Science.gov

Sample records for particle simulation codes

  1. Electromagnetic particle simulation codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    Electromagnetic particle simulations solve the full set of Maxwell's equations. They thus include the effects of self-consistent electric and magnetic fields, magnetic induction, and electromagnetic radiation. The algorithms for an electromagnetic code which works directly with the electric and magnetic fields are described. The fields and current are separated into transverse and longitudinal components. The transverse E and B fields are integrated in time using a leapfrog scheme applied to the Fourier components. The particle pushing is performed via the relativistic Lorentz force equation for the particle momentum. As an example, simulation results are presented for the electron cyclotron maser instability which illustrate the importance of relativistic effects on the wave-particle resonance condition and on wave dispersion.

  2. A distributed particle simulation code in C++

    SciTech Connect

    Forslund, D.W.; Wingate, C.A.; Ford, P.S.; Junkins, J.S.; Pope, S.C.

    1992-03-01

    Although C++ has been successfully used in a variety of computer science applications, it has just recently begun to be used in scientific applications. We have found that the object-oriented properties of C++ lend themselves well to scientific computations by making maintenance of the code easier, by making the code easier to understand, and by providing a better paradigm for distributed memory parallel codes. We describe here aspects of developing a particle plasma simulation code using object-oriented techniques for use in a distributed computing environment. We initially designed and implemented the code for serial computation and then used the distributed programming toolkit ISIS to run it in parallel. In this connection we describe some of the difficulties presented by using C++ for doing parallel and scientific computation.

  3. The Particle Accelerator Simulation Code PyORBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Gorlov, Timofey V; Holmes, Jeffrey A; Cousineau, Sarah M; Shishlo, Andrei P

    2015-01-01

    The particle accelerator simulation code PyORBIT is presented. The structure, implementation, history, parallel and simulation capabilities, and future development of the code are discussed. The PyORBIT code is a new implementation and extension of algorithms of the original ORBIT code that was developed for the Spallation Neutron Source accelerator at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The PyORBIT code has a two level structure. The upper level uses the Python programming language to control the flow of intensive calculations performed by the lower level code implemented in the C++ language. The parallel capabilities are based on MPI communications. The PyORBIT is an open source code accessible to the public through the Google Open Source Projects Hosting service.

  4. Hybrid Particle Code Simulations of Mars: The Energy Budget.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, S. H.; Ledvina, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    The results of our latest hybrid particle simulations using the HALFSHEL code are discussed. The presentation will address the energy budget of the solar wind interaction with Mars. The simulations produce loss rates that are very consistent with measured data, Brecht and Ledvina [2014], therefore inspection of the details of the interaction is now warranted. This paper will address the relationship between the energy flowing into the planet and the energy flowing away from the planet. The partition of the energy between fields, and individual ion species will be addressed as well as the amount of energy deposited in the neutral atmosphere by incoming solar wind plasma and during the process of ion loss caused by acceleration via electric fields. Brecht, S.H. and S.A. Ledvina (2014), "The role of the Martian crustal magnetic fields in controlling ionospheric loss," Geophys. Res. Lett., 41, 5340-5346, doi:10.1002/2014GL060841.

  5. VINE: A numerical code for simulating astrophysical systems using particles I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzstein, M.; Nelson, Andrew F.; Naab, T.; Burkert, A.

    2010-10-01

    VINE is a particle based astrophysical simulation code. It uses a tree structure to efficiently solve the gravitational N-body problem and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) to simulate gas dynamical effects. The code has been successfully used for a number of studies on galaxy interactions, galactic dynamics, star formation and planet formation and given the implemented physics, other applications are possible as well.

  6. Neutral Particle Transport in Cylindrical Plasma Simulated by a Monte Carlo Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Deliang; Yan, Longwen; Zhong, Guangwu; Lu, Jie; Yi, Ping

    2007-04-01

    A Monte Carlo code (MCHGAS) has been developed to investigate the neutral particle transport. The code can calculate the radial profile and energy spectrum of neutral particles in cylindrical plasmas. The calculation time of the code is dramatically reduced when the Splitting and Roulette schemes are applied. The plasma model of an infinite cylinder is assumed in the code, which is very convenient in simulating neutral particle transports in small and middle-sized tokamaks. The design of the multi-channel neutral particle analyser (NPA) on HL-2A can be optimized by using this code.

  7. A general concurrent algorithm for plasma particle-in-cell simulation codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liewer, Paulett C.; Decyk, Viktor K.

    1989-01-01

    The general concurrent particle-in-cell (GCPIC) algorithm has been used to implement an electrostatic particle-in-cell code on a 32-node hypercube parallel computer. The GCPIC algorithm decomposes the PIC code by dividing the particle simulation physical domain into subdomains that are equal in number to the number of processors; all subdomains will accordingly possess approximately equal numbers of particles. The portion of the code which updates particle positions and velocities is nearly 100 percent efficient when the number of particles increases linearly with that of hypercube processors.

  8. The Plasma Simulation Code: A modern particle-in-cell code with patch-based load-balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germaschewski, Kai; Fox, William; Abbott, Stephen; Ahmadi, Narges; Maynard, Kristofor; Wang, Liang; Ruhl, Hartmut; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2016-08-01

    This work describes the Plasma Simulation Code (PSC), an explicit, electromagnetic particle-in-cell code with support for different order particle shape functions. We review the basic components of the particle-in-cell method as well as the computational architecture of the PSC code that allows support for modular algorithms and data structure in the code. We then describe and analyze in detail a distinguishing feature of PSC: patch-based load balancing using space-filling curves which is shown to lead to major efficiency gains over unbalanced methods and a previously used simpler balancing method.

  9. Electron Microburst Energy Dispersion Derived by Test Particle Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Parks, G. K.; Park, Y.; Tsurutani, B.

    2011-12-01

    Electron microbursts, energetic electron precipitation having duration less than 1 sec, have been thought to be generated by chorus wave and electron interactions. While the coincidence of chorus and microburst occurrence supports the wave-particle interaction theory, more crucial evidences have not been observed to explain the origin of microbursts. We think one of the observational evidences could be energy dispersion of microbursts. During chorus waves propagate along magnetic field, the resonance condition should be satisfied at different magnetic latitude for different energy electrons because chorus waves are coherent waves having narrow frequency band and electron microbursts have wide energy range, at least several hundreds KeV. If we observed electron microbursts at low altitude, the arrival time of different energy electrons should make unique energy dispersion structures. In order to observe the energy dispersion, we need a detector having fast time resolution and wide energy range. Our study is focused on defining the time resolution and energy range required to measure microburst energy dispersion. We performed test particles simulation interacting with simple coherent waves like chorus waves. By the wave-particle interaction, energetic electrons (test particles) changed pitch angles and some electrons were detected with energy dispersion at 600 km. We assumed a detector measuring microbursts at the altitude of 600 km. These results provide useful information in designing electron detectors for the future mission.

  10. The FLUKA Code: An Accurate Simulation Tool for Particle Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Julia; Boehlen, Till T.; Cerutti, Francesco; Chin, Mary P. W.; Dos Santos Augusto, Ricardo; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ortega, Pablo G.; Kozłowska, Wioletta; Magro, Giuseppe; Mairani, Andrea; Parodi, Katia; Sala, Paola R.; Schoofs, Philippe; Tessonnier, Thomas; Vlachoudis, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) codes are increasingly spreading in the hadrontherapy community due to their detailed description of radiation transport and interaction with matter. The suitability of a MC code for application to hadrontherapy demands accurate and reliable physical models capable of handling all components of the expected radiation field. This becomes extremely important for correctly performing not only physical but also biologically based dose calculations, especially in cases where ions heavier than protons are involved. In addition, accurate prediction of emerging secondary radiation is of utmost importance in innovative areas of research aiming at in vivo treatment verification. This contribution will address the recent developments of the FLUKA MC code and its practical applications in this field. Refinements of the FLUKA nuclear models in the therapeutic energy interval lead to an improved description of the mixed radiation field as shown in the presented benchmarks against experimental data with both 4He and 12C ion beams. Accurate description of ionization energy losses and of particle scattering and interactions lead to the excellent agreement of calculated depth–dose profiles with those measured at leading European hadron therapy centers, both with proton and ion beams. In order to support the application of FLUKA in hospital-based environments, Flair, the FLUKA graphical interface, has been enhanced with the capability of translating CT DICOM images into voxel-based computational phantoms in a fast and well-structured way. The interface is capable of importing also radiotherapy treatment data described in DICOM RT standard. In addition, the interface is equipped with an intuitive PET scanner geometry generator and automatic recording of coincidence events. Clinically, similar cases will be presented both in terms of absorbed dose and biological dose calculations describing the various available features. PMID:27242956

  11. The FLUKA Code: An Accurate Simulation Tool for Particle Therapy.

    PubMed

    Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Julia; Boehlen, Till T; Cerutti, Francesco; Chin, Mary P W; Dos Santos Augusto, Ricardo; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ortega, Pablo G; Kozłowska, Wioletta; Magro, Giuseppe; Mairani, Andrea; Parodi, Katia; Sala, Paola R; Schoofs, Philippe; Tessonnier, Thomas; Vlachoudis, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) codes are increasingly spreading in the hadrontherapy community due to their detailed description of radiation transport and interaction with matter. The suitability of a MC code for application to hadrontherapy demands accurate and reliable physical models capable of handling all components of the expected radiation field. This becomes extremely important for correctly performing not only physical but also biologically based dose calculations, especially in cases where ions heavier than protons are involved. In addition, accurate prediction of emerging secondary radiation is of utmost importance in innovative areas of research aiming at in vivo treatment verification. This contribution will address the recent developments of the FLUKA MC code and its practical applications in this field. Refinements of the FLUKA nuclear models in the therapeutic energy interval lead to an improved description of the mixed radiation field as shown in the presented benchmarks against experimental data with both (4)He and (12)C ion beams. Accurate description of ionization energy losses and of particle scattering and interactions lead to the excellent agreement of calculated depth-dose profiles with those measured at leading European hadron therapy centers, both with proton and ion beams. In order to support the application of FLUKA in hospital-based environments, Flair, the FLUKA graphical interface, has been enhanced with the capability of translating CT DICOM images into voxel-based computational phantoms in a fast and well-structured way. The interface is capable of importing also radiotherapy treatment data described in DICOM RT standard. In addition, the interface is equipped with an intuitive PET scanner geometry generator and automatic recording of coincidence events. Clinically, similar cases will be presented both in terms of absorbed dose and biological dose calculations describing the various available features. PMID:27242956

  12. A Linac Simulation Code for Macro-Particles Tracking and Steering Algorithm Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    sun, yipeng

    2012-05-03

    In this paper, a linac simulation code written in Fortran90 is presented and several simulation examples are given. This code is optimized to implement linac alignment and steering algorithms, and evaluate the accelerator errors such as RF phase and acceleration gradient, quadrupole and BPM misalignment. It can track a single particle or a bunch of particles through normal linear accelerator elements such as quadrupole, RF cavity, dipole corrector and drift space. One-to-one steering algorithm and a global alignment (steering) algorithm are implemented in this code.

  13. Integration of the low-energy particle track simulation code in Geant4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, Pedro; Muñoz, Antonio; Moraleda, Montserrat; Gomez Ros, José María; Blanco, Fernando; Perez, José Manuel; García, Gustavo

    2015-08-01

    The Low-Energy Particle Track Simulation code (LEPTS) is a Monte Carlo code developed to simulate the damage caused by radiation at molecular level. The code is based on experimental data of scattering cross sections, both differential and integral, and energy loss data, complemented with theoretical calculations. It covers the interactions of electrons and positrons from energies of 10 keV down to 0.1 eV in different biologically relevant materials. In this article we briefly mention the main characteristics of this code and we present its integration within the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit.

  14. Two Dimensional Particle-In-Cell Code for Simulation of Quantum Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decyk, V. K.; Tonge, J.; Dauger, D. E.

    2002-11-01

    We have developed a two dimensional code for simulating quantum plasmas (1). This unique code propagates many quantum particles forward in time self-consistently using the semi-classical approximation. Because of this it can model the statistical properties of interacting quantum particles. We are currently testing this code using small numbers of particles with model problems which we can use to verify the accuracy of the code. The goal is to model from first principles the statistical properties of plasmas where quantum mechanics plays a role such as hot high density plasmas found in stellar interiors (2). (1) D. Dauger, Semiclassical Modeling of Quantum-Mechanical Multiparticle Systems using Parallel Particle-In-Cell Methods, PHD Thesis (2) M. Opher et. al. , Nuclear reaction rates and energy in stellar plasmas: The effect of highly damped modes, Physics of Plasma, 8, No. 5, p. 2454 Sponsored by NSF

  15. Solar wind-magnetosphere interaction as simulated by a 3D, EM particle code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buneman, O.; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Neubert, T.

    1993-01-01

    The results of simulating the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction with a three dimensional, electromagnetic (EM) particle code are presented. Hitherto such global simulations were done with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) codes while lower dimensional particle or hybrid codes served to account for microscopic processes and such transport parameters as have to be introduced ad hoc in MHD. The kinetic model combines macroscopic and microscopic tasks. It relies only on the Maxwell curl equations and the Lorentz equation for particles. The preliminary results are for an unmagnetized solar wind plasma streaming past a dipolar magnetic field. The results show the formation of a bow shock and a magnetotail, the penetration of energetic particles into cusp and radiation belt regions, and dawn to dusk asymmetries.

  16. Solar wind-magnetosphere interaction as simulated by a 3-D EM particle code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buneman, Oscar; Neubert, Torsten; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    1992-01-01

    We present here our first results of simulating the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction with a new three-dimensional electromagnetic particle code. Hitherto such global simulations were done with MHD codes while lower-dimensional particle or hybrid codes served to account for microscopic processes and such transport parameters as have to be introduced ad hoc in MHD. Our kinetic model attempts to combine the macroscopic and microscopic tasks. It relies only on the Maxwell curl equation and the Lorentz equation for particles, which are ideally suited for computers. The preliminary results shown here are for an unmagnetized solar wind plasma streaming past a dipolar magnetic field. The results show the formation of a bow shock and a magnetotail, the penetration of energetic particles into cusp and radiation belt regions, and dawn-dusk asymmetries.

  17. New Particle-in-Cell Code for Numerical Simulation of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Balsa Terzic, Rui Li

    2010-05-01

    We present a first look at the new code for self-consistent, 2D simulations of beam dynamics affected by the coherent synchrotron radiation. The code is of the particle-in-cell variety: the beam bunch is sampled by point-charge particles, which are deposited on the grid; the corresponding forces on the grid are then computed using retarded potentials according to causality, and interpolated so as to advance the particles in time. The retarded potentials are evaluated by integrating over the 2D path history of the bunch, with the charge and current density at the retarded time obtained from interpolation of the particle distributions recorded at discrete timesteps. The code is benchmarked against analytical results obtained for a rigid-line bunch. We also outline the features and applications which are currently being developed.

  18. SPACE CHARGE SIMULATION METHODS INCORPORATED IN SOME MULTI - PARTICLE TRACKING CODES AND THEIR RESULTS COMPARISON.

    SciTech Connect

    BEEBE - WANG,J.; LUCCIO,A.U.; D IMPERIO,N.; MACHIDA,S.

    2002-06-03

    Space charge in high intensity beams is an important issue in accelerator physics. Due to the complicity of the problems, the most effective way of investigating its effect is by computer simulations. In the resent years, many space charge simulation methods have been developed and incorporated in various 2D or 3D multi-particle-tracking codes. It has becoming necessary to benchmark these methods against each other, and against experimental results. As a part of global effort, we present our initial comparison of the space charge methods incorporated in simulation codes ORBIT++, ORBIT and SIMPSONS. In this paper, the methods included in these codes are overviewed. The simulation results are presented and compared. Finally, from this study, the advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed.

  19. Simulation of a ceramic impact experiment using the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.; Schwalbe, L.A.

    1996-08-01

    We are developing statistically based, brittle-fracture models and are implementing them into hydrocodes that can be used for designing systems with components of ceramics, glass, and/or other brittle materials. Because of the advantages it has simulating fracture, we are working primarily with the smooth particle hydrodynamics code SPHINX. We describe a new brittle fracture model that we have implemented into SPHINX, and we discuss how the model differs from others. To illustrate the code`s current capability, we simulate an experiment in which a tungsten rod strikes a target of heavily confined ceramic. Simulations in 3D at relatively coarse resolution yield poor results. However, 2D plane-strain approximations to the test produce crack patterns that are strikingly similar to the data, although the fracture model needs further refinement to match some of the finer details. We conclude with an outline of plans for continuing research and development.

  20. MULTIDIMENSIONAL COUPLED PHOTON-ELECTRON TRANSPORT SIMULATIONS USING NEUTRAL PARTICLE SN CODES

    SciTech Connect

    Ilas, Dan; Williams, Mark L; Peplow, Douglas E.; Kirk, Bernadette Lugue

    2008-01-01

    During the past two years a study was underway at ORNL to assess the suitability of the popular SN neutral particle codes ANISN, DORT and TORT for coupled photon-electron calculations specific to external beam therapy of medical physics applications. The CEPXS-BFP code was used to generate the cross sections. The computational tests were performed on phantoms typical of those used in medical physics for external beam therapy, with materials simulated by water at different densities and the comparisons were made against Monte Carlo simulations that served as benchmarks. Although the results for one-dimensional calculations were encouraging, it appeared that the higher dimensional transport codes had fundamental difficulties in handling the electron transport. The results of two-dimensional simulations using the code DORT with an S16 fully symmetric quadrature set agree fairly with the reference Monte Carlo results but not well enough for clinical applications. While the photon fluxes are in better agreement (generally, within less than 5% from the reference), the discrepancy increases, sometimes very significantly, for the electron fluxes. The paper, however, focuses on the results obtained with the three-dimensional code TORT which had convergence difficulties for the electron groups. Numerical instabilities occurred in these groups. These instabilities were more pronounced with the degree of anisotropy of the problem.

  1. Half-Cell RF Gun Simulations with the Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell Code VORPAL

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, K.; Dimitrov, D. A.; Busby, R.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Smithe, D.; Cary, J. R.; Kewisch, J.; Kayran, D.; Calaga, R.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2009-01-22

    We have simulated Brookhaven National Laboratory's half-cell superconducting RF gun design for a proposed high-current ERL using the three-dimensional, electromagnetic particle-in-cell code VORPAL. VORPAL computes the fully self-consistent electromagnetic fields produced by the electron bunches, meaning that it accurately models space-charge effects as well as bunch-to-bunch beam loading effects and the effects of higher-order cavity modes, though these are beyond the scope of this paper. We compare results from VORPAL to the well-established space-charge code PARMELA, using RF fields produced by SUPERFISH, as a benchmarking exercise in which the two codes should agree well.

  2. Simulating hypervelocity impact effects on structures using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code MAGI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Libersky, Larry; Allahdadi, Firooz A.; Carney, Theodore C.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of interaction occurring between space debris and orbiting structures is of great interest to the planning and survivability of space assets. Computer simulation of the impact events using hydrodynamic codes can provide some understanding of the processes but the problems involved with this fundamental approach are formidable. First, any realistic simulation is necessarily three-dimensional, e.g., the impact and breakup of a satellite. Second, the thickness of important components such as satellite skins or bumper shields are small with respect to the dimension of the structure as a whole, presenting severe zoning problems for codes. Thirdly, the debris cloud produced by the primary impact will yield many secondary impacts which will contribute to the damage and possible breakup of the structure. The problem was approached by choosing a relatively new computational technique that has virtues peculiar to space impacts. The method is called Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics.

  3. Simulation for the Production of Technetium-99m Using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaita, Courtney; Gentile, Charles; Zelenty, Jennifer

    2010-11-01

    The Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) is employed to simulate the radioisotope production process that leads to the creation of Technetium-99m (Tc-99m). Tc-99m is a common metastable nuclear isomer used in nuclear medicine tests and is produced from the gamma decay of Molybdenum-99 (Mo-99). Mo-99 is commonly produced from the fission of Uranium-235, a complicated process which is only performed at a limited number of facilities. Due to the age of these facilities, coupled with the critical importance of a steady flow of Mo-99, new methods of generating Mo-99 are being investigated. Current experiments demonstrate promising alternatives, one of which consists of the neutron activation of Molybdenum-98 (Mo-98), a naturally occurring element found in nature. Mo-98 has a small cross section (.13 barns), so investigations are also aimed at overcoming this natural obstacle for producing Tc-99m. The neutron activated Mo-98 becomes Mo-99 and subsequently decays into radioactive Tc-99m. The MCNP code is being used to examine the interactions between the particles in each of these situations, thus determining a theoretical threshold to maximize the reaction's efficiency. The simulation results will be applied to ongoing experiments at the PPPL, where the empirical data will be compared to predictions from the MCNP code.

  4. Vine—A Numerical Code for Simulating Astrophysical Systems Using Particles. II. Implementation and Performance Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Wetzstein, M.; Naab, T.

    2009-10-01

    We continue our presentation of VINE. In this paper, we begin with a description of relevant architectural properties of the serial and shared memory parallel computers on which VINE is intended to run, and describe their influences on the design of the code itself. We continue with a detailed description of a number of optimizations made to the layout of the particle data in memory and to our implementation of a binary tree used to access that data for use in gravitational force calculations and searches for smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) neighbor particles. We describe the modifications to the code necessary to obtain forces efficiently from special purpose "GRAPE" hardware, the interfaces required to allow transparent substitution of those forces in the code instead of those obtained from the tree, and the modifications necessary to use both tree and GRAPE together as a fused GRAPE/tree combination. We conclude with an extensive series of performance tests, which demonstrate that the code can be run efficiently and without modification in serial on small workstations or in parallel using the OpenMP compiler directives on large-scale, shared memory parallel machines. We analyze the effects of the code optimizations and estimate that they improve its overall performance by more than an order of magnitude over that obtained by many other tree codes. Scaled parallel performance of the gravity and SPH calculations, together the most costly components of most simulations, is nearly linear up to at least 120 processors on moderate sized test problems using the Origin 3000 architecture, and to the maximum machine sizes available to us on several other architectures. At similar accuracy, performance of VINE, used in GRAPE-tree mode, is approximately a factor 2 slower than that of VINE, used in host-only mode. Further optimizations of the GRAPE/host communications could improve the speed by as much as a factor of 3, but have not yet been implemented in VINE

  5. VINE-A NUMERICAL CODE FOR SIMULATING ASTROPHYSICAL SYSTEMS USING PARTICLES. II. IMPLEMENTATION AND PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Wetzstein, M.; Naab, T.

    2009-10-01

    We continue our presentation of VINE. In this paper, we begin with a description of relevant architectural properties of the serial and shared memory parallel computers on which VINE is intended to run, and describe their influences on the design of the code itself. We continue with a detailed description of a number of optimizations made to the layout of the particle data in memory and to our implementation of a binary tree used to access that data for use in gravitational force calculations and searches for smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) neighbor particles. We describe the modifications to the code necessary to obtain forces efficiently from special purpose 'GRAPE' hardware, the interfaces required to allow transparent substitution of those forces in the code instead of those obtained from the tree, and the modifications necessary to use both tree and GRAPE together as a fused GRAPE/tree combination. We conclude with an extensive series of performance tests, which demonstrate that the code can be run efficiently and without modification in serial on small workstations or in parallel using the OpenMP compiler directives on large-scale, shared memory parallel machines. We analyze the effects of the code optimizations and estimate that they improve its overall performance by more than an order of magnitude over that obtained by many other tree codes. Scaled parallel performance of the gravity and SPH calculations, together the most costly components of most simulations, is nearly linear up to at least 120 processors on moderate sized test problems using the Origin 3000 architecture, and to the maximum machine sizes available to us on several other architectures. At similar accuracy, performance of VINE, used in GRAPE-tree mode, is approximately a factor 2 slower than that of VINE, used in host-only mode. Further optimizations of the GRAPE/host communications could improve the speed by as much as a factor of 3, but have not yet been implemented in VINE

  6. Particle entry through "Sash" groove simulated by Global 3D Electromagnetic Particle code with duskward IMF By

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X.; Cai, D.; Nishikawa, K.; Lembege, B.

    2004-12-01

    We made our efforts to parallelize the global 3D HPF Electromagnetic particle model (EMPM) for several years and have also reported our meaningful simulation results that revealed the essential physics involved in interaction of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetosphere using this EMPM (Nishikawa et al., 1995; Nishikawa, 1997, 1998a, b, 2001, 2002) in our PC cluster and supercomputer(D.S. Cai et al., 2001, 2003). Sash patterns and related phenomena have been observed and reported in some satellite observations (Fujumoto et al. 1997; Maynard, 2001), and have motivated 3D MHD simulations (White and al., 1998). We also investigated it with our global 3D parallelized HPF EMPM with dawnward IMF By (K.-I. Nishikawa, 1998) and recently new simulation with dusk-ward IMF By was accomplished in the new VPP5000 supercomputer. In the new simulations performed on the new VPP5000 supercomputer of Tsukuba University, we used larger domain size, 305×205×205, smaller grid size (Δ ), 0.5R E(the radium of the Earth), more total particle number, 220,000,000 (about 8 pairs per cell). At first, we run this code until we get the so-called quasi-stationary status; After the quasi-stationary status was established, we applied a northward IMF (B z=0.2), and then wait until the IMF arrives around the magnetopuase. After the arrival of IMF, we begin to change the IMF from northward to duskward (IMF B y=-0.2). The results revealed that the groove structure at the day-side magnetopause, that causes particle entry into inner magnetosphere and the cross structure or S-structure at near magneto-tail are formed. Moreover, in contrast with MHD simulations, kinetic characteristic of this event is also analyzed self-consistently with this simulation. The new simulation provides new and more detailed insights for the observed sash event.

  7. Particle-in-cell/accelerator code for space-charge dominated beam simulation

    2012-05-08

    Warp is a multidimensional discrete-particle beam simulation program designed to be applicable where the beam space-charge is non-negligible or dominant. It is being developed in a collaboration among LLNL, LBNL and the University of Maryland. It was originally designed and optimized for heave ion fusion accelerator physics studies, but has received use in a broader range of applications, including for example laser wakefield accelerators, e-cloud studies in high enery accelerators, particle traps and other areas.more » At present it incorporates 3-D, axisymmetric (r,z) planar (x-z) and transverse slice (x,y) descriptions, with both electrostatic and electro-magnetic fields, and a beam envelope model. The code is guilt atop the Python interpreter language.« less

  8. Particle-in-cell/accelerator code for space-charge dominated beam simulation

    SciTech Connect

    2012-05-08

    Warp is a multidimensional discrete-particle beam simulation program designed to be applicable where the beam space-charge is non-negligible or dominant. It is being developed in a collaboration among LLNL, LBNL and the University of Maryland. It was originally designed and optimized for heave ion fusion accelerator physics studies, but has received use in a broader range of applications, including for example laser wakefield accelerators, e-cloud studies in high enery accelerators, particle traps and other areas. At present it incorporates 3-D, axisymmetric (r,z) planar (x-z) and transverse slice (x,y) descriptions, with both electrostatic and electro-magnetic fields, and a beam envelope model. The code is guilt atop the Python interpreter language.

  9. Hybrid Particle Code Simulations of Mars: The Role Ionospheric Escape in Explaining Water Loss from Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, Stephen; Ledvina, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    The results of our latest hybrid particle simulations using the HALFSHEL code are discussed. The presentation will address assorted processes that produce differing ion escape rates from Mars. The simulations investigate the role of the neutral atmosphere (Univ. of Michigan's MTGCM) in its dynamic form (neutral winds and co-rotation) in the calculation of the ionospheric loss from Mars. In addition, the effect of crustal magnetic field orientation in ion escape from Mars will be discussed. Further, the presentation addresses reasons for these differences and details of the interaction around the crustal magnetic fields. Finally, these results and others will be compared to fits to data. The estimated loss rates from a variety of missions and times were fit to the solar EUV flux. Our results will be compared to this fit.

  10. Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code System To Simulate Time-Analysis Quantities.

    2012-04-15

    Version: 00 US DOE 10CFR810 Jurisdiction. The Monte Carlo simulation of correlation measurements that rely on the detection of fast neutrons and photons from fission requires that particle emissions and interactions following a fission event be described as close to reality as possible. The -PoliMi extension to MCNP and to MCNPX was developed to simulate correlated-particle and the subsequent interactions as close as possible to the physical behavior. Initially, MCNP-PoliMi, a modification of MCNP4C, wasmore » developed. The first version was developed in 2001-2002 and released in early 2004 to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC). It was developed for research purposes, to simulate correlated counts in organic scintillation detectors, sensitive to fast neutrons and gamma rays. Originally, the field of application was nuclear safeguards; however subsequent improvements have enhanced the ability to model measurements in other research fields as well. During 2010-2011 the -PoliMi modification was ported into MCNPX-2.7.0, leading to the development of MCNPX-PoliMi. Now the -PoliMi v2.0 modifications are distributed as a patch to MCNPX-2.7.0 which currently is distributed in the RSICC PACKAGE BCC-004 MCNP6_BETA2/MCNP5/MCNPX. Also included in the package is MPPost, a versatile code that provides simulated detector response. By taking advantage of the modifications in MCNPX-PoliMi, MPPost can provide an accurate simulation of the detector response for a variety of detection scenarios.« less

  11. A Model of Cataclysmic Variable Systems with the Particle Simulation Code VINE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreidberg, Laura; Wood, M.; Wetzstein, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this poster we present a preliminary model of cataclysmic variables, close binary systems consisting of a white dwarf primary and a lower mass main-sequence secondary star. Mass transfer from the secondary results in the formation of an accretion disk surrounding the primary. We modeled the accretion disk with the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as implemented in the public domain code VINE, which we modified for this project. We incorporated VINE's dynamic smoothing lengths and time-varying viscosity to create a more physical model as compared to pre-existing simulations. This project was funded by a partnership between the National Science Foundation (NSF AST-0552798), Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU), and the Department of Defense (DoD) ASSURE (Awards to Stimulate and Support Undergraduate Research Experiences) programs.

  12. Hybrid Particle Code Simulations of Mars: The Role of Crustal Magnetic Fields in Ionospheric Escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, S. H.; Ledvina, S. A.

    2014-07-01

    Using the three dimensional hybrid particle code, the role of neutral winds in the escape of ionospheric ions is investigated. The results in terms of loss rates and interaction around the crustal magnetic fields will be presented.

  13. LPIC++ a parallel one-dimensional relativistic electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell code for simulating laser-plasma-interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfund, R. E. W.; Lichters, R.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.

    1998-02-01

    We report on a recently developed electromagnetic relativistic 1D3V (one spatial, three velocity dimensions) Particle-In-Cell code for simulating laser-plasma interaction at normal and oblique incidence. The code is written in C++ and easy to extend. The data structure is characterized by the use of chained lists for the grid cells as well as particles belonging to one cell. The parallel version of the code is based on PVM. It splits the grid into several spatial domains each belonging to one processor. Since particles can cross boundaries of cells as well as domains, the processor loads will generally change in time. This is counteracted by adjusting the domain sizes dynamically, for which the use of chained lists has proven to be very convenient. Moreover, an option for restarting the simulation from intermediate stages of the time evolution has been implemented even in the parallel version. The code will be published and distributed freely.

  14. Hybrid Particle Code Simulations of Mars: The Role of Assorted Processes in Ionospheric Escape.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, S. H.; Ledvina, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    The results of our latest hybrid particle simulations using the HALFSHEL code are discussed. The presentation will address assorted processes that produce differing ion escape rates from Mars. The simulations investigate the role of the neutral atmosphere (Univ. of Michigan's MTGCM) in its dynamic form (neutral winds and co-rotation) in the calculation of the ionospheric loss from Mars. In addition, the effect of crustal magnetic field orientation in ion escape from Mars will be discussed. Further, the presentation addresses reasons for these differences and details of the interaction around the crustal magnetic fields. Finally, these results and others will be compared to fits to data produced by Lundin et al. [2013]. In the Lundin paper the estimated loss rates from a variety of missions and times were fit to the solar EUV flux. Our results will be compared to this fit. Lundin, R, S. Barabash, M. Holström, H. Nilsson, Y. Futaana, R. Ramstad, M. Ymauchi, E. Dubinin, and M. Fraenz (2013), "Solar cycle effects on the ion escape from Mars," Geophy. Res. Lett., 40, 6028-6032, doi:10.1002/2013GL058154.

  15. Multi-level adaptive particle mesh (MLAPM): a c code for cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knebe, Alexander; Green, Andrew; Binney, James

    2001-08-01

    We present a computer code written in c that is designed to simulate structure formation from collisionless matter. The code is purely grid-based and uses a recursively refined Cartesian grid to solve Poisson's equation for the potential, rather than obtaining the potential from a Green's function. Refinements can have arbitrary shapes and in practice closely follow the complex morphology of the density field that evolves. The time-step shortens by a factor of 2 with each successive refinement. Competing approaches to N-body simulation are discussed from the point of view of the basic theory of N-body simulation. It is argued that an appropriate choice of softening length ɛ is of great importance and that ɛ should be at all points an appropriate multiple of the local interparticle separation. Unlike tree and P3M codes, multigrid codes automatically satisfy this requirement. We show that at early times and low densities in cosmological simulations, ɛ needs to be significantly smaller relative to the interparticle separation than in virialized regions. Tests of the ability of the code's Poisson solver to recover the gravitational fields of both virialized haloes and Zel'dovich waves are presented, as are tests of the code's ability to reproduce analytic solutions for plane-wave evolution. The times required to conduct a ΛCDM cosmological simulation for various configurations are compared with the times required to complete the same simulation with the ART, AP3M and GADGET codes. The power spectra, halo mass functions and halo-halo correlation functions of simulations conducted with different codes are compared. The code is available from http://www-thphys.physics.ox.ac.uk/users/MLAPM.

  16. Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code simulation results and comparison with theory scaling laws for photoelectron-generated radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dipp, T.M. |

    1993-12-01

    The generation of radiation via photoelectrons induced off of a conducting surface was explored using Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code computer simulations. Using the MAGIC PIC code, the simulations were performed in one dimension to handle the diverse scale lengths of the particles and fields in the problem. The simulations involved monoenergetic, nonrelativistic photoelectrons emitted normal to the illuminated conducting surface. A sinusoidal, 100% modulated, 6.3263 ns pulse train, as well as unmodulated emission, were used to explore the behavior of the particles, fields, and generated radiation. A special postprocessor was written to convert the PIC code simulated electron sheath into far-field radiation parameters by means of rigorous retarded time calculations. The results of the small-spot PIC simulations were used to generate various graphs showing resonance and nonresonance radiation quantities such as radiated lobe patterns, frequency, and power. A database of PIC simulation results was created and, using a nonlinear curve-fitting program, compared with theoretical scaling laws. Overall, the small-spot behavior predicted by the theoretical scaling laws was generally observed in the PIC simulation data, providing confidence in both the theoretical scaling laws and the PIC simulations.

  17. Vine—A Numerical Code for Simulating Astrophysical Systems Using Particles. I. Description of the Physics and the Numerical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzstein, M.; Nelson, Andrew F.; Naab, T.; Burkert, A.

    2009-10-01

    We present a numerical code for simulating the evolution of astrophysical systems using particles to represent the underlying fluid flow. The code is written in Fortran 95 and is designed to be versatile, flexible, and extensible, with modular options that can be selected either at the time the code is compiled or at run time through a text input file. We include a number of general purpose modules describing a variety of physical processes commonly required in the astrophysical community and we expect that the effort required to integrate additional or alternate modules into the code will be small. In its simplest form the code can evolve the dynamical trajectories of a set of particles in two or three dimensions using a module which implements either a Leapfrog or Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg integrator, selected by the user at compile time. The user may choose to allow the integrator to evolve the system using individual time steps for each particle or with a single, global time step for all. Particles may interact gravitationally as N-body particles, and all or any subset may also interact hydrodynamically, using the smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) method by selecting the SPH module. A third particle species can be included with a module to model massive point particles which may accrete nearby SPH or N-body particles. Such particles may be used to model, e.g., stars in a molecular cloud. Free boundary conditions are implemented by default, and a module may be selected to include periodic boundary conditions. We use a binary "Press" tree to organize particles for rapid access in gravity and SPH calculations. Modules implementing an interface with special purpose "GRAPE" hardware may also be selected to accelerate the gravity calculations. If available, forces obtained from the GRAPE coprocessors may be transparently substituted for those obtained from the tree, or both tree and GRAPE may be used as a combination GRAPE/tree code. The code may be run without

  18. VINE-A NUMERICAL CODE FOR SIMULATING ASTROPHYSICAL SYSTEMS USING PARTICLES. I. DESCRIPTION OF THE PHYSICS AND THE NUMERICAL METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzstein, M.; Nelson, Andrew F.; Naab, T.; Burkert, A.

    2009-10-01

    We present a numerical code for simulating the evolution of astrophysical systems using particles to represent the underlying fluid flow. The code is written in Fortran 95 and is designed to be versatile, flexible, and extensible, with modular options that can be selected either at the time the code is compiled or at run time through a text input file. We include a number of general purpose modules describing a variety of physical processes commonly required in the astrophysical community and we expect that the effort required to integrate additional or alternate modules into the code will be small. In its simplest form the code can evolve the dynamical trajectories of a set of particles in two or three dimensions using a module which implements either a Leapfrog or Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg integrator, selected by the user at compile time. The user may choose to allow the integrator to evolve the system using individual time steps for each particle or with a single, global time step for all. Particles may interact gravitationally as N-body particles, and all or any subset may also interact hydrodynamically, using the smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) method by selecting the SPH module. A third particle species can be included with a module to model massive point particles which may accrete nearby SPH or N-body particles. Such particles may be used to model, e.g., stars in a molecular cloud. Free boundary conditions are implemented by default, and a module may be selected to include periodic boundary conditions. We use a binary 'Press' tree to organize particles for rapid access in gravity and SPH calculations. Modules implementing an interface with special purpose 'GRAPE' hardware may also be selected to accelerate the gravity calculations. If available, forces obtained from the GRAPE coprocessors may be transparently substituted for those obtained from the tree, or both tree and GRAPE may be used as a combination GRAPE/tree code. The code may be run without

  19. Implementation and performance of FDPS: a framework for developing parallel particle simulation codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasawa, Masaki; Tanikawa, Ataru; Hosono, Natsuki; Nitadori, Keigo; Muranushi, Takayuki; Makino, Junichiro

    2016-08-01

    We present the basic idea, implementation, measured performance, and performance model of FDPS (Framework for Developing Particle Simulators). FDPS is an application-development framework which helps researchers to develop simulation programs using particle methods for large-scale distributed-memory parallel supercomputers. A particle-based simulation program for distributed-memory parallel computers needs to perform domain decomposition, exchange of particles which are not in the domain of each computing node, and gathering of the particle information in other nodes which are necessary for interaction calculation. Also, even if distributed-memory parallel computers are not used, in order to reduce the amount of computation, algorithms such as the Barnes-Hut tree algorithm or the Fast Multipole Method should be used in the case of long-range interactions. For short-range interactions, some methods to limit the calculation to neighbor particles are required. FDPS provides all of these functions which are necessary for efficient parallel execution of particle-based simulations as "templates," which are independent of the actual data structure of particles and the functional form of the particle-particle interaction. By using FDPS, researchers can write their programs with the amount of work necessary to write a simple, sequential and unoptimized program of O(N2) calculation cost, and yet the program, once compiled with FDPS, will run efficiently on large-scale parallel supercomputers. A simple gravitational N-body program can be written in around 120 lines. We report the actual performance of these programs and the performance model. The weak scaling performance is very good, and almost linear speed-up was obtained for up to the full system of the K computer. The minimum calculation time per timestep is in the range of 30 ms (N = 107) to 300 ms (N = 109). These are currently limited by the time for the calculation of the domain decomposition and communication

  20. Application of particle and lattice codes to simulation of hydraulic fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damjanac, Branko; Detournay, Christine; Cundall, Peter A.

    2016-04-01

    With the development of unconventional oil and gas reservoirs over the last 15 years, the understanding and capability to model the propagation of hydraulic fractures in inhomogeneous and naturally fractured reservoirs has become very important for the petroleum industry (but also for some other industries like mining and geothermal). Particle-based models provide advantages over other models and solutions for the simulation of fracturing of rock masses that cannot be assumed to be continuous and homogeneous. It has been demonstrated (Potyondy and Cundall Int J Rock Mech Min Sci Geomech Abstr 41:1329-1364, 2004) that particle models based on a simple force criterion for fracture propagation match theoretical solutions and scale effects derived using the principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). The challenge is how to apply these models effectively (i.e., with acceptable models sizes and computer run times) to the coupled hydro-mechanical problems of relevant time and length scales for practical field applications (i.e., reservoir scale and hours of injection time). A formulation of a fully coupled hydro-mechanical particle-based model and its application to the simulation of hydraulic treatment of unconventional reservoirs are presented. Model validation by comparing with available analytical asymptotic solutions (penny-shape crack) and some examples of field application (e.g., interaction with DFN) are also included.

  1. Particle entry through sash in the magnetopause with a dawndard IMF as simulated by a 3-D EM particle code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, D.; Yan, X.; Lembege, B.; Nishikawa, K.

    2003-12-01

    We report a new progress in the long-term effort to represent the global interaction of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetosphere using a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle code with the improved resolutions using the HPF Tristan code. After a quasi-steady state is established with an unmagnetized solar wind we gradually switch on a northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), which causes a magnetic reconnection at the nightside cusps and the magnetosphere to be depolarized. In the case that the northward IMF is switched gradually to dawnward, there is no signature of reconnection in the near-Earth magnetotail as in the case with the southward turning. On the contrary analysis of magnetic fields in the magnetopause confirms a signature of magnetic reconnection at both the dawnside and duskside. And the plasma sheet in the near-Earth magnetotail clearly thins as in the case of southward turning. Arrival of dawnward IMF to the magnetopause creates a reconnection groove which cause particle entry into the deep region of the magnetosphere via field lines that go near the magnetopause. This deep connection is more fully recognized tailward of Earth. The flank weak-field fan joins onto the plasma sheet and the current sheet to form a geometrical feature called the cross-tail S that structurally integrates the magnetopause and the tail interior. This structure contributes to direct plasma entry between the magnetosheath to the inner magnetosphere and plasma sheet, in which the entry process heats the magnetosheath plasma to plasma sheet temperatures. These phenomena have been found by Cluster observations. Further investigation with Cluster observations will provide new insights for unsolved problems such as hot flow anomalies (HFAs), substorms, and storm-substorm relationship. 3-D movies with sash structure will be presented at the meeting.

  2. Giant impacts during planet formation: Parallel tree code simulations using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Randi L.

    There is both theoretical and observational evidence that giant planets collided with objects ≥ Mearth during their evolution. These impacts may play a key role in giant planet formation. This paper describes impacts of a ˜ Earth-mass object onto a suite of proto-giant-planets, as simulated using an SPH parallel tree code. We run 6 simulations, varying the impact angle and evolutionary stage of the proto-Jupiter. We find that it is possible for an impactor to free some mass from the core of the proto-planet it impacts through direct collision, as well as to make physical contact with the core yet escape partially, or even completely, intact. None of the 6 cases we consider produced a solid disk or resulted in a net decrease in the core mass of the pinto-planet (since the mass decrease due to disruption was outweighed by the increase due to the addition of the impactor's mass to the core). However, we suggest parameters which may have these effects, and thus decrease core mass and formation time in protoplanetary models and/or create satellite systems. We find that giant impacts can remove significant envelope mass from forming giant planets, leaving only 2 MEarth of gas, similar to Uranus and Neptune. They can also create compositional inhomogeneities in planetary cores, which creates differences in planetary thermal emission characteristics.

  3. Giant Impacts During Planet Formation: Parallel Tree Code Simulations Using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R.; Bodenheimer, P.; Asphaug, E.

    2000-12-01

    There is both theoretical and observational evidence that giant planets collided with objects with mass >= Mearth during their evolution. These impacts may help shorten planetary formation timescales by changing the opacity of the planetary atmosphere to allow quicker cooling. They may also redistribute heavy metals within giant planets, affect the core/envelope mass ratio, and help determine the ratio of emitted to absorbed energy within giant planets. Thus, the researchers propose to simulate the impact of a ~ Earth-mass object onto a proto-giant-planet with SPH. Results of the SPH collision models will be input into a steady-state planetary evolution code and the effect of impacts on formation timescales, core/envelope mass ratios, density profiles, and thermal emissions of giant planets will be quantified. The collision will be modelled using a modified version of an SPH routine which simulates the collision of two polytropes. The Saumon-Chabrier and Tillotson equations of state will replace the polytropic equation of state. The parallel tree algorithm of Olson & Packer will be used for the domain decomposition and neighbor search necessary to calculate pressure and self-gravity efficiently. This work is funded by the NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program.

  4. Simulation of the DIII-D Beam Ion Heating Experiment Using A Monte-Carlo Particle Code Combined With a Full Wave Code

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, M.; Chan, V. S.; Green, D.; Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2009-11-26

    To fully account for finite drift orbit effect of fast ions on wave-particle interaction in ion-cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF) heating experiments in tokamaks, the 5-D finite orbit Monte-Carlo plasma distribution solver ORBIT-RF is coupled with the 2-D full wave code AORSA in a self-consistent way. Comparison results of ORBIT-RF/AORSA simulation against fast-ion D{sub {alpha}}(FIDA) measurement of fast-ion distribution as well as CQL3D/ray-tracing simulation with zero-orbit approximation in the DIII-D ICRF wave beam-ion acceleration experiment are presented. Preliminary ORBIT-RF/AORSA results suggest that finite orbit width effects may explain the outward radial shift of the spatial profile measured by FIDA.

  5. Simulation of Alfvén eigenmode bursts using a hybrid code for nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics and energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todo, Y.; Berk, H. L.; Breizman, B. N.

    2012-03-01

    A hybrid simulation code for nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and energetic-particle dynamics has been extended to simulate recurrent bursts of Alfvén eigenmodes by implementing the energetic-particle source, collisions and losses. The Alfvén eigenmode bursts with synchronization of multiple modes and beam ion losses at each burst are successfully simulated with nonlinear MHD effects for the physics condition similar to a reduced simulation for a TFTR experiment (Wong et al 1991 Phys. Rev. Lett. 66 1874, Todo et al 2003 Phys. Plasmas 10 2888). It is demonstrated with a comparison between nonlinear MHD and linear MHD simulation results that the nonlinear MHD effects significantly reduce both the saturation amplitude of the Alfvén eigenmodes and the beam ion losses. Two types of time evolution are found depending on the MHD dissipation coefficients, namely viscosity, resistivity and diffusivity. The Alfvén eigenmode bursts take place for higher dissipation coefficients with roughly 10% drop in stored beam energy and the maximum amplitude of the dominant magnetic fluctuation harmonic δBm/n/B ~ 5 × 10-3 at the mode peak location inside the plasma. Quadratic dependence of beam ion loss rate on magnetic fluctuation amplitude is found for the bursting evolution in the nonlinear MHD simulation. For lower dissipation coefficients, the amplitude of the Alfvén eigenmodes is at steady levels δBm/n/B ~ 2 × 10-3 and the beam ion losses take place continuously. The beam ion pressure profiles are similar among the different dissipation coefficients, and the stored beam energy is higher for higher dissipation coefficients.

  6. LFSC - Linac Feedback Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Valentin; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    The computer program LFSC (Simulation Code>) is a numerical tool for simulation beam based feedback in high performance linacs. The code LFSC is based on the earlier version developed by a collective of authors at SLAC (L.Hendrickson, R. McEwen, T. Himel, H. Shoaee, S. Shah, P. Emma, P. Schultz) during 1990-2005. That code was successively used in simulation of SLC, TESLA, CLIC and NLC projects. It can simulate as pulse-to-pulse feedback on timescale corresponding to 5-100 Hz, as slower feedbacks, operating in the 0.1-1 Hz range in the Main Linac and Beam Delivery System. The code LFSC is running under Matlab for MS Windows operating system. It contains about 30,000 lines of source code in more than 260 subroutines. The code uses the LIAR ('Linear Accelerator Research code') for particle tracking under ground motion and technical noise perturbations. It uses the Guinea Pig code to simulate the luminosity performance. A set of input files includes the lattice description (XSIF format), and plane text files with numerical parameters, wake fields, ground motion data etc. The Matlab environment provides a flexible system for graphical output.

  7. Electrical Circuit Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Wix, Steven D.; Waters, Arlon J.; Shirley, David

    2001-08-09

    Massively-Parallel Electrical Circuit Simulation Code. CHILESPICE is a massively-arallel distributed-memory electrical circuit simulation tool that contains many enhanced radiation, time-based, and thermal features and models. Large scale electronic circuit simulation. Shared memory, parallel processing, enhance convergence. Sandia specific device models.

  8. Coalescence of two current loops with a kink instability simulated by a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Sakai, J.-I.; Zhao, Jie; Neubert, T.; Buneman, Oscar

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the dynamics of a coalescence of current loops using three-dimensional electromagnetic (EM) particle simulation code. Our focus is the investigation of such kinetic processes as energy trasnfer, heating particles, and electromagnetic emissions associated with a current loop coalescence which cannot be studied by MHD simulations. First, the two loops undergo a pinching oscillation due to a pressure imbalance between the inside and outside of the current loop. During the pinching oscillation, a kinetic kink instability is excited and electrons in the loops are heated perpendicularly to an ambient magnetic field. Next, the two current loops collide and coalesce, while at the same time a helical structure grows further. Subsequently, the perturbed current, which is due to these helically bunched electrons, can drive a whistler instability. It should be noted in this case that the whistler wave is excited by the kinetic kink instability and not a beam instability. After the coalescence of two helical loops, tilting motions can be observed in the direction of left-hand rotation, and the helical structure will relax resulting in strong plasma heating mostly in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. It is also shown that high-frequency electromagnetic waves can be emitted from the region where the two loops coalesce and propagate strongly in the direction of the electron drift velocity. These processes may be important in understanding heating mechansims for coronal loops as well as radio wave emission mechanisms from active regions of solar plasmas.

  9. TPM: Tree-Particle-Mesh code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bode, Paul

    2013-05-01

    TPM carries out collisionless (dark matter) cosmological N-body simulations, evolving a system of N particles as they move under their mutual gravitational interaction. It combines aspects of both Tree and Particle-Mesh algorithms. After the global PM forces are calculated, spatially distinct regions above a given density contrast are located; the tree code calculates the gravitational interactions inside these denser objects at higher spatial and temporal resolution. The code is parallel and uses MPI for message passing.

  10. Compressible Astrophysics Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, L.; Singer, M.

    2007-07-18

    This is an astrophysics simulation code involving a radiation diffusion module developed at LLNL coupled to compressible hydrodynamics and adaptive mesh infrastructure developed at LBNL. One intended application is to neutrino diffusion in core collapse supernovae.

  11. Developments of Electromagnetic Particle Simulation Code for Magnetic Reconnection Researches in Open System PASMO and Visualization Library VISMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, H.; Horiuchi, R.; Nunami, M.; Usami, S.; Ohno, N.

    2014-10-01

    As the capabilities of computers are improved, the sizes of simulations become greater and greater. In this situation, we have some big issues. One of them is how to develop an efficient simulation code, and another is how to visualize the large data by the simulation. In order to investigate magnetic reconnection from the microscopic viewpoint, we develop a three-dimensional electromagnetic PIC code in an open system (PASMO). For performing the code on a distributed memory and multi-processor computer system with a distributed parallel algorithm, we decompose three-dimensionally the simulation domain, and introduce the charge conservation scheme to exclude the global calculation, such as Poisson solver with FFT. In the visualization of the simulation data, we develop an in-situ visualization library VISMO for the PIC simulation to carry out the visualization in tandem with the simulation on the same computers. The simulation code with VISMO generates image files instead of raw data. We will discuss the performance of the new PASMO and the simulation results visualized by VISMO on the magnetic reconnection. Supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research from JSPS (Grant No. 23340182) and General Coordinated Research at NIFS (NIFS14KNSS046, NIFS13KNXN260 and NIFS13KNTS024).

  12. Simulation of halo particles with Simpsons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Shinji

    2003-12-01

    Recent code improvements and some simulation results of halo particles with Simpsons will be presented. We tried to identify resonance behavior of halo particles by looking at tune evolution of individual macro particle.

  13. A Description of the Full Particle Orbit Following SPIRAL Code for Simulating Fast-ion Experiments in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G.J.; Budny, R.V.; Bortolon, A.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Fu, G.Y.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Nazikian, R.; Valeo, E.; Van Zeeland, M.A.

    2012-07-27

    The numerical methods used in the full particle-orbit following SPIRAL code are described and a number of physics studies performed with the code are presented to illustrate its capabilities. The SPIRAL code is a test-particle code and is a powerful numerical tool to interpret and plan fast-ion experiments in Tokamaks. Gyro-orbit effects are important for fast ions in low-field machines such as NSTX and to a lesser extent in DIII-D. A number of physics studies are interlaced between the description of the code to illustrate its capabilities. Results on heat loads generated by a localized error-field on the DIII-D wall are compared to measurements. The enhanced Triton losses caused by the same localized error-field are calculated and compared to measured neutron signals. MHD activity such as tearing modes and Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmodes (TAEs) have a profound effect on the fast-ion content of Tokamak plasmas and SPIRAL can calculate the effects of MHD activity on the confined and lost fast-ion population as illustrated for a burst of TAE activity in NSTX. The interaction between Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating and fast ions depends solely on the gyro-motion of the fast ions and is captured exactly in the SPIRAL code. A calculation of ICRF absorption on beam ions in ITER is presented. The effects of high harmonic fast wave heating on the beam-ion slowing-down distribution in NSTX is also studied.

  14. A description of the full-particle-orbit-following SPIRAL code for simulating fast-ion experiments in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, G. J.; Budny, R. V.; Bortolon, A.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Fu, G. Y.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Nazikian, R.; Valeo, E.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2013-02-01

    The numerical methods used in the full particle-orbit following SPIRAL code are described and a number of physics studies performed with the code are presented to illustrate its capabilities. The SPIRAL code is a test-particle code and is a powerful numerical tool to interpret and plan fast-ion experiments in tokamaks. Gyro-orbit effects are important for fast ions in low-field machines such as NSTX and to a lesser extent in DIII-D. A number of physics studies are interlaced between the description of the code to illustrate its capabilities. Results on heat loads generated by a localized error-field on the DIII-D wall are compared with measurements. The enhanced Triton losses caused by the same localized error-field are calculated and compared with measured neutron signals. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity such as tearing modes and toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) have a profound effect on the fast-ion content of tokamak plasmas and SPIRAL can calculate the effects of MHD activity on the confined and lost fast-ion population as illustrated for a burst of TAE activity in NSTX. The interaction between ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating and fast ions depends solely on the gyro-motion of the fast ions and is captured exactly in the SPIRAL code. A calculation of ICRF absorption on beam ions in ITER is presented. The effects of high harmonic fast wave heating on the beam-ion slowing-down distribution in NSTX is also studied.

  15. Radiation in Particle Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    More, R; Graziani, F; Glosli, J; Surh, M

    2010-11-19

    Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of megabars to thousands of gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present four methods that attempt a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The first method applies the Lienard-Weichert solution of Maxwell's equations for a classical particle whose motion is assumed to be known. The second method expands the electromagnetic field in normal modes (planewaves in a box with periodic boundary-conditions) and solves the equation for wave amplitudes coupled to the particle motion. The third method is a hybrid molecular dynamics/Monte Carlo (MD/MC) method which calculates radiation emitted or absorbed by electron-ion pairs during close collisions. The fourth method is a generalization of the third method to include small clusters of particles emitting radiation during close encounters: one electron simultaneously hitting two ions, two electrons simultaneously hitting one ion, etc. This approach is inspired by the virial expansion method of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Using a combination of these methods we believe it is possible to do atomic-scale particle simulations of

  16. A Large-Particle Monte Carlo Code for Simulating Non-Linear High-Energy Processes Near Compact Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Boris E.; Svensson, Roland; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Sikora, Marek

    1995-01-01

    High-energy radiation processes in compact cosmic objects are often expected to have a strongly non-linear behavior. Such behavior is shown, for example, by electron-positron pair cascades and the time evolution of relativistic proton distributions in dense radiation fields. Three independent techniques have been developed to simulate these non-linear problems: the kinetic equation approach; the phase-space density (PSD) Monte Carlo method; and the large-particle (LP) Monte Carlo method. In this paper, we present the latest version of the LP method and compare it with the other methods. The efficiency of the method in treating geometrically complex problems is illustrated by showing results of simulations of 1D, 2D and 3D systems. The method is shown to be powerful enough to treat non-spherical geometries, including such effects as bulk motion of the background plasma, reflection of radiation from cold matter, and anisotropic distributions of radiating particles. It can therefore be applied to simulate high-energy processes in such astrophysical systems as accretion discs with coronae, relativistic jets, pulsar magnetospheres and gamma-ray bursts.

  17. Three-dimensional electro-magnetic particle simulations of the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction with time-varying IMF using HPF TRISTAN code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, D. S.; Li, Y. T.; Xiao, C. J.; Yan, X. Y.

    A 3-D electromagnetic particle-in-cell code, TRISTAN code, has been developed as a High Performance Fortran (HPF) program on the Fujitsu Supercomputer VPP5000. The code is used to investigate kinetic plasma processes associated with the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction, specially on the relation between the interplanetary magnetic field and the particle flux in polar region.

  18. DELightcurveSimulation: Light curve simulation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Samuel D.

    2016-02-01

    DELightcurveSimulation simulates light curves with any given power spectral density and any probability density function, following the algorithm described in Emmanoulopoulos et al. (2013). The simulated products have exactly the same variability and statistical properties as the observed light curves. The code is a Python implementation of the Mathematica code provided by Emmanoulopoulos et al.

  19. Radiation in Particle Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    More, R M; Graziani, F R; Glosli, J; Surh, M

    2009-06-15

    Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of Megabars to thousands of Gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present four methods that attempt a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The first method applies the Lienard-Weichert solution of Maxwell's equations for a classical particle whose motion is assumed to be known (section 3). The second method expands the electromagnetic field in normal modes (plane-waves in a box with periodic boundary-conditions) and solves the equation for wave amplitudes coupled to the particle motion (section 4). The third method is a hybrid MD/MC (molecular dynamics/Monte Carlo) method which calculates radiation emitted or absorbed by electron-ion pairs during close collisions (section 5). The fourth method is a generalization of the third method to include small clusters of particles emitting radiation during close encounters: one electron simultaneously hitting two ions, two electrons simultaneously hitting one ion, etc.(section 6). This approach is inspired by the Virial expansion method of equilibrium statistical mechanics.

  20. Development of the 3D Parallel Particle-In-Cell Code IMPACT to Simulate the Ion Beam Transport System of VENUS (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D. S.; Ryne, R. D.

    2005-03-01

    The superconducting ECR ion source VENUS serves as the prototype injector ion source for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The RIA driver linac requires a great variety of high charge state ion beams with up to an order of magnitude higher intensity than currently achievable with conventional ECR ion sources. In order to design the beam line optics of the low energy beam line for the RIA front end for the wide parameter range required for the RIA driver accelerator, reliable simulations of the ion beam extraction from the ECR ion source through the ion mass analyzing system are essential. The RIA low energy beam transport line must be able to transport intense beams (up to 10 mA) of light and heavy ions at 30 keV. For this purpose, LBNL is developing the parallel 3D particle-in-cell code IMPACT to simulate the ion beam transport from the ECR extraction aperture through the analyzing section of the low energy transport system. IMPACT, a parallel, particle-in-cell code, is currently used to model the superconducting RF linac section of RIA and is being modified in order to simulate DC beams from the ECR ion source extraction. By using the high performance of parallel supercomputing we will be able to account consistently for the changing space charge in the extraction region and the analyzing section. A progress report and early results in the modeling of the VENUS source will be presented.

  1. Development of the 3D Parallel Particle-In-Cell Code IMPACT to Simulate the Ion Beam Transport System of VENUS (Abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D.S.; Ryne, R.D.

    2005-03-15

    The superconducting ECR ion source VENUS serves as the prototype injector ion source for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The RIA driver linac requires a great variety of high charge state ion beams with up to an order of magnitude higher intensity than currently achievable with conventional ECR ion sources. In order to design the beam line optics of the low energy beam line for the RIA front end for the wide parameter range required for the RIA driver accelerator, reliable simulations of the ion beam extraction from the ECR ion source through the ion mass analyzing system are essential. The RIA low energy beam transport line must be able to transport intense beams (up to 10 mA) of light and heavy ions at 30 keV.For this purpose, LBNL is developing the parallel 3D particle-in-cell code IMPACT to simulate the ion beam transport from the ECR extraction aperture through the analyzing section of the low energy transport system. IMPACT, a parallel, particle-in-cell code, is currently used to model the superconducting RF linac section of RIA and is being modified in order to simulate DC beams from the ECR ion source extraction. By using the high performance of parallel supercomputing we will be able to account consistently for the changing space charge in the extraction region and the analyzing section. A progress report and early results in the modeling of the VENUS source will be presented.

  2. Nonlinear fluid simulation of particle and heat fluxes during burst of ELMs on DIII-D with BOUT++ code [Fluid Simulation of Particle and Heat Fluxes during Burst of ELMs on DIID with BOUT++ code

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xia, T. Y.; Xu, X. Q.

