient physics in the model to generate any asymmetry in the fluctuation, the model has a mechanism to preserve any asymmetry given to the system for a long time and to produce

  10. Size-Resolved Source Emission Rates of Indoor Ultrafine Particles Considering Coagulation.

    PubMed

    Rim, Donghyun; Choi, Jung-Il; Wallace, Lance A

    2016-09-20

    Indoor ultrafine particles (UFP, <100 nm) released from combustion and consumer products lead to elevated human exposure to UFP. UFP emitted from the sources undergo aerosol transformation processes such as coagulation and deposition. The coagulation effect can be significant during the source emission due to high concentration and high mobility of nanosize particles. However, few studies have estimated size-resolved UFP source emission strengths while considering coagulation in their theoretical and experimental research work. The primary objective of this study is to characterize UFP source strength by considering coagulation in addition to other indoor processes (i.e., deposition and ventilation) in a realistic setting. A secondary objective is to test a hypothesis that size-resolved UFP source emission rates are unimodal and log-normally distributed for three common indoor UFP sources: an electric stove, a natural gas burner, and a paraffin wax candle. Experimental investigations were performed in a full-scale test building. Size- and time-resolved concentrations of UFP ranging from 2 to 100 nm were monitored using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). Based on the temporal evolution of the particle size distribution during the source emission period, the size-dependent source emission rate was determined using a material-balance modeling approach. The results indicate that, for a given UFP source, the source strength varies with particle size and source type. The analytical model assuming a log-normally distributed source emission rate could predict the temporal evolution of the particle size distribution with reasonable accuracy for the gas stove and the candle. Including the effect of coagulation was found to increase the estimates of source strengths by up to a factor of 8. This result implies that previous studies on indoor UFP source strengths considering only deposition and ventilation might have largely underestimated the true values of UFP source

  11. Carcass Type Affects Local Scavenger Guilds More than Habitat Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Zachary H.; Beasley, James C.; Rhodes, Olin E.

    2016-01-01

    Scavengers and decomposers provide an important ecosystem service by removing carrion from the environment. Scavenging and decomposition are known to be temperature-dependent, but less is known about other factors that might affect carrion removal. We conducted an experiment in which we manipulated combinations of patch connectivity and carcass type, and measured responses by local scavenger guilds along with aspects of carcass depletion. We conducted twelve, 1-month trials in which five raccoon (Procyon lotor), Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana), and domestic rabbit (Oryctolagus spp.) carcasses (180 trials total) were monitored using remote cameras in 21 forest patches in north-central Indiana, USA. Of 143 trials with complete data, we identified fifteen species of vertebrate scavengers divided evenly among mammalian (N = 8) and avian species (N = 7). Fourteen carcasses (9.8%) were completely consumed by invertebrates, vertebrates exhibited scavenging behavior at 125 carcasses (87.4%), and four carcasses (2.8%) remained unexploited. Among vertebrates, mammals scavenged 106 carcasses, birds scavenged 88 carcasses, and mammals and birds scavenged 69 carcasses. Contrary to our expectations, carcass type affected the assemblage of local scavenger guilds more than patch connectivity. However, neither carcass type nor connectivity explained variation in temporal measures of carcass removal. Interestingly, increasing richness of local vertebrate scavenger guilds contributed moderately to rates of carrion removal (≈6% per species increase in richness). We conclude that scavenger-specific differences in carrion utilization exist among carcass types and that reliable delivery of carrion removal as an ecosystem service may depend on robust vertebrate and invertebrate communities acting synergistically. PMID:26886299

  12. Characterization of decay and emission rates of ultrafine particles in indoor ice rink.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Lee, K

    2013-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine indoor ultrafine particle (UFP, diameter <100 nm) levels in ice rinks and to characterize UFP decay and emission rates. All 15 public ice rinks in Seoul were investigated for UFP and carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations. Three ice rinks did not show peaks in UFP concentrations, and one ice rink used two resurfacers simultaneously. High peaks of UFP and CO concentrations were observed when the resurfacer was operated. The average air change rate in the 11 ice rinks was 0.21 ± 0.13/h. The average decay rates of UFP number concentrations measured by the P-Trak and DiSCmini were 0.54 ± 0.21/h and 0.85 ± 0.34/h, respectively. The average decay rate of UFP surface area concentration was 0.33 ± 0.15/h. The average emission rates of UFP number concentrations measured by P-Trak and DiSCmini were 1.2 × 10(14) ± 6.5 × 10(13) particles/min and 3.3 × 10(14) ± 2.4 × 10(14) particles/min, respectively. The average emission rate of UFP surface area concentration was 3.1 × 10(11) ± 2.0 × 10(11) μm(2)/min. UFP emission rate was associated with resurfacer age. DiSCmini measured higher decay and emission rates than P-Trak due to their different measuring mechanisms and size ranges.

  13. Enhancement of Particle Track Etch Rate in CR-39 by UV Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesner, Micah; Ume, Rubab; McLean, James; Sangster, Craig; Regan, Sean

    2015-11-01

    The use of CR-39 plastic as a Solid State Nuclear Track Detector is effective for obtaining data in high-energy particle experiments including inertial confinement fusion. To reveal particle tracks after irradiation, CR-39 is chemically etched at elevated temperatures with NaOH, producing signal pits at the nuclear track sites that are measurable by an optical microscope. CR-39 pieces sometimes also exhibit etch-induced noise, either surface features not caused by nuclear particles. When CR-39 is exposed to high intensity UV light after nuclear irradiation with 5.4 MeV alpha particles and before etching, an increase in etch rates and pit diameters is observed, though UV exposure can also increase noise. We have determined that light from a low pressure mercury vapor lamp (predominantly wavelength 253.7 nm) increases etch rates and pit diameters while causing minimal background noise. Heating CR-39 to elevated temperatures (~80 °C) during UV exposure also improves the signal-to-noise ratio for this process. Surprisingly, initial data from CR-39 irradiated with 3.4 MeV protons and exposed to UV show reduced pit diameters. This material is based in part upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  14. Green stabilization of microscale iron particles using guar gum: bulk rheology, sedimentation rate and enzymatic degradation.

    PubMed

    Gastone, Francesca; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-05-01

    Guar gum can be used to effectively improve stability and mobility of microscale zerovalent iron particles (MZVI) used in groundwater remediation. Guar gum is a food-grade, environment friendly natural polysaccharide, which is often used as thickening agent in a broad range of food, pharmaceutical and industrial applications. Guar gum solutions are non-Newtonian, shear thinning fluids, characterized by high viscosity in static conditions and low viscosity in dynamic conditions. In particular, the high zero shear viscosity guarantees the MZVI dispersion stability, reducing the sedimentation rate of the particles thus enabling its storage and field operations. In this work, a comprehensive rheological characterization of guar gum-based slurries of MZVI particles is provided. First, we derived a model to link the bulk shear viscosity to the concentration of guar gum and then we applied it for the derivation of a modified Stokes law for the prediction of the sedimentation rate of the iron particles. The influence of the preparation procedure (cold or hot dissolution and high shear processing) on the viscosity and on the stability of the suspensions was then assessed. Finally, the dosage and concentration of enzymes - an environment friendly breaker--were studied for enhancing and controlling the degradation kinetics of the suspensions. The derived empirical relationships can be used for the implementation of an iron slurry flow and transport model and for the design of full scale injection interventions.

  15. Analysis of carrier gas flow rate effect on hydroxyapatite particle formation in ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiyastuti, W.; Setiawan, Adhi; Nurtono, Tantular; Winardi, Sugeng

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasonic spray pyrolysis has been well-known process for producing fine particles from single and multicomponent materials. Here, the effect of carrier gas flow rate in ultrasonic spray pyrolysis process was studied in the particle formation of hydroxyapatite using solution precursor of Ca(CH3COO)2 and (NH4)2HPO4 with Ca/P ratio of 1.67. The experimental analysis was accompanied with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation for comparison. In the simulation, the evaporation of the solvent in the droplets, a second evaporation due to crust formation, the decomposition reaction of the precursor involving the transfer of heat and mass transfer from droplet to surrounding were considered. By maintaining temperature at 900 °C, the residence time increased with decreasing the carrier gas flow rate led to the increasing the evaporation rate and the reacted fraction of the precursor. The predicted and experimental results of average particles size were agreed well with discrepancy 6.3%.

  16. Model for GCR-particle fluxes in stony meteorites and production rates of cosmogenic nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    A model is presented for the differential fluxes of galactic-cosmic-ray (GCR) particles with energies above 1 MeV inside any spherical stony meteorite as a function of the meteorite's radius and the sample's depth. This model is based on the Reedy-Arnold equations for the energy-dependent fluxes of GCR particles in the moon and is an extension of flux parameters that were derived for several meteorites of various sizes. This flux is used to calculate the production rates of many cosmogenic nuclides as a function of radius and depth. The peak production rates for most nuclides made by the reactions of energetic GCR particles occur near the centers of meteorites with radii of 40 to 70 g cm/sup -2/. Although the model has some limitations, it reproduces well the basic trends for the depth-dependent production of cosmogenic nuclides in stony meteorites of various radii. These production profiles agree fairly well with measurements of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites. Some of these production profiles are different than those calculated by others. The chemical dependence of the production rates for several nuclides varies with size and depth. 25 references, 8 figures.

  17. Scavenging for Better Library Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cocking, Terry S.; Schafer, Susan A.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the Library Scavenger Hunt program at Baylor University (part of the reading and study skills program) which emphasizes learning what sources are available in a college library, where they are located, and how to use them. (SR)

  18. Estimating currents in totally asymmetric simple exclusion process with extended particles and inhomogeneous hopping rates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia, R. K. P.; Dong, Jiajia; Schmittmann, B.

    2009-03-01

    Motivated by translation in protein synthesis, we study the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process with extended particles transported along a 1-D lattice with (quenched) inhomogeneous hopping rates. The particles model ribosomes, the lattice models sequences of codons, and the hopping rates reflect the aa-tRNA concentrations. Taking the latter from data for real E.Coli genes, Monte Carlo simulations allow us to find the steady state currents, associated with protein production rates. An application would be to predict the effects of ``silent mutations'' in biological systems. In such mutations, one or more codons are replaced by others which code for the same amino-acid, so that the same protein (amino-acid chain) is synthesized by a different sequence of codons. However, the rate of production (the overall current), which depends on the details of sequence, will differ. We aim to predict the changes in these currents for all possible silent mutations. Beyond this application, this study of ``quenched distribution of distributions'' is expected to have far reaching implications in other areas of physics.

  19. Correlating field and laboratory rates of particle abrasion, Rio Medio, Sangre de Cristo Mountains, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polito, P. J.; Sklar, L. S.

    2006-12-01

    River bed sediments commonly fine downstream due to a combination of particle abrasion, selective transport of finer grains, and fining of the local sediment supply from hillslopes and tributaries. Particle abrasion rates can be directly measured in the laboratory using tumbling barrels and annular flumes, however, scaling experimental particle abrasion rates to the field has proven difficult due to the confounding effects of selective transport and local supply variations. Here we attempt to correlate laboratory and field rates of particle abrasion in a field setting where these confounding effects can be controlled. The Rio Medio, which flows westward from the crest of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains in north central New Mexico, is one of several streams studied by John P. Miller in the early 1960's. Several kilometers downstream of its headwaters, the river crosses the Picuris-Pecos fault. Upstream of the fault the river receives quartzite, sandstone and shale clasts from the Ortega Formation, while downstream sediments are supplied by the Embudo Granite. Because the upstream lithologies are not resupplied downstream of the fault, any observed fining of these clasts should be due only to abrasion and selective transport. We hypothesize that we can account for the effects of selective transport by comparing relative fining rates for the different upstream lithologies from both the field and a laboratory tumbler. By correlating laboratory abrasion rates with rock strength, we can predict the relative fining rates due solely to abrasion expected in the field; differences between the predicted and observed fining rates could then be attributed to selective transport. We used point counts to measure bed surface sediment grain size distributions at 15 locations along a 25 kilometer reach of the Rio Medio, beginning just downstream of the fault and ending upstream of a developed area with disturbed channel conditions. We recorded intermediate particle diameter as well

  20. Enhancement and degradation of the R2* relaxation rate resulting from the encapsulation of magnetic particles with hydrophilic coatings.

    PubMed

    de Haan, Hendrick W; Paquet, Chantal

    2011-12-01

    The effects of including a hydrophilic coating around the particles are studied across a wide range of particle sizes by performing Monte Carlo simulations of protons diffusing through a system of magnetic particles. A physically realistic methodology of implementing the coating by cross boundary jump scaling and transition probabilities at the coating surface is developed. Using this formulation, the coating has three distinct impacts on the relaxation rate: an enhancement at small particle sizes, a degradation at intermediate particle sizes, and no effect at large particles sizes. These varied effects are reconciled with the underlying dephasing mechanisms by using the concept of a full dephasing zone to present a physical picture of the dephasing process with and without the coating for all sizes. The enhancement at small particle sizes is studied systemically to demonstrate the existence of an optimal ratio of diffusion coefficients inside/outside the coating to achieve maximal increase in the relaxation rate.

  1. Mass-flow-rate-controlled fluid flow in nanochannels by particle insertion and deletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, Paul L.; Lukes, Jennifer R.

    2016-12-01

    A nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method to induce fluid flow in nanochannels, the insertion-deletion method (IDM), is introduced. IDM inserts and deletes particles within distinct regions in the domain, creating locally high and low pressures. The benefits of IDM are that it directly controls a physically meaningful quantity, the mass flow rate, allows for pressure and density gradients to develop in the direction of flow, and permits treatment of complex aperiodic geometries. Validation of IDM is performed, yielding good agreement with the analytical solution of Poiseuille flow in a planar channel. Comparison of IDM to existing methods indicates that it is best suited for gases, both because it intrinsically accounts for compressibility effects on the flow and because the computational cost of particle insertion is lowest for low-density fluids.

  2. Tribology and Removal Rate Characteristics of Chemical Mechanical Planarization Pads Containing Water Soluble Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charns, L.; Philipossian, A.

    2006-07-01

    Novel non-porous pads incorporating different amounts of embedded water soluble particles (WSP) have been characterized and compared to a conventional porous pad for interlayer dielectric (ILD) chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) applications. Removal rate results indicated that polishing with WSP pads was Prestonian in nature (similar to conventional porous pads). A decrease in removal rate at high combinations of pressure and velocity was observed during in-situ conditioning with WSP pads. This anomalous behavior was most likely due to the alternatively feeding and starving the wafer of slurry during in-situ conditioning since doubling the flow rate resolved the problem. The anomalous behavior, however, was not observed when conditioning was performed ex-situ. Frictional analysis indicated that polishing with WSP pads proceeded via boundary lubrication like the other porous pads with concentrically grooved surface geometries.

  3. Atmospheric aerosol scavenging processes and the role of thermo- and diffusio-phoretic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santachiara, Gianni; Prodi, Franco; Belosi, Franco

    2013-07-01

    In-cloud and below-cloud scavenging due to snow crystals is reviewed, outlining the theoretical models, laboratory and field measurements which take into account also the role of phoretic forces in this process. In-cloud scavenging includes contributions from both nucleation and impaction, while below-cloud scavenging includes only impaction. Scavenging of aerosol particles by ice has been modelled only for simple shapes (planar and columnar ice crystals) and restricted size range, in view of the large variety of shapes and, consequently, the complicated flow patterns of air, water vapour and heat around the crystal. A significant feature of theoretical efficiency curves is the predominant minimum for aerosol particles of radius between 0.01 and 0.1 μm where phoretic forces are active, analogous to the particle scavenging behaviour of water drops. Experiments on aerosol particle scavenging by snow include field measurements, experiments where natural snow crystals are allowed to fall through laboratory generated aerosol, and experiments where both crystals and aerosol are generated in the laboratory. Contradictory results have been found in laboratory and field experiments concerning the role of phoretic forces. In particular, an important discrepancy arises relating to the roles of thermophoresis and diffusiophoresis in the scavenging of submicron particles by ice crystals growing in mixed-phase clouds, consisting of water vapour, supercooled liquid droplets and ice particles. A decrease in scavenging efficiency as a function of crystal diameter is reported both theoretically and experimentally. By comparing aerosol scavenging by drops and snow, most studies agree that, in terms of equal mass of precipitation, snow is more efficient at scavenging atmospheric particles than rain.

  4. Precipitation scavenging of gaseous pollutants having arbitrary solubility in inhomogeneous atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elperin, Tov; Fominykh, Andrew; Krasovitov, Boris

    2015-04-01

    We investigate scavenging of gaseous pollutants in the atmosphere under the combined influence of rain and varying temperature distribution that affects the rate of soluble gas scavenging. We employ a one-dimensional model of precipitation scavenging of gaseous pollutants having arbitrary solubility that is valid for small gradients and for non-uniform initial vertical distributions of temperature and soluble trace gases concentration in the atmosphere. It is showed that transient altitudinal distributions of temperature and concentration under the influence of rain are determined by linear wave equations that describe propagation of temperature and scavenging wave fronts. Scavenging coefficient and the rates of precipitation scavenging are calculated for wet removal of methanol () using measured initial distribution of methanol and temperature in the atmosphere. Theoretical predictions of the dependence of the magnitude of the scavenging coefficient on rain intensity for tritium oxide and sulfur dioxide are in good agreement with the available atmospheric measurements.

  5. Experimental investigation of particle dissolution rates in aqueous solutions for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianu, O. A.; Wang, Z.; Rosen, M. A.; Naterer, G. F.

    2016-10-01

    Results of reaction kinetics studies of chemical processes related to materials integration of the thermochemical copper-chlorine cycle for hydrogen production are reported. The reaction rate of solid cuprous chloride (CuCl) in liquid hydrochloric acid is investigated experimentally for various acid concentrations. A rate constant—a function of constituent concentrations—describes how quickly the reactants are converted into products in satisfying the activation energy to enable the reaction to move forward. In this paper, the change in area of a solid CuCl particle is examined, rather than concentration in previous studies. New predictive models are developed to describe the characteristics of the chemical reaction in terms of its transition states and reaction mechanisms.

  6. Studies with sample conductivity, insertion rates, and particle deflection in a continuous flow electrophoresis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, G., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The continuous flow electrophoresis system makes electrophoresis possible in a free-flowing film of aqueous electrolyte medium. The sample continuously enters the electrolyte at the top of the chamber and is subjected to the action of a lateral dc field. This divides the sample into fractions since each component has a distinctive electrophoretic mobility. Tests were made using monodisperse polystyrene latex microspheres to determine optimum sample conductivity, insertion rates and optimum electric field applications as baseline data for future STS flight experiments. Optimum sample flow rates for the selected samples were determined to be approximately 26 micro-liters/min. Experiments with samples in deionized water yielded best results and voltages in the 20 V/cm to 30 V/cm range were optimum. Deflections of formaldehyde fixed turkey and bovine erythrocytes were determined using the continuous flow electrophoresis system. The effects of particle interactions on sample resolution and migration in the chamber was also evaluated.

  7. Low-Fidelity Polymerases of Alphaviruses Recombine at Higher Rates To Overproduce Defective Interfering Particles

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Enzo Z.; Mounce, Bryan C.; Rozen-Gagnon, Kathryn; Hooikaas, Peter Jan; Stapleford, Kenneth A.; Moratorio, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Low-fidelity RNA-dependent RNA polymerases for many RNA virus mutators have been shown to confer attenuated phenotypes, presumably due to increased mutation rates. Additionally, for many RNA viruses, replication to high titers results in the production of defective interfering particles (DIs) that also attenuate infection. We hypothesized that fidelity, recombination, and DI production are tightly linked. We show that a Sindbis virus mutator replicating at a high multiplicity of infection manifests an earlier and greater accumulation of DIs than its wild-type counterpart. The isolated DIs interfere with the replication of full-length virus in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, the ability of the mutator virus to overproduce DIs could be linked to an increased recombination frequency. These data confirm that RNA-dependent RNA polymerase fidelity and recombination are inversely correlated for this mutator. Our findings suggest that defective interference resulting from higher recombination rates may be more detrimental to RNA virus mutators than the increase in mutational burden. IMPORTANCE Replication, adaptation, and evolution of RNA viruses rely in large part on their low-fidelity RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Viruses artificially modified in their polymerases to decrease fidelity (mutator viruses) are attenuated in vivo, demonstrating the important role of fidelity in viral fitness. However, attenuation was attributed solely to the modification of the viral mutation rate and the accumulation of detrimental point mutations. In this work, we described an additional phenotype of mutator viruses: an increased recombination rate leading to defective interfering particle (DI) overproduction. Because DIs are known for their inhibitory effect on viral replication, our work suggests that fidelity variants may be attenuated in vivo via several mechanisms. This has important implications in the development of fidelity variants as live attenuated vaccine strains

  8. EFFECT OF VENTILATION SYSTEMS AND AIR FILTERS ON DECAY RATES OF PARTICLES PRODUCED BY INDOOR SOURCES IN AN OCCUPIED TOWNHOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several studies have shown the importance of particle losses in real homes due to deposition and filtration; however, none have quantitatively shown the impact of using a central forced air fan and in-duct filter on particle loss rates. In an attempt to provide such data, we me...

  9. Effect of cooling rate during solidification on the structure of high-speed steel powder particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ershova, L.S.; Smirnov, V.P.

    1985-08-01

    The structure and properties of a P/M high-speed steel form during solidification, hot plastic working, and subsequent heat treatment are the focus here. The character of steel structure variation under the action of high cooling rates during solidification has not yet been sufficiently investigated, therefore it is of interest to study the interrelationship between these factors. An R6M5F3 steel powder was produced by the atomization of molten metal in an apparatus constructed at the Ukranian Scientific-Research Institute of Special Steels, and divided into several fractions. A study was then made of the effect of cooling rate on the phase composition of the steel, degree of alloying of its solid solution and the microstructure and microhardness of the material. As a result of a higher rate of cooling, the amount of metastable M2C carbide inclusions in the structure of P/M R6M5F3 steel increases and the degree of bulk alloying of its grains grows. The increase in the microhardness of powder particles brought about by cooling at a higher rate is due to the formation of finer carbide inclusions during solidification, grain refinement, and an increased degree of alloying of the gamma and alpha solid solutions being formed.

  10. Similar rates of decrease of persistent, hydrophobic and particle-reactive contaminants in riverine systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Wilson, Jennifer T.; Callender, Edward; Fuller, Christopher C.

    1998-01-01

    Although it is well-known that concentrations of anthropogenic radionuclides and organochlorine compounds in aquatic systems have decreased since their widespread release has stopped in the United States, the magnitude and variability of rates of decrease are not well-known. Paleolimnological studies of reservoirs provide a tool for evaluating these long-term trends in riverine systems. Rates of decrease from the 1960s to the 1990s of 137Cs, PCBs, and total DDT in dated sediment cores from 11 reservoirs in the eastern and central United States were modeled using first-order rate models. Mean half-times of 10.0 (±2.5), 9.5 (±2.2), and 13 (±5.8) yr for decay-corrected 137Cs, PCBs, and total DDT, respectively, are surprisingly similar. Similar rates of decrease in a few reservoirs are also demonstrated for chlordane and lead. Conceptual and simple mathematical models relating two soil distributions of 137Cs to trends in the cores provide insight into differences in trends between watersheds with different land uses and suggest that trends are controlled by erosion, transport, mixing, and deposition of sediments. These results, supported by similar trends reported for other settings and environmental media, could provide an estimate of the decadal response time of riverine systems to changes in the regulation of other persistent hydrophobic or particle-reactive contaminants.

  11. Effect of ventilation systems and air filters on decay rates of particles produced by indoor sources in an occupied townhouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard-Reed, Cynthia; Wallace, Lance A.; Emmerich, Steven J.

    Several studies have shown the importance of particle losses in real homes due to deposition and filtration; however, none have quantitatively shown the impact of using a central forced air fan and in-duct filter on particle loss rates. In an attempt to provide such data, we measured the deposition of particles ranging from 0.3 to 10 μm in an occupied townhouse and also in an unoccupied test house. Experiments were run with three different sources (cooking with a gas stove, citronella candle, pouring kitty litter), with the central heating and air conditioning (HAC) fan on or off, and with two different types of in-duct filters (electrostatic precipitator and ordinary furnace filter). Particle size, HAC fan operation, and the electrostatic precipitator had significant effects on particle loss rates. The standard furnace filter had no effect. Surprisingly, the type of source (combustion vs. mechanical generation) and the type of furnishings (fully furnished including carpet vs. largely unfurnished including mostly bare floor) also had no measurable effect on the deposition rates of particles of comparable size. With the HAC fan off, average deposition rates varied from 0.3 h -1 for the smallest particle range (0.3-0.5 μm) to 5.2 h -1 for particles greater than 10 μm. Operation of the central HAC fan approximately doubled these rates for particles <5 μm, and increased rates by 2 h -1 for the larger particles. An in-duct electrostatic precipitator increased the loss rates compared to the fan-off condition by factors of 5-10 for particles <2.5 μm, and by a factor of 3 for 2.5-5.0 μm particles. In practical terms, use of the central fan alone could reduce indoor particle concentrations by 25-50%, and use of an in-duct ESP could reduce particle concentrations by 55-85% compared to fan-off conditions.

  12. Development of a high-rate ion counter for particle identification with GODDESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baugher, Travis; Cizewski, Jolie; Ratkiewicz, Andrew; Pain, Steven

    2014-09-01

    Gammasphere-ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) consists of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of position-sensitive silicon detectors placed inside the Gammasphere target chamber to measure particle-gamma coincidences. Experiments performed in inverse kinematics result in heavy-ion recoils at very forward angles. Detecting and identifying these recoils with high efficiency and low dead time is crucial for experiments, in particular experiments with contaminated beams. An ionization chamber has been designed, built and tested to be incorporated into the GODDESS setup to count and identify recoiling heavy ions. The design of the gas-filled, gridded ionization chamber utilizes 22 anode grids to measure energy loss of the heavy ion recoils and a plastic scintillator for timing measurements. The anode grids are tilted at 30 degrees to handle high incident-particle rate. The detector was developed, built and tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and will be used in GODDESS measurements with stable and rare isotope beams. Gammasphere-ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) consists of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of position-sensitive silicon detectors placed inside the Gammasphere target chamber to measure particle-gamma coincidences. Experiments performed in inverse kinematics result in heavy-ion recoils at very forward angles. Detecting and identifying these recoils with high efficiency and low dead time is crucial for experiments, in particular experiments with contaminated beams. An ionization chamber has been designed, built and tested to be incorporated into the GODDESS setup to count and identify recoiling heavy ions. The design of the gas-filled, gridded ionization chamber utilizes 22 anode grids to measure energy loss of the heavy ion recoils and a plastic scintillator for timing measurements. The anode grids are tilted at 30 degrees to handle high incident-particle

  13. Slew-rate dependence of tracer magnetization response in magnetic particle imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Saqlain A.; Krishnan, K. M.; Ferguson, R. M.

    2014-10-28

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new biomedical imaging technique that produces real-time, high-resolution tomographic images of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. Currently, 25 kHz and 20 mT/μ{sub 0} excitation fields are common in MPI, but lower field amplitudes may be necessary for patient safety in future designs. Here, we address fundamental questions about MPI tracer magnetization dynamics and predict tracer performance in future scanners that employ new combinations of excitation field amplitude (H{sub o}) and frequency (ω). Using an optimized, monodisperse MPI tracer, we studied how several combinations of drive field frequencies and amplitudes affect the tracer's response, using Magnetic Particle Spectrometry and AC hysteresis, for drive field conditions at 15.5, 26, and 40.2 kHz, with field amplitudes ranging from 7 to 52 mT/μ{sub 0}. For both fluid and immobilized nanoparticle samples, we determined that magnetic response was dominated by Néel reversal. Furthermore, we observed that the peak slew-rate (ωH{sub o}) determined the tracer magnetic response. Smaller amplitudes provided correspondingly smaller field of view, sometimes resulting in excitation of minor hysteresis loops. Changing the drive field conditions but keeping the peak slew-rate constant kept the tracer response almost the same. Higher peak slew-rates led to reduced maximum signal intensity and greater coercivity in the tracer response. Our experimental results were in reasonable agreement with Stoner-Wohlfarth model based theories.

  14. Using natural radionuclides 210Po and 210Pb in GEOTRACES data from the North Atlantic to estimate particulate and biologically reactive trace element scavenging and regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigaud, Sylvain; Church, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Central to understanding the coupling of oceanic carbon and nutrient cycles are trace elements that can limit ocean production and ultimately climate change. These include elements that are both lithogenic (particle reactive) and biogenic (biologically reactive) central to particle scavenging, exchange and bioavailability. The natural 210Po and 210Pb radionuclide (granddaughter/parent) pair provides the radiometric means to model particle scavenging and exchange in the ocean on monthly to annual time scales. Data on dissolved (<0.2 μm) and particulate (>0.2 μm, >53μm) 210Po (t1/2= 138.4 d) and 210Pb (T1/2 = 22.3 y) are available from seven complete water profiles during two U.S. GEOTRACES cruises that transited the North Atlantic during fall 2010 and 2011. The transects correspond to a wide range of marine environments: coastal slopes at the western and eutrophic up-welling at the eastern margins, Saharan dust sources from the east, hydro-thermal vents in the TAG plume on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and oligotrophic gyres in both the western and eastern basins. Steady state box modeling at each depth interval was employed to estimate radionuclide exchange rates at the fine-large particle and fine particulate-dissolved interface, in terms of biological uptake, and net of radioactive support or decay. By proxy, the results should predict the rates of biological (210Po) and particle reactive (210Pb) trace element adsorption and resorption, vertical particulate and carbon export, and respective residence times. The model results show the contrasting chemical behaviour of the two nuclides over the large range of oceanic conditions encountered in the North Atlantic. In the surface ocean, 210Po scavenging is linearly correlated with the concentration of particulate organic carbon (POC) in large particles, supporting the role of biogenic particles in 210Po bioaccumulation and export. At depth, 210Po exhibits significant widespread deficit with respect to 210Pb, which could

  15. High rate particle tracking and ultra-fast timing with a thin hybrid silicon pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Carassiti, V.; Ceccucci, A.; Cortina Gil, E.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Garbolino, S.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Marchetto, F.; Mapelli, A.; Martin, E.; Mazza, G.; Morel, M.; Noy, M.; Nuessle, G.; Perktold, L.; Petagna, P.; Petrucci, F.; Poltorak, K.; Riedler, P.; Rivetti, A.; Statera, M.; Velghe, B.

    2013-08-01

    The Gigatracker (GTK) is a hybrid silicon pixel detector designed for the NA62 experiment at CERN. The beam spectrometer, made of three GTK stations, has to sustain high and non-uniform particle rate (∼ 1 GHz in total) and measure momentum and angles of each beam track with a combined time resolution of 150 ps. In order to reduce multiple scattering and hadronic interactions of beam particles, the material budget of a single GTK station has been fixed to 0.5% X0. The expected fluence for 100 days of running is 2 ×1014 1 MeV neq /cm2, comparable to the one foreseen in the inner trackers of LHC detectors during 10 years of operation. To comply with these requirements, an efficient and very low-mass (< 0.15 %X0) cooling system is being constructed, using a novel microchannel cooling silicon plate. Two complementary read-out architectures have been produced as small-scale prototypes: one is based on a Time-over-Threshold circuit followed by a TDC shared by a group of pixels, while the other makes use of a constant-fraction discriminator followed by an on-pixel TDC. The read-out ASICs are produced in 130 nm IBM CMOS technology and will be thinned down to 100 μm or less. An overview of the Gigatracker detector system will be presented. Experimental results from laboratory and beam tests of prototype bump-bonded assemblies will be described as well. These results show a time resolution of about 170 ps for single hits from minimum ionizing particles, using 200 μm thick silicon sensors.

  16. Measurements of the heat release rate integral in turbulent premixed stagnation flames with particle image velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yung-Cheng; Kim, Munki; Han, Jeongjae; Yun, Sangwook; Yoon, Youngbin

    2008-08-15

    A new definition of turbulent consumption speed is proposed in this work that is based on the heat release rate integral, rather than the mass burning rate integral. Its detailed derivation and the assumptions involved are discussed in a general context that applies to all properly defined reaction progress variables. The major advantage of the proposed definition is that it does not require the thin-flame assumption, in contrast to previous definitions. Experimental determination of the local turbulent displacement speed, S{sub D}, and the local turbulent consumption speed, S{sub C}, is also demonstrated with the particle image velocimetry technique in three turbulent premixed stagnation flames. The turbulence intensity of these flames is of the same order of the laminar burning velocity. Based on the current data, a model equation for the local mean heat release rate is proposed. The relationship between S{sub D} and S{sub C} is discussed along with a possible modeling approach for the turbulent displacement speed. (author)

  17. Dose Rate Calibration of a Commercial Beta-Particle Irradiator Used In Archeological and Geological Dating

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, S.M.

    2004-10-31

    The 801E Multiple Sample Irradiator, manufactured by Daybreak Nuclear Systems, is capable of exposing up to 30 samples to beta radiation by placing each sample one by one directly beneath a heavily shielded ceramic Sr-90/Y-90 source and opening a specially designed shutter. Daybreak Nuclear Systems does not provide the {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y dose rate to the sample because of variations of up to 20% in the nominal activity of the beta sources (separately manufactured by AEA Technology). Thus it is left to the end user to determine. Here aluminum oxide doped with carbon (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C), in the form of Landauer's Luxel{trademark}, was irradiated to different known doses using a calibrated {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y beta particle irradiator, and the OSL signal monitored after each irradiation to generate a calibration curve. Comparison of the OSL Signal from the unknown 801E Irradiator dose with the calibration curve enabled the dose and therefore dose rate to be determined. The timing accuracy of the 801E Irradiator was also evaluated and found to be +/- 0.5 seconds. The dose rate of the beta source was found to be 0.147 +/- 0.007 Gy/s.

  18. Solar particle dose rate buildup and distribution in critical body organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwell, William; Weyland, Mark D.; Simonsen, Lisa C.

    1993-01-01

    Human body organs have varying degrees of radiosensitivity as evidenced by radioepidemiologic tables. The major critical organs for both the male and female that have been identified include the lung, thyroid, stomach, and breast (female). Using computerized anatomical models of the 50th percentile United States Air Force male and female, we present the self-shielding effects of these various body organs and how the shielding effects change as the location (dose point) in the body varies. Several major solar proton events from previous solar cycles and several events from the current 22nd solar cycle have been analyzed. The solar particle event rise time, peak intensity, and decay time vary considerably from event to event. Absorbed dose and dose equivalent rate calculations and organ risk assessment data are presented for each critical body organ. These data are compared with the current NASA astronaut dose limits as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements.

  19. Globins Scavenge Sulfur Trioxide Anion Radical*

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Paul R.; Gardner, Daniel P.; Gardner, Alexander P.

    2015-01-01

    Ferrous myoglobin was oxidized by sulfur trioxide anion radical (STAR) during the free radical chain oxidation of sulfite. Oxidation was inhibited by the STAR scavenger GSH and by the heme ligand CO. Bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of STAR with several ferrous globins and biomolecules were determined by kinetic competition. Reaction rate constants for myoglobin, hemoglobin, neuroglobin, and flavohemoglobin are large at 38, 120, 2,600, and ≥ 7,500 × 106 m−1 s−1, respectively, and correlate with redox potentials. Measured rate constants for O2, GSH, ascorbate, and NAD(P)H are also large at ∼100, 10, 130, and 30 × 106 m−1 s−1, respectively, but nevertheless allow for favorable competition by globins and a capacity for STAR scavenging in vivo. Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking sulfite oxidase and deleted of flavohemoglobin showed an O2-dependent growth impairment with nonfermentable substrates that was exacerbated by sulfide, a precursor to mitochondrial sulfite formation. Higher O2 exposures inactivated the superoxide-sensitive mitochondrial aconitase in cells, and hypoxia elicited both aconitase and NADP+-isocitrate dehydrogenase activity losses. Roles for STAR-derived peroxysulfate radical, superoxide radical, and sulfo-NAD(P) in the mechanism of STAR toxicity and flavohemoglobin protection in yeast are suggested. PMID:26381408

  20. Globins Scavenge Sulfur Trioxide Anion Radical.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Paul R; Gardner, Daniel P; Gardner, Alexander P

    2015-11-06

    Ferrous myoglobin was oxidized by sulfur trioxide anion radical (STAR) during the free radical chain oxidation of sulfite. Oxidation was inhibited by the STAR scavenger GSH and by the heme ligand CO. Bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of STAR with several ferrous globins and biomolecules were determined by kinetic competition. Reaction rate constants for myoglobin, hemoglobin, neuroglobin, and flavohemoglobin are large at 38, 120, 2,600, and ≥ 7,500 × 10(6) m(-1) s(-1), respectively, and correlate with redox potentials. Measured rate constants for O2, GSH, ascorbate, and NAD(P)H are also large at ∼100, 10, 130, and 30 × 10(6) m(-1) s(-1), respectively, but nevertheless allow for favorable competition by globins and a capacity for STAR scavenging in vivo. Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking sulfite oxidase and deleted of flavohemoglobin showed an O2-dependent growth impairment with nonfermentable substrates that was exacerbated by sulfide, a precursor to mitochondrial sulfite formation. Higher O2 exposures inactivated the superoxide-sensitive mitochondrial aconitase in cells, and hypoxia elicited both aconitase and NADP(+)-isocitrate dehydrogenase activity losses. Roles for STAR-derived peroxysulfate radical, superoxide radical, and sulfo-NAD(P) in the mechanism of STAR toxicity and flavohemoglobin protection in yeast are suggested.

  1. Deposition rate and etching rate due to neutral radicals and dust particles measured using QCMs together with a dust eliminating filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Ryu; Koga, Kazunori; Yamashita, Daisuke; Kamataki, Kunihiro; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Shiratani, Masaharu; Ashikawa, Naoko; Tokitani, Masayuki; Masuzaki, Suguru; Nishimura, Kiyohiko; Sagara, Akio; the LHD experimental Group Team

    2015-09-01

    We have developed an in-situ method for measuring deposition rate of radicals and dust particles using quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) together with a dust eliminating filter. The QCMs have three channels of quartz crystals. Channel 1 was used to measure total deposition rate due to radicals and dust particles. Channel 2 was covered with a dust eliminating filter. Channel 3 was covered with a stainless-steel plate. Moreover, all QCMs are covered with a grounded stainless steel mesh for suppressing influx of charged particles. The measurements were conducted in the Large Helical Device in the National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan. Although the deposition measurements during the discharges were difficult, we obtained deposition rate and etching rate by comparing the data before and after each discharge. The frequency difference for channel 1 changes from 0.1 Hz (etching) to -0.5 Hz (deposition), while those for channels 2 and 3 are within a range of +/-0.1 Hz and +/-0.05 Hz, respectively. The QCM method gives information on deposition rate and etching rate due to neutral radicals and dust particles.

  2. Rain scavenging of soluble gases by non-evaporating and evaporating droplets from inhomogeneous atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elperin, Tov; Fominykh, Andrew; Krasovitov, Boris

    2013-11-01

    We suggest a one-dimensional model of precipitation scavenging of soluble gaseous pollutants by non-evaporating and evaporating droplets that is valid for arbitrary initial vertical distribution of soluble trace gases in the atmosphere. It is shown that for low gradients of soluble trace gases in the atmosphere, scavenging of gaseous pollutants is governed by a linear wave equation that describes propagation of a wave in one direction. The derived equation is solved by the method of characteristics. Scavenging coefficient and the rates of precipitation scavenging are calculated for wet removal of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and ammonia (NH3) using measured initial distributions of trace gases. It is shown that scavenging coefficient for arbitrary initial vertical distribution of soluble trace gases in the atmosphere is non-stationary and height-dependent. In case of exponential initial distribution of soluble trace gases in the atmosphere, scavenging coefficient for non-evaporating droplets in the region between the ground and the position of a scavenging front is a product of rainfall rate, solubility parameter, and the growth constant in the formula for the initial profile of a soluble trace gas in the atmosphere. This expression yields the same estimate of scavenging coefficient for sulfur dioxide scavenging by rain as field estimates presented in McMahon and Denison (1979). It is demonstrated that the smaller the slope of the concentration profile the higher the value of a scavenging coefficient.

  3. Effect of cabin ventilation rate on ultrafine particle exposure inside automobiles.

    PubMed

    Knibbs, Luke D; de Dear, Richard J; Morawska, Lidia

    2010-05-01

    We alternately measured on-road and in-vehicle ultrafine (<100 nm) particle (UFP) concentration for 5 passenger vehicles that comprised an age range of 18 years. A range of cabin ventilation settings were assessed during 301 trips through a 4 km road tunnel in Sydney, Australia. Outdoor air flow (ventilation) rates under these settings were quantified on open roads using tracer gas techniques. Significant variability in tunnel trip average median in-cabin/on-road (I/O) UFP ratios was observed (0.08 to approximately 1.0). Based on data spanning all test automobiles and ventilation settings, a positive linear relationship was found between outdoor air flow rate and I/O ratio, with the former accounting for a substantial proportion of variation in the latter (R(2) = 0.81). UFP concentrations recorded in-cabin during tunnel travel were significantly higher than those reported by comparable studies performed on open roadways. A simple mathematical model afforded the ability to predict tunnel trip average in-cabin UFP concentrations with good accuracy. Our data indicate that under certain conditions, in-cabin UFP exposures incurred during tunnel travel may contribute significantly to daily exposure. The UFP exposure of automobile occupants appears strongly related to their choice of ventilation setting and vehicle.

  4. Relaxation rates for inverse power law particle interactions and their variable hard sphere surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Robert

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that collision models based on an assumed intermolecular potential (IPL, LJ, ...) can be successfully replaced by simplified surrogates (VHS, VSS, VS, ...) in DSMC calculations. But these surrogates only reproduce certain gross properties of the molecular model, for example, the temperature dependence of the viscosity; they do not approximate, and even mis-state, the details of the particle interactions. The success of the simplified models in problems at finite Knudsen number, where the Navier-Stokes approximation is not valid, may therefore seem surprising. To understand this success in a very special case, we showed that the first seven relaxation rates of the linearized Boltzmann equation for Maxwellian molecules are well approximated by the corresponding relaxation rates of its VHS surrogate. We will show that this analysis can be extended in somewhat less generality to IPL interactions, and to some extent to more realistic models including LJ. We believe that this analysis can help address the more general problem of identifying the properties of the collision model that dominate the predictions of the Boltzmann equation.

  5. Scavenging of rodent carcasses following simulated mortality due to field applications of anticoagulant rodenticide.

    PubMed

    Montaz, Julie; Jacquot, Marion; Coeurdassier, Michaël

    2014-11-01

    Worldwide, agricultural uses of anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) cause poisonings of non-target wildlife as observed in France where bromadiolone is used to control water vole outbreaks. Following bromadiolone field application, a part of the vole population may die aboveground of the treated plots and thus, can represent an important risk of secondary poisoning for scavengers. In this study, water voles were trapped in a non-treated area and their carcasses were placed aboveground in plots located in an area where a vole outbreak occurred. Then, the environmental persistence, the diurnal and nocturnal scavenging rates of water vole carcasses were assessed in autumn 2011 and in spring 2012. The diurnal scavenger species were also identified. The environmental persistence of the carcasses to reach at least a scavenging rate of 87.5 % was 0.5-1.5 day. The average rates of diurnal and nocturnal scavenging ranged from 67 to 100 % and 5 to 100 %, respectively. They depended on the composition of the scavenger community present near the monitored plots; diurnal scavenging rates being higher with corvids than with raptors. In autumn, the red kite and the common buzzard were the main scavengers in one of the plots, what suggests a high risk of poisoning for these raptors during post-nuptial migration. So, the collection of vole carcasses after treatments and the limitations of bromadiolone applications when high densities of predators/scavengers are observed could be implemented to mitigate the risks of secondary poisoning.

  6. Star formation rate and metallicity of damped Lyman α absorbers in cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamine, K.; Springel, V.; Hernquist, L.

    2004-02-01

    We study the distribution of the star formation rate (SFR) and metallicity of damped Lyman α absorbers (DLAs) in the redshift range z= 0-4.5 using cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the Λ cold dark matter model. Our simulations include standard radiative cooling and heating with a uniform ultraviolet background, star formation, supernova (SN) feedback, as well as a phenomenological model for feedback by galactic winds. The latter allows us to examine, in particular, the effect of galactic outflows on the distribution of the SFR and metallicity of DLAs. We employ a `conservative entropy' formulation of SPH which alleviates numerical overcooling effects that affected earlier simulations. In addition, we utilize a series of simulations of varying box-size and particle number to investigate the impact of numerical resolution on our results. We find that there is a positive correlation between the projected stellar mass density and the neutral hydrogen column density (NHI) of DLAs for high NHI systems, and that there is a good correspondence in the spatial distribution of stars and DLAs in the simulations. The evolution of typical star-to-gas mass ratios in DLAs can be characterized by an increase from approximately 2 at z= 4.5 to 3 at z= 3, to 10 at z= 1 and finally to 20 at z= 0. We also find that the projected SFR density in DLAs follows the Kennicutt law well at all redshifts, and the simulated values are consistent with the recent observational estimates of this quantity by Wolfe, Prochaska & Gawiser. The rate of evolution in the mean metallicity of simulated DLAs as a function of redshift is mild, and is consistent with the rate estimated from observations. The predicted metallicity of DLAs is generally subsolar in our simulations, and there is a significant scatter in the distribution of DLA metallicity for a given NHI. However, we find that the median metallicity of simulated DLAs is close to that of Lyman-break galaxies, and is

  7. Behaviour and fate of urban particles in coastal waters: Settling rate, size distribution and metals contamination characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oursel, B.; Garnier, C.; Pairaud, I.; Omanović, D.; Durrieu, G.; Syakti, A. D.; Le Poupon, C.; Thouvenin, B.; Lucas, Y.

    2014-02-01

    The evaluation of contaminant net fluxes from the coast to the open sea requires the study of terrigeneous particles behaviour and fate. We studied the particles issued from two small coastal rivers whose waters are mixed with treated wastewater (TWW) coming from the Marseille wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) just before discharge to the Mediterranean Sea. An experimental device was developed and used to investigate particles settling rates, size distribution and metallic contamination when mixing with seawater. The particles were sampled in flood deposits of rivers and outlets during rainy periods and in the outlet water during dry periods. The flood deposits were mainly composed of 50-200 μm-sized particles, higher metals content being observed in the finest fractions. Dry period particles showed the stronger influence of wastewater inputs. Al, Ca, Cs, Li, Rb, Ti, and Tl were mainly of terrigeneous origin, whereas Ag, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mg, Mo, Ni, Pb, POC, Sb, Sn and Zn were of anthropogenic origin, issued from non-treated sewage, TWW or industrial waste. In seafloor sediments, all metals exhibited a continuous increase of concentration from the outlet to, at least, 800 m offshore. Implementation of settling particles characteristics in a 3D hydrodynamic and sediment transport model reproduced well the observed deposition of polluted particles in the coastal zone and indicated a non-negligible offshore export of the finest particles and their accompanying pollutants.

  8. DETERMINATION OF PARTICLE DEPOSITION RATES FOR COOKING AND OTHER INDOOR SOURCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Residential indoor particle concentrations are dependent on indoor sources, penetration of outdoor particles, air change with outdoors, and deposition of particles on indoor surfaces as well as other loss mechanisms. Of these factors, few data are available on deposition of pa...

  9. Recoil-Implantation Of Multiple Radioisotopes Towards Wear Rate Measurements And Particle Tracing In Prosthetic Joints

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Jacob A.; Timmers, Heiko; Smith, Paul N.; Scarvell, Jennifer M.; Gladkis, Laura

    2011-06-01

    This study demonstrates a new method of radioisotope labeling of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene inserts in prosthetic joints for wear studies. The radioisotopes {sup 97}Ru, {sup 100}Pd, {sup 100}Rh, and {sup 101m}Rh are produced in fusion evaporation reactions induced by {sup 12}C ions in a {sup 92}Zr target foil. The fusion products recoil-implant into ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene plugs, machined to fit into the surface of the inserts. During laboratory simulations of the joint motion, a wear rate of the labeled polyethylene may be measured and the pathways of wear debris particles can be traced by detecting characteristic gamma-rays. The concentration profiles of the radioisotopes extend effectively uniformly from the polyethylene surface to a depth of about 4 {mu}m. The multiplicity of labeling and the use of several gamma-ray lines aids with avoiding systematic measurement uncertainties. Two polyethylene plugs were labeled and one was fitted into the surface of the tibial insert of a knee prosthesis, which had been worn in. Actuation over close to 100,000 cycles with a 900 N axial load and a 24 deg. flexion angle removed (14{+-}1)% of the gamma-ray activity from the plug. Most of this activity dispersed into the serum lubricant identifying this as the important debris pathway. Less than 1% activity was transferred to the femoral component of the prosthesis and the measured activity on the tibial tray was insignificant. Assuming uniform wear across the superior surface of the insert, a wear rate of (12{+-}3) mm{sup 3}/Megacycle was determined. This is consistent with wear rate measurements under similar conditions using other techniques.

  10. Recoil-Implantation Of Multiple Radioisotopes Towards Wear Rate Measurements And Particle Tracing In Prosthetic Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Jacob A.; Smith, Paul N.; Scarvell, Jennifer M.; Gladkis, Laura; Timmers, Heiko

    2011-06-01

    This study demonstrates a new method of radioisotope labeling of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene inserts in prosthetic joints for wear studies. The radioisotopes 97Ru, 100Pd, 100Rh, and 101mRh are produced in fusion evaporation reactions induced by 12C ions in a 92Zr target foil. The fusion products recoil-implant into ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene plugs, machined to fit into the surface of the inserts. During laboratory simulations of the joint motion, a wear rate of the labeled polyethylene may be measured and the pathways of wear debris particles can be traced by detecting characteristic gamma-rays. The concentration profiles of the radioisotopes extend effectively uniformly from the polyethylene surface to a depth of about 4 μm. The multiplicity of labeling and the use of several gamma-ray lines aids with avoiding systematic measurement uncertainties. Two polyethylene plugs were labeled and one was fitted into the surface of the tibial insert of a knee prosthesis, which had been worn in. Actuation over close to 100,000 cycles with a 900 N axial load and a 24° flexion angle removed (14±1)% of the gamma-ray activity from the plug. Most of this activity dispersed into the serum lubricant identifying this as the important debris pathway. Less than 1% activity was transferred to the femoral component of the prosthesis and the measured activity on the tibial tray was insignificant. Assuming uniform wear across the superior surface of the insert, a wear rate of (12±3) mm3/Megacycle was determined. This is consistent with wear rate measurements under similar conditions using other techniques.

  11. Reduction of exposure to ultrafine particles by kitchen exhaust hoods: the effects of exhaust flow rates, particle size, and burner position.

    PubMed

    Rim, Donghyun; Wallace, Lance; Nabinger, Steven; Persily, Andrew

    2012-08-15

    Cooking stoves, both gas and electric, are one of the strongest and most common sources of ultrafine particles (UFP) in homes. UFP have been shown to be associated with adverse health effects such as DNA damage and respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. This study investigates the effectiveness of kitchen exhaust hoods in reducing indoor levels of UFP emitted from a gas stove and oven. Measurements in an unoccupied manufactured house monitored size-resolved UFP (2 nm to 100 nm) concentrations from the gas stove and oven while varying range hood flow rate and burner position. The air change rate in the building was measured continuously based on the decay of a tracer gas (sulfur hexafluoride, SF(6)). The results show that range hood flow rate and burner position (front vs. rear) can have strong effects on the reduction of indoor levels of UFP released from the stove and oven, subsequently reducing occupant exposure to UFP. Higher range hood flow rates are generally more effective for UFP reduction, though the reduction varies with particle diameter. The influence of the range hood exhaust is larger for the back burner than for the front burner. The number-weighted particle reductions for range hood flow rates varying between 100 m(3)/h and 680 m(3)/h range from 31% to 94% for the front burner, from 54% to 98% for the back burner, and from 39% to 96% for the oven.

  12. Radiation damage in single-particle cryo-electron microscopy: effects of dose and dose rate

    PubMed Central

    Karuppasamy, Manikandan; Karimi Nejadasl, Fatemeh; Vulovic, Milos; Koster, Abraham J.; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.

