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Sample records for particle simulation codes

  1. Electromagnetic particle simulation codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    Electromagnetic particle simulations solve the full set of Maxwell's equations. They thus include the effects of self-consistent electric and magnetic fields, magnetic induction, and electromagnetic radiation. The algorithms for an electromagnetic code which works directly with the electric and magnetic fields are described. The fields and current are separated into transverse and longitudinal components. The transverse E and B fields are integrated in time using a leapfrog scheme applied to the Fourier components. The particle pushing is performed via the relativistic Lorentz force equation for the particle momentum. As an example, simulation results are presented for the electron cyclotron maser instability which illustrate the importance of relativistic effects on the wave-particle resonance condition and on wave dispersion.

  2. DSD - A Particle Simulation Code for Modeling Dusty Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Glenn; Lampe, Martin; Ganguli, Gurudas

    1999-11-01

    The NRL Dynamically Shielded Dust code (DSD) is a particle simulation code developed to study the behavior of strongly coupled, dusty plasmas. The model includes the electrostatic wake effects of plasma ions flowing through plasma electrons, collisions of dust and plasma particles with each other and with neutrals. The simulation model contains the short-range strong forces of a shielded Coulomb system, and the long-range forces that are caused by the wake. It also includes other effects of a flowing plasma such as drag forces. In order to model strongly coupled dust in plasmas, we make use of the techniques of molecular dynamics simulation, PIC simulation, and the "particle-particle/particle-mesh" (P3M) technique of Hockney and Eastwood. We also make use of the dressed test particle representation of Rostoker and Rosenbluth. Many of the techniques we use in the model are common to all PIC plasma simulation codes. The unique properties of the code follow from the accurate representation of both the short-range aspects of the interaction between dust grains, and long-range forces mediated by the complete plasma dielectric response. If the streaming velocity is zero, the potential used in the model reduces to the Debye-Huckel potential, and the simulation is identical to molecular dynamics models of the Yukawa potential. The plasma appears only implicitly through the plasma dispersion function, so it is not necessary in the code to resolve the fast plasma time scales.

  3. The Particle Accelerator Simulation Code PyORBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Gorlov, Timofey V; Holmes, Jeffrey A; Cousineau, Sarah M; Shishlo, Andrei P

    2015-01-01

    The particle accelerator simulation code PyORBIT is presented. The structure, implementation, history, parallel and simulation capabilities, and future development of the code are discussed. The PyORBIT code is a new implementation and extension of algorithms of the original ORBIT code that was developed for the Spallation Neutron Source accelerator at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The PyORBIT code has a two level structure. The upper level uses the Python programming language to control the flow of intensive calculations performed by the lower level code implemented in the C++ language. The parallel capabilities are based on MPI communications. The PyORBIT is an open source code accessible to the public through the Google Open Source Projects Hosting service.

  4. Parallelization of a Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjidoukas, P.; Bousis, C.; Emfietzoglou, D.

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a high performance version of the Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code MC4. The original application code, developed in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) for Microsoft Excel, was first rewritten in the C programming language for improving code portability. Several pseudo-random number generators have been also integrated and studied. The new MC4 version was then parallelized for shared and distributed-memory multiprocessor systems using the Message Passing Interface. Two parallel pseudo-random number generator libraries (SPRNG and DCMT) have been seamlessly integrated. The performance speedup of parallel MC4 has been studied on a variety of parallel computing architectures including an Intel Xeon server with 4 dual-core processors, a Sun cluster consisting of 16 nodes of 2 dual-core AMD Opteron processors and a 200 dual-processor HP cluster. For large problem size, which is limited only by the physical memory of the multiprocessor server, the speedup results are almost linear on all systems. We have validated the parallel implementation against the serial VBA and C implementations using the same random number generator. Our experimental results on the transport and energy loss of electrons in a water medium show that the serial and parallel codes are equivalent in accuracy. The present improvements allow for studying of higher particle energies with the use of more accurate physical models, and improve statistics as more particles tracks can be simulated in low response time.

  5. Hybrid Particle Code Simulations of Mars: The Energy Budget.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, S. H.; Ledvina, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    The results of our latest hybrid particle simulations using the HALFSHEL code are discussed. The presentation will address the energy budget of the solar wind interaction with Mars. The simulations produce loss rates that are very consistent with measured data, Brecht and Ledvina [2014], therefore inspection of the details of the interaction is now warranted. This paper will address the relationship between the energy flowing into the planet and the energy flowing away from the planet. The partition of the energy between fields, and individual ion species will be addressed as well as the amount of energy deposited in the neutral atmosphere by incoming solar wind plasma and during the process of ion loss caused by acceleration via electric fields. Brecht, S.H. and S.A. Ledvina (2014), "The role of the Martian crustal magnetic fields in controlling ionospheric loss," Geophys. Res. Lett., 41, 5340-5346, doi:10.1002/2014GL060841.

  6. Particle tracking code of simulating global RF feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Mestha, L.K.

    1991-09-01

    It is well known in the control community'' that a good feedback controller design is deeply rooted in the physics of the system. For example, when accelerating the beam we must keep several parameters under control so that the beam travels within the confined space. Important parameters include the frequency and phase of the rf signal, the dipole field, and the cavity voltage. Because errors in these parameters will progressively mislead the beam from its projected path in the tube, feedback loops are used to correct the behavior. Since the feedback loop feeds energy to the system, it changes the overall behavior of the system and may drive it to instability. Various types of controllers are used to stabilize the feedback loop. Integrating the beam physics with the feedback controllers allows us to carefully analyze the beam behavior. This will not only guarantee optimal performance but will also significantly enhance the ability of the beam control engineer to deal effectively with the interaction of various feedback loops. Motivated by this theme, we developed a simple one-particle tracking code to simulate particle behavior with feedback controllers. In order to achieve our fundamental objective, we can ask some key questions: What are the input and output parameters How can they be applied to the practical machine How can one interface the rf system dynamics such as the transfer characteristics of the rf cavities and phasing between the cavities Answers to these questions can be found by considering a simple case of a single cavity with one particle, tracking it turn-by-turn with appropriate initial conditions, then introducing constraints on crucial parameters. Critical parameters are rf frequency, phase, and amplitude once the dipole field has been given. These are arranged in the tracking code so that we can interface the feedback system controlling them.

  7. The Plasma Simulation Code: A modern particle-in-cell code with patch-based load-balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germaschewski, Kai; Fox, William; Abbott, Stephen; Ahmadi, Narges; Maynard, Kristofor; Wang, Liang; Ruhl, Hartmut; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2016-08-01

    This work describes the Plasma Simulation Code (PSC), an explicit, electromagnetic particle-in-cell code with support for different order particle shape functions. We review the basic components of the particle-in-cell method as well as the computational architecture of the PSC code that allows support for modular algorithms and data structure in the code. We then describe and analyze in detail a distinguishing feature of PSC: patch-based load balancing using space-filling curves which is shown to lead to major efficiency gains over unbalanced methods and a previously used simpler balancing method.

  8. The FLUKA Code: An Accurate Simulation Tool for Particle Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Julia; Boehlen, Till T.; Cerutti, Francesco; Chin, Mary P. W.; Dos Santos Augusto, Ricardo; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ortega, Pablo G.; Kozłowska, Wioletta; Magro, Giuseppe; Mairani, Andrea; Parodi, Katia; Sala, Paola R.; Schoofs, Philippe; Tessonnier, Thomas; Vlachoudis, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) codes are increasingly spreading in the hadrontherapy community due to their detailed description of radiation transport and interaction with matter. The suitability of a MC code for application to hadrontherapy demands accurate and reliable physical models capable of handling all components of the expected radiation field. This becomes extremely important for correctly performing not only physical but also biologically based dose calculations, especially in cases where ions heavier than protons are involved. In addition, accurate prediction of emerging secondary radiation is of utmost importance in innovative areas of research aiming at in vivo treatment verification. This contribution will address the recent developments of the FLUKA MC code and its practical applications in this field. Refinements of the FLUKA nuclear models in the therapeutic energy interval lead to an improved description of the mixed radiation field as shown in the presented benchmarks against experimental data with both 4He and 12C ion beams. Accurate description of ionization energy losses and of particle scattering and interactions lead to the excellent agreement of calculated depth–dose profiles with those measured at leading European hadron therapy centers, both with proton and ion beams. In order to support the application of FLUKA in hospital-based environments, Flair, the FLUKA graphical interface, has been enhanced with the capability of translating CT DICOM images into voxel-based computational phantoms in a fast and well-structured way. The interface is capable of importing also radiotherapy treatment data described in DICOM RT standard. In addition, the interface is equipped with an intuitive PET scanner geometry generator and automatic recording of coincidence events. Clinically, similar cases will be presented both in terms of absorbed dose and biological dose calculations describing the various available features. PMID:27242956

  9. The FLUKA Code: An Accurate Simulation Tool for Particle Therapy.

    PubMed

    Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Julia; Boehlen, Till T; Cerutti, Francesco; Chin, Mary P W; Dos Santos Augusto, Ricardo; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ortega, Pablo G; Kozłowska, Wioletta; Magro, Giuseppe; Mairani, Andrea; Parodi, Katia; Sala, Paola R; Schoofs, Philippe; Tessonnier, Thomas; Vlachoudis, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) codes are increasingly spreading in the hadrontherapy community due to their detailed description of radiation transport and interaction with matter. The suitability of a MC code for application to hadrontherapy demands accurate and reliable physical models capable of handling all components of the expected radiation field. This becomes extremely important for correctly performing not only physical but also biologically based dose calculations, especially in cases where ions heavier than protons are involved. In addition, accurate prediction of emerging secondary radiation is of utmost importance in innovative areas of research aiming at in vivo treatment verification. This contribution will address the recent developments of the FLUKA MC code and its practical applications in this field. Refinements of the FLUKA nuclear models in the therapeutic energy interval lead to an improved description of the mixed radiation field as shown in the presented benchmarks against experimental data with both (4)He and (12)C ion beams. Accurate description of ionization energy losses and of particle scattering and interactions lead to the excellent agreement of calculated depth-dose profiles with those measured at leading European hadron therapy centers, both with proton and ion beams. In order to support the application of FLUKA in hospital-based environments, Flair, the FLUKA graphical interface, has been enhanced with the capability of translating CT DICOM images into voxel-based computational phantoms in a fast and well-structured way. The interface is capable of importing also radiotherapy treatment data described in DICOM RT standard. In addition, the interface is equipped with an intuitive PET scanner geometry generator and automatic recording of coincidence events. Clinically, similar cases will be presented both in terms of absorbed dose and biological dose calculations describing the various available features.

  10. Simulation and calculation of particle trapping using a quasistatic 2D simulation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshed, Sepehr; Antonsen, Thomas; Huang, Chengkun; Mori, Warren

    2008-11-01

    In LWFA schemes the laser pulse must propagate several centimeters and maintain its coherence over this distance, which corresponds to many Rayleigh lengths. These Wakefields and their effect on the laser can be simulated in quasistatic approximation [1, 2]. In this approximation the assumption is that the driver (laser) does not change shape during the time it takes for it to pass by a plasma particle. As a result the particles that are trapped and moving with near-luminal velocity can not be treated with this approximation. Here we have modified the 2D code WAKE with an alternate algorithm so that when a plasma particle gains sufficient energy from wakefields it is promoted to beam particle status which later on may become trapped in the wakefields of laser. Similar implementations have been made in the 3D code QUICKPIC [2]. We also have done comparison between WAKE and results from 200 TW laser simulations using OSIRIS [3]. These changes in WAKE will give users a tool that can be used on a desk top machine to simulate GeV acceleration.[0pt] [1] P. Mora and T. M. Antonsen Jr., Phys Plasma 4, 217 (1997)[0pt] [2] C. Huang et al. Comp Phys. 217 (2006)[0pt] [3] W. Lu et al. PRST, Accelerators and Beams 10, 061301 (2007)

  11. A Linac Simulation Code for Macro-Particles Tracking and Steering Algorithm Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    sun, yipeng

    2012-05-03

    In this paper, a linac simulation code written in Fortran90 is presented and several simulation examples are given. This code is optimized to implement linac alignment and steering algorithms, and evaluate the accelerator errors such as RF phase and acceleration gradient, quadrupole and BPM misalignment. It can track a single particle or a bunch of particles through normal linear accelerator elements such as quadrupole, RF cavity, dipole corrector and drift space. One-to-one steering algorithm and a global alignment (steering) algorithm are implemented in this code.

  12. Simulation and calculation of particle trapping using a quasistatic simulation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshed, Sepehr; Palastro, John; Antonsen, Thomas; Huang, Chengkun; Mori, Warren

    2007-11-01

    In LWFA schemes the laser pulse must propagate several centimeters and maintain its coherence over this distance, which corresponds to many Rayleigh lengths. These Wakefields and their effect on the laser can be simulated in quasistatic approximation [1, 2]. In this approximation the assumption is that the driver (laser) does not change shape during the time it takes for it to pass by a plasma particle. As a result the particles that are trapped and moving with near-luminal velocity can not be treated with this approximation. Here we have modified the 2D code WAKE with an alternate algorithm so that when a plasma particle gains sufficient energy from wakefields it becomes trapped to satisfy the trapping conditions. Similar implementations have been made in the 3D cod QUICKPIC [2]. We also have done simulation and comparison of results for centimeter scale GeV electron accelerator experiments from LBL [3] with WAKE. These changes in WAKE will give users a tool that can be used on a desk top machine to simulate GeV acceleration. [1] P. Mora and T. M. Antonsen Jr., Phys Plasma 4, 217 (1997) [2] C. Huang et al. Comp Phys. 217 (2006) [3] W. P. Leemans et al. Nature Phys 2, 696 (2006) Letters

  13. New Particle-in-Cell Code for Numerical Simulation of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Balsa Terzic, Rui Li

    2010-05-01

    We present a first look at the new code for self-consistent, 2D simulations of beam dynamics affected by the coherent synchrotron radiation. The code is of the particle-in-cell variety: the beam bunch is sampled by point-charge particles, which are deposited on the grid; the corresponding forces on the grid are then computed using retarded potentials according to causality, and interpolated so as to advance the particles in time. The retarded potentials are evaluated by integrating over the 2D path history of the bunch, with the charge and current density at the retarded time obtained from interpolation of the particle distributions recorded at discrete timesteps. The code is benchmarked against analytical results obtained for a rigid-line bunch. We also outline the features and applications which are currently being developed.

  14. Acceleration of a Particle-in-Cell Code for Space Plasma Simulations with OpenACC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano; Vaivads, Andris; Vencels, Juris; Deca, Jan; Lapenta, Giovanni; Hart, Alistair; Laure, Erwin

    2015-04-01

    We simulate space plasmas with the Particle-in-cell (PIC) method that uses computational particles to mimic electrons and protons in solar wind and in Earth magnetosphere. The magnetic and electric fields are computed by solving the Maxwell's equations on a computational grid. In each PIC simulation step, there are four major phases: interpolation of fields to particles, updating the location and velocity of each particle, interpolation of particles to grids and solving the Maxwell's equations on the grid. We use the iPIC3D code, which was implemented in C++, using both MPI and OpenMP, for our case study. By November 2014, heterogeneous systems using hardware accelerators such as Graphics Processing Unit (GPUs) and the Many Integrated Core (MIC) coprocessors for high performance computing continue growth in the top 500 most powerful supercomputers world wide. Scientific applications for numerical simulations need to adapt to using accelerators to achieve portability and scalability in the coming exascale systems. In our work, we conduct a case study of using OpenACC to offload the computation intensive parts: particle mover and interpolation of particles to grids, in a massively parallel Particle-in-Cell simulation code, iPIC3D, to multi-GPU systems. We use MPI for inter-node communication for halo exchange and communicating particles. We identify the most promising parts suitable for GPUs accelerator by profiling using CrayPAT. We implemented manual deep copy to address the challenges of porting C++ classes to GPU. We document the necessary changes in the exiting algorithms to adapt for GPU computation. We present the challenges and findings as well as our methodology for porting a Particle-in-Cell code to multi-GPU systems using OpenACC. In this work, we will present the challenges, findings and our methodology of porting a Particle-in-Cell code for space applications as follows: We profile the iPIC3D code by Cray Performance Analysis Tool (CrayPAT) and identify

  15. Simulation of a ceramic impact experiment using the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.; Schwalbe, L.A.

    1996-08-01

    We are developing statistically based, brittle-fracture models and are implementing them into hydrocodes that can be used for designing systems with components of ceramics, glass, and/or other brittle materials. Because of the advantages it has simulating fracture, we are working primarily with the smooth particle hydrodynamics code SPHINX. We describe a new brittle fracture model that we have implemented into SPHINX, and we discuss how the model differs from others. To illustrate the code`s current capability, we simulate an experiment in which a tungsten rod strikes a target of heavily confined ceramic. Simulations in 3D at relatively coarse resolution yield poor results. However, 2D plane-strain approximations to the test produce crack patterns that are strikingly similar to the data, although the fracture model needs further refinement to match some of the finer details. We conclude with an outline of plans for continuing research and development.

  16. Half-Cell RF Gun Simulations with the Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell Code VORPAL

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, K.; Dimitrov, D. A.; Busby, R.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Smithe, D.; Cary, J. R.; Kewisch, J.; Kayran, D.; Calaga, R.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2009-01-22

    We have simulated Brookhaven National Laboratory's half-cell superconducting RF gun design for a proposed high-current ERL using the three-dimensional, electromagnetic particle-in-cell code VORPAL. VORPAL computes the fully self-consistent electromagnetic fields produced by the electron bunches, meaning that it accurately models space-charge effects as well as bunch-to-bunch beam loading effects and the effects of higher-order cavity modes, though these are beyond the scope of this paper. We compare results from VORPAL to the well-established space-charge code PARMELA, using RF fields produced by SUPERFISH, as a benchmarking exercise in which the two codes should agree well.

  17. Simulating hypervelocity impact effects on structures using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code MAGI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Libersky, Larry; Allahdadi, Firooz A.; Carney, Theodore C.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of interaction occurring between space debris and orbiting structures is of great interest to the planning and survivability of space assets. Computer simulation of the impact events using hydrodynamic codes can provide some understanding of the processes but the problems involved with this fundamental approach are formidable. First, any realistic simulation is necessarily three-dimensional, e.g., the impact and breakup of a satellite. Second, the thickness of important components such as satellite skins or bumper shields are small with respect to the dimension of the structure as a whole, presenting severe zoning problems for codes. Thirdly, the debris cloud produced by the primary impact will yield many secondary impacts which will contribute to the damage and possible breakup of the structure. The problem was approached by choosing a relatively new computational technique that has virtues peculiar to space impacts. The method is called Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics.

  18. VINE-A NUMERICAL CODE FOR SIMULATING ASTROPHYSICAL SYSTEMS USING PARTICLES. II. IMPLEMENTATION AND PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Wetzstein, M.; Naab, T.

    2009-10-01

    We continue our presentation of VINE. In this paper, we begin with a description of relevant architectural properties of the serial and shared memory parallel computers on which VINE is intended to run, and describe their influences on the design of the code itself. We continue with a detailed description of a number of optimizations made to the layout of the particle data in memory and to our implementation of a binary tree used to access that data for use in gravitational force calculations and searches for smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) neighbor particles. We describe the modifications to the code necessary to obtain forces efficiently from special purpose 'GRAPE' hardware, the interfaces required to allow transparent substitution of those forces in the code instead of those obtained from the tree, and the modifications necessary to use both tree and GRAPE together as a fused GRAPE/tree combination. We conclude with an extensive series of performance tests, which demonstrate that the code can be run efficiently and without modification in serial on small workstations or in parallel using the OpenMP compiler directives on large-scale, shared memory parallel machines. We analyze the effects of the code optimizations and estimate that they improve its overall performance by more than an order of magnitude over that obtained by many other tree codes. Scaled parallel performance of the gravity and SPH calculations, together the most costly components of most simulations, is nearly linear up to at least 120 processors on moderate sized test problems using the Origin 3000 architecture, and to the maximum machine sizes available to us on several other architectures. At similar accuracy, performance of VINE, used in GRAPE-tree mode, is approximately a factor 2 slower than that of VINE, used in host-only mode. Further optimizations of the GRAPE/host communications could improve the speed by as much as a factor of 3, but have not yet been implemented in VINE

  19. Vine—A Numerical Code for Simulating Astrophysical Systems Using Particles. II. Implementation and Performance Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Wetzstein, M.; Naab, T.

    2009-10-01

    We continue our presentation of VINE. In this paper, we begin with a description of relevant architectural properties of the serial and shared memory parallel computers on which VINE is intended to run, and describe their influences on the design of the code itself. We continue with a detailed description of a number of optimizations made to the layout of the particle data in memory and to our implementation of a binary tree used to access that data for use in gravitational force calculations and searches for smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) neighbor particles. We describe the modifications to the code necessary to obtain forces efficiently from special purpose "GRAPE" hardware, the interfaces required to allow transparent substitution of those forces in the code instead of those obtained from the tree, and the modifications necessary to use both tree and GRAPE together as a fused GRAPE/tree combination. We conclude with an extensive series of performance tests, which demonstrate that the code can be run efficiently and without modification in serial on small workstations or in parallel using the OpenMP compiler directives on large-scale, shared memory parallel machines. We analyze the effects of the code optimizations and estimate that they improve its overall performance by more than an order of magnitude over that obtained by many other tree codes. Scaled parallel performance of the gravity and SPH calculations, together the most costly components of most simulations, is nearly linear up to at least 120 processors on moderate sized test problems using the Origin 3000 architecture, and to the maximum machine sizes available to us on several other architectures. At similar accuracy, performance of VINE, used in GRAPE-tree mode, is approximately a factor 2 slower than that of VINE, used in host-only mode. Further optimizations of the GRAPE/host communications could improve the speed by as much as a factor of 3, but have not yet been implemented in VINE

  20. Particle-in-cell/accelerator code for space-charge dominated beam simulation

    SciTech Connect

    2012-05-08

    Warp is a multidimensional discrete-particle beam simulation program designed to be applicable where the beam space-charge is non-negligible or dominant. It is being developed in a collaboration among LLNL, LBNL and the University of Maryland. It was originally designed and optimized for heave ion fusion accelerator physics studies, but has received use in a broader range of applications, including for example laser wakefield accelerators, e-cloud studies in high enery accelerators, particle traps and other areas. At present it incorporates 3-D, axisymmetric (r,z) planar (x-z) and transverse slice (x,y) descriptions, with both electrostatic and electro-magnetic fields, and a beam envelope model. The code is guilt atop the Python interpreter language.

  1. Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code System To Simulate Time-Analysis Quantities.

    SciTech Connect

    PADOVANI, ENRICO

    2012-04-15

    Version: 00 US DOE 10CFR810 Jurisdiction. The Monte Carlo simulation of correlation measurements that rely on the detection of fast neutrons and photons from fission requires that particle emissions and interactions following a fission event be described as close to reality as possible. The -PoliMi extension to MCNP and to MCNPX was developed to simulate correlated-particle and the subsequent interactions as close as possible to the physical behavior. Initially, MCNP-PoliMi, a modification of MCNP4C, was developed. The first version was developed in 2001-2002 and released in early 2004 to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC). It was developed for research purposes, to simulate correlated counts in organic scintillation detectors, sensitive to fast neutrons and gamma rays. Originally, the field of application was nuclear safeguards; however subsequent improvements have enhanced the ability to model measurements in other research fields as well. During 2010-2011 the -PoliMi modification was ported into MCNPX-2.7.0, leading to the development of MCNPX-PoliMi. Now the -PoliMi v2.0 modifications are distributed as a patch to MCNPX-2.7.0 which currently is distributed in the RSICC PACKAGE BCC-004 MCNP6_BETA2/MCNP5/MCNPX. Also included in the package is MPPost, a versatile code that provides simulated detector response. By taking advantage of the modifications in MCNPX-PoliMi, MPPost can provide an accurate simulation of the detector response for a variety of detection scenarios.

  2. Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code simulation results and comparison with theory scaling laws for photoelectron-generated radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dipp, T.M. |

    1993-12-01

    The generation of radiation via photoelectrons induced off of a conducting surface was explored using Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code computer simulations. Using the MAGIC PIC code, the simulations were performed in one dimension to handle the diverse scale lengths of the particles and fields in the problem. The simulations involved monoenergetic, nonrelativistic photoelectrons emitted normal to the illuminated conducting surface. A sinusoidal, 100% modulated, 6.3263 ns pulse train, as well as unmodulated emission, were used to explore the behavior of the particles, fields, and generated radiation. A special postprocessor was written to convert the PIC code simulated electron sheath into far-field radiation parameters by means of rigorous retarded time calculations. The results of the small-spot PIC simulations were used to generate various graphs showing resonance and nonresonance radiation quantities such as radiated lobe patterns, frequency, and power. A database of PIC simulation results was created and, using a nonlinear curve-fitting program, compared with theoretical scaling laws. Overall, the small-spot behavior predicted by the theoretical scaling laws was generally observed in the PIC simulation data, providing confidence in both the theoretical scaling laws and the PIC simulations.

  3. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    2016-10-05

    This code is a highly modular framework for developing smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations running on parallel platforms. The compartmentalization of the code allows for rapid development of new SPH applications and modifications of existing algorithms. The compartmentalization also allows changes in one part of the code used by many applications to instantly be made available to all applications.

  4. VINE-A NUMERICAL CODE FOR SIMULATING ASTROPHYSICAL SYSTEMS USING PARTICLES. I. DESCRIPTION OF THE PHYSICS AND THE NUMERICAL METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzstein, M.; Nelson, Andrew F.; Naab, T.; Burkert, A.

    2009-10-01

    We present a numerical code for simulating the evolution of astrophysical systems using particles to represent the underlying fluid flow. The code is written in Fortran 95 and is designed to be versatile, flexible, and extensible, with modular options that can be selected either at the time the code is compiled or at run time through a text input file. We include a number of general purpose modules describing a variety of physical processes commonly required in the astrophysical community and we expect that the effort required to integrate additional or alternate modules into the code will be small. In its simplest form the code can evolve the dynamical trajectories of a set of particles in two or three dimensions using a module which implements either a Leapfrog or Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg integrator, selected by the user at compile time. The user may choose to allow the integrator to evolve the system using individual time steps for each particle or with a single, global time step for all. Particles may interact gravitationally as N-body particles, and all or any subset may also interact hydrodynamically, using the smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) method by selecting the SPH module. A third particle species can be included with a module to model massive point particles which may accrete nearby SPH or N-body particles. Such particles may be used to model, e.g., stars in a molecular cloud. Free boundary conditions are implemented by default, and a module may be selected to include periodic boundary conditions. We use a binary 'Press' tree to organize particles for rapid access in gravity and SPH calculations. Modules implementing an interface with special purpose 'GRAPE' hardware may also be selected to accelerate the gravity calculations. If available, forces obtained from the GRAPE coprocessors may be transparently substituted for those obtained from the tree, or both tree and GRAPE may be used as a combination GRAPE/tree code. The code may be run without

  5. Vine—A Numerical Code for Simulating Astrophysical Systems Using Particles. I. Description of the Physics and the Numerical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzstein, M.; Nelson, Andrew F.; Naab, T.; Burkert, A.

    2009-10-01

    We present a numerical code for simulating the evolution of astrophysical systems using particles to represent the underlying fluid flow. The code is written in Fortran 95 and is designed to be versatile, flexible, and extensible, with modular options that can be selected either at the time the code is compiled or at run time through a text input file. We include a number of general purpose modules describing a variety of physical processes commonly required in the astrophysical community and we expect that the effort required to integrate additional or alternate modules into the code will be small. In its simplest form the code can evolve the dynamical trajectories of a set of particles in two or three dimensions using a module which implements either a Leapfrog or Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg integrator, selected by the user at compile time. The user may choose to allow the integrator to evolve the system using individual time steps for each particle or with a single, global time step for all. Particles may interact gravitationally as N-body particles, and all or any subset may also interact hydrodynamically, using the smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) method by selecting the SPH module. A third particle species can be included with a module to model massive point particles which may accrete nearby SPH or N-body particles. Such particles may be used to model, e.g., stars in a molecular cloud. Free boundary conditions are implemented by default, and a module may be selected to include periodic boundary conditions. We use a binary "Press" tree to organize particles for rapid access in gravity and SPH calculations. Modules implementing an interface with special purpose "GRAPE" hardware may also be selected to accelerate the gravity calculations. If available, forces obtained from the GRAPE coprocessors may be transparently substituted for those obtained from the tree, or both tree and GRAPE may be used as a combination GRAPE/tree code. The code may be run without

  6. Nonlinear Simulation of Alfven Eigenmodes driven by Energetic Particles: Comparison between HMGC and TAEFL Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierwage, Andreas; Spong, Donald A.

    2009-05-01

    Hybrid-MHD-Gyrokinetic Code (HMGC) [1] and the gyrofluid code TAEFL [2,3] are used for nonlinear simulation of Alfven Eigenmodes in Tokamak plasma. We compare results obtained in two cases: (I) a case designed for cross-code benchmark of TAE excitation; (II) a case based on a dedicated DIII-D shot #132707 where RSAE and TAE activity is observed. Differences between the numerical simulation results are discussed and future directions are outlined. [1] S. Briguglio, G. Vlad, F. Zonca and C. Kar, Phys. Plasmas 2 (1995) 3711. [2] D.A. Spong, B.A. Carreras and C.L. Hedrick, Phys. Fluids B4 (1992) 3316. [3] D.A. Spong, B.A. Carreras and C.L. Hedrick, Phys. Plasmas 1 (1994) 1503.

  7. Implementation and performance of FDPS: a framework for developing parallel particle simulation codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasawa, Masaki; Tanikawa, Ataru; Hosono, Natsuki; Nitadori, Keigo; Muranushi, Takayuki; Makino, Junichiro

    2016-08-01

    We present the basic idea, implementation, measured performance, and performance model of FDPS (Framework for Developing Particle Simulators). FDPS is an application-development framework which helps researchers to develop simulation programs using particle methods for large-scale distributed-memory parallel supercomputers. A particle-based simulation program for distributed-memory parallel computers needs to perform domain decomposition, exchange of particles which are not in the domain of each computing node, and gathering of the particle information in other nodes which are necessary for interaction calculation. Also, even if distributed-memory parallel computers are not used, in order to reduce the amount of computation, algorithms such as the Barnes-Hut tree algorithm or the Fast Multipole Method should be used in the case of long-range interactions. For short-range interactions, some methods to limit the calculation to neighbor particles are required. FDPS provides all of these functions which are necessary for efficient parallel execution of particle-based simulations as "templates," which are independent of the actual data structure of particles and the functional form of the particle-particle interaction. By using FDPS, researchers can write their programs with the amount of work necessary to write a simple, sequential and unoptimized program of O(N2) calculation cost, and yet the program, once compiled with FDPS, will run efficiently on large-scale parallel supercomputers. A simple gravitational N-body program can be written in around 120 lines. We report the actual performance of these programs and the performance model. The weak scaling performance is very good, and almost linear speed-up was obtained for up to the full system of the K computer. The minimum calculation time per timestep is in the range of 30 ms (N = 107) to 300 ms (N = 109). These are currently limited by the time for the calculation of the domain decomposition and communication

  8. An implementation of granular dynamics for simulating frictional elastic particles based on the DL_POLY code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Meenakshi; Hancock, Bruno; Bentham, Craig; Elliott, James

    2005-02-01

    We have modified Daresbury Laboratory's replicated data strategy (RDS) parallel molecular dynamics (MD) package DL_POLY (version 2.13) to study the granular dynamics of frictional elastic particles. DL_POLY [Smith and Forester, The DL_POLY_2 User Manual v2.13, 2001; Forester and Smith, The DL_POLY_2 Reference Manual v2.13, 2001] is a MD package originally developed to study liquid state and macromolecular systems by accounting for various molecular interaction forces. The particles of interest in this study are macroscopic grains in pharmaceutical powders, with sizes ranging from tens to hundreds of microns. We have therefore substituted the molecular interaction forces with contact forces (including linear-dashpot, HKK interaction forces and Coulombic friction) while taking advantage of the RDS scheme. In effect, we have created a parallel Discrete Element Simulation (DES) code. In this paper, we describe the modifications made to the original DL_POLY code and the results from the validation tests of the granular dynamics simulations for systems of monodisperse spherical particles settling under gravity. The code can also be utilized to study particle packings generated via uniaxial compaction and, in some cases, simultaneous application of shear, at constant strain.

  9. High Altitude Neutral Particle Transport Using the Monte Carlo Simulation Code MCNP with Variable Density Atmosphere

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    Monti Captain# USAF AFIT.’GNE/F•P/91M-6 (LO IA Approved for public release; distribution unlimited AFIT/IGNE/ENP/91M-6 HIGH ALTITUDE NEUTRAL... distribution unlimited Preface The purpose of this study was to perform Monte Carlo simulations of neutral particle transport with primary and secondary...21 4. Spatial Cell Geometry for Co-Altitude Detectors .................... .................. 44 5. MCNP vs. SMAUG Neutron Fluence at Source Co

  10. N-body simulations for f(R) gravity using a self-adaptive particle-mesh code

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Gongbo; Koyama, Kazuya; Li Baojiu

    2011-02-15

    We perform high-resolution N-body simulations for f(R) gravity based on a self-adaptive particle-mesh code MLAPM. The chameleon mechanism that recovers general relativity on small scales is fully taken into account by self-consistently solving the nonlinear equation for the scalar field. We independently confirm the previous simulation results, including the matter power spectrum, halo mass function, and density profiles, obtained by Oyaizu et al.[Phys. Rev. D 78, 123524 (2008)] and Schmidt et al.[Phys. Rev. D 79, 083518 (2009)], and extend the resolution up to k{approx}20 h/Mpc for the measurement of the matter power spectrum. Based on our simulation results, we discuss how the chameleon mechanism affects the clustering of dark matter and halos on full nonlinear scales.

  11. A simulation of a capacitively coupled oxygen discharge using the oopd1 particle-in-cell Monte Carlo code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, J. T.; Lieberman, M. A.; Wang, Ying; Verboncoeur, J. P.

    2009-10-01

    The oopd1 particle-in-cell Monte Carlo (PIC-MC) code is used to simulate a capacitively coupled discharge in oxygen. oopd1 is a one-dimensional object-oriented PIC-MC code [1] in which the model system has one spatial dimension and three velocity components. It contains models for planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries and replaces the XPDx1 series [2], which is not object-oriented. The revised oxygen model includes, in addition to electrons, the oxygen molecule in ground state, the oxygen atom in ground state, the negative ion O^-, and the positive ions O^+ and O2^+. The cross sections for the collisions among the oxygen species have been significantly revised from earlier work using the xpdp1 code [3]. Here we explore the electron energy distribution function (EEDF), the ion energy distribution function (IEDF) and the density profiles for various pressures and driving frequencies. In particular we investigate the influence of the O^+ ion on the IEDF, we explore the influence of multiple driving frequencies, and we do comparisons to the previous xpdx1 codes. [1] J. P. Verboncoeur, A. B. Langdon, and N. T. Gladd, Comp. Phys. Comm. 87 (1995) 199 [2] J. P. Verboncoeur, M. V. Alves, V. Vahedi, and C. K. Birdsall, J. Comp. Physics 104 (1993) 321 [2] V. Vahedi and M. Surendra, Comp. Phys. Comm. 87 (1995) 179

  12. Simulation of Alfvén eigenmode bursts using a hybrid code for nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics and energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todo, Y.; Berk, H. L.; Breizman, B. N.

    2012-03-01

    A hybrid simulation code for nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and energetic-particle dynamics has been extended to simulate recurrent bursts of Alfvén eigenmodes by implementing the energetic-particle source, collisions and losses. The Alfvén eigenmode bursts with synchronization of multiple modes and beam ion losses at each burst are successfully simulated with nonlinear MHD effects for the physics condition similar to a reduced simulation for a TFTR experiment (Wong et al 1991 Phys. Rev. Lett. 66 1874, Todo et al 2003 Phys. Plasmas 10 2888). It is demonstrated with a comparison between nonlinear MHD and linear MHD simulation results that the nonlinear MHD effects significantly reduce both the saturation amplitude of the Alfvén eigenmodes and the beam ion losses. Two types of time evolution are found depending on the MHD dissipation coefficients, namely viscosity, resistivity and diffusivity. The Alfvén eigenmode bursts take place for higher dissipation coefficients with roughly 10% drop in stored beam energy and the maximum amplitude of the dominant magnetic fluctuation harmonic δBm/n/B ~ 5 × 10-3 at the mode peak location inside the plasma. Quadratic dependence of beam ion loss rate on magnetic fluctuation amplitude is found for the bursting evolution in the nonlinear MHD simulation. For lower dissipation coefficients, the amplitude of the Alfvén eigenmodes is at steady levels δBm/n/B ~ 2 × 10-3 and the beam ion losses take place continuously. The beam ion pressure profiles are similar among the different dissipation coefficients, and the stored beam energy is higher for higher dissipation coefficients.

  13. LFSC - Linac Feedback Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Valentin; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    The computer program LFSC (Simulation Code>) is a numerical tool for simulation beam based feedback in high performance linacs. The code LFSC is based on the earlier version developed by a collective of authors at SLAC (L.Hendrickson, R. McEwen, T. Himel, H. Shoaee, S. Shah, P. Emma, P. Schultz) during 1990-2005. That code was successively used in simulation of SLC, TESLA, CLIC and NLC projects. It can simulate as pulse-to-pulse feedback on timescale corresponding to 5-100 Hz, as slower feedbacks, operating in the 0.1-1 Hz range in the Main Linac and Beam Delivery System. The code LFSC is running under Matlab for MS Windows operating system. It contains about 30,000 lines of source code in more than 260 subroutines. The code uses the LIAR ('Linear Accelerator Research code') for particle tracking under ground motion and technical noise perturbations. It uses the Guinea Pig code to simulate the luminosity performance. A set of input files includes the lattice description (XSIF format), and plane text files with numerical parameters, wake fields, ground motion data etc. The Matlab environment provides a flexible system for graphical output.

  14. Simulations of an accelerator-based shielding experiment using the particle and heavy-ion transport code system PHITS.

    PubMed

    Sato, T; Sihver, L; Iwase, H; Nakashima, H; Niita, K

    2005-01-01

    In order to estimate the biological effects of HZE particles, an accurate knowledge of the physics of interaction of HZE particles is necessary. Since the heavy ion transport problem is a complex one, there is a need for both experimental and theoretical studies to develop accurate transport models. RIST and JAERI (Japan), GSI (Germany) and Chalmers (Sweden) are therefore currently developing and bench marking the General-Purpose Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System (PHITS), which is based on the NMTC and MCNP for nucleon/meson and neutron transport respectively, and the JAM hadron cascade model. PHITS uses JAERI Quantum Molecular Dynamics (JQMD) and the Generalized Evaporation Model (GEM) for calculations of fission and evaporation processes, a model developed at NASA Langley for calculation of total reaction cross sections, and the SPAR model for stopping power calculations. The future development of PHITS includes better parameterization in the JQMD model used for the nucleus-nucleus reactions, and improvement of the models used for calculating total reaction cross sections, and addition of routines for calculating elastic scattering of heavy ions, and inclusion of radioactivity and burn up processes. As a part of an extensive bench marking of PHITS, we have compared energy spectra of secondary neutrons created by reactions of HZE particles with different targets, with thicknesses ranging from <1 to 200 cm. We have also compared simulated and measured spatial, fluence and depth-dose distributions from different high energy heavy ion reactions. In this paper, we report simulations of an accelerator-based shielding experiment, in which a beam of 1 GeV/n Fe-ions has passed through thin slabs of polyethylene, Al, and Pb at an acceptance angle up to 4 degrees.

  15. Electrical Circuit Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Wix, Steven D.; Waters, Arlon J.; Shirley, David

    2001-08-09

    Massively-Parallel Electrical Circuit Simulation Code. CHILESPICE is a massively-arallel distributed-memory electrical circuit simulation tool that contains many enhanced radiation, time-based, and thermal features and models. Large scale electronic circuit simulation. Shared memory, parallel processing, enhance convergence. Sandia specific device models.

  16. Compressible Astrophysics Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, L.; Singer, M.

    2007-07-18

    This is an astrophysics simulation code involving a radiation diffusion module developed at LLNL coupled to compressible hydrodynamics and adaptive mesh infrastructure developed at LBNL. One intended application is to neutrino diffusion in core collapse supernovae.

  17. Modeling secondary particle tracks generated by intermediate- and low-energy protons in water with the Low-Energy Particle Track Simulation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhovtsev, Alexey; Traore, Ali; Muñoz, Antonio; Blanco, Francisco; García, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Using a recent extension of the Low-Energy Particle Track Simulation (LEPTS) Monte Carlo code, we model the slowing-down of heavy charged particles propagating in water, combined with an explicit molecular-level description of radiation effects due to the formation of secondary electrons, their propagation through the medium, and electron-induced molecular dissociations. As a case study, we consider the transport of protons with the initial energy of 1 MeV until their thermalization, so that we cover the energy range that contributes mainly to the energy deposition in the Bragg peak region. In order to include protons into the simulation procedure, a comprehensive dataset of integral and differential cross sections of elastic and inelastic scattering of intermediate- and low-energy protons from water molecules is created. Experimental and theoretical cross sections available in the literature are carefully examined, compared and verified. The ionization cross section by protons includes recent experimental measurements of the production of different charged fragments.

  18. Computational performance of SequenceL coding of the lattice Boltzmann method for multi-particle flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başağaoğlu, Hakan; Blount, Justin; Blount, Jarred; Nelson, Bryant; Succi, Sauro; Westhart, Phil M.; Harwell, John R.

    2017-04-01

    This paper reports, for the first time, the computational performance of SequenceL for mesoscale simulations of large numbers of particles in a microfluidic device via the lattice-Boltzmann method. The performance of SequenceL simulations was assessed against the optimized serial and parallelized (via OpenMP directives) FORTRAN90 simulations. At present, OpenMP directives were not included in inter-particle and particle-wall repulsive (steric) interaction calculations due to difficulties that arose from inter-iteration dependencies between consecutive iterations of the do-loops. SequenceL simulations, on the other hand, relied on built-in automatic parallelism. Under these conditions, numerical simulations revealed that the parallelized FORTRAN90 outran the performance of SequenceL by a factor of 2.5 or more when the number of particles was 100 or less. SequenceL, however, outran the performance of the parallelized FORTRAN90 by a factor of 1.3 when the number of particles was 300. Our results show that when the number of particles increased by 30-fold, the computational time of SequenceL simulations increased linearly by a factor of 1.5, as compared to a 3.2-fold increase in serial and a 7.7-fold increase in parallelized FORTRAN90 simulations. Considering SequenceL's efficient built-in parallelism that led to a relatively small increase in computational time with increased number of particles, it could be a promising programming language for computationally-efficient mesoscale simulations of large numbers of particles in microfluidic experiments.

  19. Error coding simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Viveca K.

    1993-01-01

    There are various elements such as radio frequency interference (RFI) which may induce errors in data being transmitted via a satellite communication link. When a transmission is affected by interference or other error-causing elements, the transmitted data becomes indecipherable. It becomes necessary to implement techniques to recover from these disturbances. The objective of this research is to develop software which simulates error control circuits and evaluate the performance of these modules in various bit error rate environments. The results of the evaluation provide the engineer with information which helps determine the optimal error control scheme. The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) recommends the use of Reed-Solomon (RS) and convolutional encoders and Viterbi and RS decoders for error correction. The use of forward error correction techniques greatly reduces the received signal to noise needed for a certain desired bit error rate. The use of concatenated coding, e.g. inner convolutional code and outer RS code, provides even greater coding gain. The 16-bit cyclic redundancy check (CRC) code is recommended by CCSDS for error detection.

  20. A Description of the Full Particle Orbit Following SPIRAL Code for Simulating Fast-ion Experiments in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G.J.; Budny, R.V.; Bortolon, A.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Fu, G.Y.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Nazikian, R.; Valeo, E.; Van Zeeland, M.A.

    2012-07-27

    The numerical methods used in the full particle-orbit following SPIRAL code are described and a number of physics studies performed with the code are presented to illustrate its capabilities. The SPIRAL code is a test-particle code and is a powerful numerical tool to interpret and plan fast-ion experiments in Tokamaks. Gyro-orbit effects are important for fast ions in low-field machines such as NSTX and to a lesser extent in DIII-D. A number of physics studies are interlaced between the description of the code to illustrate its capabilities. Results on heat loads generated by a localized error-field on the DIII-D wall are compared to measurements. The enhanced Triton losses caused by the same localized error-field are calculated and compared to measured neutron signals. MHD activity such as tearing modes and Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmodes (TAEs) have a profound effect on the fast-ion content of Tokamak plasmas and SPIRAL can calculate the effects of MHD activity on the confined and lost fast-ion population as illustrated for a burst of TAE activity in NSTX. The interaction between Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating and fast ions depends solely on the gyro-motion of the fast ions and is captured exactly in the SPIRAL code. A calculation of ICRF absorption on beam ions in ITER is presented. The effects of high harmonic fast wave heating on the beam-ion slowing-down distribution in NSTX is also studied.

  1. Radiation in Particle Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    More, R; Graziani, F; Glosli, J; Surh, M

    2010-11-19

    Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of megabars to thousands of gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present four methods that attempt a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The first method applies the Lienard-Weichert solution of Maxwell's equations for a classical particle whose motion is assumed to be known. The second method expands the electromagnetic field in normal modes (planewaves in a box with periodic boundary-conditions) and solves the equation for wave amplitudes coupled to the particle motion. The third method is a hybrid molecular dynamics/Monte Carlo (MD/MC) method which calculates radiation emitted or absorbed by electron-ion pairs during close collisions. The fourth method is a generalization of the third method to include small clusters of particles emitting radiation during close encounters: one electron simultaneously hitting two ions, two electrons simultaneously hitting one ion, etc. This approach is inspired by the virial expansion method of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Using a combination of these methods we believe it is possible to do atomic-scale particle simulations of

  2. A Large-Particle Monte Carlo Code for Simulating Non-Linear High-Energy Processes Near Compact Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Boris E.; Svensson, Roland; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Sikora, Marek

    1995-01-01

    High-energy radiation processes in compact cosmic objects are often expected to have a strongly non-linear behavior. Such behavior is shown, for example, by electron-positron pair cascades and the time evolution of relativistic proton distributions in dense radiation fields. Three independent techniques have been developed to simulate these non-linear problems: the kinetic equation approach; the phase-space density (PSD) Monte Carlo method; and the large-particle (LP) Monte Carlo method. In this paper, we present the latest version of the LP method and compare it with the other methods. The efficiency of the method in treating geometrically complex problems is illustrated by showing results of simulations of 1D, 2D and 3D systems. The method is shown to be powerful enough to treat non-spherical geometries, including such effects as bulk motion of the background plasma, reflection of radiation from cold matter, and anisotropic distributions of radiating particles. It can therefore be applied to simulate high-energy processes in such astrophysical systems as accretion discs with coronae, relativistic jets, pulsar magnetospheres and gamma-ray bursts.

  3. Radiation in Particle Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    More, R M; Graziani, F R; Glosli, J; Surh, M

    2009-06-15

    Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of Megabars to thousands of Gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present four methods that attempt a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The first method applies the Lienard-Weichert solution of Maxwell's equations for a classical particle whose motion is assumed to be known (section 3). The second method expands the electromagnetic field in normal modes (plane-waves in a box with periodic boundary-conditions) and solves the equation for wave amplitudes coupled to the particle motion (section 4). The third method is a hybrid MD/MC (molecular dynamics/Monte Carlo) method which calculates radiation emitted or absorbed by electron-ion pairs during close collisions (section 5). The fourth method is a generalization of the third method to include small clusters of particles emitting radiation during close encounters: one electron simultaneously hitting two ions, two electrons simultaneously hitting one ion, etc.(section 6). This approach is inspired by the Virial expansion method of equilibrium statistical mechanics.

  4. Development of the 3D Parallel Particle-In-Cell Code IMPACT to Simulate the Ion Beam Transport System of VENUS (Abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D.S.; Ryne, R.D.

    2005-03-15

    The superconducting ECR ion source VENUS serves as the prototype injector ion source for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The RIA driver linac requires a great variety of high charge state ion beams with up to an order of magnitude higher intensity than currently achievable with conventional ECR ion sources. In order to design the beam line optics of the low energy beam line for the RIA front end for the wide parameter range required for the RIA driver accelerator, reliable simulations of the ion beam extraction from the ECR ion source through the ion mass analyzing system are essential. The RIA low energy beam transport line must be able to transport intense beams (up to 10 mA) of light and heavy ions at 30 keV.For this purpose, LBNL is developing the parallel 3D particle-in-cell code IMPACT to simulate the ion beam transport from the ECR extraction aperture through the analyzing section of the low energy transport system. IMPACT, a parallel, particle-in-cell code, is currently used to model the superconducting RF linac section of RIA and is being modified in order to simulate DC beams from the ECR ion source extraction. By using the high performance of parallel supercomputing we will be able to account consistently for the changing space charge in the extraction region and the analyzing section. A progress report and early results in the modeling of the VENUS source will be presented.

  5. Development of the 3D Parallel Particle-In-Cell Code IMPACT to Simulate the Ion Beam Transport System of VENUS (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D. S.; Ryne, R. D.

    2005-03-01

    The superconducting ECR ion source VENUS serves as the prototype injector ion source for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The RIA driver linac requires a great variety of high charge state ion beams with up to an order of magnitude higher intensity than currently achievable with conventional ECR ion sources. In order to design the beam line optics of the low energy beam line for the RIA front end for the wide parameter range required for the RIA driver accelerator, reliable simulations of the ion beam extraction from the ECR ion source through the ion mass analyzing system are essential. The RIA low energy beam transport line must be able to transport intense beams (up to 10 mA) of light and heavy ions at 30 keV. For this purpose, LBNL is developing the parallel 3D particle-in-cell code IMPACT to simulate the ion beam transport from the ECR extraction aperture through the analyzing section of the low energy transport system. IMPACT, a parallel, particle-in-cell code, is currently used to model the superconducting RF linac section of RIA and is being modified in order to simulate DC beams from the ECR ion source extraction. By using the high performance of parallel supercomputing we will be able to account consistently for the changing space charge in the extraction region and the analyzing section. A progress report and early results in the modeling of the VENUS source will be presented.

  6. Nonlinear fluid simulation of particle and heat fluxes during burst of ELMs on DIII-D with BOUT++ code [Fluid Simulation of Particle and Heat Fluxes during Burst of ELMs on DIID with BOUT++ code

    DOE PAGES

    Xia, T. Y.; Xu, X. Q.

    2015-09-01

    In order to study the distribution and evolution of the transient particle and heat fluxes during edge-localized mode (ELM) bursts, a BOUT++ six-field two-fluid model based on the Braginskii equations with non-ideal physics effects is used to simulate pedestal collapse in divertor geometry. We used the profiles from the DIII-D H-mode discharge #144382 with fast target heat flux measurements as the initial conditions for the simulations. Moreover, a flux-limited parallel thermal conduction is used with three values of the flux-limiting coefficientmore » $${{\\alpha}_{j}}$$ , free streaming model with $${{\\alpha}_{j}}=1$$ , sheath-limit with $${{\\alpha}_{j}}=0.05$$ , and one value in between. The studies show that a 20 times increase in $${{\\alpha}_{j}}$$ leads to ~6 times increase in the heat flux amplitude to both the inner and outer targets, and the widths of the fluxes are also expanded. The sheath-limit model of flux-limiting coefficient is found to be the most appropriate one, which shows ELM sizes close to the measurements. The evolution of the density profile during the burst of ELMs of DIII-D discharge #144382 is simulated, and the collapse in width and depth of $${{n}_{\\text{e}}}$$ are reproduced at different time steps. The growing process of the profiles for the heat flux at divertor targets during the burst of ELMs measured by IRTV (infrared television) is also reproduced by this model. The widths of heat fluxes towards targets are a little narrower, and the peak amplitudes are twice the measurements possibly due to the lack of a model of divertor radiation which can effectively reduce the heat fluxes. The magnetic flutter combined with parallel thermal conduction is found to be able to increase the total heat loss by around 33% since the magnetic flutter terms provide the additional conductive heat transport in the radial direction. Finally, the heat flux profile at both the inner and outer targets is obviously broadened by magnetic flutter. The

  7. Nonlinear fluid simulation of particle and heat fluxes during burst of ELMs on DIII-D with BOUT++ code [Fluid Simulation of Particle and Heat Fluxes during Burst of ELMs on DIID with BOUT++ code

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, T. Y.; Xu, X. Q.

    2015-09-01

    In order to study the distribution and evolution of the transient particle and heat fluxes during edge-localized mode (ELM) bursts, a BOUT++ six-field two-fluid model based on the Braginskii equations with non-ideal physics effects is used to simulate pedestal collapse in divertor geometry. We used the profiles from the DIII-D H-mode discharge #144382 with fast target heat flux measurements as the initial conditions for the simulations. Moreover, a flux-limited parallel thermal conduction is used with three values of the flux-limiting coefficient ${{\\alpha}_{j}}$ , free streaming model with ${{\\alpha}_{j}}=1$ , sheath-limit with ${{\\alpha}_{j}}=0.05$ , and one value in between. The studies show that a 20 times increase in ${{\\alpha}_{j}}$ leads to ~6 times increase in the heat flux amplitude to both the inner and outer targets, and the widths of the fluxes are also expanded. The sheath-limit model of flux-limiting coefficient is found to be the most appropriate one, which shows ELM sizes close to the measurements. The evolution of the density profile during the burst of ELMs of DIII-D discharge #144382 is simulated, and the collapse in width and depth of ${{n}_{\\text{e}}}$ are reproduced at different time steps. The growing process of the profiles for the heat flux at divertor targets during the burst of ELMs measured by IRTV (infrared television) is also reproduced by this model. The widths of heat fluxes towards targets are a little narrower, and the peak amplitudes are twice the measurements possibly due to the lack of a model of divertor radiation which can effectively reduce the heat fluxes. The magnetic flutter combined with parallel thermal conduction is found to be able to increase the total heat loss by around 33% since the magnetic flutter terms provide the additional conductive heat transport in the radial direction. Finally, the heat flux profile at both the inner and outer targets is obviously broadened by magnetic flutter. The lobe structures

  8. Flight code validation simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, B.A.

    1995-08-01

    An End-To-End Simulation capability for software development and validation of missile flight software on the actual embedded computer has been developed utilizing a 486 PC, i860 DSP coprocessor, embedded flight computer and custom dual port memory interface hardware. This system allows real-time interrupt driven embedded flight software development and checkout. The flight software runs in a Sandia Digital Airborne Computer (SANDAC) and reads and writes actual hardware sensor locations in which IMU (Inertial Measurements Unit) data resides. The simulator provides six degree of freedom real-time dynamic simulation, accurate real-time discrete sensor data and acts on commands and discretes from the flight computer. This system was utilized in the development and validation of the successful premier flight of the Digital Miniature Attitude Reference System (DMARS) in January 1995 at the White Sands Missile Range on a two stage attitude controlled sounding rocket.

  9. An implicit Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic code

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Charles E.

    2000-05-01

    An implicit version of the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) code SPHINX has been written and is working. In conjunction with the SPHINX code the new implicit code models fluids and solids under a wide range of conditions. SPH codes are Lagrangian, meshless and use particles to model the fluids and solids. The implicit code makes use of the Krylov iterative techniques for solving large linear-systems and a Newton-Raphson method for non-linear corrections. It uses numerical derivatives to construct the Jacobian matrix. It uses sparse techniques to save on memory storage and to reduce the amount of computation. It is believed that this is the first implicit SPH code to use Newton-Krylov techniques, and is also the first implicit SPH code to model solids. A description of SPH and the techniques used in the implicit code are presented. Then, the results of a number of tests cases are discussed, which include a shock tube problem, a Rayleigh-Taylor problem, a breaking dam problem, and a single jet of gas problem. The results are shown to be in very good agreement with analytic solutions, experimental results, and the explicit SPHINX code. In the case of the single jet of gas case it has been demonstrated that the implicit code can do a problem in much shorter time than the explicit code. The problem was, however, very unphysical, but it does demonstrate the potential of the implicit code. It is a first step toward a useful implicit SPH code.

  10. HADES, A Radiographic Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Aufderheide, M.B.; Slone, D.M.; Schach von Wittenau, A.E.

    2000-08-18

    We describe features of the HADES radiographic simulation code. We begin with a discussion of why it is useful to simulate transmission radiography. The capabilities of HADES are described, followed by an application of HADES to a dynamic experiment recently performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. We describe quantitative comparisons between experimental data and HADES simulations using a copper step wedge. We conclude with a short discussion of future work planned for HADES.

  11. Multidimensional multiphysics simulation of TRISO particle fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, J. D.; Williamson, R. L.; Novascone, S. R.; Perez, D. M.; Spencer, B. W.; Pastore, G.

    2013-11-01

    Multidimensional multiphysics analysis of TRISO-coated particle fuel using the BISON finite element nuclear fuels code is described. The governing equations and material models applicable to particle fuel and implemented in BISON are outlined. Code verification based on a recent IAEA benchmarking exercise is described, and excellent comparisons are reported. Multiple TRISO-coated particles of increasing geometric complexity are considered. The code's ability to use the same algorithms and models to solve problems of varying dimensionality from 1D through 3D is demonstrated. The code provides rapid solutions of 1D spherically symmetric and 2D axially symmetric models, and its scalable parallel processing capability allows for solutions of large, complex 3D models. Additionally, the flexibility to easily include new physical and material models and straightforward ability to couple to lower length scale simulations makes BISON a powerful tool for simulation of coated-particle fuel. Future code development activities and potential applications are identified.

  12. SIMULATING THE COMMON ENVELOPE PHASE OF A RED GIANT USING SMOOTHED-PARTICLE HYDRODYNAMICS AND UNIFORM-GRID CODES

    SciTech Connect

    Passy, Jean-Claude; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; De Marco, Orsola; Fryer, Chris L.; Diehl, Steven; Rockefeller, Gabriel; Herwig, Falk; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Bryan, Greg L.

    2012-01-01

    We use three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations to study the rapid infall phase of the common envelope (CE) interaction of a red giant branch star of mass equal to 0.88 M{sub Sun} and a companion star of mass ranging from 0.9 down to 0.1 M{sub Sun }. We first compare the results obtained using two different numerical techniques with different resolutions, and find very good agreement overall. We then compare the outcomes of those simulations with observed systems thought to have gone through a CE. The simulations fail to reproduce those systems in the sense that most of the envelope of the donor remains bound at the end of the simulations and the final orbital separations between the donor's remnant and the companion, ranging from 26.8 down to 5.9 R{sub Sun }, are larger than the ones observed. We suggest that this discrepancy vouches for recombination playing an essential role in the ejection of the envelope and/or significant shrinkage of the orbit happening in the subsequent phase.

  13. Aerosol kinetic code "AERFORM": Model, validation and simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainullin, K. G.; Golubev, A. I.; Petrov, A. M.; Piskunov, V. N.

    2016-06-01

    The aerosol kinetic code "AERFORM" is modified to simulate droplet and ice particle formation in mixed clouds. The splitting method is used to calculate condensation and coagulation simultaneously. The method is calibrated with analytic solutions of kinetic equations. Condensation kinetic model is based on cloud particle growth equation, mass and heat balance equations. The coagulation kinetic model includes Brownian, turbulent and precipitation effects. The real values are used for condensation and coagulation growth of water droplets and ice particles. The model and the simulation results for two full-scale cloud experiments are presented. The simulation model and code may be used autonomously or as an element of another code.

  14. Multidimensional Multiphysics Simulation of TRISO Particle Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    J. D. Hales; R. L. Williamson; S. R. Novascone; D. M. Perez; B. W. Spencer; G. Pastore

    2013-11-01

    Multidimensional multiphysics analysis of TRISO-coated particle fuel using the BISON finite-element based nuclear fuels code is described. The governing equations and material models applicable to particle fuel and implemented in BISON are outlined. Code verification based on a recent IAEA benchmarking exercise is described, and excellant comparisons are reported. Multiple TRISO-coated particles of increasing geometric complexity are considered. It is shown that the code's ability to perform large-scale parallel computations permits application to complex 3D phenomena while very efficient solutions for either 1D spherically symmetric or 2D axisymmetric geometries are straightforward. Additionally, the flexibility to easily include new physical and material models and uncomplicated ability to couple to lower length scale simulations makes BISON a powerful tool for simulation of coated-particle fuel. Future code development activities and potential applications are identified.

  15. Battery Particle Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    2014-09-15

    Two simulations show the differences between a battery being drained at a slower rate, over a full hour, versus a faster rate, only six minutes (a tenth of an hour). In both cases battery particles go from being fully charged (green) to fully drained (red), but there are significant differences in the patterns of discharge based on the rate.

  16. Superdense Coding with Uniformly Accelerated Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahmand, Mehrnoosh; Mohammadzadeh, Hosein; Mehri-Dehnavi, Hossein; Rahimi, Robabeh

    2017-03-01

    We study superdense coding with uniformly accelerated particle in single mode approximation and beyond single mode approximation. We use four different functions, the capacity of superdense coding, negativity, discord and the probability of success for evaluating the final results. In single mode approximation, all the four functions behave as expected, however in beyond single mode approximation, except the probability of success, the other three functions represent peculiar behaviors at least for special ranges where the beyond single mode approximation is strong.

  17. TOPAS Tool for Particle Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, Joseph

    2013-05-30

    TOPAS lets users simulate the passage of subatomic particles moving through any kind of radiation therapy treatment system, can import a patient geometry, can record dose and other quantities, has advanced graphics, and is fully four-dimensional (3D plus time) to handle the most challenging time-dependent aspects of modern cancer treatments.TOPAS unlocks the power of the most accurate particle transport simulation technique, the Monte Carlo (MC) method, while removing the painstaking coding work such methods used to require. Research physicists can use TOPAS to improve delivery systems towards safer and more effective radiation therapy treatments, easily setting up and running complex simulations that previously used to take months of preparation. Clinical physicists can use TOPAS to increase accuracy while reducing side effects, simulating patient-specific treatment plans at the touch of a button. TOPAS is designed as a “user code” layered on top of the Geant4 Simulation Toolkit. TOPAS includes the standard Geant4 toolkit, plus additional code to make Geant4 easier to control and to extend Geant4 functionality. TOPAS aims to make proton simulation both “reliable” and “repeatable.” “Reliable” means both accurate physics and a high likelihood to simulate precisely what the user intended to simulate, reducing issues of wrong units, wrong materials, wrong scoring locations, etc. “Repeatable” means not just getting the same result from one simulation to another, but being able to easily restore a previously used setup and reducing sources of error when a setup is passed from one user to another. TOPAS control system incorporates key lessons from safety management, proactively removing possible sources of user error such as line-ordering mistakes In control files. TOPAS has been used to model proton therapy treatment examples including the UCSF eye treatment head, the MGH stereotactic alignment in radiosurgery treatment head and the MGH gantry treatment heads

  18. FLUKA: A Multi-Particle Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, A.; Sala, P.R.; Fasso, A.; Ranft, J.; /Siegen U.

