Science.gov

Sample records for particle-gamma coincidence measurements

  1. Preliminary results of oxygen isotope ratio measurement with a particle-gamma coincidence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borysiuk, Maciek; Kristiansson, Per; Ros, Linus; Abdel, Nassem S.; Elfman, Mikael; Nilsson, Charlotta; Pallon, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The possibility to study variations in the oxygen isotopic ratio with photon tagged nuclear reaction analysis (pNRA) is evaluated in the current work. The experiment described in the article was performed at Lund Ion Beam Analysis Facility (LIBAF) with a 2 MeV deuteron beam. Isotopic fractionation of light elements such as carbon, oxygen and nitrogen is the basis of many analytical tools in hydrology, geology, paleobiology and paleogeology. IBA methods provide one possible tool for measurement of isotopic content. During this experimental run we focused on measurement of the oxygen isotopic ratio. The measurement of stable isotopes of oxygen has a number of applications; the particular one driving the current investigation belongs to the field of astrogeology and specifically evaluation of fossil extraterrestrial material. There are three stable isotopes of oxygen: 16O, 17O and 18O. We procured samples highly enriched with all three isotopes. Isotopes 16O and 18O were easily detected in the enriched samples, but no significant signal from 17O was detected in the same samples. The measured yield was too low to detect 18O in a sample with natural abundances of oxygen isotopes, at least in the current experimental setup, but the spectral line from the reaction with 16O was clearly visible.

  2. Coincidence/Multiplicity Photofission Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Jones; M.T. Swinhoe; S.J. Tobin; W. H. Geist; D.R. Norman; R.B. Rothrock; C.R. Freeman; K. J. Haskell

    2009-09-01

    An series of experiments using the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) photonuclear inspection system and a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)-supplied, list-mode data acquisition method have shown enhanced performance utilizing pulsed photofission-induced, neutron coincidence counting between pulses of an up-to-10-MeV electron accelerator for nuclear material detection and identification. The enhanced inspection methodology has applicability to homeland security, treaty-related support, and weapon dismantlement applications. For the latter, this technology can directly support of Department of Energy/NA241 programmatic mission objectives relative to future Rocky Ridge-type testing campaigns for active inspection systems.

  3. Measurements of alpha-gamma coincidences with an optimized dual-parameter multichannel system.

    PubMed

    Jurado Vargas, M; Caro Marroyo, B; Martín Sánchez, A

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of alpha-gamma coincidences have usually been carried out using a single channel to detect alpha-particles of a given energy, and a multichannel analyser for the detection of the corresponding coincident gamma-rays. An alpha-gamma coincidence chamber coupled to the electronic chain ending with a dual-parameter multichannel analyser has been developed and optimized. This system simultaneously stores alpha-particle, gamma-ray, and alpha-gamma coincidence spectra, which allows a general analysis to be made of the degree of coincidence between each alpha-particle and each gamma-ray emission. With this technique, a two-dimensional spectrum was obtained and analysed using "contour graphics". An application to the study of the decay scheme of (241)Am is described. PMID:24140879

  4. Particle gamma correlations in 12C measured with the CsI(Tl) based detector array CHIMERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardella, G.; Acosta, L.; Amorini, F.; Auditore, L.; Berceanu, I.; Castoldi, A.; De Filippo, E.; Dell`Aquila, D.; Francalanza, L.; Gnoffo, B.; Guazzoni, C.; Lanzalone, G.; Lombardo, I.; Minniti, T.; Morgana, E.; Norella, S.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Pop, A.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Russotto, P.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2015-11-01

    The gamma decay of the first excited 4.44 MeV 2+level of 12C, populated by inelastic scattering of proton and 16O beams at various energies was studied in order to test γ-ray detection efficiency and the quality of angular distribution information given by the CsI(Tl) detectors of the 4π CHIMERA array. The γ-decay was measured in coincidence with ejectile scattered particles in an approximately 4π geometry allowing to extract the angular distribution in the reference frame of recoiling 12C target. The typical sin2 (2θ) behavior of angular distribution was observed in the case of 16O beam. Besides that, for the proton beam, in order to explain the observed distribution, the addition of an incoherent flat contribution was required. This latter is the effect of proton spin flip events allowing the population of M=±1 magnetic substates, that is not possible in reactions induced by 16O beam. A comparison with previously collected data, obtained measuring only in and out of plane proton-γ-ray coincidences, confirms the good quality of the angular distribution information given by the apparatus. Possible applications with radioactive beams are outlined.

  5. Novel Beta-Gamma Coincidence Measurements Using Phoswich Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, James H.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Panisko, Mark E.; Ripplinger, Mike D.

    2003-09-30

    The PNNL has developed an Automated Radio-xenon Sampler/Analyzer (ARSA) for the CTBT to measure four radio-xenon isotopes using a beta-gamma coincidence counting detector. A novel method to measure beta-gamma coincidences using a phoswich detector with state-of-the-art pulse shape discrimination techniqueses has been investigated.

  6. Photoion Auger-electron coincidence measurements near threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, J.C.; Biedermann, C.; Keller, N.; Liljeby, L.; Short, R.T.; Sellin, I.A. . Dept. of Physics Oak Ridge National Lab., TN ); Lindle, D.W. , Gaithersburg, MD )

    1990-01-01

    The vacancy cascade which fills an atomic inner-shell hole is a complex process which can proceed by a variety of paths, often resulting in a broad distribution of photoion charge states. We have measured simplified argon photoion charge distributions by requiring a coincidence with a K-LL or K-LM Auger electron, following K excitation with synchrotron radiation, as a function of photon energy, and report here in detail the argon charge distributions coincident with K-L{sub 1}L{sub 23} Auger electrons. The distributions exhibit a much more pronounced photon-energy dependence than do the more complicated non-coincident spectra. Resonant excitation of the K electron to np levels, shakeoff of these np electrons by subsequent decay processes, double-Auger decay, and recapture of the K photoelectron through postcollision interaction occur with significant probability. 17 refs.

  7. The particle-gamma coincidence method: A brief introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, J.; Derya, V.; Endres, J.; Hennig, A.; Netterdon, L.; Pascu, S.; Pickstone, S. G.; Sauerwein, A.; Scholz, P.; Spieker, M.; Streit, T.-M.; Zilges, A.

    2013-06-10

    Excitation energy information from particle detectors can significantly improve the analysis process of {gamma}-ray spectra and result in more detailed nuclear structure information. Therefore, a new setup at the HORUS {gamma}-ray spectrometer at the University of Cologne has been installed, housing silicon particle detectors at up to eight positions.

  8. Coincidence-Summing Corrections for Close Geometry Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gueray, R. Taygun

    2008-11-11

    For a given stellar temperature, nuclear reactions take place in the energy range of the Gamow window with the relatively low energies of the astrophysical interest for charged particle induced reactions. In order to measure the nuclear reaction cross sections with the activation method at projectile energies as low as possible, a gamma counting system that consists of Ge detectors and the irradiated target in close geometry is required. The presence of cascade transitions requires coincidence summing corrections that can not be ignored because of the very large solid angle. In this study, the determination of the summing correction factor and photopeak efficiency for a gamma spectrometer, as an example, composed of two Ge clover detectors in close geometry is briefly described.

  9. Fission measurements with PPAC detectors using a coincidence technique

    SciTech Connect

    Paradela, C.; Duran, I.; Tarrio, D.; Audouin, L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Stephan, C.

    2011-07-01

    A fission detection setup based on Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPAC) has been constructed and used at the CERN n-TOF facility. The setup takes advantage of the coincidence detection of both fission fragments to discriminate the background reactions produced by high energy neutrons and it allows obtaining neutron-induced fission cross section up to 1 GeV. (authors)

  10. Enhanced Photofission-based, Coincidence/Multiplicity Inspection Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Jones; D.R. Norman; K.J. Haskell; M.T. Swinhoe; S.J. Tobin; W.H. Geist; R.B. Rothrock; C.R. Freeman

    2010-07-01

    An enhanced active interrogation system has been developed that integrates a transportable Idaho National Laboratory (INL) photonuclear inspection system, using a pulsed bremsstrahlung source and a reconfigurable neutron detection system, with a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) list-mode data acquisition system. A series of active interrogation experiments have shown enhanced nuclear material detection and identification utilizing pulsed photofission-induced, neutron coincidence/multiplicity counting between pulses of an up-to-10-MeV electron accelerator. This paper describes the integrated inspection system and presents some key shielded and unshielded nuclear material inspection results. The enhanced inspection methodology has applicability to homeland security and possible nuclear weapon dismantlement treaties.

  11. First principle active neutron coincidence counting measurements of uranium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Braden; Charlton, William; Peerani, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    Uranium is present in most nuclear fuel cycle facilities ranging from uranium mines, enrichment plants, fuel fabrication facilities, nuclear reactors, and reprocessing plants. The isotopic, chemical, and geometric composition of uranium can vary significantly between these facilities, depending on the application and type of facility. Examples of this variation are: enrichments varying from depleted (~0.2 wt% 235U) to high enriched (>20 wt% 235U); compositions consisting of U3O8, UO2, UF6, metallic, and ceramic forms; geometries ranging from plates, cans, and rods; and masses which can range from a 500 kg fuel assembly down to a few grams fuel pellet. Since 235U is a fissile material, it is routinely safeguarded in these facilities. Current techniques for quantifying the 235U mass in a sample include neutron coincidence counting. One of the main disadvantages of this technique is that it requires a known standard of representative geometry and composition for calibration, which opens up a pathway for potential erroneous declarations by the State and reduces the effectiveness of safeguards. In order to address this weakness, the authors have developed a neutron coincidence counting technique which uses the first principle point-model developed by Boehnel instead of the "known standard" method. This technique was primarily tested through simulations of 1000 g U3O8 samples using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code. The results of these simulations showed good agreement between the simulated and exact 235U sample masses.