    2011-01-01

    combined with an improved understanding of the effects of dose and dose rate will aid single-particle cryo-electron microscopists to have better control of the outcome of their experiments. PMID:21525648

  13. Multiple free-radical scavenging (MULTIS) capacity in cattle serum

    PubMed Central

    Sueishi, Yoshimi; Kamogawa, Erisa; Kimura, Anna; Kitahara, Go; Satoh, Hiroyuki; Asanuma, Taketoshi; Oowada, Shigeru

    2017-01-01

    Multiple free-radical scavenging (MULTIS) activity in cattle and human sera was evaluated with electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Scavenging rates against six active species, namely hydroxyl radical, superoxide anion, alkoxyl radical, alkylperoxyl radical, methyl radical, and singlet oxygen were quantified. The difference in the electron spin resonance signal intensity in the presence and absence of the serum was converted into the scavenging rates. Comparative MULTIS measurements were made in sera from eight beef cattle, three fetal calves and fifteen healthy human volunteers. Further, we determined the MULTIS value of albumin, the most abundant component in serum. MULTIS values in cattle sera indicated higher scavenging activity against most free radical species tested than human sera. In particular, cattle serum scavenging activities against superoxide and methyl radical were higher than human serum by 2.6 and 3.7 fold, respectively. In cattle serum, albumin appears to play a dominant role in MULTIS activity, but in human serum that is not the case. Previous data indicated that the abundance of uric acid in bovine blood is nearly 80% less than humans; however, this difference does not explain the deviation in MULTIS profile. PMID:28163386

  14. The TDF System for Thermonuclear Plasma Reaction Rates, Mean Energies and Two-Body Final State Particle Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Warshaw, S I

    2001-07-11

    The rate of thermonuclear reactions in hot plasmas as a function of local plasma temperature determines the way in which thermonuclear ignition and burning proceeds in the plasma. The conventional model approach to calculating these rates is to assume that the reacting nuclei in the plasma are in Maxwellian equilibrium at some well-defined plasma temperature, over which the statistical average of the reaction rate quantity {sigma}v is calculated, where {sigma} is the cross-section for the reaction to proceed at the relative velocity v between the reacting particles. This approach is well-understood and is the basis for much nuclear fusion and astrophysical nuclear reaction rate data. The Thermonuclear Data File (TDF) system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Warshaw 1991), which is the topic of this report, contains data on the Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates for various light nuclear reactions and the correspondingly Maxwellian-averaged energy spectra of the particles in the final state of those reactions as well. This spectral information closely models the output particle and energy distributions in a burning plasma, and therefore leads to more accurate computational treatments of thermonuclear burn, output particle energy deposition and diagnostics, in various contexts. In this report we review and derive the theoretical basis for calculating Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates, mean particle energies, and output particle spectral energy distributions for these reactions in the TDF system. The treatment of the kinematics is non-relativistic. The current version of the TDF system provides exit particle energy spectrum distributions for two-body final state reactions only. In a future report we will discuss and describe how output particle energy spectra for three- and four-body final states can be developed for the TDF system. We also include in this report a description of the algorithmic implementation of the

  15. Radical scavengers from heavy hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Junichi

    1996-10-01

    The hydrogen-donating properties of some hydrocarbons form the basis for processes such as coal liquefaction and heavy oil upgrading. However, these hydrocarbons have seldom been used for other purposes, because their potential applications have not been well recognized. Research has indicated that these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons can be used in important reactions as radical scavengers and have properties particular to those of pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms. Over years of study researchers have found that pure hydrocarbons with radical-scavenging effects nearly as high as those in conventional hindered phenolic antioxidants can be produced from petroleum, and these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons exhibit such effects even in oxidative atmospheres (i.e., they function as antioxidants). He has also shown that these mixtures have some properties particular to pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms, and they`ve seen that a mechanism based on the steric effects appears when these hydrocarbons are used in heavy oil hydroprocessing. Hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons should be a viable resource in many applications. In this article, he presents radical-scavenging abilities, characteristics as pure hydrocarbons, and applications on the basis of the studies.

  16. Extension of a Kinetic-Theory Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates to Reactions with Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Recently introduced molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction rate information) are extended to include reactions involving charged particles and electronic energy levels. The proposed extensions include ionization reactions, exothermic associative ionization reactions, endothermic and exothermic charge exchange reactions, and other exchange reactions involving ionized species. The extensions are shown to agree favorably with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions.

  17. Scavenging of H2O2 by mouse brain mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Starkov, Anatoly A.; Andreyev, Alexander Yu; Zhang, Steven F.; Starkova, Natalia N.; Korneeva, Maria; Syromyatnikov, Mikhail; Popov, Vasily N.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism is unique in that mitochondria both generate and scavenge ROS. Recent estimates of ROS scavenging capacity of brain mitochondria are surprisingly high, ca. 9-12 nmol H2O2/min/mg, which is ~100 times higher than the rate of ROS generation. This raises a question whether brain mitochondria are a source or a sink of ROS. We studied the interaction between ROS generation and scavenging in mouse brain mitochondria by measuring the rate of removal of H2O2 added at a concentration of 0.4 μM, which is close to the reported physiological H2O2 concentrations in tissues, under conditions of low and high levels of mitochondrial H2O2 generation. With NAD-linked substrates, the rate of H2O2 generation by mitochondria was ~50–70 pmol/min/mg. The H2O2 scavenging dynamics was best approximated by the first order reaction equation. H2O2 scavenging was not affected by the uncoupling of mitochondria, phosphorylation of added ADP, or the genetic ablation of glutathione peroxidase 1, but decreased in the absence of respiratory substrates, in the presence of thioredoxin reductase inhibitor auranofin, or in partially disrupted mitochondria. With succinate, the rate of H2O2 generation was ~2,200–2,900 pmol/min/mg; the scavenging of added H2O2 was masked by a significant accumulation of generated H2O2 in the assay medium. The obtained data were fitted into a simple model that reasonably well described the interaction between H2O2 scavenging and production. It showed that mitochondria are neither a sink nor a source of H2O2, but can function as both at the same time, efficiently stabilizing exogenous H2O2 concentration at a level directly proportional to the ratio of the H2O2 generation rate to the rate constant of the first order scavenging reaction. PMID:25248416

  18. A study of liquid boric oxide particle growth rates in a gas stream from a simulated jet engine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setze, Paul C

    1957-01-01

    It was experimentally determined that the liquid boric oxide particles leaving a jet engine combustor, burning a boron-containing fuel, will have diameters of 1.0 x 10(exp -5) to 2.0 x 10(exp -5) centimeter. For this size range the particle heat-transfer and drag coefficients are essentially infinite. The results may be applied to any boron-containing fuel. Equations are developed that enable the calculation of the particle size-time history. A study of boric oxide deposition mechanisms is included, and suggestions for decreading deposition rates given.

  19. The combustion of large particles of char in bubbling fluidized beds: The dependence of Sherwood number and the rate of burning on particle diameter

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, J.S.; Hayhurst, A.N.; Scott, S.A.

    2006-11-15

    Particles of char derived from a variety of fuels (e.g., biomass, sewage sludge, coal, or graphite), with diameters in excess of {approx}1.5mm, burn in fluidized bed combustors containing smaller particles of, e.g., sand, such that the rate is controlled by the diffusion both of O{sub 2} to the burning solid and of the products CO and CO{sub 2} away from it into the particulate phase. It is therefore important to characterize these mass transfer processes accurately. Measurements of the burning rate of char particles made from sewage sludge suggest that the Sherwood number, Sh, increases linearly with the diameter of the fuel particle, d{sub char} (for d{sub char}>{approx}1.5mm). This linear dependence of Sh on d{sub char} is expected from the basic equation Sh=2{epsilon}{sub mf}(1+d{sub char}/2{delta}{sub diff})/{tau}, provided the thickness of the boundary layer for mass transfer, {delta}{sub diff}, is constant in the region of interest (d{sub char}>{approx}1.5mm). Such a dependence is not seen in the empirical equations currently used and based on the Frossling expression. It is found here that for chars made from sewage sludge (for d{sub char}>{approx}1.5mm), the thickness of the boundary layer for mass transfer in a fluidized bed, {delta}{sub diff}, is less than that predicted by empirical correlations based on the Frossling expression. In fact, {delta}{sub diff} is not more than the diameter of the fluidized sand particles. Finally, the experiments in this study indicate that models based on surface renewal theory should be rejected for a fluidized bed, because they give unrealistically short contact times for packets of fluidized particles at the surface of a burning sphere. The result is the new correlation Sh = 2{epsilon}{sub mf}/{tau} + (A{sub cush}/A{sub char})(d{sub char}/ {delta}{sub diff}) for the dependence of Sh on d{sub char}, the diameter of a burning char particle. This equation is based on there being a gas-cushion of fluidizing gas underneath a

  20. Wear rate quantifying in real-time using the charged particle surface activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandreanu, B.; Popa-Simil, L.; Voiculescu, D.; Racolta, P. M.

    1997-02-01

    Surface activation, commonly known as Thin Layer Activation (TLA), is currently employed in over 30 accelerator laboratories around the world for wear and/or corrosion monitoring in industrial plants [1-6]. TLA was primarily designed and developed to meet requirements of potential industrial partners, in order to transfer this technique from research to industry. The method consists of accelerated ion bombardment of a surface of interest, e.g., a machine part subjected to wear. Loss of material owing to wear, erosive corrosion or abrasion is characterized by monitoring the resultant changes in radioactivity. In principle, depending upon the case at hand, one may choose to measure either the remnant activity of the component of interest or to monitor the activity of the debris. For applications of the second type, especially when a lubricating agent is involved, dedicated installations have been constructed and adapted to an engine or a tribological testing stand in order to assure oil circulation around an externally placed detection gauge. This way, the wear particles suspended in the lubricant can be detected and the material loss rates quantified in real time. Moreover, in specific cases, such as the one presented in this paper, remnant activity measurements prove to be useful tools for complementary results. This paper provides a detailed presentation of such a case: in situ resistance-to-wear testing of two types of piston rings.

  1. Microtubule dynamics analysis using kymographs and variable-rate particle filters.

    PubMed

    Smal, Ihor; Grigoriev, Ilya; Akhmanova, Anna; Niessen, Wiro J; Meijering, Erik

    2010-07-01

    Studying intracellular dynamics is of fundamental importance for understanding healthy life at the molecular level and for developing drugs to target disease processes. One of the key technologies to enable this research is the automated tracking and motion analysis of these objects in microscopy image sequences. To make better use of the spatiotemporal information than common frame-by-frame tracking methods, two alternative approaches have recently been proposed, based upon either Bayesian estimation or space-time segmentation. In this paper, we propose to combine the power of both approaches, and develop a new probabilistic method to segment the traces of the moving objects in kymograph representations of the image data. It is based on variable-rate particle filtering and uses multiscale trend analysis of the extracted traces to estimate the relevant kinematic parameters. Experiments on realistic synthetically generated images as well as on real biological image data demonstrate the improved potential of the new method for the analysis of microtubule dynamics in vitro.

  2. Postmortem scavenging by the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana): Impact on taphonomic assemblages and progression.

    PubMed

    King, Kama A; Lord, Wayne D; Ketchum, Heather R; O'Brien, R Christopher

    2016-09-01

    The Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) is a highly active scavenger whose behavior has significant impacts on rates of decomposition and skeletonization, which have previously not been addressed. In this study, scavenging by the opossum led to the skeletonization of carcasses in half of the accumulated degree days (ADD) of a comparable non-scavenged control carcass. Opossums used body orifices, as well as natural tears caused by the decomposition process, to access internal tissues and consume them. This activity resulted in little movement of the carcass and the retained appearance of natural undisturbed decomposition. This concealed activity has the potential to cause drastically incorrect estimates of time since deposition and post-mortem interval. Scavenging by opossums was also found to leave distinct tooth mark and other defects on bone, which have not been previously distinguished in the literature. This research suggests, beyond effects on PMI, that scavenging by opossums has been historically overlooked and misattributed to canid scavengers.

  3. Diffusion Rate Limitations in Actin-Based Propulsion of Hard and Deformable Particles

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Richard B.; Purich, Daniel L.

    2006-01-01

    The mechanism by which actin polymerization propels intracellular vesicles and invasive microorganisms remains an open question. Several recent quantitative studies have examined propulsion of biomimetic particles such as polystyrene microspheres, phospholipid vesicles, and oil droplets. In addition to allowing quantitative measurement of parameters such as the dependence of particle speed on its size, these systems have also revealed characteristic behaviors such a saltatory motion of hard particles and oscillatory deformation of soft particles. Such measurements and observations provide tests for proposed mechanisms of actin-based motility. In the actoclampin filament end-tracking motor model, particle-surface-bound filament end-tracking proteins are involved in load-insensitive processive insertion of actin subunits onto elongating filament plus-ends that are persistently tethered to the surface. In contrast, the tethered-ratchet model assumes working filaments are untethered and the free-ended filaments grow as thermal ratchets in a load-sensitive manner. This article presents a model for the diffusion and consumption of actin monomers during actin-based particle propulsion to predict the monomer concentration field around motile particles. The results suggest that the various behaviors of biomimetic particles, including dynamic saltatory motion of hard particles and oscillatory vesicle deformations, can be quantitatively and self-consistently explained by load-insensitive, diffusion-limited elongation of (+)-end-tethered actin filaments, consistent with predictions of the actoclampin filament-end tracking mechanism. PMID:16731556

  4. Damping rates of surface plasmons for particles of size from nano- to micrometers; reduction of the nonradiative decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolwas, K.; Derkachova, A.

    2013-01-01

    Damping rates of multipolar, localized surface plasmons (SPs) of gold and silver nanospheres of radii up to 1000 nm were found with the tools of classical electrodynamics. The significant increase in damping rates followed by noteworthy decrease for larger particles takes place along with substantial red-shift of plasmon resonance frequencies as a function of particle size. We also introduced interface damping into our modeling, which substantially modifies the plasmon damping rates of smaller particles. We demonstrate unexpected reduction of the multipolar SP damping rates in certain size ranges. This effect can be explained by the suppression of the nonradiative decay channel as a result of the lost competition with the radiative channel. We show that experimental dipole damping rates [H. Baida, et al., Nano Lett. 9(10) (2009) 3463, and C. Sönnichsen, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 (2002) 077402], and the resulting resonance quality factors can be described in a consistent and straightforward way within our modeling extended to particle sizes still unavailable experimentally.

  5. Visible light photon counters (VLPCs) for high rate tracking medical imaging and particle astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Atac, M.

    1998-02-01

    This paper is on the operation principles of the Visible Light Photon Counters (VLPCs), application to high luminosity-high multiplicity tracking for High Energy Charged Particle Physics, and application to Medical Imaging and Particle Astrophysics. The VLPCs as Solid State Photomultipliers (SSPMS) with high quantum efficiency can detect down to single photons very efficiently with excellent time resolution and high avalanche gains.

  6. Emission rates and the personal cloud effect associated with particle release from the perihuman environment.

    PubMed

    Licina, D; Tian, Y; Nazaroff, W W

    2016-12-23

    Inhalation exposure to elevated particulate matter levels is correlated with deleterious health and well-being outcomes. Despite growing evidence that identifies humans as sources of coarse airborne particles, the extent to which personal exposures are influenced by particle releases near occupants is unknown. In a controlled chamber, we monitored airborne total particle levels with high temporal and particle-size resolution for a range of simulated occupant activities. We also sampled directly from the subject's breathing zone to characterize exposures. A material-balance model showed that a sitting occupant released 8 million particles/h in the diameter range 1-10 μm. Elevated emissions were associated with increased intensity of upper body movements and with walking. Emissions were correlated with exposure, but not linearly. The personal PM10 exposure increment above the room-average levels was 1.6-13 μg/m(3) during sitting, owing to spatial heterogeneity of particulate matter concentrations, a feature that was absent during walking. The personal cloud was more discernible among larger particles, as would be expected for shedding from skin and clothing. Manipulating papers and clothing fabric was a strong source of airborne particles. An increase in personal exposure was observed owing to particle mass exchange associated with a second room occupant.

  7. Separation of nanoparticles: Filtration and scavenging from waste incineration plants.

    PubMed

    Förster, Henning; Thajudeen, Thaseem; Funk, Christine; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    Increased amounts of nanoparticles are applied in products of everyday life and despite material recycling efforts, at the end of their life cycle they are fed into waste incineration plants. This raises the question on the fate of nanoparticles during incineration. In terms of environmental impact the key question is how well airborne nanoparticles are removed by separation processes on their way to the bag house filters and by the existing filtration process based on pulse-jet cleanable fibrous filter media. Therefore, we investigate the scavenging and the filtration of metal nanoparticles under typical conditions in waste incineration plants. The scavenging process is investigated by a population balance model while the nanoparticle filtration experiments are realized in a filter test rig. The results show that depending on the particle sizes, in some cases nearly 80% of the nanoparticles are scavenged by fly ash particles before they reach the bag house filter. For the filtration step dust cakes with a pressure drop of 500Pa or higher are found to be very effective in preventing nanoparticles from penetrating through the filter. Thus, regeneration of the filter must be undertaken with care in order to guarantee highly efficient collection of particles even in the lower nanometre size regime.

  8. Enhancement of fusion rates due to quantum effects in the particles momentum distribution in nonideal plasma media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisch, N. J.; Gladush, M. G.; Petrushevich, Y. V.; Quarati, P.; Starostin, A. N.

    2012-06-01

    This study concerns a situation when measurements of the nonresonant cross-section of nuclear reactions appear highly dependent on the environment in which the particles interact. An appealing example discussed in the paper is the interaction of a deuteron beam with a target of deuterated metal Ta. In these experiments, the reaction cross section for d(d, p)t was shown to be orders of magnitude greater than what the conventional model predicts for the low-energy particles. In this paper we take into account the influence of quantum effects due to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle for particles in a non-ideal plasma medium elastically interacting with the medium particles. In order to calculate the nuclear reaction rate in the non-ideal environment we apply both the Monte Carlo technique and approximate analytical calculation of the Feynman diagram using nonrelativistic kinetic Green's functions in the medium which correspond to the generalized energy and momentum distribution functions of interacting particles. We show a possibility to reduce the 12-fold integral corresponding to this diagram to a fivefold integral. This can significantly speed up the computation and control accuracy. Our calculations show that quantum effects significantly influence reaction rates such as p +7Be, 3He +4He, p +7Li, and 12C +12C. The new reaction rates may be much higher than the classical ones for the interior of the Sun and supernova stars. The possibility to observe the theoretical predictions under laboratory conditions is discussed.

  9. Biological impact of low dose-rate simulated solar particle event radiation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chang, P Y; Doppalapudi, R; Bakke, J; Wang, A; Menda, S; Davis, Z

    2010-08-01

    C57Bl6-lacZ animals were exposed to a range of low dose-rate simulated solar particle event (sSPE) radiation at the NASA-sponsored Research Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Peripheral blood was harvested from animals from 1 to 12 days after total body irradiation (TBI) to quantify the level of circulating reticulocytes (RET) and micronucleated reticulocytes (MN-RET) as an early indicator of radiation-induced genotoxicity. Bone marrow lymphocytes and hippocampal tissues from each animal were collected at 12 days and up to two months, to evaluate dose-dependent late effects after sSPE exposure. Early hematopoietic changes show that the % RET was reduced up to 3 days in response to radiation exposure but recovered at 12 days postirradiation. The % MN-RET in peripheral blood was temporally regulated and dependant on the total accumulated dose. Total chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes increased linearly with dose within a week after radiation and remained significantly higher than the control values at 4 weeks after exposure. The level of aberrations in the irradiated animals returned to control levels by 8 weeks postirradiation. Measurements of chromosome 2 and 8 specific aberrations indicate that, consistent with conventional giemsa-staining methods, the level of aberrations is also not significantly higher than in control animals at 8 weeks postirradiation. The hippocampus was surveyed for differential transcriptional regulation of genes known to be associated with neurogenesis. Our results showed differential expression of neurotrophin and their associated receptor genes within 1 week after sSPE exposure. Progressive changes in the profile of expressed genes known to be involved in neurogenic signaling pathways were dependent on the sSPE dose. Our results to date suggest that radiation-induced changes in the hematopoietic system, i.e., chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes, are transient and do not persist past 4 weeks after radiation

  10. Understanding how mammalian scavengers use information from avian scavengers: cue from above.

    PubMed

    Kane, Adam; Kendall, Corinne J

    2017-03-15

    Interspecific social information transfer can play a key role in many aspects of animal ecology from foraging to habitat selection to predator avoidance. Within scavenging communities, avian scavengers often act as producers and mammalian scavengers act as scroungers, but we predict that species-specific cueing will allow for mammalian scavengers to utilize particular avian scavenger species using preferred food sources similar to their own preferences. We use empirical and theoretic approaches to assess interactions between mammalian and avian scavengers in one of the most diverse scavenging guilds in Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya. Using a spatially explicit model and data from experimental carcasses, we found evidence that mammals benefit from local enhancement provided by vultures and that mammalian-avian following patterns are consistent with the idea that species-specific cueing is occurring. Results suggest that ongoing population declines in avian scavengers may have significant impacts on mammalian scavengers and potentially create trophic cascades.

  11. Homogeneous ice freezing temperatures and ice nucleation rates of aqueous ammonium sulfate and aqueous levoglucosan particles for relevant atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel Alexander; Lopez, Miguel David

    2009-09-28

    Homogeneous ice nucleation from micrometre-sized aqueous (NH4)2SO4 and aqueous levoglucosan particles is studied employing the optical microscope technique. A new experimental method is introduced that allows us to control the initial water activity of the aqueous droplets. Homogeneous ice freezing temperatures and ice melting temperatures of these aqueous solution droplets, 10 to 80 microm in diameter, are determined. Homogeneous ice nucleation from aqueous (NH4)2SO4 particles 5-39 wt% in concentration and aqueous levoglucosan particles with initial water activities of 0.85-0.99 yield upper limits of the homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients of up to 1x10(10) cm(-3) s(-1). The experimentally derived homogeneous ice freezing temperatures and upper limits of the homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients are compared with corresponding predictions of the water-activity-based ice nucleation theory [T. Koop, B. P. Luo, A. Tsias and T. Peter, Nature, 2000, 406, 611]. It is found that the water-activity-based ice nucleation theory can capture the experimentally derived ice freezing temperatures and homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients of the aqueous (NH4)2SO4 and aqueous levoglucosan particles. However, the level of agreement between experimentally derived and predicted values, in particular for homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients, crucially depends on the extrapolation method to obtain water activities at corresponding freezing temperatures. It is suggested that the combination of experimentally derived ice freezing temperatures and homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients can serve as a better validation of the water-activity-based ice nucleation theory than when compared to the observation of homogeneous ice freezing temperatures alone. The atmospheric implications with regard to the application of the water-activity-based ice nucleation theory and derivation of maximum ice particle production rates are briefly discussed.

  12. Influence of particle size on the low and high strain rate behavior of dense colloidal dispersions of nanosilica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asija, Neelanchali; Chouhan, Hemant; Gebremeskel, Shishay Amare; Bhatnagar, Naresh

    2017-01-01

    Shear thickening is a non-Newtonian flow behavior characterized by the increase in apparent viscosity with the increase in applied shear rate, particularly when the shear rate exceeds a critical value termed as the critical shear rate (CSR). Due to this remarkable property of shear-thickening fluids (STFs), they are extensively used in hip protection pads, protective gear for athletes, and more recently in body armor. The use of STFs in body armor has led to the development of the concept of liquid body armor. In this study, the effect of particle size is explored on the low and high strain rate behavior of nanosilica dispersions, so as to predict the efficacy of STF-aided personal protection systems (PPS), specifically for ballistic applications. The low strain rate study was conducted on cone and plate rheometer, whereas the high strain rate characterization of STF was conducted on in-house fabricated split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. Spherical nanosilica particles of three different sizes (100, 300, and 500 nm) as well as fumed silica particles of four different specific surface areas (Aerosil A-90, A-130, A-150, and A-200), respectively, were used in this study. The test samples were prepared by dispersing nanosilica particles in polypropylene glycol (PPG) using ultrasonic homogenization method. The low strain rate studies aided in determining the CSR of the synthesized STF dispersions, whereas the high strain rate studies explored the impact-resisting ability of STFs in terms of the impact toughness and the peak stress attained during the impact loading of STF in SHPB testing.

  13. Effect of particle adsorption rates on the disproportionation process in pickering stabilised bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettelaie, Rammile; Murray, Brent

    2014-05-01

    The degree of shrinkage of particle stabilised bubbles of various sizes, in a polydisperse bubble dispersion, has been investigated in the light of the finite adsorption times for the particles and the disproportionation kinetics of the bubbles. For the case where the system contains an abundance of particles we find a threshold radius, above which bubbles are stabilised without any significant reduction in their size. Bubbles with an initial radius below this threshold on the other hand undergo a large degree of shrinkage prior to stabilisation. As the ratio of the available particles to the bubbles is reduced, it is shown that the final bubble size, for the larger bubbles in the distribution, becomes increasingly governed by the number of particles, rather than their adsorption time per se. For systems with "adsorption controlled" shrinkage ratio, the final bubble distribution is found to be wider than the initial one, while for a "particle number controlled" case it is actually narrower. Starting from a unimodal bubble size distribution, we predict that at intermediate times, prior to the full stabilisation of all bubbles, the distribution breaks up into a bimodal one. However, the effect is transient and a unimodal final bubble size distribution is recovered, when all the bubbles are stabilised by the particles.

  14. Measurement of the rate of wear of dental composite resins by a /sup 90/Sr beta particle transmission gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Moores, G.E.; Glentworth, P.; Harrison, A.

    1983-09-01

    The wear rate of restorative dental composite resins is an important parameter in the assessment of their in vivo performance. The two more widely used methods of quantifying wear are measuring the dimensional change and measuring the change in the mass of the specimen. The former method is complicated by uneven wear of specimens and presents difficulties with samples of irregular shape, and the latter method involves measurements of changes in mass as small as tens of micrograms with specimens of sizes similar to those encountered clinically. A /sup 90/Sr beta particle transmission gauge has been designed and constructed to enable the wear rate of small specimens of dental composite resins to be measured. The /sup 90/Sr beta particle transmission gauge enables indirect measurements of changes in mass to be made and overcomes some of the difficulties inherent in the direct measurement of mass and length. Applications of the /sup 90/Sr beta particle transmission gauge to the measurement of wear rates are given for restorative dental resins having a range of inorganic filler contents and types. The results show that the /sup 90/Sr beta particle transmission gauge is capable of measuring the rate of wear to a degree of precision similar to that of micrometer-derived measurements.

  15. 210Po and 210Pb distribution, dissolved-particulate exchange rates, and particulate export along the North Atlantic US GEOTRACES GA03 section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigaud, S.; Stewart, G.; Baskaran, M.; Marsan, D.; Church, T.

    2015-06-01

    Vertical profiles of 210Po and 210Pb in the water column were measured in the dissolved phase (<0.45 μm), and small (0.8-51 μm) and large (>51 μm) particles at seven stations along the US GEOTRACES North Atlantic Zonal Transect (GA03). Mass balance calculations were employed to assess nuclide exchange rates at the dissolved-small particle interface and between small and large particles, and to quantify export with settling large particles. In the surface ocean, 210Po scavenging is linearly correlated with the concentration of particulate organic carbon (POC) in large particles, supporting the role of biogenic particle in 210Po bioaccumulation and export. In stations near the coast, this link is more complex due to the variable source of biogenic material and temporal changes in the surface biogeochemical and physical conditions. At depth, 210Po exhibits significant widespread deficit with respect to 210Pb that could in part be attributed to in situ 210Po scavenging and may be related to surface biological productivity. As previously reported the 210Pb scavenging rates in the surface ocean were higher at ocean margins. At depth, 210Pb scavenging increases with depth and eastward due to the increase of adsorption sites available in the benthic layers and to a regional contribution of benthic 210Pb scavenging and/or particle flux, respectively. The benthic nepheloid layer (BNL) and the Hydrothermal TAG plume distinctly enhance 210Pb scavenging due to increased surface adsorption in association with resuspended or freshly formed particles. In contrast, 210Po is not seen to be significantly scavenged in these environments due to its relatively short half-life and the long residence time of particles.

  16. Whole house particle removal and clean air delivery rates for in-duct and portable ventilation systems.

    PubMed

    Macintosh, David L; Myatt, Theodore A; Ludwig, Jerry F; Baker, Brian J; Suh, Helen H; Spengler, John D

    2008-11-01

    A novel method for determining whole house particle removal and clean air delivery rates attributable to central and portable ventilation/air cleaning systems is described. The method is used to characterize total and air-cleaner-specific particle removal rates during operation of four in-duct air cleaners and two portable air-cleaning devices in a fully instrumented test home. Operation of in-duct and portable air cleaners typically increased particle removal rates over the baseline rates determined in the absence of operating a central fan or an indoor air cleaner. Removal rates of 0.3- to 0.5-microm particles ranged from 1.5 hr(-1) during operation of an in-duct, 5-in. pleated media filter to 7.2 hr(-1) for an in-duct electrostatic air cleaner in comparison to a baseline rate of 0 hr(-1) when the air handler was operating without a filter. Removal rates for total particulate matter less than 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) mass concentrations were 0.5 hr(-1) under baseline conditions, 0.5 hr(-1) during operation of three portable ionic air cleaners, 1 hr(-1) for an in-duct 1-in. media filter, 2.4 hr(-1) for a single high-efficiency particle arrestance (HEPA) portable air cleaner, 4.6 hr(-1) for an in-duct 5-in. media filter, 4.7 hr(-1) during operation of five portable HEPA filters, 6.1 hr(-1) for a conventional in-duct electronic air cleaner, and 7.5 hr(-1) for a high efficiency in-duct electrostatic air cleaner. Corresponding whole house clean air delivery rates for PM2.5 attributable to the air cleaner independent of losses within the central ventilation system ranged from 2 m3/min for the conventional media filter to 32 m3/min for the high efficiency in-duct electrostatic device. Except for the portable ionic air cleaner, the devices considered here increased particle removal indoors over baseline deposition rates.

  17. Effect of competition between catalytic particles C on the rate of the reversible diffusion-controlled reaction A+C⇌B+C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felderhof, B. U.; Jones, R. B.

    1999-11-01

    The effect of competition between catalytic particles C on the rate of the reversible diffusion-controlled reaction A+C⇌B+C is studied in a self-consistent approximation. The C-particles are assumed static with random configuration. The A- and B-particles diffuse in a fluid or solid background medium. Frequency-dependent effective rate coefficients are calculated as a function of the volume fraction of C-particles.

  18. Relative feeding rates on free and particle-bound bacteria by freshwater macrozooplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenberg, S.A.; Maccubbin, A.E.

    1985-09-01

    Feeding suspensions of equivalent particle spectra were assembled with either free-living (< 1.0 ..mu..m) or attached bacteria specifically labeled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine. Clearance (ml ind/sup -1/ d/sup -1/) of attached bacteria was 3-29 x that of free bacteria for the cladocerans Acantholeberis, Chydorus, and Eubosmina. Pseudosida and Ceriodaphnia showed weaker discrimination or no selection, indicating a lower size threshold for filtration in these species. Feeding suspensions composed of isolated free bacteria yielded significantly higher or lower estimates of grazing than free bacteria with the full complement of particles, depending on species. Relative clearance (attached:free) tended to increase with body size within a species and varied for different particle environments. Bacteria associated with large particles may increase detrital energy flow to consumers in eutrophic environments.

  19. Dependence of molecular hydrogen formation in water on scavengers of the precursor to the hydrated electron

    SciTech Connect

    Pastina, B. |; LaVerne, J.A.; Pimblott, S.M.

    1999-07-22

    Early studies on the radiolysis of water suggested a wide variety of precursors, and mechanisms, for the formation of the observed yield of molecular hydrogen. Molecular hydrogen yields have been measured in the {gamma} radiolysis of aqueous solutions with a wide variety of scavengers of the hydrated electron and its precursors. A decrease in molecular hydrogen yield with increasing scavenging capacity of the hydrated electron is found with all solutes. Scavengers with particularly high rate coefficients for reaction with the precursors to the hydrated electron compared to the hydrated electron, such as selenate and to a lesser extent molybdate, show a more rapid decrease in hydrogen yields with increasing scavenging capacity than is observed with the other solutes. The yield of molecular hydrogen is better parameterized by the scavenging capacity for the precursors to the hydrated electron than by the scavenging capacity for the hydrated electron. Good scavengers of precursors to the hydrated electrons do not exhibit a nonscavengable hydrogen yield in the high scavenging capacity limit. These results suggest that the previously accepted nonscavengable yield of molecular hydrogen is due to precursors of the hydrated electron and it can be lowered with appropriate scavengers.

  20. The effect of falling particles on the shape and spin rate of an asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilkova, O.

    2003-05-01

    This simulation is focused on the specific influence of the gravitational field of a very elongated rotating asteroid on the location of zones of the most intensive bombardment by falling particles. It is assumed that the particles are distributed uniformly in the space surrounding the asteroid. The asteroid shape is approximated by a triaxial ellipsoid with semiaxes 28,12,10.5 km (equal to those of asteroid 243 Ida) and by a dumb-bell of the same mass. The computations and appropriate figures show that at a rotation period faster than approximately 9.1 hours for the triaxial ellipsoid model and 3.3 hours for the dumb-bell one the leading sides of the asteroid receive a higher flux of impacting particles than the trailing sides while at slower periods the situation is the opposite. The zones of possible erosion are computed depending on the asteroid rotation period and on the ratio of impact and rebound velocities of particles. The contribution of all impacting particles to the angular momentum of the asteroid is computed, which leads to the conclusion that falling out of particles damps the asteroid rotation at any spin period.

  1. Laboratory Experiments on Heterogeneous CO2 Ice Nucleation and Growth Rates on Meteor Smoke Particle Analogues in the Martian Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachbar, M.; Duft, D.; Mangan, T.; Gomez Martin, J. C.; Plane, J. M. C.; Leisner, T.

    2014-12-01

    CO2 ice particles with radii of about 100 nm have been detected in the Martian mesosphere region at heights between 80 km and 100 km. Gravity waves propagating upward cause a cooling of this region leading to temporary supersaturated conditions during which heterogeneous nucleation of CO2 can take place. Large uncertainties in describing the nucleation processes at the extreme conditions of the Martian mesopause region state the need of laboratory measurements. Sub-3 nanometer radius meteor smoke particle (MSP) analogues are created in a microwave plasma and stored in an electrodynamic trap for examining CO2 ice nucleation as well as growth rates at low particle temperatures between 60 K and 75 K and CO2 concentrations up to 1017 m-3 which are reasonably close to conditions present in the Martian mesosphere. Ice nucleation and growth processes of the particles are examined by analyzing the mass distribution of the particles with a time of flight spectrometer as a function of the residence time under supersaturated conditions. In this paper, first measurements of CO2 ice nucleation and growth on iron oxide and silicate particles will be presented. These results are extrapolated to realistic Martian conditions reducing the large uncertainty in dealing with CO2 ice nucleation on MSPs.

  2. Revisiting the ultra-high dose rate effect: implications for charged particle radiotherapy using protons and light ions

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, P; Jones, B; Yokoi, T; Hill, M; Vojnovic, B

    2012-01-01

    Objective To reinvestigate ultra-high dose rate radiation (UHDRR) radiobiology and consider potential implications for hadrontherapy. Methods A literature search of cellular UHDRR exposures was performed. Standard oxygen diffusion equations were used to estimate the time taken to replace UHDRR-related oxygen depletion. Dose rates from conventional and novel methods of hadrontherapy accelerators were considered, including spot scanning beam delivery, which intensifies dose rate. Results The literature findings were that, for X-ray and electron dose rates of around 109 Gy s–1, 5–10 Gy depletes cellular oxygen, significantly changing the radiosensitivity of cells already in low oxygen tension (around 3 mmHg or 0.4 kPa). The time taken to reverse the oxygen depletion of such cells is estimated to be over 20–30 s at distances of over 100 μm from a tumour blood vessel. In this time window, tumours have a higher hypoxic fraction (capable of reducing tumour control), so the next application of radiation within the same fraction should be at a time that exceeds these estimates in the case of scanned beams or with ultra-fast laser-generated particles. Conclusion This study has potential implications for particle therapy, including laser-generated particles, where dose rate is greatly increased. Conventional accelerators probably do not achieve the critical UHDRR conditions. However, specific UHDRR oxygen depletion experiments using proton and ion beams are indicated. PMID:22496068

  3. Performance of a large size triple GEM detector at high particle rate for the CBM Experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adak, Rama Prasad; Kumar, Ajit; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Das, Supriya; Raha, Sibaji; Samanta, Subhasis; Saini, Jogender

    2017-02-01

    In CBM Experiment at FAIR, dimuons will be detected by a Muon Chamber (MUCH) consisting of segmented absorbers of varying widths and tracking chambers sandwiched between the absorber-pairs. In this fixed target heavy-ion collision experiment, operating at highest interaction rate of 10 MHz for Au+Au collision, the inner region of the 1st detector will face a particle rate of 1 MHz/cm2. To operate at such a high particle density, GEM technology based detectors have been selected for the first two stations of MUCH. We have reported earlier the performance of several small-size GEM detector prototypes built at VECC for use in MUCH. In this work, we report on a large GEM prototype tested with proton beam of momentum 2.36 GeV/c at COSY-Jülich Germany. The detector was read out using nXYTER operated in self-triggering mode. An efficiency higher than 96% at ΔVGEM = 375.2 V was achieved. The variation of efficiency with the rate of incoming protons has been found to vary within 2% when tested up to a maximum rate of 2.8 MHz/cm2. The gain was found to be stable at high particle rate with a maximum variation of ∼9%.

  4. Energy scavenging from environmental vibration.

    SciTech Connect

    Galchev, Tzeno; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Najafi, Khalil

    2009-10-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an efficient energy scavenger for converting ambient low-frequency vibrations into electrical power. In order to achieve this a novel inertial micro power generator architecture has been developed that utilizes the bi-stable motion of a mechanical mass to convert a broad range of low-frequency (< 30Hz), and large-deflection (>250 {micro}m) ambient vibrations into high-frequency electrical output energy. The generator incorporates a bi-stable mechanical structure to initiate high-frequency mechanical oscillations in an electromagnetic scavenger. This frequency up-conversion technique enhances the electromechanical coupling and increases the generated power. This architecture is called the Parametric Frequency Increased Generator (PFIG). Three generations of the device have been fabricated. It was first demonstrated using a larger bench-top prototype that had a functional volume of 3.7cm3. It generated a peak power of 558{micro}W and an average power of 39.5{micro}W at an input acceleration of 1g applied at 10 Hz. The performance of this device has still not been matched by any other reported work. It yielded the best power density and efficiency for any scavenger operating from low-frequency (<10Hz) vibrations. A second-generation device was then fabricated. It generated a peak power of 288{micro}W and an average power of 5.8{micro}W from an input acceleration of 9.8m/s{sup 2} at 10Hz. The device operates over a frequency range of 20Hz. The internal volume of the generator is 2.1cm{sup 3} (3.7cm{sup 3} including casing), half of a standard AA battery. Lastly, a piezoelectric version of the PFIG is currently being developed. This device clearly demonstrates one of the key features of the PFIG architecture, namely that it is suitable for MEMS integration, more so than resonant generators, by incorporating a brittle bulk piezoelectric ceramic. This is the first micro-scale piezoelectric generator capable of <10Hz operation. The

  5. High Throughput Immunomagnetic Scavenging Technique for ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Journal Article This article describes a novel immunomagnetic scavenging (IMSc) technique for extracting cholinesterase inhibitors from aqueous matrixes using biological targeting and antibody-based extraction.

  6. The scavenging of high altitude aerosol by small ice crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew Bell, D.; Saunders, Clive P. R.

    There have been several global models developed for the theoretical investigation of the removal of high altitude aerosol from the atmosphere, following concern about the injection of particulate material by nuclear explosions and volcanic events. These models lack a knowledge of the scavenging efficiencies of the small ice crystals associated with cirus clouds and storm ice anvils. These are the only hydrometers that could remove the injected particles. In the past there have been a number of practical studies into the scavenging efficiencies of large ice crystaks and snowflakes. A comparison of the extrapolated results of these findings and the theoretical models of Martin et al. (1980, Pure appl. Phys.188, 1109-1129, J. atmos. Sci.37, 1628-1638) for the small crystal situation has been made. It was found that in general the extrapolated results gave efficiencies that were significantly higher than the predicted value. This difference was found to be enhanced as the crystal diameter decreased. Experiments used small ice plates grown at ˜-18.5°C in a cloud chamber, which were then permitted to fall through a dense aerosol cloud, to provide the first direct measurements of the scavenging efficiencies of this small crystals under cloud conditions. Initial results are presented for mono-disperse NaCl aerosol particles of size 4-6 μm.

  7. Energy scavenging from insect flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkan Aktakka, Ethem; Kim, Hanseup; Najafi, Khalil

    2011-09-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication and testing of an energy scavenger that generates power from the wing motion of a Green June Beetle (Cotinis nitida) during its tethered flight. The generator utilizes non-resonant piezoelectric bimorphs operated in the d31 bending mode to convert mechanical vibrations of a beetle into electrical output. The available deflection, force, and power output from oscillatory movements at different locations on a beetle are measured with a meso-scale piezoelectric beam. This way, the optimum location to scavenge energy is determined, and up to ~115 µW total power is generated from body movements. Two initial generator prototypes were fabricated, mounted on a beetle, and harvested 11.5 and 7.5 µW in device volumes of 11.0 and 5.6 mm3, respectively, from 85 to 100 Hz wing strokes during the beetle's tethered flight. A spiral generator was designed to maximize the power output by employing a compliant structure in a limited area. The necessary technology needed to fabricate this prototype was developed, including a process to machine high-aspect ratio devices from bulk piezoelectric substrates with minimum damage to the material using a femto-second laser. The fabricated lightweight spiral generators produced 18.5-22.5 µW on a bench-top test setup mimicking beetles' wing strokes. Placing two generators (one on each wing) can result in more than 45 µW of power per insect. A direct connection between the generator and the flight muscles of the insect is expected to increase the final power output by one order of magnitude.

  8. NOTE: Detection limits for ferrimagnetic particle concentrations using magnetic resonance imaging based proton transverse relaxation rate measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardoe, H.; Chua-anusorn, W.; St. Pierre, T. G.; Dobson, J.

    2003-03-01

    A clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system was used to measure proton transverse relaxation rates (R2) in agar gels with varying concentrations of ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in a field strength of 1.5 T. The nanoparticles were prepared by coprecipitation of ferric and ferrous ions in the presence of either dextran or polyvinyl alcohol. The method of preparation resulted in loosely packed clusters (dextran) or branched chains (polyvinyl alcohol) of particles containing of the order of 600 and 400 particles, respectively. For both methods of particle preparation, concentrations of ferrimagnetic iron in agar gel less than 0.01 mg ml-1 had no measurable effect on the value of R2 for the gel. The results indicate that MRI-based R2 measurements using 1.5 T clinical scanners are not quite sensitive enough to detect the very low concentrations of nanoparticulate biogenic magnetite reported in human brain tissue.

  9. Numerical calculation of protein-ligand binding rates through solution of the Smoluchowski equation using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Wenxiao; Daily, Michael; Baker, Nathan A.

    2015-05-07

    Background: The calculation of diffusion-controlled ligand binding rates is important for understanding enzyme mechanisms as well as designing enzyme inhibitors. Methods: We demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of a Lagrangian particle-based method, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), to study diffusion in biomolecular systems by numerically solving the time-dependent Smoluchowski equation for continuum diffusion. Unlike previous studies, a reactive Robin boundary condition (BC), rather than the absolute absorbing (Dirichlet) BC, is considered on the reactive boundaries. This new BC treatment allows for the analysis of enzymes with “imperfect” reaction rates. Results: The numerical method is first verified in simple systems and thenmore » applied to the calculation of ligand binding to a mouse acetylcholinesterase (mAChE) monomer. Rates for inhibitor binding to mAChE are calculated at various ionic strengths and compared with experiment and other numerical methods. We find that imposition of the Robin BC improves agreement between calculated and experimental reaction rates. Conclusions: Although this initial application focuses on a single monomer system, our new method provides a framework to explore broader applications of SPH in larger-scale biomolecular complexes by taking advantage of its Lagrangian particle-based nature.« less

  10. Numerical calculation of protein-ligand binding rates through solution of the Smoluchowski equation using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wenxiao; Daily, Michael; Baker, Nathan A.

    2015-05-07

    Background: The calculation of diffusion-controlled ligand binding rates is important for understanding enzyme mechanisms as well as designing enzyme inhibitors. Methods: We demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of a Lagrangian particle-based method, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), to study diffusion in biomolecular systems by numerically solving the time-dependent Smoluchowski equation for continuum diffusion. Unlike previous studies, a reactive Robin boundary condition (BC), rather than the absolute absorbing (Dirichlet) BC, is considered on the reactive boundaries. This new BC treatment allows for the analysis of enzymes with “imperfect” reaction rates. Results: The numerical method is first verified in simple systems and then applied to the calculation of ligand binding to a mouse acetylcholinesterase (mAChE) monomer. Rates for inhibitor binding to mAChE are calculated at various ionic strengths and compared with experiment and other numerical methods. We find that imposition of the Robin BC improves agreement between calculated and experimental reaction rates. Conclusions: Although this initial application focuses on a single monomer system, our new method provides a framework to explore broader applications of SPH in larger-scale biomolecular complexes by taking advantage of its Lagrangian particle-based nature.

  11. Antioxidant and radical scavenging properties of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Ak, Tuba; Gülçin, Ilhami

    2008-07-10

    Curcumin (diferuoyl methane) is a phenolic compound and a major component of Curcuma longa L. In the present paper, we determined the antioxidant activity of curcumin by employing various in vitro antioxidant assays such as 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical (DPPH*) scavenging, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging activity, N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine dihydrochloride (DMPD) radical scavenging activity, total antioxidant activity determination by ferric thiocyanate, total reducing ability determination by the Fe(3+)-Fe(2+) transformation method, superoxide anion radical scavenging by the riboflavin/methionine/illuminate system, hydrogen peroxide scavenging and ferrous ions (Fe(2+)) chelating activities. Curcumin inhibited 97.3% lipid peroxidation of linoleic acid emulsion at 15 microg/mL concentration (20 mM). On the other hand, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA, 123 mM), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT, 102 mM), alpha-tocopherol (51 mM) and trolox (90 mM) as standard antioxidants indicated inhibition of 95.4, 99.7, 84.6 and 95.6% on peroxidation of linoleic acid emulsion at 45 microg/mL concentration, respectively. In addition, curcumin had an effective DPPH* scavenging, ABTS*(+) scavenging, DMPD*(+) scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, ferric ions (Fe(3+)) reducing power and ferrous ions (Fe(2+)) chelating activities. Also, BHA, BHT, alpha-tocopherol and trolox, were used as the reference antioxidant and radical scavenger compounds. According to the present study, curcumin can be used in the pharmacological and food industry because of these properties.

  12. Particle Flow Cell Formation at Minimum Fluidization Flow Rates in a Rectangular Gas-Fluidized Bed.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    Kunii and Levenspiel Model ----------------- 66 C. FLUIDIZED BED VARIABLES THAT AFFECT HEAT TRANSFER ---------------------------------- 69 5 1...and Levenspiel Model -------------------------- 68 25. Heat transfer coefficient vs. mass velocity --------- 72 26. Contact geometry of surface-particle...becomes a very important factor. According to Kunii and Levenspiel [34], distributors should have a sufficient pressure drop to achieve equal flow

  13. Material removal mechanism and material removal rate model of polishing process for quartz glass using soft particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Defu; Chen, Guanglin; Hu, Qing

    2015-10-01

    Fiber arrays are used to connect arrayed waveguide chips. The end-faces of fiber array components are multi-materials non-uniform surfaces. Their low polishing quality has become a bottleneck that restricts coupling performance of integrated photo-electronic devices. The chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is normally used to improve the polishing quality of the end-faces of fiber array components. It is very important to optimize process parameters by researching the mechanical behavior of nanoparticles and material microstructure evolution on the CMP interfaces. Based on the elastic and hyper-elastic contact of the soft polishing particle with quartz glass and polishing pad, the material removal mechanism at molecular scale of polishing process for quartz glass using soft polishing particles is investigated, and the material removal rate model is also derived by using Arrhenius theory and molecule vibration theory. Theoretical and experimental results show that the material is mainly removed by the interfacial tribo-chemical effect between polishing particle and quartz glass during CMP process. The depth of a single particle embedding into the quartz glass is at molecular scale, and the superficial molecules of quartz glass are removed by chemical reactions because of enough energy obtained. The material removal rate of quartz glass during CMP process is determined by the polishing pressure, the chemical reagents and its concentration, and the relative movement speed between the quartz glass workpiece and the polishing pad.

  14. Simulation of the low-Earth-orbit dose rates using secondary radiations from the HZE particles at NIRS-HIMAC.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, H; Suzuki, M; Ando, K; Fujitaka, K

    2001-01-01

    In order to study biological effects from cyclic dose rates encountered at the low-Earth orbit (LEO), an experimental facility was designed in the Biology room of the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (NIRS-HIMAC). An incubator placed in this facility is irradiated repeatedly by secondary radiations from HZE-particle beams supplied for independent users. The daily-average dose rate (1.4 mGy d-1) measured for 223 days and short-term dose rates measured for selected beam conditions were comparable to the dose rates observed in past LEO missions. Severe solar particle events can be simulated with hourly maximum dose rate of 2.8 mGy h-1. Preliminary measurements using CR-39 and TLD indicated that the dominant LET range is less than 5 keV micrometers-1. These results demonstrate the possibility of this facility for radiobiology studies of the effects of low dose rates comparable to the LEO environment.

  15. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  16. Modeling of the Temperature Effect on Oxygen Absorption by Iron-Based Oxygen Scavengers.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, Vladimir A; Miltz, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    A new engineering-oriented model for prediction of the effect of temperature on the kinetics of oxygen absorption by iron-based oxygen scavengers (IOSs) was developed. The model is based on the physicochemical mechanism of the O2 scavenging process by the active component of the IOS (iron powder). The conclusions of this study are: (1) the iron deposits formed on the iron particles are composed of 2 different layers: an inner layer of Fe3 O4 and an outer layer of FeOOH that vanishes with the depletion of oxygen. (2) The model considers the chemical processes in the heterogeneous closed system "Fe-H2 O-NaCl-O2 " and describes the kinetics of oxygen absorption by the powder, depending on the characteristics of the system. (3) The nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) of the O2 absorption kinetics was derived and a simple approximate solution to this ODE was obtained theoretically that is similar to the empirical exponential formula published in the relevant literature. (4) The temperature dependence of the oxygen absorption rate is more complicated than that described by the Arrhenius equation.

  17. Melatonin and its precursors scavenge nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, Y.; Mori, A.; Liburdy, R.; Packer, L.

    1998-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) scavenging activity of melatonin, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, serotonin, 5-hydroxytryptophan and L-tryptophan was examined by the Griess reaction using flow injection analysis. 1-Hydroxy-2-oxo-3-(N-methyl-3-aminopropyl)-3-methyl-1-triazene(NOC-7) was used as NO generator. The Griess reagent stoichiometrically reacts with NO2-, which was converted by a cadmium-copper reduction column from the stable end products of NO oxidation. Except for tryptophan, all the compounds examined scavenged NO in a dose-dependent manner. Melatonin, which has a methoxy group in the 5-position and an acetyl side chain, exhibited the most potent scavenging activity among the compounds tested. Serotonin, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, and 5-hydroxytryptophan, respectively, showed moderate scavenging activity compared to melatonin. Tryptophan, which has neither a methoxy nor a hydroxyl group in the 5-position, exhibited the least NO scavenging activity.

  18. Estimation of radionuclide ((137)Cs) emission rates from a nuclear power plant accident using the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM).

    PubMed

    Park, Soon-Ung; Lee, In-Hye; Ju, Jae-Won; Joo, Seung Jin

    2016-10-01

    A methodology for the estimation of the emission rate of (137)Cs by the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM) with the use of monitored (137)Cs concentrations around a nuclear power plant has been developed. This method has been employed with the MM5 meteorological model in the 600 km × 600 km model domain with the horizontal grid scale of 3 km × 3 km centered at the Fukushima nuclear power plant to estimate (137)Cs emission rate for the accidental period from 00 UTC 12 March to 00 UTC 6 April 2011. The Lagrangian Particles are released continuously with the rate of one particle per minute at the first level modelled, about 15 m above the power plant site. The presently developed method was able to simulate quite reasonably the estimated (137)Cs emission rate compared with other studies, suggesting the potential usefulness of the present method for the estimation of the emission rate from the accidental power plant without detailed inventories of reactors and fuel assemblies and spent fuels. The advantage of this method is not so complicated but can be applied only based on one-time forward LPDM simulation with monitored concentrations around the power plant, in contrast to other inverse models. It was also found that continuously monitored radionuclides concentrations from possibly many sites located in all directions around the power plant are required to get accurate continuous emission rates from the accident power plant. The current methodology can also be used to verify the previous version of radionuclides emissions used among other modeling groups for the cases of intermittent or discontinuous samplings.

  19. Numerical calculation of protein-ligand binding rates through solution of the Smoluchowski equation using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wenxiao; Daily, Michael D.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of a Lagrangian particle-based method, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), to study diffusion in biomolecular systems by numerically solving the time-dependent Smoluchowski equation for continuum diffusion. The numerical method is first verified in simple systems and then applied to the calculation of ligand binding to an acetylcholinesterase monomer. Unlike previous studies, a reactive Robin boundary condition (BC), rather than the absolute absorbing (Dirichlet) boundary condition, is considered on the reactive boundaries. This new boundary condition treatment allows for the analysis of enzymes with "imperfect" reaction rates. Rates for inhibitor binding to mAChE are calculated at various ionic strengths and compared with experiment and other numerical methods. We find that imposition of the Robin BC improves agreement between calculated and experimental reaction rates. Although this initial application focuses on a single monomer system, our new method provides a framework to explore broader applications of SPH in larger-scale biomolecular complexes by taking advantage of its Lagrangian particle-based nature.

  20. Effects of locust bean gum and mono- and diglyceride concentrations on particle size and melting rates of ice cream.

    PubMed

    Cropper, S L; Kocaoglu-Vurma, N A; Tharp, B W; Harper, W J

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine how varying concentrations of the stabilizer, locust bean gum (LBG), and different levels of the emulsifier, mono- and diglycerides (MDGs), influenced fat aggregation and melting characteristics of ice cream. Ice creams were made containing MDGs and LBG singly and in combination at concentrations ranging between 0.0% to 0.14% and 0.0% to 0.23%, respectively. Particle size analysis, conducted on both the mixes and ice cream, and melting rate testing on the ice cream were used to determine fat aggregation. No significant differences (P < 0.05) were found between particle size values for experimental ice cream mixes. However, higher concentrations of both LBG and MDG in the ice creams resulted in values that were larger than the control. This study also found an increase in the particle size values when MDG levels were held constant and LBG amounts were increased in the ice cream. Ice creams with higher concentrations of MDG and LBG together had the greatest difference in the rate of melting than the control. The melting rate decreased with increasing LBG concentrations at constant MDG levels. These results illustrated that fat aggregation may not only be affected by emulsifiers, but that stabilizers may play a role in contributing to the destabilization of fat globules.