    2005-12-14

    This report describes the 2005 version of the Fluka particle transport code. The first part introduces the basic notions, describes the modular structure of the system, and contains an installation and beginner's guide. The second part complements this initial information with details about the various components of Fluka and how to use them. It concludes with a detailed history and bibliography.

  19. Computer Code for Nanostructure Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filikhin, Igor; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2009-01-01

    Due to their small size, nanostructures can have stress and thermal gradients that are larger than any macroscopic analogue. These gradients can lead to specific regions that are susceptible to failure via processes such as plastic deformation by dislocation emission, chemical debonding, and interfacial alloying. A program has been developed that rigorously simulates and predicts optoelectronic properties of nanostructures of virtually any geometrical complexity and material composition. It can be used in simulations of energy level structure, wave functions, density of states of spatially configured phonon-coupled electrons, excitons in quantum dots, quantum rings, quantum ring complexes, and more. The code can be used to calculate stress distributions and thermal transport properties for a variety of nanostructures and interfaces, transport and scattering at nanoscale interfaces and surfaces under various stress states, and alloy compositional gradients. The code allows users to perform modeling of charge transport processes through quantum-dot (QD) arrays as functions of inter-dot distance, array order versus disorder, QD orientation, shape, size, and chemical composition for applications in photovoltaics and physical properties of QD-based biochemical sensors. The code can be used to study the hot exciton formation/relation dynamics in arrays of QDs of different shapes and sizes at different temperatures. It also can be used to understand the relation among the deposition parameters and inherent stresses, strain deformation, heat flow, and failure of nanostructures.

  20. NASA National Combustion Code Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iannetti, Anthony; Davoudzadeh, Farhad

    2001-01-01

    A systematic effort is in progress to further validate the National Combustion Code (NCC) that has been developed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) for comprehensive modeling and simulation of aerospace combustion systems. The validation efforts include numerical simulation of the gas-phase combustor experiments conducted at the Center for Turbulence Research (CTR), Stanford University, followed by comparison and evaluation of the computed results with the experimental data. Presently, at GRC, a numerical model of the experimental gaseous combustor is built to simulate the experimental model. The constructed numerical geometry includes the flow development sections for air annulus and fuel pipe, 24 channel air and fuel swirlers, hub, combustor, and tail pipe. Furthermore, a three-dimensional multi-block, multi-grid grid (1.6 million grid points, 3-levels of multi-grid) is generated. Computational simulation of the gaseous combustor flow field operating on methane fuel has started. The computational domain includes the whole flow regime starting from the fuel pipe and the air annulus, through the 12 air and 12 fuel channels, in the combustion region and through the tail pipe.

  1. Hybrid simulation codes with application to shocks and upstream waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winske, D.

    1985-01-01

    Hybrid codes in which part of the plasma is represented as particles and the rest as a fluid are discussed. In the past few years such codes with particle ions and massless, fluid electrons have been applied to space plasmas, especially to collisionless shocks. All of these simulation codes are one-dimensional and similar in structure, except for how the field equations are solved. The various approaches that are used (resistive Ohm's law, predictor-corrector, Hamiltonian) are described in detail and results from the various codes are compared with examples taken from collisionless shocks and low frequency wave phenomena upstream of shocks.

  2. Comprehensive Benchmark Suite for Simulation of Particle Laden Flows Using the Discrete Element Method with Performance Profiles from the Multiphase Flow with Interface eXchanges (MFiX) Code

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Peiyuan; Brown, Timothy; Fullmer, William D.; Hauser, Thomas; Hrenya, Christine; Grout, Ray; Sitaraman, Hariswaran

    2016-01-29

    Five benchmark problems are developed and simulated with the computational fluid dynamics and discrete element model code MFiX. The benchmark problems span dilute and dense regimes, consider statistically homogeneous and inhomogeneous (both clusters and bubbles) particle concentrations and a range of particle and fluid dynamic computational loads. Several variations of the benchmark problems are also discussed to extend the computational phase space to cover granular (particles only), bidisperse and heat transfer cases. A weak scaling analysis is performed for each benchmark problem and, in most cases, the scalability of the code appears reasonable up to approx. 103 cores. Profiling of the benchmark problems indicate that the most substantial computational time is being spent on particle-particle force calculations, drag force calculations and interpolating between discrete particle and continuum fields. Hardware performance analysis was also carried out showing significant Level 2 cache miss ratios and a rather low degree of vectorization. These results are intended to serve as a baseline for future developments to the code as well as a preliminary indicator of where to best focus performance optimizations.

  3. Data simulation for the Associated Particle Imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Tunnell, L.N.

    1994-06-01

    A data simulation procedure for the Associated Particle Imaging (API) system has been developed by postprocessing output from the Monte Carlo Neutron Photon (MCNP) code. This paper compares the simulated results to our experimental data.

  4. Overview of WARP, a particle code for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Callahan, D.A.; Langdon, A.B.; Haber, I.

    1993-02-22

    The beams in a Heavy Ion beam driven inertial Fusion (HIF) accelerator must be focused onto small spots at the fusion target, and so preservation of beam quality is crucial. The nonlinear self-fields of these space-charge-dominated beams can lead to emittance growth; thus a self-consistent field description is necessary. We have developed a multi-dimensional discrete-particle simulation code, WARP, and are using it to study the behavior of HIF beams. The code`s 3d package combines features of an accelerator code and a particle-in-cell plasma simulation, and can efficiently track beams through many lattice elements and around bends. We have used the code to understand the physics of aggressive drift-compression in the MBE-4 experiment at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). We have applied it to LBL`s planned ILSE experiments, to various ``recirculator`` configurations, and to the study of equilibria and equilibration processes. Applications of the 3d package to ESQ injectors, and of the r, z package to longitudinal stability in driver beams, are discussed in related papers.

  5. The TESS (Tandem Experiment Simulation Studies) computer code user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R.J. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Cohen, B.I. )

    1990-06-01

    TESS (Tandem Experiment Simulation Studies) is a one-dimensional, bounded particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code designed to investigate the confinement and transport of plasma in a magnetic mirror device, including tandem mirror configurations. Mirror plasmas may be modeled in a system which includes an applied magnetic field and/or a self-consistent or applied electrostatic potential. The PIC code TESS is similar to the PIC code DIPSI (Direct Implicit Plasma Surface Interactions) which is designed to study plasma transport to and interaction with a solid surface. The codes TESS and DIPSI are direct descendants of the PIC code ES1 that was created by A. B. Langdon. This document provides the user with a brief description of the methods used in the code and a tutorial on the use of the code. 10 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. GPU-enabled particle-particle particle-tree scheme for simulating dense stellar cluster system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasawa, Masaki; Portegies Zwart, Simon; Makino, Junichiro

    2015-07-01

    We describe the implementation and performance of the (Particle-Particle Particle-Tree) scheme for simulating dense stellar systems. In , the force experienced by a particle is split into short-range and long-range contributions. Short-range forces are evaluated by direct summation and integrated with the fourth order Hermite predictor-corrector method with the block timesteps. For long-range forces, we use a combination of the Barnes-Hut tree code and the leapfrog integrator. The tree part of our simulation environment is accelerated using graphical processing units (GPU), whereas the direct summation is carried out on the host CPU. Our code gives excellent performance and accuracy for star cluster simulations with a large number of particles even when the core size of the star cluster is small.

  7. BOA, Beam Optics Analyzer A Particle-In-Cell Code

    SciTech Connect

    Thuc Bui

    2007-12-06

    The program was tasked with implementing time dependent analysis of charges particles into an existing finite element code with adaptive meshing, called Beam Optics Analyzer (BOA). BOA was initially funded by a DOE Phase II program to use the finite element method with adaptive meshing to track particles in unstructured meshes. It uses modern programming techniques, state-of-the-art data structures, so that new methods, features and capabilities are easily added and maintained. This Phase II program was funded to implement plasma simulations in BOA and extend its capabilities to model thermal electrons, secondary emissions, self magnetic field and implement a more comprehensive post-processing and feature-rich GUI. The program was successful in implementing thermal electrons, secondary emissions, and self magnetic field calculations. The BOA GUI was also upgraded significantly, and CCR is receiving interest from the microwave tube and semiconductor equipment industry for the code. Implementation of PIC analysis was partially successful. Computational resource requirements for modeling more than 2000 particles begin to exceed the capability of most readily available computers. Modern plasma analysis typically requires modeling of approximately 2 million particles or more. The problem is that tracking many particles in an unstructured mesh that is adapting becomes inefficient. In particular memory requirements become excessive. This probably makes particle tracking in unstructured meshes currently unfeasible with commonly available computer resources. Consequently, Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. is exploring hybrid codes where the electromagnetic fields are solved on the unstructured, adaptive mesh while particles are tracked on a fixed mesh. Efficient interpolation routines should be able to transfer information between nodes of the two meshes. If successfully developed, this could provide high accuracy and reasonable computational efficiency.

  8. Track-Structure Simulations for Charged Particles

    PubMed Central

    Dingfelder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Monte-Carlo track-structure simulations provide a detailed and accurate picture of radiation transport of charged particles through condensed matter of biological interest. Liquid water serves as surrogate for soft tissue and is used in most Monte-Carlo track-structure codes. Basic theories of radiation transport and track-structure simulations are discussed and differences to condensed history codes highlighted. Interaction cross sections for electrons, protons, alpha particles, light and heavy ions are required input data for track-structure simulations. Different calculation methods, including the plane-wave Born approximation, the dielectric theory, and semi-empirical approaches are presented using liquid water as a target. Low-energy electron transport and light ion transport are discussed as areas of special interest. PMID:23032889

  9. SU-E-T-590: Optimizing Magnetic Field Strengths with Matlab for An Ion-Optic System in Particle Therapy Consisting of Two Quadrupole Magnets for Subsequent Simulations with the Monte-Carlo Code FLUKA

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, K; Weber, U; Simeonov, Y; Zink, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Aim of this study was to optimize the magnetic field strengths of two quadrupole magnets in a particle therapy facility in order to obtain a beam quality suitable for spot beam scanning. Methods: The particle transport through an ion-optic system of a particle therapy facility consisting of the beam tube, two quadrupole magnets and a beam monitor system was calculated with the help of Matlab by using matrices that solve the equation of motion of a charged particle in a magnetic field and field-free region, respectively. The magnetic field strengths were optimized in order to obtain a circular and thin beam spot at the iso-center of the therapy facility. These optimized field strengths were subsequently transferred to the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA and the transport of 80 MeV/u C12-ions through this ion-optic system was calculated by using a user-routine to implement magnetic fields. The fluence along the beam-axis and at the iso-center was evaluated. Results: The magnetic field strengths could be optimized by using Matlab and transferred to the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA. The implementation via a user-routine was successful. Analyzing the fluence-pattern along the beam-axis the characteristic focusing and de-focusing effects of the quadrupole magnets could be reproduced. Furthermore the beam spot at the iso-center was circular and significantly thinner compared to an unfocused beam. Conclusion: In this study a Matlab tool was developed to optimize magnetic field strengths for an ion-optic system consisting of two quadrupole magnets as part of a particle therapy facility. These magnetic field strengths could subsequently be transferred to and implemented in the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA to simulate the particle transport through this optimized ion-optic system.

  10. Dynamic simulation of particle sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongzhen; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2004-11-01

    The sedimentation of 1024 spheres has been simulated via a recently developed method:Physalis Method. Particles are initially randomly distributed and periodic boundary conditions are assumed. The time evolution of the particle spatial distribution is studied by meassuering the structure factor. Properties of particles velocity distribution, e.g. variance, time autocorrelation, have been studied. The effects of particle rotation and collision are discussed.

  11. IMPLEMENTATION OF SINK PARTICLES IN THE ATHENA CODE

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Hao; Ostriker, Eve C. E-mail: eco@astro.princeton.edu

    2013-01-15

    We describe the implementation and tests of sink particle algorithms in the Eulerian grid-based code Athena. The introduction of sink particles enables the long-term evolution of systems in which localized collapse occurs, and it is impractical (or unnecessary) to resolve the accretion shocks at the centers of collapsing regions. We discuss the similarities and differences of our methods compared to other implementations of sink particles. Our criteria for sink creation are motivated by the properties of the Larson-Penston collapse solution. We use standard particle-mesh methods to compute particle and gas gravity together. Accretion of mass and momenta onto sinks is computed using fluxes returned by the Riemann solver. A series of tests based on previous analytic and numerical collapse solutions is used to validate our method and implementation. We demonstrate use of our code for applications with a simulation of planar converging supersonic turbulent flow, in which multiple cores form and collapse to create sinks; these sinks continue to interact and accrete from their surroundings over several Myr.

  12. Balancing Particle and Mesh Computation in a Particle-In-Cell Code

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, Patrick H; D'Azevedo, Eduardo; Hager, Robert; Ku, Seung-Hoe; Yoon, Eisung; Chang, C. S.

    2016-01-01

    The XGC1 plasma microturbulence particle-in-cell simulation code has both particle-based and mesh-based computational kernels that dominate performance. Both of these are subject to load imbalances that can degrade performance and that evolve during a simulation. Each separately can be addressed adequately, but optimizing just for one can introduce significant load imbalances in the other, degrading overall performance. A technique has been developed based on Golden Section Search that minimizes wallclock time given prior information on wallclock time, and on current particle distribution and mesh cost per cell, and also adapts to evolution in load imbalance in both particle and mesh work. In problems of interest this doubled the performance on full system runs on the XK7 at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility compared to load balancing only one of the kernels.

  13. Particle-in-Cell simulation of energetic particles driven instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Parker, Scott E.; Lang, Jianying; Fu, Guoyong

    2009-11-01

    We present simulations of the evolution of energetic particles driven modes with the gyrokinetic turbulence code GEMfootnotetextY. Chen and S. E. Parker, J. Comp. Phys. 220, 839 (2007), except that kinetic electrons are replaced by a mass-less fluid model. PIC simulations of energetic particles use either the conventional full-f method or the δ method. The latter is adequate for low-amplitude fluctuation amplitudes. The collisional δ -methodfootnotetextY. Chen and R. White, Phys. Plasmas 4, 3591 (1997) is used to systematically account for collisions and particle source and sink. Steady state saturation amplitudes are benchmarked with predictions of analytic theory. We also employ full-f simulationsfootnotetextY. Todo et. al, Phys. Plasmas 10, 2888 (2003) to study bursty events in which the instabilities reach large amplitudes and cause macroscopic redistribution or loss of the particles. With full-f it is easy to retain all the nonlinear effects and treat accurately discontinuities in the distribution function at phase-space boundaries. Whereas the energetic particle current is neglegible in the Ampere's law in δ simulations, it is important in full-f simulations. Thermal ion kinetic effects are observed to be important.

  14. (abstract) 3D Electromagnetic Plasma Particle Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.; Liewer, P. C.; Lyster, P.; Decyk, V. K.

    1993-01-01

    A 3D electromagnetic plasma particle-in-cell code has been developed using the General Concurrent PIC algorithm. The GCPIC algorithm uses a domain decomposition to divide the computation among the processors. Particles must be exchanged between processors as they move. The efficiencies for 1-, 2-, and 3-dimensional partitions of the three dimensional domain are compared, and the algorithm is found to be very efficient even when a large fraction (e.g., 30%) of the particles must be exchanged at every time step. This PIC code has been used to perform simulations of a variety of space plasma physics problems. Results of three applications will be discussed: 1) plasma disturbances induced by moving conducting bodies in a magnetized plasma; 2) plasma plume interactions; and 3) solar wind termination shock.

  15. Particle Simulation of ICRF Absorption in VASIMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilin, Andrew; Díaz, Franklin Chang; Squire, Jared; Breizman, Boris; Carter, Mark

    2001-06-01

    We discuss computational challenges in particle simulation of the Ion-Cyclotron Resonance Heating of plasma in the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR). Mathematical simulation helps to design an ICRF antenna, i.e., maximize absorption of RF power into the plasma in the resonance area. In the ICRF simulation code EMIR, RF fields are expanded in a periodic Fourier sum in the azimuthal coordinate to reduce the three-dimensional problem to a weighted sum over two-dimensional solutions. Absorption is introduced in the cold plasma model by adding an imaginary collision frequency to the RF-driven frequency. The ion trajectories are followed through the static and RF fields using the particle trajectory code VASIMR. The VASIMR and EMIR codes are then iterated until convergence, then the collisional absorption parameter in the EMIR code is adjusted and the iteration is continued until the power deposited by the RF system matches the power absorbed by the ion trajectories in a global sense.

  16. The stellar atmosphere simulation code Bifrost. Code description and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudiksen, B. V.; Carlsson, M.; Hansteen, V. H.; Hayek, W.; Leenaarts, J.; Martínez-Sykora, J.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Numerical simulations of stellar convection and photospheres have been developed to the point where detailed shapes of observed spectral lines can be explained. Stellar atmospheres are very complex, and very different physical regimes are present in the convection zone, photosphere, chromosphere, transition region and corona. To understand the details of the atmosphere it is necessary to simulate the whole atmosphere since the different layers interact strongly. These physical regimes are very diverse and it takes a highly efficient massively parallel numerical code to solve the associated equations. Aims: The design, implementation and validation of the massively parallel numerical code Bifrost for simulating stellar atmospheres from the convection zone to the corona. Methods: The code is subjected to a number of validation tests, among them the Sod shock tube test, the Orzag-Tang colliding shock test, boundary condition tests and tests of how the code treats magnetic field advection, chromospheric radiation, radiative transfer in an isothermal scattering atmosphere, hydrogen ionization and thermal conduction. Results.Bifrost completes the tests with good results and shows near linear efficiency scaling to thousands of computing cores.

  17. A methodology for the rigorous verification of plasma simulation codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, Fabio

    2016-10-01

    The methodology used to assess the reliability of numerical simulation codes constitutes the Verification and Validation (V&V) procedure. V&V is composed by two separate tasks: the verification, which is a mathematical issue targeted to assess that the physical model is correctly solved, and the validation, which determines the consistency of the code results, and therefore of the physical model, with experimental data. In the present talk we focus our attention on the verification, which in turn is composed by the code verification, targeted to assess that a physical model is correctly implemented in a simulation code, and the solution verification, that quantifies the numerical error affecting a simulation. Bridging the gap between plasma physics and other scientific domains, we introduced for the first time in our domain a rigorous methodology for the code verification, based on the method of manufactured solutions, as well as a solution verification based on the Richardson extrapolation. This methodology was applied to GBS, a three-dimensional fluid code based on a finite difference scheme, used to investigate the plasma turbulence in basic plasma physics experiments and in the tokamak scrape-off layer. Overcoming the difficulty of dealing with a numerical method intrinsically affected by statistical noise, we have now generalized the rigorous verification methodology to simulation codes based on the particle-in-cell algorithm, which are employed to solve Vlasov equation in the investigation of a number of plasma physics phenomena.

  18. A Monte Carlo simulation code for calculating damage and particle transport in solids: The case for electron-bombarded solids for electron energies up to 900 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qiang; Shao, Lin

    2017-03-01

    Current popular Monte Carlo simulation codes for simulating electron bombardment in solids focus primarily on electron trajectories, instead of electron-induced displacements. Here we report a Monte Carol simulation code, DEEPER (damage creation and particle transport in matter), developed for calculating 3-D distributions of displacements produced by electrons of incident energies up to 900 MeV. Electron elastic scattering is calculated by using full-Mott cross sections for high accuracy, and primary-knock-on-atoms (PKAs)-induced damage cascades are modeled using ZBL potential. We compare and show large differences in 3-D distributions of displacements and electrons in electron-irradiated Fe. The distributions of total displacements are similar to that of PKAs at low electron energies. But they are substantially different for higher energy electrons due to the shifting of PKA energy spectra towards higher energies. The study is important to evaluate electron-induced radiation damage, for the applications using high flux electron beams to intentionally introduce defects and using an electron analysis beam for microstructural characterization of nuclear materials.

  19. Concurrent Algorithm For Particle-In-Cell Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liewer, Paulett C.; Decyk, Viktor K.

    1990-01-01

    Separate decompositions used for particle-motion and field calculations. General Concurrent Particle-in-Cell (GCPIC) algorithm used to implement motions of individual plasma particles (ions and electrons) under influence of particle-in-cell (PIC) computer codes on concurrent processors. Simulates motions of individual plasma particles under influence of electromagnetic fields generated by particles themselves. Performed to study variety of nonlinear problems in plasma physics, including magnetic and inertial fusion, plasmas in outer space, propagation of electron and ion beams, free-electron lasers, and particle accelerators.

  20. Improvement of Mishchenko's T-matrix code for absorbing particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Alexander

    2005-06-01

    The use of Gaussian elimination with backsubstitution for matrix inversion in scattering theories is discussed. Within the framework of the T-matrix method (the state-of-the-art code by Mishchenko is freely available at http://www.giss.nasa.gov/~crmim), it is shown that the domain of applicability of Mishchenko's FORTRAN 77 (F77) code can be substantially expanded in the direction of strongly absorbing particles where the current code fails to converge. Such an extension is especially important if the code is to be used in nanoplasmonic or nanophotonic applications involving metallic particles. At the same time, convergence can also be achieved for large nonabsorbing particles, in which case the non-Numerical Algorithms Group option of Mishchenko's code diverges. Computer F77 implementation of Mishchenko's code supplemented with Gaussian elimination with backsubstitution is freely available at http://www.wave-scattering.com.

  1. Improvement of Mishchenko's T-matrix code for absorbing particles.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Alexander

    2005-06-10

    The use of Gaussian elimination with backsubstitution for matrix inversion in scattering theories is discussed. Within the framework of the T-matrix method (the state-of-the-art code by Mishchenko is freely available at http://www.giss.nasa.gov/-crmim), it is shown that the domain of applicability of Mishchenko's FORTRAN 77 (F77) code can be substantially expanded in the direction of strongly absorbing particles where the current code fails to converge. Such an extension is especially important if the code is to be used in nanoplasmonic or nanophotonic applications involving metallic particles. At the same time, convergence can also be achieved for large nonabsorbing particles, in which case the non-Numerical Algorithms Group option of Mishchenko's code diverges. Computer F77 implementation of Mishchenko's code supplemented with Gaussian elimination with backsubstitution is freely available at http://www.wave-scattering.com.

  2. Simulation of neoclassical transport with the continuum gyrokinetic code COGENT

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, M. A.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorr, M.; Rognlien, T.; Hittinger, J.; Compton, J.; Colella, P.; Martin, D.; McCorquodale, P.

    2013-01-25

    The development of the continuum gyrokinetic code COGENT for edge plasma simulations is reported. The present version of the code models a nonlinear axisymmetric 4D (R, v∥, μ) gyrokinetic equation coupled to the long-wavelength limit of the gyro-Poisson equation. Here, R is the particle gyrocenter coordinate in the poloidal plane, and v∥ and μ are the guiding center velocity parallel to the magnetic field and the magnetic moment, respectively. The COGENT code utilizes a fourth-order finite-volume (conservative) discretization combined with arbitrary mapped multiblock grid technology (nearly field-aligned on blocks) to handle the complexity of tokamak divertor geometry with high accuracy. Furthermore, topics presented are the implementation of increasingly detailed model collision operators, and the results of neoclassical transport simulations including the effects of a strong radial electric field characteristic of a tokamak pedestal under H-mode conditions.

  3. Simulation of neoclassical transport with the continuum gyrokinetic code COGENT

    DOE PAGES

    Dorf, M. A.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorr, M.; ...

    2013-01-25

    The development of the continuum gyrokinetic code COGENT for edge plasma simulations is reported. The present version of the code models a nonlinear axisymmetric 4D (R, v∥, μ) gyrokinetic equation coupled to the long-wavelength limit of the gyro-Poisson equation. Here, R is the particle gyrocenter coordinate in the poloidal plane, and v∥ and μ are the guiding center velocity parallel to the magnetic field and the magnetic moment, respectively. The COGENT code utilizes a fourth-order finite-volume (conservative) discretization combined with arbitrary mapped multiblock grid technology (nearly field-aligned on blocks) to handle the complexity of tokamak divertor geometry with high accuracy.more » Furthermore, topics presented are the implementation of increasingly detailed model collision operators, and the results of neoclassical transport simulations including the effects of a strong radial electric field characteristic of a tokamak pedestal under H-mode conditions.« less

  4. UNIPIC code for simulations of high power microwave devices

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianguo; Zhang Dianhui; Wang Yue; Qiao Hailiang; Li Xiaoze; Liu Chunliang; Li Yongdong; Wang Hongguang

    2009-03-15

    In this paper, UNIPIC code, a new member in the family of fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) codes for simulations of high power microwave (HPM) generation, is introduced. In the UNIPIC code, the electromagnetic fields are updated using the second-order, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, and the particles are moved using the relativistic Newton-Lorentz force equation. The convolutional perfectly matched layer method is used to truncate the open boundaries of HPM devices. To model curved surfaces and avoid the time step reduction in the conformal-path FDTD method, CP weakly conditional-stable FDTD (WCS FDTD) method which combines the WCS FDTD and CP-FDTD methods, is implemented. UNIPIC is two-and-a-half dimensional, is written in the object-oriented C++ language, and can be run on a variety of platforms including WINDOWS, LINUX, and UNIX. Users can use the graphical user's interface to create the geometric structures of the simulated HPM devices, or input the old structures created before. Numerical experiments on some typical HPM devices by using the UNIPIC code are given. The results are compared to those obtained from some well-known PIC codes, which agree well with each other.

  5. ORBXYZ: a 3D single-particle orbit code for following charged-particle trajectories in equilibrium magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.V.; Cohen, R.H.; Ferguson, J.R.; Johnston, B.M.; Sharp, C.B.; Willmann, P.A.

    1981-06-30

    The single particle orbit code, TIBRO, has been modified extensively to improve the interpolation methods used and to allow use of vector potential fields in the simulation of charged particle orbits on a 3D domain. A 3D cubic B-spline algorithm is used to generate spline coefficients used in the interpolation. Smooth and accurate field representations are obtained. When vector potential fields are used, the 3D cubic spline interpolation formula analytically generates the magnetic field used to push the particles. This field has del.BETA = 0 to computer roundoff. When magnetic induction is used the interpolation allows del.BETA does not equal 0, which can lead to significant nonphysical results. Presently the code assumes quadrupole symmetry, but this is not an essential feature of the code and could be easily removed for other applications. Many details pertaining to this code are given on microfiche accompanying this report.

  6. Enhanced stopping of macro-particles in particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    May, J.; Tonge, J.; Ellis, I.; Mori, W. B.; Fiuza, F.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2014-05-15

    We derive an equation for energy transfer from relativistic charged particles to a cold background plasma appropriate for finite-size particles that are used in particle-in-cell simulation codes. Expressions for one-, two-, and three-dimensional particles are presented, with special attention given to the two-dimensional case. This energy transfer is due to the electric field of the wake set up in the background plasma by the relativistic particle. The enhanced stopping is dependent on the q{sup 2}/m, where q is the charge and m is the mass of the relativistic particle, and therefore simulation macro-particles with large charge but identical q/m will stop more rapidly. The stopping power also depends on the effective particle shape of the macro-particle. These conclusions are verified in particle-in-cell simulations. We present 2D simulations of test particles, relaxation of high-energy tails, and integrated fast ignition simulations showing that the enhanced drag on macro-particles may adversely affect the results of these simulations in a wide range of high-energy density plasma scenarios. We also describe a particle splitting algorithm which can potentially overcome this problem and show its effect in controlling the stopping of macro-particles.

  7. Development of a relativistic Particle In Cell code PARTDYN for linear accelerator beam transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadte, D.; Patidar, C. B.; Pal, M. K.

    2017-04-01

    A relativistic Particle In Cell (PIC) code PARTDYN is developed for the beam dynamics simulation of z-continuous and bunched beams. The code is implemented in MATLAB using its MEX functionality which allows both ease of development as well higher performance similar to a compiled language like C. The beam dynamics calculations carried out by the code are compared with analytical results and with other well developed codes like PARMELA and BEAMPATH. The effect of finite number of simulation particles on the emittance growth of intense beams has been studied. Corrections to the RF cavity field expressions were incorporated in the code so that the fields could be calculated correctly. The deviations of the beam dynamics results between PARTDYN and BEAMPATH for a cavity driven in zero-mode have been discussed. The beam dynamics studies of the Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) using PARTDYN have been presented.

  8. photon-plasma: A modern high-order particle-in-cell code

    SciTech Connect

    Haugbølle, Troels; Frederiksen, Jacob Trier; Nordlund, Åke

    2013-06-15

    We present the photon-plasma code, a modern high order charge conserving particle-in-cell code for simulating relativistic plasmas. The code is using a high order implicit field solver and a novel high order charge conserving interpolation scheme for particle-to-cell interpolation and charge deposition. It includes powerful diagnostics tools with on-the-fly particle tracking, synthetic spectra integration, 2D volume slicing, and a new method to correctly account for radiative cooling in the simulations. A robust technique for imposing (time-dependent) particle and field fluxes on the boundaries is also presented. Using a hybrid OpenMP and MPI approach, the code scales efficiently from 8 to more than 250.000 cores with almost linear weak scaling on a range of architectures. The code is tested with the classical benchmarks particle heating, cold beam instability, and two-stream instability. We also present particle-in-cell simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, and new results on radiative collisionless shocks.

  9. Simulation of Alfven wave-resonant particle interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.; Pekker, M.

    1995-07-01

    New numerical simulations are presented on the self-consistent dynamics of energetic particles and a set of unstable discrete shear Alfven modes in a tokamak. Our code developed for these simulations has been previously tested in the simulations of the bump-on-tail instability model. The code has a Hamiltonian structure for the mode-particle coupling, with the superimposed wave damping, particle source and classical relaxation processes. In the alpha particle-Alfven wave problem, we observe a transition from a single mode saturation to the mode overlap and global quasilinear diffusion, which is qualitatively similar to that observed in the bump-on-tail model. We demonstrate a considerable enhancement in the wave energy due to the resonance overlap. We also demonstrate the effect of global diffusion on the energetic particle losses.

  10. A MULTIPURPOSE COHERENT INSTABILITY SIMULATION CODE

    SciTech Connect

    BLASKIEWICZ,M.

    2007-06-25

    A multipurpose coherent instability simulation code has been written, documented, and released for use. TRANFT (tran-eff-tee) uses fast Fourier transforms to model transverse wakefields, transverse detuning wakes and longitudinal wakefields in a computationally efficient way. Dual harmonic RF allows for the study of enhanced synchrotron frequency spread. When coupled with chromaticity, the theoretically challenging but highly practical post head-tail regime is open to study. Detuning wakes allow for transverse space charge forces in low energy hadron beams, and a switch allowing for radiation damping makes the code useful for electrons.

  11. Shielding evaluation for solar particle events using MCNPX, PHITS and OLTARIS codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghara, S. K.; Sriprisan, S. I.; Singleterry, R. C.; Sato, T.

    2015-01-01

    Detailed analyses of Solar Particle Events (SPE) were performed to calculate primary and secondary particle spectra behind aluminum, at various thicknesses in water. The simulations were based on Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport codes, MCNPX 2.7.0 and PHITS 2.64, and the space radiation analysis website called OLTARIS (On-Line Tool for the Assessment of Radiation in Space) version 3.4 (uses deterministic code, HZETRN, for transport). The study is set to investigate the impact of SPEs spectra transporting through 10 or 20 g/cm2 Al shield followed by 30 g/cm2 of water slab. Four historical SPE events were selected and used as input source spectra particle differential spectra for protons, neutrons, and photons are presented. The total particle fluence as a function of depth is presented. In addition to particle flux, the dose and dose equivalent values are calculated and compared between the codes and with the other published results. Overall, the particle fluence spectra from all three codes show good agreement with the MC codes showing closer agreement compared to the OLTARIS results. The neutron particle fluence from OLTARIS is lower than the results from MC codes at lower energies (E < 100 MeV). Based on mean square difference analysis the results from MCNPX and PHITS agree better for fluence, dose and dose equivalent when compared to OLTARIS results.

  12. Shielding evaluation for solar particle events using MCNPX, PHITS and OLTARIS codes.

    PubMed

    Aghara, S K; Sriprisan, S I; Singleterry, R C; Sato, T

    2015-01-01

    Detailed analyses of Solar Particle Events (SPE) were performed to calculate primary and secondary particle spectra behind aluminum, at various thicknesses in water. The simulations were based on Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport codes, MCNPX 2.7.0 and PHITS 2.64, and the space radiation analysis website called OLTARIS (On-Line Tool for the Assessment of Radiation in Space) version 3.4 (uses deterministic code, HZETRN, for transport). The study is set to investigate the impact of SPEs spectra transporting through 10 or 20 g/cm(2) Al shield followed by 30 g/cm(2) of water slab. Four historical SPE events were selected and used as input source spectra particle differential spectra for protons, neutrons, and photons are presented. The total particle fluence as a function of depth is presented. In addition to particle flux, the dose and dose equivalent values are calculated and compared between the codes and with the other published results. Overall, the particle fluence spectra from all three codes show good agreement with the MC codes showing closer agreement compared to the OLTARIS results. The neutron particle fluence from OLTARIS is lower than the results from MC codes at lower energies (E<100 MeV). Based on mean square difference analysis the results from MCNPX and PHITS agree better for fluence, dose and dose equivalent when compared to OLTARIS results.

  13. Transferring ecosystem simulation codes to supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skiles, J. W.; Schulbach, C. H.

    1995-01-01

    Many ecosystem simulation computer codes have been developed in the last twenty-five years. This development took place initially on main-frame computers, then mini-computers, and more recently, on micro-computers and workstations. Supercomputing platforms (both parallel and distributed systems) have been largely unused, however, because of the perceived difficulty in accessing and using the machines. Also, significant differences in the system architectures of sequential, scalar computers and parallel and/or vector supercomputers must be considered. We have transferred a grassland simulation model (developed on a VAX) to a Cray Y-MP/C90. We describe porting the model to the Cray and the changes we made to exploit the parallelism in the application and improve code execution. The Cray executed the model 30 times faster than the VAX and 10 times faster than a Unix workstation. We achieved an additional speedup of 30 percent by using the compiler's vectoring and 'in-line' capabilities. The code runs at only about 5 percent of the Cray's peak speed because it ineffectively uses the vector and parallel processing capabilities of the Cray. We expect that by restructuring the code, it could execute an additional six to ten times faster.

  14. Multi-physics/scale simulations using particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2006-03-01

    Particle simulations of continuum and discrete phenomena can be formulated by following the motion of interacting particles that carry the physical properties of the systems that is being approximated (continuum) or modeled (discrete) by the particles. We identify the common computational characteristics of particle methods and emphasize their key properties that enable the formulation of a novel, systematic framework for multiscale simulations, that can be applicable to the simulation of diverse physical problems. We present novel multiresolution particle methods for continuum (fluid/solid) simulations, using adaptive mesh refinement and wavelets, by relaxing the grid-free character of particle methods and discuss the coupling of scales in continuum-atomistic flow simulations.

  15. BEAM: a Monte Carlo code to simulate radiotherapy treatment units.

    PubMed

    Rogers, D W; Faddegon, B A; Ding, G X; Ma, C M; We, J; Mackie, T R

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes BEAM, a general purpose Monte Carlo code to simulate the radiation beams from radiotherapy units including high-energy electron and photon beams, 60Co beams and orthovoltage units. The code handles a variety of elementary geometric entities which the user puts together as needed (jaws, applicators, stacked cones, mirrors, etc.), thus allowing simulation of a wide variety of accelerators. The code is not restricted to cylindrical symmetry. It incorporates a variety of powerful variance reduction techniques such as range rejection, bremsstrahlung splitting and forcing photon interactions. The code allows direct calculation of charge in the monitor ion chamber. It has the capability of keeping track of each particle's history and using this information to score separate dose components (e.g., to determine the dose from electrons scattering off the applicator). The paper presents a variety of calculated results to demonstrate the code's capabilities. The calculated dose distributions in a water phantom irradiated by electron beams from the NRC 35 MeV research accelerator, a Varian Clinac 2100C, a Philips SL75-20, an AECL Therac 20 and a Scanditronix MM50 are all shown to be in good agreement with measurements at the 2 to 3% level. Eighteen electron spectra from four different commercial accelerators are presented and various aspects of the electron beams from a Clinac 2100C are discussed. Timing requirements and selection of parameters for the Monte Carlo calculations are discussed.

  16. ORBXYZ: A 3D single-particle orbit code for following charged particle trajectories in equilibrium magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. V.; Cohen, R. H.; Ferguson, J. R.; Johnston, B. M.; Sharp, C. B.; Willmann, P. A.

    1981-06-01

    The single particle orbit code, TIBRO, was modified extensively to improve the interpolation methods used and to allow use of vector potential fields in the simulation of charged particle orbits on a 3D domain. A 3D cubic B-spline algorithm is used to generate spline coefficients used in the interpolation. Smooth and accurate field representations are obtained. When vector potential fields are used, the 3D cubic spline interpolation formula analytically generates the magnetic field used to push the particles. This field has del.BETA = 0 to computer roundoff. When magnetic induction is used the interpolation allows del.BETA does not equal 0, which can lead to significant nonphysical results. Presently the code assumes quadrupole symmetry, but this is not an essential feature of the code and could be easily removed for other applications.

  17. ALEGRA -- code validation: Experiments and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Konrad, C.H.; Mosher, D.A.; Reinhart, W.D; Duggins, B.D.; Rodeman, R.; Trucano, T.G.; Summers, R.M.; Peery, J.S.

    1998-03-16

    In this study, the authors are providing an experimental test bed for validating features of the ALEGRA code over a broad range of strain rates with overlapping diagnostics that encompass the multiple responses. A unique feature of the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian Grid for Research Applications (ALEGRA) code is that it allows simultaneous computational treatment, within one code, of a wide range of strain-rates varying from hydrodynamic to structural conditions. This range encompasses strain rates characteristic of shock-wave propagation (10{sup 7}/s) and those characteristic of structural response (10{sup 2}/s). Most previous code validation experimental studies, however, have been restricted to simulating or investigating a single strain-rate regime. What is new and different in this investigation is that the authors have performed well-instrumented experiments which capture features relevant to both hydrodynamic and structural response in a single experiment. Aluminum was chosen for use in this study because it is a well characterized material--its EOS and constitutive material properties are well defined over a wide range of loading rates. The current experiments span strain rate regimes of over 10{sup 7}/s to less than 10{sup 2}/s in a single experiment. The input conditions are extremely well defined. Velocity interferometers are used to record the high strain-rate response, while low strain rate data were collected using strain gauges.

  18. Load-balancing techniques for a parallel electromagnetic particle-in-cell code

    SciTech Connect

    PLIMPTON,STEVEN J.; SEIDEL,DAVID B.; PASIK,MICHAEL F.; COATS,REBECCA S.

    2000-01-01

    QUICKSILVER is a 3-d electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation code developed and used at Sandia to model relativistic charged particle transport. It models the time-response of electromagnetic fields and low-density-plasmas in a self-consistent manner: the fields push the plasma particles and the plasma current modifies the fields. Through an LDRD project a new parallel version of QUICKSILVER was created to enable large-scale plasma simulations to be run on massively-parallel distributed-memory supercomputers with thousands of processors, such as the Intel Tflops and DEC CPlant machines at Sandia. The new parallel code implements nearly all the features of the original serial QUICKSILVER and can be run on any platform which supports the message-passing interface (MPI) standard as well as on single-processor workstations. This report describes basic strategies useful for parallelizing and load-balancing particle-in-cell codes, outlines the parallel algorithms used in this implementation, and provides a summary of the modifications made to QUICKSILVER. It also highlights a series of benchmark simulations which have been run with the new code that illustrate its performance and parallel efficiency. These calculations have up to a billion grid cells and particles and were run on thousands of processors. This report also serves as a user manual for people wishing to run parallel QUICKSILVER.

  19. SU-E-T-753: Three-Dimensional Dose Distributions of Incident Proton Particle in the Polymer Gel Dosimeter and the Radiochromic Gel Dosimeter: A Simulation Study with MCNP Code

    SciTech Connect

    Park, M; Kim, G; Ji, Y; Kim, K; Park, S; Jung, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to estimate the three-dimensional dose distributions in the polymer and the radiochromic gel dosimeter, and to identify the detectability of both gel dosimeters by comparing with the water phantom in case of irradiating the proton particles. Methods: The normoxic polymer gel and the LCV micelle radiochromic gel were used in this study. The densities of polymer and the radiochromic gel dosimeter were 1.024 and 1.005 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively. The dose distributions of protons in the polymer and radiochromic gel were simulated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code (MCNPX, Los Alamos National Laboratory). The shape of phantom irradiated by proton particles was a hexahedron with the dimension of 12.4 × 12.4 × 15.0 cm{sup 3}. The energies of proton beam were 50, 80, and 140 MeV energies were directed to top of the surface of phantom. The cross-sectional view of proton dose distribution in both gel dosimeters was estimated with the water phantom and evaluated by the gamma evaluation method. In addition, the absorbed dose(Gy) was also calculated for evaluating the proton detectability. Results: The evaluation results show that dose distributions in both gel dosimeters at intermediated section and Bragg-peak region are similar with that of the water phantom. At entrance section, however, inconsistencies of dose distribution are represented, compared with water. The relative absorbed doses in radiochromic and polymer gel dosimeter were represented to be 0.47 % and 2.26 % difference, respectively. These results show that the radiochromic gel dosimeter was better matched than the water phantom in the absorbed dose evaluation. Conclusion: The polymer and the radiochromic gel dosimeter show similar characteristics in dose distributions for the proton beams at intermediate section and Bragg-peak region. Moreover the calculated absorbed dose in both gel dosimeters represents similar tendency by comparing with that in water phantom.

  20. Adaptation of multidimensional group particle tracking and particle wall-boundary condition model to the FDNS code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. S.; Farmer, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    A particulate two-phase flow CFD model was developed based on the FDNS code which is a pressure based predictor plus multi-corrector Navier-Stokes flow solver. Turbulence models with compressibility correction and the wall function models were employed as submodels. A finite-rate chemistry model was used for reacting flow simulation. For particulate two-phase flow simulations, a Eulerian-Lagrangian solution method using an efficient implicit particle trajectory integration scheme was developed in this study. Effects of particle-gas reaction and particle size change to agglomeration or fragmentation were not considered in this investigation. At the onset of the present study, a two-dimensional version of FDNS which had been modified to treat Lagrangian tracking of particles (FDNS-2DEL) had already been written and was operational. The FDNS-2DEL code was too slow for practical use, mainly because it had not been written in a form amenable to vectorization on the Cray, nor was the full three-dimensional form of FDNS utilized. The specific objective of this study was to reorder to calculations into long single arrays for automatic vectorization on the Cray and to implement the full three-dimensional version of FDNS to produce the FDNS-3DEL code. Since the FDNS-2DEL code was slow, a very limited number of test cases had been run with it. This study was also intended to increase the number of cases simulated to verify and improve, as necessary, the particle tracking methodology coded in FDNS.

  1. Particle beam dynamics simulations using the POOMA framework

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, W.; Ryne, R.; Cleland, T.; Cummings, J.; Habib, S.; Mark, G.; Ji Qiang

    1998-12-31

    A program for simulation of the dynamics of high intensity charged particle beams in linear particle accelerators has been developed in C++ using the POOMA Framework, for use on serial and parallel architectures. The code models the trajectories of charged particles through a sequence of different accelerator beamline elements such as drift chambers, quadrupole magnets, or RF cavities. An FFT-based particle-in-cell algorithm is used to solve the Poisson equation that models the Coulomb interactions of the particles. The code employs an object-oriented design with software abstractions for the particle beam, accelerator beamline, and beamline elements, using C++ templates to efficiently support both 2D and 3D capabilities in the same code base. The POOMA Framework, which encapsulates much of the effort required for parallel execution, provides particle and field classes, particle-field interaction capabilities, and parallel FFT algorithms. The performance of this application running serially and in parallel is compared to an existing HPF implementation, with the POOMA version seen to run four times faster than the HPF code.

  2. General Relativistic Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics code developments: A progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Joshua; Silberman, Zachary; Rizzo, Monica

    2017-01-01

    We report on our progress in developing a new general relativistic Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) code, which will be appropriate for studying the properties of accretion disks around black holes as well as compact object binary mergers and their ejecta. We will discuss in turn the relativistic formalisms being used to handle the evolution, our techniques for dealing with conservative and primitive variables, as well as those used to ensure proper conservation of various physical quantities. Code tests and performance metrics will be discussed, as will the prospects for including smoothed particle hydrodynamics codes within other numerical relativity codebases, particularly the publicly available Einstein Toolkit. We acknowledge support from NSF award ACI-1550436 and an internal RIT D-RIG grant.

  3. Simulating flow and segregation of cylindrical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongzhi; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-11-01

    Efficient and accurate simulation of cylindrical particles using discrete element method (DEM) is a challenge. Typical approaches to simulating cylindrical particle systems are based on the glued spheres method, which has low accuracy, or real shape models, which have high computational cost. In this work we utilize super-ellipsoids, which belong to super-quadrics, to model cylindrical particles in DEM simulations. Simulations of a single cylinder impacting a flat wall indicate that super-ellipsoids provide the same accuracy as real shape models and much better accuracy than the glued sphere method. Simulations of super-ellipsoid cylindrical particles in rotating tumblers result in nearly the same angle of repose as experiments and real shape simulations, demonstrating the accuracy of super-ellipsoid DEM simulations for multi-particle systems. The segregation of bidisperse cylindrical particles differing in length in a bounded heap was simulated by super-ellipsoid DEM, and the results are similar to the experiment. In spite of these advantages of using super-ellipsoid cylindrical particles, simulations of filling a box with particles indicate that the simulation times for super-ellipsoid cylinders is about an order of magnitude longer than that for the same number of spherical particles.

  4. GPU-optimized Code for Long-term Simulations of Beam-beam Effects in Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Roblin, Yves; Morozov, Vasiliy; Terzic, Balsa; Aturban, Mohamed A.; Ranjan, D.; Zubair, Mohammed

    2013-06-01

    We report on the development of the new code for long-term simulation of beam-beam effects in particle colliders. The underlying physical model relies on a matrix-based arbitrary-order symplectic particle tracking for beam transport and the Bassetti-Erskine approximation for beam-beam interaction. The computations are accelerated through a parallel implementation on a hybrid GPU/CPU platform. With the new code, a previously computationally prohibitive long-term simulations become tractable. We use the new code to model the proposed medium-energy electron-ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab.

  5. Unlike-particle collision operator for gyrokinetic particle simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnikov, R.A.; Wang, W.X.; Hinton, F.L.

    2010-08-01

    Plasmas in modern tokamak experiments contain a significant fraction of impurity ion species in addition to main deuterium background. A new unlike-particle collision operator for {delta}f particle simulation has been developed to self-consistently study the non-local effects of impurities on neoclassical transport in toroidal plasmas. A new algorithm for simulation of cross-collisions between different ion species includes test-particle and conserving field-particle operators. The field-particle operator is designed to enforce conservation of number, momentum and energy. It was shown that the new operator correctly simulates the thermal equilibration of different plasma components. It was verified that the ambipolar radial electric field reaches steady state when the total radial guiding center particle current vanishes.

  6. Export Controls on Astrophysical Simulation Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Amidst concerns about nuclear proliferation, the US government has established guidelines on what types of astrophysical simulation codes can be run and disseminated on open systems. I will review the basic export controls that have been enacted by the federal government to slow the pace of software acquisition by potential adversaries who seek to develop weapons of mass destruction. The good news is that it is relatively simple to avoid ITAR issues with the Department of Energy if one remembers a few simple rules. I will discuss in particular what types of algorithm development can get researchers into trouble if they are not aware of the regulations and how to avoid these pitfalls while doing world class science.

  7. A smooth particle hydrodynamics code to model collisions between solid, self-gravitating objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, C.; Riecker, S.; Maindl, T. I.; Speith, R.; Scherrer, S.; Kley, W.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Modern graphics processing units (GPUs) lead to a major increase in the performance of the computation of astrophysical simulations. Owing to the different nature of GPU architecture compared to traditional central processing units (CPUs) such as x86 architecture, existing numerical codes cannot be easily migrated to run on GPU. Here, we present a new implementation of the numerical method smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) using CUDA and the first astrophysical application of the new code: the collision between Ceres-sized objects. Aims: The new code allows for a tremendous increase in speed of astrophysical simulations with SPH and self-gravity at low costs for new hardware. Methods: We have implemented the SPH equations to model gas, liquids and elastic, and plastic solid bodies and added a fragmentation model for brittle materials. Self-gravity may be optionally included in the simulations and is treated by the use of a Barnes-Hut tree. Results: We find an impressive performance gain using NVIDIA consumer devices compared to our existing OpenMP code. The new code is freely available to the community upon request. If you are interested in our CUDA SPH code miluphCUDA, please write an email to Christoph Schäfer. miluphCUDA is the CUDA port of miluph. miluph is pronounced [maßl2v]. We do not support the use of the code for military purposes.

  8. Load management strategy for Particle-In-Cell simulations in high energy particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Dérouillat, J.

    2016-09-01

    In the wake of the intense effort made for the experimental CILEX project, numerical simulation campaigns have been carried out in order to finalize the design of the facility and to identify optimal laser and plasma parameters. These simulations bring, of course, important insight into the fundamental physics at play. As a by-product, they also characterize the quality of our theoretical and numerical models. In this paper, we compare the results given by different codes and point out algorithmic limitations both in terms of physical accuracy and computational performances. These limitations are illustrated in the context of electron laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). The main limitation we identify in state-of-the-art Particle-In-Cell (PIC) codes is computational load imbalance. We propose an innovative algorithm to deal with this specific issue as well as milestones towards a modern, accurate high-performance PIC code for high energy particle acceleration.

  9. Particle Simulations of Plasma Detachment in VASIMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, A. V.; ChangDiaz, F. R.; Squire, J. P.; Breizman, B. N.; Carter, M. D.; Novakovski, S. V.

    1999-01-01

    The particle simulations in a Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) currently include self-consistent calculation of. 1) stationary magnetic field in plasma, 2) ion density and velocity, 3) ion-cyclotron radio-frequency heating, 4) ambipolar electric field. The assumptions of quasineutral and collissionless plasma are based on the range of operating VASIMR parameters. The main motivation for the particle simulation in VASIMR is plasma detachment from the magnetic field in the exhaust area. The plasma detachment is caused mainly by the Larmor radius increase. The plasma beta effect on detachment is observed and investigated as well. The results of particle simulations are compared with those from MHD simulations.

  10. Turbulence dissipation challenge: particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roytershteyn, V.; Karimabadi, H.; Omelchenko, Y.; Germaschewski, K.

    2015-12-01

    We discuss application of three particle in cell (PIC) codes to the problems relevant to turbulence dissipation challenge. VPIC is a fully kinetic code extensively used to study a variety of diverse problems ranging from laboratory plasmas to astrophysics. PSC is a flexible fully kinetic code offering a variety of algorithms that can be advantageous to turbulence simulations, including high order particle shapes, dynamic load balancing, and ability to efficiently run on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). Finally, HYPERS is a novel hybrid (kinetic ions+fluid electrons) code, which utilizes asynchronous time advance and a number of other advanced algorithms. We present examples drawn both from large-scale turbulence simulations and from the test problems outlined by the turbulence dissipation challenge. Special attention is paid to such issues as the small-scale intermittency of inertial range turbulence, mode content of the sub-proton range of scales, the formation of electron-scale current sheets and the role of magnetic reconnection, as well as numerical challenges of applying PIC codes to simulations of astrophysical turbulence.

  11. DANIEL: A computer code for high-speed dusty gas flows with multiple particle sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, M.

    1989-05-01

    This report describes a calculational model for nonreacting high-speed gas-particle flow dynamics. Differential equations are derived for a compressible, polytropic dusty gas with suspended larger particles. Dust is described as rigid particles small enough to maintain temperature and velocity equilibrium with the clean gas. The larger particles are rigid, noncolliding spheres of various sizes having velocities and temperatures significantly different from those of the gas. Exchange terms are included in the differential equations to account for momentum and energy transfer between the dusty gas and the particles. An explicit, Eulerian numerical algorithm approximates the solution of the differential equations. This algorithm is used to simulate volcanic pyroclastic fountaining. The numerical technique produces plausible volcanic eruption models. These results support the appropriateness of further code development, including adaptation to low flow speeds, turbulence transport and diffusion, and swirl. 12 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Data parallel sorting for particle simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagum, Leonardo

    1992-01-01

    Sorting on a parallel architecture is a communications intensive event which can incur a high penalty in applications where it is required. In the case of particle simulation, only integer sorting is necessary, and sequential implementations easily attain the minimum performance bound of O (N) for N particles. Parallel implementations, however, have to cope with the parallel sorting problem which, in addition to incurring a heavy communications cost, can make the minimun performance bound difficult to attain. This paper demonstrates how the sorting problem in a particle simulation can be reduced to a merging problem, and describes an efficient data parallel algorithm to solve this merging problem in a particle simulation. The new algorithm is shown to be optimal under conditions usual for particle simulation, and its fieldwise implementation on the Connection Machine is analyzed in detail. The new algorithm is about four times faster than a fieldwise implementation of radix sort on the Connection Machine.

  13. Communication Systems Simulator with Error Correcting Codes Using MATLAB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, C.; Gonzalez, J. E.; Pardo, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, the characteristics of a simulator for channel coding techniques used in communication systems, are described. This software has been designed for engineering students in order to facilitate the understanding of how the error correcting codes work. To help students understand easily the concepts related to these kinds of codes, a…

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of particle acceleration at astrophysical shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Roy K.

    1989-01-01

    A Monte Carlo code was developed for the simulation of particle acceleration at astrophysical shocks. The code is implemented in Turbo Pascal on a PC. It is modularized and structured in such a way that modification and maintenance are relatively painless. Monte Carlo simulations of particle acceleration at shocks follow the trajectories of individual particles as they scatter repeatedly across the shock front, gaining energy with each crossing. The particles are assumed to scatter from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence on both sides of the shock. A scattering law is used which is related to the assumed form of the turbulence, and the particle and shock parameters. High energy cosmic ray spectra derived from Monte Carlo simulations have observed power law behavior just as the spectra derived from analytic calculations based on a diffusion equation. This high energy behavior is not sensitive to the scattering law used. In contrast with Monte Carlo calculations diffusive calculations rely on the initial injection of supra-thermal particles into the shock environment. Monte Carlo simulations are the only known way to describe the extraction of particles directly from the thermal pool. This was the triumph of the Monte Carlo approach. The question of acceleration efficiency is an important one in the shock acceleration game. The efficiency of shock waves efficient to account for the observed flux of high energy galactic cosmic rays was examined. The efficiency of the acceleration process depends on the thermal particle pick-up and hence the low energy scattering in detail. One of the goals is the self-consistent derivation of the accelerated particle spectra and the MHD turbulence spectra. Presumably the upstream turbulence, which scatters the particles so they can be accelerated, is excited by the streaming accelerated particles and the needed downstream turbulence is convected from the upstream region. The present code is to be modified to include a better

  15. Optimizations of the energy grid search algorithm in continuous-energy Monte Carlo particle transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Jonathan A.; Romano, Paul K.; Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord S.

    2015-11-01

    In this work we propose, implement, and test various optimizations of the typical energy grid-cross section pair lookup algorithm in Monte Carlo particle transport codes. The key feature common to all of the optimizations is a reduction in the length of the vector of energies that must be searched when locating the index of a particle's current energy. Other factors held constant, a reduction in energy vector length yields a reduction in CPU time. The computational methods we present here are physics-informed. That is, they are designed to utilize the physical information embedded in a simulation in order to reduce the length of the vector to be searched. More specifically, the optimizations take advantage of information about scattering kinematics, neutron cross section structure and data representation, and also the expected characteristics of a system's spatial flux distribution and energy spectrum. The methods that we present are implemented in the OpenMC Monte Carlo neutron transport code as part of this work. The gains in computational efficiency, as measured by overall code speedup, associated with each of the optimizations are demonstrated in both serial and multithreaded simulations of realistic systems. Depending on the system, simulation parameters, and optimization method employed, overall code speedup factors of 1.2-1.5, relative to the typical single-nuclide binary search algorithm, are routinely observed.

  16. Recent improvements to the ASTRA particle tracking code

    SciTech Connect

    Flottmann, Klaus; Lidia, Steven; Piot, Philippe

    2003-05-19

    The Astra simulation code has been successfully used in the design of linac and rf photoinjector systems utilizing beams with azimuthal symmetry. We present recently implemented changes to Astra that allow tracking of beams in beamlines without the assumption of any symmetry. The changes especially include a 3D mesh space charge algorithm and the possibility to import 3D electromagnetic fieldmaps from eigensolver programs.

  17. CFD development for macro particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiang; Glenn, Chance; Xiao, Zhigang; Zhang, Sijun

    2014-05-01

    Numerous industrial operations involve fluid-particle systems, in which both phases display very complex behaviour. Some examples include fluidisation technology in catalytic reactors, pneumatic transportation of grain or powder materials, carbon nanotube alignment in the nano-devices and circuit integration and so on. In this paper, a macro particle method is developed to model the fluid-particle flows. The macro particle is formed by a collection of micro-sized particles so that the number of macro particles to be tracked is much less than the number of smaller particles. Unlike the calculations of instantaneous point variables of fluid phase with moving discrete boundaries of the smaller particles with direct numerical simulation, the boundary of each macro particle is just dealt with the blocked-off approach. On the other hand, the flow fields based on the present method is solved by original Navier-Stokes, rather than the modified ones based on the locally averaged theorem. The flow fields are solved on the length scale of computational cells, while the resolutions of solid particles are the size of macro particle, which is determined as needed in specific applications. The macro particle method is validated by several selected cases, which demonstrate that the macro particle method could accurately resolve fluid-particle systems in an efficient, robust and flexible fashion.

  18. Fast Particle Methods for Multiscale Phenomena Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koumoutsakos, P.; Wray, A.; Shariff, K.; Pohorille, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    We are developing particle methods oriented at improving computational modeling capabilities of multiscale physical phenomena in : (i) high Reynolds number unsteady vortical flows, (ii) particle laden and interfacial flows, (iii)molecular dynamics studies of nanoscale droplets and studies of the structure, functions, and evolution of the earliest living cell. The unifying computational approach involves particle methods implemented in parallel computer architectures. The inherent adaptivity, robustness and efficiency of particle methods makes them a multidisciplinary computational tool capable of bridging the gap of micro-scale and continuum flow simulations. Using efficient tree data structures, multipole expansion algorithms, and improved particle-grid interpolation, particle methods allow for simulations using millions of computational elements, making possible the resolution of a wide range of length and time scales of these important physical phenomena.The current challenges in these simulations are in : [i] the proper formulation of particle methods in the molecular and continuous level for the discretization of the governing equations [ii] the resolution of the wide range of time and length scales governing the phenomena under investigation. [iii] the minimization of numerical artifacts that may interfere with the physics of the systems under consideration. [iv] the parallelization of processes such as tree traversal and grid-particle interpolations We are conducting simulations using vortex methods, molecular dynamics and smooth particle hydrodynamics, exploiting their unifying concepts such as : the solution of the N-body problem in parallel computers, highly accurate particle-particle and grid-particle interpolations, parallel FFT's and the formulation of processes such as diffusion in the context of particle methods. This approach enables us to transcend among seemingly unrelated areas of research.

  19. Software quality and process improvement in scientific simulation codes

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosiano, J.; Webster, R.

    1997-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the quest to develope better simulation code quality through process modeling and improvement. This study is based on the experience of the authors and interviews with ten subjects chosen from simulation code development teams at LANL. This study is descriptive rather than scientific.

  20. Comparison of Particle Flow Code and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Modelling of Landslide Run outs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preh, A.; Poisel, R.; Hungr, O.

    2009-04-01

    In most continuum mechanics methods modelling the run out of landslides the moving mass is divided into a number of elements, the velocities of which can be established by numerical integration of Newtońs second law (Lagrangian solution). The methods are based on fluid mechanics modelling the movements of an equivalent fluid. In 2004, McDougall and Hungr presented a three-dimensional numerical model for rapid landslides, e.g. debris flows and rock avalanches, called DAN3D.The method is based on the previous work of Hungr (1995) and is using an integrated two-dimensional Lagrangian solution and meshless Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) principle to maintain continuity. DAN3D has an open rheological kernel, allowing the use of frictional (with constant porepressure ratio) and Voellmy rheologies and gives the possibility to change material rheology along the path. Discontinuum (granular) mechanics methods model the run out mass as an assembly of particles moving down a surface. Each particle is followed exactly as it moves and interacts with the surface and with its neighbours. Every particle is checked on contacts with every other particle in every time step using a special cell-logic for contact detection in order to reduce the computational effort. The Discrete Element code PFC3D was adapted in order to make possible discontinuum mechanics models of run outs. Punta Thurwieser Rock Avalanche and Frank Slide were modelled by DAN as well as by PFC3D. The simulations showed correspondingly that the parameters necessary to get results coinciding with observations in nature are completely different. The maximum velocity distributions due to DAN3D reveal that areas of different maximum flow velocity are next to each other in Punta Thurwieser run out whereas the distribution of maximum flow velocity shows almost constant maximum flow velocity over the width of the run out regarding Frank Slide. Some 30 percent of total kinetic energy is rotational kinetic energy in

  1. Physalis: a New Method for Particle Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Shu; Oguz, Hasan; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2000-11-01

    A new computational method for the full Navier-Stokes viscous flow past cylinders and spheres is described and illustrated with preliminary results. Since, in the rest frame, the velocity vanishes on the particle, the Stokes equations apply in the immediate neighborhood of the surface. The analytic solutions of these equations available for both spheres and cylinders permit to effectively remove the particle, the effect of which is replaced by a consistency condition on the nodes of the computational grid that surround the particle. This condition is satisfied iteratively by a method that solves the field equations over the entire computational domain disregarding the presence of the particles, so that fast solvers can be used. The procedure eliminates the geometrical complexity of multi-particle simulations and permits to simulate disperse flows containing a large number of particles with a moderate computatonal cost. Supported by DOE and Japanese MESSC.