    2015-09-01

    In order to study the distribution and evolution of the transient particle and heat fluxes during edge-localized mode (ELM) bursts, a BOUT++ six-field two-fluid model based on the Braginskii equations with non-ideal physics effects is used to simulate pedestal collapse in divertor geometry. We used the profiles from the DIII-D H-mode discharge #144382 with fast target heat flux measurements as the initial conditions for the simulations. Moreover, a flux-limited parallel thermal conduction is used with three values of the flux-limiting coefficientmore » $${{\\alpha}_{j}}$$ , free streaming model with $${{\\alpha}_{j}}=1$$ , sheath-limit with $${{\\alpha}_{j}}=0.05$$ , and one value in between. The studies show that a 20 times increase in $${{\\alpha}_{j}}$$ leads to ~6 times increase in the heat flux amplitude to both the inner and outer targets, and the widths of the fluxes are also expanded. The sheath-limit model of flux-limiting coefficient is found to be the most appropriate one, which shows ELM sizes close to the measurements. The evolution of the density profile during the burst of ELMs of DIII-D discharge #144382 is simulated, and the collapse in width and depth of $${{n}_{\\text{e}}}$$ are reproduced at different time steps. The growing process of the profiles for the heat flux at divertor targets during the burst of ELMs measured by IRTV (infrared television) is also reproduced by this model. The widths of heat fluxes towards targets are a little narrower, and the peak amplitudes are twice the measurements possibly due to the lack of a model of divertor radiation which can effectively reduce the heat fluxes. The magnetic flutter combined with parallel thermal conduction is found to be able to increase the total heat loss by around 33% since the magnetic flutter terms provide the additional conductive heat transport in the radial direction. Finally, the heat flux profile at both the inner and outer targets is obviously broadened by magnetic flutter. The

  3. Nonlinear fluid simulation of particle and heat fluxes during burst of ELMs on DIII-D with BOUT++ code [Fluid Simulation of Particle and Heat Fluxes during Burst of ELMs on DIID with BOUT++ code

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, T. Y.; Xu, X. Q.

    2015-09-01

    In order to study the distribution and evolution of the transient particle and heat fluxes during edge-localized mode (ELM) bursts, a BOUT++ six-field two-fluid model based on the Braginskii equations with non-ideal physics effects is used to simulate pedestal collapse in divertor geometry. We used the profiles from the DIII-D H-mode discharge #144382 with fast target heat flux measurements as the initial conditions for the simulations. Moreover, a flux-limited parallel thermal conduction is used with three values of the flux-limiting coefficient ${{\\alpha}_{j}}$ , free streaming model with ${{\\alpha}_{j}}=1$ , sheath-limit with ${{\\alpha}_{j}}=0.05$ , and one value in between. The studies show that a 20 times increase in ${{\\alpha}_{j}}$ leads to ~6 times increase in the heat flux amplitude to both the inner and outer targets, and the widths of the fluxes are also expanded. The sheath-limit model of flux-limiting coefficient is found to be the most appropriate one, which shows ELM sizes close to the measurements. The evolution of the density profile during the burst of ELMs of DIII-D discharge #144382 is simulated, and the collapse in width and depth of ${{n}_{\\text{e}}}$ are reproduced at different time steps. The growing process of the profiles for the heat flux at divertor targets during the burst of ELMs measured by IRTV (infrared television) is also reproduced by this model. The widths of heat fluxes towards targets are a little narrower, and the peak amplitudes are twice the measurements possibly due to the lack of a model of divertor radiation which can effectively reduce the heat fluxes. The magnetic flutter combined with parallel thermal conduction is found to be able to increase the total heat loss by around 33% since the magnetic flutter terms provide the additional conductive heat transport in the radial direction. Finally, the heat flux profile at both the inner and outer targets is obviously broadened by magnetic flutter. The lobe structures

  4. High Energy Particle Transport Code System.

    2003-12-17

    Version 00 NMTC/JAM is an upgraded version of the code CCC-694/NMTC-JAERI97, which was developed in 1982 at JAERI and is based on the CCC-161/NMTC code system. NMTC/JAM simulates high energy nuclear reactions and nuclear meson transport processes. The applicable energy range of NMTC/JAM was extended in principle up to 200 GeV for nucleons and mesons by introducing the high energy nuclear reaction code Jet-Aa Microscopic (JAM) for the intra-nuclear cascade part. For the evaporation andmore » fission process, a new model, GEM, can be used to describe the light nucleus production from the excited residual nucleus. According to the extension of the applicable energy, the nucleon-nucleus non-elastic, elastic and differential elastic cross section data were upgraded. In addition, the particle transport in a magnetic field was implemented for beam transport calculations. Some new tally functions were added, and the format of input and output of data is more user friendly. These new calculation functions and utilities provide a tool to carry out reliable neutronics study of a large scale target system with complex geometry more accurately and easily than with the previous model. It implements an intranuclear cascade model taking account of the in-medium nuclear effects and the preequilibrium calculation model based on the exciton one. For treating the nucleon transport process, the nucleon-nucleus cross sections are revised to those derived by the systematics of Pearlstein. Moreover, the level density parameter derived by Ignatyuk is included as a new option for particle evaporation calculation. A geometry package based on the Combinatorial Geometry with multi-array system and the importance sampling technique is implemented in the code. Tally function is also employed for obtaining such physical quantities as neutron energy spectra, heat deposition and nuclide yield without editing a history file. The code can simulate both the primary spallation reaction and the

  5. Error coding simulations in C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Viveca K.

    1994-01-01

    When data is transmitted through a noisy channel, errors are produced within the data rendering it indecipherable. Through the use of error control coding techniques, the bit error rate can be reduced to any desired level without sacrificing the transmission data rate. The Astrionics Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center has decided to use a modular, end-to-end telemetry data simulator to simulate the transmission of data from flight to ground and various methods of error control. The simulator includes modules for random data generation, data compression, Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) transfer frame formation, error correction/detection, error generation and error statistics. The simulator utilizes a concatenated coding scheme which includes CCSDS standard (255,223) Reed-Solomon (RS) code over GF(2(exp 8)) with interleave depth of 5 as the outermost code, (7, 1/2) convolutional code as an inner code and CCSDS recommended (n, n-16) cyclic redundancy check (CRC) code as the innermost code, where n is the number of information bits plus 16 parity bits. The received signal-to-noise for a desired bit error rate is greatly reduced through the use of forward error correction techniques. Even greater coding gain is provided through the use of a concatenated coding scheme. Interleaving/deinterleaving is necessary to randomize burst errors which may appear at the input of the RS decoder. The burst correction capability length is increased in proportion to the interleave depth. The modular nature of the simulator allows for inclusion or exclusion of modules as needed. This paper describes the development and operation of the simulator, the verification of a C-language Reed-Solomon code, and the possibility of using Comdisco SPW(tm) as a tool for determining optimal error control schemes.

  6. Error coding simulations in C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Viveca K.

    1994-10-01

    When data is transmitted through a noisy channel, errors are produced within the data rendering it indecipherable. Through the use of error control coding techniques, the bit error rate can be reduced to any desired level without sacrificing the transmission data rate. The Astrionics Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center has decided to use a modular, end-to-end telemetry data simulator to simulate the transmission of data from flight to ground and various methods of error control. The simulator includes modules for random data generation, data compression, Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) transfer frame formation, error correction/detection, error generation and error statistics. The simulator utilizes a concatenated coding scheme which includes CCSDS standard (255,223) Reed-Solomon (RS) code over GF(2(exp 8)) with interleave depth of 5 as the outermost code, (7, 1/2) convolutional code as an inner code and CCSDS recommended (n, n-16) cyclic redundancy check (CRC) code as the innermost code, where n is the number of information bits plus 16 parity bits. The received signal-to-noise for a desired bit error rate is greatly reduced through the use of forward error correction techniques. Even greater coding gain is provided through the use of a concatenated coding scheme. Interleaving/deinterleaving is necessary to randomize burst errors which may appear at the input of the RS decoder. The burst correction capability length is increased in proportion to the interleave depth. The modular nature of the simulator allows for inclusion or exclusion of modules as needed. This paper describes the development and operation of the simulator, the verification of a C-language Reed-Solomon code, and the possibility of using Comdisco SPW(tm) as a tool for determining optimal error control schemes.

  7. Flight code validation simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, B.A.

    1995-08-01

    An End-To-End Simulation capability for software development and validation of missile flight software on the actual embedded computer has been developed utilizing a 486 PC, i860 DSP coprocessor, embedded flight computer and custom dual port memory interface hardware. This system allows real-time interrupt driven embedded flight software development and checkout. The flight software runs in a Sandia Digital Airborne Computer (SANDAC) and reads and writes actual hardware sensor locations in which IMU (Inertial Measurements Unit) data resides. The simulator provides six degree of freedom real-time dynamic simulation, accurate real-time discrete sensor data and acts on commands and discretes from the flight computer. This system was utilized in the development and validation of the successful premier flight of the Digital Miniature Attitude Reference System (DMARS) in January 1995 at the White Sands Missile Range on a two stage attitude controlled sounding rocket.

  8. HADES, A Radiographic Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Aufderheide, M.B.; Slone, D.M.; Schach von Wittenau, A.E.

    2000-08-18

    We describe features of the HADES radiographic simulation code. We begin with a discussion of why it is useful to simulate transmission radiography. The capabilities of HADES are described, followed by an application of HADES to a dynamic experiment recently performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. We describe quantitative comparisons between experimental data and HADES simulations using a copper step wedge. We conclude with a short discussion of future work planned for HADES.

  9. Multidimensional multiphysics simulation of TRISO particle fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, J. D.; Williamson, R. L.; Novascone, S. R.; Perez, D. M.; Spencer, B. W.; Pastore, G.

    2013-11-01

    Multidimensional multiphysics analysis of TRISO-coated particle fuel using the BISON finite element nuclear fuels code is described. The governing equations and material models applicable to particle fuel and implemented in BISON are outlined. Code verification based on a recent IAEA benchmarking exercise is described, and excellent comparisons are reported. Multiple TRISO-coated particles of increasing geometric complexity are considered. The code's ability to use the same algorithms and models to solve problems of varying dimensionality from 1D through 3D is demonstrated. The code provides rapid solutions of 1D spherically symmetric and 2D axially symmetric models, and its scalable parallel processing capability allows for solutions of large, complex 3D models. Additionally, the flexibility to easily include new physical and material models and straightforward ability to couple to lower length scale simulations makes BISON a powerful tool for simulation of coated-particle fuel. Future code development activities and potential applications are identified.

  10. An implicit Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic code

    SciTech Connect

    Charles E. Knapp

    2000-04-01

    An implicit version of the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) code SPHINX has been written and is working. In conjunction with the SPHINX code the new implicit code models fluids and solids under a wide range of conditions. SPH codes are Lagrangian, meshless and use particles to model the fluids and solids. The implicit code makes use of the Krylov iterative techniques for solving large linear-systems and a Newton-Raphson method for non-linear corrections. It uses numerical derivatives to construct the Jacobian matrix. It uses sparse techniques to save on memory storage and to reduce the amount of computation. It is believed that this is the first implicit SPH code to use Newton-Krylov techniques, and is also the first implicit SPH code to model solids. A description of SPH and the techniques used in the implicit code are presented. Then, the results of a number of tests cases are discussed, which include a shock tube problem, a Rayleigh-Taylor problem, a breaking dam problem, and a single jet of gas problem. The results are shown to be in very good agreement with analytic solutions, experimental results, and the explicit SPHINX code. In the case of the single jet of gas case it has been demonstrated that the implicit code can do a problem in much shorter time than the explicit code. The problem was, however, very unphysical, but it does demonstrate the potential of the implicit code. It is a first step toward a useful implicit SPH code.

  11. Macroscale particle simulation of kinetic Alfven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, Motohiko; Sato, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, Akira

    1987-01-01

    Two types of simulations of the kinetic Alfven wave are presented using a macroscale particle simulation code (Tanaka and Sato, 1986) which enables individual particle dynamics to be followed in the MHD scales. In this code, low frequency electromagnetic fields are solved by eliminating high frequency oscillations such as the light modes, and the scalar potential electric field is solved by eliminating Lagrangian oscillations. The dependences of the frequency and the Landau damping on the perpendicular wavenumber were studied, and good agreement was found between simulation and theoretical predictions. Some fundamental nonlinear interactions of the kinetic Alfven wave with the particles (parallel acceleration of the electrons) were also noted.

  12. SIMULATING THE COMMON ENVELOPE PHASE OF A RED GIANT USING SMOOTHED-PARTICLE HYDRODYNAMICS AND UNIFORM-GRID CODES

    SciTech Connect

    Passy, Jean-Claude; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; De Marco, Orsola; Fryer, Chris L.; Diehl, Steven; Rockefeller, Gabriel; Herwig, Falk; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Bryan, Greg L.

    2012-01-01

    We use three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations to study the rapid infall phase of the common envelope (CE) interaction of a red giant branch star of mass equal to 0.88 M{sub Sun} and a companion star of mass ranging from 0.9 down to 0.1 M{sub Sun }. We first compare the results obtained using two different numerical techniques with different resolutions, and find very good agreement overall. We then compare the outcomes of those simulations with observed systems thought to have gone through a CE. The simulations fail to reproduce those systems in the sense that most of the envelope of the donor remains bound at the end of the simulations and the final orbital separations between the donor's remnant and the companion, ranging from 26.8 down to 5.9 R{sub Sun }, are larger than the ones observed. We suggest that this discrepancy vouches for recombination playing an essential role in the ejection of the envelope and/or significant shrinkage of the orbit happening in the subsequent phase.

  13. Simulation Code Development and Its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zenghai

    2015-10-01

    Under the support of the U.S. DOE SciDAC program, SLAC has been developing a suite of 3D parallel finite-element codes aimed at high-accuracy, high-fidelity electromagnetic and beam physics simulations for the design and optimization of next-generation particle accelerators. Running on the latest supercomputers, these codes have made great strides in advancing the state of the art in applied math and computer science at the petascale that enable the integrated modeling of electromagnetics, self-consistent Particle-In-Cell (PIC) particle dynamics as well as thermal, mechanical, and multi-physics effects. This paper will present the latest development and application of ACE3P to a wide range of accelerator projects.

  14. Aerosol kinetic code "AERFORM": Model, validation and simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainullin, K. G.; Golubev, A. I.; Petrov, A. M.; Piskunov, V. N.

    2016-06-01

    The aerosol kinetic code "AERFORM" is modified to simulate droplet and ice particle formation in mixed clouds. The splitting method is used to calculate condensation and coagulation simultaneously. The method is calibrated with analytic solutions of kinetic equations. Condensation kinetic model is based on cloud particle growth equation, mass and heat balance equations. The coagulation kinetic model includes Brownian, turbulent and precipitation effects. The real values are used for condensation and coagulation growth of water droplets and ice particles. The model and the simulation results for two full-scale cloud experiments are presented. The simulation model and code may be used autonomously or as an element of another code.

  15. Battery Particle Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    2014-09-15

    Two simulations show the differences between a battery being drained at a slower rate, over a full hour, versus a faster rate, only six minutes (a tenth of an hour). In both cases battery particles go from being fully charged (green) to fully drained (red), but there are significant differences in the patterns of discharge based on the rate.

  16. Multidimensional Multiphysics Simulation of TRISO Particle Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    J. D. Hales; R. L. Williamson; S. R. Novascone; D. M. Perez; B. W. Spencer; G. Pastore

    2013-11-01

    Multidimensional multiphysics analysis of TRISO-coated particle fuel using the BISON finite-element based nuclear fuels code is described. The governing equations and material models applicable to particle fuel and implemented in BISON are outlined. Code verification based on a recent IAEA benchmarking exercise is described, and excellant comparisons are reported. Multiple TRISO-coated particles of increasing geometric complexity are considered. It is shown that the code's ability to perform large-scale parallel computations permits application to complex 3D phenomena while very efficient solutions for either 1D spherically symmetric or 2D axisymmetric geometries are straightforward. Additionally, the flexibility to easily include new physical and material models and uncomplicated ability to couple to lower length scale simulations makes BISON a powerful tool for simulation of coated-particle fuel. Future code development activities and potential applications are identified.

  17. TOPAS Tool for Particle Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, Joseph

    2013-05-30

    TOPAS lets users simulate the passage of subatomic particles moving through any kind of radiation therapy treatment system, can import a patient geometry, can record dose and other quantities, has advanced graphics, and is fully four-dimensional (3D plus time) to handle the most challenging time-dependent aspects of modern cancer treatments.TOPAS unlocks the power of the most accurate particle transport simulation technique, the Monte Carlo (MC) method, while removing the painstaking coding work such methods used to require. Research physicists can use TOPAS to improve delivery systems towards safer and more effective radiation therapy treatments, easily setting up and running complex simulations that previously used to take months of preparation. Clinical physicists can use TOPAS to increase accuracy while reducing side effects, simulating patient-specific treatment plans at the touch of a button. TOPAS is designed as a “user code” layered on top of the Geant4 Simulation Toolkit. TOPAS includes the standard Geant4 toolkit, plus additional code to make Geant4 easier to control and to extend Geant4 functionality. TOPAS aims to make proton simulation both “reliable” and “repeatable.” “Reliable” means both accurate physics and a high likelihood to simulate precisely what the user intended to simulate, reducing issues of wrong units, wrong materials, wrong scoring locations, etc. “Repeatable” means not just getting the same result from one simulation to another, but being able to easily restore a previously used setup and reducing sources of error when a setup is passed from one user to another. TOPAS control system incorporates key lessons from safety management, proactively removing possible sources of user error such as line-ordering mistakes In control files. TOPAS has been used to model proton therapy treatment examples including the UCSF eye treatment head, the MGH stereotactic alignment in radiosurgery treatment head and the MGH gantry treatment heads

  18. TOPAS Tool for Particle Simulation

    2013-05-30

    TOPAS lets users simulate the passage of subatomic particles moving through any kind of radiation therapy treatment system, can import a patient geometry, can record dose and other quantities, has advanced graphics, and is fully four-dimensional (3D plus time) to handle the most challenging time-dependent aspects of modern cancer treatments.TOPAS unlocks the power of the most accurate particle transport simulation technique, the Monte Carlo (MC) method, while removing the painstaking coding work such methods usedmore » to require. Research physicists can use TOPAS to improve delivery systems towards safer and more effective radiation therapy treatments, easily setting up and running complex simulations that previously used to take months of preparation. Clinical physicists can use TOPAS to increase accuracy while reducing side effects, simulating patient-specific treatment plans at the touch of a button. TOPAS is designed as a “user code” layered on top of the Geant4 Simulation Toolkit. TOPAS includes the standard Geant4 toolkit, plus additional code to make Geant4 easier to control and to extend Geant4 functionality. TOPAS aims to make proton simulation both “reliable” and “repeatable.” “Reliable” means both accurate physics and a high likelihood to simulate precisely what the user intended to simulate, reducing issues of wrong units, wrong materials, wrong scoring locations, etc. “Repeatable” means not just getting the same result from one simulation to another, but being able to easily restore a previously used setup and reducing sources of error when a setup is passed from one user to another. TOPAS control system incorporates key lessons from safety management, proactively removing possible sources of user error such as line-ordering mistakes In control files. TOPAS has been used to model proton therapy treatment examples including the UCSF eye treatment head, the MGH stereotactic alignment in radiosurgery treatment head and the MGH gantry

  19. Computer Code for Nanostructure Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filikhin, Igor; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2009-01-01

    Due to their small size, nanostructures can have stress and thermal gradients that are larger than any macroscopic analogue. These gradients can lead to specific regions that are susceptible to failure via processes such as plastic deformation by dislocation emission, chemical debonding, and interfacial alloying. A program has been developed that rigorously simulates and predicts optoelectronic properties of nanostructures of virtually any geometrical complexity and material composition. It can be used in simulations of energy level structure, wave functions, density of states of spatially configured phonon-coupled electrons, excitons in quantum dots, quantum rings, quantum ring complexes, and more. The code can be used to calculate stress distributions and thermal transport properties for a variety of nanostructures and interfaces, transport and scattering at nanoscale interfaces and surfaces under various stress states, and alloy compositional gradients. The code allows users to perform modeling of charge transport processes through quantum-dot (QD) arrays as functions of inter-dot distance, array order versus disorder, QD orientation, shape, size, and chemical composition for applications in photovoltaics and physical properties of QD-based biochemical sensors. The code can be used to study the hot exciton formation/relation dynamics in arrays of QDs of different shapes and sizes at different temperatures. It also can be used to understand the relation among the deposition parameters and inherent stresses, strain deformation, heat flow, and failure of nanostructures.

  20. Gyrokinetic particle simulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.W.

    1986-07-01

    A new type of particle simulation model based on the gyrophase-averaged Vlasov and Poisson equations is presented. The reduced system, in which particle gyrations are removed from the equations of motion while the finite Larmor radius effects are still preserved, is most suitable for studying low frequency microinstabilities in magnetized plasmas. It is feasible to simulate an elongated system (L/sub parallel/ >> L/sub perpendicular/) with a three-dimensional grid using the present model without resorting to the usual mode expansion technique, since there is essentially no restriction on the size of ..delta..x/sub parallel/ in a gyrokinetic plasma. The new approach also enables us to further separate the time and spatial scales of the simulation from those associated with global transport through the use of multiple spatial scale expansion. Thus, the model can be a very efficient tool for studying anomalous transport problems related to steady-state drift-wave turbulence in magnetic confinement devices. It can also be applied to other areas of plasma physics.

  1. Coulomb Collision Algorithms for Particle Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Bruce

    2006-04-01

    This paper surveys some of the particle code algorithms used to model Coulomb collisions in fully ionized plasmas, e.g., pair-wise operators such as the Takizuka-Abe^1 scheme and extensions^2, Langevin equation collision operators^3,4, and partially linearized gyrokinetic collisions operators for strongly magnetized plasmas.^5,6,7 Some recent experience is reported.^8 Issues such as physics completeness, accuracy, and comparative algorithm performance are highlighted. 1. T. Takizuka and H. Abe, J. Comput. Phys. 25, 205 (1977). 2. K. Nanbu, Phys. Rev. E 55, 4642 (1997). 3. M.E. Jones, et al., J. Comp. Phys. 123, 169 (1996). 4. W.M. Manheimer, M. Lampe, and G. Joyce, et al., J. Comp. Phys. 138, 565 (1997). 5. X.Q. Xu and M.N. Rosenbluth, Phys. Fluids B 3, 627 (1991). 6. A.M. Dimits and B.I. Cohen, Phys. Rev. E 49, 709 (1994). 7. Z. Lin, W. M. Tang, and W. W. Lee, Phys.Plasmas 2, 2975 (August 1995). 8. B.I. Cohen, et al., ``Effects of ion-ion collisions and inhomogeneity in two-dimensional kinetic ion simulations of stimulated Brillouin backscattering,'' accepted for publication in Phys. Plasmas (2006).

  2. FLUKA: A Multi-Particle Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, A.; Sala, P.R.; Fasso, A.; Ranft, J.; /Siegen U.

    2005-12-14

    This report describes the 2005 version of the Fluka particle transport code. The first part introduces the basic notions, describes the modular structure of the system, and contains an installation and beginner's guide. The second part complements this initial information with details about the various components of Fluka and how to use them. It concludes with a detailed history and bibliography.

  3. SPAMCART: a code for smoothed particle Monte Carlo radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, O.; Whitworth, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    We present a code for generating synthetic spectral energy distributions and intensity maps from smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation snapshots. The code is based on the Lucy Monte Carlo radiative transfer method, i.e. it follows discrete luminosity packets as they propagate through a density field, and then uses their trajectories to compute the radiative equilibrium temperature of the ambient dust. The sources can be extended and/or embedded, and discrete and/or diffuse. The density is not mapped on to a grid, and therefore the calculation is performed at exactly the same resolution as the hydrodynamics. We present two example calculations using this method. First, we demonstrate that the code strictly adheres to Kirchhoff's law of radiation. Secondly, we present synthetic intensity maps and spectra of an embedded protostellar multiple system. The algorithm uses data structures that are already constructed for other purposes in modern particle codes. It is therefore relatively simple to implement.

  4. Hybrid simulation codes with application to shocks and upstream waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winske, D.

    1985-01-01

    Hybrid codes in which part of the plasma is represented as particles and the rest as a fluid are discussed. In the past few years such codes with particle ions and massless, fluid electrons have been applied to space plasmas, especially to collisionless shocks. All of these simulation codes are one-dimensional and similar in structure, except for how the field equations are solved. The various approaches that are used (resistive Ohm's law, predictor-corrector, Hamiltonian) are described in detail and results from the various codes are compared with examples taken from collisionless shocks and low frequency wave phenomena upstream of shocks.

  5. Data simulation for the Associated Particle Imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Tunnell, L.N.

    1994-06-01

    A data simulation procedure for the Associated Particle Imaging (API) system has been developed by postprocessing output from the Monte Carlo Neutron Photon (MCNP) code. This paper compares the simulated results to our experimental data.

  6. PICsar: Particle in cell pulsar magnetosphere simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.

    2016-07-01

    PICsar simulates the magnetosphere of an aligned axisymmetric pulsar and can be used to simulate other arbitrary electromagnetics problems in axisymmetry. Written in Fortran, this special relativistic, electromagnetic, charge conservative particle in cell code features stretchable body-fitted coordinates that follow the surface of a sphere, simplifying the application of boundary conditions in the case of the aligned pulsar; a radiation absorbing outer boundary, which allows a steady state to be set up dynamically and maintained indefinitely from transient initial conditions; and algorithms for injection of charged particles into the simulation domain. PICsar is parallelized using MPI and has been used on research problems with ~1000 CPUs.

  7. Track-Structure Simulations for Charged Particles

    PubMed Central

    Dingfelder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Monte-Carlo track-structure simulations provide a detailed and accurate picture of radiation transport of charged particles through condensed matter of biological interest. Liquid water serves as surrogate for soft tissue and is used in most Monte-Carlo track-structure codes. Basic theories of radiation transport and track-structure simulations are discussed and differences to condensed history codes highlighted. Interaction cross sections for electrons, protons, alpha particles, light and heavy ions are required input data for track-structure simulations. Different calculation methods, including the plane-wave Born approximation, the dielectric theory, and semi-empirical approaches are presented using liquid water as a target. Low-energy electron transport and light ion transport are discussed as areas of special interest. PMID:23032889

  8. Variable Coded Modulation software simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sielicki, Thomas A.; Hamkins, Jon; Thorsen, Denise

    This paper reports on the design and performance of a new Variable Coded Modulation (VCM) system. This VCM system comprises eight of NASA's recommended codes from the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) standards, including four turbo and four AR4JA/C2 low-density parity-check codes, together with six modulations types (BPSK, QPSK, 8-PSK, 16-APSK, 32-APSK, 64-APSK). The signaling protocol for the transmission mode is based on a CCSDS recommendation. The coded modulation may be dynamically chosen, block to block, to optimize throughput.

  9. SU-E-T-590: Optimizing Magnetic Field Strengths with Matlab for An Ion-Optic System in Particle Therapy Consisting of Two Quadrupole Magnets for Subsequent Simulations with the Monte-Carlo Code FLUKA

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, K; Weber, U; Simeonov, Y; Zink, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Aim of this study was to optimize the magnetic field strengths of two quadrupole magnets in a particle therapy facility in order to obtain a beam quality suitable for spot beam scanning. Methods: The particle transport through an ion-optic system of a particle therapy facility consisting of the beam tube, two quadrupole magnets and a beam monitor system was calculated with the help of Matlab by using matrices that solve the equation of motion of a charged particle in a magnetic field and field-free region, respectively. The magnetic field strengths were optimized in order to obtain a circular and thin beam spot at the iso-center of the therapy facility. These optimized field strengths were subsequently transferred to the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA and the transport of 80 MeV/u C12-ions through this ion-optic system was calculated by using a user-routine to implement magnetic fields. The fluence along the beam-axis and at the iso-center was evaluated. Results: The magnetic field strengths could be optimized by using Matlab and transferred to the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA. The implementation via a user-routine was successful. Analyzing the fluence-pattern along the beam-axis the characteristic focusing and de-focusing effects of the quadrupole magnets could be reproduced. Furthermore the beam spot at the iso-center was circular and significantly thinner compared to an unfocused beam. Conclusion: In this study a Matlab tool was developed to optimize magnetic field strengths for an ion-optic system consisting of two quadrupole magnets as part of a particle therapy facility. These magnetic field strengths could subsequently be transferred to and implemented in the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA to simulate the particle transport through this optimized ion-optic system.

  10. BOA, Beam Optics Analyzer A Particle-In-Cell Code

    SciTech Connect

    Thuc Bui

    2007-12-06

    The program was tasked with implementing time dependent analysis of charges particles into an existing finite element code with adaptive meshing, called Beam Optics Analyzer (BOA). BOA was initially funded by a DOE Phase II program to use the finite element method with adaptive meshing to track particles in unstructured meshes. It uses modern programming techniques, state-of-the-art data structures, so that new methods, features and capabilities are easily added and maintained. This Phase II program was funded to implement plasma simulations in BOA and extend its capabilities to model thermal electrons, secondary emissions, self magnetic field and implement a more comprehensive post-processing and feature-rich GUI. The program was successful in implementing thermal electrons, secondary emissions, and self magnetic field calculations. The BOA GUI was also upgraded significantly, and CCR is receiving interest from the microwave tube and semiconductor equipment industry for the code. Implementation of PIC analysis was partially successful. Computational resource requirements for modeling more than 2000 particles begin to exceed the capability of most readily available computers. Modern plasma analysis typically requires modeling of approximately 2 million particles or more. The problem is that tracking many particles in an unstructured mesh that is adapting becomes inefficient. In particular memory requirements become excessive. This probably makes particle tracking in unstructured meshes currently unfeasible with commonly available computer resources. Consequently, Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. is exploring hybrid codes where the electromagnetic fields are solved on the unstructured, adaptive mesh while particles are tracked on a fixed mesh. Efficient interpolation routines should be able to transfer information between nodes of the two meshes. If successfully developed, this could provide high accuracy and reasonable computational efficiency.

  11. Computer simulations of particle-surface dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Karo, A.M.; Hiskes, J.R.; DeBoni, T.M.

    1986-10-01

    Our simulations of particle-surface dynamics use the molecular dynamics codes that we have developed over the past several years. The initial state of a molecule and the parameters defining the incoming trajectory can be specifically described or randomly selected. Statistical analyses of the states of the particles and their trajectories following wall collisions are carried out by the code. We have carried out calculations at high center-of-mass energies and low incidence angles and have examined the survival fraction of molecules and the dependence upon the incoming trajectory. We report also on preliminary efforts that are being made to simulate sputtering and recombinant desorption processes, since the recombinant desorption of hydrogen from typical wall materials may be an important source for vibrationally-excited hydrogen in volume sources; for surface sources the presence of occluded hydrogen may affect the concentration of atomic species.

  12. Balancing Particle and Mesh Computation in a Particle-In-Cell Code

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, Patrick H; D'Azevedo, Eduardo; Hager, Robert; Ku, Seung-Hoe; Yoon, Eisung; Chang, C. S.

    2016-01-01

    The XGC1 plasma microturbulence particle-in-cell simulation code has both particle-based and mesh-based computational kernels that dominate performance. Both of these are subject to load imbalances that can degrade performance and that evolve during a simulation. Each separately can be addressed adequately, but optimizing just for one can introduce significant load imbalances in the other, degrading overall performance. A technique has been developed based on Golden Section Search that minimizes wallclock time given prior information on wallclock time, and on current particle distribution and mesh cost per cell, and also adapts to evolution in load imbalance in both particle and mesh work. In problems of interest this doubled the performance on full system runs on the XK7 at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility compared to load balancing only one of the kernels.

  13. Fission Particle Emission Multiplicity Simulation

    2006-09-27

    Simulates discrete neutron and gamma-ray emission from the fission of heavy nuclei that is either spontaneous or neutron induced. This is a function library that encapsulates the fission physics and is intended to be called Monte Carlo transport code.

  14. Nonlinear fluid simulation of particle and heat fluxes during burst of ELMs on DIII-D with BOUT++  code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, T. Y.; Xu, X. Q.

    2015-09-01

    In order to study the distribution and evolution of the transient particle and heat fluxes during edge-localized mode (ELM) bursts, a BOUT++  six-field two-fluid model based on the Braginskii equations with non-ideal physics effects is used to simulate pedestal collapse in divertor geometry. The profiles from the DIII-D H-mode discharge #144382 with fast target heat flux measurements are used as the initial conditions for the simulations. A flux-limited parallel thermal conduction is used with three values of the flux-limiting coefficient {αj} , free streaming model with {αj}=1 , sheath-limit with {αj}=0.05 , and one value in between. The studies show that a 20 times increase in {αj} leads to  ∼6 times increase in the heat flux amplitude to both the inner and outer targets, and the widths of the fluxes are also expanded. The sheath-limit model of flux-limiting coefficient is found to be the most appropriate one, which shows ELM sizes close to the measurements. The evolution of the density profile during the burst of ELMs of DIII-D discharge #144382 is simulated, and the collapse in width and depth of {{n}\\text{e}} are reproduced at different time steps. The growing process of the profiles for the heat flux at divertor targets during the burst of ELMs measured by IRTV (infrared television) is also reproduced by this model. The widths of heat fluxes towards targets are a little narrower, and the peak amplitudes are twice the measurements possibly due to the lack of a model of divertor radiation which can effectively reduce the heat fluxes. The magnetic flutter combined with parallel thermal conduction is found to be able to increase the total heat loss by around 33% since the magnetic flutter terms provide the additional conductive heat transport in the radial direction. The heat flux profile at both the inner and outer targets is obviously broadened by magnetic flutter. The lobe structures near the X-point at LFS are both broadened and elongated due

  15. Concurrent Algorithm For Particle-In-Cell Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liewer, Paulett C.; Decyk, Viktor K.

    1990-01-01

    Separate decompositions used for particle-motion and field calculations. General Concurrent Particle-in-Cell (GCPIC) algorithm used to implement motions of individual plasma particles (ions and electrons) under influence of particle-in-cell (PIC) computer codes on concurrent processors. Simulates motions of individual plasma particles under influence of electromagnetic fields generated by particles themselves. Performed to study variety of nonlinear problems in plasma physics, including magnetic and inertial fusion, plasmas in outer space, propagation of electron and ion beams, free-electron lasers, and particle accelerators.

  16. Partially linearized algorithms in gyrokinetic particle simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dimits, A.M.; Lee, W.W.

    1990-10-01

    In this paper, particle simulation algorithms with time-varying weights for the gyrokinetic Vlasov-Poisson system have been developed. The primary purpose is to use them for the removal of the selected nonlinearities in the simulation of gradient-driven microturbulence so that the relative importance of the various nonlinear effects can be assessed. It is hoped that the use of these procedures will result in a better understanding of the transport mechanisms and scaling in tokamaks. Another application of these algorithms is for the improvement of the numerical properties of the simulation plasma. For instance, implementations of such algorithms (1) enable us to suppress the intrinsic numerical noise in the simulation, and (2) also make it possible to regulate the weights of the fast-moving particles and, in turn, to eliminate the associated high frequency oscillations. Examples of their application to drift-type instabilities in slab geometry are given. We note that the work reported here represents the first successful use of the weighted algorithms in particle codes for the nonlinear simulation of plasmas.

  17. The virtual beamline (VBL) laser simulation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacks, R. A.; McCandless, K. P.; Feigenbaum, E.; Di Nicola, J. M. G.; Luke, K. J.; Riedel, W.; Learn, R. J.; Kraines, B. J.

    2015-02-01

    Design, activation, and operation of large laser systems rely on accurate, efficient, user-friendly simulation of laser performance. At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the principle tool for this simulation over the past ten years has been the VBL, an outgrowth of the Prop code that uses the same text-file input grammar and is closely integrated with the Laser Performance Operations Model (LPOM). Here, we describe the physics capabilities of this code, its user interface, and our plans for near-term future developments.

  18. Simulation of neoclassical transport with the continuum gyrokinetic code COGENT

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dorf, M. A.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorr, M.; Rognlien, T.; Hittinger, J.; Compton, J.; Colella, P.; Martin, D.; McCorquodale, P.

    2013-01-25

    The development of the continuum gyrokinetic code COGENT for edge plasma simulations is reported. The present version of the code models a nonlinear axisymmetric 4D (R, v∥, μ) gyrokinetic equation coupled to the long-wavelength limit of the gyro-Poisson equation. Here, R is the particle gyrocenter coordinate in the poloidal plane, and v∥ and μ are the guiding center velocity parallel to the magnetic field and the magnetic moment, respectively. The COGENT code utilizes a fourth-order finite-volume (conservative) discretization combined with arbitrary mapped multiblock grid technology (nearly field-aligned on blocks) to handle the complexity of tokamak divertor geometry with high accuracy.more » Furthermore, topics presented are the implementation of increasingly detailed model collision operators, and the results of neoclassical transport simulations including the effects of a strong radial electric field characteristic of a tokamak pedestal under H-mode conditions.« less

  19. Simulation of neoclassical transport with the continuum gyrokinetic code COGENT

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, M. A.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorr, M.; Rognlien, T.; Hittinger, J.; Compton, J.; Colella, P.; Martin, D.; McCorquodale, P.

    2013-01-25

    The development of the continuum gyrokinetic code COGENT for edge plasma simulations is reported. The present version of the code models a nonlinear axisymmetric 4D (R, v∥, μ) gyrokinetic equation coupled to the long-wavelength limit of the gyro-Poisson equation. Here, R is the particle gyrocenter coordinate in the poloidal plane, and v∥ and μ are the guiding center velocity parallel to the magnetic field and the magnetic moment, respectively. The COGENT code utilizes a fourth-order finite-volume (conservative) discretization combined with arbitrary mapped multiblock grid technology (nearly field-aligned on blocks) to handle the complexity of tokamak divertor geometry with high accuracy. Furthermore, topics presented are the implementation of increasingly detailed model collision operators, and the results of neoclassical transport simulations including the effects of a strong radial electric field characteristic of a tokamak pedestal under H-mode conditions.

  20. Enhanced stopping of macro-particles in particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    May, J.; Tonge, J.; Ellis, I.; Mori, W. B.; Fiuza, F.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2014-05-15

    We derive an equation for energy transfer from relativistic charged particles to a cold background plasma appropriate for finite-size particles that are used in particle-in-cell simulation codes. Expressions for one-, two-, and three-dimensional particles are presented, with special attention given to the two-dimensional case. This energy transfer is due to the electric field of the wake set up in the background plasma by the relativistic particle. The enhanced stopping is dependent on the q{sup 2}/m, where q is the charge and m is the mass of the relativistic particle, and therefore simulation macro-particles with large charge but identical q/m will stop more rapidly. The stopping power also depends on the effective particle shape of the macro-particle. These conclusions are verified in particle-in-cell simulations. We present 2D simulations of test particles, relaxation of high-energy tails, and integrated fast ignition simulations showing that the enhanced drag on macro-particles may adversely affect the results of these simulations in a wide range of high-energy density plasma scenarios. We also describe a particle splitting algorithm which can potentially overcome this problem and show its effect in controlling the stopping of macro-particles.

  1. UNIPIC code for simulations of high power microwave devices

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianguo; Zhang Dianhui; Wang Yue; Qiao Hailiang; Li Xiaoze; Liu Chunliang; Li Yongdong; Wang Hongguang

    2009-03-15

    In this paper, UNIPIC code, a new member in the family of fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) codes for simulations of high power microwave (HPM) generation, is introduced. In the UNIPIC code, the electromagnetic fields are updated using the second-order, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, and the particles are moved using the relativistic Newton-Lorentz force equation. The convolutional perfectly matched layer method is used to truncate the open boundaries of HPM devices. To model curved surfaces and avoid the time step reduction in the conformal-path FDTD method, CP weakly conditional-stable FDTD (WCS FDTD) method which combines the WCS FDTD and CP-FDTD methods, is implemented. UNIPIC is two-and-a-half dimensional, is written in the object-oriented C++ language, and can be run on a variety of platforms including WINDOWS, LINUX, and UNIX. Users can use the graphical user's interface to create the geometric structures of the simulated HPM devices, or input the old structures created before. Numerical experiments on some typical HPM devices by using the UNIPIC code are given. The results are compared to those obtained from some well-known PIC codes, which agree well with each other.

  2. FLY: MPI-2 High Resolution code for LSS Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becciani, U.; Antonuccio, V.; Comparato, M.

    2010-11-01

    Cosmological simulations of structures and galaxies formations have played a fundamental role in the study of the origin, formation and evolution of the Universe. These studies improved enormously with the use of supercomputers and parallel systems and, recently, grid based systems and Linux clusters. Now we present the new version of the tree N-body parallel code FLY that runs on a PC Linux Cluster using the one side communication paradigm MPI-2 and we show the performances obtained. FLY is included in the Computer Physics Communication Program Library. This new version was developed using the Linux Cluster of CINECA, an IBM Cluster with 1024 Intel Xeon Pentium IV 3.0 Ghz. The results show that it is possible to run a 64 Million particle simulation in less than 15 minutes for each timestep, and the code scalability with the number of processors is achieved. This lead us to propose FLY as a code to run very large N-Body simulations with more than 10(9) particles with the higher resolution of a pure tree code.

  3. FLY: MPI-2 high resolution code for LSS cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becciani, U.; Antonuccio-Delogu, V.; Comparato, M.

    2007-02-01

    Cosmological simulations of structures and galaxies formations have played a fundamental role in the study of the origin, formation and evolution of the Universe. These studies improved enormously with the use of supercomputers and parallel systems and, recently, grid based systems and Linux clusters. Now we present the new version of the tree N-body parallel code FLY that runs on a PC Linux Cluster using the one side communication paradigm MPI-2 and we show the performances obtained. FLY is included in the Computer Physics Communication Program Library. This new version was developed using the Linux Cluster of CINECA, an IBM Cluster with 1024 Intel Xeon Pentium IV 3.0 GHz. The results show that it is possible to run a 64 million particle simulation in less than 15 minutes for each time-step, and the code scalability with the number of processors is achieved. This leads us to propose FLY as a code to run very large N-body simulations with more than 109 particles with the higher resolution of a pure tree code. The FLY new version is available at the CPC Program Library, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADSC_v2_0.html [U. Becciani, M. Comparato, V. Antonuccio-Delogu, Comput Phys. Comm. 174 (2006) 605].

  4. Obtaining gigaflop performance from particle simulation of plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.V.; Curtis, B.C.; Shumaker, D.E. ); Horowitz, E.J. )

    1990-06-01

    In the numerical simulation of plasma phenomena there are two fundamental approaches that are generally followed. In the continuum approach one models the evolution of the fluid moment equations derived from the appropriate Boltzmann equation of the plasma. Alternatively, in the particle approach a large group of simulated charged particles are moved according to the self-consistent electromagnetic fields which partly depend on the charge and current densities of these same particles. Although the particle simulation method has been traditionally the more expensive of the two, it is much more capable of giving adequate account of many important kinetic phenomena. With the advent of the vector multiprocessor supercomputers, such as the Cray-2 or Cray Y-MP, we have learned to adapt particle simulation codes to exploit the parallel features of these machines. Yet, in spite of such developments, the particle simulation codes have remained much slower than the maximum machine speeds. We have investigated new techniques that further optimize these methods to bring the speeds of these particle simulations into the gigaflop range. Recent progress in this area suggests that the use of particle simulation methods will become competitive with the alternative fluid models especially when it is realized that gigaflop performance makes them much more affordable. 2 refs., 3 tabs.

  5. ORBXYZ: a 3D single-particle orbit code for following charged-particle trajectories in equilibrium magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.V.; Cohen, R.H.; Ferguson, J.R.; Johnston, B.M.; Sharp, C.B.; Willmann, P.A.

    1981-06-30

    The single particle orbit code, TIBRO, has been modified extensively to improve the interpolation methods used and to allow use of vector potential fields in the simulation of charged particle orbits on a 3D domain. A 3D cubic B-spline algorithm is used to generate spline coefficients used in the interpolation. Smooth and accurate field representations are obtained. When vector potential fields are used, the 3D cubic spline interpolation formula analytically generates the magnetic field used to push the particles. This field has del.BETA = 0 to computer roundoff. When magnetic induction is used the interpolation allows del.BETA does not equal 0, which can lead to significant nonphysical results. Presently the code assumes quadrupole symmetry, but this is not an essential feature of the code and could be easily removed for other applications. Many details pertaining to this code are given on microfiche accompanying this report.

  6. A MULTIPURPOSE COHERENT INSTABILITY SIMULATION CODE

    SciTech Connect

    BLASKIEWICZ,M.

    2007-06-25

    A multipurpose coherent instability simulation code has been written, documented, and released for use. TRANFT (tran-eff-tee) uses fast Fourier transforms to model transverse wakefields, transverse detuning wakes and longitudinal wakefields in a computationally efficient way. Dual harmonic RF allows for the study of enhanced synchrotron frequency spread. When coupled with chromaticity, the theoretically challenging but highly practical post head-tail regime is open to study. Detuning wakes allow for transverse space charge forces in low energy hadron beams, and a switch allowing for radiation damping makes the code useful for electrons.

  7. High performance stream computing for particle beam transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, R.; Bailey, D.; Higham, J.; Salt, M.

    2008-07-01

    Understanding modern particle accelerators requires simulating charged particle transport through the machine elements. These simulations can be very time consuming due to the large number of particles and the need to consider many turns of a circular machine. Stream computing offers an attractive way to dramatically improve the performance of such simulations by calculating the simultaneous transport of many particles using dedicated hardware. Modern Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) are powerful and affordable stream computing devices. The results of simulations of particle transport through the booster-to-storage-ring transfer line of the DIAMOND synchrotron light source using an NVidia GeForce 7900 GPU are compared to the standard transport code MAD. It is found that particle transport calculations are suitable for stream processing and large performance increases are possible. The accuracy and potential speed gains are compared and the prospects for future work in the area are discussed.

  8. Simulation of EAST vertical displacement events by tokamak simulation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Qinglai; Xiao, Bingjia; Guo, Yong; Liu, Lei; Xing, Zhe; Humphreys, D. A.

    2016-10-01

    Vertical instability is a potentially serious hazard for elongated plasma. In this paper, the tokamak simulation code (TSC) is used to simulate vertical displacement events (VDE) on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). Key parameters from simulations, including plasma current, plasma shape and position, flux contours and magnetic measurements match experimental data well. The growth rates simulated by TSC are in good agreement with TokSys results. In addition to modeling the free drift, an EAST fast vertical control model enables TSC to simulate the course of VDE recovery. The trajectories of the plasma current center and control currents on internal coils (IC) fit experimental data well.

  9. Stochastic Parallel PARticle Kinetic Simulator

    2008-07-01

    SPPARKS is a kinetic Monte Carlo simulator which implements kinetic and Metropolis Monte Carlo solvers in a general way so that they can be hooked to applications of various kinds. Specific applications are implemented in SPPARKS as physical models which generate events (e.g. a diffusive hop or chemical reaction) and execute them one-by-one. Applications can run in paralle so long as the simulation domain can be partitoned spatially so that multiple events can be invokedmore » simultaneously. SPPARKS is used to model various kinds of mesoscale materials science scenarios such as grain growth, surface deposition and growth, and reaction kinetics. It can also be used to develop new Monte Carlo models that hook to the existing solver and paralle infrastructure provided by the code.« less

  10. photon-plasma: A modern high-order particle-in-cell code

    SciTech Connect

    Haugbølle, Troels; Frederiksen, Jacob Trier; Nordlund, Åke

    2013-06-15

    We present the photon-plasma code, a modern high order charge conserving particle-in-cell code for simulating relativistic plasmas. The code is using a high order implicit field solver and a novel high order charge conserving interpolation scheme for particle-to-cell interpolation and charge deposition. It includes powerful diagnostics tools with on-the-fly particle tracking, synthetic spectra integration, 2D volume slicing, and a new method to correctly account for radiative cooling in the simulations. A robust technique for imposing (time-dependent) particle and field fluxes on the boundaries is also presented. Using a hybrid OpenMP and MPI approach, the code scales efficiently from 8 to more than 250.000 cores with almost linear weak scaling on a range of architectures. The code is tested with the classical benchmarks particle heating, cold beam instability, and two-stream instability. We also present particle-in-cell simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, and new results on radiative collisionless shocks.

  11. Neptune: An astrophysical smooth particle hydrodynamics code for massively parallel computer architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandalski, Stou

    Smooth particle hydrodynamics is an efficient method for modeling the dynamics of fluids. It is commonly used to simulate astrophysical processes such as binary mergers. We present a newly developed GPU accelerated smooth particle hydrodynamics code for astrophysical simulations. The code is named neptune after the Roman god of water. It is written in OpenMP parallelized C++ and OpenCL and includes octree based hydrodynamic and gravitational acceleration. The design relies on object-oriented methodologies in order to provide a flexible and modular framework that can be easily extended and modified by the user. Several pre-built scenarios for simulating collisions of polytropes and black-hole accretion are provided. The code is released under the MIT Open Source license and publicly available at http://code.google.com/p/neptune-sph/.

  12. Optimization of Particle-in-Cell Codes on RISC Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decyk, Viktor K.; Karmesin, Steve Roy; Boer, Aeint de; Liewer, Paulette C.

    1996-01-01

    General strategies are developed to optimize particle-cell-codes written in Fortran for RISC processors which are commonly used on massively parallel computers. These strategies include data reorganization to improve cache utilization and code reorganization to improve efficiency of arithmetic pipelines.

  13. Transferring ecosystem simulation codes to supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skiles, J. W.; Schulbach, C. H.

    1995-01-01

    Many ecosystem simulation computer codes have been developed in the last twenty-five years. This development took place initially on main-frame computers, then mini-computers, and more recently, on micro-computers and workstations. Supercomputing platforms (both parallel and distributed systems) have been largely unused, however, because of the perceived difficulty in accessing and using the machines. Also, significant differences in the system architectures of sequential, scalar computers and parallel and/or vector supercomputers must be considered. We have transferred a grassland simulation model (developed on a VAX) to a Cray Y-MP/C90. We describe porting the model to the Cray and the changes we made to exploit the parallelism in the application and improve code execution. The Cray executed the model 30 times faster than the VAX and 10 times faster than a Unix workstation. We achieved an additional speedup of 30 percent by using the compiler's vectoring and 'in-line' capabilities. The code runs at only about 5 percent of the Cray's peak speed because it ineffectively uses the vector and parallel processing capabilities of the Cray. We expect that by restructuring the code, it could execute an additional six to ten times faster.

  14. Shielding evaluation for solar particle events using MCNPX, PHITS and OLTARIS codes.

    PubMed

    Aghara, S K; Sriprisan, S I; Singleterry, R C; Sato, T

    2015-01-01

    Detailed analyses of Solar Particle Events (SPE) were performed to calculate primary and secondary particle spectra behind aluminum, at various thicknesses in water. The simulations were based on Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport codes, MCNPX 2.7.0 and PHITS 2.64, and the space radiation analysis website called OLTARIS (On-Line Tool for the Assessment of Radiation in Space) version 3.4 (uses deterministic code, HZETRN, for transport). The study is set to investigate the impact of SPEs spectra transporting through 10 or 20 g/cm(2) Al shield followed by 30 g/cm(2) of water slab. Four historical SPE events were selected and used as input source spectra particle differential spectra for protons, neutrons, and photons are presented. The total particle fluence as a function of depth is presented. In addition to particle flux, the dose and dose equivalent values are calculated and compared between the codes and with the other published results. Overall, the particle fluence spectra from all three codes show good agreement with the MC codes showing closer agreement compared to the OLTARIS results. The neutron particle fluence from OLTARIS is lower than the results from MC codes at lower energies (E<100 MeV). Based on mean square difference analysis the results from MCNPX and PHITS agree better for fluence, dose and dose equivalent when compared to OLTARIS results. PMID:26177623

  15. Implicit methods in particle simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I.

    1982-03-16

    This paper surveys recent advances in the application of implicit integration schemes to particle simulation of plasmas. The use of implicit integration schemes is motivated by the goal of efficiently studying low-frequency plasma phenomena using a large timestep, while retaining accuracy and kinetics. Implicit schemes achieve numerical stability and provide selective damping of unwanted high-frequency waves. This paper reviews the implicit moment and direct implicit methods. Lastly, the merging of implicit methods with orbit averaging can result in additional computational savings.

  16. Discrete Particle Noise in Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Plasma Microturbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Nevins, W M; Dimits, A; Hammett, G

    2005-05-24

    Recent gyrokinetic simulations of electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence with flux-tube continuum codes vs. the global particle-in-cell (PIC) code GTC yielded different results despite similar plasma parameters. Differences between the simulations results were attributed to insufficient phase-space resolution and novel physics associated with toroidicity and/or global simulations. We have reproduced the results of the global PIC code using the flux-tube PIC code PG3EQ, thereby eliminating global effects as the cause of the discrepancy. We show that the late-time decay of ETG turbulence and the steady-state heat transport observed in these PIC simulations results from discrete particle noise. Discrete particle noise is a numerical artifact, so both these PG3EQ simulations and the previous GTC simulations have nothing to say about steady-state ETG turbulence and the associated anomalous heat transport. In the course of this work we develop three diagnostics which can help to determine if a particular PIC simulation has become dominated by discrete particle noise.

  17. Recent advances in neutral particle transport methods and codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmy, Yousry Y.

    1997-02-01

    An overview of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) 3D neural particle transport code, TORT, is presented. Special features of the code that make it invaluable for large applications are summarized for the prospective user. Advanced capabilities currently under development and installation in the production release of TORT are discussed in some detail. These include: multitasking on Cray platforms running the UNICOS operating system; adjacent-cell preconditioning acceleration scheme; and graphics codes for displaying computed quantities such as the flux. Further developments for TORT and its companion codes to enhance its present capabilities, as well as expand its range of applications will be discussed. Speculation on the next generation of neutral particle transport codes at ORNL, especially regarding unstructured grids and high order spatial approximations, will also be mentioned.

  18. Recent advances in neutral particle transport methods and codes

    SciTech Connect

    Azmy, Y.Y.

    1996-06-01

    An overview of ORNL`s three-dimensional neutral particle transport code, TORT, is presented. Special features of the code that make it invaluable for large applications are summarized for the prospective user. Advanced capabilities currently under development and installation in the production release of TORT are discussed; they include: multitasking on Cray platforms running the UNICOS operating system; Adjacent cell Preconditioning acceleration scheme; and graphics codes for displaying computed quantities such as the flux. Further developments for TORT and its companion codes to enhance its present capabilities, as well as expand its range of applications are disucssed. Speculation on the next generation of neutron particle transport codes at ORNL, especially regarding unstructured grids and high order spatial approximations, are also mentioned.

  19. Simulation studies using multibody dynamics code DART

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keat, James E.

    1989-01-01

    DART is a multibody dynamics code developed by Photon Research Associates for the Air Force Astronautics Laboratory (AFAL). The code is intended primarily to simulate the dynamics of large space structures, particularly during the deployment phase of their missions. DART integrates nonlinear equations of motion numerically. The number of bodies in the system being simulated is arbitrary. The bodies' interconnection joints can have an arbitrary number of degrees of freedom between 0 and 6. Motions across the joints can be large. Provision for simulating on-board control systems is provided. Conservation of energy and momentum, when applicable, are used to evaluate DART's performance. After a brief description of DART, studies made to test the program prior to its delivery to AFAL are described. The first is a large angle reorientating of a flexible spacecraft consisting of a rigid central hub and four flexible booms. Reorientation was accomplished by a single-cycle sine wave shape torque input. In the second study, an appendage, mounted on a spacecraft, was slewed through a large angle. Four closed-loop control systems provided control of this appendage and of the spacecraft's attitude. The third study simulated the deployment of the rim of a bicycle wheel configuration large space structure. This system contained 18 bodies. An interesting and unexpected feature of the dynamics was a pulsing phenomena experienced by the stays whole playout was used to control the deployment. A short description of the current status of DART is given.

  20. Parallel 3-D Electromagnetic Particle Code Using High Performance FORTRAN: Parallel TRISTAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, D.; Li, Y.; Nishikawa, K.-I.; et al.

    A three-dimensional full electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC ) code, TRISTAN (Tridimensional Stanford) code, has been parallelized using High Performance Fortran (HPF) as a RPM (Real Parallel Machine). In the parallelized HPF code, the simulation domain is decomposed in one-dimension, and both the particle and field data located in each domain that we call the sub-domain are distributed on each processor. Both the particle and field data on a sub-domain are needed by the neighbor sub-domains and thus communications between the sub-domains are inevitable. Our simulation results using HPF exhibit the promising applicability of the HPF communications to a large scale scientific computing such as solar wind-magnetosphere interactions.

  1. Efficient evaluation of collisional energy transfer terms for plasma particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrell, A. E.; Sherlock, M.; Rose, S. J.

    2016-02-01

    Particle-based simulations, such as in particle-in-cell (PIC) codes, are widely used in plasma physics research. The analysis of particle energy transfers, as described by the second moment of the Boltzmann equation, is often necessary within these simulations. We present computationally efficient, analytically derived equations for evaluating collisional energy transfer terms from simulations using discrete particles. The equations are expressed as a sum over the properties of the discrete particles.

  2. Containment Fire Simulation by a CFD Code

    SciTech Connect

    Heitsch, Matthias

    2002-07-01

    In the frame of an international collaborative project to evaluate fire models a code benchmark was initiated to better quantify the strengths and weaknesses of the codes involved. CFX has been applied to simulate selected cases of both parts of the benchmark. These simulations are presented and discussed in this paper. In the first part of the benchmark a pool fire just represented by a heat release table is considered. Consequently, the physical fire model within CFX is simple. Radiative heat exchange together with turbulent mixing are involved. Two cases with and without venting of the fire room are compared. The second part of the benchmark requires a more detailed fire model in order to inspect the availability of oxygen locally and to control the fire intensity. Under unvented conditions oxygen starvation is encountered and the fire oscillates. Mechanical ventilation changes this behavior and provides enough oxygen all over the simulation time. The predefined damage criteria to characterize, if a target cable in the fire room would be damaged, are not met. However, surface temperatures predicted are well above the assumed threshold temperatures. A continuation of the work presented is foreseen and will address a more complex physical modeling of relevant fire scenarios. (author)

  3. Recent advances in the Mercury Monte Carlo particle transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, P. S.; Dawson, S. A.; McKinley, M. S.; O'Brien, M. J.; Stevens, D. E.; Beck, B. R.; Jurgenson, E. D.; Ebbers, C. A.; Hall, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    We review recent physics and computational science advances in the Mercury Monte Carlo particle transport code under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We describe recent efforts to enable a nuclear resonance fluorescence capability in the Mercury photon transport. We also describe recent work to implement a probability of extinction capability into Mercury. We review the results of current parallel scaling and threading efforts that enable the code to run on millions of MPI processes. (authors)

  4. Load-balancing techniques for a parallel electromagnetic particle-in-cell code

    SciTech Connect

    PLIMPTON,STEVEN J.; SEIDEL,DAVID B.; PASIK,MICHAEL F.; COATS,REBECCA S.

    2000-01-01

    QUICKSILVER is a 3-d electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation code developed and used at Sandia to model relativistic charged particle transport. It models the time-response of electromagnetic fields and low-density-plasmas in a self-consistent manner: the fields push the plasma particles and the plasma current modifies the fields. Through an LDRD project a new parallel version of QUICKSILVER was created to enable large-scale plasma simulations to be run on massively-parallel distributed-memory supercomputers with thousands of processors, such as the Intel Tflops and DEC CPlant machines at Sandia. The new parallel code implements nearly all the features of the original serial QUICKSILVER and can be run on any platform which supports the message-passing interface (MPI) standard as well as on single-processor workstations. This report describes basic strategies useful for parallelizing and load-balancing particle-in-cell codes, outlines the parallel algorithms used in this implementation, and provides a summary of the modifications made to QUICKSILVER. It also highlights a series of benchmark simulations which have been run with the new code that illustrate its performance and parallel efficiency. These calculations have up to a billion grid cells and particles and were run on thousands of processors. This report also serves as a user manual for people wishing to run parallel QUICKSILVER.

  5. Simulating flow and segregation of cylindrical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongzhi; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-11-01

    Efficient and accurate simulation of cylindrical particles using discrete element method (DEM) is a challenge. Typical approaches to simulating cylindrical particle systems are based on the glued spheres method, which has low accuracy, or real shape models, which have high computational cost. In this work we utilize super-ellipsoids, which belong to super-quadrics, to model cylindrical particles in DEM simulations. Simulations of a single cylinder impacting a flat wall indicate that super-ellipsoids provide the same accuracy as real shape models and much better accuracy than the glued sphere method. Simulations of super-ellipsoid cylindrical particles in rotating tumblers result in nearly the same angle of repose as experiments and real shape simulations, demonstrating the accuracy of super-ellipsoid DEM simulations for multi-particle systems. The segregation of bidisperse cylindrical particles differing in length in a bounded heap was simulated by super-ellipsoid DEM, and the results are similar to the experiment. In spite of these advantages of using super-ellipsoid cylindrical particles, simulations of filling a box with particles indicate that the simulation times for super-ellipsoid cylinders is about an order of magnitude longer than that for the same number of spherical particles.