  1. Forensically significant scavenging guilds in the southwest of Western Australia.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, R Christopher; Forbes, Shari L; Meyer, Jan; Dadour, Ian

    2010-05-20

    Estimation of time since death is an important factor in forensic investigations and the state of decomposition of a body is a prime basis for such estimations. The rate of decomposition is, however, affected by many environmental factors such as temperature, rainfall, and solar radiation as well as by indoor or outdoor location, covering and the type of surface the body is resting upon. Scavenging has the potential for major impact upon the rate of decomposition of a body, but there is little direct research upon its effect. The information that is available relates almost exclusively to North American and European contexts. The Australian faunal assemblage is unique in that it includes no native large predators or large detrivorous avians. This research investigates the animals that scavenge carcasses in natural outdoor settings in southern Western Australia and the factors which can affect each scavenger's activity. The research was conducted at four locations around Perth, Western Australia with different environmental conditions. Pig carcasses, acting as models for the human body, were positioned in an outdoor environment with no protection from scavengers or other environmental conditions. Twenty-four hour continuous time-lapse video capture was used to observe the pattern of visits of all animals to the carcasses. The time of day, length of feeding, material fed upon, area of feeding, and any movement of the carcass were recorded for each feeding event. Some species were observed to scavenge almost continually throughout the day and night. Insectivores visited the carcasses mostly during bloat and putrefaction; omnivores fed during all stages of decomposition and scavenging by carnivores, rare at any time, was most likely to occur during the early stages of decomposition. Avian species, which were the most prolific visitors to the carcasses in all locations, like reptiles, fed only during daylight hours. Only mammals and amphibians, which were seldom seen

  2. Interest rate next-day variation prediction based on hybrid feedforward neural network, particle swarm optimization, and multiresolution techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmiri, Salim

    2016-02-01

    Multiresolution analysis techniques including continuous wavelet transform, empirical mode decomposition, and variational mode decomposition are tested in the context of interest rate next-day variation prediction. In particular, multiresolution analysis techniques are used to decompose interest rate actual variation and feedforward neural network for training and prediction. Particle swarm optimization technique is adopted to optimize its initial weights. For comparison purpose, autoregressive moving average model, random walk process and the naive model are used as main reference models. In order to show the feasibility of the presented hybrid models that combine multiresolution analysis techniques and feedforward neural network optimized by particle swarm optimization, we used a set of six illustrative interest rates; including Moody's seasoned Aaa corporate bond yield, Moody's seasoned Baa corporate bond yield, 3-Month, 6-Month and 1-Year treasury bills, and effective federal fund rate. The forecasting results show that all multiresolution-based prediction systems outperform the conventional reference models on the criteria of mean absolute error, mean absolute deviation, and root mean-squared error. Therefore, it is advantageous to adopt hybrid multiresolution techniques and soft computing models to forecast interest rate daily variations as they provide good forecasting performance.

  3. Anaerobic co-digestion of food waste and dairy manure: effects of food waste particle size and organic loading rate.

    PubMed

    Agyeman, Fred O; Tao, Wendong

    2014-01-15

    This study was to comprehensively evaluate the effects of food waste particle size on co-digestion of food waste and dairy manure at organic loading rates increased stepwise from 0.67 to 3 g/L/d of volatile solids (VS). Three anaerobic digesters were fed semi-continuously with equal VS amounts of food waste and dairy manure. Food waste was ground to 2.5 mm (fine), 4 mm (medium), and 8 mm (coarse) for the three digesters, respectively. Methane production rate and specific methane yield were significantly higher in the digester with fine food waste. Digestate dewaterability was improved significantly by reducing food waste particle size. Specific methane yield was highest at the organic loading rate of 2g VS/L/d, being 0.63, 0.56, and 0.47 L CH4/g VS with fine, medium, and coarse food waste, respectively. Methane production rate was highest (1.40-1.53 L CH4/L/d) at the organic loading rate of 3 g VS/L/d. The energy used to grind food waste was minor compared with the heating value of the methane produced.

  4. Scavenger Receptors and Their Potential as Therapeutic Targets in the Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, Sam L.; Freestone, Katie; Dunn, Sarah; Twigg, Michael W.; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Walker, John H.; Wheatcroft, Stephen B.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2010-01-01

    Scavenger receptors act as membrane-bound and soluble proteins that bind to macromolecular complexes and pathogens. This diverse supergroup of proteins mediates binding to modified lipoprotein particles which regulate the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic plaques. In vascular tissues, scavenger receptors are implicated in regulating intracellular signaling, lipid accumulation, foam cell development, and cellular apoptosis or necrosis linked to the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. One approach is using gene therapy to modulate scavenger receptor function in atherosclerosis. Ectopic expression of membrane-bound scavenger receptors using viral vectors can modify lipid profiles and reduce the incidence of atherosclerosis. Alternatively, expression of soluble scavenger receptors can also block plaque initiation and progression. Inhibition of scavenger receptor expression using a combined gene therapy and RNA interference strategy also holds promise for long-term therapy. Here we review our current understanding of the gene delivery by viral vectors to cells and tissues in gene therapy strategies and its application to the modulation of scavenger receptor function in atherosclerosis. PMID:20981357

  5. Anaesthesia Machine: Checklist, Hazards, Scavenging

    PubMed Central

    Goneppanavar, Umesh; Prabhu, Manjunath

    2013-01-01

    From a simple pneumatic device of the early 20th century, the anaesthesia machine has evolved to incorporate various mechanical, electrical and electronic components to be more appropriately called anaesthesia workstation. Modern machines have overcome many drawbacks associated with the older machines. However, addition of several mechanical, electronic and electric components has contributed to recurrence of some of the older problems such as leak or obstruction attributable to newer gadgets and development of newer problems. No single checklist can satisfactorily test the integrity and safety of all existing anaesthesia machines due to their complex nature as well as variations in design among manufacturers. Human factors have contributed to greater complications than machine faults. Therefore, better understanding of the basics of anaesthesia machine and checking each component of the machine for proper functioning prior to use is essential to minimise these hazards. Clear documentation of regular and appropriate servicing of the anaesthesia machine, its components and their satisfactory functioning following servicing and repair is also equally important. Trace anaesthetic gases polluting the theatre atmosphere can have several adverse effects on the health of theatre personnel. Therefore, safe disposal of these gases away from the workplace with efficiently functioning scavenging system is necessary. Other ways of minimising atmospheric pollution such as gas delivery equipment with negligible leaks, low flow anaesthesia, minimal leak around the airway equipment (facemask, tracheal tube, laryngeal mask airway, etc.) more than 15 air changes/hour and total intravenous anaesthesia should also be considered. PMID:24249887

  6. Anaesthesia machine: checklist, hazards, scavenging.

    PubMed

    Goneppanavar, Umesh; Prabhu, Manjunath

    2013-09-01

    From a simple pneumatic device of the early 20(th) century, the anaesthesia machine has evolved to incorporate various mechanical, electrical and electronic components to be more appropriately called anaesthesia workstation. Modern machines have overcome many drawbacks associated with the older machines. However, addition of several mechanical, electronic and electric components has contributed to recurrence of some of the older problems such as leak or obstruction attributable to newer gadgets and development of newer problems. No single checklist can satisfactorily test the integrity and safety of all existing anaesthesia machines due to their complex nature as well as variations in design among manufacturers. Human factors have contributed to greater complications than machine faults. Therefore, better understanding of the basics of anaesthesia machine and checking each component of the machine for proper functioning prior to use is essential to minimise these hazards. Clear documentation of regular and appropriate servicing of the anaesthesia machine, its components and their satisfactory functioning following servicing and repair is also equally important. Trace anaesthetic gases polluting the theatre atmosphere can have several adverse effects on the health of theatre personnel. Therefore, safe disposal of these gases away from the workplace with efficiently functioning scavenging system is necessary. Other ways of minimising atmospheric pollution such as gas delivery equipment with negligible leaks, low flow anaesthesia, minimal leak around the airway equipment (facemask, tracheal tube, laryngeal mask airway, etc.) more than 15 air changes/hour and total intravenous anaesthesia should also be considered.

  7. Haemoglobin scavenging after subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Durnford, A; Dunbar, J; Galea, J; Bulters, D; Nicoll, J A R; Boche, D; Galea, I

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and effective clearance of cell-free haemoglobin after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is important to prevent vasospasm and neurotoxicity and improve long-term outcome. Haemoglobin is avidly bound by haptoglobin, and the complex is cleared by CD163 expressed on the membrane surface of macrophages. We studied the kinetics of haemoglobin and haptoglobin in cerebrospinal fluid after SAH. We show that haemoglobin levels rise gradually after SAH. Haptoglobin levels rise acutely with aneurysmal rupture as a result of injection of blood into the subarachnoid space. Although levels decline as haemoglobin scavenging occurs, complete depletion of haptoglobin does not occur and levels start rising again, indicating saturation of CD163 sites available for haptoglobin-haemoglobin clearance. In a preliminary neuropathological study we demonstrate that meningeal CD163 expression is upregulated after SAH, in keeping with a proinflammatory state. However, loss of CD163 occurs in meningeal areas with overlying blood compared with areas without overlying blood. Becauses ADAM17 is the enzyme responsible for shedding membrane-bound CD163, its inhibition may be a potential therapeutic strategy after SAH.

  8. Impacts of oxidation aging on secondary organic aerosol formation, particle growth rate, cloud condensation nuclei abundance, and aerosol climate forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, F.; Luo, G.

    2014-12-01

    Particle composition measurements indicate that organic aerosol (OA) makes up ~20-90% of submicron particulate mass and secondary OA (SOA) accounts for a large fraction (~ 72 ±21%) of these OA masses at many locations around the globe. The volatility changes of secondary organic gases (SOG) associated with oxidation aging as well as the contribution of highly oxidized low volatile SOG (LV-SOG) to the condensational growth of secondary particles have been found to be important in laboratory and field measurements but are poorly represented in global models. A novel scheme to extend the widely used two-product SOA formation model, by adding a third product arising from the oxidation aging (i.e., LV-SOG) and considering the dynamic transfer of mass from higher to lower volatile products, has been developed and implemented into a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) and a community atmosphere model (CESM-CAM5). The scheme requires only minor changes to the existing two-product SOA formation model and is computationally efficient. With the oxidation rate constrained by laboratory measurements, we show that the new scheme predicts a much higher SOA mass concentrations, improving the agreement with aerosol mass spectrometer SOA measurements. The kinetic condensation of LV-SOG on ultrafine particles, simulated by a size-resolved (sectional) advanced particle microphysics (APM) model incorporated into in GEOS-Chem and CAM5, increases the particle growth rate substantially and improves the agreement of simulated cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations with observations. Based on GEOS-Chem-APM simulations, the new SOA formation scheme increases global mean low troposphere SOA mass concentration by ~130% and CCN abundance by ~ 15%, and optical depth of secondary particles and coated black carbon and primary organic carbon particles by ~10%. As a result, aerosol radiative cooling effect (direct + first indirect) is enhanced by -0.9 W/m2, with large spatial

  9. Ultraviolet radiation detector to obtain the rate of particles at different heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce, E.; Flores, E.; Conde, R.

    2016-10-01

    The nature and origin of cosmic rays remains one of the greatest puzzles of modern astrophysics after more than 50 years since their first registration. Several ground experiments have reported the rate registered at its height of operation. To continue with the study of cosmic rays, we propose obtain the rate at different heights in the Earth's atmosphere, developing a small and portable ultraviolet radiation detector, consisting of a scintillation plastic, a PMT, and a fast DAQ system. In this work we present the design and construction of the UV detector and the rate recorded in the Sierra Negra Volcano near Puebla, Mexico (4200 m.a.s.l).

  10. Dielectric polymer: scavenging energy from human motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Mistral, Claire; Basrour, Skandar; Chaillout, Jean-Jacques

    2008-03-01

    More and more sensors are embedded in human body for medical applications, for sport. The short lifetime of the batteries, available on the market, reveals a real problem of autonomy of these systems. A promising alternative is to scavenge the ambient energy such as the mechanical one. Up to now, few scavenging structures have operating frequencies compatible with ambient one. And, most of the developed structures are rigid and use vibration as mechanical source. For these reasons, we developed a scavenger that operates in a large frequency spectrum from quasi-static to dynamic range. This generator is fully flexible, light and does not hamper the human motion. Thus, we report in this paper an analytical model for dielectric generator with news electrical and mechanical characterization, and the development of an innovating application: scavenging energy from human motion. The generator is located on the knee and design to scavenge 0.1mJ per scavenging cycle at a frequency of 1Hz, enough to supply a low consumption system and with a poling voltage as low as possible to facilitate the power management. Our first prototype is a membrane with an area of 5*3cm and 31µm in thickness which scavenge 0.1mJ under 170V at constant charge Q.

  11. Continuous desorption rate measurement from a shallow-bed of poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) particles with correction for experimental artifacts.

    PubMed

    Bujalski, Robert; Cantwell, Frederick F

    2004-09-10

    A 0.50 mm high bed, containing ca. 3 mg of the nominally non-porous poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) (PS-DVB) sorbent Hamilton PRP-infinity, is located in a valve. After the bed is pre-equilibrated with a (7/3) methanol/water solution of naphthalene (NA), the valve is switched and (7/3) methanol/water solvent flows continuously through the bed at a high linear velocity. This causes NA to desorb into a constantly refreshed solvent, creating a "shallow-bed" contactor with an "infinite bath" kinetic condition. The effluent from the bed passes through a UV-absorbance detector which generates the observed instantaneous desorption rate curve for NA. The same experiment is performed using the solute phloroglucinol (PG), which is not sorbed by PRP-infinity and serves as an "impulse response function marker" (IRF-Marker). The resulting peak-shaped IRF curve is used in two ways (i.e. subtraction and deconvolution) in order to correct the observed instantaneous rate curve of NA for the following experimental artifacts: hold-up volume of the bed and valve, transit-delay time between the bed and the detector and instrument bandbroadening of the NA zone. The cumulative desorption rate curve, which is a plot of moles NA desorbed versus time, is obtained by integration. It is found to be accurately described by the theoretical equation for homogeneous spherical diffusion. The diffusion coefficient of NA inside the PRP-infinity particles (5.0+/-0.6) x 10(-11) cm2/s, agrees with the literature value that was obtained from the sorption rate of NA into the same particles. This constitutes virtually conclusive evidence for diffusion control of intra-particle kinetics of NA in the PS-DVB matrix of PRP-infinity and related polymers. The influence of both sorbent and solute properties on the method is evaluated.

  12. Variations of boundary reaction rate and particle size on the diffusion-induced stress in a phase separating electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; He, Linghui; Ni, Yong; Song, Yicheng

    2014-10-14

    In contrast to the case of single-phase delithiation wherein faster discharging leads to higher diffusion-induced stress (DIS), this paper reports nonmonotonous dependency of the boundary reaction rate on the DIS in nanosized spherical electrode accompanying phase separation. It is attributed to a transition from two-phase to single-phase delithiation driven by increase of the boundary reaction rate leading to narrowing and vanishing of the miscibility gap in a range of the particle size. The profiles of lithium concentration and the DIS are identified during the transition based on a continuum model. The resultant maximum DIS first decreases in the region of two-phase delithiation and later returns to increase in the region of single-phase delithiation with the increase of the boundary reaction rate. A map for the failure behavior in the spherical electrode particle is constructed based on the Tresca failure criterion. These results indicate that the failure caused by the DIS can be avoided by appropriate selection of the said parameters in such electrodes.

  13. EXPOSURE TO CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICLES IN DETROIT ALTERS HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevations in airborne particulate matter (PM) are linked to increased mortality and morbidity in humans with cardiopulmonary disease. Clinical studies show that PM is associated with altered heart rate variability (HRV) and suggests that loss of autonomic control may underlie ca...

  14. Measurement of Localized Corrosion Rates at Inclusion Particles in AA7075 by In Situ Three Dimensional (3D) X-ray Synchrotron Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sudhanshu S.; Williams, Jason J.; Stannard, Tyler J.; Xiao, Xianghui; De Carlo, Francesco; Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2016-03-01

    In situ X-ray synchrotron tomography was used to measure the localized corrosion rate of Mg2Si particles present in 7075 aluminum alloys in deionized ultra-filtered (DIUF) water. The evolution of hydrogen bubbles was captured as a function of time and the measured volume was used to calculate the local corrosion rate of Mg2Si particles. It was shown that in the absence of chloride ions, stress was needed to create fresh particle surfaces, either by fracture or debonding, to initiate corrosion at the particles.

  15. Scavenger Receptors and Resistance to Inhaled Allergens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    allergic asthma Keywords: Dendritic cell migration, allergic asthma, scavenger receptors Arredouani et al. 2 Abstract The class A scavenger...dendritic cells, MARCO (Macrophage receptor with collagenous structure), and SR-AI/ II (1, 2 , 4). MARCO, like SR-AI/ II , binds acetylated LDL and...backcrossed for at least ten generations to the C57BL/6 background. SR-AI/ II -/- mice were generated by disrupting exon 4 of the SR-A gene, which is

  16. Shell-model study on event rates of lightest supersymmetric particles scattering off 83Kr and 125Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirinen, P.; Srivastava, P. C.; Suhonen, J.; Kortelainen, M.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the elastic and inelastic scattering of lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) dark matter off two possible target nuclei, 83Kr and 125Te. For the nuclear-structure calculations, we employ the nuclear shell model using recently generated realistic interactions. We have condensed the nuclear-physics contribution to a set of nuclear-structure factors that are independent of the adopted supersymmetric (SUSY) model. Total event rates are then easily calculated by combining the nuclear-structure factors with SUSY parameters of choice. In particular, 125Te shows promise as a detector material with both the elastic and inelastic channels yielding an appreciable nuclear response.

  17. Cross sections and rate coefficients for inelastic interactions of heavy particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, J. A.; Soon, W. H.

    1991-01-01

    The existing analytical inelastic cross-sections for direct atom-atom ionizing collisions of Firsov (1959), Fleischmann et al. (1972), and Drawin (1968) are discussed. General analytical expressions for direct ionization cross-sections in atom-atom collisions are derived. The main advantage of the present cross-sections is their generality, simplicity, and overall accuracy, which is acceptable in most applications and is better than the overall accuracy of the cross-sections of Firsov, Fleischmann et al., and Drawin. The atom-atom interaction is considered as a superposition of all the pairwise interactions between the test particle and all the electrons of the outer nl shell of the target atom. Such a picture of atom-atom collision is acceptable at low- and medium-impact energies because then the electrons of the outer shell of the target atom are most likely the ones that get ionized. At high-impact energy, the picture becomes inaccurate because of strong overlapping of the atomic shells.

  18. Development of a high-rate ion counter for particle identification with GODDESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baugher, Travis; Cizewski, J. A.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Febbraro, M.; Pain, S. D.; Jones, K. L.; Smith, K.

    2015-10-01

    Transfer reactions in inverse kinematics can provide a wealth of data on the structure of exotic nuclei. Gammasphere-ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) consists of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of position-sensitive silicon detectors placed inside the Gammasphere target chamber. GODDESS enables particle-gamma coincidence measurements to be performed for inelastic, stripping and pickup reactions with high resolution and high efficiency. Experiments performed in inverse kinematics result in heavy-ion recoils at very forward angles. Detecting and identifying these recoils with high efficiency and low dead time is crucial for experiments, in particular experiments with contaminated beams. An ionization chamber has been incorporated into the GODDESS setup to count and identify recoiling heavy ions. The gas-filled, gridded ionization chamber was developed, built and tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and with first in-beam tests during the GODDESS commissioning experiment at Argonne National Laboratory. Preliminary results will be presented. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation.

  19. An electromagnetic energy scavenger from direct airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong-Hyok; Ji, Chang-Hyeon; Galle, Preston; Herrault, Florian; Wu, Xiaosong; Lee, Jin-Ho; Choi, Chang-Auk; Allen, Mark G.

    2009-09-01

    This paper presents two types of electromagnetic power generators exploiting direct conversion of airflow into mechanical vibration: (1) a windbelt-based vibratory linear energy scavenger targeting strong airflows and (2) a Helmholtz-resonator-based generator capable of scavenging energy from weaker airflows, i.e. environmental airflows. Both devices consist of two tightly coupled parts: a mechanical resonator, which produces high-frequency mechanical oscillation from quasi-constant airflow, and a permanent magnet/coil system, which generates electrical power from the resonator's motion. The proposed energy scavengers obviate the typically required matching of the resonant frequencies of the scavenger and the ambient energy sources it taps. This enables a device that is simpler, smaller and higher-frequency than the previously reported resonant power generator. The windbelt-based energy scavenger demonstrated a peak-to-peak output voltage of 81 mV at 0.53 kHz, from an input pressure of 50 kPa. The Helmholtz-resonator-based energy scavenger achieved a peak-to-peak output voltage of 4 mV at 1.4 kHz, from an input pressure of 0.2 kPa, which is equivalent to 5 m s-1 (10 mph) of wind velocity.

  20. The evaluation of potential limonene scavengers

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, R.; Ebert, D.; Shepodd, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    This work is the study of different scavengers of limonene. Limonene is a citrus-based, low toxicity, hydrocarbon solvent for cleaning circuit boards and other parts. Though almost all limonene evaporates after cleaning procedures, trace residual limonene would be a concern if allowed to migrate freely through a sealed system. This work was charted to investigate materials that would effectively scavenge and permanently immobilize trace limonene. The requirements of a successful scavenger are the following: it must remove >90% of 30 mg/l limonene from a sealed volume with 3 months, at 20--25 C; it must not release any volatiles over prolonged aging; it must be packaged such that limonene vapors can access the scavenger, but not such that the scavenging medium can migrate; and it must operate in the presence of water, oxygen, pentane, toluene, and carbon dioxide gases. A number of adsorbents were evaluated. Additionally, a scheme for scavenging limonene by chemical reaction was investigated at Sandia. This attempt was not successful. The details of this investigation are found at the end of this report.

  1. Scavenging by chimpanzees at Ngogo and the relevance of chimpanzee scavenging to early hominin behavioral ecology.

    PubMed

    Watts, David P

    2008-01-01

    Chimpanzees regularly hunt a variety of prey species. However, they rarely scavenge, which distinguishes chimpanzee carnivory from that of some modern hunter-gatherers and, presumably, at least some Plio-Pleistocene hominins. I use observations made over an 11-year period to document all known opportunities for scavenging encountered by chimpanzees at Ngogo, Kibale National Park, Uganda, and describe all cases of scavenging. I also review data on scavenging from other chimpanzee research sites. Chimpanzees at Ngogo encountered scavenging opportunities only about once per 100 days and ate meat from scavenged carcasses only four times. Scavenging opportunities are also rare at other sites, even where leopards are present (Mahale, Taï, Gombe), and scavenging of leopard kills is known only from Mahale. Feeding on prey that chimpanzees had hunted but then abandoned is the most common form of scavenging reported across study sites. For example, several individuals at Ngogo ate meat from a partially consumed red colobus carcass abandoned after a hunt the previous day. Such behavior probably was not common among Oldowan hominins. Ngogo data and those from other sites also show that chimpanzees sometimes eat meat from carcasses of prey that they did not see killed and that were not killed by chimpanzees, and that scavenging allows access to carcasses larger than those of any prey items. However, chimpanzees ignore relatively many opportunities to obtain meat from such carcasses. Scavenging may be rare because fresh carcasses are rare, because the risk of bacterial infections and zoonoses is high, and because chimpanzees may not recognize certain species as potential prey or certain size classes of prey species as food sources. Its minimal nutritional importance, along with the absence of technology to facilitate confrontational scavenging and rapid carcass processing, apparently distinguishes chimpanzee foraging strategies from those of at least some Oldowan hominins.

  2. High-rate axial-field ionization chamber for particle identification of radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, J.; Singh, Varinderjit; Visser, G.; Alexander, A.; Hudan, S.; Huston, J.; Wiggins, B. B.; Chbihi, A.; Famiano, M.; Bischak, M. M.; deSouza, R. T.

    2016-11-01

    The design, construction and performance characteristics of a simple axial-field ionization chamber suitable for identifying ions in a radioactive beam are presented. Optimized for use with low-energy radioactive beams (< 5 MeV / A) the detector presents only three 0.5 μm/cm2 foils to the beam in addition to the detector gas. A fast charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) integrated into the detector design is also described. Coupling this fast CSA to the axial field ionization chamber produces an output pulse with a risetime of 60-70 ns and a fall time of 100 ns, making the detector capable of sustaining a relatively high rate and providing a time resolution of 6-8 ns. Tests with an α source establish the detector energy resolution as ∼ 8 % for an energy deposit of ∼3.5 MeV. The energy resolution with beams of 2.5 and 4.0 MeV/A 39K ions and the dependence of the energy resolution on beam intensity is measured. At an instantaneous rate of 3×105 ions/s the energy resolution has degraded to 14% with a pileup of 12%. The good energy resolution of this detector at rates up to 3×105 ions/s makes it an effective tool in the characterization of low-energy radioactive beams.

  3. The influence of dose, dose-rate and particle fragmentation on cataract induction by energetic iron ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medvedovsky, C.; Worgul, B. V.; Huang, Y.; Brenner, D. J.; Tao, F.; Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.; Ainsworth, E. J.

    1994-01-01

    Because activities in space necessarily involve chronic exposure to a heterogeneous charged particle radiation field it is important to assess the influence of dose-rate and the possible modulating role of heavy particle fragmentation on biological systems. Using the well-studied cataract model, mice were exposed to plateau 600 MeV/amu Fe-56 ions either as acute or fractionated exposures at total doses of 5-504 cGy. Additional groups of mice received 20, 360 and 504 cGy behind 50 mm of polyethylene, which simulates body shielding. The reference radiation consisted of Co-60 gamma radiation. The animals were examined by slit lamp biomicroscopy over their three year life spans. In accordance with our previous observations with heavy particles, the cataractogenic potential of the 600 MeV/amu Fe-56 ions was greater than for low-Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation and increased with decreasing dose relative to gamma rays. Fractionation of a given dose of Fe-56 ions did not reduce the cataractogenicity of the radiation compared to the acute regimen. Fragmentation of the beam in the polyethylene did not alter the cataractotoxicity of the ions, either when administered singly or in fractions.

  4. Experimental study of vorticity-strain rate interaction in turbulent partially-premixed jet flames using tomographic particle image velocimetry

    DOE PAGES

    Coriton, Bruno; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2016-02-16

    In turbulent flows, the interaction between vorticity, ω, and strain rate, s, is considered a primary mechanism for the transfer of energy from large to small scales through vortex stretching. The ω-s coupling in turbulent jet flames is investigated using tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV). TPIV provides a direct measurement of the three-dimensional velocity field from which ω and s are determined. The effects of combustion and mean shear on the ω-s interaction are investigated in turbulent partially premixed methane/air jet flames with high and low probabilities of localized extinction as well as in a non-reacting isothermal air jet withmore » Reynolds number of approximately 13,000. Results show that combustion causes structures of high vorticity and strain rate to agglomerate in highly correlated, elongated layers that span the height of the probe volume. In the non-reacting jet, these structures have a more varied morphology, greater fragmentation, and are not as well correlated. The enhanced spatiotemporal correlation of vorticity and strain rate in the stable flame results in stronger ω-s interaction characterized by increased enstrophy and strain-rate production rates via vortex stretching and straining, respectively. The probability of preferential local alignment between ω and the eigenvector of the intermediate principal strain rate, s2, which is intrinsic to the ω-s coupling in turbulent flows, is larger in the flames and increases with the flame stability. The larger mean shear in the flame imposes a preferential orientation of ω and s2 tangential to the shear layer. The extensive and compressive principal strain rates, s1 and s3, respectively, are preferentially oriented at approximately 45° with respect to the jet axis. As a result, the production rates of strain and vorticity tend to be dominated by instances in which ω is parallel to the s1¯-s2¯ plane and orthogonal to s3¯.« less

  5. The effect of HPMC particle size on the drug release rate and the percolation threshold in extended-release mini-tablets.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Faiezah A A; Roberts, Matthew; Seton, Linda; Ford, James L; Levina, Marina; Rajabi-Siahboomi, Ali R

    2015-01-01

    The particle size of HPMC is a critical factor that can influence drug release rate from hydrophilic matrix systems. Percolation theory is a statistical tool which is used to study the disorder of particles in a lattice of a sample. The percolation threshold is the point at which a component is dominant in a cluster resulting in significant changes in drug release rates. Mini-tablets are compact dosage forms of 1.5-4 mm diameter, which have potential benefits in the delivery of drug to some patient groups such as pediatrics. In this study, the effect of HPMC particle size on hydrocortisone release and its associated percolation threshold for mini-tablets and tablets was assessed. For both mini-tablets and tablets, large polymer particles reduced tensile strength, but increased the drug release rate and the percolation threshold. Upon hydration, compacts with 45-125 μm HPMC particles formed a strong gel layer with low porosity, reducing hydrocortisone release rates. In comparison, faster drug release rates were obtained when 125-355 µm HPMC particles were used, due to the greater pore sizes that resulted in the formation of a weaker gel. Using 125-355 µm HPMC particles increased the percolation threshold for tablets and to a greater extent for mini-tablets. This work has demonstrated the importance of HPMC particle size in ER matrices, the effects of which are even more obvious for mini-tablets.

  6. Prediction of Solids Circulation Rate of Cork Particles in an Ambient-Pressure Pilot-Scale Circulating Fluidized Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yue; Turton, Richard; Famouri, Parviz; Boyle, Edward J.

    2009-01-07

    Circulating fluidized beds (CFB) are currently used in many industrial processes for noncatalytic and catalytic because its effective control is the key to smooth operation of a CFB system. This paper presents a method for solids flow metering from pressure drop measurements in the standpipe dense phase. A model based on the Ergun equation is developed to predict the solids flow rate and voidage in the dense phase of the standpipe. The profile of the solids flow rate under unsteady state is also presented. With the use of this method, the dynamic response time at different locations along the standpipe of a pilot-scale fluidized bed operating at ambient conditions with 812 mu m cork particles is estimated successfully. Through the use of a pressure balance analysis, solids flow models for the standpipe, riser, and other sections of the flow loop are combined to give an integrated CFB model.

  7. Application of particle swarm optimisation for solving deteriorating inventory model with fluctuating demand and controllable deterioration rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Ren; Dye, Chung-Yuan

    2013-06-01

    In most of the inventory models in the literature, the deterioration rate of goods is viewed as an exogenous variable, which is not subject to control. In the real market, the retailer can reduce the deterioration rate of product by making effective capital investment in storehouse equipments. In this study, we formulate a deteriorating inventory model with time-varying demand by allowing preservation technology cost as a decision variable in conjunction with replacement policy. The objective is to find the optimal replenishment and preservation technology investment strategies while minimising the total cost over the planning horizon. For any given feasible replenishment scheme, we first prove that the optimal preservation technology investment strategy not only exists but is also unique. Then, a particle swarm optimisation is coded and used to solve the nonlinear programming problem by employing the properties derived from this article. Some numerical examples are used to illustrate the features of the proposed model.

  8. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY: Material removal rate in chemical-mechanical polishing of wafers based on particle trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianxiu, Su; Xiqu, Chen; Jiaxi, Du; Renke, Kang

    2010-05-01

    Distribution forms of abrasives in the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process are analyzed based on experimental results. Then the relationships between the wafer, the abrasive and the polishing pad are analyzed based on kinematics and contact mechanics. According to the track length of abrasives on the wafer surface, the relationships between the material removal rate and the polishing velocity are obtained. The analysis results are in accord with the experimental results. The conclusion provides a theoretical guide for further understanding the material removal mechanism of wafers in CMP.

  9. Effects of subchronic exposures to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) in mice. III. Acute and chronic effects of CAPs on heart rate, heart-rate fluctuation, and body temperature.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Nadziejko, Christine; Chen, Lung Chi

    2005-04-01

    Normal mice (C57) and mice prone to develop atherosclerosis (ApoE-/-) were implanted with electrocardiograph (EKG), core body temperature, and motion transmitters were exposed daily for 6 h to Tuxedo, NY, concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) for 5 day/wk during the spring and summer of 2003. The series of 5-min EKG monitoring and body-temperature measurements were obtained for each animal in the CAPs and filtered air sham exposure groups. Our hypothesis was that chronic exposure could cause cumulative health effects. We used our recently developed nonparametric method to estimate the daily time periods that mean heart rates (HR), body temperature, and physical activity differed significantly between the CAPs and sham exposed group. CAPs exposure most affected heart rate between 1:30 a.m. and 4:30 a.m. With the response variables being the average heart rate, body temperature, and physical activity, we adopted a two-stage modeling approach to obtain the estimates of chronic and acute effects on the changes of these three response variables. In the first stage, a time-varying model estimated daily crude effects. In the second stage, the true means of the estimated crude effects were modeled with a polynominal function of time for chronic effects, a linear term of daily CAPs exposure concentrations for acute effects, and a random component for unknown noise. A Bayesian framework combined these two stages. There were significant decreasing patterns of HR, body temperature, and physical activity for the ApoE-/- mice over the 5 mo of CAPs exposure, with smaller and nonsignificant changes for the C57 mice. The chronic effect changes of the three response variables for ApoE-/- mice were maximal in the last few weeks. There was also a significant relationship between CAPs exposure concentration and short-term changes of heart rate in ApoE-/- mice during exposure. Response variables were also defined for examining fluctuations of 5-min heart rates within long (i.e., 3-6 h

  10. Estimating rates of decompression from textures of erupted ash particles produced by 1999-2006 eruptions of Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Heather M.N.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Mothes, Patricia A.; Hall, Minard L.; Ruiz, Andrés Gorki; Le Pennec, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    Persistent low- to moderate-level eruptive activity of andesitic volcanoes is difficult to monitor because small changes in magma supply rates may cause abrupt transitions in eruptive style. As direct measurement of magma supply is not possible, robust techniques for indirect measurements must be developed. Here we demonstrate that crystal textures of ash particles from 1999 to 2006 Vulcanian and Strombolian eruptions of Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador, provide quantitative information about the dynamics of magma ascent and eruption that is difficult to obtain from other monitoring approaches. We show that the crystallinity of erupted ash particles is controlled by the magma supply rate (MSR); ash erupted during periods of high magma supply is substantially less crystalline than during periods of low magma supply. This correlation is most easily explained by efficient degassing at very low pressures (<<50 MPa) and degassing-driven crystallization controlled by the time available prior to eruption. Our data also suggest that the observed transition from intermittent Vulcanian explosions at low MSR to more continuous periods of Strombolian eruptions and lava fountains at high MSR can be explained by the rise of bubbles through (Strombolian) or trapping of bubbles beneath (Vulcanian) vent-capping, variably viscous (and crystalline) magma.

  11. Accurate determination of volume and evaporation rate of micron-size liquid particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.; Sasagawa, N.; Sakai, K.

    2010-09-01

    We developed a noncontact method to measure the liquid droplet size of about 10 μm diameter within accuracy of 0.1 μm. A droplet ejected by an inkjet nozzle is induced into the glass windshield and falls due to the gravity against the viscosity of the atmosphere. The droplet is illuminated by a laser passing along the center of the glass windshield and the droplet diameter is determined from the falling velocity by the video analysis with the knowledge about the density of the droplet, and the viscosity of the atmosphere. The real time measurement of the droplet size through the rapid evaporation process thus becomes possible. The evaporation rate from the pure water droplet determined by the present method was found be more than 200 times larger than that from the surface with macroscopic spatial scale.

  12. High-rate axial-field ionization chamber for particle identification of Radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desouza, Romualdo; Vadas, Justin; Singh, Varinderjit; Visser, G.; Alexander, A.; Hudan, S.; Huston, J.; Wiggins, B.; Chbihi, A.; Famiano, M.; Bischak, M.

    2017-01-01

    The design, construction and performance characteristics of a simple axial-field ionization chamber suitable for identifying ions in a radioactive beam are presented. The detector is optimized for use with low-energy radioactive beams (<) 5 MeV/A. A fast charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) integrated into the detector design is also described. Coupling this fast CSA to the axial field ionization chamber produces an output pulse with a rise-time of 60 to 70 ns and a fall time of 100 ns, making the detector capable of sustaining a relatively high rate while providing a time resolution of 6 to 8 ns. Tests with an α source establish the detector energy resolution as 8 % for an energy deposit of 3.5 MeV. Beam tests indicate that the detector is an effective tool for the characterization of low-energy radioactive beams at beam intensities up to 3 x 105 ions/s. Supported by the U.S. DOE under Award # DE-FG02-88ER-40404 and the NSF under Grant No. 1342962.

  13. Effects of below-cloud scavenging on the regional aerosol budget in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Soo Ya; Park, Rokjin J.; Kim, Yong Pyo; Woo, Jung-Hun

    2012-10-01

    We examine the effects of below-cloud scavenging on regional aerosol simulations over East Asia using wet deposition fluxes observed at Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET) sites and the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model together with a new below-cloud-scavenging scheme. Typical air quality models, including CMAQ, assume below-cloud scavenging as a simple first-order process with a constant or simple form depending on rain intensity. The scheme used here accounts for the collection efficiency, terminal velocity of raindrops, raindrop-size distributions, and particle-size distributions, which are important factors affecting below-cloud scavenging. We conduct model simulations for spring 2001, including baseline and sensitivity simulations. Our analysis mainly focuses on May 2001 to rule out the effect of dust aerosols. Simulated wet deposition fluxes of SO42-, NO3-, and NH4+ by the new scheme are increased by 103, 16, and 108%, respectively, relative to the baseline simulation and show better agreement with observations. The effect of below-cloud scavenging on coarse particles is even greater, producing wet deposition fluxes two orders of magnitude higher than the baseline. The resulting changes in the model indicate the considerable impacts of below-cloud scavenging on regional aerosol simulations over East Asia, where both anthropogenic emissions and natural sources of aerosols are present throughout the year. An accurate wet scavenging simulation is critical to simulate the atmospheric burden and wet deposition fluxes of both fine-mode and coarse-mode aerosols over East Asia.

  14. Crystallization of aqueous inorganic-malonic acid particles: nucleation rates, dependence on size, and dependence on the ammonium-to-sulfate ratio.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Matthew T; Riffell, Jenna L; Bertram, Allan K

    2006-07-06

    Using an electrodynamic balance, we determined the relative humidity (RH) at which aqueous inorganic-malonic acid particles crystallized, with ammonium sulfate ((NH(4))(2)SO(4)), letovicite ((NH(4))(3)H(SO(4))(2)), or ammonium bisulfate (NH(4)HSO(4)) as the inorganic component. The results for (NH(4))(2)SO(4)-malonic acid particles and (NH(4))(3)H(SO(4))(2)-malonic acid particles show that malonic acid decreases the crystallization RH of the inorganic particles by less than 7% RH when the dry malonic acid mole fraction is less than 0.25. At a dry malonic acid mole fraction of about 0.5, the presence of malonic acid can decrease the crystallization RH of the inorganic particles by up to 35% RH. For the NH(4)HSO(4)-malonic acid particles, the presence of malonic acid does not significantly modify the crystallization RH of the inorganic particles for the entire range of dry malonic acid mole fractions studied; in all cases, either the particles did not crystallize or the crystallization RH was close to 0% RH. Size dependent measurements show that the crystallization RH of aqueous (NH(4))(2)SO(4) particles is not a strong function of particle volume. However, for aqueous (NH(4))(2)SO(4)-malonic acid particles (with dry malonic acid mole fraction = 0.36), the crystallization RH is a stronger function of particle volume, with the crystallization RH decreasing by 6 +/- 3% RH when the particle volume decreases by an order of magnitude. To our knowledge, these are the first size dependent measurements of the crystallization RH of atmospherically relevant inorganic-organic particles. These results suggest that for certain organic mole fractions the particle size and observation time need to be considered when extrapolating laboratory crystallization results to atmospheric scenarios. For aqueous (NH(4))(2)SO(4) particles, the homogeneous nucleation rate data are a strong function of RH, but for aqueous (NH(4))(2)SO(4)-malonic acid particles (with dry organic mole fraction = 0

  15. Hydroxyl radical scavengers inhibit lymphocyte mitogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Novogrodsky, A; Ravid, A; Rubin, A L; Stenzel, K H

    1982-01-01

    Agents that are known to be scavengers of hydroxyl radicals inhibit lymphocyte mitogenesis induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) to a greater extent than they inhibit mitogenesis induced by concanavalin A or phytohemagglutinin. These agents include dimethyl sulfoxide, benzoate, thiourea, dimethylurea, tetramethylurea, L-tryptophan, mannitol, and several other alcohols. Their inhibitory effect is not associated with cytotoxicity. The hydroxyl radical scavengers do not inhibit PMA-dependent amino acid transport in T cells or PMA-induced superoxide production by monocytes. Thus, they do not inhibit the primary interaction of PMA with responding cells. Treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with PMA increased cellular guanylate cyclase in most experiments, and dimethyl sulfoxide tended to inhibit this increase. In addition to inhibition of PMA-induced mitogenesis, hydroxyl radical scavengers markedly inhibited the activity of lymphocyte activating factor (interleukin 1). The differential inhibition of lymphocyte mitogenesis induced by different mitogens appears to be related to the differential macrophage requirements of the mitogens. The data suggest that hydroxyl radicals may be involved in mediating the triggering signal for lymphocyte activation. Some of the hydroxyl radical scavengers are inducers of cellular differentiation,. nd it is possible that their differentiating activity is related to their ability to scavenge free radicals. PMID:6122209

  16. Body Size as a Driver of Scavenging in Theropod Dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Kane, Adam; Healy, Kevin; Ruxton, Graeme D; Jackson, Andrew L

    2016-06-01

    Theropod dinosaurs dominated Earth's terrestrial ecosystem as a diverse group of predators for more than 160 million years, yet little is known about their foraging ecology. Maintaining a balanced energy budget presented a major challenge for therapods, which ranged from the chicken-sized Microraptor up to the whale-sized Giganotosaurus, in the face of intense competition and the demands of ontogenetic growth. Facultative scavenging, a behavior present in almost all modern predators, may have been important in supplementing energetically expensive lifestyles. By using agent-based models based on the allometric relationship between size and foraging behaviors, we show that theropods between 27 and 1,044 kg would have gained a significant energetic advantage over individuals at both the small and large extremes of theropod body mass through their scavenging efficiency. These results were robust to rate of competition, primary productivity, and detection distance. Our models demonstrate the potential importance of facultative scavenging in theropods and the role of body size in defining its prevalence in Mesozoic terrestrial systems.

  17. A mathematical approach to selective scavenging of the different classes of typical atmospheric aerosols by rainout and health impact.

    PubMed

    García Nieto, P J; del Coz Díaz, J J; Ordóñez Galán, C; Taboada Castro, J

    2006-03-01

    In this work, initially a general mathematical framework for wet deposition processes is developed and followed by an in-depth discussion of the scavenging of material below cloud due to rain. These processes are then integrated into an overall framework focussing mainly on precipitation scavenging by rain. This work studies the scavenging efficiencies of aerosol particles within a given rain regime as a function of time by below-cloud scavenging. The health impact of aerosol before and after rain is also considered by comparing the respirable dust fractions. The well-known equations of below-cloud scavenging are applied to eight different classes of atmospheric aerosols (marine background (MB), clean continental background (CCB), average background (AB), background and aged urban plume (BAUP), background and local sources (BLS), urban average (UA), urban and freeway (UF) and central power plant (CCP)) in two precipitation regimes (drizzle and heavy rain) with one drop size distribution (DSD). From this study it is inferred that respirable dust is scavenged with relative ease by rainout. Compared with the volume of respirable aerosol average urban environment (UA) before rain roughly 5.2% remains after 18 hours of drizzle and 4% after 18 hours of heavy rain. Over a long timescale, the results show that heavy rain is more efficient than drizzle in particle scavenging.

  18. Study on the free radical scavenging activity of sea cucumber (Paracaudina chinens var.) gelatin hydrolysate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Mingyong; Xiao, Feng; Zhao, Yuanhui; Liu, Zunying; Li, Bafang; Dong, Shiyuan

    2007-07-01

    Gelatin from the sea cucumber (Paracaudina chinens var.) was hydrolyzed by bromelain and the hydrolysate was found to have a high free radical scavenging activity. The hydrolysate was fractionated through an ultrafiltration membrane with 5 kDa molecular weight cutoff (MWCO). The portion (less than 5 kDa) was further separated by Sephadex G-25. The active peak was collected and assayed for free radical scavenging activity. The scavenging rates for superoxide anion radicals (O2·-) and hydroxyl radicals (·OH) of the fraction with the highest activity were 29.02% and 75.41%, respectively. A rabbit liver mitochondrial free radical damage model was adopted to study the free radical scavenging activity of the fraction. The results showed that the sea cucumber gelatin hydrolysate can prevent the damage of rabbit liver and mitochondria.

  19. Wet precipitation scavenging of soluble atmospheric trace gases due to chemical absorption in inhomogeneous atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elperin, Tov; Fominykh, Andrew; Krasovitov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the effects of irreversible chemical reactions of the first and higher orders and aqueous-phase dissociation reactions on the rate of trace gas scavenging by rain in the atmosphere with non-uniform concentration and temperature. We employ an one-dimensional model of precipitation scavenging of chemically active soluble gaseous pollutants that is valid for small gradients of temperature and concentration in the atmosphere. It is demonstrated that transient altitudinal distribution of concentration under the influence of rain is determined by the partial hyperbolic differential equation of the first order. Scavenging coefficients are calculated for wet removal of chlorine, nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide for the exponential and linear initial altitudinal distributions of trace gases concentration in the atmosphere and linear and uniform altitudinal temperature distributions. Theoretical predictions of the dependence of the magnitude of the scavenging coefficient on rain intensity for sulfur dioxide are in a good agreement with the available atmospheric measurements.

  20. Key role in ecosystem functioning of scavengers reliant on a single common species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inger, Richard; Per, Esra; Cox, Daniel T. C.; Gaston, Kevin J.

    2016-07-01

    The importance of species richness in maintaining ecosystem function in the field remains unclear. Recent studies however have suggested that in some systems functionality is maintained by a few abundant species. Here we determine this relationship by quantifying the species responsible for a key ecosystem role, carcass removal by scavengers. We find that, unlike those within largely unaltered environments, the scavenger community within our highly altered system is dominated by a single species, the Carrion crow, despite the presence of a number of other scavenging species. Furthermore, we find no relationship between abundance of crows and carcass removal. However, the overall activity of crows predicts carcass biomass removal rate in an asymptotic manner, suggesting that a relatively low level of abundance and scavenging activity is required to maintain this component of ecosystem function.

  1. Key role in ecosystem functioning of scavengers reliant on a single common species

    PubMed Central

    Inger, Richard; Per, Esra; Cox, Daniel T.C.; Gaston, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of species richness in maintaining ecosystem function in the field remains unclear. Recent studies however have suggested that in some systems functionality is maintained by a few abundant species. Here we determine this relationship by quantifying the species responsible for a key ecosystem role, carcass removal by scavengers. We find that, unlike those within largely unaltered environments, the scavenger community within our highly altered system is dominated by a single species, the Carrion crow, despite the presence of a number of other scavenging species. Furthermore, we find no relationship between abundance of crows and carcass removal. However, the overall activity of crows predicts carcass biomass removal rate in an asymptotic manner, suggesting that a relatively low level of abundance and scavenging activity is required to maintain this component of ecosystem function. PMID:27404915

  2. Wet precipitation scavenging of soluble atmospheric trace gases due to chemical absorption in inhomogeneous atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elperin, Tov; Fominykh, Andrew; Krasovitov, Boris

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the effects of irreversible chemical reactions of the first and higher orders and aqueous-phase dissociation reactions on the rate of trace gas scavenging by rain in the atmosphere with non-uniform concentration and temperature. We employ an one-dimensional model of precipitation scavenging of chemically active soluble gaseous pollutants that is valid for small gradients of temperature and concentration in the atmosphere. It is demonstrated that transient altitudinal distribution of concentration under the influence of rain is determined by the partial hyperbolic differential equation of the first order. Scavenging coefficients are calculated for wet removal of chlorine, nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide for the exponential and linear initial altitudinal distributions of trace gases concentration in the atmosphere and linear and uniform altitudinal temperature distributions. Theoretical predictions of the dependence of the magnitude of the scavenging coefficient on rain intensity for sulfur dioxide are in a good agreement with the available atmospheric measurements.

  3. Short-Term Effect of Coarse Particles on Daily Mortality Rate in A Tropical City, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shang-Shyue; Weng, Yi-Hao; Chiu, Ya-Wen; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2015-01-01

    Many studies examined the short-term effects of air pollution on frequency of daily mortality over the past two decades. However, information on the relationship between exposure to levels of coarse particles (PM(2.5-10)) and daily mortality rate is relatively sparse due to limited availability of monitoring data and findings are inconsistent. This study was undertaken to determine whether an association exists between PM(2.5-10) levels and rate of daily mortality in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, a large industrial city with a tropical climate. Daily mortality rate, air pollution parameters, and weather data for Kaohsiung were obtained for the period 2006-2008. The relative risk (RR) of daily mortality occurrence was estimated using a time-stratified case-crossover approach, controlling for (1) weather variables, (2) day of the week, (3) seasonality, and (4) long-term time trends. For the single-pollutant model without adjustment for other pollutants, PM(2.5-10) exposure levels showed significant correlation with total mortality rate both on warm and cool days, with an interquartile range increase associated with a 14% (95% CI = 5-23%) and 12% (95% CI = 5-20%) rise in number of total deaths, respectively. In two-pollutant models, PM(2.5-10) exerted significant influence on total mortality frequency after inclusion of sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) on warm days. On cool days, PM(2.5-10) induced significant elevation in total mortality rate when SO(2) or ozone (O(3)) was added in the regression model. There was no apparent indication of an association between PM(2.5-10) exposure and deaths attributed to respiratory and circulatory diseases. This study provided evidence of correlation between short-term exposure to PM(2.5-10) and increased risk of death for all causes.

  4. Killer whales and whaling: the scavenging hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Hal; Reeves, Randall

    2005-01-01

    Killer whales (Orcinus orca) frequently scavenged from the carcasses produced by whalers. This practice became especially prominent with large-scale mechanical whaling in the twentieth century, which provided temporally and spatially clustered floating carcasses associated with loud acoustic signals. The carcasses were often of species of large whale preferred by killer whales but that normally sink beyond their diving range. In the middle years of the twentieth century floating whaled carcasses were much more abundant than those resulting from natural mortality of whales, and we propose that scavenging killer whales multiplied through diet shifts and reproduction. During the 1970s the numbers of available carcasses fell dramatically with the cessation of most whaling (in contrast to a reasonably stable abundance of living whales), and the scavenging killer whales needed an alternative source of nutrition. Diet shifts may have triggered declines in other prey species, potentially affecting ecosystems, as well as increasing direct predation on living whales. PMID:17148221

  5. Killer whales and whaling: the scavenging hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Hal; Reeves, Randall

    2005-12-22

    Killer whales (Orcinus orca) frequently scavenged from the carcasses produced by whalers. This practice became especially prominent with large-scale mechanical whaling in the twentieth century, which provided temporally and spatially clustered floating carcasses associated with loud acoustic signals. The carcasses were often of species of large whale preferred by killer whales but that normally sink beyond their diving range. In the middle years of the twentieth century floating whaled carcasses were much more abundant than those resulting from natural mortality of whales, and we propose that scavenging killer whales multiplied through diet shifts and reproduction. During the 1970s the numbers of available carcasses fell dramatically with the cessation of most whaling (in contrast to a reasonably stable abundance of living whales), and the scavenging killer whales needed an alternative source of nutrition. Diet shifts may have triggered declines in other prey species, potentially affecting ecosystems, as well as increasing direct predation on living whales.

  6. Scavenging ratios based on inflow air concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W.E.; Dana, M.T.; Lee, R.N.; Slinn, W.G.N.; Thorp, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    Scavenging ratios were calculated from field measurements made during April 1985. Event precipitation samples were collected at the surface, but air chemistry measurements in the air mass feeding the precipitation were made from an aircraft. In contrast, ratios calculated in previous studies have used air concentration and precipitation chemistry data from only surface measurements. Average scavenging ratios were calculated for SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, total sulfate, total nitrate, and total ammonium for 5 events; the geometric mean of these scavenging ratios were 8.5 {times} 10{sup 5}, 5.6 {times} 10{sup 6}, 4.3 {times} 10{sup 5}, 3.4 {times} 10{sup 5}, 2.4 {times} 10{sup 6}, and 9.7 {times} 10{sup 4}, respectively. These means are similar to but less variable than previous ratios formed using only surface data.

  7. Clinical Long-Term Outcome and Reinterventional Rate After Uterine Fibroid Embolization with Nonspherical Versus Spherical Polyvinyl Alcohol Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Duvnjak, Stevo; Ravn, Pernille; Green, Anders; Andersen, Poul Erik

    2016-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to evaluate the long-term clinical outcome and frequency of reinterventions in patients with uterine fibroids treated with embolization at a single center using polyvinyl alcohol microparticles.MethodsThe study included all patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids treated with uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) with spherical (s-PVA) and nonspherical (ns-PVA) polyvinyl alcohol microparticles during the period January 2001 to January 2011. Clinical success and secondary interventions were examined. Hospital records were reviewed during follow-up, and symptom-specific questionnaires were sent to all patients.ResultsIn total, 515 patients were treated with UFE and 350 patients (67 %) were available for long-term clinical follow-up. Median time of follow-up was 93 (range 76–120.2) months. Eighty-five patients (72 %) had no reinterventions during follow-up in the group embolized with ns-PVA compared with 134 patients (58 %) treated with s-PVA. Thirty-three patients (28 %) underwent secondary interventions in the ns-PVA group compared with 98 patients (42 %) in s-PVA group (χ{sup 2} test, p < 0.01).ConclusionsSpherical PVA particles 500–700 µm showed high reintervention rate at long-term follow-up, and almost one quarter of the patients underwent secondary interventions, suggesting that this type of particle is inappropriate for UFE.