  2. FDPS: Framework for Developing Particle Simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasawa, Masaki; Tanikawa, Ataru; Hosono, Natsuki; Nitadori, Keigo; Muranushi, Takayuki; Makino, Junichiro

    2016-04-01

    FDPS provides the necessary functions for efficient parallel execution of particle-based simulations as templates independent of the data structure of particles and the functional form of the interaction. It is used to develop particle-based simulation programs for large-scale distributed-memory parallel supercomputers. FDPS includes templates for domain decomposition, redistribution of particles, and gathering of particle information for interaction calculation. It uses algorithms such as Barnes-Hut tree method for long-range interactions; methods to limit the calculation to neighbor particles are used for short-range interactions. FDPS reduces the time and effort necessary to write a simple, sequential and unoptimized program of O(N^2) calculation cost, and produces compiled programs that will run efficiently on large-scale parallel supercomputers.

  3. Exact simulation of polarized light reflectance by particle deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezan Pour, B.; Mackowski, D. W.

    2015-12-01

    The use of polarimetric light reflection measurements as a means of identifying the physical and chemical characteristics of particulate materials obviously relies on an accurate model of predicting the effects of particle size, shape, concentration, and refractive index on polarized reflection. The research examines two methods for prediction of reflection from plane parallel layers of wavelength—sized particles. The first method is based on an exact superposition solution to Maxwell's time harmonic wave equations for a deposit of spherical particles that are exposed to a plane incident wave. We use a FORTRAN-90 implementation of this solution (the Multiple Sphere T Matrix (MSTM) code), coupled with parallel computational platforms, to directly simulate the reflection from particle layers. The second method examined is based upon the vector radiative transport equation (RTE). Mie theory is used in our RTE model to predict the extinction coefficient, albedo, and scattering phase function of the particles, and the solution of the RTE is obtained from adding—doubling method applied to a plane—parallel configuration. Our results show that the MSTM and RTE predictions of the Mueller matrix elements converge when particle volume fraction in the particle layer decreases below around five percent. At higher volume fractions the RTE can yield results that, depending on the particle size and refractive index, significantly depart from the exact predictions. The particle regimes which lead to dependent scattering effects, and the application of methods to correct the vector RTE for particle interaction, will be discussed.

  4. Study of asymmetrical electric discharges using particle simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Maria Virginia

    1990-11-01

    Asymmetrical electric discharges are widely used in the microelectronics industry. The asymmetry in the electrode areas determines the magnitude of the plasma-to-electrode voltage (V sub a) at the powered electrode, which determines the ion bombarding energy. Two many-particle simulation codes, PDC1 and PDC2, were developed. These codes are electrostatic, one-dimensional (radial) and model a bounded plasma between two infinite cylinders or two concentric spheres that can be connected to an RLC external circuit. Both codes consider asymmetrical electrode areas. In order to simulate electrical discharges, Monte-Carlo simulation of electron-neutral and ion-neutral collisions were included. These codes were used to study the relationship between the voltage area ratio across the sheaths, V(sub a)/V(sub b), and the electrode area ratio A(sub b)/A(sub a). Simulation results agree with experimental results and also with the analytical model that includes local ionization near the electrodes which is observed to occur in almost all of the simulations.

  5. SpectralPlasmaSolver: a Spectral Code for Multiscale Simulations of Collisionless, Magnetized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vencels, Juris; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Manzini, Gianmarco; Markidis, Stefano; Peng, Ivy Bo; Roytershteyn, Vadim

    2016-05-01

    We present the design and implementation of a spectral code, called SpectralPlasmaSolver (SPS), for the solution of the multi-dimensional Vlasov-Maxwell equations. The method is based on a Hermite-Fourier decomposition of the particle distribution function. The code is written in Fortran and uses the PETSc library for solving the non-linear equations and preconditioning and the FFTW library for the convolutions. SPS is parallelized for shared- memory machines using OpenMP. As a verification example, we discuss simulations of the two-dimensional Orszag-Tang vortex problem and successfully compare them against a fully kinetic Particle-In-Cell simulation. An assessment of the performance of the code is presented, showing a significant improvement in the code running-time achieved by preconditioning, while strong scaling tests show a factor of 10 speed-up using 16 threads.

  6. Overview of Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Niita, Koji; Matsuda, Norihiro; Hashimoto, Shintaro; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Furuta, Takuya; Noda, Shusaku; Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Iwase, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Fukahori, Tokio; Okumura, Keisuke; Kai, Tetsuya; Chiba, Satoshi; Sihver, Lembit

    2014-06-01

    A general purpose Monte Carlo Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System, PHITS, is being developed through the collaboration of several institutes in Japan and Europe. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency is responsible for managing the entire project. PHITS can deal with the transport of nearly all particles, including neutrons, protons, heavy ions, photons, and electrons, over wide energy ranges using various nuclear reaction models and data libraries. It is written in Fortran language and can be executed on almost all computers. All components of PHITS such as its source, executable and data-library files are assembled in one package and then distributed to many countries via the Research organization for Information Science and Technology, the Data Bank of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development's Nuclear Energy Agency, and the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center. More than 1,000 researchers have been registered as PHITS users, and they apply the code to various research and development fields such as nuclear technology, accelerator design, medical physics, and cosmic-ray research. This paper briefly summarizes the physics models implemented in PHITS, and introduces some important functions useful for specific applications, such as an event generator mode and beam transport functions.

  7. Fully resolved simulations of particle sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierakowski, Adam; Wang, Yayun; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    Progress in computational capabilities - and specifically in the realm of massively parallel architectures - render possible the simulation of fully resolved fluid-particle systems. This development will drastically improve physical understanding and modelling of these systems when the particle size is not negligible and their concentration appreciable. Using a newly developed GPU-centric implementation of the Physalis method for the solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in the presence of finite-sized spheres, we carry out fully resolved simulations of more than one thousand sedimenting spheres. We discuss the results of these simulations focusing on statistical aspects such as particle velocity fluctuations, particle pair distribution function, microstructure, and others. Supported by NSF Grant CBET 1335965.

  8. Particle simulation of plasmas and stellar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.; Clark, A.; Craddock, G.G.; Gilden, D.L.; Leung, W.K.; Li, Y.M.; Robertson, J.A.; Saltzman, B.J.

    1985-04-01

    A computational technique is introduced which allows the student and researcher an opportunity to observe the physical behavior of a class of many-body systems. A series of examples is offered which illustrates the diversity of problems that may be studied using particle simulation. These simulations were in fact assigned as homework in a course on computational physics.

  9. Process to create simulated lunar agglutinate particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustafson, Robert J. (Inventor); Gustafson, Marty A. (Inventor); White, Brant C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method of creating simulated agglutinate particles by applying a heat source sufficient to partially melt a raw material is provided. The raw material is preferably any lunar soil simulant, crushed mineral, mixture of crushed minerals, or similar material, and the heat source creates localized heating of the raw material.

  10. DgSMC-B code: A robust and autonomous direct simulation Monte Carlo code for arbitrary geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargaran, H.; Minuchehr, A.; Zolfaghari, A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we describe the structure of a new Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code that takes advantage of combinatorial geometry (CG) to simulate any rarefied gas flows Medias. The developed code, called DgSMC-B, has been written in FORTRAN90 language with capability of parallel processing using OpenMP framework. The DgSMC-B is capable of handling 3-dimensional (3D) geometries, which is created with first-and second-order surfaces. It performs independent particle tracking for the complex geometry without the intervention of mesh. In addition, it resolves the computational domain boundary and volume computing in border grids using hexahedral mesh. The developed code is robust and self-governing code, which does not use any separate code such as mesh generators. The results of six test cases have been presented to indicate its ability to deal with wide range of benchmark problems with sophisticated geometries such as airfoil NACA 0012. The DgSMC-B code demonstrates its performance and accuracy in a variety of problems. The results are found to be in good agreement with references and experimental data.

  11. Development and Test of 2.5-Dimensional Electromagnetic PIC Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Yun; Lee, Ensang; Kim, Khan-Hyuk; Seon, Jongho; Lee, Dong-Hun; Ryu, Kwang-Sun

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a 2.5-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulation code using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method to investigate electromagnetic phenomena that occur in space plasmas. Our code is based on the leap-frog method and the centered difference method for integration and differentiation of the governing equations. We adopted the relativistic Buneman-Boris method to solve the Lorentz force equation and the Esirkepov method to calculate the current density while maintaining charge conservation. Using the developed code, we performed test simulations for electron two-stream instability and electron temperature anisotropy induced instability with the same initial parameters as used in previously reported studies. The test simulation results are almost identical with those of the previous papers.

  12. Codesign approach towards an Exascale scalable plasma simulation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaya, J.; Deca, J.; Innocenti, M. E.; Johnson, A.; Lapenta, G.; Markidis, S.; Olshevsky, V.; Vapirev, A.

    2013-10-01

    Particle in cell simulations represent an excellent paradigm for codesign efforts. PIC codes are simple and flexible with many variants addressing different physics applications (e.g. explicit, implicit, hybrid, gyrokinetic, fluid) and different architecture (e.g. vector, parallel, GPU). It is relatively easy to consider radical changes and test them in a short time. For this reason, the project DEEP funded by the European Commission (www.deep-project.eu) and the Intel Exascience Lab (www.exascience.com) have used PIC as one of their target application for a codesign approach aiming at developing PIC methods for future exascale comupters. The starting point is the iPic3D implicit PIC approach. Here we report on the analysis of code performance, on the use of GPUs and the new MICs (Intel Xeon processors). We describe how the method can be rethinked for hybrid architectures composed of MICs and CPUs (as in the new Deep Supercomputer in Juelich, as well as in others). The focus is on a codesign approach where computer science issue motivate modifications of the algorithms used while physics constraints what should be eventually achieved.

  13. Neoclassical Simulation of Tokamak Plasmas using Continuum Gyrokinetc Code TEMPEST

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X Q

    2007-11-09

    We present gyrokinetic neoclassical simulations of tokamak plasmas with self-consistent electric field for the first time using a fully nonlinear (full-f) continuum code TEMPEST in a circular geometry. A set of gyrokinetic equations are discretized on a five dimensional computational grid in phase space. The present implementation is a Method of Lines approach where the phase-space derivatives are discretized with finite differences and implicit backwards differencing formulas are used to advance the system in time. The fully nonlinear Boltzmann model is used for electrons. The neoclassical electric field is obtained by solving gyrokinetic Poisson equation with self-consistent poloidal variation. With our 4D ({psi}, {theta}, {epsilon}, {mu}) version of the TEMPEST code we compute radial particle and heat flux, the Geodesic-Acoustic Mode (GAM), and the development of neoclassical electric field, which we compare with neoclassical theory with a Lorentz collision model. The present work provides a numerical scheme and a new capability for self-consistently studying important aspects of neoclassical transport and rotations in toroidal magnetic fusion devices.

  14. Kinetic transport simulation of energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, He; Waltz, R. E.

    2016-05-01

    A kinetic transport code (EPtran) is developed for the transport of the energetic particles (EPs). The EPtran code evolves the EP distribution function in radius, energy, and pitch angle phase space (r, E, λ) to steady state with classical slowing down, pitch angle scattering, as well as radial and energy transport of the injected EPs (neutral beam injection (NBI) or fusion alpha). The EPtran code is illustrated by treating the transport of NBI fast ions from high-n ITG/TEM micro-turbulence and EP driven unstable low-n Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) in a well-studied DIII-D NBI heated discharge with significant AE central core loss. The kinetic transport code results for this discharge are compared with previous study using a simple EP density moment transport code ALPHA (R.E. Waltz and E.M. Bass 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 104006). The dominant EP-AE transport is treated with a local stiff critical EP density (or equivalent pressure) gradient radial transport model modified to include energy-dependence and the nonlocal effects EP drift orbits. All previous EP transport models assume that the EP velocity space distribution function is not significantly distorted from the classical ‘no transport’ slowing down distribution. Important transport distortions away from the slowing down EP spectrum are illustrated by a focus on the coefficient of convection: EP energy flux divided by the product of EP average energy and EP particle flux.

  15. Development of MCNPX-ESUT computer code for simulation of neutron/gamma pulse height distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolfazl Hosseini, Seyed; Vosoughi, Naser; Zangian, Mehdi

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the development of the MCNPX-ESUT (MCNPX-Energy Engineering of Sharif University of Technology) computer code for simulation of neutron/gamma pulse height distribution is reported. Since liquid organic scintillators like NE-213 are well suited and routinely used for spectrometry in mixed neutron/gamma fields, this type of detectors is selected for simulation in the present study. The proposed algorithm for simulation includes four main steps. The first step is the modeling of the neutron/gamma particle transport and their interactions with the materials in the environment and detector volume. In the second step, the number of scintillation photons due to charged particles such as electrons, alphas, protons and carbon nuclei in the scintillator material is calculated. In the third step, the transport of scintillation photons in the scintillator and lightguide is simulated. Finally, the resolution corresponding to the experiment is considered in the last step of the simulation. Unlike the similar computer codes like SCINFUL, NRESP7 and PHRESP, the developed computer code is applicable to both neutron and gamma sources. Hence, the discrimination of neutron and gamma in the mixed fields may be performed using the MCNPX-ESUT computer code. The main feature of MCNPX-ESUT computer code is that the neutron/gamma pulse height simulation may be performed without needing any sort of post processing. In the present study, the pulse height distributions due to a monoenergetic neutron/gamma source in NE-213 detector using MCNPX-ESUT computer code is simulated. The simulated neutron pulse height distributions are validated through comparing with experimental data (Gohil et al. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, 664 (2012) 304-309.) and the results obtained from similar computer codes like SCINFUL, NRESP7 and Geant4. The simulated gamma pulse height distribution for a 137Cs

  16. Particle Mesh Hydrodynamics for Astrophysics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatelain, Philippe; Cottet, Georges-Henri; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    We present a particle method for the simulation of three dimensional compressible hydrodynamics based on a hybrid Particle-Mesh discretization of the governing equations. The method is rooted on the regularization of particle locations as in remeshed Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (rSPH). The rSPH method was recently introduced to remedy problems associated with the distortion of computational elements in SPH, by periodically re-initializing the particle positions and by using high order interpolation kernels. In the PMH formulation, the particles solely handle the convective part of the compressible Euler equations. The particle quantities are then interpolated onto a mesh, where the pressure terms are computed. PMH, like SPH, is free of the convection CFL condition while at the same time it is more efficient as derivatives are computed on a mesh rather than particle-particle interactions. PMH does not detract from the adaptive character of SPH and allows for control of its accuracy. We present simulations of a benchmark astrophysics problem demonstrating the capabilities of this approach.

  17. Flux boundary conditions in particle simulations.

    PubMed

    Flekkøy, Eirik G; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael; Coveney, Peter V

    2005-08-01

    Flux boundary conditions are interesting in a number of contexts ranging from multiscale simulations to simulations of molecular hydrodynamics in nanoscale systems. Here we introduce, analyze, and test a general scheme to impose boundary conditions that simultaneously control the momentum and energy flux into open particle systems The scheme is shown to handle far from equilibrium simulations. It acquires its main characteristics from the requirement that it fulfills the second law of thermodynamics and thus minimizes the entropy production, when it is applied to reversible processes. It is shown both theoretically and through simulations that the scheme emulates the effect of an extended particle system as far as particle number fluctuations, temperature, and density profiles are concerned. The numerical scheme is further shown to be accurate and stable in both equilibrium and far from equilibrium contexts.

  18. Integration of Heat Transfer, Stress, and Particle Trajectory Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Thuc Bui; Michael Read; Lawrence ives

    2012-05-17

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. developed and currently markets Beam Optics Analyzer (BOA) in the United States and abroad. BOA is a 3D, charged particle optics code that solves the electric and magnetic fields with and without the presence of particles. It includes automatic and adaptive meshing to resolve spatial scales ranging from a few millimeters to meters. It is fully integrated with CAD packages, such as SolidWorks, allowing seamless geometry updates. The code includes iterative procedures for optimization, including a fully functional, graphical user interface. Recently, time dependent, particle in cell capability was added, pushing particles synchronically under quasistatic electromagnetic fields to obtain particle bunching under RF conditions. A heat transfer solver was added during this Phase I program. Completed tasks include: (1) Added a 3D finite element heat transfer solver with adaptivity; (2) Determined the accuracy of the linear heat transfer field solver to provide the basis for development of higher order solvers in Phase II; (3) Provided more accurate and smoother power density fields; and (4) Defined the geometry using the same CAD model, while maintaining different meshes, and interfacing the power density field between the particle simulator and heat transfer solvers. These objectives were achieved using modern programming techniques and algorithms. All programming was in C++ and parallelization in OpenMP, utilizing state-of-the-art multi-core technology. Both x86 and x64 versions are supported. The GUI design and implementation used Microsoft Foundation Class.

  19. ParaDiS-FEM dislocation dynamics simulation code primer

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, M; Hommes, G; Aubry, S; Arsenlis, A

    2011-09-27

    The ParaDiS code is developed to study bulk systems with periodic boundary conditions. When we try to perform discrete dislocation dynamics simulations for finite systems such as thin films or cylinders, the ParaDiS code must be extended. First, dislocations need to be contained inside the finite simulation box; Second, dislocations inside the finite box experience image stresses due to the free surfaces. We have developed in-house FEM subroutines to couple with the ParaDiS code to deal with free surface related issues in the dislocation dynamics simulations. This primer explains how the coupled code was developed, the main changes from the ParaDiS code, and the functions of the new FEM subroutines.

  20. M3D-K simulations of sawteeth and energetic particle transport in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Wei; Sheng, Zheng-Mao; Fu, G. Y.; Breslau, J. A.; Wang, Feng

    2014-09-15

    Nonlinear simulations of sawteeth and related energetic particle transport are carried out using the kinetic/magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hybrid code M3D-K. MHD simulations show repeated sawtooth cycles for a model tokamak equilibrium. Furthermore, test particle simulations are carried out to study the energetic particle transport due to a sawtooth crash. The results show that energetic particles are redistributed radially in the plasma core, depending on pitch angle and energy. For trapped particles, the redistribution occurs for particle energy below a critical value in agreement with existing theories. For co-passing particles, the redistribution is strong with little dependence on particle energy. In contrast, the redistribution level of counter-passing particles decreases with increasing particle energy.

  1. Para: a computer simulation code for plasma driven electromagnetic launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Thio, Y.-C.

    1983-03-01

    A computer code for simulation of rail-type accelerators utilizing a plasma armature has been developed and is described in detail. Some time varying properties of the plasma are taken into account in this code thus allowing the development of a dynamical model of the behavior of a plasma in a rail-type electromagnetic launcher. The code is being successfully used to predict and analyse experiments on small calibre rail-gun launchers.

  2. Second order gyrokinetic theory for particle-in-cell codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tronko, Natalia; Bottino, Alberto; Sonnendrücker, Eric

    2016-08-01

    The main idea of the gyrokinetic dynamical reduction consists in a systematical removal of the fast scale motion (the gyromotion) from the dynamics of the plasma, resulting in a considerable simplification and a significant gain of computational time. The gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov equations are nowadays implemented in for modeling (both laboratory and astrophysical) strongly magnetized plasmas. Different versions of the reduced set of equations exist, depending on the construction of the gyrokinetic reduction procedure and the approximations performed in the derivation. The purpose of this article is to explicitly show the connection between the general second order gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov system issued from the modern gyrokinetic theory and the model currently implemented in the global electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell code ORB5. Necessary information about the modern gyrokinetic formalism is given together with the consistent derivation of the gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov equations from first principles. The variational formulation of the dynamics is used to obtain the corresponding energy conservation law, which in turn is used for the verification of energy conservation diagnostics currently implemented in ORB5. This work fits within the context of the code verification project VeriGyro currently run at IPP Max-Planck Institut in collaboration with others European institutions.

  3. Probabilistic load simulation: Code development status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, J. F.; Ho, H.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Composite Load Spectra (CLS) project is to develop generic load models to simulate the composite load spectra that are included in space propulsion system components. The probabilistic loads thus generated are part of the probabilistic design analysis (PDA) of a space propulsion system that also includes probabilistic structural analyses, reliability, and risk evaluations. Probabilistic load simulation for space propulsion systems demands sophisticated probabilistic methodology and requires large amounts of load information and engineering data. The CLS approach is to implement a knowledge based system coupled with a probabilistic load simulation module. The knowledge base manages and furnishes load information and expertise and sets up the simulation runs. The load simulation module performs the numerical computation to generate the probabilistic loads with load information supplied from the CLS knowledge base.

  4. Probabilistic load simulation: Code development status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, J. F.; Ho, H.

    1991-05-01

    The objective of the Composite Load Spectra (CLS) project is to develop generic load models to simulate the composite load spectra that are included in space propulsion system components. The probabilistic loads thus generated are part of the probabilistic design analysis (PDA) of a space propulsion system that also includes probabilistic structural analyses, reliability, and risk evaluations. Probabilistic load simulation for space propulsion systems demands sophisticated probabilistic methodology and requires large amounts of load information and engineering data. The CLS approach is to implement a knowledge based system coupled with a probabilistic load simulation module. The knowledge base manages and furnishes load information and expertise and sets up the simulation runs. The load simulation module performs the numerical computation to generate the probabilistic loads with load information supplied from the CLS knowledge base.

  5. Loading relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zenitani, Seiji

    2015-04-15

    Numerical algorithms to load relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle-in-cell (PIC) and Monte-Carlo simulations are presented. For stationary relativistic Maxwellian, the inverse transform method and the Sobol algorithm are reviewed. To boost particles to obtain relativistic shifted-Maxwellian, two rejection methods are proposed in a physically transparent manner. Their acceptance efficiencies are ≈50% for generic cases and 100% for symmetric distributions. They can be combined with arbitrary base algorithms.

  6. Numerical simulation of particle-wave interaction in boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.; Danabasoglu, G.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of wall injection and particle motion on the spatial stability of two-dimensional plane channel flow are investigated. For this purpose, an accurate Navier-Stokes solver to simulate the space-time evolution of disturbances in three-dimensional flows has been developed. The code is operational on the NASA Langley CRAY2 and can be ported to any other supercomputer. The code has been tested extensively in tracking the spatial evolution of two-dimensional disturbances in plane channel flow and provided excellent agreement with the linear theory including at the inflow/outflow boundaries. Preliminary calculations have been performed to investigate the effects of stationary and moving sources of vortical disturbances simulating a particle traveling in the flow field. Results suggest that even at very low amplitudes, vortical disturbances act as amplifiers on the Tollmien-Schlichting waves promoting rapid instability. It is also found that slow moving particles are more dangerous than both stationary and fast moving particles for the same disturbance levels.

  7. CPIC: A Parallel Particle-In-Cell Code for Studying Spacecraft Charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierbachtol, Collin; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Moulton, David; Vernon, Louis

    2015-11-01

    CPIC is a three-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell code designed for use with curvilinear meshes. One of its primary objectives is to aid in studying spacecraft charging in the magnetosphere. CPIC maintains near-optimal computational performance and scaling thanks to a mapped logical mesh field solver, and a hybrid physical-logical space particle mover (avoiding the need to track particles). CPIC is written for parallel execution, utilizing a combination of both OpenMP threading and MPI distributed memory. New capabilities are being actively developed and added to CPIC, including the ability to handle multi-block curvilinear mesh structures. Verification results comparing CPIC to analytic test problems will be provided. Particular emphasis will be placed on the charging and shielding of a sphere-in-plasma system. Simulated charging results of representative spacecraft geometries will also be presented. Finally, its performance capabilities will be demonstrated through parallel scaling data.

  8. Applications of the Monte Carlo Code Geant to Particle Beam Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymanowski, H.; Fuchs, T.; Nill, S.; Wilkens, J. J.; Pflugfelder, D.; Oelfke, U.; Glinec, Y.; Faure, J.; Malka, V.

    2006-04-01

    We report on the use of the Monte Carlo simulation code GEANT for two different applications in the field of particle beam therapy. The first application relates to the planning of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatments. An important issue is thereby the accurate prediction of the dose while irradiating complex inhomogeneous patient geometries. We developed an improved method to account for tissue inhomogeneities in pencil beam algorithms. We show that GEANT3 can be successfully used to validate the new model before its integration in our treatment planning system. Another project concerns the investigation of the potential of high-energy particles produced by laser-plasma interactions for radiotherapy. GEANT4 simulations of the dosimetric properties of an experimental laser-accelerated electron beam were performed. They show that this technique may be very attractive for the development of new therapy beam modalities such as very-high energy (170 MeV) electrons.

  9. Monte Carlo simulations of intensity profiles for energetic particle propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tautz, R. C.; Bolte, J.; Shalchi, A.

    2016-02-01

    Aims: Numerical test-particle simulations are a reliable and frequently used tool for testing analytical transport theories and predicting mean-free paths. The comparison between solutions of the diffusion equation and the particle flux is used to critically judge the applicability of diffusion to the stochastic transport of energetic particles in magnetized turbulence. Methods: A Monte Carlo simulation code is extended to allow for the generation of intensity profiles and anisotropy-time profiles. Because of the relatively low number density of computational particles, a kernel function has to be used to describe the spatial extent of each particle. Results: The obtained intensity profiles are interpreted as solutions of the diffusion equation by inserting the diffusion coefficients that have been directly determined from the mean-square displacements. The comparison shows that the time dependence of the diffusion coefficients needs to be considered, in particular the initial ballistic phase and the often subdiffusive perpendicular coefficient. Conclusions: It is argued that the perpendicular component of the distribution function is essential if agreement between the diffusion solution and the simulated flux is to be obtained. In addition, time-dependent diffusion can provide a better description than the classic diffusion equation only after the initial ballistic phase.

  10. Petascale Flow Simulations Using Particles and Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2014-11-01

    How to chose the discretization of flow models in order to harness the power of available computer architectures? Our group explores this question for particle (vortex methods, molecular and dissipative particle dynamics) and grid based (finite difference, finite volume) discretisations for flow simulations across scales. I will discuss methodologies to transition between these methods and their implementation in massively parallel computer architectures. I will present simulations ranging from flows of cells in microfluidic channels to cloud cavitation collapse at 14.5 PFLOP/s. This research was supported by the European Research Council, the Swiss National Science Foundation and the Swiss National Supercomputing Center.

  11. Simulations of one- and two-dimensional complex plasmas using a modular, object-oriented code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferson, R. A.; Cianciosa, M.; Thomas, E.

    2010-11-01

    In a complex plasma, charged microparticles ("dust") are added to a background of ions, electrons, and neutral particles. This dust fully interacts with the surrounding plasma and self-consistently alters the plasma environment leading to the emergence of new plasma behavior. Numerical tools that complement experimental investigations can provide important insights into the properties of complex plasmas. This paper discusses a newly developed code, named DEMON (dynamic exploration of microparticle clouds optimized numerically), for simulating a complex plasma. The DEMON code models the behavior of the charged particle component of a complex plasma in a uniform plasma background. The key feature of the DEMON code is the use of a modular force model that allows a wide variety of experimental configurations to be studied without varying the core code infrastructure. Examples of the flexibility of this modular approach are presented using examples of one- and two-dimensional complex plasmas.

  12. One-dimensional kinematics of particle stream flow with application to solar wind simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olmsted, C.; Akasofu, S.-L.

    1985-01-01

    A simple kinematic method for determining the particle velocity distribution of a model solar wind for which the spatial distribution of particles is given as a function of particle travel time has been developed by Hakamada and Akasofu (1982). Here their method is formalized mathematically and an inverse procedure for determining the particle distribution from a given velocity distribution is derived. This inverse procedure is then applied to a simulated velocity distribution obtained from an MHD finite difference code.

  13. Global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations of internal kink instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mishchenko, Alexey; Zocco, Alessandro

    2012-12-15

    Internal kink instabilities have been studied in straight tokamak geometry employing an electromagnetic gyrokinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code. The ideal-MHD internal kink mode and the collisionless m=1 tearing mode have been successfully simulated with the PIC code. Diamagnetic effects on the internal kink modes have also been investigated.

  14. Study on angular variation of cosmic ray secondary particles with atmospheric depth using CORSIKA code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patgiri, P.; Kalita, D.; Boruah, K.

    2017-04-01

    The distribution of the secondary cosmic ray charged particles in the atmosphere as a function of zenith angle of the primary particle depends on various factors such as atmospheric depth, latitude and longitude of the place of observation and possibly other atmospheric conditions. This work is focussed on the investigation of atmospheric attenuation of an Extensive Air Shower using the zenith angle distribution of the secondary charged particles, at different atmospheric depths for pure primary compositions (gamma, proton and iron nucleus) and mixed compositions employing the Monte Carlo Simulation code CORSIKA (versions 6.990 and 7.3500) in the energy range 10 TeV-1 PeV. The secondary charged particles in different zenith angle bins are fitted with a differential distribution dN sp /dθ = A(X)sinθcos n(X)θ, where the power index n(X) is a function of atmospheric depth X. For a given zenith angle θ, the frequency of the showers with secondary charged particle intensity higher than a threshold is also fitted with a relation F(θ,X0) = F(0,X0)exp[-X0(secθ - 1)/λ], where X0 is the vertical atmospheric depth and λ is the attenuation length. Further, the angular distribution parameter n(X) and attenuation co-efficients (λ) from our simulation result for different primaries are compared with available experimental data.

  15. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of a field reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, D. P. Lau, C. K.; Holod, I.; Lin, Z.; Dettrick, S.

    2016-01-15

    Gyrokinetic particle simulation of the field-reversed configuration (FRC) has been developed using the gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC). The magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium is mapped from cylindrical coordinates to Boozer coordinates for the FRC core and scrape-off layer (SOL), respectively. A field-aligned mesh is constructed for solving self-consistent electric fields using a semi-spectral solver in a partial torus FRC geometry. This new simulation capability has been successfully verified and driftwave instability in the FRC has been studied using the gyrokinetic simulation for the first time. Initial GTC simulations find that in the FRC core, the ion-scale driftwave is stabilized by the large ion gyroradius. In the SOL, the driftwave is unstable on both ion and electron scales.

  16. Nonlinear particle simulation of ion cyclotron waves in toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kuley, A. Lin, Z.; Bao, J.; Wei, X. S.; Xiao, Y.

    2015-12-10

    Global particle simulation model has been developed in this work to provide a first-principles tool for studying the nonlinear interactions of radio frequency (RF) waves with plasmas in tokamak. In this model, ions are considered as fully kinetic particles using the Vlasov equation and electrons are treated as guiding centers using the drift kinetic equation with realistic electron-to-ion mass ratio. Boris push scheme for the ion motion has been developed in the toroidal geometry using magnetic coordinates and successfully verified for the ion cyclotron and ion Bernstein waves in global gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC). The nonlinear simulation capability is applied to study the parametric decay instability of a pump wave into an ion Bernstein wave side band and a low frequency ion cyclotron quasi mode.

  17. Nonlinear particle simulation of ion cyclotron waves in toroidal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuley, A.; Bao, J.; Lin, Z.; Wei, X. S.; Xiao, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Global particle simulation model has been developed in this work to provide a first-principles tool for studying the nonlinear interactions of radio frequency (RF) waves with plasmas in tokamak. In this model, ions are considered as fully kinetic particles using the Vlasov equation and electrons are treated as guiding centers using the drift kinetic equation with realistic electron-to-ion mass ratio. Boris push scheme for the ion motion has been developed in the toroidal geometry using magnetic coordinates and successfully verified for the ion cyclotron and ion Bernstein waves in global gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC). The nonlinear simulation capability is applied to study the parametric decay instability of a pump wave into an ion Bernstein wave side band and a low frequency ion cyclotron quasi mode.

  18. Code for Axial and Crossflow Turbine Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan Murray, Matthew Barone

    2013-07-25

    CACTUS is a code that calculates the performance and aero/hydrodynamic loads of a wind or water turbine. The turbine may be either a vertical-axis or a horizontal-axis machine, and may consist of one or more blade curved or straight blades. The performance model is based on a lifting-line free wake formulation that calculates rotor power and blade loads in the time domain. The rotor is treated as a rotating rigid body, such that structural dynamical motions are not modeled. The turbine is assumed to operate within a steady, but possibly sheared, wind or current velocity. For marine hydrokinetic energy applications, the presence of a river/tidal channel bed and water surface boundaries may be modeled.

  19. Computational plasticity algorithm for particle dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbenhoft, K.; Lyamin, A. V.; Vignes, C.

    2017-03-01

    The problem of particle dynamics simulation is interpreted in the framework of computational plasticity leading to an algorithm which is mathematically indistinguishable from the common implicit scheme widely used in the finite element analysis of elastoplastic boundary value problems. This algorithm provides somewhat of a unification of two particle methods, the discrete element method and the contact dynamics method, which usually are thought of as being quite disparate. In particular, it is shown that the former appears as the special case where the time stepping is explicit while the use of implicit time stepping leads to the kind of schemes usually labelled contact dynamics methods. The framing of particle dynamics simulation within computational plasticity paves the way for new approaches similar (or identical) to those frequently employed in nonlinear finite element analysis. These include mixed implicit-explicit time stepping, dynamic relaxation and domain decomposition schemes.

  20. Interactive methods for exploring particle simulation data

    SciTech Connect

    Co, Christopher S.; Friedman, Alex; Grote, David P.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Bethel, E. Wes; Joy, Kenneth I.

    2004-05-01

    In this work, we visualize high-dimensional particle simulation data using a suite of scatter plot-based visualizations coupled with interactive selection tools. We use traditional 2D and 3D projection scatter plots as well as a novel oriented disk rendering style to convey various information about the data. Interactive selection tools allow physicists to manually classify ''interesting'' sets of particles that are highlighted across multiple, linked views of the data. The power of our application is the ability to correspond new visual representations of the simulation data with traditional, well understood visualizations. This approach supports the interactive exploration of the high-dimensional space while promoting discovery of new particle behavior.

  1. PLASMA ENERGETIC PARTICLES SIMULATION CENTER (PEPSC)

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, Herbert L.

    2014-05-23

    The main effort of the Texas group was to develop theoretical and simplified numerical models to understand chirping phenomena often seen for Alfven and geodesic acoustic waves in experimental plasmas such as D-III-D, NSTX and JET. Its main numerical effort was to modify the AEGIS code, which was originally developed as an eigenvalue solver. To apply to the chirping problem this code has to be able to treat the linear response to the continuum and the response of the plasma to external drive or to an internal drive that comes from the formation of phase space chirping structures. The theoretical underpinning of this investigation still needed to be more fully developed to understand how to best formulate the theoretical problem. Considerable progress was made on this front by B.N. Breizman and his collaborators and a new reduced model was developed by H. L. Berk and his PhD student, G. Wang which can be uses as simplified model to describe chirping in a large aspect ratio tokamak. This final report will concentrate on these two directions that were developed as well as results that were found in the work with the AEGIS code and in the progress in developing a novel quasi-linear formulation for a description of Alfvenic modes destabilized by energetic particles, such as alpha particles in a burning plasma.

  2. Muon simulation codes MUSIC and MUSUN for underground physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, V. A.

    2009-03-01

    The paper describes two Monte Carlo codes dedicated to muon simulations: MUSIC (MUon SImulation Code) and MUSUN (MUon Simulations UNderground). MUSIC is a package for muon transport through matter. It is particularly useful for propagating muons through large thickness of rock or water, for instance from the surface down to underground/underwater laboratory. MUSUN is designed to use the results of muon transport through rock/water to generate muons in or around underground laboratory taking into account their energy spectrum and angular distribution.

  3. LOOPREF: A Fluid Code for the Simulation of Coronal Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deFainchtein, Rosalinda; Antiochos, Spiro; Spicer, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the code LOOPREF. LOOPREF is a semi-one dimensional finite element code that is especially well suited to simulate coronal-loop phenomena. It has a full implementation of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), which is crucial for this type of simulation. The AMR routines are an improved version of AMR1D. LOOPREF's versatility makes is suitable to simulate a wide variety of problems. In addition to efficiently providing very high resolution in rapidly changing regions of the domain, it is equipped to treat loops of variable cross section, any non-linear form of heat conduction, shocks, gravitational effects, and radiative loss.

  4. PHITS-2.76, Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Version 03 PHITS can deal with the transport of almost all particles (nucleons, nuclei, mesons, photons, and electrons) over wide energy ranges, using several nuclear reaction models and nuclear data libraries. Geometrical configuration of the simulation can be set with GG (General Geometry) or CG (Combinatorial Geometry). Various quantities such as heat deposition, track length and production yields can be deduced from the simulation, using implemented estimator functions called "tally". The code also has a function to draw 2D and 3D figures of the calculated results as well as the setup geometries, using a code ANGEL. The physical processes included in PHITS can be divided into two categories, transport process and collision process. In the transport process, PHITS can simulate motion of particles under external fields such as magnetic and gravity. Without the external fields, neutral particles move along a straight trajectory with constant energy up to the next collision point. However, charge particles interact many times with electrons in the material losing energy and changing direction. PHITS treats ionization processes not as collision but as a transport process, using the continuous-slowing-down approximation. The average stopping power is given by the charge density of the material and the momentum of the particle taking into account the fluctuations of the energy loss and the angular deviation. In the collision process, PHITS can simulate the elastic and inelastic interactions as well as decay of particles. The total reaction cross section, or the life time of the particle is an essential quantity in the determination of the mean free path of the transport particle. According to the mean free path, PHITS chooses the next collision point using the Monte Carlo method. To generate the secondary particles of the collision, we need the information of the final states of the collision. For neutron induced reactions in low energy region, PHITS employs the cross

  5. Loading relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenitani, S.

    2015-12-01

    In order to study energetic plasma phenomena by using particle-in-cell (PIC) and Monte-Carlo simulations, we need to deal with relativistic velocity distributions in these simulations. However, numerical algorithms to deal with relativistic distributions are not well known. In this contribution, we overview basic algorithms to load relativistic Maxwell distributions in PIC and Monte-Carlo simulations. For stationary relativistic Maxwellian, the inverse transform method and the Sobol algorithm are reviewed. To boost particles to obtain relativistic shifted-Maxwellian, two rejection methods are newly proposed in a physically transparent manner. Their acceptance efficiencies are 􏰅50% for generic cases and 100% for symmetric distributions. They can be combined with arbitrary base algorithms.

  6. Full f gyrokinetic method for particle simulation of tokamak transport

    SciTech Connect

    Heikkinen, J.A. Janhunen, S.J.; Kiviniemi, T.P.; Ogando, F.

    2008-05-10

    A gyrokinetic particle-in-cell approach with direct implicit construction of the coefficient matrix of the Poisson equation from ion polarization and electron parallel nonlinearity is described and applied in global electrostatic toroidal plasma transport simulations. The method is applicable for calculation of the evolution of particle distribution function f including as special cases strong plasma pressure profile evolution by transport and formation of neoclassical flows. This is made feasible by full f formulation and by recording the charge density changes due to the ion polarization drift and electron acceleration along the local magnetic field while particles are advanced. The code has been validated against the linear predictions of the unstable ion temperature gradient mode growth rates and frequencies. Convergence and saturation in both turbulent and neoclassical limit of the ion heat conductivity is obtained with numerical noise well suppressed by a sufficiently large number of simulation particles. A first global full f validation of the neoclassical radial electric field in the presence of turbulence for a heated collisional tokamak plasma is obtained. At high Mach number (M{sub p}{approx}1) of the poloidal flow, the radial electric field is significantly enhanced over the standard neoclassical prediction. The neoclassical radial electric field together with the related GAM oscillations is found to regulate the turbulent heat and particle diffusion levels particularly strongly in a large aspect ratio tokamak at low plasma current.

  7. Benchmarking the codes VORPAL, OSIRIS, and QuickPIC with Laser Wakefield Acceleration Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, K.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Cowan, B.; Cary, J. R.; Huang, C.; Mori, W. B.; Tsung, F. S.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E.; Fonseca, R. A.; Martins, S. F.; Silva, L. O.

    2009-01-22

    Three-dimensional laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) simulations have recently been performed to benchmark the commonly used particle-in-cell (PIC) codes VORPAL, OSIRIS, and QuickPIC. The simulations were run in parallel on over 100 processors, using parameters relevant to LWFA with ultra-short Ti-Sapphire laser pulses propagating in hydrogen gas. Both first-order and second-order particle shapes were employed. We present the results of this benchmarking exercise, and show that accelerating gradients from full PIC agree for all values of a{sub 0} and that full and reduced PIC agree well for values of a{sub 0} approaching 4.

  8. Simulating the transport of heavy charged particles through trabecular spongiosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersh, Jacob A.

    As planning continues for manned missions far beyond Low Earth Orbit, a paramount concern remains the flight crew's exposure to galactic cosmic radiation. When humans exit the protective magnetic field of Earth, they become subject to bombardment by highly-reactive heavy charged (HZE) particles. A possible consequence of this two- to three-year-long mission is the onset of radiation-induced leukemia, a disorder with a latency period as short as two to three years. Because data on risk to humans from exposure to HZE particles is non-existent, studies of leukemia in animals are now underway to investigate the relative effectiveness of HZE exposures. Leukemogenesis can result from energy depositions occurring within marrow contained in the trabecular spongiosa. Trabecular spongiosa is found in flat bones and within the ends of long bones, and is characterized by an intricate matrix of interconnected bone tissue forming cavities that house marrow. The microscopic internal dimensions of spongiosa vary between species. As radiation traverses this region, interface-induced dose perturbations that occur at the interfaces between bone and marrow affect the patterns of energy deposition within the region. An aim of this project is to determine the extent by which tissue heterogeneity and microscopic dimensions have on patterns of energy deposition within the trabecular spongiosa. This leads to the development of PATHFIT, a computer code capable of generating simple quadric-based geometric models of trabecular spongiosa for both humans and mice based on actual experimentally-determined internal dimensions of trabecular spongiosa. Following the creation of spongiosa models, focus is placed on the development of HITSPAP, a hybrid Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport code system that combines capabilities of the MC code PENELOPE and MC code PARTRAC. This code is capable of simulating the transport of HZE particles through accurate models of trabecular spongiosa. The final and

  9. HADES, A Code for Simulating a Variety of Radiographic Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Aufderheide, M B; Henderson, G; von Wittenau, A; Slone, D M; Barty, A; Martz, Jr., H E

    2004-10-28

    It is often useful to simulate radiographic images in order to optimize imaging trade-offs and to test tomographic techniques. HADES is a code that simulates radiography using ray tracing techniques. Although originally developed to simulate X-Ray transmission radiography, HADES has grown to simulate neutron radiography over a wide range of energy, proton radiography in the 1 MeV to 100 GeV range, and recently phase contrast radiography using X-Rays in the keV energy range. HADES can simulate parallel-ray or cone-beam radiography through a variety of mesh types, as well as through collections of geometric objects. HADES was originally developed for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) applications, but could be a useful tool for simulation of portal imaging, proton therapy imaging, and synchrotron studies of tissue. In this paper we describe HADES' current capabilities and discuss plans for a major revision of the code.

  10. SimTrack: A compact c++ code for particle orbit and spin tracking in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Yun

    2015-08-29

    SimTrack is a compact c++ code of 6-d symplectic element-by-element particle tracking in accelerators originally designed for head-on beam–beam compensation simulation studies in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It provides a 6-d symplectic orbit tracking with the 4th order symplectic integration for magnet elements and the 6-d symplectic synchro-beam map for beam–beam interaction. Since its inception in 2009, SimTrack has been intensively used for dynamic aperture calculations with beam–beam interaction for RHIC. Recently, proton spin tracking and electron energy loss due to synchrotron radiation were added. In this article, I will present the code architecture, physics models, and some selected examples of its applications to RHIC and a future electron-ion collider design eRHIC.

  11. SimTrack: A compact c++ code for particle orbit and spin tracking in accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Yun

    2015-08-29

    SimTrack is a compact c++ code of 6-d symplectic element-by-element particle tracking in accelerators originally designed for head-on beam–beam compensation simulation studies in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It provides a 6-d symplectic orbit tracking with the 4th order symplectic integration for magnet elements and the 6-d symplectic synchro-beam map for beam–beam interaction. Since its inception in 2009, SimTrack has been intensively used for dynamic aperture calculations with beam–beam interaction for RHIC. Recently, proton spin tracking and electron energy loss due to synchrotron radiation were added. In this article, I will present the code architecture,more » physics models, and some selected examples of its applications to RHIC and a future electron-ion collider design eRHIC.« less

  12. Simulations of collision of ice particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamankhan, Piroz

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop a realistic model for ice-structure interaction. To this end, the experiments made by Bridges et al. [Bridges FG, Hatzes A, Liu DNC. Structure, stability and evolution of Saturn's rings. Nature 1984;309:333-5] in order to measure the coefficient of restitution for ice particles are thoroughly analyzed. One particularly troublesome aspect of the aforementioned experiments is fracture of the ice particles during a collision. In the present effort, the collisional properties of the ice particles are investigated using a Finite Element approach. It is found that a major challenge in modeling collision of the ice balls is the prediction of the onset of fracture and crack propagation in them. In simulations of a block of ice collision to a structure, it is crucial that fracture is determined correctly, as it will influence the collisional properties of the ice particles. The results of the simulation, considering fracture criterion implemented into the Finite Element Model [Zamankhan P, Bordbar M-H. Complex flow dynamics in dense granular flows. Part I: experimentation. J Appl Mech (T-ASME) 2006;73:648-57; Zamankhan P, Huang J. Complex flow dynamics in dense granular flows. Part II: simulations. J Appl Mech (T-ASME) 2007;74:691-702] together with a material model for the ice, imply that most of the kinetic energy dissipation occurs as a result of fracturing at the contact surface of the ice particles. The results obtained in the present study suggest that constitutive models such as those proposed by Brilliantov et al. [Brilliantov NV, Spahn F, Hertzsch JM, Poschel T. Model for collisions in granular gases. Phys Rev E;1996;53:5382-92] for collisions of ice particles are highly questionable.

  13. Particle simulation of intense electron cyclotron heating and beat-wave current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I.

    1987-10-12

    High-power free-electron lasers make new methods possible for heating plasmas and driving current in toroidal plasmas with electromagnetic waves. We have undertaken particle simulation studies with one and two dimensional, relativistic particle simulation codes of intense pulsed electron cyclotron heating and beat-wave current drive. The particle simulation methods here are conventional: the algorithms are time-centered, second-order-accurate, explicit, leap-frog difference schemes. The use of conventional methods restricts the range of space and time scales to be relatively compact in the problems addressed. Nevertheless, experimentally relevant simulations have been performed. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Computer Models Simulate Fine Particle Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Through a NASA Seed Fund partnership with DEM Solutions Inc., of Lebanon, New Hampshire, scientists at Kennedy Space Center refined existing software to study the electrostatic phenomena of granular and bulk materials as they apply to planetary surfaces. The software, EDEM, allows users to import particles and obtain accurate representations of their shapes for modeling purposes, such as simulating bulk solids behavior, and was enhanced to be able to more accurately model fine, abrasive, cohesive particles. These new EDEM capabilities can be applied in many industries unrelated to space exploration and have been adopted by several prominent U.S. companies, including John Deere, Pfizer, and Procter & Gamble.

  15. Simulating Marvel with the Stun Code

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, L A

    2001-05-23

    MARVEL, a nuclear-driven shock-tube experiment, consisted of a 2.2 kiloton nuclear explosive detonated 176 meters underground at one end of a 122-meter long, 1-meter diameter horizontal tunnel. Vaporization of material in the immediate vicinity of the explosive provided the source of high-energy driver gas. The driven gas was the ambient atmospheric air in the tunnel. The event was staged as an experimental and calculational study of the time dependent .ow of energy in the tunnel and surrounding alluvium. In this report we describe the derivation and implementation of a ''1-3/4D'' hydrocode to simulate the experiment. Calculations were performed to study the influence of energy transport to, and mass ablation from, the walls of the tunnel on the shock velocity.

  16. Edge-relevant plasma simulations with the continuum code COGENT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, M.; Dorr, M.; Ghosh, D.; Hittinger, J.; Rognlien, T.; Cohen, R.; Lee, W.; Schwartz, P.

    2016-10-01

    We describe recent advances in cross-separatrix and other edge-relevant plasma simulations with COGENT, a continuum gyro-kinetic code being developed by the Edge Simulation Laboratory (ESL) collaboration. The distinguishing feature of the COGENT code is its high-order finite-volume discretization methods, which employ arbitrary mapped multiblock grid technology (nearly field-aligned on blocks) to handle the complexity of tokamak divertor geometry with high accuracy. This paper discusses the 4D (axisymmetric) electrostatic version of the code, and the presented topics include: (a) initial simulations with kinetic electrons and development of reduced fluid models; (b) development and application of implicit-explicit (IMEX) time integration schemes; and (c) conservative modeling of drift-waves and the universal instability. Work performed for USDOE, at LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and at LBNL under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  17. Nexus: A modular workflow management system for quantum simulation codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogel, Jaron T.

    2016-01-01

    The management of simulation workflows represents a significant task for the individual computational researcher. Automation of the required tasks involved in simulation work can decrease the overall time to solution and reduce sources of human error. A new simulation workflow management system, Nexus, is presented to address these issues. Nexus is capable of automated job management on workstations and resources at several major supercomputing centers. Its modular design allows many quantum simulation codes to be supported within the same framework. Current support includes quantum Monte Carlo calculations with QMCPACK, density functional theory calculations with Quantum Espresso or VASP, and quantum chemical calculations with GAMESS. Users can compose workflows through a transparent, text-based interface, resembling the input file of a typical simulation code. A usage example is provided to illustrate the process.

  18. Nexus: a modular workflow management system for quantum simulation codes

    SciTech Connect

    Krogel, Jaron T.

    2015-08-24

    The management of simulation workflows is a significant task for the individual computational researcher. Automation of the required tasks involved in simulation work can decrease the overall time to solution and reduce sources of human error. A new simulation workflow management system, Nexus, is presented to address these issues. Nexus is capable of automated job management on workstations and resources at several major supercomputing centers. Its modular design allows many quantum simulation codes to be supported within the same framework. Current support includes quantum Monte Carlo calculations with QMCPACK, density functional theory calculations with Quantum Espresso or VASP, and quantum chemical calculations with GAMESS. Users can compose workflows through a transparent, text-based interface, resembling the input file of a typical simulation code. A usage example is provided to illustrate the process.

  19. Nexus: a modular workflow management system for quantum simulation codes

    DOE PAGES

    Krogel, Jaron T.

    2015-08-24

    The management of simulation workflows is a significant task for the individual computational researcher. Automation of the required tasks involved in simulation work can decrease the overall time to solution and reduce sources of human error. A new simulation workflow management system, Nexus, is presented to address these issues. Nexus is capable of automated job management on workstations and resources at several major supercomputing centers. Its modular design allows many quantum simulation codes to be supported within the same framework. Current support includes quantum Monte Carlo calculations with QMCPACK, density functional theory calculations with Quantum Espresso or VASP, and quantummore » chemical calculations with GAMESS. Users can compose workflows through a transparent, text-based interface, resembling the input file of a typical simulation code. A usage example is provided to illustrate the process.« less

  20. Spacecraft charging analysis with the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D

    SciTech Connect

    Deca, J.; Lapenta, G.; Marchand, R.; Markidis, S.

    2013-10-15

    We present the first results on the analysis of spacecraft charging with the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, designed for running on massively parallel supercomputers. The numerical algorithm is presented, highlighting the implementation of the electrostatic solver and the immersed boundary algorithm; the latter which creates the possibility to handle complex spacecraft geometries. As a first step in the verification process, a comparison is made between the floating potential obtained with iPic3D and with Orbital Motion Limited theory for a spherical particle in a uniform stationary plasma. Second, the numerical model is verified for a CubeSat benchmark by comparing simulation results with those of PTetra for space environment conditions with increasing levels of complexity. In particular, we consider spacecraft charging from plasma particle collection, photoelectron and secondary electron emission. The influence of a background magnetic field on the floating potential profile near the spacecraft is also considered. Although the numerical approaches in iPic3D and PTetra are rather different, good agreement is found between the two models, raising the level of confidence in both codes to predict and evaluate the complex plasma environment around spacecraft.

  1. Towards robust algorithms for current deposition and dynamic load-balancing in a GPU particle in cell code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francesco; Londrillo, Pasquale; Sgattoni, Andrea; Sinigardi, Stefano; Turchetti, Giorgio

    2012-12-01

    We present `jasmine', an implementation of a fully relativistic, 3D, electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code, capable of running simulations in various laser plasma acceleration regimes on Graphics-Processing-Units (GPUs) HPC clusters. Standard energy/charge preserving FDTD-based algorithms have been implemented using double precision and quadratic (or arbitrary sized) shape functions for the particle weighting. When porting a PIC scheme to the GPU architecture (or, in general, a shared memory environment), the particle-to-grid operations (e.g. the evaluation of the current density) require special care to avoid memory inconsistencies and conflicts. Here we present a robust implementation of this operation that is efficient for any number of particles per cell and particle shape function order. Our algorithm exploits the exposed GPU memory hierarchy and avoids the use of atomic operations, which can hurt performance especially when many particles lay on the same cell. We show the code multi-GPU scalability results and present a dynamic load-balancing algorithm. The code is written using a python-based C++ meta-programming technique which translates in a high level of modularity and allows for easy performance tuning and simple extension of the core algorithms to various simulation schemes.

  2. Full electromagnetic Vlasov code simulation of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    SciTech Connect

    Umeda, Takayuki; Miwa, Jun-ichiro; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Togano, Kentaro; Nakamura, Takuma K. M.; Shinohara, Iku; Fukazawa, Keiichiro

    2010-05-15

    Recent advancement in numerical techniques for Vlasov simulations and their application to cross-scale coupling in the plasma universe are discussed. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are now widely used for numerical modeling of global and macroscopic phenomena. In the framework of the MHD approximation, however, diffusion coefficients such as resistivity and adiabatic index are given from empirical models. Thus there are recent attempts to understand first-principle kinetic processes in macroscopic phenomena, such as magnetic reconnection and the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability via full kinetic particle-in-cell and Vlasov codes. In the present study, a benchmark test for a new four-dimensional full electromagnetic Vlasov code is performed. First, the computational speed of the Vlasov code is measured and a linear performance scaling is obtained on a massively parallel supercomputer with more than 12 000 cores. Second, a first-principle Vlasov simulation of the KH instability is performed in order to evaluate current status of numerical techniques for Vlasov simulations. The KH instability is usually adopted as a benchmark test problem for guiding-center Vlasov codes, in which a cyclotron motion of charged particles is neglected. There is not any full electromagnetic Vlasov simulation of the KH instability; this is because it is difficult to follow E-vectorxB-vector drift motion accurately without approximations. The present first-principle Vlasov simulation has successfully represented the formation of KH vortices and its secondary instability. These results suggest that Vlasov code simulations would be a powerful approach for studies of cross-scale coupling on future Peta-scale supercomputers.

  3. Collisional PIC Simulations of Particles in Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, William

    2003-10-01

    Because of the long range of Coloumb forces, collisions with distant particles in plasmas are more important than collisions with near neighbors. In addition, many problems in space physics and magnetic confinement include regions of weak magnetic field where the MHD approximation breaks down. A particle-in-cell code based on the quiet direct simulation Monte-Carlo method(B. J. Albright, W. Daughton, D. Lemons, D. Winske, and M. E. Jones, Physics of Plasmas) 9, 1898 (2002). is being developed to study collisional (e.g., ν ˜ Ω) particle motion in magnetic fields. Primary application is to energetic particle loss in the radiation belts(K. Papadopoulos, COSPAR Meeting, Houston, TX, Oct., 2002.) at a given energy and L-shell. Other applications include trapping in rotating field-reversed configurations(N. Rostoker and A. Qerushi, Physics of Plasmas) 9, 3057 (2002)., and electron behavior in magnetic traps(V. Gorgadze, T. Pasquini, J. S. Wurtele, and J. Fajans, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc.) 47, 127 (2002).. The use of the random time-step method(W. Peter, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc.) 47, 52 (2002). to decrease simulation times by 1-2 orders of magnitude is also being studied.

  4. Development of a Computational Framework on Fluid-Solid Mixture Flow Simulations for the COMPASS Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Morita, Koji; Shirakawa, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Yuichi

    The COMPASS code is designed based on the moving particle semi-implicit method to simulate various complex mesoscale phenomena relevant to core disruptive accidents of sodium-cooled fast reactors. In this study, a computational framework for fluid-solid mixture flow simulations was developed for the COMPASS code. The passively moving solid model was used to simulate hydrodynamic interactions between fluid and solids. Mechanical interactions between solids were modeled by the distinct element method. A multi-time-step algorithm was introduced to couple these two calculations. The proposed computational framework for fluid-solid mixture flow simulations was verified by the comparison between experimental and numerical studies on the water-dam break with multiple solid rods.

  5. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Stimulated Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winjum, B. J.; Fahlen, J.; Tsung, F. S.; Mori, W. B.; Hinkel, D. E.; Langdon, A. B.

    2006-10-01

    Using the full-PIC code OSIRIS, we have studied stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) over a wide range of parameters relevant to NIF. The role of beat-wave damping as a saturation mechanism is explored, as well as its relationship to other nonlinear effects which have previously been used to explain SRS behavior in NIF-relevant plasmas. Vu et al., have proposed that a nonlinear frequency shift due to the trapped particles detunes the instability, Brunner and Valeo argue that the trapped-particle instability is one of the dominant saturation mechanisms, while L. Yin et al., claim that electron beam acoustic modes are important. We will discuss the role played by each of these effects in OSIRIS simulations, as well as the importance of plasma wave convection on the recurrence of SRS reflectivity. We will also discuss how SRS behavior changes as the electron density and temperature are varied.

  6. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of the beta-induced Alfven eigen mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huasen; Lin, Zhihong; Holod, Ihor; Wang, Xin; Xiao, Yong; Zhang, Wenlu

    2010-11-01

    The beta-induced Alfven eigen mode (BAE) is studied using the global gyrokinetic particle code GTC. In our simulation, BAE is successfully excited by antenna and energetic particle density gradient. Through the antenna frequency scan, we can measure the BAE frequency and damping rate by numerical fitting the saturation amplitude. BAE excitation by energetic particles shows that the BAE propagates in the ion diamagnetic direction and the frequency has a little downshift, which is due to modification of the energetic particles. The frequency and growth rate in gyrokinetic simulation is a little different from drift kinetic simulation, which is expected due to the finite larmor radius effect. We also find that the BAE frequency is related to the wavelength and the plasma beta while the growth rate is sensitive to the energetic particle properties. Benchmarks between GTC and HMGC are also done through initial perturbation, antenna excitation and energetic particle excitation. The simulation results agree with each other very well.

  7. Simulation of Neutral Particle Transport During HiPIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieschmann, Jan; Gallian, Sara; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    In this work the importance of the knowledge of the spatial distribution, its temporal evolution as well as their energy distribution of heavy particles within sputtering processes is discussed. To describe these discharges - typically operated at very low pressures below 1 Pa - specific modeling approaches are required. Our approach comprises a three-dimensional kinetic Lagrangian description of neutral particles. A modified version of the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code dsmcFoam is used, with the aim to describe the evolution of background and sputtered particles of a High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) process in a research reactor. Emphasize is put on the influence of the initial angular distribution of sputtered particles, as well as their energy distribution and its angular dependence. Based on the work of Stepanova and Dew a modified Thompson energy distribution is used. Differently distributed sputtered particles provide densities and fluxes concerning the corresponding film formation. This work is supported by the German Research Foundation in the frame of the Collaborative Research Centre TRR 87.

  8. Plasma particle simulation of electrostatic ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Xiaohang; Keefer, Dennis; Ruyten, Wilhelmus

    1990-01-01

    Charge exchange collisons between beam ions and neutral propellant gas can result in erosion of the accelerator grid surfaces of an ion engine. A particle in cell (PIC) is developed along with a Monte Carlo method to simulate the ion dynamics and charge exchange processes in the grid region of an ion thruster. The simulation is two-dimensional axisymmetric and uses three velocity components (2d3v) to investigate the influence of charge exchange collisions on the ion sputtering of the accelerator grid surfaces. An example calculation has been performed for an ion thruster operated on xenon propellant. The simulation shows that the greatest sputtering occurs on the downstream surface of the grid, but some sputtering can also occur on the upstream surface as well as on the interior of the grid aperture.

  9. Advanced methods in global gyrokinetic full f particle simulation of tokamak transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ogando, F.; Heikkinen, J. A.; Henriksson, S.; Janhunen, S. J.; Kiviniemi, T. P.; Leerink, S.

    2006-11-30

    A new full f nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation code, named ELMFIRE, has been developed for simulating transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas. The code is based on a gyrokinetic particle-in-cell algorithm, which can consider electrons and ions jointly or separately, as well as arbitrary impurities. The implicit treatment of the ion polarization drift and the use of full f methods allow for simulations of strongly perturbed plasmas including wide orbit effects, steep gradients and rapid dynamic changes. This article presents in more detail the algorithms incorporated into ELMFIRE, as well as benchmarking comparisons to both neoclassical theory and other codes.Code ELMFIRE calculates plasma dynamics by following the evolution of a number of sample particles. Because of using an stochastic algorithm its results are influenced by statistical noise. The effect of noise on relevant magnitudes is analyzed.Turbulence spectra of FT-2 plasma has been calculated with ELMFIRE, obtaining results consistent with experimental data.

  10. Maestro and Castro: Simulation Codes for Astrophysical Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zingale, Michael; Almgren, Ann; Beckner, Vince; Bell, John; Friesen, Brian; Jacobs, Adam; Katz, Maximilian P.; Malone, Christopher; Nonaka, Andrew; Zhang, Weiqun

    2017-01-01

    Stellar explosions are multiphysics problems—modeling them requires the coordinated input of gravity solvers, reaction networks, radiation transport, and hydrodynamics together with microphysics recipes to describe the physics of matter under extreme conditions. Furthermore, these models involve following a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, which puts tough demands on simulation codes. We developed the codes Maestro and Castro to meet the computational challenges of these problems. Maestro uses a low Mach number formulation of the hydrodynamics to efficiently model convection. Castro solves the fully compressible radiation hydrodynamics equations to capture the explosive phases of stellar phenomena. Both codes are built upon the BoxLib adaptive mesh refinement library, which prepares them for next-generation exascale computers. Common microphysics shared between the codes allows us to transfer a problem from the low Mach number regime in Maestro to the explosive regime in Castro. Importantly, both codes are freely available (https://github.com/BoxLib-Codes). We will describe the design of the codes and some of their science applications, as well as future development directions.Support for development was provided by NSF award AST-1211563 and DOE/Office of Nuclear Physics grant DE-FG02-87ER40317 to Stony Brook and by the Applied Mathematics Program of the DOE Office of Advance Scientific Computing Research under US DOE contract DE-AC02-05CH11231 to LBNL.