  12. Characterization of Alpha Contamination in Lanthanum Trichloride Scintillators Using Coincidence Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Milbrath, Brian D.; Runkle, Robert C.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Kaye, William R.; Lepel, Elwood A.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Smith, Leon E.

    2005-08-01

    The commercial availability of LaCl3:Ce scintillators has been much anticipated due to their significantly lower resolution relative to NaI(Tl). Our investigation of these scintillators in regards to the effect of their improved resolution for coincidence gamma-ray measurement applications revealed that the scintillators had a large, internal alpha contamination affecting the gamma-ray energy range from 1700-3000 keV. One passive method of identifying contaminants relies on exploiting coincident signatures. Aided by a coincidence lookup library developed at PNNL, we determined that the parent contaminant is Ac-227 via an alpha-gamma coincidence measurement. In this paper, we characterize the level of contamination and describe our coincidence measurement technique. The Ac-227 concentration was approximately 0.13 ppt. We demonstrate that this coincidence technique measures minimum detectable activities much lower than singles gamma-ray spectroscopy. We also discuss gamma- and beta-contamination in these scintillators.

  13. True coincidence-summing corrections for the coincident gamma-rays measured with coplanar grid CdZnTe detectors.

    PubMed

    Yücel, H; Solmaz, A N; Köse, E; Bor, D

    2010-06-01

    In this study, true coincidence-summing (TCS) correction factors have been measured for the sources (22)Na, (60)Co, (133)Ba and (152)Eu by use of three large volume coplanar grid CdZnTe (acronym: CZT) detectors. In case of a close-in detection geometry, two different TCS calculation algorithms were used to compute the required TCS correction factors. Both of the algorithms are based on the measured total-to-peak (TTP) ratio and full-energy peak (FEP) efficiency values that were obtained using almost "single" energy and coincidence-free nuclides. The results for TCS correction factors obtained by two different algorithms were agreeable to each other. The obtained TCS factors were ranged from about 7% to 30.5% in a 2250 mm(3) CZT detector when a close counting geometry was used. For other two detectors with a volume of 1000 and 1687.5mm(3), the resulted TCS correction factors were relatively smaller and varied between about 0.1% and 20% at the close counting geometry condition. Therefore, the results indicate that there is a need for the estimation of TCS corrections in CZT detectors, especially when their crystal volumes are greater than 1cm(3) and these detectors are used in the case of a close-in detection geometry. PMID:20167503

  14. Assembly of an alpha-gamma coincidence measuring device for checking alpha decay schemes.

    PubMed

    Martín Sánchez, A; Caro Marroyo, B

    2012-09-01

    Two new chambers for measuring alpha-particle emissions have been made: a low-geometry chamber with a powerful magnet to eliminate conversion electrons, and an alpha-gamma coincidence chamber. Both devices incorporate a high-resolution Si detector, and the second chamber, a low-energy Ge detector as well. A dual parameter multichannel analyzer was used to register coincidences in the second device. Alpha-particle and gamma-ray detectors work simultaneously in both individual and dual modes, providing single and coincidence spectra. Some preliminary alpha-gamma coincidence spectra have been obtained.

  15. Sum-coincidence measurement of {sup 125}I with germanium detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, R.M.; Norman, B.R.

    1997-12-01

    Coincidence counting is a powerful technique for the measurement of many radionuclides by absolute counting. In particular, the method has been used for several years for the absolute standardization of iodine 125.

  16. Particle-gamma studies with the new Hyperion array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, R. O.; Burke, J. T.; Fisher, S.; Parker, J.; Ota, S.; Ting, A.; Casperson, R. J.; McCleskey, E.; McIntosh, A. B.; Beausang, C. W.; Wilson, E.; Humby, P.

    2015-10-01

    Hyperion is a charged-particle and γ-ray spectroscopy array for low energy nuclear physics studies consisting of a highly segmented silicon telescope for charged particle detection surrounded by up to 14 HPGe ``clover'' γ-ray detectors. Hyperion was designed and built between March 2014 and May 2015 as a significant upgrade to the existing STARLiTeR array currently at Texas A&M University Cyclotron Institute. The array was installed in May 2015 in preparation for its commissioning runs scheduled for September 2015. Hyperion will offer high particle-gamma and particle-gamma-gamma detection efficiencies and is intended to be used both for low energy structure studies and indirect measurements of neutron cross sections via the surrogate method. Details of the new array and the commissioning experiment focusing on 167 , 168 , 169Tm studies will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344. Supported by DoE grant numbers DE-FG52-09NA29467 (TAMU), DE-NA0001801, DE-FG02-05ER41379 (UofR).

  17. Calibration of a neutron coincidence counter for measurement of the plutonium content of wet oxalate cakes

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, T.W.

    1983-04-01

    A novel calibration procedure has been applied to the dual-ring thermal neutron coincidence counter used at the Los Alamos Plutonium Processing Facility to measure the plutonium content of wet oxalate cakes. The calibration uses the measured content of the plutonium oxide product and the coincidence counter response to estimate the plutonium content in up to four wet plutonium oxalate cakes. These estimated mass values are then used to calibrate the counter. The calibration calculation is iterative in determining the calibration function coefficients and plutonium masses for oxalate material.

  18. Digital Pulse Shape Analysis with Phoswich Detectors to Simplify Coincidence Measurements of Radioactive Xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Hennig, Wolfgang; Tan, Hui; Warburton, William K.; McIntyre, Justin I.

    2005-08-31

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty establishes a network of monitoring stations to detect radioactive Xenon in the atmosphere from nuclear weapons testing. One such monitoring system is the Automated Radio-xenon Sampler/Analyzer (ARSA) developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, which uses a complex arrangement of separate beta and gamma detectors to detect beta-gamma coincidences from the Xe isotopes of interest. The coincidence measurement is very sensitive, but the large number of detectors and photomultiplier tubes require careful calibration which makes the system hard to use. It has been suggested that beta-gamma coincidences could be detected with only a single photomultiplier tube and electronics channel by using a phoswich detector consisting of optically coupled beta and gamma detectors (Ely, 2003). In that work, rise time analysis of signals from a phoswich detector was explored as a method to determine if interactions occurred in either the beta or the gamma detector or in both simultaneously. However, this approach was not able to detect coincidences with the required sensitivity or to measure the beta and gamma energies with sufficient precision for Xenon monitoring. In this paper, we present a new algorithm to detect coincidences by pulse shape analysis of the signals from a BC-404/CsI(Tl) phoswich detector. Implemented on fast digital readout electronics, the algorithm achieves clear separation of beta only, gamma only and coincidence events, accurate measurement of both beta and gamma energies, and has an error rate for detecting coincidences of less than 0.1%. Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport and light collection were performed to optimize design parameters for a replacement detector module for the ARSA system, obtaining an estimated coincidence detection efficiency of 82-92% and a background rejection rate better than 99%. The new phoswich/pulse shape analysis method is thus suitable to simplify the existing ARSA

  19. Mass measurement of 80Y by β-γ coincidence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, C. J.; Brenner, D. S.; Zamfir, N. V.; Caprio, M. A.; Aprahamian, A.; Wiescher, M. C.; Beausang, C. W.; Berant, Z.; Casten, R. F.; Cooper, J. R.; Gill, R. L.; Krücken, R.; Novak, J. R.; Pietralla, N.; Shawcross, M.; Teymurazyan, A.; Wolf, A.

    2003-03-01

    The QEC value of 80Y has been measured by β-γ coincidence spectroscopy to be ⩾8929(83) keV. Combining this result with the adopted mass excess of the daughter 80Sr gives a mass excess for 80Y of ⩾-61 376(83) keV. Results are compared with other measurements, with Audi-Wapstra systematics, and with predictions of mass formulas. Implications of this measurement are considered for the rp process.

  20. Mass Measurement of 80Y by β-γ Coincidence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, D. S.; Barton, C. J.; Zamfir, N. V.; Caprio, M. A.; Aprahamian, A.; Beausang, C. W.; Berant, Z.; Casten, R. F.; Cooper, J. R.; Gill, R. L.; Kruecken, R.; Novak, J. R.; Pietralla, N.; Shawcross, M.; Teymurazyan, A.; Wolf, A.; Wiescher, M.

    2003-06-01

    The QEC value of 80Y has been measured by β-γ coincidence spectroscopy to be ≥8929(83) keV. Combing this result with the adopted mass excess of the daughter 80Sr gives a mass excess for 80Y of ≥ -61376(83) keV. Results are compared with other measurements, with Audi-Wapstra systematics, and with predictions of mass formulas. Implications for rp-process simulations are considered.

  1. Using CHIMERA detector at LNS for gamma-particle coincidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardella, G.; Acosta, L.; Auditore, L.; Chatterjiee, M. B.; Castoldi, A.; De Filippo, E.; Dell'Aquila, D.; De Luca, S.; Gnoffo, B.; Guazzoni, C.; Francalanza, L.; Lanzalone, G.; Lombardo, I.; Martorana, N.; Norella, S.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2016-05-01

    We have recently evaluated the quality of γ-ray angular distributions that can be extracted in particle-gamma coincidence measurements using the CHIMERA detector at LNS. γ-rays have been detected using the CsI(Tl) detectors of the spherical part of the CHIMERA array. Very clean γ-rays angular distributions were extracted in reactions induced by different stable beams impinging on 12C thin targets. The results evidenced an effect of projectile spin flip on the γ-rays angular distributions. γ-particle coincidence measurements were also performed in reactions induced by neutron rich exotic beams produced through in-flight fragmentation at LNS. In recent experiments also the Farcos array was used to improve energy and angular resolution measurements of the detected charged particles. Results obtained with both stable and radioactive beams are reported.