  6. GPU-optimized Code for Long-term Simulations of Beam-beam Effects in Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Roblin, Yves; Morozov, Vasiliy; Terzic, Balsa; Aturban, Mohamed A.; Ranjan, D.; Zubair, Mohammed

    2013-06-01

    We report on the development of the new code for long-term simulation of beam-beam effects in particle colliders. The underlying physical model relies on a matrix-based arbitrary-order symplectic particle tracking for beam transport and the Bassetti-Erskine approximation for beam-beam interaction. The computations are accelerated through a parallel implementation on a hybrid GPU/CPU platform. With the new code, a previously computationally prohibitive long-term simulations become tractable. We use the new code to model the proposed medium-energy electron-ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab.

  7. Spiking network simulation code for petascale computers

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, Susanne; Schmidt, Maximilian; Eppler, Jochen M.; Plesser, Hans E.; Masumoto, Gen; Igarashi, Jun; Ishii, Shin; Fukai, Tomoki; Morrison, Abigail; Diesmann, Markus; Helias, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    Brain-scale networks exhibit a breathtaking heterogeneity in the dynamical properties and parameters of their constituents. At cellular resolution, the entities of theory are neurons and synapses and over the past decade researchers have learned to manage the heterogeneity of neurons and synapses with efficient data structures. Already early parallel simulation codes stored synapses in a distributed fashion such that a synapse solely consumes memory on the compute node harboring the target neuron. As petaflop computers with some 100,000 nodes become increasingly available for neuroscience, new challenges arise for neuronal network simulation software: Each neuron contacts on the order of 10,000 other neurons and thus has targets only on a fraction of all compute nodes; furthermore, for any given source neuron, at most a single synapse is typically created on any compute node. From the viewpoint of an individual compute node, the heterogeneity in the synaptic target lists thus collapses along two dimensions: the dimension of the types of synapses and the dimension of the number of synapses of a given type. Here we present a data structure taking advantage of this double collapse using metaprogramming techniques. After introducing the relevant scaling scenario for brain-scale simulations, we quantitatively discuss the performance on two supercomputers. We show that the novel architecture scales to the largest petascale supercomputers available today. PMID:25346682

  8. Spiking network simulation code for petascale computers.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Susanne; Schmidt, Maximilian; Eppler, Jochen M; Plesser, Hans E; Masumoto, Gen; Igarashi, Jun; Ishii, Shin; Fukai, Tomoki; Morrison, Abigail; Diesmann, Markus; Helias, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    Brain-scale networks exhibit a breathtaking heterogeneity in the dynamical properties and parameters of their constituents. At cellular resolution, the entities of theory are neurons and synapses and over the past decade researchers have learned to manage the heterogeneity of neurons and synapses with efficient data structures. Already early parallel simulation codes stored synapses in a distributed fashion such that a synapse solely consumes memory on the compute node harboring the target neuron. As petaflop computers with some 100,000 nodes become increasingly available for neuroscience, new challenges arise for neuronal network simulation software: Each neuron contacts on the order of 10,000 other neurons and thus has targets only on a fraction of all compute nodes; furthermore, for any given source neuron, at most a single synapse is typically created on any compute node. From the viewpoint of an individual compute node, the heterogeneity in the synaptic target lists thus collapses along two dimensions: the dimension of the types of synapses and the dimension of the number of synapses of a given type. Here we present a data structure taking advantage of this double collapse using metaprogramming techniques. After introducing the relevant scaling scenario for brain-scale simulations, we quantitatively discuss the performance on two supercomputers. We show that the novel architecture scales to the largest petascale supercomputers available today. PMID:25346682

  9. Spiking network simulation code for petascale computers.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Susanne; Schmidt, Maximilian; Eppler, Jochen M; Plesser, Hans E; Masumoto, Gen; Igarashi, Jun; Ishii, Shin; Fukai, Tomoki; Morrison, Abigail; Diesmann, Markus; Helias, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    Brain-scale networks exhibit a breathtaking heterogeneity in the dynamical properties and parameters of their constituents. At cellular resolution, the entities of theory are neurons and synapses and over the past decade researchers have learned to manage the heterogeneity of neurons and synapses with efficient data structures. Already early parallel simulation codes stored synapses in a distributed fashion such that a synapse solely consumes memory on the compute node harboring the target neuron. As petaflop computers with some 100,000 nodes become increasingly available for neuroscience, new challenges arise for neuronal network simulation software: Each neuron contacts on the order of 10,000 other neurons and thus has targets only on a fraction of all compute nodes; furthermore, for any given source neuron, at most a single synapse is typically created on any compute node. From the viewpoint of an individual compute node, the heterogeneity in the synaptic target lists thus collapses along two dimensions: the dimension of the types of synapses and the dimension of the number of synapses of a given type. Here we present a data structure taking advantage of this double collapse using metaprogramming techniques. After introducing the relevant scaling scenario for brain-scale simulations, we quantitatively discuss the performance on two supercomputers. We show that the novel architecture scales to the largest petascale supercomputers available today.

  10. Casting pearls ballistically: Efficient massively parallel simulation of particle deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lubachevsky, B.D.; Privman, V.; Roy, S.C.

    1996-06-01

    We simulate ballistic particle deposition wherein a large number of spherical particles are {open_quotes}cast{close_quotes} vertically over a planar horizontal surface. Upon first contact (with the surface or with a previously deposited particle) each particle stops. This model helps material scientists to study the adsorption and sediment formation. The model is sequential, with particles deposited one by one. We have found an equivalent formulation using a continuous time random process and we simulate the latter in parallel using a method similar to the one previously employed for simulating Ising spins. We augment the parallel algorithm for simulating Ising spins with several techniques aimed at the increase of efficiency of producing the particle configuration and statistics collection. Some of these techniques are similar to earlier ones. We implement the resulting algorithm on a 16K PE MasPar MP-1 and a 4K PE MasPar MP-2. The parallel code runs on MasPar computers nearly two orders of magnitude faster than an optimized sequential code runs on a fast workstation. 17 refs., 9 figs.

  11. Export Controls on Astrophysical Simulation Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Amidst concerns about nuclear proliferation, the US government has established guidelines on what types of astrophysical simulation codes can be run and disseminated on open systems. I will review the basic export controls that have been enacted by the federal government to slow the pace of software acquisition by potential adversaries who seek to develop weapons of mass destruction. The good news is that it is relatively simple to avoid ITAR issues with the Department of Energy if one remembers a few simple rules. I will discuss in particular what types of algorithm development can get researchers into trouble if they are not aware of the regulations and how to avoid these pitfalls while doing world class science.

  12. Three-dimensional parallel UNIPIC-3D code for simulations of high-power microwave devices

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianguo; Chen Zaigao; Wang Yue; Zhang Dianhui; Qiao Hailiang; Fu Meiyan; Yuan Yuan; Liu Chunliang; Li Yongdong; Wang Hongguang

    2010-07-15

    This paper introduces a self-developed, three-dimensional parallel fully electromagnetic particle simulation code UNIPIC-3D. In this code, the electromagnetic fields are updated using the second-order, finite-difference time-domain method, and the particles are moved using the relativistic Newton-Lorentz force equation. The electromagnetic field and particles are coupled through the current term in Maxwell's equations. Two numerical examples are used to verify the algorithms adopted in this code, numerical results agree well with theoretical ones. This code can be used to simulate the high-power microwave (HPM) devices, such as the relativistic backward wave oscillator, coaxial vircator, and magnetically insulated line oscillator, etc. UNIPIC-3D is written in the object-oriented C++ language and can be run on a variety of platforms including WINDOWS, LINUX, and UNIX. Users can use the graphical user's interface to create the complex geometric structures of the simulated HPM devices, which can be automatically meshed by UNIPIC-3D code. This code has a powerful postprocessor which can display the electric field, magnetic field, current, voltage, power, spectrum, momentum of particles, etc. For the sake of comparison, the results computed by using the two-and-a-half-dimensional UNIPIC code are also provided for the same parameters of HPM devices, the numerical results computed from these two codes agree well with each other.

  13. Particle Splitting: A New Method for SPH Star Formation Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitsionas, Spyridon

    2003-07-01

    We have invented a new algorithm to use with self-gravitating SPH Star Formation codes. The new method is designed to enable SPH simulations to self-regulate their numerical resolution, i.e. the number of SPH particles; the latter is calculated using the Jeans condition (Bate & Burkert 1997) and the local hydrodynamic conditions of the gas. We apply our SPH with Particle Splitting code to cloud-cloud collision simulations. Chapter 2 lists the properties of our standard SPH code. Chapter 3 discusses the efficiency of the standard code as this is applied to simulations of rotating, uniform clouds with m=2 density perturbations. Chapter 4 [astro-ph/0203057] describes the new method and the tests that it has successfully been applied to. It also contains the results of the application of Particle Splitting to the case of rotating clouds as those of Chapter 3, where, with great computational efficiency, we have reproduced the results of FD codes and SPH simulations with large numbers of particles. Chapter 5 gives a detailed account of the cloud-cloud collisions studied, starting from a variety of initial conditions produced by altering the cloud mass, cloud velocity and the collision impact parameter. In the majority of the cases studied, the collisions produced filaments (similar to those observed in ammonia in nearby Star Forming Regions) or networks of filaments; groups of protostellar cores have been produced by fragmentation of the filaments. The accretion rates at these cores are comparable to those of Class 0 objects. Due to time-step constraints the simulations stop early in their evolution. The star formation efficiency of this mechanism is extrapolated in time and is found to be 10-20%.

  14. A new parallel P3M code for very large-scale cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFarland, Tom; Couchman, H. M. P.; Pearce, F. R.; Pichlmeier, Jakob

    1998-12-01

    We have developed a parallel Particle-Particle, Particle-Mesh (P3M) simulation code for the Cray T3E parallel supercomputer that is well suited to studying the time evolution of systems of particles interacting via gravity and gas forces in cosmological contexts. The parallel code is based upon the public-domain serial Adaptive P3M-SPH (http://coho.astro.uwo.ca/pub/hydra/hydra.html) code of Couchman et al. (1995)[ApJ, 452, 797]. The algorithm resolves gravitational forces into a long-range component computed by discretizing the mass distribution and solving Poisson's equation on a grid using an FFT convolution method, and a short-range component computed by direct force summation for sufficiently close particle pairs. The code consists primarily of a particle-particle computation parallelized by domain decomposition over blocks of neighbour-cells, a more regular mesh calculation distributed in planes along one dimension, and several transformations between the two distributions. The load balancing of the P3M code is static, since this greatly aids the ongoing implementation of parallel adaptive refinements of the particle and mesh systems. Great care was taken throughout to make optimal use of the available memory, so that a version of the current implementation has been used to simulate systems of up to 109 particles with a 10243 mesh for the long-range force computation. These are the largest Cosmological N-body simulations of which we are aware. We discuss these memory optimizations as well as those motivated by computational performance. Performance results are very encouraging, and, even without refinements, the code has been used effectively for simulations in which the particle distribution becomes highly clustered as well as for other non-uniform systems of astrophysical interest.

  15. Load management strategy for Particle-In-Cell simulations in high energy particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Dérouillat, J.

    2016-09-01

    In the wake of the intense effort made for the experimental CILEX project, numerical simulation campaigns have been carried out in order to finalize the design of the facility and to identify optimal laser and plasma parameters. These simulations bring, of course, important insight into the fundamental physics at play. As a by-product, they also characterize the quality of our theoretical and numerical models. In this paper, we compare the results given by different codes and point out algorithmic limitations both in terms of physical accuracy and computational performances. These limitations are illustrated in the context of electron laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). The main limitation we identify in state-of-the-art Particle-In-Cell (PIC) codes is computational load imbalance. We propose an innovative algorithm to deal with this specific issue as well as milestones towards a modern, accurate high-performance PIC code for high energy particle acceleration.

  16. The use of electromagnetic particle-in-cell codes in accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.

    1988-12-01

    The techniques developed for the numerical simulation of plasmas have numerous applications relevant to accelerators. The operation of many accelerator components involves transients, interactions between beams and rf fields, and internal plasma oscillations. These effects produce non-linear behavior which can be represented accurately by particle in cell (PIC) simulations. We will give a very brief overview of the algorithms used in PIC Codes. We will examine the range of parameters over which they are useful. We will discuss the factors which determine whether a two or three dimensional simulation is most appropriate. PIC codes have been applied to a wide variety of diverse problems, spanning many of the systems in a linear accelerator. We will present a number of practical examples of the application of these codes to areas such as guns, bunchers, rf sources, beam transport, emittance growth and final focus. 8 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. A smooth particle hydrodynamics code to model collisions between solid, self-gravitating objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, C.; Riecker, S.; Maindl, T. I.; Speith, R.; Scherrer, S.; Kley, W.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Modern graphics processing units (GPUs) lead to a major increase in the performance of the computation of astrophysical simulations. Owing to the different nature of GPU architecture compared to traditional central processing units (CPUs) such as x86 architecture, existing numerical codes cannot be easily migrated to run on GPU. Here, we present a new implementation of the numerical method smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) using CUDA and the first astrophysical application of the new code: the collision between Ceres-sized objects. Aims: The new code allows for a tremendous increase in speed of astrophysical simulations with SPH and self-gravity at low costs for new hardware. Methods: We have implemented the SPH equations to model gas, liquids and elastic, and plastic solid bodies and added a fragmentation model for brittle materials. Self-gravity may be optionally included in the simulations and is treated by the use of a Barnes-Hut tree. Results: We find an impressive performance gain using NVIDIA consumer devices compared to our existing OpenMP code. The new code is freely available to the community upon request. If you are interested in our CUDA SPH code miluphCUDA, please write an email to Christoph Schäfer. miluphCUDA is the CUDA port of miluph. miluph is pronounced [maßl2v]. We do not support the use of the code for military purposes.

  18. Turbulence dissipation challenge: particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roytershteyn, V.; Karimabadi, H.; Omelchenko, Y.; Germaschewski, K.

    2015-12-01

    We discuss application of three particle in cell (PIC) codes to the problems relevant to turbulence dissipation challenge. VPIC is a fully kinetic code extensively used to study a variety of diverse problems ranging from laboratory plasmas to astrophysics. PSC is a flexible fully kinetic code offering a variety of algorithms that can be advantageous to turbulence simulations, including high order particle shapes, dynamic load balancing, and ability to efficiently run on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). Finally, HYPERS is a novel hybrid (kinetic ions+fluid electrons) code, which utilizes asynchronous time advance and a number of other advanced algorithms. We present examples drawn both from large-scale turbulence simulations and from the test problems outlined by the turbulence dissipation challenge. Special attention is paid to such issues as the small-scale intermittency of inertial range turbulence, mode content of the sub-proton range of scales, the formation of electron-scale current sheets and the role of magnetic reconnection, as well as numerical challenges of applying PIC codes to simulations of astrophysical turbulence.

  19. Vectorizing the interpolation routines of particle-in-cell codes

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    A discussion of the interpolation routines in particle-in-cell codes is presented indicating the problems in vectorizing them. Solutions to these problems are then discussed with the timing results indicating the effectiveness of the solutions. A comparison of our methods to those of Nishiguchi et al. (J. Comput. Phys. 61, 519 (1985)) is presented. Finally, multitasking is briefly addressed. copyright 1987 Academic Press, Inc.

  20. Particle Acceleration in the Low Corona Over Broad Longitudes: Coupling MHD and 3D Particle Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorby, M.; Schwadron, N.; Torok, T.; Downs, C.; Lionello, R.; Linker, J.; Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Riley, P.; Desai, M. I.; Dayeh, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent work on the coupling between the Energetic Particle Radiation Environment Module (EPREM, a 3D energetic particle model) and Magnetohydrodynamics Around a Sphere (MAS, an MHD code developed at Predictive Science, Inc.) has demonstrated the efficacy of compression regions around fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) for particle acceleration low in the corona (˜ 3 - 6 solar radii). These couplings show rapid particle acceleration over a broad longitudinal extent (˜ 80 degrees) resulting from the pile-up of magnetic flux in the compression regions and their subsequent expansion. The challenge for forming large SEP events in such compression-acceleration scenarios is to have enhanced scattering within the acceleration region while also allowing for efficient escape of accelerated particles downstream (away from the Sun) from the compression region. We present here the most recent simulation results including energetic particle and CME plasma profiles, the subsequent flux and dosages at 1AU, and an analysis of the compressional regions as efficient accelerators.

  1. Simulating Ice Particle Melting using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Pelissier, Craig

    2015-04-01

    To measure precipitation from space requires an accurate estimation of the collective scattering properties of particles suspended in a precipitating column. It is well known that the complicated and typically unknowable shapes of the solid precipitation particles cause much uncertainty in the retrievals involving such particles. This remote-sensing problem becomes even more difficult with the "melting layer" containing partially melted ice particles, where both the geometric shape and liquid-solid fraction of the hydrometeors are variables.. For the scattering properties of these particles depend not only on their shapes, but also their melt-water fraction,and the spatial distribution of liquid and ice within. To obtain an accurate estimation thus requires a set of "realistic" particle geometries and a method to determine the melt-water distribution at various stages in the melting process. Once this is achieved, a suitable method can be used to compute the scattering properties. In previous work, the growth of a set of astoundingly realistic ice particles has been simulated using the "Snowfake" algorithm of Gravner and Griffeath. To simulate the melting process of these particles, the method of Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is used. SPH is a mesh-less particle-based approach where kinematic and thermal dynamics is controlled entirely through two-body interactions between neighboring SPH particles. An important property of SPH is that the interaction at boundaries between air/ice/water is implicitly taken care of. This is crucial for this work since those boundaries are complex and vary throughout the melting process. We present the SPH implementation and a simulation, using highly parallel Graphic Processing Units (GPUs), with ~1 million SPH particles to represent one of the generated ice particle geometries. We plan to use this method, especially its parallelized version, to simulate the melting of all the "Snowfake" particles (~10,000 of them) in our

  2. A comparison of the measured responses of a tissue-equivalent proportional counter to high energy heavy (HZE) particles and those simulated using the Geant4 Monte Carlo code

    PubMed Central

    Taddei, Phillip J.; Zhao, Zhongxiang; Borak, Thomas B.

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of heavy ion interactions using the Geant4 toolkit were compared with measurements of energy deposition in a spherical tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). A spherical cavity with a physical diameter of 12.7 mm was filled with propane-based tissue-equivalent gas surrounded by a wall of A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic that was 2.54 mm to thick. Measurements and Monte Carlo simulations were used to record the energy deposition and the trajectory of the incident particle on an event-by-event basis for ions ranging in atomic number from 2 (4He) to 26 (56Fe) and in energy from 200 MeV/nucleon to 1000 MeV/nucleon. In the simulations, tracking of secondary electrons was terminated when the range of an electron was below a specified threshold. The effects of range cuts for electrons at 0.5 μm, 1 μm, 10 μm, and 100 μm were evaluated. To simulate an energy deposition influenced by large numbers of low energy electrons with large transverse momentum, it was necessary to track electrons down to range cuts of 10 μm or less. The Geant4 simulated data closely matched the measured data acquired using a TEPC for incident particles traversing the center of the detector as well as near the gas-wall interface. Values of frequency mean lineal energy and dose mean lineal energy were within 8% of the measured data. The production of secondary particles in the aluminum vacuum chamber had no effect on the response of the TEPC for 56Fe at 1000 MeV/nucleon. The results of this study confirm that Geant4 can simulate patterns of energy deposition for existing microdosimeters and is valuable for improving the design of a new generation of detectors used for space dosimetry and for characterizing particle beams used in hadron radiotherapy. PMID:20862212

  3. Fast Particle Methods for Multiscale Phenomena Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koumoutsakos, P.; Wray, A.; Shariff, K.; Pohorille, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    We are developing particle methods oriented at improving computational modeling capabilities of multiscale physical phenomena in : (i) high Reynolds number unsteady vortical flows, (ii) particle laden and interfacial flows, (iii)molecular dynamics studies of nanoscale droplets and studies of the structure, functions, and evolution of the earliest living cell. The unifying computational approach involves particle methods implemented in parallel computer architectures. The inherent adaptivity, robustness and efficiency of particle methods makes them a multidisciplinary computational tool capable of bridging the gap of micro-scale and continuum flow simulations. Using efficient tree data structures, multipole expansion algorithms, and improved particle-grid interpolation, particle methods allow for simulations using millions of computational elements, making possible the resolution of a wide range of length and time scales of these important physical phenomena.The current challenges in these simulations are in : [i] the proper formulation of particle methods in the molecular and continuous level for the discretization of the governing equations [ii] the resolution of the wide range of time and length scales governing the phenomena under investigation. [iii] the minimization of numerical artifacts that may interfere with the physics of the systems under consideration. [iv] the parallelization of processes such as tree traversal and grid-particle interpolations We are conducting simulations using vortex methods, molecular dynamics and smooth particle hydrodynamics, exploiting their unifying concepts such as : the solution of the N-body problem in parallel computers, highly accurate particle-particle and grid-particle interpolations, parallel FFT's and the formulation of processes such as diffusion in the context of particle methods. This approach enables us to transcend among seemingly unrelated areas of research.

  4. Communication Systems Simulator with Error Correcting Codes Using MATLAB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, C.; Gonzalez, J. E.; Pardo, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, the characteristics of a simulator for channel coding techniques used in communication systems, are described. This software has been designed for engineering students in order to facilitate the understanding of how the error correcting codes work. To help students understand easily the concepts related to these kinds of codes, a…

  5. FDPS: Framework for Developing Particle Simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasawa, Masaki; Tanikawa, Ataru; Hosono, Natsuki; Nitadori, Keigo; Muranushi, Takayuki; Makino, Junichiro

    2016-04-01

    FDPS provides the necessary functions for efficient parallel execution of particle-based simulations as templates independent of the data structure of particles and the functional form of the interaction. It is used to develop particle-based simulation programs for large-scale distributed-memory parallel supercomputers. FDPS includes templates for domain decomposition, redistribution of particles, and gathering of particle information for interaction calculation. It uses algorithms such as Barnes-Hut tree method for long-range interactions; methods to limit the calculation to neighbor particles are used for short-range interactions. FDPS reduces the time and effort necessary to write a simple, sequential and unoptimized program of O(N^2) calculation cost, and produces compiled programs that will run efficiently on large-scale parallel supercomputers.

  6. Software quality and process improvement in scientific simulation codes

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosiano, J.; Webster, R.

    1997-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the quest to develope better simulation code quality through process modeling and improvement. This study is based on the experience of the authors and interviews with ten subjects chosen from simulation code development teams at LANL. This study is descriptive rather than scientific.

  7. First Transport Code Simulations using the TGLF Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, J. E.

    2007-11-01

    The first transport code simulations using the newly developed TGLF theory-based transport model [1,2] are presented. TGLF has comprehensive physics to approximate the turbulent transport due to drift-ballooning modes in tokamaks. The TGLF model is a next generation gyro-Landau-fluid model that includes several recent advances that remove the limitations of its predecessor, GLF23. The model solves for the linear eigenmodes of trapped ion and electron modes (TIM, TEM), ion and electron temperature gradient (ITG, ETG) modes and finite beta kinetic ballooning (KB) modes in either shifted circle or shaped geometry [1]. A database of over 400 nonlinear GYRO gyrokinetic simulations has been created [3]. A subset of 140 simulations including Miller shaped geometry has been used to find a model for the saturation levels. Using a simple quasilinear (QL) saturation rule, we find remarkable agreement with the energy and particle fluxes from a wide variety of GYRO simulations for both shaped or circular geometry and also for low aspect ratio. Using this new QL saturation rule along with a new ExB shear quench rule for shaped geometry, we predict the density, temperature, and toroidal rotation profiles in a transport code and compare the results against experimental data in the ITPA Profile Database. We examine the impact of the improved electron physics in the model and the role of elongation and triangularity on the predicted profiles and compare to the results previously obtained using the GLF23 model. [1] G.M. Staebler, J.E. Kinsey, and R.E. Waltz, Phys. Plasmas 12, 102508 (2005). [2] G.M. Staebler, J.E. Kinsey, and R.E. Waltz, to appear in Phys. Plasmas, May(2007). [3] The GYRO database is documented at fusion.gat.com/theory/gyro.

  8. Exact simulation of polarized light reflectance by particle deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezan Pour, B.; Mackowski, D. W.

    2015-12-01

    The use of polarimetric light reflection measurements as a means of identifying the physical and chemical characteristics of particulate materials obviously relies on an accurate model of predicting the effects of particle size, shape, concentration, and refractive index on polarized reflection. The research examines two methods for prediction of reflection from plane parallel layers of wavelength—sized particles. The first method is based on an exact superposition solution to Maxwell's time harmonic wave equations for a deposit of spherical particles that are exposed to a plane incident wave. We use a FORTRAN-90 implementation of this solution (the Multiple Sphere T Matrix (MSTM) code), coupled with parallel computational platforms, to directly simulate the reflection from particle layers. The second method examined is based upon the vector radiative transport equation (RTE). Mie theory is used in our RTE model to predict the extinction coefficient, albedo, and scattering phase function of the particles, and the solution of the RTE is obtained from adding—doubling method applied to a plane—parallel configuration. Our results show that the MSTM and RTE predictions of the Mueller matrix elements converge when particle volume fraction in the particle layer decreases below around five percent. At higher volume fractions the RTE can yield results that, depending on the particle size and refractive index, significantly depart from the exact predictions. The particle regimes which lead to dependent scattering effects, and the application of methods to correct the vector RTE for particle interaction, will be discussed.

  9. Optimizations of the energy grid search algorithm in continuous-energy Monte Carlo particle transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Jonathan A.; Romano, Paul K.; Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord S.

    2015-11-01

    In this work we propose, implement, and test various optimizations of the typical energy grid-cross section pair lookup algorithm in Monte Carlo particle transport codes. The key feature common to all of the optimizations is a reduction in the length of the vector of energies that must be searched when locating the index of a particle's current energy. Other factors held constant, a reduction in energy vector length yields a reduction in CPU time. The computational methods we present here are physics-informed. That is, they are designed to utilize the physical information embedded in a simulation in order to reduce the length of the vector to be searched. More specifically, the optimizations take advantage of information about scattering kinematics, neutron cross section structure and data representation, and also the expected characteristics of a system's spatial flux distribution and energy spectrum. The methods that we present are implemented in the OpenMC Monte Carlo neutron transport code as part of this work. The gains in computational efficiency, as measured by overall code speedup, associated with each of the optimizations are demonstrated in both serial and multithreaded simulations of realistic systems. Depending on the system, simulation parameters, and optimization method employed, overall code speedup factors of 1.2-1.5, relative to the typical single-nuclide binary search algorithm, are routinely observed.

  10. Numerical simulation of particle bed scour by vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, Dan; Dubief, Yves; Dewoolkar, Mandar

    2014-11-01

    The repeated impacts of a vortex dipole on a particle bed are simulated using a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) code. The resulting scour characteristics and flow dynamics are investigated as a function of the Shields number. The fluid phase is treated as a continuum and the discretized Navier-Stokes equations are solved down to the smallest scales of the flow, on an Eulerian grid. The particles comprising the bed are represented by the Discrete Particle Model (DPM), whereby each individual particle is tracked in a Lagrangian framework. Particle-particle and particle-wall collisions are modeled using a soft-sphere model. The fluid phase and the solid phase are coupled through a forcing term in the fluid conservation of momentum equation, and a drag force in the particle equation of motion, governed by Newton's Second Law. Above the critical Shields number, the scour hole topography is not fundamentally altered with subsequent impacts until the scale of the scour hole reaches a critical value. At which point, the shape and scale of the scour hole significantly alters the behavior of the vortex dipole and results in strongly asymmetric scour topographies. The two-way coupling between the bed scour and the vortex dipole dynamics are analyzed. Support from UVM Transportation Research Center and NSF CBET-0967224.

  11. Modeling of a-particle redistribution by sawteeth in TFTR using FPPT code

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelenkov, N.N.; Budny, R.V.; Duong, H.H.

    1996-06-01

    Results from recent DT experiments on TFTR to measure the radial density profiles of fast confined well trapped {alpha}-particles using the Pellet Charge eXchange (PCX) diagnostic [PETROV M. P., et. al. Nucl. Fusion, 35 (1995) 1437] indicate that sawtooth oscillations produce a significant broadening of the trapped alpha radial density profiles. ` Conventional models consistent with measured sawtooth effects on passing particles do not provide satisfactory simulations of the trapped particle mixing measured by PCX diagnostic. We propose a different mechanism for fast particle mixing during the sawtooth crash to explain the trapped {alpha}-particle density profile broadening after the crash. The model is based on the fast particle orbit averaged toroidal drift in a perturbed helical electric field with an adjustable absolute value. Such a drift of the fast particles results in a change of their energy and a redistribution in phase space. The energy redistribution is shown to obey the diffusion equation, while the redistribution in toroidal momentum P{var_phi} (or in minor radius) is assumed stochastic with large diffusion coefficient and was taken flat. The distribution function in a pre- sawtooth plasma and its evolution in a post-sawtooth crash plasma is simulated using the Fokker-Planck Post-TRANSP (FPPT) processor code. It is shown that FPPT calculated {alpha}-particle distributions are consistent with TRANSP Monte-Carlo calculations. Comparison of FPPT results with Pellet Char eXchange (PCX) measurements shows good agreement for 9 both sawtooth free and sawtoothing plasmas.

  12. Particle simulation of plasmas and stellar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.; Clark, A.; Craddock, G.G.; Gilden, D.L.; Leung, W.K.; Li, Y.M.; Robertson, J.A.; Saltzman, B.J.

    1985-04-01

    A computational technique is introduced which allows the student and researcher an opportunity to observe the physical behavior of a class of many-body systems. A series of examples is offered which illustrates the diversity of problems that may be studied using particle simulation. These simulations were in fact assigned as homework in a course on computational physics.

  13. Particle simulation of auroral double layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Bruce L.; Okuda, Hideo

    1987-01-01

    Work on the simulation of auroral double layers (DLs) with realistic particle-in-cell models is presented. An early model simulated weak DLs formed in a self-consistent circuit but under conditions subject to the ion-acoustic instability. Recent work has focused on strong DLs formed when currentless jets are injected into a dipole magnetic field.

  14. Process to create simulated lunar agglutinate particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustafson, Robert J. (Inventor); Gustafson, Marty A. (Inventor); White, Brant C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method of creating simulated agglutinate particles by applying a heat source sufficient to partially melt a raw material is provided. The raw material is preferably any lunar soil simulant, crushed mineral, mixture of crushed minerals, or similar material, and the heat source creates localized heating of the raw material.

  15. SpectralPlasmaSolver: a Spectral Code for Multiscale Simulations of Collisionless, Magnetized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vencels, Juris; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Manzini, Gianmarco; Markidis, Stefano; Peng, Ivy Bo; Roytershteyn, Vadim

    2016-05-01

    We present the design and implementation of a spectral code, called SpectralPlasmaSolver (SPS), for the solution of the multi-dimensional Vlasov-Maxwell equations. The method is based on a Hermite-Fourier decomposition of the particle distribution function. The code is written in Fortran and uses the PETSc library for solving the non-linear equations and preconditioning and the FFTW library for the convolutions. SPS is parallelized for shared- memory machines using OpenMP. As a verification example, we discuss simulations of the two-dimensional Orszag-Tang vortex problem and successfully compare them against a fully kinetic Particle-In-Cell simulation. An assessment of the performance of the code is presented, showing a significant improvement in the code running-time achieved by preconditioning, while strong scaling tests show a factor of 10 speed-up using 16 threads.

  16. Kinetic transport simulation of energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, He; Waltz, R. E.

    2016-05-01

    A kinetic transport code (EPtran) is developed for the transport of the energetic particles (EPs). The EPtran code evolves the EP distribution function in radius, energy, and pitch angle phase space (r, E, λ) to steady state with classical slowing down, pitch angle scattering, as well as radial and energy transport of the injected EPs (neutral beam injection (NBI) or fusion alpha). The EPtran code is illustrated by treating the transport of NBI fast ions from high-n ITG/TEM micro-turbulence and EP driven unstable low-n Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) in a well-studied DIII-D NBI heated discharge with significant AE central core loss. The kinetic transport code results for this discharge are compared with previous study using a simple EP density moment transport code ALPHA (R.E. Waltz and E.M. Bass 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 104006). The dominant EP-AE transport is treated with a local stiff critical EP density (or equivalent pressure) gradient radial transport model modified to include energy-dependence and the nonlocal effects EP drift orbits. All previous EP transport models assume that the EP velocity space distribution function is not significantly distorted from the classical ‘no transport’ slowing down distribution. Important transport distortions away from the slowing down EP spectrum are illustrated by a focus on the coefficient of convection: EP energy flux divided by the product of EP average energy and EP particle flux.

  17. Beam-Beam Simulations with the Gaussian Code TRS

    SciTech Connect

    Matter, Regina S.

    2000-06-26

    The authors have summarized the main features of the beam-beam simulation code TRS and presented two sample applications to the PEP-II collider. The code has been successfully tested against analytic results and against other simulation codes whenever such comparisons are meaningful. The soft-gaussian approximation is believed to represent reliably incoherent beam-beam effects. The code has been used to perform studies for the PEP-II collider. For example, simulated tune scans reveal undesirable operating points due to beam blowup from synchrotron sidebands. The dynamical beta effect, clearly seen in these simulations, also influences the choice of a working point. The code has been used to establish the adequate beam separation at the parasitic collision points [24], and has been applied to the proposed muon collider [25], including the effects from the instability of the muon.

  18. Code generation: a strategy for neural network simulators.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Dan F M

    2010-10-01

    We demonstrate a technique for the design of neural network simulation software, runtime code generation. This technique can be used to give the user complete flexibility in specifying the mathematical model for their simulation in a high level way, along with the speed of code written in a low level language such as C+ +. It can also be used to write code only once but target different hardware platforms, including inexpensive high performance graphics processing units (GPUs). Code generation can be naturally combined with computer algebra systems to provide further simplification and optimisation of the generated code. The technique is quite general and could be applied to any simulation package. We demonstrate it with the 'Brian' simulator ( http://www.briansimulator.org ).

  19. Modeling and simulation of bubbles and particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorgan, Andrew James

    The interaction of particles, drops, and bubbles with a fluid (gas or liquid) is important in a number of engineering problems. The present works seeks to extend the understanding of these interactions through numerical simulation. To model many of these relevant flows, it is often important to consider finite Reynolds number effects on drag, lift, torque and history force. Thus, the present work develops an equation of motion for spherical particles with a no-slip surface based on theoretical analysis, experimental data and surface-resolved simulations which is appropriate for dispersed multiphase flows. The equation of motion is then extended to account for finite particle size. This extension is critical for particles which will have a size significantly larger than the grid cell size, particularly important for bubbles and low-density particles. The extension to finite particle size is accomplished through spatial-averaging (both volume-based and surface-based) of the continuous flow properties. This averaging is consistent with the Faxen limit for solid spheres at small Reynolds numbers and added mass and fluid stress forces at inviscid limits. Further work is needed for more quantitative assessment of the truncation terms in complex flows. The new equation of motion is then used to assess the relative importance of each force in the context of two low-density particles (an air bubble and a sand particle) in a boundary layer of water. This relative importance is measured by considering effects on particle concentration, visualization of particle-fluid interactions, diffusion rates, and Lagrangian statistics collected along the particle trajectory. Strong added mass and stress gradient effects are observed for the bubble but these were found to have little effect on a sand particle of equal diameter. Lift was shown to be important for both conditions provided the terminal velocity was aligned with the flow direction. The influence of lift was found to be

  20. Object-oriented particle simulation on parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Reynders, J.V.W.; Forslund, D.W.; Hinker, P.J.; Tholburn, M.; Kilman, D.G.; Humphrey, W.F.

    1994-04-01

    A general purpose, object-oriented particle simulation (OOPS) library has been developed for use on a variety of system architectures with a uniform high-level interface. This includes the development of library implementations for the CM5, Intel Paragon, and CRI T3D. Codes written on any of these platforms can be ported to other platforms without modifications by utilizing the high-level library. The general character of the library allows application to such diverse areas as plasma physics, suspension flows, vortex simulations, porous media, and materials science.

  1. Generating optimal initial conditions for smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, Steven; Rockefeller, Gabriel M; Fryer, Christopher L

    2008-01-01

    We present a new optimal method to set up initial conditions for Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations, which may also be of interest for N-body simulations. This new method is based on weighted Voronoi tesselations (WVTs) and can meet arbitrarily complex spatial resolution requirements. We conduct a comprehensive review of existing SPH setup methods, and outline their advantages, limitations and drawbacks. A serial version of our WVT setup method is publicly available and we give detailed instruction on how to easily implement the new method on top of an existing parallel SPH code.

  2. Development and Test of 2.5-Dimensional Electromagnetic PIC Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Yun; Lee, Ensang; Kim, Khan-Hyuk; Seon, Jongho; Lee, Dong-Hun; Ryu, Kwang-Sun

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a 2.5-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulation code using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method to investigate electromagnetic phenomena that occur in space plasmas. Our code is based on the leap-frog method and the centered difference method for integration and differentiation of the governing equations. We adopted the relativistic Buneman-Boris method to solve the Lorentz force equation and the Esirkepov method to calculate the current density while maintaining charge conservation. Using the developed code, we performed test simulations for electron two-stream instability and electron temperature anisotropy induced instability with the same initial parameters as used in previously reported studies. The test simulation results are almost identical with those of the previous papers.

  3. Neoclassical Simulation of Tokamak Plasmas using Continuum Gyrokinetc Code TEMPEST

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X Q

    2007-11-09

    We present gyrokinetic neoclassical simulations of tokamak plasmas with self-consistent electric field for the first time using a fully nonlinear (full-f) continuum code TEMPEST in a circular geometry. A set of gyrokinetic equations are discretized on a five dimensional computational grid in phase space. The present implementation is a Method of Lines approach where the phase-space derivatives are discretized with finite differences and implicit backwards differencing formulas are used to advance the system in time. The fully nonlinear Boltzmann model is used for electrons. The neoclassical electric field is obtained by solving gyrokinetic Poisson equation with self-consistent poloidal variation. With our 4D ({psi}, {theta}, {epsilon}, {mu}) version of the TEMPEST code we compute radial particle and heat flux, the Geodesic-Acoustic Mode (GAM), and the development of neoclassical electric field, which we compare with neoclassical theory with a Lorentz collision model. The present work provides a numerical scheme and a new capability for self-consistently studying important aspects of neoclassical transport and rotations in toroidal magnetic fusion devices.

  4. CPIC: a curvilinear Particle-In-Cell code for plasma-material interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delzanno, G.; Camporeale, E.; Moulton, J. D.; Borovsky, J. E.; MacDonald, E.; Thomsen, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    We present a recently developed Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code in curvilinear geometry called CPIC (Curvilinear PIC) [1], where the standard PIC algorithm is coupled with a grid generation/adaptation strategy. Through the grid generator, which maps the physical domain to a logical domain where the grid is uniform and Cartesian, the code can simulate domains of arbitrary complexity, including the interaction of complex objects with a plasma. At present the code is electrostatic. Poisson's equation (in logical space) can be solved with either an iterative method based on the Conjugate Gradient (CG) or the Generalized Minimal Residual (GMRES) coupled with a multigrid solver used as a preconditioner, or directly with multigrid. The multigrid strategy is critical for the solver to perform optimally or nearly optimally as the dimension of the problem increases. CPIC also features a hybrid particle mover, where the computational particles are characterized by position in logical space and velocity in physical space. The advantage of a hybrid mover, as opposed to more conventional movers that move particles directly in the physical space, is that the interpolation of the particles in logical space is straightforward and computationally inexpensive, since one does not have to track the position of the particle. We will present our latest progress on the development of the code and document the code performance on standard plasma-physics tests. Then we will present the (preliminary) application of the code to a basic dynamic-charging problem, namely the charging and shielding of a spherical spacecraft in a magnetized plasma for various level of magnetization and including the pulsed emission of an electron beam from the spacecraft. The dynamical evolution of the sheath and the time-dependent current collection will be described. This study is in support of the ConnEx mission concept to use an electron beam from a magnetospheric spacecraft to trace magnetic field lines from the

  5. Integration of Heat Transfer, Stress, and Particle Trajectory Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Thuc Bui; Michael Read; Lawrence ives

    2012-05-17

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. developed and currently markets Beam Optics Analyzer (BOA) in the United States and abroad. BOA is a 3D, charged particle optics code that solves the electric and magnetic fields with and without the presence of particles. It includes automatic and adaptive meshing to resolve spatial scales ranging from a few millimeters to meters. It is fully integrated with CAD packages, such as SolidWorks, allowing seamless geometry updates. The code includes iterative procedures for optimization, including a fully functional, graphical user interface. Recently, time dependent, particle in cell capability was added, pushing particles synchronically under quasistatic electromagnetic fields to obtain particle bunching under RF conditions. A heat transfer solver was added during this Phase I program. Completed tasks include: (1) Added a 3D finite element heat transfer solver with adaptivity; (2) Determined the accuracy of the linear heat transfer field solver to provide the basis for development of higher order solvers in Phase II; (3) Provided more accurate and smoother power density fields; and (4) Defined the geometry using the same CAD model, while maintaining different meshes, and interfacing the power density field between the particle simulator and heat transfer solvers. These objectives were achieved using modern programming techniques and algorithms. All programming was in C++ and parallelization in OpenMP, utilizing state-of-the-art multi-core technology. Both x86 and x64 versions are supported. The GUI design and implementation used Microsoft Foundation Class.

  6. DgSMC-B code: A robust and autonomous direct simulation Monte Carlo code for arbitrary geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargaran, H.; Minuchehr, A.; Zolfaghari, A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we describe the structure of a new Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code that takes advantage of combinatorial geometry (CG) to simulate any rarefied gas flows Medias. The developed code, called DgSMC-B, has been written in FORTRAN90 language with capability of parallel processing using OpenMP framework. The DgSMC-B is capable of handling 3-dimensional (3D) geometries, which is created with first-and second-order surfaces. It performs independent particle tracking for the complex geometry without the intervention of mesh. In addition, it resolves the computational domain boundary and volume computing in border grids using hexahedral mesh. The developed code is robust and self-governing code, which does not use any separate code such as mesh generators. The results of six test cases have been presented to indicate its ability to deal with wide range of benchmark problems with sophisticated geometries such as airfoil NACA 0012. The DgSMC-B code demonstrates its performance and accuracy in a variety of problems. The results are found to be in good agreement with references and experimental data.

  7. Overview of Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Niita, Koji; Matsuda, Norihiro; Hashimoto, Shintaro; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Furuta, Takuya; Noda, Shusaku; Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Iwase, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Fukahori, Tokio; Okumura, Keisuke; Kai, Tetsuya; Chiba, Satoshi; Sihver, Lembit

    2014-06-01

    A general purpose Monte Carlo Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System, PHITS, is being developed through the collaboration of several institutes in Japan and Europe. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency is responsible for managing the entire project. PHITS can deal with the transport of nearly all particles, including neutrons, protons, heavy ions, photons, and electrons, over wide energy ranges using various nuclear reaction models and data libraries. It is written in Fortran language and can be executed on almost all computers. All components of PHITS such as its source, executable and data-library files are assembled in one package and then distributed to many countries via the Research organization for Information Science and Technology, the Data Bank of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development's Nuclear Energy Agency, and the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center. More than 1,000 researchers have been registered as PHITS users, and they apply the code to various research and development fields such as nuclear technology, accelerator design, medical physics, and cosmic-ray research. This paper briefly summarizes the physics models implemented in PHITS, and introduces some important functions useful for specific applications, such as an event generator mode and beam transport functions.

  8. Simulations of intracavity laser heating of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linford, Gary J.

    1991-05-01

    The interaction physics of intracavity laser heated particles has been analyzed for the case of a moderate power (20 kW), high repetition rate (OM 12 kHz) Nd:YAG laser oscillator producing low energy (OM 10-5 J) optical pulses at (lambda) = 1.06 (mu) . The particles considered in this work are contaminants that inadvertently become attached to intracavity optical surfaces lying within the beam line of the laser during the course of assembly and test. Computer simulations were written to describe the behavior of a variety of dielectric, refractory, and metallic particles when irradiated with small diameter (OM 10-2 cm), high intensity (108 W/cm2) intracavity laser radiation. The simulations have shown that owing to the small laser beam diameters, contaminating intracavity particles larger than 5 (mu) can affect the dynamics of Nd:YAG laser oscillation, causing mode changes, delaying the achievement of peak laser power, and reducing performance. Significant heating of the particles may occur during the relatively short (OM 40 ns) oscillation build-up time applicable to these laser cavities. Ablation of material, melting, and vaporization of small diameter (< 10-4 cm) particles under these intracavity laser conditions is predicted. Steady-state conditions are calculated for high repetition rate operation with the result that asymptotic particle and substrate temperatures depend upon the thermal properties of the optical substrates. Operating regimes for which laser heated particle damage does not occur were determined.

  9. Low Mach Code with Particle Transport Version 1.0

    2010-08-09

    Computational technique is based on the firect numerical simulation of the particulate flows using distributed Lagrange multiplier technique (Kanarska et al. 2010 submitted to Computers and Fluids journal). Each particle is explicitly resolved on the Eulerian grid as a separate domain, using solid volume of fractions. The fluid equations are solved through the entire computational domain, and, Lagrange multiplier constrains are applied inside the solid domain to satisfy rigidity contrains.

  10. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of neoclassical transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.

    1995-02-01

    A time varying weighting ({delta} f) scheme for gyrokinetic particle simulation is applied to a steady state, multi-species simulation of neoclassical transport. Accurate collision operators conserving momentum and energy are developed and implemented. Simulation results using these operators are found to agree very well with neoclassical theory. For example, it is dynamically demonstrated in these multispecies simulations that like-particle collisions produce no particle flux and that the neoclassical fluxes are ambipolar for an ion-electron plasma. An important physics feature of the present scheme is the introduction of toroidal sheared flow to the simulations. Simulation results are in agreement with the existing analytical neoclassical theory of Hinton and Wong. The poloidal electric field associated with toroidal mass flow is found to enhance density gradient driven electron particle flux and the bootstrap current while reducing temperature gradient driven flux and current. Finally, neoclassical theory in steep gradient profile relevant to the edge regime is examined by taking into account finite banana width effects. In general, the present work demonstrates a valuable new capability for studying important aspects of neoclassical transport inaccessible by conventional analytical calculation processes.

  11. M3D-K simulations of sawteeth and energetic particle transport in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Wei; Sheng, Zheng-Mao; Fu, G. Y.; Breslau, J. A.; Wang, Feng

    2014-09-15

    Nonlinear simulations of sawteeth and related energetic particle transport are carried out using the kinetic/magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hybrid code M3D-K. MHD simulations show repeated sawtooth cycles for a model tokamak equilibrium. Furthermore, test particle simulations are carried out to study the energetic particle transport due to a sawtooth crash. The results show that energetic particles are redistributed radially in the plasma core, depending on pitch angle and energy. For trapped particles, the redistribution occurs for particle energy below a critical value in agreement with existing theories. For co-passing particles, the redistribution is strong with little dependence on particle energy. In contrast, the redistribution level of counter-passing particles decreases with increasing particle energy.

  12. Loading relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zenitani, Seiji

    2015-04-15

    Numerical algorithms to load relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle-in-cell (PIC) and Monte-Carlo simulations are presented. For stationary relativistic Maxwellian, the inverse transform method and the Sobol algorithm are reviewed. To boost particles to obtain relativistic shifted-Maxwellian, two rejection methods are proposed in a physically transparent manner. Their acceptance efficiencies are ≈50% for generic cases and 100% for symmetric distributions. They can be combined with arbitrary base algorithms.

  13. ParaDiS-FEM dislocation dynamics simulation code primer

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, M; Hommes, G; Aubry, S; Arsenlis, A

    2011-09-27

    The ParaDiS code is developed to study bulk systems with periodic boundary conditions. When we try to perform discrete dislocation dynamics simulations for finite systems such as thin films or cylinders, the ParaDiS code must be extended. First, dislocations need to be contained inside the finite simulation box; Second, dislocations inside the finite box experience image stresses due to the free surfaces. We have developed in-house FEM subroutines to couple with the ParaDiS code to deal with free surface related issues in the dislocation dynamics simulations. This primer explains how the coupled code was developed, the main changes from the ParaDiS code, and the functions of the new FEM subroutines.

  14. Radiative Transport for a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Bernd; Kessel-Deynet, Olaf; Burkert, Andreas

    One crude approximation to describe the effect of Radiative Transport in SPH simulations is to introduce a density dependent polytropic index in the equation of state (Matthew R. Bate 1998), which is larger than one if the medium becomes optically thick. By doing this one fixes the system to a special density-temperature dependence. But in principle the system should have the possibility to realize a variety of different density-temperature dependencies if radiative transport is involved and arbitrary heating and cooling functions can be used. We combine the advantages of the SPH Code with an algorithm describing a flux limited diffusive radiative transport to develop a RHD-Code. Flux limited diffusion involves the Rosseland-means of the absorption and scattering coefficients. To calculate this coefficients we use the model from Preibisch et al. 1993. This will restrict our simulations to low temperatures (T <= 1000 K) and high densities (ρ >= 103 cm-3) but on the other hand keeps the code as simple and as fast as possible. For a given energy-density distribution, the radiation field evolves towards the equilibrium solution on a time-scale much smaller than the typical dynamical time-step for the hydrodynamic equations. So the RT equations have to be solved implicit. To do this we use the nice convergence features of the Successive Over-Relaxing (SOR) method. The focus of the simulations than will be on the prestellar phase where molecular cloud cores become optically thick. The central temperature is still low (T = 10 dots 500 K) and thus the ionization and dissociation degree is low and nearly constant.

  15. Type I X-ray burst simulation code

    SciTech Connect

    Fisker, J. L.; Hix, W. R.; Liebendoerfer, M.

    2007-07-01

    dAGILE is an astrophysical code that simulates accretion of matter onto a neutron star and the subsequent x-ray burst. It is a one-dimensional time-dependent spherically symmetric code with generalized nuclear reaction networks, diffusive radiation/conduction, realistic boundary conditions, and general relativistic hydrodynamics. The code is described in more detail in Astrophysical Journal 650(2006)332 and Astrophysical Journal Supplements 174(2008)261.

  16. Para: a computer simulation code for plasma driven electromagnetic launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Thio, Y.-C.

    1983-03-01

    A computer code for simulation of rail-type accelerators utilizing a plasma armature has been developed and is described in detail. Some time varying properties of the plasma are taken into account in this code thus allowing the development of a dynamical model of the behavior of a plasma in a rail-type electromagnetic launcher. The code is being successfully used to predict and analyse experiments on small calibre rail-gun launchers.

  17. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of neoclassical transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.

    1995-08-01

    A time varying weighting ({delta}{ital f} ) scheme for gyrokinetic particle simulation is applied to a steady-state, multispecies simulation of neoclassical transport. Accurate collision operators conserving momentum and energy are developed and implemented. Simulation results using these operators are found to agree very well with neoclassical theory. For example, it is dynamically demonstrated that like-particle collisions produce no particle flux and that the neoclassical fluxes are ambipolar for an ion--electron plasma. An important physics feature of the present scheme is the introduction of toroidal flow to the simulations. Simulation results are in agreement with the existing analytical neoclassical theory. The poloidal electric field associated with toroidal mass flow is found to enhance density gradient-driven electron particle flux and the bootstrap current while reducing temperature gradient-driven flux and current. Finally, neoclassical theory in steep gradient profile relevant to the edge regime is examined by taking into account finite banana width effects. In general, in the present work a valuable new capability for studying important aspects of neoclassical transport inaccessible by conventional analytical calculation processes is demonstrated. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  18. Simulation of the Radiative Emission from Plasmas Based on LSP Particle-In-Cell Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfarlane, Joseph; Golovkin, Igor; Woodruff, Pamela; Welch, Dale; Thoma, Carston; Witherspoon, Douglas

    2009-11-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation codes are valuable tools in simulating the physical properties of plasmas in a wide variety of high energy density laboratory plasma experiments. Two examples of this are short-pulse laser experiments, which are used to study the fast ignition concept for inertial fusion, and plasma jet experiments, which are of interest to magnetic fusion and mageto-inertial fusion studies. The LSP code is a widely-used PIC simulation code that computes the detailed characteristics of electron and ion particle distributions in such experiments. To compute the radiative emission characteristics of plasmas based on PIC simulation predictions, we use the SPECT3D multi-dimensional collisional-radiative package to generate high-resolution spectra and images which can be compared with experimental measurements. SPECT3D includes the effects of energetic particles (including relativistic electrons) in computing non-LTE atomic level populations, emergent spectra, and images for the target plasma. We will present results for the radiative characteristics of plasmas created in short-pulse laser and plasma jet experiments.

  19. Particle simulation of Alfven waves excited at a boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Tsung, F.S.; Tonge, J.W.; Morales, G.J.

    2005-01-01

    A particle-in-cell (PIC) code has been developed that is capable of describing the propagation of compressional and shear Alfven waves excited from a boundary. The code is used to elucidate the properties of Alfven wave cones radiated from sources having transverse scale comparable to the electron skin depth. Good agreement between theoretical predictions and simulation results is found over a wide range of frequencies. An investigation has been undertaken of the effect of hot ions on the Alfven wave cones. The PIC simulations demonstrate that as the ion temperature is increased there is a reversal in the cone angle. The reversal implies that there is a cross-field focusing of the shear Alfven waves. This is a feature which is presently being considered in studies of field-line resonances in the earth's magnetic field. The PIC results also illustrate the damping of shear modes due to the Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance with hot ions.

  20. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of a field reversed configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, D. P.; Lau, C. K.; Holod, I.; Lin, Z.; Dettrick, S.

    2016-01-01

    Gyrokinetic particle simulation of the field-reversed configuration (FRC) has been developed using the gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC). The magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium is mapped from cylindrical coordinates to Boozer coordinates for the FRC core and scrape-off layer (SOL), respectively. A field-aligned mesh is constructed for solving self-consistent electric fields using a semi-spectral solver in a partial torus FRC geometry. This new simulation capability has been successfully verified and driftwave instability in the FRC has been studied using the gyrokinetic simulation for the first time. Initial GTC simulations find that in the FRC core, the ion-scale driftwave is stabilized by the large ion gyroradius. In the SOL, the driftwave is unstable on both ion and electron scales.

  1. EvoL: the new Padova Tree-SPH parallel code for cosmological simulations. I. Basic code: gravity and hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlin, E.; Buonomo, U.; Grassi, T.; Piovan, L.; Chiosi, C.

    2010-04-01

    Context. We present the new release of the Padova N-body code for cosmological simulations of galaxy formation and evolution, EvoL. The basic Tree + SPH code is presented and analysed, together with an overview of the software architectures. Aims: EvoL is a flexible parallel Fortran95 code, specifically designed for simulations of cosmological structure formations on cluster, galactic and sub-galactic scales. Methods: EvoL is a fully Lagrangian self-adaptive code, based on the classical oct-tree by Barnes & Hut (1986, Nature, 324, 446) and on the smoothed particle hydrodynamics algorithm (SPH, Lucy 1977, AJ, 82, 1013). It includes special features like adaptive softening lengths with correcting extra-terms, and modern formulations of SPH and artificial viscosity. It is designed to be run in parallel on multiple CPUs to optimise the performance and save computational time. Results: We describe the code in detail, and present the results of a number of standard hydrodynamical tests.

  2. FLY: a code for LSS cosmological simulations for a PC Linux Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comparato, M.; Becciani, U.; Antonuccio-Delogu, V.; Costa, A.

    2006-07-01

    We developed FLY with the main goal of maximizing the number of particles that can be simulated in an MPP system without data replication. FLY builds a tree that is shared among all the processes that execute a simulation, each process having the same number of bodies which evolve during each time-step. Now we present the new version of the code that runs on a PC Linux Cluster using the one side communication paradigm MPI-2 and the performance results obtained.

  3. Two dimensional particle simulations of Raman backward amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, Min; Lindberg, Ryan; Wurtele, Jonathan

    2005-10-01

    We carried out two-dimensional particle simulations of the Raman backward amplifier. The particle code is based on the one-dimensional averaged-PIC (aPIC) code [1]. From the speculation that the longitudinal ponderomotive driving by the two counter-propagating lasers is quite dominant over the transverse one, the two-dimensional version of the aPIC can be easily built up by putting many one-dimensional aPIC solvers in parallel. The solvers are coupled by the diffraction terms of the lasers, which enables one to simulate the transverse effects in the Raman backward amplifier. One of the most important issues regarding the transverse effects is the focusability of the amplified pulse. Previous simulations [2-3], which are based on the fluid model, show that the focusing phase of the seed laser is preserved well during the amplification process. However, there has scarcely been kinetic studies on the same problem. Various simulations from the fully kinetic two-dimensional aPIC are presented. We discuss the kinetic effects (electron trapping) on the focusablity of the amplified seed. [1] M.S. Hur, G. Penn, J.S. Wurtele, and R. Lindberg, Phys. Plasmas vol. 11, p. 5204 (2004). [2] A.A. Solodov, V.M. Malkin, and N.J. Fisch, Phys. Plasmas vol. 10, p. 2540 (2003). [3] G.M. Fraiman, N.A. Yampolsky, V.M. Malkin, and N.J. Fisch, Phys. Plasmas vol. 9, p.3617 (2002).

  4. Nonlinear particle simulation of ion cyclotron waves in toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kuley, A. Lin, Z.; Bao, J.; Wei, X. S.; Xiao, Y.

    2015-12-10

    Global particle simulation model has been developed in this work to provide a first-principles tool for studying the nonlinear interactions of radio frequency (RF) waves with plasmas in tokamak. In this model, ions are considered as fully kinetic particles using the Vlasov equation and electrons are treated as guiding centers using the drift kinetic equation with realistic electron-to-ion mass ratio. Boris push scheme for the ion motion has been developed in the toroidal geometry using magnetic coordinates and successfully verified for the ion cyclotron and ion Bernstein waves in global gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC). The nonlinear simulation capability is applied to study the parametric decay instability of a pump wave into an ion Bernstein wave side band and a low frequency ion cyclotron quasi mode.

  5. The EMPOWER Code: Electro-Magnetic Particle Operation With Enhanced Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimabadi, H.; Omelchenko, Y. A.; Vu, H. X.

    2007-11-01

    Large-scale full PIC simulations play a crucial role in the modeling of laser-plasma interactions, accelerators, HPM devices and magnetic reconnection. These simulations ubiquitously employ uniform meshes, which severely limits their CPU speed and in many cases makes high-resolution runs prohibitive even on massively parallel computers. On the other hand, inadequate spatial resolution of realistic features (localized plasma volumes, device boundaries, etc.) is known to result in unacceptable errors. Structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR) has successfully been applied to fluid dynamics and MHD simulations. However, extending SAMR to practical electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) models has proven to be nontrivial due to a number of additional numerical challenges, with spurious wave reflection and macro-particle self-force at the coarse-fine mesh interfaces being the most severe. These approximation errors typically result in a significant loss of simulation accuracy, energy/momentum non-conservation and long-time instabilities. We review our progress in resolving these issues in our new EM-PIC code, EMPOWER. We demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the new techniques on realistic examples related to simulations of high-power EM pulses and energetic particle beams.

  6. Interactive methods for exploring particle simulation data

    SciTech Connect

    Co, Christopher S.; Friedman, Alex; Grote, David P.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Bethel, E. Wes; Joy, Kenneth I.

    2004-05-01

    In this work, we visualize high-dimensional particle simulation data using a suite of scatter plot-based visualizations coupled with interactive selection tools. We use traditional 2D and 3D projection scatter plots as well as a novel oriented disk rendering style to convey various information about the data. Interactive selection tools allow physicists to manually classify ''interesting'' sets of particles that are highlighted across multiple, linked views of the data. The power of our application is the ability to correspond new visual representations of the simulation data with traditional, well understood visualizations. This approach supports the interactive exploration of the high-dimensional space while promoting discovery of new particle behavior.

  7. Second order gyrokinetic theory for particle-in-cell codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tronko, Natalia; Bottino, Alberto; Sonnendrücker, Eric

    2016-08-01

    The main idea of the gyrokinetic dynamical reduction consists in a systematical removal of the fast scale motion (the gyromotion) from the dynamics of the plasma, resulting in a considerable simplification and a significant gain of computational time. The gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov equations are nowadays implemented in for modeling (both laboratory and astrophysical) strongly magnetized plasmas. Different versions of the reduced set of equations exist, depending on the construction of the gyrokinetic reduction procedure and the approximations performed in the derivation. The purpose of this article is to explicitly show the connection between the general second order gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov system issued from the modern gyrokinetic theory and the model currently implemented in the global electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell code ORB5. Necessary information about the modern gyrokinetic formalism is given together with the consistent derivation of the gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov equations from first principles. The variational formulation of the dynamics is used to obtain the corresponding energy conservation law, which in turn is used for the verification of energy conservation diagnostics currently implemented in ORB5. This work fits within the context of the code verification project VeriGyro currently run at IPP Max-Planck Institut in collaboration with others European institutions.

  8. An Integer-Coded Chaotic Particle Swarm Optimization for Traveling Salesman Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Chen; Yan-Duo, Zhang; Jing, Lu; Hui, Tian

    Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP) is one of NP-hard combinatorial optimization problems, which will experience “combination explosion” when the problem goes beyond a certain size. Therefore, it has been a hot topic to search an effective solving method. The general mathematical model of TSP is discussed, and its permutation and combination based model is presented. Based on these, Integer-coded Chaotic Particle Swarm Optimization for solving TSP is proposed. Where, particle is encoded with integer; chaotic sequence is used to guide global search; and particle varies its positions via “flying”. With a typical 20-citys TSP as instance, the simulation experiment of comparing ICPSO with GA is carried out. Experimental results demonstrate that ICPSO is simple but effective, and better than GA at performance.