  11. A Particle-In-Cell Gun Code for Surface-Converter H- Ion Source Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon-Golcher, Edwin; Bowers, Kevin J.

    2007-08-01

    We present the current status of a particle-in-cell with Monte Carlo collisions (PIC-MCC) gun code under development at Los Alamos for the study of surface-converter H- ion sources. The program preserves a first-principles approach to a significant extent and simulates the production processes without ad hoc models within the plasma region. Some of its features include: solution of arbitrary electrostatic and magnetostatic fields in an axisymmetric (r,z) geometry to describe the self-consistent time evolution of a plasma; simulation of a multi-species (e-,H+,H2+,H3+,H-) plasma discharge from a neutral hydrogen gas and filament-originated seed electrons; full 2-dimensional (r,z) 3-velocity (vr,vz,vφ) dynamics for all species with exact conservation of the canonical angular momentum pφ; detailed collision physics between charged particles and neutrals and the ability to represent multiple smooth (not stair-stepped) electrodes of arbitrary shape and voltage whose surfaces may be secondary-particle emitters (H- and e-). The status of this development is discussed in terms of its physics content and current implementation details.

  12. Simulating marine propellers with vortex particle method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Youjiang; Abdel-Maksoud, Moustafa; Song, Baowei

    2017-01-01

    The vortex particle method is applied to compute the open water characteristics of marine propellers. It is based on the large-eddy simulation technique, and the Smagorinsky-Lilly sub-grid scale model is implemented for the eddy viscosity. The vortex particle method is combined with the boundary element method, in the sense that the body is modelled with boundary elements and the slipstream is modelled with vortex particles. Rotational periodic boundaries are adopted, which leads to a cylindrical sector domain for the slipstream. The particle redistribution scheme and the fast multipole method are modified to consider the rotational periodic boundaries. Open water characteristics of three propellers with different skew angles are calculated with the proposed method. The results are compared with the ones obtained with boundary element method and experiments. It is found that the proposed method predicts the open water characteristics more accurately than the boundary element method, especially for high loading condition and high skew propeller. The influence of the Smagorinsky constant is also studied, which shows the results have a low sensitivity to it.

  13. Applicability of the MCPNX particle transport code for determination of the source correction effect in positron lifetime measurements on thin polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Urban-Klaehn

    2007-09-01

    The method presented herein uses the MCNPX Monte Carlo particle transport code to track individual positrons and other particles through geometry that accounts for the detectors, backing foils, samples and sources with their actual sizes, positions and material characteristics. Polymer material, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), with different thickness of films served as samples. The excellent agreement between the experimental results and the MCNPX simulation of source correction effects for varied positron sources and different film thicknesses validates the applicability of the MCNPX code.

  14. Kinetic Simulations of Particle Acceleration at Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Caprioli, Damiano; Guo, Fan

    2015-07-16

    Collisionless shocks are mediated by collective electromagnetic interactions and are sources of non-thermal particles and emission. The full particle-in-cell approach and a hybrid approach are sketched, simulations of collisionless shocks are shown using a multicolor presentation. Results for SN 1006, a case involving ion acceleration and B field amplification where the shock is parallel, are shown. Electron acceleration takes place in planetary bow shocks and galaxy clusters. It is concluded that acceleration at shocks can be efficient: >15%; CRs amplify B field via streaming instability; ion DSA is efficient at parallel, strong shocks; ions are injected via reflection and shock drift acceleration; and electron DSA is efficient at oblique shocks.

  15. 3-D Particle Simulation of Current Sheet Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Lin, Yu; Wang, Xueyi; Tummel, Kurt; Chen, Liu

    2015-11-01

    The electrostatic (ES) and electromagnetic (EM) instabilities of a Harris current sheet are investigated using a 3-D linearized (δf) gyrokinetic (GK) electron and fully kinetic (FK) ion (GeFi) particle simulation code. The equilibrium magnetic field consists of an asymptotic anti-parallel Bx 0 and a guide field BG. The ES simulations show the excitation of lower-hybrid drift instability (LHDI) at the current sheet edge. The growth rate of the 3-D LHDI is scanned through the (kx ,ky) space. The most unstable modes are found to be at k∥ = 0 for smaller ky. As ky increases, the growth rate shows two peaks at k∥ ≠ 0 , consistent with analytical GK theory. The eigenmode structure and growth rate of LHDI obtained from the GeFi simulation agree well with those obtained from the FK PIC simulation. Decreasing BG, the asymptotic βe 0, or background density can destabilize the LHDI. In the EM simulation, tearing mode instability is dominant in the cases with ky kx , there exist two unstable modes: a kink-like (LHDI) mode at the current sheet edge and a sausage-like mode at the sheet center. The results are compared with the GK eigenmode theory and the FK simulation.

  16. Enhanced Verification Test Suite for Physics Simulation Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, J R; Brock, J S; Brandon, S T; Cotrell, D L; Johnson, B; Knupp, P; Rider, W; Trucano, T; Weirs, V G

    2008-10-10

    This document discusses problems with which to augment, in quantity and in quality, the existing tri-laboratory suite of verification problems used by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The purpose of verification analysis is demonstrate whether the numerical results of the discretization algorithms in physics and engineering simulation codes provide correct solutions of the corresponding continuum equations. The key points of this document are: (1) Verification deals with mathematical correctness of the numerical algorithms in a code, while validation deals with physical correctness of a simulation in a regime of interest. This document is about verification. (2) The current seven-problem Tri-Laboratory Verification Test Suite, which has been used for approximately five years at the DOE WP laboratories, is limited. (3) Both the methodology for and technology used in verification analysis have evolved and been improved since the original test suite was proposed. (4) The proposed test problems are in three basic areas: (a) Hydrodynamics; (b) Transport processes; and (c) Dynamic strength-of-materials. (5) For several of the proposed problems we provide a 'strong sense verification benchmark', consisting of (i) a clear mathematical statement of the problem with sufficient information to run a computer simulation, (ii) an explanation of how the code result and benchmark solution are to be evaluated, and (iii) a description of the acceptance criterion for simulation code results. (6) It is proposed that the set of verification test problems with which any particular code be evaluated include some of the problems described in this document. Analysis of the proposed verification test problems constitutes part of a necessary--but not sufficient--step that builds confidence in physics and engineering simulation codes. More complicated test cases, including physics models of greater

  17. Direct Numerical Simulation of Yukawa Systems by Particle-in-cell Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Wolf-Christian; Zeiler, Andreas; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2002-12-01

    Aiming at a fully self-consistent numerical model for the simulation of complex plasmas in rf-driven discharges, a highly efficient parallel particle-in-cell code has been developed, allowing for realizations of up to one billion interacting particles. As a first test case, we consider a Yukawa system which represents the simplest approximation of a complex plasma. The Yukawa approach where the dust particles are dressed with an isotropic Debye potential can be regarded as a low-order description of the dust-plasma interaction in the bulk a rf-driven complex plasma, away from the electrode sheaths. The simulation code is tested by examining a liquid-solid phase transition, i.e., the formation of a face-centered-cubic Yukawa crystal. This is done in a periodic-cube sub-volume, containing 13,824 dust particles, which corresponds to a total system size of ≈ 884,000 particles.

  18. Evaluation of the Aleph PIC Code on Benchmark Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerner, Jeremiah; Pacheco, Jose; Grillet, Anne

    2016-09-01

    Aleph is a massively parallel, 3D unstructured mesh, Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code, developed to model low temperature plasma applications. In order to verify and validate performance, Aleph is benchmarked against a series of canonical problems to demonstrate statistical indistinguishability in the results. Here, a series of four problems is studied: Couette flows over a range of Knudsen number, sheath formation in an undriven plasma, the two-stream instability, and a capacitive discharge. These problems respectively exercise collisional processes, particle motion in electrostatic fields, electrostatic field solves coupled to particle motion, and a fully coupled reacting plasma. Favorable comparison with accepted results establishes confidence in Aleph's capability and accuracy as a general purpose PIC code. Finally, Aleph is used to investigate the sensitivity of a triggered vacuum gap switch to the particle injection conditions associated with arc breakdown at the trigger. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Development of a CFD code for casting simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murph, Jesse E.

    1993-01-01

    Because of high rejection rates for large structural castings (e.g., the Space Shuttle Main Engine Alternate Turbopump Design Program), a reliable casting simulation computer code is very desirable. This code would reduce both the development time and life cycle costs by allowing accurate modeling of the entire casting process. While this code could be used for other types of castings, the most significant reductions of time and cost would probably be realized in complex investment castings, where any reduction in the number of development castings would be of significant benefit. The casting process is conveniently divided into three distinct phases: (1) mold filling, where the melt is poured or forced into the mold cavity; (2) solidification, where the melt undergoes a phase change to the solid state; and (3) cool down, where the solidified part continues to cool to ambient conditions. While these phases may appear to be separate and distinct, temporal overlaps do exist between phases (e.g., local solidification occurring during mold filling), and some phenomenological events are affected by others (e.g., residual stresses depend on solidification and cooling rates). Therefore, a reliable code must accurately model all three phases and the interactions between each. While many codes have been developed (to various stages of complexity) to model the solidification and cool down phases, only a few codes have been developed to model mold filling.

  20. Flow-Based Detection of Bar Coded Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K A; Dougherty, G M; Santiago, J G

    2005-06-24

    We have developed methods for flow control, electric field alignment, and readout of colloidal Nanobarcodes{copyright}. Our flow-based detection scheme leverages microfluidics and alternate current (AC) electric fields to align and image particles in a well-defined image plane. Using analytical models of the particle rotation in electric fields we can optimize the field strength and frequency necessary to align the particles. This detection platform alleviates loss of information in solution-based assays due to particle clumping during detection.

  1. Boundary conditions in a meshless staggered particle code

    SciTech Connect

    Libersky, L.D.; Randles, P.W.

    1998-07-01

    A meshless method utilizing two sets of particles and generalized boundary conditions is introduced. Companion sets of particles, one carrying velocity and the other carrying stress, are employed to reduce the undesirable effects of colocation of all field variables and increase accuracy. Boundary conditions implemented within this staggered framework include contact, stress-free, stress, velocity, and symmetry constraints. Several test problems are used to evaluate the method. Of particular importance is the motion of stress particles relative to velocity particles in higher dimensions. Early results show promise, but difficulties remain that must be overcome if the staggered technique is to be successful.

  2. Development of Momentum Conserving Monte Carlo Simulation Code for ECCD Study in Helical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, S.; Hasegawa, S.; Moriya, Y.

    2015-03-01

    Parallel momentum conserving collision model is developed for GNET code, in which a linearized drift kinetic equation is solved in the five dimensional phase-space to study the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) in helical plasmas. In order to conserve the parallel momentum, we introduce a field particle collision term in addition to the test particle collision term. Two types of the field particle collision term are considered. One is the high speed limit model, where the momentum conserving term does not depend on the velocity of the background plasma and can be expressed in a simple form. The other is the velocity dependent model, which is derived from the Fokker-Planck collision term directly. In the velocity dependent model the field particle operator can be expressed using Legendre polynominals and, introducing the Rosenbluth potential, we derive the field particle term for each Legendre polynominals. In the GNET code, we introduce an iterative process to implement the momentum conserving collision operator. The high speed limit model is applied to the ECCD simulation of the heliotron-J plasma. The simulation results show a good conservation of the momentum with the iterative scheme.

  3. Toroidal Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell Code with Gyro-kinetic Electron and Fully-kinetic ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jingbo; Zhang, Wenlu; Liu, Pengfei; Li, Ding

    2016-10-01

    A kinetic simulation model has been developed using gyro-kinetic electron and fully-kinetic ion by removing fast gyro motion of electrons using the Lie-transform perturbation theory. A particle-in-cell kinetic code is developed based on this model in general magnetic flux coordinate systems, which is particularly suitable for simulations of toroidally confined plasma. Single particle motion and field solver are successfully verified respectively. Integrated electrostatic benchmark, for example the lower-hybrid wave (LHW) and ion Bernstein wave (IBW), shows a good agreement with theoretical results. Preliminary electromagnetic benchmark of fast wave at lower hybrid frequency range is also presented. This code can be a first-principal tool to investigate high frequency nonlinear phenomenon, such as parametric decay instability, during lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD) and ion cyclotron radio frequency heating (ICRF) with complex geometry effect included. Supported by National Special Research Program of China For ITER and National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  4. Shear-Alfv'en Waves in Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Thomas D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Lee, W. W.

    2012-10-01

    Numerical properties of shear-Alfv'en waves in slab geometry have been studied using a Particle-in-Cell code implementing the recently developed double split-weight scheme [1]. This scheme separates the non-adiabatic response of the particles from both their adiabatic responses and the field-line bending effects arising from the background density and temperature gradients of both the electrons and the ions. This scheme is an improvement over the original split-weight scheme [2] in the presence of the zeroth-order inhomogeneities. The present studies consist of testing numerical restrictions on temporal resolution in the simulation of these waves in one and two dimensions, and on spatial resolutions on the formation of shear Alfv'en eigenmodes in two dimensional sheared slab simulations. For example, it is found that the correct behavior of ion temperature gradient modes in terms of frequencies and growth rates can be maintained with time steps larger than the limit imposed by the shear-Alfven waves. Details will be reported.[4pt] [1] E. A. Startsev and W. W. Lee, ``Finite-Beta Simulation of Microinstabilities,'' manuscript in preparation (2012). [0pt] [2] W. W. Lee, J. L. V. Lewandowski, T. S. Hahm and Z. Lin, ``Shear-Alf'en Waves in Gyrokinetic Plasmas,'' Phys. Plasmas 10, 4435 (2001).

  5. Aggregation of Thermal Particles in Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Iat Neng

    2011-03-01

    Based on the Schrodinger Equation, energy levels are evaluated for charged particle or atom surrounded by few atoms imitated to atomic cavity situations under multipole or Lennard-Jones interactions. To examine the states of corresponding eigenvalues, the associated wave functions from simulation are plotted in three-dimension to elucidate the space distribution of particles. In cases for testing on effect of different adjacent atomic structures, concentration region of distribution is revealed from a series of results. The range of localization shown also is affected by the type and strength of interactions between particles and atoms, besides the number and position of surrounding atoms. The thermal effect considered in the computation is modeled by average over results from random fluctuation of atom positions for a given heating grade. Moreover, analysis with fuzzy conditions is applied to reduce the complicated and time-consumption approach, also for the training in science education. Even the investigation is limited and tentative, qualitative studies on different parameters and structures can provide the influence of factors and approximate information to compare with the experience evidences. Supported by UM grant No. RG062/09-10S/CIN/FST.

  6. Unsteady Cascade Aerodynamic Response Using a Multiphysics Simulation Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, C.; Reddy, T. S. R.; Spyropoulos, E.

    2000-01-01

    The multiphysics code Spectrum(TM) is applied to calculate the unsteady aerodynamic pressures of oscillating cascade of airfoils representing a blade row of a turbomachinery component. Multiphysics simulation is based on a single computational framework for the modeling of multiple interacting physical phenomena, in the present case being between fluids and structures. Interaction constraints are enforced in a fully coupled manner using the augmented-Lagrangian method. The arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method is utilized to account for deformable fluid domains resulting from blade motions. Unsteady pressures are calculated for a cascade designated as the tenth standard, and undergoing plunging and pitching oscillations. The predicted unsteady pressures are compared with those obtained from an unsteady Euler co-de refer-red in the literature. The Spectrum(TM) code predictions showed good correlation for the cases considered.

  7. Simulations of Laboratory Astrophysics Experiments using the CRASH code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trantham, Matthew; Kuranz, Carolyn; Manuel, Mario; Keiter, Paul; Drake, R. P.

    2014-10-01

    Computer simulations can assist in the design and analysis of laboratory astrophysics experiments. The Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) at the University of Michigan developed a code that has been used to design and analyze high-energy-density experiments on OMEGA, NIF, and other large laser facilities. This Eulerian code uses block-adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) with implicit multigroup radiation transport, electron heat conduction and laser ray tracing. This poster/talk will demonstrate some of the experiments the CRASH code has helped design or analyze including: Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Taylor, imploding bubbles, and interacting jet experiments. This work is funded by the Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC via Grant DEFC52-08NA28616, by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, Grant Number DE-NA0001840, and by the National Laser User Facility Program, Grant Number DE-NA0000850.

  8. Simulations of Laboratory Astrophysics Experiments using the CRASH code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trantham, Matthew; Kuranz, Carolyn; Fein, Jeff; Wan, Willow; Young, Rachel; Keiter, Paul; Drake, R. Paul

    2015-11-01

    Computer simulations can assist in the design and analysis of laboratory astrophysics experiments. The Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) at the University of Michigan developed a code that has been used to design and analyze high-energy-density experiments on OMEGA, NIF, and other large laser facilities. This Eulerian code uses block-adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) with implicit multigroup radiation transport, electron heat conduction and laser ray tracing. This poster will demonstrate some of the experiments the CRASH code has helped design or analyze including: Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Taylor, magnetized flows, jets, and laser-produced plasmas. This work is funded by the following grants: DEFC52-08NA28616, DE-NA0001840, and DE-NA0002032.

  9. Parallel code NSBC: Simulations of relativistic nuclei scattering by a bent crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaev, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    The presented program was designed to simulate the passage of relativistic nuclei through a bent crystal. Namely, the input data is related to a nuclei beam. The nuclei move into the crystal under planar channeling and quasichanneling conditions. The program realizes the numerical algorithm to evaluate the trajectory of nucleus in the bent crystal. The program output is formed by the projectile motion data including the angular distribution of nuclei behind the crystal. The program could be useful to simulate the particle tracking at the accelerator facilities used the crystal collimation systems. The code has been written on C++ and designed for the multiprocessor systems (clusters).

  10. Progress on coupling UEDGE and Monte-Carlo simulation codes

    SciTech Connect

    Rensink, M.E.; Rognlien, T.D.

    1996-08-28

    Our objective is to develop an accurate self-consistent model for plasma and neutral sin the edge of tokamak devices such as DIII-D and ITER. The tow-dimensional fluid model in the UEDGE code has been used successfully for simulating a wide range of experimental plasma conditions. However, when the neutral mean free path exceeds the gradient scale length of the background plasma, the validity of the diffusive and inertial fluid models in UEDGE is questionable. In the long mean free path regime, neutrals can be accurately and efficiently described by a Monte Carlo neutrals model. Coupling of the fluid plasma model in UEDGE with a Monte Carlo neutrals model should improve the accuracy of our edge plasma simulations. The results described here used the EIRENE Monte Carlo neutrals code, but since information is passed to and from the UEDGE plasma code via formatted test files, any similar neutrals code such as DEGAS2 or NIMBUS could, in principle, be used.

  11. Parallel Monte Carlo Electron and Photon Transport Simulation Code (PMCEPT code)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kum, Oyeon

    2004-11-01

    Simulations for customized cancer radiation treatment planning for each patient are very useful for both patient and doctor. These simulations can be used to find the most effective treatment with the least possible dose to the patient. This typical system, so called ``Doctor by Information Technology", will be useful to provide high quality medical services everywhere. However, the large amount of computing time required by the well-known general purpose Monte Carlo(MC) codes has prevented their use for routine dose distribution calculations for a customized radiation treatment planning. The optimal solution to provide ``accurate" dose distribution within an ``acceptable" time limit is to develop a parallel simulation algorithm on a beowulf PC cluster because it is the most accurate, efficient, and economic. I developed parallel MC electron and photon transport simulation code based on the standard MPI message passing interface. This algorithm solved the main difficulty of the parallel MC simulation (overlapped random number series in the different processors) using multiple random number seeds. The parallel results agreed well with the serial ones. The parallel efficiency approached 100% as was expected.

  12. T-Matrix: Codes for Computing Electromagnetic Scattering by Nonspherical and Aggregated Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterman, Peter; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Travis, Larry D.; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2015-11-01

    The T-Matrix package includes codes to compute electromagnetic scattering by homogeneous, rotationally symmetric nonspherical particles in fixed and random orientations, randomly oriented two-sphere clusters with touching or separated components, and multi-sphere clusters in fixed and random orientations. All codes are written in Fortran-77. LAPACK-based, extended-precision, Gauss-elimination- and NAG-based, and superposition codes are available, as are double-precision superposition, parallelized double-precision, double-precision Lorenz-Mie codes, and codes for the computation of the coefficients for the generalized Chebyshev shape.

  13. Shock Particle Interaction - Fully Resolved Simulations and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Yash; Neal, Chris; Jackson, Thomas L.; Balachandar, S. "Bala"; Thakur, Siddharth

    2016-11-01

    Currently there is a substantial lack of fully resolved data for shock interacting with multiple particles. In this talk we will fill this gap by presenting results of shock interaction with 1-D array and 3-D structured arrays of particles. Objectives of performing fully resolved simulations of shock propagation through packs of multiple particles are twofold, 1) To understand the complicated physical phenomena occurring during shock particle interaction, and 2) To translate the knowledge from microscale simulations in building next generation point-particle models for macroscale simulations that can better predict the motion (forces) and heat transfer for particles. We compare results from multiple particle simulations against the single particle simulations and make relevant observations. The drag history and flow field for multiple particle simulations are markedly different from those of single particle simluations, highlighting the effect of neighboring particles. We propose new models which capture this effect of neighboring particles. These models are called Pair-wise Interaction Extended Point Particle models (PIEP). Effect of multiple neighboring particles is broken down into pair-wise interactions, and these pair-wise interactions are superimposed to get the final model U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  14. Radiation Protection Studies for Medical Particle Accelerators using Fluka Monte Carlo Code.

    PubMed

    Infantino, Angelo; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Lucconi, Giulia; Pancaldi, Davide; Vichi, Sara; Zagni, Federico; Mostacci, Domiziano; Marengo, Mario

    2016-11-24

    Radiation protection (RP) in the use of medical cyclotrons involves many aspects both in the routine use and for the decommissioning of a site. Guidelines for site planning and installation, as well as for RP assessment, are given in international documents; however, the latter typically offer analytic methods of calculation of shielding and materials activation, in approximate or idealised geometry set-ups. The availability of Monte Carlo (MC) codes with accurate up-to-date libraries for transport and interaction of neutrons and charged particles at energies below 250 MeV, together with the continuously increasing power of modern computers, makes the systematic use of simulations with realistic geometries possible, yielding equipment and site-specific evaluation of the source terms, shielding requirements and all quantities relevant to RP at the same time. In this work, the well-known FLUKA MC code was used to simulate different aspects of RP in the use of biomedical accelerators, particularly for the production of medical radioisotopes. In the context of the Young Professionals Award, held at the IRPA 14 conference, only a part of the complete work is presented. In particular, the simulation of the GE PETtrace cyclotron (16.5 MeV) installed at S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital evaluated the effective dose distribution around the equipment; the effective number of neutrons produced per incident proton and their spectral distribution; the activation of the structure of the cyclotron and the vault walls; the activation of the ambient air, in particular the production of (41)Ar. The simulations were validated, in terms of physical and transport parameters to be used at the energy range of interest, through an extensive measurement campaign of the neutron environmental dose equivalent using a rem-counter and TLD dosemeters. The validated model was then used in the design and the licensing request of a new Positron Emission Tomography facility.

  15. A PIC-MCC code for simulation of streamer propagation in air

    SciTech Connect

    Chanrion, O. Neubert, T.

    2008-07-20

    A particle code has been developed to study the distribution and acceleration of electrons in electric discharges in air. The code can follow the evolution of a discharge from the initial stage of a single free electron in a background electric field to the formation of an electron avalanche and its transition into a streamer. The code is in 2D axi-symmetric coordinates, allowing quasi 3D simulations during the initial stages of streamer formation. This is important for realistic simulations of problems where space charge fields are essential such as in streamer formation. The charged particles are followed in a Cartesian mesh and the electric field is updated with Poisson's equation from the charged particle densities. Collisional processes between electrons and air molecules are simulated with a Monte Carlo technique, according to cross section probabilities. The code also includes photoionisation processes of air molecules by photons emitted by excited constituents. The paper describes the code and presents some results of streamer development at 70 km altitude in the mesosphere where electrical discharges (sprites) are generated above severe thunderstorms and at {approx}10 km relevant for lightning and thundercloud electrification. The code is used to study acceleration of thermal seed electrons in streamers and to understand the conditions under which electrons may reach energies in the runaway regime. This is the first study in air, with a particle model with realistic spatial dependencies of the electrostatic field. It is shown that at 1 atm pressure the electric field must exceed {approx}7.5 times the breakdown field to observe runaway electrons in a constant electric field. This value is close to the field where the electric force on an electron equals the maximum frictional force on an electron - found at {approx}100 eV. It is also found that this value is reached in a negative streamer tip at 10 km altitude when the background electric field equals

  16. The T-matrix code Tsym for homogeneous dielectric particles with finite symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahnert, Michael

    2013-07-01

    A T-matrix code tailored to non-axisymmetric particles with finite symmetries is described. The code exploits geometric symmetries of particles by use of group theoretical methods. Commutation relations of the T-matrix are implemented for reducing CPU-time requirements. Irreducible representations of finite groups are employed for alleviating ill-conditioning problems in numerical computations. Further, an iterative T-matrix method for particles with small-scale surface perturbations is implemented. The code can compute both differential and integrated optical properties of particles in either fixed or random orientation. Methods for testing the convergence and correctness of the computational results are discussed. The package also includes a database of pre-computed group-character tables, as well as an interface to the GAP programming language for computational group theory. The code can be downloaded at http://www.rss.chalmers.se/∼kahnert/Tsym.html.

  17. Low-temperature plasma simulations with the LSP PIC code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, Johan; Khrabrov, Alex; Kaganovich, Igor; Keating, David; Selezneva, Svetlana; Sommerer, Timothy

    2014-10-01

    The LSP (Large-Scale Plasma) PIC-MCC code has been used to simulate several low-temperature plasma configurations, including a gas switch for high-power AC/DC conversion, a glow discharge and a Hall thruster. Simulation results will be presented with an emphasis on code comparison and validation against experiment. High-voltage, direct-current (HVDC) power transmission is becoming more common as it can reduce construction costs and power losses. Solid-state power-electronics devices are presently used, but it has been proposed that gas switches could become a compact, less costly, alternative. A gas-switch conversion device would be based on a glow discharge, with a magnetically insulated cold cathode. Its operation is similar to that of a sputtering magnetron, but with much higher pressure (0.1 to 0.3 Torr) in order to achieve high current density. We have performed 1D (axial) and 2D (axial/radial) simulations of such a gas switch using LSP. The 1D results were compared with results from the EDIPIC code. To test and compare the collision models used by the LSP and EDIPIC codes in more detail, a validation exercise was performed for the cathode fall of a glow discharge. We will also present some 2D (radial/azimuthal) LSP simulations of a Hall thruster. The information, data, or work presented herein was funded in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), U.S. Department of Energy, under Award Number DE-AR0000298.

  18. Simulation of dynamic material response with the PAGOSA code

    SciTech Connect

    Holian, K.S.; Adams, T.F.

    1993-08-01

    The 3D Eulerian PAGOSA hydrocode is being run on the massively parallel Connection Machine (CM) to simulate the response of materials to dynamic loading, such as by high explosives or high velocity impact. The code has a variety of equation of state forms, plastic yield models, and fracture and fragmentation models. The numerical algorithms in PAGOSA and the implementation of material models are discussed briefly.

  19. Monte Carlo code for high spatial resolution ocean color simulations.

    PubMed

    D'Alimonte, Davide; Zibordi, Giuseppe; Kajiyama, Tamito; Cunha, José C

    2010-09-10

    A Monte Carlo code for ocean color simulations has been developed to model in-water radiometric fields of downward and upward irradiance (E(d) and E(u)), and upwelling radiance (L(u)) in a two-dimensional domain with a high spatial resolution. The efficiency of the code has been optimized by applying state-of-the-art computing solutions, while the accuracy of simulation results has been quantified through benchmark with the widely used Hydrolight code for various values of seawater inherent optical properties and different illumination conditions. Considering a seawater single scattering albedo of 0.9, as well as surface waves of 5 m width and 0.5 m height, the study has shown that the number of photons required to quantify uncertainties induced by wave focusing effects on E(d), E(u), and L(u) data products is of the order of 10(6), 10(9), and 10(10), respectively. On this basis, the effects of sea-surface geometries on radiometric quantities have been investigated for different surface gravity waves. Data products from simulated radiometric profiles have finally been analyzed as a function of the deployment speed and sampling frequency of current free-fall systems in view of providing recommendations to improve measurement protocols.

  20. CHOLLA: A New Massively Parallel Hydrodynamics Code for Astrophysical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Evan E.; Robertson, Brant E.

    2015-04-01

    We present Computational Hydrodynamics On ParaLLel Architectures (Cholla ), a new three-dimensional hydrodynamics code that harnesses the power of graphics processing units (GPUs) to accelerate astrophysical simulations. Cholla models the Euler equations on a static mesh using state-of-the-art techniques, including the unsplit Corner Transport Upwind algorithm, a variety of exact and approximate Riemann solvers, and multiple spatial reconstruction techniques including the piecewise parabolic method (PPM). Using GPUs, Cholla evolves the fluid properties of thousands of cells simultaneously and can update over 10 million cells per GPU-second while using an exact Riemann solver and PPM reconstruction. Owing to the massively parallel architecture of GPUs and the design of the Cholla code, astrophysical simulations with physically interesting grid resolutions (≳2563) can easily be computed on a single device. We use the Message Passing Interface library to extend calculations onto multiple devices and demonstrate nearly ideal scaling beyond 64 GPUs. A suite of test problems highlights the physical accuracy of our modeling and provides a useful comparison to other codes. We then use Cholla to simulate the interaction of a shock wave with a gas cloud in the interstellar medium, showing that the evolution of the cloud is highly dependent on its density structure. We reconcile the computed mixing time of a turbulent cloud with a realistic density distribution destroyed by a strong shock with the existing analytic theory for spherical cloud destruction by describing the system in terms of its median gas density.

  1. CHOLLA: A NEW MASSIVELY PARALLEL HYDRODYNAMICS CODE FOR ASTROPHYSICAL SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Evan E.; Robertson, Brant E.

    2015-04-15

    We present Computational Hydrodynamics On ParaLLel Architectures (Cholla ), a new three-dimensional hydrodynamics code that harnesses the power of graphics processing units (GPUs) to accelerate astrophysical simulations. Cholla models the Euler equations on a static mesh using state-of-the-art techniques, including the unsplit Corner Transport Upwind algorithm, a variety of exact and approximate Riemann solvers, and multiple spatial reconstruction techniques including the piecewise parabolic method (PPM). Using GPUs, Cholla evolves the fluid properties of thousands of cells simultaneously and can update over 10 million cells per GPU-second while using an exact Riemann solver and PPM reconstruction. Owing to the massively parallel architecture of GPUs and the design of the Cholla code, astrophysical simulations with physically interesting grid resolutions (≳256{sup 3}) can easily be computed on a single device. We use the Message Passing Interface library to extend calculations onto multiple devices and demonstrate nearly ideal scaling beyond 64 GPUs. A suite of test problems highlights the physical accuracy of our modeling and provides a useful comparison to other codes. We then use Cholla to simulate the interaction of a shock wave with a gas cloud in the interstellar medium, showing that the evolution of the cloud is highly dependent on its density structure. We reconcile the computed mixing time of a turbulent cloud with a realistic density distribution destroyed by a strong shock with the existing analytic theory for spherical cloud destruction by describing the system in terms of its median gas density.

  2. KULL: LLNL's ASCI Inertial Confinement Fusion Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Rathkopf, J. A.; Miller, D. S.; Owen, J. M.; Zike, M. R.; Eltgroth, P. G.; Madsen, N. K.; McCandless, K. P.; Nowak, P. F.; Nemanic, M. K.; Gentile, N. A.; Stuart, L. M.; Keen, N. D.; Palmer, T. S.

    2000-01-10

    KULL is a three dimensional, time dependent radiation hydrodynamics simulation code under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI), KULL's purpose is to simulate the physical processes in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets. The National Ignition Facility, where ICF experiments will be conducted, and ASCI are part of the experimental and computational components of DOE's Stockpile Stewardship Program. This paper provides an overview of ASCI and describes KULL, its hydrodynamic simulation capability and its three methods of simulating radiative transfer. Particular emphasis is given to the parallelization techniques essential to obtain the performance required of the Stockpile Stewardship Program and to exploit the massively parallel processor machines that ASCI is procuring.

  3. Generating performance portable geoscientific simulation code with Firedrake (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, D. A.; Bercea, G.; Cotter, C. J.; Kelly, P. H.; Loriant, N.; Luporini, F.; McRae, A. T.; Mitchell, L.; Rathgeber, F.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation will demonstrate how a change in simulation programming paradigm can be exploited to deliver sophisticated simulation capability which is far easier to programme than are conventional models, is capable of exploiting different emerging parallel hardware, and is tailored to the specific needs of geoscientific simulation. Geoscientific simulation represents a grand challenge computational task: many of the largest computers in the world are tasked with this field, and the requirements of resolution and complexity of scientists in this field are far from being sated. However, single thread performance has stalled, even sometimes decreased, over the last decade, and has been replaced by ever more parallel systems: both as conventional multicore CPUs and in the emerging world of accelerators. At the same time, the needs of scientists to couple ever-more complex dynamics and parametrisations into their models makes the model development task vastly more complex. The conventional approach of writing code in low level languages such as Fortran or C/C++ and then hand-coding parallelism for different platforms by adding library calls and directives forces the intermingling of the numerical code with its implementation. This results in an almost impossible set of skill requirements for developers, who must simultaneously be domain science experts, numericists, software engineers and parallelisation specialists. Even more critically, it requires code to be essentially rewritten for each emerging hardware platform. Since new platforms are emerging constantly, and since code owners do not usually control the procurement of the supercomputers on which they must run, this represents an unsustainable development load. The Firedrake system, conversely, offers the developer the opportunity to write PDE discretisations in the high-level mathematical language UFL from the FEniCS project (http://fenicsproject.org). Non-PDE model components, such as parametrisations

  4. Particle methods for simulation of subsurface multiphase fluid flow and biogeological processes

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Meakin; Alexandre Tartakovsky; Tim Scheibe; Daniel Tartakovsky; Georgr Redden; Philip E. Long; Scott C. Brooks; Zhijie Xu

    2007-06-01

    A number of particle models that are suitable for simulating multiphase fluid flow and biogeological processes have been developed during the last few decades. Here we discuss three of them: a microscopic model - molecular dynamics; a mesoscopic model - dissipative particle dynamics; and a macroscopic model - smoothed particle hydrodynamics. Particle methods are robust and versatile, and it is relatively easy to add additional physical, chemical and biological processes into particle codes. However, the computational efficiency of particle methods is low relative to continuum methods. Multiscale particle methods and hybrid (particle–particle and particle–continuum) methods are needed to improve computational efficiency and make effective use of emerging computational capabilities. These new methods are under development.

  5. Particle methods for simulation of subsurface multiphase fluid flow and biogeological processes

    SciTech Connect

    Meakin, Paul; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Redden, George; Long, Philip E.; Brooks, Scott C.; Xu, Zhijie

    2007-08-01

    A number of particle models that are suitable for simulating multiphase fluid flow and biogeological processes have been developed during the last few decades. Here we discuss three of them: a microscopic model - molecular dynamics; a mesoscopic model - dissipative particle dynamics; and a macroscopic model - smoothed particle hydrodynamics. Particle methods are robust and versatile, and it is relatively easy to add additional physical, chemical and biological processes into particle codes. However, the computational efficiency of particle methods is low relative to continuum methods. Multiscale particle methods and hybrid (particle–particle and particle–continuum) methods are needed to improve computational efficiency and make effective use of emerging computational capabilities. These new methods are under development.

  6. Particle Simulations of a Linear Dielectric Wall Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B R; Blackfield, D T; Nelson, S D

    2007-06-12

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) is a compact induction accelerator structure that incorporates the accelerating mechanism, pulse forming structure, and switch structure into an integrated module. The DWA consists of stacked stripline Blumlein assemblies, which can provide accelerating gradients in excess of 100 MeV/meter. Blumleins are switched sequentially according to a prescribed acceleration schedule to maintain synchronism with the proton bunch as it accelerates. A finite difference time domain code (FDTD) is used to determine the applied acceleration field to the proton bunch. Particle simulations are used to model the injector as well as the accelerator stack to determine the proton bunch energy distribution, both longitudinal and transverse dynamic focusing, and emittance growth associated with various DWA configurations.

  7. DANTSYS: A diffusion accelerated neutral particle transport code system

    SciTech Connect

    Alcouffe, R.E.; Baker, R.S.; Brinkley, F.W.; Marr, D.R.; O`Dell, R.D.; Walters, W.F.

    1995-06-01

    The DANTSYS code package includes the following transport codes: ONEDANT, TWODANT, TWODANT/GQ, TWOHEX, and THREEDANT. The DANTSYS code package is a modular computer program package designed to solve the time-independent, multigroup discrete ordinates form of the boltzmann transport equation in several different geometries. The modular construction of the package separates the input processing, the transport equation solving, and the post processing (or edit) functions into distinct code modules: the Input Module, one or more Solver Modules, and the Edit Module, respectively. The Input and Edit Modules are very general in nature and are common to all the Solver Modules. The ONEDANT Solver Module contains a one-dimensional (slab, cylinder, and sphere), time-independent transport equation solver using the standard diamond-differencing method for space/angle discretization. Also included in the package are solver Modules named TWODANT, TWODANT/GQ, THREEDANT, and TWOHEX. The TWODANT Solver Module solves the time-independent two-dimensional transport equation using the diamond-differencing method for space/angle discretization. The authors have also introduced an adaptive weighted diamond differencing (AWDD) method for the spatial and angular discretization into TWODANT as an option. The TWOHEX Solver Module solves the time-independent two-dimensional transport equation on an equilateral triangle spatial mesh. The THREEDANT Solver Module solves the time independent, three-dimensional transport equation for XYZ and RZ{Theta} symmetries using both diamond differencing with set-to-zero fixup and the AWDD method. The TWODANT/GQ Solver Module solves the 2-D transport equation in XY and RZ symmetries using a spatial mesh of arbitrary quadrilaterals. The spatial differencing method is based upon the diamond differencing method with set-to-zero fixup with changes to accommodate the generalized spatial meshing.

  8. Particle kinetic simulation of high altitude hypervelocity flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Brian L.

    1993-01-01

    In this grant period, the focus has been on enhancement and application of the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) particle method for computing hypersonic flows of re-entry vehicles. Enhancement efforts dealt with modeling gas-gas interactions for thermal non-equilibrium relaxation processes and gas-surface interactions for prediction of vehicle surface temperatures. Both are important for application to problems of engineering interest. The code was employed in a parametric study to improve future applications, and in simulations of aeropass maneuvers in support of the Magellan mission. Detailed comparisons between continuum models for internal energy relaxation and DSMC models reveals that several discrepancies exist. These include definitions of relaxation parameters and the methodologies for implementing them in DSMC codes. These issues were clarified and all differences were rectified in a paper (Appendix A) submitted to Physics of Fluids A, featuring several key figures in the DSMC community as co-authors and B. Haas as first author. This material will be presented at the Fluid Dynamics meeting of the American Physical Society on November 21, 1993. The aerodynamics of space vehicles in highly rarefied flows are very sensitive to the vehicle surface temperatures. Rather than require prescribed temperature estimates for spacecraft as is typically done in DSMC methods, a new technique was developed which couples the dynamic surface heat transfer characteristics into the DSMC flow simulation code to compute surface temperatures directly. This model, when applied to thin planar bodies such as solar panels, was described in AIAA Paper No. 93-2765 (Appendix B) and was presented at the Thermophysics Conference in July 1993. The paper has been submitted to the Journal of Thermophysics and Heat Transfer. Application of the DSMC method to problems of practical interest requires a trade off between solution accuracy and computational expense and limitations. A

  9. Beam-splitting code for light scattering by ice crystal particles within geometric-optics approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoshonkin, Alexander V.; Kustova, Natalia V.; Borovoi, Anatoli G.

    2015-10-01

    The open-source beam-splitting code is described which implements the geometric-optics approximation to light scattering by convex faceted particles. This code is written in C++ as a library which can be easy applied to a particular light scattering problem. The code uses only standard components, that makes it to be a cross-platform solution and provides its compatibility to popular Integrated Development Environments (IDE's). The included example of solving the light scattering by a randomly oriented ice crystal is written using Qt 5.1, consequently it is a cross-platform solution, too. Both physical and computational aspects of the beam-splitting algorithm are discussed. Computational speed of the beam-splitting code is obviously higher compared to the conventional ray-tracing codes. A comparison of the phase matrix as computed by our code with the ray-tracing code by A. Macke shows excellent agreement.

  10. Physical Models for Particle Tracking Simulations in the RF Gap

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P.; Holmes, Jeffrey A.

    2015-06-01

    This document describes the algorithms that are used in the PyORBIT code to track the particles accelerated in the Radio-Frequency cavities. It gives the mathematical description of the algorithms and the assumptions made in each case. The derived formulas have been implemented in the PyORBIT code. The necessary data for each algorithm are described in detail.

  11. Microscale simulations of shock interaction with large assembly of particles for developing point-particle models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Siddharth; Neal, Chris; Mehta, Yash; Sridharan, Prasanth; Jackson, Thomas; Balachandar, S.

    2017-01-01

    Micrsoscale simulations are being conducted for developing point-particle and other related models that are needed for the mesoscale and macroscale simulations of explosive dispersal of particles. These particle models are required to compute (a) instantaneous aerodynamic force on the particle and (b) instantaneous net heat transfer between the particle and the surrounding. A strategy for a sequence of microscale simulations has been devised that allows systematic development of the hybrid surrogate models that are applicable at conditions representative of the explosive dispersal application. The ongoing microscale simulations seek to examine particle force dependence on: (a) Mach number, (b) Reynolds number, and (c) volume fraction (different particle arrangements such as cubic, face-centered cubic (FCC), body-centered cubic (BCC) and random). Future plans include investigation of sequences of fully-resolved microscale simulations consisting of an array of particles subjected to more realistic time-dependent flows that progressively better approximate the actual problem of explosive dispersal. Additionally, effects of particle shape, size, and number in simulation as well as the transient particle deformation dependence on various parameters including: (a) particle material, (b) medium material, (c) multiple particles, (d) incoming shock pressure and speed, (e) medium to particle impedance ratio, (f) particle shape and orientation to shock, etc. are being investigated.

  12. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of beta-induced Alfven eigenmode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H. S.; Lin, Z.; Holod, I.; Xiao, Y.; Wang, X.; Zhang, W. L.

    2010-11-15

    The beta-induced Alfven eigenmode (BAE) in toroidal plasmas is studied using global gyrokinetic particle simulations. The BAE real frequency and damping rate measured in the initial perturbation simulation and in the antenna excitation simulation agree well with each other. The real frequency is slightly higher than the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accumulation point frequency due to the kinetic effects of thermal ions. Simulations with energetic particle density gradient show exponential growth of BAE with a growth rate sensitive to the energetic particle temperature and density. The nonperturbative contributions by energetic particles modify the mode structure and reduce the frequency relative to the MHD theory. The finite Larmor radius effects of energetic particles reduce the BAE growth rate. Benchmarks between gyrokinetic particle simulation and hybrid MHD-gyrokinetic simulation show good agreement in BAE real frequency and mode structure.

  13. Some Developments of the Equilibrium Particle Simulation Method for the Direct Simulation of Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macrossan, M. N.

    1995-01-01

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is the established technique for the simulation of rarefied gas flows. In some flows of engineering interest, such as occur for aero-braking spacecraft in the upper atmosphere, DSMC can become prohibitively expensive in CPU time because some regions of the flow, particularly on the windward side of blunt bodies, become collision dominated. As an alternative to using a hybrid DSMC and continuum gas solver (Euler or Navier-Stokes solver) this work is aimed at making the particle simulation method efficient in the high density regions of the flow. A high density, infinite collision rate limit of DSMC, the Equilibrium Particle Simulation method (EPSM) was proposed some 15 years ago. EPSM is developed here for the flow of a gas consisting of many different species of molecules and is shown to be computationally efficient (compared to DSMC) for high collision rate flows. It thus offers great potential as part of a hybrid DSMC/EPSM code which could handle flows in the transition regime between rarefied gas flows and fully continuum flows. As a first step towards this goal a pure EPSM code is described. The next step of combining DSMC and EPSM is not attempted here but should be straightforward. EPSM and DSMC are applied to Taylor-Couette flow with Kn = 0.02 and 0.0133 and S(omega) = 3). Toroidal vortices develop for both methods but some differences are found, as might be expected for the given flow conditions. EPSM appears to be less sensitive to the sequence of random numbers used in the simulation than is DSMC and may also be more dissipative. The question of the origin and the magnitude of the dissipation in EPSM is addressed. It is suggested that this analysis is also relevant to DSMC when the usual accuracy requirements on the cell size and decoupling time step are relaxed in the interests of computational efficiency.

  14. Code System for Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    TEUCHERT, E.

    1999-04-21

    Version 00 VSOP94 (Very Superior Old Programs) is a system of codes linked together for the simulation of reactor life histories. It comprises neutron cross section libraries and processing routines, repeated neutron spectrum evaluation, 2-D diffusion calculation based on neutron flux synthesis with depletion and shut-down features, in-core and out-of-pile fuel management, fuel cycle cost analysis, and thermal hydraulics (at present restricted to Pebble Bed HTRs). Various techniques have been employed to accelerate the iterative processes and to optimize the internal data transfer. The code system has been used extensively for comparison studies of reactors, their fuel cycles, and related detailed features. In addition to its use in research and development work for the High Temperature Reactor, the system has been applied successfully to Light Water and Heavy Water Reactors.

  15. Upgrades to the NESS (Nuclear Engine System Simulation) Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fittje, James E.

    2007-01-01

    In support of the President's Vision for Space Exploration, the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) concept is being evaluated as a potential propulsion technology for human expeditions to the moon and Mars. The need for exceptional propulsion system performance in these missions has been documented in numerous studies, and was the primary focus of a considerable effort undertaken during the 1960's and 1970's. The NASA Glenn Research Center is leveraging this past NTR investment in their vehicle concepts and mission analysis studies with the aid of the Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS) code. This paper presents the additional capabilities and upgrades made to this code in order to perform higher fidelity NTR propulsion system analysis and design.

  16. Traveling-wave-tube simulation: The IBC (Interactive Beam-Circuit) code

    SciTech Connect

    Morey, I.J.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1989-09-26

    Interactive Beam-Circuit (IBC) is a one-dimensional many particle simulation code which has been developed to run interactively on a PC or Workstation, and displaying most of the important physics of a traveling-wave-tube. The code is a substantial departure from previous efforts, since it follows all of the particles in the tube, rather than just those in one wavelength, as commonly done. This step allows for nonperiodic inputs in time, a nonuniform line and a large set of spatial diagnostics. The primary aim is to complement a microwave tube lecture course, although past experience has shown that such codes readily become research tools. Simple finite difference methods are used to model the fields of the coupled slow-wave transmission line. The coupling between the beam and the transmission line is based upon the finite difference equations of Brillouin. The space-charge effects are included, in a manner similar to that used by Hess; the original part is use of particle-in-cell techniques to model the space-charge fields. 11 refs., 11 figs.

  17. Particle-in-cell simulations of plasma accelerators and electron-neutral collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo E.; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.; Shadwick, B.A.

    2001-10-01

    We present 2-D simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented particle-in-cell code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approx}10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approx}10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory and fluid simulations. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications of XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling relativistic electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  18. Application of a vectorized particle simulation in high-speed near-continuum flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael S.; Mcdonald, Jeffrey D.

    1989-01-01

    An efficient particle simulation technique, developed for use on vector architecture based supercomputers for studying hypersonic rarefied gas flows is employed to simulate the complex wake generated by Mach six flow over a 10 deg half-angle wedge for freestream Reynolds numbers of 1780 and 3560. Data obtained are compared against higher Reynolds number experimental results. Simulations utilized as many as 10 to the 5th computational cells and 10 to the 7th simulated particles having power-law interaction potentials. A code performance of 1.8-2.4 microsec of Cray-2 CPU time to process a single particle per timestep is achieved. Diffuse adiabatic and isothermal wedge surface models are used in this investigation. Although the wedge geometry is two-dimensional, the simulation incorporates a width-wise direction, resulting in a three-dimensional computation.

  19. Axisymmetric Plume Simulations with NASA's DSMC Analysis Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, B. D.; Lumpkin, F. E., III

    2012-01-01

    A comparison of axisymmetric Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) Analysis Code (DAC) results to analytic and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solutions in the near continuum regime and to 3D DAC solutions in the rarefied regime for expansion plumes into a vacuum is performed to investigate the validity of the newest DAC axisymmetric implementation. This new implementation, based on the standard DSMC axisymmetric approach where the representative molecules are allowed to move in all three dimensions but are rotated back to the plane of symmetry by the end of the move step, has been fully integrated into the 3D-based DAC code and therefore retains all of DAC s features, such as being able to compute flow over complex geometries and to model chemistry. Axisymmetric DAC results for a spherically symmetric isentropic expansion are in very good agreement with a source flow analytic solution in the continuum regime and show departure from equilibrium downstream of the estimated breakdown location. Axisymmetric density contours also compare favorably against CFD results for the R1E thruster while temperature contours depart from equilibrium very rapidly away from the estimated breakdown surface. Finally, axisymmetric and 3D DAC results are in very good agreement over the entire plume region and, as expected, this new axisymmetric implementation shows a significant reduction in computer resources required to achieve accurate simulations for this problem over the 3D simulations.

  20. Large-Eddy Simulation Code Developed for Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBonis, James R.

    2003-01-01

    A large-eddy simulation (LES) code was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to provide more accurate and detailed computational analyses of propulsion flow fields. The accuracy of current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods is limited primarily by their inability to properly account for the turbulent motion present in virtually all propulsion flows. Because the efficiency and performance of a propulsion system are highly dependent on the details of this turbulent motion, it is critical for CFD to accurately model it. The LES code promises to give new CFD simulations an advantage over older methods by directly computing the large turbulent eddies, to correctly predict their effect on a propulsion system. Turbulent motion is a random, unsteady process whose behavior is difficult to predict through computer simulations. Current methods are based on Reynolds-Averaged Navier- Stokes (RANS) analyses that rely on models to represent the effect of turbulence within a flow field. The quality of the results depends on the quality of the model and its applicability to the type of flow field being studied. LES promises to be more accurate because it drastically reduces the amount of modeling necessary. It is the logical step toward improving turbulent flow predictions. In LES, the large-scale dominant turbulent motion is computed directly, leaving only the less significant small turbulent scales to be modeled. As part of the prediction, the LES method generates detailed information on the turbulence itself, providing important information for other applications, such as aeroacoustics. The LES code developed at Glenn for propulsion flow fields is being used to both analyze propulsion system components and test improved LES algorithms (subgrid-scale models, filters, and numerical schemes). The code solves the compressible Favre-filtered Navier- Stokes equations using an explicit fourth-order accurate numerical scheme, it incorporates a compressible form of

  1. Novel methods in the Particle-In-Cell accelerator Code-Framework Warp

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J-L; Grote, D. P.; Cohen, R. H.; Friedman, A.

    2012-12-26

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) Code-Framework Warp is being developed by the Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL) to guide the development of accelerators that can deliver beams suitable for high-energy density experiments and implosion of inertial fusion capsules. It is also applied in various areas outside the Heavy Ion Fusion program to the study and design of existing and next-generation high-energy accelerators, including the study of electron cloud effects and laser wakefield acceleration for example. This study presents an overview of Warp's capabilities, summarizing recent original numerical methods that were developed by the HIFS-VNL (including PIC with adaptive mesh refinement, a large-timestep 'drift-Lorentz' mover for arbitrarily magnetized species, a relativistic Lorentz invariant leapfrog particle pusher, simulations in Lorentz-boosted frames, an electromagnetic solver with tunable numerical dispersion and efficient stride-based digital filtering), with special emphasis on the description of the mesh refinement capability. In addition, selected examples of the applications of the methods to the abovementioned fields are given.

  2. Time-Dependent, Parallel Neutral Particle Transport Code System.

    SciTech Connect

    BAKER, RANDAL S.

    2009-09-10

    Version 00 PARTISN (PARallel, TIme-Dependent SN) is the evolutionary successor to CCC-547/DANTSYS. The PARTISN code package is a modular computer program package designed to solve the time-independent or dependent multigroup discrete ordinates form of the Boltzmann transport equation in several different geometries. The modular construction of the package separates the input processing, the transport equation solving, and the post processing (or edit) functions into distinct code modules: the Input Module, the Solver Module, and the Edit Module, respectively. PARTISN is the evolutionary successor to the DANTSYSTM code system package. The Input and Edit Modules in PARTISN are very similar to those in DANTSYS. However, unlike DANTSYS, the Solver Module in PARTISN contains one, two, and three-dimensional solvers in a single module. In addition to the diamond-differencing method, the Solver Module also has Adaptive Weighted Diamond-Differencing (AWDD), Linear Discontinuous (LD), and Exponential Discontinuous (ED) spatial differencing methods. The spatial mesh may consist of either a standard orthogonal mesh or a block adaptive orthogonal mesh. The Solver Module may be run in parallel for two and three dimensional problems. One can now run 1-D problems in parallel using Energy Domain Decomposition (triggered by Block 5 input keyword npeg>0). EDD can also be used in 2-D/3-D with or without our standard Spatial Domain Decomposition. Both the static (fixed source or eigenvalue) and time-dependent forms of the transport equation are solved in forward or adjoint mode. In addition, PARTISN now has a probabilistic mode for Probability of Initiation (static) and Probability of Survival (dynamic) calculations. Vacuum, reflective, periodic, white, or inhomogeneous boundary conditions are solved. General anisotropic scattering and inhomogeneous sources are permitted. PARTISN solves the transport equation on orthogonal (single level or block-structured AMR) grids in 1-D (slab, two

  3. Computer and laboratory simulation of interactions between spacecraft surfaces and charged-particle environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. J.

    1979-01-01

    Cases where the charged-particle environment acts on the spacecraft (e.g., spacecraft charging phenomena) and cases where a system on the spacecraft causes the interaction (e.g., high voltage space power systems) are considered. Both categories were studied in ground simulation facilities to understand the processes involved and to measure the pertinent parameters. Computer simulations are based on the NASA Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP) code. Analytical models are developed in this code and verified against the experimental data. Extrapolation from the small test samples to space conditions are made with this code. Typical results from laboratory and computer simulations are presented for both types of interactions. Extrapolations from these simulations to performance in space environments are discussed.

  4. Heart simulation with surface equations for using on MCNP code

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaei-Ochbelagh, D.; Salman-Nezhad, S.; Asadi, A.; Rahimi, A.

    2011-12-26

    External photon beam radiotherapy is carried out in a way to achieve an 'as low as possible' a dose in healthy tissues surrounding the target. One of these surroundings can be heart as a vital organ of body. As it is impossible to directly determine the absorbed dose by heart, using phantoms is one way to acquire information around it. The other way is Monte Carlo method. In this work we have presented a simulation of heart geometry by introducing of different surfaces in MCNP code. We used 14 surface equations in order to determine human heart modeling. Those surfaces are borders of heart walls and contents.

  5. Heart simulation with surface equations for using on MCNP code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei-Ochbelagh, D.; Salman-Nezhad, S.; Asadi, A.; Rahimi, A.

    2011-12-01

    External photon beam radiotherapy is carried out in a way to achieve an "as low as possible" a dose in healthy tissues surrounding the target. One of these surroundings can be heart as a vital organ of body. As it is impossible to directly determine the absorbed dose by heart, using phantoms is one way to acquire information around it. The other way is Monte Carlo method. In this work we have presented a simulation of heart geometry by introducing of different surfaces in MCNP code. We used 14 surface equations in order to determine human heart modeling. Those surfaces are borders of heart walls and contents.

  6. Heat flow between species in one-dimensional particle plasma simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, William S.; Gray, Perry C.

    1991-01-01

    The theory of Eldridge and Feix (1962) is presently applied to characterize the rate of heat flow between two one-dimensional particle species. Formulas derived assuming initial Maxwellian distributions, while complex, are judged applicable to simulators. Tests of the theory by simulations using Langdon and Birdsall's (1985) standard code yield results which indicate that heat flow between species may become rapid when the actual (not necessarily the intended) temperatures differ: thereby presenting a substantial hazard.

  7. Simulation of Code Spectrum and Code Flow of Cultured Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Shinichi; Nishitani, Yoshi; Hosokawa, Chie; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Sawai, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that, in cultured neuronal networks on a multielectrode, pseudorandom-like sequences (codes) are detected, and they flow with some spatial decay constant. Each cultured neuronal network is characterized by a specific spectrum curve. That is, we may consider the spectrum curve as a "signature" of its associated neuronal network that is dependent on the characteristics of neurons and network configuration, including the weight distribution. In the present study, we used an integrate-and-fire model of neurons with intrinsic and instantaneous fluctuations of characteristics for performing a simulation of a code spectrum from multielectrodes on a 2D mesh neural network. We showed that it is possible to estimate the characteristics of neurons such as the distribution of number of neurons around each electrode and their refractory periods. Although this process is a reverse problem and theoretically the solutions are not sufficiently guaranteed, the parameters seem to be consistent with those of neurons. That is, the proposed neural network model may adequately reflect the behavior of a cultured neuronal network. Furthermore, such prospect is discussed that code analysis will provide a base of communication within a neural network that will also create a base of natural intelligence.

  8. Computer code for the atomistic simulation of lattice defects and dynamics. [COMENT code

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffgens, J.O.; Graves, N.J.; Oster, C.A.

    1980-04-01

    This document has been prepared to satisfy the need for a detailed, up-to-date description of a computer code that can be used to simulate phenomena on an atomistic level. COMENT was written in FORTRAN IV and COMPASS (CDC assembly language) to solve the classical equations of motion for a large number of atoms interacting according to a given force law, and to perform the desired ancillary analysis of the resulting data. COMENT is a dual-purpose intended to describe static defect configurations as well as the detailed motion of atoms in a crystal lattice. It can be used to simulate the effect of temperature, impurities, and pre-existing defects on radiation-induced defect production mechanisms, defect migration, and defect stability.

  9. Gyrokinetic Simulation of Energetic Particles Turbulence and Transport in Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenlu; Lin, Zhihong; Holod, Ihor; Xiao, Yong; Bierwage, Andreas; Spong, Donald; Chu, Ming

    2009-05-01

    The confinement of the energetic particles (EP) is a critical issue in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), since that ignition relies on the self-heating by the fusion products. Shear Alfven wave excitations by EP in toroidal systems, for example Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) and Energetic Particle Mode (EPM) have been investigated as primary candidate for fluctuation-induced transport of EP in fusion plasma. In this work, TAE excitations by energetic particles are investigated in large scale first-principle simulations of fusion plasmas using the global gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) [Lin, Science 1998]. Comprehensive linear benchmarking results are reported between GTC, GYRO, fluid code TAEFL, and Magnetohydrodynamic-gyrokinetic hybrid code HMGC.

  10. EMPulse, a new 3-D simulation code for electromagnetic pulse studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Bruce; Eng, Chester; Farmer, William; Friedman, Alex; Grote, David; Kruger, Hans; Larson, David

    2016-10-01

    EMPulse is a comprehensive and modern 3-D simulation code for electro-magnetic pulse (EMP) formation and propagation studies, being developed at LLNL as part of a suite of codes to study E1 EMP originating from prompt gamma rays. EMPulse builds upon the open-source Warp particle-in-cell code framework developed by members of this team and collaborators at other institutions. The goal of this endeavor is a new tool enabling the detailed and self-consistent study of multi-dimensional effects in geometries that have typically been treated only approximately. Here we present an overview of the project, the models and methods that have been developed and incorporated into EMPulse, tests of these models, comparisons to simulations undertaken in CHAP-lite (derived from the legacy code CHAP due to C. Longmire and co-workers), and some approaches to increased computational efficiency being studied within our project. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Microfluidic CODES: a scalable multiplexed electronic sensor for orthogonal detection of particles in microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruxiu; Wang, Ningquan; Kamili, Farhan; Sarioglu, A Fatih

    2016-04-21

    Numerous biophysical and biochemical assays rely on spatial manipulation of particles/cells as they are processed on lab-on-a-chip devices. Analysis of spatially distributed particles on these devices typically requires microscopy negating the cost and size advantages of microfluidic assays. In this paper, we introduce a scalable electronic sensor technology, called microfluidic CODES, that utilizes resistive pulse sensing to orthogonally detect particles in multiple microfluidic channels from a single electrical output. Combining the techniques from telecommunications and microfluidics, we route three coplanar electrodes on a glass substrate to create multiple Coulter counters producing distinct orthogonal digital codes when they detect particles. We specifically design a digital code set using the mathematical principles of Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) telecommunication networks and can decode signals from different microfluidic channels with >90% accuracy through computation even if these signals overlap. As a proof of principle, we use this technology to detect human ovarian cancer cells in four different microfluidic channels fabricated using soft lithography. Microfluidic CODES offers a simple, all-electronic interface that is well suited to create integrated, low-cost lab-on-a-chip devices for cell- or particle-based assays in resource-limited settings.

  12. A Modified Parallel Tree Code for N-Body Simulation of the Large-Scale Structure of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becciani, U.; Antonuccio-Delogu, V.; Gambera, M.