  2. Standardization of Ga-68 by coincidence measurements, liquid scintillation counting and 4πγ counting.

    PubMed

    Roteta, Miguel; Peyres, Virginia; Rodríguez Barquero, Leonor; García-Toraño, Eduardo; Arenillas, Pablo; Balpardo, Christian; Rodrígues, Darío; Llovera, Roberto

    2012-09-01

    The radionuclide (68)Ga is one of the few positron emitters that can be prepared in-house without the use of a cyclotron. It disintegrates to the ground state of (68)Zn partially by positron emission (89.1%) with a maximum energy of 1899.1 keV, and partially by electron capture (10.9%). This nuclide has been standardized in the frame of a cooperation project between the Radionuclide Metrology laboratories from CIEMAT (Spain) and CNEA (Argentina). Measurements involved several techniques: 4πβ-γ coincidences, integral gamma counting and Liquid Scintillation Counting using the triple to double coincidence ratio and the CIEMAT/NIST methods. Given the short half-life of the radionuclide assayed, a direct comparison between results from both laboratories was excluded and a comparison of experimental efficiencies of similar NaI detectors was used instead. PMID:22421395

  3. Non-coincident Inter-instrument Comparisons of Ozone Measurements Using Quasi-conservative Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lait, L. R.; Newman, P. A.; Schoeberl, M. R.; McGee, T.; Twigg, T.; Browell, E.; Bevilacqua, R.; Andersen, S. B.; DeBacker, H.; Benesova, A.

    2004-01-01

    Ozone measurements from ozonesondes, AROTAL, DIAL, and POAM III instruments during the SOLVE-2/VINTERSOL period are composited in a time-varying, flow-following quasi-conservative (PV-6) coordinate space; the resulting composites from each instrument are mapped onto the other instruments locations and times. The mapped data are then used to intercompare data from the different instruments. Overall, the four data sets are found to be in good agreement. AROTAL shows somewhat lower values below 16 km, and DIAL has a positive bias at the upper limits of its altitude range. These intercomparisons are consistent with those obtained from more conventional near-coincident profiles, where available. Although the PV-theta mapping technique entails larger uncertainties of individual profile differences compared to direct near-coincident comparisons, the ability to include much larger numbers of comparisons can make this technique advantageous.

  4. Development of a method for activity measurements of 232Th daughters with a multidetector gamma-ray coincidence spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Antovic, N; Svrkota, N

    2009-06-01

    The method for activity measurements of the (232)Th daughters, developed at the six-crystal gamma-ray coincidence spectrometer PRIPYAT-2M and based on coincidence counting of the 583 and 2615 keV photons from cascade transitions which follow beta(-)-decay of (208)Tl, as well as on counting the 911 keV photons which follow beta(-)-decay of (228)Ac in the integral and non-coincidence mode of counting, is presented.

  5. Development of a method for activity measurements of 232Th daughters with a multidetector gamma-ray coincidence spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Antovic, N; Svrkota, N

    2009-06-01

    The method for activity measurements of the (232)Th daughters, developed at the six-crystal gamma-ray coincidence spectrometer PRIPYAT-2M and based on coincidence counting of the 583 and 2615 keV photons from cascade transitions which follow beta(-)-decay of (208)Tl, as well as on counting the 911 keV photons which follow beta(-)-decay of (228)Ac in the integral and non-coincidence mode of counting, is presented. PMID:19299155

  6. Analysis of calibration data for the uranium active neutron coincidence counting collar with attention to errors in the measured neutron coincidence rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Stephen; Burr, Tom; Favalli, Andrea; Nicholson, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    The declared linear density of 238U and 235U in fresh low enriched uranium light water reactor fuel assemblies can be verified for nuclear safeguards purposes using a neutron coincidence counter collar in passive and active mode, respectively. The active mode calibration of the Uranium Neutron Collar - Light water reactor fuel (UNCL) instrument is normally performed using a non-linear fitting technique. The fitting technique relates the measured neutron coincidence rate (the predictor) to the linear density of 235U (the response) in order to estimate model parameters of the nonlinear Padé equation, which traditionally is used to model the calibration data. Alternatively, following a simple data transformation, the fitting can also be performed using standard linear fitting methods. This paper compares performance of the nonlinear technique to the linear technique, using a range of possible error variance magnitudes in the measured neutron coincidence rate. We develop the required formalism and then apply the traditional (nonlinear) and alternative approaches (linear) to the same experimental and corresponding simulated representative datasets. We find that, in this context, because of the magnitude of the errors in the predictor, it is preferable not to transform to a linear model, and it is preferable not to adjust for the errors in the predictor when inferring the model parameters.

  7. Coincidence measurement of the fully differential cross section for atomic-field bremsstrahlung

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulk, J. D.; Quarles, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    A coincidence measurement was made of the absolute cross section for electron-atomic-field bremsstrahlung, differential in photon energy, photon-emission angle, and electron scattering angle. The incident electron energy was 140 keV and the scattering materials were thin films of aluminum and gold. The data are compared to the theoretical calculations of Elwert and Haug and of Bethe and Heitler. Both theories give generally satisfactory agreement for aluminum. The Elwert-Haug theory is somewhat more accurate for gold.

  8. The underwater coincidence counter for plutonium measurements in mixed-oxide fuel assemblies manual

    SciTech Connect

    G. W. Eccleston; H. O. Menlove; M. Abhold; M. Baker; J. Pecos

    1999-05-01

    This manual describes the Underwater Coincidence Counter (UWCC) that has been designed for the measurement of plutonium in mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies prior to irradiation. The UWCC uses high-efficiency {sup 3}He neutron detectors to measure the spontaneous-fission and induced-fission rates in the fuel assembly. Measurements can be made on MOX fuel assemblies in air or underwater. The neutron counting rate is analyzed for singles, doubles, and triples time correlations to determine the {sup 240}Pu effective mass per unit length of the fuel assembly. The system can verify the plutonium loading per unit length to a precision of less than 1% in a measurement time of 2 to 3 minutes. System design, components, performance tests, and operational characteristics are described in this manual.

  9. Triple coincidence beam spin asymmetry measurements in Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canan, Mustafa

    2011-12-01

    The Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) provides hitherto the most complete information about the quark structure of hadron. GPDs are accessible through hard-exclusive reactions, among which Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) is the cleanest reaction. A dedicated DVCS experiment on Hydrogen (E00-110) ran in the Hall A at Jefferson Laboratory in Fall 2004. I present here Beam Spin Asymmetry (BSA) results for the ep → epgamma reaction studied in the E00-110 experiment with fully exclusive triple coincidence H(e, e'gammap ) detection. I present a re-calibration of the electromagnetic calorimeter used to detect the high energy photon. This calibration is necessary to account for the effects of pile-up. The results show a 1-sigma disagreement with the double coincidence H(e, e'gamma )p results, I also presents a feasibility study for measurements of neutron GPDs via the 3He ? (e, e'gamma)ppn reaction on a polarized 3He target with JLab at 12 GeV. These measurements offer the prospect of a determination of all four GPDs.

  10. Doubly excited states of ammonia by scattered electron-ion coincidence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Karin; Sakai, Yasuhiro

    2012-03-01

    To obtain information on the optically forbidden doubly excited states of ammonia (NH3), we performed scattered electron-ion coincidence measurements. First, we observed scattered electrons using electron energy-loss spectroscopy and determined the generalized oscillator strength distribution (GOSD) under 200 eV incident electron energy at a scattering angle of 8°. Ionic GOSDs were also determined by combination with the coincidence signal, which was observed by the time-of-flight mass spectrometer at each energy-loss value, for each ion. The total and partial ionic GOSDs were compared with the experimental results of both photon and fast electron impact. Moreover, the neutral GOSD determined by subtracting the total ionic GOSD from the total was compared with previous results. In addition to the optically forbidden doubly excited states, which were identified by Kato et al (2003 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 36 3541) and Ishikawa et al (2008 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 41 195204), we found a new optically forbidden doubly excited state at around 35 eV.

  11. Energy and coincidence time resolution measurements of CdTe detectors for PET.

    PubMed

    Ariño, G; Chmeissani, M; De Lorenzo, G; Puigdengoles, C; Cabruja, E; Calderón, Y; Kolstein, M; Macias-Montero, J G; Martinez, R; Mikhaylova, E; Uzun, D

    2013-02-01

    We report on the characterization of 2 mm thick CdTe diode detector with Schottky contacts to be employed in a novel conceptual design of PET scanner. Results at -8°C with an applied bias voltage of -1000 V/mm show a 1.2% FWHM energy resolution at 511 keV. Coincidence time resolution has been measured by triggering on the preamplifier output signal to improve the timing resolution of the detector. Results at the same bias and temperature conditions show a FWHM of 6 ns with a minimum acceptance energy of 500 keV. These results show that pixelated CdTe Schottky diode is an excellent candidate for the development of next generation nuclear medical imaging devices such as PET, Compton gamma cameras, and especially PET-MRI hybrid systems when used in a magnetic field immune configuration.

  12. Coincidence Exclusive Measurement of the Nonmesonic Weak Decay of {sub {lambda}}{sup 12}C

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M. J.; Ajimura, S.; Aoki, K.; Banu, A.; Bhang, H.; Fukuda, T.; Hashimoto, O.; Hwang, J. I.; Kameoka, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kim, E. H.; Kim, J. H.; Maruta, T.; Miura, Y.; Miyake, Y.; Nagae, T.; Nakamura, M.; Nakamura, S. N.; Noumi, H.; Okada, S.