  8. Contribution of gas and electric stoves to residential ultrafine particle concentrations between 2 and 64 nm: size distributions and emission and coagulation remission and coagulation rates.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Lance; Wang, Fang; Howard-Reed, Cynthia; Persily, Andrew

    2008-12-01

    Three indoor sources (a gas stove, an electric stove, and an electric toaster oven) of ultrafine particles (UFPs) have been studied in an instrumented test house on the campus of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Previous studies have reported the concentration of ultrafine particles indoors due to cooking, but have been limited to particles with diameters greater than 10 nm. New technology now makes it possible to measure particles as small as 2 nm. Therefore, NIST conducted a study to measure typical concentrations and estimate emission rates and coagulation rates of UFPs in the size range from 2 to 64 nm. More than 150 tests were completed. Peak concentrations from the gas and electric stovetop burners/coils occurred at a particle size of approximately 5 nm. Total number concentrations were as much as 10 times greater than reported in previous studies of particle sizes above 10 nm. Because of these high concentrations of very small particles, coagulation was the dominant process affecting the evolution of the size distribution after the source was turned off. The observed number concentration changes due to coagulation were fit by models including corrections for van der Waals and viscosity forces and fractal shapes. Indoor/outdoor ratios indicated that less than 5% of the <10 nm particles penetrated the house. This suggests that outdoor sources of these ultrafine particles will not contribute substantially to human exposure if indoor sources are present.

  9. Hit rates and radiation doses to nuclei of bone lining cells from alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polig, E.; Jee, W. S.; Kruglikov, I. L.

    1992-01-01

    Factors relating the local concentration of a bone-seeking alpha-particle emitter to the mean hit rate have been determined for nuclei of bone lining cells using a Monte Carlo procedure. Cell nuclei were approximated by oblate spheroids with dimensions and location taken from a previous histomorphometric study. The Monte Carlo simulation is applicable for planar and diffuse labels at plane or cylindrical bone surfaces. Additionally, the mean nuclear dose per hit, the dose mean per hit, the mean track segment length and its second moment, the percentage of stoppers, and the frequency distribution of the dose have been determined. Some basic features of the hit statistics for bone lining cells have been outlined, and the consequences of existing standards of radiation protection with regard to the hit frequency to cell nuclei are discussed.

  10. Experimental study of vorticity-strain rate interaction in turbulent partially-premixed jet flames using tomographic particle image velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Coriton, Bruno; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2016-02-16

    In turbulent flows, the interaction between vorticity, ω, and strain rate, s, is considered a primary mechanism for the transfer of energy from large to small scales through vortex stretching. The ω-s coupling in turbulent jet flames is investigated using tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV). TPIV provides a direct measurement of the three-dimensional velocity field from which ω and s are determined. The effects of combustion and mean shear on the ω-s interaction are investigated in turbulent partially premixed methane/air jet flames with high and low probabilities of localized extinction as well as in a non-reacting isothermal air jet with Reynolds number of approximately 13,000. Results show that combustion causes structures of high vorticity and strain rate to agglomerate in highly correlated, elongated layers that span the height of the probe volume. In the non-reacting jet, these structures have a more varied morphology, greater fragmentation, and are not as well correlated. The enhanced spatiotemporal correlation of vorticity and strain rate in the stable flame results in stronger ω-s interaction characterized by increased enstrophy and strain-rate production rates via vortex stretching and straining, respectively. The probability of preferential local alignment between ω and the eigenvector of the intermediate principal strain rate, s2, which is intrinsic to the ω-s coupling in turbulent flows, is larger in the flames and increases with the flame stability. The larger mean shear in the flame imposes a preferential orientation of ω and s2 tangential to the shear layer. The extensive and compressive principal strain rates, s1 and s3, respectively, are preferentially oriented at approximately 45° with respect to the jet axis. As a result, the production rates of strain and vorticity tend to be dominated by instances in which ω is parallel to the s1¯-s2¯ plane and orthogonal

  11. A pilot study of traditional indoor biomass cooking and heating in rural Bhutan: gas and particle concentrations and emission rates.

    PubMed

    Wangchuk, T; He, C; Knibbs, L D; Mazaheri, M; Morawska, L

    2017-01-01

    Although many studies have reported the health effects of biomass fuels in developing countries, relatively few have quantitatively characterized emissions from biomass stoves during cooking and heating. The aim of this pilot study was to characterize the emission characteristics of different biomass stoves in four rural houses in Bhutan during heating (metal chimney stove), rice cooking (traditional mud stove), fodder preparation (stone tripod stove), and liquor distillation (traditional mud stove). Three stage measurements (before, during, and after the activity had ceased) were conducted for PM2.5 , particle number (PN), CO, and CO2 . When stoves were operated, the pollutant concentrations were significantly elevated above background levels, by an average of 40 and 18 times for PM2.5 and CO, respectively. Emission rates (mg/min) ranged from 1.07 × 10(2) (PM2.5 ) and 3.50 × 10(2) (CO) for the stone tripod stove during fodder preparation to 6.20 × 10(2) (PM2.5 ) and 2.22 × 10(3) (CO) for the traditional mud stove during liquor distillation. Usable PN data were only available for one house, during heating using a metal chimney stove, which presented an emission rate of 3.24 × 10(13) particles/min. Interventions to control household air pollution in Bhutan, in order to reduce the health risks associated with cooking and heating, are recommended.

  12. Analysis of the Hydrogen Reduction Rate of Magnetite Concentrate Particles in a Drop Tube Reactor Through CFD Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Deqiu; Mohassab, Yousef; Elzohiery, Mohamed; Sohn, H. Y.

    2016-06-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach, coupled with experimental results, was developed to accurately evaluate the kinetic parameters of iron oxide particle reduction. Hydrogen reduction of magnetite concentrate particles was used as a sample case. A detailed evaluation of the particle residence time and temperature profile inside the reactor is presented. This approach eliminates the errors associated with assumptions like constant particle temperature and velocity while the particles travel down a drop tube reactor. The gas phase was treated as a continuum in the Eulerian frame of reference, and the particles are tracked using a Lagrangian approach in which the trajectory and velocity are determined by integrating the equation of particle motion. In addition, a heat balance on the particle that relates the particle temperature to convection and radiation was also applied. An iterative algorithm that numerically solves the governing coupled ordinary differential equations was developed to determine the pre-exponential factor and activation energy that best fit the experimental data.

  13. Composition-dependent freezing nucleation rates for HNO3/H2O aerosols resembling gravity-wave-perturbed stratospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prenni, Anthony J.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Tisdale, Robert T.; Siefert, Ronald L.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1998-11-01

    Laboratory measurements are presented for the freezing kinetics of H2O/HNO3 aerosols over the temperature range of 188-204 K. For 2:1 H2O:HNO3 aerosols crystallizing to NAD we observed a maximum nucleation rate of J = 9.3×109 cm-3 s-1 at 194 K. This temperature is between the glass point of 161 K [Ji et al., 1993] and the melting point of 235.5 K [Ji et al., 1996]. This can be compared to a previous measurement of J = 6.7×109 cm-3 s-1 at 193 K [Disselkamp et al., 1996] and lower temperature measurements of J ≈ 1010-1012 cm-3 s-1 at 178.8 - 175.8 K [Bertram and Sloan, 1998a]. Measured nucleation rates decrease as the aerosol becomes dilute, but NAD formation is still observable for 2.5:1 H2O:HNO3 at temperatures near 195 K. In contrast, freezing of 3:1 H2O:HNO3 aerosol was not observed for constant temperature experiments throughout this temperature range, yielding an upper limit of J<1.5×109 cm-3 s-1. This is the lowest experimental value determined for 3:1 H2O:HNO3 freezing rates at these temperatures. From the measured freezing rates and knowledge of the free energy of diffusion the average interfacial free energy for NAD in a 2:1 H2O:HNO3 solution was determined to be σ = 25.2 ergs cm-2. A limit for the interfacial free energy was placed on 3:1 H2O:HNO3 particles, for which freezing was not observed. These data imply that if aerosols reach compositions more concentrated than 3:1 H2O:HNO3 in the atmosphere, NAD may play a role in polar stratospheric cloud formation.

  14. Wet scavenging of soluble gases in DC3 deep convective storms using WRF-Chem simulations and aircraft observations: DEEP CONVECTIVE WET SCAVENGING OF GASES

    SciTech Connect

    Bela, Megan M.; Barth, Mary C.; Toon, Owen B.; Fried, Alan; Homeyer, Cameron R.; Morrison, Hugh; Cummings, Kristin A.; Li, Yunyao; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Yang, Qing; Wennberg, Paul O.; Crounse, John D.; St. Clair, Jason M.; Teng, Alex P.; O'Sullivan, Daniel; Huey, L. Gregory; Chen, Dexian; Liu, Xiaoxi; Blake, Donald R.; Blake, Nicola J.; Apel, Eric C.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Flocke, Frank; Campos, Teresa; Diskin, Glenn

    2016-04-21

    We examine wet scavenging of soluble trace gases in storms observed during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign. We conduct high-resolution simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) of a severe storm in Oklahoma. The model represents well the storm location, size, and structure as compared with Next Generation Weather Radar reflectivity, and simulated CO transport is consistent with aircraft observations. Scavenging efficiencies (SEs) between inflow and outflow of soluble species are calculated from aircraft measurements and model simulations. Using a simple wet scavenging scheme, we simulate the SE of each soluble species within the error bars of the observations. The simulated SEs of all species except nitric acid (HNO3) are highly sensitive to the values specified for the fractions retained in ice when cloud water freezes. To reproduce the observations, we must assume zero ice retention for formaldehyde (CH2O) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and complete retention for methyl hydrogen peroxide (CH3OOH) and sulfur dioxide (SO2), likely to compensate for the lack of aqueous chemistry in the model. We then compare scavenging efficiencies among storms that formed in Alabama and northeast Colorado and the Oklahoma storm. Significant differences in SEs are seen among storms and species. More scavenging of HNO3 and less removal of CH3OOH are seen in storms with higher maximum flash rates, an indication of more graupel mass. Graupel is associated with mixed-phase scavenging and lightning production of nitrogen oxides (NOx ), processes that may explain the observed differences in HNO3 and CH3OOH scavenging.

  15. Camera-based three-dimensional real-time particle tracking at kHz rates and Ångström accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Daldrop, Peter; Joo, Sihwa; Otto, Oliver; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Seidel, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Optical and magnetic tweezers are widely employed to probe the mechanics and activity of individual biomolecular complexes. They rely on micrometer-sized particles to detect molecular conformational changes from the particle position. Real-time particle tracking with Ångström accuracy has so far been only achieved using laser detection through photodiodes. Here we demonstrate that camera-based imaging can provide a similar performance for all three dimensions. Particle imaging at kHz rates is combined with real-time data processing being accelerated by a graphics processing unit. For particles that are fixed in the sample cell we can detect 3 Å sized steps that are introduced by cell translations at rates of 10 Hz, while for DNA-tethered particles 5 Å steps at 1 Hz can be resolved. Moreover, 20 particles can be tracked in parallel with comparable accuracy. Our approach provides a simple and robust way for high-resolution tweezers experiments using multiple particles at a time. PMID:25565216

  16. Drug dispersion degree and drug dissolution rate in Hybrane S1200-based instant-release matricial particles prepared by hot melt extrusion.

    PubMed

    Ravina-Eirin, Elena; Gomez-Amoza, J L; Martínez-Pacheco, Ramón

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the dissolution of a poorly soluble drug (prednisolone) from different sized matricial particles (from <250 to >1500 µm) with two drug contents (10% or 20%) obtained by hot melt extrusion using the hyperbranched polyesteramide Hybrane S1200 (water-soluble and with a Tg of 45 °C) as the carrier. X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and SEM studies permit us to conclude that in 10% prednisolone extrudate, the drug is mainly dispersed within the carrier, whereas in those containing 20% an important fraction of the drug remains in a crystalline state and is accumulated on the surface of the extrudates. On particles proceeding from 10% drug extrudate, the drug dissolution rate is very high and slightly dependant on particle size and in all cases, higher than the pure micronized drug. However, on particles proceeding from 20% prednisolone extrudate particle size have a major effect on drug dissolution rate, attributable to higher proportions of crystalline drug accumulated on the surface, hindering polymer dissolution. Thus, the reduction of the particle size after extrudate grinding creates new surfaces from inside, that leads to strong increments on prednisolone dissolution rate, and becomes higher than the pure micronized drug one when the particle size is <250 µm.

  17. Effects of long-term exposure to ammonium sulfate particles on growth and gas exchange rates of Fagus crenata, Castanopsis sieboldii, Larix kaempferi and Cryptomeria japonica seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Otani, Yoko; Li, Peiran; Nagao, Hiroshi; Lenggoro, I. Wuled; Ishida, Atsushi; Yazaki, Kenichi; Noguchi, Kyotaro; Nakaba, Satoshi; Yamane, Kenichi; Kuroda, Katsushi; Sano, Yuzou; Funada, Ryo; Izuta, Takeshi

    2014-11-01

    To clarify the effects of long-term exposure to ammonium sulfate (AS) particles on growth and physiological functions of forest tree species, seedlings of Fagus crenata, Castanopsis sieboldii, Larix kaempferi and Cryptomeria japonica were exposed to submicron-size AS particles during two growing seasons from 3 June 2011 to 8 October 2012. The mean sulfate concentration in PM2.5 increased during the exposure inside the chamber in 2011 and 2012 by 2.73 and 4.32 μg SO42- m-3, respectively. No significant effects of exposure to AS particles were detected on the whole-plant dry mass of the seedlings. These results indicate that the exposure to submicrometer AS particles at the ambient level for two growing seasons did not significantly affect the growth of the seedlings. No significant effects of exposure to AS particles were found on the net photosynthetic rate in the leaves or needles of F. crenata, C. sieboldii and L. kaempferi seedlings. Also, in the previous-year needles of C. japonica seedlings, exposure to AS particles significantly reduced the net photosynthetic rate, which may be caused by the reduction in the concentration of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). On the contrary, in current-year needles of C. japonica seedlings, net photosynthetic rate significantly increased with exposure to AS particles, which may be the result of increases in stomatal conductance and concentrations of Rubisco and chlorophyll. Furthermore, exposure to AS particles correlated with an increase in concentrations of NH4+, free amino acid and total soluble protein, suggesting that AS particles may be deliquesced, absorbed into the leaves and metabolized into amino acid and protein. These results suggest that net photosynthesis in the needles of C. japonica is relatively sensitive to submicron-size AS particles as compared with the other three tree species.

  18. Laboratory observations of temperature and humidity dependencies of nucleation and growth rates of sub-3 nm particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huan; Dai, Liang; Zhao, Yi; Kanawade, Vijay P.; Tripathi, Sachchida N.; Ge, Xinlei; Chen, Mindong; Lee, Shan-Hu

    2017-02-01

    Temperature and relative humidity (RH) are the most important thermodynamic parameters in aerosol formation, yet laboratory studies of nucleation and growth dependencies on temperature and RH are lacking. Here we report the experimentally observed temperature and RH dependences of sulfuric acid aerosol nucleation and growth. Experiments were performed in a flow tube in the temperature range from 248 to 313 K, RH from 0.8% to 79%, and relative acidity (RA) of sulfuric acid from 6 × 10-5 to 0.38 (2 × 107-109 cm-3). The impurity levels of base compounds were determined to be NH3 < 23 pptv (parts per thousand by volume), methylamine < 1.5 pptv, and dimethylamine < 0.52 pptv. Our results showed that low temperatures favor nucleation at fixed sulfuric acid concentration but impede nucleation when RA is fixed. It is also shown that binary nucleation of sulfuric acid and water is negligible in planetary boundary layer temperature and sulfuric acid ranges. An empirical algorithm was derived to correlate the nucleation rate with RA, RH, and temperature together. Collision-limited condensation of free-sulfuric acid molecules fails to predict the observed growth rate in the sub-3 nm size range, as well as its dependence on temperature and RH. This suggests that evaporation, sulfuric acid hydration, and possible involvement of other ternary molecules should be considered for the sub-3 nm particle growth.

  19. Rare earth element scavenging in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Robert H.; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    1990-10-01

    Examinations of rare earth element (REE) adsorption in seawater, using a variety of surface-types, indicated that, for most surfaces, light rare earth elements (LREEs) are preferentially adsorbed compared to the heavy rare earths (HREEs). Exceptions to this behavior were observed only for silica phases (glass surfaces, acid-cleaned diatomaceous earth, and synthetic SiO 2). The affinity of the rare earths for surfaces can be strongly affected by thin organic coatings. Glass surfaces which acquired an organic coating through immersion in Tampa Bay exhibited adsorptive behavior typical of organic-rich, rather than glass, surfaces. Models of rare earth distributions between seawater and carboxylate-rich surfaces indicate that scavenging processes which involve such surfaces should exhibit a strong dependence on pH and carbonate complexation. Scavenging models involving carboxylate surfaces produce relative REE abundance patterns in good general agreement with observed shale-normalized REE abundances in seawater. Scavenging by carboxylate-rich surfaces should produce HREE enrichments in seawater relative to the LREEs and may produce enrichments of lanthanum relative to its immediate trivalent neighbors. Due to the origin of distribution coefficients as a difference between REE solution complexation (which increases strongly with atomic number) and surface complexation (which apparently also increases with atomic number) the relative solution abundance patterns of the REEs produced by scavenging reactions can be quite complex.

  20. Targeting metabolic scavenging in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lyssiotis, Costas A; Cantley, Lewis C

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic tumor metabolism is rewired to facilitate survival and growth in a nutrient-depleted environment. This leads to a unique dependence on metabolic recycling and scavenging pathways, including NAD salvage. Targeting this pathway in pancreatic cancer disrupts metabolic homeostasis and impairs tumor growth.

  1. Decreasing Pica by Targeting Antecedent Scavenging Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bluestone, Michael A.

    A nonverbal, severely retarded, 24-year-old female, who had undergone abdominal surgery due to pica (compulsive eating of inedible substances) participated in the study. Antecendent scavenging behavior was reliably identified and redirected. Pica was prevented by using a short duration physical restraint. Giving non-edible items that might be…

  2. Scavenger Hunt: Middle School Earth Science "Test."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Katharine D.; Sanders, Richard L.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a scavenger hunt activity that has been used successfully with middle school students in an earth science course. This activity includes items that call for library research rather than the collection of objects, emphasize real-world connections, are skill-oriented, ask for originality and creativity, and are just for fun. (JRH)

  3. Scavenger Hunts: Chasing Down Scientific Answers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Marshall S.; Dew, Nancy; Kronberg, Joyce R.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a scavenger hunt activity that stimulates active learning. Presents objectives, examples, pitfalls, grading methods, and evaluation based on course experiences with the technique. Although the method was used with lower division biology courses, it is applicable to a wide variety of science courses at various levels. (SAH)

  4. Nature or Nurture? Gender Roles Scavenger Hunt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whalen, Shannon; Maurer-Starks, Suanne

    2008-01-01

    The examination of gender roles and stereotypes and their subsequent impact on sexual behavior is a concept for discussion in many sex education courses in college and sex education units in high school. This analysis often leads to a discussion of the impact of nature vs. nurture on gender roles. The gender roles scavenger hunt is an interactive…

  5. Phase, Viscosity, Morphology, and Room Temperature Evaporation Rates of SOA Particles Generated from Different Precursors, at Low and High Relative Humidities, and their Interaction with Hydrophobic Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. M.; Zelenyuk, A.; Imre, D. G.; Beranek, J.; Abramson, E.; Shrivastava, M.

    2012-12-01

    Formation, properties, transformations, and temporal evolution of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles strongly depend on particle phase. Semi-volatile molecules that comprise SOA particles were assumed to form a low viscosity solution that maintains equilibrium with the evolving gas phase by rapid evaporation condensation. However, studies by our group indicate that laboratory-generated alpha-pinene SOA particles and ambient SOA characterized in a recent field campaign are in a semi-solid, highly viscous phase, and their evaporation rates are orders of magnitude slower than predicted. We present the results of recent studies in which we have extended our work to include SOA particles generated by oxidation of a number of precursors including limonene, n-alkenes, cyclo-alkenes and isoprene. The resulting particles are characterized by their phase, morphology and room temperature evaporation rates. We conclude that, while the detailed properties of SOA particles depend of their precursor, all studied SOA particles are highly viscous semi-solids that exhibit very slow evaporation rates. Given that atmospheric relative humidity (RH) can change particle phase, it is important to investigate the effect of RH on the phase and evaporation kinetics of SOA particles. To this end SOA particles were generated at low and high (~90%) RH, and their evaporation kinetics and phase were characterized as a function of RH. In the ambient atmosphere SOA particles form in the presence of a mixture of different organic compounds, which are present at or below their equilibrium vapor pressure, and thus have been ignored. However, our data show that these compounds can adsorb to the surface of particles during SOA formation, becoming trapped in the highly viscous SOA, and affect particle properties. We examine the interaction between SOA particles and different hydrophobic organics representing typical anthropogenic emissions by making SOA in the presence of the vapors of these

  6. The comparative effects of large carnivores on the acquisition of carrion by scavengers.

    PubMed

    Allen, Maximilian L; Elbroch, L Mark; Wilmers, Christopher C; Wittmer, Heiko U

    2015-06-01

    Pumas (Puma concolor) and black bears (Ursus americanus) are large carnivores that may influence scavenger population dynamics. We used motion-triggered video cameras deployed at deer carcasses to determine how pumas and black bears affected three aspects of carrion acquisition by scavengers: presence, total feeding time, and mean feeding-bout duration. We found that pumas were unable to limit acquisition of carrion by large carnivores but did limit aspects of carrion acquisition by both birds and mesocarnivores. Through their suppression of mesocarnivores and birds, pumas apparently initiated a cascading pattern and increased carrion acquisition by small carnivores. In contrast, black bears monopolized carrion resources and generally had larger limiting effects on carrion acquisition by all scavengers. Black bears also limited puma feeding behaviors at puma kills, which may require pumas to compensate for energetic losses through increasing their kill rates of ungulates. Our results suggest that pumas provide carrion and selectively influence species acquiring carrion, while black bears limit carrion availability to all other scavengers. These results suggest that the effects of large carnivores on scavengers depend on attributes of both carnivores and scavengers (including size) and that competition for carcasses may result in intraguild predation as well as mesocarnivore release.

  7. Degradation of TAIC by water falling film dielectric barrier discharge--influence of radical scavengers.

    PubMed

    Rong, Shaopeng; Sun, Yabing

    2015-04-28

    This work describes the application of plasma generated by water falling film dielectric barrier discharge for the degradation of triallyl isocyanurate (TAIC). The results indicated that TAIC solution of 1000mg/L was effectively removed within 60min treatment at 120W output power. Six intermediates were identified and a possible evolution of the TAIC degradation process was continuously proposed basing on the results of mass spectrum analysis. The effects of metal ions and radical scavengers were investigated. Results showed that whatever hydrogen radical scavengers (carbon tetrachloride, perfluorooctane) or hydroxyl radical scavengers (iso-propyl alcohol, tert-butyl alcohol) all could further enhance the degradation processes, and both kings of radical scavengers could promote the generation of H2O2. In the present study, we employed a novel method by introducing the mixed additives of Fe(2+) and radical scavengers into the plasma. It was found that the reaction rate constant and energy efficiency were improved by 309.2% and 387.8%, respectively. Among the mixed additives, Fe(2+) could promote the decomposition and increase the oxidizing power of H2O2, which is generated from the plasma discharge and greatly enhanced by the radical scavengers.

  8. Uncertainties in Carbonaceous Aerosol Emissions, Scavenging Parameterizations, and Optical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, D.; Bond, T.; Kinne, S.; Klimont, Z.; Sun, H.; van Aardenne, J.; van der Werf, G.

    2006-12-01

    Estimates of human influence on climate are especially hindered by poor constraint on the amount of anthropogenic carbonaceous aerosol absorption in the atmosphere. Coordination of observation and model analyses attempt to constrain particle absorption amount, however these are limited by uncertainties in aerosol emission estimates, model scavenging parameterization, aerosol size assumption, contributions from organic aerosol absorption, air concentration observational techniques and by sparsity of data coverage. We perform multiple simulations using GISS modelE and six present-day emission estimates for black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) (Bond et al 2004 middle and upper estimates, IIASA, EDGAR, GFED v1 and v2); for one of these emissions we apply 4 different BC/OC scavenging parameterizations. The resulting concentrations will be compared with a new compilation of observed BC/OC concentrations. We then use these model concentrations, together with effective radius assumptions and estimates of OC absorption to calculate a range of carbonaceous aerosol absorption. We constrain the wavelength-dependent model τ- absorption with AERONET sun-photometer observations. We will discuss regions, seasons and emission sectors with greatest uncertainty, including those where observational constraint is lacking. We calculate the range of model radiative forcing from our simulations and discuss the degree to which it is constrained by observations.

  9. A protocol for detecting and scavenging gas-phase free radicals in mainstream cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Yu, Long-Xi; Dzikovski, Boris G; Freed, Jack H

    2012-01-02

    Cigarette smoking is associated with human cancers. It has been reported that most of the lung cancer deaths are caused by cigarette smoking (5,6,7,12). Although tobacco tars and related products in the particle phase of cigarette smoke are major causes of carcinogenic and mutagenic related diseases, cigarette smoke contains significant amounts of free radicals that are also considered as an important group of carcinogens(9,10). Free radicals attack cell constituents by damaging protein structure, lipids and DNA sequences and increase the risks of developing various types of cancers. Inhaled radicals produce adducts that contribute to many of the negative health effects of tobacco smoke in the lung(3). Studies have been conducted to reduce free radicals in cigarette smoke to decrease risks of the smoking-induced damage. It has been reported that haemoglobin and heme-containing compounds could partially scavenge nitric oxide, reactive oxidants and carcinogenic volatile nitrosocompounds of cigarette smoke(4). A 'bio-filter' consisted of haemoglobin and activated carbon was used to scavenge the free radicals and to remove up to 90% of the free radicals from cigarette smoke(14). However, due to the cost-ineffectiveness, it has not been successfully commercialized. Another study showed good scavenging efficiency of shikonin, a component of Chinese herbal medicine(8). In the present study, we report a protocol for introducing common natural antioxidant extracts into the cigarette filter for scavenging gas phase free radicals in cigarette smoke and measurement of the scavenge effect on gas phase free radicals in mainstream cigarette smoke (MCS) using spin-trapping Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) Spectroscopy(1,2,14). We showed high scavenging capacity of lycopene and grape seed extract which could point to their future application in cigarette filters. An important advantage of these prospective scavengers is that they can be obtained in large quantities from byproducts of

  10. Deer carcass decomposition and potential scavenger exposure to chronic wasting disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennelle, C.S.; Samuel, M.D.; Nolden, C.A.; Berkley, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy afflicting the Cervidae family in North America, causing neurodegeneration and ultimately death. Although there are no reports of natural cross-species transmission of CWD to noncervids, infected deer carcasses pose a potential risk of CWD exposure for other animals. We placed 40 disease-free white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) carcasses and 10 gut piles in the CWD-affected area of Wisconsin (USA) from September to April in 2003 through 2005. We used photos from remotely operated cameras to characterize scavenger visitation and relative activity. To evaluate factors driving the rate of carcass removal (decomposition), we used KaplanMeier survival analysis and a generalized linear mixed model. We recorded 14 species of scavenging mammals (6 visiting species) and 14 species of scavenging birds (8 visiting species). Prominent scavengers included American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos), raccoons (Procyon lotor), and Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana). We found no evidence that deer consumed conspecific remains, although they visited gut piles more often than carcasses relative to temporal availability in the environment. Domestic dogs, cats, and cows either scavenged or visited carcass sites, which could lead to human exposure to CWD. Deer carcasses persisted for 18 days to 101 days depending on the season and year, whereas gut piles lasted for 3 days. Habitat did not influence carcass decomposition, but mammalian and avian scavenger activity and higher temperatures were positively associated with faster removal. Infected deer carcasses or gut piles can serve as potential sources of CWD prions to a variety of scavengers. In areas where surveillance for CWD exposure is practical, management agencies should consider strategies for testing primary scavengers of deer carcass material.

  11. Scavenging ratios of polycyclic aromatic compounds in rain and snow in the Athabasca oil sands region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Cheng, I.; Muir, D.; Charland, J.-P.

    2015-02-01

    The Athabasca oil sands industry in northern Alberta, Canada, is a possible source of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs). Monitored PACs, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylated PAHs, and dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), in precipitation and in air at three near-source sites in the Fort MacKay and Fort McMurray area during January 2011 to May 2012, were used to generate a database of scavenging ratios (Wt) for PACs scavenged by both snow and rain. Higher concentrations in precipitation and air were observed for alkylated PAHs and DBTs compared to the other PACs. The sums of the median precipitation concentrations over the period of data analyzed were 0.48 μ g L-1 for the 18 PAHs, 3.38 μ g L-1 for the 20 alkylated PAHs, and 0.94 μ g L-1 for the 5 DBTs. The sums of the median air concentrations for parent PAHs, alkylated PAHs, and DBTs were 8.37, 67.26, and 11.83 ng m-3, respectively. Median Wt over the measurement period were 6100 - 1.1 × 106 from snow scavenging and 350 - 2.3 × 105 from rain scavenging depending on the PAC species. Median Wt for parent PAHs were within the range of those observed at other urban and suburban locations, but Wt for acenaphthylene in snow samples were 2-7 times higher compared to other urban and suburban locations. Wt for some individual snow and rain samples exceeded literature values by a factor of 10. Wt for benzo(a)pyrene, dibenz(a,h)anthracene, and benzo(g,h,i)perylene in snow samples had reached 107, which is the maximum for PAH snow scavenging ratios reported in the literature. From the analysis of data subsets, Wt for particulate-phase dominant PACs were 14-20 times greater than gas-phase dominant PACs in snow samples and 7-20 times greater than gas-phase dominant PACs in rain samples. Wt from snow scavenging were ~ 9 times greater than from rain scavenging for particulate-phase dominant PACs and 4-9.6 times greater than from rain scavenging for gas-phase dominant PACs. Gas-particle fractions of each PAC

  12. Influence of the Twist Rate Under Quasi-Hydrostatic Pressure on the Texture and Secondary Phase Particles in Bi(Pb)2223 Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imayev, M. F.; Parkhimovich, N. Yu.

    2015-10-01

    The influence of the twist rate of torsion under quasi-hydrostatic pressure on the phase composition, microstructure, and texture of superconducting Bi(Pb)2223-based ceramics is investigated at temperature Т = 865°C. It is established that a decrease in the twist rate leads to the displacement of the maxima of texture strength and of the secondary phase particle size toward smaller twist angles. The intergrowth of Bi(Pb)2223 matrix phase plates into (Sr, Ca)14Cu24O41 particles leading to the reduction of particle sizes is revealed. The reduction of (Sr, Ca)14Cu24O41 particle sizes correlates with the development of dynamic recrystallization of the matrix phase, which is confirmed by the texture weakening.

  13. Observations of the UARS Particle Environment Monitor and computation of ionization rates in the middle and upper atmosphere during a geomagnetic storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharber, J. R.; Frahm, R. A.; Winningham, J. D.; Biard, J. C.; Lummerzheim, D.; Rees, M. H.; Chenette, D. L.; Gaines, E. E.; Nightingale, R. W.; Imhof, W. L.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we present observations made by the Particle Environment Monitor (PEM) instruments during the geomagnetic storm of 8-9 November, 1991. Ionization and energy deposition rates as functions of altitude in the middle and upper atmosphere by incident electrons and positive ions in the storm interval are computed. The suite of PEM instruments provides a systematic measurement of energetic particles and their associated X-rays over an energy range not fully covered by previous satellite missions.

  14. Investigation into Seasonal Scavenging Patterns of Raccoons on Human Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yangseung; Jantz, Lee Meadows; Smith, Jake

    2016-03-01

    Although raccoons are known as one of the most common scavengers in the U.S., scavenging by these animals has seldom been studied in terms of forensic significance. In this research, the seasonal pattern of raccoon scavenging and its effect on human decomposition was investigated using 178 human cadavers placed at the Anthropological Research Facility (ARF) of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) between February 2011 and December 2013. The results reveal that (i) the frequency of scavenging increases during summer, (ii) scavenging occurs relatively immediately and lasts shorter in summer months, and (iii) scavenging influences the decomposition process by hollowing limbs and by disturbing insect activities, both of which eventually increases the chance of mummification on the affected body. This information is expected to help forensic investigators identify raccoon scavenging as well as make a more precise interpretation of the effect of raccoon scavenging on bodies at crime scenes.

  15. [Introduces a novel scavenger for waste anesthetic gas].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yan-dong; Liang, Jin-bing; Song, Jin-hua

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces a novel scavenger for waste anesthetic gas which makes use of negative pressure in operating room. This setting can scavenge the exhaust gas absolutely without affection the normal work of anaesthesia.

  16. ESCAPING PARTICLE FLUXES IN THE ATMOSPHERES OF CLOSE-IN EXOPLANETS. II. REDUCED MASS-LOSS RATES AND ANISOTROPIC WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J. H.

    2013-04-01

    In Paper I, we presented a one-dimensional hydrodynamic model for the winds of close-in exoplanets. However, close-in exoplanets are tidally locked and irradiated only on the day sides by their host stars. This requires two-dimensional hydrodynamic models with self-consistent radiative transfer calculations. In this paper, for the tidal-locking (two-dimensional radiative transfer) and non-tidal-locking cases (one-dimensional radiative transfer), we constructed a multi-fluid two-dimensional hydrodynamic model with detailed radiative transfer to depict the escape of particles. We found that the tidal forces (the sum of tidal gravity of the star and centrifugal force due to the planetary rotation) supply significant accelerations and result in anisotropic winds. An important effect of the tidal forces is that it severely depresses the outflow of particles near the polar regions where the density and the radial velocity are a factor of a few (ten) smaller than those of the low-latitude regions. As a consequence, most particles escape the surface of the planet from the regions of low latitude. Comparing the tidal-locking and non-tidal-locking cases, we found that their optical depths are very different so that the flows also emerge with a different pattern. In the case of non-tidal locking, the radial velocities at the base of the wind are higher than the meridional velocities. However, in the case of tidal locking, the meridional velocities dominate the flow at the base of the wind, and they can effectively transfer mass and energy from the day sides to the night sides. Further, we also found that the differences of the winds show a middle extent at large radii. This means that the structure of the wind at the base can be changed by the two-dimensional radiative transfer due to large optical depths, but the extent is reduced with an increase in radius. Because the escape is depressed in the polar regions, the mass-loss rate predicted by the non-tidal-locking model, in

  17. Reconstruction of 20th Century Atmospheric Deposition Rates in the Sierra Nevada (California) using Spheroidal Carbonaceous Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, A.; Sickman, J. O.; Rose, N.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen deposition is altering biogeochemical cycles and ecological processes in high-elevation aquatic ecosystems. A need for stricter standards based on measurable ecological effects has been identified as an important step towards their long-term protection. One of the challenges with identifying ecological thresholds is a lack of knowledge of background conditions (pre- industrial) and changes that may have occurred prior to extensive monitoring programs. However, this information can be obtained using paleolimnological approaches. We are investigating historic atmospheric deposition in the Sierra Nevada using spheroidal carbonaceous particles (SCPs) in lake sediments. SCPs are strong geochemical indicators of anthropogenic atmospheric deposition because they are only produced by industrial combustion of fossil fuels---there are no natural sources. We detected SCPs as early as 1870 at Moat Lake in the eastern Sierra Nevada. SCP concentrations increased over time, peaking in the mid-1980's (2,399 gDM-1) while SCP accumulation rates peaked in the early 1920's (105 no, cm-2 yr-1) (Figure 1). Lakes along the western slope of the Sierra (Pear and Emerald) show similar patterns although differences vary by site and are likely explained by watershed characteristics and proximity to emission sources. SCP concentrations at Pear and Emerald lakes peak 10-15 years earlier than Moat. A consistent decrease was observed at Pear and Moat following the peak concentrations until present. Present day concentrations are 556 gDM-1 at Moat and 473 gDM-1 at Pear. At Emerald lake SCPs also initially decreased starting in 1964, but an increasing trend is observed from 1995 through present. These data improve our understanding of historic atmospheric deposition patterns and are being used to inform additional palaeolimnological research, including diatom analyses, with the broader objective of reconstructing historic nitrogen deposition and estimating critical loads for

  18. The influence of third-body particles on wear rate in unicondylar knee arthroplasty: a wear simulator study with bone and cement debris.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Christian; Grupp, Thomas M; Fritz, Bernhard; Schilling, Christoph; Chevalier, Yan; Utzschneider, Sandra; Jansson, Volkmar

    2013-05-01

    The reduced intraoperative visibility of minimally invasive implanted unicondylar knee arthroplasty makes it difficult to remove bone and cement debris, which have been reported on the surface of damaged and retrieved bearings. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the influence of bone and cement particles on the wear rate of unicompartmental knee prostheses in vitro. Fixed bearing unicompartmental knee prostheses were tested using a knee-wear-simulator according to the ISO standard 14243-1:2002(E) for 5.0 million cycles. Afterwards bone debris (particle size 671 ± 262 μm) were added to the test fluid in a concentration of 5 g/l for 1.5 million cycles, followed by 1.5 million cycles blended with cement debris (particle size 644 ± 186 μm) in the same concentration. Wear rate, knee-kinematics and wear-pattern were analyzed. The wear rate reached 12.5 ± 1.0 mm³/million cycles in the running-in and decreased during the steady state phase to 4.4 ± 0.91 mm³/million cycles. Bone particles resulted in a wear rate of 3.0 ± 1.27 mm³/million cycles with no influence on the wear rate compared to the steady state phase. Cement particles, however, lead to a significantly higher wear rate (25.0 ± 16.93 mm³/million cycles) compared to the steady state phase. The careful removal of extruded cement debris during implantation may help in reducing wear rate. Bone debris are suggested to have less critical influence on the prostheses wear rate.

  19. Improving the API dissolution rate during pharmaceutical hot-melt extrusion I: Effect of the API particle size, and the co-rotating, twin-screw extruder screw configuration on the API dissolution rate.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Gogos, Costas G; Ioannidis, Nicolas

    2015-01-15

    The dissolution rate of the active pharmaceutical ingredients in pharmaceutical hot-melt extrusion is the most critical elementary step during the extrusion of amorphous solid solutions - total dissolution has to be achieved within the short residence time in the extruder. Dissolution and dissolution rates are affected by process, material and equipment variables. In this work, we examine the effect of one of the material variables and one of the equipment variables, namely, the API particle size and extruder screw configuration on the API dissolution rate, in a co-rotating, twin-screw extruder. By rapidly removing the extruder screws from the barrel after achieving a steady state, we collected samples along the length of the extruder screws that were characterized by polarized optical microscopy (POM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to determine the amount of undissolved API. Analyses of samples indicate that reduction of particle size of the API and appropriate selection of screw design can markedly improve the dissolution rate of the API during extrusion. In addition, angle of repose measurements and light microscopy images show that the reduction of particle size of the API can improve the flowability of the physical mixture feed and the adhesiveness between its components, respectively, through dry coating of the polymer particles by the API particles.

  20. Precipitation scavenging models: Sensitivities, tests, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    Multiphase'' atmospheric-chemistry models can be described as atmospheric-pollutant simulations that explicitly differentiate between physical phases in the atmosphere (.e.g., gas, cloud water, rain water, snow,...), and directly compute chemical transport and transformation behavior between and within each of these individual phases. Initially formulated for specific application to precipitation-scavenging analysis, many attributes of these models have become incorporated into the more general atmospheric-chemisty codes as well. During the past few years, several of these multiphase precipitation-scavenging models have been developed to the point where they can be applied, in a moderately straightforward fashion, by members of the extended atmospheric sciences community. This presentation provides a brief overview of several aspects of a number of these models, including their structure, their application, their sensitivities and uncertainty levels, their evaluation against field measurements, and their availability.

  1. Precipitation scavenging models: Sensitivities, tests, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    ``Multiphase`` atmospheric-chemistry models can be described as atmospheric-pollutant simulations that explicitly differentiate between physical phases in the atmosphere (.e.g., gas, cloud water, rain water, snow,...), and directly compute chemical transport and transformation behavior between and within each of these individual phases. Initially formulated for specific application to precipitation-scavenging analysis, many attributes of these models have become incorporated into the more general atmospheric-chemisty codes as well. During the past few years, several of these multiphase precipitation-scavenging models have been developed to the point where they can be applied, in a moderately straightforward fashion, by members of the extended atmospheric sciences community. This presentation provides a brief overview of several aspects of a number of these models, including their structure, their application, their sensitivities and uncertainty levels, their evaluation against field measurements, and their availability.

  2. Radical scavenging activity of antioxidants evaluated by means of electrogenerated HO radical.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Raquel; Geraldo, Dulce; Bento, Fátima

    2014-11-01

    A method is proposed and tested concerning the characterization of antioxidants by means of their reaction with electrogenerated HO radicals in galvanostatic assays with simultaneous O2 evolution, using a Pt anode fairly oxidized. The consumption of a set of species with antioxidant activity, ascorbic acid (AA), caffeic acid (CA), gallic acid (GA) and trolox (T), is described by a first order kinetics. The rate of the processes is limited by the kinetics of reaction with HO radicals and by the kinetics of charge transfer. Information regarding the scavenger activity of antioxidants is obtained by the relative value of the rate constant of the reaction between antioxidants and HO radicals, k(AO,HO)/k(O2). The number of HO radicals scavenged per molecule of antioxidant is also estimated and ranged from 260 (ascorbic acid) to 500 (gallic acid). The method is applied successfully in the characterization of the scavenger activity of ascorbic acid in a green-tea based beverage.

  3. 21 CFR 868.5430 - Gas-scavenging apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gas-scavenging apparatus. 868.5430 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5430 Gas-scavenging apparatus. (a) Identification. A gas-scavenging apparatus is a device intended to collect excess anesthetic, analgesic, or...

  4. 21 CFR 868.5430 - Gas-scavenging apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gas-scavenging apparatus. 868.5430 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5430 Gas-scavenging apparatus. (a) Identification. A gas-scavenging apparatus is a device intended to collect excess anesthetic, analgesic, or...

  5. 21 CFR 868.5430 - Gas-scavenging apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas-scavenging apparatus. 868.5430 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5430 Gas-scavenging apparatus. (a) Identification. A gas-scavenging apparatus is a device intended to collect excess anesthetic, analgesic, or...

  6. 21 CFR 868.5430 - Gas-scavenging apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gas-scavenging apparatus. 868.5430 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5430 Gas-scavenging apparatus. (a) Identification. A gas-scavenging apparatus is a device intended to collect excess anesthetic, analgesic, or...

  7. Accretion rate of extraterrestrial particles determined from osmium isotope systematics of pacific pelagic clay and manganese nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Esser, B.K.; Turekian, K.K. )

    1988-06-01

    Pelagic clay and Mn nodules from DOMES sites in the North Pacific and a varved glacial lake deposit from Connecticut were analyzed for Os concentration and isotopic composition by isotope-dilution secondary ion mass spectrometry after treatment by NiS fusion of oxalic acid leaching. Bulk pelagic clay from DOMES site C has {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os = 6.5 and Os = 0.14 ng/g. Oxalic acid leaches of this same sediment and of Mn nodules for DOMES sites A and C have more radiogenic {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os ratios which average 8.3. Bulk glacial Lake Hitchcock sediment has {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os = 12.5 and Os = 0.06 ng/g. The total Os flux to North Pacific pelagic clay is 7 to 10 ng Os/cm{sup 2}/10{sup 6} y. Lake Hitchcock sediment provides an integrated value for the local crustal {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os ratio. The oxalic acid leaches are assumed to attack hydrogenous phases selectively. A simple model in which the only sources of Os to the ocean are continental crust with the isotopic composition of Lake Hitchcock and extraterrestrial particles with {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os = 1.1 results in a cosmic flux of osmium to the sediment of 4.9 ng Os/cm{sup 2}/10{sub 6} y of which 20% is hydrogenous. A model in which the sources of Os to the ocean are continental crust with an {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os ratio of 30, oceanic mantle or crust with {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os = 1.04 and extraterrestrial particles with {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os = 1.1 results in a cosmic flux of Os to the sediment of 5.7 ng Os/cm{sup 2}/10{sup 6} y of which none is hydrogenous. These extraterrestrial Os fluxes correspond to maximum C-1 chondrite accretion rates of between 4.9 {times} 10{sub 4} and 5.6 {times}10{sub 4} tonnes/y.

  8. Compartment-specific Control of Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging by Antioxidant Pathway Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Dey, Swati; Sidor, Agnieszka; O'Rourke, Brian

    2016-05-20

    Oxidative stress arises from an imbalance in the production and scavenging rates of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and is a key factor in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease and aging. The presence of parallel pathways and multiple intracellular compartments, each having its own ROS sources and antioxidant enzymes, complicates the determination of the most important regulatory nodes of the redox network. Here we quantified ROS dynamics within specific intracellular compartments in the cytosol and mitochondria and determined which scavenging enzymes exert the most control over antioxidant fluxes in H9c2 cardiac myoblasts. We used novel targeted viral gene transfer vectors expressing redox-sensitive GFP fused to sensor domains to measure H2O2 or oxidized glutathione. Using genetic manipulation in heart-derived H9c2 cells, we explored the contribution of specific antioxidant enzymes to ROS scavenging and glutathione redox potential within each intracellular compartment. Our findings reveal that antioxidant flux is strongly dependent on mitochondrial substrate catabolism, with availability of NADPH as a major rate-controlling step. Moreover, ROS scavenging by mitochondria significantly contributes to cytoplasmic ROS handling. The findings provide fundamental information about the control of ROS scavenging by the redox network and suggest novel interventions for circumventing oxidative stress in cardiac cells.

  9. Study of atmospheric pollution scavenging. [Annotated bibligraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.L.

    1990-08-01

    Atmospheric scavenging research conducted by the Illinois State Water Survey under contract with the Department of Energy has been a significant factor in the historical development of the field of precipitation scavenging. Emphasis of the work during the 1980's became focused on the problem of acid rain problem with the Survey being chosen as the Central Analytical Laboratory for sample analysis of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). The DOE research was responsible for laying the groundwork from the standpoint of sampling and chemical analysis that has now become routine features of NADP/NTN. A significant aspect of the research has been the participation by the Water Survey in the MAP3S precipitation sampling network which is totally supported by DOE, is the longest continuous precipitation sampling network in existence, and maintains an event sampling protocol. The following review consists of a short description of each of the papers appearing in the Study of Atmospheric Scavenging progress reports starting with the Eighteenth Progress Report in 1980 to the Twenty- Third Progress Report in 1989. In addition a listing of the significant publications and interviews associated with the program are given in the bibliography.

  10. Energy scavenging sources for biomedical sensors.

    PubMed

    Romero, E; Warrington, R O; Neuman, M R

    2009-09-01

    Energy scavenging has increasingly become an interesting option for powering electronic devices because of the almost infinite lifetime and the non-dependence on fuels for energy generation. Moreover, the rise of wireless technologies promises new applications in medical monitoring systems, but these still face limitations due to battery lifetime and size. A trade-off of these two factors has typically governed the size, useful life and capabilities of an autonomous system. Energy generation from sources such as motion, light and temperature gradients has been established as commercially viable alternatives to batteries for human-powered flashlights, solar calculators, radio receivers and thermal-powered wristwatches, among others. Research on energy harvesting from human activities has also addressed the feasibility of powering wearable or implantable systems. Biomedical sensors can take advantage of human-based activities as the energy source for energy scavengers. This review describes the state of the art of energy scavenging technologies for powering sensors and instrumentation of physiological variables. After a short description of the human power and the energy generation limits, the different transduction mechanisms, recent developments and challenges faced are reviewed and discussed.

  11. Atmospheric Hydrogen Scavenging: from Enzymes to Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Constant, Philippe; Hards, Kiel; Morales, Sergio E.; Oakeshott, John G.; Russell, Robyn J.; Taylor, Matthew C.; Berney, Michael; Conrad, Ralf; Cook, Gregory M.

    2014-01-01

    We have known for 40 years that soils can consume the trace amounts of molecular hydrogen (H2) found in the Earth's atmosphere. This process is predicted to be the most significant term in the global hydrogen cycle. However, the organisms and enzymes responsible for this process were only recently identified. Pure culture experiments demonstrated that several species of Actinobacteria, including streptomycetes and mycobacteria, can couple the oxidation of atmospheric H2 to the reduction of ambient O2. A combination of genetic, biochemical, and phenotypic studies suggest that these organisms primarily use this fuel source to sustain electron input into the respiratory chain during energy starvation. This process is mediated by a specialized enzyme, the group 5 [NiFe]-hydrogenase, which is unusual for its high affinity, oxygen insensitivity, and thermostability. Atmospheric hydrogen scavenging is a particularly dependable mode of energy generation, given both the ubiquity of the substrate and the stress tolerance of its catalyst. This minireview summarizes the recent progress in understanding how and why certain organisms scavenge atmospheric H2. In addition, it provides insight into the wider significance of hydrogen scavenging in global H2 cycling and soil microbial ecology. PMID:25501483

  12. An Integrated Instrumentation System for Velocity, Concentration and Mass Flow Rate Measurement of Solid Particles Based on Electrostatic and Capacitance Sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Kong, Ming; Xu, Chuanlong; Wang, Shimin; Fan, Ying

    2015-12-10

    The online and continuous measurement of velocity, concentration and mass flow rate of pneumatically conveyed solid particles for the high-efficiency utilization of energy and raw materials has become increasingly significant. In this paper, an integrated instrumentation system for the velocity, concentration and mass flow rate measurement of dense phase pneumatically conveyed solid particles based on electrostatic and capacitance sensorsis developed. The electrostatic sensors are used for particle mean velocity measurement in combination with the cross-correlation technique, while the capacitance sensor with helical surface-plate electrodes, which has relatively homogeneous sensitivity distribution, is employed for the measurement of particle concentration and its capacitance is measured by an electrostatic-immune AC-based circuit. The solid mass flow rate can be further calculated from the measured velocity and concentration. The developed instrumentation system for velocity and concentration measurement is verified and calibrated on a pulley rig and through static experiments, respectively. Finally the system is evaluated with glass beads on a gravity-fed rig. The experimental results demonstrate that the system is capable of the accurate solid mass flow rate measurement, and the relative error is within -3%-8% for glass bead mass flow rates ranging from 0.13 kg/s to 0.9 kg/s.

  13. An Integrated Instrumentation System for Velocity, Concentration and Mass Flow Rate Measurement of Solid Particles Based on Electrostatic and Capacitance Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Kong, Ming; Xu, Chuanlong; Wang, Shimin; Fan, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The online and continuous measurement of velocity, concentration and mass flow rate of pneumatically conveyed solid particles for the high-efficiency utilization of energy and raw materials has become increasingly significant. In this paper, an integrated instrumentation system for the velocity, concentration and mass flow rate measurement of dense phase pneumatically conveyed solid particles based on electrostatic and capacitance sensorsis developed. The electrostatic sensors are used for particle mean velocity measurement in combination with the cross-correlation technique, while the capacitance sensor with helical surface-plate electrodes, which has relatively homogeneous sensitivity distribution, is employed for the measurement of particle concentration and its capacitance is measured by an electrostatic-immune AC-based circuit. The solid mass flow rate can be further calculated from the measured velocity and concentration. The developed instrumentation system for velocity and concentration measurement is verified and calibrated on a pulley rig and through static experiments, respectively. Finally the system is evaluated with glass beads on a gravity-fed rig. The experimental results demonstrate that the system is capable of the accurate solid mass flow rate measurement, and the relative error is within −3%–8% for glass bead mass flow rates ranging from 0.13 kg/s to 0.9 kg/s. PMID:26690434

  14. Measuring the emission rate of an aerosol source placed in a ventilated room using a tracer gas: influence of particle wall deposition.

    PubMed

    Bémer, D; Lecler, M T; Régnier, R; Hecht, G; Gerber, J M

    2002-04-01

    A method to measure the emission rate of an airborne pollutant source using a tracer gas was tested in the case of an aerosol source. The influence of particle deposition on the walls of a test room of 72 m3 was studied. The deposition rate of an aerosol of MgCl2 was determined by means of two methods: one based on measuring the aerosol concentration decay inside the ventilated room, the other based on calculation of the material mass balance. The concentration decay was monitored by optical counting and the aerosol mass concentration determined by means of sampling on a filter and analysis of the mass deposited by atomic absorption spectrometry. Four series of measurements were carried out. The curve giving the deposition rate according to the particle aerodynamic diameter (d(ae)) was established and shows deposition rates higher than those predicted using the model of Corner. The decay method gives the best results. The study carried out has shown that the phenomenon of deposition has little effect on the measurement of the aerosol source emission rate using a tracer gas for particles of aerodynamic diameter < 5 microm (underestimation < 25%). For particles of a greater diameter, wall deposition is an extremely limiting factor for the method, the influence of which can, however, be limited by using a test booth of small volume and keeping the sampling duration as short as possible.

  15. The use of oxygen scavengers to prevent the transient discolouration of ground beef packaged under controlled, oxygen-depleted atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Gill, C O; McGinnis, J C

    1995-01-01

    Rates of O(2) absorption from air were determined for a type of commercial O(2) scavenger that is formulated for rapid O(2) absorption at chiller temperatures. Rates of O(2) absorption from N(2) atmospheres containing 600 ppm O(2) were determined for trays that each contained 350 g of ground beef. Packs with controlled atmospheres of N(2) that contained ground beef and O(2) scavengers were prepared, to determine the conditions under which the scavengers could prevent the transient discolouration of the meat which arises from its reaction with the residual O(2) initially present in pack atmospheres. The rates of O(2) absorption by individual scavengers varied from the average by ±50%. The rate of O(2) absorption declined with decreasing oxygen concentration, from an average value per scavenger of about 12 ml h(-1) when O(2) concentrations were between 20 and 10%. At O(2) concentrations <1% (10,000 ppm) the rate of O(2) absorption was directly proportioned to the O(2) concentration so that the O(2) concentration in an atmosphere in a gas-impermeable pouch declined exponentially with time. The absorption of O(2) by ground beef was similarly dependent on the O(2) concentration. At 2 °C, the transient discolouration of beef in atmospheres initially containing about 50 ppm O(2) was prevented by the presence of 17.5 scavengers per l of atmosphere. At -15 °C, discolouration was prevented by 5 scavengers per l. The findings indicate that the O(2) concentration in pack atmospheres has to be reduced below 10 ppm within 30 min at 2 °C, or 2 h at -1.5 °C if ground beef is not to transiently discolour. It is unlikely that the required rates of O(2) absorption could be obtained economically with currently available, commercial O(2) scavengers.