  9. PLASMA ENERGETIC PARTICLES SIMULATION CENTER (PEPSC)

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, Herbert L.

    2014-05-23

    The main effort of the Texas group was to develop theoretical and simplified numerical models to understand chirping phenomena often seen for Alfven and geodesic acoustic waves in experimental plasmas such as D-III-D, NSTX and JET. Its main numerical effort was to modify the AEGIS code, which was originally developed as an eigenvalue solver. To apply to the chirping problem this code has to be able to treat the linear response to the continuum and the response of the plasma to external drive or to an internal drive that comes from the formation of phase space chirping structures. The theoretical underpinning of this investigation still needed to be more fully developed to understand how to best formulate the theoretical problem. Considerable progress was made on this front by B.N. Breizman and his collaborators and a new reduced model was developed by H. L. Berk and his PhD student, G. Wang which can be uses as simplified model to describe chirping in a large aspect ratio tokamak. This final report will concentrate on these two directions that were developed as well as results that were found in the work with the AEGIS code and in the progress in developing a novel quasi-linear formulation for a description of Alfvenic modes destabilized by energetic particles, such as alpha particles in a burning plasma.

  10. Quasineutral particle simulation technique for whistlers

    SciTech Connect

    Lampe, Martin . E-mail: lampe@nrl.navy.mil; Joyce, Glenn; Manheimer, Wallace M.; Streltsov, Anatoly; Ganguli, Gurudas

    2006-05-01

    We present a new hybrid fluid/PIC simulation scheme for whistlers, which eliminates both the speed-of-light time scale and the electron plasma oscillation time scale, and concentrates simulation resources on the resonant parts of electron phase space that control whistler evolution. The code runs with time steps on the order of the electron gyrofrequency, with extremely accurate energy conservation and numerical stability. Examples are shown of application to whistler instability growth and saturation, and ducting of whistlers in density channels.

  11. Full f gyrokinetic method for particle simulation of tokamak transport

    SciTech Connect

    Heikkinen, J.A. Janhunen, S.J.; Kiviniemi, T.P.; Ogando, F.

    2008-05-10

    A gyrokinetic particle-in-cell approach with direct implicit construction of the coefficient matrix of the Poisson equation from ion polarization and electron parallel nonlinearity is described and applied in global electrostatic toroidal plasma transport simulations. The method is applicable for calculation of the evolution of particle distribution function f including as special cases strong plasma pressure profile evolution by transport and formation of neoclassical flows. This is made feasible by full f formulation and by recording the charge density changes due to the ion polarization drift and electron acceleration along the local magnetic field while particles are advanced. The code has been validated against the linear predictions of the unstable ion temperature gradient mode growth rates and frequencies. Convergence and saturation in both turbulent and neoclassical limit of the ion heat conductivity is obtained with numerical noise well suppressed by a sufficiently large number of simulation particles. A first global full f validation of the neoclassical radial electric field in the presence of turbulence for a heated collisional tokamak plasma is obtained. At high Mach number (M{sub p}{approx}1) of the poloidal flow, the radial electric field is significantly enhanced over the standard neoclassical prediction. The neoclassical radial electric field together with the related GAM oscillations is found to regulate the turbulent heat and particle diffusion levels particularly strongly in a large aspect ratio tokamak at low plasma current.

  12. Simulating the transport of heavy charged particles through trabecular spongiosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersh, Jacob A.

    As planning continues for manned missions far beyond Low Earth Orbit, a paramount concern remains the flight crew's exposure to galactic cosmic radiation. When humans exit the protective magnetic field of Earth, they become subject to bombardment by highly-reactive heavy charged (HZE) particles. A possible consequence of this two- to three-year-long mission is the onset of radiation-induced leukemia, a disorder with a latency period as short as two to three years. Because data on risk to humans from exposure to HZE particles is non-existent, studies of leukemia in animals are now underway to investigate the relative effectiveness of HZE exposures. Leukemogenesis can result from energy depositions occurring within marrow contained in the trabecular spongiosa. Trabecular spongiosa is found in flat bones and within the ends of long bones, and is characterized by an intricate matrix of interconnected bone tissue forming cavities that house marrow. The microscopic internal dimensions of spongiosa vary between species. As radiation traverses this region, interface-induced dose perturbations that occur at the interfaces between bone and marrow affect the patterns of energy deposition within the region. An aim of this project is to determine the extent by which tissue heterogeneity and microscopic dimensions have on patterns of energy deposition within the trabecular spongiosa. This leads to the development of PATHFIT, a computer code capable of generating simple quadric-based geometric models of trabecular spongiosa for both humans and mice based on actual experimentally-determined internal dimensions of trabecular spongiosa. Following the creation of spongiosa models, focus is placed on the development of HITSPAP, a hybrid Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport code system that combines capabilities of the MC code PENELOPE and MC code PARTRAC. This code is capable of simulating the transport of HZE particles through accurate models of trabecular spongiosa. The final and

  13. Muon simulation codes MUSIC and MUSUN for underground physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, V. A.

    2009-03-01

    The paper describes two Monte Carlo codes dedicated to muon simulations: MUSIC (MUon SImulation Code) and MUSUN (MUon Simulations UNderground). MUSIC is a package for muon transport through matter. It is particularly useful for propagating muons through large thickness of rock or water, for instance from the surface down to underground/underwater laboratory. MUSUN is designed to use the results of muon transport through rock/water to generate muons in or around underground laboratory taking into account their energy spectrum and angular distribution.

  14. LOOPREF: A Fluid Code for the Simulation of Coronal Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deFainchtein, Rosalinda; Antiochos, Spiro; Spicer, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the code LOOPREF. LOOPREF is a semi-one dimensional finite element code that is especially well suited to simulate coronal-loop phenomena. It has a full implementation of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), which is crucial for this type of simulation. The AMR routines are an improved version of AMR1D. LOOPREF's versatility makes is suitable to simulate a wide variety of problems. In addition to efficiently providing very high resolution in rapidly changing regions of the domain, it is equipped to treat loops of variable cross section, any non-linear form of heat conduction, shocks, gravitational effects, and radiative loss.

  15. Computer Models Simulate Fine Particle Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Through a NASA Seed Fund partnership with DEM Solutions Inc., of Lebanon, New Hampshire, scientists at Kennedy Space Center refined existing software to study the electrostatic phenomena of granular and bulk materials as they apply to planetary surfaces. The software, EDEM, allows users to import particles and obtain accurate representations of their shapes for modeling purposes, such as simulating bulk solids behavior, and was enhanced to be able to more accurately model fine, abrasive, cohesive particles. These new EDEM capabilities can be applied in many industries unrelated to space exploration and have been adopted by several prominent U.S. companies, including John Deere, Pfizer, and Procter & Gamble.

  16. Benchmarking the codes VORPAL, OSIRIS, and QuickPIC with Laser Wakefield Acceleration Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Kevin; Huang, C.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Mori, W.B.; Tsung, F.S.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Cowan, B.; Cary, J.R.; Esarey, E.; Fonseca, R.A.; Martins, S.F.; Silva, L.O.

    2008-09-08

    Three-dimensional laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) simulations have recently been performed to benchmark the commonly used particle-in-cell (PIC) codes VORPAL, OSIRIS, and QuickPIC. The simulations were run in parallel on over 100 processors, using parameters relevant to LWFA with ultra-short Ti-Sapphire laser pulses propagating in hydrogen gas. Both first-order and second-order particle shapes were employed. We present the results of this benchmarking exercise, and show that accelerating gradients from full PIC agree for all values of a0 and that full and reduced PIC agree well for values of a0 approaching 4.

  17. Benchmarking the codes VORPAL, OSIRIS, and QuickPIC with Laser Wakefield Acceleration Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, K.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Cowan, B.; Cary, J. R.; Huang, C.; Mori, W. B.; Tsung, F. S.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E.; Fonseca, R. A.; Martins, S. F.; Silva, L. O.

    2009-01-22

    Three-dimensional laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) simulations have recently been performed to benchmark the commonly used particle-in-cell (PIC) codes VORPAL, OSIRIS, and QuickPIC. The simulations were run in parallel on over 100 processors, using parameters relevant to LWFA with ultra-short Ti-Sapphire laser pulses propagating in hydrogen gas. Both first-order and second-order particle shapes were employed. We present the results of this benchmarking exercise, and show that accelerating gradients from full PIC agree for all values of a{sub 0} and that full and reduced PIC agree well for values of a{sub 0} approaching 4.

  18. Fact Checking LIGO's Radiometer Code with Simulated LIGO Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrush, Samantha Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves are predicted by various models, ranging from cosmological sources to astrophysical objects. One example of an astrophysical source is a neutron star in a binary system. The strongest example of this is from Scorpios X-1. A key set of instruments that are used to search for gravitational waves are the LIGO detectors. As the signal strength is expected to be small relative to the background noise from a single LIGO detector, data from two detectors are cross-correlated to increase sensitivity to any potential gravitational waves. In order to test the effectiveness of the cross-correlation 'radiometer' code in detecting point sources similar to Scorpius X-1, the code was modified to have the capability to add multiple simulated pulsar signals. To validate the changes to the radiometer code, two trials were run. The first trial compared results from simulated data read in through previously existing means with simulated data read in through the modified code. The second trial read in realistic LIGO data through the traditional means and explored the effects of adding simulated data via the modified code. Once the modified code has completed its vetting, it will be used to ascertain how well injected signals can be recovered when they fall on the border between frequency bins. After running multiple trials with different frequency shifts, the amount of attenuation found for each bin shift agrees with theory, and it was found that the bin shifting does have the ability to completely attenuate signals at higher frequencies.

  19. HADES, A Code for Simulating a Variety of Radiographic Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Aufderheide, M B; Henderson, G; von Wittenau, A; Slone, D M; Barty, A; Martz, Jr., H E

    2004-10-28

    It is often useful to simulate radiographic images in order to optimize imaging trade-offs and to test tomographic techniques. HADES is a code that simulates radiography using ray tracing techniques. Although originally developed to simulate X-Ray transmission radiography, HADES has grown to simulate neutron radiography over a wide range of energy, proton radiography in the 1 MeV to 100 GeV range, and recently phase contrast radiography using X-Rays in the keV energy range. HADES can simulate parallel-ray or cone-beam radiography through a variety of mesh types, as well as through collections of geometric objects. HADES was originally developed for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) applications, but could be a useful tool for simulation of portal imaging, proton therapy imaging, and synchrotron studies of tissue. In this paper we describe HADES' current capabilities and discuss plans for a major revision of the code.

  20. Particle simulation of intense electron cyclotron heating and beat-wave current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I.

    1987-10-12

    High-power free-electron lasers make new methods possible for heating plasmas and driving current in toroidal plasmas with electromagnetic waves. We have undertaken particle simulation studies with one and two dimensional, relativistic particle simulation codes of intense pulsed electron cyclotron heating and beat-wave current drive. The particle simulation methods here are conventional: the algorithms are time-centered, second-order-accurate, explicit, leap-frog difference schemes. The use of conventional methods restricts the range of space and time scales to be relatively compact in the problems addressed. Nevertheless, experimentally relevant simulations have been performed. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  1. PHITS-2.76, Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Version 03 PHITS can deal with the transport of almost all particles (nucleons, nuclei, mesons, photons, and electrons) over wide energy ranges, using several nuclear reaction models and nuclear data libraries. Geometrical configuration of the simulation can be set with GG (General Geometry) or CG (Combinatorial Geometry). Various quantities such as heat deposition, track length and production yields can be deduced from the simulation, using implemented estimator functions called "tally". The code also has a function to draw 2D and 3D figures of the calculated results as well as the setup geometries, using a code ANGEL. The physical processes included in PHITS can be divided into two categories, transport process and collision process. In the transport process, PHITS can simulate motion of particles under external fields such as magnetic and gravity. Without the external fields, neutral particles move along a straight trajectory with constant energy up to the next collision point. However, charge particles interact many times with electrons in the material losing energy and changing direction. PHITS treats ionization processes not as collision but as a transport process, using the continuous-slowing-down approximation. The average stopping power is given by the charge density of the material and the momentum of the particle taking into account the fluctuations of the energy loss and the angular deviation. In the collision process, PHITS can simulate the elastic and inelastic interactions as well as decay of particles. The total reaction cross section, or the life time of the particle is an essential quantity in the determination of the mean free path of the transport particle. According to the mean free path, PHITS chooses the next collision point using the Monte Carlo method. To generate the secondary particles of the collision, we need the information of the final states of the collision. For neutron induced reactions in low energy region, PHITS employs the cross

  2. PHITS-2.76, Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System

    2015-08-01

    Version 03 PHITS can deal with the transport of almost all particles (nucleons, nuclei, mesons, photons, and electrons) over wide energy ranges, using several nuclear reaction models and nuclear data libraries. Geometrical configuration of the simulation can be set with GG (General Geometry) or CG (Combinatorial Geometry). Various quantities such as heat deposition, track length and production yields can be deduced from the simulation, using implemented estimator functions called "tally". The code also has amore » function to draw 2D and 3D figures of the calculated results as well as the setup geometries, using a code ANGEL. The physical processes included in PHITS can be divided into two categories, transport process and collision process. In the transport process, PHITS can simulate motion of particles under external fields such as magnetic and gravity. Without the external fields, neutral particles move along a straight trajectory with constant energy up to the next collision point. However, charge particles interact many times with electrons in the material losing energy and changing direction. PHITS treats ionization processes not as collision but as a transport process, using the continuous-slowing-down approximation. The average stopping power is given by the charge density of the material and the momentum of the particle taking into account the fluctuations of the energy loss and the angular deviation. In the collision process, PHITS can simulate the elastic and inelastic interactions as well as decay of particles. The total reaction cross section, or the life time of the particle is an essential quantity in the determination of the mean free path of the transport particle. According to the mean free path, PHITS chooses the next collision point using the Monte Carlo method. To generate the secondary particles of the collision, we need the information of the final states of the collision. For neutron induced reactions in low energy region, PHITS employs

  3. Numerical simulation of turbulent particle diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocksell, Todd Leslie

    Understanding particle diffusion and dispersion in multi-phase flows is important to a variety of engineering environments. In the present study, a Continuous Random Walk (CRW) model was constructed that can predict turbulent particle diffusion based on commonly available turbulence statistical correlations that may be obtained with Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (BANS) solutions. To evaluate this model, several test flows were considered including a theoretical channel flow, a wake flow, a jet flow, and a turbulent boundary layer. For the first three flows it was shown that proper correction of the Markov chain velocity fluctuations involving gradients in turbulence intensity significantly improved solution accuracy. For the turbulent boundary layer simulations, the flow is significantly more inhomogeneous (high gradients of turbulent kinetic energy and integral time-scale near the wall) and significantly more anisotropic (the root-mean-square of the velocity perturbations differs by several-fold depending on the direction). The particles were injected in the near-wall region for a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and mean particle concentration profiles are obtained without the empiricism associated with RANS methods (turbulence modeling) or uncertainties associated with experiments (near-wall resolution difficulties). These results were compared to the CRW predictions that employed the mean turbulent statistics measured from the DNS results, so that a self-consistent comparison could be made. To accurately simulate particles in wall-bounded flows with the CRW model, a modified Markov chain based on a normalized velocity fluctuation was found to be important to avoid unphysical wall-ward particle fluxes. Also, the incremental drift velocity for the Markov chain (required for inhomogeneous turbulent flows) was extended to include effects of particle inertia and virtual mass to enable simulation for a wide range of Stokes numbers. The CRW results with the finite

  4. Numerical simulations of collisions between rotating particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salo, H.

    1987-04-01

    Numerical simulations of Keplerian systems consisting of 200 mutually colliding rotating particles show that friction and surface irregularity reduce the equilibrium velocity dispersion and transfer some of the energy of random velocities to rotational velocities. The results confirm the theoretical predictions of Salo (1987). Simulations are performed for identical and different particle sizes, and for a power-law distribution of sizes. Taking rotation into account is not found to alter the previously observed Rayleigh distribution of eccentricities and inclinations, while the components of the rotational velocities are found to follow a Gaussian distribution. Application to the rarefied regions of Saturn's rings suggests that friction is able to reduce the equilibrium geometric thickness by about one-half.

  5. Simulating Marvel with the Stun Code

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, L A

    2001-05-23

    MARVEL, a nuclear-driven shock-tube experiment, consisted of a 2.2 kiloton nuclear explosive detonated 176 meters underground at one end of a 122-meter long, 1-meter diameter horizontal tunnel. Vaporization of material in the immediate vicinity of the explosive provided the source of high-energy driver gas. The driven gas was the ambient atmospheric air in the tunnel. The event was staged as an experimental and calculational study of the time dependent .ow of energy in the tunnel and surrounding alluvium. In this report we describe the derivation and implementation of a ''1-3/4D'' hydrocode to simulate the experiment. Calculations were performed to study the influence of energy transport to, and mass ablation from, the walls of the tunnel on the shock velocity.

  6. 2D MHD test-particle simulations in modeling geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Elkington, S. R.; Hudson, M. K.; Murphy, J. J.; Schmitt, P.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    The effects of magnetic storms on the evolution of the electron radiation belts are studied using MHD test-particle simulations. The 2D guiding center code developed by Elkington et al. (2002) has been used to simulate particle motion in the Solar Magnetic equatorial plane in the MHD fields calculated from the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global MHD code. However, our study shows that the B-minimum plane is well off the SM equatorial plane during solstice events. Since 3D test-particle simulation is computationally expensive, we improve the 2D model by pushing particles in the B-minimum surface instead of the SM equatorial plane. Paraview software is used to visualize the LFM data file and to find the B-minimum surface. Magnetic and electric fields on B-minimum surface are projected to the equatorial plane for particle pushing.

  7. SimTrack: A compact c++ code for particle orbit and spin tracking in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Yun

    2015-08-29

    SimTrack is a compact c++ code of 6-d symplectic element-by-element particle tracking in accelerators originally designed for head-on beam–beam compensation simulation studies in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It provides a 6-d symplectic orbit tracking with the 4th order symplectic integration for magnet elements and the 6-d symplectic synchro-beam map for beam–beam interaction. Since its inception in 2009, SimTrack has been intensively used for dynamic aperture calculations with beam–beam interaction for RHIC. Recently, proton spin tracking and electron energy loss due to synchrotron radiation were added. In this article, I will present the code architecture, physics models, and some selected examples of its applications to RHIC and a future electron-ion collider design eRHIC.

  8. SimTrack: A compact c++ code for particle orbit and spin tracking in accelerators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Luo, Yun

    2015-08-29

    SimTrack is a compact c++ code of 6-d symplectic element-by-element particle tracking in accelerators originally designed for head-on beam–beam compensation simulation studies in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It provides a 6-d symplectic orbit tracking with the 4th order symplectic integration for magnet elements and the 6-d symplectic synchro-beam map for beam–beam interaction. Since its inception in 2009, SimTrack has been intensively used for dynamic aperture calculations with beam–beam interaction for RHIC. Recently, proton spin tracking and electron energy loss due to synchrotron radiation were added. In this article, I will present the code architecture,more » physics models, and some selected examples of its applications to RHIC and a future electron-ion collider design eRHIC.« less

  9. SimTrack: A compact c++ code for particle orbit and spin tracking in accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yun

    2015-11-01

    SimTrack is a compact c++ code of 6-d symplectic element-by-element particle tracking in accelerators originally designed for head-on beam-beam compensation simulation studies in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It provides a 6-d symplectic orbit tracking with the 4th order symplectic integration for magnet elements and the 6-d symplectic synchro-beam map for beam-beam interaction. Since its inception in 2009, SimTrack has been intensively used for dynamic aperture calculations with beam-beam interaction for RHIC. Recently, proton spin tracking and electron energy loss due to synchrotron radiation were added. In this paper, I will present the code architecture, physics models, and some selected examples of its applications to RHIC and a future electron-ion collider design eRHIC.

  10. ALPAL: A tool to generate simulation codes from natural descriptions

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, G.O. Jr.; Painter, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    ALPAL is a tool that automatically generates code to solve nonlinear integro-differential equations, given a very high-level specification of the equations to be solved and the numerical methods to be used. ALPAL is designed to handle the sort of complicated mathematical models used in very large scientific simulation codes. Other features of ALPAL include an interactive graphical front end, the ability to symbolically compute exact Jacobians for implicit methods, and a high degree of code optimization. 14 refs., 9 figs.

  11. Nexus: a modular workflow management system for quantum simulation codes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Krogel, Jaron T.

    2015-08-24

    The management of simulation workflows is a significant task for the individual computational researcher. Automation of the required tasks involved in simulation work can decrease the overall time to solution and reduce sources of human error. A new simulation workflow management system, Nexus, is presented to address these issues. Nexus is capable of automated job management on workstations and resources at several major supercomputing centers. Its modular design allows many quantum simulation codes to be supported within the same framework. Current support includes quantum Monte Carlo calculations with QMCPACK, density functional theory calculations with Quantum Espresso or VASP, and quantummore » chemical calculations with GAMESS. Users can compose workflows through a transparent, text-based interface, resembling the input file of a typical simulation code. A usage example is provided to illustrate the process.« less

  12. Nexus: a modular workflow management system for quantum simulation codes

    SciTech Connect

    Krogel, Jaron T.

    2015-08-24

    The management of simulation workflows is a significant task for the individual computational researcher. Automation of the required tasks involved in simulation work can decrease the overall time to solution and reduce sources of human error. A new simulation workflow management system, Nexus, is presented to address these issues. Nexus is capable of automated job management on workstations and resources at several major supercomputing centers. Its modular design allows many quantum simulation codes to be supported within the same framework. Current support includes quantum Monte Carlo calculations with QMCPACK, density functional theory calculations with Quantum Espresso or VASP, and quantum chemical calculations with GAMESS. Users can compose workflows through a transparent, text-based interface, resembling the input file of a typical simulation code. A usage example is provided to illustrate the process.

  13. Nexus: A modular workflow management system for quantum simulation codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogel, Jaron T.

    2016-01-01

    The management of simulation workflows represents a significant task for the individual computational researcher. Automation of the required tasks involved in simulation work can decrease the overall time to solution and reduce sources of human error. A new simulation workflow management system, Nexus, is presented to address these issues. Nexus is capable of automated job management on workstations and resources at several major supercomputing centers. Its modular design allows many quantum simulation codes to be supported within the same framework. Current support includes quantum Monte Carlo calculations with QMCPACK, density functional theory calculations with Quantum Espresso or VASP, and quantum chemical calculations with GAMESS. Users can compose workflows through a transparent, text-based interface, resembling the input file of a typical simulation code. A usage example is provided to illustrate the process.

  14. Plasma particle simulation of electrostatic ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Xiaohang; Keefer, Dennis; Ruyten, Wilhelmus

    1990-01-01

    Charge exchange collisons between beam ions and neutral propellant gas can result in erosion of the accelerator grid surfaces of an ion engine. A particle in cell (PIC) is developed along with a Monte Carlo method to simulate the ion dynamics and charge exchange processes in the grid region of an ion thruster. The simulation is two-dimensional axisymmetric and uses three velocity components (2d3v) to investigate the influence of charge exchange collisions on the ion sputtering of the accelerator grid surfaces. An example calculation has been performed for an ion thruster operated on xenon propellant. The simulation shows that the greatest sputtering occurs on the downstream surface of the grid, but some sputtering can also occur on the upstream surface as well as on the interior of the grid aperture.

  15. Improved Boundary Model for Particle Simulation of Collisionless Driven Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, H.; Horiuchi, R.

    2006-10-01

    To clarify the relationship between particle kinetic effects and anomalous resistivity due to plasma instabilities in collisionless driven reconnection, we develop a three-dimensional Particle Simulation code for Magnetic reconnection in an Open system (PASMO). Recently, we have improved a model of upstream boundary to satisfy sufficiently the frozen-in condition both for ions and electrons. From the condition, plasma inflow is driven by ExB drift due to a driving electric field. In the previous model, particles are supplied into the system each time step, based on the particle flux through upstream boundary. The number density changes in proportion to magnetic field. In the improved model, particles in a cell near upstream boundary are newly loaded so as to satisfy shifted Maxwellian rigorously every time step. Using this model, the frozen-in condition is satisfied near the boundary both for electrons and ions. We will discuss the relationship between excitation of instability and mechanism of magnetic reconnection in the meeting.

  16. Particle-in-cell Simulations of the Lunar Photoelectron Sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, A. R.; Horanyi, M.

    2009-12-01

    Previous observations have identified a number phenomena on the lunar surface, which are best explained as results of duty plasma processes leading to dust charging, levitation and horizontal transport. These observations include Surveyor images of Horizon Glow (HG), astronaut sketches of dust “streamers” and in-situ measurements made by the Lunar Ejecta and Meteorite (LEAM) experiment. Recent laboratory experiments that approximately reproduced the near surface lunar plasma environment showed that charging can lead to the levitation and transport of dust grains in a tenuous electron sheath. A critical ingredient to the observed phenomena is the presence of a photoelectron sheath, formed when solar ultraviolet radiation causes the lunar regolith to emit electrons. In order to understand the dynamics and underlying physics of dust particles on the surface of the Moon, the lunar photoelectron sheath has been modeled via a 1-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) code. In order to validate this code, the results are compared with analytical solutions of the electron density, electric field and sheath thickness for three standard electron velocity distributions. Post-validation, initial simulations have focused on the dependence of the lunar photoelectric sheath on non-standard electron velocity distributions and an incoming solar wind flux. Further additions to the model will include the temporal evolution of the solar UV flux and the presence of dust particles, especially their role as sources and sinks of plasma.

  17. Towards robust algorithms for current deposition and dynamic load-balancing in a GPU particle in cell code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francesco; Londrillo, Pasquale; Sgattoni, Andrea; Sinigardi, Stefano; Turchetti, Giorgio

    2012-12-01

    We present `jasmine', an implementation of a fully relativistic, 3D, electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code, capable of running simulations in various laser plasma acceleration regimes on Graphics-Processing-Units (GPUs) HPC clusters. Standard energy/charge preserving FDTD-based algorithms have been implemented using double precision and quadratic (or arbitrary sized) shape functions for the particle weighting. When porting a PIC scheme to the GPU architecture (or, in general, a shared memory environment), the particle-to-grid operations (e.g. the evaluation of the current density) require special care to avoid memory inconsistencies and conflicts. Here we present a robust implementation of this operation that is efficient for any number of particles per cell and particle shape function order. Our algorithm exploits the exposed GPU memory hierarchy and avoids the use of atomic operations, which can hurt performance especially when many particles lay on the same cell. We show the code multi-GPU scalability results and present a dynamic load-balancing algorithm. The code is written using a python-based C++ meta-programming technique which translates in a high level of modularity and allows for easy performance tuning and simple extension of the core algorithms to various simulation schemes.

  18. Spacecraft charging analysis with the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D

    SciTech Connect

    Deca, J.; Lapenta, G.; Marchand, R.; Markidis, S.

    2013-10-15

    We present the first results on the analysis of spacecraft charging with the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, designed for running on massively parallel supercomputers. The numerical algorithm is presented, highlighting the implementation of the electrostatic solver and the immersed boundary algorithm; the latter which creates the possibility to handle complex spacecraft geometries. As a first step in the verification process, a comparison is made between the floating potential obtained with iPic3D and with Orbital Motion Limited theory for a spherical particle in a uniform stationary plasma. Second, the numerical model is verified for a CubeSat benchmark by comparing simulation results with those of PTetra for space environment conditions with increasing levels of complexity. In particular, we consider spacecraft charging from plasma particle collection, photoelectron and secondary electron emission. The influence of a background magnetic field on the floating potential profile near the spacecraft is also considered. Although the numerical approaches in iPic3D and PTetra are rather different, good agreement is found between the two models, raising the level of confidence in both codes to predict and evaluate the complex plasma environment around spacecraft.

  19. Advanced methods in global gyrokinetic full f particle simulation of tokamak transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ogando, F.; Heikkinen, J. A.; Henriksson, S.; Janhunen, S. J.; Kiviniemi, T. P.; Leerink, S.

    2006-11-30

    A new full f nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation code, named ELMFIRE, has been developed for simulating transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas. The code is based on a gyrokinetic particle-in-cell algorithm, which can consider electrons and ions jointly or separately, as well as arbitrary impurities. The implicit treatment of the ion polarization drift and the use of full f methods allow for simulations of strongly perturbed plasmas including wide orbit effects, steep gradients and rapid dynamic changes. This article presents in more detail the algorithms incorporated into ELMFIRE, as well as benchmarking comparisons to both neoclassical theory and other codes.Code ELMFIRE calculates plasma dynamics by following the evolution of a number of sample particles. Because of using an stochastic algorithm its results are influenced by statistical noise. The effect of noise on relevant magnitudes is analyzed.Turbulence spectra of FT-2 plasma has been calculated with ELMFIRE, obtaining results consistent with experimental data.

  20. PSDF: Particle Stream Data Format for N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, Will M.; Ames, Jeff; Hut, Piet; Makino, Junichiro; McMillan, Steve; Muranushi, Takayuki; Nakamura, Koichi; Nitadori, Keigo; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2012-07-01

    We present a data format for the output of general N-body simulations, allowing the presence of individual time steps. By specifying a standard, different N-body integrators and different visualization and analysis programs can all share the simulation data, independent of the type of programs used to produce the data. Our Particle Stream Data Format, PSDF, is specified in YAML, based on the same approach as XML but with a simpler syntax. Together with a specification of PSDF, we provide background and motivation, as well as specific examples in a variety of computer languages. We also offer a web site from which these examples can be retrieved, in order to make it easy to augment existing codes in order to give them the option to produce PSDF output.

  1. Nonlinear electromagnetic gyrokinetic particle simulations with the electron hybrid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Y.; Lin, Z.; Chen, L.; Hahm, T.; Wang, W.; Lee, W.

    2006-10-01

    The electromagnetic model with fluid electrons is successfully implemented into the global gyrokinetic code GTC. In the ideal MHD limit, shear Alfven wave oscillation and continuum damping is demonstrated. Nonlinear electromagnetic simulation is further pursued in the presence of finite ηi. Turbulence transport in the AITG unstable β regime is studied. This work is supported by Department of Energy (DOE) Grant DE-FG02-03ER54724, Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC02-04ER54796 (UCI), DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-76CH03073 (PPPL), and in part by SciDAC Center for Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas. Z. Lin, et al., Science 281, 1835 (1998). F. Zonca and L. Chen, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 30, 2240 (1998); G. Zhao and L. Chen, Phys. Plasmas 9, 861 (2002).

  2. Kinetic Simulations of Particle Acceleration at Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Caprioli, Damiano; Guo, Fan

    2015-07-16

    Collisionless shocks are mediated by collective electromagnetic interactions and are sources of non-thermal particles and emission. The full particle-in-cell approach and a hybrid approach are sketched, simulations of collisionless shocks are shown using a multicolor presentation. Results for SN 1006, a case involving ion acceleration and B field amplification where the shock is parallel, are shown. Electron acceleration takes place in planetary bow shocks and galaxy clusters. It is concluded that acceleration at shocks can be efficient: >15%; CRs amplify B field via streaming instability; ion DSA is efficient at parallel, strong shocks; ions are injected via reflection and shock drift acceleration; and electron DSA is efficient at oblique shocks.

  3. A GeneralizedWeight-Based Particle-In-Cell Simulation Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    W.W. Lee, T.G. Jenkins and S. Ethier

    2010-02-02

    A generalized weight-based particle simulation scheme suitable for simulating magnetized plasmas, where the zeroth-order inhomogeneity is important, is presented. The scheme is an extension of the perturbative simulation schemes developed earlier for particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The new scheme is designed to simulate both the perturbed distribution (δf) and the full distribution (full-F) within the same code. The development is based on the concept of multiscale expansion, which separates the scale lengths of the background inhomogeneity from those associated with the perturbed distributions. The potential advantage for such an arrangement is to minimize the particle noise by using δf in the linear stage stage of the simulation, while retaining the flexibility of a full-F capability in the fully nonlinear stage of the development when signals associated with plasma turbulence are at a much higher level than those from the intrinsic particle noise.

  4. 3-D Particle Simulation of Current Sheet Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Lin, Yu; Wang, Xueyi; Tummel, Kurt; Chen, Liu

    2015-11-01

    The electrostatic (ES) and electromagnetic (EM) instabilities of a Harris current sheet are investigated using a 3-D linearized (δf) gyrokinetic (GK) electron and fully kinetic (FK) ion (GeFi) particle simulation code. The equilibrium magnetic field consists of an asymptotic anti-parallel Bx 0 and a guide field BG. The ES simulations show the excitation of lower-hybrid drift instability (LHDI) at the current sheet edge. The growth rate of the 3-D LHDI is scanned through the (kx ,ky) space. The most unstable modes are found to be at k∥ = 0 for smaller ky. As ky increases, the growth rate shows two peaks at k∥ ≠ 0 , consistent with analytical GK theory. The eigenmode structure and growth rate of LHDI obtained from the GeFi simulation agree well with those obtained from the FK PIC simulation. Decreasing BG, the asymptotic βe 0, or background density can destabilize the LHDI. In the EM simulation, tearing mode instability is dominant in the cases with ky kx , there exist two unstable modes: a kink-like (LHDI) mode at the current sheet edge and a sausage-like mode at the sheet center. The results are compared with the GK eigenmode theory and the FK simulation.

  5. Development Of Sputtering Models For Fluids-Based Plasma Simulation Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitzer, Seth; Beckwith, Kristian; Stoltz, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Rf-driven plasma devices such as ion sources and plasma processing devices for many industrial and research applications benefit from detailed numerical modeling. Simulation of these devices using explicit PIC codes is difficult due to inherent separations of time and spatial scales. One alternative type of model is fluid-based codes coupled with electromagnetics, that are applicable to modeling higher-density plasmas in the time domain, but can relax time step requirements. To accurately model plasma-surface processes, such as physical sputtering and secondary electron emission, kinetic particle models have been developed, where particles are emitted from a material surface due to plasma ion bombardment. In fluid models plasma properties are defined on a cell-by-cell basis, and distributions for individual particle properties are assumed. This adds a complexity to surface process modeling, which we describe here. We describe the implementation of sputtering models into the hydrodynamic plasma simulation code USim, as well as methods to improve the accuracy of fluids-based simulation of plasmas-surface interactions by better modeling of heat fluxes. This work was performed under the auspices of the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences Award #DE-SC0009585.

  6. Particle simulation on heterogeneous distributed supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Jeffrey C.; Dagum, Leonardo

    1993-01-01

    We describe the implementation and performance of a three dimensional particle simulation distributed between a Thinking Machines CM-2 and a Cray Y-MP. These are connected by a combination of two high-speed networks: a high-performance parallel interface (HIPPI) and an optical network (UltraNet). This is the first application to use this configuration at NASA Ames Research Center. We describe our experience implementing and using the application and report the results of several timing measurements. We show that the distribution of applications across disparate supercomputing platforms is feasible and has reasonable performance. In addition, several practical aspects of the computing environment are discussed.

  7. Verification and Validation of MERCURY: A Modern, Monte Carlo Particle Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R J; Cullen, D E; Greenman, G M; Hagmann, C A

    2004-12-09

    Verification and Validation (V&V) is a critical phase in the development cycle of any scientific code. The aim of the V&V process is to determine whether or not the code fulfills and complies with the requirements that were defined prior to the start of the development process. While code V&V can take many forms, this paper concentrates on validation of the results obtained from a modern code against those produced by a validated, legacy code. In particular, the neutron transport capabilities of the modern Monte Carlo code MERCURY are validated against those in the legacy Monte Carlo code TART. The results from each code are compared for a series of basic transport and criticality calculations which are designed to check a variety of code modules. These include the definition of the problem geometry, particle tracking, collisional kinematics, sampling of secondary particle distributions, and nuclear data. The metrics that form the basis for comparison of the codes include both integral quantities and particle spectra. The use of integral results, such as eigenvalues obtained from criticality calculations, is shown to be necessary, but not sufficient, for a comprehensive validation of the code. This process has uncovered problems in both the transport code and the nuclear data processing codes which have since been rectified.

  8. Large eddy simulation and its implementation in the COMMIX code.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J.; Yu, D.-H.

    1999-02-15

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is a numerical simulation method for turbulent flows and is derived by spatial averaging of the Navier-Stokes equations. In contrast with the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) method, LES is capable of calculating transient turbulent flows with greater accuracy. Application of LES to differing flows has given very encouraging results, as reported in the literature. In recent years, a dynamic LES model that presented even better results was proposed and applied to several flows. This report reviews the LES method and its implementation in the COMMIX code, which was developed at Argonne National Laboratory. As an example of the application of LES, the flow around a square prism is simulated, and some numerical results are presented. These results include a three-dimensional simulation that uses a code developed by one of the authors at the University of Notre Dame, and a two-dimensional simulation that uses the COMMIX code. The numerical results are compared with experimental data from the literature and are found to be in very good agreement.

  9. Enhanced Verification Test Suite for Physics Simulation Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, J R; Brock, J S; Brandon, S T; Cotrell, D L; Johnson, B; Knupp, P; Rider, W; Trucano, T; Weirs, V G

    2008-10-10

    This document discusses problems with which to augment, in quantity and in quality, the existing tri-laboratory suite of verification problems used by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The purpose of verification analysis is demonstrate whether the numerical results of the discretization algorithms in physics and engineering simulation codes provide correct solutions of the corresponding continuum equations. The key points of this document are: (1) Verification deals with mathematical correctness of the numerical algorithms in a code, while validation deals with physical correctness of a simulation in a regime of interest. This document is about verification. (2) The current seven-problem Tri-Laboratory Verification Test Suite, which has been used for approximately five years at the DOE WP laboratories, is limited. (3) Both the methodology for and technology used in verification analysis have evolved and been improved since the original test suite was proposed. (4) The proposed test problems are in three basic areas: (a) Hydrodynamics; (b) Transport processes; and (c) Dynamic strength-of-materials. (5) For several of the proposed problems we provide a 'strong sense verification benchmark', consisting of (i) a clear mathematical statement of the problem with sufficient information to run a computer simulation, (ii) an explanation of how the code result and benchmark solution are to be evaluated, and (iii) a description of the acceptance criterion for simulation code results. (6) It is proposed that the set of verification test problems with which any particular code be evaluated include some of the problems described in this document. Analysis of the proposed verification test problems constitutes part of a necessary--but not sufficient--step that builds confidence in physics and engineering simulation codes. More complicated test cases, including physics models of greater

  10. Transport and discrete particle noise in gyrokinetic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas; Lee, W. W.

    2006-10-01

    We present results from our recent investigations regarding the effects of discrete particle noise on the long-time behavior and transport properties of gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations. It is found that the amplitude of nonlinearly saturated drift waves is unaffected by discreteness-induced noise in plasmas whose behavior is dominated by a single mode in the saturated state. We further show that the scaling of this noise amplitude with particle count is correctly predicted by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, even though the drift waves have driven the plasma from thermal equilibrium. As well, we find that the long-term behavior of the saturated system is unaffected by discreteness-induced noise even when multiple modes are included. Additional work utilizing a code with both total-f and δf capabilities is also presented, as part of our efforts to better understand the long- time balance between entropy production, collisional dissipation, and particle/heat flux in gyrokinetic plasmas.

  11. Three-dimensional direct particle simulation on the Connection Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagum, Leonardo

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the algorithms necessary for an efficient data parallel implementation of a 3D particle simulation. In particular, a general master/slave algorithm and a fast sorting algorithm are described and the use of these algorithms in a particle simulation is outlined. A particle simulation using these algorithms has been implemented on a 32768 processor Connection Machine that is capable of simulating over 30 million particles at an average rate of 2.4-microsec/particle/step. Results are presented from the simulation of flow over an Aeroassisted Flight Experiment geometry at 100 km altitude.

  12. Development and testing of cut-cell boundaries for electromagnetic particle-in-cell codes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieter, Chet; Smithe, David N.; Stoltz, Peter H.; Cary, John R.

    2007-03-01

    The finite difference time domain (FDTD) approach for electromagnetic particle-in-cell (EM-PIC) is a proven method for many problems involving interactions of charged particles with electromagnetic fields. However accurately modeling fields and particle process at complex boundaries with such methods is still an active research topic. A variety of methods have been developed for this purpose but the testing and application of these methods to real world problems in fairly limited. We have recently implemented the Dey-Mittra boundary algorithm into our EM-PIC code VORPAL. Convergence tests comparing how the frequency of cavity oscillations converge to the physical values for simulations run with stair-step and Dey-Mittra algorithms will be presented. These tests demonstrate how the Dey-Mittra algorithm provides considerable improvements over stair step boundaries. A method to correct for the image charge accumulation from removing particles at complex surfaces will also be presented. Applications to superconducting RF cavities and high-powered microwave devices will be presented.

  13. Applicability of the MCPNX particle transport code for determination of the source correction effect in positron lifetime measurements on thin polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Urban-Klaehn

    2007-09-01

    The method presented herein uses the MCNPX Monte Carlo particle transport code to track individual positrons and other particles through geometry that accounts for the detectors, backing foils, samples and sources with their actual sizes, positions and material characteristics. Polymer material, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), with different thickness of films served as samples. The excellent agreement between the experimental results and the MCNPX simulation of source correction effects for varied positron sources and different film thicknesses validates the applicability of the MCNPX code.

  14. Development of a CFD code for casting simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murph, Jesse E.

    1993-01-01

    Because of high rejection rates for large structural castings (e.g., the Space Shuttle Main Engine Alternate Turbopump Design Program), a reliable casting simulation computer code is very desirable. This code would reduce both the development time and life cycle costs by allowing accurate modeling of the entire casting process. While this code could be used for other types of castings, the most significant reductions of time and cost would probably be realized in complex investment castings, where any reduction in the number of development castings would be of significant benefit. The casting process is conveniently divided into three distinct phases: (1) mold filling, where the melt is poured or forced into the mold cavity; (2) solidification, where the melt undergoes a phase change to the solid state; and (3) cool down, where the solidified part continues to cool to ambient conditions. While these phases may appear to be separate and distinct, temporal overlaps do exist between phases (e.g., local solidification occurring during mold filling), and some phenomenological events are affected by others (e.g., residual stresses depend on solidification and cooling rates). Therefore, a reliable code must accurately model all three phases and the interactions between each. While many codes have been developed (to various stages of complexity) to model the solidification and cool down phases, only a few codes have been developed to model mold filling.

  15. Unsteady Cascade Aerodynamic Response Using a Multiphysics Simulation Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, C.; Reddy, T. S. R.; Spyropoulos, E.

    2000-01-01

    The multiphysics code Spectrum(TM) is applied to calculate the unsteady aerodynamic pressures of oscillating cascade of airfoils representing a blade row of a turbomachinery component. Multiphysics simulation is based on a single computational framework for the modeling of multiple interacting physical phenomena, in the present case being between fluids and structures. Interaction constraints are enforced in a fully coupled manner using the augmented-Lagrangian method. The arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method is utilized to account for deformable fluid domains resulting from blade motions. Unsteady pressures are calculated for a cascade designated as the tenth standard, and undergoing plunging and pitching oscillations. The predicted unsteady pressures are compared with those obtained from an unsteady Euler co-de refer-red in the literature. The Spectrum(TM) code predictions showed good correlation for the cases considered.

  16. Simulations of Laboratory Astrophysics Experiments using the CRASH code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trantham, Matthew; Kuranz, Carolyn; Fein, Jeff; Wan, Willow; Young, Rachel; Keiter, Paul; Drake, R. Paul

    2015-11-01

    Computer simulations can assist in the design and analysis of laboratory astrophysics experiments. The Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) at the University of Michigan developed a code that has been used to design and analyze high-energy-density experiments on OMEGA, NIF, and other large laser facilities. This Eulerian code uses block-adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) with implicit multigroup radiation transport, electron heat conduction and laser ray tracing. This poster will demonstrate some of the experiments the CRASH code has helped design or analyze including: Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Taylor, magnetized flows, jets, and laser-produced plasmas. This work is funded by the following grants: DEFC52-08NA28616, DE-NA0001840, and DE-NA0002032.

  17. Pedestal Fueling Simulations with a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Stotler, C.S. Chang, S.H. Ku, J. Lang and G.Y. Park

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  18. Boundary conditions in a meshless staggered particle code

    SciTech Connect

    Libersky, L.D.; Randles, P.W.

    1998-07-01

    A meshless method utilizing two sets of particles and generalized boundary conditions is introduced. Companion sets of particles, one carrying velocity and the other carrying stress, are employed to reduce the undesirable effects of colocation of all field variables and increase accuracy. Boundary conditions implemented within this staggered framework include contact, stress-free, stress, velocity, and symmetry constraints. Several test problems are used to evaluate the method. Of particular importance is the motion of stress particles relative to velocity particles in higher dimensions. Early results show promise, but difficulties remain that must be overcome if the staggered technique is to be successful.

  19. RAMSES-CH: a new chemodynamical code for cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Few, C. G.; Courty, S.; Gibson, B. K.; Kawata, D.; Calura, F.; Teyssier, R.

    2012-07-01

    We present a new chemodynamical code -RAMSES-CH- for use in simulating the self-consistent evolution of chemical and hydrodynamical properties of galaxies within a fully cosmological framework. We build upon the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES, which includes a treatment of self-gravity, hydrodynamics, star formation, radiative cooling and supernova feedback, to trace the dominant isotopes of C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si and Fe. We include the contribution of Type Ia and Type II supernovae, in addition to low- and intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch stars, relaxing the instantaneous recycling approximation. The new chemical evolution modules are highly flexible and portable, lending themselves to ready exploration of variations in the underpinning stellar and nuclear physics. We apply RAMSES-CH to the cosmological simulation of a typical L★ galaxy, demonstrating the successful recovery of the basic empirical constraints regarding [α/Fe]-[Fe/H] and Type Ia/II supernova rates.

  20. Parallel Monte Carlo Electron and Photon Transport Simulation Code (PMCEPT code)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kum, Oyeon

    2004-11-01

    Simulations for customized cancer radiation treatment planning for each patient are very useful for both patient and doctor. These simulations can be used to find the most effective treatment with the least possible dose to the patient. This typical system, so called ``Doctor by Information Technology", will be useful to provide high quality medical services everywhere. However, the large amount of computing time required by the well-known general purpose Monte Carlo(MC) codes has prevented their use for routine dose distribution calculations for a customized radiation treatment planning. The optimal solution to provide ``accurate" dose distribution within an ``acceptable" time limit is to develop a parallel simulation algorithm on a beowulf PC cluster because it is the most accurate, efficient, and economic. I developed parallel MC electron and photon transport simulation code based on the standard MPI message passing interface. This algorithm solved the main difficulty of the parallel MC simulation (overlapped random number series in the different processors) using multiple random number seeds. The parallel results agreed well with the serial ones. The parallel efficiency approached 100% as was expected.

  1. Application of the S3M and Mcnpx Codes in Particle Detector Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovič, Márius; Sedlačková, Katarína; Šagátová, Andrea; Strašík, Ivan

    2014-02-01

    Semiconductor detectors can be used to detect neutrons if they are covered by a conversion layer. Some neutrons transfer their kinetic energy to hydrogen via elastic nuclear scattering in the conversion layer, and protons are produced as recoils. These protons enter the sensitive volume of the detector and are detected. In the process of detector development, Monte Carlo computer codes are necessary to simulate the detection process. This paper presents the main features of the S3M code (SRIM Supporting Software Modules) and shows its application potential. Examples are given for the neutron detectors with a conversion layer and for CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) diamond detectors for beam-condition monitors at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider). Special attention is paid to the S3M statistical modules that can be of interest also for other application areas like beam transport, accelerators, ion therapy, etc. The results are generated by MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) simulations used to optimize the thickness of the HDPE (high density polyethylene) conversion layer.

  2. A PIC-MCC code for simulation of streamer propagation in air

    SciTech Connect

    Chanrion, O. Neubert, T.

    2008-07-20

    A particle code has been developed to study the distribution and acceleration of electrons in electric discharges in air. The code can follow the evolution of a discharge from the initial stage of a single free electron in a background electric field to the formation of an electron avalanche and its transition into a streamer. The code is in 2D axi-symmetric coordinates, allowing quasi 3D simulations during the initial stages of streamer formation. This is important for realistic simulations of problems where space charge fields are essential such as in streamer formation. The charged particles are followed in a Cartesian mesh and the electric field is updated with Poisson's equation from the charged particle densities. Collisional processes between electrons and air molecules are simulated with a Monte Carlo technique, according to cross section probabilities. The code also includes photoionisation processes of air molecules by photons emitted by excited constituents. The paper describes the code and presents some results of streamer development at 70 km altitude in the mesosphere where electrical discharges (sprites) are generated above severe thunderstorms and at {approx}10 km relevant for lightning and thundercloud electrification. The code is used to study acceleration of thermal seed electrons in streamers and to understand the conditions under which electrons may reach energies in the runaway regime. This is the first study in air, with a particle model with realistic spatial dependencies of the electrostatic field. It is shown that at 1 atm pressure the electric field must exceed {approx}7.5 times the breakdown field to observe runaway electrons in a constant electric field. This value is close to the field where the electric force on an electron equals the maximum frictional force on an electron - found at {approx}100 eV. It is also found that this value is reached in a negative streamer tip at 10 km altitude when the background electric field equals

  3. Simulation of dynamic material response with the PAGOSA code

    SciTech Connect

    Holian, K.S.; Adams, T.F.

    1993-08-01

    The 3D Eulerian PAGOSA hydrocode is being run on the massively parallel Connection Machine (CM) to simulate the response of materials to dynamic loading, such as by high explosives or high velocity impact. The code has a variety of equation of state forms, plastic yield models, and fracture and fragmentation models. The numerical algorithms in PAGOSA and the implementation of material models are discussed briefly.

  4. Systematic effects in CALOR simulation code to model experimental configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Job, P.K.; Proudfoot, J. ); Handler, T. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Gabriel, T.A. )

    1991-03-27

    CALOR89 code system is being used to simulate test beam results and the design parameters of several calorimeter configurations. It has been bench-marked against the ZEUS, D{theta} and HELIOS data. This study identifies the systematic effects in CALOR simulation to model the experimental configurations. Five major systematic effects are identified. These are the choice of high energy nuclear collision model, material composition, scintillator saturation, shower integration time, and the shower containment. Quantitative estimates of these systematic effects are presented. 23 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. KULL: LLNL's ASCI Inertial Confinement Fusion Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Rathkopf, J. A.; Miller, D. S.; Owen, J. M.; Zike, M. R.; Eltgroth, P. G.; Madsen, N. K.; McCandless, K. P.; Nowak, P. F.; Nemanic, M. K.; Gentile, N. A.; Stuart, L. M.; Keen, N. D.; Palmer, T. S.

    2000-01-10

    KULL is a three dimensional, time dependent radiation hydrodynamics simulation code under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI), KULL's purpose is to simulate the physical processes in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets. The National Ignition Facility, where ICF experiments will be conducted, and ASCI are part of the experimental and computational components of DOE's Stockpile Stewardship Program. This paper provides an overview of ASCI and describes KULL, its hydrodynamic simulation capability and its three methods of simulating radiative transfer. Particular emphasis is given to the parallelization techniques essential to obtain the performance required of the Stockpile Stewardship Program and to exploit the massively parallel processor machines that ASCI is procuring.

  6. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Alfven Eigenmodes with Zonal Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhixuan

    2012-03-01

    Effects of collective Shear Alfven wave instabilities on the energetic particle confinement in tokamak depend ultimately on the nonlinear evolution of the turbulence with spontaneously generated zonal fields (zonal flows and zonal currents). In this work, we study nonlinear interaction of Alfv'en eigenmodes with zonal fields using global gyrokinetic toroidal code GTC. We choose to start from the simplest case, linear electrostatic eigenmodes in cylindrical geometry, and then gradually extend our study into electromagnetic eigenmode in toroidal geometry. We have verified GTC for linear simulation in cylindrical geometry with the ExB flow shear. Ion temperature gradient instability is observed to be suppressed when ExB flow shear is strong enough. A good agreement has also been achieved between our simulation result of kinetic Alfv'en wave and LAPD experimental result. Now we are doing TAE (torodicity-induced Alfv'en eigenmodes) simulation using the DIII-D equilibrium data. Linear simulation result agrees well with DIII-D data. Our next step is to include nonlinear effects to study the interaction between zonal fields and TAEs. Work supported by DOE SciDAC GSEP Center and Plasma Science Center.

  7. Monte Carlo code for high spatial resolution ocean color simulations.

    PubMed

    D'Alimonte, Davide; Zibordi, Giuseppe; Kajiyama, Tamito; Cunha, José C

    2010-09-10

    A Monte Carlo code for ocean color simulations has been developed to model in-water radiometric fields of downward and upward irradiance (E(d) and E(u)), and upwelling radiance (L(u)) in a two-dimensional domain with a high spatial resolution. The efficiency of the code has been optimized by applying state-of-the-art computing solutions, while the accuracy of simulation results has been quantified through benchmark with the widely used Hydrolight code for various values of seawater inherent optical properties and different illumination conditions. Considering a seawater single scattering albedo of 0.9, as well as surface waves of 5 m width and 0.5 m height, the study has shown that the number of photons required to quantify uncertainties induced by wave focusing effects on E(d), E(u), and L(u) data products is of the order of 10(6), 10(9), and 10(10), respectively. On this basis, the effects of sea-surface geometries on radiometric quantities have been investigated for different surface gravity waves. Data products from simulated radiometric profiles have finally been analyzed as a function of the deployment speed and sampling frequency of current free-fall systems in view of providing recommendations to improve measurement protocols.

  8. Monte Carlo code for high spatial resolution ocean color simulations.

    PubMed

    D'Alimonte, Davide; Zibordi, Giuseppe; Kajiyama, Tamito; Cunha, José C

    2010-09-10

    A Monte Carlo code for ocean color simulations has been developed to model in-water radiometric fields of downward and upward irradiance (E(d) and E(u)), and upwelling radiance (L(u)) in a two-dimensional domain with a high spatial resolution. The efficiency of the code has been optimized by applying state-of-the-art computing solutions, while the accuracy of simulation results has been quantified through benchmark with the widely used Hydrolight code for various values of seawater inherent optical properties and different illumination conditions. Considering a seawater single scattering albedo of 0.9, as well as surface waves of 5 m width and 0.5 m height, the study has shown that the number of photons required to quantify uncertainties induced by wave focusing effects on E(d), E(u), and L(u) data products is of the order of 10(6), 10(9), and 10(10), respectively. On this basis, the effects of sea-surface geometries on radiometric quantities have been investigated for different surface gravity waves. Data products from simulated radiometric profiles have finally been analyzed as a function of the deployment speed and sampling frequency of current free-fall systems in view of providing recommendations to improve measurement protocols. PMID:20830183

  9. CHOLLA: A NEW MASSIVELY PARALLEL HYDRODYNAMICS CODE FOR ASTROPHYSICAL SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Evan E.; Robertson, Brant E.

    2015-04-15

    We present Computational Hydrodynamics On ParaLLel Architectures (Cholla ), a new three-dimensional hydrodynamics code that harnesses the power of graphics processing units (GPUs) to accelerate astrophysical simulations. Cholla models the Euler equations on a static mesh using state-of-the-art techniques, including the unsplit Corner Transport Upwind algorithm, a variety of exact and approximate Riemann solvers, and multiple spatial reconstruction techniques including the piecewise parabolic method (PPM). Using GPUs, Cholla evolves the fluid properties of thousands of cells simultaneously and can update over 10 million cells per GPU-second while using an exact Riemann solver and PPM reconstruction. Owing to the massively parallel architecture of GPUs and the design of the Cholla code, astrophysical simulations with physically interesting grid resolutions (≳256{sup 3}) can easily be computed on a single device. We use the Message Passing Interface library to extend calculations onto multiple devices and demonstrate nearly ideal scaling beyond 64 GPUs. A suite of test problems highlights the physical accuracy of our modeling and provides a useful comparison to other codes. We then use Cholla to simulate the interaction of a shock wave with a gas cloud in the interstellar medium, showing that the evolution of the cloud is highly dependent on its density structure. We reconcile the computed mixing time of a turbulent cloud with a realistic density distribution destroyed by a strong shock with the existing analytic theory for spherical cloud destruction by describing the system in terms of its median gas density.

  10. Particle methods for simulation of subsurface multiphase fluid flow and biogeological processes

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Meakin; Alexandre Tartakovsky; Tim Scheibe; Daniel Tartakovsky; Georgr Redden; Philip E. Long; Scott C. Brooks; Zhijie Xu

    2007-06-01

    A number of particle models that are suitable for simulating multiphase fluid flow and biogeological processes have been developed during the last few decades. Here we discuss three of them: a microscopic model - molecular dynamics; a mesoscopic model - dissipative particle dynamics; and a macroscopic model - smoothed particle hydrodynamics. Particle methods are robust and versatile, and it is relatively easy to add additional physical, chemical and biological processes into particle codes. However, the computational efficiency of particle methods is low relative to continuum methods. Multiscale particle methods and hybrid (particle–particle and particle–continuum) methods are needed to improve computational efficiency and make effective use of emerging computational capabilities. These new methods are under development.

  11. Rethinking Electrostatic Solvers in Particle Simulations for the Exascale Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, Jan; Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni; Járleberg, Erik; Apostolov, Rossen; Laure, Erwin

    2012-10-01

    In preparation to the exascale era, an alternative approach to calculate the electrostatic forces in Particle Mesh (PM) methods is proposed. While the traditional techniques are based on the calculation of the electrostatic potential by solving the Poisson equation, in the new approach the electric field is calculated by solving Ampère's law. When the Ampere's law is discretized explicitly in time, the electric field values on the mesh are simply updated from the previous values. In this way, the electrostatic solver becomes an embarrassingly parallel problem, making the algorithm extremely scalable and suitable for exascale computing platforms. An implementation PM code with the new electrostatic solver is presented to show that the proposed method produces correct results. It is a very promising algorithm for exascale PM simulations.

  12. Particle Simulations of a Linear Dielectric Wall Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B R; Blackfield, D T; Nelson, S D

    2007-06-12

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) is a compact induction accelerator structure that incorporates the accelerating mechanism, pulse forming structure, and switch structure into an integrated module. The DWA consists of stacked stripline Blumlein assemblies, which can provide accelerating gradients in excess of 100 MeV/meter. Blumleins are switched sequentially according to a prescribed acceleration schedule to maintain synchronism with the proton bunch as it accelerates. A finite difference time domain code (FDTD) is used to determine the applied acceleration field to the proton bunch. Particle simulations are used to model the injector as well as the accelerator stack to determine the proton bunch energy distribution, both longitudinal and transverse dynamic focusing, and emittance growth associated with various DWA configurations.

  13. Simulations of auroral plasma processes - Electric fields, waves and particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Thiemann, H.; Schunk, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Plasma processes driven by current sheets of finite thicknesses in an ambient magnetized plasma are studied using a 2 1/2 dimensional particle-in-cell code, and similarities are found between simulated plasma processes and those observed in the auroral plasma. Current sheets are shown to be bounded by large perpendicular electric fields occurring near their edges above the conducting boundary. Shaped potential structures form when the current sheets are narrow, and when the current sheets are wide, potential structures develop a significant parallel potential drop such that the electrons are accelerated upwards. Downward parallel electric fields of variable strength are noted in the downward current region, and double layer formation is seen in both narrow and wide current sheets. High frequency oscillations near the electron plasma frequency and its harmonic are seen, and low frequency waves are observed.

  14. Particle kinetic simulation of high altitude hypervelocity flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Brian L.