    2006-07-11

    We have measured the angular correlation of the pair nucleons np and nn emitted from the nonmesonic weak decay (NMWD) of {sub {lambda}}{sup 12}C produced via the ({pi}+,K+) reaction in coincidence measurement. The {lambda}p {yields} np and {lambda}n {yields} nn modes were clearly identified by measuring the back-to-back correlation of the emitted nucleon pairs which is the characteristic of two-body kinematics. From the measured nucleon pair numbers Nnn and Nnp, the ratio {gamma}n/{gamma}p of the partial decay widths {gamma}n({lambda}n {yields} nn) and {gamma}p({lambda}p {yields} np) of {sub {lambda}}{sup 12}C was extracted to be 0.51 {+-} 0.13(stat){+-}0.04(syst); this result is almost free from the ambiguity due to the nuclear final state interaction and 3-body decay process, which were inherent in the previous results. The obtained {gamma}n/{gamma}p ratio of {sub {lambda}}{sup 12}C (p-shell) is close to that of {sub {lambda}}{sup 5}He (s-shell). The results are consistent with those of recent theoretical calculations.

  13. First satellite measurements of chemical changes in coincidence with sprite activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnone, Enrico; São Sabbas, Fernanda; Kero, Antti; Soula, Serge; Carlotti, Massimo; Chanrion, Olivier; Dinelli, Bianca Maria; Papandrea, Enzo; Castelli, Elisa; Neubert, Torsten

    2010-05-01

    The last twenty years have seen the discovery of electric discharges in the Earth's atmosphere above thunderstorms, the so-called sprites and jets. It has been suggested that they impact the atmospheric chemistry and possibly affect the ozone layer through their repeated occurrence. Whereas theoretical studies and laboratory experiments suggest enhancement of such gasses as nitrogen oxides by up to hundreds of percent within sprites, a definitive detection of their chemical effects have to date been unsuccessful. In this paper, we report on the first measurements of atmospheric chemical perturbations recorded in coincidence with sprite activity. A striking event occurred on 25 August 2003 when the MIPAS spectrometer onboard the Envisat satellite recorded spectroscopic measurements soon after a sequence of 11 sprites observed above Corsica (France) by Eurosprite ground facilities (details of the convective system are discussed in a companion paper by São Sabbas et al.). The measurements show an enhancement of ambient nitrous oxide by 80% at 52 km altitude in the region above the parent thunderstorm. The recorded chemical changes imply sprites can exert significant modification of the atmospheric chemistry at a regional scale, confirming model and laboratory predictions of sprite-chemistry, and requiring a new estimate of their global impact. The results of the analysis and their implications are discussed.

  14. The Particle-Gamma Detector GODDESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratkiewicz, A.; Cizewski, J. A.; Baugher, T.; Burcher, S.; Hardy, S.; Lonsdale, S.; Shand, C.; Pain, S. D.; Marsh, I.; Jones, K. L.; Peters, W. A.; Carpenter, M. P.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S.; Kozub, R. L.; Afanasieva, L.; Blackmon, J. C.

    2014-09-01

    Transfer reactions in inverse kinematics provide a powerful probe of the single-particle structure of nuclei far from stability. The Californium Rare Isotope Breeder (CARIBU) at ATLAS produces exotic nuclei near possible r-process paths and makes them available for study. Gammasphere ORRUBA: Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) employs the large internal geometry of the high-resolution γ-ray detector Gammasphere to instrument the large-area position-sensitive particle detector ORRUBA. This coupling of Gammasphere and ORRUBA allows high-efficiency, high-resolution measurements of surrogate reactions for neutron capture, collective excitations via inelastic scattering, pickup reactions (such as (d,t)), and stripping reactions (e.g. (d,p)). Results from commissioning measurements and plans for future experiments will be presented. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation.

  15. Mass measurement of ^80Y by β-γ coincidence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Daeg; Zamfir, Victor; Berant, Zvi; Wolf, Alex; Barton, Charles; Caprio, Mark; Casten, Rick; Beausang, Con; Krücken, Reiner; Pietralla, Norbert; Cooper, Jeff; Novak, John; Aprahamian, Ani; Shawcross, Mark; Teymurazyan, Artur; Wiescher, Michael; Gill, Ron

    2002-10-01

    The rp-process has been proposed to account for the nucleosynthesis and terrestrial isotopic abundances of proton-rich nuclei. The path and termination point for this process above ^56Ni is uncertain due to our limited knowledge of nuclear properties, especially masses, near the proton drip line. ^80Y, the β-decay daughter of the waiting-point nucleus ^80Zr, was produced by bombardment of a ^58Ni target with 115 MeV ^28Si at the WNSL, Yale University. Recoil atoms were collected and transported to a shielded environment were β-γ coincidence decay measurements were made using a planar array of 4 clover Ge γ-ray detectors and a plastic scintillator β-ray detector. β-spectrum end-point energies were used to determine a Q_EC value for decay to ^80Sr. Results for ^80Y will be compared with other measurements, that vary over a range of ˜2 MeV, and with Audi-Wapstra systematics. Implications for the rp-process will be discussed.

  16. Measurement of U-235 Fission Neutron Spectra Using a Multiple Gamma Coincidence Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Chuncheng; Kegel, G.H.R.; Egan, J.J.; DeSimone, D.J.; Alimeti, A.; Roldan, C.F.; McKittrick, T.M.; Kim, D.-S.; Chen, X.; Tremblay, S.E.

    2005-05-24

    The Los Alamos Model of Madland and Nix predicts the shape of the fission neutron energy spectrum for incident primary neutrons of different energies. Verifications of the model normally are limited to measurements of the fission neutron spectra for energies higher than that of the primary neutrons because the low-energy spectrum is distorted by the admixture of elastically and inelastically scattered neutrons. This situation can be remedied by using a measuring technique that separates fission from scattering events. One solution consists of using a fissile sample so thin that fission fragments can be observed indicating the occurrence of a fission event. A different approach is considered in this paper. It has been established that a fission event is accompanied by the emission of between seven and eight gamma rays, while in a scattering interaction, between zero and two gammas are emitted, so that a gamma multiplicity detector should supply a datum to distinguish a fission event from a scattering event. We proceed as follows: A subnanosecond pulsed and bunched proton beam from the UML Van de Graaff generates nearly mono-energetic neutrons by irradiating a thin metallic lithium target. The neutrons irradiate a 235U sample. Emerging neutron energies are measured with a time-of-flight spectrometer. A set of four BaF2 detectors is located close to the 235U sample. These detectors together with their electronic components identify five different events for each neutron detected, i.e., whether four, three, two, one, or none of the BaF2 detectors received one (or more) gamma rays. We present work, preliminary to the final measurements, involving feasibility considerations based on gamma-ray coincidence measurements with four BaF2 detectors, and the design of a Fission-Scattering Discriminator under construction.

  17. Understanding volcanic processes using UV camera measurements of sulfur dioxide and coincident infrasound and seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Marika Piirak

    The exsolution of volatiles from magma maintains an important control on volcanic eruption styles. The nucleation, growth, and connectivity of bubbles during magma ascent provide the driving force behind eruptions, and the rate, volume, and ease of gas exsolution can affect eruptive activity. Volcanic plumes are the observable consequence of this magmatic degassing, and remote sensing techniques allow us to quantify changes in gas exsolution. However, until recently the methods used to measure volcanic plumes did not have the capability of detecting rapid changes in degassing on the scale of standard geophysical observations. The advent of the UV camera now makes high sample rate gas measurements possible. This type of dataset can then be compared to other volcanic observations to provide an in depth picture of degassing mechanisms in the shallow conduit. The goals of this research are to develop a robust methodology for UV camera field measurements of volcanic plumes, and utilize this data in conjunction with seismoacoustic records to illuminate degassing processes. Field and laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the effects of imaging conditions, vignetting, exposure time, calibration technique, and filter usage on the UV camera sulfur dioxide measurements. Using the best practices determined from these studies, a field campaign was undertaken at Volcan de Pacaya, Guatemala. Coincident plume sulfur dioxide measurements, acoustic recordings, and seismic observations were collected and analyzed jointly. The results provide insight into the small explosive features, variations in degassing rate, and plumbing system of this complex volcanic system. This research provides useful information for determining volcanic hazard at Pacaya, and demonstrates the potential of the UV camera in multiparameter studies.

  18. Terrestrial and Airborne LIDAR: Comparison of Coincident Datasets for Measuring Ground Deformation and Topographic Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayen, R. E.; Stewart, J. P.; Lembo, A. J.; Hu, J.; Davis, C. A.; Hogue, T.; Collins, B. D.; Minasian, D.; Louis-Kayen, N. M.; O'Rourke, T. D.