  16. Performance of High Flow Rate Personal Respirable Samplers When Challenged with Mineral Aerosols of Different Particle Size Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, Peter; Thorpe, Andrew; Echt, Alan

    2016-01-01

    It is thought that the performance of respirable samplers may vary when exposed to dust aerosols with different particle sizes and wind speeds. This study investigated the performance of the GK 4.16 (RASCAL), GK 2.69, PPI 8, and FSP 10, high flow rate personal samplers when exposed to aerosols of mineral dust in a wind tunnel at two different wind speeds (1 and 2 m s−1) and orientations (towards and side-on to the source of emission). The mass median aerodynamic diameter of four aerosolized test dusts ranged from 8 to 25 µm with geometric standard deviations from 1.6 to 2 µm. The performance of each sampler type was compared with that of the SIMPEDS (Higgins–Dewell design) sampler. There was slight evidence to suggest that the performance of the FSP 10 is affected by the direction of the inlet relative to the air flow, although this was not significant when most respirable dust concentrations were compared, possibly due to the variability of paired dust concentration results. The GK 2.69, RASCAL, and PPI 8 samplers had similar performances, although the results when side-on to the emission source were generally slightly lower than the SIMPEDS. Despite slight differences between respirable dust concentrations the respirable crystalline silica values were not significantly different from the SIMPEDS. The GK family of cyclones obtained most precise results and more closely matched the SIMPEDS. A comparison with dust concentration results from previous calm air chamber studies (where wind speeds were < 0.4 m s−1) found that the relative performance between samplers was similar to those observed in this work indicating consistent performance relative to the SIMPEDS in both calm and moving air. PMID:26865560

  17. Scavenging ratio of polycyclic aromatic compounds in rain and snow at the Athabasca oil sands region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Cheng, I.; Muir, D.; Charland, J.-P.

    2014-07-01

    -phase dominant PACs and 4-9.6 times greater than rain scavenging for gas-phase dominant PACs. Gas-particle fractions of each PAC, particle size distributions of particulate-phase dominant PACs, and Henry's Law constant of gas-phase dominant PACs explained, to a large extent, the different Wt values among the different PACs and precipitation types. This study verified findings from a previous study of Wang et al. (2014) which suggested that snow scavenging is more efficient than rain scavenging of particles for equivalent precipitation amount, and also provided new knowledge on the scavenging of gas-phase PACs by snow and rain.

  18. The prediction of variability occurring in fluidized bed coating equipment. I. The measurement of particle circulation rates in a bottom-spray fluidized bed coater.

    PubMed

    Cheng, X X; Turton, R

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect that changes in design and process variables had on the movement of particles around a fluidized bed coating apparatus. To measure the mean and variance of the particle cycle time distribution (CTD), the number of passages taken by a magnetic tracer particle through the spray zone was measured by a detector coil wound around the partition. The reproducibility of the measurement technique was tested by taking repeated measurements of the tracer particle movement, using similar bed operating conditions, and the method was found to give reproducible results. A series of experiments was carried out by varying operating conditions such as the partition gap, fluidizing air rate, and partition diameter and length, and measuring the change in the rate at which the tracer particle circulated in the coating device. The results of the experiments showed that, over the range of parameters tested in this work, the partition gap had the strongest influence on the rate of particle circulation. Moreover, for the 6-in.-diameter Wurster process used in the current work, the mean circulation time for the 1.1-mm-diameter Nu-Pareil particles was found to vary over the range of 2.2-10.4 sec. In addition, the mean and standard deviation of the CTD could be linearly correlated over a wide range of operating conditions, with a correlation coefficient of 0.80. Finally, an estimate of the variability in mass coating uniformity was made based on the results from the cycle time distributions. It was concluded that the effect of variability in the CTD could account for only a small fraction of the variability in the observed mass coating distribution.

  19. Evaluation of scavenging in two-stroke-cycle engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venediger, Herbert J

    1934-01-01

    The viewpoints are discussed, according to which the scavenging of two-stroke-cycle engines can be evaluated, and the relations between scavenging pressure and the quantity of the scavenging medium required, as also between the scavenging pressure and the revolution speed, are developed. It is further shown that the power increase is limited by the scavenging process, so that further researches are desirable for qualitative improvement. These results lead to several conclusions regarding the propulsion of motor vehicles by the two-stroke-cycle engines. Lastly, attention is called to the fundamental defect of the two-dimensional treatment of the scavenging process and to the consequent distinction between the two-dimensional and three-dimensional scavenging-type efficiency.

  20. Phosphorus scavenging in the unicellular marine diazotroph Crocosphaera watsonii.

    PubMed

    Dyhrman, Sonya T; Haley, Sheean T

    2006-02-01

    Through the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen and photosynthesis, marine diazotrophs play a critical role in the global cycling of nitrogen and carbon. Crocosphaera watsonii is a recently described unicellular diazotroph that may significantly contribute to marine nitrogen fixation in tropical environments. One of the many factors that can constrain the growth and nitrogen fixation rates of marine diazotrophs is phosphorus bioavailability. Using genomic and physiological approaches, we examined phosphorus scavenging mechanisms in strains of C. watsonii from both the Atlantic and the Pacific. Observations from the C. watsonii WH8501 genome suggest that this organism has the capacity for high-affinity phosphate transport (e.g., homologs of pstSCAB) in low-phosphate, oligotrophic systems. The pstS gene (high-affinity phosphate binding) is present in strains isolated from both the Atlantic and the Pacific, and its expression was regulated by the exogenous phosphate supply in strain WH8501. Genomic observation also indicated a broad capacity for phosphomonoester hydrolysis (e.g., a putative alkaline phosphatase). In contrast, no clear homologs of genes for phosphonate transport and hydrolysis could be identified. Consistent with these genomic observations, C. watsonii WH8501 is able to grow on phosphomonoesters as a sole source of added phosphorus but not on the phosphonates tested to date. Taken together these data suggest that C. watsonii has a robust capacity for scavenging phosphorus in oligotrophic systems, although this capacity differs from that of other marine cyanobacterial genera, such as Synechococcus, Prochlorococcus, and Trichodesmium.

  1. Cooperative effects of scavengers on the scavenged yield of the hydrated electron

    SciTech Connect

    Pimblott, S.M.; LaVerne, J.A.

    1992-10-29

    An analytic description of the cooperative effects of scavengers on the radiation chemistry of the hydrated electron in aqueous solution is developed by using the available experimental data and the results of deterministic diffusion-kinetic calculations. The formulation has two components: the first corresponds to the effect of the primary (electron) scavenger in isolation and the second represents the suppression of the e{sub aq}{sup {minus}} + OH spur reaction by the secondary (hydroxyl radical) scavenger. The two aqueous systems that have been considered in detail are nitrate/formate and nitrous oxide/2-propanol. The agreement between the analytic treatment, the experimental data, and the kinetic modeling is good. 37 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Scavenging of radioactive soluble gases from inhomogeneous atmosphere by evaporating rain droplets.

    PubMed

    Elperin, Tov; Fominykh, Andrew; Krasovitov, Boris

    2015-05-01

    We analyze effects of inhomogeneous concentration and temperature distributions in the atmosphere, rain droplet evaporation and radioactive decay of soluble gases on the rate of trace gas scavenging by rain. We employ a one-dimensional model of precipitation scavenging of radioactive soluble gaseous pollutants that is valid for small gradients and non-uniform initial altitudinal distributions of temperature and concentration in the atmosphere. We assume that conditions of equilibrium evaporation of rain droplets are fulfilled. It is demonstrated that transient altitudinal distribution of concentration under the influence of rain is determined by the linear wave equation that describes propagation of a scavenging wave front. The obtained equation is solved by the method of characteristics. Scavenging coefficients are calculated for wet removal of gaseous iodine-131 and tritiated water vapor (HTO) for the exponential initial distribution of trace gases concentration in the atmosphere and linear temperature distribution. Theoretical predictions of the dependence of the magnitude of the scavenging coefficient on rain intensity for tritiated water vapor are in good agreement with the available atmospheric measurements.

  3. Nitric oxide scavenging by red cell microparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Zhao, Weixin; Christ, George J; Gladwin, Mark T; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B

    2013-12-01

    Red cell microparticles form during the storage of red blood cells and in diseases associated with red cell breakdown and asplenia, including hemolytic anemias such as sickle cell disease. These small phospholipid vesicles that are derived from red blood cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of transfusion of aged stored blood and hemolytic diseases, via activation of the hemostatic system and effects on nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Red cell microparticles react with the important signaling molecule NO almost as fast as cell-free hemoglobin, about 1000 times faster than red-cell-encapsulated hemoglobin. The degree to which this fast reaction with NO by red cell microparticles influences NO bioavailability depends on several factors that are explored here. In the context of stored blood preserved in ADSOL, we find that both cell-free hemoglobin and red cell microparticles increase as a function of duration of storage, and the proportion of extra erythrocytic hemoglobin in the red cell microparticle fraction is about 20% throughout storage. Normalized by hemoglobin concentration, the NO-scavenging ability of cell-free hemoglobin is slightly higher than that of red cell microparticles as determined by a chemiluminescence NO-scavenging assay. Computational simulations show that the degree to which red cell microparticles scavenge NO will depend substantially on whether they enter the cell-free zone next to the endothelial cells. Single-microvessel myography experiments performed under laminar flow conditions demonstrate that microparticles significantly enter the cell-free zone and inhibit acetylcholine, endothelial-dependent, and NO-dependent vasodilation. Taken together, these data suggest that as little as 5 μM hemoglobin in red cell microparticles, an amount formed after the infusion of one unit of aged stored packed red blood cells, has the potential to reduce NO bioavailability and impair endothelial-dependent vasodilation.

  4. A comparative study of the hydroxyl radical scavenging capacity of activated sludge and membrane bioreactor wastewater effluents.

    PubMed

    Grant, Jacque-Ann; Hofmann, Ron

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the hydroxyl radical scavenging characteristics of wastewater from five membrane bioreactor (MBR) and five activated sludge (AS) systems. The average values of the characteristics of both wastewater types was found to be significantly different at a 90% confidence interval in terms UV absorbance at 254 nm, alkalinity, and biopolymer concentration. Effluent organic matter (EfOM), with an average kOH,EfOM of (2.75 ± 1.04) × 10(8) M(-1)s(-1), was identified as the primary hydroxyl scavenger contributing to >70% of the background scavenging in all cases, except when nitrite exceeded 0.3 mg NO(2)(-)-N/L. The average scavenging capacity, EfOM scavenging capacity, and the EfOM reaction rate constant of the AS wastewaters exceeded that of the MBR. However, due to the small sample size (n = 5) and considerable variability in scavenging characteristics among the MBR wastewaters, the difference in EfOM reactivity between the two wastewaters was not statistically significant at a 90% confidence interval. Nevertheless, these preliminary findings suggest the possibility that MBR wastewaters may be more amenable to treatment by advanced oxidation. A plausible explanation is that MBRs were observed to reject biopolymers, and a strong correlation was observed between EfOM scavenging capacity and biopolymer concentration.

  5. Influence of Si distribution in framework of SAPO-34 and its particle size on propylene selectivity and production rate for conversion of ethylene to propylene.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Yasuyoshi; Motokura, Ken; Koyama, To-ru; Miyaji, Akimitsu; Baba, Toshihide

    2009-10-28

    To investigate the effect of SAPO-34 particle size (with a fixed Si mole fraction in its framework) and that of the Si mole fraction (in a SAPO-34 framework with fixed particle size) on propylene selectivity and production rate for the conversion of ethylene to propylene, SAPO-34 was prepared by hydrothermal synthesis using tetraethyl ammonium hydroxide or morpholine as a structural agent. The conversion of ethylene was carried out at 473 K using SAPO-34. The selectivity for propylene, the rate of propylene production, and the lifetime of the catalyst were strongly influenced by the catalyst crystal size. The SAPO-34 with a approximately 2.5 microm particle size had the highest selectivity for propylene (approximately 80%) up to a high conversion of ethylene (approximately 70%), while SAPO-34 with smaller particles had a longer catalyst lifetime, implying that catalyst deactivation was suppressed. The mole fraction of Si in the SAPO-34 framework with fixed particle size had little influence on the selectivity for propylene, indicating that the acid strength of SAPO-34 is independent of the Si mole fraction and all protons in SAPO-34 behave equivalently. Furthermore, the acid strength of protons determined by the measurements of NH(3)-TPD (temperature-programmed desorption) spectra did not depend on either the Si mole fraction or the SAPO-34 particle size. This result was also evident in the cracking rate of n-butane, which increased proportionally with increasing number of protons in SAPO-34.The number of protons generated by the incorporation of Si4+ into the SAPO-34 lattice increased proportionally, up to one Si atom introduced into every cage of SAPO-34, but did not continue to increase with further introduction of Si4+ into the lattice.

  6. Hydroxyl radical (OH) scavenging in young and mature landfill leachates.

    PubMed

    Ghazi, Niloufar M; Lastra, Andres A; Watts, Michael J

    2014-06-01

    The final discharge point for collected landfill leachates is frequently the local municipal wastewater treatment facility. The salinity, color, nutrient, and anthropogenic organics contamination of leachates often necessitate some form of pre-treatment. When advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are considered for pre-treatment, the unique composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and the relatively high concentrations of some inorganic solutes in leachate will inhibit treatment efficiency. The most important benchmark for design of AOPs is the expected steady-state production of free radical (OH). Without a quantitative assessment of total OH consumption in high-strength waste water, like a landfill leachate, efficient AOP treatment is uncertain. For this reason, two landfill leachates, distinct in color, DOM, and age of landfill, were characterized for OH-scavenging using an established competition kinetics method. After stripping the samples of inorganic carbon, the DOM in leachate from mature (stabilized) landfill was found to react with OH at a rate of 9.76 × 10(8) M(-1)s(-1). However, DOM in leachate from newer landfill was observed to scavenge available OH at a faster rate (8.28 × 10(9) M(-1)s(-1)). The combination of fast rate of reaction with OH and abundance of DOM in the sampled leachate severely limited the contribution of OH to degradation of an O3- and OH-labile organic probe compound (bisphenol-a) in oxidized mature leachate (fOH = 0.03). Substantial dosing of both O3 and H2O2 (>70 mg/L and >24 mg/L, respectively) may be required to see at least 1-log-removal (>90%) of an OH-selective leachate contaminant (i.e., parachlorobenzoic acid) in a mature landfill leachate.

  7. Aerosol transport and wet scavenging in deep convective clouds: A case study and model evaluation using a multiple passive tracer analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qing; Easter, Richard C.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Jimenez, Jose L.; Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Hailong; Berg, Larry K.; Barth, Mary C.; Liu, Ying; Shrivastava, Manishkumar B.; Singh, Balwinder; Morrison, Hugh; Fan, Jiwen; Ziegler, Conrad L.; Bela, Megan; Apel, Eric; Diskin, Glenn S.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-08-01

    Wet scavenging of aerosols by continental deep convective clouds is studied for a supercell storm complex observed over Oklahoma during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry campaign. A new passive-tracer-based transport analysis framework is developed to characterize convective transport using vertical profiles of several passive trace gases. For this case, the analysis estimates that observed passive gas mixing ratios in the upper troposphere convective outflow consist of 47% low level (<3 km) inflow air, 32% entrained midtroposphere air, and 21% upper troposphere air. The new analysis framework is used to estimate aerosol wet scavenging efficiencies. Observations yield high overall scavenging efficiencies of 81% for submicron aerosol mass. Organic, sulfate, and ammonium aerosols have similar wet scavenging efficiencies (80%-84%). The apparent scavenging efficiency for nitrate aerosol is much lower (57%), but the scavenging efficiency for nitrate aerosol plus nitric acid combined (84%) is close to the other species. Scavenging efficiencies for aerosol number are high for larger particles (84% for 0.15-2.5 µm diameter) but are lower for smaller particles (64% for 0.03-0.15 µm). The storm is simulated using the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model. Compared to the observation-based analysis, the standard model strongly underestimates aerosol scavenging efficiencies by 32% and 41% in absolute differences for submicron mass and number. Adding a new treatment of secondary activation significantly improves simulated aerosol scavenging, producing wet scavenging efficiencies that are only 7% and 8% lower than observed efficiencies. This finding emphasizes the importance of secondary activation for aerosol wet removal in deep convective storms.

  8. Power conversion from environmentally scavenged energy sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Druxman, Lee Daniel

    2007-09-01

    As the power requirements for modern electronics continue to decrease, many devices which were once dependent on wired power are now being implemented as portable devices operating from self-contained power sources. The most prominent source of portable power is the electrochemical battery, which converts chemical energy into electricity. However, long lasting batteries require large amounts of space for chemical storage, and inevitably require replacement when the chemical reaction no longer takes place. There are many transducers and scavenging energy sources (SES) that are able to exploit their environment to generate low levels of electrical power over a long-term time period, including photovoltaic cells, thermoelectric generators, thermionic generators, and kinetic/piezoelectric power generators. This generated power is sustainable as long as specific environmental conditions exist and also does not require the large volume of a long lifetime battery. In addition to the required voltage generation, stable power conversion requires excess energy to be efficiently stored in an ultracapacitor or similar device and monitoring control algorithms to be implemented, while computer modeling and simulation can be used to complement experimental testing. However, building an efficient and stable power source scavenged from a varying input source is challenging.

  9. Layout-aware Soft Error Rate Estimation Technique for Integrated Circuits under the Environment with Energetic Charged Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balbekov, A. O.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Bobkov, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    Single Event Transient (SET) is a current and voltage disturbance in an integrated circuit (IC), caused by charged particle impact. In modern IC technologies single charged particle can cause multiple SETs on multiple electrical nodes, this can lead to faults. There are several mitigation techniques with their drawbacks affecting circuit performance. This work presents a comparison of experimental data with simulation results acquired by the means of our technique and tools. Our technique is able to simulate sub-100 nm IC performance under multiple SET using industry standard SPICE simulator, without incorporation of a T-CAD or physical measurements, and taking into account layout of the device.

  10. The effects of oxygen scavenging on jet fuel thermal stability

    SciTech Connect

    Heneghan, S.P.; Williams, T.F.; Whitacre, S.; Ervin, J.S.

    1996-10-01

    Preliminary tests with a proposed oxygen scavenger (triphenyl-phosphine, TPP) have been done in closed static and flowing systems to study its effects on the oxidation and the deposit formation of jet fuel. TPP was found to significantly slow the oxidation of hexadecane or jet fuel at some temperatures/concentrations and increase the oxidation rate at other conditions. The additive helped decrease the formation of deposits at higher concentrations (200 mg/l) but not at lower concentrations. No evidence of phosphorous was observed in the deposits that were formed. Gas chomatography combined with mass spectrometry and atomic emission detection showed that TPP produced the expected oxidation product (triphenylphosphineoxide) and an unexpected triphenylphosphine-sulfide. The GC/AED allowed A quantitative analysis of the conversion efficiency of TPP to TPPO upon stressing in a closed system.

  11. Acute Hematological Effects in Mice Exposed to the Expected Doses, Dose-rates, and Energies of Solar Particle Event-like Proton Radiation.

    PubMed

    Sanzari, Jenine K; Cengel, Keith A; Wan, X Steven; Rusek, Adam; Kennedy, Ann R

    2014-07-01

    NASA has funded several projects that have provided evidence for the radiation risk in space. One radiation concern arises from solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is composed of energetic electrons, protons, alpha particles and heavier particles. SPEs are unpredictable and the accompanying SPE radiation can place astronauts at risk of blood cell death, contributing to a weakened immune system and increased susceptibility to infection. The doses, dose rates, and energies of the proton radiation expected to occur during a SPE have been simulated at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, delivering total body doses to mice. Hematological values were evaluated at acute time points, up to 24 hrs. post-radiation exposure.

  12. Acute Hematological Effects in Mice Exposed to the Expected Doses, Dose-rates, and Energies of Solar Particle Event-like Proton Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Cengel, Keith A.; Wan, X. Steven; Rusek, Adam; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA has funded several projects that have provided evidence for the radiation risk in space. One radiation concern arises from solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is composed of energetic electrons, protons, alpha particles and heavier particles. SPEs are unpredictable and the accompanying SPE radiation can place astronauts at risk of blood cell death, contributing to a weakened immune system and increased susceptibility to infection. The doses, dose rates, and energies of the proton radiation expected to occur during a SPE have been simulated at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, delivering total body doses to mice. Hematological values were evaluated at acute time points, up to 24 hrs. post-radiation exposure. PMID:25202654

  13. Acute hematological effects in mice exposed to the expected doses, dose-rates, and energies of solar particle event-like proton radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Cengel, Keith A.; Steven Wan, X.; Rusek, Adam; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-07-01

    NASA has funded several projects that have provided evidence for the radiation risk in space. One radiation concern arises from solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is composed of energetic electrons, protons, alpha particles and heavier particles. SPEs are unpredictable and the accompanying SPE radiation can place astronauts at risk of blood cell death, contributing to a weakened immune system and increased susceptibility to infection. The doses, dose rates, and energies of the proton radiation expected to occur during an SPE have been simulated at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, delivering total body doses to mice. Hematological values were evaluated at acute time points, up to 24 hours post-radiation exposure.

  14. PARTICLE REMOVAL RATES BY THE MUD SHRIMP UPOGEBIA PUGETTENSIS, ITS BURROW, AND A COMMENSAL CLAM: EFFECTS ON ESTUARINE PHYTOPLANKTON ABUNDANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The burrowing shrimp Upogebia pugettensis is an abundant intertidal inhabitant of Pacific Northwest bays and estuaries where it lives commensally with the bivalve Cryptomya californica. Suspension-feeding activities by the shrimp and by its commensal clam, as well as particle se...

  15. Novel spectroscopic sensor for the hydroxyl radical scavenging activity measurement of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Bekdeşer, Burcu; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Apak, Reşat

    2012-09-15

    A novel spectroscopic sensor was developed and validated for hydroxyl radical scavenging (HRS) activity estimation using terephthalate (TP) as probe. This sensor was designed by electrostatic immobilization of the chromogenic oxidizing agent of the CUPric Reducing Antioxidant Capacity (CUPRAC) method, Cu(II)-Neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) complex, on a Nafion cation-exchange membrane, and the spectrophotometric assay developed in aqueous-alcoholic solutions was integrated to the CUPRAC sensor. Hydroxyl radicals ((•)OH) generated from an equivalent mixture of Fe(II)+EDTA with hydrogen peroxide attacked both the probe and the (•)OH scavengers in 37 °C-incubated solutions for 1/2h. The HRS activity was measured using the decrease in CUPRAC absorbance at 450 nm - arising from the reduction of Cu(II)-Nc reagent to the Cu(I)-neocuproine chelate - of the hydroxylated probe (TP) undergoing radical attack in the presence of (•)OH scavengers. The HRS activity was evaluated as the second-order rate constants of biologically active compounds for (•)OH scavenging and also as the percentage scavenging of a measured compound or sample relative to a reference compound. Using this reaction, a kinetic approach was adopted to assess the HRS activity of amino acids, plasma- and thiol-antioxidants. This assay, applicable to small molecule antioxidants and tissue homogenates, proved to be efficient for serine and albumin for which the widely used TBARS (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances) test is nonresponsive. Under optimal conditions, about half of the probe (TP) was converted into 2-hydroxyterephthalate (hTP), and this monohydroxylated derivative, being the only product of hydroxylation, was a more specific marker of (•)OH than the non-specific malondialdehyde end-product of the TBARS test. The sensor gave a linear response to scavenger concentration in the competition kinetic equation.

  16. Do garlic-derived allyl sulfides scavenge peroxyl radicals?

    PubMed

    Amorati, Riccardo; Pedulli, Gian Franco

    2008-03-21

    The chain-breaking antioxidant activities of two garlic-derived allyl sulfides, i.e. diallyl disulfide (1), the main component of steam-distilled garlic oil, and allyl methyl sulfide (3) were evaluated by studying the thermally initiated autoxidation of cumene or styrene in their presence. Although the rate of cumene oxidation was reduced by addition of both 1 and 3, the dependence on the concentration of the two sulfides could not be explained on the basis of the classic antioxidant mechanism as with phenolic antioxidants. The rate of oxidation of styrene, on the other hand, did not show significant changes upon addition of either 1 or 3. This unusual behaviour was explained in terms of the co-oxidant effect, consisting in the decrease of the autoxidation rate of a substrate forming tertiary peroxyl radicals (i.e. cumene) upon addition of little amounts of a second oxidizable substrate giving rise instead to secondary peroxyl radicals. The relevant rate constants for the reaction of ROO(.) with 1 and 3 were measured as 1.6 and 1.0 M(-1) s(-1), respectively, fully consistent with the H-atom abstraction from substituted sulfides. It is therefore concluded that sulfides 1 and 3 do not scavenge peroxyl radicals and therefore cannot be considered chain-breaking antioxidants.

  17. Scavenging dissolved oxygen via acoustic droplet vaporization.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Holland, Christy K; Haworth, Kevin J

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) of perfluorocarbon emulsions has been explored for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Previous studies have demonstrated that vaporization of a liquid droplet results in a gas microbubble with a diameter 5-6 times larger than the initial droplet diameter. The expansion factor can increase to a factor of 10 in gassy fluids as a result of air diffusing from the surrounding fluid into the microbubble. This study investigates the potential of this process to serve as an ultrasound-mediated gas scavenging technology. Perfluoropentane droplets diluted in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were insonified by a 2 MHz transducer at peak rarefactional pressures lower than and greater than the ADV pressure amplitude threshold in an in vitro flow phantom. The change in dissolved oxygen (DO) of the PBS before and after ADV was measured. A numerical model of gas scavenging, based on conservation of mass and equal partial pressures of gases at equilibrium, was developed. At insonation pressures exceeding the ADV threshold, the DO of air-saturated PBS decreased with increasing insonation pressures, dropping as low as 25% of air saturation within 20s. The decrease in DO of the PBS during ADV was dependent on the volumetric size distribution of the droplets and the fraction of droplets transitioned during ultrasound exposure. Numerically predicted changes in DO from the model agreed with the experimentally measured DO, indicating that concentration gradients can explain this phenomenon. Using computationally modified droplet size distributions that would be suitable for in vivo applications, the DO of the PBS was found to decrease with increasing concentrations. This study demonstrates that ADV can significantly decrease the DO in an aqueous fluid, which may have direct therapeutic applications and should be considered for ADV-based diagnostic or therapeutic applications.

  18. Microstructure and Strain Rate Effects on the Mechanical Behavior of Particle Reinforced Epoxy-Based Reactive Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    properties between metals on polymer substrates using X- ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In their work, they focused on two main groups of metals...versus substrate temperature for DEA/air- oxidized Al heated in vacuum. The error bars are derived from estimated uncertainties in measuring peak... production of an interphase around the particles. To corroborate their findings they showed two distinct peaks in the free volume distribution from PALS

  19. Effects of suspended particles on the rate of mass transfer to a rotating disk electrode. [Ferric cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Roha, D.J.

    1981-06-01

    Limiting currents for the reduction of ferric cyanide at a rotating disk were determined in the presence of 0 to 40 percent by volume of spherical glass beads. Experiments were conducted with six different particle diameters, and with rotation speeds in the range of 387 to 270 rpm, usong both a 0.56 cm and a 1.41 cm radius disk electrode. It was established that at a given rpm upon addition of glass beads in the limiting current, i/sub L/, may increase to more than three times its value without solids. This increase in limiting current density is greater at high rotation speeds and with the larger disk electrode. i/sub L/ as a function of particle diameter yields at maximum at approx. 10 ..mu..m. Two mass transfer models are offered to explain this behavior, both of which assume that the beads are in contact with the disk electrode and moving parallel to its surface. In the surface renewal model it is assumed that complete mixing takes place with the passage of each bead and the boundary layer is replaced with fresh bulk solution. While with the particle film model it is assumed the bead and a clinging film of fluid rotate together. The film promotes mass transfer by alternately absorbing and desorbing the diffusing species. The particle film model best explains the observed behavior of the limiting current density. Calculations of stirring power required verses i/sub L/ observed, show that adding beads to increase i/sub L/ consumes less additional power than simply increasing the rotation speed alone and even permits a decrease in the amount of stirring energy required per unit reactant consumed, at limiting current conditions.

  20. Scavenger removal: Bird and bat carcass persistence in a tropical wind farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villegas-Patraca, Rafael; Macías-Sánchez, Samuel; MacGregor-Fors, Ian; Muñoz-Robles, Carlos

    2012-08-01

    Energy produced by wind farms has diverse positive environmental effects, but can also be related to negative impacts, including wildlife mortality through collisions with wind turbines. Bird and bat mortality caused by collisions with wind turbines can be estimated indirectly by counting carcasses within wind farms. However, carcass removal by scavengers often biases such measurements. In this study, we identified the main scavengers removing bird and bat carcasses in a tropical wind farm. A known fate analysis was done to assess the effect of carcass type (i.e., small bird, large bird, bat), vegetation type (i.e., secondary vegetation, croplands) and season (dry and rainy seasons of 2009) on carcass persistence rates. We identified three main scavenger groups, with mammals being the most abundant group. Our results show high rates of carcass removal relative to previous studies, especially for bats; there were fewer remaining carcasses after 20 days in our tropical site than in non-tropical environments reported elsewhere. We found a higher carcass persistence rate during the rainy season than in the dry season, possibly due to a greater abundance of food resources for scavenger organisms in the rainy season. Although we found some evidence for higher persistence rates for large bird carcasses than for small bird and bat carcasses during the rainy season, overall carcass type was not a strong predictor of persistence rates. Similarly, we did not find a strong effect of vegetation type on carcass persistence rates. Results suggest that in order to estimate accurate bird and bat mortality in tropical wind farm areas, seasonality should be incorporated to correction factors of carcass removal rates.

  1. REVISED BIG BANG NUCLEOSYNTHESIS WITH LONG-LIVED, NEGATIVELY CHARGED MASSIVE PARTICLES: UPDATED RECOMBINATION RATES, PRIMORDIAL {sup 9}Be NUCLEOSYNTHESIS, AND IMPACT OF NEW {sup 6}Li LIMITS

    SciTech Connect

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Kino, Yasushi; Mathews, Grant J. E-mail: kyungsik@kau.ac.kr E-mail: kajino@nao.ac.jp E-mail: gmathews@nd.edu

    2014-09-01

    We extensively reanalyze the effects of a long-lived, negatively charged massive particle, X {sup –}, on big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The BBN model with an X {sup –} particle was originally motivated by the discrepancy between the {sup 6,} {sup 7}Li abundances predicted in the standard BBN model and those inferred from observations of metal-poor stars. In this model, {sup 7}Be is destroyed via the recombination with an X {sup –} particle followed by radiative proton capture. We calculate precise rates for the radiative recombinations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 7}Li, {sup 9}Be, and {sup 4}He with X {sup –}. In nonresonant rates, we take into account respective partial waves of scattering states and respective bound states. The finite sizes of nuclear charge distributions cause deviations in wave functions from those of point-charge nuclei. For a heavy X {sup –} mass, m{sub X} ≳ 100 GeV, the d-wave → 2P transition is most important for {sup 7}Li and {sup 7,} {sup 9}Be, unlike recombination with electrons. Our new nonresonant rate of the {sup 7}Be recombination for m{sub X} = 1000 GeV is more than six times larger than the existing rate. Moreover, we suggest a new important reaction for {sup 9}Be production: the recombination of {sup 7}Li and X {sup –} followed by deuteron capture. We derive binding energies of X nuclei along with reaction rates and Q values. We then calculate BBN and find that the amount of {sup 7}Be destruction depends significantly on the charge distribution of {sup 7}Be. Finally, updated constraints on the initial abundance and the lifetime of the X {sup –} are derived in the context of revised upper limits to the primordial {sup 6}Li abundance. Parameter regions for the solution to the {sup 7}Li problem and the primordial {sup 9}Be abundances are revised.

  2. Revised Big Bang Nucleosynthesis with Long-lived, Negatively Charged Massive Particles: Updated Recombination Rates, Primordial 9Be Nucleosynthesis, and Impact of New 6Li Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Kino, Yasushi; Mathews, Grant. J.

    2014-09-01

    We extensively reanalyze the effects of a long-lived, negatively charged massive particle, X -, on big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The BBN model with an X - particle was originally motivated by the discrepancy between the 6, 7Li abundances predicted in the standard BBN model and those inferred from observations of metal-poor stars. In this model, 7Be is destroyed via the recombination with an X - particle followed by radiative proton capture. We calculate precise rates for the radiative recombinations of 7Be, 7Li, 9Be, and 4He with X -. In nonresonant rates, we take into account respective partial waves of scattering states and respective bound states. The finite sizes of nuclear charge distributions cause deviations in wave functions from those of point-charge nuclei. For a heavy X - mass, mX >~ 100 GeV, the d-wave → 2P transition is most important for 7Li and 7, 9Be, unlike recombination with electrons. Our new nonresonant rate of the 7Be recombination for mX = 1000 GeV is more than six times larger than the existing rate. Moreover, we suggest a new important reaction for 9Be production: the recombination of 7Li and X - followed by deuteron capture. We derive binding energies of X nuclei along with reaction rates and Q values. We then calculate BBN and find that the amount of 7Be destruction depends significantly on the charge distribution of 7Be. Finally, updated constraints on the initial abundance and the lifetime of the X - are derived in the context of revised upper limits to the primordial 6Li abundance. Parameter regions for the solution to the 7Li problem and the primordial 9Be abundances are revised.

  3. Initial evaluation of (227)Th-p-benzyl-DOTA-rituximab for low-dose rate alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dahle, Jostein; Borrebaek, Jørgen; Melhus, Katrine B; Bruland, Oyvind S; Salberg, Gro; Olsen, Dag Rune; Larsen, Roy H

    2006-02-01

    Radioimmunotherapy has proven clinically effective in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Radioimmunotherapy trials have so far been performed with beta-emitting isotopes. In contrast to beta-emitters, the shorter range and high linear energy transfer (LET) of alpha particles allow for more efficient and selective killing of individually targeted tumor cells. However, there are several obstacles to the use of alpha-particle immunotherapy, including problems with chelation chemistry and nontarget tissue toxicity. The alpha-emitting radioimmunoconjugate (227)Th-DOTA-p-benzyl-rituximab is a new potential anti-lymphoma agent that might overcome some of these difficulties. The present study explores the immunoreactivity, in vivo stability and biodistribution, as well as the effect on in vitro cell growth, of this novel radioimmunoconjugate. To evaluate in vivo stability, uptake in balb/c mice of the alpha-particle-emitting nuclide (227)Th alone, the chelated form, (227)Th-p-nitrobenzyl-DOTA and the radioimmunoconjugate (227)Th-DOTA-p-benzyl-rituximab was compared in a range of organs at increasing time points after injection. The immunoreactive fraction of (227)Th-DOTA-p-benzyl-rituximab was 56-65%. During the 28 days after injection of radioimmunoconjugate only, very modest amounts of the (227)Th had detached from DOTA-p-benzyl-rituximab, indicating a relevant stability in vivo. The half-life of (227)Th-DOTA-p-benzyl-rituximab in blood was 7.4 days. Incubation of lymphoma cells with (227)Th-DOTA-p-benzyl-rituximab resulted in a significant antigen-dependent inhibition of cell growth. The data presented here warrant further studies of (227)Th-DOTA-p-benzyl-rituximab.

  4. Helping Students Understand American Influence in Canada: A Scavenger Hunt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokott, Bridget; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Explains a scavenger hunt to collect items (newspaper clippings, pictures, records, etc.) that represent the influence of the United States on Canadian Culture. The teacher prepares scavenger hunt stations which include items that students have collected. An assessment on items follows the hunt. (KC)

  5. Evaluation of a modified scavenging system to reduce occupational exposure to nitrous oxide in labor and delivery rooms.

    PubMed

    Chessor, Ed; Verhoeven, Marieke; Hon, Chun-Yip; Teschke, Kay

    2005-06-01

    We developed a new scavenging mask for the administration of nitrous oxide to mothers-to-be during labor in order to minimize leakage of the patient's exhaled breath into the room and, therefore, decreasing staff exposure to nitrous oxide. The scavenging system was designed with an inner mask for gas delivery, an outer mask to capture exhaled breath, and a continuous exhaust airflow based on breathing flow rates. In this study we field tested the scavenging system by measuring personal exposures of nurses (N = 30) and room air concentrations (N = 33), while patients self-administered nitrous oxide either through the conventional or modified scavenging system. Personal exposures were measured using passive nitrous oxide monitors, and area measurements were made using a direct-reading infrared analyzer. Information about volumes of nitrous oxide used, nurses' movements, and patients' use of the analgesic was recorded in order to examine factors that influenced exposures and the effectiveness of the scavenging system. The new scavenging system significantly reduced exposures in the room and to nurses (arithmetic mean nitrous oxide concentrations = 39.7 ppm and 40.2 ppm, respectively, compared with 82.2 ppm and 69.3 ppm, respectively, for the conventional system). Other factors associated with lower concentrations included larger distances between the nurse and the patient, and greater times since nitrous oxide was used. Observations during the field trial indicated that subjects did not hold the scavenging mask close enough to the face to capture exhaled breath during much of the time when the breath was highly contaminated. Additional modifications to the scavenging system are required to further reduce nitrous oxide concentrations and to improve comfort and usability.

  6. A Targeted "Capture" and "Removal" Scavenger toward Multiple Pollutants for Water Remediation based on Molecular Recognition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Shen, Haijing; Hu, Xiaoxia; Li, Yan; Li, Zhihao; Xu, Jinfan; Song, Xiufeng; Zeng, Haibo; Yuan, Quan

    2016-03-01

    For the water remediation techniques based on adsorption, the long-standing contradictories between selectivity and multiple adsorbability, as well as between affinity and recyclability, have put it on weak defense amid more and more severe environment crisis. Here, a pollutant-targeting hydrogel scavenger is reported for water remediation with both high selectivity and multiple adsorbability for several pollutants, and with strong affinity and good recyclability through rationally integrating the advantages of multiple functional materials. In the scavenger, aptamers fold into binding pockets to accommodate the molecular structure of pollutants to afford perfect selectivity, and Janus nanoparticles with antibacterial function as well as anisotropic surfaces to immobilize multiple aptamers allow for simultaneously handling different kinds of pollutants. The scavenger exhibits high efficiencies in removing pollutants from water and it can be easily recycled for many times without significant loss of loading capacities. Moreover, the residual concentrations of each contaminant are well below the drinking water standards. Thermodynamic behavior of the adsorption process is investigated and the rate-controlling process is determined. Furthermore, a point of use device is constructed and it displays high efficiency in removing pollutants from environmental water. The scavenger exhibits great promise to be applied in the next generation of water purification systems.

  7. Hydroxyl radical reactions and the radical scavenging activity of β-carboline alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Herraiz, Tomás; Galisteo, Juan

    2015-04-01

    β-Carbolines are bioactive pyridoindole alkaloids occurring in foods, plants and the human body. Their activity as hydroxyl radical (OH) scavengers is reported here by using three different methods: deoxyribose degradation, hydroxylation of benzoate and hydroxylation of 2'-deoxyguanosine to give 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) as assessed by RP-HPLC (MS). Fenton reactions (Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) plus H2O2) were used for OH generation, and the radical increased in the presence of ascorbic acid or 6-hydroxydopamine as pro-oxidants. β-Carbolines were scavengers of OH in the three assays and in the presence of pro-oxidants. Tetrahydro-β-carboline-3-carboxylic acids were active against the hydroxylation of 2'-deoxyguanosine. β-Carbolines reacted with hydroxyl radicals (OH) affording hydroxy-β-carbolines, whereas tetrahydro-β-carbolines gave oxidative and degradation products. On the basis of IC50 and reaction rates (k), β-carbolines (norharman and harman), and tetrahydro-β-carbolines (tetrahydro-β-carboline, 1-methyltetrahydro-β-carboline and pinoline) were good OH radical scavengers and their activity was comparable to that of the indole, melatonin, which is an effective hydroxyl radical scavenger and antioxidant.

  8. Kinetic Reaction Mechanism of Sinapic Acid Scavenging NO2 and OH Radicals: A Theoretical Study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Wang, AiHua; Shi, Peng; Zhang, Hui; Li, ZeSheng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism and kinetics underlying reactions between the naturally-occurring antioxidant sinapic acid (SA) and the very damaging ·NO2 and ·OH were investigated through the density functional theory (DFT). Two most possible reaction mechanisms were studied: hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and radical adduct formation (RAF). Different reaction channels of neutral and anionic sinapic acid (SA-) scavenging radicals in both atmosphere and water medium were traced independently, and the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were calculated. We find the most active site of SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 and ·OH is the –OH group in benzene ring by HAT mechanism, while the RAF mechanism for SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 seems thermodynamically unfavorable. In water phase, at 298 K, the total rate constants of SA eliminating ·NO2 and ·OH are 1.30×108 and 9.20×109 M-1 S-1 respectively, indicating that sinapic acid is an efficient scavenger for both ·NO2 and ·OH. PMID:27622460

  9. Case study of a solid-waste-scavenger community with respect to health and environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kungskulniti, Nipapun.

    1991-01-01

    This study was an investigation of a solid waste scavenger community at the On-Nooch Dump Site in Bangkok, Thailand. The purpose was to identify the dimensions of the public health conditions of solid waste scavengers and their community. Cross-sectional field surveys and measurements were undertaken to characterize the distribution and magnitude of health-related problems and environmental conditions. Scavengers were found to be exposed to hazardous conditions due to the waste materials at the dump site. Cuts and punctures from sharp materials were the most common complaints among scavengers. Health symptoms like headache, diarrhea, respiratory illness, skin diseases and back pain were also reported. There was a high prevalence of childhood respiratory illness especially among those children of households where cigarette smoking was present. Children had poor nutritional status and were commonly infected by intestinal protozoa and helminths. An appreciable proportion of adult respondents was below the normal range for lung function performance. Seroprevalence of HBV infection was found to be high among male respondents in addition to six respondents that had possible HIV infections. The quality of the community water supply was low. Air pollution measurements showed acceptable ambient air levels except for particulate levels (TSP and RSP). Levels of indoor, outdoor, and personal exposure NO{sub 2} were found to be similar. Data for an inner-city project apartment community named Din-Dang were also collected for comparison. A priority rating index and recommendations for public health condition improvements were presented.

  10. NACRE II: an update of the NACRE compilation of charged-particle-induced thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei with mass number A<16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Goriely, S.; Arnould, M.; Ohta, M.; Utsunomiya, H.

    2013-11-01

    An update of the NACRE compilation [3] is presented. This new compilation, referred to as NACRE II, reports thermonuclear reaction rates for 34 charged-particle induced, two-body exoergic reactions on nuclides with mass number A<16, of which fifteen are particle-transfer reactions and the rest radiative capture reactions. When compared with NACRE, NACRE II features in particular (1) the addition to the experimental data collected in NACRE of those reported later, preferentially in the major journals of the field by early 2013, and (2) the adoption of potential models as the primary tool for extrapolation to very low energies of astrophysical S-factors, with a systematic evaluation of uncertainties.

  11. Estimating Carcass Persistence and Scavenging Bias in a Human Influenced Landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, Paul L.; Lance, Ellen W.; Sowl, Kristine M.; Donnelly, Tyrone F.

    2010-01-01

    We examined variation in persistence rates of waterfowl carcasses placed along a series of transects in tundra habitats in western Alaska. This study was designed to assess the effects of existing tower structures and was replicated with separate trials in winter, summer and fall as both the resident avian population and the suite of potential scavengers varied seasonally. Carcass persistence rates were uniformly low, with <50% of carcasses persisting for more than a day on average. Persistence rate varied by carcass age, carcass size, among transects and was lowest in the fall and highest in the summer. We found little support for models where persistence varied in relation to the presence of tower structures. We interpret this as evidence that scavengers were not habituated to searching for carcasses near these structures. Our data demonstrate that only a small fraction of bird carcasses are likely to persist between searches, and if not appropriately accounted for, scavenging bias could significantly influence bird mortality estimates. The variation that we documented suggests that persistence rates should not be extrapolated among tower locations or across time periods as the variation in carcass persistence will result in biased estimates of total bird strike mortality.

  12. Human disturbance of an avian scavenging guild

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skagen, Susan K.; Knight, Richard L.; Orians, Gordon H.

    1991-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of human activities on relationships within foraging guilds, we examined inacanus dynamics of eagles, crows, and gulls scavenging on spawned salmon in the Pacific Northwest. We examined several hypotheses that postulate the asymmetric foraging relationships of the three guild members and that reveal the influence of competition and facilitation in these relationships. Spatial and temporal patterns of resource use by the three primary guild members varied with the presence and absence of human activity at experimental feeding stations. At control (undisturbed) stations, eagles preferred to feed >100 m from vegetative cover, whereas gulls fed <50 m from cover. At experimental (disturbed) stations, eagles rarely fed, and feeding activity by gulls increased at both near and far stations. Crows often fed on alternate food sources in fields adjacent to the river, especially when salmon carcasses were scarce, whereas eagles and gulls rarely did so. We also examined if and how the behavior of single guild members changes in the presence or absence of other guild members. In the absence of eagles, gulls and crows preferred stations far from cover, numbers of both increased at feeding stations, birds were distributed nearer to carcasses, and they fed more. We emphasize that guild theory lends important insights to our understanding of the effects of human disturbance on wildlife communities.

  13. The extreme solar cosmic ray particle event on 20 January 2005 and its influence on the radiation dose rate at aircraft altitude.

    PubMed

    Bütikofer, R; Flückiger, E O; Desorgher, L; Moser, M R

    2008-03-01

    In January 2005 toward the end of solar activity cycle 23 the Sun was very active. Between 15 and 20 January 2005, the solar active region NOAA AR 10720 produced five powerful solar flares. In association with this major solar activity several pronounced variations in the ground-level cosmic ray intensity were observed. The fifth of these flares (X7.1) produced energetic solar cosmic rays that caused a giant increase in the count rates of the ground-based cosmic ray detectors (neutron monitors). At southern polar neutron monitor stations the increase of the count rate reached several thousand percent. From the recordings of the worldwide network of neutron monitors, we determined the characteristics of the solar particle flux near Earth. In the initial phase of the event, the solar cosmic ray flux near Earth was extremely anisotropic. The energy spectrum of the solar cosmic rays was fairly soft during the main and the decay phase. We investigated also the flux of different secondary particle species in the atmosphere and the radiation dosage at flight altitude. Our analysis shows a maximum increment of the effective dose rate due to solar cosmic rays in the south polar region around 70 degrees S and 130 degrees E at flight altitude of almost three orders of magnitude.

  14. Components of Particle Emissions from Light-Duty Spark-Ignition Vehicles with Varying Aromatic Content and Octane Rating in Gasoline.

    PubMed

    Short, Daniel Z; Vu, Diep; Durbin, Thomas D; Karavalakis, Georgios; Asa-Awuku, Akua

    2015-09-01

    Typical gasoline consists of varying concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons and octane ratings. However, their impacts on particulate matter (PM) such as black carbon (BC) and water-soluble and insoluble particle compositions are not well-defined. This study tests seven 2012 model year vehicles, which include one port fuel injection (PFI) configured hybrid vehicle, one PFI vehicle, and six gasoline direct injection (GDI) vehicles. Each vehicle was driven on the Unified transient testing cycle (UC) using four different fuels. Three fuels had a constant octane rating of 87 with varied aromatic concentrations at 15%, 25%, and 35%. A fourth fuel with higher octane rating, 91, contained 35% aromatics. BC, PM mass, surface tension, and water-soluble organic mass (WSOM) fractions were measured. The water-insoluble mass (WIM) fraction of the vehicle emissions was estimated. Increasing fuel aromatic content increases BC emission factors (EFs) of transient cycles. BC concentrations were higher for the GDI vehicles than the PFI and hybrid vehicles, suggesting a potential climate impact for increased GDI vehicle production. Vehicle steady-state testing showed that the hygroscopicity of PM emissions at high speeds (70 mph; κ > 1) are much larger than emissions at low speeds (30 mph; κ < 0.1). Iso-paraffin content in the fuels was correlated to the decrease in WSOM emissions. Both aromatic content and vehicle speed increase the amount of hygroscopic material found in particle emissions.

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and chlorinated pesticides in background air in central Europe - investigating parameters affecting wet scavenging of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahpoury, P.; Lammel, G.; Holubová Šmejkalová, A.; Klánová, J.; Přibylová, P.; Váňa, M.

    2015-02-01

    Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and chlorinated pesticides (CPs) were measured in air and precipitation at a background site in central Europe. ∑ PAH concentrations in air and rainwater ranged from 0.7 to 327.9 ng m-3 and below limit of quantification (< LOQ) to 2.1 × 103 ng L-1. The concentrations of PCBs and CPs in rainwater were < LOQ. ∑ PCB and ∑ CP concentrations in air ranged from < LOQ to 44.6 and < LOQ to 351.7 pg m-3, respectively. The potential relationships between PAH wet scavenging and particulate matter and rainwater properties were investigated. The concentrations of ionic species in particulate matter and rainwater were significantly correlated, highlighting the importance of particle scavenging process. Overall, higher scavenging efficiencies were found for relatively less volatile PAHs, underlining the effect of analyte gas-particle partitioning on scavenging process. The particulate matter removal by rain, and consequently PAH wet scavenging, was more effective when the concentrations of ionic species were high. In addition, the elemental and organic carbon contents of the particulate matter were found to influence the PAH scavenging.

  16. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and chlorinated pesticides in background air in central Europe - investigating parameters affecting wet scavenging of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahpoury, P.; Lammel, G.; Holubová Šmejkalová, A.; Klánová, J.; Přibylová, P.; Váňa, M.

    2014-10-01

    Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and chlorinated pesticides (CPs) were measured in air and precipitation at a background site in central Europe. Σ PAH concentrations in air and rainwater ranged from 0.7 to 327.9 ng m-3 and below analytical method detection limit (< MDL) to 2.1 × 103 ng L-1. The concentrations of PCBs and CPs in rainwater were < MDL. Σ PCB and Σ CP concentrations in air ranged from < MDL to 44.6 and < MDL to 351.7 pg m-3, respectively. The potential relationships between PAH wet scavenging and particulate matter and rainwater properties were investigated. The concentrations of ionic species in particulate matter and rainwater were significantly correlated, highlighting the importance of particle scavenging process. Overall, higher scavenging efficiencies were found for relatively less volatile PAHs, underlining the effect of analyte gas-particle partitioning on scavenging process. The PAH wet scavenging was more effective when the concentrations of ionic species were high. In addition, the elemental and organic carbon contents of the particulate matter were found to influence the PAH scavenging.

  17. Efficient scavenging of β-carotene radical cations by antiinflammatory salicylates.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hong; Liang, Ran; Han, Rui-Min; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Skibsted, Leif H

    2014-02-01

    The radical cation generated during photobleaching of β-carotene is scavenged efficiently by the anion of methyl salicylate from wintergreen oil in a second-order reaction approaching the diffusion limit with k2 = 3.2 × 10(9) L mol(-1) s(-1) in 9 : 1 v/v chloroform-methanol at 23 °C, less efficiently by the anion of salicylic acid with 2.2 × 10(8) L mol(-1) s(-1), but still of possible importance for light-exposed tissue. Surprisingly, acetylsalicylate, the aspirin anion, reacts with an intermediate rate in a reaction assigned to the anion of the mixed acetic-salicylic acid anhydride formed through base induced rearrangements. The relative scavenging rate of the β-carotene radical cation by the three salicylates is supported by DFT-calculations.

  18. Data that describe at-a-point temporal variations in the transport rate and particle-size distribution of bedload; East Fork River, Wyoming, and Fall River, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomez, Basil; Emmett, W.W.

    1990-01-01

    Data from the East Fork River, Wyoming, and the Fall River, Colorado, that document at-a-point temporal variations in the transport rate and particle-size distribution of bedload, associated with the downstream migration of dunes, are presented. Bedload sampling was undertaken, using a 76.2 x 76.2 mm Helley-Smith sampler, on three separate occasions at each site in June 1988. In each instance, the sampling time was 30 seconds and the sampling intervals 5 minutes. The sampling period ranged from 4.92 to 8.25 hours. Water stage did not vary appreciably during any of the sampling periods. (USGS)

  19. Scavenger Receptors: Emerging Roles in Cancer Biology and Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaofei; Guo, Chunqing; Fisher, Paul B.; Subjeck, John R.; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Scavenger receptors constitute a large family of evolutionally conserved protein molecules that are structurally and functionally diverse. Although scavenger receptors were originally identified based on their capacity to scavenge modified lipoproteins, these molecules have been shown to recognize and bind to a broad spectrum of ligands, including modified and unmodified host-derived molecules or microbial components. As a major subset of innate pattern recognition receptors, scavenger receptors are mainly expressed on myeloid cells and function in a wide range of biological processes, such as endocytosis, adhesion, lipid transport, antigen presentation, and pathogen clearance. In addition to playing a crucial role in maintenance of host homeostasis, scavenger receptors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, e.g., atherosclerosis, neurodegeneration, or metabolic disorders. Emerging evidence has begun to reveal these receptor molecules as important regulators of tumor behavior and host immune responses to cancer. This review summarizes our current understanding on the newly identified, distinct functions of scavenger receptors in cancer biology and immunology. The potential of scavenger receptors as diagnostic biomarkers and novel targets for therapeutic interventions to treat malignancies is also highlighted. PMID:26216637

  20. Scavenger Receptors: Emerging Roles in Cancer Biology and Immunology.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaofei; Guo, Chunqing; Fisher, Paul B; Subjeck, John R; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Scavenger receptors constitute a large family of evolutionally conserved protein molecules that are structurally and functionally diverse. Although scavenger receptors were originally identified based on their capacity to scavenge modified lipoproteins, these molecules have been shown to recognize and bind to a broad spectrum of ligands, including modified and unmodified host-derived molecules or microbial components. As a major subset of innate pattern recognition receptors, scavenger receptors are mainly expressed on myeloid cells and function in a wide range of biological processes, such as endocytosis, adhesion, lipid transport, antigen presentation, and pathogen clearance. In addition to playing a crucial role in maintenance of host homeostasis, scavenger receptors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, e.g., atherosclerosis, neurodegeneration, or metabolic disorders. Emerging evidence has begun to reveal these receptor molecules as important regulators of tumor behavior and host immune responses to cancer. This review summarizes our current understanding on the newly identified, distinct functions of scavenger receptors in cancer biology and immunology. The potential of scavenger receptors as diagnostic biomarkers and novel targets for therapeutic interventions to treat malignancies is also highlighted.