    1993-01-01

    In this grant period, the focus has been on enhancement and application of the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) particle method for computing hypersonic flows of re-entry vehicles. Enhancement efforts dealt with modeling gas-gas interactions for thermal non-equilibrium relaxation processes and gas-surface interactions for prediction of vehicle surface temperatures. Both are important for application to problems of engineering interest. The code was employed in a parametric study to improve future applications, and in simulations of aeropass maneuvers in support of the Magellan mission. Detailed comparisons between continuum models for internal energy relaxation and DSMC models reveals that several discrepancies exist. These include definitions of relaxation parameters and the methodologies for implementing them in DSMC codes. These issues were clarified and all differences were rectified in a paper (Appendix A) submitted to Physics of Fluids A, featuring several key figures in the DSMC community as co-authors and B. Haas as first author. This material will be presented at the Fluid Dynamics meeting of the American Physical Society on November 21, 1993. The aerodynamics of space vehicles in highly rarefied flows are very sensitive to the vehicle surface temperatures. Rather than require prescribed temperature estimates for spacecraft as is typically done in DSMC methods, a new technique was developed which couples the dynamic surface heat transfer characteristics into the DSMC flow simulation code to compute surface temperatures directly. This model, when applied to thin planar bodies such as solar panels, was described in AIAA Paper No. 93-2765 (Appendix B) and was presented at the Thermophysics Conference in July 1993. The paper has been submitted to the Journal of Thermophysics and Heat Transfer. Application of the DSMC method to problems of practical interest requires a trade off between solution accuracy and computational expense and limitations. A

  15. Generating performance portable geoscientific simulation code with Firedrake (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, D. A.; Bercea, G.; Cotter, C. J.; Kelly, P. H.; Loriant, N.; Luporini, F.; McRae, A. T.; Mitchell, L.; Rathgeber, F.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation will demonstrate how a change in simulation programming paradigm can be exploited to deliver sophisticated simulation capability which is far easier to programme than are conventional models, is capable of exploiting different emerging parallel hardware, and is tailored to the specific needs of geoscientific simulation. Geoscientific simulation represents a grand challenge computational task: many of the largest computers in the world are tasked with this field, and the requirements of resolution and complexity of scientists in this field are far from being sated. However, single thread performance has stalled, even sometimes decreased, over the last decade, and has been replaced by ever more parallel systems: both as conventional multicore CPUs and in the emerging world of accelerators. At the same time, the needs of scientists to couple ever-more complex dynamics and parametrisations into their models makes the model development task vastly more complex. The conventional approach of writing code in low level languages such as Fortran or C/C++ and then hand-coding parallelism for different platforms by adding library calls and directives forces the intermingling of the numerical code with its implementation. This results in an almost impossible set of skill requirements for developers, who must simultaneously be domain science experts, numericists, software engineers and parallelisation specialists. Even more critically, it requires code to be essentially rewritten for each emerging hardware platform. Since new platforms are emerging constantly, and since code owners do not usually control the procurement of the supercomputers on which they must run, this represents an unsustainable development load. The Firedrake system, conversely, offers the developer the opportunity to write PDE discretisations in the high-level mathematical language UFL from the FEniCS project (http://fenicsproject.org). Non-PDE model components, such as parametrisations

  16. Relativistic Modeling Capabilities in PERSEUS Extended-MHD Simulation Code for HED Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlin, Nathaniel; Seyler, Charles

    2015-11-01

    We discuss the incorporation of relativistic modeling capabilities into the PERSEUS extended MHD simulation code for high-energy-density (HED) plasmas, and present the latest simulation results. The use of fully relativistic equations enables the model to remain self-consistent in simulations of such relativistic phenomena as hybrid X-pinches and laser-plasma interactions. We have overcome a major challenge of a relativistic fluid implementation, namely the recovery of primitive variables (density, velocity, pressure) from conserved quantities at each time step of a simulation. Our code recovers non-relativistic results along with important features of published Particle-In-Cell simulation results for a laser penetrating a super-critical hydrogen gas with Fast Ignition applications. In particular, we recover the penetration of magnetized relativistic electron jets ahead of the laser. Our code also reveals new physics in the modeling of a laser incident on a thin foil. This work is supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration stewardship sciences academic program under Department of Energy cooperative agreements DE-FOA-0001153 and DE-NA0001836.

  17. Monte Carlo N Particle code - Dose distribution of clinical electron beams in inhomogeneous phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Nedaie, H. A.; Mosleh-Shirazi, M. A.; Allahverdi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Electron dose distributions calculated using the currently available analytical methods can be associated with large uncertainties. The Monte Carlo method is the most accurate method for dose calculation in electron beams. Most of the clinical electron beam simulation studies have been performed using non- MCNP [Monte Carlo N Particle] codes. Given the differences between Monte Carlo codes, this work aims to evaluate the accuracy of MCNP4C-simulated electron dose distributions in a homogenous phantom and around inhomogeneities. Different types of phantoms ranging in complexity were used; namely, a homogeneous water phantom and phantoms made of polymethyl methacrylate slabs containing different-sized, low- and high-density inserts of heterogeneous materials. Electron beams with 8 and 15 MeV nominal energy generated by an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator were investigated. Measurements were performed for a 10 cm × 10 cm applicator at a source-to-surface distance of 100 cm. Individual parts of the beam-defining system were introduced into the simulation one at a time in order to show their effect on depth doses. In contrast to the first scattering foil, the secondary scattering foil, X and Y jaws and applicator provide up to 5% of the dose. A 2%/2 mm agreement between MCNP and measurements was found in the homogenous phantom, and in the presence of heterogeneities in the range of 1-3%, being generally within 2% of the measurements for both energies in a "complex" phantom. A full-component simulation is necessary in order to obtain a realistic model of the beam. The MCNP4C results agree well with the measured electron dose distributions. PMID:23533162

  18. T-Matrix: Codes for Computing Electromagnetic Scattering by Nonspherical and Aggregated Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterman, Peter; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Travis, Larry D.; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2015-11-01

    The T-Matrix package includes codes to compute electromagnetic scattering by homogeneous, rotationally symmetric nonspherical particles in fixed and random orientations, randomly oriented two-sphere clusters with touching or separated components, and multi-sphere clusters in fixed and random orientations. All codes are written in Fortran-77. LAPACK-based, extended-precision, Gauss-elimination- and NAG-based, and superposition codes are available, as are double-precision superposition, parallelized double-precision, double-precision Lorenz-Mie codes, and codes for the computation of the coefficients for the generalized Chebyshev shape.

  19. Some Developments of the Equilibrium Particle Simulation Method for the Direct Simulation of Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macrossan, M. N.

    1995-01-01

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is the established technique for the simulation of rarefied gas flows. In some flows of engineering interest, such as occur for aero-braking spacecraft in the upper atmosphere, DSMC can become prohibitively expensive in CPU time because some regions of the flow, particularly on the windward side of blunt bodies, become collision dominated. As an alternative to using a hybrid DSMC and continuum gas solver (Euler or Navier-Stokes solver) this work is aimed at making the particle simulation method efficient in the high density regions of the flow. A high density, infinite collision rate limit of DSMC, the Equilibrium Particle Simulation method (EPSM) was proposed some 15 years ago. EPSM is developed here for the flow of a gas consisting of many different species of molecules and is shown to be computationally efficient (compared to DSMC) for high collision rate flows. It thus offers great potential as part of a hybrid DSMC/EPSM code which could handle flows in the transition regime between rarefied gas flows and fully continuum flows. As a first step towards this goal a pure EPSM code is described. The next step of combining DSMC and EPSM is not attempted here but should be straightforward. EPSM and DSMC are applied to Taylor-Couette flow with Kn = 0.02 and 0.0133 and S(omega) = 3). Toroidal vortices develop for both methods but some differences are found, as might be expected for the given flow conditions. EPSM appears to be less sensitive to the sequence of random numbers used in the simulation than is DSMC and may also be more dissipative. The question of the origin and the magnitude of the dissipation in EPSM is addressed. It is suggested that this analysis is also relevant to DSMC when the usual accuracy requirements on the cell size and decoupling time step are relaxed in the interests of computational efficiency.

  20. Controlling seepage in discrete particle simulations of biological systems.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Bruce S; Joldes, Grand R; Wong, Kelvin K L; Tan, Chin Wee; Smith, David W

    2016-01-01

    It is now commonplace to represent materials in a simulation using assemblies of discrete particles. Sometimes, one wishes to maintain the integrity of boundaries between particle types, for example, when modelling multiple tissue layers. However, as the particle assembly evolves during a simulation, particles may pass across interfaces. This behaviour is referred to as 'seepage'. The aims of this study were (i) to examine the conditions for seepage through a confining particle membrane and (ii) to define some simple rules that can be employed to control seepage. Based on the force-deformation response of spheres with various sizes and stiffness, we develop analytic expressions for the force required to move a 'probe particle' between confining 'membrane particles'. We analyse the influence that particle's size and stiffness have on the maximum force that can act on the probe particle before the onset of seepage. The theoretical results are applied in the simulation of a biological cell under unconfined compression. PMID:26629728

  1. Physical Models for Particle Tracking Simulations in the RF Gap

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P.; Holmes, Jeffrey A.

    2015-06-01

    This document describes the algorithms that are used in the PyORBIT code to track the particles accelerated in the Radio-Frequency cavities. It gives the mathematical description of the algorithms and the assumptions made in each case. The derived formulas have been implemented in the PyORBIT code. The necessary data for each algorithm are described in detail.

  2. Particle-in-cell simulations of plasma accelerators and electron-neutral collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo E.; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.; Shadwick, B.A.

    2001-10-01

    We present 2-D simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented particle-in-cell code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approx}10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approx}10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory and fluid simulations. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications of XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling relativistic electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic MACH Code Used to Simulate Magnetoplasmadynamic Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Pavlos G.; LaPointe, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    The On-Board Propulsion program at the NASA Glenn Research Center is utilizing a state of-the-art numerical simulation to model the performance of high-power electromagnetic plasma thrusters. Such thrusters are envisioned for use in lunar and Mars cargo transport, piloted interplanetary expeditions, and deep-space robotic exploration of the solar system. The experimental portion of this program is described in reference 1. This article describes the numerical modeling program used to guide the experimental research. The synergistic use of numerical simulations and experimental research has spurred the rapid advancement of high-power thruster technologies for a variety of bold new NASA missions. From its inception as a U.S. Department of Defense code in the mid-1980's, the Multiblock Arbitrary Coordinate Hydromagnetic (MACH) simulation tool has been used by the plasma physics community to model a diverse range of plasma problems--including plasma opening switches, inertial confinement fusion concepts, compact toroid formation and acceleration, z-pinch implosion physics, laser-target interactions, and a variety of plasma thrusters. The MACH2 code used at Glenn is a time-dependent, two-dimensional, axisymmetric, multimaterial code with a multiblock structure. MACH3, a more recent three-dimensional version of the code, is currently undergoing beta tests. The MACH computational mesh moves in an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) fashion that allows the simulation of diffusive-dominated and dispersive-dominated problems, and the mesh can be refined via a variety of adaptive schemes to capture regions of varying characteristic scale. The mass continuity and momentum equations model a compressible viscous fluid, and three energy equations are used to simulate nonthermal equilibrium between electrons, ions, and the radiation field. Magnetic fields are modeled by an induction equation that includes resistive diffusion, the Hall effect, and a thermal source for magnetic

  4. Code System for Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Simulation.

    1999-04-21

    Version 00 VSOP94 (Very Superior Old Programs) is a system of codes linked together for the simulation of reactor life histories. It comprises neutron cross section libraries and processing routines, repeated neutron spectrum evaluation, 2-D diffusion calculation based on neutron flux synthesis with depletion and shut-down features, in-core and out-of-pile fuel management, fuel cycle cost analysis, and thermal hydraulics (at present restricted to Pebble Bed HTRs). Various techniques have been employed to accelerate the iterativemore » processes and to optimize the internal data transfer. The code system has been used extensively for comparison studies of reactors, their fuel cycles, and related detailed features. In addition to its use in research and development work for the High Temperature Reactor, the system has been applied successfully to Light Water and Heavy Water Reactors.« less

  5. Upgrades to the NESS (Nuclear Engine System Simulation) Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fittje, James E.

    2007-01-01

    In support of the President's Vision for Space Exploration, the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) concept is being evaluated as a potential propulsion technology for human expeditions to the moon and Mars. The need for exceptional propulsion system performance in these missions has been documented in numerous studies, and was the primary focus of a considerable effort undertaken during the 1960's and 1970's. The NASA Glenn Research Center is leveraging this past NTR investment in their vehicle concepts and mission analysis studies with the aid of the Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS) code. This paper presents the additional capabilities and upgrades made to this code in order to perform higher fidelity NTR propulsion system analysis and design.

  6. Code System for Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    TEUCHERT, E.

    1999-04-21

    Version 00 VSOP94 (Very Superior Old Programs) is a system of codes linked together for the simulation of reactor life histories. It comprises neutron cross section libraries and processing routines, repeated neutron spectrum evaluation, 2-D diffusion calculation based on neutron flux synthesis with depletion and shut-down features, in-core and out-of-pile fuel management, fuel cycle cost analysis, and thermal hydraulics (at present restricted to Pebble Bed HTRs). Various techniques have been employed to accelerate the iterative processes and to optimize the internal data transfer. The code system has been used extensively for comparison studies of reactors, their fuel cycles, and related detailed features. In addition to its use in research and development work for the High Temperature Reactor, the system has been applied successfully to Light Water and Heavy Water Reactors.

  7. DANTSYS: A diffusion accelerated neutral particle transport code system

    SciTech Connect

    Alcouffe, R.E.; Baker, R.S.; Brinkley, F.W.; Marr, D.R.; O`Dell, R.D.; Walters, W.F.

    1995-06-01

    The DANTSYS code package includes the following transport codes: ONEDANT, TWODANT, TWODANT/GQ, TWOHEX, and THREEDANT. The DANTSYS code package is a modular computer program package designed to solve the time-independent, multigroup discrete ordinates form of the boltzmann transport equation in several different geometries. The modular construction of the package separates the input processing, the transport equation solving, and the post processing (or edit) functions into distinct code modules: the Input Module, one or more Solver Modules, and the Edit Module, respectively. The Input and Edit Modules are very general in nature and are common to all the Solver Modules. The ONEDANT Solver Module contains a one-dimensional (slab, cylinder, and sphere), time-independent transport equation solver using the standard diamond-differencing method for space/angle discretization. Also included in the package are solver Modules named TWODANT, TWODANT/GQ, THREEDANT, and TWOHEX. The TWODANT Solver Module solves the time-independent two-dimensional transport equation using the diamond-differencing method for space/angle discretization. The authors have also introduced an adaptive weighted diamond differencing (AWDD) method for the spatial and angular discretization into TWODANT as an option. The TWOHEX Solver Module solves the time-independent two-dimensional transport equation on an equilateral triangle spatial mesh. The THREEDANT Solver Module solves the time independent, three-dimensional transport equation for XYZ and RZ{Theta} symmetries using both diamond differencing with set-to-zero fixup and the AWDD method. The TWODANT/GQ Solver Module solves the 2-D transport equation in XY and RZ symmetries using a spatial mesh of arbitrary quadrilaterals. The spatial differencing method is based upon the diamond differencing method with set-to-zero fixup with changes to accommodate the generalized spatial meshing.

  8. Computer and laboratory simulation of interactions between spacecraft surfaces and charged-particle environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. J.

    1979-01-01

    There are two categories of interactions considered in this report. The first, spacecraft passive, refers to cases where the charged-particle environment acts on the spacecraft (e.g., spacecraft charging phenomena). The second, spacecraft active, refers to cases where a system on the spacecraft causes the interaction (e.g., high voltage space power systems). Both categories are studied in ground simulation facilities to understand the processes involved and to measure the pertinent parameters. Computer simulations are based on the NASA Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP) code. Analytical models are developed in this code and verified against the experimental data. Extrapolation from the small test samples to space conditions are made with this code. Typical results from laboratory and computer simulations are presented for both types of interactions. Extrapolations from these simulations to performance in space environments are discussed.

  9. Computer and laboratory simulation of interactions between spacecraft surfaces and charged-particle environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. J.

    1979-01-01

    Cases where the charged-particle environment acts on the spacecraft (e.g., spacecraft charging phenomena) and cases where a system on the spacecraft causes the interaction (e.g., high voltage space power systems) are considered. Both categories were studied in ground simulation facilities to understand the processes involved and to measure the pertinent parameters. Computer simulations are based on the NASA Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP) code. Analytical models are developed in this code and verified against the experimental data. Extrapolation from the small test samples to space conditions are made with this code. Typical results from laboratory and computer simulations are presented for both types of interactions. Extrapolations from these simulations to performance in space environments are discussed.

  10. Traveling-wave-tube simulation: The IBC (Interactive Beam-Circuit) code

    SciTech Connect

    Morey, I.J.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1989-09-26

    Interactive Beam-Circuit (IBC) is a one-dimensional many particle simulation code which has been developed to run interactively on a PC or Workstation, and displaying most of the important physics of a traveling-wave-tube. The code is a substantial departure from previous efforts, since it follows all of the particles in the tube, rather than just those in one wavelength, as commonly done. This step allows for nonperiodic inputs in time, a nonuniform line and a large set of spatial diagnostics. The primary aim is to complement a microwave tube lecture course, although past experience has shown that such codes readily become research tools. Simple finite difference methods are used to model the fields of the coupled slow-wave transmission line. The coupling between the beam and the transmission line is based upon the finite difference equations of Brillouin. The space-charge effects are included, in a manner similar to that used by Hess; the original part is use of particle-in-cell techniques to model the space-charge fields. 11 refs., 11 figs.

  11. Simulating oblique incident irradiation using the BEAMnrc Monte Carlo code.

    PubMed

    Downes, P; Spezi, E

    2009-04-01

    A new source for the simulation of oblique incident irradiation has been developed for the BEAMnrc Monte Carlo code. In this work, we describe a method for the simulation of any component that is rotated at some angle relative to the central axis of the modelled radiation unit. The performance of the new BEAMnrc source was validated against experimental measurements. The comparison with ion chamber data showed very good agreement between experiments and calculation for a number of oblique irradiation angles ranging from 0 degrees to 30 degrees . The routine was also cross-validated, in geometrically equivalent conditions, against a different radiation source available in the DOSXYZnrc code. The test showed excellent consistency between the two routines. The new radiation source can be particularly useful for the Monte Carlo simulation of radiation units in which the radiation beam is tilted with respect to the unit's central axis. To highlight this, a modern cone-beam CT unit is modelled using this new source and validated against measurement.

  12. Beam-splitting code for light scattering by ice crystal particles within geometric-optics approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoshonkin, Alexander V.; Kustova, Natalia V.; Borovoi, Anatoli G.

    2015-10-01

    The open-source beam-splitting code is described which implements the geometric-optics approximation to light scattering by convex faceted particles. This code is written in C++ as a library which can be easy applied to a particular light scattering problem. The code uses only standard components, that makes it to be a cross-platform solution and provides its compatibility to popular Integrated Development Environments (IDE's). The included example of solving the light scattering by a randomly oriented ice crystal is written using Qt 5.1, consequently it is a cross-platform solution, too. Both physical and computational aspects of the beam-splitting algorithm are discussed. Computational speed of the beam-splitting code is obviously higher compared to the conventional ray-tracing codes. A comparison of the phase matrix as computed by our code with the ray-tracing code by A. Macke shows excellent agreement.

  13. Micropolar crystal plasticity simulation of particle strengthening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayeur, J. R.; McDowell, D. L.

    2015-09-01

    The yield and work hardening behavior of a small-scale initial-boundary value problem involving dislocation plasticity in an idealized particle strengthened system is investigated using micropolar single crystal plasticity and is compared with results for the same problem from dislocation dynamics simulations. A micropolar single crystal is a work-conjugate higher-order continuum that treats the lattice rotations as generalized displacements, and supports couple stresses that are work-conjugate to the lattice torsion-curvature, leading to a non-symmetric Cauchy stress. The resolved skew-symmetric component of the Cauchy stress tensor results in slip system level kinematic hardening during heterogeneous deformation that depends on gradients of lattice torsion-curvature. The scale-dependent mechanical response of the micropolar single crystal is dictated both by energetic (higher-order elastic constants) and dissipative (plastic torsion-curvature) intrinsic material length scales. We show that the micropolar model captures essential details of the average stress-strain behavior predicted by discrete dislocation dynamics and of the cumulative slip and dislocation density fields predicted by statistical dislocation dynamics.

  14. Heart simulation with surface equations for using on MCNP code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei-Ochbelagh, D.; Salman-Nezhad, S.; Asadi, A.; Rahimi, A.

    2011-12-01

    External photon beam radiotherapy is carried out in a way to achieve an "as low as possible" a dose in healthy tissues surrounding the target. One of these surroundings can be heart as a vital organ of body. As it is impossible to directly determine the absorbed dose by heart, using phantoms is one way to acquire information around it. The other way is Monte Carlo method. In this work we have presented a simulation of heart geometry by introducing of different surfaces in MCNP code. We used 14 surface equations in order to determine human heart modeling. Those surfaces are borders of heart walls and contents.

  15. Heart simulation with surface equations for using on MCNP code

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaei-Ochbelagh, D.; Salman-Nezhad, S.; Asadi, A.; Rahimi, A.

    2011-12-26

    External photon beam radiotherapy is carried out in a way to achieve an 'as low as possible' a dose in healthy tissues surrounding the target. One of these surroundings can be heart as a vital organ of body. As it is impossible to directly determine the absorbed dose by heart, using phantoms is one way to acquire information around it. The other way is Monte Carlo method. In this work we have presented a simulation of heart geometry by introducing of different surfaces in MCNP code. We used 14 surface equations in order to determine human heart modeling. Those surfaces are borders of heart walls and contents.

  16. Water pipe flow simulation using improved virtual particles on smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, E. S.; Yeak, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a meshless method used widely to solve problems such as fluid flows. Due to its meshless property, it is ideal to solve problems on complex geometry. In this paper, boundary treatment were implied for the rectangular pipe flow simulations using SPH. The repulsive force is applied to the boundary particles along with the improved virtual particles on different geometry alignment. The water flow is solved using incompressible SPH and will be examined throughout the simulation. Results from this simulation will be compared with single layered virtual particles. Based on the result of the study, it is found that the improved virtual particles is more accurate and stable.

  17. Code System to Calculate Particle Penetration Through Aerosol Transport Lines.

    1999-07-14

    Version 00 Distribution is restricted to US Government Agencies and Their Contractors Only. DEPOSITION1.03 is an interactive software program which was developed for the design and analysis of aerosol transport lines. Models are presented for calculating aerosol particle penetration through straight tubes of arbitrary orientation, inlets, and elbows. An expression to calculate effective depositional velocities of particles on tube walls is derived. The concept of maximum penetration is introduced, which is the maximum possible penetrationmore » through a sampling line connecting any two points in a three-dimensional space. A procedure to predict optimum tube diameter for an existing transport line is developed. Note that there is a discrepancy in this package which includes the DEPOSITION 1.03 executable and the DEPOSITION 2.0 report. RSICC was unable to obtain other executables or reports.« less

  18. Computer code for the atomistic simulation of lattice defects and dynamics. [COMENT code

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffgens, J.O.; Graves, N.J.; Oster, C.A.

    1980-04-01

    This document has been prepared to satisfy the need for a detailed, up-to-date description of a computer code that can be used to simulate phenomena on an atomistic level. COMENT was written in FORTRAN IV and COMPASS (CDC assembly language) to solve the classical equations of motion for a large number of atoms interacting according to a given force law, and to perform the desired ancillary analysis of the resulting data. COMENT is a dual-purpose intended to describe static defect configurations as well as the detailed motion of atoms in a crystal lattice. It can be used to simulate the effect of temperature, impurities, and pre-existing defects on radiation-induced defect production mechanisms, defect migration, and defect stability.

  19. Random walk particle tracking simulations of non-Fickian transport in heterogeneous media

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, G. Tartakovsky, D.M. Dentz, M. Viswanathan, H.; Berkowitz, B.; Robinson, B.A.

    2010-06-01

    Derivations of continuum nonlocal models of non-Fickian (anomalous) transport require assumptions that might limit their applicability. We present a particle-based algorithm, which obviates the need for many of these assumptions by allowing stochastic processes that represent spatial and temporal random increments to be correlated in space and time, be stationary or non-stationary, and to have arbitrary distributions. The approach treats a particle trajectory as a subordinated stochastic process that is described by a set of Langevin equations, which represent a continuous time random walk (CTRW). Convolution-based particle tracking (CBPT) is used to increase the computational efficiency and accuracy of these particle-based simulations. The combined CTRW-CBPT approach enables one to convert any particle tracking legacy code into a simulator capable of handling non-Fickian transport.

  20. Simulation of Code Spectrum and Code Flow of Cultured Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Shinichi; Nishitani, Yoshi; Hosokawa, Chie; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Sawai, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that, in cultured neuronal networks on a multielectrode, pseudorandom-like sequences (codes) are detected, and they flow with some spatial decay constant. Each cultured neuronal network is characterized by a specific spectrum curve. That is, we may consider the spectrum curve as a "signature" of its associated neuronal network that is dependent on the characteristics of neurons and network configuration, including the weight distribution. In the present study, we used an integrate-and-fire model of neurons with intrinsic and instantaneous fluctuations of characteristics for performing a simulation of a code spectrum from multielectrodes on a 2D mesh neural network. We showed that it is possible to estimate the characteristics of neurons such as the distribution of number of neurons around each electrode and their refractory periods. Although this process is a reverse problem and theoretically the solutions are not sufficiently guaranteed, the parameters seem to be consistent with those of neurons. That is, the proposed neural network model may adequately reflect the behavior of a cultured neuronal network. Furthermore, such prospect is discussed that code analysis will provide a base of communication within a neural network that will also create a base of natural intelligence. PMID:27239189

  1. Simulation of Code Spectrum and Code Flow of Cultured Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Shinichi; Nishitani, Yoshi; Hosokawa, Chie; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Sawai, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that, in cultured neuronal networks on a multielectrode, pseudorandom-like sequences (codes) are detected, and they flow with some spatial decay constant. Each cultured neuronal network is characterized by a specific spectrum curve. That is, we may consider the spectrum curve as a "signature" of its associated neuronal network that is dependent on the characteristics of neurons and network configuration, including the weight distribution. In the present study, we used an integrate-and-fire model of neurons with intrinsic and instantaneous fluctuations of characteristics for performing a simulation of a code spectrum from multielectrodes on a 2D mesh neural network. We showed that it is possible to estimate the characteristics of neurons such as the distribution of number of neurons around each electrode and their refractory periods. Although this process is a reverse problem and theoretically the solutions are not sufficiently guaranteed, the parameters seem to be consistent with those of neurons. That is, the proposed neural network model may adequately reflect the behavior of a cultured neuronal network. Furthermore, such prospect is discussed that code analysis will provide a base of communication within a neural network that will also create a base of natural intelligence.

  2. ATES/heat pump simulations performed with ATESSS code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vail, L. W.

    1989-01-01

    Modifications to the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage System Simulator (ATESSS) allow simulation of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES)/heat pump systems. The heat pump algorithm requires a coefficient of performance (COP) relationship of the form: COP = COP sub base + alpha (T sub ref minus T sub base). Initial applications of the modified ATES code to synthetic building load data for two sizes of buildings in two U.S. cities showed insignificant performance advantage of a series ATES heat pump system over a conventional groundwater heat pump system. The addition of algorithms for a cooling tower and solar array improved performance slightly. Small values of alpha in the COP relationship are the principal reason for the limited improvement in system performance. Future studies at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are planned to investigate methods to increase system performance using alternative system configurations and operations scenarios.

  3. Code System to Simulate 3D Tracer Dispersion in Atmosphere.

    2002-01-25

    Version 00 SHREDI is a shielding code system which executes removal-diffusion computations for bi-dimensional shields in r-z or x-y geometries. It may also deal with monodimensional problems (infinitely high cylinders or slabs). MESYST can simulate 3D tracer dispersion in the atmosphere. Three programs are part of this system: CRE_TOPO prepares the terrain data for MESYST. NOABL calculates three-dimensional free divergence windfields over complex terrain. PAS computes tracer concentrations and depositions on a given domain. Themore » purpose of this work is to develop a reliable simulation tool for pollutant atmospheric dispersion, which gives a realistic approach and allows one to compute the pollutant concentrations over complex terrains with good accuracy. The factional brownian model, which furnishes more accurate concentration values, is introduced to calculate pollutant atmospheric dispersion. The model was validated on SIESTA international experiments.« less

  4. Laser-driven Implosion Simulations with the Kull Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Thomas B.; Owen, J. Michael; Madsen, Niel K.

    1999-11-01

    We present results of two- and three-dimensional simulations of implosion of a gamma-law gas driven by absorption of energy from an external laser source. Laser light propagation and power deposition were modeled with a recently-developed package(T. B. Kaiser, J. L. Milovich, A. I. Shestakov, M. K. Prasad, Bulletin of the A.P.S. 43), paper R8Q 26 (1998). that uses geometrical optics and inverse-bremsstrahlung to model the relevant physical processes, while the hydrodynamics calculations used a finite-volume, staggered-grid ALE scheme, and electron heat transport was treated diffusively. The simulations were performed with Kull, an ASCI code currently being developed at LLNL to model ICF experiments and astrophysical phenomena.

  5. ROAR: A 3-D tethered rocket simulation code

    SciTech Connect

    York, A.R. II; Ludwigsen, J.S.

    1992-04-01

    A high-velocity impact testing technique, utilizing a tethered rocket, is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The technique involves tethering a rocket assembly to a pivot location and flying it in a semicircular trajectory to deliver the rocket and payload to an impact target location. Integral to developing this testing technique is the parallel development of accurate simulation models. An operational computer code, called ROAR (Rocket-on-a-Rope), has been developed to simulate the three-dimensional transient dynamic behavior of the tether and motor/payload assembly. This report presents a discussion of the parameters modeled, the governing set of equations, the through-time integration scheme, and the input required to set up a model. Also included is a sample problem and a comparison with experimental results.

  6. Novel methods in the Particle-In-Cell accelerator Code-Framework Warp

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J-L; Grote, D. P.; Cohen, R. H.; Friedman, A.

    2012-12-26

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) Code-Framework Warp is being developed by the Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL) to guide the development of accelerators that can deliver beams suitable for high-energy density experiments and implosion of inertial fusion capsules. It is also applied in various areas outside the Heavy Ion Fusion program to the study and design of existing and next-generation high-energy accelerators, including the study of electron cloud effects and laser wakefield acceleration for example. This study presents an overview of Warp's capabilities, summarizing recent original numerical methods that were developed by the HIFS-VNL (including PIC with adaptive mesh refinement, a large-timestep 'drift-Lorentz' mover for arbitrarily magnetized species, a relativistic Lorentz invariant leapfrog particle pusher, simulations in Lorentz-boosted frames, an electromagnetic solver with tunable numerical dispersion and efficient stride-based digital filtering), with special emphasis on the description of the mesh refinement capability. In addition, selected examples of the applications of the methods to the abovementioned fields are given.

  7. The GBS code for tokamak scrape-off layer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, F. D.; Ricci, P.; Jolliet, S.; Loizu, J.; Morales, J.; Mosetto, A.; Musil, F.; Riva, F.; Tran, T. M.; Wersal, C.

    2016-06-01

    We describe a new version of GBS, a 3D global, flux-driven plasma turbulence code to simulate the turbulent dynamics in the tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL), superseding the code presented by Ricci et al. (2012) [14]. The present work is driven by the objective of studying SOL turbulent dynamics in medium size tokamaks and beyond with a high-fidelity physics model. We emphasize an intertwining framework of improved physics models and the computational improvements that allow them. The model extensions include neutral atom physics, finite ion temperature, the addition of a closed field line region, and a non-Boussinesq treatment of the polarization drift. GBS has been completely refactored with the introduction of a 3-D Cartesian communicator and a scalable parallel multigrid solver. We report dramatically enhanced parallel scalability, with the possibility of treating electromagnetic fluctuations very efficiently. The method of manufactured solutions as a verification process has been carried out for this new code version, demonstrating the correct implementation of the physical model.

  8. A framework for control simulations using the TRANSP code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Mark D.; Andre, Rob; Gates, David; Gerhardt, Stefan; Goumiri, Imene; Menard, Jon

    2014-10-01

    The high-performance operational goals of present-day and future tokamaks will require development of advanced feedback control algorithms. Though reduced models are often used for initial designs, it is important to study the performance of control schemes with integrated models prior to experimental implementation. To this end, a flexible framework for closed loop simulations within the TRANSP code is being developed. The framework exploits many of the predictive capabilities of TRANSP and provides a means for performing control calculations based on user-supplied data (controller matrices, target waveforms, etc.). These calculations, along with the acquisition of ``real-time'' measurements and manipulation of TRANSP internal variables based on actuator requests, are implemented through a hook that allows custom run-specific code to be inserted into the standard TRANSP source code. As part of the framework, a module has been created to constrain the thermal stored energy in TRANSP using a confinement scaling expression. Progress towards feedback control of the current profile on NSTX-U will be presented to demonstrate the framework. Supported in part by an appointment to the U.S. Department of Energy Fusion Energy Postdoctoral Research Program administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education.

  9. Simulation study of high-frequency energetic particle driven geodesic acoustic mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hao Ido, Takeshi; Osakabe, Masaki; Todo, Yasushi

    2015-09-15

    High-frequency energetic particle driven geodesic acoustic modes (EGAM) observed in the large helical device plasmas are investigated using a hybrid simulation code for energetic particles and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Energetic particle inertia is incorporated in the MHD momentum equation for the simulation where the beam ion density is comparable to the bulk plasma density. Bump-on-tail type beam ion velocity distribution created by slowing down and charge exchange is considered. It is demonstrated that EGAMs have frequencies higher than the geodesic acoustic modes and the dependence on bulk plasma temperature is weak if (1) energetic particle density is comparable to the bulk plasma density and (2) charge exchange time (τ{sub cx}) is sufficiently shorter than the slowing down time (τ{sub s}) to create a bump-on-tail type distribution. The frequency of high-frequency EGAM rises as the energetic particle pressure increases under the condition of high energetic particle pressure. The frequency also increases as the energetic particle pitch angle distribution shifts to higher transit frequency. It is found that there are two kinds of particles resonant with EGAM: (1) trapped particles and (2) passing particles with transit frequency close to the mode frequency. The EGAMs investigated in this work are destabilized primarily by the passing particles whose transit frequencies are close to the EGAM frequency.

  10. Application of TITAN for Simulation of Particle Streaming in a Duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royston, Katherine; Haghighat, Alireza; Yi, Ce

    2016-02-01

    The TITAN hybrid deterministic transport code is applied to the simulation of particle streaming in a nuclear power plant duct. A simple model is used consisting of a concrete duct emerging from the pressure vessel with an isotropic surface source with a U-235 fission spectrum located at the pressure vessel end. Multiple methods of simulating the duct using the TITAN code are considered to demonstrate the flexibility of the code and the advantages of TITAN's algorithms. These methods include a discrete ordinates (SN) calculation, a characteristics method calculation, and the use of a fictitious quadrature set with simplified ray-tracing. The TITAN code's results are compared with MCNP5 solutions. While all TITAN solutions are obtained in a shorter computation time than the MCNP5 solution, the TITAN solution with the fictitious quadrature set shows the largest speedup.

  11. Collisional simulations of particles in a narrow planetary ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolvoord, Robert A.; Burns, Joseph A.

    1992-01-01

    A model is used to investigate how particle-particle collisions might modify some consequences of satellite perturbations relevant to short-term features of narrow planetary rings. A Monte Carlo-like simulation ring-model particle velocity alteration allows the simulation of collisions while individual particles are tracked. Periodic features visible in Voyager images are reproduced in a 2D numerical model which incorporates the collisional simulation as well as the perturbations of adjacent satellites. Collisions are noted to wash out periodic features within one collisional relaxation time.

  12. Time-Dependent, Parallel Neutral Particle Transport Code System.

    2009-09-10

    Version 00 PARTISN (PARallel, TIme-Dependent SN) is the evolutionary successor to CCC-547/DANTSYS. The PARTISN code package is a modular computer program package designed to solve the time-independent or dependent multigroup discrete ordinates form of the Boltzmann transport equation in several different geometries. The modular construction of the package separates the input processing, the transport equation solving, and the post processing (or edit) functions into distinct code modules: the Input Module, the Solver Module, and themore » Edit Module, respectively. PARTISN is the evolutionary successor to the DANTSYSTM code system package. The Input and Edit Modules in PARTISN are very similar to those in DANTSYS. However, unlike DANTSYS, the Solver Module in PARTISN contains one, two, and three-dimensional solvers in a single module. In addition to the diamond-differencing method, the Solver Module also has Adaptive Weighted Diamond-Differencing (AWDD), Linear Discontinuous (LD), and Exponential Discontinuous (ED) spatial differencing methods. The spatial mesh may consist of either a standard orthogonal mesh or a block adaptive orthogonal mesh. The Solver Module may be run in parallel for two and three dimensional problems. One can now run 1-D problems in parallel using Energy Domain Decomposition (triggered by Block 5 input keyword npeg>0). EDD can also be used in 2-D/3-D with or without our standard Spatial Domain Decomposition. Both the static (fixed source or eigenvalue) and time-dependent forms of the transport equation are solved in forward or adjoint mode. In addition, PARTISN now has a probabilistic mode for Probability of Initiation (static) and Probability of Survival (dynamic) calculations. Vacuum, reflective, periodic, white, or inhomogeneous boundary conditions are solved. General anisotropic scattering and inhomogeneous sources are permitted. PARTISN solves the transport equation on orthogonal (single level or block-structured AMR) grids in 1-D

  13. Assessment of the IVA3 code for multifield flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, H. B.

    1995-07-01

    This report presents an assessment of the IVA3 computer code for multifield flow simulation, as applied to the premixing phase of a hypothetical steam explosion in a water-cooled power reactor. The first section of this report reviews the derivation of the basic partial differential equations of multifield modeling, with reference to standard practices in the multiphase flow literature. Basic underlying assumptions and approximations are highlighted, and comparison is made between IVA3 and other codes in current use. Although Kolev's derivation of these equations is outside the mainstream of the multiphase literature, the basic partial differential equations are in fact nearly equivalent to those in other codes. In the second section, the assumptions and approximations required to pass from generic differential equations to a specific working form are detailed. Some modest improvements to the IVA3 model are suggested. In Section 3, the finite difference approximations to the differential equations are described. The discretization strategy is discussed with reference to numerical stability, accuracy, and the role of various physical phenomena - material convection, sonic propagation, viscous stress, and interfacial exchanges - in the choice of discrete approximations. There is also cause for concern about the approximations of time evolution in some heat transfer terms, which might be adversely affecting numerical accuracy. The fourth section documents the numerical solution method used in IVA3. An explanation for erratic behavior sometimes observed in the first outer iteration is suggested, along with possible remedies. Finally, six recommendations for future assessment and improvement of the IVA3 model and code are made.

  14. Particle simulation of collisionless reconnection using TRISTAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotzé, P. B.; Nishikawa, K.-I.; Büchner, J.

    Magnetic reconnection is an important mechanism in the dynamics of the magnetosphere in facilitating the change in magnetospheric topology in response to the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). In the magnetosphere the classical collision rate is small, while the inertia of the electrons allows the frozen-in flux constraint to be broken. At small values of resistivity, this dissipation region then controls the rate of reconnection by forming an elongated Sweet-Parker layer, with an inflow velocity νi into the x-line that scales like: νi = δ ∆ νA νA (1) where δ and ∆ are the width (controlled by resistivity) and length (macroscopic) of the dissipation region respectively and νA is the Alfvén velocity. The scale length around the x-line where the electrons become demagnetised is of the order of the electron skin depth c/ωpe. This region is however much smaller than the ion inertial length c/ωpi, below which the Hall terms in the kinetic Ohm's law become important. Within this distance from the x-line the ions decouple from the electrons and are accelerated away at Alfv´enic velocities (Burkhart et al., 1990) The dynamics of the system at the scale length of the electron dissipation layer is therefore linked to Hall physics, making it a critical ingredient in determining collisionless reconnection rates. Particle simulation techniques have been used to investigate magnetic reconnection in 2-D for a Harris sheet equilibrium. A set of parameters are chosen as well as the dimensions of the computational domain, the boundary conditions and the initial amplitude and form of a seed magnetic island to start the reconnection process. Some preliminary results will be given in this paper.

  15. An Advanced simulation Code for Modeling Inductive Output Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Thuc Bui; R. Lawrence Ives

    2012-04-27

    During the Phase I program, CCR completed several major building blocks for a 3D large signal, inductive output tube (IOT) code using modern computer language and programming techniques. These included a 3D, Helmholtz, time-harmonic, field solver with a fully functional graphical user interface (GUI), automeshing and adaptivity. Other building blocks included the improved electrostatic Poisson solver with temporal boundary conditions to provide temporal fields for the time-stepping particle pusher as well as the self electric field caused by time-varying space charge. The magnetostatic field solver was also updated to solve for the self magnetic field caused by time changing current density in the output cavity gap. The goal function to optimize an IOT cavity was also formulated, and the optimization methodologies were investigated.

  16. Tracking parameter simulation for the Turkish accelerator center particle factory tracker system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapan, I.; Pilicer, E.; Pilicer, F. B.

    2016-09-01

    The silicon tracker part of the Turkish Accelerator Center super charm particle factory detector was designed for effectively tracking charged particles with momentum values up to 2.0 GeV/c. In this work, the FLUKA simulation code has been used to estimate the track parameters and their resolutions in the designed tracker system. These results have been compared with those obtained by the tkLayout software package. The simulated track parameter resolutions are compatible with the physics goals of the tracking detector.

  17. Global Hybrid Simulations of Energetic Particle-driven Modes in Toroidal Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    G.Y. Fu; J. Breslau; E. Fredrickson; W. Park; H.R. Strauss

    2004-12-14

    Global hybrid simulations of energetic particle-driven MHD modes have been carried out for tokamaks and spherical tokamaks using the hybrid code M3D. The numerical results for the National Spherical Tokamak Experiments (NSTX) show that Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes are excited by beam ions with their frequencies consistent with the experimental observations. Nonlinear simulations indicate that the n=2 mode frequency chirps down as the mode moves out radially. For ITER, it is shown that the alpha-particle effects are strongly stabilizing for internal kink mode when central safety factor q(0) is sufficiently close to unity. However, the elongation of ITER plasma shape reduces the stabilization significantly.

  18. Microfluidic CODES: a scalable multiplexed electronic sensor for orthogonal detection of particles in microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruxiu; Wang, Ningquan; Kamili, Farhan; Sarioglu, A Fatih

    2016-04-21

    Numerous biophysical and biochemical assays rely on spatial manipulation of particles/cells as they are processed on lab-on-a-chip devices. Analysis of spatially distributed particles on these devices typically requires microscopy negating the cost and size advantages of microfluidic assays. In this paper, we introduce a scalable electronic sensor technology, called microfluidic CODES, that utilizes resistive pulse sensing to orthogonally detect particles in multiple microfluidic channels from a single electrical output. Combining the techniques from telecommunications and microfluidics, we route three coplanar electrodes on a glass substrate to create multiple Coulter counters producing distinct orthogonal digital codes when they detect particles. We specifically design a digital code set using the mathematical principles of Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) telecommunication networks and can decode signals from different microfluidic channels with >90% accuracy through computation even if these signals overlap. As a proof of principle, we use this technology to detect human ovarian cancer cells in four different microfluidic channels fabricated using soft lithography. Microfluidic CODES offers a simple, all-electronic interface that is well suited to create integrated, low-cost lab-on-a-chip devices for cell- or particle-based assays in resource-limited settings.

  19. A Bounce-Averaged Test Particle Code for Studying the Evolution of the Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkington, S. R.; Chan, A. A.

    2012-12-01

    Global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the Earth's interaction with the heliospheric environment provide a computationally-tractable means of understanding the large-scale response of the Earth's magnetosphere to driving by the solar wind. Global wave generation and propagation, magnetic reconnection, convection, and the effect of external currents on magnetospheric configuration are all physical features that can be approximated by the MHD method. Considerable physical insight may be gained by combining global MHD simulations with test particle simulations of the energetic particles comprising the radiation belts. Such simulations have been used to study, for example, the injection of solar energetic particles into Earth's inner magnetosphere, the diffusion and transport of energetic electrons in the outer zone radiation belts, and the access of plasmasheet particles to the stable trapping region around the Earth. However, fully-3d test particle simulations can be computationally expensive, even under the guiding-center approximation, and MHD/test particle simulations generally do not include the effects of higher-frequency (VLF) waves that may be important in describing radiation belt particle acceleration and loss. In this work we describe a new bounce-averaged test particle simulation method that allows tracking the transport and evolution of the radiation belts in response to the global processes described by magnetospheric MHD models, and suggest how these methods can be extended to include the effect of non-MHD waves on the radiation belts.

  20. PACO: PArticle COunting Method To Enforce Concentrations in Dynamic Simulations.

    PubMed

    Berti, Claudio; Furini, Simone; Gillespie, Dirk

    2016-03-01

    We present PACO, a computationally efficient method for concentration boundary conditions in nonequilibrium particle simulations. Because it requires only particle counting, its computational effort is significantly smaller than other methods. PACO enables Brownian dynamics simulations of micromolar electrolytes (3 orders of magnitude lower than previously simulated). PACO for Brownian dynamics is integrated in the BROWNIES package (www.phys.rush.edu/BROWNIES). We also introduce a molecular dynamics PACO implementation that allows for very accurate control of concentration gradients.

  1. GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo simulation of particle coagulation based on the inverse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, J.; Kruis, F. E.

    2013-09-01

    Simulating particle coagulation using Monte Carlo methods is in general a challenging computational task due to its numerical complexity and the computing cost. Currently, the lowest computing costs are obtained when applying a graphic processing unit (GPU) originally developed for speeding up graphic processing in the consumer market. In this article we present an implementation of accelerating a Monte Carlo method based on the Inverse scheme for simulating particle coagulation on the GPU. The abundant data parallelism embedded within the Monte Carlo method is explained as it will allow an efficient parallelization of the MC code on the GPU. Furthermore, the computation accuracy of the MC on GPU was validated with a benchmark, a CPU-based discrete-sectional method. To evaluate the performance gains by using the GPU, the computing time on the GPU against its sequential counterpart on the CPU were compared. The measured speedups show that the GPU can accelerate the execution of the MC code by a factor 10-100, depending on the chosen particle number of simulation particles. The algorithm shows a linear dependence of computing time with the number of simulation particles, which is a remarkable result in view of the n2 dependence of the coagulation.

  2. Transient dynamics simulations: Parallel algorithms for contact detection and smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Plimpton, S.; Attaway, S.; Swegle, J.

    1996-09-01

    Transient dynamics simulations are commonly used to model phenomena such as car crashes, underwater explosions, and the response of shipping containers to high-speed impacts. Physical objects in such a simulation are typically represented by Lagrangian meshes because the meshes can move and deform with the objects as they undergo stress. Fluids (gasoline, water) or fluid-like materials (earth) in the simulation can be modeled using the techniques of smoothed particle hydrodynamics. Implementing a hybrid mesh/particle model on a massively parallel computer poses several difficult challenges. One challenge is to simultaneously parallelize and load-balance both the mesh and particle portions of the computation. A second challenge is to efficiently detect the contacts that occur within the deforming mesh and between mesh elements and particles as the simulation proceeds. These contacts impart forces to the mesh elements and particles which must be computed at each timestep to accurately capture the physics of interest. In this paper we describe new parallel algorithms for smoothed particle hydrodynamics and contact detection which turn out to have several key features in common. Additionally, we describe how to join the new algorithms with traditional parallel finite element techniques to create an integrated particle/mesh transient dynamics simulation. Our approach to this problem differs from previous work in that we use three different parallel decompositions, a static one for the finite element analysis and dynamic ones for particles and for contact detection. We have implemented our ideas in a parallel version of the transient dynamics code PRONTO-3D and present results for the code running on a large Intel Paragon.

  3. Assessment of Microphysical Models in the National Combustion Code (NCC) for Aircraft Particulate Emissions: Particle Loss in Sampling Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Thomas; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2008-01-01

    This paper at first describes the fluid network approach recently implemented into the National Combustion Code (NCC) for the simulation of transport of aerosols (volatile particles and soot) in the particulate sampling systems. This network-based approach complements the other two approaches already in the NCC, namely, the lower-order temporal approach and the CFD-based approach. The accuracy and the computational costs of these three approaches are then investigated in terms of their application to the prediction of particle losses through sample transmission and distribution lines. Their predictive capabilities are assessed by comparing the computed results with the experimental data. The present work will help establish standard methodologies for measuring the size and concentration of particles in high-temperature, high-velocity jet engine exhaust. Furthermore, the present work also represents the first step of a long term effort of validating physics-based tools for the prediction of aircraft particulate emissions.

  4. Epp: A C++ EGSnrc user code for x-ray imaging and scattering simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lippuner, Jonas; Elbakri, Idris A.; Cui Congwu; Ingleby, Harry R.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Easy particle propagation (Epp) is a user code for the EGSnrc code package based on the C++ class library egspp. A main feature of egspp (and Epp) is the ability to use analytical objects to construct simulation geometries. The authors developed Epp to facilitate the simulation of x-ray imaging geometries, especially in the case of scatter studies. While direct use of egspp requires knowledge of C++, Epp requires no programming experience. Methods: Epp's features include calculation of dose deposited in a voxelized phantom and photon propagation to a user-defined imaging plane. Projection images of primary, single Rayleigh scattered, single Compton scattered, and multiple scattered photons may be generated. Epp input files can be nested, allowing for the construction of complex simulation geometries from more basic components. To demonstrate the imaging features of Epp, the authors simulate 38 keV x rays from a point source propagating through a water cylinder 12 cm in diameter, using both analytical and voxelized representations of the cylinder. The simulation generates projection images of primary and scattered photons at a user-defined imaging plane. The authors also simulate dose scoring in the voxelized version of the phantom in both Epp and DOSXYZnrc and examine the accuracy of Epp using the Kawrakow-Fippel test. Results: The results of the imaging simulations with Epp using voxelized and analytical descriptions of the water cylinder agree within 1%. The results of the Kawrakow-Fippel test suggest good agreement between Epp and DOSXYZnrc. Conclusions: Epp provides the user with useful features, including the ability to build complex geometries from simpler ones and the ability to generate images of scattered and primary photons. There is no inherent computational time saving arising from Epp, except for those arising from egspp's ability to use analytical representations of simulation geometries. Epp agrees with DOSXYZnrc in dose calculation, since

  5. Accelerated simulation of stochastic particle removal processes in particle-resolved aerosol models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, J. H.; Michelotti, M. D.; Riemer, N.; Heath, M. T.; West, M.

    2016-10-01

    Stochastic particle-resolved methods have proven useful for simulating multi-dimensional systems such as composition-resolved aerosol size distributions. While particle-resolved methods have substantial benefits for highly detailed simulations, these techniques suffer from high computational cost, motivating efforts to improve their algorithmic efficiency. Here we formulate an algorithm for accelerating particle removal processes by aggregating particles of similar size into bins. We present the Binned Algorithm for particle removal processes and analyze its performance with application to the atmospherically relevant process of aerosol dry deposition. We show that the Binned Algorithm can dramatically improve the efficiency of particle removals, particularly for low removal rates, and that computational cost is reduced without introducing additional error. In simulations of aerosol particle removal by dry deposition in atmospherically relevant conditions, we demonstrate about 50-times increase in algorithm efficiency.

  6. Application of adaptive mesh refinement to particle-in-cell simulations of plasmas and beams

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J.-L.; Colella, P.; Kwan, J.W.; McCorquodale, P.; Serafini, D.B.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Westenskow, G.; Adam, J.-C.; Heron, A.; Haber, I.

    2003-11-04

    Plasma simulations are often rendered challenging by the disparity of scales in time and in space which must be resolved. When these disparities are in distinctive zones of the simulation domain, a method which has proven to be effective in other areas (e.g. fluid dynamics simulations) is the mesh refinement technique. We briefly discuss the challenges posed by coupling this technique with plasma Particle-In-Cell simulations, and present examples of application in Heavy Ion Fusion and related fields which illustrate the effectiveness of the approach. We also report on the status of a collaboration under way at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory between the Applied Numerical Algorithms Group (ANAG) and the Heavy Ion Fusion group to upgrade ANAG's mesh refinement library Chombo to include the tools needed by Particle-In-Cell simulation codes.

  7. An adaptive procedure for the numerical parameters of a particle simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galitzine, Cyril; Boyd, Iain D.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, a computational procedure that automatically determines the optimum time step, cell weight and species weights for steady-state multi-species DSMC (direct simulation Monte Carlo) simulations is presented. The time step is required to satisfy the basic requirements of the DSMC method while the weight and relative weights fields are chosen so as to obtain a user-specified average number of particles in all cells of the domain. The procedure allows the conduct of efficient DSMC simulations with minimal user input and is integrable into existing DSMC codes. The adaptive method is used to simulate a test case consisting of two counterflowing jets at a Knudsen number of 0.015. Large accuracy gains for sampled number densities and velocities over a standard simulation approach for the same number of particles are observed.

  8. Finite Element Simulation Code for Computing Thermal Radiation from a Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, C. N.; Rappaport, H. L.

    2004-11-01

    A finite element code, ``THERMRAD,'' for computing thermal radiation from a plasma is under development. Radiation from plasma test particles is found in cylindrical geometry. Although the plasma equilibrium is assumed axisymmetric individual test particle excitation produces a non-axisymmetric electromagnetic response. Specially designed Whitney class basis functions are to be used to allow the solution to be solved on a two-dimensional grid. The basis functions enforce both a vanishing of the divergence of the electric field within grid elements where the complex index of refraction is assumed constant and continuity of tangential electric field across grid elements while allowing the normal component of the electric field to be discontinuous. An appropriate variational principle which incorporates the Sommerfeld radiation condition on the simulation boundary, as well as its discretization by the Rayleigh-Ritz technique is given. 1. ``Finte Element Method for Electromagnetics Problems,'' Volakis et al., Wiley, 1998.

  9. Inclusion of photon production and transport and (e/sup +/e/sup /minus//) pair production in a particle-in-cell code for astrophysical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sulkanen, M.E.; Gisler, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    This present study constitutes the first attempt to include, in a particle-in-cell code, the effects of radiation losses, photon production and transport, and charged-particle production by photons scattering in an intense background magnetic field. We discuss the physics and numerical issues that had to be addressed in including these effects in the ISIS code. Then we present a test simulation of the propagation of a pulse of high-energy photons across an intense magnetic field using this modified version of ISIS. This simulation demonstrates dissipation of the photon pulse with charged-particle production, emission of secondary synchrotron and curvature photons and the concomitant momentum dissipation of the charged particles, and subsequent production of lower-energy pairs. 5 refs.

  10. Lagrangian simulation of turbulent particle dispersion in electrostatic precipitators

    SciTech Connect

    Soldati, A.; Casal, M.; Andreussi, P.; Banerjee, S.

    1997-06-01

    Industrial design of electrostatic precipitators is based on the transport theory developed by Deutsch (1922), which assumes that transverse turbulent mixing is effective enough to maintain the concentration profile uniform throughout the cross section (i.e., turbulent diffusivity is assumed infinite). To improve understanding of turbulent particle dispersion under the influence of electrostatic forces, a database on particle trajectories was first generated, based on the flow field from a direct numerical simulation of a plate-plate precipitator. The effect of various parameters, such as particle size, charge and particle migration velocity, on dispersion and collection efficiency was investigated. Results show that particle concentration profiles are not uniform due to finite values of turbulent diffusion coefficient. The simulations indicate that the early stages of particle collection are controlled by particle migration velocity, while final stages are controlled by turbulence diffusion mechanisms.

  11. Numerical simulations of glass impacts using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.

    1996-05-01

    As part of a program to develop advanced hydrocode design tools, we have implemented a brittle fracture model for glass into the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code. We have evaluated this model and the code by predicting data from one-dimensional flyer plate impacts into glass. Since fractured glass properties, which are needed in the model, are not available, we did sensitivity studies of these properties, as well as sensitivity studies to determine the number of particles needed in the calculations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the data. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Numerical simulations of glass impacts using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.

    1995-07-01

    As part of a program to develop advanced hydrocode design tools, we have implemented a brittle fracture model for glass into the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code. We have evaluated this model and the code by predicting data from one-dimensional flyer plate impacts into glass. Since fractured glass properties, which are needed in the model, are not available, we did sensitivity studies of these properties, as well as sensitivity studies to determine the number of particles needed in the calculations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the data.

  13. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Particle simulations in causal set theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philpott, L.

    2010-02-01

    Models of particle propagation in causal set theory are investigated through simulations. For the swerves model the simulations are shown to agree with the expected continuum diffusion behaviour. Given the limitations on the simulated causal set size, the agreement is far better than anticipated.

  14. Simulation of plume dynamics using particle graphics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourtellott, John; Coker, Charles F.; Crow, Dennis R.

    2000-07-01

    To enhance the fidelity of numerical flow field (plume) imagery in hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) systems, new methods using particle system graphics have been developed. To render infrared (IR) images that are consistent with the underlying physical phenomenology, techniques for particle placement, pixel rasterization and drawing were developed and implemented in computer software. The software was integrated into an existing HIL scene generator and used to demonstrate several new capabilities. Moving particle systems were used to depict the internal flow and turbulence common to plumes. Persistent particle systems were used to depict the trail of hot gas and particulates left behind typical plumes. The addition of plume dynamic behaviors such as these can potentially improve HIL systems and, as a result, improve the testing of seekers and other weapon systems.

  15. VISRAD, 3-D Target Design and Radiation Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovkina, Viktoriya; Macfarlane, Joseph; Golovkin, Igor; Kulkarni, Subodh

    2014-10-01

    The 3-D view factor code VISRAD is widely used in designing HEDP experiments at major laser and pulsed-power facilities, including NIF, OMEGA, OMEGA-EP, ORION, LMJ, Z, and PLX. It simulates target designs by generating a 3-D grid of surface elements, utilizing a variety of 3-D primitives and surface removal algorithms, and can be used to compute the radiation flux throughout the surface element grid by computing element-to-element view factors and solving power balance equations. Target set-up and beam pointing are facilitated by allowing users to specify positions and angular orientations using a variety of coordinates systems (e.g., that of any laser beam, target component, or diagnostic port). Analytic modeling for laser beam spatial profiles for OMEGA DPPs and NIF CPPs is used to compute laser intensity profiles throughout the grid of surface elements. We will discuss recent improvements to the software package and plans for future developments.

  16. VISRAD, 3-D Target Design and Radiation Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingjie; Macfarlane, Joseph; Golovkin, Igor

    2015-11-01

    The 3-D view factor code VISRAD is widely used in designing HEDP experiments at major laser and pulsed-power facilities, including NIF, OMEGA, OMEGA-EP, ORION, LMJ, Z, and PLX. It simulates target designs by generating a 3-D grid of surface elements, utilizing a variety of 3-D primitives and surface removal algorithms, and can be used to compute the radiation flux throughout the surface element grid by computing element-to-element view factors and solving power balance equations. Target set-up and beam pointing are facilitated by allowing users to specify positions and angular orientations using a variety of coordinates systems (e.g., that of any laser beam, target component, or diagnostic port). Analytic modeling for laser beam spatial profiles for OMEGA DPPs and NIF CPPs is used to compute laser intensity profiles throughout the grid of surface elements. We will discuss recent improvements to the software package and plans for future developments.

  17. Generating Optimal Initial Conditions for Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, S.; Rockefeller, G.; Fryer, C. L.; Riethmiller, D.; Statler, T. S.

    2015-12-01

    We review existing smoothed particle hydrodynamics setup methods and outline their advantages, limitations, and drawbacks. We present a new method for constructing initial conditions for smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations, which may also be of interest for N-body simulations, and demonstrate this method on a number of applications. This new method is inspired by adaptive binning techniques using weighted Voronoi tessellations. Particles are placed and iteratively moved based on their proximity to neighbouring particles and the desired spatial resolution. This new method can satisfy arbitrarily complex spatial resolution requirements.

  18. The Million-Body Problem: Particle Simulations in Astrophysics

    ScienceCinema

    Rasio, Fred [Northwestern University

    2016-07-12

    Computer simulations using particles play a key role in astrophysics. They are widely used to study problems across the entire range of astrophysical scales, from the dynamics of stars, gaseous nebulae, and galaxies, to the formation of the largest-scale structures in the universe. The 'particles' can be anything from elementary particles to macroscopic fluid elements, entire stars, or even entire galaxies. Using particle simulations as a common thread, this talk will present an overview of computational astrophysics research currently done in our theory group at Northwestern. Topics will include stellar collisions and the gravothermal catastrophe in dense star clusters.

  19. Lattice Boltzmann Simulations of Peristaltic Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connington, Kevin; Kang, Qinjun; Viswanathan, Hari; Chen, Shiyi; Abdel-Fattah, Amr

    2008-11-01

    A peristaltic flow occurs when a tube or channel with flexible walls transports the contained fluid by progressing a series of contraction or expansion waves along the length of those walls. It is a mechanism used to transport fluid and immersed solid particles when it is ineffective or impossible to impose a favorable pressure gradient or desirous to avoid contact between the transported mixture and mechanical moving parts. Peristaltic transport occurs in many physiological situations and has myriad industrial applications. We focus our study on the peristaltic transport of a macroscopic particle in a two dimensional channel using the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM). We systematically investigate the effect of variation of the relevant non-dimensional parameters of the system on the particle transport. We examine the particle behavior when the system exhibits the peculiar phenomenon of fluid ``trapping.'' Finally, we analyze how the particle presence affects stress, pressure, and dissipation in the fluid in hopes of determining preferred working conditions for peristaltic transport of shear-sensitive particles.

  20. Linear benchmarks between the hybrid codes HYMAGYC and HMGC to study energetic particle driven Alfvénic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogaccia, G.; Vlad, G.; Briguglio, S.

    2016-11-01

    Resonant interaction between energetic particles (EPs), produced by fusion reactions and/or additional heating systems, and shear Alfvén modes can destabilize global Alfvénic modes enhancing the EP transport. In order to investigate the EP transport in present and next generation fusion devices, numerical simulations are recognized as a very important tool. Among the various numerical models, the hybrid MHD gyrokinetic one has shown to be a valid compromise between a sufficiently accurate wave-particle interaction description and affordable computational resource requirements. This paper presents a linear benchmark between the hybrid codes HYMAGYC and HMGC. The HYMAGYC code solves the full, linear MHD equations in general curvilinear geometry for the bulk plasma and describes the EP population by the nonlinear gyrokinetic Vlasov equation. On the other side, HMGC solves the nonlinear, reduced O≤ft(ε 03\\right) , pressureless MHD equations ({ε0} being the inverse aspect ratio) for the bulk plasma and the drift kinetic Vlasov equation for the EPs. The results of the HYMAGYC and HMGC codes have been compared both in the MHD limit and in a wide range of the EP parameter space for two test cases (one of which being the so-called TAE n  =  6 ITPA Energetic Particle Group test case), both characterized by {ε0}\\ll 1 . In the first test case (test case A), good qualitative agreement is found w.r.t. real frequencies, growth rates and spatial structures of the most unstable modes, with some quantitative differences for the growth rates. For the so-called ITPA test case (test case B), at the nominal energetic particle density value, the disagreement between the two codes is, on the contrary, also qualitative, as a different mode is found as the most unstable one.