    2009-05-01

    We present the results from a controlled study on the use of pulse-based terrestrial lidar and phase-based airborne lidar to detect topographic change and ground deformation in areas of earthquake- and storm- induced landslides. Terrestrial and airborne lidar scans were performed at three sites in Los Angeles County and their accuracy was gauged using coincident total station survey measurements as the control. The study was supported by the Multidisciplinary Center for Earthquake Engineering Research (MCEER), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP). Horizontal accuracy was evaluated through the measurement of Northing and Easting residuals, standardized to WGS84. Assessment of accuracy was made on lengths and heights of well-defined objects in the lidar scans, such as LADWP buildings and water tanks. The bias and dispersion of lidar height measurements, standardized to NGVD88, were assessed at the Mulholland Tank adjacent to Hollywood Reservoir, the Owens Aqueduct Penstock at Power Plant 2 (PP2) in San Francisquito Canyon, and a flat un-vegetated site near the Los Angeles Reservoir before and after carefully measured trenching. At the vegetated slopes near PP2 and the Hollywood Reservoir site, airborne lidar showed minimal elevation bias and a standard deviation of approximately 50 cm, whereas terrestrial lidar demonstrated large bias and dispersion (on order of meters) due to the inability of ground-based lidar to penetrate heavy vegetation. Both systems were able to assess heights and lengths on unobstructed man made structures at the sub-decimeter scale. At the trench site, airborne lidar showed decimeter scale bias of -23.6 cm for flat ground to -8.7 cm for trenched ground, and dispersion of 5.6 for flat ground to 20 cm for trenched ground. Terrestrial lidar was nearly unbiased (~0 cm for flat or trenched ground) and with very low dispersion of 4.1 and 6.5 cm for flat and trenched ground, respectively

  19. Development of a coincidence system for the measurement of X-ray emission atomic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Filiberto; Miranda, Javier

    2013-07-01

    Preliminary results obtained in experiments carried out with an x-ray spectrometer built at the Instituto de Física for Atomic Physics and environmental sciences studies are presented. The experiments are based on a coincidence method for signals produced by LEGe and Si(Li) detectors. The x-ray fluorescence yields (ωLi) and Coster-Kronig transition probabilities (fij) for elements with 55 ≤ Z ≤ 60 are among the quantities of interest. The method is based on the simultaneous detection of K x-rays with the LEGe detector and the L x-rays with the Si(Li) detector. The primary radiation source is an x-ray tube with Rh anode. The system was tested with the coincidence of the L x-rays from Ce with its K line, demonstrating the feasibility of the experiments.

  20. Development of a coincidence system for the measurement of X-ray emission atomic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Filiberto; Miranda, Javier

    2013-07-03

    Preliminary results obtained in experiments carried out with an x-ray spectrometer built at the Instituto de Fisica for Atomic Physics and environmental sciences studies are presented. The experiments are based on a coincidence method for signals produced by LEGe and Si(Li) detectors. The x-ray fluorescence yields ({omega}{sub Li}) and Coster-Kronig transition probabilities (f{sub ij}) for elements with 55 {<=} Z {<=} 60 are among the quantities of interest. The method is based on the simultaneous detection of K x-rays with the LEGe detector and the L x-rays with the Si(Li) detector. The primary radiation source is an x-ray tube with Rh anode. The system was tested with the coincidence of the L x-rays from Ce with its K line, demonstrating the feasibility of the experiments.

  1. Error-control and processes optimization of (223/224)Ra measurement using Delayed Coincidence Counter (RaDeCC).

    PubMed

    Xiaoqing, Cheng; Lixin, Yi; Lingling, Liu; Guoqiang, Tang; Zhidong, Wang

    2015-11-01

    RaDeCC has proved to be a precise and standard way to measure (224)Ra and (223)Ra in water samples and successfully made radium a tracer of several environmental processes. In this paper, the relative errors of (224)Ra and (223)Ra measurement in water samples via a Radium Delayed Coincidence Count system are analyzed through performing coincidence correction calculations and error propagation. The calculated relative errors range of 2.6% ∼ 10.6% for (224)Ra and 9.6% ∼ 14.2% for (223)Ra. For different radium activities, effects of decay days and counting time on final radium relative errors are evaluated and the results show that these relative errors can decrease by adjusting the two measurement factors. Finally, to minimize propagated errors in Radium activity, a set of optimized RaDeCC measurement parameters are proposed.

  2. Error-control and processes optimization of (223/224)Ra measurement using Delayed Coincidence Counter (RaDeCC).

    PubMed

    Xiaoqing, Cheng; Lixin, Yi; Lingling, Liu; Guoqiang, Tang; Zhidong, Wang

    2015-11-01

    RaDeCC has proved to be a precise and standard way to measure (224)Ra and (223)Ra in water samples and successfully made radium a tracer of several environmental processes. In this paper, the relative errors of (224)Ra and (223)Ra measurement in water samples via a Radium Delayed Coincidence Count system are analyzed through performing coincidence correction calculations and error propagation. The calculated relative errors range of 2.6% ∼ 10.6% for (224)Ra and 9.6% ∼ 14.2% for (223)Ra. For different radium activities, effects of decay days and counting time on final radium relative errors are evaluated and the results show that these relative errors can decrease by adjusting the two measurement factors. Finally, to minimize propagated errors in Radium activity, a set of optimized RaDeCC measurement parameters are proposed. PMID:26233651

  3. Coincidence measurements of electron-impact coherence parameters for e-He scattering in the full range of scattering angles

    SciTech Connect

    Klosowski, Lukasz; Piwinski, Mariusz; Dziczek, Dariusz; Pleskacz, Katarzyna; Chwirot, Stanislaw

    2009-12-15

    Electron impact coherence parameters for inelastic e-He scattering have been measured for the excitation to the 2 {sup 1}P{sub 1} state at collision energy of 100 eV. The experiment was conducted using angular correlation electron-photon coincidence technique with a magnetic angle changer allowing measurements in full range of scattering angles. The results are compared with other experimental data and theoretical predictions available for this collisional system.

  4. Note: An improved 3D imaging system for electron-electron coincidence measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yun Fei; Lee, Suk Kyoung; Adhikari, Pradip; Herath, Thushani; Lingenfelter, Steven; Winney, Alexander H.; Li, Wen

    2015-09-15

    We demonstrate an improved imaging system that can achieve highly efficient 3D detection of two electrons in coincidence. The imaging system is based on a fast frame complementary metal-oxide semiconductor camera and a high-speed waveform digitizer. We have shown previously that this detection system is capable of 3D detection of ions and electrons with good temporal and spatial resolution. Here, we show that with a new timing analysis algorithm, this system can achieve an unprecedented dead-time (<0.7 ns) and dead-space (<1 mm) when detecting two electrons. A true zero dead-time detection is also demonstrated.

  5. Note: An improved 3D imaging system for electron-electron coincidence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yun Fei; Lee, Suk Kyoung; Adhikari, Pradip; Herath, Thushani; Lingenfelter, Steven; Winney, Alexander H.; Li, Wen

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate an improved imaging system that can achieve highly efficient 3D detection of two electrons in coincidence. The imaging system is based on a fast frame complementary metal-oxide semiconductor camera and a high-speed waveform digitizer. We have shown previously that this detection system is capable of 3D detection of ions and electrons with good temporal and spatial resolution. Here, we show that with a new timing analysis algorithm, this system can achieve an unprecedented dead-time (<0.7 ns) and dead-space (<1 mm) when detecting two electrons. A true zero dead-time detection is also demonstrated.

  6. A new method of time difference measurement: The time difference method by dual phase coincidence points detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Wei

    1993-01-01

    In the high accurate measurement of periodic signals, the greatest common factor frequency and its characteristics have special functions. A method of time difference measurement - the time difference method by dual 'phase coincidence points' detection is described. This method utilizes the characteristics of the greatest common factor frequency to measure time or phase difference between periodic signals. It can suit a very wide frequency range. Measurement precision and potential accuracy of several picoseconds were demonstrated with this new method. The instrument based on this method is very simple, and the demand for the common oscillator is low. This method and instrument can be used widely.

  7. Coincidence measurements between fragment ions and the number of emitted electrons in heavy ion collisions with polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, T.; Majima, T.; Kishimoto, T.; Tsuchida, H.; Itoh, A.

    2012-11-01

    We have studied multiple ionization and multifragmentation of a chlorofluorocarbon molecule, CH2FCF3, induced by collisions of 580-keV C+ ions. Coincidence measurements of product ions and the number of emitted electrons from CH2FCF3 were performed under charge-changing conditions of C+ → Cq+ (q = 0, 2, 3). A fully inclusive measurement regardless of outgoing projectile charge state was also performed by making coincidence with a pulsed ion beam. Mass distributions of fragment ions and number distributions of emitted electrons were both found to change greatly according to charge-changing conditions. Highly multiple ionization emitting up to about 10 electrons was observed in electron loss collisions.

  8. Alpha and conversion electron spectroscopy of 238,239Pu and 241Am and alpha-conversion electron coincidence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dion, Michael P.; Miller, Brian W.; Warren, Glen A.

    2016-09-01

    A technique to determine the isotopic constituents of a mixed actinide sample has been proposed by a coincident alpha-conversion electron measurement. This presents a unique signature to allow the unfolding of isotopes that possess overlapping alpha particle energy and reduce backgrounds of an unseparated sample. The work presented here are results of conversion electron spectroscopy of 241Am, 238Pu and 239Pu using a dual-stage peltier-cooled 25 mm2 silicon drift detector and alpha spectroscopy with a passivated ion implanted planar silicon detector. The conversion electron spectra were evaluated from 20-55 keV based on fits to the dominant conversion electron emissions, which allowed the relative conversion electron emission intensities to be determined. These measurements provide crucial singles spectral information and calibration to aid in the coincident measurement approach. Furthermore, an alpha-conversion electron spectrometer was assembled using the silicon based detectors described and results of a coincident spectrum analysis is reported for 241Am.

  9. Integrator or Coincidence Detector: A Novel Measure Based on the Discrete Reverse Correlation to Determine a Neuron's Operational Mode.