    2000-09-01

    N-body codes for performing simulations of the origin and evolution of the large-scale structure of the universe have improved significantly over the past decade in terms of both the resolution achieved and the reduction of the CPU time. However, state-of-the-art N-body codes hardly allow one to deal with particle numbers larger than a few 107, even on the largest parallel systems. In order to allow simulations with larger resolution, we have first reconsidered the grouping strategy as described in J. Barnes (1990, J. Comput. Phys. 87, 161) (hereafter B90) and applied it with some modifications to our WDSH-PT (Work and Data SHaring-Parallel Tree) code (U. Becciani et al., 1996, Comput. Phys. Comm. 99, 1). In the first part of this paper we will give a short description of the code adopting the algorithm of J. E. Barnes and P. Hut (1986, Nature 324, 446) and in particular the memory and work distribution strategy applied to describe the data distribution on a CC-NUMA machine like the CRAY-T3E system. In very large simulations (typically N>=107), due to network contention and the formation of clusters of galaxies, an uneven load easily verifies. To remedy this, we have devised an automatic work redistribution mechanism which provided a good dynamic load balance without adding significant overhead. In the second part of the paper we describe the modification to the Barnes grouping strategy we have devised to improve the performance of the WDSH-PT code. We will use the property that nearby particles have similar interaction lists. This idea has been checked in B90, where an interaction list is built which applies everywhere within a cell Cgroup containing a small number of particles Ncrit. B90 reuses this interaction list for each particle p∈Cgroup in the cell in turn. We will assume each particle p to have the same interaction list. We consider that the agent force Fp on a particle p can be decomposed into two terms Fp=Ffar+Fnear. The first term Ffar is the same for

  13. The GBS code for tokamak scrape-off layer simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, F.D.; Ricci, P.; Jolliet, S.; Loizu, J.; Morales, J.; Mosetto, A.; Musil, F.; Riva, F.; Tran, T.M.; Wersal, C.

    2016-06-15

    We describe a new version of GBS, a 3D global, flux-driven plasma turbulence code to simulate the turbulent dynamics in the tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL), superseding the code presented by Ricci et al. (2012) [14]. The present work is driven by the objective of studying SOL turbulent dynamics in medium size tokamaks and beyond with a high-fidelity physics model. We emphasize an intertwining framework of improved physics models and the computational improvements that allow them. The model extensions include neutral atom physics, finite ion temperature, the addition of a closed field line region, and a non-Boussinesq treatment of the polarization drift. GBS has been completely refactored with the introduction of a 3-D Cartesian communicator and a scalable parallel multigrid solver. We report dramatically enhanced parallel scalability, with the possibility of treating electromagnetic fluctuations very efficiently. The method of manufactured solutions as a verification process has been carried out for this new code version, demonstrating the correct implementation of the physical model.

  14. ATES/heat pump simulations performed with ATESSS code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vail, L. W.

    1989-01-01

    Modifications to the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage System Simulator (ATESSS) allow simulation of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES)/heat pump systems. The heat pump algorithm requires a coefficient of performance (COP) relationship of the form: COP = COP sub base + alpha (T sub ref minus T sub base). Initial applications of the modified ATES code to synthetic building load data for two sizes of buildings in two U.S. cities showed insignificant performance advantage of a series ATES heat pump system over a conventional groundwater heat pump system. The addition of algorithms for a cooling tower and solar array improved performance slightly. Small values of alpha in the COP relationship are the principal reason for the limited improvement in system performance. Future studies at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are planned to investigate methods to increase system performance using alternative system configurations and operations scenarios.

  15. ROAR: A 3-D tethered rocket simulation code

    SciTech Connect

    York, A.R. II; Ludwigsen, J.S.

    1992-04-01

    A high-velocity impact testing technique, utilizing a tethered rocket, is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The technique involves tethering a rocket assembly to a pivot location and flying it in a semicircular trajectory to deliver the rocket and payload to an impact target location. Integral to developing this testing technique is the parallel development of accurate simulation models. An operational computer code, called ROAR (Rocket-on-a-Rope), has been developed to simulate the three-dimensional transient dynamic behavior of the tether and motor/payload assembly. This report presents a discussion of the parameters modeled, the governing set of equations, the through-time integration scheme, and the input required to set up a model. Also included is a sample problem and a comparison with experimental results.

  16. Self-consistent simulation of plasma scenarios for ITER using a combination of 1.5D transport codes and free-boundary equilibrium codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parail, V.; Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, R.; Artaud, J.-F.; Besseghir, K.; Cavinato, M.; Corrigan, G.; Garcia, J.; Garzotti, L.; Gribov, Y.; Imbeaux, F.; Koechl, F.; Labate, C. V.; Lister, J.; Litaudon, X.; Loarte, A.; Maget, P.; Mattei, M.; McDonald, D.; Nardon, E.; Saibene, G.; Sartori, R.; Urban, J.

    2013-11-01

    Self-consistent transport simulation of ITER scenarios is a very important tool for the exploration of the operational space and for scenario optimization. It also provides an assessment of the compatibility of developed scenarios (which include fast transient events) with machine constraints, in particular with the poloidal field coil system, heating and current drive, fuelling and particle and energy exhaust systems. This paper discusses results of predictive modelling of all reference ITER scenarios and variants using two suites of linked transport and equilibrium codes. The first suite consisting of the 1.5D core/2D SOL code JINTRAC (Wiesen S. et al 2008 JINTRAC-JET modelling suite JET ITC-Report) and the free-boundary equilibrium evolution code CREATE-NL (Albanese R. et al 2003 ISEM 2003 (Versailles, France); Albanese R. et al 2004 Nucl. Fusion 44 999), was mainly used to simulate the inductive D-T reference Scenario-2 with fusion gain Q = 10 and its variants in H, D and He (including ITER scenarios with reduced current and toroidal field). The second suite of codes was used mainly for the modelling of hybrid and steady-state ITER scenarios. It combines the 1.5D core transport code CRONOS (Artaud J.F. et al 2010 Nucl. Fusion 50 043001) and the free-boundary equilibrium evolution code DINA-CH (Kim S.H. et al 2009 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 51 105007).

  17. Random walk particle tracking simulations of non-Fickian transport in heterogeneous media

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, G. Tartakovsky, D.M. Dentz, M. Viswanathan, H.; Berkowitz, B.; Robinson, B.A.

    2010-06-01

    Derivations of continuum nonlocal models of non-Fickian (anomalous) transport require assumptions that might limit their applicability. We present a particle-based algorithm, which obviates the need for many of these assumptions by allowing stochastic processes that represent spatial and temporal random increments to be correlated in space and time, be stationary or non-stationary, and to have arbitrary distributions. The approach treats a particle trajectory as a subordinated stochastic process that is described by a set of Langevin equations, which represent a continuous time random walk (CTRW). Convolution-based particle tracking (CBPT) is used to increase the computational efficiency and accuracy of these particle-based simulations. The combined CTRW-CBPT approach enables one to convert any particle tracking legacy code into a simulator capable of handling non-Fickian transport.

  18. Particle/Continuum Hybrid Simulation in a Parallel Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baganoff, Donald

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to modify an existing parallel particle code based on the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to include a Navier-Stokes (NS) calculation so that a hybrid solution could be developed. In carrying out this work, it was determined that the following five issues had to be addressed before extensive program development of a three dimensional capability was pursued: (1) find a set of one-sided kinetic fluxes that are fully compatible with the DSMC method, (2) develop a finite volume scheme to make use of these one-sided kinetic fluxes, (3) make use of the one-sided kinetic fluxes together with DSMC type boundary conditions at a material surface so that velocity slip and temperature slip arise naturally for near-continuum conditions, (4) find a suitable sampling scheme so that the values of the one-sided fluxes predicted by the NS solution at an interface between the two domains can be converted into the correct distribution of particles to be introduced into the DSMC domain, (5) carry out a suitable number of tests to confirm that the developed concepts are valid, individually and in concert for a hybrid scheme.

  19. An Advanced simulation Code for Modeling Inductive Output Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Thuc Bui; R. Lawrence Ives

    2012-04-27

    During the Phase I program, CCR completed several major building blocks for a 3D large signal, inductive output tube (IOT) code using modern computer language and programming techniques. These included a 3D, Helmholtz, time-harmonic, field solver with a fully functional graphical user interface (GUI), automeshing and adaptivity. Other building blocks included the improved electrostatic Poisson solver with temporal boundary conditions to provide temporal fields for the time-stepping particle pusher as well as the self electric field caused by time-varying space charge. The magnetostatic field solver was also updated to solve for the self magnetic field caused by time changing current density in the output cavity gap. The goal function to optimize an IOT cavity was also formulated, and the optimization methodologies were investigated.

  20. COOL: A code for dynamic Monte Carlo simulation of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, Paolo

    2011-02-01

    COOL is a program to simulate evaporative and sympathetic cooling for a mixture of two gases co-trapped in a harmonic potential. The collisions involved are assumed to be exclusively elastic, and losses are due to evaporation from the trap. Each particle is followed individually in its trajectory, consequently properties such as spatial densities or energy distributions can be readily evaluated. The code can be used sequentially, by employing one output as input for another run. The code can be easily generalised to describe more complicated processes, such as the inclusion of inelastic collisions, or the possible presence of more than two species in the trap. Program summaryProgram title: COOL Catalogue identifier: AEHJ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHJ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 111 674 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 18 618 045 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: Desktop Operating system: Linux RAM: 500 Mbytes Classification: 16.7, 23 Nature of problem: Simulation of the sympathetic process occurring for two molecular gases co-trapped in a deep optical trap. Solution method: The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method exploits the decoupling, over a short time period, of the inter-particle interaction from the trapping potential. The particle dynamics is thus exclusively driven by the external optical field. The rare interparticle collisions are considered with an acceptance/rejection mechanism, that is by comparing a random number to the collisional probability defined in terms of the inter-particle cross section and centre-of-mass energy. All particles in the trap are individually simulated so that at each time step a number of useful quantities, such as

  1. Simulation study of high-frequency energetic particle driven geodesic acoustic mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hao Ido, Takeshi; Osakabe, Masaki; Todo, Yasushi

    2015-09-15

    High-frequency energetic particle driven geodesic acoustic modes (EGAM) observed in the large helical device plasmas are investigated using a hybrid simulation code for energetic particles and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Energetic particle inertia is incorporated in the MHD momentum equation for the simulation where the beam ion density is comparable to the bulk plasma density. Bump-on-tail type beam ion velocity distribution created by slowing down and charge exchange is considered. It is demonstrated that EGAMs have frequencies higher than the geodesic acoustic modes and the dependence on bulk plasma temperature is weak if (1) energetic particle density is comparable to the bulk plasma density and (2) charge exchange time (τ{sub cx}) is sufficiently shorter than the slowing down time (τ{sub s}) to create a bump-on-tail type distribution. The frequency of high-frequency EGAM rises as the energetic particle pressure increases under the condition of high energetic particle pressure. The frequency also increases as the energetic particle pitch angle distribution shifts to higher transit frequency. It is found that there are two kinds of particles resonant with EGAM: (1) trapped particles and (2) passing particles with transit frequency close to the mode frequency. The EGAMs investigated in this work are destabilized primarily by the passing particles whose transit frequencies are close to the EGAM frequency.

  2. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations of repulsive particle-particle and particle-wall interactions: Coughing and choking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başaǧaoǧlu, Hakan; Succi, Sauro

    2010-04-01

    We propose and numerically investigate a new particle retention mechanism for particle entrapment in creeping flows in a constricted section of a saturated rough-walled narrow flow channel. We hypothesize that particles, whose size is smaller than channel width, can be temporarily or permanently immobilized in a flow channel away from channel walls due to particle-particle and particle-wall repulsive potentials, and, consequently, the flow field is clogged temporarily (coughing) or permanently (choking). Two mathematically simplified repulsive particle-particle and particle-wall interaction potentials are incorporated into a two-dimensional colloidal lattice-Boltzmann model. These potentials are two-body Lennard-Jones 12 and screened electrostatic repulsive potentials. Numerical simulations reveal that unlike in smooth-walled flow channels, particles are entrapped away from rough-walled channel walls and subsequently clog the flow field if fluid-drag and repulsive forces on particles are in balance. Off-balance forces, however, could result in temporary clogging if repulsive forces are stronger on the advancing edge of a particle than on its trailing edge. The new conceptualization and two-particle numerical simulations successfully captured (i) temporary entrapment of two particles (coughing), (ii) temporary entrapment of one of the particles with permanent entrapment of the other particle (coughing-choking), and (iii) permanent entrapment of both particles (choking) as a function of repulsive interaction strength.

  3. Assessment of Microphysical Models in the National Combustion Code (NCC) for Aircraft Particulate Emissions: Particle Loss in Sampling Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Thomas; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2008-01-01

    This paper at first describes the fluid network approach recently implemented into the National Combustion Code (NCC) for the simulation of transport of aerosols (volatile particles and soot) in the particulate sampling systems. This network-based approach complements the other two approaches already in the NCC, namely, the lower-order temporal approach and the CFD-based approach. The accuracy and the computational costs of these three approaches are then investigated in terms of their application to the prediction of particle losses through sample transmission and distribution lines. Their predictive capabilities are assessed by comparing the computed results with the experimental data. The present work will help establish standard methodologies for measuring the size and concentration of particles in high-temperature, high-velocity jet engine exhaust. Furthermore, the present work also represents the first step of a long term effort of validating physics-based tools for the prediction of aircraft particulate emissions.

  4. Overview of the Tusas Code for Simulation of Dendritic Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Trainer, Amelia J.; Newman, Christopher Kyle; Francois, Marianne M.

    2016-01-07

    The aim of this project is to conduct a parametric investigation into the modeling of two dimensional dendrite solidification, using the phase field model. Specifically, we use the Tusas code, which is for coupled heat and phase-field simulation of dendritic solidification. Dendritic solidification, which may occur in the presence of an unstable solidification interface, results in treelike microstructures that often grow perpendicular to the rest of the growth front. The interface may become unstable if the enthalpy of the solid material is less than that of the liquid material, or if the solute is less soluble in solid than it is in liquid, potentially causing a partition [1]. A key motivation behind this research is that a broadened understanding of phase-field formulation and microstructural developments can be utilized for macroscopic simulations of phase change. This may be directly implemented as a part of the Telluride project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), through which a computational additive manufacturing simulation tool is being developed, ultimately to become part of the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program within the U.S. Department of Energy [2].

  5. Particle-in-cell simulations on spontaneous thermal magnetic field fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Simões, F. J. R. Jr.; Pavan, J.; Gaelzer, R.; Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.

    2013-10-15

    In this paper an electromagnetic particle code is used to investigate the spontaneous thermal emission. Specifically we perform particle-in-cell simulations employing a non-relativistic isotropic Maxwellian particle distribution to show that thermal fluctuations are related to the origin of spontaneous magnetic field fluctuation. These thermal fluctuations can become seed for further amplification mechanisms and thus be considered at the origin of the cosmological magnetic field, at microgauss levels. Our numerical results are in accordance with theoretical results presented in the literature.

  6. Octree particle management for DSMC and PIC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Robert Scott; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2016-12-01

    The ratio of physical to computationally modeled particles is of critical importance to the fidelity of particle-based simulation methods such as Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and Particle-in-Cell (PIC). Like adaptive mesh refinement for continuum/grid-based simulations, particle remapping enables dynamic control of simulation fidelity in regions of interest so that computational resources can be efficiently distributed within the problem. This is particularly important for simulations involving high dynamic range in the density for one or more species such as problems involving chain-branching reactions like combustion and ionizing breakdown. In this work, a new method of particle remapping is presented which strictly conserves mass, momentum, and energy while simultaneously remaining faithful to the original velocity distribution function through the use of octree binning in velocity space.

  7. Kinetic simulation of neutral particle transport in sputtering processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieschmann, Jan; Gallian, Sara; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Ries, Stefan; Bibinov, Nikita; Awakowicz, Peter

    2013-09-01

    For many physical vapor deposition applications using sputtering processes, knowledge about the detailed spatial and temporal evolution of the involved gas species is of great importance. Modeling of the involved gas dynamic and plasma processes is however challenging, because the operating pressure is typically below 1 Pa. In consequence, only kinetic descriptions are appropriate. In order to approach this problem, the dynamics of sputtered particle transport through a neutral gas background is simulated. For this study, a modified version of the three-dimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code dsmcFoam is utilized. The impact of a transient sputtering wind is investigated in a generic reactor geometry, which may be used for dc Magnetron Sputtering (dcMS), High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS), as well as sputtering in capacitively coupled discharges. In the present work a rarefaction of the background gas is observed. Moreover in pulsed mode the temporal dynamics of the rarefaction and subsequent recovery of the background gas is investigated. This work is supported by the German Research Foundation in the frame of TRR 87.

  8. Particle Simulations of DARHT-II Transport System

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B; Chen, Y J

    2001-06-11

    The DARHT-II beam line utilizes a fast stripline kicker to temporally chop a high current electron beam from a single induction LINAC and deliver multiple temporal electron beam pulses to an x-ray converter target. High beam quality needs to be maintained throughout the transport line from the end of the accelerator through the final focus lens to the x-ray converter target to produce a high quality radiographic image. Issues that will affect beam quality such as spot size and emittance at the converter target include dynamic effects associated with the stripline kicker as well as emittance growth due to the nonlinear forces associated with the kicker and various focusing elements in the transport line. In addition, dynamic effects associated with transverse resistive wall instability as well as gas focusing will affect the beam transport. A particle-in-cell code is utilized to evaluate beam transport in the downstream transport line in DARHT-II. External focusing forces are included utilizing either analytic expressions or field maps. Models for wakefields from the beam kicker, transverse resistive wall instability, and gas focusing are included in the simulation to provide a more complete picture of beam transport in DARHT-II. From these simulations, for various initial beam loads based on expected accelerator performance the temporally integrated target spot size and emittance can be estimated.

  9. Linear benchmarks between the hybrid codes HYMAGYC and HMGC to study energetic particle driven Alfvénic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogaccia, G.; Vlad, G.; Briguglio, S.

    2016-11-01

    Resonant interaction between energetic particles (EPs), produced by fusion reactions and/or additional heating systems, and shear Alfvén modes can destabilize global Alfvénic modes enhancing the EP transport. In order to investigate the EP transport in present and next generation fusion devices, numerical simulations are recognized as a very important tool. Among the various numerical models, the hybrid MHD gyrokinetic one has shown to be a valid compromise between a sufficiently accurate wave-particle interaction description and affordable computational resource requirements. This paper presents a linear benchmark between the hybrid codes HYMAGYC and HMGC. The HYMAGYC code solves the full, linear MHD equations in general curvilinear geometry for the bulk plasma and describes the EP population by the nonlinear gyrokinetic Vlasov equation. On the other side, HMGC solves the nonlinear, reduced O≤ft(ε 03\\right) , pressureless MHD equations ({ε0} being the inverse aspect ratio) for the bulk plasma and the drift kinetic Vlasov equation for the EPs. The results of the HYMAGYC and HMGC codes have been compared both in the MHD limit and in a wide range of the EP parameter space for two test cases (one of which being the so-called TAE n  =  6 ITPA Energetic Particle Group test case), both characterized by {ε0}\\ll 1 . In the first test case (test case A), good qualitative agreement is found w.r.t. real frequencies, growth rates and spatial structures of the most unstable modes, with some quantitative differences for the growth rates. For the so-called ITPA test case (test case B), at the nominal energetic particle density value, the disagreement between the two codes is, on the contrary, also qualitative, as a different mode is found as the most unstable one.

  10. Numerical simulations of hydrodynamic instabilities: Perturbation codes PANSY, PERLE, and 2D code CHIC applied to a realistic LIL target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallo, L.; Olazabal-Loumé, M.; Maire, P. H.; Breil, J.; Morse, R.-L.; Schurtz, G.

    2006-06-01

    This paper deals with ablation front instabilities simulations in the context of direct drive ICF. A simplified DT target, representative of realistic target on LIL is considered. We describe here two numerical approaches: the linear perturbation method using the perturbation codes Perle (planar) and Pansy (spherical) and the direct simulation method using our Bi-dimensional hydrodynamic code Chic. Numerical solutions are shown to converge, in good agreement with analytical models.

  11. GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo simulation of particle coagulation based on the inverse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, J.; Kruis, F. E.

    2013-09-01

    Simulating particle coagulation using Monte Carlo methods is in general a challenging computational task due to its numerical complexity and the computing cost. Currently, the lowest computing costs are obtained when applying a graphic processing unit (GPU) originally developed for speeding up graphic processing in the consumer market. In this article we present an implementation of accelerating a Monte Carlo method based on the Inverse scheme for simulating particle coagulation on the GPU. The abundant data parallelism embedded within the Monte Carlo method is explained as it will allow an efficient parallelization of the MC code on the GPU. Furthermore, the computation accuracy of the MC on GPU was validated with a benchmark, a CPU-based discrete-sectional method. To evaluate the performance gains by using the GPU, the computing time on the GPU against its sequential counterpart on the CPU were compared. The measured speedups show that the GPU can accelerate the execution of the MC code by a factor 10-100, depending on the chosen particle number of simulation particles. The algorithm shows a linear dependence of computing time with the number of simulation particles, which is a remarkable result in view of the n2 dependence of the coagulation.

  12. Delta-f to Full-F Particle-In-Cell Simulation of Microturbulence in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. W.; Ethier, S.; Ganesh, J.

    2012-10-01

    The use of a generalized weight-based particle simulation scheme suitable for simulating tokamak turbulence is reported. The scheme, which is a generalization of the perturbed distribution schemes developed earlier for PIC simulations, is now capable of handling the full distribution of the particles in the simulation. Specifically, we can simulate both the delta-f and the full-F particles within the same code. Its development [1] is based on the concept of multiscale expansion, which separates the scale lengths of the background inhomogeneity from those associated with the perturbed distributions, and on the fact that the intrinsic particle noise level is troublesome only in the beginning of the simulation, where the signal to noise ratio is low. But, when the signal to noise ratio becomes higher afterwards, we can gradually turn on the the full-F particles without interfering with the ensuing fluctuations. We will report on the simulation studies using GTC [2] for the ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven instabilities in the presence of zonal flows. The physics of steady state transport in tokamaks will be discussed.[4pt] [1] W. W. Lee, T. G. Jenkins and S. Ethier, Comp. Phys. Comm. 182, 564 (2011).[0pt] [2] Z. Lin, T. S. Hahm, W. W. Lee, W. M. Tang, R. White Science 281, 1835 (1998).

  13. Understanding bulk behavior of particulate materials from particle scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiaoliang

    Particulate materials play an increasingly significant role in various industries, such as pharmaceutical manufacturing, food, mining, and civil engineering. The objective of this research is to better understand bulk behaviors of particulate materials from particle scale simulations. Packing properties of assembly of particles are investigated first, focusing on the effects of particle size, surface energy, and aspect ratio on the coordination number, porosity, and packing structures. The simulation results show that particle sizes, surface energy, and aspect ratio all influence the porosity of packing to various degrees. The heterogeneous force networks within particle assembly under external compressive loading are investigated as well. The results show that coarse-coarse contacts dominate the strong network and coarse-fine contacts dominate the total network. Next, DEM models are developed to simulate the particle dynamics inside a conical screen mill (comil) and magnetically assisted impaction mixer (MAIM), both are important particle processing devices. For comil, the mean residence time (MRT), spatial distribution of particles, along with the collision dynamics between particles as well as particle and vessel geometries are examined as a function of the various operating parameters such as impeller speed, screen hole size, open area, and feed rate. The simulation results can help better understand dry coating experimental results using comil. For MAIM system, the magnetic force is incorporated into the contact model, allowing to describe the interactions between magnets. The simulation results reveal the connections between homogeneity of mixture and particle scale variables such as size of magnets and surface energy of non-magnets. In particular, at the fixed mass ratio of magnets to non-magnets and surface energy the smaller magnets lead to better homogeneity of mixing, which is in good agreement with previously published experimental results. Last but not

  14. Simulations of collisionless shocks - Some implications for particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, D.

    1992-08-01

    The role of self-consistent plasma simulations is discussed with reference to collisionless shock structure and the extraction of thermal particles to supra-thermal energies. Examples are given from quasi-perpendicular and parallel shock geometries. The cyclic reformation behavior of the quasi-parallel shock, as revealed by simulations, is detailed, and some implications given. Finally, some recent advances are described in the techniques of simulation of strong particle acceleration.

  15. Field ionization model implemented in Particle In Cell code and applied to laser-accelerated carbon ions

    SciTech Connect

    Nuter, R.; Gremillet, L.; Lefebvre, E.; Levy, A.; Ceccotti, T.; Martin, P.

    2011-03-15

    A novel numerical modeling of field ionization in PIC (Particle In Cell) codes is presented. Based on the quasistatic approximation of the ADK (Ammosov Delone Krainov) theory and implemented through a Monte Carlo scheme, this model allows for multiple ionization processes. Two-dimensional PIC simulations are performed to analyze the cut-off energies of the laser-accelerated carbon ions measured on the UHI 10 Saclay facility. The influence of the target and the hydrocarbon pollutant composition on laser-accelerated carbon ion energies is demonstrated.

  16. VISRAD, 3-D Target Design and Radiation Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovkin, Igor; Macfarlane, Joseph; Golovkina, Viktoriya

    2016-10-01

    The 3-D view factor code VISRAD is widely used in designing HEDP experiments at major laser and pulsed-power facilities, including NIF, OMEGA, OMEGA-EP, ORION, LMJ, Z, and PLX. It simulates target designs by generating a 3-D grid of surface elements, utilizing a variety of 3-D primitives and surface removal algorithms, and can be used to compute the radiation flux throughout the surface element grid by computing element-to-element view factors and solving power balance equations. Target set-up and beam pointing are facilitated by allowing users to specify positions and angular orientations using a variety of coordinates systems (e.g., that of any laser beam, target component, or diagnostic port). Analytic modeling for laser beam spatial profiles for OMEGA DPPs and NIF CPPs is used to compute laser intensity profiles throughout the grid of surface elements. We will discuss recent improvements to the software package and plans for future developments.

  17. Accelerated simulation of stochastic particle removal processes in particle-resolved aerosol models

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, J.H.; Michelotti, M.D.; Riemer, N.; Heath, M.T.; West, M.

    2016-10-01

    Stochastic particle-resolved methods have proven useful for simulating multi-dimensional systems such as composition-resolved aerosol size distributions. While particle-resolved methods have substantial benefits for highly detailed simulations, these techniques suffer from high computational cost, motivating efforts to improve their algorithmic efficiency. Here we formulate an algorithm for accelerating particle removal processes by aggregating particles of similar size into bins. We present the Binned Algorithm for particle removal processes and analyze its performance with application to the atmospherically relevant process of aerosol dry deposition. We show that the Binned Algorithm can dramatically improve the efficiency of particle removals, particularly for low removal rates, and that computational cost is reduced without introducing additional error. In simulations of aerosol particle removal by dry deposition in atmospherically relevant conditions, we demonstrate about 50-times increase in algorithm efficiency.

  18. Histogramming of the Charged Particle Measurements with MSL/RAD - Comparison of Histogram Data with Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehresmann, B.; Zeitlin, C.; Hassler, D. M.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Boettcher, S.; Koehler, J.; Martin, C.; Brinza, D.; Rafkin, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on-board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is designed to measure a broad range of energetic particle radiation. A significant part of this radiation consists of charged particles, which mainly stem from cosmic background radiation, Solar particle events, and secondaries created by the interaction of these particles with the Martian atmosphere and soil. To measure charged particles RAD is equipped with a set of detectors: a particle telescope consisting of three silicon Solid-State Detectors (SSDs), a CsI scintillator and a plastic scintillator, as well as a further plastic scintillator used as anti-coincidence. RAD uses an elaborate post-processing logic to analyze if a measured event qualifies as a charged particle, as well as to distinguish between particles stopping in any one of the detectors and particles penetrating the whole detector stack. RAD then arranges these qualifying events in an appropriate stopping or penetrating charged particle histogram, reducing the data volume necessary to maintain crucial information about the measured particle. For ground-based data analysis it is of prime importance to derive information, such as particle species or energy, from the data in the downloaded histograms. Here, we will present how the chosen binning of these histograms enables us to derive this information. Pre-flight, we used the Monte-Carlo code GEANT4 to simulate the expected particle radiation and its interactions with a full model of the RAD sensor head. By mirroring the on-board processing logic, we derived statistics of which particle species and energies populate any one bin in the set of charged particle histograms. Finally, we will compare the resulting histogram data from RAD cruise and surface observations with simulations. RAD is supported by NASA (HEOMD) under JPL subcontract #1273039 to SwRI, and by DLR in Germany under contract to Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel (CAU).

  19. Numerical simulations of glass impacts using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.

    1995-07-01

    As part of a program to develop advanced hydrocode design tools, we have implemented a brittle fracture model for glass into the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code. We have evaluated this model and the code by predicting data from one-dimensional flyer plate impacts into glass. Since fractured glass properties, which are needed in the model, are not available, we did sensitivity studies of these properties, as well as sensitivity studies to determine the number of particles needed in the calculations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the data.

  20. A Coulomb collision algorithm for weighted particle simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Ronald H.; Combi, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    A binary Coulomb collision algorithm is developed for weighted particle simulations employing Monte Carlo techniques. Charged particles within a given spatial grid cell are pair-wise scattered, explicitly conserving momentum and implicitly conserving energy. A similar algorithm developed by Takizuka and Abe (1977) conserves momentum and energy provided the particles are unweighted (each particle representing equal fractions of the total particle density). If applied as is to simulations incorporating weighted particles, the plasma temperatures equilibrate to an incorrect temperature, as compared to theory. Using the appropriate pairing statistics, a Coulomb collision algorithm is developed for weighted particles. The algorithm conserves energy and momentum and produces the appropriate relaxation time scales as compared to theoretical predictions. Such an algorithm is necessary for future work studying self-consistent multi-species kinetic transport.

  1. Determining Pitch-angle Diffusion Coefficients from Test Particle Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivascenko, Alex; Lange, Sebastian; Spanier, Felix; Vainio, Rami

    2016-12-01

    The transport and acceleration of charged particles in turbulent media are topics of great interest in space physics and interstellar astrophysics. These processes are dominated by the scattering of particles off magnetic irregularities. The scattering process itself is usually described by small-angle scattering, with the pitch-angle coefficient {D}μ μ playing a major role. Since the diffusion coefficient {D}μ μ can be determined analytically only for the approximation of quasilinear theory, the determination of this coefficient from numerical simulations has become more important. So far these simulations have yielded particle tracks for small-scale scattering, which can then be interpreted using the running diffusion coefficients. This method has a limited range of validity. This paper presents two new methods that allow for the calculation of the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient from numerical simulations. These methods no longer analyze particle trajectories and instead examine the change of particle distribution functions. It is shown that these methods provide better resolved results and allow for the analysis of strong turbulence. The application of these methods to Monte Carlo simulations of particle scattering and hybrid MHD-particle simulations is presented. Both analysis methods are able to recover the diffusion coefficients used as input for the Monte Carlo simulations and provide better results in MHD simulations, especially for stronger turbulence.

  2. A unified radiative magnetohydrodynamics code for lightning-like discharge simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qiang Chen, Bin Xiong, Run; Cai, Zhaoyang; Chen, P. F.

    2014-03-15

    A two-dimensional Eulerian finite difference code is developed for solving the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations including the effects of self-consistent magnetic field, thermal conduction, resistivity, gravity, and radiation transfer, which when combined with specified pulse current models and plasma equations of state, can be used as a unified lightning return stroke solver. The differential equations are written in the covariant form in the cylindrical geometry and kept in the conservative form which enables some high-accuracy shock capturing schemes to be equipped in the lightning channel configuration naturally. In this code, the 5-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme combined with Lax-Friedrichs flux splitting method is introduced for computing the convection terms of the MHD equations. The 3-order total variation diminishing Runge-Kutta integral operator is also equipped to keep the time-space accuracy of consistency. The numerical algorithms for non-ideal terms, e.g., artificial viscosity, resistivity, and thermal conduction, are introduced in the code via operator splitting method. This code assumes the radiation is in local thermodynamic equilibrium with plasma components and the flux limited diffusion algorithm with grey opacities is implemented for computing the radiation transfer. The transport coefficients and equation of state in this code are obtained from detailed particle population distribution calculation, which makes the numerical model is self-consistent. This code is systematically validated via the Sedov blast solutions and then used for lightning return stroke simulations with the peak current being 20 kA, 30 kA, and 40 kA, respectively. The results show that this numerical model consistent with observations and previous numerical results. The population distribution evolution and energy conservation problems are also discussed.

  3. The Million-Body Problem: Particle Simulations in Astrophysics

    ScienceCinema

    Rasio, Fred [Northwestern University

    2016-07-12

    Computer simulations using particles play a key role in astrophysics. They are widely used to study problems across the entire range of astrophysical scales, from the dynamics of stars, gaseous nebulae, and galaxies, to the formation of the largest-scale structures in the universe. The 'particles' can be anything from elementary particles to macroscopic fluid elements, entire stars, or even entire galaxies. Using particle simulations as a common thread, this talk will present an overview of computational astrophysics research currently done in our theory group at Northwestern. Topics will include stellar collisions and the gravothermal catastrophe in dense star clusters.

  4. Fully resolved simulations of 2,000 fluidized particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willen, Daniel; Sierakowski, Adam; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Computational capabilities have matured sufficiently to render possible the dynamic simulation of thousands of resolved particles in fluid flows, generating an unprecendented amount of data. In this work we present a simulation of 2,000 fluidized particles generated with the Physalis method, and focus on probing the data with tools from statistical physics. In particular, the study of particle triads and tetrads has been used to study the dispersion of passive scalars in turbulence. Knowledge of the average shape and size of these structures over time provides insight into particle diffusion and the persistence of clusters. Supported by NSF award No CBET 1335965.

  5. MPI parallelization of full PIC simulation code with Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Tatsuki; Nunami, Masanori; Usui, Hideyuki; Moritaka, Toseo

    2010-11-01

    A new parallelization technique developed for PIC method with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is introduced. In AMR technique, the complicated cell arrangements are organized and managed as interconnected pointers with multiple resolution levels, forming a fully threaded tree structure as a whole. In order to retain this tree structure distributed over multiple processes, remote memory access, an extended feature of MPI2 standards, is employed. Another important feature of the present simulation technique is the domain decomposition according to the modified Morton ordering. This algorithm can group up the equal number of particle calculation loops, which allows for the better load balance. Using this advanced simulation code, preliminary results for basic physical problems are exhibited for the validity check, together with the benchmarks to test the performance and the scalability.

  6. Validation and Verification of Two Particle-In-Cells Codes for a Glow Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, Johan; Khrabrov, Alexander V.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Sommerer, Timothy

    2016-10-01

    The two particle-in-cell codes EDIPIC and LSP were benchmarked and validated for a parallel-plate glow discharge in helium, in which the axial electric field had been carefully measured. Both particle-in-cell codes reproduce very well cathode fall and negative glow regions of the discharge, including formation of high density plasma with very low-energy electrons in negative glow. A detailed code comparison was performed for several synthetic cases of electron-beam injection into helium gas and showed that the codes are in excellent agreement for ionization rate, as well as for elastic and excitation collisions with isotropic scattering pattern. However, electron velocity distribution is anisotropic in the cathode fall, and therefore, a more accurate model of anisotropic scattering in elastic and ionization cross sections needs to be taken into account. In the process of validation several issues with both codes were fixed, including necessity to use modern random generators in both codes, and choose efficient numerical model from EDIPIC for secondary electron emission and circuit model in LSP. This Research was supported by US Department of Energy.

  7. COOL: A code for Dynamic Monte Carlo Simulation of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, Paolo

    2012-02-01

    Cool is a program to simulate evaporative and sympathetic cooling for a mixture of two gases co-trapped in an harmonic potential. The collisions involved are assumed to be exclusively elastic, and losses are due to evaporation from the trap. Each particle is followed individually in its trajectory, consequently properties such as spatial densities or energy distributions can be readily evaluated. The code can be used sequentially, by employing one output as input for another run. The code can be easily generalised to describe more complicated processes, such as the inclusion of inelastic collisions, or the possible presence of more than two species in the trap. New version program summaryProgram title: COOL Catalogue identifier: AEHJ_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHJ_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 097 733 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 18 425 722 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: Desktop Operating system: Linux RAM: 500 Mbytes Classification: 16.7, 23 Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEHJ_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 182 (2011) 388 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Simulation of the sympathetic process occurring for two molecular gases co-trapped in a deep optical trap. Solution method: The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method exploits the decoupling, over a short time period, of the inter-particle interaction from the trapping potential. The particle dynamics is thus exclusively driven by the external optical field. The rare inter-particle collisions are considered with an acceptance/rejection mechanism, that is, by comparing a random number to the collisional probability

  8. MCNPX Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport in SiC semiconductor detectors of fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlačková, K.; Zat'ko, B.; Šagátová, A.; Pavlovič, M.; Nečas, V.; Stacho, M.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate particle transport properties of a fast neutron detector based on silicon carbide. MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) code was used in our study because it allows seamless particle transport, thus not only interacting neutrons can be inspected but also secondary particles can be banked for subsequent transport. Modelling of the fast-neutron response of a SiC detector was carried out for fast neutrons produced by 239Pu-Be source with the mean energy of about 4.3 MeV. Using the MCNPX code, the following quantities have been calculated: secondary particle flux densities, reaction rates of elastic/inelastic scattering and other nuclear reactions, distribution of residual ions, deposited energy and energy distribution of pulses. The values of reaction rates calculated for different types of reactions and resulting energy deposition values showed that the incident neutrons transfer part of the carried energy predominantly via elastic scattering on silicon and carbon atoms. Other fast-neutron induced reactions include inelastic scattering and nuclear reactions followed by production of α-particles and protons. Silicon and carbon recoil atoms, α-particles and protons are charged particles which contribute to the detector response. It was demonstrated that although the bare SiC material can register fast neutrons directly, its detection efficiency can be enlarged if it is covered by an appropriate conversion layer. Comparison of the simulation results with experimental data was successfully accomplished.

  9. GRMHD Simulations of Jet Formation with a New Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Y.; Nishikawa, K.-I.; Koide, S.; Hardee, P.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a new three-dimensional general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) code by using a conservative, high-resolution shock-capturing scheme. The numerical fluxes are calculated using the HLL approximate Riemann solver scheme. The flux-interpolated, constrained transport scheme is used to maintain a divergence-free magnetic field. Various one-dimensional test problems in both special and general relativity show significant improvements over our previous model. We have performed simulations of jet formations from a geometrically thin accretion disk near both nonrotating and rotating black holes. The new simulation results show that the jet is formed in the same manner as in previous work and propagates outward. In the rotating black hole cases, jets form much closer to the black hole's ergosphere and the magnetic field is strongly twisted due the frame-dragging effect. As the magnetic field strength becomes weaker, a larger amount of matter is launched with the jet. On the other hand, when the magnetic field strength becomes stronger, the jet has less matter and becomes poynting-flux dominated. We will also discuss how the jet properties depend on the rotation of a black hole.

  10. Towards Fast, Scalable Hard Particle Monte Carlo Simulations on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Joshua A.; Irrgang, M. Eric; Glaser, Jens; Harper, Eric S.; Engel, Michael; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2014-03-01

    Parallel algorithms for Monte Carlo simulations of thermodynamic ensembles of particles have received little attention because of the inherent serial nature of the statistical sampling. We discuss the implementation of Monte Carlo for arbitrary hard shapes in HOOMD-blue, a GPU-accelerated particle simulation tool, to enable million particle simulations in a field where thousands is the norm. In this talk, we discuss our progress on basic parallel algorithms, optimizations that maximize GPU performance, and communication patterns for scaling to multiple GPUs. Research applications include colloidal assembly and other uses in materials design, biological aggregation, and operations research.

  11. Computational Particle Dynamic Simulations on Multicore Processors (CPDMu) Final Report Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Schmalz, Mark S

    2011-07-24

    Statement of Problem - Department of Energy has many legacy codes for simulation of computational particle dynamics and computational fluid dynamics applications that are designed to run on sequential processors and are not easily parallelized. Emerging high-performance computing architectures employ massively parallel multicore architectures (e.g., graphics processing units) to increase throughput. Parallelization of legacy simulation codes is a high priority, to achieve compatibility, efficiency, accuracy, and extensibility. General Statement of Solution - A legacy simulation application designed for implementation on mainly-sequential processors has been represented as a graph G. Mathematical transformations, applied to G, produce a graph representation {und G} for a high-performance architecture. Key computational and data movement kernels of the application were analyzed/optimized for parallel execution using the mapping G {yields} {und G}, which can be performed semi-automatically. This approach is widely applicable to many types of high-performance computing systems, such as graphics processing units or clusters comprised of nodes that contain one or more such units. Phase I Accomplishments - Phase I research decomposed/profiled computational particle dynamics simulation code for rocket fuel combustion into low and high computational cost regions (respectively, mainly sequential and mainly parallel kernels), with analysis of space and time complexity. Using the research team's expertise in algorithm-to-architecture mappings, the high-cost kernels were transformed, parallelized, and implemented on Nvidia Fermi GPUs. Measured speedups (GPU with respect to single-core CPU) were approximately 20-32X for realistic model parameters, without final optimization. Error analysis showed no loss of computational accuracy. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits - The proposed research will constitute a breakthrough in solution of problems related to efficient

  12. Particle kinetic simulation of high altitude hypervelocity flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Iain; Haas, Brian L.

    1994-01-01

    Rarefied flows about hypersonic vehicles entering the upper atmosphere or through nozzles expanding into a near vacuum may only be simulated accurately with a direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Under this grant, researchers enhanced the models employed in the DSMC method and performed simulations in support of existing NASA projects or missions. DSMC models were developed and validated for simulating rotational, vibrational, and chemical relaxation in high-temperature flows, including effects of quantized anharmonic oscillators and temperature-dependent relaxation rates. State-of-the-art advancements were made in simulating coupled vibration - dissociation - recombination for post-shock flows. Models were also developed to compute vehicle surface temperatures directly in the code rather than requiring isothermal estimates. These codes were instrumental in simulating aerobraking of NASA's Magellan spacecraft during orbital maneuvers to assess heat transfer and aerodynamic properties of the delicate satellite. NASA also depended upon simulations of entry of the Galileo probe into the atmosphere of Jupiter to provide drag and flow field information essential for accurate interpretation of an onboard experiment. Finally, the codes have been used extensively to simulate expanding nozzle flows in low-power thrusters in support of propulsion activities at NASA-Lewis. Detailed comparisons between continuum calculations and DSMC results helped to quantify the limitations of continuum CFD codes in rarefied applications.

  13. Particle kinetic simulation of high altitude hypervelocity flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Iain; Haas, Brian L.

    1994-01-01

    Rarefied flows about hypersonic vehicles entering the upper atmosphere or through nozzles expanding into a near vacuum may only be simulated accurately with a direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Under this grant, researchers enhanced the models employed in the DSMC method and performed simulations in support of existing NASA projects or missions. DSMC models were developed and validated for simulating rotational, vibrational, and chemical relaxation in high-temperature flows, including effects of quantized anharmonic oscillators and temperature-dependent relaxation rates. State-of-the-art advancements were made in simulating coupled vibration-dissociation recombination for post-shock flows. Models were also developed to compute vehicle surface temperatures directly in the code rather than requiring isothermal estimates. These codes were instrumental in simulating aerobraking of NASA's Magellan spacecraft during orbital maneuvers to assess heat transfer and aerodynamic properties of the delicate satellite. NASA also depended upon simulations of entry of the Galileo probe into the atmosphere of Jupiter to provide drag and flow field information essential for accurate interpretation of an onboard experiment. Finally, the codes have been used extensively to simulate expanding nozzle flows in low-power thrusters in support of propulsion activities at NASA-Lewis. Detailed comparisons between continuum calculations and DSMC results helped to quantify the limitations of continuum CFD codes in rarefied applications.

  14. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of microturbulence for general magnetic geometry and experimental profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Yong; Holod, Ihor; Wang, Zhixuan; Lin, Zhihong; Zhang, Taige

    2015-02-15

    Developments in gyrokinetic particle simulation enable the gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) to simulate turbulent transport in tokamaks with realistic equilibrium profiles and plasma geometry, which is a critical step in the code–experiment validation process. These new developments include numerical equilibrium representation using B-splines, a new Poisson solver based on finite difference using field-aligned mesh and magnetic flux coordinates, a new zonal flow solver for general geometry, and improvements on the conventional four-point gyroaverage with nonuniform background marker loading. The gyrokinetic Poisson equation is solved in the perpendicular plane instead of the poloidal plane. Exploiting these new features, GTC is able to simulate a typical DIII-D discharge with experimental magnetic geometry and profiles. The simulated turbulent heat diffusivity and its radial profile show good agreement with other gyrokinetic codes. The newly developed nonuniform loading method provides a modified radial transport profile to that of the conventional uniform loading method.

  15. TWANG-PIC, a novel gyro-averaged one-dimensional particle-in-cell code for interpretation of gyrotron experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Braunmueller, F. Tran, T. M.; Alberti, S.; Genoud, J.; Hogge, J.-Ph.; Tran, M. Q.; Vuillemin, Q.

    2015-06-15

    A new gyrotron simulation code for simulating the beam-wave interaction using a monomode time-dependent self-consistent model is presented. The new code TWANG-PIC is derived from the trajectory-based code TWANG by describing the electron motion in a gyro-averaged one-dimensional Particle-In-Cell (PIC) approach. In comparison to common PIC-codes, it is distinguished by its computation speed, which makes its use in parameter scans and in experiment interpretation possible. A benchmark of the new code is presented as well as a comparative study between the two codes. This study shows that the inclusion of a time-dependence in the electron equations, as it is the case in the PIC-approach, is mandatory for simulating any kind of non-stationary oscillations in gyrotrons. Finally, the new code is compared with experimental results and some implications of the violated model assumptions in the TWANG code are disclosed for a gyrotron experiment in which non-stationary regimes have been observed and for a critical case that is of interest in high power gyrotron development.

  16. Eulerian-Lagrangian Simulation of an Explosive Dispersal of Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollin, Bertrand; Ouellet, Frederick; Koneru, Rahul; Annamalai, Subramanian

    2016-11-01

    Explosive dispersal of solid particles can be observed in a wide variety of contexts, notably in natural phenomenon such as volcanic eruptions or in engineering applications such as detonation of multiphase explosives. As the initial blast wave crosses the surrounding layer of particles, compaction occurs shortly before particles disperse radially outward at high speed. During the dispersion phase, complex multiphase interactions occurs between particles and detonation products of the explosive. Using a Eulerian-Lagrangian approach, namely point particle simulations, we study the case of a bed of particles of cylindrical shape surrounding an explosive chord. Our interest lies in predicting the behavior of particles after detonation. In particular, capturing and describing the mechanisms responsible for late-time formation of stable particle jets is sought. Therefore, detonation of the explosive material is not simulated. Instead an equivalent energy source is used to initiate the simulation. We present a detailed description of our approach to solving this problem, and our most recent progress in the analysis of particles explosive dispersal. This work was supported by the U.S. DoE, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  17. Particle-in-cell simulations of Hall plasma thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Rodrigo; Ferreira, Jose Leonardo; Martins, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    Hall plasma thrusters can be modelled using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. In these simulations, the plasma is described by a set of equations which represent a coupled system of charged particles and electromagnetic fields. The fields are computed using a spatial grid (i.e., a discretization in space), whereas the particles can move continuously in space. Briefly, the particle and fields dynamics are computed as follows. First, forces due to electric and magnetic fields are employed to calculate the velocities and positions of particles. Next, the velocities and positions of particles are used to compute the charge and current densities at discrete positions in space. Finally, these densities are used to solve the electromagnetic field equations in the grid, which are interpolated at the position of the particles to obtain the acting forces, and restart this cycle. We will present numerical simulations using software for PIC simulations to study turbulence, wave and instabilities that arise in Hall plasma thrusters. We have sucessfully reproduced a numerical simulation of a SPT-100 Hall thruster using a two-dimensional (2D) model. In addition, we are developing a 2D model of a cylindrical Hall thruster. The results of these simulations will contribute to improve the performance of plasma thrusters to be used in Cubesats satellites currenty in development at the Plasma Laboratory at University of Brasília.

  18. Stochastic Simulation of Lagrangian Particle Transport in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guangyuan

    This dissertation presents the development and validation of the One Dimensional Turbulence (ODT) multiphase model in the Lagrangian reference frame. ODT is a stochastic model that captures the full range of length and time scales and provides statistical information on fine-scale turbulent-particle mixing and transport at low computational cost. The flow evolution is governed by a deterministic solution of the viscous processes and a stochastic representation of advection through stochastic domain mapping processes. The three algorithms for Lagrangian particle transport are presented within the context of the ODT approach. The Type-I and -C models consider the particle-eddy interaction as instantaneous and continuous change of the particle position and velocity, respectively. The Type-IC model combines the features of the Type-I and -C models. The models are applied to the multi-phase flows in the homogeneous decaying turbulence and turbulent round jet. Particle dispersion, dispersion coefficients, and velocity statistics are predicted and compared with experimental data. The models accurately reproduces the experimental data sets and capture particle inertial effects and trajectory crossing effect. A new adjustable particle parameter is introduced into the ODT model, and sensitivity analysis is performed to facilitate parameter estimation and selection. A novel algorithm of the two-way momentum coupling between the particle and carrier phases is developed in the ODT multiphase model. Momentum exchange between the phases is accounted for through particle source terms in the viscous diffusion. The source term is implemented in eddy events through a new kernel transformation and an iterative procedure is required for eddy selection. This model is applied to a particle-laden turbulent jet flow, and simulation results are compared with experimental measurements. The effect of particle addition on the velocities of the gas phase is investigated. The development of

  19. Particle impact tests. [simulation of micrometeoroid damage to orbiter surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komatsu, G. K.

    1978-01-01

    Particle impact tests were performed on three types of orbiter surface with a micrometeoroid facility. The test equipment electrostatically accelerated micron sized particles to high velocities simulating micrometeoroid impacts. Test particles were titanium diboride with typical velocities in the range 1 to 2.3 km x sec/1 and equivalent particle diameters in the range 4 to 16 microns. Impact angles to the material surface were 90, 60 and 30 degrees. The particle impact sites were located on the sample surfaces and craters were photographed with a magnification of 400X.

  20. R-Matrix Codes for Charged-particle Induced Reactionsin the Resolved Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect

    Leeb, Helmut; Dimitriou, Paraskevi; Thompson, Ian J.

    2017-01-01

    A Consultant’s Meeting was held at the IAEA Headquarters, from 5 to 7 December 2016, to discuss the status of R-matrix codes currently used in calculations of charged-particle induced reaction cross sections at low energies. The meeting was a follow-up to the R-matrix Codes meeting held in December 2015, and served the purpose of monitoring progress in: the development of a translation code to enable exchange of input/output parameters between the various codes in different formats, fitting procedures and treatment of uncertainties, the evaluation methodology, and finally dissemination. The details of the presentations and technical discussions, as well as additional actions that were proposed to achieve all the goals of the meeting are summarized in this report.

  1. Study of self-consistent particle flows in a plasma blob with particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Hiroki Ishiguro, Seiji

    2015-10-15

    The self-consistent particle flows in a filamentary coherent structure along the magnetic field line in scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma (plasma blob) have been investigated by means of a three-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulation code. The presence of the spiral current system composed of the diamagnetic and parallel currents in a blob is confirmed by the particle simulation without any assumed sheath boundary models. Furthermore, the observation of the electron and ion parallel velocity distributions in a blob shows that those distributions are far from Maxwellian due to modification with the sheath formation and that the electron temperature on the higher potential side in a blob is higher than that on the lower potential side. Also, it is found that the ions on the higher potential side are accelerated more intensively along the magnetic field line than those on the lower potential side near the edge. This study indicates that particle simulations are able to provide an exact current closure to analysis of blob dynamics and will bring more accurate prediction of plasma transport in the SOL without any empirical assumptions.

  2. Gyrokinetic Electron and Fully Kinetic Ion Particle Simulation of Collisionless Plasma Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Lin; Xueyi Wang; Liu Chen; Zhihong Lin

    2009-08-11

    Fully kinetic-particle simulations and hybrid simulations have been utilized for decades to investigate various fundamental plasma processes, such as magnetic reconnection, fast compressional waves, and wave-particle interaction. Nevertheless, due to disparate temporal and spatial scales between electrons and ions, existing fully kinetic-particle codes have to employ either unrealistically high electron-to-ion mass ratio, me/mi, or simulation domain limited to a few or a few ten's of the ion Larmor radii, or/and time much less than the global Alfven time scale in order to accommodate available computing resources. On the other hand, in the hybrid simulation, the ions are treated as fully kinetic particles but the electrons are treated as a massless fluid. The electron kinetic effects, e.g., wave-particle resonances and finite electron Larmor radius effects, are completely missing. Important physics, such as the electron transit time damping of fast compressional waves or the triggering mechanism of magnetic reconnection in collisionless plasmas is absent in the hybrid codes. Motivated by these considerations and noting that dynamics of interest to us has frequencies lower than the electron gyrofrequency, we planned to develop an innovative particle simulation model, gyrokinetic (GK) electrons and fully kinetic (FK) ions. In the GK-electron and FK-ion (GKe/FKi) particle simulation model, the rapid electron cyclotron motion is removed, while keeping finite electron Larmor radii, realistic me/mi ratio, wave-particle interactions, and off-diagonal components of electron pressure tensor. The computation power can thus be significantly improved over that of the full-particle codes. As planned in the project DE-FG02-05ER54826, we have finished the development of the new GK-electron and FK-ion scheme, finished its benchmark for a uniform plasma in 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D systems against linear waves obtained from analytical theories, and carried out a further convergence test

  3. Combining hydrodynamic modeling with nonthermal test particle tracking to improve flare simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Henry Degraffenried, III

    Solar flares remain a subject of intense study in the solar physics community. These huge releases of energy on the Sun have direct consequences for humans on Earth and in space. The processes that impart tremendous amounts of energy are not well understood. In order to test theoretical models of flare formation and evolution, state of the art, numerical codes must be created that can accurately simulate the wide range of electromagnetic radiation emitted by flares. A direct comparison of simulated radiation to increasingly detailed observations will allow scientists to test the validity of theoretical models. To accomplish this task, numerical codes were developed that can simulate both the thermal and nonthermal components of a flaring plasma, their interactions, and their emissions. The HYLOOP code combines a hydrodynamic equation solver with a nonthermal particle tracking code in order to simulate the thermal and nonthermal aspects of a flare. A solar flare was simulated using this new code with a static atmosphere and with a dynamic atmosphere, to illustrate the importance of considering hydrodynamic effects on nonthermal beam evolution. The importance of density gradients in the evolution of nonthermal electron beams was investigated by studying their effects in isolation. The importance of the initial pitch-angle cosine distribution to flare dynamics was investigated. Emission in XRT filters were calculated and analyzed to see if there were soft X-ray signatures that could give clues to the nonthermal particle distributions. Finally the HXR source motions that appeared in the simulations were compared to real observations of this phenomena.

  4. The effect of particle rotation in multi-particle flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierakowski, Adam; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2013-11-01

    In multi-particle flow simulations, particle rotation is difficult to calculate and is often imprecisely accounted for or ignored altogether. We examine the effect of these procedures on the overall flow characteristics through large systems of particles when the particle center is fixed and either allowed or not to rotate. We use a newly developed GPU-centric implementation of the Physalis method for the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations in the presence of finite-size spheres. We investigate periodic systems of more than 100 randomly-distributed particles at Reynolds numbers up to 100. By considering flow characteristics such as mean velocity and pressure drop, we shed light on the importance of including particle rotation effects in large particle-flow simulations. Study supported by NSF grant CBET 1258398.

  5. Verification of particle-in-cell simulations with Monte Carlo collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, M. M.

    2016-10-01

    Widespread recent interest in techniques for demonstrating that computer simulation programs are correct (‘verification’) has been motivated by evidence that traditional development and testing procedures are disturbingly ineffective. Reproducing an exact solution of the relevant model equations is generally accepted as the strongest available verification procedure, but this technique depends on the availability of suitable exact solutions. In this paper we consider verification of a particle-in-cell simulation with Monte Carlo collisions. We know of no exact solutions that simultaneously exercise all of the functions of this code. However, we show here that there can be found in the literature a number of non-trivial exact solutions, each of which exercises a substantial subset of these functions, and which in combination exercise all of the functions of the code. That the code is able to reproduce these solutions is correctness evidence of a stronger kind than has hitherto been elucidated.

  6. Validation and benchmarking of two particle-in-cell codes for a glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, Johan; Khrabrov, Alexander; Kaganovich, Igor; Sommerer, Timothy; Keating, David

    2017-01-01

    The two particle-in-cell codes EDIPIC and LSP are benchmarked and validated for a parallel-plate glow discharge in helium, in which the axial electric field had been carefully measured, primarily to investigate and improve the fidelity of their collision models. The scattering anisotropy of electron-impact ionization, as well as the value of the secondary-electron emission yield, are not well known in this case. The experimental uncertainty for the emission yield corresponds to a factor of two variation in the cathode current. If the emission yield is tuned to make the cathode current computed by each code match the experiment, the computed electric fields are in excellent agreement with each other, and within about 10% of the experimental value. The non-monotonic variation of the width of the cathode fall with the applied voltage seen in the experiment is reproduced by both codes. The electron temperature in the negative glow is within experimental error bars for both codes, but the density of slow trapped electrons is underestimated. A more detailed code comparison done for several synthetic cases of electron-beam injection into helium gas shows that the codes are in excellent agreement for ionization rate, as well as for elastic and excitation collisions with isotropic scattering pattern. The remaining significant discrepancies between the two codes are due to differences in their electron binary-collision models, and for anisotropic scattering due to elastic and excitation collisions.

  7. Rescaling of microwave breakdown theory for monatomic gases by particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huihui; Meng, Lin; Liu, Dagang; Liu, Laqun

    2013-12-15

    A particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo code is developed to rescale the microwave breakdown theory which is put forward by Vyskrebentsev and Raizer. The results of simulations show that there is a distinct error in this theory when the high energy tail of electron energy distribution function increases. A rescaling factor is proposed to modify this theory, and the change rule of the rescaling factor is presented.

  8. Direct numerical simulation of particles in a turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Ankit; Kumaran, Vishwanathan

    2016-11-01

    Goswami and Kumaran(2009a,b,2011a) studied the effect of fluid turbulence on particle phase in DNS.However,their studies were restricted to one way coupling where the effect of particles on fluid turbulence was not incorporated. We have extended their work by formulating a reverse force treatment through multipole expansion for the particle disturbance to the fluid turbulence.Here,the fluid velocity, strain rate and rotation rate at the particle position are used,as a far field,to calculate the disturbance caused by the particle and relaxing the point particle approximation.The simulations are done at high Stokes number where the fluid velocity fluctuations are uncorrelated over time scales of the particle dynamics.The results indicate that the particle mean velocity and stress are reduced when reverse force is incorporated.Level of reduction increases with mass loading and Stokes number.The variance of particle distribution function is reduced due to reduction in the fluid turbulent intensities.The particle velocity,angular velocity distribution function and stresses are compared for simulations where only the reverse force is incorporated, and where the dipoles are also incorporated, to examine the effect of force dipoles on the fluid turbulence and the particle distributions.

  9. An optimization method of relativistic backward wave oscillator using particle simulation and genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zaigao; Wang, Jianguo; Wang, Yue; Qiao, Hailiang; Zhang, Dianhui; Guo, Weijie

    2013-11-01

    Optimal design method of high-power microwave source using particle simulation and parallel genetic algorithms is presented in this paper. The output power, simulated by the fully electromagnetic particle simulation code UNIPIC, of the high-power microwave device is given as the fitness function, and the float-encoding genetic algorithms are used to optimize the high-power microwave devices. Using this method, we encode the heights of non-uniform slow wave structure in the relativistic backward wave oscillators (RBWO), and optimize the parameters on massively parallel processors. Simulation results demonstrate that we can obtain the optimal parameters of non-uniform slow wave structure in the RBWO, and the output microwave power enhances 52.6% after the device is optimized.

  10. An optimization method of relativistic backward wave oscillator using particle simulation and genetic algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zaigao; Wang, Jianguo; Wang, Yue; Qiao, Hailiang; Zhang, Dianhui; Guo, Weijie

    2013-11-15

    Optimal design method of high-power microwave source using particle simulation and parallel genetic algorithms is presented in this paper. The output power, simulated by the fully electromagnetic particle simulation code UNIPIC, of the high-power microwave device is given as the fitness function, and the float-encoding genetic algorithms are used to optimize the high-power microwave devices. Using this method, we encode the heights of non-uniform slow wave structure in the relativistic backward wave oscillators (RBWO), and optimize the parameters on massively parallel processors. Simulation results demonstrate that we can obtain the optimal parameters of non-uniform slow wave structure in the RBWO, and the output microwave power enhances 52.6% after the device is optimized.

  11. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of dilute fluid-particle flows in aerosol concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hari, Sridhar

    2003-07-01

    In this study, commercially available Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software, CFX-4.4 has been used for the simulations of aerosol transport through various aerosol-sampling devices. Aerosol transport was modeled as a classical dilute and dispersed two-phase flow problem. Eulerian-Lagrangian framework was adopted wherein the fluid was treated as the continuous phase and aerosol as the dispersed phase, with a one-way coupling between the phases. Initially, performance of the particle transport algorithm implemented in the code was validated against available experimental and numerical data in the literature. Code predictions were found to be in good agreement against experimental data and previous numerical predictions. As a next step, the code was used as a tool to optimize the performance of a virtual impactor prototype. Suggestions on critical geometrical details available in the literature, for a virtual impactor, were numerically investigated on the prototype and the optimum set of parameters was determined. Performance curves were generated for the optimized design at various operating conditions. A computational model of the Linear Slot Virtual Impactor (LSVI) fabricated based on the optimization study, was constructed using the worst-case values of the measured geometrical parameters, with offsets in the horizontal and vertical planes. Simulations were performed on this model for the LSVI operating conditions. Behavior of various sized particles inside the impactor was illustrated with the corresponding particle tracks. Fair agreement was obtained between code predictions and experimental results. Important information on the virtual impactor performance, not known earlier, or, not reported in the literature in the past, obtained from this study, is presented. In the final part of this study, simulations on aerosol deposition in turbulent pipe flow were performed. Code predictions were found to be completely uncorrelated to experimental data. The

  12. Towards the optimization of a gyrokinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code on large-scale hybrid architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohana, N.; Jocksch, A.; Lanti, E.; Tran, T. M.; Brunner, S.; Gheller, C.; Hariri, F.; Villard, L.