  1. ASPEN: A Fully Kinetic, Reduced-Description Particle-in-Cell Model for Simulating Parametric Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, H. X.; Bezzerides, B.; DuBois, D. F.

    1999-11-01

    A fully kinetic, reduced-description particle-in-cell (RPIC) model is presented in which deviations from quasineutrality, electron and ion kinetic effects, and nonlinear interactions between low-frequency and high-frequency parametric instabilities are modeled correctly. The model is based on a reduced description where the electromagnetic field is represented by three separate temporal envelopes in order to model parametric instabilities with low-frequency and high-frequency daughter waves. Because temporal envelope approximations are invoked, the simulation can be performed on the electron time scale instead of the time scale of the light waves. The electrons and ions are represented by discrete finite-size particles, permitting electron and ion kinetic effects to be modeled properly. The Poisson equation is utilized to ensure that space-charge effects are included. The RPIC model is fully three dimensional and has been implemented in two dimensions on the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) parallel computer at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the resulting simulation code has been named ASPEN. We believe this code is the first particle-in-cell code capable of simulating the interaction between low-frequency and high-frequency parametric instabilites in multiple dimensions. Test simulations of stimulated Raman scattering, stimulated Brillouin scattering, and Langmuir decay instability are presented.

  2. Advances and future needs in particle production and transport code developments

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    The next generation of accelerators and ever expanding needs of existing accelerators demand new developments and additions to Monte-Carlo codes, with an emphasis on enhanced modeling of elementary particle and heavy-ion interactions and transport. Challenges arise from extremely high beam energies and beam power, increasing complexity of accelerators and experimental setups, as well as design, engineering and performance constraints. All these put unprecedented requirements on the accuracy of particle production predictions, the capability and reliability of the codes used in planning new accelerator facilities and experiments, the design of machine, target and collimation systems, detectors and radiation shielding and minimization of their impact on environment. Recent advances in widely-used general-purpose all-particle codes are described for the most critical modules such as particle production event generators, elementary particle and heavy ion transport in an energy range which spans up to 17 decades, nuclide inventory and macroscopic impact on materials, and dealing with complex geometry of accelerator and detector structures. Future requirements for developing physics models and Monte-Carlo codes are discussed.

  3. Particle kinetic simulation of high altitude hypervelocity flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Iain; Haas, Brian L.

    1994-01-01

    Rarefied flows about hypersonic vehicles entering the upper atmosphere or through nozzles expanding into a near vacuum may only be simulated accurately with a direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Under this grant, researchers enhanced the models employed in the DSMC method and performed simulations in support of existing NASA projects or missions. DSMC models were developed and validated for simulating rotational, vibrational, and chemical relaxation in high-temperature flows, including effects of quantized anharmonic oscillators and temperature-dependent relaxation rates. State-of-the-art advancements were made in simulating coupled vibration-dissociation recombination for post-shock flows. Models were also developed to compute vehicle surface temperatures directly in the code rather than requiring isothermal estimates. These codes were instrumental in simulating aerobraking of NASA's Magellan spacecraft during orbital maneuvers to assess heat transfer and aerodynamic properties of the delicate satellite. NASA also depended upon simulations of entry of the Galileo probe into the atmosphere of Jupiter to provide drag and flow field information essential for accurate interpretation of an onboard experiment. Finally, the codes have been used extensively to simulate expanding nozzle flows in low-power thrusters in support of propulsion activities at NASA-Lewis. Detailed comparisons between continuum calculations and DSMC results helped to quantify the limitations of continuum CFD codes in rarefied applications.

  4. Particle kinetic simulation of high altitude hypervelocity flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Iain; Haas, Brian L.

    1994-01-01

    Rarefied flows about hypersonic vehicles entering the upper atmosphere or through nozzles expanding into a near vacuum may only be simulated accurately with a direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Under this grant, researchers enhanced the models employed in the DSMC method and performed simulations in support of existing NASA projects or missions. DSMC models were developed and validated for simulating rotational, vibrational, and chemical relaxation in high-temperature flows, including effects of quantized anharmonic oscillators and temperature-dependent relaxation rates. State-of-the-art advancements were made in simulating coupled vibration - dissociation - recombination for post-shock flows. Models were also developed to compute vehicle surface temperatures directly in the code rather than requiring isothermal estimates. These codes were instrumental in simulating aerobraking of NASA's Magellan spacecraft during orbital maneuvers to assess heat transfer and aerodynamic properties of the delicate satellite. NASA also depended upon simulations of entry of the Galileo probe into the atmosphere of Jupiter to provide drag and flow field information essential for accurate interpretation of an onboard experiment. Finally, the codes have been used extensively to simulate expanding nozzle flows in low-power thrusters in support of propulsion activities at NASA-Lewis. Detailed comparisons between continuum calculations and DSMC results helped to quantify the limitations of continuum CFD codes in rarefied applications.

  5. ESC-EEC-EPC code system for plasma core and edge equilibrium and particle orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xujing

    2013-10-01

    A new Edge Equilibrium Code (EEC), which is a new solver of the Grad-Shafranov equation complementing the existing ESC code (based on Fourier representation) is presented. EEC, being developed specifically for the near edge region with an arbitrary shape of the plasma boundary, uses adaptive flux coordinates with Hermite finite element representation. A special routine for fast solving the sparse matrix equations was created for EEC. The edge solution of EEC is matched with the core solution from ESC through a virtual boundary and the two codes communicate as two parallel processes. This approach addresses the future needs in enhancing functionality of EEC without conflicting with the interface of both codes. The code was complemented by Edge Particle Code (EPC) for massive calculation of collisional particle orbits using GPU. The resulting ESC-EEC-EPC code system acquired unmatched ability (a) in fast free and fixed boundary equilibrium calculations for arbitrary plasma shapes, (b) in using both r - z and different flux coordinates, (c) in choosing different combinations of input profiles, (d) in performing equilibrium reconstruction together with variances analysis, and (e) in assessing the diagnostics used for equilibrium reconstruction. Chinese National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program 2011GB105003, US DOE SBIR grant # 94307S10-II.

  6. Computational Particle Dynamic Simulations on Multicore Processors (CPDMu) Final Report Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Schmalz, Mark S

    2011-07-24

    Statement of Problem - Department of Energy has many legacy codes for simulation of computational particle dynamics and computational fluid dynamics applications that are designed to run on sequential processors and are not easily parallelized. Emerging high-performance computing architectures employ massively parallel multicore architectures (e.g., graphics processing units) to increase throughput. Parallelization of legacy simulation codes is a high priority, to achieve compatibility, efficiency, accuracy, and extensibility. General Statement of Solution - A legacy simulation application designed for implementation on mainly-sequential processors has been represented as a graph G. Mathematical transformations, applied to G, produce a graph representation {und G} for a high-performance architecture. Key computational and data movement kernels of the application were analyzed/optimized for parallel execution using the mapping G {yields} {und G}, which can be performed semi-automatically. This approach is widely applicable to many types of high-performance computing systems, such as graphics processing units or clusters comprised of nodes that contain one or more such units. Phase I Accomplishments - Phase I research decomposed/profiled computational particle dynamics simulation code for rocket fuel combustion into low and high computational cost regions (respectively, mainly sequential and mainly parallel kernels), with analysis of space and time complexity. Using the research team's expertise in algorithm-to-architecture mappings, the high-cost kernels were transformed, parallelized, and implemented on Nvidia Fermi GPUs. Measured speedups (GPU with respect to single-core CPU) were approximately 20-32X for realistic model parameters, without final optimization. Error analysis showed no loss of computational accuracy. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits - The proposed research will constitute a breakthrough in solution of problems related to efficient

  7. MCNPX Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport in SiC semiconductor detectors of fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlačková, K.; Zat'ko, B.; Šagátová, A.; Pavlovič, M.; Nečas, V.; Stacho, M.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate particle transport properties of a fast neutron detector based on silicon carbide. MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) code was used in our study because it allows seamless particle transport, thus not only interacting neutrons can be inspected but also secondary particles can be banked for subsequent transport. Modelling of the fast-neutron response of a SiC detector was carried out for fast neutrons produced by 239Pu-Be source with the mean energy of about 4.3 MeV. Using the MCNPX code, the following quantities have been calculated: secondary particle flux densities, reaction rates of elastic/inelastic scattering and other nuclear reactions, distribution of residual ions, deposited energy and energy distribution of pulses. The values of reaction rates calculated for different types of reactions and resulting energy deposition values showed that the incident neutrons transfer part of the carried energy predominantly via elastic scattering on silicon and carbon atoms. Other fast-neutron induced reactions include inelastic scattering and nuclear reactions followed by production of α-particles and protons. Silicon and carbon recoil atoms, α-particles and protons are charged particles which contribute to the detector response. It was demonstrated that although the bare SiC material can register fast neutrons directly, its detection efficiency can be enlarged if it is covered by an appropriate conversion layer. Comparison of the simulation results with experimental data was successfully accomplished.

  8. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of microturbulence for general magnetic geometry and experimental profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Yong; Holod, Ihor; Wang, Zhixuan; Lin, Zhihong; Zhang, Taige

    2015-02-15

    Developments in gyrokinetic particle simulation enable the gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) to simulate turbulent transport in tokamaks with realistic equilibrium profiles and plasma geometry, which is a critical step in the code–experiment validation process. These new developments include numerical equilibrium representation using B-splines, a new Poisson solver based on finite difference using field-aligned mesh and magnetic flux coordinates, a new zonal flow solver for general geometry, and improvements on the conventional four-point gyroaverage with nonuniform background marker loading. The gyrokinetic Poisson equation is solved in the perpendicular plane instead of the poloidal plane. Exploiting these new features, GTC is able to simulate a typical DIII-D discharge with experimental magnetic geometry and profiles. The simulated turbulent heat diffusivity and its radial profile show good agreement with other gyrokinetic codes. The newly developed nonuniform loading method provides a modified radial transport profile to that of the conventional uniform loading method.

  9. Physical viscosity in smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijacki, Debora; Springel, Volker

    2006-09-01

    Most hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy cluster formation carried out to date have tried to model the cosmic gas as an ideal, inviscid fluid, where only a small amount of (unwanted) numerical viscosity is present, arising from practical limitations of the numerical method employed, and with a strength that depends on numerical resolution. However, the physical viscosity of the gas in hot galaxy clusters may in fact not be negligible, suggesting that a self-consistent treatment that accounts for the internal gas friction would be more appropriate. To allow such simulations using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method, we derive a novel SPH formulation of the Navier-Stokes and general heat transfer equations and implement them in the GADGET-2 code. We include both shear and bulk viscosity stress tensors, as well as saturation criteria that limit viscous stress transport where appropriate. Our scheme integrates consistently into the entropy and energy conserving formulation of SPH employed by the code. Using a number of simple hydrodynamical test problems, e.g. the flow of a viscous fluid through a pipe, we demonstrate the validity of our implementation. Adopting Braginskii parametrization for the shear viscosity of hot gaseous plasmas, we then study the influence of viscosity on the interplay between AGN-inflated bubbles and the surrounding intracluster medium (ICM). We find that certain bubble properties like morphology, maximum clustercentric radius reached or survival time depend quite sensitively on the assumed level of viscosity. Interestingly, the sound waves launched into the ICM by the bubble injection are damped by physical viscosity, establishing a non-local heating process. However, we find that the associated heating is rather weak due to the overall small energy content of the sound waves. Finally, we carry out cosmological simulations of galaxy cluster formation with a viscous ICM. We find that the presence of physical viscosity induces new

  10. Particle-in-cell simulations of Hall plasma thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Rodrigo; Ferreira, Jose Leonardo; Martins, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    Hall plasma thrusters can be modelled using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. In these simulations, the plasma is described by a set of equations which represent a coupled system of charged particles and electromagnetic fields. The fields are computed using a spatial grid (i.e., a discretization in space), whereas the particles can move continuously in space. Briefly, the particle and fields dynamics are computed as follows. First, forces due to electric and magnetic fields are employed to calculate the velocities and positions of particles. Next, the velocities and positions of particles are used to compute the charge and current densities at discrete positions in space. Finally, these densities are used to solve the electromagnetic field equations in the grid, which are interpolated at the position of the particles to obtain the acting forces, and restart this cycle. We will present numerical simulations using software for PIC simulations to study turbulence, wave and instabilities that arise in Hall plasma thrusters. We have sucessfully reproduced a numerical simulation of a SPT-100 Hall thruster using a two-dimensional (2D) model. In addition, we are developing a 2D model of a cylindrical Hall thruster. The results of these simulations will contribute to improve the performance of plasma thrusters to be used in Cubesats satellites currenty in development at the Plasma Laboratory at University of Brasília.

  11. A unified radiative magnetohydrodynamics code for lightning-like discharge simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qiang Chen, Bin Xiong, Run; Cai, Zhaoyang; Chen, P. F.

    2014-03-15

    A two-dimensional Eulerian finite difference code is developed for solving the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations including the effects of self-consistent magnetic field, thermal conduction, resistivity, gravity, and radiation transfer, which when combined with specified pulse current models and plasma equations of state, can be used as a unified lightning return stroke solver. The differential equations are written in the covariant form in the cylindrical geometry and kept in the conservative form which enables some high-accuracy shock capturing schemes to be equipped in the lightning channel configuration naturally. In this code, the 5-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme combined with Lax-Friedrichs flux splitting method is introduced for computing the convection terms of the MHD equations. The 3-order total variation diminishing Runge-Kutta integral operator is also equipped to keep the time-space accuracy of consistency. The numerical algorithms for non-ideal terms, e.g., artificial viscosity, resistivity, and thermal conduction, are introduced in the code via operator splitting method. This code assumes the radiation is in local thermodynamic equilibrium with plasma components and the flux limited diffusion algorithm with grey opacities is implemented for computing the radiation transfer. The transport coefficients and equation of state in this code are obtained from detailed particle population distribution calculation, which makes the numerical model is self-consistent. This code is systematically validated via the Sedov blast solutions and then used for lightning return stroke simulations with the peak current being 20 kA, 30 kA, and 40 kA, respectively. The results show that this numerical model consistent with observations and previous numerical results. The population distribution evolution and energy conservation problems are also discussed.

  12. Space Station gas-grain simulation facility - Microgravity particle research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, Glenn C.; Fogleman, Guy; Huntington, Judith L.

    1988-01-01

    The proposed Space Station gas-grain simulation facility (GGSF) and the possibilities for research in the facility are discussed. The physics of particles in microgravity is reviewed. The proposed design of the GGSF is illustrated and examined. Examples of experiments which have been suggested for the GGSF are presented, including the formation of organic haze particles in Titan's atmosphere, organic compound synthesis on surfaces of growing particles, fractal particles, planetary ring particle dynamics, aggregation of fine geological particulates in planetary atmospheres, and dipolar grain coagulation and orientation.

  13. Stochastic Simulation of Lagrangian Particle Transport in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guangyuan

    This dissertation presents the development and validation of the One Dimensional Turbulence (ODT) multiphase model in the Lagrangian reference frame. ODT is a stochastic model that captures the full range of length and time scales and provides statistical information on fine-scale turbulent-particle mixing and transport at low computational cost. The flow evolution is governed by a deterministic solution of the viscous processes and a stochastic representation of advection through stochastic domain mapping processes. The three algorithms for Lagrangian particle transport are presented within the context of the ODT approach. The Type-I and -C models consider the particle-eddy interaction as instantaneous and continuous change of the particle position and velocity, respectively. The Type-IC model combines the features of the Type-I and -C models. The models are applied to the multi-phase flows in the homogeneous decaying turbulence and turbulent round jet. Particle dispersion, dispersion coefficients, and velocity statistics are predicted and compared with experimental data. The models accurately reproduces the experimental data sets and capture particle inertial effects and trajectory crossing effect. A new adjustable particle parameter is introduced into the ODT model, and sensitivity analysis is performed to facilitate parameter estimation and selection. A novel algorithm of the two-way momentum coupling between the particle and carrier phases is developed in the ODT multiphase model. Momentum exchange between the phases is accounted for through particle source terms in the viscous diffusion. The source term is implemented in eddy events through a new kernel transformation and an iterative procedure is required for eddy selection. This model is applied to a particle-laden turbulent jet flow, and simulation results are compared with experimental measurements. The effect of particle addition on the velocities of the gas phase is investigated. The development of

  14. GATOR: A 3-D time-dependent simulation code for helix TWTs

    SciTech Connect

    Zaidman, E.G.; Freund, H.P.

    1996-12-31

    A 3D nonlinear analysis of helix TWTs is presented. The analysis and simulation code is based upon a spectral decomposition using the vacuum sheath helix modes. The field equations are integrated on a grid and advanced in time using a MacCormack predictor-corrector scheme, and the electron orbit equations are integrated using a fourth order Runge-Kutta algorithm. Charge is accumulated on the grid and the field is interpolated to the particle location by a linear map. The effect of dielectric liners on the vacuum sheath helix dispersion is included in the analysis. Several numerical cases are considered. Simulation of the injection of a DC beam and a signal at a single frequency is compared with a linear field theory of the helix TWT interaction, and good agreement is found.

  15. COOL: A code for Dynamic Monte Carlo Simulation of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, Paolo

    2012-02-01

    Cool is a program to simulate evaporative and sympathetic cooling for a mixture of two gases co-trapped in an harmonic potential. The collisions involved are assumed to be exclusively elastic, and losses are due to evaporation from the trap. Each particle is followed individually in its trajectory, consequently properties such as spatial densities or energy distributions can be readily evaluated. The code can be used sequentially, by employing one output as input for another run. The code can be easily generalised to describe more complicated processes, such as the inclusion of inelastic collisions, or the possible presence of more than two species in the trap. New version program summaryProgram title: COOL Catalogue identifier: AEHJ_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHJ_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 097 733 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 18 425 722 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: Desktop Operating system: Linux RAM: 500 Mbytes Classification: 16.7, 23 Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEHJ_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 182 (2011) 388 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Simulation of the sympathetic process occurring for two molecular gases co-trapped in a deep optical trap. Solution method: The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method exploits the decoupling, over a short time period, of the inter-particle interaction from the trapping potential. The particle dynamics is thus exclusively driven by the external optical field. The rare inter-particle collisions are considered with an acceptance/rejection mechanism, that is, by comparing a random number to the collisional probability

  16. COMPARISON OF SIMULATION CODES FOR MICROWAVE INSTABILITY IN BUNCHED BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Cai, Y.; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    In accelerator design, there is often a need to evaluate the threshold to the (longitudinal) microwave instability for a bunched beam in an electron storage ring. Several computational tools are available that allow them, once given the wakefield representing a ring, to numerically find the threshold current and to simulate the development of the instability. In this work, they present results of coputer simulations using two codes recently developed at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory: a Vlasov-Fokker-Planck (VFP) solver based on an algorithm by Warnock and Ellison, and a program that find the threshold from the linearized Vlasov equation. They apply the programs to find the instability threshold for three models of ring impedances: that of a Q = 1 resonator, of shielded coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR), and of a resistive wall. The first example is wel-bheaved, but the other two are singular wakes that need special care. Note that similar numerical studies of the threshold of a Q = 1 resonantor wake have been performed by Oide and Yokova, and others. They compare the results of the two programs and discuss their respective capabilities and limitations. In this report they assume the slippage factor {eta} is always positive. They work in Gaussian units.

  17. GRMHD Simulations of Jet Formation with a New Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Y.; Nishikawa, K.-I.; Koide, S.; Hardee, P.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a new three-dimensional general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) code by using a conservative, high-resolution shock-capturing scheme. The numerical fluxes are calculated using the HLL approximate Riemann solver scheme. The flux-interpolated, constrained transport scheme is used to maintain a divergence-free magnetic field. Various one-dimensional test problems in both special and general relativity show significant improvements over our previous model. We have performed simulations of jet formations from a geometrically thin accretion disk near both nonrotating and rotating black holes. The new simulation results show that the jet is formed in the same manner as in previous work and propagates outward. In the rotating black hole cases, jets form much closer to the black hole's ergosphere and the magnetic field is strongly twisted due the frame-dragging effect. As the magnetic field strength becomes weaker, a larger amount of matter is launched with the jet. On the other hand, when the magnetic field strength becomes stronger, the jet has less matter and becomes poynting-flux dominated. We will also discuss how the jet properties depend on the rotation of a black hole.

  18. Study of self-consistent particle flows in a plasma blob with particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Hiroki Ishiguro, Seiji

    2015-10-15

    The self-consistent particle flows in a filamentary coherent structure along the magnetic field line in scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma (plasma blob) have been investigated by means of a three-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulation code. The presence of the spiral current system composed of the diamagnetic and parallel currents in a blob is confirmed by the particle simulation without any assumed sheath boundary models. Furthermore, the observation of the electron and ion parallel velocity distributions in a blob shows that those distributions are far from Maxwellian due to modification with the sheath formation and that the electron temperature on the higher potential side in a blob is higher than that on the lower potential side. Also, it is found that the ions on the higher potential side are accelerated more intensively along the magnetic field line than those on the lower potential side near the edge. This study indicates that particle simulations are able to provide an exact current closure to analysis of blob dynamics and will bring more accurate prediction of plasma transport in the SOL without any empirical assumptions.

  19. Combining hydrodynamic modeling with nonthermal test particle tracking to improve flare simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Henry Degraffenried, III

    Solar flares remain a subject of intense study in the solar physics community. These huge releases of energy on the Sun have direct consequences for humans on Earth and in space. The processes that impart tremendous amounts of energy are not well understood. In order to test theoretical models of flare formation and evolution, state of the art, numerical codes must be created that can accurately simulate the wide range of electromagnetic radiation emitted by flares. A direct comparison of simulated radiation to increasingly detailed observations will allow scientists to test the validity of theoretical models. To accomplish this task, numerical codes were developed that can simulate both the thermal and nonthermal components of a flaring plasma, their interactions, and their emissions. The HYLOOP code combines a hydrodynamic equation solver with a nonthermal particle tracking code in order to simulate the thermal and nonthermal aspects of a flare. A solar flare was simulated using this new code with a static atmosphere and with a dynamic atmosphere, to illustrate the importance of considering hydrodynamic effects on nonthermal beam evolution. The importance of density gradients in the evolution of nonthermal electron beams was investigated by studying their effects in isolation. The importance of the initial pitch-angle cosine distribution to flare dynamics was investigated. Emission in XRT filters were calculated and analyzed to see if there were soft X-ray signatures that could give clues to the nonthermal particle distributions. Finally the HXR source motions that appeared in the simulations were compared to real observations of this phenomena.

  20. Hyperbolic divergence cleaning, the electrostatic limit, and potential boundary conditions for particle-in-cell codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, M.; Munz, C.-D.; Fasoulas, S.

    2015-08-01

    In a numerical solution of the Maxwell-Vlasov system, the consistency with the charge conservation and divergence conditions has to be kept solving the hyperbolic evolution equations of the Maxwell system, since the vector identity ∇ ṡ (∇ × u →) = 0 and/or the charge conservation of moving particles may be not satisfied completely due to discretization errors. One possible method to force the consistency is the hyperbolic divergence cleaning. This hyperbolic constraint formulation of Maxwell's equations has been proposed previously, coupling the divergence conditions to the hyperbolic evolution equations, which can then be treated with the same numerical method. We pick up this method again and show that electrostatic limit may be obtained by accentuating the divergence cleaning sub-system and converging to steady state. Hence, the electrostatic case can be treated by the electrodynamic code with reduced computational effort. In addition, potential boundary conditions as often given in practical applications can be coupled in a similar way to get appropriate boundary conditions for the field equations. Numerical results are shown for an electric dipole, a parallel-plate capacitor, and a Langmuir wave. The use of potential boundary conditions is demonstrated in an Einzel lens simulation.

  1. Verification of particle-in-cell simulations with Monte Carlo collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, M. M.

    2016-10-01

    Widespread recent interest in techniques for demonstrating that computer simulation programs are correct (‘verification’) has been motivated by evidence that traditional development and testing procedures are disturbingly ineffective. Reproducing an exact solution of the relevant model equations is generally accepted as the strongest available verification procedure, but this technique depends on the availability of suitable exact solutions. In this paper we consider verification of a particle-in-cell simulation with Monte Carlo collisions. We know of no exact solutions that simultaneously exercise all of the functions of this code. However, we show here that there can be found in the literature a number of non-trivial exact solutions, each of which exercises a substantial subset of these functions, and which in combination exercise all of the functions of the code. That the code is able to reproduce these solutions is correctness evidence of a stronger kind than has hitherto been elucidated.

  2. Rescaling of microwave breakdown theory for monatomic gases by particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huihui; Meng, Lin; Liu, Dagang; Liu, Laqun

    2013-12-15

    A particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo code is developed to rescale the microwave breakdown theory which is put forward by Vyskrebentsev and Raizer. The results of simulations show that there is a distinct error in this theory when the high energy tail of electron energy distribution function increases. A rescaling factor is proposed to modify this theory, and the change rule of the rescaling factor is presented.

  3. Simulation of gas particle flow in a HVOF torch

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.H.; Moore, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    A transient two-dimensional numerical simulation of Inconel spraying in an HVOF torch barrel has been performed. The gas flow is treated as a continuum multicomponent chemically reacting flow, while particles are modeled using a stochastic particle spray model, fully coupled to the gas flow. The calculated results agree well with experimental data, and show important statistical aspects of particle flow in the torch.

  4. An optimization method of relativistic backward wave oscillator using particle simulation and genetic algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zaigao; Wang, Jianguo; Wang, Yue; Qiao, Hailiang; Zhang, Dianhui; Guo, Weijie

    2013-11-15

    Optimal design method of high-power microwave source using particle simulation and parallel genetic algorithms is presented in this paper. The output power, simulated by the fully electromagnetic particle simulation code UNIPIC, of the high-power microwave device is given as the fitness function, and the float-encoding genetic algorithms are used to optimize the high-power microwave devices. Using this method, we encode the heights of non-uniform slow wave structure in the relativistic backward wave oscillators (RBWO), and optimize the parameters on massively parallel processors. Simulation results demonstrate that we can obtain the optimal parameters of non-uniform slow wave structure in the RBWO, and the output microwave power enhances 52.6% after the device is optimized.

  5. Atomistic Simulation of Sea Spray Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokturk, H.

    2012-12-01

    Particles generated by ocean wave spray play an important role in many atmospheric processes such as cloud condensation, cycling of elements like chlorine, and scattering of sunlight reaching the ocean surface [1-2]. Indeed, artificially spraying droplets of seawater to the atmosphere by marine vessels roaming the ocean has been suggested as a geoengineering method to combat global warming [3]. One of the interesting aspects of ocean spray particles is that they include dissolved salt ions. Typically a liter of seawater contains about 3.5 g of salt which is mostly sodium chloride. Hydrated salt ions of the particle create a molecular structure which is different from that of pure water. An objective of this research is to investigate the influence of the dissolved ions on the properties of the particles by using first principle quantum mechanical calculations. Another objective is to probe the interaction of carbon dioxide (CO2) with such particles to understand whether the ions might enhance the absorption of atmospheric CO2 into the particles. Atomic models used in the calculations consist of a salt ion, for example sodium (Na+) ion surrounded by water molecules. Calculations are performed by using the DFT method with B3LYP hybrid functional and Pople type basis sets augmented with polarization and diffuse functions. Results of the calculations indicate that average binding energy of water molecules nearest to the ion is 0.7 eV per molecule for Na+ and 0.5 eV per molecule for Cl-. Water molecules are bound to the ion with significantly greater energy than that of the hydrogen bond (~0.2 eV) which is the binding mechanism of pure water. Higher binding energy of the particles explains why they serve well as condensation nuclei. As expected, binding energy decreases with increasing distance from the ion. It becomes comparable to that of the hydrogen bond at a distance of about 2 nm which corresponds to approximately 7 layers of water molecules surrounding the ion

  6. Towards a high performance geometry library for particle-detector simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolakis, J.; Bandieramonte, M.; Bitzes, G.; Brun, R.; Canal, P.; Carminati, F.; Cosmo, G.; De Fine Licht, J. C.; Duhem, L.; Elvira, V. D.; Gheata, A.; Jun, S. Y.; Lima, G.; Nikitina, T.; Novak, M.; Sehgal, R.; Shadura, O.; Wenzel, S.

    2015-05-01

    Thread-parallelisation and single-instruction multiple data (SIMD) ”vectorisation” of software components in HEP computing has become a necessity to fully benefit from current and future computing hardware. In this context, the Geant-Vector/GPU simulation project aims to re-engineer current software for the simulation of the passage of particles through detectors in order to increase the overall event throughput. As one of the core modules in this area, the geometry library plays a central role and vectorising its algorithms will be one of the cornerstones towards achieving good CPU performance. Here, we report on the progress made in vectorising the shape primitives, as well as in applying new C++ template based optimisations of existing code available in the Geant4, ROOT or USolids geometry libraries. We will focus on a presentation of our software development approach that aims to provide optimised code for all use cases of the library (e.g., single particle and many-particle APIs) and to support different architectures (CPU and GPU) while keeping the code base small, manageable and maintainable. We report on a generic and templated C++ geometry library as a continuation of the AIDA USolids project. The experience gained with these developments will be beneficial to other parts of the simulation software, such as for the optimisation of the physics library, and possibly to other parts of the experiment software stack, such as reconstruction and analysis.

  7. TWANG-PIC, a novel gyro-averaged one-dimensional particle-in-cell code for interpretation of gyrotron experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Braunmueller, F. Tran, T. M.; Alberti, S.; Genoud, J.; Hogge, J.-Ph.; Tran, M. Q.; Vuillemin, Q.

    2015-06-15

    A new gyrotron simulation code for simulating the beam-wave interaction using a monomode time-dependent self-consistent model is presented. The new code TWANG-PIC is derived from the trajectory-based code TWANG by describing the electron motion in a gyro-averaged one-dimensional Particle-In-Cell (PIC) approach. In comparison to common PIC-codes, it is distinguished by its computation speed, which makes its use in parameter scans and in experiment interpretation possible. A benchmark of the new code is presented as well as a comparative study between the two codes. This study shows that the inclusion of a time-dependence in the electron equations, as it is the case in the PIC-approach, is mandatory for simulating any kind of non-stationary oscillations in gyrotrons. Finally, the new code is compared with experimental results and some implications of the violated model assumptions in the TWANG code are disclosed for a gyrotron experiment in which non-stationary regimes have been observed and for a critical case that is of interest in high power gyrotron development.

  8. Antiproton annihilation physics in the Monte Carlo particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taasti, Vicki Trier; Knudsen, Helge; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Sobolevsky, Nikolai; Thomsen, Bjarne; Bassler, Niels

    2015-03-01

    The Monte Carlo particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A is designed to simulate therapeutic beams for cancer radiotherapy with fast ions. SHIELD-HIT12A allows creation of antiproton beam kernels for the treatment planning system TRiP98, but first it must be benchmarked against experimental data. An experimental depth dose curve obtained by the AD-4/ACE collaboration was compared with an earlier version of SHIELD-HIT, but since then inelastic annihilation cross sections for antiprotons have been updated and a more detailed geometric model of the AD-4/ACE experiment was applied. Furthermore, the Fermi-Teller Z-law, which is implemented by default in SHIELD-HIT12A has been shown not to be a good approximation for the capture probability of negative projectiles by nuclei. We investigate other theories which have been developed, and give a better agreement with experimental findings. The consequence of these updates is tested by comparing simulated data with the antiproton depth dose curve in water. It is found that the implementation of these new capture probabilities results in an overestimation of the depth dose curve in the Bragg peak. This can be mitigated by scaling the antiproton collision cross sections, which restores the agreement, but some small deviations still remain. Best agreement is achieved by using the most recent antiproton collision cross sections and the Fermi-Teller Z-law, even if experimental data conclude that the Z-law is inadequately describing annihilation on compounds. We conclude that more experimental cross section data are needed in the lower energy range in order to resolve this contradiction, ideally combined with more rigorous models for annihilation on compounds.

  9. Icarus: A 2-D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) Code for Multi-Processor Computers

    SciTech Connect

    BARTEL, TIMOTHY J.; PLIMPTON, STEVEN J.; GALLIS, MICHAIL A.

    2001-10-01

    Icarus is a 2D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code which has been optimized for the parallel computing environment. The code is based on the DSMC method of Bird[11.1] and models from free-molecular to continuum flowfields in either cartesian (x, y) or axisymmetric (z, r) coordinates. Computational particles, representing a given number of molecules or atoms, are tracked as they have collisions with other particles or surfaces. Multiple species, internal energy modes (rotation and vibration), chemistry, and ion transport are modeled. A new trace species methodology for collisions and chemistry is used to obtain statistics for small species concentrations. Gas phase chemistry is modeled using steric factors derived from Arrhenius reaction rates or in a manner similar to continuum modeling. Surface chemistry is modeled with surface reaction probabilities; an optional site density, energy dependent, coverage model is included. Electrons are modeled by either a local charge neutrality assumption or as discrete simulational particles. Ion chemistry is modeled with electron impact chemistry rates and charge exchange reactions. Coulomb collision cross-sections are used instead of Variable Hard Sphere values for ion-ion interactions. The electro-static fields can either be: externally input, a Langmuir-Tonks model or from a Green's Function (Boundary Element) based Poison Solver. Icarus has been used for subsonic to hypersonic, chemically reacting, and plasma flows. The Icarus software package includes the grid generation, parallel processor decomposition, post-processing, and restart software. The commercial graphics package, Tecplot, is used for graphics display. All of the software packages are written in standard Fortran.

  10. Simulations of particle structuring driven by electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yi; Vlahovska, Petia; Miksis, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments (Ouriemi and Vlahovska, 2014) show intriguing surface patterns when a uniform electric field is applied to a droplet covered with colloidal particles. Depending on the particle properties and the electric field intensity, particles organize into an equatorial belt, pole-to-pole chains, or dynamic vortices. Here we present 3D simulations of the collective particle dynamics, which account for electrohydrodynamic flow and dielectrophoresis of particles. In stronger electric fields, particles are expected to undergo Quincke rotation and impose disturbance to the ambient flow. Transition from ribbon-shaped belt to rotating clusters is observed in the presence of the rotation-induced hydrodynamical interactions. Our results provide insight into the various particle assembles discovered in the experiments.

  11. Simulation of Turbulent Combustion Fields of Shock-Dispersed Aluminum Using the AMR Code

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E; Khasainov, B

    2006-11-02

    We present a Model for simulating experiments of combustion in Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) explosions. The SDF charge consisted of a 0.5-g spherical PETN booster, surrounded by 1-g of fuel powder (flake Aluminum). Detonation of the booster charge creates a high-temperature, high-pressure source (PETN detonation products gases) that both disperses the fuel and heats it. Combustion ensues when the fuel mixes with air. The gas phase is governed by the gas-dynamic conservation laws, while the particle phase obeys the continuum mechanics laws for heterogeneous media. The two phases exchange mass, momentum and energy according to inter-phase interaction terms. The kinetics model used an empirical particle burn relation. The thermodynamic model considers the air, fuel and booster products to be of frozen composition, while the Al combustion products are assumed to be in equilibrium. The thermodynamic states were calculated by the Cheetah code; resulting state points were fit with analytic functions suitable for numerical simulations. Numerical simulations of combustion of an Aluminum SDF charge in a 6.4-liter chamber were performed. Computed pressure histories agree with measurements.

  12. Particle dynamics simulations of Turing patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziekan, P.; Lemarchand, A.; Nowakowski, B.

    2012-08-01

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo method is used to reproduce Turing patterns at the microscopic level in reaction-diffusion systems. In order to satisfy the basic condition for the development of such a spatial structure, we propose a model involving a solvent, which allows for disparate diffusivities of individual reactive species. One-dimensional structures are simulated in systems of various lengths. Simulation results agree with the macroscopic predictions obtained by integration of the reaction-diffusion equations. Additional effects due to internal fluctuations are observed, such as temporal transitions between structures of different wavelengths in a confined system. For a structure developing behind a propagating wave front, the fluctuations suppress the induction period and accelerate the formation of the Turing pattern. These results support the ability of reaction-diffusion models to robustly reproduce axial segmentation including the formation of early vertebrae or somites in noisy biological environments.

  13. Three dimensional discrete particle simulation of an AOTV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiereisen, William J.; Mcdonald, Jeffrey D.

    1989-01-01

    A discrete Particle Simulation method, recently formulated by Baganoff, is discussed in the context of its application to the simulation of the flow field about the Aeroassisted Flight Experiment (AFE). As a basis for discussion the current algorithm is first described. Because of the use of a cubic Cartesian mesh, the representation of the geometry is different than that of other particle methods and an algorithm for its generation is discussed. The method is applied to test problems and then to the AFE calculation with the use of 9.52 million particles and 432,000 cells.

  14. Locally conformal finite-difference time-domain techniques for particle-in-cell plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. E.; Welch, D. R.; Zimmerman, W. R.; Miller, C. L.; Genoni, T. C.; Rose, D. V.; Price, D. W.; Martin, P. N.; Short, D. J.; Jones, A. W. P.; Threadgold, J. R.

    2011-02-01

    The Dey-Mittra [S. Dey, R. Mitra, A locally conformal finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm for modeling three-dimensional perfectly conducting objects, IEEE Microwave Guided Wave Lett. 7 (273) 1997] finite-difference time-domain partial cell method enables the modeling of irregularly shaped conducting surfaces while retaining second-order accuracy. We present an algorithm to extend this method to include charged particle emission and absorption in particle-in-cell codes. Several examples are presented that illustrate the possible improvements that can be realized using the new algorithm for problems relevant to plasma simulation.

  15. Development of a CFD code for casting simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murph, Jesse E.

    1992-01-01

    The task of developing a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to accurately model the mold filling phase of a casting operation was accomplished in a systematic manner. First the state-of-the-art was determined through a literature search, a code search, and participation with casting industry personnel involved in consortium startups. From this material and inputs from industry personnel, an evaluation of the currently available codes was made. It was determined that a few of the codes already contained sophisticated CFD algorithms and further validation of one of these codes could preclude the development of a new CFD code for this purpose. With industry concurrence, ProCAST was chosen for further evaluation. Two benchmark cases were used to evaluate the code's performance using a Silicon Graphics Personal Iris system. The results of these limited evaluations (because of machine and time constraints) are presented along with discussions of possible improvements and recommendations for further evaluation.

  16. Launch Environment Water Flow Simulations Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Berg, Jared J.; Harris, Michael F.; Crespo, Alejandro C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) to simulate the water flow from the rainbird nozzle system used in the sound suppression system during pad abort and nominal launch. The simulations help determine if water from rainbird nozzles will impinge on the rocket nozzles and other sensitive ground support elements.

  17. Computer simulations of particle-bubble interactions and particle sliding using Discrete Element Method.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, R; Ata, S; Wanless, E J; Moreno-Atanasio, R

    2012-09-01

    Three dimensional Discrete Element Method (DEM) computer simulations have been carried out to analyse the kinetics of collision of multiple particles against a stationary bubble and the sliding of the particles over the bubble surface. This is the first time that a computational analysis of the sliding time and particle packing arrangements of multiple particles on the surface of a bubble has been carried out. The collision kinetics of monodisperse (33 μm in radius) and polydisperse (12-33 μm in radius) particle systems have been analysed in terms of the time taken by 10%, 50% and 100% of the particles to collide against the bubble. The dependencies of these collision times on the strength of hydrophobic interactions follow relationships close to power laws. However, minimal sensitivity of the collision times to particle size was found when linear and square relationships of the hydrophobic force with particles radius were considered. The sliding time for single particles has corroborated published theoretical expressions. Finally, a good qualitative comparison with experiments has been observed with respect to the particle packing at the bottom of the bubble after sliding demonstrating the usefulness of computer simulations in the studies of particle-bubble systems.

  18. DSC -- Disruption Simulation Code for Tokamaks and ITER applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, S. A.; Grubert, J. E.; Zakharov, L. E.

    2010-11-01

    Arguably the most important issue facing the further development of magnetic fusion via advanced tokamaks is to predict, avoid, or mitigate disruptions. This recently became the hottest challenging topic in fusion research because of several potentially damaging effects, which could impact the ITER device. To address this issue, two versions of a new 3D adaptive Disruption Simulation Code (DSC) will be developed. The first version will solve the ideal reduced 3D MHD model in the real geometry with a thin conducting wall structure, utilizing the adaptive meshless technique. The second version will solve the resistive reduced 3D MHD model in the real geometry of the conducting structure of the tokamak vessel and will finally be parallelized. The DSC will be calibrated against the JET disruption data and will be capable of predicting the disruption effects in ITER, as well as contributing to the development of the disruption mitigation scheme and suppression of the RE generation. The progress on the first version of the 3D DSC development will be presented.

  19. Radioactive Sediment Transport on Ogaki Dam Reservoir in Fukushima Evacuated Zone: Numerical Simulation Studies by 2-D River Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Susumu; Kitamura, Akihiro; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Machida, Masahiko

    2015-04-01

    Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident on March 2011 released significant quantities of radionuclides to atmosphere. The most significant nuclide is radioactive cesium isotopes. Therefore, the movement of the cesium is one of the critical issues for the environmental assessment. Since the cesium is strongly sorbed by soil particles, the cesium transport can be regarded as the sediment transport which is mainly brought about by the aquatic system such as a river and a lake. In this research, our target is the sediment transport on Ogaki dam reservoir which is located in about 16 km northwest from FDNPP. The reservoir is one of the principal irrigation dam reservoirs in Fukushima Prefecture and its upstream river basin was heavily contaminated by radioactivity. We simulate the sediment transport on the reservoir using 2-D river simulation code named Nays2D originally developed by Shimizu et al. (The latest version of Nays2D is available as a code included in iRIC (http://i-ric.org/en/), which is a river flow and riverbed variation analysis software package). In general, a 2-D simulation code requires a huge amount of calculation time. Therefore, we parallelize the code and execute it on a parallel computer. We examine the relationship between the behavior of the sediment transport and the height of the reservoir exit. The simulation result shows that almost all the sand that enter into the reservoir deposit close to the entrance of the reservoir for any height of the exit. The amounts of silt depositing within the reservoir slightly increase by raising the height of the exit. However, that of the clay dramatically increases. Especially, more than half of the clay deposits, if the exit is sufficiently high. These results demonstrate that the water level of the reservoir has a strong influence on the amount of the clay discharged from the reservoir. As a result, we conclude that the tuning of the water level has a possibility for controlling the

  20. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas (GPS - TTBP) Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chame, Jacqueline

    2011-05-27

    The goal of this project is the development of the Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code (GTC) Framework and its applications to problems related to the physics of turbulence and turbulent transport in tokamaks,. The project involves physics studies, code development, noise effect mitigation, supporting computer science efforts, diagnostics and advanced visualizations, verification and validation. Its main scientific themes are mesoscale dynamics and non-locality effects on transport, the physics of secondary structures such as zonal flows, and strongly coherent wave-particle interaction phenomena at magnetic precession resonances. Special emphasis is placed on the implications of these themes for rho-star and current scalings and for the turbulent transport of momentum. GTC-TTBP also explores applications to electron thermal transport, particle transport; ITB formation and cross-cuts such as edge-core coupling, interaction of energetic particles with turbulence and neoclassical tearing mode trigger dynamics. Code development focuses on major initiatives in the development of full-f formulations and the capacity to simulate flux-driven transport. In addition to the full-f -formulation, the project includes the development of numerical collision models and methods for coarse graining in phase space. Verification is pursued by linear stability study comparisons with the FULL and HD7 codes and by benchmarking with the GKV, GYSELA and other gyrokinetic simulation codes. Validation of gyrokinetic models of ion and electron thermal transport is pursed by systematic stressing comparisons with fluctuation and transport data from the DIII-D and NSTX tokamaks. The physics and code development research programs are supported by complementary efforts in computer sciences, high performance computing, and data management.

  1. Air shower simulation for WASAVIES: warning system for aviation exposure to solar energetic particles.

    PubMed

    Sato, T; Kataoka, R; Yasuda, H; Yashiro, S; Kuwabara, T; Shiota, D; Kubo, Y

    2014-10-01

    WASAVIES, a warning system for aviation exposure to solar energetic particles (SEPs), is under development by collaboration between several institutes in Japan and the USA. It is designed to deterministically forecast the SEP fluxes incident on the atmosphere within 6 h after flare onset using the latest space weather research. To immediately estimate the aircrew doses from the obtained SEP fluxes, the response functions of the particle fluxes generated by the incidence of monoenergetic protons into the atmosphere were developed by performing air shower simulations using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code system. The accuracy of the simulation was well verified by calculating the increase count rates of a neutron monitor during a ground-level enhancement, combining the response function with the SEP fluxes measured by the PAMELA spectrometer. The response function will be implemented in WASAVIES and used to protect aircrews from additional SEP exposure. PMID:24344351

  2. AN IMPLICIT"DRIFT-LORENTZ" PARTICLE MOVER FOR PLASMA AND BEAM SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Vay, J.-L; Cohen, R.H.

    2008-07-15

    In order to efficiently perform particle simulations in systems with widely varying magnetization, we developed a drift-Lorentz mover, which interpolates between full particle dynamics and drift kinetics in such a way as to preserve a physically correct gyroradius and particle drifts for both large and small ratios of the timestep to the cyclotron period. In order to extend applicability of the mover to systems with plasma frequency exceeding the cyclotron frequency such as one may have with fully neutralized drift compression of a heavy-ion beam we have developed an implicit version of the mover. A first step in this direction, in which the polarization charge was added to the field solver, was described previously. Here we describe a fully implicit algorithm (which is analogous to the direct-implicit method for conventionalparticle-in-cell simulation), summarize a stability analysis of it, and describe several tests of the resultant code.

  3. Air shower simulation for WASAVIES: warning system for aviation exposure to solar energetic particles.

    PubMed

    Sato, T; Kataoka, R; Yasuda, H; Yashiro, S; Kuwabara, T; Shiota, D; Kubo, Y

    2014-10-01

    WASAVIES, a warning system for aviation exposure to solar energetic particles (SEPs), is under development by collaboration between several institutes in Japan and the USA. It is designed to deterministically forecast the SEP fluxes incident on the atmosphere within 6 h after flare onset using the latest space weather research. To immediately estimate the aircrew doses from the obtained SEP fluxes, the response functions of the particle fluxes generated by the incidence of monoenergetic protons into the atmosphere were developed by performing air shower simulations using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code system. The accuracy of the simulation was well verified by calculating the increase count rates of a neutron monitor during a ground-level enhancement, combining the response function with the SEP fluxes measured by the PAMELA spectrometer. The response function will be implemented in WASAVIES and used to protect aircrews from additional SEP exposure.

  4. Code OK2—A simulation code of ion-beam illumination on an arbitrary shape and structure target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogoyski, A. I.; Kawata, S.; Someya, T.

    2004-08-01

    irradiation and non-uniformity evaluations are sophisticated and difficult to calculate analytically. Based on our code one can numerically obtain a three-dimensional profile of energy deposition onto an arbitrary shape and structure target. Method of solution: OK2 code works on the base of OK1 [1-9]. The code simulates a multi-beam illumination on a target with arbitrary shape and structure, and obtains the 3D energy deposition profile. Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: None Typical running time: The execution time depends on the pellet mesh number and the number of beams in the simulated illumination as well as on the beam characteristics (beam radius on the pellet surface, beam subdivision, projectile particle energy and so on). In almost of the practical running tests performed, the typical running time for one beam deposition is about 40 s on a PC with a CPU of Pentium 4, 2.4 GHz. Unusual features of the program: None References: [1] A.I. Ogoyski, et al., Code OK1—Simulation of multi-beam irradiation on a spherical target in heavy ion fusion, Comput. Phys. Commun. 157 (2004) 160-172. [2] J.J. Barnard, et al., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Research Report, UCRL-LR-108095 (1991). [3] C. Deutsch, et al., J. Plasma and Fusion Res. 77 (2001) 33. [4] T. Someya, et al., Fusion Science Tech. 43 (2003) 282-289. [5] S.V. Bulanov, et al., Phys. Lett. A 299 (2002) 240-247. [6] M.H. Emery, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 48 (1982) 253. [7] S. Kawata, et al., J. Phys. Soc. Japan 53 (1984) 3416. [8] T. Mehlhorn, Sandia Report, SAND80-0038 (1980). [9] H.H. Andersen, J.F. Ziegler, The Stopping and Ranges of Ions in Matter, vol. 3, Pergamon Press, Elmsford, NY, 1977.

  5. Simulations of Energetic Particles Interacting with Dynamical Magnetic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, M.; Shalchi, A.

    2016-02-01

    We explore the transport of energetic particles in interplanetary space by using test-particle simulations. In previous work such simulations have been performed by using either magnetostatic turbulence or undamped propagating plasma waves. In the current paper we simulate for the first time particle transport in dynamical turbulence. To do so we employ two models, namely the damping model of dynamical turbulence and the random sweeping model. We compute parallel and perpendicular diffusion coefficients and compare our numerical findings with solar wind observations. We show that good agreement can be found between simulations and the Palmer consensus range for both dynamical turbulence models if the ratio of turbulent magnetic field and mean field is δB/B0 = 0.5.

  6. Pressure calculation in hybrid particle-field simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Milano, Giuseppe; Kawakatsu, Toshihiro

    2010-12-07

    In the framework of a recently developed scheme for a hybrid particle-field simulation techniques where self-consistent field (SCF) theory and particle models (molecular dynamics) are combined [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 214106 (2009)], we developed a general formulation for the calculation of instantaneous pressure and stress tensor. The expressions have been derived from statistical mechanical definition of the pressure starting from the expression for the free energy functional in the SCF theory. An implementation of the derived formulation suitable for hybrid particle-field molecular dynamics-self-consistent field simulations is described. A series of test simulations on model systems are reported comparing the calculated pressure with those obtained from standard molecular dynamics simulations based on pair potentials.

  7. Accelerating particle-in-cell simulations using multilevel Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketson, Lee

    2015-11-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have been an important tool in understanding plasmas since the dawn of the digital computer. Much more recently, the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method has accelerated particle-based simulations of a variety of systems described by stochastic differential equations (SDEs), from financial portfolios to porous media flow. The fundamental idea of MLMC is to perform correlated particle simulations using a hierarchy of different time steps, and to use these correlations for variance reduction on the fine-step result. This framework is directly applicable to the Langevin formulation of Coulomb collisions, as demonstrated in previous work, but in order to apply to PIC simulations of realistic scenarios, MLMC must be generalized to incorporate self-consistent evolution of the electromagnetic fields. We present such a generalization, with rigorous results concerning its accuracy and efficiency. We present examples of the method in the collisionless, electrostatic context, and discuss applications and extensions for the future.

  8. Simulating confined particles with a flat density profile.

    PubMed

    Korolkovas, Airidas

    2016-08-01

    Particle simulations confined by sharp walls usually develop an oscillatory density profile. For some applications, most notably soft matter liquids, this behavior is often unrealistic and one expects a monotonic density climb instead. To reconcile simulations with experiments, we propose mirror-and-shift boundary conditions where each interface is mapped to a distant part of itself. The main result is that the particle density increases almost monotonically from zero to bulk, over a short distance of about one particle diameter. The method is applied to simulate a polymer brush in explicit solvent, grafted on a flat silicon substrate. The simulated density profile agrees favorably with neutron reflectometry measurements and self-consistent field theory results. PMID:27627239

  9. Simulating confined particles with a flat density profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolkovas, Airidas

    2016-08-01

    Particle simulations confined by sharp walls usually develop an oscillatory density profile. For some applications, most notably soft matter liquids, this behavior is often unrealistic and one expects a monotonic density climb instead. To reconcile simulations with experiments, we propose mirror-and-shift boundary conditions where each interface is mapped to a distant part of itself. The main result is that the particle density increases almost monotonically from zero to bulk, over a short distance of about one particle diameter. The method is applied to simulate a polymer brush in explicit solvent, grafted on a flat silicon substrate. The simulated density profile agrees favorably with neutron reflectometry measurements and self-consistent field theory results.

  10. Particle entry into the inner magnetosphere during duskward IMF By: Global three-dimensional electromagnetic full particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, D.; Yan, X. Y.; Nishikawa, K.-I.; Lembege, B.

    2006-06-01

    The change of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction from northward to duskward has an important impact on the inner magnetosphere. This impact is analyzed with the help of a new parallel version of the global three-dimensional full particle simulation code. For northward IMF, bands of weak magnetic field (sash) form poleward of the cusp at high latitudes in each hemisphere. These sashes move to the equator (within opposite quadrants) as the IMF rotates duskward and merge into one another to form the characteristic ``Crosstail-S'' within the neutral sheet of the magnetotail. These macroscopic magnetic patterns (sashes and Crosstail-S) evidenced herein are in a good agreement with results of previous 3D MHD simulations and experimental observations. Moreover, the analysis of particle fluxes shows that ``sashes'' and ``Crosstail-S'' act as magnetic groove to facilitate the entry and injection of magnetosheath particles into the inner magnetosphere. Injected particles are accelerated after the IMF changes its direction from northward to duskward.

  11. DNA strand breaks induced by electrons simulated with Nanodosimetry Monte Carlo Simulation Code: NASIC.

    PubMed

    Li, Junli; Li, Chunyan; Qiu, Rui; Yan, Congchong; Xie, Wenzhang; Wu, Zhen; Zeng, Zhi; Tung, Chuanjong

    2015-09-01

    The method of Monte Carlo simulation is a powerful tool to investigate the details of radiation biological damage at the molecular level. In this paper, a Monte Carlo code called NASIC (Nanodosimetry Monte Carlo Simulation Code) was developed. It includes physical module, pre-chemical module, chemical module, geometric module and DNA damage module. The physical module can simulate physical tracks of low-energy electrons in the liquid water event-by-event. More than one set of inelastic cross sections were calculated by applying the dielectric function method of Emfietzoglou's optical-data treatments, with different optical data sets and dispersion models. In the pre-chemical module, the ionised and excited water molecules undergo dissociation processes. In the chemical module, the produced radiolytic chemical species diffuse and react. In the geometric module, an atomic model of 46 chromatin fibres in a spherical nucleus of human lymphocyte was established. In the DNA damage module, the direct damages induced by the energy depositions of the electrons and the indirect damages induced by the radiolytic chemical species were calculated. The parameters should be adjusted to make the simulation results be agreed with the experimental results. In this paper, the influence study of the inelastic cross sections and vibrational excitation reaction on the parameters and the DNA strand break yields were studied. Further work of NASIC is underway.

  12. Update on the Development and Validation of MERCURY: A Modern, Monte Carlo Particle Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R J; Taylor, J M; McKinley, M S; Greenman, G M; Cullen, D E; O'Brien, M J; Beck, B R; Hagmann, C A

    2005-06-06

    An update on the development and validation of the MERCURY Monte Carlo particle transport code is presented. MERCURY is a modern, parallel, general-purpose Monte Carlo code being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. During the past year, several major algorithm enhancements have been completed. These include the addition of particle trackers for 3-D combinatorial geometry (CG), 1-D radial meshes, 2-D quadrilateral unstructured meshes, as well as a feature known as templates for defining recursive, repeated structures in CG. New physics capabilities include an elastic-scattering neutron thermalization model, support for continuous energy cross sections and S ({alpha}, {beta}) molecular bound scattering. Each of these new physics features has been validated through code-to-code comparisons with another Monte Carlo transport code. Several important computer science features have been developed, including an extensible input-parameter parser based upon the XML data description language, and a dynamic load-balance methodology for efficient parallel calculations. This paper discusses the recent work in each of these areas, and describes a plan for future extensions that are required to meet the needs of our ever expanding user base.

  13. ANNarchy: a code generation approach to neural simulations on parallel hardware.

    PubMed

    Vitay, Julien; Dinkelbach, Helge Ü; Hamker, Fred H

    2015-01-01

    Many modern neural simulators focus on the simulation of networks of spiking neurons on parallel hardware. Another important framework in computational neuroscience, rate-coded neural networks, is mostly difficult or impossible to implement using these simulators. We present here the ANNarchy (Artificial Neural Networks architect) neural simulator, which allows to easily define and simulate rate-coded and spiking networks, as well as combinations of both. The interface in Python has been designed to be close to the PyNN interface, while the definition of neuron and synapse models can be specified using an equation-oriented mathematical description similar to the Brian neural simulator. This information is used to generate C++ code that will efficiently perform the simulation on the chosen parallel hardware (multi-core system or graphical processing unit). Several numerical methods are available to transform ordinary differential equations into an efficient C++code. We compare the parallel performance of the simulator to existing solutions.

  14. ANNarchy: a code generation approach to neural simulations on parallel hardware

    PubMed Central

    Vitay, Julien; Dinkelbach, Helge Ü.; Hamker, Fred H.

    2015-01-01

    Many modern neural simulators focus on the simulation of networks of spiking neurons on parallel hardware. Another important framework in computational neuroscience, rate-coded neural networks, is mostly difficult or impossible to implement using these simulators. We present here the ANNarchy (Artificial Neural Networks architect) neural simulator, which allows to easily define and simulate rate-coded and spiking networks, as well as combinations of both. The interface in Python has been designed to be close to the PyNN interface, while the definition of neuron and synapse models can be specified using an equation-oriented mathematical description similar to the Brian neural simulator. This information is used to generate C++ code that will efficiently perform the simulation on the chosen parallel hardware (multi-core system or graphical processing unit). Several numerical methods are available to transform ordinary differential equations into an efficient C++code. We compare the parallel performance of the simulator to existing solutions. PMID:26283957

  15. ANNarchy: a code generation approach to neural simulations on parallel hardware.

    PubMed

    Vitay, Julien; Dinkelbach, Helge Ü; Hamker, Fred H

    2015-01-01

    Many modern neural simulators focus on the simulation of networks of spiking neurons on parallel hardware. Another important framework in computational neuroscience, rate-coded neural networks, is mostly difficult or impossible to implement using these simulators. We present here the ANNarchy (Artificial Neural Networks architect) neural simulator, which allows to easily define and simulate rate-coded and spiking networks, as well as combinations of both. The interface in Python has been designed to be close to the PyNN interface, while the definition of neuron and synapse models can be specified using an equation-oriented mathematical description similar to the Brian neural simulator. This information is used to generate C++ code that will efficiently perform the simulation on the chosen parallel hardware (multi-core system or graphical processing unit). Several numerical methods are available to transform ordinary differential equations into an efficient C++code. We compare the parallel performance of the simulator to existing solutions. PMID:26283957

  16. PIC/MCC simulation of capacitively coupled discharges: Effect of particle management and integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Anbang; Becker, Markus M.; Loffhagen, Detlef

    2016-09-01

    A PIC/MCC simulation model for the analysis of low-temperature discharge plasmas is represented which takes the common leapfrog and the velocity Verlet algorithm for the particle integration, adaptive particle management as well as parallel computing using MPI into account. Main features of the model including the impact of super particle numbers, adaptive particle management and the time step size for the different integration methods are represented. The investigations are performed for low-pressure capacitively coupled radio frequency discharges in helium and argon. Besides a code verification by comparison with benchmark simulation results in helium it is shown that an adaptive particle management is particularly suitable for the simulation of discharges at elevated pressures where boundary effects and processes in the sheath regions are important. Furthermore, it is pointed out that the velocity Verlet integration scheme allows to speed up the PIC/MCC simulations compared to the leapfrog method because it makes the use of larger time steps at the same accuracy possible.

  17. The local skin dose conversion coefficients of electrons, protons and alpha particles calculated using the Geant4 code.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bintuan; Dang, Bingrong; Wang, Zhuanzi; Wei, Wei; Li, Wenjian

    2013-10-01

    The skin tissue-equivalent slab reported in the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 116 to calculate the localised skin dose conversion coefficients (LSDCCs) was adopted into the Monte Carlo transport code Geant4. The Geant4 code was then utilised for computation of LSDCCs due to a circular parallel beam of monoenergetic electrons, protons and alpha particles <10 MeV. The computed LSDCCs for both electrons and alpha particles are found to be in good agreement with the results using the MCNPX code of ICRP 116 data. The present work thus validates the LSDCC values for both electrons and alpha particles using the Geant4 code.

  18. Test particle method for incorporation of the kinetic effects into the envelope simulations of Raman backscattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Min Sup; Suk, Hyyong

    2007-10-01

    A new test particle method is presented for self-consistent incorporation of the kinetic effects into the fluid three-wave model. One of the most important kinetic effects is the electron trapping and it has been found that the trapping affects significantly the behavior of Raman backscatter and Raman backward laser amplification. The conventional fluid three-wave model cannot reproduce the kinetic simulations in the trapping regime. The test particle scheme utilizes the same equations for the laser evolution as in the three-wave model. However, the plasma wave is treated by the envelope-kinetic equation, which consists of envelope evolution and the kinetic term. The core of the new scheme is employing test particles to compute the kinetic term self-consistently. The benchmarking results against the averaged particle-in-cell (aPIC) code show excellent agreements, and the computation speed gain over the aPIC is from 2 to 20 depending on parameters.