    PubMed

    Kanev, Jacob; Koutsou, Achilleas; Christodoulou, Chris; Obermayer, Klaus

    2016-10-01

    In this letter, we propose a definition of the operational mode of a neuron, that is, whether a neuron integrates over its input or detects coincidences. We complete the range of possible operational modes by a new mode we call gap detection, which means that a neuron responds to gaps in its stimulus. We propose a measure consisting of two scalar values, both ranging from -1 to +1: the neural drive, which indicates whether its stimulus excites the neuron, serves as background noise, or inhibits it; the neural mode, which indicates whether the neuron's response is the result of integration over its input, of coincidence detection, or of gap detection; with all three modes possible for all neural drive values. This is a pure spike-based measure and can be applied to measure the influence of either all or subset of a neuron's stimulus. We derive the measure by decomposing the reverse correlation, test it in several artificial and biological settings, and compare it to other measures, finding little or no correlation between them. We relate the results of the measure to neural parameters and investigate the effect of time delay during spike generation. Our results suggest that a neuron can use several different modes simultaneously on different subsets of its stimulus to enable it to respond to its stimulus in a complex manner. PMID:27557103

  10. Coincidence Proportional Counter

    DOEpatents

    Manley, J H

    1950-11-21

    A coincidence proportional counter having a plurality of collecting electrodes so disposed as to measure the range or energy spectrum of an ionizing particle-emitting source such as an alpha source, is disclosed.

  11. The underwater coincidence counter (UWCC) for plutonium measurements in mixed oxide fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Eccleston, G.W.; Menlove, H.O.; Abhold, M.; Baker, M.; Pecos, J.

    1998-12-31

    The use of fresh uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in light-water reactors (LWR) is increasing in Europe and Japan and it is necessary to verify the plutonium content in the fuel for international safeguards purposes. The UWCC is a new instrument that has been designed to operate underwater and nondestructively measure the plutonium in unirradiated MOX fuel assemblies. The UWCC can be quickly configured to measure either boiling-water reactor (BWR) or pressurized-water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies. The plutonium loading per unit length is measured using the UWCC to precisions of less than 1% in a measurement time of 2 to 3 minutes. Initial calibrations of the UWCC were completed on measurements of MOX fuel in Mol, Belgium. The MCNP-REN Monte Carlo simulation code is being benchmarked to the calibration measurements to allow accurate simulations for extended calibrations of the UWCC.

  12. Coincident measurements of prompt fission γ rays and fission fragments at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, C. L.; Baramsai, B.; Jandel, M.; Rusev, G.; Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Ullmann, J.; Kawano, T.; Stetcu, I.; Talou, P.

    2015-10-01

    Modern statistical approaches to modeling fission involve the calculation of not only average quantities but also fully correlated distributions of all fission products. Applications such as those involving the detection of special nuclear materials also rely on fully correlated data of fission products. Experimental measurements of correlated data are thus critical to the validation of theory and the development of important applications. The goal of this experiment was to measure properties of prompt fission gamma-ray emission as a function of fission fragments' total kinetic energy in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf. The measurement was carried out at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE), a 4 π γ-ray calorimeter. A prototype design consisting of two silicon detectors was installed in the center of DANCE, allowing simultaneous measurement of fission fragments and γ rays. Effort has been taken to simulate fragment kinetic energy losses as well as γ-ray attenuation in DANCE using such tools as GEANT4 and SRIM. Theoretical predictions generated by the code CGMF were also incorporated as input for these simulations. Results from the experiment and simulations will be presented, along with plans for future measurements.

  13. Monte Carlo Study of Feasibility of Passive Time-Coincidence Measurements for Monitoring Large Fissile Storage Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Bevins, James E; Hayward, Jason P; Mihalczo, John T

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring the amount of HEU in large (metric tons) storage arrays with passive time coincidence distribution measurements is complicated by a variety of effects. These include: (1) time correlated background from HEU outside the particular localized section of the storage array being monitored, (2) cosmic radiation induced fission of nearby array materials, and (3) how large a portion of the array can be monitored with a set of detectors at a particular location in the array. Such a large storage array is typically rows of 2 wide and 3 high birdcages (metal structures that maintain safe nuclear criticality spacing between stored HEU castings) separated by 2 foot wide aisles between rows. This evaluation investigates how large an array of birdcages can be monitored by two 4x4 arrays of proton recoil scintillators. Monte Carlo simulations provided the time distribution of coincidences, multiplets (number of times n detection events occur in a time interval), and Feynman variance as a function of the length of the array. These calculations were performed for hypothetical arrays of 18 kg HEU standard Y-12 storage castings spaced 20 in apart. These types of arrays are used because the spacing between HEU castings are loosely coupled in that the castings at the ends of the arrays only interact with adjacent castings; this makes monitoring of the entire array difficult with detectors at a particular location in the array.

  14. Measurement of Activated Au foils by 2{pi}{beta}+2{pi}{beta}-{gamma} Coincidence Counting and EGS5 Monte Carlo Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Yasushi; Harano, Hideki; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Nishiyama, Jun; Moriyama, Kentaro; Unno, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Takahiro; Yunoki, Akira; Hino, Yoshio; Kudo, Katsuhisa

    2009-03-10

    Neutron activation analysis using Au foil is a common and important method for measurement of thermal neutron fluence. To determine the activity of Au foil experimentally, Kawada et al. proposed 2{pi}{beta}+2{pi}{beta}-{gamma} coincidence counting. This method is based on 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma} coincidence counting but a 4{pi}{beta} detector is divided into two 2{pi}{beta} detectors those are independently operated in the method. In this research the correction factors in 2{pi}{beta}+2{pi}{beta}-{gamma} coincidence counting were obtained by measurement and simulation. The activities obtained by these correction factors were in good agreement.

  15. Random coincidences during in-beam PET measurements at microbunched therapeutic ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parodi, K.; Crespo, P.; Eickhoff, H.; Haberer, T.; Pawelke, J.; Schardt, D.; Enghardt, W.

    2005-06-01

    At the experimental carbon ion tumour therapy facility at GSI Darmstadt, in-beam positron emission tomography (PET) is used to monitor the dose delivery precision. A dual head positron camera has been assembled from commercial detector components in order to measure the β+-activity, induced by the irradiation, simultaneously to the dose application. Despite the positive clinical impact, the image quality is limited by the low counting statistics, orders of magnitude below that in standard PET applications to nuclear medicine. This paper investigates the origin for the noisy acquisition during particle extraction from the synchrotron of GSI. The results demonstrate the failure of standard random correction techniques due to a γ-ray background correlated in time with the carbon ion beam microstructure. This prevents the use of data acquired during beam extraction for imaging. The loss of counting statistics is expected to rise further at the future hospital-based facility at Heidelberg, due to a more efficient utilisation of the accelerator resulting in shorter beam pauses and a reduced treatment time. In this respect, this paper provides the basis for a new data acquisition concept tailored to the unconventional application of in-beam PET imaging to therapy monitoring at radiofrequency pulsed radiation sources.

  16. Measurement of cone beam CT coincidence with megavoltage isocentre and image sharpness using the QUASAR Penta-Guide phantom.

    PubMed

    Sykes, J R; Lindsay, R; Dean, C J; Brettle, D S; Magee, D R; Thwaites, D I

    2008-10-01

    For image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) systems based on cone beam CT (CBCT) integrated into a linear accelerator, the reproducible alignment of imager to x-ray source is critical to the registration of both the x-ray-volumetric image with the megavoltage (MV) beam isocentre and image sharpness. An enhanced method of determining the CBCT to MV isocentre alignment using the QUASAR Penta-Guide phantom was developed which improved both precision and accuracy. This was benchmarked against our existing method which used software and a ball-bearing (BB) phantom provided by Elekta. Additionally, a method of measuring an image sharpness metric (MTF(50)) from the edge response function of a spherical air cavity within the Penta-Guide phantom was developed and its sensitivity was tested by simulating misalignments of the kV imager. Reproducibility testing of the enhanced Penta-Guide method demonstrated a systematic error of <0.2 mm when compared to the BB method with near equivalent random error (s=0.15 mm). The mean MTF(50) for five measurements was 0.278+/-0.004 lp mm(-1) with no applied misalignment. Simulated misalignments exhibited a clear peak in the MTF(50) enabling misalignments greater than 0.4 mm to be detected. The Penta-Guide phantom can be used to precisely measure CBCT-MV coincidence and image sharpness on CBCT-IGRT systems.

  17. An instrument for continuous measurement of 220Rn (and 222Rn) using delayed coincidences between 220Rn and 216Po

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigu, J.; Elliott, J.

    1994-05-01

    An instrument has been developed for continuous monitoring of 220Rn. The method of data analysis is based on delayed coincidences between 220Rn and 216Po. The instrument basically consists of a scaler equipped with a photomultiplier tube (PMT) to which a scintillation cell (SC) of the flow through type is optically coupled. The scaler is equipped with a pulse output (P/O) port which provides a TTL pulse, +5 V in amplitude and 5 to 10 μs duration for each nuclear event recorded by the SC and its associated electronic circuitry. The P/O port is connected to a 32 bit counter/timer unit operating at 1 MHz which records and stores the time of arrival of pulses. For laboratory use, the counter/timer is connected to the serial port of a laptop PC. However, for field applications, where space and weight pose severe practical limitations, the PC is substituted by an expanded counter/timer unit which incorporates a muprocessor for data analysis, a LCD for data display, and a keypad to key in function instructions. Furthermore, some additional hardware permits the measurement of 220Rn flux density, J( 220Rn) , from soils and other materials. Because total α-particle count, as well as delayed (α - α) coincidence rates are recorded in two separate channels, the method permits the measurement of 222Rn in addition to 220Rn. The method is particularly useful for low concentration levels. The sensitivity of the method primarily depends on the volume of the SC. For a low volume SC (˜0.16 l), a sensitivity of 0.2 h -1/Bq m -3 for 220Rn and 1.4 h -1/Bq m -3 for 222Rn are readily attainable. For a large volume (1.5 l) SC (external PMT used), the sensitivity for 220Rn is ≥ 1.5 h -1/Bq m -3, depending on the SC design and the operating sampling flowrate. (Note: h -1 stands for counts per hour). The above instrument has been used extensively at the National Radon/Thoron Test Facility (NRTTF) of the Elliot Lake Laboratory for routine monitoring of 220Rn levels since 1992. It has

  18. Development of NANA: A Fast-Scintillator, Coincidence Gamma-ray Array for Radioactive Source Characterisation and Absolute Activity Measurements at the UK National Physical Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, P. H.; Shearman, R.; Judge, S. M.; Lorusso, G.; Main, P.; Bell, S.; Collins, S. M.; Ivanov, P.; Jerome, S. M.; Keightley, J. D.; Larijani, C.; Lotay, G.; Pearce, A. K.