    2016-11-01

    With the aim of enabling state-of-the-art gyrokinetic PIC codes to benefit from the performance of recent multithreaded devices, we developed an application from a platform called the “PIC-engine” [1, 2, 3] embedding simplified basic features of the PIC method. The application solves the gyrokinetic equations in a sheared plasma slab using B-spline finite elements up to fourth order to represent the self-consistent electrostatic field. Preliminary studies of the so-called Particle-In-Fourier (PIF) approach, which uses Fourier modes as basis functions in the periodic dimensions of the system instead of the real-space grid, show that this method can be faster than PIC for simulations with a small number of Fourier modes. Similarly to the PIC-engine, multiple levels of parallelism have been implemented using MPI+OpenMP [2] and MPI+OpenACC [1], the latter exploiting the computational power of GPUs without requiring complete code rewriting. It is shown that sorting particles [3] can lead to performance improvement by increasing data locality and vectorizing grid memory access. Weak scalability tests have been successfully run on the GPU-equipped Cray XC30 Piz Daint (at CSCS) up to 4,096 nodes. The reduced time-to-solution will enable more realistic and thus more computationally intensive simulations of turbulent transport in magnetic fusion devices.

  13. Simulation of Turbulent Combustion Fields of Shock-Dispersed Aluminum Using the AMR Code

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E; Khasainov, B

    2006-11-02

    We present a Model for simulating experiments of combustion in Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) explosions. The SDF charge consisted of a 0.5-g spherical PETN booster, surrounded by 1-g of fuel powder (flake Aluminum). Detonation of the booster charge creates a high-temperature, high-pressure source (PETN detonation products gases) that both disperses the fuel and heats it. Combustion ensues when the fuel mixes with air. The gas phase is governed by the gas-dynamic conservation laws, while the particle phase obeys the continuum mechanics laws for heterogeneous media. The two phases exchange mass, momentum and energy according to inter-phase interaction terms. The kinetics model used an empirical particle burn relation. The thermodynamic model considers the air, fuel and booster products to be of frozen composition, while the Al combustion products are assumed to be in equilibrium. The thermodynamic states were calculated by the Cheetah code; resulting state points were fit with analytic functions suitable for numerical simulations. Numerical simulations of combustion of an Aluminum SDF charge in a 6.4-liter chamber were performed. Computed pressure histories agree with measurements.

  14. Particle simulation for accretion sheets in narrow double stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, F.; Herold, H.; Ruder, H.

    1988-11-01

    Development and behavior of accretion sheets in double stars systems are studied by particle simulation calculations. Numerical analysis considers the following parameters in the binary system: primary and secondary components, path period of the system, and mass flow rates. Mass behavior is described by Roche-potential. The particle motion equation in the double star system is solved by the Leap-Frog procedure. Velocity friction simulation is obtained by viscous interaction considerations.

  15. MMAPDNG: A new, fast code backed by a memory-mapped database for simulating delayed γ-ray emission with MCNPX package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Tak Pui; Ludewigt, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    The simulation of the emission of beta-delayed gamma rays following nuclear fission and the calculation of time-dependent energy spectra is a computational challenge. The widely used radiation transport code MCNPX includes a delayed gamma-ray routine that is inefficient and not suitable for simulating complex problems. This paper describes the code "MMAPDNG" (Memory-Mapped Delayed Neutron and Gamma), an optimized delayed gamma module written in C, discusses usage and merits of the code, and presents results. The approach is based on storing required Fission Product Yield (FPY) data, decay data, and delayed particle data in a memory-mapped file. When compared to the original delayed gamma-ray code in MCNPX, memory utilization is reduced by two orders of magnitude and the ray sampling is sped up by three orders of magnitude. Other delayed particles such as neutrons and electrons can be implemented in future versions of MMAPDNG code using its existing framework.

  16. Update on the Development and Validation of MERCURY: A Modern, Monte Carlo Particle Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R J; Taylor, J M; McKinley, M S; Greenman, G M; Cullen, D E; O'Brien, M J; Beck, B R; Hagmann, C A

    2005-06-06

    An update on the development and validation of the MERCURY Monte Carlo particle transport code is presented. MERCURY is a modern, parallel, general-purpose Monte Carlo code being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. During the past year, several major algorithm enhancements have been completed. These include the addition of particle trackers for 3-D combinatorial geometry (CG), 1-D radial meshes, 2-D quadrilateral unstructured meshes, as well as a feature known as templates for defining recursive, repeated structures in CG. New physics capabilities include an elastic-scattering neutron thermalization model, support for continuous energy cross sections and S ({alpha}, {beta}) molecular bound scattering. Each of these new physics features has been validated through code-to-code comparisons with another Monte Carlo transport code. Several important computer science features have been developed, including an extensible input-parameter parser based upon the XML data description language, and a dynamic load-balance methodology for efficient parallel calculations. This paper discusses the recent work in each of these areas, and describes a plan for future extensions that are required to meet the needs of our ever expanding user base.

  17. Towards a high performance geometry library for particle-detector simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolakis, J.; Bandieramonte, M.; Bitzes, G.; Brun, R.; Canal, P.; Carminati, F.; Cosmo, G.; Licht, J. C. De Fine; Duhem, L.; Elvira, V. D.; Gheata, A.; Jun, S. Y.; Lima, G.; Nikitina, T.; Novak, M.; Sehgal, R.; Shadura, O.; Wenzel, S.

    2015-05-22

    Thread-parallelization and single-instruction multiple data (SIMD) ”vectorisation” of software components in HEP computing has become a necessity to fully benefit from current and future computing hardware. In this context, the Geant-Vector/GPU simulation project aims to re-engineer current software for the simulation of the passage of particles through detectors in order to increase the overall event throughput. As one of the core modules in this area, the geometry library plays a central role and vectorising its algorithms will be one of the cornerstones towards achieving good CPU performance. Here, we report on the progress made in vectorising the shape primitives, as well as in applying new C++ template based optimizations of existing code available in the Geant4, ROOT or USolids geometry libraries. We will focus on a presentation of our software development approach that aims to provide optimized code for all use cases of the library (e.g., single particle and many-particle APIs) and to support different architectures (CPU and GPU) while keeping the code base small, manageable and maintainable. We report on a generic and templated C++ geometry library as a continuation of the AIDA USolids project. As a result, the experience gained with these developments will be beneficial to other parts of the simulation software, such as for the optimization of the physics library, and possibly to other parts of the experiment software stack, such as reconstruction and analysis.

  18. Towards a high performance geometry library for particle-detector simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Apostolakis, J.; Bandieramonte, M.; Bitzes, G.; ...

    2015-05-22

    Thread-parallelization and single-instruction multiple data (SIMD) ”vectorisation” of software components in HEP computing has become a necessity to fully benefit from current and future computing hardware. In this context, the Geant-Vector/GPU simulation project aims to re-engineer current software for the simulation of the passage of particles through detectors in order to increase the overall event throughput. As one of the core modules in this area, the geometry library plays a central role and vectorising its algorithms will be one of the cornerstones towards achieving good CPU performance. Here, we report on the progress made in vectorising the shape primitives, asmore » well as in applying new C++ template based optimizations of existing code available in the Geant4, ROOT or USolids geometry libraries. We will focus on a presentation of our software development approach that aims to provide optimized code for all use cases of the library (e.g., single particle and many-particle APIs) and to support different architectures (CPU and GPU) while keeping the code base small, manageable and maintainable. We report on a generic and templated C++ geometry library as a continuation of the AIDA USolids project. As a result, the experience gained with these developments will be beneficial to other parts of the simulation software, such as for the optimization of the physics library, and possibly to other parts of the experiment software stack, such as reconstruction and analysis.« less

  19. Towards a high performance geometry library for particle-detector simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolakis, J.; Bandieramonte, M.; Bitzes, G.; Brun, R.; Canal, P.; Carminati, F.; Cosmo, G.; De Fine Licht, J. C.; Duhem, L.; Elvira, V. D.; Gheata, A.; Jun, S. Y.; Lima, G.; Nikitina, T.; Novak, M.; Sehgal, R.; Shadura, O.; Wenzel, S.

    2015-05-01

    Thread-parallelisation and single-instruction multiple data (SIMD) ”vectorisation” of software components in HEP computing has become a necessity to fully benefit from current and future computing hardware. In this context, the Geant-Vector/GPU simulation project aims to re-engineer current software for the simulation of the passage of particles through detectors in order to increase the overall event throughput. As one of the core modules in this area, the geometry library plays a central role and vectorising its algorithms will be one of the cornerstones towards achieving good CPU performance. Here, we report on the progress made in vectorising the shape primitives, as well as in applying new C++ template based optimisations of existing code available in the Geant4, ROOT or USolids geometry libraries. We will focus on a presentation of our software development approach that aims to provide optimised code for all use cases of the library (e.g., single particle and many-particle APIs) and to support different architectures (CPU and GPU) while keeping the code base small, manageable and maintainable. We report on a generic and templated C++ geometry library as a continuation of the AIDA USolids project. The experience gained with these developments will be beneficial to other parts of the simulation software, such as for the optimisation of the physics library, and possibly to other parts of the experiment software stack, such as reconstruction and analysis.

  20. Verification of particle-in-cell simulations against exact solutions of kinetic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Miles

    2015-09-01

    Demonstrating correctness of computer simulations (or verification) has become a matter of increasing concern in recent years. The strongest type of verification is a demonstration that the simulation converges to an exact solution of the mathematical model that is supposed to be solved. Of course, this is possible only if such an exact solution is available. In this paper, we are interested in kinetic simulation using the particle-in-cell method, and consequently a relevant exact solution must be a solution of a kinetic equation. While we know of no such solutions that exercise all the features of a typical particle-in-cell simulation, in this paper we show that the mathematical literature contains several such solutions that involve a large fraction of the functionality of such a code, and which collectively exercise essentially all of the code functionality. These solutions include the plane diode, the neutron criticality problem, and the calculation of ion energy distribution functions in oscillating fields. In each of theses cases, we can show the the particle-in-cell simulation converges to the exact solution in the expected way. These demonstrations are strong evidence of correct implementation. Work supported by Science Foundation Ireland under grant 08/SRC/I1411.

  1. Performance Evaluation of the Electrostatic Particle-in-Cell Code hPIC on the Blue Waters Supercomputer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaziev, Rinat; Mokos, Ryan; Curreli, Davide

    2016-10-01

    The newly-developed hPIC code is a kinetic-kinetic electrostatic Particle-in-Cell application, targeted at large-scale simulations of Plasma-Material Interactions. The code can simulate multi-component strongly-magnetized plasmas in a region close to the wall, including the magnetic sheath/presheath and the first surface layers, which release material impurities. The Poisson solver is based on PETSc conjugate gradient with BoomerAMG algebraic multigrid preconditioners. Scaling tests on the Blue Waters supercomputer have demonstrated good strong-scaling up to 262,144 cores and excellent weak-scaling (tested up to 64,000 cores). In this presentation, we will make an overview of the on-node optimization activities and the main code features, as well as provide a detailed analysis of the results of the verification tests performed. Work supported by the NCSA Faculty Fellowship Program at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications; supercomputing resources provided by Exploratory Blue Waters Allocation.

  2. Atomistic Simulation of Sea Spray Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokturk, H.

    2012-12-01

    Particles generated by ocean wave spray play an important role in many atmospheric processes such as cloud condensation, cycling of elements like chlorine, and scattering of sunlight reaching the ocean surface [1-2]. Indeed, artificially spraying droplets of seawater to the atmosphere by marine vessels roaming the ocean has been suggested as a geoengineering method to combat global warming [3]. One of the interesting aspects of ocean spray particles is that they include dissolved salt ions. Typically a liter of seawater contains about 3.5 g of salt which is mostly sodium chloride. Hydrated salt ions of the particle create a molecular structure which is different from that of pure water. An objective of this research is to investigate the influence of the dissolved ions on the properties of the particles by using first principle quantum mechanical calculations. Another objective is to probe the interaction of carbon dioxide (CO2) with such particles to understand whether the ions might enhance the absorption of atmospheric CO2 into the particles. Atomic models used in the calculations consist of a salt ion, for example sodium (Na+) ion surrounded by water molecules. Calculations are performed by using the DFT method with B3LYP hybrid functional and Pople type basis sets augmented with polarization and diffuse functions. Results of the calculations indicate that average binding energy of water molecules nearest to the ion is 0.7 eV per molecule for Na+ and 0.5 eV per molecule for Cl-. Water molecules are bound to the ion with significantly greater energy than that of the hydrogen bond (~0.2 eV) which is the binding mechanism of pure water. Higher binding energy of the particles explains why they serve well as condensation nuclei. As expected, binding energy decreases with increasing distance from the ion. It becomes comparable to that of the hydrogen bond at a distance of about 2 nm which corresponds to approximately 7 layers of water molecules surrounding the ion

  3. The local skin dose conversion coefficients of electrons, protons and alpha particles calculated using the Geant4 code.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bintuan; Dang, Bingrong; Wang, Zhuanzi; Wei, Wei; Li, Wenjian

    2013-10-01

    The skin tissue-equivalent slab reported in the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 116 to calculate the localised skin dose conversion coefficients (LSDCCs) was adopted into the Monte Carlo transport code Geant4. The Geant4 code was then utilised for computation of LSDCCs due to a circular parallel beam of monoenergetic electrons, protons and alpha particles <10 MeV. The computed LSDCCs for both electrons and alpha particles are found to be in good agreement with the results using the MCNPX code of ICRP 116 data. The present work thus validates the LSDCC values for both electrons and alpha particles using the Geant4 code.

  4. Development of a CFD code for casting simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murph, Jesse E.

    1992-01-01

    The task of developing a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to accurately model the mold filling phase of a casting operation was accomplished in a systematic manner. First the state-of-the-art was determined through a literature search, a code search, and participation with casting industry personnel involved in consortium startups. From this material and inputs from industry personnel, an evaluation of the currently available codes was made. It was determined that a few of the codes already contained sophisticated CFD algorithms and further validation of one of these codes could preclude the development of a new CFD code for this purpose. With industry concurrence, ProCAST was chosen for further evaluation. Two benchmark cases were used to evaluate the code's performance using a Silicon Graphics Personal Iris system. The results of these limited evaluations (because of machine and time constraints) are presented along with discussions of possible improvements and recommendations for further evaluation.

  5. Direct simulation of particle dispersion in a decaying isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elghobashi, S.; Truesdell, G. C.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a numerical investigation of the dispersion of solid particles in decaying isotropic turbulence are presented. The 3D time-dependent velocity field of a homogeneous nonstationary turbulence is computed using the method of direct numerical simulation (DNS). The dispersion characteristics of three different solid particles (corn, copper, and glass) injected in the flow are obtained by integrating the complete equation of particle motion along the instantaneous trajectories of 22-cubed particles for each particle type, and then by performing ensemble averaging. Good agreement was achieved between the present DNS results and the measured time development of the mean-square displacement of the particles. Questions of how and why the dispersion statistics of a solid particle differ from those of its corresponding fluid point and surrounding fluid and what influences inertia and gravity have on these statistics are also discussed.

  6. Code OK2—A simulation code of ion-beam illumination on an arbitrary shape and structure target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogoyski, A. I.; Kawata, S.; Someya, T.

    2004-08-01

    irradiation and non-uniformity evaluations are sophisticated and difficult to calculate analytically. Based on our code one can numerically obtain a three-dimensional profile of energy deposition onto an arbitrary shape and structure target. Method of solution: OK2 code works on the base of OK1 [1-9]. The code simulates a multi-beam illumination on a target with arbitrary shape and structure, and obtains the 3D energy deposition profile. Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: None Typical running time: The execution time depends on the pellet mesh number and the number of beams in the simulated illumination as well as on the beam characteristics (beam radius on the pellet surface, beam subdivision, projectile particle energy and so on). In almost of the practical running tests performed, the typical running time for one beam deposition is about 40 s on a PC with a CPU of Pentium 4, 2.4 GHz. Unusual features of the program: None References: [1] A.I. Ogoyski, et al., Code OK1—Simulation of multi-beam irradiation on a spherical target in heavy ion fusion, Comput. Phys. Commun. 157 (2004) 160-172. [2] J.J. Barnard, et al., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Research Report, UCRL-LR-108095 (1991). [3] C. Deutsch, et al., J. Plasma and Fusion Res. 77 (2001) 33. [4] T. Someya, et al., Fusion Science Tech. 43 (2003) 282-289. [5] S.V. Bulanov, et al., Phys. Lett. A 299 (2002) 240-247. [6] M.H. Emery, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 48 (1982) 253. [7] S. Kawata, et al., J. Phys. Soc. Japan 53 (1984) 3416. [8] T. Mehlhorn, Sandia Report, SAND80-0038 (1980). [9] H.H. Andersen, J.F. Ziegler, The Stopping and Ranges of Ions in Matter, vol. 3, Pergamon Press, Elmsford, NY, 1977.

  7. NIMROD Code Simulation of Plasma Exhaust Expansion in the VASIMR Magnetic Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarditi, Alfonso G.

    2001-10-01

    The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR, [1]) engine is an advanced propulsion concept that uses radio frequency waves to accelerate a propellant (typically a Hydrogen or Helium plasma) at much higher speeds than can be reached by any conventional chemical rocket. The high exhaust speed results in a very efficient spacecraft design, as much less propellant mass is required to achieve the same acceleration of a vehicle in space. An experimental VASIMR prototype is currently under development at the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory, NASA Johnson Space Center. A magnetic nozzle is used to convert the thermal plasma energy into thrust along the longitudinal direction. A 3D, two-fluid simulation has been developed with the NIMROD code [2,3] to study the details of this process and the properties of the plasma detachment from the nozzle. The code has been customized with the introduction of a plasma source term and open-end boundary conditions for a cylindrical geometry. In the simulation, a source injects plasma in the nozzle-shaped external magnetic field. The initial plasma pulse expands in the vacuum region following the field lines and eventually evolves into a steady state profile where the plasma flow that crosses the open-end boundaries is balanced by the flow injected at the source. The NIMROD runs have been benchmarked with 2D simulations with a particle trajectory code. Initial comparisons with experimental probe measurements are also presented. The results of these test runs are being used to optimize the design parameters of the engine plasma acceleration section and of the magnetic nozzle field profile. [1] F. R. Chang-Diaz, Scientific American, p. 90, Nov. 2000. [2] A. H. Glasser, et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion, 41, A74 (1999). [3] C. R. Sovinec, Int. Sherwood Fusion Theory Conf., Los Angeles, CA (USA), March 2000

  8. Leap frog integrator modifications in highly collisional particle-in-cell codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanzlikova, N.; Turner, M. M.

    2014-07-01

    Leap frog integration method is a standard, simple, fast, and accurate way to implement velocity and position integration in particle-in-cell codes. Due to the direct solution of kinetics of particles in phase space central to the particle-in-cell procedure, important information can be obtained on particle velocity distributions, and consequently on transport and heating processes. This approach is commonly associated with physical situations where collisional effects are weak, but can also be profitably applied in some highly collisional cases, such as occur in semiconductor devices and gaseous discharges at atmospheric pressure. In this paper, we show that the implementation of the leap frog integration method in these circumstances can violate some of the assumptions central to the accuracy of this scheme. Indeed, without adaptation, the method gives incorrect results. We show here how the method must be modified to deal correctly with highly collisional cases.

  9. Nonlinear d--ta-f Simulation Studies of Intense Charged Particle Beams with Large Temperature Anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson; Hong Qin

    2002-05-07

    In this paper, a 3-D nonlinear perturbative particle simulation code (BEST) [H. Qin, R.C. Davidson and W.W. Lee, Physical Review Special Topics on Accelerators and Beams 3 (2000) 084401] is used to systematically study the stability properties of intense nonneutral charged particle beams with large temperature anisotropy (T{sub {perpendicular}b} >> T{sub {parallel}b}). The most unstable modes are identified, and their eigen frequencies, radial mode structure, and nonlinear dynamics are determined for axisymmetric perturbations with {partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative}{theta} = 0.

  10. Three dimensional discrete particle simulation of an AOTV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiereisen, William J.; Mcdonald, Jeffrey D.

    1989-01-01

    A discrete Particle Simulation method, recently formulated by Baganoff, is discussed in the context of its application to the simulation of the flow field about the Aeroassisted Flight Experiment (AFE). As a basis for discussion the current algorithm is first described. Because of the use of a cubic Cartesian mesh, the representation of the geometry is different than that of other particle methods and an algorithm for its generation is discussed. The method is applied to test problems and then to the AFE calculation with the use of 9.52 million particles and 432,000 cells.

  11. The Monte Carlo code CSSE for the simulation of realistic thermal neutron sensor devices for Humanitarian Demining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomba, M.; D'Erasmo, G.; Pantaleo, A.

    2003-02-01

    The CSSE code, a GEANT3-based Monte Carlo simulation program, has been developed in the framework of the EXPLODET project (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 422 (1999) 918) with the aim to simulate experimental set-ups employed in Thermal Neutron Analysis (TNA) for the landmines detection. Such a simulation code appears to be useful for studying the background in the γ-ray spectra obtained with this technique, especially in the region where one expects to find the explosive signature (the γ-ray peak at 10.83 MeV coming from neutron capture by nitrogen). The main features of the CSSE code are introduced and original innovations emphasized. Among the latter, an algorithm simulating the time correlation between primary particles, according with their time distributions is presented. Such a correlation is not usually achievable within standard GEANT-based codes and allows to reproduce some important phenomena, as the pulse pile-up inside the NaI(Tl) γ-ray detector employed, producing a more realistic detector response simulation. CSSE has been successfully tested by reproducing a real nuclear sensor prototype assembled at the Physics Department of Bari University.

  12. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas (GPS - TTBP) Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chame, Jacqueline

    2011-05-27

    The goal of this project is the development of the Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code (GTC) Framework and its applications to problems related to the physics of turbulence and turbulent transport in tokamaks,. The project involves physics studies, code development, noise effect mitigation, supporting computer science efforts, diagnostics and advanced visualizations, verification and validation. Its main scientific themes are mesoscale dynamics and non-locality effects on transport, the physics of secondary structures such as zonal flows, and strongly coherent wave-particle interaction phenomena at magnetic precession resonances. Special emphasis is placed on the implications of these themes for rho-star and current scalings and for the turbulent transport of momentum. GTC-TTBP also explores applications to electron thermal transport, particle transport; ITB formation and cross-cuts such as edge-core coupling, interaction of energetic particles with turbulence and neoclassical tearing mode trigger dynamics. Code development focuses on major initiatives in the development of full-f formulations and the capacity to simulate flux-driven transport. In addition to the full-f -formulation, the project includes the development of numerical collision models and methods for coarse graining in phase space. Verification is pursued by linear stability study comparisons with the FULL and HD7 codes and by benchmarking with the GKV, GYSELA and other gyrokinetic simulation codes. Validation of gyrokinetic models of ion and electron thermal transport is pursed by systematic stressing comparisons with fluctuation and transport data from the DIII-D and NSTX tokamaks. The physics and code development research programs are supported by complementary efforts in computer sciences, high performance computing, and data management.

  13. Dissipative Particle Dynamics Simulations at Extreme Scale: GPU Algorithms, Implementation and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yu-Hang; Karniadakis, George; Crunch Team

    2014-03-01

    We present a scalable dissipative particle dynamics simulation code, fully implemented on the Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) using a hybrid CUDA/MPI programming model, which achieves 10-30 times speedup on a single GPU over 16 CPU cores and almost linear weak scaling across a thousand nodes. A unified framework is developed within which the efficient generation of the neighbor list and maintaining particle data locality are addressed. Our algorithm generates strictly ordered neighbor lists in parallel, while the construction is deterministic and makes no use of atomic operations or sorting. Such neighbor list leads to optimal data loading efficiency when combined with a two-level particle reordering scheme. A faster in situ generation scheme for Gaussian random numbers is proposed using precomputed binary signatures. We designed custom transcendental functions that are fast and accurate for evaluating the pairwise interaction. Computer benchmarks demonstrate the speedup of our implementation over the CPU implementation as well as strong and weak scalability. A large-scale simulation of spontaneous vesicle formation consisting of 128 million particles was conducted to illustrate the practicality of our code in real-world applications. This work was supported by the new Department of Energy Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials (CM4). Simulations were carried out at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility through the INCITE program under project BIP017.

  14. New Capabilities in Mercury: A Modern, Monte Carlo Particle Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R J; Cullen, D E; Greenman, G M; Hagmann, C A; Kramer, K J; McKinley, M S; O'Brien, M J; Taylor, J M

    2007-03-08

    The new physics, algorithmic and computer science capabilities of the Mercury general-purpose Monte Carlo particle transport code are discussed. The new physics and algorithmic features include in-line energy deposition and isotopic depletion, significant enhancements to the tally and source capabilities, diagnostic ray-traced particles, support for multi-region hybrid (mesh and combinatorial geometry) systems, and a probability of initiation method. Computer science enhancements include a second method of dynamically load-balancing parallel calculations, improved methods for visualizing 3-D combinatorial geometries and initial implementation of an in-line visualization capabilities.

  15. PEGASUS. 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Code Which Solves for Geometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, T.J.

    1998-12-01

    Pegasus is a 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Code which solves for geometries which can be represented by bodies of revolution. Included are all the surface chemistry enhancements in the 2D code Icarus as well as a real vacuum pump model. The code includes multiple species transport.

  16. 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Code Which Solves for Geometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, Timothy J.

    1998-01-13

    Pegasus is a 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Code which solves for geometries which can be represented by bodies of revolution. Included are all the surface chemistry enhancements in the 2D code Icarus as well as a real vacuum pump model. The code includes multiple species transport.

  17. AN IMPLICIT"DRIFT-LORENTZ" PARTICLE MOVER FOR PLASMA AND BEAM SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Vay, J.-L; Cohen, R.H.

    2008-07-15

    In order to efficiently perform particle simulations in systems with widely varying magnetization, we developed a drift-Lorentz mover, which interpolates between full particle dynamics and drift kinetics in such a way as to preserve a physically correct gyroradius and particle drifts for both large and small ratios of the timestep to the cyclotron period. In order to extend applicability of the mover to systems with plasma frequency exceeding the cyclotron frequency such as one may have with fully neutralized drift compression of a heavy-ion beam we have developed an implicit version of the mover. A first step in this direction, in which the polarization charge was added to the field solver, was described previously. Here we describe a fully implicit algorithm (which is analogous to the direct-implicit method for conventionalparticle-in-cell simulation), summarize a stability analysis of it, and describe several tests of the resultant code.

  18. Air shower simulation for WASAVIES: warning system for aviation exposure to solar energetic particles.

    PubMed

    Sato, T; Kataoka, R; Yasuda, H; Yashiro, S; Kuwabara, T; Shiota, D; Kubo, Y

    2014-10-01

    WASAVIES, a warning system for aviation exposure to solar energetic particles (SEPs), is under development by collaboration between several institutes in Japan and the USA. It is designed to deterministically forecast the SEP fluxes incident on the atmosphere within 6 h after flare onset using the latest space weather research. To immediately estimate the aircrew doses from the obtained SEP fluxes, the response functions of the particle fluxes generated by the incidence of monoenergetic protons into the atmosphere were developed by performing air shower simulations using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code system. The accuracy of the simulation was well verified by calculating the increase count rates of a neutron monitor during a ground-level enhancement, combining the response function with the SEP fluxes measured by the PAMELA spectrometer. The response function will be implemented in WASAVIES and used to protect aircrews from additional SEP exposure.

  19. Simulations of Shock Wave Interaction with a Particle Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koneru, Rahul; Rollin, Bertrand; Ouellet, Frederick; Annamalai, Subramanian; Balachandar, S.'Bala'

    2016-11-01

    Simulations of a shock wave interacting with a cloud of particles are performed in an attempt to understand similar phenomena observed in dispersal of solid particles under such extreme environment as an explosion. We conduct numerical experiments in which a particle curtain fills only 87% of the shock tube from bottom to top. As such, the particle curtain upon interaction with the shock wave is expected to experience Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities. In this study, the initial volume fraction profile matches with that of Sandia Multiphase Shock Tube experiments, and the shock Mach number is limited to M =1.66. In these simulations we use a Eulerian-Lagrangian approach along with state-of-the-art point-particle force and heat transfer models. Measurements of particle dispersion are made at different initial volume fractions of the particle cloud. A detailed analysis of the evolution of the particle curtain with respect to the initial conditions is presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  20. ANNarchy: a code generation approach to neural simulations on parallel hardware

    PubMed Central

    Vitay, Julien; Dinkelbach, Helge Ü.; Hamker, Fred H.

    2015-01-01

    Many modern neural simulators focus on the simulation of networks of spiking neurons on parallel hardware. Another important framework in computational neuroscience, rate-coded neural networks, is mostly difficult or impossible to implement using these simulators. We present here the ANNarchy (Artificial Neural Networks architect) neural simulator, which allows to easily define and simulate rate-coded and spiking networks, as well as combinations of both. The interface in Python has been designed to be close to the PyNN interface, while the definition of neuron and synapse models can be specified using an equation-oriented mathematical description similar to the Brian neural simulator. This information is used to generate C++ code that will efficiently perform the simulation on the chosen parallel hardware (multi-core system or graphical processing unit). Several numerical methods are available to transform ordinary differential equations into an efficient C++code. We compare the parallel performance of the simulator to existing solutions. PMID:26283957

  1. Switchable particle statistics with an embedding quantum simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiao-Hang; Arrazola, Iñigo; Pedernales, Julen S.; Lamata, Lucas; Chen, Xi; Solano, Enrique

    2017-02-01

    We propose the implementation of a switch of particle statistics with an embedding quantum simulator. By encoding both Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statistics into an enlarged Hilbert space, the statistics of the simulated quantum particles may be changed in situ during the time evolution, from bosons to fermions and from fermions to bosons, as many times as desired before a measurement is performed. We illustrate our proposal with few-qubit examples, although the protocol is straightforwardly extendable to larger numbers of particles. This proposal can be implemented on different quantum platforms such as trapped ions, quantum photonics, and superconducting circuits, among others. The possibility to implement permutation symmetrization and antisymmetrization of quantum particles enhances the toolbox of quantum simulations for unphysical operations as well as for symmetry transformations.

  2. Launch Environment Water Flow Simulations Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Berg, Jared J.; Harris, Michael F.; Crespo, Alejandro C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) to simulate the water flow from the rainbird nozzle system used in the sound suppression system during pad abort and nominal launch. The simulations help determine if water from rainbird nozzles will impinge on the rocket nozzles and other sensitive ground support elements.

  3. PLASIM: A computer code for simulating charge exchange plasma propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. S.; Deininger, W. D.; Winder, D. R.; Kaufman, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    The propagation of the charge exchange plasma for an electrostatic ion thruster is crucial in determining the interaction of that plasma with the associated spacecraft. A model that describes this plasma and its propagation is described, together with a computer code based on this model. The structure and calling sequence of the code, named PLASIM, is described. An explanation of the program's input and output is included, together with samples of both. The code is written in ANSI Standard FORTRAN.

  4. Prediction of material strength and fracture of glass using the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.

    1994-08-01

    The design of many military devices involves numerical predictions of the material strength and fracture of brittle materials. The materials of interest include ceramics, that are used in armor packages; glass that is used in truck and jeep windshields and in helicopters; and rock and concrete that are used in underground bunkers. As part of a program to develop advanced hydrocode design tools, the authors have implemented a brittle fracture model for glass into the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code. The authors have evaluated this model and the code by predicting data from one-dimensional flyer plate impacts into glass, and data from tungsten rods impacting glass. Since fractured glass properties, which are needed in the model, are not available, the authors did sensitivity studies of these properties, as well as sensitivity studies to determine the number of particles needed in the calculations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the data.

  5. DNA strand breaks induced by electrons simulated with Nanodosimetry Monte Carlo Simulation Code: NASIC.

    PubMed

    Li, Junli; Li, Chunyan; Qiu, Rui; Yan, Congchong; Xie, Wenzhang; Wu, Zhen; Zeng, Zhi; Tung, Chuanjong

    2015-09-01

    The method of Monte Carlo simulation is a powerful tool to investigate the details of radiation biological damage at the molecular level. In this paper, a Monte Carlo code called NASIC (Nanodosimetry Monte Carlo Simulation Code) was developed. It includes physical module, pre-chemical module, chemical module, geometric module and DNA damage module. The physical module can simulate physical tracks of low-energy electrons in the liquid water event-by-event. More than one set of inelastic cross sections were calculated by applying the dielectric function method of Emfietzoglou's optical-data treatments, with different optical data sets and dispersion models. In the pre-chemical module, the ionised and excited water molecules undergo dissociation processes. In the chemical module, the produced radiolytic chemical species diffuse and react. In the geometric module, an atomic model of 46 chromatin fibres in a spherical nucleus of human lymphocyte was established. In the DNA damage module, the direct damages induced by the energy depositions of the electrons and the indirect damages induced by the radiolytic chemical species were calculated. The parameters should be adjusted to make the simulation results be agreed with the experimental results. In this paper, the influence study of the inelastic cross sections and vibrational excitation reaction on the parameters and the DNA strand break yields were studied. Further work of NASIC is underway.

  6. Parallel-vector algorithms for particle simulations on shared-memory multiprocessors

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiura, Daisuke; Sakaguchi, Hide

    2011-03-01

    Over the last few decades, the computational demands of massive particle-based simulations for both scientific and industrial purposes have been continuously increasing. Hence, considerable efforts are being made to develop parallel computing techniques on various platforms. In such simulations, particles freely move within a given space, and so on a distributed-memory system, load balancing, i.e., assigning an equal number of particles to each processor, is not guaranteed. However, shared-memory systems achieve better load balancing for particle models, but suffer from the intrinsic drawback of memory access competition, particularly during (1) paring of contact candidates from among neighboring particles and (2) force summation for each particle. Here, novel algorithms are proposed to overcome these two problems. For the first problem, the key is a pre-conditioning process during which particle labels are sorted by a cell label in the domain to which the particles belong. Then, a list of contact candidates is constructed by pairing the sorted particle labels. For the latter problem, a table comprising the list indexes of the contact candidate pairs is created and used to sum the contact forces acting on each particle for all contacts according to Newton's third law. With just these methods, memory access competition is avoided without additional redundant procedures. The parallel efficiency and compatibility of these two algorithms were evaluated in discrete element method (DEM) simulations on four types of shared-memory parallel computers: a multicore multiprocessor computer, scalar supercomputer, vector supercomputer, and graphics processing unit. The computational efficiency of a DEM code was found to be drastically improved with our algorithms on all but the scalar supercomputer. Thus, the developed parallel algorithms are useful on shared-memory parallel computers with sufficient memory bandwidth.

  7. The three-dimensional, discrete ordinates neutral particle transport code TORT: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Azmy, Y.Y.

    1996-12-31

    The centerpiece of the Discrete Ordinates Oak Ridge System (DOORS), the three-dimensional neutral particle transport code TORT is reviewed. Its most prominent features pertaining to large applications, such as adjustable problem parameters, memory management, and coarse mesh methods, are described. Advanced, state-of-the-art capabilities including acceleration and multiprocessing are summarized here. Future enhancement of existing graphics and visualization tools is briefly presented.

  8. First experience with particle-in-cell plasma physics code on ARM-based HPC systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáez, Xavier; Soba, Alejandro; Sánchez, Edilberto; Mantsinen, Mervi; Mateo, Sergi; Cela, José M.; Castejón, Francisco

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we will explore the feasibility of porting a Particle-in-cell code (EUTERPE) to an ARM multi-core platform from the Mont-Blanc project. The used prototype is based on a system-on-chip Samsung Exynos 5 with an integrated GPU. It is the first prototype that could be used for High-Performance Computing (HPC), since it supports double precision and parallel programming languages.

  9. IONEX: a meshfree ion extraction code based on "particle in cloud of points" concept.

    PubMed

    Galkin, S A; Grubert, J E; Cluggish, B P; Barov, N; Kim, J S

    2010-02-01

    Ion Extraction (IONEX) is an ion extraction modeling code, developed at FAR-TECH, Inc., based on the meshless particle-in-cloud-of-points concept. IONEX self-consistently solves motion equations for ions and Poisson's equation for the electrostatic field, assuming a Boltzmann distribution for the electrons. IONEX is capable of handling multiple species and is graphical user interface-driven. The two-dimensional version is benchmarked with IGUN. The basic algorithm and sample runs are presented.

  10. Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulation of colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, Safa; Boromand, Arman; Maia, Joao

    2014-03-01

    DPD as a mesoscale method was firstly proposed to study dynamics of suspensions under flow condition. However the proposed method failed to capture shear properties of suspensions because it lacked: first a potential to reproduce lubrication forces and second a clear definition for the colloid surface. Recently we reported a modified DPD method which defines colloidal particles as particles with hard core and a dissipative coat. An additional lubrication force was introduced to include the short-range hydrodynamics that are not captured in original DPD. The model was found to be able to reproduce shear properties of suspensions for a wide range of different systems, from monodisperse to bimodal with different volume fractions, compositions and size ratios. In present work our modified DPD method is employed to study both equilibrium and flow properties of colloidal suspension. Zero shear viscosity of suspension is measured using Green-Kubo expressions and the results are compared to theoretical predictions. Furthermore, structure formation in suspensions is studied in respect to energy landscape of the fluid both at rest and under flow.

  11. Simulations of Energetic Particles Interacting with Dynamical Magnetic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, M.; Shalchi, A.

    2016-02-01

    We explore the transport of energetic particles in interplanetary space by using test-particle simulations. In previous work such simulations have been performed by using either magnetostatic turbulence or undamped propagating plasma waves. In the current paper we simulate for the first time particle transport in dynamical turbulence. To do so we employ two models, namely the damping model of dynamical turbulence and the random sweeping model. We compute parallel and perpendicular diffusion coefficients and compare our numerical findings with solar wind observations. We show that good agreement can be found between simulations and the Palmer consensus range for both dynamical turbulence models if the ratio of turbulent magnetic field and mean field is δB/B0 = 0.5.

  12. Pressure calculation in hybrid particle-field simulations.

    PubMed

    Milano, Giuseppe; Kawakatsu, Toshihiro

    2010-12-07

    In the framework of a recently developed scheme for a hybrid particle-field simulation techniques where self-consistent field (SCF) theory and particle models (molecular dynamics) are combined [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 214106 (2009)], we developed a general formulation for the calculation of instantaneous pressure and stress tensor. The expressions have been derived from statistical mechanical definition of the pressure starting from the expression for the free energy functional in the SCF theory. An implementation of the derived formulation suitable for hybrid particle-field molecular dynamics-self-consistent field simulations is described. A series of test simulations on model systems are reported comparing the calculated pressure with those obtained from standard molecular dynamics simulations based on pair potentials.

  13. Pressure calculation in hybrid particle-field simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Milano, Giuseppe; Kawakatsu, Toshihiro

    2010-12-07

    In the framework of a recently developed scheme for a hybrid particle-field simulation techniques where self-consistent field (SCF) theory and particle models (molecular dynamics) are combined [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 214106 (2009)], we developed a general formulation for the calculation of instantaneous pressure and stress tensor. The expressions have been derived from statistical mechanical definition of the pressure starting from the expression for the free energy functional in the SCF theory. An implementation of the derived formulation suitable for hybrid particle-field molecular dynamics-self-consistent field simulations is described. A series of test simulations on model systems are reported comparing the calculated pressure with those obtained from standard molecular dynamics simulations based on pair potentials.

  14. SIMULATIONS OF ENERGETIC PARTICLES INTERACTING WITH DYNAMICAL MAGNETIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, M.; Shalchi, A. E-mail: husseinm@myumanitoba.ca

    2016-02-01

    We explore the transport of energetic particles in interplanetary space by using test-particle simulations. In previous work such simulations have been performed by using either magnetostatic turbulence or undamped propagating plasma waves. In the current paper we simulate for the first time particle transport in dynamical turbulence. To do so we employ two models, namely the damping model of dynamical turbulence and the random sweeping model. We compute parallel and perpendicular diffusion coefficients and compare our numerical findings with solar wind observations. We show that good agreement can be found between simulations and the Palmer consensus range for both dynamical turbulence models if the ratio of turbulent magnetic field and mean field is δB/B{sub 0} = 0.5.

  15. Simulating confined particles with a flat density profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolkovas, Airidas

    2016-08-01

    Particle simulations confined by sharp walls usually develop an oscillatory density profile. For some applications, most notably soft matter liquids, this behavior is often unrealistic and one expects a monotonic density climb instead. To reconcile simulations with experiments, we propose mirror-and-shift boundary conditions where each interface is mapped to a distant part of itself. The main result is that the particle density increases almost monotonically from zero to bulk, over a short distance of about one particle diameter. The method is applied to simulate a polymer brush in explicit solvent, grafted on a flat silicon substrate. The simulated density profile agrees favorably with neutron reflectometry measurements and self-consistent field theory results.

  16. Accelerating particle-in-cell simulations using multilevel Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketson, Lee

    2015-11-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have been an important tool in understanding plasmas since the dawn of the digital computer. Much more recently, the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method has accelerated particle-based simulations of a variety of systems described by stochastic differential equations (SDEs), from financial portfolios to porous media flow. The fundamental idea of MLMC is to perform correlated particle simulations using a hierarchy of different time steps, and to use these correlations for variance reduction on the fine-step result. This framework is directly applicable to the Langevin formulation of Coulomb collisions, as demonstrated in previous work, but in order to apply to PIC simulations of realistic scenarios, MLMC must be generalized to incorporate self-consistent evolution of the electromagnetic fields. We present such a generalization, with rigorous results concerning its accuracy and efficiency. We present examples of the method in the collisionless, electrostatic context, and discuss applications and extensions for the future.

  17. Steady flow of smooth, inelastic particles on a bumpy inclined plane: hard and soft particle simulations.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Anurag; Khakhar, D V

    2010-04-01

    We study smooth, slightly inelastic particles flowing under gravity on a bumpy inclined plane using event-driven and discrete-element simulations. Shallow layers (ten particle diameters) are used to enable simulation using the event-driven method within reasonable computational times. Steady flows are obtained in a narrow range of angles (13 degrees-14.5 degrees); lower angles result in stopping of the flow and higher angles in continuous acceleration. The flow is relatively dense with the solid volume fraction, nu approximately 0.5 , and significant layering of particles is observed. We derive expressions for the stress, heat flux, and dissipation for the hard and soft particle models from first principles. The computed mean velocity, temperature, stress, dissipation, and heat flux profiles of hard particles are compared to soft particle results for different values of stiffness constant (k). The value of stiffness constant for which results for hard and soft particles are identical is found to be k>or=2x10(6) mg/d, where m is the mass of a particle, g is the acceleration due to gravity, and d is the particle diameter. We compare the simulation results to constitutive relations obtained from the kinetic theory of Jenkins and Richman [J. T. Jenkins and M. W. Richman, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 87, 355 (1985)] for pressure, dissipation, viscosity, and thermal conductivity. We find that all the quantities are very well predicted by kinetic theory for volume fractions nu<0.5. At higher densities, obtained for thicker layers (H=15d and H=20d), the kinetic theory does not give accurate prediction. Deviations of the kinetic theory predictions from simulation results are relatively small for dissipation and heat flux and most significant deviations are observed for shear viscosity and pressure. The results indicate the range of applicability of soft particle simulations and kinetic theory for dense flows.

  18. Simulating Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) with a Guide Field using Fluid Code, HiFi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budner, Tamas; Chen, Yangao; Meier, Eric; Ji, Hantao; MRX Team

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a phenomenon that occurs in plasmas when magnetic field lines effectively ``break'' and reconnect resulting in a different topological configuration. In this process, energy that was once stored in the magnetic field is transfered into the thermal velocity of the particles, effectively heating the plasma. MRX at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory creates the conditions under which reconnection can occur by initially ramping the current in two adjacent coils and then rapidly decreasing with and without a guide magnetic field along the reconnecting current. We simulate this experiment using a fluid code called HiFi, an implicit and adaptive high order spectral element modeling framework, and compare our results to experimental data from MRX. The purpose is to identify physics behind the observed reconnection process for the field line break and the resultant plasma heating.

  19. Derivative particles for simulating detailed movements of fluids.

    PubMed

    Song, Oh-young; Kim, Doyub; Ko, Hyeong-Seok

    2007-01-01

    We present a new fluid simulation technique that significantly reduces the nonphysical dissipation of velocity. The proposed method is based on an apt use of particles and derivative information. We note that a major source of numerical dissipation in the conventional Navier-Stokes equations solver lies in the advection step. Hence, starting with the conventional grid-based simulator, when the details of fluid movements need to be simulated, we replace the advection part with a particle simulator. When swapping between the grid-based and particle-based simulators, the physical quantities such as the level set and velocity must be converted. For this purpose, we develop a novel dissipation-suppressing conversion procedure that utilizes the derivative information stored in the particles, as well as in the grid points. For the fluid regions where such details are not needed, the advection is simulated using an octree-based constrained interpolation profile (CIP) solver, which we develop in this work. Through several experiments, we show that the proposed technique can reproduce the detailed movements of high-Reynolds-number fluids such as droplets/bubbles, thin water sheets, and whirlpools. The increased accuracy in the advection, which forms the basis of the proposed technique, can also be used to produce better results in larger scale fluid simulations.

  20. Study and simulation of low rate video coding schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayood, Khalid; Chen, Yun-Chung; Kipp, G.

    1992-01-01

    The semiannual report is included. Topics covered include communication, information science, data compression, remote sensing, color mapped images, robust coding scheme for packet video, recursively indexed differential pulse code modulation, image compression technique for use on token ring networks, and joint source/channel coder design.

  1. Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in Two and Three Spatial Dimensions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacone, R. E.; Vu, H. X.

    1996-11-01

    The results arising from numerical simulations of Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) in two and three spatial dimensions using HERCULES, a particle ion/adiabatic fluid-electron particle-in cell code(H. X. Vu, J. Comput. Phys.) 124, 417 (1996)., are presented. We compare the results of these simulations against the solutions of a linearized fluid model of SBS in homogeneous plasmas(C. J. McKinstrie, R. Betti, R. E. Giacone, T. Kolber and J. S. Li, Phys. Rev. E) 50, 2182 (1994).. Multidimensional effects on the angular dependance of SBS are studied. The results obtained from numerical simulations are in good agreement with the linear model. Comparisons of beam bending (H. A. Rose, Phys. Plasmas) 3, 1709 (1996). and cross laser beams effects in two and three dimensions will be also presented. Work performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy.

  2. Data decomposition of Monte Carlo particle transport simulations via tally servers

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Paul K.; Siegel, Andrew R.; Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord

    2013-11-01

    An algorithm for decomposing large tally data in Monte Carlo particle transport simulations is developed, analyzed, and implemented in a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code, OpenMC. The algorithm is based on a non-overlapping decomposition of compute nodes into tracking processors and tally servers. The former are used to simulate the movement of particles through the domain while the latter continuously receive and update tally data. A performance model for this approach is developed, suggesting that, for a range of parameters relevant to LWR analysis, the tally server algorithm should perform with minimal overhead on contemporary supercomputers. An implementation of the algorithm in OpenMC is then tested on the Intrepid and Titan supercomputers, supporting the key predictions of the model over a wide range of parameters. We thus conclude that the tally server algorithm is a successful approach to circumventing classical on-node memory constraints en route to unprecedentedly detailed Monte Carlo reactor simulations.

  3. Particle in cell simulation of laser-accelerated proton beams for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Fourkal, E; Shahine, B; Ding, M; Li, J S; Tajima, T; Ma, C M

    2002-12-01

    In this article we present the results of particle in cell (PIC) simulations of laser plasma interaction for proton acceleration for radiation therapy treatments. We show that under optimal interaction conditions protons can be accelerated up to relativistic energies of 300 MeV by a petawatt laser field. The proton acceleration is due to the dragging Coulomb force arising from charge separation induced by the ponderomotive pressure (light pressure) of high-intensity laser. The proton energy and phase space distribution functions obtained from the PIC simulations are used in the calculations of dose distributions using the GEANT Monte Carlo simulation code. Because of the broad energy and angular spectra of the protons, a compact particle selection and beam collimation system will be needed to generate small beams of polyenergetic protons for intensity modulated proton therapy.

  4. Large scale water entry simulation with smoothed particle hydrodynamics on single- and multi-GPU systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Zhe; Xu, Fei; Takahashi, Akiyuki; Sun, Yu

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a Weakly Compressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (WCSPH) framework is presented utilizing the parallel architecture of single- and multi-GPU (Graphic Processing Unit) platforms. The program is developed for water entry simulations where an efficient potential based contact force is introduced to tackle the interaction between fluid and solid particles. The single-GPU SPH scheme is implemented with a series of optimization to achieve high performance. To go beyond the memory limitation of single GPU, the scheme is further extended to multi-GPU platform basing on an improved 3D domain decomposition and inter-node data communication strategy. A typical benchmark test of wedge entry is investigated in varied dimensions and scales to validate the accuracy and efficiency of the program. The results of 2D and 3D benchmark tests manifest great consistency with the experiment and better accuracy than other numerical models. The performance of the single-GPU code is assessed by comparing with serial and parallel CPU codes. The improvement of the domain decomposition strategy is verified, and a study on the scalability and efficiency of the multi-GPU code is carried out as well by simulating tests with varied scales in different amount of GPUs. Lastly, the single- and multi-GPU codes are further compared with existing state-of-the-art SPH parallel frameworks for a comprehensive assessment.

  5. Particle simulation of plasmas on the massively parallel processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gledhill, I. M. A.; Storey, L. R. O.

    1987-01-01

    Particle simulations, in which collective phenomena in plasmas are studied by following the self consistent motions of many discrete particles, involve several highly repetitive sets of calculations that are readily adaptable to SIMD parallel processing. A fully electromagnetic, relativistic plasma simulation for the massively parallel processor is described. The particle motions are followed in 2 1/2 dimensions on a 128 x 128 grid, with periodic boundary conditions. The two dimensional simulation space is mapped directly onto the processor network; a Fast Fourier Transform is used to solve the field equations. Particle data are stored according to an Eulerian scheme, i.e., the information associated with each particle is moved from one local memory to another as the particle moves across the spatial grid. The method is applied to the study of the nonlinear development of the whistler instability in a magnetospheric plasma model, with an anisotropic electron temperature. The wave distribution function is included as a new diagnostic to allow simulation results to be compared with satellite observations.

  6. SIMULATION OF PARTICLE SPECTRA AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    KAHANA,D.E.; KAHANA,S.H.

    2001-09-04

    A purely hadronic simulation is performed of the recently reported data from PHOBOS at energies of {radical}s = 56, 130 GeV using the relativistic heavy ion cascade LUCIFER which had previously given a good description of the NA49 inclusive spectra at {radical}s = 17.2 GeV/A. The results compare well with these early measurements at RHIC and indeed successfully predict the increase in multiplicity now seen by PHOBOS and the other RHIC detectors at the nominal maximum energy of {radical}s = 200 GeV/A, suggesting that evidence for quark-gluon matter remains elusive.

  7. A PARALLEL MONTE CARLO CODE FOR SIMULATING COLLISIONAL N-BODY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Pattabiraman, Bharath; Umbreit, Stefan; Liao, Wei-keng; Choudhary, Alok; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Memik, Gokhan; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2013-02-15

    We present a new parallel code for computing the dynamical evolution of collisional N-body systems with up to N {approx} 10{sup 7} particles. Our code is based on the Henon Monte Carlo method for solving the Fokker-Planck equation, and makes assumptions of spherical symmetry and dynamical equilibrium. The principal algorithmic developments involve optimizing data structures and the introduction of a parallel random number generation scheme as well as a parallel sorting algorithm required to find nearest neighbors for interactions and to compute the gravitational potential. The new algorithms we introduce along with our choice of decomposition scheme minimize communication costs and ensure optimal distribution of data and workload among the processing units. Our implementation uses the Message Passing Interface library for communication, which makes it portable to many different supercomputing architectures. We validate the code by calculating the evolution of clusters with initial Plummer distribution functions up to core collapse with the number of stars, N, spanning three orders of magnitude from 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 7}. We find that our results are in good agreement with self-similar core-collapse solutions, and the core-collapse times generally agree with expectations from the literature. Also, we observe good total energy conservation, within {approx}< 0.04% throughout all simulations. We analyze the performance of the code, and demonstrate near-linear scaling of the runtime with the number of processors up to 64 processors for N = 10{sup 5}, 128 for N = 10{sup 6} and 256 for N = 10{sup 7}. The runtime reaches saturation with the addition of processors beyond these limits, which is a characteristic of the parallel sorting algorithm. The resulting maximum speedups we achieve are approximately 60 Multiplication-Sign , 100 Multiplication-Sign , and 220 Multiplication-Sign , respectively.

  8. A Parallel Monte Carlo Code for Simulating Collisional N-body Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattabiraman, Bharath; Umbreit, Stefan; Liao, Wei-keng; Choudhary, Alok; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Memik, Gokhan; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2013-02-01

    We present a new parallel code for computing the dynamical evolution of collisional N-body systems with up to N ~ 107 particles. Our code is based on the Hénon Monte Carlo method for solving the Fokker-Planck equation, and makes assumptions of spherical symmetry and dynamical equilibrium. The principal algorithmic developments involve optimizing data structures and the introduction of a parallel random number generation scheme as well as a parallel sorting algorithm required to find nearest neighbors for interactions and to compute the gravitational potential. The new algorithms we introduce along with our choice of decomposition scheme minimize communication costs and ensure optimal distribution of data and workload among the processing units. Our implementation uses the Message Passing Interface library for communication, which makes it portable to many different supercomputing architectures. We validate the code by calculating the evolution of clusters with initial Plummer distribution functions up to core collapse with the number of stars, N, spanning three orders of magnitude from 105 to 107. We find that our results are in good agreement with self-similar core-collapse solutions, and the core-collapse times generally agree with expectations from the literature. Also, we observe good total energy conservation, within <~ 0.04% throughout all simulations. We analyze the performance of the code, and demonstrate near-linear scaling of the runtime with the number of processors up to 64 processors for N = 105, 128 for N = 106 and 256 for N = 107. The runtime reaches saturation with the addition of processors beyond these limits, which is a characteristic of the parallel sorting algorithm. The resulting maximum speedups we achieve are approximately 60×, 100×, and 220×, respectively.

  9. Parallel canonical Monte Carlo simulations through sequential updating of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keeffe, C. J.; Orkoulas, G.

    2009-04-01

    In canonical Monte Carlo simulations, sequential updating of particles is equivalent to random updating due to particle indistinguishability. In contrast, in grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations, sequential implementation of the particle transfer steps in a dense grid of distinct points in space improves both the serial and the parallel efficiency of the simulation. The main advantage of sequential updating in parallel canonical Monte Carlo simulations is the reduction in interprocessor communication, which is usually a slow process. In this work, we propose a parallelization method for canonical Monte Carlo simulations via domain decomposition techniques and sequential updating of particles. Each domain is further divided into a middle and two outer sections. Information exchange is required after the completion of the updating of the outer regions. During the updating of the middle section, communication does not occur unless a particle moves out of this section. Results on two- and three-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluids indicate a nearly perfect improvement in parallel efficiency for large systems.

  10. Parallel canonical Monte Carlo simulations through sequential updating of particles.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, C J; Orkoulas, G

    2009-04-07

    In canonical Monte Carlo simulations, sequential updating of particles is equivalent to random updating due to particle indistinguishability. In contrast, in grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations, sequential implementation of the particle transfer steps in a dense grid of distinct points in space improves both the serial and the parallel efficiency of the simulation. The main advantage of sequential updating in parallel canonical Monte Carlo simulations is the reduction in interprocessor communication, which is usually a slow process. In this work, we propose a parallelization method for canonical Monte Carlo simulations via domain decomposition techniques and sequential updating of particles. Each domain is further divided into a middle and two outer sections. Information exchange is required after the completion of the updating of the outer regions. During the updating of the middle section, communication does not occur unless a particle moves out of this section. Results on two- and three-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluids indicate a nearly perfect improvement in parallel efficiency for large systems.

  11. Numerical simulation of the devolatilization of a moving coal particle

    SciTech Connect

    Higuera, F.J.

    2009-05-15

    The devolatilization of an isolated coal particle moving relative to the surrounding gas is numerically simulated using a competing reaction model of the pyrolysis and assuming that the released volatiles burn in an infinitely thin diffusion flame around the particle or not at all. The temperature of the particle is assumed to be uniform and the effects of the heat of pyrolysis, the intraparticle mass transfer resistance, and the variation of the particle radius are neglected. The effects of the size and velocity of the particle and of the temperature and oxygen mass fraction of the gas on the particle and flame temperature histories, the devolatilization time and the yield of light and heavy volatiles are investigated. The motion of the particle may have an important effect on the shape and position of the flame of volatiles, but it has only a mild effect on the devolatilization process for the particle sizes typical of pulverized coal combustion. This effect increases for large particles or in the absence of radiation. The relative motion enhances the heat transfer between the particle and the gas, causing the devolatilization time to decrease at high gas temperatures and to increase at low gas temperatures. The numerical results are compared with a blowing-corrected Nusselt number correlation often used in heat transfer models of the process. (author)

  12. Relativistic Particle-In-Cell Simulations of Particle Accleration in Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, J. F.

    2008-01-01

    Highly accelerated particles are observed in astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), microquasars, and Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations of relativistic electron-ion and electron-positron jets injected into a stationary medium show that efficient acceleration occurs downstream in the jet. In collisionless relativistic shocks particle acceleration is due to plasma waves and their associated instabilities, e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-stream instabilities, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability. Simulations show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly non-uniform, small-scale magnetic fields. The instability depends on strength and direction of the magnetic field. Particles in relativistic jets may be accelerated in a complicated dynamics of relativistic jets with magnetic field. We present results of our recent PIC simulations.

  13. Estimation of particle number size distributions from mass based model simulations and comparison to observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engler, Christa; Heinold, Bernd; Tegen, Ina

    2014-05-01

    The atmospheric Chemistry Transport Model system COSMO-MUSCAT was used to determine the particle mass concentrations of dust and anthropogenically emitted aerosol particles over Europe. The model system consists of the online coupled code of the operational forecast model COSMO (Schättler et al., 2009) and the chemistry-transport model MUSCAT (Wolke et al., 2012). For a four-months-period in 2008 (May to August), the dust and anthropogenic aerosol mass concentrations for six different species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, organic and elemental carbon and sea salt) were simulated. For the dust, five different size bins were used and a representative particle size and density were assumed for each size bin. Afterwards, the number concentration was calculated. For the anthropogenic aerosol, lognormal modes were assumed with a representative mode diameter, sigma and density for each component. These parameters were then used to convert the simulated mass concentrations to number concentrations and number size distributions for each component. Those individual size distributions can then be summed up to a total particle number size distribution. A first comparison with measurement data from the Cape Verde Islands showed a good agreement between observed and simulated dust particle size distributions. Both, the shape of the number size distributions and the order of magnitude of the particle number concentrations compared well. Only for the smallest size bin, observed numbers were occasionally higher, which can be explained by anthropogenic or biomass burning aerosol, which is included in the measurements of the total particle size distributions but was not included in the model runs. Comparisons of measured and simulated size distributions of the anthropogenic aerosol will be available soon. In case the data are available, we will also present an estimation of the particle number concentrations with the aerosol microphysical aerosol module ext-M7 for the duration of a

  14. Flow and particle deposition in the Turbuhaler: a CFD simulation.

    PubMed

    Milenkovic, J; Alexopoulos, A H; Kiparissides, C

    2013-05-01

    In this work the steady-state flow in a commercial dry powder inhaler device, DPI (i.e., Turbuhaler) is described using computational fluid dynamics. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved using commercial CFD software considering different flow models, i.e., laminar, k-ε, k-ε RNG, and k-ω SST as well as large Eddy simulation. Particle motion and deposition are described using a Eulerian-fluid/Lagrangian-particle approach. Particle collisions with the DPI walls are taken to result in deposition when the normal collision velocity is less than a critical capture velocity. Flow and particle deposition, for a range of mouthpiece pressure drops (i.e., 800-8800 Pa), as well as particle sizes corresponding to single particles and aggregates (i.e., 0.5-20 μm), are examined. The total volumetric outflow rate, the overall particle deposition as well as the spatial distribution of deposition sites in the DPI are determined. The transitional k-ω SST model for turbulent flow was found to produce results most similar to a reference solution obtained with LES, as well as experimental results for the pressure drop in the DPI. Overall, the simulation results are found to be in agreement with the available experimental data for local and total particle deposition.

  15. Microdosimetry of alpha particles for simple and 3D voxelised geometries using MCNPX and Geant4 Monte Carlo codes.

    PubMed

    Elbast, M; Saudo, A; Franck, D; Petitot, F; Desbrée, A

    2012-07-01

    Microdosimetry using Monte Carlo simulation is a suitable technique to describe the stochastic nature of energy deposition by alpha particle at cellular level. Because of its short range, the energy imparted by this particle to the targets is highly non-uniform. Thus, to achieve accurate dosimetric results, the modelling of the geometry should be as realistic as possible. The objectives of the present study were to validate the use of the MCNPX and Geant4 Monte Carlo codes for microdosimetric studies using simple and three-dimensional voxelised geometry and to study their limit of validity in this last case. To that aim, the specific energy (z) deposited in the cell nucleus, the single-hit density of specific energy f(1)(z) and the mean-specific energy were calculated. Results show a good agreement when compared with the literature using simple geometry. The maximum percentage difference found is <6 %. For voxelised phantom, the study of the voxel size highlighted that the shape of the curve f(1)(z) obtained with MCNPX for <1 µm voxel size presents a significant difference with the shape of non-voxelised geometry. When using Geant4, little differences are observed whatever the voxel size is. Below 1 µm, the use of Geant4 is required. However, the calculation time is 10 times higher with Geant4 than MCNPX code in the same conditions.

  16. Hydrodynamics in adaptive resolution particle simulations: Multiparticle collision dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseeva, Uliana; Winkler, Roland G.; Sutmann, Godehard

    2016-06-01

    A new adaptive resolution technique for particle-based multi-level simulations of fluids is presented. In the approach, the representation of fluid and solvent particles is changed on the fly between an atomistic and a coarse-grained description. The present approach is based on a hybrid coupling of the multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC) method and molecular dynamics (MD), thereby coupling stochastic and deterministic particle-based methods. Hydrodynamics is examined by calculating velocity and current correlation functions for various mixed and coupled systems. We demonstrate that hydrodynamic properties of the mixed fluid are conserved by a suitable coupling of the two particle methods, and that the simulation results agree well with theoretical expectations.