  1. Particle separator

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    Method and apparatus (10) are provided for separating and classifying particles (48,50,56) by dispersing the particles within a fluid (52) that is upwardly flowing within a cone-shaped pipe (12) that has its large end (20) above its small end (18). Particles of similar size and shape (48,50) migrate to individual levels (A,B) within the flowing fluid. As the fluid is deflected by a plate (42) at the top end of the pipe (12), the smallest particles are collected on a shelf-like flange (40). Ever larger particles are collected as the flow rate of the fluid is increased. To prevent particle sticking on the walls (14) of the pipe (12), additional fluid is caused to flow into the pipe (12) through holes (68) that are specifically provided for that purpose. Sticking is further prevented by high frequency vibrators (70) that are positioned on the apparatus (10).

  2. Scavenging by mammalian carnivores on prairie dog colonies: implications for the spread of plague.

    PubMed

    Boone, Amanda; Kraft, John P; Stapp, Paul

    2009-04-01

    Plague causes mass mortality of prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) in shortgrass steppe. Although the pathogen, the bacterium Yersinia pestis, is spread within colonies by flea bites or contact between infected hosts, it is unclear how Y. pestis is transported over long distances between isolated colonies. One possibility is that wideranging, plague-resistant mammalian carnivores pick up fleas when scavenging prairie dog carcasses. Using guinea pigs as surrogates for prairie dogs, we compared how quickly scavengers discovered carcasses on active prairie dog colonies, on colonies recently extirpated by plague, and in grasslands without prairie dogs. In June-July 2007, we monitored the fates of 20 guinea pig carcasses for 4 consecutive days on each site type. Ten carcasses were placed in wire exclosures that restricted access only to arthropods and small rodents; the other 10 were exposed to all scavengers. Scavengers were identified by tracks, evidence of consumption, and/or remote cameras. Carnivores discovered carcasses more quickly on active and plague colonies (mean +/- 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.6 +/- 0.7, 1.4 +/- 1.4 days, respectively) than on grasslands (3.1 +/- 0.7 days). By the end of the trials, all (100%) exposed carcasses were removed from active colonies, whereas 60% were removed from plague colonies and 30% were removed from grasslands. Rates of carcass discovery and removal on active colonies were significantly greater than in grasslands, which mirrored differences in carnivore activity recorded during earlier scat surveys. A small fraction (30%-40%) of carcasses in exclosures were eaten by rodents, but only on active and plague colonies, suggesting that small rodents, presumably grasshopper mice (Onychomys leucogaster), may also consume carcasses and pick up fleas if carcasses are not removed by carnivores first. These results, combined with observations that fleas remain alive on prairie dogs at least 1 day following their death, suggest that

  3. Influence of inspiratory flow rate, particle size, and airway caliber on aerosolized drug delivery to the lung.

    PubMed

    Dolovich, M A

    2000-06-01

    A number of studies in the literature support the use of fine aerosols of drug, inhaled at low IFRs to target peripheral airways, with the objective of improving clinical responses to inhaled therapy (Fig. 8). Attempts have been made to separate response due to changes in total administered dose or the surface concentration of the dose from response due to changes in site of deposition--both are affected by the particle size of the aerosol, with IFR additionally influencing the latter. The tools for measuring dose and distribution have improved over the last 10-15 years, and thus we should expect greater accuracy in these measurements for assessing drug delivery to the lung. There are still issues, though, in producing radiolabeled (99m)technetium aerosols that are precise markers for the pharmaceutical product being tested and in quantitating absolute doses deposited in the lung. PET isotopes may provide the means for directly labelling a drug and perhaps can offer an alternative for making these measurements in the future, but deposition measurements should not be used in isolation; protocols should incorporate clinical tests to provide parallel therapeutic data in response to inhalation of the drug by the various patient populations being studied.

  4. Nacre II:. AN Update and Extension of the Nacre Compilation of Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates for Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Goriely, S.; Arnould, M.

    2013-03-01

    The status of a new evaluation of astrophysical nuclear reaction rates, referred as NACRE- II, is reported. It includes 19 radiative capture and 15 transfer reactions on targets with mass numbers A < 16. This work is meant to supersede the NACRE compilation. Post-NACRE experimental data are taken into account. Extrapolations of the astrophysical S-factor to largely sub-Coulomb energies are based on the use of the potential model and of the distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) for capture and transfer reactions, respectively. Adopted rates and their lower and upper limits are provided. Here, we illustrate with some results the general procedure followed in the construction of NACRE-II.

  5. A Parallel Distributed-Memory Particle Method Enables Acquisition-Rate Segmentation of Large Fluorescence Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Yaser; Sbalzarini, Ivo F.

    2016-01-01

    Modern fluorescence microscopy modalities, such as light-sheet microscopy, are capable of acquiring large three-dimensional images at high data rate. This creates a bottleneck in computational processing and analysis of the acquired images, as the rate of acquisition outpaces the speed of processing. Moreover, images can be so large that they do not fit the main memory of a single computer. We address both issues by developing a distributed parallel algorithm for segmentation of large fluorescence microscopy images. The method is based on the versatile Discrete Region Competition algorithm, which has previously proven useful in microscopy image segmentation. The present distributed implementation decomposes the input image into smaller sub-images that are distributed across multiple computers. Using network communication, the computers orchestrate the collectively solving of the global segmentation problem. This not only enables segmentation of large images (we test images of up to 1010 pixels), but also accelerates segmentation to match the time scale of image acquisition. Such acquisition-rate image segmentation is a prerequisite for the smart microscopes of the future and enables online data compression and interactive experiments. PMID:27046144

  6. Multi-purpose two- and three-dimensional momentum imaging of charged particles for attosecond experiments at 1 kHz repetition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Månsson, Erik P. Sorensen, Stacey L.; Gisselbrecht, Mathieu; Arnold, Cord L.; Kroon, David; Guénot, Diego; Fordell, Thomas; Johnsson, Per; L’Huillier, Anne; Lépine, Franck

    2014-12-15

    We report on the versatile design and operation of a two-sided spectrometer for the imaging of charged-particle momenta in two dimensions (2D) and three dimensions (3D). The benefits of 3D detection are to discern particles of different mass and to study correlations between fragments from multi-ionization processes, while 2D detectors are more efficient for single-ionization applications. Combining these detector types in one instrument allows us to detect positive and negative particles simultaneously and to reduce acquisition times by using the 2D detector at a higher ionization rate when the third dimension is not required. The combined access to electronic and nuclear dynamics available when both sides are used together is important for studying photoreactions in samples of increasing complexity. The possibilities and limitations of 3D momentum imaging of electrons or ions in the same spectrometer geometry are investigated analytically and three different modes of operation demonstrated experimentally, with infrared or extreme ultraviolet light and an atomic/molecular beam.

  7. The effects of indoor particle exposure on blood pressure and heart rate among young adults: An air filtration-based intervention study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lian-Yu; Chen, Hua-Wei; Su, Te-Li; Hong, Gui-Bing; Huang, Li-Chu; Chuang, Kai-Jen

    2011-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate whether air filtration can modify the effect of indoor particles on blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) in a young, healthy population. We recruited 60 students to participate in a study of multiple, prolonged exposures to either particle-filtered or non-filtered indoor air. We made four home visits in which we took continuous 48-hour measurements of systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), and HR in each participant. Particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM 2.5) and total volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured at each participant's home. We used mixed-effects models to associate BP and HR with indoor particles and total VOCs, which were averaged over 1-hour to 8-hour periods prior to physiological measurements. We found that the mean values for indoor PM 2.5 exposures at 1-hour to 4-hour were associated with an elevation in SBP, DBP and HR. The effects of indoor PM 2.5 on BP and HR were greatest during the visits without air filtration. During visits with air filtration, participants showed no significant change in BP and HR in response to indoor PM 2.5 exposure. We concluded that air filtration can reduce indoor PM 2.5 concentrations and modify the effect of PM 2.5 on BP and HR in a healthy, young population.

  8. Homogeneous ice nucleation from aqueous inorganic/organic particles representative of biomass burning: water activity, freezing temperatures, nucleation rates.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel A; Rigg, Yannick J

    2011-02-10

    Homogeneous ice nucleation plays an important role in the formation of cirrus clouds with subsequent effects on the global radiative budget. Here we report on homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures and corresponding nucleation rate coefficients of aqueous droplets serving as surrogates of biomass burning aerosol. Micrometer-sized (NH(4))(2)SO(4)/levoglucosan droplets with mass ratios of 10:1, 1:1, 1:5, and 1:10 and aqueous multicomponent organic droplets with and without (NH(4))(2)SO(4) under typical tropospheric temperatures and relative humidities are investigated experimentally using a droplet conditioning and ice nucleation apparatus coupled to an optical microscope with image analysis. Homogeneous freezing was determined as a function of temperature and water activity, a(w), which was set at droplet preparation conditions. The ice nucleation data indicate that minor addition of (NH(4))(2)SO(4) to the aqueous organic droplets renders the temperature dependency of water activity negligible in contrast to the case of aqueous organic solution droplets. The mean homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient derived from 8 different aqueous droplet compositions with average diameters of ∼60 μm for temperatures as low as 195 K and a(w) of 0.82-1 is 2.18 × 10(6) cm(-3) s(-1). The experimentally derived freezing temperatures and homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients are in agreement with predictions of the water activity-based homogeneous ice nucleation theory when taking predictive uncertainties into account. However, the presented ice nucleation data indicate that the water activity-based homogeneous ice nucleation theory overpredicts the freezing temperatures by up to 3 K and corresponding ice nucleation rate coefficients by up to ∼2 orders of magnitude. A shift of 0.01 in a(w), which is well within the uncertainty of typical field and laboratory relative humidity measurements, brings experimental and predicted freezing temperatures and homogeneous ice

  9. Radiation protection of in vitro mammalian cells: effects of hydroxyl radical scavengers on the slopes and shoulders of survival curves

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, D.; Walton, H.L. )

    1991-05-01

    We have tested several chemical compounds, characterized and widely used as hydroxyl radical (.OH) scavengers, for their effects on the radiation sensitivity of Chinese hamster V79 cells irradiated in air or nitrogen. Our purpose is to reexamine the proposed relationship between the level of protection and the rates at which the scavengers react with .OH. We found that the additives can have two apparently independent effects on the shape of survival curves: a reduction in sensitivity (i.e., 'protection,' a decrease in the value of k) and an increase in the size of the shoulder of the survival curve (an increase in the value of Dq). We measured intracellular scavenger concentrations, and, using these values in our analysis, we found that neither of the two effects is correlated with the rates at which the scavengers react with .OH. Although these results could mean that .OH do not cause lethal damage, the interpretation we believe most probably correct is that these scavengers protect in multiple ways. The protection would occur in addition to or instead of simple .OH removal.

  10. Evaluation of a newly developed below-cloud scavenging scheme of regional aerosol simulations: its implication for aerosol budget over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, S.; Park, R.; Kim, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Wet scavenging is the most important process for the aerosol removal. It is divided into in-cloud and below-cloud scavenging processes. Although the below-cloud scavenging is less efficient than the in-cloud scavenging, it is important for the removal of coarse and very fine particles from the polluted boundary layer. Important factors determining the efficiency of below-cloud scavenging process by rain droplets are collision efficiency, terminal velocity of a raindrop, raindrop size distributions, and particle size distributions. Complex 3-D models of atmospheric aerosols, however, in general neglect those factors and use a simple parameterization for the below-cloud scavenging in the form of either constant or first-order equations. For example, a Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia (MICS-Asia) II showed a large range of simulated wet deposition fluxes depending on wet deposition parameterizations of participating models despite of the use of similar meteorological fields. A mechanistic scheme incorporating important factors above to be easily implemented in existing 3-D models is necessary for a better below-cloud scavenging simulation. In this study we test and evaluate a new scheme of the below-cloud scavenging process with Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, accounting for the relationship between the raindrop size distribution and rain intensity along with realistic consideration of other important factors. We conducted regional simulations of CMAQ with the new scheme in East Asia and compared results with other models in MICS-Asia II. We also evaluate the improved CMAQ model by comparing with observations from the Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) and the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) aircraft campaigns in spring 2001. Improved wet deposition simulations of aerosols result in a better understanding on aerosol budget and its climatic implication over East Asia.

  11. Aerosol transport and wet scavenging in deep convective clouds: a case study and model evaluation using a multiple passive tracer analysis approach

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Qing; Easter, Richard C.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Jimenez, Jose L.; Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Hailong; Berg, Larry K.; Barth, Mary; Liu, Ying; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Singh, Balwinder; Morrison, H.; Fan, Jiwen; Ziegler, Conrad L.; Bela, Megan; Apel, Eric; Diskin, G. S.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-08-20

    The effect of wet scavenging on ambient aerosols in deep, continental convective clouds in the mid-latitudes is studied for a severe storm case in Oklahoma during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign. A new passive-tracer based transport analysis framework is developed to characterize the convective transport based on the vertical distribution of several slowly reacting and nearly insoluble trace gases. The passive gas concentration in the upper troposphere convective outflow results from a mixture of 47% from the lower level (0-3 km), 21% entrained from the upper troposphere, and 32% from mid-atmosphere based on observations. The transport analysis framework is applied to aerosols to estimate aerosol transport and wet-scavenging efficiency. Observations yield high overall scavenging efficiencies of 81% and 68% for aerosol mass (Dp < 1μm) and aerosol number (0.03< Dp < 2.5μm), respectively. Little chemical selectivity to wet scavenging is seen among observed submicron sulfate (84%), organic (82%), and ammonium (80%) aerosols, while nitrate has a much lower scavenging efficiency of 57% likely due to the uptake of nitric acid. Observed larger size particles (0.15 - 2.5μm) are scavenged more efficiently (84%) than smaller particles (64%; 0.03 - 0.15μm). The storm is simulated using the chemistry version of the WRF model. Compared to the observation based analysis, the standard model underestimates the wet scavenging efficiency for both mass and number concentrations with low biases of 31% and 40%, respectively. Adding a new treatment of secondary activation significantly improves simulation results, so that the bias in scavenging efficiency in mass and number concentrations is reduced to <10%. This supports the hypothesis that secondary activation is an important process for wet removal of aerosols in deep convective storms.

  12. Mechanoreception, a possible mechanism for food fall detection in deep-sea scavengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klages, Michael; Muyakshin, Sergey; Soltwedel, Thomas; Arntz, Wolf E.

    2002-01-01

    There is strong evidence in the literature that energy supply for deep-sea scavengers is largely restricted to food falls of dead vertebrates such as fish and mammals. The problem for any scavenger inhabiting the seafloor is the unpredictability both in space and time of food fall events. It is generally accepted that chemoreception is one of the major means by which marine organisms detect food sources. Another major source of potential information, however, may come from hydroacoustic stimuli, which have long-range penetration. Such hydroacoustic stimuli will either arise when a large carcass hits and impacts the seafloor or during food consumption of scavengers producing feeding noises. The intensity and transmission characteristics depend upon sediment properties, size, weight and composition of the carcass as well as on size and mouthpart morphology of feeding individuals. In this study the relevance of hydroacoustic stimuli for food fall detection has been investigated in the pandalid shrimp Pandalus borealis Krøyer, 1838. The sensitivity of P. borealis to particle displacement amplitude was found to be close to values measured in other crustaceans. Based on 228 single experiments carried out with five specimens, our results indicate that low-frequency noises may be helpful in detecting food fall events but only in the near-field. In this paper we suggest that the impact of a sinking carcass at the seafloor is a likely source producing elastic waves at the water-seafloor interface. Based on both empirical findings and general theoretical calculations of elastic waves originating from a sinking object hitting the seafloor we conclude that such "micro seismic events" may allow resting scavengers even several hundred metres away to detect a food source.

  13. Free Radical Scavenging and Cellular Antioxidant Properties of Astaxanthin

    PubMed Central

    Dose, Janina; Matsugo, Seiichi; Yokokawa, Haruka; Koshida, Yutaro; Okazaki, Shigetoshi; Seidel, Ulrike; Eggersdorfer, Manfred; Rimbach, Gerald; Esatbeyoglu, Tuba

    2016-01-01

    Astaxanthin is a coloring agent which is used as a feed additive in aquaculture nutrition. Recently, potential health benefits of astaxanthin have been discussed which may be partly related to its free radical scavenging and antioxidant properties. Our electron spin resonance (ESR) and spin trapping data suggest that synthetic astaxanthin is a potent free radical scavenger in terms of diphenylpicryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) and galvinoxyl free radicals. Furthermore, astaxanthin dose-dependently quenched singlet oxygen as determined by photon counting. In addition to free radical scavenging and singlet oxygen quenching properties, astaxanthin induced the antioxidant enzyme paroxoanase-1, enhanced glutathione concentrations and prevented lipid peroxidation in cultured hepatocytes. Present results suggest that, beyond its coloring properties, synthetic astaxanthin exhibits free radical scavenging, singlet oxygen quenching, and antioxidant activities which could probably positively affect animal and human health. PMID:26784174

  14. Relationship between radical scavenging effects and anticorrosive properties of polyphenols

    SciTech Connect

    Gust, J.; Wawer, I.

    1995-01-01

    The radical scavenging effects and anticorrosive properties of polyphenols (gallic acid [GA] and two gallotannins) that contained ortho-trihydroxyl aromatic rings but different numbers of GA moieties and different molecular masses were studied. Scavenging of the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) by the polyphenols was studied by electron spin resonance (ESR). The ESR spectra of the reaction products of the polyphenols and hydrated ferric sulfate were recorded. The anticorrosive properties of the polyphenols were studied by gravimetric and linear polarization measurements. X-ray analysis and mercury porosimetry were used to investigate the rust and its phase components converted by the polyphenols. An increase in the molecular mass (and the number of GA moieties) was found to increase the ability of the polyphenols to scavenge DPPH radicals and to convert the rust. Thus, evaluation of the scavenging effect was shown effective as a fast method to estimate and predict the usefulness of various polyphenols for anticorrosive applications.

  15. Formaldehyde-methanol, metallic-oxide agents head scavengers list

    SciTech Connect

    Schaack, J.P.; Chan, F.

    1989-01-23

    Use of batch-operated chemical H/sub 2/S scavengers as an inexpensive gas-sweetening process may be an attractive alternative for moderately sour gas wells with small production remote from a gas-processing plant. This article begins a four-part series describing the most common H/sub 2/S scavengers available to the natural gas-producing industry. Advantages, disadvantages, health and safety aspects, case histories, design guidelines, and economics of these scavengers will be addressed. Currently available, nonregenerative scavengers for small-plant H/sub 2/S removal may be categorized into four groups: Formaldehyde-methanol-based, metallic oxide-based, caustic-based, and other processes.

  16. Nitric oxide radical scavenging active components from Phyllanthus emblica L.

    PubMed

    Kumaran, A; Karunakaran, R Joel

    2006-03-01

    An activity-directed fractionation and purification process was used to identify the nitric oxide (NO) scavenging components of Phyllanthus emblica. Dried fruit rind of P. emblica was extracted with methanol and then separated into hexane, ethyl acetate, and water fractions. Among these only the ethyl acetate phase showed strong NO scavenging activity in vitro, when compared with water and hexane phases. The ethyl acetate fraction was then subjected to separation and purification using Sephadex LH-20 chromatography. Five compounds showing strong NO scavenging activity were identified by spectral methods (1H NMR, 13C NMR, and MS) and by comparison with literature values to be Gallic acid, Methyl gallate, Corilagin, Furosin, and Geraniin. In addition, HPLC identification and quantification of isolated compounds were also performed. Gallic acid was found to be a major compound in the ethyl acetate extract and Geraniin showed highest NO scavenging activity among the isolated compounds.

  17. Wet scavenging of soluble gases in DC3 deep convective storms using WRF-Chem simulations and aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bela, Megan M.; Barth, Mary C.; Toon, Owen B.; Fried, Alan; Homeyer, Cameron R.; Morrison, Hugh; Cummings, Kristin A.; Li, Yunyao; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Allen, Dale J.; Yang, Qing; Wennberg, Paul O.; Crounse, John D.; St. Clair, Jason M.; Teng, Alex P.; O'Sullivan, Daniel; Huey, L. Gregory; Chen, Dexian; Liu, Xiaoxi; Blake, Donald R.; Blake, Nicola J.; Apel, Eric C.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Flocke, Frank; Campos, Teresa; Diskin, Glenn

    2016-04-01

    We examine wet scavenging of soluble trace gases in storms observed during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign. We conduct high-resolution simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) of a severe storm in Oklahoma. The model represents well the storm location, size, and structure as compared with Next Generation Weather Radar reflectivity, and simulated CO transport is consistent with aircraft observations. Scavenging efficiencies (SEs) between inflow and outflow of soluble species are calculated from aircraft measurements and model simulations. Using a simple wet scavenging scheme, we simulate the SE of each soluble species within the error bars of the observations. The simulated SEs of all species except nitric acid (HNO3) are highly sensitive to the values specified for the fractions retained in ice when cloud water freezes. To reproduce the observations, we must assume zero ice retention for formaldehyde (CH2O) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and complete retention for methyl hydrogen peroxide (CH3OOH) and sulfur dioxide (SO2), likely to compensate for the lack of aqueous chemistry in the model. We then compare scavenging efficiencies among storms that formed in Alabama and northeast Colorado and the Oklahoma storm. Significant differences in SEs are seen among storms and species. More scavenging of HNO3 and less removal of CH3OOH are seen in storms with higher maximum flash rates, an indication of more graupel mass. Graupel is associated with mixed-phase scavenging and lightning production of nitrogen oxides (NOx), processes that may explain the observed differences in HNO3 and CH3OOH scavenging.

  18. Sodium cromoglycate and doxantrazole are oxygen radical scavengers.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi-Hashjin, G; Nijkamp, F P; Henricks, P A J; Folkerts, G

    2002-10-01

    The effects of two mast cell stabilisers, sodium cromoglycate (SCG) and doxantrazole, on the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were studied. Guinea-pig alveolar macrophages (AMs) generated lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence (LDCL). This was increased when the cells were stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or zymosan (by 133% and 464%, respectively, in total LDCL over 60 min). SCG decreased PMA-induced LDCL at higher concentrations (10 mM, by 55%) than doxantrazole (1 mM, by 75%). SCG decreased radical production by AMs in response to zymosan in a concentration-dependent manner by < or = 72%. Doxantrazole (0.1-1 mM) diminished total LDCL by 30-80%. In addition, glucose oxidase led to LDCL generation when incubated with glucose in a cell-free medium. This was inhibited by 47-83% in the presence of SCG or doxantrazole. SCG and doxantrazole inhibited the hydrogen peroxide- and peroxynitrite-induced LDCL by < or = 92%. Moreover, these drugs slightly increased the survival rate of the AMs. It is concluded that doxantrazole- and sodium cromoglycate-inhibited lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence production by guinea-pig alveolar macrophages is due to a direct scavenging effect on reactive oxygen species. Doxantrazole is approximately 10-times more potent. Mast cell stabilisers may be effective in allergic asthma not only by preventing the allergen-induced mediator release, but also by preventing radical-induced lung damage.

  19. Confrontational scavenging as a possible source for language and cooperation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of language and the high degree of cooperation found among humans seems to require more than a straightforward enhancement of primate traits. Some triggering episode unique to human ancestors was likely necessary. Here it is argued that confrontational scavenging was such an episode. Arguments for and against an established confrontational scavenging niche are discussed, as well as the probable effects of such a niche on language and co-operation. Finally, several possible directions for future research are suggested. PMID:21933413

  20. Low-Tech Scavenger Hunt Model for Student Orientation.

    PubMed

    Renner, Barbara Rochen; Cahoon, Elizabeth; Allegri, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Scavenger hunts are an effective, fun way of orienting new students to the library. The low-tech nature and small scale of the scavenger hunt program described here might be more suitable for health sciences libraries than other models, particularly for libraries with small staffs. This model also includes a unique optional element useful for library marketing. This article describes the methods used, shares reactions of program participants, and provides suggestions for those considering orienting students in this way.

  1. An illicit economy: scavenging and recycling of medical waste.

    PubMed

    Patwary, Masum A; O'Hare, William Thomas; Sarker, M H

    2011-11-01

    This paper discusses a significant illicit economy, including black and grey aspects, associated with medical waste scavenging and recycling in a megacity, considering hazards to the specific group involved in scavenging as well as hazards to the general population of city dwellers. Data were collected in Dhaka, Bangladesh, using a variety of techniques based on formal representative sampling for fixed populations (such as recycling operatives) and adaptive sampling for roaming populations (such as scavengers). Extremely hazardous items (including date expired medicines, used syringes, knives, blades and saline bags) were scavenged, repackaged and resold to the community. Some HCE employees were also observed to sell hazardous items directly to scavengers, and both employees and scavengers were observed to supply contaminated items to an informal plastics recycling industry. This trade was made possible by the absence of segregation, secure storage and proper disposal of medical waste. Corruption, a lack of accountability and individual responsibility were also found to be contributors. In most cases the individuals involved with these activities did not understand the risks. Although motivation was often for personal gain or in support of substance abuse, participants sometimes felt that they were providing a useful service to the community.

  2. An experimental evaluation of potential scavenger effects on snake road mortality detections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hubbard, Kaylan A.; Chalfoun, Anna D.

    2012-01-01

    As road networks expand and collisions between vehicles and wildlife become more common, accurately quantifying mortality rates for the taxa that are most impacted will be critical. Snakes are especially vulnerable to collisions with vehicles because of their physiology and behavior. Reptile road mortality is typically quantified using driving or walking surveys; however, scavengers can rapidly remove carcasses from the road and cause underestimation of mortality. Our objective was to determine the effect that scavengers might have had on our ability to accurately detect reptile road mortality during over 150 h and 4,000 km of driving surveys through arid shrublands in southwest Wyoming, which resulted in only two observations of mortality. We developed unique simulated snake carcasses out of Burbot (Lota lota), a locally invasive fish species, and examined removal rates across three different road types at three study sites. Carcass size was not a significant predictor of time of removal, and carcass removal was comparable during the daytime and nighttime hours. However, removal of simulated carcasses was higher on paved roads than unpaved or two-track roads at all study sites, with an average of 75% of the carcasses missing within 60 h compared to 34% and 31%, respectively. Scavengers may therefore negatively impact the ability of researchers to accurately detect herpetofaunal road mortality, especially for paved roads where road mortality is likely the most prevalent.

  3. Inversely estimating the vertical profile of the soil CO2 production rate in a deciduous broadleaf forest using a particle filtering method.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Gen; Yonemura, Seiichiro; Kishimoto-Mo, Ayaka W; Murayama, Shohei; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Yokozawa, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux from the soil surface, which is a major source of CO2 from terrestrial ecosystems, represents the total CO2 production at all soil depths. Although many studies have estimated the vertical profile of the CO2 production rate, one of the difficulties in estimating the vertical profile is measuring diffusion coefficients of CO2 at all soil depths in a nondestructive manner. In this study, we estimated the temporal variation in the vertical profile of the CO2 production rate using a data assimilation method, the particle filtering method, in which the diffusion coefficients of CO2 were simultaneously estimated. The CO2 concentrations at several soil depths and CO2 efflux from the soil surface (only during the snow-free period) were measured at two points in a broadleaf forest in Japan, and the data were assimilated into a simple model including a diffusion equation. We found that there were large variations in the pattern of the vertical profile of the CO2 production rate between experiment sites: the peak CO2 production rate was at soil depths around 10 cm during the snow-free period at one site, but the peak was at the soil surface at the other site. Using this method to estimate the CO2 production rate during snow-cover periods allowed us to estimate CO2 efflux during that period as well. We estimated that the CO2 efflux during the snow-cover period (about half the year) accounted for around 13% of the annual CO2 efflux at this site. Although the method proposed in this study does not ensure the validity of the estimated diffusion coefficients and CO2 production rates, the method enables us to more closely approach the "actual" values by decreasing the variance of the posterior distribution of the values.

  4. Inversely Estimating the Vertical Profile of the Soil CO2 Production Rate in a Deciduous Broadleaf Forest Using a Particle Filtering Method

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Gen; Yonemura, Seiichiro; Kishimoto-Mo, Ayaka W.; Murayama, Shohei; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Yokozawa, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux from the soil surface, which is a major source of CO2 from terrestrial ecosystems, represents the total CO2 production at all soil depths. Although many studies have estimated the vertical profile of the CO2 production rate, one of the difficulties in estimating the vertical profile is measuring diffusion coefficients of CO2 at all soil depths in a nondestructive manner. In this study, we estimated the temporal variation in the vertical profile of the CO2 production rate using a data assimilation method, the particle filtering method, in which the diffusion coefficients of CO2 were simultaneously estimated. The CO2 concentrations at several soil depths and CO2 efflux from the soil surface (only during the snow-free period) were measured at two points in a broadleaf forest in Japan, and the data were assimilated into a simple model including a diffusion equation. We found that there were large variations in the pattern of the vertical profile of the CO2 production rate between experiment sites: the peak CO2 production rate was at soil depths around 10 cm during the snow-free period at one site, but the peak was at the soil surface at the other site. Using this method to estimate the CO2 production rate during snow-cover periods allowed us to estimate CO2 efflux during that period as well. We estimated that the CO2 efflux during the snow-cover period (about half the year) accounted for around 13% of the annual CO2 efflux at this site. Although the method proposed in this study does not ensure the validity of the estimated diffusion coefficients and CO2 production rates, the method enables us to more closely approach the “actual” values by decreasing the variance of the posterior distribution of the values. PMID:25793387

  5. Coumarin-Chalcone Hybrids as Peroxyl Radical Scavengers: Kinetics and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Gloria; Galano, Annia; Alvarez-Idaboy, Juan R; Russo, Nino

    2016-04-25

    The primary antioxidant activity of coumarin-chalcone hybrids has been investigated using the density functional and the conventional transition state theories. Their peroxyl radical scavenging ability was studied in solvents of different polarity and taking into account different reaction mechanisms. It was found that the activity of the hybrids increases with the polarity of the environment and the number of phenolic sites. In addition, their peroxyl radical scavenging activity is larger than those of the corresponding nonhybrid coumarin and chalcone molecules. This finding is in line with previous experimental evidence. All the investigated molecules were found to react faster than Trolox with (•)OOH, regardless of the polarity of the environment. The role of deprotonation on the overall activity of the studied compounds was assessed. The rate constants and branching ratios for the reactions of all the studied compounds with (•)OOH are reported for the first time.

  6. Lacidipine, a potential peroxynitrite scavenger: investigation of activity by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Garzotti, Marco

    2003-01-01

    Inflamed tissues are often characterised by the production of *NO and O(2)(-) radicals, which are known to react at an extremely fast rate to produce peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). This highly oxidising entity reacts with protein-bound tyrosine to give 3-nitrotyrosine, which is considered a biochemical marker of peroxynitrite-induced damage. Lacidipine is a calcium antagonist indicated for the treatment of mild to moderate hypertension. In the present work, electrospray mass spectrometry with and without liquid chromatography was used to evaluate the capability of lacidipine and two other related molecules as ONOO(-) scavengers. This capability is compared with that associated with a number of commercial polyphenols described in the literature as efficient scavengers of this cytotoxic agent. The use of mass spectrometry provided rapid quantitative assessment of both the nitration and its reduction, and showed that lacidipine possesses a reasonable capability for reducing in vitro nitration of superoxide dismutase.

  7. Resveratrol scavenges reactive oxygen species and effects radical-induced cellular responses.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Stephen S; Xia, Chang; Jiang, Bin-Hua; Stinefelt, Beth; Klandorf, Hillar; Harris, Gabriel K; Shi, Xianglin

    2003-10-03

    Scavenging or quenching of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) involved in oxidative stress has been the subject of many recent studies. Resveratrol, found in various natural food products, has been linked to decreased coronary artery disease and preventing cancer development. The present study measured the effect of resveratrol on several different systems involving the hydroxyl, superoxide, metal/enzymatic-induced, and cellular generated radicals. The rate constant for reaction of resveratrol with the hydroxyl radical was determined, and resveratrol was found to be an effective scavenger of hydroxyl, superoxide, and metal-induced radicals as well as showing antioxidant abilities in cells producing ROS. Resveratrol exhibits a protective effect against lipid peroxidation in cell membranes and DNA damage caused by ROS. Resveratrol was also found to have a significant inhibitory effect on the NF-kappaB signaling pathway after cellular exposure to metal-induced radicals. It was concluded that resveratrol in foods plays an important antioxidant role.

  8. Phospholipids in oxidized LDL not adducted to apoB are recognized by the CD36 scavenger receptor.

    PubMed

    Podrez, Eugene A; Hoppe, George; O'Neil, June; Hoff, Henry F

    2003-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) results in its recognition by scavenger receptors on macrophages. Whereas blockage of lysyl residues on apoB-100 of oxLDL by lipid peroxidation products appears to be critical for recognition by the scavenger receptor class A (SR-A), modification of the lipid moiety has been suggested to be responsible for recognition by the scavenger class B receptor, CD36. We studied the recognition by scavenger receptors of oxidized LDL in which lysyl residues are blocked prior to oxidation through methylation [ox(m)LDL]. This permits us to minimize any contribution of modified apoB-100 to the recognition of oxLDL, but does not disrupt the native configuration of lipids in the particle. We found that ox(m)LDL was recognized by receptors on mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPM) almost as well as oxLDL. Ox(m)LDL was recognized by CD36-transfected cells but not by SR-A-transfected cells. Oxidized phospholipids (oxPC) transferred from oxLDL or directly from oxPC to LDL, conveyed recognition by CD36-transfected cells, confirming that CD36 recognized unbound oxidized phospholipids in ox(m)LDL. Collectively, these results suggest that oxPC not adducted to apoB within the intact oxLDL particle are recognized by the macrophage scavenger receptor CD36, that these lipids are not recognized by SR-A, and that they can transfer from oxidized to unoxidized LDL and induce CD36 recognition.

  9. Photometric hydroxyl radical scavenging analysis of standard natural organic matter isolates.

    PubMed

    Donham, J E; Rosenfeldt, E J; Wigginton, K R

    2014-04-01

    Hydroxyl radical (˙OH) scavenging reaction rate constants of standard natural organic matter (NOM) isolates (k˙OH,NOM) were measured with a rapid background scavenging method, to expand the dataset of published k˙OH,NOM values. The proposed method relies on ˙OH generation with a simple UV/H₂O₂ AOP-based system. The associated decay of a ˙OH probe compound is monitored with a field-deployable spectrophotometer and k˙OH,NOM is determined through competition kinetics. The resulting k˙OH,NOM values for the six NOM standard isolates ranged from 1.02 (±0.10) × 10(8) MC(-1) s(-1) for Suwannee River Fulvic Acid I Standard to 2.03 (±0.12) × 10(8) MC(-1) s(-1) for Pony Lake Fulvic Acid Reference NOM, which is within the range reported with more elaborate and time-consuming k˙OH,NOM methods. A slight correlation between nitrogen content and scavenging rate constant was evident while no significant correlation between k˙OH,NOM and atomic composition, carbon structure, weight-average molecular weight, UV absorbance (SUVA₂₅₄), or fluorescence index (FI) was observed. Overall, the results demonstrate that k˙OH,NOM can be rapidly assessed in NOM isolate samples. The results suggest that this type of rapid field-deployable spectrophotometric method may minimize the need for expensive and time-consuming background scavenging methods, and for models that predict k˙OH,NOM based on other NOM characteristics.

  10. Invasive carnivores alter ecological function and enhance complementarity in scavenger assemblages on ocean beaches.

    PubMed

    Brown, Marion B; Schlacher, Thomas A; Schoeman, David S; Weston, Michael A; Huijbers, Chantal M; Olds, Andrew D; Connolly, Rod M

    2015-10-01

    Species composition is expected to alter ecological function in assemblages if species traits differ strongly. Such effects are often large and persistent for nonnative carnivores invading islands. Alternatively, high similarity in traits within assemblages creates a degree of functional redundancy in ecosystems. Here we tested whether species turnover results in functional ecological equivalence or complementarity, and whether invasive carnivores on islands significantly alter such ecological function. The model system consisted of vertebrate scavengers (dominated by raptors) foraging on animal carcasses on ocean beaches on two Australian islands, one with and one without invasive red foxes (Vulpes vulpes). Partitioning of scavenging events among species, carcass removal rates, and detection speeds were quantified using camera traps baited with fish carcasses at the dune-beach interface. Complete segregation of temporal foraging niches between mammals (nocturnal) and birds (diurnal) reflects complementarity in carrion utilization. Conversely, functional redundancy exists within the bird guild where several species of raptors dominate carrion removal in a broadly similar way. As predicted, effects of red foxes were large. They substantially changed the nature and rate of the scavenging process in the system: (1) foxes consumed over half (55%) of all carrion available at night, compared with negligible mammalian foraging at night on the fox-free island, and (2) significant shifts in the composition of the scavenger assemblages consuming beach-cast carrion are the consequence of fox invasion at one island. Arguably, in the absence of other mammalian apex predators, the addition of red foxes creates a new dimension of functional complementarity in beach food webs. However, this functional complementarity added by foxes is neither benign nor neutral, as marine carrion subsidies to coastal red fox populations are likely to facilitate their persistence as exotic

  11. Scavenging activity can produce predictable patterns in surface skeletal remains scattering: observations and comments from two experiments.

    PubMed

    Kjorlien, Yvonne P; Beattie, Owen B; Peterson, Arthur E

    2009-07-01

    In forensic contexts, surface deposited remains are frequently found that have been scattered by various taphonomic processes. In an effort to develop strategies to improve recovery rates, this study evaluates whether patterns can be detected in the scattering of remains due to scavenger activity. In two experiments, 24 human analogues (pig carcasses) were placed in two adjacent but differing environmental contexts: 12 in wooded and 12 in open grassland. Six carcasses in each of these contexts were dressed in human clothing. Elapsed time and direction of movement information for each carcass and its parts were collected and analyzed. Unclothed carcasses and carcasses in open contexts exhibited scavenger activity sooner than the others. Scattering of remains occurred along game trails and was directed away from human population and activity. Due to the highly variable nature of scavenger activity, daily observations during a research project are the key leading to a better understanding of the development of these patterns.

  12. Effects of particle size and air flow rates on the runaway temperature of bituminous coal at 290K < T < 700K

    SciTech Connect

    Malhotro, V.M.; Crelling, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    Spontaneous ignition and combustion of coal are major problems not only for actual mining of coal but also for its transportation and for industrial users. Most coals are prone to spontaneous combustion, but their susceptibility to ignition increases as the coal rank decreases. However, there are many anomalies to this straight rank order susceptibility. Chamberlain and Hall have in fact, pointed out that some higher rank coals may be more susceptible to spontaneous ignition than lower rank coals. The causes and mechanisms of spontaneous ignition are enigmatic because exceptions exist for every previously-suggested, single cause. Several models have been advanced to describe spontaneous heating, however. Among these are coal rank, electrostatic effects, geological factors, temperature, microbial ignition, the reduction in reactivity due to deterioration, air flow rates, particle size, pyrite content, porosity and water wetting of coal. The purpose of this research was to examine the factors which may contribute to spontaneous ignition of ultrafine (particle size < 250 /mu/m) bituminous coals and maceral enriched fractions under storage, air flow and/or dense phase pneumatic conditions and to understand physical interactions and chemical reactions pathways which may lead to spontaneous ignition of bituminous coals. We have initiated spontaneous ignition, FTIR, DSC, TGA and EPR measurements to accumulate data which can be used to propose mathematical models for spontaneous ignition of stored and pneumatically conveyed coals. In this report, we present our preliminary results on a high-volatile bituminous coal subjected to ignition temperature and FTIR measurements.

  13. Cloud Scavenging Effects on Aerosol Radiative and Cloud-nucleating Properties - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2009-03-05

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  14. Novel hydroxyl radical scavenging antioxidant activity assay for water-soluble antioxidants using a modified CUPRAC method.

    PubMed

    Bektaşoğlu, Burcu; Esin Celik, Saliha; Ozyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Apak, Reşat

    2006-07-07

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide anion, hydroxyl ((*)OH), peroxyl, and alkoxyl radicals may attack biological macromolecules giving rise to oxidative stress-originated diseases. Since (*)OH is very short-lived, secondary products resulting from (*)OH attack to various probes are measured. Although the measurement of aromatic hydroxylation with HPLC/electrochemical detection is more specific than the low-yield TBARS test, it requires sophisticated instrumentation. As a more convenient and less costly alternative, we used p-aminobenzoate, 2,4- and 3,5-dimethoxybenzoate probes for detecting hydroxyl radicals generated from an equivalent mixture of Fe(II)+EDTA with hydrogen peroxide. The produced hydroxyl radicals attacked both the probe and the water-soluble antioxidants in 37 degrees C-incubated solutions for 2h. The CUPRAC (i.e., our original method for total antioxidant capacity assay) absorbance of the ethylacetate extract due to the reduction of Cu(II)-neocuproine reagent by the hydroxylated probe decreased in the presence of (*)OH scavengers, the difference being proportional to the scavenging ability of the tested compound. A rate constant for the reaction of the scavenger with hydroxyl radical can be deduced from the inhibition of color formation. The second-order rate constants of the scavengers were determined with competition kinetics by means of a linear plot of A(0)/A as a function of C(scavenger)/C(probe), where A(0) and A are the CUPRAC absorbances of the system in the absence and presence of scavenger, respectively, and C is the molar concentration of relevant species. The 2,4- and 3,5-dimethoxybenzoates were the best probes in terms of linearity and sensitivity. Iodide, metabisulfite, hexacyanoferrate(II), thiourea, formate, and dimethyl sulfoxide were shown by the modified CUPRAC assay to be more effective scavengers than mannitol, glucose, lysine, and simple alcohols, as in the TBARS assay. The developed method is less lengthy, more

  15. Escherichia coli removal in biochar-augmented biofilter: effect of infiltration rate, initial bacterial concentration, biochar particle size, and presence of compost.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sanjay K; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2014-10-07

    Bioretention systems and biofilters are used in low impact development to passively treat urban stormwater. However, these engineered natural systems are not efficient at removing fecal indicator bacteria, the contaminants responsible for a majority of surface water impairments. The present study investigates the efficacy of biochar-augmented model sand biofilters for Escherichia coli removal under a variety of stormwater bacterial concentrations and infiltration rates. Additionally, we test the role of biochar particle size and "presence of compost on model" biofilter performance. Our results show that E. coli removal in a biochar-augmented sand biofilter is ∼ 96% and is not greatly affected by increases in stormwater infiltration rates and influent bacterial concentrations, particularly within the ranges expected in field. Removal of fine (<125 μm) biochar particles from the biochar-sand biofilter decreased the removal capacity from 95% to 62%, indicating biochar size is important. Addition of compost to biochar-sand biofilters not only lowered E. coli removal capacity but also increased the mobilization of deposited bacteria during intermittent infiltration. This result is attributed to exhaustion of attachment sites on biochar by the dissolved organic carbon leached from compost. Overall, our study indicates that biochar has potential to remove bacteria from stormwater under a wide range of field conditions, but for biochar to be effective, the size should be small and biochar should be applied without compost. Although the results aid in the optimization of biofilter design, further studies are needed to examine biochar potential in the field over an entire rainy season.

  16. Rapid scavenging of jellyfish carcasses reveals the importance of gelatinous material to deep-sea food webs

    PubMed Central

    Sweetman, Andrew K.; Smith, Craig R.; Dale, Trine; Jones, Daniel O. B.

    2014-01-01

    Jellyfish blooms are common in many oceans, and anthropogenic changes appear to have increased their magnitude in some regions. Although mass falls of jellyfish carcasses have been observed recently at the deep seafloor, the dense necrophage aggregations and rapid consumption rates typical for vertebrate carrion have not been documented. This has led to a paradigm of limited energy transfer to higher trophic levels at jelly falls relative to vertebrate organic falls. We show from baited camera deployments in the Norwegian deep sea that dense aggregations of deep-sea scavengers (more than 1000 animals at peak densities) can rapidly form at jellyfish baits and consume entire jellyfish carcasses in 2.5 h. We also show that scavenging rates on jellyfish are not significantly different from fish carrion of similar mass, and reveal that scavenging communities typical for the NE Atlantic bathyal zone, including the Atlantic hagfish, galatheid crabs, decapod shrimp and lyssianasid amphipods, consume both types of carcasses. These rapid jellyfish carrion consumption rates suggest that the contribution of gelatinous material to organic fluxes may be seriously underestimated in some regions, because jelly falls may disappear much more rapidly than previously thought. Our results also demonstrate that the energy contained in gelatinous carrion can be efficiently incorporated into large numbers of deep-sea scavengers and food webs, lessening the expected impacts (e.g. smothering of the seafloor) of enhanced jellyfish production on deep-sea ecosystems and pelagic–benthic coupling. PMID:25320167

  17. Rapid scavenging of jellyfish carcasses reveals the importance of gelatinous material to deep-sea food webs.

    PubMed

    Sweetman, Andrew K; Smith, Craig R; Dale, Trine; Jones, Daniel O B

    2014-12-07

    Jellyfish blooms are common in many oceans, and anthropogenic changes appear to have increased their magnitude in some regions. Although mass falls of jellyfish carcasses have been observed recently at the deep seafloor, the dense necrophage aggregations and rapid consumption rates typical for vertebrate carrion have not been documented. This has led to a paradigm of limited energy transfer to higher trophic levels at jelly falls relative to vertebrate organic falls. We show from baited camera deployments in the Norwegian deep sea that dense aggregations of deep-sea scavengers (more than 1000 animals at peak densities) can rapidly form at jellyfish baits and consume entire jellyfish carcasses in 2.5 h. We also show that scavenging rates on jellyfish are not significantly different from fish carrion of similar mass, and reveal that scavenging communities typical for the NE Atlantic bathyal zone, including the Atlantic hagfish, galatheid crabs, decapod shrimp and lyssianasid amphipods, consume both types of carcasses. These rapid jellyfish carrion consumption rates suggest that the contribution of gelatinous material to organic fluxes may be seriously underestimated in some regions, because jelly falls may disappear much more rapidly than previously thought. Our results also demonstrate that the energy contained in gelatinous carrion can be efficiently incorporated into large numbers of deep-sea scavengers and food webs, lessening the expected impacts (e.g. smothering of the seafloor) of enhanced jellyfish production on deep-sea ecosystems and pelagic-benthic coupling.

  18. Free radical scavenging abilities of polypeptide from Chlamys farreri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhiwu; Chu, Xiao; Liu, Chengjuan; Wang, Yuejun; Mi, Sun; Wang, Chunbo

    2006-09-01

    We investigated the radical scavenging effect and antioxidation property of polypeptide extracted from Chlamys farreri (PCF) in vitro using chemiluminescence and electron spin resonance (ESR) methods. We examined the scavenging effects of PCF on superoxide anions (O{2/-}), hydroxyl radicals (OH·), peroxynitrite (ONOO-) and the inhibiting capacity of PCF on peroxidation of linoleic acid. Our experiment suggested that PCF could scavenge oxygen free radicals including superoxide anions (O{2/-}) (IC50=0.3 mg/ml), hydroxyl radicals (OH·) (IC50=0.2 μg/ml) generated from the reaction systems and effectively inhibit the oxidative activity of ONOO- (IC50=0.2 mg/ml). At 1.25 mg/ml of PCF, the inhibition ratio on lipid peroxidation of linoleic acid was 43%. The scavenging effect of PCF on O{2/-}, OH· and ONOO- free radicals were stronger than those of vitamin C but less on lipid peroxidation of linoleic acid. Thus PCF could scavenge free radicals and inhibit the peroxidation of linoleic acid in vitro. It is an antioxidant from marine products and potential for industrial production in future.

  19. Barbiturates as protective agents in brain ischemia and as free radical scavengers in vitro.

    PubMed

    Smith, D S; Rehncrona, S; Siesjö, B K

    1980-01-01

    Barbiturates protect the brain in several types of ischemia. The exact mechanism(s) by which they afford protection are unknown. Interest has been focused for the most part on their effects as metabolic depressants, but a slowing energy consumption rate in the ischemic brain cannot explain protection in all ischemic situations. Other propositions for the protective mechanisms of barbiturates include alterations in blood flow distribution, membrane stabilization as well as antioxidant and free radical scavenging properties. We have studied the inhibitory effects of various barbiturates on iron- and ascorbic acid-stimulated lipid peroxidation in brain tissue in vitro. While thiopental was highly efficient, other barbiturates had no (phenobarbital, pentobarbital) or only minor (methohexital) inhibitory effects. The findings were confirmed by studies of the scavenging properties of these barbiturates with a different system (1,1 diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl). Since all tested barbiturates protect in brain ischemia in vivo, our results do not support the hypothesis that they protect by acting as free radical scavengers.

  20. Foraging by marine scavengers: Effects of relatedness, bait damage and hunger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, P. G.; Howarth, J.

    1996-12-01

    Field studies using fish-baited creels have confirmed that Carcinus maenas, Necora puber and Pagurus bernhardus (Crustacea: Decapoda), Buccinum undatum (Gastropoda) and Asterias rubens (Echinodermata) are prominent scavenging species in shallow waters in the Clyde Sea area. Capture rates of these species by creels baited with dead fish plus variously damaged C. maenas were examined in the field. The addition of substantially fractured C. maenas significantly reduced the capture of conspecifics, but significantly enhanced the capture of the taxonomically unrelated species A. rubens. The remaining crustacean taxa (of the above) were unaffected by this treatment. The magnitude of th response was related strongly to the extent to which C. maenas were damaged. The effects of hunger on these responses were tested in a laboratory experiment in which the responses of starved and fed batches of C. maenas were investigated. Starved crabs remained attracted to fish bait, despite the proximity of dead conspecifics. Conversely, crabs of the fed batch were significantly more reluctant to enter creels containing damaged conspecifics. The localized presence of odours emanating from dead conspecifics did not cause crabs to remain inactive in shelter. We conclude that taxonomic relatedness to bait, degree of carcass damage and hunger of the scavenger all interact in determining foraging decision-making even by so-called generalist scavengers.

  1. Superoxide scavenging by thiol/copper complex of captopril--an EPR spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Reguli, J; Misík, V

    1995-02-01

    Scavenging of superoxide radical by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril (CAP), a thiol compound, was studied by several investigators and the results were contradictory; while some reported a high superoxide scavenging activity of CAP others found that CAP removed superoxide inefficiently. In this work we show that in the presence of copper ions the apparent rate of superoxide removal by CAP (molar ratio CAP:CuSO4 4:1) was two orders of magnitude higher (approximately 1.5 x 10(5) M-1s-1 at pH 7.4) than the literature value for superoxide scavenging by CAP alone (< 10(3) M-1s-1 at pH 7.4). We presume that in the presence of copper ions a CAP/copper complex with a SOD-mimicking activity is being formed. Similar results were also obtained with another thiol glutathione (GSH). The possible role of the CAP/copper complexes in the anti-inflammatory effect of CAP is discussed.

  2. Iron chlorin e6 scavenges hydroxyl radical and protects human endothelial cells against hydrogen peroxide toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, J W; Yoon, S S; Yang, R

    2001-09-01

    Iron chlorin e6 (FeCe6) has recently been proposed to be potentially antimutagenic and antioxidative. However, the antioxidant property of FeCe6 has not been elucidated in detail. In this study, we investigated the ability of FeCe6 to scavenge hydroxyl radical and to protect biomolecules and mammalian cells from oxidative stress-mediated damage. In electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments, FeCe6 showed excellent hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, whereas its iron-deficient molecule, chlorin e6 (Ce6) showed little effect. FeCe6 also significantly reduced hydroxyl radical-induced thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) formation and benzoate hydroxylation in a dose-dependent manner. The rate constant for reaction between FeCe6 and hydroxyl radical was measured as 8.5 x 10(10) M(-1) s(-1) by deoxyribose degradation method, and this value was much higher than that of most hydroxyl radical scavengers. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of FeCe6 was also confirmed by ESR study and cytochrome c reduction assay, but its in vitro activity appeared to be less efficient in comparison with other well-known SOD mimics. In addition, FeCe6 appreciably diminished hydroxyl radical-induced DNA single-strand breakage and protein degradation in Fe-catalyzed and Cu-catalyzed Fenton systems, and it significantly protected human endothelial cells against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) toxicity. These results suggest that FeCe6 is a novel hydroxyl radical scavenger and may be useful for preventing oxidative injury in biological systems.

  3. Hybrid support vector regression and autoregressive integrated moving average models improved by particle swarm optimization for property crime rates forecasting with economic indicators.

    PubMed

    Alwee, Razana; Shamsuddin, Siti Mariyam Hj; Sallehuddin, Roselina

    2013-01-01

    Crimes forecasting is an important area in the field of criminology. Linear models, such as regression and econometric models, are commonly applied in crime forecasting. However, in real crimes data, it is common that the data consists of both linear and nonlinear components. A single model may not be sufficient to identify all the characteristics of the data. The purpose of this study is to introduce a hybrid model that combines support vector regression (SVR) and autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) to be applied in crime rates forecasting. SVR is very robust with small training data and high-dimensional problem. Meanwhile, ARIMA has the ability to model several types of time series. However, the accuracy of the SVR model depends on values of its parameters, while ARIMA is not robust to be applied to small data sets. Therefore, to overcome this problem, particle swarm optimization is used to estimate the parameters of the SVR and ARIMA models. The proposed hybrid model is used to forecast the property crime rates of the United State based on economic indicators. The experimental results show that the proposed hybrid model is able to produce more accurate forecasting results as compared to the individual models.