    2015-06-01

    A multi-detector modular coincidence gamma-ray spectrometer is being designed and constructed for use at the UK's National Physical Laboratory (NPL) for use in direct measurement and metrological standardisation of nuclear decay activities. In its first generation, the NPL National Nuclear Array (NANA) will consist of twelve individual halide scintillation detectors placed in a high-efficiency geometry around a well-defined central point source position. This brief conference paper provides details of the measured detector module and coincidence energy and timing responses for the LaBr3(Ce) detectors which will be used in the NANA array. Preliminary GEANT4 simulations of the array's full energy peak efficiency and expected gamma-ray coincidence response are also presented.

  19. Assessing spaceborne lidar detection and characterization of aerosols near clouds using coincident airborne lidar and other measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Vaughan, M.; Omar, A. H.; Burton, S. P.; Rogers, R.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    The objectives are to 1) evaluate potential shortcomings in the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aerosol height detection concerning specific biomass burning smoke events informed by airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) in different cloud environments and 2) study the lidar-derived atmospheric parameters in the vicinity of clouds for the cases where smoke is within or above clouds. In the case of light absorbing aerosols like biomass burning smoke, studies show that the greater the cloud cover below the aerosols, the more likely the aerosols are to heat the planet. An accurate aerosol height assumption is also crucial to a correct retrieval of aerosol chemical composition from passive space-based measurements (through the Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and aerosol absorption coefficient, as exemplified by aerosol retrievals using the passive Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)). Strong smoke events are recognized as very difficult to quantify from space using passive (MODIS, OMI etc...) or active (CALIOP) satellite sensors for different reasons. This study is performed through (i) the selection of smoke events with coincident CALIOP and airborne HSRL aerosol observations, with smoke presence determined according to the HSRL aerosol classification data, (ii) the order of such events by range of HSRL aerosol optical depth, total color ratio and depolarization ratio (the latter two informing on the size and shape of the particles) and the evaluation of CALIOP's detection, classification and retrieval performance for each event, (iii) the study of the HSRL (or CALIOP when available) atmospheric parameters (total color ratio, volume depolarization ratio, mean attenuated backscatter) in the vicinity of clouds for each smoke event.

  20. Coincidence measurements of the (. pi. /sup +/,. pi. /sup 0/p) reaction in the /triangle/-resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeibraten, S.

    1989-05-01

    This thesis describes an experimental study of the (..pi../sup +/, ..pi../sup 0/p) reaction at incident energy T/sub ..pi../sup +// = 165 MeV. This work is part of the first experiment to detect neutral pions and protons in coincidence in kinematically complete measurements. The reaction was studied on /sup 16/O (using water targets) at several pion angles: theta/sub ..pi../sup 0// = 70/degree/, 80/degree/, 110/degree/, and 130/degree/. At theta/sub ..pi../sup 0// = 110/degree/ measurements were also made on /sup 56/Fe, /sup 120/Sn, and /sup 208/Pb. The neutral pions were detected with the LAMPF ..pi../sup 0/ spectrometer, while the protons were detected in a vertical array of plastic-scintillator ..delta..E-E telescopes, each spanning 8.5 msr. Energy spectra of the differential cross sections d/sup 4/sigma/dE/sub ..pi../sup 0// dE/sub p/d..cap omega../sub ..pi../sup 0//d..cap omega../sub p/ were obtained for each proton telescope and subsequently integrated over proton and pion energy and proton angle. The characteristics of these spectra are consistent with a quasi-free description of the (..pi../sup +/,..pi../sup 0/p) reaction. The angular dependence of dsigma/d..cap omega../sub ..pi../sup 0//(theta/sub ..pi../sup 0//) for /sup 16/O(..pi../sup +/,..pi../sup 0/p) was found to be in accordance with that of the cross section for the corresponding free reaction at backward ..pi../sup 0/ angles. For the /sup 16/O(..pi../sup +/,..pi../sup 0/p) reaction, events in which a p-shell nucleon had been removed were identified. The p-shell events were found to constitute only 40--50% of the total cross section for quasi-free one-nucleon removal. The (..pi../sup +/,..pi../sup 0/p) cross section at theta/sub ..pi../sup 0// = 110/degree/ proved to be almost the same for all target nuclei, possibly slightly decreasing as a function of A. 102 refs., 108 figs., 24 tabs.

  1. Development of an in-situ structure/photo-absorption coincident measurement system for precise structure-optical property relationship research at SPring-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungeun; Kato, Kenichi; Moritomo, Yutaka; Takata, Masaki

    2010-06-01

    We have developed the structure and optical property coincident measurement system equipped with the photo-absorption system to the Large Debye-Scherrer Camera at BL44B2 of the SPring-8. Both photo-absorption detecting systems, the Si pin-photo diode for a 532 nm CW laser and the absorption spectrum covered the range of UV-IR (200˜1400 nm) for a white beam, are adopted. In order to verify the coincident measurement system, the X-ray powder diffraction and photo-absorption with the cyanide complex were performed individually and simultaneously under the temperature changes. As a result, the coincident measurement system performed successfully the one-to-one corresponding measurement between X-ray diffraction and photo-absorption. In addition, the monitoring of the photo-absorption informed us the property change of the material for the measurement condition and the sample transformation by temperature, laser etc. as well as damage by high-brilliance synchrotron radiation X-ray beam.

  2. Validation of satellite overland retrievals of AOD at northern high latitudes with coincident measurements from airborne sunphotometer, lidar, and in situ sensors during ARCTAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, J. M.; Shinozuka, Y.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Ramachandran, S.; Johnson, R. R.; Clarke, A. D.; Howell, S. G.; McNaughton, C.; Freitag, S.; Kapustin, V. N.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Torres, O.; Veefkind, P.; Remer, L. A.; Mattoo, S.; Levy, R. C.; Chu, A. D.; Kahn, R. A.; Davis, M. R.

    2009-12-01

    The 2008 Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) field campaign presented a unique opportunity for validation of satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD) over a variety of surfaces at northern high latitudes. In particular, the 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) was operated together with a variety of in-situ and other remote sensors aboard the NASA P-3B research aircraft during both the spring and summer phases of ARCTAS. Among the in-situ sensors were a nephelometer and particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) operated by University of Hawaii Group for Environmental Aerosol Research (HIGEAR). P-3B science missions included several coincident underflights of the Terra and A-Train satellites during a variety of aerosol loading conditions, including Arctic haze and smoke plumes from boreal forest fires. In this presentation, we will compare AATS-14 AOD spectra, adjusted for the contribution from the layer below the aircraft using the HiGEAR scattering and absorption measurements, with full column AOD retrievals from coincident measurements by satellite sensors such as MISR, MODIS, OMI, and POLDER. We also intend to show comparisons of aerosol extinction derived from AATS-14 measurements during P-3B vertical profiles with coincident measurements from CALIOP aboard the CALIPSO satellite and from the high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) flown aboard the NASA B-200 aircraft.

  3. CALIBRATION OF THE HB LINE ACTIVE WELL NEUTRON COINCIDENCE COUNTER FOR MEASUREMENT OF LANL 3013 HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM PRODUCT SPLITS

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R; Donald02 Williams, D; Rstephen Lee, R; David-W Roberts, D; Leah Arrigo, L

    2008-01-22

    In this paper we describe set-up, calibration, and testing of the F-Area Analytical Labs active well neutron coincidence counter(HV-221000-NDA-X-1-DK-AWCC-1)in SRNL for use in HB-Line to enable assay of 3013EU/Pu metal product. The instrument was required within a three-month window for availability upon receipt of LANL Category IV uranium oxide samples into the SRS HB-Line facility. We describe calibration of the instrument in the SRNL nuclear nondestructive assay facility in the range 10-400 g HEU for qualification and installation in HB-Line for assay of the initial suite of product samples.

  4. NEUTRON MULTIPLICITY AND ACTIVE WELL NEUTRON COINCIDENCE VERIFICATION MEASUREMENTS PERFORMED FOR MARCH 2009 SEMI-ANNUAL DOE INVENTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R.; Ayers, J.; Tietze, F.; Klapper, K.