  19. 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Code Which Solves for Geometrics

    1998-01-13

    Pegasus is a 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Code which solves for geometries which can be represented by bodies of revolution. Included are all the surface chemistry enhancements in the 2D code Icarus as well as a real vacuum pump model. The code includes multiple species transport.

  20. Steady flow of smooth, inelastic particles on a bumpy inclined plane: hard and soft particle simulations.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Anurag; Khakhar, D V

    2010-04-01

    We study smooth, slightly inelastic particles flowing under gravity on a bumpy inclined plane using event-driven and discrete-element simulations. Shallow layers (ten particle diameters) are used to enable simulation using the event-driven method within reasonable computational times. Steady flows are obtained in a narrow range of angles (13 degrees-14.5 degrees); lower angles result in stopping of the flow and higher angles in continuous acceleration. The flow is relatively dense with the solid volume fraction, nu approximately 0.5 , and significant layering of particles is observed. We derive expressions for the stress, heat flux, and dissipation for the hard and soft particle models from first principles. The computed mean velocity, temperature, stress, dissipation, and heat flux profiles of hard particles are compared to soft particle results for different values of stiffness constant (k). The value of stiffness constant for which results for hard and soft particles are identical is found to be k>or=2x10(6) mg/d, where m is the mass of a particle, g is the acceleration due to gravity, and d is the particle diameter. We compare the simulation results to constitutive relations obtained from the kinetic theory of Jenkins and Richman [J. T. Jenkins and M. W. Richman, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 87, 355 (1985)] for pressure, dissipation, viscosity, and thermal conductivity. We find that all the quantities are very well predicted by kinetic theory for volume fractions nu<0.5. At higher densities, obtained for thicker layers (H=15d and H=20d), the kinetic theory does not give accurate prediction. Deviations of the kinetic theory predictions from simulation results are relatively small for dissipation and heat flux and most significant deviations are observed for shear viscosity and pressure. The results indicate the range of applicability of soft particle simulations and kinetic theory for dense flows.

  1. Data decomposition of Monte Carlo particle transport simulations via tally servers

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Paul K.; Siegel, Andrew R.; Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord

    2013-11-01

    An algorithm for decomposing large tally data in Monte Carlo particle transport simulations is developed, analyzed, and implemented in a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code, OpenMC. The algorithm is based on a non-overlapping decomposition of compute nodes into tracking processors and tally servers. The former are used to simulate the movement of particles through the domain while the latter continuously receive and update tally data. A performance model for this approach is developed, suggesting that, for a range of parameters relevant to LWR analysis, the tally server algorithm should perform with minimal overhead on contemporary supercomputers. An implementation of the algorithm in OpenMC is then tested on the Intrepid and Titan supercomputers, supporting the key predictions of the model over a wide range of parameters. We thus conclude that the tally server algorithm is a successful approach to circumventing classical on-node memory constraints en route to unprecedentedly detailed Monte Carlo reactor simulations.

  2. The Fluid-Kinetic Particle-in-Cell method for plasma simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markidis, Stefano; Henri, Pierre; Lapenta, Giovanni; Rönnmark, Kjell; Hamrin, Maria; Meliani, Zakaria; Laure, Erwin

    2014-08-01

    A method that solves concurrently the multi-fluid and Maxwell's equations has been developed for plasma simulations. By calculating the stress tensor in the multi-fluid momentum equation by means of computational particles moving in a self-consistent electromagnetic field, the kinetic effects are retained while solving the multi-fluid equations. The Maxwell's and multi-fluid equations are discretized implicitly in time enabling kinetic simulations over time scales typical of the fluid simulations. The Fluid-Kinetic Particle-in-Cell method has been implemented in a three-dimensional electromagnetic code, and tested against the two-stream instability, the Weibel instability, the ion cyclotron resonance and magnetic reconnection problems. The method is a promising approach for coupling fluid and kinetic methods in a unified framework.

  3. Particle-based simulations of self-motile suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinz, Denis F.; Panchenko, Alexander; Kim, Tae-Yeon; Fried, Eliot

    2015-11-01

    A simple model for simulating flows of active suspensions is investigated. The approach is based on dissipative particle dynamics. While the model is potentially applicable to a wide range of self-propelled particle systems, the specific class of self-motile bacterial suspensions is considered as a modeling scenario. To mimic the rod-like geometry of a bacterium, two dissipative particle dynamics particles are connected by a stiff harmonic spring to form an aggregate dissipative particle dynamics molecule. Bacterial motility is modeled through a constant self-propulsion force applied along the axis of each such aggregate molecule. The model accounts for hydrodynamic interactions between self-propelled agents through the pairwise dissipative interactions conventional to dissipative particle dynamics. Numerical simulations are performed using a customized version of the open-source software package LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator) software package. Detailed studies of the influence of agent concentration, pairwise dissipative interactions, and Stokes friction on the statistics of the system are provided. The simulations are used to explore the influence of hydrodynamic interactions in active suspensions. For high agent concentrations in combination with dominating pairwise dissipative forces, strongly correlated motion patterns and a fluid-like spectral distributions of kinetic energy are found. In contrast, systems dominated by Stokes friction exhibit weaker spatial correlations of the velocity field. These results indicate that hydrodynamic interactions may play an important role in the formation of spatially extended structures in active suspensions.

  4. Particle simulation of plasmas on the massively parallel processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gledhill, I. M. A.; Storey, L. R. O.

    1987-01-01

    Particle simulations, in which collective phenomena in plasmas are studied by following the self consistent motions of many discrete particles, involve several highly repetitive sets of calculations that are readily adaptable to SIMD parallel processing. A fully electromagnetic, relativistic plasma simulation for the massively parallel processor is described. The particle motions are followed in 2 1/2 dimensions on a 128 x 128 grid, with periodic boundary conditions. The two dimensional simulation space is mapped directly onto the processor network; a Fast Fourier Transform is used to solve the field equations. Particle data are stored according to an Eulerian scheme, i.e., the information associated with each particle is moved from one local memory to another as the particle moves across the spatial grid. The method is applied to the study of the nonlinear development of the whistler instability in a magnetospheric plasma model, with an anisotropic electron temperature. The wave distribution function is included as a new diagnostic to allow simulation results to be compared with satellite observations.

  5. SIMULATION OF PARTICLE SPECTRA AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    KAHANA,D.E.; KAHANA,S.H.

    2001-09-04

    A purely hadronic simulation is performed of the recently reported data from PHOBOS at energies of {radical}s = 56, 130 GeV using the relativistic heavy ion cascade LUCIFER which had previously given a good description of the NA49 inclusive spectra at {radical}s = 17.2 GeV/A. The results compare well with these early measurements at RHIC and indeed successfully predict the increase in multiplicity now seen by PHOBOS and the other RHIC detectors at the nominal maximum energy of {radical}s = 200 GeV/A, suggesting that evidence for quark-gluon matter remains elusive.

  6. Leap frog integrator modifications in highly collisional particle-in-cell codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanzlikova, N.; Turner, M. M.

    2014-07-01

    Leap frog integration method is a standard, simple, fast, and accurate way to implement velocity and position integration in particle-in-cell codes. Due to the direct solution of kinetics of particles in phase space central to the particle-in-cell procedure, important information can be obtained on particle velocity distributions, and consequently on transport and heating processes. This approach is commonly associated with physical situations where collisional effects are weak, but can also be profitably applied in some highly collisional cases, such as occur in semiconductor devices and gaseous discharges at atmospheric pressure. In this paper, we show that the implementation of the leap frog integration method in these circumstances can violate some of the assumptions central to the accuracy of this scheme. Indeed, without adaptation, the method gives incorrect results. We show here how the method must be modified to deal correctly with highly collisional cases.

  7. Simulation and phases of macroscopic particles in vortex flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Heath Eric

    Granular materials are an interesting class of media in that they exhibit many disparate characteristics depending on conditions. The same set of particles may behave like a solid, liquid, gas, something in-between, or something completely unique depending on the conditions. Practically speaking, granular materials are used in many aspects of manufacturing, therefore any new information gleaned about them may help refine these techniques. For example, learning of a possible instability may help avoid it in practical application, saving machinery, money, and even personnel. To that end, we intend to simulate a granular medium under tornado-like vortex airflow by varying particle parameters and observing the behaviors that arise. The simulation itself was written in Python from the ground up, starting from the basic simulation equations in Poschel [1]. From there, particle spin, viscous friction, and vertical and tangential airflow were added. The simulations were then run in batches on a local cluster computer, varying the parameters of radius, flow force, density, and friction. Phase plots were created after observing the behaviors of the simulations and the regions and borders were analyzed. Most of the results were as expected: smaller particles behaved more like a gas, larger particles behaved more like a solid, and most intermediate simulations behaved like a liquid. A small subset formed an interesting crossover region in the center, and under moderate forces began to throw a few particles at a time upward from the center in a fountain-like effect. Most borders between regions appeared to agree with analysis, following a parabolic critical rotational velocity at which the parabolic surface of the material dips to the bottom of the mass of particles. The fountain effects seemed to occur at speeds along and slightly faster than this division. [1] Please see thesis for references.

  8. Wave-Particle Interactions with Whistlers: Comparison Between Particle-in-Cell and Quasi-Linear Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporeale, E.; Zimbardo, G.

    2015-12-01

    We study the wave-particle interactions between lower band chorus whistlers and an anisotropic tenuous population of relativistic electrons. We present the first direct comparison of first-principle particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations with a quasi-linear diffusion code. In the PIC approach, the waves are self-consistently generated by the temperature anisotropy instability that quickly saturates and relaxes the system toward marginal stability. We show that the quasi-linear diffusion and PIC results have significant quantitative mismatch in regions of energy/pitch angle where the resonance condition is not satisfied. Moreover, for pitch angles close to the loss cone the diffusion code overestimates the scattering, particularly at low energies. This suggests that higher-order nonlinear theories should be taken in consideration in order to capture non-resonant interactions, resonance broadening, and to account for scattering at angles close to 90 degree. Finally, we show that pitch angle diffusion is enhanced during the linear wave growth phase, and it rapidly saturates well before a single bounce period. We discuss how the saturation is related to the fact that the domain in which the particles pitch angle diffuse is bounded, and to the well-known problem of 90 degree diffusion barrier.

  9. Adaptive mesh simulations of astrophysical detonations using the ASCI flash code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryxell, B.; Calder, A. C.; Dursi, L. J.; Lamb, D. Q.; MacNeice, P.; Olson, K.; Ricker, P.; Rosner, R.; Timmes, F. X.; Truran, J. W.; Tufo, H. M.; Zingale, M.

    2001-08-01

    The Flash code was developed at the University of Chicago as part of the Department of Energy's Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). The code was designed specifically to simulate thermonuclear flashes in compact stars (white dwarfs and neutron stars). This paper will give a brief introduction to the astrophysics problems we wish to address, followed by a description of the current version of the Flash code. Finally, we discuss two simulations of astrophysical detonations that we have carried out with the code. The first is of a helium detonation in an X-ray burst. The other simulation models a carbon detonation in a Type Ia supernova explosion. .

  10. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of settling behaviors of irregularly shaped particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pei; Galindo-Torres, S. A.; Tang, Hongwu; Jin, Guangqiu; Scheuermann, A.; Li, Ling

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the settling dynamics of irregularly shaped particles in a still fluid under a wide range of conditions with Reynolds numbers Re varying between 1 and 2000, sphericity ϕ and circularity c both greater than 0.5, and Corey shape factor (CSF) less than 1. To simulate the particle settling process, a modified lattice Boltzmann model combined with a turbulence module was adopted. This model was first validated using experimental data for particles of spherical and cubic shapes. For irregularly shaped particles, two different types of settling behaviors were observed prior to particles reaching a steady state: accelerating and accelerating-decelerating, which could be distinguished by a critical CSF value of approximately 0.7. The settling dynamics were analyzed with a focus on the projected areas and angular velocities of particles. It was found that a minor change in the starting projected area, an indicator of the initial particle orientation, would not strongly affect the settling velocity for low Re. Periodic oscillations developed for all simulated particles when Re>100 . The amplitude of these oscillations increased with Re. However, the periods were not sensitive to Re. The critical Re that defined the transition between the steady and periodically oscillating behaviors depended on the inertia tensor. In particular, the maximum eigenvalue of the inertia tensor played a major role in signaling this transition in comparison to the intermediate and minimum eigenvalues.

  11. Single-particle Lagrangian and structure statistics in kinematically simulated particle-laden turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, S.; Lightstone, M. F.; Tullis, S.

    2016-03-01

    Kinematic simulation (KS) is a means of generating a turbulent-like velocity field, in a manner that enforces a desired input Eulerian energy spectrum. Such models have also been applied in particle-laden flows, due to their ability to enforce spatial organization of the fluid velocity field when simulating the trajectories of individual Lagrangian particles. A critical evaluation of KS is presented; in particular, we examine its ability to reproduce single-particle Lagrangian statistics. Also the ability of KS to reproduce the preferential concentration of inertial particles is examined. Some computational results are presented, in which particles are transported alternatively by (1) turbulence generated by direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, and (2) KS. The effect of unsteadiness formulation in particular is examined. We find that even steady KS qualitatively reproduces the continuity effect, clustering of inertial particles, the elevated dispersion of inertial particles over fluid particles, and the intermittency of Lagrangian velocity signals, but generally not to the same extent as is seen in the DNS.

  12. Implementation and Characterization of Three-Dimensional Particle-in-Cell Codes on Multiple-Instruction-Multiple-Data Massively Parallel Supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyster, P. M.; Liewer, P. C.; Decyk, V. K.; Ferraro, R. D.

    1995-01-01

    A three-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulation code has been developed on coarse-grain distributed-memory massively parallel computers with message passing communications. Our implementation is the generalization to three-dimensions of the general concurrent particle-in-cell (GCPIC) algorithm. In the GCPIC algorithm, the particle computation is divided among the processors using a domain decomposition of the simulation domain. In a three-dimensional simulation, the domain can be partitioned into one-, two-, or three-dimensional subdomains ("slabs," "rods," or "cubes") and we investigate the efficiency of the parallel implementation of the push for all three choices. The present implementation runs on the Intel Touchstone Delta machine at Caltech; a multiple-instruction-multiple-data (MIMD) parallel computer with 512 nodes. We find that the parallel efficiency of the push is very high, with the ratio of communication to computation time in the range 0.3%-10.0%. The highest efficiency (> 99%) occurs for a large, scaled problem with 64(sup 3) particles per processing node (approximately 134 million particles of 512 nodes) which has a push time of about 250 ns per particle per time step. We have also developed expressions for the timing of the code which are a function of both code parameters (number of grid points, particles, etc.) and machine-dependent parameters (effective FLOP rate, and the effective interprocessor bandwidths for the communication of particles and grid points). These expressions can be used to estimate the performance of scaled problems--including those with inhomogeneous plasmas--to other parallel machines once the machine-dependent parameters are known.

  13. New Capabilities in Mercury: A Modern, Monte Carlo Particle Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R J; Cullen, D E; Greenman, G M; Hagmann, C A; Kramer, K J; McKinley, M S; O'Brien, M J; Taylor, J M

    2007-03-08

    The new physics, algorithmic and computer science capabilities of the Mercury general-purpose Monte Carlo particle transport code are discussed. The new physics and algorithmic features include in-line energy deposition and isotopic depletion, significant enhancements to the tally and source capabilities, diagnostic ray-traced particles, support for multi-region hybrid (mesh and combinatorial geometry) systems, and a probability of initiation method. Computer science enhancements include a second method of dynamically load-balancing parallel calculations, improved methods for visualizing 3-D combinatorial geometries and initial implementation of an in-line visualization capabilities.

  14. Study and simulation of low rate video coding schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayood, Khalid; Chen, Yun-Chung; Kipp, G.

    1992-01-01

    The semiannual report is included. Topics covered include communication, information science, data compression, remote sensing, color mapped images, robust coding scheme for packet video, recursively indexed differential pulse code modulation, image compression technique for use on token ring networks, and joint source/channel coder design.

  15. FLY. A parallel tree N-body code for cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonuccio-Delogu, V.; Becciani, U.; Ferro, D.

    2003-10-01

    FLY is a parallel treecode which makes heavy use of the one-sided communication paradigm to handle the management of the tree structure. In its public version the code implements the equations for cosmological evolution, and can be run for different cosmological models. This reference guide describes the actual implementation of the algorithms of the public version of FLY, and suggests how to modify them to implement other types of equations (for instance, the Newtonian ones). Program summary Title of program: FLY Catalogue identifier: ADSC Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADSC Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: Cray T3E, Sgi Origin 3000, IBM SP Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested: Unicos 2.0.5.40, Irix 6.5.14, Aix 4.3.3 Programming language used: Fortran 90, C Memory required to execute with typical data: about 100 Mwords with 2 million-particles Number of bits in a word: 32 Number of processors used: parallel program. The user can select the number of processors >=1 Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: parallelized Number of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4615604 Distribution format: tar gzip file Keywords: Parallel tree N-body code for cosmological simulations Nature of physical problem: FLY is a parallel collisionless N-body code for the calculation of the gravitational force. Method of solution: It is based on the hierarchical oct-tree domain decomposition introduced by Barnes and Hut (1986). Restrictions on the complexity of the program: The program uses the leapfrog integrator schema, but could be changed by the user. Typical running time: 50 seconds for each time-step, running a 2-million-particles simulation on an Sgi Origin 3800 system with 8 processors having 512 Mbytes RAM for each processor. Unusual features of the program: FLY

  16. Prediction of material strength and fracture of glass using the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.

    1994-08-01

    The design of many military devices involves numerical predictions of the material strength and fracture of brittle materials. The materials of interest include ceramics, that are used in armor packages; glass that is used in truck and jeep windshields and in helicopters; and rock and concrete that are used in underground bunkers. As part of a program to develop advanced hydrocode design tools, the authors have implemented a brittle fracture model for glass into the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code. The authors have evaluated this model and the code by predicting data from one-dimensional flyer plate impacts into glass, and data from tungsten rods impacting glass. Since fractured glass properties, which are needed in the model, are not available, the authors did sensitivity studies of these properties, as well as sensitivity studies to determine the number of particles needed in the calculations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the data.

  17. Prediction of material strength and fracture of brittle materials using the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.; Stellingwwerf, R.F.

    1995-12-31

    The design of many devices involves numerical predictions of the material strength and fracture of brittle materials. The materials of interest include ceramics that are used in armor packages; glass that is used in windshields; and rock and concrete that are used in oil wells. As part of a program to develop advanced hydrocode design tools, the authors have implemented a brittle fracture model for glass into the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code. The authors have evaluated this model and the code by predicting data from tungsten rods impacting glass. Since fractured glass properties, which are needed in the model, are not available, they did sensitivity studies of these properties, as well as sensitivity studies to determine the number of particles needed in the calculations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the data.

  18. The gap-tooth method in particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gear, C. William; Li, Ju; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.

    2003-09-01

    We explore the gap-tooth method for multiscale modeling of systems represented by microscopic physics-based simulators, when coarse-grained evolution equations are not available in closed form. A biased random walk particle simulation, motivated by the viscous Burgers equation, serves as an example. We construct macro-to-micro (lifting) and micro-to-macro (restriction) operators, and drive the coarse time-evolution by particle simulations in appropriately coupled microdomains (“teeth”) separated by large spatial gaps. A macroscopically interpolative mechanism for communication between the teeth at the particle level is introduced. The results demonstrate the feasibility of a “closure-on-demand” approach to solving some hydrodynamics problems.

  19. A New Multiphase Model for Simulating Energetically Driven Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, D E; Murphy, M J

    2010-02-02

    The proper representation of particulate phenomena is important for the simulation of many non-ideal particle loaded explosives. These explosives present severe numerical difficulties to simulate because numerical approaches for packed particle beds often behave poorly for the dilute regime and the reverse is often true for methods developed for the dilute regime. This paper presents a multiphase framework for the simulation of these non-ideal explosives that accurately accounts for the particulate behavior in both of these regimes. The capability of this framework is enhanced by the use of prescribed PDF methods for both particle size distributions and the representation of chemical processes. We have validated this framework using several experimental methods that accommodate the separation of momentum flux measurements in two-phase blast flows.

  20. Target Lagrangian kinematic simulation for particle-laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, S.; Lightstone, M. F.; Tullis, S.

    2016-09-01

    The target Lagrangian kinematic simulation method was motivated as a stochastic Lagrangian particle model that better synthesizes turbulence structure, relative to stochastic separated flow models. By this method, the trajectories of particles are constructed according to synthetic turbulent-like fields, which conform to a target Lagrangian integral timescale. In addition to recovering the expected Lagrangian properties of fluid tracers, this method is shown to reproduce the crossing trajectories and continuity effects, in agreement with an experimental benchmark.

  1. The three-dimensional, discrete ordinates neutral particle transport code TORT: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Azmy, Y.Y.

    1996-12-31

    The centerpiece of the Discrete Ordinates Oak Ridge System (DOORS), the three-dimensional neutral particle transport code TORT is reviewed. Its most prominent features pertaining to large applications, such as adjustable problem parameters, memory management, and coarse mesh methods, are described. Advanced, state-of-the-art capabilities including acceleration and multiprocessing are summarized here. Future enhancement of existing graphics and visualization tools is briefly presented.

  2. IONEX: A meshfree ion extraction code based on ''particle in cloud of points'' concept

    SciTech Connect

    Galkin, S. A.; Grubert, J. E.; Cluggish, B. P.; Barov, N.; Kim, J. S.

    2010-02-15

    Ion Extraction (IONEX) is an ion extraction modeling code, developed at FAR-TECH, Inc., based on the meshless particle-in-cloud-of-points concept. IONEX self-consistently solves motion equations for ions and Poisson's equation for the electrostatic field, assuming a Boltzmann distribution for the electrons. IONEX is capable of handling multiple species and is graphical user interface-driven. The two-dimensional version is benchmarked with IGUN. The basic algorithm and sample runs are presented.

  3. First experience with particle-in-cell plasma physics code on ARM-based HPC systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáez, Xavier; Soba, Alejandro; Sánchez, Edilberto; Mantsinen, Mervi; Mateo, Sergi; Cela, José M.; Castejón, Francisco

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we will explore the feasibility of porting a Particle-in-cell code (EUTERPE) to an ARM multi-core platform from the Mont-Blanc project. The used prototype is based on a system-on-chip Samsung Exynos 5 with an integrated GPU. It is the first prototype that could be used for High-Performance Computing (HPC), since it supports double precision and parallel programming languages.

  4. Classical radiation reaction in particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vranic, M.; Martins, J. L.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-07-01

    Under the presence of ultra high intensity lasers or other intense electromagnetic fields the motion of particles in the ultrarelativistic regime can be severely affected by radiation reaction. The standard particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithms do not include radiation reaction effects. Even though this is a well known mechanism, there is not yet a definite algorithm nor a standard technique to include radiation reaction in PIC codes. We have compared several models for the calculation of the radiation reaction force, with the goal of implementing an algorithm for classical radiation reaction in the Osiris framework, a state-of-the-art PIC code. The results of the different models are compared with standard analytical results, and the relevance/advantages of each model are discussed. Numerical issues relevant to PIC codes such as resolution requirements, application of radiation reaction to macro particles and computational cost are also addressed. For parameters of interest where the classical description of the electron motion is applicable, all the models considered are shown to give comparable results. The Landau and Lifshitz reduced model is chosen for implementation as one of the candidates with the minimal overhead and no additional memory requirements.

  5. Turbulent Particle Pair Diffusion Using Kinematic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Nadeem

    2015-11-01

    Sweeping errors in Kinematic Simulations (KS) have been shown to be negligible in turbulent flows with extended inertial subranges up to at least 1 in KS may therefore be a genuine effect, challenging previous assumptions that in turbulence with generalized power-law energy spectra, E (k) ~k-p for 1 <= 3, locality would lead to, K ~σΔγ , where σΔ = [ <Δ2 > ]1/2 , Δ is the pair separation, v is the pair relative velocity, < > is the ensemble average, and γ = (1 + p) / 2 . For Kolmogorov turbulence this gives, K ~σΔ4 / 3 . A new analysis, supported by KS confirms that both local and non-local effects govern the pair diffusion process, leading to, K ~σΔγp , where now γp > γ for Kolmogorov turbulence, K ~σΔ1 . 53 . Thus non-local diffusional processes cannot be neglected, and this may have important consequences for the general theory of turbulence. The author acknowledge financial support from SABIC, #SB101011.

  6. Simulated electron holography of PSD particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conbhuí, Pádraig Ó.; Williams, Wyn; Nagy, Les

    2016-04-01

    Electron holography is an experimental technique that is capable of observing magnetic microstructures on the same scale as can be determined using numerical modeling and thus bridge the gap between experimental measurements and theory. I will present a technique for simulating holographic images from the results of micromagnetic models and demonstrate an easily used tool for generating holograms on the fly in an interactive environment (ie in ParaView). Since holography flattens 3D information onto a 2D image, some useful information can be lost. By looking at some examples of holograms of interesting 3D magnetizations (ie PSD structures), particularly how they change as they're rotated, along with comparisons of different structures, I will examine what information can be retrieved and what might be lost. The existance of an external dipole can be indicative of an in-plane component of a seemingly out-of-plane vortex core. It is also seen, however, that two quite different structures (in this case a [111] vortex core and a [111] uniform magnetization) can sometimes be quite indistinguishable.

  7. Simulation of hydrodynamically interacting particles confined by a spherical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aponte-Rivera, Christian; Zia, Roseanna N.

    2016-06-01

    from the forced particle. Surprisingly, however, there is a separation beyond which entrainment changes sign. For some configurations, the passive particle is dragged along with the forced particle, and at others, it is driven in the opposite direction, consistent with observations of recirculating flow and reverse particle migration in eukaryotic cells. The mobility functions presented here can be utilized to model the motion of any number of enclosed particles, making them ideal for use in dynamic simulation.

  8. Recent advances in the simulation of particle-laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harting, J.; Frijters, S.; Ramaioli, M.; Robinson, M.; Wolf, D. E.; Luding, S.

    2014-10-01

    A substantial number of algorithms exists for the simulation of moving particles suspended in fluids. However, finding the best method to address a particular physical problem is often highly non-trivial and depends on the properties of the particles and the involved fluid(s) together. In this report, we provide a short overview on a number of existing simulation methods and provide two state of the art examples in more detail. In both cases, the particles are described using a Discrete Element Method (DEM). The DEM solver is usually coupled to a fluid-solver, which can be classified as grid-based or mesh-free (one example for each is given). Fluid solvers feature different resolutions relative to the particle size and separation. First, a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann algorithm (mesh-based and with rather fine resolution) is presented to study the behavior of particle stabilized fluid interfaces and second, a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics implementation (mesh-free, meso-scale resolution, similar to the particle size) is introduced to highlight a new player in the field, which is expected to be particularly suited for flows including free surfaces.

  9. Noiseless Vlasov-Poisson simulations with linearly transformed particles

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Martin C.; Sonnendrucker, Eric; Friedman, Alex; Grote, David P.; Lund, Steve M.

    2014-06-25

    We introduce a deterministic discrete-particle simulation approach, the Linearly-Transformed Particle-In-Cell (LTPIC) method, that employs linear deformations of the particles to reduce the noise traditionally associated with particle schemes. Formally, transforming the particles is justified by local first order expansions of the characteristic flow in phase space. In practice the method amounts of using deformation matrices within the particle shape functions; these matrices are updated via local evaluations of the forward numerical flow. Because it is necessary to periodically remap the particles on a regular grid to avoid excessively deforming their shapes, the method can be seen as a development of Denavit's Forward Semi-Lagrangian (FSL) scheme (Denavit, 1972 [8]). However, it has recently been established (Campos Pinto, 2012 [20]) that the underlying Linearly-Transformed Particle scheme converges for abstract transport problems, with no need to remap the particles; deforming the particles can thus be seen as a way to significantly lower the remapping frequency needed in the FSL schemes, and hence the associated numerical diffusion. To couple the method with electrostatic field solvers, two specific charge deposition schemes are examined, and their performance compared with that of the standard deposition method. Finally, numerical 1d1v simulations involving benchmark test cases and halo formation in an initially mismatched thermal sheet beam demonstrate some advantages of our LTPIC scheme over the classical PIC and FSL methods. Lastly, benchmarked test cases also indicate that, for numerical choices involving similar computational effort, the LTPIC method is capable of accuracy comparable to or exceeding that of state-of-the-art, high-resolution Vlasov schemes.

  10. Noiseless Vlasov-Poisson simulations with linearly transformed particles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pinto, Martin C.; Sonnendrucker, Eric; Friedman, Alex; Grote, David P.; Lund, Steve M.

    2014-06-25

    We introduce a deterministic discrete-particle simulation approach, the Linearly-Transformed Particle-In-Cell (LTPIC) method, that employs linear deformations of the particles to reduce the noise traditionally associated with particle schemes. Formally, transforming the particles is justified by local first order expansions of the characteristic flow in phase space. In practice the method amounts of using deformation matrices within the particle shape functions; these matrices are updated via local evaluations of the forward numerical flow. Because it is necessary to periodically remap the particles on a regular grid to avoid excessively deforming their shapes, the method can be seen as a development ofmore » Denavit's Forward Semi-Lagrangian (FSL) scheme (Denavit, 1972 [8]). However, it has recently been established (Campos Pinto, 2012 [20]) that the underlying Linearly-Transformed Particle scheme converges for abstract transport problems, with no need to remap the particles; deforming the particles can thus be seen as a way to significantly lower the remapping frequency needed in the FSL schemes, and hence the associated numerical diffusion. To couple the method with electrostatic field solvers, two specific charge deposition schemes are examined, and their performance compared with that of the standard deposition method. Finally, numerical 1d1v simulations involving benchmark test cases and halo formation in an initially mismatched thermal sheet beam demonstrate some advantages of our LTPIC scheme over the classical PIC and FSL methods. Lastly, benchmarked test cases also indicate that, for numerical choices involving similar computational effort, the LTPIC method is capable of accuracy comparable to or exceeding that of state-of-the-art, high-resolution Vlasov schemes.« less

  11. Noiseless Vlasov–Poisson simulations with linearly transformed particles

    SciTech Connect

    Campos Pinto, Martin; Sonnendrücker, Eric; Friedman, Alex; Grote, David P.; Lund, Steve M.

    2014-10-15

    We introduce a deterministic discrete-particle simulation approach, the Linearly-Transformed Particle-In-Cell (LTPIC) method, that employs linear deformations of the particles to reduce the noise traditionally associated with particle schemes. Formally, transforming the particles is justified by local first order expansions of the characteristic flow in phase space. In practice the method amounts of using deformation matrices within the particle shape functions; these matrices are updated via local evaluations of the forward numerical flow. Because it is necessary to periodically remap the particles on a regular grid to avoid excessively deforming their shapes, the method can be seen as a development of Denavit's Forward Semi-Lagrangian (FSL) scheme (Denavit, 1972 [8]). However, it has recently been established (Campos Pinto, 2012 [20]) that the underlying Linearly-Transformed Particle scheme converges for abstract transport problems, with no need to remap the particles; deforming the particles can thus be seen as a way to significantly lower the remapping frequency needed in the FSL schemes, and hence the associated numerical diffusion. To couple the method with electrostatic field solvers, two specific charge deposition schemes are examined, and their performance compared with that of the standard deposition method. Finally, numerical 1d1v simulations involving benchmark test cases and halo formation in an initially mismatched thermal sheet beam demonstrate some advantages of our LTPIC scheme over the classical PIC and FSL methods. Benchmarked test cases also indicate that, for numerical choices involving similar computational effort, the LTPIC method is capable of accuracy comparable to or exceeding that of state-of-the-art, high-resolution Vlasov schemes.

  12. Noiseless Vlasov-Poisson simulations with linearly transformed particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos Pinto, Martin; Sonnendrücker, Eric; Friedman, Alex; Grote, David P.; Lund, Steve M.

    2014-10-01

    We introduce a deterministic discrete-particle simulation approach, the Linearly-Transformed Particle-In-Cell (LTPIC) method, that employs linear deformations of the particles to reduce the noise traditionally associated with particle schemes. Formally, transforming the particles is justified by local first order expansions of the characteristic flow in phase space. In practice the method amounts of using deformation matrices within the particle shape functions; these matrices are updated via local evaluations of the forward numerical flow. Because it is necessary to periodically remap the particles on a regular grid to avoid excessively deforming their shapes, the method can be seen as a development of Denavit's Forward Semi-Lagrangian (FSL) scheme (Denavit, 1972 [8]). However, it has recently been established (Campos Pinto, 2012 [20]) that the underlying Linearly-Transformed Particle scheme converges for abstract transport problems, with no need to remap the particles; deforming the particles can thus be seen as a way to significantly lower the remapping frequency needed in the FSL schemes, and hence the associated numerical diffusion. To couple the method with electrostatic field solvers, two specific charge deposition schemes are examined, and their performance compared with that of the standard deposition method. Finally, numerical 1d1v simulations involving benchmark test cases and halo formation in an initially mismatched thermal sheet beam demonstrate some advantages of our LTPIC scheme over the classical PIC and FSL methods. Benchmarked test cases also indicate that, for numerical choices involving similar computational effort, the LTPIC method is capable of accuracy comparable to or exceeding that of state-of-the-art, high-resolution Vlasov schemes.

  13. Nonlinear delta(f) Simulations of Collective Effects in Intense Charged Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Qin

    2003-01-21

    A nonlinear delta(f) particle simulation method based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equations has been recently developed to study collective processes in high-intensity beams, where space-charge and magnetic self-field effects play a critical role in determining the nonlinear beam dynamics. Implemented in the Beam Equilibrium, Stability and Transport (BEST) code [H. Qin, R.C. Davidson, and W.W. Lee, Physical Review -- Special Topics on Accelerator and Beams 3 (2000) 084401; 3 (2000) 109901.], the nonlinear delta(f) method provides a low-noise and self-consistent tool for simulating collective interactions and nonlinear dynamics of high-intensity beams in modern and next-generation accelerators and storage rings, such as the Spallation Neutron Source and heavy ion fusion drivers. A wide range of linear eigenmodes of high-intensity charged-particle beams can be systematically studied using the BEST code. Simulation results for the electron-proton two-stream instability in the Proton Storage Ring experiment [R. Macek, et al., in Proc. of the Particle Accelerator Conference, Chicago, 2001 (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 2001), Vol. 1, p. 688.] at the Los Alamos National Laboratory agree well with experimental observations. Large-scale parallel simulations have also been carried out for the ion-electron two-stream instability in the very-high-intensity heavy ion beams envisioned for heavy ion fusion applications. In both cases, the simulation results indicate that the dominant two-stream instability has a dipole-mode (hose-like) structure and can be stabilized by a modest axial momentum spread of the beam particles.

  14. GPU-centric resolved-particle disperse two-phase flow simulation using the Physalis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierakowski, Adam J.

    2016-10-01

    We present work on a new implementation of the Physalis method for resolved-particle disperse two-phase flow simulations. We discuss specifically our GPU-centric programming model that avoids all device-host data communication during the simulation. Summarizing the details underlying the implementation of the Physalis method, we illustrate the application of two GPU-centric parallelization paradigms and record insights on how to best leverage the GPU's prioritization of bandwidth over latency. We perform a comparison of the computational efficiency between the current GPU-centric implementation and a legacy serial-CPU-optimized code and conclude that the GPU hardware accounts for run time improvements up to a factor of 60 by carefully normalizing the run times of both codes.

  15. Comparison of DAC and MONACO DSMC Codes with Flat Plate Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, Jose F.

    2010-01-01

    Various implementations of the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method exist in academia, government and industry. By comparing implementations, deficiencies and merits of each can be discovered. This document reports comparisons between DSMC Analysis Code (DAC) and MONACO. DAC is NASA's standard DSMC production code and MONACO is a research DSMC code developed in academia. These codes have various differences; in particular, they employ distinct computational grid definitions. In this study, DAC and MONACO are compared by having each simulate a blunted flat plate wind tunnel test, using an identical volume mesh. Simulation expense and DSMC metrics are compared. In addition, flow results are compared with available laboratory data. Overall, this study revealed that both codes, excluding grid adaptation, performed similarly. For parallel processing, DAC was generally more efficient. As expected, code accuracy was mainly dependent on physical models employed.

  16. Particle simulation of auroral double layers. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.L.

    1992-06-01

    Externally driven magnetic reconnection has been proposed as a possible mechanism for production of auroral electrons during magnetic substorms. Fluid simulations of magnetic reconnection lead to strong plasma flows towards the increasing magnetic field of the earth. These plasma flows must generate large scale potential drops to preserve global charge neutrality. We have examined currentless injection of plasma along a dipole magnetic field into a bounded region using both analytic techniques and particle simulation.

  17. Particle-in-Cell laser-plasma simulation on Xeon Phi coprocessors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmin, I. A.; Bastrakov, S. I.; Efimenko, E. S.; Gonoskov, A. A.; Korzhimanov, A. V.; Meyerov, I. B.

    2016-05-01

    This paper concerns the development of a high-performance implementation of the Particle-in-Cell method for plasma simulation on Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors. We discuss the suitability of the method for Xeon Phi architecture and present our experience in the porting and optimization of the existing parallel Particle-in-Cell code PICADOR. Direct porting without code modification gives performance on Xeon Phi close to that of an 8-core CPU on a benchmark problem with 50 particles per cell. We demonstrate step-by-step optimization techniques, such as improving data locality, enhancing parallelization efficiency and vectorization leading to an overall 4.2 × speedup on CPU and 7.5 × on Xeon Phi compared to the baseline version. The optimized version achieves 16.9 ns per particle update on an Intel Xeon E5-2660 CPU and 9.3 ns per particle update on an Intel Xeon Phi 5110P. For a real problem of laser ion acceleration in targets with surface grating, where a large number of macroparticles per cell is required, the speedup of Xeon Phi compared to CPU is 1.6 ×.

  18. A comparison of total reaction cross section models used in particle and heavy ion transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sihver, Lembit; Lantz, M.; Takechi, M.; Kohama, A.; Ferrari, A.; Cerutti, F.; Sato, T.

    To be able to calculate the nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus total reaction cross sections with precision is very important for studies of basic nuclear properties, e.g. nuclear structure. This is also of importance for particle and heavy ion transport calculations because, in all particle and heavy ion transport codes, the probability function that a projectile particle will collide within a certain distance x in the matter depends on the total reaction cross sections. Furthermore, the total reaction cross sections will also scale the calculated partial fragmentation cross sections. It is therefore crucial that accurate total reaction cross section models are used in the transport calculations. In this paper, different models for calculating nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus total reaction cross sections are compared and discussed.

  19. Finite-size particle simulations in the drift-kinetic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evstatiev, Evstati; Spencer, Andy; Kim, Jin-Soo; Shadwick, Bradley

    2013-10-01

    We extend previous variational formulations of finite-size particle plasma simulation methods to the drift-kinetic approximation. Such approximation is applicable to strongly magnetized plasmas, e.g., in tokamacs and magnetic mirrors. In our numerical examples we apply the drift-kinetic approximation to the electron population of the plasma in an electron cyclotron heating ion source (ECRIS) device. The electrons in an ECRIS device are strongly non-Maxwellian (due to the radio-frequency heating) and require kinetic treatment. The drift-kinetic approximation has allowed us to reduce the computational load associated with resolving the electron motion by about two orders of magnitude and to extend the simulation time to hundreds of microseconds. Details of the algorithms and some numerical results will be presented. Simulations are done with FAR-TECH's SIMulation of PLasmas code, SIMPL. Work supported by the DOE-SBIR office of Nuclear Physics.

  20. Electron-Anode Interactions in Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Applied-B Ion Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.E.; Cuneo, M.D.; Johnson, D.J.; Mehlhorn, T.A.; Pointon, T.D.; Renk, T.J.; Stygar, W.A.; Vesey, R.A.

    1998-11-12

    Particle-in-cell simulations of applied-B ion diodes using the QUICKSILVER code have been augmented with Monte Carlo calculations of electron-anode interactions (reflection and energy deposition). Extraction diode simulations demonstrate a link between the instability evolution and increased electron loss and anode heating. Simulations of radial and extraction ion diodes show spatial non-uniformity in the predicted electron loss profile leading to hot spots on the anode that rapidly exceed the 350-450 {degree}C range, known to be sufficient for plasma formation on electron-bombarded surfaces. Thermal resorption calculations indicate complete resorption of contaminants with 15-20 kcal/mole binding energies in high-dose regions of the anode during the power pulse. Comparisons of parasitic ion emission simulations and experiment show agreement in some aspects; but also highlight the need for better ion source, plasma, and neutral gas models.

  1. Statistical Model Code System to Calculate Particle Spectra from HMS Precompound Nucleus Decay.

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, Marshall

    2014-11-01

    Version 05 The HMS-ALICE/ALICE codes address the question: What happens when photons,nucleons or clusters/heavy ions of a few 100 kV to several 100 MeV interact with nuclei? The ALICE codes (as they have evolved over 50 years) use several nuclear reaction models to answer this question, predicting the energies and angles of particles emitted (n,p,2H,3H,3He,4He,6Li) in the reaction, and the residues, the spallation and fission products. Models used are principally Monte-Carlo formulations of the Hybrid/Geometry Dependent Hybrid precompound, Weisskopf-Ewing evaporation, Bohr Wheeler fission, and recently a Fermi stastics break-up model( for light nuclei). Angular distribution calculation relies on the Chadwick-Oblozinsky linear momentum conservation model. Output gives residual product yields, and single and double differential cross sections for ejectiles in lab and CM frames. An option allows 1-3 particle out exclusive (ENDF format) for all combinations of n,p,alpha channels. Product yields include estimates of isomer yields where isomers exist. Earlier versions included the ability to compute coincident particle emission correlations, and much of this coding is still in place. Recoil product ddcs are computed, but not presently written to output files. Code execution begins with an on-screen interrogation for input, with defaults available for many aspects. A menu of model options is available within the input interrogation screen. The input is saved to hard drive. Subsequent runs may use this file, use the file with line editor changes, or begin again with the on-line interrogation.

  2. Statistical Model Code System to Calculate Particle Spectra from HMS Precompound Nucleus Decay.

    2014-11-01

    Version 05 The HMS-ALICE/ALICE codes address the question: What happens when photons,nucleons or clusters/heavy ions of a few 100 kV to several 100 MeV interact with nuclei? The ALICE codes (as they have evolved over 50 years) use several nuclear reaction models to answer this question, predicting the energies and angles of particles emitted (n,p,2H,3H,3He,4He,6Li) in the reaction, and the residues, the spallation and fission products. Models used are principally Monte-Carlo formulations of the Hybrid/Geometrymore » Dependent Hybrid precompound, Weisskopf-Ewing evaporation, Bohr Wheeler fission, and recently a Fermi stastics break-up model( for light nuclei). Angular distribution calculation relies on the Chadwick-Oblozinsky linear momentum conservation model. Output gives residual product yields, and single and double differential cross sections for ejectiles in lab and CM frames. An option allows 1-3 particle out exclusive (ENDF format) for all combinations of n,p,alpha channels. Product yields include estimates of isomer yields where isomers exist. Earlier versions included the ability to compute coincident particle emission correlations, and much of this coding is still in place. Recoil product ddcs are computed, but not presently written to output files. Code execution begins with an on-screen interrogation for input, with defaults available for many aspects. A menu of model options is available within the input interrogation screen. The input is saved to hard drive. Subsequent runs may use this file, use the file with line editor changes, or begin again with the on-line interrogation.« less

  3. Microscale simulation of particle deposition in porous media.

    PubMed

    Boccardo, Gianluca; Marchisio, Daniele L; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-03-01

    In this work several geometries, each representing a different porous medium, are considered to perform detailed computational fluid dynamics simulation for fluid flow, particle transport and deposition. Only Brownian motions and steric interception are accounted for as deposition mechanisms. Firstly pressure drop in each porous medium is analyzed in order to determine an effective grain size, by fitting the results with the Ergun law. Then grid independence is assessed. Lastly, particle transport in the system is investigated via Eulerian steady-state simulations, where particle concentration is solved for, not following explicitly particles' trajectories, but solving the corresponding advection-diffusion equation. An assumption was made in considering favorable collector-particle interactions, resulting in a "perfect sink" boundary condition for the collectors. The gathered simulation data are used to calculate the deposition efficiency due to Brownian motions and steric interception. The original Levich law for one simple circular collector is verified; subsequently porous media constituted by a packing of collectors are scrutinized. Results show that the interactions between the different collectors result in behaviors which are not in line with the theory developed by Happel and co-workers, highlighting a different dependency of the deposition efficiency on the dimensionless groups involved in the relevant correlations.

  4. Simulating ion beam extraction from a single aperture triode acceleration column: A comparison of the beam transport codes IGUN and PBGUNS with test stand data

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.; Wills, J. S. C.; Diamond, W. T.

    2008-04-15

    Ion beam extraction from two different ion sources with single aperture triode extraction columns was simulated with the particle beam transport codes PBGUNS and IGUN. For each ion source, the simulation results are compared to experimental data generated on well-equipped test stands. Both codes reproduced the qualitative behavior of the extracted ion beams to incremental and scaled changes to the extraction electrode geometry observed on the test stands. Numerical values of optimum beam currents and beam emittance generated by the simulations also agree well with test stand data.

  5. Neoclassical simulation of tokamak plasmas using the continuum gyrokinetic code TEMPEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. Q.

    2008-07-01

    We present gyrokinetic neoclassical simulations of tokamak plasmas with a self-consistent electric field using a fully nonlinear (full- f ) continuum code TEMPEST in a circular geometry. A set of gyrokinetic equations are discretized on a five-dimensional computational grid in phase space. The present implementation is a method of lines approach where the phase-space derivatives are discretized with finite differences, and implicit backward differencing formulas are used to advance the system in time. The fully nonlinear Boltzmann model is used for electrons. The neoclassical electric field is obtained by solving the gyrokinetic Poisson equation with self-consistent poloidal variation. With a four-dimensional (ψ,θ,γ,μ) version of the TEMPEST code, we compute the radial particle and heat fluxes, the geodesic-acoustic mode, and the development of the neoclassical electric field, which we compare with neoclassical theory using a Lorentz collision model. The present work provides a numerical scheme for self-consistently studying important dynamical aspects of neoclassical transport and electric field in toroidal magnetic fusion devices.

  6. The GENGA Code: Gravitational Encounters in N-body simulations with GPU Acceleration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, Simon; Stadel, Joachim

    2013-07-01

    We present a GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) implementation of a hybrid symplectic N-body integrator based on the Mercury Code (Chambers 1999), which handles close encounters with a very good energy conservation. It uses a combination of a mixed variable integration (Wisdom & Holman 1991) and a direct N-body Bulirsch-Stoer method. GENGA is written in CUDA C and runs on NVidia GPU's. The GENGA code supports three simulation modes: Integration of up to 2048 massive bodies, integration with up to a million test particles, or parallel integration of a large number of individual planetary systems. To achieve the best performance, GENGA runs completely on the GPU, where it can take advantage of the very fast, but limited, memory that exists there. All operations are performed in parallel, including the close encounter detection and grouping independent close encounter pairs. Compared to Mercury, GENGA runs up to 30 times faster. Two applications of GENGA are presented: First, the dynamics of planetesimals and the late stage of rocky planet formation due to planetesimal collisions. Second, a dynamical stability analysis of an exoplanetary system with an additional hypothetical super earth, which shows that in some multiple planetary systems, additional super earths could exist without perturbing the dynamical stability of the other planets (Elser et al. 2013).

  7. 3-D spreadsheet simulation of a modern particle detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Alan J.

    2004-01-01

    A spreadsheet simulation of a modern particle detector has been developed and can be readily used as an instructional tool in the physics classroom. The spreadsheet creates a three-dimensional model that can be rotated and helical trajectories can be highlighted. An associated student worksheet is also presented.

  8. Water Flow Simulation using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce; Berg, Jared; Harris, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of water flow from the rainbird nozzles has been accomplished using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). The advantage of using SPH is that no meshing is required, thus the grid quality is no longer an issue and accuracy can be improved.

  9. 3-D Spreadsheet Simulation of a Modern Particle Detector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Alan J.

    2004-01-01

    A spreadsheet simulation of a modern particle detector has been developed and can be readily used as an instructional tool in the physics classroom. The spreadsheet creates a three-dimensional model that can be rotated and helical trajectories can be highlighted. An associated student worksheet is also presented.

  10. Pseudo-random number generation for Brownian Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations on GPU devices

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Carolyn L.; Anderson, Joshua A.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2011-08-10

    Highlights: {yields} Molecular Dynamics codes implemented on GPUs have achieved two-order of magnitude computational accelerations. {yields} Brownian Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations require a large number of random numbers per time step. {yields} We introduce a method for generating small batches of pseudorandom numbers distributed over many threads of calculations. {yields} With this method, Dissipative Particle Dynamics is implemented on a GPU device without requiring thread-to-thread communication. - Abstract: Brownian Dynamics (BD), also known as Langevin Dynamics, and Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) are implicit solvent methods commonly used in models of soft matter and biomolecular systems. The interaction of the numerous solvent particles with larger particles is coarse-grained as a Langevin thermostat is applied to individual particles or to particle pairs. The Langevin thermostat requires a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) to generate the stochastic force applied to each particle or pair of neighboring particles during each time step in the integration of Newton's equations of motion. In a Single-Instruction-Multiple-Thread (SIMT) GPU parallel computing environment, small batches of random numbers must be generated over thousands of threads and millions of kernel calls. In this communication we introduce a one-PRNG-per-kernel-call-per-thread scheme, in which a micro-stream of pseudorandom numbers is generated in each thread and kernel call. These high quality, statistically robust micro-streams require no global memory for state storage, are more computationally efficient than other PRNG schemes in memory-bound kernels, and uniquely enable the DPD simulation method without requiring communication between threads.

  11. Exploiting MIC architectures for the simulation of channeling of charged particles in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagli, Enrico; Karpusenko, Vadim

    2016-08-01

    Coherent effects of ultra-relativistic particles in crystals is an area of science under development. DYNECHARM + + is a toolkit for the simulation of coherent interactions between high-energy charged particles and complex crystal structures. The particle trajectory in a crystal is computed through numerical integration of the equation of motion. The code was revised and improved in order to exploit parallelization on multi-cores and vectorization of single instructions on multiple data. An Intel Xeon Phi card was adopted for the performance measurements. The computation time was proved to scale linearly as a function of the number of physical and virtual cores. By enabling the auto-vectorization flag of the compiler a three time speedup was obtained. The performances of the card were compared to the Dual Xeon ones.

  12. Verification of particle simulation of radio frequency waves in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuley, Animesh; Wang, Z. X.; Lin, Z.; Wessel, F.

    2013-10-01

    Radio frequency (RF) waves can provide heating, current and flow drive, as well as instability control for steady state operations of fusion experiments. A particle simulation model has been developed in this work to provide a first-principles tool for studying the RF nonlinear interactions with plasmas. In this model, ions are considered as fully kinetic particles using the Vlasov equation and electrons are treated as guiding centers using the drift kinetic equation. This model has been implemented in a global gyrokinetic toroidal code using real electron-to-ion mass ratio. To verify the model, linear simulations of ion plasma oscillation, ion Bernstein wave, and lower hybrid wave are carried out in cylindrical geometry and found to agree well with analytic predictions.

  13. Verification of particle simulation of radio frequency waves in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kuley, Animesh; Lin, Z.; Wang, Z. X.; Wessel, F.

    2013-10-15

    Radio frequency (RF) waves can provide heating, current and flow drive, as well as instability control for steady state operations of fusion experiments. A particle simulation model has been developed in this work to provide a first-principles tool for studying the RF nonlinear interactions with plasmas. In this model, ions are considered as fully kinetic particles using the Vlasov equation and electrons are treated as guiding centers using the drift kinetic equation. This model has been implemented in a global gyrokinetic toroidal code using real electron-to-ion mass ratio. To verify the model, linear simulations of ion plasma oscillation, ion Bernstein wave, and lower hybrid wave are carried out in cylindrical geometry and found to agree well with analytic predictions.

  14. Multiscale simulation of ideal mixtures using smoothed dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Petsev, Nikolai D; Leal, L Gary; Shell, M Scott

    2016-02-28

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) [P. Español and M. Revenga, Phys. Rev. E 67, 026705 (2003)] is a thermodynamically consistent particle-based continuum hydrodynamics solver that features scale-dependent thermal fluctuations. We obtain a new formulation of this stochastic method for ideal two-component mixtures through a discretization of the advection-diffusion equation with thermal noise in the concentration field. The resulting multicomponent approach is consistent with the interpretation of the SDPD particles as moving volumes of fluid and reproduces the correct fluctuations and diffusion dynamics. Subsequently, we provide a general multiscale multicomponent SDPD framework for simulations of molecularly miscible systems spanning length scales from nanometers to the non-fluctuating continuum limit. This approach reproduces appropriate equilibrium properties and is validated with simulation of simple one-dimensional diffusion across multiple length scales. PMID:26931689

  15. Multiscale simulation of ideal mixtures using smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petsev, Nikolai D.; Leal, L. Gary; Shell, M. Scott

    2016-02-01

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) [P. Español and M. Revenga, Phys. Rev. E 67, 026705 (2003)] is a thermodynamically consistent particle-based continuum hydrodynamics solver that features scale-dependent thermal fluctuations. We obtain a new formulation of this stochastic method for ideal two-component mixtures through a discretization of the advection-diffusion equation with thermal noise in the concentration field. The resulting multicomponent approach is consistent with the interpretation of the SDPD particles as moving volumes of fluid and reproduces the correct fluctuations and diffusion dynamics. Subsequently, we provide a general multiscale multicomponent SDPD framework for simulations of molecularly miscible systems spanning length scales from nanometers to the non-fluctuating continuum limit. This approach reproduces appropriate equilibrium properties and is validated with simulation of simple one-dimensional diffusion across multiple length scales.

  16. Particle track simulation by N2 laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gushchin, E.; Lebedev, A. N.; Somov, S. V.

    1984-07-01

    The use of N2 high-power pulsed lasers to simulate particle tracks is discussed. In gas-filled detectors, the tracks are attributed to either direct photoionization of the surface of dust particles or to two-photon ionization of unidentified molecular impurities with an ionization potential less than 2 hnu. Two-photon ionization of various saturated organic vapors is investigated and it is found that the addition of these substances to the working gas makes it possible to decrease the laser power and obtain laser tracks with virtually any electron density. It is also shown that the electron density is proportional to the square of the light power. Laser track simulation has applications in spatial and energy calibration of positive-sensitive detectors, the measurement of the drift of particle tracks in streamer, spark, and bubble chambers, and photoionization molecular spectroscopy.

  17. The Split-weight Particle Simulation Scheme for Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Manuilskiy; W.W. Lee

    1999-11-01

    An efficient numerical method for treating electrons in magnetized plasmas has been developed. The scheme, which is based on the perturbative (delta f) gyrokinetic particle simulation, splits the particle electron responses into adiabatic and non-adiabatic parts. The former is incorporated into the gyrokinetic Poisson's equation, while the latter is calculated dynamically with the aid of the charge conservation equation. The new scheme affords us the possibility of suppressing unwanted high frequency oscillations and, in the meantime, relaxing the Courant condition for the thermal particles moving in the parallel direction. It is most useful for studying low-frequency phenomena in plasmas. As an example, one-dimensional drift wave simulation has been carried out using the scheme and the results are presented in the paper. This methodology can easily be generalized to problems in three-dimensional toroidal geometry as well as those in unmagnetized plasmas.

  18. Initial Self-Consistent 3D Electron-Cloud Simulations of the LHC Beam with the Code WARP+POSINST

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J; Furman, M A; Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Grote, D P

    2005-10-11

    We present initial results for the self-consistent beam-cloud dynamics simulations for a sample LHC beam, using a newly developed set of modeling capability based on a merge [1] of the three-dimensional parallel Particle-In-Cell (PIC) accelerator code WARP [2] and the electron-cloud code POSINST [3]. Although the storage ring model we use as a test bed to contain the beam is much simpler and shorter than the LHC, its lattice elements are realistically modeled, as is the beam and the electron cloud dynamics. The simulated mechanisms for generation and absorption of the electrons at the walls are based on previously validated models available in POSINST [3, 4].

  19. Program Code Generator for Cardiac Electrophysiology Simulation with Automatic PDE Boundary Condition Handling

    PubMed Central

    Punzalan, Florencio Rusty; Kunieda, Yoshitoshi; Amano, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies involving human hearts can have certain limitations. Methods such as computer simulations can be an important alternative or supplemental tool. Physiological simulation at the tissue or organ level typically involves the handling of partial differential equations (PDEs). Boundary conditions and distributed parameters, such as those used in pharmacokinetics simulation, add to the complexity of the PDE solution. These factors can tailor PDE solutions and their corresponding program code to specific problems. Boundary condition and parameter changes in the customized code are usually prone to errors and time-consuming. We propose a general approach for handling PDEs and boundary conditions in computational models using a replacement scheme for discretization. This study is an extension of a program generator that we introduced in a previous publication. The program generator can generate code for multi-cell simulations of cardiac electrophysiology. Improvements to the system allow it to handle simultaneous equations in the biological function model as well as implicit PDE numerical schemes. The replacement scheme involves substituting all partial differential terms with numerical solution equations. Once the model and boundary equations are discretized with the numerical solution scheme, instances of the equations are generated to undergo dependency analysis. The result of the dependency analysis is then used to generate the program code. The resulting program code are in Java or C programming language. To validate the automatic handling of boundary conditions in the program code generator, we generated simulation code using the FHN, Luo-Rudy 1, and Hund-Rudy cell models and run cell-to-cell coupling and action potential propagation simulations. One of the simulations is based on a published experiment and simulation results are compared with the experimental data. We conclude that the proposed program code generator can be used to

  20. Program Code Generator for Cardiac Electrophysiology Simulation with Automatic PDE Boundary Condition Handling.

    PubMed

    Punzalan, Florencio Rusty; Kunieda, Yoshitoshi; Amano, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies involving human hearts can have certain limitations. Methods such as computer simulations can be an important alternative or supplemental tool. Physiological simulation at the tissue or organ level typically involves the handling of partial differential equations (PDEs). Boundary conditions and distributed parameters, such as those used in pharmacokinetics simulation, add to the complexity of the PDE solution. These factors can tailor PDE solutions and their corresponding program code to specific problems. Boundary condition and parameter changes in the customized code are usually prone to errors and time-consuming. We propose a general approach for handling PDEs and boundary conditions in computational models using a replacement scheme for discretization. This study is an extension of a program generator that we introduced in a previous publication. The program generator can generate code for multi-cell simulations of cardiac electrophysiology. Improvements to the system allow it to handle simultaneous equations in the biological function model as well as implicit PDE numerical schemes. The replacement scheme involves substituting all partial differential terms with numerical solution equations. Once the model and boundary equations are discretized with the numerical solution scheme, instances of the equations are generated to undergo dependency analysis. The result of the dependency analysis is then used to generate the program code. The resulting program code are in Java or C programming language. To validate the automatic handling of boundary conditions in the program code generator, we generated simulation code using the FHN, Luo-Rudy 1, and Hund-Rudy cell models and run cell-to-cell coupling and action potential propagation simulations. One of the simulations is based on a published experiment and simulation results are compared with the experimental data. We conclude that the proposed program code generator can be used to

  1. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of ion temperature gradient drift instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.W.; Tang, W.M.

    1987-04-01

    Ion temperature gradient drift instabilities have been investigated using gyrokinetic particle simulation techniques for the purpose of identifying the mechanisms responsible for their nonlinear saturation as well as the associated anomalous transport. For simplicity, the simulation has been carried out in a shear-free slab geometry, where the background pressure gradient is held fixed in time to represent quasistatic profiles typical of tokamak discharges. It is found that the nonlinearly generated zero-frequency responses for the ion parallel momentum and pressure are the dominant mechanisms giving rise to saturation. This is supported by the excellent agreement between the simulation results and those obtained from mode coupling calculations.

  2. Multiple time-scale methods in particle simulations of plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I.

    1985-02-14

    This paper surveys recent advances in the application of multiple time-scale methods to particle simulation of collective phenomena in plasmas. These methods dramatically improve the efficiency of simulating low-frequency kinetic behavior by allowing the use of a large timestep, while retaining accuracy. The numerical schemes surveyed provide selective damping of unwanted high-frequency waves and preserve numerical stability in a variety of physics models: electrostatic, magneto-inductive, Darwin and fully electromagnetic. The paper reviews hybrid simulation models, the implicitmoment-equation method, the direct implicit method, orbit averaging, and subcycling.

  3. Long-term radiation belt simulation with the VERB 3-D code: Comparison with CRRES observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbotin, D. A.; Shprits, Y. Y.; Ni, B.

    2011-12-01

    Highly energetic electrons in the Earth’s radiation belts are hazardous for satellite equipment. Fluxes of relativistic electrons can vary by orders of magnitude during geomagnetic storms. The evolution of relativistic electron fluxes in the radiation belts is described by the 3-D Fokker-Planck equation in terms of the radial distance, energy, and equatorial pitch angle. To better understand the mechanisms that control radiation belt acceleration and loss and particle flux dynamics, we present a long-term radiation belt simulation for 100 days from 29 July to 6 November 1990 with the 3-D Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code and compare the results with the electron fluxes observed by the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES). We also perform a comparison of Phase Space Density with a multisatellite reanalysis obtained by using Kalman filtering of observations from CRRES, Geosynchronous (GEO), GPS, and Akebono satellites. VERB 3-D simulations include radial, energy, and pitch angle diffusion and mixed energy and pitch angle diffusion driven by electromagnetic waves inside the magnetosphere with losses to the atmosphere. Boundary conditions account for the convective source of electrons and loss to the magnetopause. The results of the simulation that include all of the above processes show a good agreement with the data. The agreement implies that these processes are important for the radiation belt electron dynamics and therefore should be accounted for in outer radiation belt simulations. We also show that the results are very sensitive to the assumed wave model. Our simulations are driven only by the variation of the Kp index and variations of the seed electron population around geosynchronous orbit, which allows the model to be used for forecasting and nowcasting.