  4. Application of RVA and Time-Lapse Photography to Explore Effects of Extent of Chlorination, Milling Extraction Rate, and Particle-Size Reduction of Flour on Cake-Baking Functionality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three factors (extent of chlorination, milling extraction rate and particle-size reduction) in the cake-bakeing functionality of Croplan 594W flour were explored by Rapid Visco-Analyzer (RVA) and time-lapse photography. The extent of chlorination and milling extraction rate showed dramatic effects,...

  5. Study of atmospheric pollution scavenging. Eighteenth progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Semonin, R.G.; Bartlett, J.D.; Bowersox, V.C.; Gatz, D.F.; Naiman, D.Q.; Peden, M.E.; Stahlhut, R.K.; Stensland, G.J.

    1980-07-01

    The analysis of aerosol samples obtained in rural east-central Illinois reveals a seasonal maximum in SO/sub 4/ during May to July and a similar pattern for NH/sub 4/. The annual median SO/sub 4/ is about 1 to 1.5 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/. In contrast to these ions, NO/sub 3/ displays highest values in the cold season. Soil-related species (Ca, K) seem to maximize in relation to farm tillage and harvesting practices. The NO/sub 3/ in recent precipitation samples over the northeast US increased between 1 and 2 times the values observed in the mid-1950's. A case study from SCORE-78 suggests that all ion concentrations analyzed from sequentially collected samples decreased from the onset of rain to a minimum corresponding to the heaviest rain rates. Four groups of elements in 10 event rain samples were identified using factor analysis. The groups include soluble and insoluble crustal elements, soluble pollutant metals and sulfate, and insoluble pollutant metals. Utilizing the factor analysis approach, the St. Louis METROMEX precipitation chemistry data showed that the SO/sub 4/ deposition patterns group consistently with those of other soluble pollutants. Additional factor analysis efforts on the St. Louis rainwater data set revealed that soluble and insoluble concentrations of a given element have different deposition patterns suggesting that scavenging and/or precipitation formation processes dictate the patterns. An approach to managing the vast data base of rain chemistry used in the above studies is described. The software also examines the data for certain aspects of quality assurance. The procedures used to analyze ambient air filter samples are discussed.

  6. Free radical scavenging (DPPH) potential in nine Mentha species.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nisar; Fazal, Hina; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Abbasi, Bilal Haider

    2012-02-01

    Mentha species are used in every day life in various food items. These species produce valuable secondary metabolites that scavenge toxic free radicals. Toxic free radicals can cause different diseases in the human body. In the present study free radical scavenging potential (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl scavenging activity) in nine Mentha species were investigated to evaluate and explore new potential sources for natural antioxidants. The activity was performed after different time intervals with incubation period of 30 minutes. The methanolic extracts revealed that significantly higher activity (82%) was observed in Mentha suaveolens, followed by Mentha longifolia (79%), Mentha officinalis (76%) and Mentha piperita, Mentha pulegium, Mentha royleana (75%), respectively. Significantly same activity was observed in Mentha arvensis and Mentha spicata. Lower activity was observed in Mentha citrata (64%). The present study revealed that these species can be used as natural antioxidants.

  7. Scavenging energy from human motion with tubular dielectric polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Mistral, Claire; Basrour, Skandar

    2010-04-01

    Scavenging energy from human motion is a challenge to supply low consumption systems for sport or medical applications. A promising solution is to use electroactive polymers and especially dielectric polymers to scavenge mechanical energy during walk. In this paper, we present a tubular dielectric generator which is the first step toward an integration of these structures into textiles. For a 10cm length and under a strain of 100%, the structure is able to scavenge 1.5μJ for a poling voltage of 200V and up to 40μJ for a poling voltage of 1000V. A 30cm length structure is finally compared to our previous planar structure, and the power management module for those structures is discussed.

  8. Functionalized graphene quantum dots loaded with free radicals combined with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry to screen radical scavenging natural antioxidants from Licorice and Scutellariae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoying; Niu, XiuLi; Shi, Gaofeng; Chen, Xuefu; Yao, Ruixing; Chen, Fuwen

    2014-12-01

    A novel screening method was developed for the detection and identification of radical scavenging natural antioxidants based on a free radical reaction combined with liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Functionalized graphene quantum dots were prepared for loading free radicals in the complex screening system. The detection was performed with and without a preliminary exposure of the samples to specific free radicals on the functionalized graphene quantum dots, which can facilitate charge transfer between free radicals and antioxidants. The difference in chromatographic peak areas was used to identify potential antioxidants. This is a novel approach to simultaneously evaluate the antioxidant power of a component versus a free radical, and to identify it in a vegetal matrix. The structures of the antioxidants in the samples were identified using tandem mass spectrometry and comparison with standards. Fourteen compounds were found to possess potential antioxidant activity, and their free radical scavenging capacities were investigated. The order of scavenging capacity of 14 compounds was compared according to their free radical scavenging rate. 4',5,6,7-Tetrahydroxyflavone (radical scavenging rate: 0.05253 mL mg(-1) s(-1) ) showed the strongest capability for scavenging free radicals.

  9. The Impact of Flight Hardware Scavenging on Space Logistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    For a given fixed launch vehicle capacity the logistics payload delivered to the moon may be only roughly 20 percent of the payload delivered to the International Space Station (ISS). This is compounded by the much lower flight frequency to the moon and thus low availability of spares for maintenance. This implies that lunar hardware is much more scarce and more costly per kilogram than ISS and thus there is much more incentive to preserve hardware. The Constellation Lunar Surface System (LSS) program is considering ways of utilizing hardware scavenged from vehicles including the Altair lunar lander. In general, the hardware will have only had a matter of hours of operation yet there may be years of operational life remaining. By scavenging this hardware the program, in effect, is treating vehicle hardware as part of the payload. Flight hardware may provide logistics spares for system maintenance and reduce the overall logistics footprint. This hardware has a wide array of potential applications including expanding the power infrastructure, and exploiting in-situ resources. Scavenging can also be seen as a way of recovering the value of, literally, billions of dollars worth of hardware that would normally be discarded. Scavenging flight hardware adds operational complexity and steps must be taken to augment the crew s capability with robotics, capabilities embedded in flight hardware itself, and external processes. New embedded technologies are needed to make hardware more serviceable and scavengable. Process technologies are needed to extract hardware, evaluate hardware, reconfigure or repair hardware, and reintegrate it into new applications. This paper also illustrates how scavenging can be used to drive down the cost of the overall program by exploiting the intrinsic value of otherwise discarded flight hardware.

  10. High throughput assay for evaluation of reactive carbonyl scavenging capacity☆

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, N.; Cavaille, J.P.; Graziani, F.; Robin, M.; Ouari, O.; Pietri, S.; Stocker, P.

    2014-01-01

    Many carbonyl species from either lipid peroxidation or glycoxidation are extremely reactive and can disrupt the function of proteins and enzymes. 4-hydroxynonenal and methylglyoxal are the most abundant and toxic lipid-derived reactive carbonyl species. The presence of these toxics leads to carbonyl stress and cause a significant amount of macromolecular damages in several diseases. Much evidence indicates trapping of reactive carbonyl intermediates may be a useful strategy for inhibiting or decreasing carbonyl stress-associated pathologies. There is no rapid and convenient analytical method available for the assessment of direct carbonyl scavenging capacity, and a very limited number of carbonyl scavengers have been identified to date, their therapeutic potential being highlighted only recently. In this context, we have developed a new and rapid sensitive fluorimetric method for the assessment of reactive carbonyl scavengers without involvement glycoxidation systems. Efficacy of various thiol- and non-thiol-carbonyl scavenger pharmacophores was tested both using this screening assay adapted to 96-well microplates and in cultured cells. The scavenging effects on the formation of Advanced Glycation End-product of Bovine Serum Albumin formed with methylglyoxal, 4-hydroxynonenal and glucose-glycated as molecular models were also examined. Low molecular mass thiols with an α-amino-β-mercaptoethane structure showed the highest degree of inhibitory activity toward both α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and dicarbonyls. Cysteine and cysteamine have the best scavenging ability toward methylglyoxal. WR-1065 which is currently approved for clinical use as a protective agent against radiation and renal toxicity was identified as the best inhibitor of 4-hydroxynonenal. PMID:24688895

  11. Molecular scavengers as carriers of analytes for mass spectrometry identification.

    PubMed

    Smoluch, Marek; Ceglowski, Michal; Kurczewska, Joanna; Babij, Michal; Gotszalk, Teodor; Silberring, Jerzy; Schroeder, Grzegorz

    2014-11-18

    Storage and preconcentration of various molecules by molecular scavengers for thermal desorption and identification by mass spectrometry is presented. A dielectric barrier discharge ionization source combined with a heating element for the chemical characterization of amines and organic acids, initially trapped by molecular scavengers, is described. The developed technique can be applied for preconcentration of minute amounts of molecules in liquid and gaseous phases, as well as their transportation and thorough analysis. The method, operating at ambient pressure, can also be complementary to electron impact ionization, with no need for sample derivatization.

  12. Scavengers: A behind-the-scenes recycling battle

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    Though it may not garner a spotlight as the number-one issue facing the recycling industry, the theft of recyclables is a subtle and elusive vexation that is costing haulers and recyclers thousands of dollars each year. Scavenging is not a new dilemma for the industry. But aside from an occasional seminar on the topic, not much attention has been devoted to the problem, despite the fact that poaching deprives curbside programs of revenues that help offset operating costs. In some locations, losses due to scavenging have sabotaged the efficacy of curbside recycling as a whole.

  13. Spectroscopy investigation on chemo-catalytic, free radical scavenging and bactericidal properties of biogenic silver nanoparticles synthesized using Salicornia brachiata aqueous extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seralathan, Janani; Stevenson, Priscilla; Subramaniam, Shankar; Raghavan, Rachana; Pemaiah, Brindha; Sivasubramanian, Aravind; Veerappan, Anbazhagan

    2014-01-01

    Nanosized silver have been widely used in many applications, such as catalysis, photonics, sensors, medicine etc. Thus, there is an increasing need to develop high-yield, low cost, non-toxic and eco-friendly procedures for the synthesis of nanoparticles. Herein, we report an efficient, green synthesis of silver nanoparticles utilizing the aqueous extract of Salicornia brachiata, a tropical plant of the Chenopodiaceae family. Silver nanoparticles have been characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The morphology of the particles formed consists of highly diversified shapes like spherical, rod-like, prism, triangular, pentagonal and hexagonal pattern. However, addition of sodium hydroxide to the extract produces mostly spherical particles. The stable nanoparticles obtained using this green method show remarkable catalytic activity in the reduction of 4-nitro phenol to 4-amino phenol. The reduction catalyzed by silver nanoparticles followed the first-order kinetics, with a rate constant of, 0.6 × 10-2 s-1. The bactericidal activity of the synthesized silver nanoparticles against the pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus aureus E, Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, was also explored using REMA. The obtained results showed that the minimum inhibitory concentration required to induce bactericidal effect is lower than the control antibiotic, ciprofloxacin. In addition to these, the biogenic synthesized nanoparticles also exhibited excellent free radical scavenging activity.

  14. The behavior of scavenged isotopes in marine anoxic environments: 210Pb and 210Po in the water column of the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ching-Ling; Murray, James W.

    1994-04-01

    Vertical profiles of dissolved and particulate 210Pb and 210Po were determined at two stations in the Black Sea in June 1988. Vertical fluxes of 210Pb and 210Po were also measured in the upper 150 m, using floating sediment traps. The fractionation of 210Pb between dissolved and particulate phases in the Black Sea is strongly influenced by the redox conditions in the water column. Dissolved 210Pb dominates in the oxic zone, while particulate 210Pb is the major form in the deep sulfide-rich anoxic zone. The distribution of 210Pb across the suboxic zone appears to be mainly controlled by redox cycling of manganese and iron. In the sulfide-rich layer coprecipitation of lead with iron sulfide is probably the dominant scavenging mechanism. A simple scavenging model was used to calculate the residence times of dissolved and particulate 210Pb in the oxic, suboxic, and anoxic zones. The residence times of dissolved 210Pb relative to scavenging by particles are 0.5-1, 2-3, and 3.5 years in the oxic, suboxic, and anoxic layers, respectively. The corresponding residence times of particulate 210Pb relative to particle removal processes in the same layers are 0.1, 1.5-2.5, and 8.5 years, respectively. A particle settling velocity of about 40 m y -1 was derived from the 210Pb /226Ra disequilibrium in the deep Black Sea. The relatively short residence times of 210Pb support the hypothesis that anoxic basins are important sites for boundary scavenging of 210Pb. The 210Po profiles indicate that biological rather than inorganic particles are the major carrier phases for polonium in the Black sea. Dissolved 210Po is deficient relative to dissolved 210Pb in the euphotic zone, suggesting preferential uptake of 210Po over 210Pb by particles residing in that layer. The residence time of dissolved 210Po, with respect to scavenging by particles in the euphotic zone, is about 200 days. Below the mid-depth of the suboxic zone, 210Po is in excess relative to 210Pb, and is thought to originate

  15. Lead Stable Isotope Tracers of Atmospheric and Marine Scavenging in the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, A. J.; Alleman, L. Y.; Church, T. M.

    2001-12-01

    The element lead is introduced to the marine atmosphere from combustion sources, but has had very large scale reductions in the North Atlantic due to the phasing out of leaded gasoline first in North America followed by Europe. The regional sources and transient fate of lead in the surface Sargasso Sea can be traced using its isotopic signature. The stable lead isotopic record has been documented in the atmosphere and waters of Bermuda over the past decade. Here, lead isotopes can be used as a proxy to trace atmospheric sources and particle exchange processes of trace elements within the water column. The long term record has allowed us to document seasonal/decadinal trends in emission source intensity, as well as atmospheric scavenging processes during changes in regional emissions. Also documented is the close link between such transient changes in lead atmospheric deposition, and its cycling within the oligotrophic Sargasso Sea. The impact of this atmospheric transient has been recorded throughout the water column (down to 4200m) at the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS). While the lead isotopic profiles show significant seasonal shifts in the mixed layer, they appear quite homogeneous at depth. Thus, one can distinguish the specific isotopic imprint of distinct water masses including (1) Atlantic central waters, (2) North Atlantic deep waters and (3) recirculating deep boundary current water. Included is the downward ventilation of the transient tracer, plus the role of surface advection in its mass balance. The signature in the suspended particles document scavenging and repackaging processes at depth in these oligotrophic waters. Lead isotope ratios (206Pb/207Pb) in suspended particles are confirmed to be in complete equilibrium with the dissolved fraction suggesting a rapid exchange between these reservoirs.

  16. Lead stable isotope tracers of atmospheric and marine scavenging in the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, T.; Alleman, L.; Véron, A.

    2003-04-01

    The element lead is present in the marine atmosphere from combustion sources, but has had very large-scale reductions in the North Atlantic due to the phasing out of leaded gasoline first in North America followed by Europe. The regional sources and transient fate of lead in the in the ocean can be traced using its stable isotopic signature. The stable lead isotopic record has been documented in the atmosphere and waters of Bermuda over the past decade. Here, lead stable isotopes can be used as a proxy to trace atmospheric sources and particle exchange processes of trace elements within the water column. The long-term record has allowed us to document seasonal/decadinal trends in emission source intensity, as well as atmospheric scavenging processes during changes in regional emissions. Also documented is the close link between such transient changes in lead atmospheric deposition, and lead cycling within the oligotrophic Sargasso Sea. The impact of this atmospheric transient has been recorded throughout the water column (down to 4200m) at the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS). While the lead isotopic profiles show significant seasonal shifts in the mixed layer, and longer transients in the meso-pelagic zone, they appear quite homogeneous at depth. Thus, one can distinguish the specific isotopic imprint of distinct water masses including (1) Atlantic central waters, (2) North Atlantic deep waters and (3) re-circulating deep boundary current water. Included is the downward ventilation of the transient tracer, plus the role of surface advection in its mass balance. The signature in the suspended particles document scavenging and repackaging processes at depth in these oligotrophic waters. Lead isotope ratios (206Pb/207Pb) in suspended particles are confirmed to be in complete equilibrium with the dissolved fraction suggesting a rapid exchange between these reservoirs. Alternatively, both dissolved and particulate lead may originate from the same source as conserved

  17. Role of aluminum as an oxygen-scavenger in zirconium based bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, Jochen; Busch, Ralf; Mueller, Frank; Grandthyll, Samuel; Huefner, Stefan

    2012-02-13

    In order to investigate a way to diminish the impact of oxygen onto the critical cooling rate of Zr-based alloys, the bonding chemistry of the elements in Zr-Cu-Ni-Al-Nb-Si bulk metallic glasses with different oxygen contents is studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Complementary undercooling experiments lead to continuous-cooling-transformation diagrams for the studied alloys. The experimental results demonstrate that Al not only acts as a scavenger for both absorbed and intrinsic oxygen but the dissolution of its oxide on atomic length scales refrains from heterogeneous nucleation. The combined effect is an enhancement of oxygen tolerance in the investigated alloy.

  18. LEAD SCAVENGER CELLS, LOOKING NORTHEAST. NOTE VSHAPED LAUNDER TO COLLECT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LEAD SCAVENGER CELLS, LOOKING NORTHEAST. NOTE V-SHAPED LAUNDER TO COLLECT CONCENTRATE FROTH THAT SPILLED OVER WIER ALONG EDGE OF CELLS. EACH ELECTRIC MOTOR TURNED AGITATORS IN TWO CELLS VIA BELT DRIVES. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  19. Interpretations of the OSCAR data for reactive-gas scavenging

    SciTech Connect

    Easter, R.C.; Hales, J.M.

    1982-11-01

    A description is given of the application of a reactive scavenging model for the interpretation of data from the Oxidation and Scavenging Characteristics of April Rains (OSCAR) field study to evaluate scavenging mechanisms. The OSCAR experiment, conducted during April 1982, was a cooperative field investigation of wet removal by cyclonic storms. A part of the experiment involved intensive measurements at a site in NE Indiana and was designed to provide needed inputs for diagnostic scavenging models. Sequential precipitation chemistry, surface and airborne air chemistry, cloud physics, and meteorological measurements were performed. The model application reported here involves a single storm event at the Indiana site. Although the work presented involves the analysis of only a single precipitation event over a limited geographical area (10/sup 4/ km/sup 2/), the data utilized have considerable uncertainties, and the model contains numerous approximations, it is nevertheless concluded that the ability of the model to reproduce much of the observed precipitation chemistry behavior for the event is quite encouraging.

  20. Supplanting ecosystem services provided by scavengers raises greenhouse gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Reyes, Zebensui; Pérez-García, Juan M.; Moleón, Marcos; Botella, Francisco; Carrete, Martina; Lazcano, Carolina; Moreno-Opo, Rubén; Margalida, Antoni; Donázar, José A.; Sánchez-Zapata, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Global warming due to human-induced increments in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHG) is one of the most debated topics among environmentalists and politicians worldwide. In this paper we assess a novel source of GHG emissions emerged following a controversial policy decision. After the outbreak of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in Europe, the sanitary regulation required that livestock carcasses were collected from farms and transformed or destroyed in authorised plants, contradicting not only the obligations of member states to conserve scavenger species but also generating unprecedented GHG emission. However, how much of this emission could be prevented in the return to traditional and natural scenario in which scavengers freely remove livestock carcasses is largely unknown. Here we show that, in Spain (home of 95% of European vultures), supplanting the natural removal of dead extensive livestock by scavengers with carcass collection and transport to intermediate and processing plants meant the emission of 77,344 metric tons of CO2 eq. to the atmosphere per year, in addition to annual payments of ca. $50 million to insurance companies. Thus, replacing the ecosystem services provided by scavengers has not only conservation costs, but also important and unnecessary environmental and economic costs.

  1. Energy scavenging strain absorber: application to kinetic dielectric elastomer generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Mistral, C.; Beaune, M.; Vu-Cong, T.; Sylvestre, A.

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric elastomer generators (DEGs) are light, compliant, silent energy scavengers. They can easily be incorporated into clothing where they could scavenge energy from the human kinetic movements for biomedical applications. Nevertheless, scavengers based on dielectric elastomers are soft electrostatic generators requiring a high voltage source to polarize them and high external strain, which constitutes the two major disadvantages of these transducers. We propose here a complete structure made up of a strain absorber, a DEG and a simple electronic power circuit. This new structure looks like a patch, can be attached on human's wear and located on the chest, knee, elbow… Our original strain absorber, inspired from a sailing boat winch, is able to heighten the external available strain with a minimal factor of 2. The DEG is made of silicone Danfoss Polypower and it has a total area of 6cm per 2.5cm sustaining a maximal strain of 50% at 1Hz. A complete electromechanical analytical model was developed for the DEG associated to this strain absorber. With a poling voltage of 800V, a scavenged energy of 0.57mJ per cycle is achieved with our complete structure. The performance of the DEG can further be improved by enhancing the imposed strain, by designing a stack structure, by using a dielectric elastomer with high dielectric permittivity.

  2. Supplanting ecosystem services provided by scavengers raises greenhouse gas emissions

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Reyes, Zebensui; Pérez-García, Juan M.; Moleón, Marcos; Botella, Francisco; Carrete, Martina; Lazcano, Carolina; Moreno-Opo, Rubén; Margalida, Antoni; Donázar, José A.; Sánchez-Zapata, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Global warming due to human-induced increments in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHG) is one of the most debated topics among environmentalists and politicians worldwide. In this paper we assess a novel source of GHG emissions emerged following a controversial policy decision. After the outbreak of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in Europe, the sanitary regulation required that livestock carcasses were collected from farms and transformed or destroyed in authorised plants, contradicting not only the obligations of member states to conserve scavenger species but also generating unprecedented GHG emission. However, how much of this emission could be prevented in the return to traditional and natural scenario in which scavengers freely remove livestock carcasses is largely unknown. Here we show that, in Spain (home of 95% of European vultures), supplanting the natural removal of dead extensive livestock by scavengers with carcass collection and transport to intermediate and processing plants meant the emission of 77,344 metric tons of CO2 eq. to the atmosphere per year, in addition to annual payments of ca. $50 million to insurance companies. Thus, replacing the ecosystem services provided by scavengers has not only conservation costs, but also important and unnecessary environmental and economic costs. PMID:25589381

  3. Supplanting ecosystem services provided by scavengers raises greenhouse gas emissions.

    PubMed

    Morales-Reyes, Zebensui; Pérez-García, Juan M; Moleón, Marcos; Botella, Francisco; Carrete, Martina; Lazcano, Carolina; Moreno-Opo, Rubén; Margalida, Antoni; Donázar, José A; Sánchez-Zapata, José A

    2015-01-15

    Global warming due to human-induced increments in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHG) is one of the most debated topics among environmentalists and politicians worldwide. In this paper we assess a novel source of GHG emissions emerged following a controversial policy decision. After the outbreak of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in Europe, the sanitary regulation required that livestock carcasses were collected from farms and transformed or destroyed in authorised plants, contradicting not only the obligations of member states to conserve scavenger species but also generating unprecedented GHG emission. However, how much of this emission could be prevented in the return to traditional and natural scenario in which scavengers freely remove livestock carcasses is largely unknown. Here we show that, in Spain (home of 95% of European vultures), supplanting the natural removal of dead extensive livestock by scavengers with carcass collection and transport to intermediate and processing plants meant the emission of 77,344 metric tons of CO2 eq. to the atmosphere per year, in addition to annual payments of ca. $50 million to insurance companies. Thus, replacing the ecosystem services provided by scavengers has not only conservation costs, but also important and unnecessary environmental and economic costs.

  4. Recent Findings in EPA’s Lead Scavengers Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to continued concerns about the concentrations of 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) in ground water from spills of leaded gasoline, OUST formed a Lead Scavengers Team with assistance from ASTSWMO. ASTSWMO and EPA Regions solicited participation from state agencies. Analysis w...

  5. Library Scavenger Hunts: A Way out of the Bewilderness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutcheon, Randall

    1990-01-01

    Describes a "scavenger hunt" approach to teaching research and critical thinking skills to high school and college students. Students are provided with lists of challenging questions, supporting materials (cartoons, quotations, odd facts and humorous excerpts), and clues for developing a research strategy. Examples of questions, clues…

  6. Reward Your Students with an Online Scavenger Hunt!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Board, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Do you have a class of students who do excellent work and whom you would like to give an enjoyable reward? Try an "Internet scavenger hunt" for a fun and educational change of pace! This article shares how to run the activity.

  7. Using Scavenger Hunts to Familiarize Students with Scientific Journal Articles.

    PubMed

    Lijek, Rebeccah S; Fankhauser, Sarah C

    2016-03-01

    Primary scientific literature can be difficult to navigate for anyone unfamiliar with its foreign, formal structure. We sought to create a fun, easy learning tool to help familiarize students of all ages with the structure of a scientific article. Our main learning objective was for the student to realize that science writing is formulaic-that specific information is found in predictable locations within an article-and that, with an understanding of the formula, anyone can comfortably navigate any journal article and accurately predict what to expect to find in each section. To this end, we designed a Journal Article Scavenger Hunt that requires the user to find and identify a series of commonplace features of a primary research article. The scavenger hunt activity is quick and easy to implement, and is adaptable to various ages and settings, including the classroom, lab, and at outreach events. The questions in the scavenger hunt can be scaled in difficulty and specificity to suit the instructor's needs. Over many years of using this activity, we have received positive feedback from students of all ages, from elementary school students to lay adult-learners as well as science teachers themselves. By making the unknown seem predictable and approachable, the scavenger hunt helps a variety of audiences feel more comfortable with science and more confident in their ability to engage directly with the scientific literature. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education.

  8. Free Radical Scavenging Activity of Leaves of Alocasia indica (Linn).

    PubMed

    Mulla, W A; Salunkhe, V R; Kuchekar, S B; Qureshi, M N

    2009-05-01

    The free radical scavenging potential of the plant Alocasia indica(Linn.) was studied by using different antioxidant models of screening like scavenging of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl radical, nitric oxide radical, superoxide anion radical, hydroxyl radical, iron chelating activity, total antioxidant capacity, non-enzymatic glycosylation of haemoglobin, rapid screening for antioxidant compounds by thin layer chromatography. The hydroalcoholic extract at 1000 mug/ml showed maximum scavenging of superoxide radical (87.17) by riboflavin-NBT-system, followed by scavenging of stable radical 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl radical (83.48%), nitric oxide radical (74.09%) hydroxyl radical (60.96%) at the same concentration. However the extract showed only moderate activity by iron chelation (68.26%). That could be due to higher phenolic content in the extract. This finding suggests that hydro alcoholic extract of A. indica possess potent in vitro antioxidant activity as compared to the standard ascorbic acid. The results justify the therapeutic applications of the plant in the indigenous system of medicine, augmenting its therapeutic value.

  9. Submicrometer particle removal indoors by a novel electrostatic precipitator with high clean air delivery rate, low ozone emissions, and carbon fiber ionizer.

    PubMed

    Kim, H-J; Han, B; Kim, Y-J; Oda, T; Won, H

    2013-10-01

    A novel positive-polarity electrostatic precipitator (ESP) was developed using an ionization stage (0.4 × 0.4 × 0.14 m(3) ) with 16 carbon fiber ionizers in each channel and a collection stage (0.4 × 0.4 × 0.21 m(3) ) with parallel metallic plates. The single-pass collection efficiency and clean air delivery rate (CADR) were measured by standard tests using KCl particles in 0.25-0.35 μm. Performance was determined using the Deutsch equation and established diffusion and field charging theories and also compared with the commercialized HEPA filter-type air cleaner. Experimental results showed that the single-pass collection efficiency of the ESP ranged from 50 to 95% and decreased with the flow rate (10-20 m(3) /min), but increased with the voltage applied to the ionizers (6 to 8 kV) and collection plates (-5 to -7 kV). The ESP with 18 m(3) /min achieved a CADR of 12.1 m(3) /min with a voltage of 8 kV applied to the ionization stage and with a voltage of -6 kV applied to the collection stage. The concentration of ozone in the test chamber (30.4 m(3) ), a maximum value of 5.4 ppb over 12 h of continuous operation, was much lower than the current indoor regulation (50 ppb).

  10. Three-dimensional hollow-structured binary oxide particles as an advanced anode material for high-rate and long cycle life lithium-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Deli; Wang, Jie; He, Huan; ...

    2015-12-30

    Transition metal oxides are among the most promising anode candidates for next-generation lithium-ion batteries for their high theoretical capacity. However, the large volume expansion and low lithium ion diffusivity leading to a poor charging/discharging performance. In this study, we developed a surfactant and template-free strategy for the synthesis of a composite of CoxFe3–xO4 hollow spheres supported by carbon nanotubes via an impregnation–reduction–oxidation process. The synergy of the composite, as well as the hollow structures in the electrode materials, not only facilitate Li ion and electron transport, but also accommodate large volume expansion. Using state-of-the-art electron tomography, we directly visualize themore » particles in 3-D, where the voids in the hollow structures serve to buffer the volume expansion of the material. These improvements result in a high reversible capacity as well as an outstanding rate performance for lithium-ion battery applications. As a result, this study sheds light on large-scale production of hollow structured metal oxides for commercial applications in energy storage and conversion.« less

  11. Three-dimensional hollow-structured binary oxide particles as an advanced anode material for high-rate and long cycle life lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Deli; Wang, Jie; He, Huan; Han, Lili; Lin, Ruoqian; Xin, Huolin L.; Wu, Zexing; Liu, Hongfang

    2015-12-30

    Transition metal oxides are among the most promising anode candidates for next-generation lithium-ion batteries for their high theoretical capacity. However, the large volume expansion and low lithium ion diffusivity leading to a poor charging/discharging performance. In this study, we developed a surfactant and template-free strategy for the synthesis of a composite of CoxFe3–xO4 hollow spheres supported by carbon nanotubes via an impregnation–reduction–oxidation process. The synergy of the composite, as well as the hollow structures in the electrode materials, not only facilitate Li ion and electron transport, but also accommodate large volume expansion. Using state-of-the-art electron tomography, we directly visualize the particles in 3-D, where the voids in the hollow structures serve to buffer the volume expansion of the material. These improvements result in a high reversible capacity as well as an outstanding rate performance for lithium-ion battery applications. As a result, this study sheds light on large-scale production of hollow structured metal oxides for commercial applications in energy storage and conversion.

  12. Evaluation of free radical scavenging and anti-oxidative capacity of polydatin-nanostructured lipid carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiang-Ping; Shi, Fan; Li, Hai-Jie; Yin, Li-De; Wang, Yi-Fei; Wang, Zhi-ping; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2016-10-01

    Cellular damage induced by free-radicals like reactive oxygen species has been implicated in several diseases. 2, 2-azobis(2-amidino-propane) dihydrochloride(AAPH) generates two potent ROS capable of inducing lipid peroxidation: alkoxy radical(RO-) and peroxy radical (ROO-). These radicals are similar to those that are physiologically active and thus might initiate a cascade of intracellular toxic events leading to oxidation, lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and subsequent cell death. Hence naturally anti-oxidant play a vital role in combating these conditions. In this study, polydatin loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (Pol-NLC) was prepared by hot melting and then high pressure homogenization technique. The effects of Pol-NLC on free radical scavenging and anti-oxidative capacity is investigated. The particle size and zeta potential of Pol-NLC were 113.9 +/- 1.1 nm and -16.3 1 +/- 0.27 mV, respectively. By free radical scavenging assays, the IC50 value of Pol-NLC were 28.71, 9.83 μg/mL with DPPH, ABTS assay respectively, and 0.143 mg ferrous sulfate/1 mg Pol-NLC with FRAP assay. These results indicated that the antioxidant properties of Pol-NLC hold great potential used as an alternative to more toxic synthetic anti-oxidants as an additive in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical preparations for the oxidative diseases treatment.

  13. Abyssal Scavenging Communities attracted to Sargassum and fish in the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Aharon G.; Drazen, Jeffrey C.

    2013-02-01

    Deep-sea communities rely on epipelagic surface production as a primary source of energy and food. The flux of phytodetritus drives many abyssal ecological processes but the flux of large particles such as nekton carcasses, macroalgae, and wood may also be important. Recent baited camera experiments noted that some abyssal fish consumed spinach and phytoplankton placed on the seafloor. To evaluate if fish or other scavengers would consume natural plant or macroalgal material falling to the deep-sea floor we conducted camera experiments using Sargassum or mackerel bait in the Sargasso Sea. A benthic community of invertebrates was attracted to Sargassum, which naturally falls to the seafloor in this area. In five instances it was observed that an isopod Bathyopsurus sp. removed a piece of Sargassum from the main clump and left the field of view with it. An ophiuroid is also observed handling a piece of Sargassum. The group of scavengers attracted to mackerel bait was very different and was dominated by large ophidiid fish. In contrast to studies elsewhere in the abyssal North Atlantic, only a small number of rattails are observed, which could be related to water depth or an ichthyofaunal zonal change between oligotrophic and eutrophic regions.

  14. Free radical scavenging injectable hydrogels for regenerative therapy.

    PubMed

    Komeri, Remya; Thankam, Finosh Gnanaprakasam; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2017-02-01

    Pathological free radicals generated from inflamed and infarcted cardiac tissues interferes natural tissue repair mechanisms. Hypoxic microenvironment at the injured zone of non-regenerating cardiac tissues hinders the therapeutic attempts including cell therapy. Here we report an injectable, cytocompatible, free radical scavenging synthetic hydrogel formulation for regenerative therapy. New hydrogel (PEAX-P) is prepared with D-xylitol-co-fumarate-co-poly ethylene adipate-co-PEG comaromer (PEAX) and PEGDiacrylate. PEAX-P hydrogel swells 4.9 times the initial weight and retains 100.07kPa Young modulus at equilibrium swelling, which is suitable for cardiac applications. PEAX-P hydrogel retains elastic nature even at 60% compressive strain, which is favorable to fit with the dynamic and elastic natural tissue counterparts. PEAX-P hydrogel scavenges 51% DPPH radical, 40% hydroxyl radicals 41% nitrate radicals with 31% reducing power. The presence of hydrogel protects 62% cardiomyoblast cells treated with stress inducing media at LD 50 concentration. The free hydroxyl groups in sugar alcohols of the comacromer influence the free radical scavenging. Comparatively, PEAX-P hydrogel based on xylitol evinces slightly lower scavenging characteristics than with previously reported PEAM-P hydrogel containing mannitol having more hydroxyl groups. The possible free radical scavenging mechanism of the present hydrogel relies on the free π electrons associated with uncrosslinked fumarate bonds, hydrogen atoms associated with sugar alcohols/PEG and radical dilution by free water in the matrix. Briefly, the present PEAX-P hydrogel is a potential injectable system for combined antioxidant and regenerative therapy.

  15. A comment on "Novel scavenger removal trials increase wind turbine-caused avian fatality estimates"

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huso, Manuela M.P.; Erickson, Wallace P.

    2013-01-01

    In a recent paper, Smallwood et al. (2010) conducted a study to compare their “novel” approach to conducting carcass removal trials with what they term the “conventional” approach and to evaluate the effects of the different methods on estimated avian fatality at a wind power facility in California. A quick glance at Table 3 that succinctly summarizes their results and provides estimated fatality rates and 80% confidence intervals calculated using the 2 methods reveals a surprising result. The confidence intervals of all of their estimates and most of the conventional estimates extend below 0. These results imply that wind turbines may have the capacity to create live birds. But a more likely interpretation is that a serious error occurred in the calculation of either the average fatality rate or its standard error or both. Further evaluation of their methods reveals that the scientific basis for concluding that “many estimates of scavenger removal rates prior to [their] study were likely biased low due to scavenger swamping” and “previously reported estimates of avian fatality rates … should be adjusted upwards” was not evident in their analysis and results. Their comparison to conventional approaches was not applicable, their statistical models were questionable, and the conclusions they drew were unsupported.

  16. Holographic particle detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Theodore

    1988-01-01

    The feasibility was studied of developing a novel particle track detector based on the detection of 1p-1s emission radiation from electron bubbles in liquid helium. The principles, design, construction, and initial testing of the detection system have been described in previous reports. The main obstacle encountered was the construction of the liquid-helium tight infrared windows. Despite numerous efforts in testing and redesigning the windows, the problem of window leakage at low temperature persisted. Due to limited time and resources, attention was switched to investigating the possibility of using room-temperature liquid as the detection medium. A possible mechanism was the detection of de-excitation radiation emitted from localized electrons in common liquids where electrons exhibit low mobilities, as suggested in the previous report. The purity of the liquid is critical in this method as the dissolved impurities (such as oxygen), even in trace amounts, will act as scavengers of electrons. Another mechanism is discussed whereby the formation of the superoxide ions by electron scavenging behavior of dissolved oxygen is exploited to detect the track of ionizing particles. An experiment to measure the ionization current produced in a liquid by a pulsed X-ray beam in order to study propertiies of the ions is also reported.

  17. Carbon particles

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  18. EFFECT OF CENTRAL FANS AND IN-DUCT FILTERS ON DEPOSITION RATES OF ULTRAFINE AND FINE PARTICLES IN AN OCCUPIED TOWNHOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Airborne particles are implicated in morbidity and mortality of certain high-risk subpopulations. Exposure to particles occurs mostly indoors, where a main removal mechanism is deposition to surfaces. Deposition can be affected by the use of forced- air circulation through duct...

  19. Atmospheric scavenging of hydrochloric acid. [from rocket exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knutson, E. O.; Fenton, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    The scavenging of hydrogen chloride from a solid rocket exhaust cloud was investigated. Water drops were caused to fall through a confined exhaust cloud and then analyzed to determine the amount of HCl captured during fall. Bubblers were used to measure HCl concentration within the chamber. The measured chamber HCl concentration, together with the measured HCl deposition on the chamber walls, accounted for 81 to 94% of the theoretical HCl. It was found that the amount of HCl captured was approximately one-half of that predicted by the Frossling correlation. No effect of humidity was detected through a range of 69-98% R.H.. The scavenging of HCl from a solid rocket exhaust cloud was calculated using an idealized Kennedy Space Center rain cycle. Results indicate that this cycle would reduce the cloud HCl concentration to 20.6% if its value in the absence of rain.

  20. Flavonoid constituents and free radical scavenging activity of Alchemilla mollis.

    PubMed

    Trendafilova, Antoaneta; Todorova, Milka; Nikolova, Milena; Gavrilova, Anna; Vitkova, Antonina

    2011-12-01

    Antioxidant capacity of the methanolic extract of Alchemilla mollis was measured by its ability to scavenge the DPPH radical. The EtOAc fraction obtained after partition of the total extract was found to be the most active radical scavenger (IC50 9.8 +/- 1.8 microg/mL) and was subjected to fractionation by Sephadex LH-20 CC. Further purification by RP-18 CC led to the isolation of eight flavonoid glycosides: cis- and trans-tiliroside (1 and 2), rhodiolgin (3), hyperoside (4), isoquercitrin (5), miquelianin (6), sinocrassoside D2 (7), and gossypetin-3-O-beta-D-galactopyranosyl-7-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside (8). It was found that 8 is a new compound and its antioxidant activity is also reported. Identification of the isolated compounds was carried out by spectroscopic and spectrometric analysis (1D and 2D NMR, UV and MS).

  1. Carbohydrates and their free radical scavenging capability: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Marin, Elizabeth; Martínez, Ana

    2012-08-16

    A density functional theory (DFT) study on the free radical (OH(•) and OOH(•)) scavenging properties of some mono- and polysaccharides is presented. Two mechanisms, single electron transfer (SET) and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), are considered. The former mechanism is studied by making use of the vertical ionization energy and vertical electron affinity of the radicals and carbohydrates. It is confirmed that the SET mechanism is not plausible to occur. With respect to the HAT, not only does the OH(•) radical react preferably with one hydrogen atom bonded to one carbon atom, but also the reaction with a hydrogen atom bonded to an oxygen is possible. Finally, it is suggested that the carbohydrates are not able to directly scavenge OOH(•).

  2. Radical scavenging, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of halophytic species.

    PubMed

    Meot-Duros, Laetitia; Le Floch, Gaëtan; Magné, Christian

    2008-03-05

    For the first time, both antioxidant and antimicrobial activities are simultaneously reported in halophytic plants, particularly on polar fractions. Chloroformic and methanolic extracts of the halophytes Eryngium maritimum L., Crithmum maritimum L. and Cakile maritima Scop. were tested for their antimicrobial activities against 12 bacterial and yeast strains. In addition, radical scavenging and antioxidant activities were assessed, as well as total phenol contents. Only one bacterial strain (Listeria monocytogenes) was not inhibited by plants extracts, and apolar (chloroformic) fractions were generally more active than polar (methanolic) ones. Eryngium maritimum presented the weakest radical scavenging activity (ABTS IC(50)=0.28 mg ml(-1)), as well as the lowest total phenol content (16.4 mg GAE g(-1) DW). However, the three halophytic species had relatively strong total antioxidant activities (from 32.7 to 48.6 mg ascorbate equivalents g (-1) DW). Consequences on the potential use of these plants in food or cosmetic industry are discussed.

  3. Free radical scavengers in anaesthesiology and critical care.

    PubMed

    Hatwalne, Milind S

    2012-05-01

    Free radicals are highly reactive and unstable compounds. These highly reactive molecules cause oxidative damage to cellular components such as DNA, proteins and lipids. They play central role in the mechanism of cell injury and cell death. Free radical scavengers either prevent these reactive species from being formed, or remove them before they can damage vital components of the cell. Oxidative stress defines an imbalance in production of oxidizing chemical species and their effective removal by protective antioxidants and scavenger enzymes. Evidence of massive oxidative stress is well established in critical illnesses characterized by tissue ischaemia-reperfusion injury and by an intense systemic inflammatory response such as during sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute lung injury. Several clinical trials have been performed in order to reduce oxidative stress by supplementation of antioxidants alone or in combination with standard therapies. Antioxidant supplementation at an early stage of illness may lead to improved therapies in the treatment of critically ill patients. Several intravenous anaesthetic drugs act as reactive oxygen species scavengers. Anaesthetic preconditioning is of particular interest to anaesthesiologist, in which lasting protection of myocardium is elicited by brief exposure to a inhalational anaesthetic agent. These anasthetics may also mediate protective effects in other organs, such as the brain and kidney It is important for the anaesthesiologist to understand the mechanism of damage caused by free radicals and how free radical scavengers work so that this knowledge can be applied to varied pathological conditions. The topic was hand searched in text books and electronically searched from PubMed and Google scholar using text words.

  4. Free radical scavengers and antioxidants from Tagetes mendocina.

    PubMed

    Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo; Tapia, Alejandro; Theoduloz, Cristina; Rodríguez, Jaime; López, Susana; Feresin, Gabriela Egly

    2004-01-01

    Tagetes mendocina (Asteraceae) is a medicinal plant widely used in the Andean provinces of Argentina. Preliminary assays showed free radical scavenging activity in the methanol extract of the aerial parts, measured by the decoloration of a methanolic solution of the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) and scavenging of the superoxide anion. Assay-guided isolation led to 4'-hydroxyacetophenone (1), protocatechuic acid (2), syringic acid (3), patuletin (4), quercetagetin 7-O-beta-D-glucoside (5), patuletin 7-O-beta-D-glucoside (6) and axillarin 7-O-beta-D-glucoside (7) as the free radical scavengers and antioxidant compounds from Tagetes mendocina. On the basis of dry starting material, the total phenolic content of the crude drug was 3.00% with 0.372% of flavonoids. The content of compounds 1-7 in the crude drug was 0.008, 0.015, 0.010, 0.029, 0.238, 0.058 and 0.017%, respectively. Quercetagetin 7-O-beta-D-glucoside proved to be the main free radical scavenger of the extracts measured by the DPPH decoloration test as well as for quenching the superoxide anion and inhibition of lipoperoxidation in erythrocytes. In the lipid peroxidation assay the percentual inhibition was related with the number of methoxy groups in the molecule, ranging from 86% for the quercetagetin glucoside to 67% for the monomethoxylated and 31% for the dimethoxylated derivative. The compounds showed low cytotoxicity towards human lung fibroblasts with IC50 > 1 mM for compounds 1-3 and 0.24 to 0.52 mM for the flavonoids 4-7.

  5. In situ measurement of mesopelagic particle sinking rates and the control of carbon transfer to the ocean interior during the Vertical Flux in the Global Ocean (VERTIGO) voyages in the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trull, T. W.; Bray, S. G.; Buesseler, K. O.; Lamborg, C. H.; Manganini, S.; Moy, C.; Valdes, J.

    2008-07-01

    Among the parameters affecting carbon transfer to the ocean interior, particle sinking rates vary three orders of magnitude and thus more than primary production, f-ratios, or particle carbon contents [e.g., Boyd, P.W., Trull, T.W., 2006. Understanding the export of marine biogenic particles: is there consensus? Progress in Oceanography 4, 276-312, doi:10.1016/j.pocean.2006.10.007]. Very few data have been obtained from the mesopelagic zone where the majority of carbon remineralization occurs and the attenuation of the sinking flux is determined. Here, we report sinking rates from ˜300 m depth for the subtropical (station ALOHA, June 2004) and subarctic (station K2, July 2005) North Pacific Ocean, obtained from short (6.5 day) deployments of an indented rotating sphere (IRS) sediment trap operating as an in situ settling column [Peterson, M.L., Wakeham, S.G., Lee, C., Askea, M.A., Miquel, J.C., 2005. Novel techniques for collection of sinking particles in the ocean and determining their settling rates. Limnology and Oceanography Methods 3, 520-532] to separate the flux into 11 sinking-rate fractions ranging from >820 to >2 m d -1 that are collected by a carousel for further analysis. Functioning of the IRS trap was tested using a novel programming sequence to check that all particles have cleared the settling column prior to the next delivery of particles by the 6-hourly rotation cycle of the IRS. There was some evidence (from the flux distribution among the cups and photomicroscopy of the collected particles) that very slow-sinking particles may have been under-collected because they were unable to penetrate the brine-filled collection cups, but good evidence for appropriate collection of fast-settling fractions. Approximately 50% of the particulate organic carbon (POC) flux was sinking at greater than 100 m d -1 at both stations. At ALOHA, more than 15% of the POC flux sank at >820 m d -1, but low fluxes make this uncertain, and precluded resolution of particles

  6. Study of atmospheric pollution scavenging. Twenty-fourth progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.L.

    1990-08-01

    Atmospheric scavenging research conducted by the Illinois State Water Survey under contract with the Department of Energy has been a significant factor in the historical development of the field of precipitation scavenging. Emphasis of the work during the 1980`s became focused on the problem of acid rain problem with the Survey being chosen as the Central Analytical Laboratory for sample analysis of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). The DOE research was responsible for laying the groundwork from the standpoint of sampling and chemical analysis that has now become routine features of NADP/NTN. A significant aspect of the research has been the participation by the Water Survey in the MAP3S precipitation sampling network which is totally supported by DOE, is the longest continuous precipitation sampling network in existence, and maintains an event sampling protocol. The following review consists of a short description of each of the papers appearing in the Study of Atmospheric Scavenging progress reports starting with the Eighteenth Progress Report in 1980 to the Twenty- Third Progress Report in 1989. In addition a listing of the significant publications and interviews associated with the program are given in the bibliography.

  7. Shape similarities and differences in the skulls of scavenging raptors.

    PubMed

    Guangdi, S I; Dong, Yiyi; Ma, Yujun; Zhang, Zihui

    2015-04-01

    Feeding adaptations are a conspicuous feature of avian evolution. Bill and cranial shape as well as the jaw muscles are closely related to diet choice and feeding behaviors. Diurnal raptors of Falconiformes exhibit a wide range of foraging behaviors and prey preferences, and are assigned to seven dietary groups in this study. Skulls of 156 species are compared from the dorsal, lateral and ventral views, by using geometric morphometric techniques with those landmarks capturing as much information as possible on the overall shape of cranium, bill, orbits, nostrils and attachment area for different jaw muscles. The morphometric data showed that the skull shape of scavengers differ significantly from other raptors, primarily because of different feeding adaptations. As a result of convergent evolution, different scavengers share generalized common morphology, possessing relatively slender and lower skulls, longer bills, smaller and more sideward orbits, and more caudally positioned quadrates. Significant phylogenetic signals suggested that phylogeny also played important role in shape variation within scavengers. New World vultures can be distinguished by their large nostrils, narrow crania and small orbits; Caracaras typically show large palatines, crania and orbits, as well as short, deep and sharp bill.

  8. Scavenging nucleic acid debris to combat autoimmunity and infectious disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, Eda K.; Shumansky, Kara L.; Borst, Luke B.; Burnette, Angela D.; Sample, Christopher J.; Ramsburg, Elizabeth A.; Sullenger, Bruce A.

    2016-08-01

    Nucleic acid-containing debris released from dead and dying cells can be recognized as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) or pattern-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by the innate immune system. Inappropriate activation of the innate immune response can engender pathological inflammation and autoimmune disease. To combat such diseases, major efforts have been made to therapeutically target the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that recognize such DAMPs and PAMPs, or the downstream effector molecules they engender, to limit inflammation. Unfortunately, such strategies can limit the ability of the immune system to combat infection. Previously, we demonstrated that nucleic acid-binding polymers can act as molecular scavengers and limit the ability of artificial nucleic acid ligands to activate PRRs. Herein, we demonstrate that nucleic acid scavengers (NASs) can limit pathological inflammation and nucleic acid-associated autoimmunity in lupus-prone mice. Moreover, we observe that such NASs do not limit an animal’s ability to combat viral infection, but rather their administration improves survival when animals are challenged with lethal doses of influenza. These results indicate that molecules that scavenge extracellular nucleic acid debris represent potentially safer agents to control pathological inflammation associated with a wide range of autoimmune and infectious diseases.

  9. Calixtyrosol: a Novel Calixarene Based Potent Radical Scavenger

    PubMed Central

    Nasuhi Pur, Fazel; Akbari Dilmaghani, Karim

    2015-01-01

    The oxidative stress causes many diseases in human, therefore antioxidants have a special position in the medicinal chemistry. Tyrosol is an important antioxidant with a plenty of biological properties. There are many strategies such as clustering single drug units in order to develop new drugs. The cluster effect can increase drug effects relative to single drug unit. Calixtyrosol is the novel cluster of tyrosol that shows a more effective antioxidant activity than single tyrosol. In fact, tyrosol can be considered as 1/4 of the cluster. Four hydroxyethyl moieties have been grafted at the upper rim of the calix[4]arene in all-syn orientation, giving novel agent in the field of antioxidant agents. Free radical scavenging tests were determined by the 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical in methanol for four antioxidants: calixtyrosol, tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol and 3, 5-di-tert-buty l-4-hydroxytoluene to compare their antioxidant activity. Free radical scavenging test showed that calixtyrosol has enhanced antioxidant activity in comparison to the corresponding single tyrosol unit (> 5 fold), it has even more active than the other test antioxidants (2 fold). Presumably, it is attributed to tethering and arraying of four impacted tyrosol units, which make a synergistic effect in interactions with radicals for creating effective radical scavenging activity. This method is in debt of synergistic effect, tethering and arraying of single units in the cluster structure. PMID:26664385

  10. Calixtyrosol: a Novel Calixarene Based Potent Radical Scavenger.

    PubMed

    Nasuhi Pur, Fazel; Akbari Dilmaghani, Karim

    2015-01-01

    The oxidative stress causes many diseases in human, therefore antioxidants have a special position in the medicinal chemistry. Tyrosol is an important antioxidant with a plenty of biological properties. There are many strategies such as clustering single drug units in order to develop new drugs. The cluster effect can increase drug effects relative to single drug unit. Calixtyrosol is the novel cluster of tyrosol that shows a more effective antioxidant activity than single tyrosol. In fact, tyrosol can be considered as 1/4 of the cluster. Four hydroxyethyl moieties have been grafted at the upper rim of the calix[4]arene in all-syn orientation, giving novel agent in the field of antioxidant agents. Free radical scavenging tests were determined by the 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical in methanol for four antioxidants: calixtyrosol, tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol and 3, 5-di-tert-buty l-4-hydroxytoluene to compare their antioxidant activity. Free radical scavenging test showed that calixtyrosol has enhanced antioxidant activity in comparison to the corresponding single tyrosol unit (> 5 fold), it has even more active than the other test antioxidants (2 fold). Presumably, it is attributed to tethering and arraying of four impacted tyrosol units, which make a synergistic effect in interactions with radicals for creating effective radical scavenging activity. This method is in debt of synergistic effect, tethering and arraying of single units in the cluster structure.

  11. Scavenging nucleic acid debris to combat autoimmunity and infectious disease

    PubMed Central

    Holl, Eda K.; Shumansky, Kara L.; Borst, Luke B.; Burnette, Angela D.; Sample, Christopher J.; Ramsburg, Elizabeth A.; Sullenger, Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid-containing debris released from dead and dying cells can be recognized as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) or pattern-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by the innate immune system. Inappropriate activation of the innate immune response can engender pathological inflammation and autoimmune disease. To combat such diseases, major efforts have been made to therapeutically target the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that recognize such DAMPs and PAMPs, or the downstream effector molecules they engender, to limit inflammation. Unfortunately, such strategies can limit the ability of the immune system to combat infection. Previously, we demonstrated that nucleic acid-binding polymers can act as molecular scavengers and limit the ability of artificial nucleic acid ligands to activate PRRs. Herein, we demonstrate that nucleic acid scavengers (NASs) can limit pathological inflammation and nucleic acid-associated autoimmunity in lupus-prone mice. Moreover, we observe that such NASs do not limit an animal’s ability to combat viral infection, but rather their administration improves survival when animals are challenged with lethal doses of influenza. These results indicate that molecules that scavenge extracellular nucleic acid debris represent potentially safer agents to control pathological inflammation associated with a wide range of autoimmune and infectious diseases. PMID:27528673

  12. Free radical scavenging potential of Chlorophytum tuberosum Baker.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Sreevidya; Govindarajan, Raghavan; Vijayakumar, Madhavan; Mehrotra, Shanta

    2006-04-06

    Chlorophytum tuberosum Baker commonly referred as 'Musli' has been widely used as a potent 'Rasayana' drug in 'Ayurveda' as a rejuvenator and tonic. Antioxidant potential of Chlorophytum tuberosum has been investigated for their ability to scavenge 1,1,diphenyl picryl hydrazyl (DPPH), nitric oxide radical along with their capacity to reduce lipid peroxidation in rat liver homogenate, chelation of ferrous ion, radical scavenging potential using chemiluminescence and their total antioxidant capacity. Sugar, starch, protein, and Vitamin C content were estimated spectrophotometrically along with the percentages of the individual amino acids by HPLC and individual sugars by using HPTLC as standardization tool. The extract has been found to possess antioxidant activity in all the models tested as evident by IC50 values being 225.31, 888.44, 809.22 and 422.97 microg/ml for scavenging of DPPH, nitric oxide, lipid peroxidation and ferry bi-pyridyl complex, respectively, along with a integral anitoxidant activity of 2.986 nmol ascorbic acid/g equivalents in photochemiluminescence assay.