  17. 3D Continuum-Particle Simulations for Multiscale Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesinghe, Sanith; Hornung, Richard; Garcia, Alejandro; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas

    2001-06-01

    An adaptive mesh and algorithmic refinement (AMAR) scheme to model multi-scale, continuum-particle hydrodynamic flows is presented. AMAR ensures the particle description is applied exclusively in regions with high flow gradients and discontinous material interfaces, i.e. regions where the continuum flow assumptions are typically invalid. Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) is used to model the particle regions on the finest grid of the adaptive hierarchy. The continuum flow is modelled using the compressible flow Euler equations and is solved using a second order Godunov scheme. Coupling is achieved by conservation of fluxes across the continuum-particle grid boundaries. The AMAR data structures are supported by a C++ object oriented framework (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Infrastructure - SAMRAI) which allows for efficient parallel implementation. The scheme also extends to simulations of gas mixtures. Results for test cases are compared with theory and experiment.

  18. Taking larger timesteps with speed-limited particle-in-cell simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Gregory; Cary, John

    2015-11-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation is often impractical because it includes too much unnecessary physics. For example, to avoid instability in many simulations the timestep must be small enough to resolve the plasma frequency, even if plasma oscillations do not play a significant role. Other methods (e.g., MHD/fluid and hybrid approaches) allow faster simulation, but often don't include enough physics. A new method, speed-limited PIC (SLPIC) simulation, offers kinetic simulation with an arbitrary-strength approximation tied to the timestep. With a small (standard PIC) timestep, SLPIC is identical to PIC, while a larger timestep (e.g., large compared to the inverse plasma frequency) results in the relaxation of fast particles over slower timescales. SLPIC is therefore useful in situations where the particle distribution functions change slowly compared to the timestep required by PIC. For example, SLPIC can simulate collisionless sheaths with a timestep hundreds of times larger than the inverse plasma frequency. SLPIC involves relatively isolated changes of a standard PIC code and poses no extra difficulties for parallelism; complexities of PIC, such as field solvers, collisions, and boundary conditions, carry over naturally to SLPIC with little change. This work is supported by NASA.

  19. A New Multiphase Model for Simulating Energetically Driven Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, D E; Murphy, M J

    2010-02-02

    The proper representation of particulate phenomena is important for the simulation of many non-ideal particle loaded explosives. These explosives present severe numerical difficulties to simulate because numerical approaches for packed particle beds often behave poorly for the dilute regime and the reverse is often true for methods developed for the dilute regime. This paper presents a multiphase framework for the simulation of these non-ideal explosives that accurately accounts for the particulate behavior in both of these regimes. The capability of this framework is enhanced by the use of prescribed PDF methods for both particle size distributions and the representation of chemical processes. We have validated this framework using several experimental methods that accommodate the separation of momentum flux measurements in two-phase blast flows.

  20. Simulation of heavy charged particles damage on MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhnov, V.; Glushko, A.; Makarchuk, V.; Zinchenko, L.; Terekhov, V.; Mikhaylichenko, S.

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents computer simulation results of heavy charged particles radiation effect on elements of electrostatic microelectromechanical systems. Modeling methods of heavy charged particles impact on MEMS elements were envisaged. The radiation sensitivity of different types of fractal electrostatic MEMS were evaluated. Methods of reduction of radiation impact on electrostatic MEMS based on fractal theory were discussed. Conclusions about fractal electrostatic MEMS features were outlined.

  1. An Implicit "Drift-Lorentz" Particle Mover for Plasma and Beam Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Grote, D P; Vay, J

    2008-03-07

    In order to efficiently perform particle simulations in systems with widely varying magnetization, we have developed a 'drift-Lorentz mover', which interpolates between full particle dynamics and drift kinetics in such a way as to preserve a physically correct gyroradius and particle drifts for both large and small ratios of the timestep to the cyclotron period. In order to extend applicability of the mover to systems with plasma frequency exceeding the cyclotron frequency - such as one may have with fully neutralized drift compression of a heavy ion beam - we have developed an implicit version of the mover. A first step in this direction, in which the polarization charge was added to the field solver, was described previously. Here we describe a fully implicit algorithm (which is analogous to the direct-implicit method for conventional particle-in-cell simulation), a stability analysis of it, its implementation in the WARP code, and several tests of the resultant code. The fully implemented version is electrostatic; we are beginning development of an electromagnetic version, and describe also the status of that effort.

  2. Comparison of DAC and MONACO DSMC Codes with Flat Plate Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, Jose F.

    2010-01-01

    Various implementations of the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method exist in academia, government and industry. By comparing implementations, deficiencies and merits of each can be discovered. This document reports comparisons between DSMC Analysis Code (DAC) and MONACO. DAC is NASA's standard DSMC production code and MONACO is a research DSMC code developed in academia. These codes have various differences; in particular, they employ distinct computational grid definitions. In this study, DAC and MONACO are compared by having each simulate a blunted flat plate wind tunnel test, using an identical volume mesh. Simulation expense and DSMC metrics are compared. In addition, flow results are compared with available laboratory data. Overall, this study revealed that both codes, excluding grid adaptation, performed similarly. For parallel processing, DAC was generally more efficient. As expected, code accuracy was mainly dependent on physical models employed.

  3. Simulation of spacecraft attitude dynamics using TREETOPS and model-specific computer Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, John E.; No, T. S.; Fitz-Coy, Norman G.

    1989-01-01

    The simulation of spacecraft attitude dynamics and control using the generic, multi-body code called TREETOPS and other codes written especially to simulate particular systems is discussed. Differences in the methods used to derive equations of motion--Kane's method for TREETOPS and the Lagrangian and Newton-Euler methods, respectively, for the other two codes--are considered. Simulation results from the TREETOPS code are compared with those from the other two codes for two example systems. One system is a chain of rigid bodies; the other consists of two rigid bodies attached to a flexible base body. Since the computer codes were developed independently, consistent results serve as a verification of the correctness of all the programs. Differences in the results are discussed. Results for the two-rigid-body, one-flexible-body system are useful also as information on multi-body, flexible, pointing payload dynamics.

  4. Simulated electron holography of PSD particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conbhuí, Pádraig Ó.; Williams, Wyn; Nagy, Les

    2016-04-01

    Electron holography is an experimental technique that is capable of observing magnetic microstructures on the same scale as can be determined using numerical modeling and thus bridge the gap between experimental measurements and theory. I will present a technique for simulating holographic images from the results of micromagnetic models and demonstrate an easily used tool for generating holograms on the fly in an interactive environment (ie in ParaView). Since holography flattens 3D information onto a 2D image, some useful information can be lost. By looking at some examples of holograms of interesting 3D magnetizations (ie PSD structures), particularly how they change as they're rotated, along with comparisons of different structures, I will examine what information can be retrieved and what might be lost. The existance of an external dipole can be indicative of an in-plane component of a seemingly out-of-plane vortex core. It is also seen, however, that two quite different structures (in this case a [111] vortex core and a [111] uniform magnetization) can sometimes be quite indistinguishable.

  5. Five-field simulations of peeling-ballooning modes using BOUT++ code

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, T. Y.; Xu, X. Q.

    2013-05-15

    The simulations of edge localized modes (ELMs) with a 5-field peeling-ballooning (P-B) model using BOUT++ code are reported in this paper. In order to study the particle and energy transport in the pedestal region, the pressure equation is separated into ion density and ion and electron temperature equations. Through the simulations, the length scale L{sub n} of the gradient of equilibrium density n{sub i0} is found to destabilize the P-B modes in ideal MHD model. With ion diamagnetic effects, the growth rate is inversely proportional to n{sub i0} at medium toroidal mode number n. For the nonlinear simulations, the gradient of n{sub i0} in the pedestal region can more than double the ELM size. This increasing effect can be suppressed by thermal diffusivities χ{sub ∥}, employing the flux limited expression. Thermal diffusivities are sufficient to suppress the perturbations at the top of pedestal region. These suppressing effects lead to smaller ELM size of P-B modes.

  6. Distortion and flow of nematics simulated by dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tongyang; Wang, Xiaogong

    2014-05-14

    In this study, we simulated distortion and flow of nematics by dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). The nematics were modeled by a binary mixture that contained rigid rods composed of DPD particles as mesogenic units and normal DPD particles as solvent. Elastic distortions were investigated by monitoring director orientation in space under influences of boundary anchoring and external fields. Static distortion demonstrated by the simulation is consistent with the prediction of Frank elastic theory. Spatial distortion profile of the director was examined to obtain static elastic constants. Rotational motions of the director under influence of the external field were simulated to understand the dynamic process. The rules revealed by the simulation are in a good agreement with those obtained from dynamical experiments and classical theories for nematics. Three Miesowicz viscosities were obtained by using external fields to hold the orientation of the rods in shear flows. The simulation showed that the Miesowicz viscosities have the order of ηc > ηa > ηb and the rotational viscosity γ1 is about two orders larger than the Miesowicz viscosity ηb. The DPD simulation correctly reproduced the non-monotonic concentration dependence of viscosity, which is a unique property of lyotropic nematic fluids. By comparing simulation results with classical theories for nematics and experiments, the DPD nematic fluids are proved to be a valid model to investigate the distortion and flow of lyotropic nematics.

  7. Continuity waves in fully resolved simulations of settling particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willen, Daniel; Sierakowski, Adam; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    Fully resolved simulations of 500 to 2,000 particles settling in a fluid have been conducted with the Physalis method. A new approach to the reconstruction of pseudo-continuum fields is described and is used to examine the results with the purpose of identifying concentration waves. The velocity of concentration waves is successfully deduced from the simulations. A comparison of the results with continuity wave theory shows good agreement. Several new insights about the particle microstructure conditionally averaged on volume fraction and velocity are also described. This work is supported by NSF award CBET1335965.

  8. Multigrid Particle-in-cell Simulations of Plasma Microturbulence

    SciTech Connect

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2003-06-17

    A new scheme to accurately retain kinetic electron effects in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations for the case of electrostatic drift waves is presented. The splitting scheme, which is based on exact separation between adiabatic and on adiabatic electron responses, is shown to yield more accurate linear growth rates than the standard df scheme. The linear and nonlinear elliptic problems that arise in the splitting scheme are solved using a multi-grid solver. The multi-grid particle-in-cell approach offers an attractive path, both from the physics and numerical points of view, to simulate kinetic electron dynamics in global toroidal plasmas.

  9. Soil signature simulation of complex mixtures and particle size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Tyler; Bachmann, Charles M.; Salvaggio, Carl

    2015-09-01

    Soil reflectance signatures were modeled using the digital imaging and remote sensing image generation model and Blender three-dimensional (3-D) graphic design software. Using these tools, the geometry, radiometry, and chemistry of quartz and magnetite were exploited to model the presence of particle size and porosity effects in the visible and the shortwave infrared spectrum. Using the physics engines within the Blender 3-D graphic design software, physical representations of granular soil scenes were created. Each scene characterized a specific particle distribution and density. Chemical and optical properties of pure quartz and magnetite were assigned to particles in the scene based on particle size. This work presents a model to describe an observed phase-angle dependence of beach sand density. Bidirectional reflectance signatures were simulated for targets of varying size distribution and density. This model provides validation for a phenomenological trade space between density and particle size distribution in complex, heterogeneous soil mixtures. It also confirms the suggestion that directional reflectance signatures can be defined by intimate mixtures that depend on pore spacing. The study demonstrated that by combining realistic target geometry and spectral measurements of pure quartz and magnetite, effects of soil particle size and density could be modeled without functional data fitting or rigorous analysis of material dynamics. This research does not use traditional function-based models for simulation. The combination of realistic geometry, physically viable particle structure, and first-principles ray-tracing enables the ability to represent signature changes that have been observed in experimental observations.

  10. Noiseless Vlasov–Poisson simulations with linearly transformed particles

    SciTech Connect

    Campos Pinto, Martin; Sonnendrücker, Eric; Friedman, Alex; Grote, David P.; Lund, Steve M.

    2014-10-15

    We introduce a deterministic discrete-particle simulation approach, the Linearly-Transformed Particle-In-Cell (LTPIC) method, that employs linear deformations of the particles to reduce the noise traditionally associated with particle schemes. Formally, transforming the particles is justified by local first order expansions of the characteristic flow in phase space. In practice the method amounts of using deformation matrices within the particle shape functions; these matrices are updated via local evaluations of the forward numerical flow. Because it is necessary to periodically remap the particles on a regular grid to avoid excessively deforming their shapes, the method can be seen as a development of Denavit's Forward Semi-Lagrangian (FSL) scheme (Denavit, 1972 [8]). However, it has recently been established (Campos Pinto, 2012 [20]) that the underlying Linearly-Transformed Particle scheme converges for abstract transport problems, with no need to remap the particles; deforming the particles can thus be seen as a way to significantly lower the remapping frequency needed in the FSL schemes, and hence the associated numerical diffusion. To couple the method with electrostatic field solvers, two specific charge deposition schemes are examined, and their performance compared with that of the standard deposition method. Finally, numerical 1d1v simulations involving benchmark test cases and halo formation in an initially mismatched thermal sheet beam demonstrate some advantages of our LTPIC scheme over the classical PIC and FSL methods. Benchmarked test cases also indicate that, for numerical choices involving similar computational effort, the LTPIC method is capable of accuracy comparable to or exceeding that of state-of-the-art, high-resolution Vlasov schemes.

  11. Noiseless Vlasov-Poisson simulations with linearly transformed particles

    DOE PAGES

    Pinto, Martin C.; Sonnendrucker, Eric; Friedman, Alex; ...

    2014-06-25

    We introduce a deterministic discrete-particle simulation approach, the Linearly-Transformed Particle-In-Cell (LTPIC) method, that employs linear deformations of the particles to reduce the noise traditionally associated with particle schemes. Formally, transforming the particles is justified by local first order expansions of the characteristic flow in phase space. In practice the method amounts of using deformation matrices within the particle shape functions; these matrices are updated via local evaluations of the forward numerical flow. Because it is necessary to periodically remap the particles on a regular grid to avoid excessively deforming their shapes, the method can be seen as a development ofmore » Denavit's Forward Semi-Lagrangian (FSL) scheme (Denavit, 1972 [8]). However, it has recently been established (Campos Pinto, 2012 [20]) that the underlying Linearly-Transformed Particle scheme converges for abstract transport problems, with no need to remap the particles; deforming the particles can thus be seen as a way to significantly lower the remapping frequency needed in the FSL schemes, and hence the associated numerical diffusion. To couple the method with electrostatic field solvers, two specific charge deposition schemes are examined, and their performance compared with that of the standard deposition method. Finally, numerical 1d1v simulations involving benchmark test cases and halo formation in an initially mismatched thermal sheet beam demonstrate some advantages of our LTPIC scheme over the classical PIC and FSL methods. Lastly, benchmarked test cases also indicate that, for numerical choices involving similar computational effort, the LTPIC method is capable of accuracy comparable to or exceeding that of state-of-the-art, high-resolution Vlasov schemes.« less

  12. Noiseless Vlasov-Poisson simulations with linearly transformed particles

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Martin C.; Sonnendrucker, Eric; Friedman, Alex; Grote, David P.; Lund, Steve M.

    2014-06-25

    We introduce a deterministic discrete-particle simulation approach, the Linearly-Transformed Particle-In-Cell (LTPIC) method, that employs linear deformations of the particles to reduce the noise traditionally associated with particle schemes. Formally, transforming the particles is justified by local first order expansions of the characteristic flow in phase space. In practice the method amounts of using deformation matrices within the particle shape functions; these matrices are updated via local evaluations of the forward numerical flow. Because it is necessary to periodically remap the particles on a regular grid to avoid excessively deforming their shapes, the method can be seen as a development of Denavit's Forward Semi-Lagrangian (FSL) scheme (Denavit, 1972 [8]). However, it has recently been established (Campos Pinto, 2012 [20]) that the underlying Linearly-Transformed Particle scheme converges for abstract transport problems, with no need to remap the particles; deforming the particles can thus be seen as a way to significantly lower the remapping frequency needed in the FSL schemes, and hence the associated numerical diffusion. To couple the method with electrostatic field solvers, two specific charge deposition schemes are examined, and their performance compared with that of the standard deposition method. Finally, numerical 1d1v simulations involving benchmark test cases and halo formation in an initially mismatched thermal sheet beam demonstrate some advantages of our LTPIC scheme over the classical PIC and FSL methods. Lastly, benchmarked test cases also indicate that, for numerical choices involving similar computational effort, the LTPIC method is capable of accuracy comparable to or exceeding that of state-of-the-art, high-resolution Vlasov schemes.

  13. Size distributions of manure particles released under simulated rainfall.

    PubMed

    Pachepsky, Yakov A; Guber, Andrey K; Shelton, Daniel R; McCarty, Gregory W

    2009-03-01

    Manure and animal waste deposited on cropland and grazing lands serve as a source of microorganisms, some of which may be pathogenic. These microorganisms are released along with particles of dissolved manure during rainfall events. Relatively little if anything is known about the amounts and sizes of manure particles released during rainfall, that subsequently may serve as carriers, abode, and nutritional source for microorganisms. The objective of this work was to obtain and present the first experimental data on sizes of bovine manure particles released to runoff during simulated rainfall and leached through soil during subsequent infiltration. Experiments were conducted using 200 cm long boxes containing turfgrass soil sod; the boxes were designed so that rates of manure dissolution and subsequent infiltration and runoff could be monitored independently. Dairy manure was applied on the upper portion of boxes. Simulated rainfall (ca. 32.4 mm h(-1)) was applied for 90 min on boxes with stands of either live or dead grass. Electrical conductivity, turbidity, and particle size distributions obtained from laser diffractometry were determined in manure runoff and soil leachate samples. Turbidity of leachates and manure runoff samples decreased exponentially. Turbidity of manure runoff samples was on average 20% less than turbidity of soil leachate samples. Turbidity of leachate samples from boxes with dead grass was on average 30% less than from boxes with live grass. Particle size distributions in manure runoff and leachate suspensions remained remarkably stable after 15 min of runoff initiation, although the turbidity continued to decrease. Particles had the median diameter of 3.8 microm, and 90% of particles were between 0.6 and 17.8 microm. The particle size distributions were not affected by the grass status. Because manure particles are known to affect transport and retention of microbial pathogens in soil, more information needs to be collected about the

  14. GPU-centric resolved-particle disperse two-phase flow simulation using the Physalis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierakowski, Adam J.

    2016-10-01

    We present work on a new implementation of the Physalis method for resolved-particle disperse two-phase flow simulations. We discuss specifically our GPU-centric programming model that avoids all device-host data communication during the simulation. Summarizing the details underlying the implementation of the Physalis method, we illustrate the application of two GPU-centric parallelization paradigms and record insights on how to best leverage the GPU's prioritization of bandwidth over latency. We perform a comparison of the computational efficiency between the current GPU-centric implementation and a legacy serial-CPU-optimized code and conclude that the GPU hardware accounts for run time improvements up to a factor of 60 by carefully normalizing the run times of both codes.

  15. Cosmological particle-in-cell simulations with ultralight axion dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veltmaat, Jan; Niemeyer, Jens C.

    2016-12-01

    We study cosmological structure formation with ultralight axion dark matter, or "fuzzy dark matter" (FDM), using a particle-mesh scheme to account for the quantum pressure arising in the Madelung formulation of the Schrödinger-Poisson equations. Subpercent-level energy conservation and correct linear behavior are demonstrated. Whereas the code gives rise to the same core-halo profiles as direct simulations of the Schrödinger equation, it does not reproduce the detailed interference patterns. In cosmological simulations with FDM initial conditions, we find a maximum relative difference of O(10%) in the power spectrum near the quantum Jeans length compared to using a standard N -body code with identical initial conditions. This shows that the effect of quantum pressure during nonlinear structure formation cannot be neglected for precision constraints on a dark matter component consisting of ultralight axions.

  16. Effects of Hydrodynamic Interaction in Aerosol Particle Settling: Mesoscopic Particle-level Full Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuiqing; Yang, Mengmeng; Marshall, Jeffrey

    2014-11-01

    A new mesoscopic particle-level approach is developed for the full dynamics simulation (FDS) of the settling of systems of aerosol micro-particles. The approach efficiently combines an adhesive discrete-element method for particle motions and an Oseen dynamics method for hydrodynamic interactions. Compared to conventional Stokeslet and Oseenlet simulations, the FDS not only accounts for the cloud-scale fluid inertia effect and the particle inertia effect, but also overcomes the singularity problem using a soft-sphere model of adhesive contact. The effect of hydrodynamic interactions is investigated based on FDS results. The particle inertia is found to reduce the mobility of particle clouds and to elongate the cloud on vertical direction. Meanwhile, the fluid inertia decreases the settling velocity by weakening the hydrodynamic interaction and tends to flatten the cloud, leading to breakup. Expressions for the settling velocity of particle cloud are proposed with consideration of fluid inertia effect and the cloud shape. Finally, the transformation in settling behavior from a finite particle cloud to an unbounded uniform suspension is explained. This work has been funded by the National Natural Science Funds of China (No. 50976058), and by the National Key Basic Research and Development Program (2013CB228506).

  17. Simulating ion beam extraction from a single aperture triode acceleration column: A comparison of the beam transport codes IGUN and PBGUNS with test stand data

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.; Wills, J. S. C.; Diamond, W. T.

    2008-04-15

    Ion beam extraction from two different ion sources with single aperture triode extraction columns was simulated with the particle beam transport codes PBGUNS and IGUN. For each ion source, the simulation results are compared to experimental data generated on well-equipped test stands. Both codes reproduced the qualitative behavior of the extracted ion beams to incremental and scaled changes to the extraction electrode geometry observed on the test stands. Numerical values of optimum beam currents and beam emittance generated by the simulations also agree well with test stand data.

  18. Simulation of current generations in a three-dimensional particle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsung, Frank Shih-Yu

    1999-07-01

    Noninductively generated current is important for the steady state operation of tokamak plasmas. In the CCT (Continuous Current Tokamak) experiment here at UCLA, a continuous current has been observed in ECRH-generated plasmas, and in plasmas generated by electron beams, in both co- and counter-streaming cases. In 2+1/2D simulation works done by Nunan et al, a continuous toroidal current was maintained by particle fueling alone. In Nunan's work, the ``preferential loss'' model was proposed to explain the noninductive generation of toroidal currents in magnetized plasmas. However, this model assumes the conservation of the canonical toroidal momentum and therefore may not exist in three dimensional simulations. The aim of this thesis is to demonstrate this effect in a 3-D plasma model. A scalable 3-D electromagnetic PIC (Particle-in-Cell) code was developed for this purpose. Because the electromagnetic signals travels a short distance during each time-step, this code need not communicate globally and therefore has a parallel overhead independent of the number of processors. On the SP2 at Cornell Theory Center, the program is over 96% efficient on 128 nodes. Optimization techniques for RISC- based processors are also discussed. Using the parallel 3-D code, we have carried out the TDC simulations using 32 grids in the previously ignorable (toroidal) direction and 160 times as many particles as before ( 1.6˙107 particles). These 3-D calculations agree qualitatively with the 2+1/2D results. In addition, particle scans were performed in both the 2+1/2D and 3-D to identify the source of particle transport in these simulations. In addition, test particle calculations were carried out to address issues related to the TDC problem. In one test charge calculation, we showed how the curvature drift breaks up the toroidal symmetry during start-up and generates current. Because of the 1/r dependence of the curvature drift, this effect becomes important when the radius is small

  19. Mitigating Particle Integration Error in Relativistic Laser-Plasma Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuera, Adam; Weichmann, Kathleen; Cowan, Benjamin; Cary, John

    2016-10-01

    In particle-in-cell simulations of laser wakefield accelerators with a0 greater than unity, errors in particle trajectories produce incorrect beam charges and energies, predicting performance not realized in experiments such as the Texas Petawatt Laser. In order to avoid these errors, the simulation time step must resolve a time scale smaller than the laser period by a factor of a0. If the Yee scheme advances the fields with this time step, the laser wavelength must be over-resolved by a factor of a0 to avoid dispersion errors. Here is presented and demonstrated with Vorpal simulations, a new electromagnetic algorithm, building on previous work, correcting Yee dispersion for arbitrary sub-CFL time steps, reducing simulation times by a0.

  20. Electrostatic Characteristics of Materials Exposed to Martian Simulant Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calle, C. I.; Kim, H. S.; Young, S.; Jackson, D.; Lombardi, A. J.

    1998-11-01

    The Pathfinder mission to Mars identified Andesitic rock as the primary type of rock at the landing site. Several experiments were designed at NASA/Kennedy Space Center to determine the charging characteristics of common space materials exposed to small particles derived from those rocks. MARS-1, a Martian soil simulant prepared from Andesitic rocks by NASA/JSC was used in this work. Characterization of this simulant was made using scanning electron microscopy and inductively coupled argon plasma spectroscopy coupled with a carbon-sulfur detector. These results were compared to the Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer analysis on Pathfinder. The simulant was found to be a suitable substitute for Martian soil for our purposes. Two experimental designs and methods to simulate the exposure of different materials to wind-blown dust were made. These designs permit dust particle delivery to samples at different speeds. Initial experiments made with these designs to determine their viability were promising.

  1. Neoclassical simulation of tokamak plasmas using the continuum gyrokinetic code TEMPEST.

    PubMed

    Xu, X Q

    2008-07-01

    We present gyrokinetic neoclassical simulations of tokamak plasmas with a self-consistent electric field using a fully nonlinear (full- f ) continuum code TEMPEST in a circular geometry. A set of gyrokinetic equations are discretized on a five-dimensional computational grid in phase space. The present implementation is a method of lines approach where the phase-space derivatives are discretized with finite differences, and implicit backward differencing formulas are used to advance the system in time. The fully nonlinear Boltzmann model is used for electrons. The neoclassical electric field is obtained by solving the gyrokinetic Poisson equation with self-consistent poloidal variation. With a four-dimensional (psi,theta,micro) version of the TEMPEST code, we compute the radial particle and heat fluxes, the geodesic-acoustic mode, and the development of the neoclassical electric field, which we compare with neoclassical theory using a Lorentz collision model. The present work provides a numerical scheme for self-consistently studying important dynamical aspects of neoclassical transport and electric field in toroidal magnetic fusion devices.

  2. The GENGA Code: Gravitational Encounters in N-body simulations with GPU Acceleration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, Simon; Stadel, Joachim

    2013-07-01

    We present a GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) implementation of a hybrid symplectic N-body integrator based on the Mercury Code (Chambers 1999), which handles close encounters with a very good energy conservation. It uses a combination of a mixed variable integration (Wisdom & Holman 1991) and a direct N-body Bulirsch-Stoer method. GENGA is written in CUDA C and runs on NVidia GPU's. The GENGA code supports three simulation modes: Integration of up to 2048 massive bodies, integration with up to a million test particles, or parallel integration of a large number of individual planetary systems. To achieve the best performance, GENGA runs completely on the GPU, where it can take advantage of the very fast, but limited, memory that exists there. All operations are performed in parallel, including the close encounter detection and grouping independent close encounter pairs. Compared to Mercury, GENGA runs up to 30 times faster. Two applications of GENGA are presented: First, the dynamics of planetesimals and the late stage of rocky planet formation due to planetesimal collisions. Second, a dynamical stability analysis of an exoplanetary system with an additional hypothetical super earth, which shows that in some multiple planetary systems, additional super earths could exist without perturbing the dynamical stability of the other planets (Elser et al. 2013).

  3. Verification and validation of the MCNPX-PoliMi code for simulations of neutron multiplicity counting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. D.; Miller, E. C.; Flaska, M.; Pozzi, S. A.; Oberer, R. B.; Chiang, L. G.

    2013-02-01

    Neutron coincidence counting is widely used in nuclear safeguards. Simulations of these systems can be performed using Monte Carlo codes such as MCNPX to aid in calibration or measurement design. However, the MCNPX coincidence-counting routines treat particle histories individually, therefore the dead time of the acquisition electronics is not treated. The MCNPX-PoliMi code provides the ability to model detailed effects such as data-acquisition electronics and system dead times. A specialized post-processing code has been developed to interpret the collision-log file and determine the response of a 3He multiplicity counter. The MCNPX-PoliMi simulation provides the full neutron multiplicity distribution measured by the 3He tubes. This distribution is used to compute the singles, doubles, and triples rates which are the quantities used to determine 235U mass. MCNPX-PoliMi has previously been validated with passive multiplicity measurements. In this study, a detailed analysis of the measurement system operating in active mode is presented for uranium-oxide standards ranging from 0.5 to 4.0 kg with a Canberra JCC-51 active well coincidence counter. MCNPX-PoliMi calculations are also compared with MCNPX. The two codes agree to within 1% for the cases with negligible dead times. The simulations are validated with measurements performed at the Y-12 National Security Complex.

  4. Initial Self-Consistent 3D Electron-Cloud Simulations of the LHC Beam with the Code WARP+POSINST

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J; Furman, M A; Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Grote, D P

    2005-10-11

    We present initial results for the self-consistent beam-cloud dynamics simulations for a sample LHC beam, using a newly developed set of modeling capability based on a merge [1] of the three-dimensional parallel Particle-In-Cell (PIC) accelerator code WARP [2] and the electron-cloud code POSINST [3]. Although the storage ring model we use as a test bed to contain the beam is much simpler and shorter than the LHC, its lattice elements are realistically modeled, as is the beam and the electron cloud dynamics. The simulated mechanisms for generation and absorption of the electrons at the walls are based on previously validated models available in POSINST [3, 4].

  5. Measuring Landau damping in Particle-in-Cell simulations using particles of different charge-weights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, C.; Sarkar, A.; Cao, Y.-X.; Huang, M. C.; Li, J.

    2016-10-01

    We study whether putting more particles in ``region of interest (ROI)'' in phase space can efficiently increase Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation accuracy. We use Landau damping of a plasma wave as a figure of merit and set the ROI near the phase velocity of the wave. Improvement in Landau damping rate measurement is observed in 1D PIC simulations when employing more particles in the ROI but the effect is not monotonic. This is partly due to energy transfer from particles of large charge weights to those of smaller weights through the electric fields. Possible strategies to mitigate the energy transfer will also be discussed. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1314734 and by the Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-SC0012316.

  6. Fundamentals of chemistry modeling applicable to a vectorized particle simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Brian L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the fundamentals of extending the vectorized particle simulation method derived by Baganoff and McDonald (1990), McDonald and Baganoff (1988), and McDonald (1989) for modeling chemically reacting flows. Details of reaction mechanics per reaction are presented, with particular attention given to the quantum nature of the vibrational mode. The models of reactive flows developed here were verified through a simulation of a superheated diatomic gas relaxing thermochemically to equilibrium in a reservoir.

  7. Particle simulation of auroral double layers. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.L.

    1992-06-01

    Externally driven magnetic reconnection has been proposed as a possible mechanism for production of auroral electrons during magnetic substorms. Fluid simulations of magnetic reconnection lead to strong plasma flows towards the increasing magnetic field of the earth. These plasma flows must generate large scale potential drops to preserve global charge neutrality. We have examined currentless injection of plasma along a dipole magnetic field into a bounded region using both analytic techniques and particle simulation.

  8. Porting plasma physics simulation codes to modern computing architectures using the libmrc framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germaschewski, Kai; Abbott, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    Available computing power has continued to grow exponentially even after single-core performance satured in the last decade. The increase has since been driven by more parallelism, both using more cores and having more parallelism in each core, e.g. in GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. Adapting existing plasma physics codes is challenging, in particular as there is no single programming model that covers current and future architectures. We will introduce the open-source libmrc framework that has been used to modularize and port three plasma physics codes: The extended MHD code MRCv3 with implicit time integration and curvilinear grids; the OpenGGCM global magnetosphere model; and the particle-in-cell code PSC. libmrc consolidates basic functionality needed for simulations based on structured grids (I/O, load balancing, time integrators), and also introduces a parallel object model that makes it possible to maintain multiple implementations of computational kernels, on e.g. conventional processors and GPUs. It handles data layout conversions and enables us to port performance-critical parts of a code to a new architecture step-by-step, while the rest of the code can remain unchanged. We will show examples of the performance gains and some physics applications.

  9. Program Code Generator for Cardiac Electrophysiology Simulation with Automatic PDE Boundary Condition Handling

    PubMed Central

    Punzalan, Florencio Rusty; Kunieda, Yoshitoshi; Amano, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies involving human hearts can have certain limitations. Methods such as computer simulations can be an important alternative or supplemental tool. Physiological simulation at the tissue or organ level typically involves the handling of partial differential equations (PDEs). Boundary conditions and distributed parameters, such as those used in pharmacokinetics simulation, add to the complexity of the PDE solution. These factors can tailor PDE solutions and their corresponding program code to specific problems. Boundary condition and parameter changes in the customized code are usually prone to errors and time-consuming. We propose a general approach for handling PDEs and boundary conditions in computational models using a replacement scheme for discretization. This study is an extension of a program generator that we introduced in a previous publication. The program generator can generate code for multi-cell simulations of cardiac electrophysiology. Improvements to the system allow it to handle simultaneous equations in the biological function model as well as implicit PDE numerical schemes. The replacement scheme involves substituting all partial differential terms with numerical solution equations. Once the model and boundary equations are discretized with the numerical solution scheme, instances of the equations are generated to undergo dependency analysis. The result of the dependency analysis is then used to generate the program code. The resulting program code are in Java or C programming language. To validate the automatic handling of boundary conditions in the program code generator, we generated simulation code using the FHN, Luo-Rudy 1, and Hund-Rudy cell models and run cell-to-cell coupling and action potential propagation simulations. One of the simulations is based on a published experiment and simulation results are compared with the experimental data. We conclude that the proposed program code generator can be used to

  10. Program Code Generator for Cardiac Electrophysiology Simulation with Automatic PDE Boundary Condition Handling.

    PubMed

    Punzalan, Florencio Rusty; Kunieda, Yoshitoshi; Amano, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies involving human hearts can have certain limitations. Methods such as computer simulations can be an important alternative or supplemental tool. Physiological simulation at the tissue or organ level typically involves the handling of partial differential equations (PDEs). Boundary conditions and distributed parameters, such as those used in pharmacokinetics simulation, add to the complexity of the PDE solution. These factors can tailor PDE solutions and their corresponding program code to specific problems. Boundary condition and parameter changes in the customized code are usually prone to errors and time-consuming. We propose a general approach for handling PDEs and boundary conditions in computational models using a replacement scheme for discretization. This study is an extension of a program generator that we introduced in a previous publication. The program generator can generate code for multi-cell simulations of cardiac electrophysiology. Improvements to the system allow it to handle simultaneous equations in the biological function model as well as implicit PDE numerical schemes. The replacement scheme involves substituting all partial differential terms with numerical solution equations. Once the model and boundary equations are discretized with the numerical solution scheme, instances of the equations are generated to undergo dependency analysis. The result of the dependency analysis is then used to generate the program code. The resulting program code are in Java or C programming language. To validate the automatic handling of boundary conditions in the program code generator, we generated simulation code using the FHN, Luo-Rudy 1, and Hund-Rudy cell models and run cell-to-cell coupling and action potential propagation simulations. One of the simulations is based on a published experiment and simulation results are compared with the experimental data. We conclude that the proposed program code generator can be used to

  11. Beam Dynamics in an Electron Lens with the Warp Particle-in-cell Code

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio; Moens, Vince; Redaelli, Stefano

    2014-07-01

    Electron lenses are a mature technique for beam manipulation in colliders and storage rings. In an electron lens, a pulsed, magnetically confined electron beam with a given current-density profile interacts with the circulating beam to obtain the desired effect. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for beam-beam compensation, for abort-gap clearing, and for halo scraping. They will be used in RHIC at BNL for head-on beam-beam compensation, and their application to the Large Hadron Collider for halo control is under development. At Fermilab, electron lenses will be implemented as lattice elements for nonlinear integrable optics. The design of electron lenses requires tools to calculate the kicks and wakefields experienced by the circulating beam. We use the Warp particle-in-cell code to study generation, transport, and evolution of the electron beam. For the first time, a fully 3-dimensional code is used for this purpose.

  12. Pseudo-random number generation for Brownian Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations on GPU devices

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Carolyn L.; Anderson, Joshua A.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2011-08-10

    Highlights: {yields} Molecular Dynamics codes implemented on GPUs have achieved two-order of magnitude computational accelerations. {yields} Brownian Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations require a large number of random numbers per time step. {yields} We introduce a method for generating small batches of pseudorandom numbers distributed over many threads of calculations. {yields} With this method, Dissipative Particle Dynamics is implemented on a GPU device without requiring thread-to-thread communication. - Abstract: Brownian Dynamics (BD), also known as Langevin Dynamics, and Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) are implicit solvent methods commonly used in models of soft matter and biomolecular systems. The interaction of the numerous solvent particles with larger particles is coarse-grained as a Langevin thermostat is applied to individual particles or to particle pairs. The Langevin thermostat requires a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) to generate the stochastic force applied to each particle or pair of neighboring particles during each time step in the integration of Newton's equations of motion. In a Single-Instruction-Multiple-Thread (SIMT) GPU parallel computing environment, small batches of random numbers must be generated over thousands of threads and millions of kernel calls. In this communication we introduce a one-PRNG-per-kernel-call-per-thread scheme, in which a micro-stream of pseudorandom numbers is generated in each thread and kernel call. These high quality, statistically robust micro-streams require no global memory for state storage, are more computationally efficient than other PRNG schemes in memory-bound kernels, and uniquely enable the DPD simulation method without requiring communication between threads.

  13. Massive Neutrino Decay Driven Radiative Instabilities, Sub-Structure Survival in Galaxy Clusters and a Nested - Particle-Mesh Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splinter, Randall John

    1995-01-01

    I have performed a series of studies concerning the clustering of mass on large scales in the universe, with the goal being an increased understanding of the role of various processes in the formation of structure in the universe. One of the first dark matter candidates was the massive neutrino. In this section I investigate the role of a radiative decay mode for a massive neutrino species, and its impact on structure formation. By reviving a concept known as "mock gravity" I attempt to provide seed masses for eventual galaxy formation in a Hot Dark Matter universe. I show that mock gravity is ineffective at generating seed masses for galaxy formation; the ionization rate is too large and the universe becomes fully ionized well before the radiation pressure can have any effect on the clumping of matter. The final section of this thesis presents a series of N-body experiments which are aimed at understanding the theoretical sources of substructure in galaxy clusters. I perform a series of simulations using a variety of power law initial conditions to generate our cluster data sets. From there I use the statistical methods developed by Bird to analyze the subsequent survival of the sub-structures. I find that for a high omega universe that a significant number of clusters should exhibit sub-structure for very long periods of time after their formation. To test whether the sub-structure results are dependent upon the resolution of the N-body code I develop a nested-grid code for use in performing high resolution studies of gravitational instability. In the next section I present an N-body code which features a nested-grid technology. This nested-grid method allows me to extend both the force and mass resolution of a traditional particle-mesh type code. This code will prove extremely useful for studying problems in large-scale structure formation where one is focusing on highly non -linear objects, and hence force and mass resolution are at a premium. In this chapter I

  14. An improved sink particle algorithm for SPH simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubber, D. A.; Walch, S.; Whitworth, A. P.

    2013-04-01

    Numerical simulations of star formation frequently rely on the implementation of sink particles: (a) to avoid expending computational resource on the detailed internal physics of individual collapsing protostars, (b) to derive mass functions, binary statistics and clustering kinematics (and hence to make comparisons with observation), and (c) to model radiative and mechanical feedback; sink particles are also used in other contexts, for example to represent accreting black holes in galactic nuclei. We present a new algorithm for creating and evolving sink particles in smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations, which appears to represent a significant improvement over existing algorithms - particularly in situations where sinks are introduced after the gas has become optically thick to its own cooling radiation and started to heat up by adiabatic compression. (i) It avoids spurious creation of sinks. (ii) It regulates the accretion of matter on to a sink so as to mitigate non-physical perturbations in the vicinity of the sink. (iii) Sinks accrete matter, but the associated angular momentum is transferred back to the surrounding medium. With the new algorithm - and modulo the need to invoke sufficient resolution to capture the physics preceding sink formation - the properties of sinks formed in simulations are essentially independent of the user-defined parameters of sink creation, or the number of SPH particles used.

  15. Microscale simulation of particle deposition in porous media.

    PubMed

    Boccardo, Gianluca; Marchisio, Daniele L; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-03-01

    In this work several geometries, each representing a different porous medium, are considered to perform detailed computational fluid dynamics simulation for fluid flow, particle transport and deposition. Only Brownian motions and steric interception are accounted for as deposition mechanisms. Firstly pressure drop in each porous medium is analyzed in order to determine an effective grain size, by fitting the results with the Ergun law. Then grid independence is assessed. Lastly, particle transport in the system is investigated via Eulerian steady-state simulations, where particle concentration is solved for, not following explicitly particles' trajectories, but solving the corresponding advection-diffusion equation. An assumption was made in considering favorable collector-particle interactions, resulting in a "perfect sink" boundary condition for the collectors. The gathered simulation data are used to calculate the deposition efficiency due to Brownian motions and steric interception. The original Levich law for one simple circular collector is verified; subsequently porous media constituted by a packing of collectors are scrutinized. Results show that the interactions between the different collectors result in behaviors which are not in line with the theory developed by Happel and co-workers, highlighting a different dependency of the deposition efficiency on the dimensionless groups involved in the relevant correlations.

  16. Verification of particle simulation of radio frequency waves in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kuley, Animesh; Lin, Z.; Wang, Z. X.; Wessel, F.

    2013-10-15

    Radio frequency (RF) waves can provide heating, current and flow drive, as well as instability control for steady state operations of fusion experiments. A particle simulation model has been developed in this work to provide a first-principles tool for studying the RF nonlinear interactions with plasmas. In this model, ions are considered as fully kinetic particles using the Vlasov equation and electrons are treated as guiding centers using the drift kinetic equation. This model has been implemented in a global gyrokinetic toroidal code using real electron-to-ion mass ratio. To verify the model, linear simulations of ion plasma oscillation, ion Bernstein wave, and lower hybrid wave are carried out in cylindrical geometry and found to agree well with analytic predictions.

  17. Direct numerical simulation of particle alignment in viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulsen, Martien; Jaensson, Nick; Anderson, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    Rigid particles suspended in viscoelastic fluids under shear can align in string-like structures in flow direction. To unravel this phenomenon, we present 3D direct numerical simulations of the alignment of two and three rigid, non-Brownian particles in a shear flow of a viscoelastic fluid. The equations are solved on moving, boundary-fitted meshes, which are locally refined to accurately describe the polymer stresses around and in between the particles. A small minimal gap size between the particles is introduced. The Giesekus model is used and the effect of the Weissenberg number, shear thinning and solvent viscosity is investigated. Alignment of two and three particles is observed. Morphology plots have been created for various combinations of fluid parameters. Alignment is mainly governed by the value of the elasticity parameter S, defined as half of the ratio between the first normal stress difference and shear stress of the suspending fluid. Alignment appears to occur above a critical value of S, which decreases with increasing shear thinning. This result, together with simulations of a shear-thinning Carreau fluid, leads us to the conclusion that normal stress differences are essential for particle alignment to occur, but it is also strongly promoted by shear thinning.

  18. Water Flow Simulation using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce; Berg, Jared; Harris, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of water flow from the rainbird nozzles has been accomplished using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). The advantage of using SPH is that no meshing is required, thus the grid quality is no longer an issue and accuracy can be improved.

  19. 3-D Spreadsheet Simulation of a Modern Particle Detector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Alan J.

    2004-01-01

    A spreadsheet simulation of a modern particle detector has been developed and can be readily used as an instructional tool in the physics classroom. The spreadsheet creates a three-dimensional model that can be rotated and helical trajectories can be highlighted. An associated student worksheet is also presented.

  20. Multiscale simulation of ideal mixtures using smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petsev, Nikolai D.; Leal, L. Gary; Shell, M. Scott

    2016-02-01

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) [P. Español and M. Revenga, Phys. Rev. E 67, 026705 (2003)] is a thermodynamically consistent particle-based continuum hydrodynamics solver that features scale-dependent thermal fluctuations. We obtain a new formulation of this stochastic method for ideal two-component mixtures through a discretization of the advection-diffusion equation with thermal noise in the concentration field. The resulting multicomponent approach is consistent with the interpretation of the SDPD particles as moving volumes of fluid and reproduces the correct fluctuations and diffusion dynamics. Subsequently, we provide a general multiscale multicomponent SDPD framework for simulations of molecularly miscible systems spanning length scales from nanometers to the non-fluctuating continuum limit. This approach reproduces appropriate equilibrium properties and is validated with simulation of simple one-dimensional diffusion across multiple length scales.

  1. Smoothed Profile Method to Simulate Colloidal Particles in Complex Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Ryoichi; Nakayama, Yasuya; Kim, Kang

    A new direct numerical simulation scheme, called "Smoothed Profile (SP) method," is presented. The SP method, as a direct numerical simulation of particulate flow, provides a way to couple continuum fluid dynamics with rigid-body dynamics through smoothed profile of colloidal particle. Our formulation includes extensions to colloids in multicomponent solvents such as charged colloids in electrolyte solutions. This method enables us to compute the time evolutions of colloidal particles, ions, and host fluids simultaneously by solving Newton, advection-diffusion, and Navier-Stokes equations so that the electro-hydrodynamic couplings can be fully taken into account. The electrophoretic mobilities of charged spherical particles are calculated in several situations. The comparisons with approximation theories show quantitative agreements for dilute dispersions without any empirical parameters.

  2. Benchmark of numerical tools simulating beam propagation and secondary particles in ITER NBI

    SciTech Connect

    Sartori, E. Veltri, P.; Serianni, G.; Dlougach, E.; Hemsworth, R.; Singh, M.

    2015-04-08

    Injection of high energy beams of neutral particles is a method for plasma heating in fusion devices. The ITER injector, and its prototype MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector and Concept Advancement), are large extrapolations from existing devices: therefore numerical modeling is needed to set thermo-mechanical requirements for all beam-facing components. As the power and charge deposition originates from several sources (primary beam, co-accelerated electrons, and secondary production by beam-gas, beam-surface, and electron-surface interaction), the beam propagation along the beam line is simulated by comprehensive 3D models. This paper presents a comparative study between two codes: BTR has been used for several years in the design of the ITER HNB/DNB components; SAMANTHA code was independently developed and includes additional phenomena, such as secondary particles generated by collision of beam particles with the background gas. The code comparison is valuable in the perspective of the upcoming experimental operations, in order to prepare a reliable numerical support to the interpretation of experimental measurements in the beam test facilities. The power density map calculated on the Electrostatic Residual Ion Dump (ERID) is the chosen benchmark, as it depends on the electric and magnetic fields as well as on the evolution of the beam species via interaction with the gas. Finally the paper shows additional results provided by SAMANTHA, like the secondary electrons produced by volume processes accelerated by the ERID fringe-field towards the Cryopumps.

  3. GYSELA, a full-f global gyrokinetic Semi-Lagrangian code for ITG turbulence simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Grandgirard, V.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Besse, N.; Bertrand, P.

    2006-11-30

    This work addresses non-linear global gyrokinetic simulations of ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence with the GYSELA code. The particularity of GYSELA code is to use a fixed grid with a Semi-Lagrangian (SL) scheme and this for the entire distribution function. The 4D non-linear drift-kinetic version of the code already showns the interest of such a SL method which exhibits good properties of energy conservation in non-linear regime as well as an accurate description of fine spatial scales. The code has been upgrated to run 5D simulations of toroidal ITG turbulence. Linear benchmarks and non-linear first results prove that semi-lagrangian codes can be a credible alternative for gyrokinetic simulations.

  4. A code to simulate nuclear reactor inventories and associated gamma-ray spectra.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, A J; Allyson, J D; Sanderson, D C

    2001-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to simulate the gamma-ray spectra that would be measured by airborne gamma spectrometry (AGS) systems from sources containing short-lived fission products. The code uses simple numerical methods to simulate the production and decay of fission products and generates spectra for sodium iodide (NaI) detectors using Monte Carlo codes. A new Monte Carlo code using a virtual array of detectors to reduce simulation times for airborne geometries is described. Spectra generated for a short irradiation and laboratory geometry have been compared with an experimental data set. The agreement is good. Spectra have also been generated for airborne geometries and longer irradiation periods. The application of this code to generate AGS spectra for accident scenarios and their uses in the development and evaluation of spectral analysis methods for such situations are discussed.

  5. SU-E-T-254: Optimization of GATE and PHITS Monte Carlo Code Parameters for Uniform Scanning Proton Beam Based On Simulation with FLUKA General-Purpose Code

    SciTech Connect

    Kurosu, K; Takashina, M; Koizumi, M; Das, I; Moskvin, V

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo codes are becoming important tools for proton beam dosimetry. However, the relationships between the customizing parameters and percentage depth dose (PDD) of GATE and PHITS codes have not been reported which are studied for PDD and proton range compared to the FLUKA code and the experimental data. Methods: The beam delivery system of the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center was modeled for the uniform scanning beam in FLUKA and transferred identically into GATE and PHITS. This computational model was built from the blue print and validated with the commissioning data. Three parameters evaluated are the maximum step size, cut off energy and physical and transport model. The dependence of the PDDs on the customizing parameters was compared with the published results of previous studies. Results: The optimal parameters for the simulation of the whole beam delivery system were defined by referring to the calculation results obtained with each parameter. Although the PDDs from FLUKA and the experimental data show a good agreement, those of GATE and PHITS obtained with our optimal parameters show a minor discrepancy. The measured proton range R90 was 269.37 mm, compared to the calculated range of 269.63 mm, 268.96 mm, and 270.85 mm with FLUKA, GATE and PHITS, respectively. Conclusion: We evaluated the dependence of the results for PDDs obtained with GATE and PHITS Monte Carlo generalpurpose codes on the customizing parameters by using the whole computational model of the treatment nozzle. The optimal parameters for the simulation were then defined by referring to the calculation results. The physical model, particle transport mechanics and the different geometrybased descriptions need accurate customization in three simulation codes to agree with experimental data for artifact-free Monte Carlo simulation. This study was supported by Grants-in Aid for Cancer Research (H22-3rd Term Cancer Control-General-043) from the Ministry of Health

  6. Finite-size effects in dissipative particle dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, María Eugenia; Gama-Goicochea, Armando; González-Melchor, Minerva; Neria, Maricela; Alejandre, José

    2006-02-28

    We have performed dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations to evaluate the effect that finite size of transversal area has on stress anisotropy and interfacial tension. The simulations were carried out in one phase and two phases in parallelepiped cells. In one-phase simulations there is no finite-size effect on stress anisotropy when the simulation is performed using repulsive forces. However, an oscillatory function of stress anisotropy is found for attractive-repulsive interactions. In the case of liquid-liquid interfaces with repulsive interaction between molecules, there is only a small effect of surface area on interfacial tension when the simulations are performed using the Monte Carlo method at constant temperature and normal pressure. An important but artificial finite-size effect of interfacial area on surface tension is found in simulations in the canonical ensemble. Reliable results of interfacial tension from DPD simulations can be obtained using small systems, less than 2000 particles, when they interact exclusively with repulsive forces.

  7. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Particle Laden Flows in Microfluidic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Clague, D S; Weisgraber, T; Wheeler, E; Hon, G; Radford, J; Gascoyne, P; Smity, R; Liepmann, D; Meinhart, C; Santiago, J; Krulevitch, P

    2003-07-22

    The goal of this effort was to develop dynamic simulation tools to study and characterize particulate transport in Microfluidic devices. This includes the effects of external fields and near-field particle-particle, particle-surface interactions. The unique aspect of this effort is that we focused on the particles in suspension and rigorously accounted for all of the interactions that they experienced in solution. In contrast, other numerical methods within the program, finite element and finite volume approaches, typically treat the suspended species as non-interacting point particles. Later in the program, some of these approaches incorporated approximations to begin to account for particle-particle interactions. Through the programs (BioFlips and SIMBIOSYS), we developed collaborative relationships with device-oriented efforts. More specifically and at the request of the SIMBIOSYS program manager, we allowed our efforts/milestones to be more guided by the needs of our BioFlips colleagues; therefore, our efforts were focused on the needs of the MD Anderson Cancer Center (Peter Gascoyne), UCDavis (Rosemary Smith), and UC Berkeley (Dorian Liepmann). The first two collaborations involved the development of Dielectrophoresis analysis tools and the later involved the development of suspension and fluid modeling tools for microneedles.

  8. Simulation of particle size distributions in Polar Mesospheric Clouds from Microphysical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, G. E.; Merkel, A.; Bardeen, C.; Rusch, D. W.; Lumpe, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    The size distribution of ice particles is perhaps the most important observable aspect of microphysical processes in Polar Mesospheric Cloud (PMC) formation and evolution. A conventional technique to derive such information is from optical observation of scattering, either passive solar scattering from photometric or spectrometric techniques, or active backscattering by lidar. We present simulated size distributions from two state-of-the-art models using CARMA sectional microphysics: WACCM/CARMA, in which CARMA is interactively coupled with WACCM3 (Bardeen et al, 2009), and stand-alone CARMA forced by WACCM3 meteorology (Merkel et al, this meeting). Both models provide well-resolved size distributions of ice particles as a function of height, location and time for realistic high-latitude summertime conditions. In this paper we present calculations of the UV scattered brightness at multiple scattering angles as viewed by the AIM Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) satellite experiment. These simulations are then considered discretely-sampled “data” for the scattering phase function, which are inverted using a technique (Lumpe et al, this meeting) to retrieve particle size information. We employ a T-matrix scattering code which applies to a wide range of non-sphericity of the ice particles, using the conventional idealized prolate/oblate spheroidal shape. This end-to-end test of the relatively new scattering phase function technique provides insight into both the retrieval accuracy and the information content in passive remote sensing of PMC.

  9. Programmable physical parameter optimization for particle plasma simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragan-Kelley, Benjamin; Verboncoeur, John; Lin, Ming-Chieh

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a scheme for interactive and programmable optimization of physical parameters for plasma simulations. The simulation code Object-Oriented Plasma Device 1-D (OOPD1) has been adapted to a Python interface, allowing sophisticated user or program interaction with simulations, and detailed numerical analysis via numpy. Because the analysis/diagnostic interface is the same as the input mechanism (the Python programming language), it is straightforward to optimize simulation parameters based on analysis of previous runs and automate the optimization process using a user-determined scheme and criteria. An example use case of the Child-Langmuir space charge limit in bipolar flow is demonstrated, where the beam current is iterated upon by measuring the relationship of the measured current and the injected current.

  10. Medium-rate speech coding simulator for mobile satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copperi, Maurizio; Perosino, F.; Rusina, F.; Albertengo, G.; Biglieri, E.

    1986-01-01

    Channel modeling and error protection schemes for speech coding are described. A residual excited linear predictive (RELP) coder for bit rates 4.8, 7.2, and 9.6 kbit/sec is outlined. The coder at 9.6 kbit/sec incorporates a number of channel error protection techniques, such as bit interleaving, error correction codes, and parameter repetition. Results of formal subjective experiments (DRT and DAM tests) under various channel conditions, reveal that the proposed coder outperforms conventional LPC-10 vocoders by 2 subjective categories, thus confirming the suitability of the RELP coder at 9.6 kbit/sec for good quality speech transmission in mobile satellite systems.

  11. Simulation of bronchial mucociliary clearance of insoluble particles by computational fluid and particle dynamics methods.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Arpád; Szöke, István

    2013-08-01

    For a correct assessment of health consequences of inhaled aerosols as a function of dose, whether for environmental, occupational or therapeutic agents, knowledge of their deposition distribution in the respiratory tract and subsequent clearance is important. The objective of this study is to model particle clearance at bronchial airway bifurcation level and to analyze the combined effect of deposition and clearance. For this purpose, a numerical model has been implemented. Air and mucus flow fields were computed in a model bronchial airway bifurcation. Inhaled particles with 1 and 10 µm aerodynamic diameters were tracked to determine deposition and clearance patterns. Simulation results revealed the existence of a slow clearance zone around the peak of the airway bifurcation causing delayed clearance of the particles depositing or entering here. Particles clearing up from the deeper airways and crossing the studied bifurcation do not accumulate in this zone, because of their tendency to avoid it. The average residence time of these particles was around 20 min independently of particle size (whether it is 1 or 10 µm). However, as a result of the superposition of deposition and clearance mechanisms, the final spatial distribution of particles deposited primarily in the target bifurcation is size dependent, because deposition is size specific. Although deposition density of particles deposited in the slow clearance area is one-two orders of magnitude higher than the average deposition density, these values are reduced by clearance by the factors of 4-7, depending on the particle size and the surface area of the selected slow clearance zone. In conclusion, although particle deposition is inhomogeneous, clearance can significantly decrease the degree of spatial non-uniformity of the particles. Therefore, for a correct assessment of doses at local levels, it is important to consider both deposition and clearance. Although future research may overwrite some of

  12. A Comparison Between GATE and MCNPX Monte Carlo Codes in Simulation of Medical Linear Accelerator

    PubMed Central

    Sadoughi, Hamid-Reza; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Momennezhad, Mahdi; Sadeghi, Hamid-Reza; Bahreyni-Toosi, Mohammad-Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy dose calculations can be evaluated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with acceptable accuracy for dose prediction in complicated treatment plans. In this work, Standard, Livermore and Penelope electromagnetic (EM) physics packages of GEANT4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) 6.1 were compared versus Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) 2.6 in simulation of 6 MV photon Linac. To do this, similar geometry was used for the two codes. The reference values of percentage depth dose (PDD) and beam profiles were obtained using a 6 MV Elekta Compact linear accelerator, Scanditronix water phantom and diode detectors. No significant deviations were found in PDD, dose profile, energy spectrum, radial mean energy and photon radial distribution, which were calculated by Standard and Livermore EM models and MCNPX, respectively. Nevertheless, the Penelope model showed an extreme difference. Statistical uncertainty in all the simulations was <1%, namely 0.51%, 0.27%, 0.27% and 0.29% for PDDs of 10 cm2× 10 cm2 filed size, for MCNPX, Standard, Livermore and Penelope models, respectively. Differences between spectra in various regions, in radial mean energy and in photon radial distribution were due to different cross section and stopping power data and not the same simulation of physics processes of MCNPX and three EM models. For example, in the Standard model, the photoelectron direction was sampled from the Gavrila-Sauter distribution, but the photoelectron moved in the same direction of the incident photons in the photoelectric process of Livermore and Penelope models. Using the same primary electron beam, the Standard and Livermore EM models of GATE and MCNPX showed similar output, but re-tuning of primary electron beam is needed for the Penelope model. PMID:24696804

  13. A Comparison Between GATE and MCNPX Monte Carlo Codes in Simulation of Medical Linear Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Sadoughi, Hamid-Reza; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Momennezhad, Mahdi; Sadeghi, Hamid-Reza; Bahreyni-Toosi, Mohammad-Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy dose calculations can be evaluated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with acceptable accuracy for dose prediction in complicated treatment plans. In this work, Standard, Livermore and Penelope electromagnetic (EM) physics packages of GEANT4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) 6.1 were compared versus Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) 2.6 in simulation of 6 MV photon Linac. To do this, similar geometry was used for the two codes. The reference values of percentage depth dose (PDD) and beam profiles were obtained using a 6 MV Elekta Compact linear accelerator, Scanditronix water phantom and diode detectors. No significant deviations were found in PDD, dose profile, energy spectrum, radial mean energy and photon radial distribution, which were calculated by Standard and Livermore EM models and MCNPX, respectively. Nevertheless, the Penelope model showed an extreme difference. Statistical uncertainty in all the simulations was <1%, namely 0.51%, 0.27%, 0.27% and 0.29% for PDDs of 10 cm(2)× 10 cm(2) filed size, for MCNPX, Standard, Livermore and Penelope models, respectively. Differences between spectra in various regions, in radial mean energy and in photon radial distribution were due to different cross section and stopping power data and not the same simulation of physics processes of MCNPX and three EM models. For example, in the Standard model, the photoelectron direction was sampled from the Gavrila-Sauter distribution, but the photoelectron moved in the same direction of the incident photons in the photoelectric process of Livermore and Penelope models. Using the same primary electron beam, the Standard and Livermore EM models of GATE and MCNPX showed similar output, but re-tuning of primary electron beam is needed for the Penelope model.

  14. GPU accelerated simulations of 3D deterministic particle transport using discrete ordinates method

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Chunye; Liu Jie; Chi Lihua; Huang Haowei; Fang Jingyue; Gong Zhenghu

    2011-07-01

    Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), originally developed for real-time, high-definition 3D graphics in computer games, now provides great faculty in solving scientific applications. The basis of particle transport simulation is the time-dependent, multi-group, inhomogeneous Boltzmann transport equation. The numerical solution to the Boltzmann equation involves the discrete ordinates (S{sub n}) method and the procedure of source iteration. In this paper, we present a GPU accelerated simulation of one energy group time-independent deterministic discrete ordinates particle transport in 3D Cartesian geometry (Sweep3D). The performance of the GPU simulations are reported with the simulations of vacuum boundary condition. The discussion of the relative advantages and disadvantages of the GPU implementation, the simulation on multi GPUs, the programming effort and code portability are also reported. The results show that the overall performance speedup of one NVIDIA Tesla M2050 GPU ranges from 2.56 compared with one Intel Xeon X5670 chip to 8.14 compared with one Intel Core Q6600 chip for no flux fixup. The simulation with flux fixup on one M2050 is 1.23 times faster than on one X5670.

  15. Modeling of Dose Distribution for a Proton Beam Delivering System with the use of the Multi-Particle Transport Code 'Fluka'

    SciTech Connect

    Mumot, Marta; Agapov, Alexey

    2007-11-26

    We have developed a new delivering system for hadron therapy which uses a multileaf collimator and a range shifter. We simulate our delivering beam system with the multi-particle transport code 'Fluka'. From these simulations we obtained information about the dose distributions, about stars generated in the delivering system elements and also information about the neutron flux. All the informations obtained were analyzed from the point of view of radiation protection, homogeneity of beam delivery to patient body, and also in order to improve some modifiers used.