  4. Benchmark of numerical tools simulating beam propagation and secondary particles in ITER NBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, E.; Veltri, P.; Dlougach, E.; Hemsworth, R.; Serianni, G.; Singh, M.

    2015-04-01

    Injection of high energy beams of neutral particles is a method for plasma heating in fusion devices. The ITER injector, and its prototype MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector and Concept Advancement), are large extrapolations from existing devices: therefore numerical modeling is needed to set thermo-mechanical requirements for all beam-facing components. As the power and charge deposition originates from several sources (primary beam, co-accelerated electrons, and secondary production by beam-gas, beam-surface, and electron-surface interaction), the beam propagation along the beam line is simulated by comprehensive 3D models. This paper presents a comparative study between two codes: BTR has been used for several years in the design of the ITER HNB/DNB components; SAMANTHA code was independently developed and includes additional phenomena, such as secondary particles generated by collision of beam particles with the background gas. The code comparison is valuable in the perspective of the upcoming experimental operations, in order to prepare a reliable numerical support to the interpretation of experimental measurements in the beam test facilities. The power density map calculated on the Electrostatic Residual Ion Dump (ERID) is the chosen benchmark, as it depends on the electric and magnetic fields as well as on the evolution of the beam species via interaction with the gas. Finally the paper shows additional results provided by SAMANTHA, like the secondary electrons produced by volume processes accelerated by the ERID fringe-field towards the Cryopumps.

  5. Benchmark of numerical tools simulating beam propagation and secondary particles in ITER NBI

    SciTech Connect

    Sartori, E. Veltri, P.; Serianni, G.; Dlougach, E.; Hemsworth, R.; Singh, M.

    2015-04-08

    Injection of high energy beams of neutral particles is a method for plasma heating in fusion devices. The ITER injector, and its prototype MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector and Concept Advancement), are large extrapolations from existing devices: therefore numerical modeling is needed to set thermo-mechanical requirements for all beam-facing components. As the power and charge deposition originates from several sources (primary beam, co-accelerated electrons, and secondary production by beam-gas, beam-surface, and electron-surface interaction), the beam propagation along the beam line is simulated by comprehensive 3D models. This paper presents a comparative study between two codes: BTR has been used for several years in the design of the ITER HNB/DNB components; SAMANTHA code was independently developed and includes additional phenomena, such as secondary particles generated by collision of beam particles with the background gas. The code comparison is valuable in the perspective of the upcoming experimental operations, in order to prepare a reliable numerical support to the interpretation of experimental measurements in the beam test facilities. The power density map calculated on the Electrostatic Residual Ion Dump (ERID) is the chosen benchmark, as it depends on the electric and magnetic fields as well as on the evolution of the beam species via interaction with the gas. Finally the paper shows additional results provided by SAMANTHA, like the secondary electrons produced by volume processes accelerated by the ERID fringe-field towards the Cryopumps.

  6. Comparison of the transport codes HZETRN, HETC and FLUKA for a solar particle event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinbockel, John H.; Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Handler, Thomas; Gabriel, Tony A.; Pinsky, Lawrence S.; Reddell, Brandon; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Singleterry, Robert C.; Norbury, John W.; Badavi, Francis F.; Aghara, Sukesh K.

    2011-03-01

    The protection of astronauts and instrumentation from galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events is one of the primary constraints associated with mission planning in low earth orbit or deep space. To help satisfy this constraint, several computational tools have been developed to analyze the effectiveness of various shielding materials and structures exposed to space radiation. These tools are now being carefully scrutinized through a systematic effort of verification, validation, and uncertainty quantification. In this benchmark study, the deterministic transport code HZETRN is compared to the Monte Carlo transport codes HETC-HEDS and FLUKA for a 30 g/cm2 water target protected by a 20 g/cm2 aluminum shield exposed to a parameterization of the February 1956 solar particle event. Neutron and proton fluences as well as dose and dose equivalent are compared at various depths in the water target. The regions of agreement and disagreement between the three codes are quantified and discussed, and recommendations for future work are given.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Particle Distribution in Capillary Membrane during Backwash.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Hussam; Keller, Anik; Gimbel, Rolf; Kowalczyk, Wojciech

    2013-09-27

    The membrane filtration with inside-out dead-end driven UF-/MF- capillary membranes is an effective process for particle removal in water treatment. Its industrial application increased in the last decade exponentially. To date, the research activities in this field were aimed first of all at the analysis of filtration phenomena disregarding the influence of backwash on the operation parameters of filtration plants. However, following the main hypothesis of this paper, backwash has great potential to increase the efficiency of filtration. In this paper, a numerical approach for a detailed study of fluid dynamic processes in capillary membranes during backwash is presented. The effect of particle size and inlet flux on the backwash process are investigated. The evaluation of these data concentrates on the analysis of particle behavior in the cross sectional plane and the appearance of eventually formed particle plugs inside the membrane capillary. Simulations are conducted in dead-end filtration mode and with two configurations. The first configuration includes a particle concentration of 10% homogeneously distributed within the capillary and the second configuration demonstrates a cake layer on the membrane surface with a packing density of 0:6. Analyzing the hydrodynamic forces acting on the particles shows that the lift force plays the main role in defining the particle enrichment areas. The operation parameters contribute in enhancing the lift force and the heterogeneity to anticipate the clogging of the membrane.

  8. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Particle Laden Flows in Microfluidic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Clague, D S; Weisgraber, T; Wheeler, E; Hon, G; Radford, J; Gascoyne, P; Smity, R; Liepmann, D; Meinhart, C; Santiago, J; Krulevitch, P

    2003-07-22

    The goal of this effort was to develop dynamic simulation tools to study and characterize particulate transport in Microfluidic devices. This includes the effects of external fields and near-field particle-particle, particle-surface interactions. The unique aspect of this effort is that we focused on the particles in suspension and rigorously accounted for all of the interactions that they experienced in solution. In contrast, other numerical methods within the program, finite element and finite volume approaches, typically treat the suspended species as non-interacting point particles. Later in the program, some of these approaches incorporated approximations to begin to account for particle-particle interactions. Through the programs (BioFlips and SIMBIOSYS), we developed collaborative relationships with device-oriented efforts. More specifically and at the request of the SIMBIOSYS program manager, we allowed our efforts/milestones to be more guided by the needs of our BioFlips colleagues; therefore, our efforts were focused on the needs of the MD Anderson Cancer Center (Peter Gascoyne), UCDavis (Rosemary Smith), and UC Berkeley (Dorian Liepmann). The first two collaborations involved the development of Dielectrophoresis analysis tools and the later involved the development of suspension and fluid modeling tools for microneedles.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Particle Distribution in Capillary Membrane during Backwash.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Hussam; Keller, Anik; Gimbel, Rolf; Kowalczyk, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    The membrane filtration with inside-out dead-end driven UF-/MF- capillary membranes is an effective process for particle removal in water treatment. Its industrial application increased in the last decade exponentially. To date, the research activities in this field were aimed first of all at the analysis of filtration phenomena disregarding the influence of backwash on the operation parameters of filtration plants. However, following the main hypothesis of this paper, backwash has great potential to increase the efficiency of filtration. In this paper, a numerical approach for a detailed study of fluid dynamic processes in capillary membranes during backwash is presented. The effect of particle size and inlet flux on the backwash process are investigated. The evaluation of these data concentrates on the analysis of particle behavior in the cross sectional plane and the appearance of eventually formed particle plugs inside the membrane capillary. Simulations are conducted in dead-end filtration mode and with two configurations. The first configuration includes a particle concentration of 10% homogeneously distributed within the capillary and the second configuration demonstrates a cake layer on the membrane surface with a packing density of 0:6. Analyzing the hydrodynamic forces acting on the particles shows that the lift force plays the main role in defining the particle enrichment areas. The operation parameters contribute in enhancing the lift force and the heterogeneity to anticipate the clogging of the membrane. PMID:24957056

  10. Numerical Simulation of Particle Distribution in Capillary Membrane during Backwash

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Hussam; Keller, Anik; Gimbel, Rolf; Kowalczyk, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    The membrane filtration with inside-out dead-end driven UF-/MF- capillary membranes is an effective process for particle removal in water treatment. Its industrial application increased in the last decade exponentially. To date, the research activities in this field were aimed first of all at the analysis of filtration phenomena disregarding the influence of backwash on the operation parameters of filtration plants. However, following the main hypothesis of this paper, backwash has great potential to increase the efficiency of filtration. In this paper, a numerical approach for a detailed study of fluid dynamic processes in capillary membranes during backwash is presented. The effect of particle size and inlet flux on the backwash process are investigated. The evaluation of these data concentrates on the analysis of particle behavior in the cross sectional plane and the appearance of eventually formed particle plugs inside the membrane capillary. Simulations are conducted in dead-end filtration mode and with two configurations. The first configuration includes a particle concentration of 10% homogeneously distributed within the capillary and the second configuration demonstrates a cake layer on the membrane surface with a packing density of 0.6. Analyzing the hydrodynamic forces acting on the particles shows that the lift force plays the main role in defining the particle enrichment areas. The operation parameters contribute in enhancing the lift force and the heterogeneity to anticipate the clogging of the membrane. PMID:24957056

  11. Programmable physical parameter optimization for particle plasma simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragan-Kelley, Benjamin; Verboncoeur, John; Lin, Ming-Chieh

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a scheme for interactive and programmable optimization of physical parameters for plasma simulations. The simulation code Object-Oriented Plasma Device 1-D (OOPD1) has been adapted to a Python interface, allowing sophisticated user or program interaction with simulations, and detailed numerical analysis via numpy. Because the analysis/diagnostic interface is the same as the input mechanism (the Python programming language), it is straightforward to optimize simulation parameters based on analysis of previous runs and automate the optimization process using a user-determined scheme and criteria. An example use case of the Child-Langmuir space charge limit in bipolar flow is demonstrated, where the beam current is iterated upon by measuring the relationship of the measured current and the injected current.

  12. Particle simulation of high-energy-density laser-driven reconnection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, A.; Fox, W.; Germaschewski, K.

    2012-10-01

    Recently, reconnection between magnetic fields, self-generated through the Biermann battery effect, has been observed and studied in high-energy-density, laser-driven experiments on the Vulcan, OMEGA, and Shenguang laser facilities. This is a novel regime for magnetic reconnection study, characterized by extremely high magnetic fields, high plasma beta and strong, supersonic plasma inflow. Reconnection in this regime is investigated with particle-in-cell simulations using the PSC code. Previous 2-d particle-in-cell reconnection simulations with parameters and geometry relevant to the experiments identified key ingredients for obtaining the very fast reconnection rates, namely two-fluid reconnection mediated by collisionless effects (that is, the Hall current and electron pressure tensor), strong flux pile-up of the inflowing magnetic field [1], and secondary instabilities that lead to magnetic island formation. We present further detailed simulations of reconnection in this geometry, exploring the role of binary particle collisions and examining mechanisms for particle energization and acceleration, as has been recently observed in laser-driven reconnection experiments [2].[4pt] [1] W. Fox, et al, PRL 106, 215003 (2011).[0pt] [2] Q.L.Dong, et al., PRL 108, 215001 (2012).

  13. Soot particle size modelling in 3D simulations of diesel engine combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraioli, V.; Beatrice, C.; Lazzaro, M.

    2011-12-01

    The present work is focused on multi-dimensional simulations of combustion in diesel engines. The primary objective was to test, in a diesel engine framework, a soot particle size model to represent the carbon particle formation and calculate the corresponding size distribution function. Simulations are performed by means of a parallel version of the KIVA3V numerical code, modified to adopt detailed kinetics reaction mechanisms. A skeletal reaction scheme for n-heptane autoignition has been extended, to include PAH kinetics and carbonaceous particle formation and consumption rates: the full reaction set is made up of 82 gas species and 50 species accounting for the particles, thus the complete reaction scheme comprises 132 species and 2206 reaction steps. Four different engine operative conditions, varying engine speed and load, are taken into account and experimentally tested on a single cylinder diesel engine fuelling pure n-heptane. Computed particle size distribution functions are compared with corresponding measurements at the exhaust, performed by a differential mobility spectrometer. A satisfying agreement between computed and measured combustion profiles is obtained in all the conditions. A reasonable aerosol evolution can be obtained, yet in all the cases the model exhibits the tendency to overestimate the number of particles within the range 5-160 nm. Moreover calculations predict a nucleation mode not detected by the available instrument. According to the simulations, the total number and size of the nascent particles would not depend on the operative conditions, while the features of the larger aggregates distinctly vary with the engine functioning.

  14. RADIAL DEPENDENCE OF PEAK PROTON AND IRON ION FLUXES IN SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS: APPLICATION OF THE PATH CODE

    SciTech Connect

    Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Li, G.; Ao, X.; Zank, G. P.

    2012-09-20

    The radial dependence of particle peak fluxes in large solar energetic particle (SEP) events is important in determining the potential impact of space weather hazards on space missions. Using the Particle Acceleration and Transport in the Heliosphere code, we model the acceleration and transport of protons and iron ions at evolving coronal mass ejection shocks propagating throughout the inner heliosphere from about 0.1 to 2.5 AU. An example shock with a compression ratio of 3.9 and a speed of 1000 km s{sup -1} close to the Sun is modeled using a two-dimensional MHD ZEUS code. The compression ratio and shock speed weakened to 2.3 and 630 km s{sup -1}, correspondingly, at 2 AU. Shocks with 15 Degree-Sign , 45 Degree-Sign , and 75 Degree-Sign angles between the upstream magnetic field and the shock normal were studied. The shock angle was kept constant throughout the simulation. Both gradual and impulsive events are studied. Diffusive shock acceleration is assumed at the shock and we use a total diffusion coefficient that includes a parallel diffusion coefficient which takes into account the upstream wave amplification, and a perpendicular diffusion coefficient which is based on the NonLinear Guiding Center theory. The transport of particles escaping from the shock is modeled using a Monte Carlo approach. Time-intensity profiles for protons and iron ions are obtained. We analyzed the radial dependence of peak fluxes (J) for both protons and iron ions from 0.5 to 2 AU. We find that the functional dependence is softer than R {sup -3} and is about R {sup -2.9} to R {sup -1.8} in the energy range of 0.3-5 MeV nuc{sup -1}. Quasi-perpendicular shock showed a steeper radial dependence than a quasi-parallel shock. Mixed events show a softer radial dependence at energies above 500 keV nuc{sup -1} for iron ions and above 1 MeV for protons. The values of J(R) depend on seed particle composition, particle energy, shock obliquity, and the interplanetary turbulence level

  15. GYSELA, a full-f global gyrokinetic Semi-Lagrangian code for ITG turbulence simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Grandgirard, V.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Besse, N.; Bertrand, P.

    2006-11-30

    This work addresses non-linear global gyrokinetic simulations of ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence with the GYSELA code. The particularity of GYSELA code is to use a fixed grid with a Semi-Lagrangian (SL) scheme and this for the entire distribution function. The 4D non-linear drift-kinetic version of the code already showns the interest of such a SL method which exhibits good properties of energy conservation in non-linear regime as well as an accurate description of fine spatial scales. The code has been upgrated to run 5D simulations of toroidal ITG turbulence. Linear benchmarks and non-linear first results prove that semi-lagrangian codes can be a credible alternative for gyrokinetic simulations.

  16. A code to simulate nuclear reactor inventories and associated gamma-ray spectra.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, A J; Allyson, J D; Sanderson, D C

    2001-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to simulate the gamma-ray spectra that would be measured by airborne gamma spectrometry (AGS) systems from sources containing short-lived fission products. The code uses simple numerical methods to simulate the production and decay of fission products and generates spectra for sodium iodide (NaI) detectors using Monte Carlo codes. A new Monte Carlo code using a virtual array of detectors to reduce simulation times for airborne geometries is described. Spectra generated for a short irradiation and laboratory geometry have been compared with an experimental data set. The agreement is good. Spectra have also been generated for airborne geometries and longer irradiation periods. The application of this code to generate AGS spectra for accident scenarios and their uses in the development and evaluation of spectral analysis methods for such situations are discussed.

  17. GPU accelerated simulations of 3D deterministic particle transport using discrete ordinates method

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Chunye; Liu Jie; Chi Lihua; Huang Haowei; Fang Jingyue; Gong Zhenghu

    2011-07-01

    Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), originally developed for real-time, high-definition 3D graphics in computer games, now provides great faculty in solving scientific applications. The basis of particle transport simulation is the time-dependent, multi-group, inhomogeneous Boltzmann transport equation. The numerical solution to the Boltzmann equation involves the discrete ordinates (S{sub n}) method and the procedure of source iteration. In this paper, we present a GPU accelerated simulation of one energy group time-independent deterministic discrete ordinates particle transport in 3D Cartesian geometry (Sweep3D). The performance of the GPU simulations are reported with the simulations of vacuum boundary condition. The discussion of the relative advantages and disadvantages of the GPU implementation, the simulation on multi GPUs, the programming effort and code portability are also reported. The results show that the overall performance speedup of one NVIDIA Tesla M2050 GPU ranges from 2.56 compared with one Intel Xeon X5670 chip to 8.14 compared with one Intel Core Q6600 chip for no flux fixup. The simulation with flux fixup on one M2050 is 1.23 times faster than on one X5670.

  18. Beam Dynamics in an Electron Lens with the Warp Particle-in-cell Code

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio; Moens, Vince; Redaelli, Stefano

    2014-07-01

    Electron lenses are a mature technique for beam manipulation in colliders and storage rings. In an electron lens, a pulsed, magnetically confined electron beam with a given current-density profile interacts with the circulating beam to obtain the desired effect. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for beam-beam compensation, for abort-gap clearing, and for halo scraping. They will be used in RHIC at BNL for head-on beam-beam compensation, and their application to the Large Hadron Collider for halo control is under development. At Fermilab, electron lenses will be implemented as lattice elements for nonlinear integrable optics. The design of electron lenses requires tools to calculate the kicks and wakefields experienced by the circulating beam. We use the Warp particle-in-cell code to study generation, transport, and evolution of the electron beam. For the first time, a fully 3-dimensional code is used for this purpose.

  19. Large-timestep mover for particle simulations of arbitrarilymagnetized species

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Vay, J-L.

    2007-03-26

    For self-consistent ion-beam simulations including electron motion, it is desirable to be able to follow electron dynamics accurately without being constrained by the electron cyclotron timescale. To this end, we have developed a particle-advance that interpolates between full particle dynamics and drift motion. By making a proper choice of interpolation parameter, simulation particles experience physically correct parallel dynamics, drift motion, and gyroradius when the timestep is large compared to the cyclotron period, though the effective gyro frequency is artificially low; in the opposite timestep limit, the method approaches a conventional Boris particle push. By combining this scheme with a Poisson solver that includes an interpolated form of the polarization drift in the dielectric response, the movers utility can be extended to higher-density problems where the plasma frequency of the species being advanced exceeds its cyclotron frequency. We describe a series of tests of the mover and its application to simulation of electron clouds in heavy-ion accelerators.

  20. Simulation of Bounce Resonance ULF Wave-Particle Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, Robert; Wang, Chengrui; Sydorenko, Dmytro; Wang, Yongfu; Zong, Quigang

    2016-04-01

    Poloidal mode ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves with high azimuthal mode number (high-m) are common throughout Earth's magnetosphere. It is speculated that substantial electric fields in these waves, on the order of tens of millivolts per metre, can energize ions and electrons efficiently via drift- and drift-bounce-resonance wave-particle interactions. We present test-particle simulations of drift-bounce resonance using a new numerical model of ULF waves. The model can use an arbitrary magnetic field and includes a realistic ionosphere with height-resolved Pedersen and Hall conductivity. An interesting finding is that fundamental mode poloidal waves in the ULF model rapidly transform into toroidal mode waves. Second harmonic high-m waves do not exhibit this behaviour. It is demonstrated that second-harmonic poloidal mode waves are very efficient at energizing ions. The test-particle simulations of bounce-resonance 2nd-harmonic wave-particle interactions are shown to produce particle signatures that reproduce ion flux oscillations observed by satellites from the Cluster mission. The expected significance of the results in the context current satellite missions such as the Van Allen Probes and up-coming ERG satellite mission will be briefly discussed.

  1. Discrete particle simulations predicting mixing behavior of solid substrate particles in a rotating drum fermenter.

    PubMed

    Schutyser, M A; Padding, J T; Weber, F J; Briels, W J; Rinzema, A; Boom, R

    2001-12-20

    A soft-sphere discrete particle model was used to simulate mixing behavior of solid substrate particles in a slow rotating drum for solid-state fermentation. In this approach, forces acting on and subsequent motion of individual particles can be predicted. The (2D) simulations were qualitatively and quantitatively validated by mixing experiments using video and image analysis techniques. It was found that the simulations successfully predicted the mixing progress as a function of the degree of filling and size of the drum. It is shown that only relatively large, straight baffles perpendicular to the drum wall (67% of the drum radius) increase the mixing performance of the rotating drum. Considering the different aspects of mixing dealt with in this work, it is concluded that the soft sphere discrete particle model can serve as a valuable tool for investigating mixing of solid substrate particles. Finally, it is expected that this model may evolve into a potential tool for design and scale-up of mixed solid-state fermenters. PMID:11745144

  2. Particle-in-cell simulations on graphic processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, C.; Zhou, X.; Li, J.; Huang, M. C.; Zhao, Y.

    2014-10-01

    We will show our recent progress in using GPU's to accelerate the PIC code OSIRIS [Fonseca et al. LNCS 2331, 342 (2002)]. The OISRIS parallel structure is retained and the computation-intensive kernels are shipped to GPU's. Algorithms for the kernels are adapted for the GPU, including high-order charge-conserving current deposition schemes with few branching and parallel particle sorting [Kong et al., JCP 230, 1676 (2011)]. These algorithms make efficient use of the GPU shared memory. This work was supported by U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FC02-04ER54789 and by NSF under Grant No. PHY-1314734.

  3. SU-E-T-254: Optimization of GATE and PHITS Monte Carlo Code Parameters for Uniform Scanning Proton Beam Based On Simulation with FLUKA General-Purpose Code

    SciTech Connect

    Kurosu, K; Takashina, M; Koizumi, M; Das, I; Moskvin, V

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo codes are becoming important tools for proton beam dosimetry. However, the relationships between the customizing parameters and percentage depth dose (PDD) of GATE and PHITS codes have not been reported which are studied for PDD and proton range compared to the FLUKA code and the experimental data. Methods: The beam delivery system of the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center was modeled for the uniform scanning beam in FLUKA and transferred identically into GATE and PHITS. This computational model was built from the blue print and validated with the commissioning data. Three parameters evaluated are the maximum step size, cut off energy and physical and transport model. The dependence of the PDDs on the customizing parameters was compared with the published results of previous studies. Results: The optimal parameters for the simulation of the whole beam delivery system were defined by referring to the calculation results obtained with each parameter. Although the PDDs from FLUKA and the experimental data show a good agreement, those of GATE and PHITS obtained with our optimal parameters show a minor discrepancy. The measured proton range R90 was 269.37 mm, compared to the calculated range of 269.63 mm, 268.96 mm, and 270.85 mm with FLUKA, GATE and PHITS, respectively. Conclusion: We evaluated the dependence of the results for PDDs obtained with GATE and PHITS Monte Carlo generalpurpose codes on the customizing parameters by using the whole computational model of the treatment nozzle. The optimal parameters for the simulation were then defined by referring to the calculation results. The physical model, particle transport mechanics and the different geometrybased descriptions need accurate customization in three simulation codes to agree with experimental data for artifact-free Monte Carlo simulation. This study was supported by Grants-in Aid for Cancer Research (H22-3rd Term Cancer Control-General-043) from the Ministry of Health

  4. Vectorization of a particle simulation method for hypersonic rarefied flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Jeffrey D.; Baganoff, Donald

    1988-01-01

    An efficient particle simulation technique for hypersonic rarefied flows is presented at an algorithmic and implementation level. The implementation is for a vector computer architecture, specifically the Cray-2. The method models an ideal diatomic Maxwell molecule with three translational and two rotational degrees of freedom. Algorithms are designed specifically for compatibility with fine grain parallelism by reducing the number of data dependencies in the computation. By insisting on this compatibility, the method is capable of performing simulation on a much larger scale than previously possible. A two-dimensional simulation of supersonic flow over a wedge is carried out for the near-continuum limit where the gas is in equilibrium and the ideal solution can be used as a check on the accuracy of the gas model employed in the method. Also, a three-dimensional, Mach 8, rarefied flow about a finite-span flat plate at a 45 degree angle of attack was simulated. It utilized over 10 to the 7th particles carried through 400 discrete time steps in less than one hour of Cray-2 CPU time. This problem was chosen to exhibit the capability of the method in handling a large number of particles and a true three-dimensional geometry.

  5. Particle simulation of filamentary formation in dielectric barrier discharge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Weili; Dong, Lifang

    2015-11-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is well known for its extensive industrial applications. Recently, new attention has been paid to DBD as a system of rich nonlinear dynamics to study the self-organized filamentary patterns. Though a number of experimental studies have been implemented, the involved physics is still not completely clear, partially due to the limitation of the available space and time-resolved diagnostics. Computer simulation has proven to be an effective tool to give insights into the discharge mechanism. So far, most simulations presented are based on fluid models. However, since the plasma is non-equilibrium in DBD where the particle velocities may deviate from the Maxwellian distribution, self-consistent kinetic simulations are required. In this paper, two successive filamentary discharges in DBD have been studied by use of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation with Monte Carlo collisions included (PIC-MCC). The formation of multiple filaments and the involved electric fields, electric potentials, plasma densities, and particle temperatures are presented. Results show that both of the surface charges and space charges play significant roles in the discharges. The total electric field in the gas gap has been completely reversed before the ac voltage hit zero, due to the accumulation of the surface charges, which triggers the next discharge. The space charges always exist between two successive discharges, which provides the `seed charges' for reignition of the filaments. This modeling has revealed significant details of the discharge behaviors, which greatly improved our understanding of DBD mechanisms.

  6. MPPhys—A many-particle simulation package for computational physics education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    In a first course to classical mechanics elementary physical processes like elastic two-body collisions, the mass-spring model, or the gravitational two-body problem are discussed in detail. The continuation to many-body systems, however, is deferred to graduate courses although the underlying equations of motion are essentially the same and although there is a strong motivation for high-school students in particular because of the use of particle systems in computer games. The missing link between the simple and the more complex problem is a basic introduction to solve the equations of motion numerically which could be illustrated, however, by means of the Euler method. The many-particle physics simulation package MPPhys offers a platform to experiment with simple particle simulations. The aim is to give a principle idea how to implement many-particle simulations and how simulation and visualization can be combined for interactive visual explorations. Catalogue identifier: AERR_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AERR_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 111327 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 608411 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++, OpenGL, GLSL, OpenCL. Computer: Linux and Windows platforms with OpenGL support. Operating system: Linux and Windows. RAM: Source Code 4.5 MB Complete package 242 MB Classification: 14, 16.9. External routines: OpenGL, OpenCL Nature of problem: Integrate N-body simulations, mass-spring models Solution method: Numerical integration of N-body-simulations, 3D-Rendering via OpenGL. Running time: Problem dependent

  7. Relativistic modeling capabilities in PERSEUS extended MHD simulation code for HED plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlin, Nathaniel D.; Seyler, Charles E.

    2014-12-01

    We discuss the incorporation of relativistic modeling capabilities into the PERSEUS extended MHD simulation code for high-energy-density (HED) plasmas, and present the latest hybrid X-pinch simulation results. The use of fully relativistic equations enables the model to remain self-consistent in simulations of such relativistic phenomena as X-pinches and laser-plasma interactions. By suitable formulation of the relativistic generalized Ohm's law as an evolution equation, we have reduced the recovery of primitive variables, a major technical challenge in relativistic codes, to a straightforward algebraic computation. Our code recovers expected results in the non-relativistic limit, and reveals new physics in the modeling of electron beam acceleration following an X-pinch. Through the use of a relaxation scheme, relativistic PERSEUS is able to handle nine orders of magnitude in density variation, making it the first fluid code, to our knowledge, that can simulate relativistic HED plasmas.

  8. Relativistic modeling capabilities in PERSEUS extended MHD simulation code for HED plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlin, Nathaniel D.; Seyler, Charles E.

    2014-12-15

    We discuss the incorporation of relativistic modeling capabilities into the PERSEUS extended MHD simulation code for high-energy-density (HED) plasmas, and present the latest hybrid X-pinch simulation results. The use of fully relativistic equations enables the model to remain self-consistent in simulations of such relativistic phenomena as X-pinches and laser-plasma interactions. By suitable formulation of the relativistic generalized Ohm’s law as an evolution equation, we have reduced the recovery of primitive variables, a major technical challenge in relativistic codes, to a straightforward algebraic computation. Our code recovers expected results in the non-relativistic limit, and reveals new physics in the modeling of electron beam acceleration following an X-pinch. Through the use of a relaxation scheme, relativistic PERSEUS is able to handle nine orders of magnitude in density variation, making it the first fluid code, to our knowledge, that can simulate relativistic HED plasmas.

  9. A Comparison Between GATE and MCNPX Monte Carlo Codes in Simulation of Medical Linear Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Sadoughi, Hamid-Reza; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Momennezhad, Mahdi; Sadeghi, Hamid-Reza; Bahreyni-Toosi, Mohammad-Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy dose calculations can be evaluated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with acceptable accuracy for dose prediction in complicated treatment plans. In this work, Standard, Livermore and Penelope electromagnetic (EM) physics packages of GEANT4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) 6.1 were compared versus Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) 2.6 in simulation of 6 MV photon Linac. To do this, similar geometry was used for the two codes. The reference values of percentage depth dose (PDD) and beam profiles were obtained using a 6 MV Elekta Compact linear accelerator, Scanditronix water phantom and diode detectors. No significant deviations were found in PDD, dose profile, energy spectrum, radial mean energy and photon radial distribution, which were calculated by Standard and Livermore EM models and MCNPX, respectively. Nevertheless, the Penelope model showed an extreme difference. Statistical uncertainty in all the simulations was <1%, namely 0.51%, 0.27%, 0.27% and 0.29% for PDDs of 10 cm(2)× 10 cm(2) filed size, for MCNPX, Standard, Livermore and Penelope models, respectively. Differences between spectra in various regions, in radial mean energy and in photon radial distribution were due to different cross section and stopping power data and not the same simulation of physics processes of MCNPX and three EM models. For example, in the Standard model, the photoelectron direction was sampled from the Gavrila-Sauter distribution, but the photoelectron moved in the same direction of the incident photons in the photoelectric process of Livermore and Penelope models. Using the same primary electron beam, the Standard and Livermore EM models of GATE and MCNPX showed similar output, but re-tuning of primary electron beam is needed for the Penelope model.

  10. Closures for Course-Grid Simulation of Fluidized Gas-Particle Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran Sundaresan

    2010-02-14

    Gas-particle flows in fluidized beds and riser reactors are inherently unstable, and they manifest fluctuations over a wide range of length and time scales. Two-fluid models for such flows reveal unstable modes whose length scale is as small as ten particle diameters. Yet, because of limited computational resources, gas-particle flows in large fluidized beds are invariably simulated by solving discretized versions of the two-fluid model equations over a coarse spatial grid. Such coarse-grid simulations do not resolve the small-scale spatial structures which are known to affect the macroscale flow structures both qualitatively and quantitatively. Thus there is a need to develop filtered two-fluid models which are suitable for coarse-grid simulations and capturing the effect of the small-scale structures through closures in terms of the filtered variables. The overall objective of the project is to develop validated closures for filtered two-fluid models for gas-particle flows, with the transport gasifier as a primary, motivating example. In this project, highly resolved three-dimensional simulations of a kinetic theory based two-fluid model for gas-particle flows have been performed and the statistical information on structures in the 100-1000 particle diameters length scale has been extracted. Based on these results, closures for filtered two-fluid models have been constructed. The filtered model equations and closures have been validated against experimental data and the results obtained in highly resolved simulations of gas-particle flows. The proposed project enables more accurate simulations of not only the transport gasifier, but also many other non-reacting and reacting gas-particle flows in a variety of chemical reactors. The results of this study are in the form of closures which can readily be incorporated into existing multi-phase flow codes such as MFIX (www.mfix.org). Therefore, the benefits of this study can be realized quickly. The training provided

  11. M3D Simulations of Energetic Particle-driven MHD Mode with Unstructured Mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, G. Y.; Park, W.; Strauss, H. R.

    2001-10-01

    The energetic particle-driven MHD modes are studied using a multi-level extended MHD code M3D(W. Park et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 1796 (1999)). In a Extended-MHD model, the plasma is divided into the bulk part and the energetic particle component. The bulk plasma is treated as either a single fluid or two fluids. The energetic particles are described by gyrokinetic particles following the self-consistent electromagnetic field. The model is self-consistent, including nonlinear effects of hot particles on the MHD dynamics and the nonlinear MHD mode coupling. Previously we had shown the results of nonlinear saturation of TAEfootnote G.Y. Fu and W. Park, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 1594 (1995), energetic particle stabilization of an internal kink and excitation of fishbone^2, and nonlinear saturation of fishbone in circular tokamaks (G.Y. Fu et al, 2000 Sherwood Meeting, Paper 2C2.). In this work, we extend the simulations to general geometry using unstructured mesh(H.R. Strauss and W. Park, Phys. Plasmas 5, 2676 (1998). We also use a gyrofluid model for fishbone in order to study the role of MHD nonlinearity in saturation near the marginal stability. Results of applications to tokamaks and spherical tokamaks will be presented.

  12. GPUPEGAS: A NEW GPU-ACCELERATED HYDRODYNAMIC CODE FOR NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF INTERACTING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kulikov, Igor

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a new scalable hydrodynamic code, GPUPEGAS (GPU-accelerated Performance Gas Astrophysical Simulation), for the simulation of interacting galaxies is proposed. The details of a parallel numerical method co-design are described. A speed-up of 55 times was obtained within a single GPU accelerator. The use of 60 GPU accelerators resulted in 96% parallel efficiency. A collisionless hydrodynamic approach has been used for modeling of stars and dark matter. The scalability of the GPUPEGAS code is shown.

  13. Modeling femtosecond pulse laser damage using particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Robert A.; Schumacher, Douglass; Chowdhury, Enam

    2014-12-01

    We present, to our knowledge, the first adaptation of the particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation method for use in the study of femtosecond pulse laser damage, including the first implementation of the Morse pair-potential for PIC codes. We compare the PIC method to a wide variety of currently used modeling schemes, ranging from purely ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to semi-empirical models with many fitting parameters and show how PIC simulations can provide a complementary approach by filling the gap in theoretical methodology between the two cases. We detail the necessity and implementation of an interatomic pair-potential in PIC studies of laser damage. Finally, we use our model to treat the full laser damage process of a copper target and show that our results compare well to simple scaling laws for crater size.

  14. Modeling femtosecond pulse laser damage on conductors using Particle-In-Cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Robert A.; Schumacher, Douglass; Chowdhury, Enam

    2013-11-01

    We present, to our knowledge, the first adaptation of the Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation method for use in the study of femtosecond pulse laser damage, including the first implementation of the Morse potential for PIC codes. We compare the PIC method to a wide variety of currently used modeling schemes, ranging from purely ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations to semi-empirical models with many fitting parameters, and show how PIC simulations can provide a complementary approach by filling the gap in theoretical methodology between the two cases. We detail the necessity and implementation of an inter-atomic pair-potential in PIC studies of laser damage. Lastly, we use our model to treat the full laser damage process of a copper target, and show that our results compare well to simple scaling laws for crater size.

  15. Accelerating dissipative particle dynamics simulations on GPUs: Algorithms, numerics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yu-Hang; Karniadakis, George Em

    2014-11-01

    We present a scalable dissipative particle dynamics simulation code, fully implemented on the Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) using a hybrid CUDA/MPI programming model, which achieves 10-30 times speedup on a single GPU over 16 CPU cores and almost linear weak scaling across a thousand nodes. A unified framework is developed within which the efficient generation of the neighbor list and maintaining particle data locality are addressed. Our algorithm generates strictly ordered neighbor lists in parallel, while the construction is deterministic and makes no use of atomic operations or sorting. Such neighbor list leads to optimal data loading efficiency when combined with a two-level particle reordering scheme. A faster in situ generation scheme for Gaussian random numbers is proposed using precomputed binary signatures. We designed custom transcendental functions that are fast and accurate for evaluating the pairwise interaction. The correctness and accuracy of the code is verified through a set of test cases simulating Poiseuille flow and spontaneous vesicle formation. Computer benchmarks demonstrate the speedup of our implementation over the CPU implementation as well as strong and weak scalability. A large-scale simulation of spontaneous vesicle formation consisting of 128 million particles was conducted to further illustrate the practicality of our code in real-world applications. Catalogue identifier: AETN_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETN_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 602 716 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 26 489 166 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C/C++, CUDA C/C++, MPI. Computer: Any computers having nVidia GPGPUs with compute capability 3.0. Operating system: Linux. Has the code been

  16. HOTB: High precision parallel code for calculation of four-particle harmonic oscillator transformation brackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepšys, A.; Mickevicius, S.; Germanas, D.; Kalinauskas, R. K.

    2014-11-01

    This new version of the HOTB program for calculation of the three and four particle harmonic oscillator transformation brackets provides some enhancements and corrections to the earlier version (Germanas et al., 2010) [1]. In particular, new version allows calculations of harmonic oscillator transformation brackets be performed in parallel using MPI parallel communication standard. Moreover, higher precision of intermediate calculations using GNU Quadruple Precision and arbitrary precision library FMLib [2] is done. A package of Fortran code is presented. Calculation time of large matrices can be significantly reduced using effective parallel code. Use of Higher Precision methods in intermediate calculations increases the stability of algorithms and extends the validity of used algorithms for larger input values. Catalogue identifier: AEFQ_v4_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEFQ_v4_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 Number of lines in programs, including test data, etc.: 1711 Number of bytes in distributed programs, including test data, etc.: 11667 Distribution format: tar.gz Program language used: FORTRAN 90 with MPI extensions for parallelism Computer: Any computer with FORTRAN 90 compiler Operating system: Windows, Linux, FreeBSD, True64 Unix Has the code been vectorized of parallelized?: Yes, parallelism using MPI extensions. Number of CPUs used: up to 999 RAM(per CPU core): Depending on allocated binomial and trinomial matrices and use of precision; at least 500 MB Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEFQ_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 181, Issue 2, (2010) 420-425 Does the new version supersede the previous version? Yes Nature of problem: Calculation of matrices of three-particle harmonic oscillator brackets (3HOB) and four-particle harmonic oscillator brackets (4HOB) in a more

  17. Particle-mesh simulations of the Lyα forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiksin, Avery; White, Martin

    2001-06-01

    Numerical hydrodynamical simulations have proven to be a successful means of reproducing many of the statistical properties of the Lyα forest as measured in high-redshift quasar spectra. Pseudo-hydrodynamical methods, based only on simulating the dark matter component, have been claimed to yield a comparable level of success. We investigate the degree to which two pseudo-methods, with and without allowing for a pseudo-gas pressure, are able to match the predictions of fully hydrodynamical plus dark matter simulations. We also address the requirements for convergence to the statistics of the spectra and the inferred properties of the Lyα forest as a function of resolution and box size. Generally, we find that it is possible to reach agreement with full hydrodynamic simulations at the 10 per cent level in the cumulative distributions of the flux and absorption line parameter statistics for readily achievable particle and grid numbers, but difficult to do much better.

  18. Wavenumber spectrum of whistler turbulence: Particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, S.; Gary, S. Peter; Narita, Y.

    2010-12-15

    The forward cascade of decaying whistler turbulence is studied in low beta plasma to understand essential properties of the energy spectrum at electron scales, by using a two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. This simulation demonstrates turbulence in which the energy cascade rate is greater than the dissipation rate at the electron inertial length. The PIC simulation shows that the magnetic energy spectrum of forward-cascaded whistler turbulence at electron inertial scales is anisotropic and develops a very steep power-law spectrum which is consistent with recent solar wind observations. A comparison of the simulated spectrum with that predicted by a phenomenological turbulence scaling model suggests that the energy cascade at the electron inertial scale depends on both magnetic fluctuations and electron velocity fluctuations, as well as on the whistler dispersion relation. Thus, not only kinetic Alfven turbulence but also whistler turbulence may explain recent solar wind observations of very steep magnetic spectra at short scales.

  19. An approach for coupled-code multiphysics core simulations from a common input

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Rodney; Belcourt, Kenneth; Hooper, Russell; Pawlowski, Roger P.; Clarno, Kevin T.; Simunovic, Srdjan; Slattery, Stuart R.; Turner, John A.; Palmtag, Scott

    2014-12-10

    This study describes an approach for coupled-code multiphysics reactor core simulations that is being developed by the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA) project in the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light-Water Reactors (CASL). In this approach a user creates a single problem description, called the “VERAIn” common input file, to define and setup the desired coupled-code reactor core simulation. A preprocessing step accepts the VERAIn file and generates a set of fully consistent input files for the different physics codes being coupled. The problem is then solved using a single-executable coupled-code simulation tool applicable to the problem, which is built using VERA infrastructure software tools and the set of physics codes required for the problem of interest. The approach is demonstrated by performing an eigenvalue and power distribution calculation of a typical three-dimensional 17 × 17 assembly with thermal–hydraulic and fuel temperature feedback. All neutronics aspects of the problem (cross-section calculation, neutron transport, power release) are solved using the Insilico code suite and are fully coupled to a thermal–hydraulic analysis calculated by the Cobra-TF (CTF) code. The single-executable coupled-code (Insilico-CTF) simulation tool is created using several VERA tools, including LIME (Lightweight Integrating Multiphysics Environment for coupling codes), DTK (Data Transfer Kit), Trilinos, and TriBITS. Parallel calculations are performed on the Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using 1156 cores, and a synopsis of the solution results and code performance is presented. Finally, ongoing development of this approach is also briefly described.

  20. An approach for coupled-code multiphysics core simulations from a common input

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schmidt, Rodney; Belcourt, Kenneth; Hooper, Russell; Pawlowski, Roger P.; Clarno, Kevin T.; Simunovic, Srdjan; Slattery, Stuart R.; Turner, John A.; Palmtag, Scott

    2014-12-10

    This study describes an approach for coupled-code multiphysics reactor core simulations that is being developed by the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA) project in the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light-Water Reactors (CASL). In this approach a user creates a single problem description, called the “VERAIn” common input file, to define and setup the desired coupled-code reactor core simulation. A preprocessing step accepts the VERAIn file and generates a set of fully consistent input files for the different physics codes being coupled. The problem is then solved using a single-executable coupled-code simulation tool applicable to the problem, which ismore » built using VERA infrastructure software tools and the set of physics codes required for the problem of interest. The approach is demonstrated by performing an eigenvalue and power distribution calculation of a typical three-dimensional 17 × 17 assembly with thermal–hydraulic and fuel temperature feedback. All neutronics aspects of the problem (cross-section calculation, neutron transport, power release) are solved using the Insilico code suite and are fully coupled to a thermal–hydraulic analysis calculated by the Cobra-TF (CTF) code. The single-executable coupled-code (Insilico-CTF) simulation tool is created using several VERA tools, including LIME (Lightweight Integrating Multiphysics Environment for coupling codes), DTK (Data Transfer Kit), Trilinos, and TriBITS. Parallel calculations are performed on the Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using 1156 cores, and a synopsis of the solution results and code performance is presented. Finally, ongoing development of this approach is also briefly described.« less

  1. Hybrid molecular-continuum simulations using smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petsev, Nikolai D.; Leal, L. Gary; Shell, M. Scott

    2015-01-01

    We present a new multiscale simulation methodology for coupling a region with atomistic detail simulated via molecular dynamics (MD) to a numerical solution of the fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations obtained from smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD). In this approach, chemical potential gradients emerge due to differences in resolution within the total system and are reduced by introducing a pairwise thermodynamic force inside the buffer region between the two domains where particles change from MD to SDPD types. When combined with a multi-resolution SDPD approach, such as the one proposed by Kulkarni et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 234105 (2013)], this method makes it possible to systematically couple atomistic models to arbitrarily coarse continuum domains modeled as SDPD fluids with varying resolution. We test this technique by showing that it correctly reproduces thermodynamic properties across the entire simulation domain for a simple Lennard-Jones fluid. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this approach is also suitable for non-equilibrium problems by applying it to simulations of the start up of shear flow. The robustness of the method is illustrated with two different flow scenarios in which shear forces act in directions parallel and perpendicular to the interface separating the continuum and atomistic domains. In both cases, we obtain the correct transient velocity profile. We also perform a triple-scale shear flow simulation where we include two SDPD regions with different resolutions in addition to a MD domain, illustrating the feasibility of a three-scale coupling.

  2. Hybrid molecular-continuum simulations using smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Petsev, Nikolai D.; Leal, L. Gary; Shell, M. Scott

    2015-01-28

    We present a new multiscale simulation methodology for coupling a region with atomistic detail simulated via molecular dynamics (MD) to a numerical solution of the fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations obtained from smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD). In this approach, chemical potential gradients emerge due to differences in resolution within the total system and are reduced by introducing a pairwise thermodynamic force inside the buffer region between the two domains where particles change from MD to SDPD types. When combined with a multi-resolution SDPD approach, such as the one proposed by Kulkarni et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 234105 (2013)], this method makes it possible to systematically couple atomistic models to arbitrarily coarse continuum domains modeled as SDPD fluids with varying resolution. We test this technique by showing that it correctly reproduces thermodynamic properties across the entire simulation domain for a simple Lennard-Jones fluid. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this approach is also suitable for non-equilibrium problems by applying it to simulations of the start up of shear flow. The robustness of the method is illustrated with two different flow scenarios in which shear forces act in directions parallel and perpendicular to the interface separating the continuum and atomistic domains. In both cases, we obtain the correct transient velocity profile. We also perform a triple-scale shear flow simulation where we include two SDPD regions with different resolutions in addition to a MD domain, illustrating the feasibility of a three-scale coupling.

  3. Three dimensional Discrete Particle Simulation about the AFE geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiereisen, William J.; Mcdonald, Jeffrey D.; Fallavollita, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    The Discrete Particle Simulation method, due to Baganoff, has recently been extended to allow representation of gases composed of multiple species, to general power-law molecular interactions and to permit flows in thermal non-equilibrium. Particular attention has been paid to the implementation of this physics while retaining the efficiency of the original algorithm. Here, the enhanced algorithm is applied to the simulation of the flow field about the Aeroassisted Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle with the same flight parameters as in a previous paper. The enhancements to the algorithm are introduced and comparisons are made to the previous calculation.

  4. Simulation of Cell Adhesion using a Particle Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer

    2005-11-01

    An efficient computational method for simulation of cell adhesion through protein binding forces is discussed. In this method, the cells are represented by deformable elastic particles, and the protein binding is represented by a rate equation. The method is first developed for collision and adhesion of two similar cells impacting on each other from opposite directions. The computational method is then applied in a particle-transport model for a cloud of interacting and colliding cells, each of which are represented by particles of finite size. One application might include red blood cells adhering together to form rouleaux, which are chains of red blood cells that are found in different parts of the circulatory system. Other potential applications include adhesion of platelets to a blood vessel wall or mechanical heart valve, which is a precursor of thrombosis formation, or adhesion of cancer cells to organ walls in the lymphatic, circulatory, digestive or pulmonary systems.

  5. Mesoscale simulations of particle reinforced epoxy-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Bradley W.; Springer, Harry Keo; Jordan, Jennifer L.; Spowart, Jonathan E.; Thadhani, Naresh

    2012-03-01

    Polymer matrix composites reinforced with metal powders have complex microstructures that vary greatly from differences in particle size, morphology, loading fractions, etc. The effects of the underlying microstructure on the mechanical and wave propagation behavior of these composites during dynamic loading conditions are not well understood. To better understand these effects, epoxy (Epon826/DEA) reinforced with different particle sizes of Al and loading fractions of Al and Ni were prepared by casting. Microstructures from the composites were then used in 2D plane strain mesoscale simulations. The effect of varying velocity loading conditions on the wave velocity was then examined to determine the Us-Up and particle deformation response as a function of composite configuration.

  6. Simulation of wave packet tunneling of interacting identical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozovik, Yu. E.; Filinov, A. V.; Arkhipov, A. S.

    2003-02-01

    We demonstrate a different method of simulation of nonstationary quantum processes, considering the tunneling of two interacting identical particles, represented by wave packets. The used method of quantum molecular dynamics (WMD) is based on the Wigner representation of quantum mechanics. In the context of this method ensembles of classical trajectories are used to solve quantum Wigner-Liouville equation. These classical trajectories obey Hamiltonian-like equations, where the effective potential consists of the usual classical term and the quantum term, which depends on the Wigner function and its derivatives. The quantum term is calculated using local distribution of trajectories in phase space, therefore, classical trajectories are not independent, contrary to classical molecular dynamics. The developed WMD method takes into account the influence of exchange and interaction between particles. The role of direct and exchange interactions in tunneling is analyzed. The tunneling times for interacting particles are calculated.

  7. Modeling of Dose Distribution for a Proton Beam Delivering System with the use of the Multi-Particle Transport Code 'Fluka'

    SciTech Connect

    Mumot, Marta; Agapov, Alexey

    2007-11-26

    We have developed a new delivering system for hadron therapy which uses a multileaf collimator and a range shifter. We simulate our delivering beam system with the multi-particle transport code 'Fluka'. From these simulations we obtained information about the dose distributions, about stars generated in the delivering system elements and also information about the neutron flux. All the informations obtained were analyzed from the point of view of radiation protection, homogeneity of beam delivery to patient body, and also in order to improve some modifiers used.

  8. Large Eddy Simulation of Flow in Turbine Cascades Using LEST and UNCLE Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David (Technical Monitor); Huang, P. G.

    2004-01-01

    During the period December 23, 1997 and December August 31, 2004, we accomplished the development of 2 CFD codes for DNS/LES/RANS simulation of turbine cascade flows, namely LESTool and UNCLE. LESTool is a structured code making use of 5th order upwind differencing scheme and UNCLE is a second-order-accuracy unstructured code. LESTool has both Dynamic SGS and Sparlart's DES models and UNCLE makes use of URANS and DES models. The current report provides a description of methodologies used in the codes.

  9. Large Eddy Simulation of Flow in Turbine Cascades Using LESTool and UNCLE Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, P. G.

    2004-01-01

    During the period December 23,1997 and December August 31,2004, we accomplished the development of 2 CFD codes for DNS/LES/RANS simulation of turbine cascade flows, namely LESTool and UNCLE. LESTool is a structured code making use of 5th order upwind differencing scheme and UNCLE is a second-order-accuracy unstructured code. LESTool has both Dynamic SGS and Spalart's DES models and UNCLE makes use of URANS and DES models. The current report provides a description of methodologies used in the codes.

  10. The TOUGH codes - a family of simulation tools for multiphase flowand transport processes in permeable media

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten

    2003-08-08

    Numerical simulation has become a widely practiced andaccepted technique for studying flow and transport processes in thevadose zone and other subsurface flow systems. This article discusses asuite of codes, developed primarily at Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory (LBNL), with the capability to model multiphase flows withphase change. We summarize history and goals in the development of theTOUGH codes, and present the governing equations for multiphase,multicomponent flow. Special emphasis is given to space discretization bymeans of integral finite differences (IFD). Issues of code implementationand architecture are addressed, as well as code applications,maintenance, and future developments.

  11. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of gas and dust mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, R. A.; Sijacki, D.; Clarke, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    We present a `two-fluid' implementation of dust in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) in the test particle limit. The scheme is able to handle both short and long stopping times and reproduces the short friction time limit, which is not properly handled in other implementations. We apply novel tests to verify its accuracy and limitations, including multidimensional tests that have not been previously applied to the drag-coupled dust problem and which are particularly relevant to self-gravitating protoplanetary discs. Our tests demonstrate several key requirements for accurate simulations of gas-dust mixtures. First, in standard SPH particle jitter can degrade the dust solution, even when the gas density is well reproduced. The use of integral gradients, a Wendland kernel and a large number of neighbours can control this, albeit at a greater computational cost. Secondly, when it is necessary to limit the artificial viscosity we recommend using the Cullen & Dehnen switch, since the alternative, using α ˜ 0.1, can generate a large velocity noise up to σv ≲ 0.3cs in the dust particles. Thirdly, we find that an accurate dust density estimate requires >400 neighbours, since, unlike the gas, the dust particles do not feel regularization forces. This density noise applies to all particle-based two-fluid implementations of dust, irrespective of the hydro solver and could lead to numerically induced fragmentation. Although our tests show accurate dusty gas simulations are possible, care must be taken to minimize the contribution from numerical noise.

  12. Gyrokinetics Simulation of Energetic Particle Turbulence and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, Patrick H.

    2011-09-21

    Progress in research during this year elucidated the physics of precession resonance and its interaction with radial scattering to form phase space density granulations. Momentum theorems for drift wave-zonal flow systems involving precession resonance were derived. These are directly generalizable to energetic particle modes. A novel nonlinear, subcritical growth mechanism was identified, which has now been verified by simulation. These results strengthen the foundation of our understanding of transport in burning plasmas

  13. Wavelet-based Poisson Solver for use in Particle-In-CellSimulations

    SciTech Connect

    Terzic, B.; Mihalcea, D.; Bohn, C.L.; Pogorelov, I.V.

    2005-05-13

    We report on a successful implementation of a wavelet based Poisson solver for use in 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. One new aspect of our algorithm is its ability to treat the general(inhomogeneous) Dirichlet boundary conditions (BCs). The solver harnesses advantages afforded by the wavelet formulation, such as sparsity of operators and data sets, existence of effective preconditioners, and the ability simultaneously to remove numerical noise and further compress relevant data sets. Having tested our method as a stand-alone solver on two model problems, we merged it into IMPACT-T to obtain a fully functional serial PIC code. We present and discuss preliminary results of application of the new code to the modeling of the Fermilab/NICADD and AES/JLab photoinjectors.

  14. PEGAS: Hydrodynamical code for numerical simulation of the gas components of interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, Igor

    A new hydrodynamical code for numerical simulation of the gravitational gas dynamics is described in the paper. The code is based on the Fluid-in-Cell method with a Godunov-type scheme at the Eulerian stage. The numerical method was adapted for GPU-based supercomputers. The performance of the code is shown by the simulation of the collision of the gas components of two similar disc galaxies in the course of the central collision of the galaxies in the polar direction.

  15. Constraining Particle Variation in Lunar Regolith for Simulant Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, Christian M.; Rickman, Doug; Stoeser, Douglas; Hoelzer, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Simulants are used by the lunar engineering community to develop and test technologies for In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), excavation and drilling, and for mitigation of hazards to machinery and human health. Working with the United States Geological Survey (USGS), other NASA centers, private industry and academia, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is leading NASA s lunar regolith simulant program. There are two main efforts: simulant production and simulant evaluation. This work requires a highly detailed understanding of regolith particle type, size, and shape distribution, and of bulk density. The project has developed Figure of Merit (FoM) algorithms to quantitatively compare these characteristics between two materials. The FoM can be used to compare two lunar regolith samples, regolith to simulant, or two parcels of simulant. In work presented here, we use the FoM algorithm to examine the variance of particle type in Apollo 16 highlands regolith core and surface samples. For this analysis we have used internally consistent particle type data for the 90-150 m fraction of Apollo core 64001/64002 from station 4, core 60009/60010 from station 10, and surface samples from various Apollo 16 stations. We calculate mean modal compositions for each core and for the group of surface samples and quantitatively compare samples of each group to its mean as a measurement of within-group variance; we also calculate an FoM for every sample against the mean composition of 64001/64002. This gives variation with depth at two locations and between Apollo 16 stations. Of the tested groups, core 60009/60010 has the highest internal variance with an average FoM score of 0.76 and core 64001/64002 has the lowest with an average FoM of 0.92. The surface samples have a low but intermediate internal variance with an average FoM of 0.79. FoM s calculated against the 64001/64002 mean reference composition range from 0.79-0.97 for 64001/64002, from 0.41-0.91 for 60009/60010, and from

  16. Brownian dynamics simulations of ellipsoidal magnetizable particle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Díaz, I.; Rinaldi, C.

    2014-06-01

    The rotational motion of soft magnetic tri-axial ellipsoidal particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid has been studied using rotational Brownian dynamics simulations by solving numerically the stochastic angular momentum equation in an orientational space described by the quaternion parameters. The model is applicable to particles where the effect of shape anisotropy is dominant. The algorithm quantifies the magnetization of a monodisperse suspension of tri-axial ellipsoids in dilute limit conditions under applied constant and time-varying magnetic fields. The variation of the relative permeability with the applied magnetic field of the particle's bulk material was included in the simulations. The results show that the equilibrium magnetization of a suspension of magnetizable tri-axial ellipsoids saturates at high magnetic field amplitudes. Additionally, the dynamic susceptibility at low magnetic field intensity presents a peak in the out-of-phase component, which is significantly smaller than the in-phase component and depends on the Langevin parameter. The dynamic magnetization of the particle suspension is in phase with the magnetic field at low and high frequencies far from the peak of the out-of-phase component.

  17. Simulating entrainment and particle fluxes in stratified estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, A.; Jirka, G.; Lion, L.W.; Brunk, B.

    1999-04-01

    Settling and entrainment are the dominant processes governing noncohesive particle concentration throughout the water column of salt-wedge estuaries. Determination of the relative contribution of these transport processes is complicated by vertical gradients in turbulence and fluid density. A differential-turbulence column (DTC) was designed to simulate a vertical section of a natural water column. With satisfactory characterization of turbulence dissipation and saltwater entrainment, the DTC facilitates controlled studies of suspended particles under estuarine conditions. The vertical decay of turbulence in the DTC was found to obey standard scaling law relations when the characteristic length scale for turbulence in the apparatus was incorporated. The entrainment rate of a density interface also followed established grid-stirred turbulence scaling laws. These relations were used to model the change in concentration of noncohesive particles above a density interface. Model simulations and experimental data from the DTC were consistent over the range of conditions encountered in natural salt-wedge estuaries. Results suggest that when the ratio of entrainment rate to particle settling velocity is small, sedimentation is the dominant transport process, while entrainment becomes significant as the ratio increases.

  18. Applications of the LAHET simulation code to relativistic heavy ion detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, L.S.; Gavron, A.

    1991-12-31

    The Los Alamos High Energy Transport (LAHET) simulation code has been applied to test beam data from the lead/scintillator Participant Calorimeter of BNL AGS experiment E814. The LAHET code treats hadronic interactions with the LANL version of the Oak Ridge code HETC. LAHET has now been expanded to handle hadrons with kinetic energies greater than 5 GeV with the FLUKA code, while HETC is used exclusively below 2.0 GeV. FLUKA is phased in linearly between 2.0 and 5.0 GeV. Transport of electrons and photons is done with EGS4, and an interface to the Los Alamos HMCNP3B library based code is provided to analyze neutrons with kinetic energies less than 20 MeV. Excellent agreement is found between the test data and simulation, and results for 2.46 GeV/c protons and pions are illustrated in this article.

  19. Applications of the LAHET simulation code to relativistic heavy ion detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, L.S.; Gavron, A.

    1991-01-01

    The Los Alamos High Energy Transport (LAHET) simulation code has been applied to test beam data from the lead/scintillator Participant Calorimeter of BNL AGS experiment E814. The LAHET code treats hadronic interactions with the LANL version of the Oak Ridge code HETC. LAHET has now been expanded to handle hadrons with kinetic energies greater than 5 GeV with the FLUKA code, while HETC is used exclusively below 2.0 GeV. FLUKA is phased in linearly between 2.0 and 5.0 GeV. Transport of electrons and photons is done with EGS4, and an interface to the Los Alamos HMCNP3B library based code is provided to analyze neutrons with kinetic energies less than 20 MeV. Excellent agreement is found between the test data and simulation, and results for 2.46 GeV/c protons and pions are illustrated in this article.

  20. Applications of the lahet simulation code to relativistic heavy ion detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, L.; Gavron, A.

    1991-12-31

    The Los Alamos High Energy Transport (LAHET) simulation code has been applied to test beam data from the lead/scintillator Participant Calorimeter of BNL AGS experiment E814. The LAHET code treats hadronic interactions with the LANL version of the Oak Ridge code HETC. LAHET has now been expanded to handle hadrons with kinetic energies greater than 5 GeV with the FLUKA code, while HETC is used exclusively below 2.0 GeV. FLUKA is phased in linearly between 2.0 and 5.0 GeV. Transport of electrons and photons is done with EGS4, and an interface to the Los Alamos HMCNP3B library based code is provided to analyze neutrons with kinetic energies less than 20 MeV. Excellent agreement is found between the test data and simulation, and results for 2.46 GeV/c protons and pions are illustrated in this article.