  13. Size effect of se-enriched green tea particles on in vitro antioxidant and antitumor activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Huajia; Li, Feng; Yang, Fangmei; Fang, Yong; Xin, Zhihong; Zhao, Liyan; Hu, Qiuhui

    2008-06-25

    The antioxidant and antitumor activities (in vitro) of superfine regular and Se-enriched green tea particles with different sizes (3.52 microm and 220 nm) were investigated in this paper. The vitamin C and tea polyphenol contents of green tea in different sizes were significantly different, and amino acid and chlorophyll just changed a little. The antioxidant activity of green tea particles was evaluated by DPPH radical scavenging and linoleic acid peroxidation inhibition methods, and the antitumor activity was evaluated by antiproliferation assay on HepG2, A549, and MGC803 cells. The results indicated that enrichment of selenium endowed green tea with higher antioxidant activity and antitumor activity on HepG2 and A549 cells but not on MGC803 cells. The DPPH radical scavenging rates of regular and Se-enriched green tea of 220 nm (67.87% and 69.49%, respectively) were significantly greater than that of 3.52 microm, but the inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation for green tea of 220 nm was lower. The inhibitory rates of green tea of 220 nm on HepG2, A549, and MGC803 cells achieved 77.35%, 80.76%, and 87.54% for regular green tea, and 82.51%, 88.09%, and 74.48% for Se-enriched green tea at the dose of 100 microg mL (-1), values that were all significantly higher compared to that of 3.52 microm.

  14. In-vitro free radical scavenging activity of biosynthesized gold and silver nanoparticles using Prunus armeniaca (apricot) fruit extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauthal, Preeti; Mukhopadhyay, Mausumi

    2013-01-01

    In-vitro free radical scavenging activity of biosynthesized gold (Au-NPs) and silver (Ag-NPs) nanoparticles was investigated in the present study. Natural precursor Prunus armeniaca (apricot) fruit extract was used as a reducing agent for the nanoparticle synthesis. The free radical scavenging activity of the nanoparticles were observed by modified 1,1'-diphynyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, DPPH and 2,2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), ABTS assay. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy, and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Appearance of optical absorption peak at 537 nm (2.20 keV) and 435 nm (3 keV) within 0.08 and 0.5 h of reaction time was confirmed the presence of metallic Au and Ag nanoclusters, respectively. Nearly spherical nanoparticles with majority of particle below 20 nm (TEM) for both Au-NPs and Ag-NPs were synthesized. XRD pattern confirmed the existence of pure nanocrystalline Au-NPs while few additional peaks in the vicinity of fcc silver-speculated crystallization of metalloproteins of fruit extract on the surface of the Ag-NPs and vice versa. FTIR spectra was supported the role of amino acids of protein/enzymes of fruit extract for synthesis and stabilization of nanoparticles. Dose-dependent scavenging activity was observed for Au-NPs and Ag-NPs in both DPPH and ABTS in-vitro assay. 50 % scavenging activity for DPPH were 11.27 and 16.18 mg and for ABTS 3.40 and 7.12 mg with Au-NPs and Ag-NPs, respectively.

  15. Ground Squirrel Shooting and Potential Lead Exposure in Breeding Avian Scavengers

    PubMed Central

    Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Wagner, Mason T.

    2016-01-01

    Recreational ground squirrel shooting is a popular activity throughout the western United States and serves as a tool for managing ground squirrel populations in agricultural regions. Belding’s ground squirrels (Spermophilus beldingi) are routinely shot in California, Nevada, and Oregon across habitats that overlap with breeding avian scavengers. Ground squirrels shot with lead (Pb)-based bullets may pose a risk to avian scavengers if they consume carcasses containing Pb fragments. To assess the potential risk to breeding avian scavengers we developed a model to estimate the number, mass, and distribution of Pb fragments in shot ground squirrels using radiographic images. Eighty percent of shot carcasses contained detectible Pb fragments with an average of 38.6 mg of Pb fragments. Seven percent of all carcasses contained Pb fragment masses exceeding a lethal dose for a model raptor nestling (e.g. American kestrel Falco sparverius). Bullet type did not influence the number of fragments in shot ground squirrels, but did influence the mass of fragments retained. Belding’s ground squirrels shot with .17 Super Mag and unknown ammunition types contained over 28 and 17 times more mass of Pb fragments than those shot with .22 solid and .22 hollow point bullets, respectively. Ground squirrel body mass was positively correlated with both the number and mass of Pb fragments in carcasses, increasing on average by 76% and 56% respectively across the range of carcass masses. Although the mass of Pb retained in ground squirrel carcasses was small relative to the original bullet mass, avian scavenger nestlings that frequently consume shot ground squirrels may be at risk for Pb-induced effects (e.g., physiology, growth, or survival). Using modeling efforts we found that if nestling golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), and Swainson’s hawks (B. swainsoni) consumed shot ground squirrels proportionately to the nestling’s mass, energy needs

  16. Ground Squirrel Shooting and Potential Lead Exposure in Breeding Avian Scavengers.

    PubMed

    Herring, Garth; Eagles-Smith, Collin A; Wagner, Mason T

    2016-01-01

    Recreational ground squirrel shooting is a popular activity throughout the western United States and serves as a tool for managing ground squirrel populations in agricultural regions. Belding's ground squirrels (Spermophilus beldingi) are routinely shot in California, Nevada, and Oregon across habitats that overlap with breeding avian scavengers. Ground squirrels shot with lead (Pb)-based bullets may pose a risk to avian scavengers if they consume carcasses containing Pb fragments. To assess the potential risk to breeding avian scavengers we developed a model to estimate the number, mass, and distribution of Pb fragments in shot ground squirrels using radiographic images. Eighty percent of shot carcasses contained detectible Pb fragments with an average of 38.6 mg of Pb fragments. Seven percent of all carcasses contained Pb fragment masses exceeding a lethal dose for a model raptor nestling (e.g. American kestrel Falco sparverius). Bullet type did not influence the number of fragments in shot ground squirrels, but did influence the mass of fragments retained. Belding's ground squirrels shot with .17 Super Mag and unknown ammunition types contained over 28 and 17 times more mass of Pb fragments than those shot with .22 solid and .22 hollow point bullets, respectively. Ground squirrel body mass was positively correlated with both the number and mass of Pb fragments in carcasses, increasing on average by 76% and 56% respectively across the range of carcass masses. Although the mass of Pb retained in ground squirrel carcasses was small relative to the original bullet mass, avian scavenger nestlings that frequently consume shot ground squirrels may be at risk for Pb-induced effects (e.g., physiology, growth, or survival). Using modeling efforts we found that if nestling golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), and Swainson's hawks (B. swainsoni) consumed shot ground squirrels proportionately to the nestling's mass, energy needs, and diet

  17. Ground squirrel shooting and potential lead exposure in breeding avian scavengers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herring, Garth; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Wagner, Mason T.

    2016-01-01

    Recreational ground squirrel shooting is a popular activity throughout the western United States and serves as a tool for managing ground squirrel populations in agricultural regions. Belding’s ground squirrels (Spermophilus beldingi) are routinely shot in California, Nevada, and Oregon across habitats that overlap with breeding avian scavengers. Ground squirrels shot with lead (Pb)-based bullets may pose a risk to avian scavengers if they consume carcasses containing Pb fragments. To assess the potential risk to breeding avian scavengers we developed a model to estimate the number, mass, and distribution of Pb fragments in shot ground squirrels using radiographic images. Eighty percent of shot carcasses contained detectible Pb fragments with an average of 38.6 mg of Pb fragments. Seven percent of all carcasses contained Pb fragment masses exceeding a lethal dose for a model raptor nestling (e.g. American kestrel Falco sparverius). Bullet type did not influence the number of fragments in shot ground squirrels, but did influence the mass of fragments retained. Belding’s ground squirrels shot with .17 Super Mag and unknown ammunition types contained over 28 and 17 times more mass of Pb fragments than those shot with .22 solid and .22 hollow point bullets, respectively. Ground squirrel body mass was positively correlated with both the number and mass of Pb fragments in carcasses, increasing on average by 76% and 56% respectively across the range of carcass masses. Although the mass of Pb retained in ground squirrel carcasses was small relative to the original bullet mass, avian scavenger nestlings that frequently consume shot ground squirrels may be at risk for Pb-induced effects (e.g., physiology, growth, or survival). Using modeling efforts we found that if nestling golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), and Swainson’s hawks (B. swainsoni) consumed shot ground squirrels proportionately to the nestling’s mass, energy needs

  18. GRI research program in H{sub 2}S scavenging -- 1995 update

    SciTech Connect

    Dalrymple, D.; Fisher, K.; Leppin, D.

    1995-11-01

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) is sponsoring an evaluation program for H{sub 2}S scavenging technologies as part of an overall sulfur removal/recovery research program. The program includes a series of full-scale field evaluations to collect data on liquid and solid H{sub 2}S scavengers. Results from the initial evaluation of liquid-based scavengers in batch tower applications are given. Updates on the evaluation of a solid-based scavenger and direct injection of liquid scavengers are also presented.

  19. Scavenging behavior of Lynx rufus on human remains during the winter months of Southeast Texas.

    PubMed

    Rippley, Angela; Larison, Nicole C; Moss, Kathryn E; Kelly, Jeffrey D; Bytheway, Joan A

    2012-05-01

    Animal-scavenging alterations on human remains can be mistaken as human criminal activity. A 32-day study, documenting animal scavenging on a human cadaver, was conducted at the Southeast Texas Applied Forensic Science facility, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, Texas. A Stealth Cam Rogue IR was positioned near the cadaver to capture scavenging activity. An atypical scavenger, the bobcat, Lynx rufus, was recorded feeding on the cadaver. Scavenging by bobcats on human remains is not a predominant behavior and has minimal documentation. Scavenging behaviors and destruction of body tissues were analyzed. Results show that the bobcat did not feed on areas of the body that it does for other large animal carcasses. Results also show the bobcat feeds similarly during peak and nonpeak hours. Understanding the destruction of human tissue and covering of the body with leaf debris may aid forensic anthropologists and pathologists in differentiating between nefarious human activity and animal scavenging.

  20. Detoxication of sulfur half-mustards by nucleophilic scavengers: robust activity of thiopurines

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinyun; Powell, K. Leslie; Thames, Howard D.; MacLeod, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (bis-(2-chloroethyl)sulfide) has been used in chemical warfare since World War I, and is well known as an acutely toxic vesicant. It has been implicated as a carcinogen after chronic low-level exposure, and is known to form inter-strand crosslinks in DNA. Sulfur and nitrogen mustards are currently of interest as potential chemical threat agents for terrorists due to ease of synthesis. Sulfur mustard and monofunctional analogs (half-mustards, 2-[chloroethyl] alkyl sulfides) react as electrophiles, damaging cellular macromolecules, and thus are potentially subject to scavenging by nucleophilic agents. We have determined rate constants for the reaction of four purine derivatives that contain nucleophilic thiol moieties with several sulfur-half-mustards. Three of these compounds, 2,6-dithiopurine, 2,6-dithiouric acid, and 9-methyl-6-mercaptopurine, exhibit facile reaction with the electrophilic mustard compounds. At near neutral pH, these thiopurines are much better nucleophilic scavengers of mustard electrophiles than other low molecular weight thiols such as N-acetyl cysteine and glutathione. Progress curves calculated by numerical integration techniques indicate that equimolar concentrations of thiopurine provide significant reductions in the overall exposure to the episulfonium ions, which are the major reactive, electrophiles produced when sulfur mustards are dissolved in aqueous solution. PMID:20050632

  1. Reversible oxygen scavenging at room temperature using electrochemically reduced titanium oxide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Thomas; Tulsyan, Gaurav; Diaz, Carlos A.; Weinstein, Steven J.; Richter, Christiaan

    2015-05-01

    A material capable of rapid, reversible molecular oxygen uptake at room temperature is desirable for gas separation and sensing, for technologies that require oxygen storage and oxygen splitting such as fuel cells (solid-oxide fuel cells in particular) and for catalytic applications that require reduced oxygen species (such as removal of organic pollutants in water and oil-spill remediation). To date, however, the lowest reported temperature for a reversible oxygen uptake material is in the range of 200-300 °C, achieved in the transition metal oxides SrCoOx (ref. 1) and LuFe2O4+x (ref. 2) via thermal cycling. Here, we report rapid and reversible oxygen scavenging by TiO2-x nanotubes at room temperature. The uptake and release of oxygen is accomplished by an electrochemical rather than a standard thermal approach. We measure an oxygen uptake rate as high as 14 mmol O2 g-1 min-1, ˜2,400 times greater than commercial, irreversible oxygen scavengers. Such a fast oxygen uptake at a remarkably low temperature suggests a non-typical mechanistic pathway for the re-oxidation of TiO2-x. Modelling the diffusion of oxygen, we show that a likely pathway involves ‘exceptionally mobile’ interstitial oxygen produced by the oxygen adsorption and decomposition dynamics, recently observed on the surface of anatase.

  2. Silicate minerals for CO2 scavenging from biogas in Autogenerative High Pressure Digestion.

    PubMed

    Lindeboom, Ralph E F; Ferrer, Ivet; Weijma, Jan; van Lier, Jules B

    2013-07-01

    Autogenerative High Pressure Digestion (AHPD) is a novel concept that integrates gas upgrading with anaerobic digestion by selective dissolution of CO2 at elevated biogas pressure. However, accumulation of CO2 and fatty acids after anaerobic digestion of glucose resulted in pH 3-5, which is incompatible with the commonly applied high-rate methanogenic processes. Therefore, we studied the use of wollastonite, olivine and anorthosite, with measured composition of CaSi1.05O3.4, Mg2Fe0.2Ni0.01Si1.2O5.3 and Na0.7Ca1K0.1Mg0.1Fe0.15Al3.1Si4O24, respectively, to scavenge CO2 during batch AHPD of glucose. Depending on the glucose to mineral ratio the pH increased to 6.0-7.5. Experiments with wollastonite showed that Ca(2+)-leaching was caused by volatile fatty acid (VFA) production during glucose digestion. At 1, 3 and 9 bar, the CH4 content reached 74%, 86% and 88%, respectively, indicating CO2 scavenging. Fixation of produced CO2 by CaCO3 precipitation in the sludge was confirmed by Fourier Transferred-InfraRed, Combined Field emission Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Thermogravimetric Analysis-Mass Spectroscopy.

  3. Detoxication of sulfur half-mustards by nucleophilic scavengers: robust activity of thiopurines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinyun; Powell, K Leslie; Thames, Howard D; MacLeod, Michael C

    2010-03-15

    Sulfur mustard (bis-(2-chloroethyl)sulfide) has been used in chemical warfare since World War I and is well known as an acutely toxic vesicant. It has been implicated as a carcinogen after chronic low-level exposure and is known to form interstrand cross-links in DNA. Sulfur and nitrogen mustards are currently of interest as potential chemical threat agents for terrorists because of ease of synthesis. Sulfur mustard and monofunctional analogues (half-mustards, 2-[chloroethyl] alkyl sulfides) react as electrophiles, damaging cellular macromolecules, and thus are potentially subject to scavenging by nucleophilic agents. We have determined rate constants for the reaction of four purine derivatives that contain nucleophilic thiol moieties with several sulfur-half-mustards. Three of these compounds, 2,6-dithiopurine, 2,6-dithiouric acid, and 9-methyl-6-mercaptopurine, exhibit facile reaction with the electrophilic mustard compounds. At near neutral pH, these thiopurines are much better nucleophilic scavengers of mustard electrophiles than other low molecular weight thiols such as N-acetyl cysteine and glutathione. Progress curves calculated by numerical integration techniques indicate that equimolar concentrations of thiopurine provide significant reductions in the overall exposure to the episulfonium ions, which are the major reactive, electrophiles produced when sulfur mustards are dissolved in aqueous solution.

  4. Can Soaked-in Scavengers Protect Metalloprotein Active Sites from Reduction During Data Collection?

    SciTech Connect

    Macedo, S.; Pechlaner, M; Schmid, W; Weik, M; Sato, K; Dennison, C; Djinovic-Carugo, K

    2009-01-01

    One of the first events taking place when a crystal of a metalloprotein is exposed to X-ray radiation is photoreduction of the metal centres. The oxidation state of a metal cannot always be determined from routine X-ray diffraction experiments alone, but it may have a crucial impact on the metal's environment and on the analysis of the structural data when considering the functional mechanism of a metalloenzyme. Here, UV-Vis microspectrophotometry is used to test the efficacy of selected scavengers in reducing the undesirable photoreduction of the iron and copper centres in myoglobin and azurin, respectively, and X-ray crystallography to assess their capacity of mitigating global and specific radiation damage effects. UV-Vis absorption spectra of native crystals, as well as those soaked in 18 different radioprotectants, show dramatic metal reduction occurring in the first 60 s of irradiation with an X-ray beam from a third-generation synchrotron source. Among the tested radioprotectants only potassium hexacyanoferrate(III) seems to be capable of partially mitigating the rate of metal photoreduction at the concentrations used, but not to a sufficient extent that would allow a complete data set to be recorded from a fully oxidized crystal. On the other hand, analysis of the X-ray crystallographic data confirms ascorbate as an efficient protecting agent against radiation damage, other than metal centre reduction, and suggests further testing of HEPES and 2,3-dichloro-1,4-naphtoquinone as potential scavengers.

  5. Improved survival using oxygen free radical scavengers in the presence of ischemic bowel anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Bergren, C T; Bodzin, J H; Cortez, J A

    1988-06-01

    A rat model was developed to determine the efficacy of oxygen free radical scavenger compounds in improving small bowel anastomotic healing in ischemia. 50 Sprague-Dawley rats underwent laparotomy and were divided into groups: I. sham operation; II. ischemia produced by ligation of mesenteric vessels along 3-5 cm of bowel; III. bowel transection and anastomosis; IV. ligation of vessels with bowel transection and anastomosis; V. ligation of vessels, bowel transection and IV administration of superoxide dismutase (SOD) (5000 U/kg) prior to anastomosis. All surviving animals were sacrificed after 2 weeks. Anastomotic tensile strength and histology were evaluated. Percent survival and the average length of survival for all groups is seen in the table below. (table: see text) A significant decrease in survival was present with the anastomotic group and the ischemic anastomotic group when compared with controls. An improved survival similar to ischemia alone was present in SOD group. No significant difference was noted between SOD and control groups. The results of this study indicate an improved survival rate and length of survival similar to controls in animals undergoing ischemic and penetrating injury to the bowel with the use of oxygen free radical scavenger compounds prior to anastomosis.

  6. Scavenged excess aluminum and its relationship to bulk titanium in biogenic sediment from the central equatorial Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, R. W.; Leinen, M.

    1996-10-01

    We present results from chemical analyses of Al and Ti in surface sediment sampled along two cross-Equator latitudinal transects at 135W and 140W in the central equatorial Pacific Ocean. Although traditionally both Al and Ti are considered to reside exclusively within terrigenous phases in marine sediment, these sediments present extremely high Al/Ti ratios that are several times that of average shale and other potential crustal sources. A sharp maximum in Al/Ti is observed slightly south of the Equator, where sedimentary bulk accumulation rate (BAR) is also highest (reflecting elevated productivity in the overlying water caused by surface water divergence). Bulk Al/Ti decreases sharply away (±2° latitude) to near crustal values at ˜4° north and south. The latitudinal profiles of Al/Ti are entirely unrelated to the concentration of the biogenic components as well as to the absolute accumulation of Al and Ti. These results indicate the presence of a significant scavenged component of Al sourced directly from seawater during particle settling. The data from the two transects analytically and oceanographically confirms our earlier work that was based on the single 135W transect. Calculations of Al excess indicate that the highest Al/Ti ratios correspond to ˜50% of the total Al being unsupported by the small amount of terrigenous phases present. These results are consistent with previous and ongoing studies of biogenic sediment, suspended particulate matter, and sediment trap material. Quantitative use of Al as an index of terrigenous material may, therefore, lead to an overestimation, by a factor of two, of the true terrigenous load in marine sediment, sedimentary rock, and settling particles. Because bulk Al/Ti appears to respond to sedimentary BAR, which in biogenic regimes is linked to surface water productivity, downcore records of Al/Ti in biogenic sediment may track productivity changes through time. Such Al/Ti proxy records may be applicable in sediment of

  7. Test for antioxidant ability by scavenging long-lived mutagenic radicals in mammalian cells and by blood test with intentional radicals: an application of gallic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Jun; Kawaura, Tomoko; Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Prost, Michel; Prost, Emmanuelle; Watanabe, Masami; Quetin-Leclercq, Joëlle

    2003-01-01

    Antioxidant ability of gallic acid (GA) are determined both by electron spin resonance measurement of long-lived radicals produced in γ-ray irradiated Syrian golden hamster embryo cells with GA and by hemolysis measurement with GA when blood cells are submitted to radicals. Scavenging properties of GA are determined by the reaction rate constant with long-lived mutagenic radicals in the cells while the blood test allows to analyze the global effects of this compound: radical scavenger+metal ion chelator+regeneration of intra- and extra-cellular antioxidant.

  8. Relative rate constants for the heterogeneous reactions of OH, NO 2 and NO radicals with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons adsorbed on carbonaceous particles. Part 1: PAHs adsorbed on 1-2 μm calibrated graphite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteve, Williams; Budzinski, Helene; Villenave, Eric

    2004-11-01

    A discharge flow reactor was used to study the heterogeneous reactions of OH, NO2 and NO radicals with 11 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) adsorbed on 1-2 μm calibrated graphite particles. Graphite was chosen as a simple model of carbonaceous atmospheric particles. Relative kinetic information was obtained from the decays of particulate-PAH concentration vs. the time, measured using off-line gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Particulate-anthracene, -benzo(a)pyrene and -perylene are the most reactive with NO2, whereas all PAHs studied present similar reactivities with OH within uncertainties. The reactivity of NO under our experimental conditions could not be distinguished from the PAH desorption.

  9. Particle Deposition onto Enclosure Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-20

    Rate, P 16 4.3 Comparison of vd and fi 16 5. Methods for Measurement of Particle Deposition 19 5.1 Measuring Particle Deposition Rate, p 19...deposition. 18 5. Methods for Measurement of Particle Deposition Owing to its importance for numerous engineering systems, the processes of particle...particle counter, time-of-flight aerosol spectrometer, electrical aerosol mobility analyzer, as well as aerosol generation methods , can be found in

  10. Lung macrophage uptake of unopsonized environmental particulates: Role of scavenger-type receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kobzik, L.

    1995-07-01

    The receptors responsible for avid alveolar macrophage (AM) phagocytosis of unopsonized environmental particulates have not been well defined. This study used flow cytometry to quantitate the effects of a panel of soluble ligands for macrophage adhesion receptors on AM binding of unopsonized environmental dusts (titanium dioxide, TiO{sub 2}; iron oxide, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}; {alpha}-quartz, SiO{sub 2}; diesel engine exhaust dust) or fluorescent latex beads. Polyanionic ligands of the macrophage scavenger receptor (SR) for acetylated-LDL caused marked inhibition of AM binding of the oxide particles and latex beads (e.g., TiO{sub 2} binding; polyinosinic acid (polyl), 10 {mu}g/ml: 70.2 {+-} 1.5% inhibition, mean {+-} SE, n = 11). In contrast, no inhibition was seen with the polyanions heparin and chondroitin sulfate (chond-S), or dextran, consistent with the known inhibitor profile of macrophage SRs for acetylated-LDL. AM uptake of latex or SiO{sub 2} beads instilled into lungs of hamsters was inhibited by administration of polyl but not chondroitin sulfate (AM beads per cell: control, 6.1 {+-} 0.7; polyl, 3.5 {+-} 0.2; chond-S, 5.1 {+-} 0.7, n {ge} 4, p < 0.05 for control vs polyl) indicating macrophage SRs operate in vivo as well as in vitro. In contrast, AM binding of the carbonaceous diesel dust particles was not inhibited by any ligand tested. AM uptake of unopsonized TiO{sub 2}, SR ligands or acetylated LDL caused no significant activation of AM respiratory burst or TNF production, consistent with past observations that opsonin-independent phagocytosis of inert particles by normal AMs is not accompanied by pro-inflammatory activation. These data implicate macrophage-type SRs in AM binding of charged environmental particles and indicate that distinct mechanisms mediate binding of carbonaceous dusts. 54 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Measurement of Elongated Particle Dissolution Rates and Consequent Size/Shape Distribution Alterations in Support of Relative Potency Determinations and Human Dosimetry Model Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Clearance of inhaled bio-persistent elongated particles (EPs) from the lungs and their associated translocation to pleural and other extra-pulmonary tissues involves a number of inter-related and coincidental physicochemical and physiological processes. These can result in EP dis...

  12. Measurement of Libby Amphibole (LA) Elongated Particle Dissolution Rates and Alteration of Size/Shape Distributions in Support of Human Dosimetry Model Development and Relative Potency Determinations

    EPA Science Inventory

    To maximize the value of toxicological data in development of human health risk assessment models of inhaled elongated mineral particles, improvements in human dosimetry modeling are needed. In order to extend the dosimetry model of deposited fibers (Asgharian et aI., Johnson 201...

  13. Evaluation of free radical scavenging capacity and antioxidative damage effect of resveratrol-nanostructured lipid carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Ju; Shi, Fan; Li, Qiu-wen; Li, Pei-shan; Chen, Tong-sheng; Wang, Yi-fei; Wang, Zhi-ping

    2016-03-01

    Cellular damage induced by free-radicals like reactive oxygen species has been implicated in several diseases. 2, 2-azobis(2-amidino-propane) dihydrochloride(AAPH) generates two potent ROS capable of inducing lipid peroxidation: alkoxy radical(RO-) and peroxy radical(ROO-). These radicals are similar to those that are physiologically active and thus might initiate a cascade of intracellular toxic events leading to oxidation, lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and subsequent cell death. Hence naturally anti-oxidant play a vital role in combating these conditions. In this study, resveratrol loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (Res-NLC) was prepared by hot melting and then high pressure homogenization technique. The effects of Res-NLC on free radical scavenging capacity and antioxidative damage is investigated. The particle size and zeta potential of Res-NLC were 139.3 ± 1.7 nm and -11.21 ± 0.41 mV, respectively. By free radical scavenging assays, the IC50 value of Res-NLC were 19.25, 5.29 μg/mL with DPPH, ABTS assay respectively, and 0.161 mg ferrous sulfate/1 mg Res-NLC with FRAP assay; and by AAPH-induced oxidative injury cell model assay, Res-NLC showed the strong protective effect against the human liver tumor HepG2 cell oxidative stress damage. These results indicated that the antioxidant properties of Res-NLC hold great potential used as an alternative to more toxic synthetic antioxidants as an additive in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical preparations for the oxidative diseases treatment.

  14. Scavenging of ammonia by raindrops in Saturn's great storm clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delitsky, M. L.; Baines, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    Observations of the great Saturn storms of 2010-2011 by Cassini instruments showed a very large depletion in atmospheric ammonia. While dynamics will play a role, the very high solubility of ammonia in water may be another important contributor to ammonia depletion in storms. Ammonia exists in Earth's atmosphere and rainstorms dissolve ammonia to a great degree, leaving almost no NH3 in the atmosphere. Studies by Elperin et al (2011, 2013) show that scavenging of ammonia is greatest as a rainstorm starts and lessens as raindrops fall, tapering off to almost zero by the time the rain reaches the ground (Elperin et al 2009). Ammonia is reaching saturation as it dissolves in the aqueous solution. As concentration increases, NH3 is then converted to aqueous species (NH3)x.(H2O)y (Max and Chapados 2013).Ammonia has the highest solubility in water compared to all other gases in the Saturn atmosphere. The Henry's Law constant for NH3 in water is 60 M/atm at 25 C. For H2S, it is 0.001 M/atm. In Saturn storms, it is "raining UP": As water-laden storm clouds convectively rise, ammonia gas will be scavenged and go into solution to a great degree, whilst all the other gases remain mostly in the gas phase. Aqueous ammonia acts as an antifreeze: if ammonia is dissolved in water cloud droplets to the limit of its solubility, as water droplets rise, they can stay liquid (and continue to scavenge NH3) to well below their normal freezing point of 0 Celsius (273 K). The freezing point for a 30 wt % water-ammonia solution is ~189 K. The pressure level where T = 189 K is at 2.8 bars. The normal freezing point of water occurs at the 9 bar pressure level in Saturn's atmosphere. 2.8 bars occurs at the -51 km altitude (below the 1 bar level). 9 bars is at the -130 km level: a difference of 79 km. A water droplet containing 30 wt% NH3 can move upwards from 9 bars to 2.8 bars (79 km) and still remain liquid, only freezing above that altitude. Calculations by the E-AIM model show that ammonia

  15. Antioxidant and radical scavenging properties of Malva sylvestris.

    PubMed

    DellaGreca, Marina; Cutillo, Francesca; D'Abrosca, Brigida; Fiorentino, Antonio; Pacifico, Severina; Zarrelli, Armando

    2009-07-01

    Antioxidant capacity of the aqueous extract of Malva sylvestris was measured by its ability to scavenge the DPPH and superoxide anion radicals and to induce the formation of a phosphomolybdenum complex. Analysis of the extract, carried out by different chromatographic techniques, led to the isolation of eleven compounds: 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, 4-methoxybenzoic acid, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid, 4-hydroxycinnamic acid, ferulic acid, methyl 2-hydroxydihydrocinnamate, scopoletin, N-trans-feruloyl tyramine, a sesquiterpene, (3R,7E)-3-hydroxy-5,7-megastigmadien-9-one, and (10E,15Z)-9,12,13-trihydroxyoctadeca-10,15-dienoic acid. The antioxidant activities of all these compounds are reported.

  16. Trophic facilitation or limitation? Comparative effects of pumas and black bears on the scavenger community.

    PubMed

    Allen, Maximilian L; Elbroch, L Mark; Wilmers, Christopher C; Wittmer, Heiko U

    2014-01-01

    Scavenging is a widespread behaviour and an important process influencing food webs and ecological communities. Large carnivores facilitate the movement of energy across trophic levels through the scavenging and decomposition of their killed prey, but competition with large carnivores is also likely to constrain acquisition of carrion by scavengers. We used an experimental approach based on motion-triggered video cameras at black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) carcasses to measure the comparative influences of two large carnivores in the facilitation and limitation of carrion acquisition by scavengers. We found that pumas (Puma concolor) and black bears (Ursus americanus) had different effects on their ecological communities. Pumas, as a top-level predator, facilitated the consumption of carrion by scavengers, despite significantly reducing their observed sum feeding times (165.7 min ± 21.2 SE at puma kills 264.3 min ± 30.1 SE at control carcasses). In contrast, black bears, as the dominant scavenger in the system, limited consumption of carrion by scavengers as evidenced by the observed reduction of scavenger species richness recorded at carcasses where they were present (mean = 2.33 ± 0.28 SE), compared to where they were absent (mean = 3.28 ± 0.23 SE). Black bears also had large negative effects on scavenger sum feeding times (88.5 min ± 19.8 SE at carcasses where bears were present, 372.3 min ± 50.0 SE at carcasses where bears were absent). In addition, we found that pumas and black bears both increased the nestedness (a higher level of order among species present) of the scavenger community. Our results suggest that scavengers have species-specific adaptions to exploit carrion despite large carnivores, and that large carnivores influence the structure and composition of scavenger communities. The interactions between large carnivores and scavengers should be considered in future studies of food webs and ecological communities.

  17. Correlation of thermophoretically-modified small particle diffusional deposition rates in forced convection systems with variable properties, transpiration cooling and/or viscous dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Rosner, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    A cooled object (heat exchanger tube or turbine blade) is considered to be immersed in a hot fluid stream containing trace amounts of suspended vapors and/or small particles. Numerical prediction calculations were done for self-similar laminar boundary layers and law-of-the-wall turbulent boundary layers. Correlations are presented for the effect of thermophoresis in the absence of transpiration cooling and viscous dissipation; the effect of real suction and blowing in the absence of thermophoresis; the effect of viscous dissipation on thermophoresis in the absence of transpiration cooling; and the combined effect of viscous dissipation and transpiration cooling on thermophoresis. The final correlation, St/St-sub-zero, is insensitive to particle properties, Euler number, and local mainstream temperature.

  18. Fluorescence energy transfer studies on the macrophage scavenger receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, Angelique Y.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Berns, Michael W.

    1994-08-01

    The macrophage scavenger receptor is a transmembrane, trimeric glycoprotein which recognizes a number of negatively charged ligands. Cross competition studies of various ligands indicate that the scavenger receptor may bear more than one type of binding site or that there may be more than one type of receptor. In this study we employed resonance energy transfer techniques to identify the location of the binding site for maleylated bovine serum albumin. Using vesicles derived from plasma membrane, we labeled the ligand with a donor probe and labeled the membrane surface with acceptor probes to determine the distance of bound ligand from the membrane surface. Measurements were taken with three different donor-acceptor pairs. Transfer measurements for ligand labeled with dansyl and HAE (hexadecanoylaminoeosin) as the acceptor yielded a distance of 47 angstrom from the surface of the plasma membrane. Similar measurements employing the same donors but using ORB (octadecylrhodamine B) as the acceptor produced a distance of 58 angstrom. Assuming that the receptor extends perpendicularly from the cell surface this distance lies within the two receptor `domains' closest to the cell surface. These domains include the spacer region, with no distinct proposed structure and a region which has sequence similarity to an alpha helical coiled coil. No transfer was observed between ligand monolabeled with fluorescein and DiI in the membrane. This suggests that the orientation of mal-BSA bound to receptor places the fluorescein probe too far from acceptor on the membrane surface to experience energy transfer.

  19. The evolutionary pathway to obligate scavenging in Gyps vultures.

    PubMed

    Dermody, Brian J; Tanner, Colby J; Jackson, Andrew L

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionary pathway to obligate scavenging in Gyps vultures remains unclear. We propose that communal roosting plays a central role in setting up the information transfer network critical for obligate scavengers in ephemeral environments and that the formation of a flotilla-like foraging group is a likely strategy for foraging Gyps vultures. Using a spatial, individual-based, optimisation model we find that the communal roost is critical for establishing the information network that enables information transfer owing to the spatial-concentration of foragers close to the roost. There is also strong selection pressure for grouping behaviour owing to the importance of maintaining network integrity and hence information transfer during foraging. We present a simple mechanism for grouping, common in many animal species, which has the added implication that it negates the requirement for roost-centric information transfer. The formation of a flotilla-like foraging group also improves foraging efficiency through the reduction of overlapping search paths. Finally, we highlight the importance of consideration of information transfer mechanisms in order to maximise the success of vulture reintroduction programmes.

  20. Scavenging hagfish as a transport host of Anisakid nematodes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hao-Yuan; Chen, Hui-Yu; Chen, Hui-Guan; Shih, Hsiu-Hui

    2016-03-15

    Hagfish are the most primitive craniates and scavengers, feeding on dead organisms as well as fish and invertebrates. Hagfish play an important ecological role in recycling nutrients, helping to recycle biomass from the upper water column. We investigated 265 specimens of four hagfish species, including Eptatretus burgeri, Eptatretus yangi, Eptatretus sheni and Eptatretus taiwanae from northeastern Taiwanese waters of the northwestern Pacific from November 2013 to June 2014. Eight species of Anisakid nematodes were identified: Anisakis pegreffii, Anisakis simplex s.s., a recombinant genotype of A. pegreffii and A. simplex s.s., Anisakis typica, Anisakis sp., Anisakis brevispiculata, Anisakis physeteris and Hysterothylacium amoyense. Anisakis sp. and H. amoyense represented new locality records. The prevalence, mean intensity and mean abundance of anisakid nematodes for all specimens were 21.51%, 5.39 larvae per fish and 1.16 larvae per fish, respectively. A. pegreffii was the most frequent species in E. burgeri, E. yangi and E. taiwanae, whereas in E. sheni, the dominant species was Anisakis sp. The number of nematodes was significantly related to the host length for E. burgeri and E. sheni, but was not related to the sex of the four hagfish species. This report of scavenging hagfish infected with Anisakid larvae suggests hagfish as a transport/paratenic host between cetaceans and piscivores. Anisakiasis may be caused by the consumption of infectious third-stage larvae in raw or undercooked hagfish.

  1. The Evolutionary Pathway to Obligate Scavenging in Gyps Vultures

    PubMed Central

    Dermody, Brian J.; Tanner, Colby J.; Jackson, Andrew L.

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionary pathway to obligate scavenging in Gyps vultures remains unclear. We propose that communal roosting plays a central role in setting up the information transfer network critical for obligate scavengers in ephemeral environments and that the formation of a flotilla-like foraging group is a likely strategy for foraging Gyps vultures. Using a spatial, individual-based, optimisation model we find that the communal roost is critical for establishing the information network that enables information transfer owing to the spatial-concentration of foragers close to the roost. There is also strong selection pressure for grouping behaviour owing to the importance of maintaining network integrity and hence information transfer during foraging. We present a simple mechanism for grouping, common in many animal species, which has the added implication that it negates the requirement for roost-centric information transfer. The formation of a flotilla-like foraging group also improves foraging efficiency through the reduction of overlapping search paths. Finally, we highlight the importance of consideration of information transfer mechanisms in order to maximise the success of vulture reintroduction programmes. PMID:21931786

  2. Superoxide scavenging activity of pirfenidone-iron complex

    SciTech Connect

    Mitani, Yoshihiro; Sato, Keizo Muramoto, Yosuke; Karakawa, Tomohiro; Kitamado, Masataka; Iwanaga, Tatsuya; Nabeshima, Tetsuji; Maruyama, Kumiko; Nakagawa, Kazuko; Ishida, Kazuhiko; Sasamoto, Kazumi

    2008-07-18

    Pirfenidone (PFD) is focused on a new anti-fibrotic drug, which can minimize lung fibrosis etc. We evaluated the superoxide (O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -}) scavenging activities of PFD and the PFD-iron complex by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, luminol-dependent chemiluminescence assay, and cytochrome c reduction assay. Firstly, we confirmed that the PFD-iron complex was formed by mixing iron chloride with threefold molar PFD, and the complex was stable in distillated water and ethanol. Secondary, the PFD-iron complex reduced the amount of O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} produced by xanthine oxidase/hypoxanthine without inhibiting the enzyme activity. Thirdly, it also reduced the amount of O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} released from phorbor ester-stimulated human neutrophils. PFD alone showed few such effects. These results suggest the possibility that the O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} scavenging effect of the PFD-iron complex contributes to the anti-fibrotic action of PFD used for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  3. Research on the Distribution of Magnetic Particles by Changing The Rate of the Radius of the Pole and the Length between Two Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiao-Ye; Gong, Yong-Yong; Yang, Kai; Huang, Zhe-Yong; Pei, Ning

    2016-05-01

    We propose an innovate program in order to improve the distribution of magnetic particles aggregated in magnetic field by changing the radius of the pole(R) and the spacing between two poles(D). The finite element software ANSYS is used to research the changes in magnetic flux density and magnetic gradient in the experiment. The analysis by Origin indicates that the force along radius reduced to less than half of the original, improving the aggregation at the center greatly.

  4. Optimization of hydroxyl radical scavenging activity of exo-polysaccharides from Inonotus obliquus in submerged fermentation using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Xu, Xiangqun; Zhu, Yang

    2010-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of fermentation medium on the hydroxyl radical scavenging activity of exo-polysaccharides from Inonotus obliquus by response surface methodology. A two-level fractional factorial design was used to evaluate the effect of different components of medium. Corn flour, peptone, and KH2PO4 were important factors significantly affecting hydroxyl radical scavenging activity. These selected variables were subsequently optimized using path of steepest ascent (descent), a central composite design, and response surface analysis. The optimal medium composition was (% w/v): corn flour 5.30, peptone 0.32, KH2PO4 0.26, MgSO4 0.02, and CaCl2 0.01. Under the optimal condition, the hydroxyl radical scavenging rate (49.4%) was much higher than that using either basal fermentation medium (10.2%) and single variable optimization of fermentation medium (35.5%). The main monosaccharides components of the RSM optimized polysaccharides are rhamnose, arabinose, xylose, mannose, glucose and galactose with molar proportion at 1.45%, 3.63%, 2.17%, 15.94%, 50.00%, and 26.81%.

  5. Some dinophycean red tide plankton species generate a superoxide scavenging substance.

    PubMed

    Sato, Emiko; Niwano, Yoshimi; Matsuyama, Yukihiko; Kim, Daekyung; Nakashima, Takuji; Oda, Tatsuya; Kohno, Masahiro

    2007-03-01

    Recent studies indicate that some raphidophycean red tide flagellates produce substances able to scavenge superoxide, whereas there have been no reports on superoxide scavenger production by dinophycean red tide flagellates. In this study, we examined the superoxide-scavenging activity of aqueous extracts from dinophycean red tide flagellates, Gymnodinium spp., Scrippsiella trochoidea, and Karenia sp., by a luminol analog L-012-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) method and an electron spin resonance (ESR)-spin trapping method, and compared the activity to that of raphidophycean red tide flagellates, Chattonella spp., Heterosigma akashiwo, and Fibrocapsa japonica. In the experiment applying the L-012-dependent CL method, only the aqueous extracts from raphidophycean red tide flagellates showed superoxide-scavenging activity. On the other hand, applying the ESR-spin trapping method, we found that the aqueous extracts from dinophycean red tide flagellates also showed superoxide-scavenging activity. This is the first report on the production of a superoxide-scavenger by dinophycean red tide flagellates.

  6. Measurements of activation reaction rates in transverse shielding concrete exposed to the secondary particle field produced by intermediate energy heavy ions on an iron target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, T.; Morev, M. N.; Iimoto, T.; Kosako, T.

    2012-01-01

    Reaction rate distributions were measured inside a 60-cm thick concrete pile placed at the lateral position of a thick (stopping length) iron target that was bombarded with heavy ions, 400 MeV/u C and 800 MeV/u Si. Foils of aluminum and gold, as well as gold, tungsten and manganese covered with cadmium were inserted at various locations in the concrete pile to serve as activation detectors. Features of reaction rate distribution, such as the shape of the reaction rate profile, contribution of the neutrons from intra-nuclear cascade and that from evaporation to the activation reactions are determined by the analysis of measured reaction rates. The measured reaction rates were compared with those calculated with radiation transport simulation codes, FLUKA and PHITS, to verify their capability to predict induced activity. The simulated reaction rates agree with the experimental results within a factor of three in general. However, systematic discrepancies between simulated reaction rates and measured reaction rates attributed to the neutron source terms are observed.

  7. Justification of Drug Product Dissolution Rate and Drug Substance Particle Size Specifications Based on Absorption PBPK Modeling for Lesinurad Immediate Release Tablets.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Xavier J H; Flanagan, Talia R; Holt, David J; Eidelman, Anna; Treacy, Don; Rowlings, Colin E

    2016-09-06

    In silico absorption modeling has been performed, to assess the impact of in vitro dissolution on in vivo performance for ZURAMPIC (lesinurad) tablets. The dissolution profiles of lesinurad tablets generated using the quality control method were used as an input to a GastroPlus model to estimate in vivo dissolution in the various parts of the GI tract and predict human exposure. A model was set up, which accounts for differences of dosage form transit, dissolution, local pH in the GI tract, and fluid volumes available for dissolution. The predictive ability of the model was demonstrated by confirming that it can reproduce the Cmax observed for independent clinical trial. The model also indicated that drug product batches that pass the proposed dissolution specification of Q = 80% in 30 min are anticipated to be bioequivalent to the clinical reference batch. To further explore the dissolution space, additional simulations were performed using a theoretical dissolution profile below the proposed specification. The GastroPlus modeling indicates that such a batch will also be bioequivalent to standard clinical batches despite having a dissolution profile, which would fail the proposed dissolution specification of Q = 80% in 30 min. This demonstrates that the proposed dissolution specification sits comfortably within a region of dissolution performance where bioequivalence is anticipated and is not near an edge of failure for dissolution, providing additional confidence to the proposed specifications. Finally, simulations were performed using a virtual drug substance batch with a particle size distribution at the limit of the proposed specification for particle size. Based on these simulations, such a batch is also anticipated to be bioequivalent to clinical reference, demonstrating that the proposed specification limits for particle size distribution would give products bioequivalent to the pivotal clinical batches.

  8. Emission rates of particle number, mass and black carbon by the Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) and its impact on air quality in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirmohammadi, Farimah; Sowlat, Mohammad H.; Hasheminassab, Sina; Saffari, Arian; Ban-Weiss, George; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2017-02-01

    This study describes a series of air monitoring measurements of particle number (PN), black carbon (BC) and PM2.5 mass concentrations in the vicinity of the Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) (roughly 150 m downwind of the LAX's south runways) as well as on-road measurements of the aforementioned pollutants using a mobile platform on three major freeways (i.e., I-110, I-105, and I-405) during May-July 2016. All measurements were performed in the "impact zone" of LAX with the predominant westerly winds from coast to inland. The overall impact of aircraft emissions from the LAX airport and its facilities in comparison to vehicular emissions from freeways on air quality was evaluated on a local scale (i.e. areas in the vicinity of the airport). PN concentration was, on average, 4.1 ± 1.2 times greater at the LAX site than on the studied freeways. Particle number emission factors for takeoffs and landings were comparable, with average values of 8.69 ×1015 particles/kg fuel and 8.16 ×1015 particles/kg fuel, respectively, and indicated a nearly 4-fold statistically significant reduction in PN emission factors for takeoffs during the past decade. BC emission factors were 0.12 ± 0.02 and 0.11 ± 0.01 g/kg fuel during takeoffs and landings, respectively. Additionally, the mean PM2.5 emission factor values for takeoffs and landings were also comparable, with values of 0.38 ± 0.04 and 0.40 ± 0.05 g/kg fuel, respectively. Within the impact zone of the airport, an area of roughly 100 km2 downwind of the LAX, measurements indicated that the LAX daily contributions to PN, BC, and PM2.5 were approximately 11, 2.5, and 1.4 times greater than those from the three surrounding freeways. These results underscore the significance of the LAX airport as a major source of pollution within its zone of impact comparing to freeway emissions.

  9. The effect of particle size, morphology and C-rates on 3D structured Co3O4 inverse opal conversion mode anode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNulty, David; Geaney, Hugh; Carroll, Elaine; Garvey, Shane; Lonergan, Alex; O’Dwyer, Colm

    2017-02-01

    Engineering Co3O4 nanoparticles into highly ordered, 3D inverse opal (IO) structures is shown to significantly improve their performance as more efficient conversion mode Li-ion anode materials. By comparison with Co3O4 microparticles, the advantages of the porous anode architecture are clearly shown. The inverse opal material markedly enhances specific capacity and capacity retention. The impact of various C rates on the rate of the initial charge demonstrates that higher rate charging (10 C) was much less destructive to the inverse opal structure than charging at a slow rate (0.1 C). Slower C rates that affect the IO structure resulted in higher specific capacities (more Li2O) as well as improved capacity retention. The IO structures cycle as CoO, which improves Coulombic efficiency and limits volumetric changes, allowing rate changes more efficiently. This work demonstrates how 3D IOs improve conversion mode anode material performance in the absence of additive or binders, thus enhancing mass transport of Li2O charge–discharge product through the open structure. This effect mitigates clogging by structural changes at slow rates (high capacity) and is beneficial to the overall electrochemical performance.

  10. Could Tyrannosaurus rex have been a scavenger rather than a predator? An energetics approach.

    PubMed

    Ruxton, Graeme D; Houston, David C

    2003-04-07

    Arguments on whether Tyrannosaurus rex was likely to have been an active predator or a scavenger have been based on evidence from jaw morphology and/or dentition. Here, we adopt an entirely novel approach, using energetic arguments to estimate the minimum productivity that would be required for an ecosystem to support a scavenger of the size of T. rex. We argue that an ecosystem as productive as the current Serengeti would provide sufficient carrion for such a scavenger. Hence, T. rex need not have been an active predator and could have found sufficient food purely by scavenging.

  11. Scavenging efficiency and red fox abundance in Mediterranean mountains with and without vultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Reyes, Zebensui; Sánchez-Zapata, José A.; Sebastián-González, Esther; Botella, Francisco; Carrete, Martina; Moleón, Marcos

    2017-02-01

    Vertebrate scavenging assemblages include two major functional groups: obligate scavengers (i.e., vultures), which depend totally on carrion and are undergoing severe declines around the globe, and facultative scavengers, which exploit carrion opportunistically and are generally ubiquitous. Our goal was to investigate the hypothesis that vultures can indirectly regulate the abundance of mesopredators (i.e., facultative scavengers) through modulating their access to carrion resources. We studied scavenging efficiency and red fox (Vulpes vulpes) abundance in two neighbouring areas of South-eastern Spain where vultures (mainly griffon vultures Gyps fulvus) are present (Cazorla) and absent (Espuña). To do so, we monitored ungulate carcasses consumption during winter and summer, and counted red fox scats along walking transects as a proxy of fox density. Our results confirmed that scavenging efficiency was higher in Cazorla and in carcasses visited by vultures. This resulted in increasing scavenging opportunities for facultative scavengers where vultures were absent. Accordingly, mean red fox abundance was higher in Espuña. These results suggest the existence of a vulture-mediated mesopredator release (i.e., an increase of mesopredator numbers following vulture loss), which could trigger important indirect ecological effects. Also, our study demonstrates that facultative scavengers are hardly able to functionally replace vultures, mainly because the former exploit carrion on a slower time scale.

  12. Uptake and catabolism of modified LDL in scavenger-receptor class A type I/II knock-out mice.

    PubMed Central

    Van Berkel, T J; Van Velzen, A; Kruijt, J K; Suzuki, H; Kodama, T

    1998-01-01

    knock-out mice was 17% of the control. The low degradation capacity of peritoneal macrophages from knock-out mice for Ac-LDL indicates that scavenger-receptor class A types I and II play a quantitative important role in the degradation of Ac-LDL by macrophages. In liver, the contribution of scavenger-receptor class A types I and II to the maximal uptake and degradation of Ac-LDL by endothelial and Kupffer cells was 40-50%. Binding studies performed at 4 degrees C indicate that the lower rates of degradation are due to a lower number of surface receptors on the cells from the knock-out mice. From the in vitro and in vivo data it can be concluded that in addition to the classic scavenger-receptors class A types I and II liver does contain additional novel poly I-sensitive scavenger-receptors that facilitate efficient removal of Ac-LDL from the blood circulation. The availability of the scavenger-receptor class A types I and II knock-out mice will stimulate further molecular identification of these receptors. PMID:9512458

  13. An Improved Reaction Rate Formulation for Charged-Particle Induced Thermonuclear Reaction of {sup 2}H(d,{gamma}){sup 4}He

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Azni Abdul; Yusof, Norhasliza; Idris, Mahirah; Kassim, Hasan Abu

    2011-03-30

    The reaction rate formula utilized in compilations such as the Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of Reaction Rates (NACRE) uses low energy approximation due to temperatures in stars are in the region of a few keVs. Most nuclear reaction experiments were done in MeV range and the interior temperatures of massive stars are {approx}10{sup 9} K. Hence an improved formulation for calculating the nuclear reaction rate that is applicable to high temperatures is discussed in this work. The exact tunneling probability that is applicable for all energies is obtained by solving the Schroedinger equation. This yields an enhanced expression for the astrophysical S-factor for calculating the thermonuclear reaction rate at high temperature. The thermonuclear reaction rate from this work is applied to the {sup 2}H(d,{gamma}){sup 4}He reaction and is compared with the NACRE compilation. This improved reaction rate can be included in the nuclear reaction network in a Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) code or a stellar nuclear network code.

  14. Microbial copper reduction method to scavenge anthropogenic radioiodine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Yeop; Lee, Ji Young; Min, Je Ho; Kim, Seung Soo; Baik, Min Hoon; Chung, Sang Yong; Lee, Minhee; Lee, Yongjae

    2016-01-01

    Unexpected reactor accidents and radioisotope production and consumption have led to a continuous increase in the global-scale contamination of radionuclides. In particular, anthropogenic radioiodine has become critical due to its highly volatile mobilization and recycling in global environments, resulting in widespread, negative impact on nature. We report a novel biostimulant method to effectively scavenge radioiodine that exhibits remarkable selectivity for the highly difficult-to-capture radioiodine of >500-fold over other anions, even under circumneutral pH. We discovered a useful mechanism by which microbially reducible copper (i.e., Cu2+ to Cu+) acts as a strong binder for iodide-iodide anions to form a crystalline halide salt of CuI that is highly insoluble in wastewater. The biocatalytic crystallization of radioiodine is a promising way to remove radioiodine in a great capacity with robust growth momentum, further ensuring its long-term stability through nuclear I− fixation via microcrystal formation. PMID:27311370

  15. Synthesis and DPPH radical scavenging activity of prenylated phenol derivatives.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Mauricio; Aravena, Jacqueline; Vergara, Alejandra; Taborga, Lautaro; Baeza, Evelyn; Catalán, Karen; González, Cesar; Carvajal, Marcela; Carrasco, Héctor; Espinoza, Luis

    2012-01-06

    The synthesis of twenty six prenylated phenols derivatives is reported. These compounds were obtained under mild conditions via Electrophilic Aromatic Substitution (EAS) coupling reactions between phenol derivatives containing electron-donor subtituents and 3-methyl-2-but