  16. Simulated data and code for analysis of herpetofauna response to forest management in the Missouri Ozarks.

    PubMed

    Rota, Christopher T; Wolf, Alexander J; Renken, Rochelle B; Gitzen, Robert A; Fantz, Debby K; Montgomery, Robert A; Olson, Matthew G; Vangilder, Larry D; Millspaugh, Joshua J

    2016-12-01

    We present predictor variables and R and Stan code for simulating and analyzing counts of Missouri Ozark herpetofauna in response to three forest management strategies. Our code performs four primary purposes: import predictor variables from spreadsheets; simulate synthetic response variables based on imported predictor variables and user-supplied values for data-generating parameters; format synthetic data for export to Stan; and analyze synthetic data.

  17. Large-timestep mover for particle simulations of arbitrarilymagnetized species

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Vay, J-L.

    2007-03-26

    For self-consistent ion-beam simulations including electron motion, it is desirable to be able to follow electron dynamics accurately without being constrained by the electron cyclotron timescale. To this end, we have developed a particle-advance that interpolates between full particle dynamics and drift motion. By making a proper choice of interpolation parameter, simulation particles experience physically correct parallel dynamics, drift motion, and gyroradius when the timestep is large compared to the cyclotron period, though the effective gyro frequency is artificially low; in the opposite timestep limit, the method approaches a conventional Boris particle push. By combining this scheme with a Poisson solver that includes an interpolated form of the polarization drift in the dielectric response, the movers utility can be extended to higher-density problems where the plasma frequency of the species being advanced exceeds its cyclotron frequency. We describe a series of tests of the mover and its application to simulation of electron clouds in heavy-ion accelerators.

  18. An approach for coupled-code multiphysics core simulations from a common input

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Rodney; Belcourt, Kenneth; Hooper, Russell; Pawlowski, Roger P.; Clarno, Kevin T.; Simunovic, Srdjan; Slattery, Stuart R.; Turner, John A.; Palmtag, Scott

    2014-12-10

    This study describes an approach for coupled-code multiphysics reactor core simulations that is being developed by the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA) project in the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light-Water Reactors (CASL). In this approach a user creates a single problem description, called the “VERAIn” common input file, to define and setup the desired coupled-code reactor core simulation. A preprocessing step accepts the VERAIn file and generates a set of fully consistent input files for the different physics codes being coupled. The problem is then solved using a single-executable coupled-code simulation tool applicable to the problem, which is built using VERA infrastructure software tools and the set of physics codes required for the problem of interest. The approach is demonstrated by performing an eigenvalue and power distribution calculation of a typical three-dimensional 17 × 17 assembly with thermal–hydraulic and fuel temperature feedback. All neutronics aspects of the problem (cross-section calculation, neutron transport, power release) are solved using the Insilico code suite and are fully coupled to a thermal–hydraulic analysis calculated by the Cobra-TF (CTF) code. The single-executable coupled-code (Insilico-CTF) simulation tool is created using several VERA tools, including LIME (Lightweight Integrating Multiphysics Environment for coupling codes), DTK (Data Transfer Kit), Trilinos, and TriBITS. Parallel calculations are performed on the Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using 1156 cores, and a synopsis of the solution results and code performance is presented. Finally, ongoing development of this approach is also briefly described.

  19. An approach for coupled-code multiphysics core simulations from a common input

    DOE PAGES

    Schmidt, Rodney; Belcourt, Kenneth; Hooper, Russell; ...

    2014-12-10

    This study describes an approach for coupled-code multiphysics reactor core simulations that is being developed by the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA) project in the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light-Water Reactors (CASL). In this approach a user creates a single problem description, called the “VERAIn” common input file, to define and setup the desired coupled-code reactor core simulation. A preprocessing step accepts the VERAIn file and generates a set of fully consistent input files for the different physics codes being coupled. The problem is then solved using a single-executable coupled-code simulation tool applicable to the problem, which ismore » built using VERA infrastructure software tools and the set of physics codes required for the problem of interest. The approach is demonstrated by performing an eigenvalue and power distribution calculation of a typical three-dimensional 17 × 17 assembly with thermal–hydraulic and fuel temperature feedback. All neutronics aspects of the problem (cross-section calculation, neutron transport, power release) are solved using the Insilico code suite and are fully coupled to a thermal–hydraulic analysis calculated by the Cobra-TF (CTF) code. The single-executable coupled-code (Insilico-CTF) simulation tool is created using several VERA tools, including LIME (Lightweight Integrating Multiphysics Environment for coupling codes), DTK (Data Transfer Kit), Trilinos, and TriBITS. Parallel calculations are performed on the Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using 1156 cores, and a synopsis of the solution results and code performance is presented. Finally, ongoing development of this approach is also briefly described.« less

  20. MPPhys—A many-particle simulation package for computational physics education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    In a first course to classical mechanics elementary physical processes like elastic two-body collisions, the mass-spring model, or the gravitational two-body problem are discussed in detail. The continuation to many-body systems, however, is deferred to graduate courses although the underlying equations of motion are essentially the same and although there is a strong motivation for high-school students in particular because of the use of particle systems in computer games. The missing link between the simple and the more complex problem is a basic introduction to solve the equations of motion numerically which could be illustrated, however, by means of the Euler method. The many-particle physics simulation package MPPhys offers a platform to experiment with simple particle simulations. The aim is to give a principle idea how to implement many-particle simulations and how simulation and visualization can be combined for interactive visual explorations. Catalogue identifier: AERR_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AERR_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 111327 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 608411 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++, OpenGL, GLSL, OpenCL. Computer: Linux and Windows platforms with OpenGL support. Operating system: Linux and Windows. RAM: Source Code 4.5 MB Complete package 242 MB Classification: 14, 16.9. External routines: OpenGL, OpenCL Nature of problem: Integrate N-body simulations, mass-spring models Solution method: Numerical integration of N-body-simulations, 3D-Rendering via OpenGL. Running time: Problem dependent

  1. Application of GPU processing for Brownian particle simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Way Lee; Sheharyar, Ali; Sadr, Reza; Bouhali, Othmane

    2015-01-01

    Reports on the anomalous thermal-fluid properties of nanofluids (dilute suspension of nano-particles in a base fluid) have been the subject of attention for 15 years. The underlying physics that govern nanofluid behavior, however, is not fully understood and is a subject of much dispute. The interactions between the suspended particles and the base fluid have been cited as a major contributor to the improvement in heat transfer reported in the literature. Numerical simulations are instrumental in studying the behavior of nanofluids. However, such simulations can be computationally intensive due to the small dimensions and complexity of these problems. In this study, a simplified computational approach for isothermal nanofluid simulations was applied, and simulations were conducted using both conventional CPU and parallel GPU implementations. The GPU implementations significantly improved the computational performance, in terms of the simulation time, by a factor of 1000-2500. The results of this investigation show that, as the computational load increases, the simulation efficiency approaches a constant. At a very high computational load, the amount of improvement may even decrease due to limited system memory.

  2. Optimized Loading for Particle-in-cell Gyrokinetic Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2004-05-13

    The problem of particle loading in particle-in-cell gyrokinetic simulations is addressed using a quadratic optimization algorithm. Optimized loading in configuration space dramatically reduces the short wavelength modes in the electrostatic potential that are partly responsible for the non-conservation of total energy; further, the long wavelength modes are resolved with good accuracy. As a result, the conservation of energy for the optimized loading is much better that the conservation of energy for the random loading. The method is valid for any geometry and can be coupled to optimization algorithms in velocity space.

  3. Closures for Course-Grid Simulation of Fluidized Gas-Particle Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran Sundaresan

    2010-02-14

    Gas-particle flows in fluidized beds and riser reactors are inherently unstable, and they manifest fluctuations over a wide range of length and time scales. Two-fluid models for such flows reveal unstable modes whose length scale is as small as ten particle diameters. Yet, because of limited computational resources, gas-particle flows in large fluidized beds are invariably simulated by solving discretized versions of the two-fluid model equations over a coarse spatial grid. Such coarse-grid simulations do not resolve the small-scale spatial structures which are known to affect the macroscale flow structures both qualitatively and quantitatively. Thus there is a need to develop filtered two-fluid models which are suitable for coarse-grid simulations and capturing the effect of the small-scale structures through closures in terms of the filtered variables. The overall objective of the project is to develop validated closures for filtered two-fluid models for gas-particle flows, with the transport gasifier as a primary, motivating example. In this project, highly resolved three-dimensional simulations of a kinetic theory based two-fluid model for gas-particle flows have been performed and the statistical information on structures in the 100-1000 particle diameters length scale has been extracted. Based on these results, closures for filtered two-fluid models have been constructed. The filtered model equations and closures have been validated against experimental data and the results obtained in highly resolved simulations of gas-particle flows. The proposed project enables more accurate simulations of not only the transport gasifier, but also many other non-reacting and reacting gas-particle flows in a variety of chemical reactors. The results of this study are in the form of closures which can readily be incorporated into existing multi-phase flow codes such as MFIX (www.mfix.org). Therefore, the benefits of this study can be realized quickly. The training provided

  4. Simulation of chemical reaction via particle tracking: Diffusion-limited versus thermodynamic rate-limited regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, David A.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2008-12-01

    Chemical reactions may be simulated without regard to local concentrations by applying simple probabilistic rules of particle interaction and combination. The forward reaction A + B→ C is coded by calculating the probability that any A and B particles will occupy the same volume over some time interval. This becomes a convolution of the location densities of the two particles. The backward reaction is a simple exponential decay of C particles into A and B particles. When the mixing of reactants is not a limiting process, the classical thermodynamic reaction rates are reproduced. When low mixing (as by diffusion) limits the reaction probabilities, the reaction rates drop significantly, including the rate of approach to global equilibrium. At long enough times, the law of mass action is reproduced exactly in the mean, with some irreducible deviation in the local equilibrium saturations (the equilibrium constant divided by the mass action expression) away from unity. The saturation variability is not sensitive to numerical parameters but depends strongly on how far from equilibrium the system is initiated. This is simply due to a relative paucity of particles of some species as the reaction moves far to one side or the other.

  5. Implementation of a flexible and scalable particle-in-cell method for massively parallel computations in the mantle convection code ASPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassmöller, Rene; Bangerth, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    modern advection-field approach, and demonstrate under which conditions which method is more efficient. We implemented the presented methods in ASPECT (aspect.dealii.org), a freely available open-source community code for geodynamic simulations. The structure of the particle code is highly modular, and segregated from the PDE solver, and can thus be easily transferred to other programs, or adapted for various application cases.

  6. User Manual and Source Code for a LAMMPS Implementation of Constant Energy Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD-E)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Distribution List 20 iv INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK. 1 The constant energy dissipative particle dynamics ( DPD -E) method is implemented into the Large-Scale...User Manual and Source Code for a LAMMPS Implementation of Constant Energy Dissipative Particle Dynamics ( DPD -E) by James P. Larentzos...Energy Dissipative Particle Dynamics ( DPD -E) James P. Larentzos Engility Corporation John K. Brennan, Joshua D. Moore, and William D. Mattson

  7. Accelerating dissipative particle dynamics simulations on GPUs: Algorithms, numerics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yu-Hang; Karniadakis, George Em

    2014-11-01

    We present a scalable dissipative particle dynamics simulation code, fully implemented on the Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) using a hybrid CUDA/MPI programming model, which achieves 10-30 times speedup on a single GPU over 16 CPU cores and almost linear weak scaling across a thousand nodes. A unified framework is developed within which the efficient generation of the neighbor list and maintaining particle data locality are addressed. Our algorithm generates strictly ordered neighbor lists in parallel, while the construction is deterministic and makes no use of atomic operations or sorting. Such neighbor list leads to optimal data loading efficiency when combined with a two-level particle reordering scheme. A faster in situ generation scheme for Gaussian random numbers is proposed using precomputed binary signatures. We designed custom transcendental functions that are fast and accurate for evaluating the pairwise interaction. The correctness and accuracy of the code is verified through a set of test cases simulating Poiseuille flow and spontaneous vesicle formation. Computer benchmarks demonstrate the speedup of our implementation over the CPU implementation as well as strong and weak scalability. A large-scale simulation of spontaneous vesicle formation consisting of 128 million particles was conducted to further illustrate the practicality of our code in real-world applications. Catalogue identifier: AETN_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETN_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 602 716 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 26 489 166 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C/C++, CUDA C/C++, MPI. Computer: Any computers having nVidia GPGPUs with compute capability 3.0. Operating system: Linux. Has the code been

  8. Solution of Poisson's equation in electrostatic Particle-In-Cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahnfeld, Daniel; Schneider, Ralf; Matyash, Konstantin; Lüskow, Karl; Bandelow, Gunnar; Kalentev, Oleksandr; Duras, Julia; Kemnitz, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    For spacecrafts the concept of ion thrusters presents a very efficient method of propulsion. Optimization of thrusters is imperative, but experimental access is difficult. Plasma simulations offer means to understand the plasma physics within an ion thruster and can aid the design of new thruster concepts. In order to achieve best simulation performances, code optimizations and parallelization strategies need to be investigated. In this work the role of different solution strategies for Poisson's equation in electrostatic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the HEMP-DM3a ion thruster was studied. The direct solution method of LU decomposition is compared to a stationary iterative method, the successive over-relaxation solver. Results and runtime of solvers were compared, and an outlook on further improvements and developments is presented. This work was supported by the German Space Agency DLR through Project 50RS1510..

  9. Simulation of Au particle interaction on graphene sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mcleod, A.; Vernon, K. C.; Rider, A. E.; Ostrikov, K.

    2013-09-01

    The interaction of Au particles with few layer graphene is of interest for the formation of the next generation of sensing devices 1. In this paper we investigate the coupling of single gold nanoparticles to a graphene sheet, and multiple gold nanoparticles with a graphene sheet using COMSOL Multiphysics. By using these simulations we are able to determine the electric field strength and associated hot-spots for various gold nanoparticle-graphene systems. The Au nanoparticles were modelled as 8 nm diameter spheres on 1.5 nm thick (5 layers) graphene, with properties of graphene obtained from the refractive index data of Weber 2 and the Au refractive index data from Palik 3. The field was incident along the plane of the sheet with polarisation tested for both s and p. The study showed strong localised interaction between the Au and graphene with limited spread; however the double particle case where the graphene sheet separated two Au nanoparticles showed distinct interaction between the particles and graphene. An offset was introduced (up to 4 nm) resulting in much reduced coupling between the opposed particles as the distance apart increased. Findings currently suggest that the graphene layer has limited interaction with incident fields with a single particle present whilst reducing the coupling region to a very fine area when opposing particles are involved. It is hoped that the results of this research will provide insight into graphene-plasmon interactions and spur the development of the next generation of sensing devices.

  10. Large Eddy Simulation of Flow in Turbine Cascades Using LEST and UNCLE Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David (Technical Monitor); Huang, P. G.

    2004-01-01

    During the period December 23, 1997 and December August 31, 2004, we accomplished the development of 2 CFD codes for DNS/LES/RANS simulation of turbine cascade flows, namely LESTool and UNCLE. LESTool is a structured code making use of 5th order upwind differencing scheme and UNCLE is a second-order-accuracy unstructured code. LESTool has both Dynamic SGS and Sparlart's DES models and UNCLE makes use of URANS and DES models. The current report provides a description of methodologies used in the codes.

  11. Large Eddy Simulation of Flow in Turbine Cascades Using LESTool and UNCLE Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, P. G.

    2004-01-01

    During the period December 23,1997 and December August 31,2004, we accomplished the development of 2 CFD codes for DNS/LES/RANS simulation of turbine cascade flows, namely LESTool and UNCLE. LESTool is a structured code making use of 5th order upwind differencing scheme and UNCLE is a second-order-accuracy unstructured code. LESTool has both Dynamic SGS and Spalart's DES models and UNCLE makes use of URANS and DES models. The current report provides a description of methodologies used in the codes.

  12. Numerical simulation of particle dynamics at a fluid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Pengtao

    2016-11-01

    Particles straddling a fluid interface exhibit rich dynamics due to the coexistence of moving boundaries, fluid interfaces, and moving contact lines. For instance, as a particle falls onto a liquid surface, it may sink, float, or even bounce off depending on a wide range of parameters. To better understand the dynamics of such a multiphase system, we develop a finite-element based arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian-phase-field method. The governing equations for particles and fluids are solved in a unified variational framework that satisfies an energy law. We first validate our code by computing three problems found in literature: sinking of a horizontal cylinder through an air-water interface, sinking of a sphere through an air-oil interface at small Reynolds numbers, and bouncing of a sphere after its normal impact onto an air-water interface. Our numerical results show good agreements with experimental data. We then investigate the effect of wetting properties, including static contact angle, slip length, and wall energy relaxation, on particle dynamics at the fluid interface. This work is supported by NSF DMS-1522604.

  13. The development of the fast-running simulation pressurized water reactor plant analyzer code (NUPAC-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, K.; Terashita, N.; Ogino, T. . Central Research Lab.)

    1989-06-01

    This article discusses a pressurized water reactor plant analyzer code (NUPAC-1) has been developed to apply to an operator support system or an advanced training simulator. The simulation code must produce reasonably accurate results as well as fun in a fast mode for realizing functions such as anomaly detection, estimation of unobservable plant internal states, and prediction of plant state trends. The NUPAC-1 code adopts fast computing methods, i.e., the table fitting method of the state variables, time-step control, and calculation control of heat transfer coefficients, in order to attain accuracy and fast-running capability.

  14. Thermochemistry Models Applicable to a Vectorized Particle Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Brian Lee

    1991-02-01

    The finite rates of reactions and thermal excitation processes in a gas result in thermochemical non-equilibrium in the hypersonic rarefied flowfield associated with vehicles during atmospheric entry. The low-density nature of this flow is such that the familiar Navier-Stokes equations are not applicable. Alternatively, particle simulation methods circumvent the difficulties of rarefaction by modeling the gas as a collection of moving and colliding particles in accordance with the principles of kinetic theory and statistical mechanics. The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of Bird has been applied extensively but is limited by excessive computational expense. An alternative particle simulation, tailored specifically to the vector-processing architecture of modern supercomputers, has been developed by Baganoff and McDonald to optimize computational performance in modeling the three-dimensional non-reactive flow of general gas mixtures including simple models for rotational and vibrational relaxation. The objective of this thesis is to extend the vectorized simulation to treat chemically reactive flows and to enhance the models for vibrational relaxation. A collision selection rule has been developed to yield vibrational relaxation rates which match the experimental fits of Millikan and White. Selection rules for dissociation, atomic exchange, and recombination reactions were developed to yield reaction rates which match those dictated by the Arrhenius experimental fits over the temperature range of interest. The vibrational relaxation mechanics model of McDonald was modified for application to both the simple harmonic and anharmonic oscillator descriptions of the quantized vibrational mode. Reaction mechanics are modeled by proportional addition or removal of reaction energy from each contributing mode in a collision. All of these models retain computational simplicity while satisfying detailed balance and promoting equilibrium. An improved reaction model

  15. Applications of the lahet simulation code to relativistic heavy ion detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, L.; Gavron, A.

    1991-12-31

    The Los Alamos High Energy Transport (LAHET) simulation code has been applied to test beam data from the lead/scintillator Participant Calorimeter of BNL AGS experiment E814. The LAHET code treats hadronic interactions with the LANL version of the Oak Ridge code HETC. LAHET has now been expanded to handle hadrons with kinetic energies greater than 5 GeV with the FLUKA code, while HETC is used exclusively below 2.0 GeV. FLUKA is phased in linearly between 2.0 and 5.0 GeV. Transport of electrons and photons is done with EGS4, and an interface to the Los Alamos HMCNP3B library based code is provided to analyze neutrons with kinetic energies less than 20 MeV. Excellent agreement is found between the test data and simulation, and results for 2.46 GeV/c protons and pions are illustrated in this article.

  16. Electromagnetic simulations of the ASDEX Upgrade ICRF Antenna with the TOPICA code

    SciTech Connect

    Krivska, A.; Milanesio, D.; Bobkov, V.; Braun, F.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2009-11-26

    Accurate and efficient simulation tools are necessary to optimize the ICRF antenna design for a set of operational conditions. The TOPICA code was developed for performance prediction and for the analysis of ICRF antenna systems in the presence of plasma, given realistic antenna geometries. Fully 3D antenna geometries can be adopted in TOPICA, just as in available commercial codes. But while those commercial codes cannot operate with a plasma loading, the TOPICA code correctly accounts for realistic plasma loading conditions, by means of the coupling with 1D FELICE code. This paper presents the evaluation of the electric current distribution on the structure, of the parallel electric field in the region between the straps and the plasma and the computation of sheaths driving RF potentials. Results of TOPICA simulations will help to optimize and re-design the ICRF ASDEX Upgrade antenna in order to reduce tungsten (W) sputtering attributed to the rectified sheath effect during ICRF operation.

  17. PyMercury: Interactive Python for the Mercury Monte Carlo Particle Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Iandola, F N; O'Brien, M J; Procassini, R J

    2010-11-29

    Monte Carlo particle transport applications are often written in low-level languages (C/C++) for optimal performance on clusters and supercomputers. However, this development approach often sacrifices straightforward usability and testing in the interest of fast application performance. To improve usability, some high-performance computing applications employ mixed-language programming with high-level and low-level languages. In this study, we consider the benefits of incorporating an interactive Python interface into a Monte Carlo application. With PyMercury, a new Python extension to the Mercury general-purpose Monte Carlo particle transport code, we improve application usability without diminishing performance. In two case studies, we illustrate how PyMercury improves usability and simplifies testing and validation in a Monte Carlo application. In short, PyMercury demonstrates the value of interactive Python for Monte Carlo particle transport applications. In the future, we expect interactive Python to play an increasingly significant role in Monte Carlo usage and testing.

  18. SuSpect: A Fortran code for the Supersymmetric and Higgs particle spectrum in the MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djouadi, Abdelhak; Kneur, Jean-Loïc; Moultaka, Gilbert

    2007-03-01

    We present the FORTRAN code SuSpect version 2.3, which calculates the Supersymmetric and Higgs particle spectrum in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). The calculation can be performed in constrained models with universal boundary conditions at high scales such as the gravity (mSUGRA), anomaly (AMSB) or gauge (GMSB) mediated supersymmetry breaking models, but also in the non-universal MSSM case with R-parity and CP conservation. Care has been taken to treat important features such as the renormalization group evolution of parameters between low and high energy scales, the consistent implementation of radiative electroweak symmetry breaking and the calculation of the physical masses of the Higgs bosons and supersymmetric particles taking into account the dominant radiative corrections. Some checks of important theoretical and experimental features, such as the absence of non-desired minima, large fine-tuning in the electroweak symmetry breaking condition, as well as agreement with precision measurements can be performed. The program is simple to use, self-contained and can easily be linked to other codes; it is rather fast and flexible, thus allowing scans of the parameter space with several possible options and choices for model assumptions and approximations. Catalogue identifier:ADYR_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYR_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions:none Programming language used:FORTRAN 77 Computer:Unix machines, PC No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:21 821 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:249 657 Distribution format:tar.gz Operating system:Unix (or Linux) RAM:approximately 2500 Kbytes Number of processors used:1 processor Nature of problem:SuSpect calculates the supersymmetric and Higgs particle spectrum (masses and some other relevant parameters) in the unconstrained Minimal

  19. Wavelet-based Poisson Solver for use in Particle-In-CellSimulations

    SciTech Connect

    Terzic, B.; Mihalcea, D.; Bohn, C.L.; Pogorelov, I.V.

    2005-05-13

    We report on a successful implementation of a wavelet based Poisson solver for use in 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. One new aspect of our algorithm is its ability to treat the general(inhomogeneous) Dirichlet boundary conditions (BCs). The solver harnesses advantages afforded by the wavelet formulation, such as sparsity of operators and data sets, existence of effective preconditioners, and the ability simultaneously to remove numerical noise and further compress relevant data sets. Having tested our method as a stand-alone solver on two model problems, we merged it into IMPACT-T to obtain a fully functional serial PIC code. We present and discuss preliminary results of application of the new code to the modeling of the Fermilab/NICADD and AES/JLab photoinjectors.

  20. Simulation of Cell Adhesion using a Particle Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer

    2005-11-01

    An efficient computational method for simulation of cell adhesion through protein binding forces is discussed. In this method, the cells are represented by deformable elastic particles, and the protein binding is represented by a rate equation. The method is first developed for collision and adhesion of two similar cells impacting on each other from opposite directions. The computational method is then applied in a particle-transport model for a cloud of interacting and colliding cells, each of which are represented by particles of finite size. One application might include red blood cells adhering together to form rouleaux, which are chains of red blood cells that are found in different parts of the circulatory system. Other potential applications include adhesion of platelets to a blood vessel wall or mechanical heart valve, which is a precursor of thrombosis formation, or adhesion of cancer cells to organ walls in the lymphatic, circulatory, digestive or pulmonary systems.

  1. On the Development of a Gridless Inflation Code for Parachute Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    STRICKLAND,JAMES H.; HOMICZ,GREGORY F.; GOSSLER,ALBERT A.; WOLFE,WALTER P.; PORTER,VICKI L.

    2000-08-29

    In this paper the authors present the current status of an unsteady 3D parachute simulation code which is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories under the Department of Energy's Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). The Vortex Inflation PARachute code (VIPAR) which embodies this effort will eventually be able to perform complete numerical simulations of ribbon parachute deployment, inflation, and steady descent. At the present time they have a working serial version of the uncoupled fluids code which can simulate unsteady 3D incompressible flows around bluff bodies made up of triangular membrane elements. A parallel version of the code has just been completed which will allow one to compute flows over complex geometries utilizing several thousand processors on one of the new DOE teraFLOP computers.

  2. Direct particle simulation on the Connection Machine CM-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagum, L.

    1992-01-01

    Particle simulation is a useful technique for analyzing low density flows. The Connection Machine CM-2 is a useful test bed for studying the fine-grain data objects decomposition and the coarse-grain domain decomposition single instruction multiple datastream (SIMD) approaches to particle simulation. Both approaches are investigated for the model problem of uniform flow through a channel and the algorithms required for the SIMD domain decomposition approach are presented. An unresolved issue with the domain decomposition approach is the effect of a poor partitioning on flows with real geometries. Initial results with the channel flow problem indicate that a poor partitioning has only a small detrimental effect on the overall performance.

  3. Hybrid molecular-continuum simulations using smoothed dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Petsev, Nikolai D; Leal, L Gary; Shell, M Scott

    2015-01-28

    We present a new multiscale simulation methodology for coupling a region with atomistic detail simulated via molecular dynamics (MD) to a numerical solution of the fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations obtained from smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD). In this approach, chemical potential gradients emerge due to differences in resolution within the total system and are reduced by introducing a pairwise thermodynamic force inside the buffer region between the two domains where particles change from MD to SDPD types. When combined with a multi-resolution SDPD approach, such as the one proposed by Kulkarni et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 234105 (2013)], this method makes it possible to systematically couple atomistic models to arbitrarily coarse continuum domains modeled as SDPD fluids with varying resolution. We test this technique by showing that it correctly reproduces thermodynamic properties across the entire simulation domain for a simple Lennard-Jones fluid. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this approach is also suitable for non-equilibrium problems by applying it to simulations of the start up of shear flow. The robustness of the method is illustrated with two different flow scenarios in which shear forces act in directions parallel and perpendicular to the interface separating the continuum and atomistic domains. In both cases, we obtain the correct transient velocity profile. We also perform a triple-scale shear flow simulation where we include two SDPD regions with different resolutions in addition to a MD domain, illustrating the feasibility of a three-scale coupling.

  4. Hybrid molecular-continuum simulations using smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Petsev, Nikolai D.; Leal, L. Gary; Shell, M. Scott

    2015-01-28

    We present a new multiscale simulation methodology for coupling a region with atomistic detail simulated via molecular dynamics (MD) to a numerical solution of the fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations obtained from smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD). In this approach, chemical potential gradients emerge due to differences in resolution within the total system and are reduced by introducing a pairwise thermodynamic force inside the buffer region between the two domains where particles change from MD to SDPD types. When combined with a multi-resolution SDPD approach, such as the one proposed by Kulkarni et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 234105 (2013)], this method makes it possible to systematically couple atomistic models to arbitrarily coarse continuum domains modeled as SDPD fluids with varying resolution. We test this technique by showing that it correctly reproduces thermodynamic properties across the entire simulation domain for a simple Lennard-Jones fluid. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this approach is also suitable for non-equilibrium problems by applying it to simulations of the start up of shear flow. The robustness of the method is illustrated with two different flow scenarios in which shear forces act in directions parallel and perpendicular to the interface separating the continuum and atomistic domains. In both cases, we obtain the correct transient velocity profile. We also perform a triple-scale shear flow simulation where we include two SDPD regions with different resolutions in addition to a MD domain, illustrating the feasibility of a three-scale coupling.

  5. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Particle Laden Flows in Microfluidic Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    wide application and will enable the study of colloidal/macromolecular transport in physiological systems, such as, blood filtration in the kidney... MICROFLUIDIC SYSTEMS DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Sponsored by Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency DARPA Order No. E117...Jun 00 – Aug 02 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE LATTICE BOLTZMANN SIMULATION OF PARTICLE LADEN FLOWS IN MICROFLUIDIC SYSTEMS 6. AUTHOR(S) David S

  6. Gyrokinetics Simulation of Energetic Particle Turbulence and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, Patrick H.

    2011-09-21

    Progress in research during this year elucidated the physics of precession resonance and its interaction with radial scattering to form phase space density granulations. Momentum theorems for drift wave-zonal flow systems involving precession resonance were derived. These are directly generalizable to energetic particle modes. A novel nonlinear, subcritical growth mechanism was identified, which has now been verified by simulation. These results strengthen the foundation of our understanding of transport in burning plasmas

  7. Dynamic Simulation of Particles in a Magnetorheological Fluid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    Washington DC 20503. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE June 2008 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND...dipole-dipole interaction. Due to the inherently small size of the particles, drag is modeled using Stokes’ drag. This mathematical model will be... used to create a computer simulation to visualize and analyze the subsequent transient microstructures formed. The model will assume a constant

  8. Simulating entrainment and particle fluxes in stratified estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, A.; Jirka, G.; Lion, L.W.; Brunk, B.

    1999-04-01

    Settling and entrainment are the dominant processes governing noncohesive particle concentration throughout the water column of salt-wedge estuaries. Determination of the relative contribution of these transport processes is complicated by vertical gradients in turbulence and fluid density. A differential-turbulence column (DTC) was designed to simulate a vertical section of a natural water column. With satisfactory characterization of turbulence dissipation and saltwater entrainment, the DTC facilitates controlled studies of suspended particles under estuarine conditions. The vertical decay of turbulence in the DTC was found to obey standard scaling law relations when the characteristic length scale for turbulence in the apparatus was incorporated. The entrainment rate of a density interface also followed established grid-stirred turbulence scaling laws. These relations were used to model the change in concentration of noncohesive particles above a density interface. Model simulations and experimental data from the DTC were consistent over the range of conditions encountered in natural salt-wedge estuaries. Results suggest that when the ratio of entrainment rate to particle settling velocity is small, sedimentation is the dominant transport process, while entrainment becomes significant as the ratio increases.

  9. Constraining Particle Variation in Lunar Regolith for Simulant Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, Christian M.; Rickman, Doug; Stoeser, Douglas; Hoelzer, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Simulants are used by the lunar engineering community to develop and test technologies for In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), excavation and drilling, and for mitigation of hazards to machinery and human health. Working with the United States Geological Survey (USGS), other NASA centers, private industry and academia, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is leading NASA s lunar regolith simulant program. There are two main efforts: simulant production and simulant evaluation. This work requires a highly detailed understanding of regolith particle type, size, and shape distribution, and of bulk density. The project has developed Figure of Merit (FoM) algorithms to quantitatively compare these characteristics between two materials. The FoM can be used to compare two lunar regolith samples, regolith to simulant, or two parcels of simulant. In work presented here, we use the FoM algorithm to examine the variance of particle type in Apollo 16 highlands regolith core and surface samples. For this analysis we have used internally consistent particle type data for the 90-150 m fraction of Apollo core 64001/64002 from station 4, core 60009/60010 from station 10, and surface samples from various Apollo 16 stations. We calculate mean modal compositions for each core and for the group of surface samples and quantitatively compare samples of each group to its mean as a measurement of within-group variance; we also calculate an FoM for every sample against the mean composition of 64001/64002. This gives variation with depth at two locations and between Apollo 16 stations. Of the tested groups, core 60009/60010 has the highest internal variance with an average FoM score of 0.76 and core 64001/64002 has the lowest with an average FoM of 0.92. The surface samples have a low but intermediate internal variance with an average FoM of 0.79. FoM s calculated against the 64001/64002 mean reference composition range from 0.79-0.97 for 64001/64002, from 0.41-0.91 for 60009/60010, and from

  10. Simulation of Surface Ship Dynamics Using Unsteady RANS Codes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    d’acquisition des vehicules militaires par la modelisation avancee et la simulation de produit virtuel] To order the complete compilation report, use...AIAA CFD Conference, Norfolk, VA (Jun 1999). 10. Gaither, J. A., "A Solid Modeling Topology Data Structure for General Grid Generation," Master’s Thesis

  11. A computer code for beam dynamics simulations in SFRFQ structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Chen, J. E.; Lu, Y. R.; Yan, X. Q.; Zhu, K.; Fang, J. X.; Guo, Z. Y.

    2007-03-01

    A computer code (SFRFQCODEv1.0) is developed to analyze the beam dynamics of Separated Function Radio Frequency Quadruples (SFRFQ) structure. Calculations show that the transverse and longitudinal stability can be ensured by selecting proper dynamic and structure parameters. This paper describes the beam dynamical mechanism of SFRFQ, and presents a design example of SFRFQ cavity, which will be used as a post accelerator of a 26 MHz 1 MeV O + Integrated Split Ring (ISR) RFQ and accelerate O + from 1 to 1.5 MeV. Three electrostatic quadruples are adopted to realize the transverse beam matching from ISR RFQ to SFRFQ cavity. This setting is also useful for the beam size adjustment and its applications.

  12. SciDAC Center for Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhihong

    2013-12-18

    During the first year of the SciDAC gyrokinetic particle simulation (GPS) project, the GPS team (Zhihong Lin, Liu Chen, Yasutaro Nishimura, and Igor Holod) at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) studied the tokamak electron transport driven by electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence, and by trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence and ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence with kinetic electron effects, extended our studies of ITG turbulence spreading to core-edge coupling. We have developed and optimized an elliptic solver using finite element method (FEM), which enables the implementation of advanced kinetic electron models (split-weight scheme and hybrid model) in the SciDAC GPS production code GTC. The GTC code has been ported and optimized on both scalar and vector parallel computer architectures, and is being transformed into objected-oriented style to facilitate collaborative code development. During this period, the UCI team members presented 11 invited talks at major national and international conferences, published 22 papers in peer-reviewed journals and 10 papers in conference proceedings. The UCI hosted the annual SciDAC Workshop on Plasma Turbulence sponsored by the GPS Center, 2005-2007. The workshop was attended by about fifties US and foreign researchers and financially sponsored several gradual students from MIT, Princeton University, Germany, Switzerland, and Finland. A new SciDAC postdoc, Igor Holod, has arrived at UCI to initiate global particle simulation of magnetohydrodynamics turbulence driven by energetic particle modes. The PI, Z. Lin, has been promoted to the Associate Professor with tenure at UCI.

  13. Speed-limited particle-in-cell (SLPIC) simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Gregory; Cary, John; Jenkins, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Speed-limited particle-in-cell (SLPIC) simulation is a new method for particle-based plasma simulation that allows increased timesteps in cases where the timestep is determined (e.g., in standard PIC) not by the smallest timescale of interest, but rather by an even smaller physical timescale that affects numerical stability. For example, SLPIC need not resolve the plasma frequency if plasma oscillations do not play a significant role in the simulation; in contrast, standard PIC must usually resolve the plasma frequency to avoid instability. Unlike fluid approaches, SLPIC retains a fully-kinetic description of plasma particles and includes all the same physical phenomena as PIC; in fact, if SLPIC is run with a PIC-compatible timestep, it is identical to PIC. However, unlike PIC, SLPIC can run stably with larger timesteps. SLPIC has been shown to be effective for finding steady-state solutions for 1D collisionless sheath problems, greatly speeding up computation despite a large ion/electron mass ratio. SLPIC is a relatively small modification of standard PIC, with no complexities that might degrade parallel efficiency (compared to PIC), and is similarly compatible with PIC field solvers and boundary conditions.

  14. Benchmark of the IMPACT Code for High Intensity Beam DynamicsSimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.D.

    2006-11-16

    The IMPACT (Integrated Map and Particle Accelerator Tracking) code was first developed under Computational Grand Challenge project in the mid 1990s [1]. It started as a three-dimensional (3D) data parallel particle-in-cell (PIC) code written in High Performance Fortran. The code used a split-operator based method to solve the Hamiltonian equations of motion. It contained linear transfer maps for drifts, quadrupole magnets and rf cavities. The space-charge forces were calculated using an FFT-based method with 3D open boundary conditions and longitudinal periodic boundary conditions. This code was completely rewritten in the late 1990s based on a message passing parallel programming paradigm using Fortran 90 and MPI following an object-oriented software design. This improved the code's scalability on large parallel computer systems and also gave the code better software maintainability and extensibility [2]. In the following years, under the SciDAC-1 accelerator project, the code was extended to include more accelerating and focusing elements such as DTL, CCL, superconducting linac, solenoid, dipole, multipoles, and others. Besides the original split-operator based integrator, a direct integration of Lorentz equations of motion using a leap-frog algorithm was also added to the IMPACT code to handle arbitrary external nonlinear fields. This integrator can read in 3D electromagnetic fields in a Cartesian grid or in a cylindrical coordinate system. Using the Lorentz integrator, we also extended the original code to handle multiple charge-state beams. The space-charge solvers were also extended to include conducting wall effects for round and rectangular pipes with longitudinal open and periodic boundary conditions. Recently, it has also been extended to handle short-range wake fields (longitudinal monopole and transverse dipole) and longitudinal coherent synchrotron radiation wake fields. Besides the parallel macroparticle tracking code, an rf linac lattice design code

  15. Physics based optimization of Particle-in-Cell simulations on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Stephen; D'Azevedo, Ed

    2016-10-01

    We present progress in improving the performance of the gyrokinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code XGC-1 on NVIDIA GPUs, as well as enhancements made to portability and developer productivity using OpenACC directives. Increasingly simulation codes are required to use heterogeneous accelerator resources on the most powerful supercomputing systems. PIC methods are well suited to these massively parallel accelerator architectures, as particles can largely be advanced independently within a time-step. Their advance must still, however, reference field data on underlying grid structures, which presents a significant performance bottleneck. Even ported to GPUs using CUDA Fortran, the XGC-1 electron push routine accounts for a significant portion of the code execution time. By applying physical insight to the motion of electrons across the device (and therefore field grids) we have developed techniques that increase performance of this kernel by up to 5X, compared to the original CUDA Fortran implementation. Architecture specific optimizations can be isolated in small `leaf' routines, which allows for a portable OpenACC implementation that performs nearly as well as the optimized CUDA.

  16. Kinetic particle simulation of turbulence in an FRC geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, Daniel; Lau, Calvin; Holod, Ihor; Lin, Zhihong; Dettrick, Sean; Binderbauer, Michl; Tajima, Toshiki

    2014-10-01

    Core turbulence in a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) is studied using the Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code with modified equilibrium geometry. The code solves the gyrokinetic equation for ions and the drift kinetic equation for electrons. The simulation region is an annulus which excludes plasma near the O-point to avoid breakdown of the gyrokinetic dynamics of ions. The C-2 FRC equilibrium is introduced to study similar conditions as found in the C-2 experiments, where the core is found to be relatively quiescent. In simulation, we find the C-2 plasma is stable to ion temperature gradient instabilities using realistic experimental parameters, consistent with experimental results obtained in C-2. When temperature and density gradients are enhanced beyond typical C-2 parameters, we observe a class of instabilities that appear as flute-like drift modes. These results shed light on a possible reason why transport temperature scaling in the C-2 core is radically different from that of typical turbulent transport scaling such as the Bohm-like regime. Progress is also reported on simulations of scrape off layer turbulence and electron driven turbulence.

  17. Simulation of Laser Wake Field Acceleration using a 2.5D PIC Code

    SciTech Connect

    An, W. M.; Hua, J. F.; Huang, W. H.; Tang, Ch. X.; Lin, Y. Z.

    2006-11-27

    A 2.5D PIC simulation code is developed to study the LWFA( Laser WakeField Acceleration ). The electron self-injection and the generation of mono-energetic electron beam in LWFA is briefly discussed through the simulation. And the experiment of this year at SILEX-I laser facility is also introduced.

  18. A lightweight in situ visualization and analysis infrastructure for multi-physics HPC simulation codes

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Cyrus; Larsen, Matt; Brugger, Eric

    2016-12-05

    Strawman is a system designed to explore the in situ visualization and analysis needs of simulation code teams running multi-physics calculations on many-core HPC architectures. It porvides rendering pipelines that can leverage both many-core CPUs and GPUs to render images of simulation meshes.

  19. Code modernization and modularization of APEX and SWAT watershed simulation models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) and APEX (Agricultural Policy / Environmental eXtender) are respectively large and small watershed simulation models derived from EPIC Environmental Policy Integrated Climate), a field-scale agroecology simulation model. All three models are coded in FORTRAN an...

  20. Transient Simulation of Accumulating Particle Deposition in Pipe Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewett, James; Sellier, Mathieu

    2015-11-01

    Colloidal particles that deposit in pipe systems can lead to fouling which is an expensive problem in both the geothermal and oil & gas industries. We investigate the gradual accumulation of deposited colloids in pipe flow using numerical simulations. An Euler-Lagrangian approach is employed for modelling the fluid and particle phases. Particle transport to the pipe wall is modelled with Brownian motion and turbulent diffusion. A two-way coupling exists between the fouled material and the pipe flow; the local mass flux of depositing particles is affected by the surrounding fluid in the near-wall region. This coupling is modelled by changing the cells from fluid to solid as the deposited particles exceed each local cell volume. A similar method has been used to model fouling in engine exhaust systems (Paz et al., Heat Transfer Eng., 34(8-9):674-682, 2013). We compare our deposition velocities and deposition profiles with an experiment on silica scaling in turbulent pipe flow (Kokhanenko et al., 19th AFMC, 2014).

  1. Fully kinetic particle simulations of high pressure streamer propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, David; Welch, Dale; Thoma, Carsten; Clark, Robert

    2012-10-01

    Streamer and leader formation in high pressure devices is a dynamic process involving a hierarchy of physical phenomena. These include elastic and inelastic particle collisions in the gas, radiation generation, transport and absorption, and electrode interactions. We have performed 2D and 3D fully EM implicit particle-in-cell simulation model of gas breakdown leading to streamer formation under DC and RF fields. The model uses a Monte Carlo treatment for all particle interactions and includes discrete photon generation, transport, and absorption for ultra-violet and soft x-ray radiation. Central to the realization of this fully kinetic particle treatment is an algorithm [D. R. Welch, et al., J. Comp. Phys. 227, 143 (2007)] that manages the total particle count by species while preserving the local momentum distribution functions and conserving charge. These models are being applied to the analysis of high-pressure gas switches [D. V. Rose, et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 093501 (2011)] and gas-filled RF accelerator cavities [D. V. Rose, et al. Proc. IPAC12, to appear].

  2. Martian Dust Devils: Laboratory Simulations of Particle Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Balme, Matthew R.; Iverson, James D.; Metzger, Stephen; Mickelson, Robert; Phoreman, Jim; White, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus has been fabricated to simulate terrestrial and Martian dust devils. Comparisons of surface pressure profiles through the vortex core generated in the apparatus with both those in natural dust devils on Earth and those inferred for Mars are similar and are consistent with theoretical Rankine vortex models. Experiments to determine particle threshold under Earth ambient atmospheric pressures show that sand (particles > 60 micron in diameter) threshold is analogous to normal boundary-layer shear, in which the rotating winds of the vortex generate surface shear and hence lift. Lower-pressure experiments down to approx. 65 mbar follow this trend for sand-sized particles. However, smaller particles (i.e., dust) and all particles at very low pressures (w 10-60 mbar) appear to be subjected to an additional lift function interpreted to result from the strong decrease in atmospheric pressure centered beneath the vortex core. Initial results suggest that the wind speeds required for the entrainment of grains approx. 2 microns in diameter (i.e., Martian dust sizes) are about half those required for entrainment by boundary layer winds on both Earth and Mars.

  3. Martian dust devils: Laboratory simulations of particle threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Balme, Matthew R.; Iversen, James D.; Metzger, Stephen; Mickelson, Robert; Phoreman, Jim; White, Bruce

    2003-05-01

    An apparatus has been fabricated to simulate terrestrial and Martian dust devils. Comparisons of surface pressure profiles through the vortex core generated in the apparatus with both those in natural dust devils on Earth and those inferred for Mars are similar and are consistent with theoretical Rankine vortex models. Experiments to determine particle threshold under Earth ambient atmospheric pressures show that sand (particles > 60 μm in diameter) threshold is analogous to normal boundary-layer shear, in which the rotating winds of the vortex generate surface shear and hence lift. Lower-pressure experiments down to ~65 mbar follow this trend for sand-sized particles. However, smaller particles (i.e., dust) and all particles at very low pressures (~10-60 mbar) appear to be subjected to an additional lift function interpreted to result from the strong decrease in atmospheric pressure centered beneath the vortex core. Initial results suggest that the wind speeds required for the entrainment of grains ~2 μm in diameter (i.e., Martian dust sizes) are about half those required for entrainment by boundary layer winds on both Earth and Mars.

  4. Implementation of a 3D version of ponderomotive guiding center solver in particle-in-cell code OSIRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helm, Anton; Vieira, Jorge; Silva, Luis; Fonseca, Ricardo

    2016-10-01

    Laser-driven accelerators gained an increased attention over the past decades. Typical modeling techniques for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) are based on particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. PIC simulations, however, are very computationally expensive due to the disparity of the relevant scales ranging from the laser wavelength, in the micrometer range, to the acceleration length, currently beyond the ten centimeter range. To minimize the gap between these despair scales the ponderomotive guiding center (PGC) algorithm is a promising approach. By describing the evolution of the laser pulse envelope separately, only the scales larger than the plasma wavelength are required to be resolved in the PGC algorithm, leading to speedups in several orders of magnitude. Previous work was limited to two dimensions. Here we present the implementation of the 3D version of a PGC solver into the massively parallel, fully relativistic PIC code OSIRIS. We extended the solver to include periodic boundary conditions and parallelization in all spatial dimensions. We present benchmarks for distributed and shared memory parallelization. We also discuss the stability of the PGC solver.

  5. Application of particle method to the casting process simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, N.; Zulaida, Y. M.; Anzai, K.

    2012-07-01

    Casting processes involve many significant phenomena such as fluid flow, solidification, and deformation, and it is known that casting defects are strongly influenced by the phenomena. However the phenomena complexly interacts each other and it is difficult to observe them directly because the temperature of the melt and other apparatus components are quite high, and they are generally opaque; therefore, a computer simulation is expected to serve a lot of benefits to consider what happens in the processes. Recently, a particle method, which is one of fully Lagrangian methods, has attracted considerable attention. The particle methods based on Lagrangian methods involving no calculation lattice have been developed rapidly because of their applicability to multi-physics problems. In this study, we combined the fluid flow, heat transfer and solidification simulation programs, and tried to simulate various casting processes such as continuous casting, centrifugal casting and ingot making. As a result of continuous casting simulation, the powder flow could be calculated as well as the melt flow, and the subsequent shape of interface between the melt and the powder was calculated. In the centrifugal casting simulation, the mold was smoothly modeled along the shape of the real mold, and the fluid flow and the rotating mold are simulated directly. As a result, the flow of the melt dragged by the rotating mold was calculated well. The eccentric rotation and the influence of Coriolis force were also reproduced directly and naturally. For ingot making simulation, a shrinkage formation behavior was calculated and the shape of the shrinkage agreed well with the experimental result.

  6. The development of CACTUS : a wind and marine turbine performance simulation code.

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Murray, Jonathan

    2010-12-01

    CACTUS (Code for Axial and Cross-flow TUrbine Simulation) is a turbine performance simulation code, based on a free wake vortex method, under development at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as part of a Department of Energy program to study marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. The current effort builds upon work previously done at SNL in the area of vertical axis wind turbine simulation, and aims to add models to handle generic device geometry and physical models specific to the marine environment. An overview of the current state of the project and validation effort is provided.

  7. A Novel Technique for Running the NASA Legacy Code LAPIN Synchronously With Simulations Developed Using Simulink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrnak, Daniel R.; Stueber, Thomas J.; Le, Dzu K.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents a method for running a dynamic legacy inlet simulation in concert with another dynamic simulation that uses a graphical interface. The legacy code, NASA's LArge Perturbation INlet (LAPIN) model, was coded using the FORTRAN 77 (The Portland Group, Lake Oswego, OR) programming language to run in a command shell similar to other applications that used the Microsoft Disk Operating System (MS-DOS) (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA). Simulink (MathWorks, Natick, MA) is a dynamic simulation that runs on a modern graphical operating system. The product of this work has both simulations, LAPIN and Simulink, running synchronously on the same computer with periodic data exchanges. Implementing the method described in this paper avoided extensive changes to the legacy code and preserved its basic operating procedure. This paper presents a novel method that promotes inter-task data communication between the synchronously running processes.

  8. MOCCA code for star cluster simulation: comparison with optical observations using COCOA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askar, Abbas; Giersz, Mirek; Pych, Wojciech; Olech, Arkadiusz; Hypki, Arkadiusz

    2016-02-01

    We introduce and present preliminary results from COCOA (Cluster simulatiOn Comparison with ObservAtions) code for a star cluster after 12 Gyr of evolution simulated using the MOCCA code. The COCOA code is being developed to quickly compare results of numerical simulations of star clusters with observational data. We use COCOA to obtain parameters of the projected cluster model. For comparison, a FITS file of the projected cluster was provided to observers so that they could use their observational methods and techniques to obtain cluster parameters. The results show that the similarity of cluster parameters obtained through numerical simulations and observations depends significantly on the quality of observational data and photometric accuracy.

  9. Intercomparision of Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Codes MCNPX, GEANT4, and FLUKA for Simulating Proton Radiotherapy of the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Randeniya, S. D.; Taddei, P. J.; Newhauser, W. D.; Yepes, P.

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of an ocular treatment beam-line consisting of a nozzle and a water phantom were carried out using MCNPX, GEANT4, and FLUKA to compare the dosimetric accuracy and the simulation efficiency of the codes. Simulated central axis percent depth-dose profiles and cross-field dose profiles were compared with experimentally measured data for the comparison. Simulation speed was evaluated by comparing the number of proton histories simulated per second using each code. The results indicate that all the Monte Carlo transport codes calculate sufficiently accurate proton dose distributions in the eye and that the FLUKA transport code has the highest simulation efficiency. PMID:20865141

  10. The GENGA code: gravitational encounters in N-body simulations with GPU acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, Simon L.; Stadel, Joachim G.

    2014-11-20

    We describe an open source GPU implementation of a hybrid symplectic N-body integrator, GENGA (Gravitational ENcounters with Gpu Acceleration), designed to integrate planet and planetesimal dynamics in the late stage of planet formation and stability analyses of planetary systems. GENGA uses a hybrid symplectic integrator to handle close encounters with very good energy conservation, which is essential in long-term planetary system integration. We extended the second-order hybrid integration scheme to higher orders. The GENGA code supports three simulation modes: integration of up to 2048 massive bodies, integration with up to a million test particles, or parallel integration of a large number of individual planetary systems. We compare the results of GENGA to Mercury and pkdgrav2 in terms of energy conservation and performance and find that the energy conservation of GENGA is comparable to Mercury and around two orders of magnitude better than pkdgrav2. GENGA runs up to 30 times faster than Mercury and up to 8 times faster than pkdgrav2. GENGA is written in CUDA C and runs on all NVIDIA GPUs with a computing capability of at least 2.0.

  11. Simulations of Edge Current Driven Kink Modes with BOUT + + code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G. Q.; Xu, X. Q.; Snyder, P. B.; Turnbull, A. D.; Xia, T. Y.; Ma, C. H.; Xi, P. W.

    2013-10-01

    Edge kink modes (or peeling modes) play a key role in the ELMs. The edge kink modes are driven by peak edge current, which comes from the bootstrap current. We calculated sequences of equilibria with different edge current using CORSICA by keeping total current and pressure profile fixed. Based on these equilibria, with the 3-field BOUT + + code, we calculated the MHD instabilities driven by edge current. For linear low-n ideal MHD modes, BOUT + + results agree with GATO results. With the edge current increasing, the dominant modes are changed from high-n ballooning modes to low-n kink modes. The edge current provides also stabilizing effects on high-n ballooning modes. Furthermore, for edge current scan without keeping total current fixed, the increasing edge current can stabilize the high-n ballooning modes and cannot drive kink modes. The diamagnetic effect can stabilize the high-n ballooning modes, but has no effect on the low-n kink modes. Also, the nonlinear behavior of kink modes is analyzed. Work supported by China MOST grant 2013GB111000 and by China NSF grant 10975161. Also performed for USDOE by LLNL under DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. HOTB: High precision parallel code for calculation of four-particle harmonic oscillator transformation brackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepšys, A.; Mickevicius, S.; Germanas, D.; Kalinauskas, R. K.

    2014-11-01

    This new version of the HOTB program for calculation of the three and four particle harmonic oscillator transformation brackets provides some enhancements and corrections to the earlier version (Germanas et al., 2010) [1]. In particular, new version allows calculations of harmonic oscillator transformation brackets be performed in parallel using MPI parallel communication standard. Moreover, higher precision of intermediate calculations using GNU Quadruple Precision and arbitrary precision library FMLib [2] is done. A package of Fortran code is presented. Calculation time of large matrices can be significantly reduced using effective parallel code. Use of Higher Precision methods in intermediate calculations increases the stability of algorithms and extends the validity of used algorithms for larger input values. Catalogue identifier: AEFQ_v4_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEFQ_v4_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 Number of lines in programs, including test data, etc.: 1711 Number of bytes in distributed programs, including test data, etc.: 11667 Distribution format: tar.gz Program language used: FORTRAN 90 with MPI extensions for parallelism Computer: Any computer with FORTRAN 90 compiler Operating system: Windows, Linux, FreeBSD, True64 Unix Has the code been vectorized of parallelized?: Yes, parallelism using MPI extensions. Number of CPUs used: up to 999 RAM(per CPU core): Depending on allocated binomial and trinomial matrices and use of precision; at least 500 MB Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEFQ_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 181, Issue 2, (2010) 420-425 Does the new version supersede the previous version? Yes Nature of problem: Calculation of matrices of three-particle harmonic oscillator brackets (3HOB) and four-particle harmonic oscillator brackets (4HOB) in a more

  13. Particle-based sampling of N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, N. T.; Stibbe, D.; Portegies Zwart, S.; McMillan, S. L. W.; Boily, C. M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach for sampling the orbits of an N-body simulation. The gist of the method is to exploit individual phase-space coordinates acquired during integration of the equations of motion. This technique, which we dub `particle-based sampling scheme', is tailor-made for resolving rapid time-variation of coordinates when needed. The PBaSS requires less disk space (by factors of 10 or more) to retrieve orbits at a chosen accuracy than those reconstructed using the classic snapshot approach. Furthermore, the PBaSS also allows a reconstruction of the system at any time-resolution not smaller than the smallest integration time-step in a post-simulation treatment, thus avoiding costly simulation reruns.

  14. Validation of chemistry models employed in a particle simulation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Brian L.; Mcdonald, Jeffrey D.

    1991-01-01

    The chemistry models employed in a statistical particle simulation method, as implemented in the Intel iPSC/860 multiprocessor computer, are validated and applied. Chemical relaxation of five-species air in these reservoirs involves 34 simultaneous dissociation, recombination, and atomic-exchange reactions. The reaction rates employed in the analytic solutions are obtained from Arrhenius experimental correlations as functions of temperature for adiabatic gas reservoirs in thermal equilibrium. Favorable agreement with the analytic solutions validates the simulation when applied to relaxation of O2 toward equilibrium in reservoirs dominated by dissociation and recombination, respectively, and when applied to relaxation of air in the temperature range 5000 to 30,000 K. A flow of O2 over a circular cylinder at high Mach number is simulated to demonstrate application of the method to multidimensional reactive flows.

  15. Event-by-event fission simulation code, generates complete fission events

    SciTech Connect

    2013-04-01

    FREYA is a computer code that generates complete fission events. The output includes the energy and momentum of these final state particles: fission products, prompt neutrons and prompt photons. The version of FREYA that is to be released is a module for MCNP6.

  16. Final Report: Model interacting particle systems for simulation and macroscopic description of particulate suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Peter J. Mucha

    2007-08-30

    Suspensions of solid particles in liquids appear in numerous applications, from environmental settings like river silt, to industrial systems of solids transport and water treatment, and biological flows such as blood flow. Despite their importance, much remains unexplained about these complicated systems. Mucha's research aims to improve understanding of basic properties of suspensions through a program of simulating model interacting particle systems with critical evaluation of proposed continuum equations, in close collaboration with experimentalists. Natural to this approach, the original proposal centered around collaboration with studies already conducted in various experimental groups. However, as was detailed in the 2004 progress report, following the first year of this award, a number of the questions from the original proposal were necessarily redirected towards other specific goals because of changes in the research programs of the proposed experimental collaborators. Nevertheless, the modified project goals and the results that followed from those goals maintain close alignment with the main themes of the original proposal, improving efficient simulation and macroscopic modeling of sedimenting and colloidal suspensions. In particular, the main investigations covered under this award have included: (1) Sedimentation instabilities, including the sedimentation analogue of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (for heavy, particle-laden fluid over lighter, clear fluid). (2) Ageing dynamics of colloidal suspensions at concentrations above the glass transition, using simplified interactions. (3) Stochastic reconstruction of velocity-field dependence for particle image velocimetry (PIV). (4) Stochastic modeling of the near-wall bias in 'nano-PIV'. (5) Distributed Lagrange multiplier simulation of the 'internal splash' of a particle falling through a stable stratified interface. (6) Fundamental study of velocity fluctuations in sedimentation. (7) Parallelization of

  17. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Compressible Electromagnetic Turbulence in High-β Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhihong

    2014-03-13

    Supported by this award, the PI and his research group at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have carried out computational and theoretical studies of instability, turbulence, and transport in laboratory and space plasmas. Several massively parallel, gyrokinetic particle simulation codes have been developed to study electromagnetic turbulence in space and laboratory plasmas. In space plasma projects, the simulation codes have been successfully applied to study the spectral cascade and plasma heating in kinetic Alfven wave turbulence, the linear and nonlinear properties of compressible modes including mirror instability and drift compressional mode, and the stability of the current sheet instabilities with finite guide field in the context of collisionless magnetic reconnection. The research results have been published in 25 journal papers and presented at many national and international conferences. Reprints of publications, source codes, and other research-related information are also available to general public on the PI’s webpage (http://phoenix.ps.uci.edu/zlin/). Two PhD theses in space plasma physics are highlighted in this report.

  18. Computational performance of a smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation for shared-memory parallel computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiura, Daisuke; Furuichi, Mikito; Sakaguchi, Hide

    2015-09-01

    The computational performance of a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation is investigated for three types of current shared-memory parallel computer devices: many integrated core (MIC) processors, graphics processing units (GPUs), and multi-core CPUs. We are especially interested in efficient shared-memory allocation methods for each chipset, because the efficient data access patterns differ between compute unified device architecture (CUDA) programming for GPUs and OpenMP programming for MIC processors and multi-core CPUs. We first introduce several parallel implementation techniques for the SPH code, and then examine these on our target computer architectures to determine the most effective algorithms for each processor unit. In addition, we evaluate the effective computing performance and power efficiency of the SPH simulation on each architecture, as these are critical metrics for overall performance in a multi-device environment. In our benchmark test, the GPU is found to produce the best arithmetic performance as a standalone device unit, and gives the most efficient power consumption. The multi-core CPU obtains the most effective computing performance. The computational speed of the MIC processor on Xeon Phi approached that of two Xeon CPUs. This indicates that using MICs is an attractive choice for existing SPH codes on multi-core CPUs parallelized by OpenMP, as it gains computational acceleration without the need for significant changes to the source code.

  19. Comparing particle-resolved simulation methods for moving particles in a viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lian-Ping; Gao, Hui; Luo, Li-Shi; Peng, Yan; Yeo, Kyong Min; Maxey, Martin R.

    2008-11-01

    In recent years, quite a few particle-resolved simulation methods have emerged for treating moving solid particles in a viscous fluid. A common advantageous feature shared by these methods is the use of a simple fixed mesh. The no-slip boundary condition on the surface of a particle is handled locally by a consistent coupling or interaction scheme. Here we examine four such methods: lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) with interpolated bounce back scheme, LBE with immersed boundary method, a hybrid method (Physalis) developed by Prosperetti and co-workers, and a force-coupling method. Our main objective is to inter-compare these methods in terms of accuracy of the simulated flow field, force / torque, and computational efficiency. Two benchmark cases are used: a particle moving in a 3D Couette flow and a 3D flow induced by a spinning sphere at finite Reynolds number. The results are discussed in terms of flow Reynolds number and geometric parameters. We will also comment on the range of relevant physical parameters accessible in these methods.

  20. Global particle in cell simulation of radio frequency waves in tokamak ∖fs20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuley, Animesh; Lin, Z.; Bao, J.; Lau, C.; Sun, G. Y.

    2016-10-01

    We are looking into a new nonlinear kinetic simulation model to study the radio frequency heating and current drive of fusion plasmas using toroidal code GTC. In this model ions are considered as fully kinetic (FK) particles using Vlasov equation and the electrons are treated as drift kinetic (DK) particles using drift kinetic equation. We have benchmarked this numerical model to verify the linear physics of normal modes, conversion of slow and fast waves and its propagation in the core region of the tokamak using the Boozer coordinates. In the nonlinear simulation of ion Bernstein wave (IBW) in a tokamak, parametric decay instability (PDI) is observed where a large amplitude pump wave decays into an IBW sideband and an ion cyclotron quasi-mode (ICQM). The ICQM induces an ion perpendicular heating, with a heating rate proportional to the pump wave intensity. Finally, in the electromagnetic LH simulation, nonlinear wave trapping of electrons is verified and plasma current is nonlinearly driven. Presently we are working on the development of new PIC simulation model using cylindrical coordinates to address the RF wave propagation from the edge of the tokamak to the core region and the parametric instabilities associated with this RF waves. We have verified the cyclotron integrator using Boris push method.