    2010-02-05

    The Analytical Development (AD) Section field nuclear measurement group performed six 'best available technique' verification measurements to satisfy a DOE requirement instituted for the March 2009 semi-annual inventory. The requirement of (1) yielded the need for SRNL Research Operations Department Material Control & Accountability (MC&A) group to measure the Pu content of five items and the highly enrich uranium (HEU) content of two. No 14Q-qualified measurement equipment was available to satisfy the requirement. The AD field nuclear group has routinely performed the required Confirmatory Measurements for the semi-annual inventories for fifteen years using sodium iodide and high purity germanium (HpGe) {gamma}-ray pulse height analysis nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments. With appropriate {gamma}-ray acquisition modeling, the HpGe spectrometers can be used to perform verification-type quantitative assay for Pu-isotopics and HEU content. The AD nuclear NDA group is widely experienced with this type of measurement and reports content for these species in requested process control, MC&A booking, and holdup measurements assays Site-wide. However none of the AD HpGe {gamma}-ray spectrometers have been 14Q-qualified, and the requirement of reference 1 specifically excluded a {gamma}-ray PHA measurement from those it would accept for the required verification measurements. The requirement of reference 1 was a new requirement for which the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Research Operations Department (ROD) MC&A group was unprepared. The criteria for exemption from verification were: (1) isotope content below 50 grams; (2) intrinsically tamper indicating or TID sealed items which contain a Category IV quantity of material; (3) assembled components; and (4) laboratory samples. Therefore all (SRNL) Material Balance Area (MBA) items with greater than 50 grams total Pu or greater than 50 grams HEU were subject to a verification measurement. The pass

  5. A beta-alpha coincidence counting system for measurement of trace quantities of 238U and 232Th in aqueous samples at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, M.; Doucas, G.; Fergani, H.; Jelley, N. A.; Majerus, S.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Peeters, S. J. M.; Perry, C.

    2016-08-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory experiment was built to measure the total flux of 8B solar neutrinos via the neutral current disintegration deuterium nuclei. This process can be mimiced by daughter isotopes of 232Th and 238U which can photodisintegrate the deuterium nucleus. Measurement of the concentration of such radioisotopes in the heavy water was critical to the success of the experiment. A radium assay technique using Hydrous Titanium Oxide coated filters was developed for this purpose and it was used in conjunction with a delayed beta-alpha coincidence counting system. The design, calibration and operation of this counting system are described in this paper. The counting efficiency for 232Th (224Ra) and 238U (226Ra) were measured to be 50 ± 5% and 62 ± 7%

  6. Comparison of Coincident Rayleigh-Scatter and Sodium Resonance Lidar Temperature Measurements from the Mesosphere-Lower-Thermosphere Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sox, L.; Wickwar, V. B.; Yuan, T.; Criddle, N.

    2015-12-01

    There are relatively few instruments that have the capabilities to make near continuous measurements of the mesosphere-lower-thermosphere (MLT) region. Rayleigh scatter and resonance lidars, particularly sodium resonance lidar, have been the two dominant ground-based techniques for acquiring mesosphere and MLT vertical temperature profiles, respectively, for more than two decades. With these measurements, the dynamics (gravity waves, tides) and long-term temperature trends (upper atmosphere cooling) of the MLT region can be studied. The Utah State University (USU; 41.7º N, 111.8º W) campus hosts a unique upper atmospheric observatory which houses both a high-power, large-aperture Rayleigh lidar and a sodium resonance Doppler lidar. For the first time, we will present coordinated, night-time averaged temperatures, overlapping in observational range (80-110 km), from the two lidars. This overlap has been achieved through the relocation of the sodium lidar from Colorado State University to USU's campus and through upgrades to the existing USU Rayleigh lidar which elevated its observational range from 45-90 km to 70-115 km. The comparison of the two sets of temperature measurements is important because the two lidar techniques derive temperature profiles using different scattering processes and analysis methods. Furthermore, previous climatological comparisons, between Rayleigh and sodium lidar, [Argall and Sica, 2007] have suggested that significant temperature differences can occur. This comparison aims to explore possible temperature effects from the differences in the two measurement techniques.

  7. Performance of A Compact Multi-crystal High-purity Germanium Detector Array for Measuring Coincident Gamma-ray Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, Chris; Daigle, Stephen; Buckner, Matt; Erikson, Luke E.; Runkle, Robert C.; Stave, Sean C.; Champagne, Art; Cooper, Andrew; Downen, Lori; Glasgow, Brian D.; Kelly, Keegan; Sallaska, Anne

    2015-02-18

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a 14-crystal array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors housed in a single cryostat. The array was used to measure the astrophysical S-factor for the 14N(p,γ)15O* reaction for several transition energies at an effective center of mass energy of 163 keV. Owing to the segmented nature of the MARS detector, the effect of gamma-ray summing was greatly reduced in comparison to past experiments which utilized large, single-crystal detectors. The new S-factor values agree within the uncertainties with the past measurements. Details of the analysis and detector performance will be presented.

  8. Performance of a compact multi-crystal high-purity germanium detector array for measuring coincident gamma-ray emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Chris; Daigle, Stephen; Buckner, Matt; Erikson, Luke E.; Runkle, Robert C.; Stave, Sean C.; Champagne, Arthur E.; Cooper, Andrew; Downen, Lori; Glasgow, Brian D.; Kelly, Keegan; Sallaska, Anne

    2015-05-01

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a 14-crystal array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors housed in a single cryostat. The array was used to measure the astrophysical S-factor for the 14N(p,γ)15O* reaction for several transition energies at an effective center-of-mass energy of 163 keV. Owing to the granular nature of the MARS detector, the effect of gamma-ray summing was greatly reduced in comparison to past experiments which utilized large, single-crystal detectors. The new S-factor values agree within their uncertainties with the past measurements. Details of the analysis and detector performance are presented.

  9. An efficient and simple method for measuring (226)Ra using the scintillation cell in a delayed coincidence counting system (RaDeCC).

    PubMed

    Waska, Hannelore; Kim, Seolwon; Kim, Guebuem; Peterson, Richard N; Burnett, William C

    2008-12-01

    A delayed coincidence counter (RaDeCC), developed to determine ultra-low levels of (223)Ra (half life = 11.1 days) and (224)Ra (half life = 3.6 days) in seawater, was adapted to measure (226)Ra (half life = 1622 years). After pre-concentration of Ra from seawater onto MnO(2)-coated fiber we show in this study that the (226)Ra activity can be determined using the RaDeCC's ability to record alpha decay of its daughters as total counts. For sufficient ingrowth of (222)Rn, the Mn-fiber is hermetically sealed in a column for a few days. Then, the ingrown (222)Rn is circulated through the RaDeCC air-loop system followed by shutting down of the pump and closure of the scintillation cell for equilibration. Counting may be completed within a few hours for seawater samples. Sample measurements with this method agreed well with data obtained using gamma-ray spectrometry. This proves that a set of Ra isotopes ((223)Ra, (224)Ra, and (226)Ra), commonly used for geophysical studies such as mixing rates of different water masses and submarine groundwater discharge, can be efficiently and rapidly measured using the RaDeCC.

  10. Sensitivity to coincidences and paranormal belief.

    PubMed

    Hadlaczky, Gergö; Westerlund, Joakim

    2011-12-01

    Often it is difficult to find a natural explanation as to why a surprising coincidence occurs. In attempting to find one, people may be inclined to accept paranormal explanations. The objective of this study was to investigate whether people with a lower threshold for being surprised by coincidences have a greater propensity to become believers compared to those with a higher threshold. Participants were exposed to artificial coincidences, which were formally defined as less or more probable, and were asked to provide remarkability ratings. Paranormal belief was measured by the Australian Sheep-Goat Scale. An analysis of the remarkability ratings revealed a significant interaction effect between Sheep-Goat score and type of coincidence, suggesting that people with lower thresholds of surprise, when experiencing coincidences, harbor higher paranormal belief than those with a higher threshold. The theoretical aspects of these findings were discussed.

  11. A coincidence detection system based on real-time software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayuso, Sindulfo; José Blanco, Juan; Medina, José; Gómez-Herrero, Raúl; García-Población, Oscar; García Tejedor, Ignacio

    2016-09-01

    Conventional real-time coincidence systems use electronic circuitry to detect coincident pulses (hardware coincidence). In this work, a new concept of coincidence system based on real-time software (software coincidence) is presented. This system is based on the recurrent supervision of the analogue-to-digital converters status, which is described in detail. A prototype has been designed and built using a low-cost development platform. It has been applied to two different experimental sets for cosmic ray muon detection. Experimental muon measurements recorded simultaneously using conventional hardware coincidence and our software coincidence system have been compared, yielding identical results. These measurements have also been validated using simultaneous neutron monitor observations. This new software coincidence system provides remarkable advantages such as higher simplicity of interconnection and adjusting. Thus, our system replaces, at least, three Nuclear Instrument Modules (NIMs) required by conventional coincidence systems, reducing its cost by a factor of 40 and eliminating pulse delay adjustments.

  12. Feasibility study of activity measurement of positron emitters based on gamma-gamma coincident detection by two NaI(Tl) detectors.

    PubMed

    Volkovitsky, Peter; Unterweger, Michael

    2012-09-01

    Detection of two and more γ-rays in coincidence by two NaI(Tl) detectors with almost 4π geometry allows absolute characterization of radionuclides emitting coincidence gammas. The method is a generalization of the Eldridge-Crowther method developed originally for x-rays and low energy γ-rays. This method is applied to the case of (94)Nb decay with two coincident gamma-rays emitted in one cascade. The application of this method for the case of coincident positron-gamma emission ((22)Na and (26)Al sources) meets some difficulties. In these decays, two 511 keV gamma quanta produced in positron annihilation are strongly correlated. Despite the fact that the third gamma emitted in (22)Na and (26)Al decays is not correlated with two annihilation quanta, the number of independent observables for (22)Na and (26)Al decays is less than the number of unknowns. The small parameter ω(00), the probability that both annihilation quanta escape detection in both NaI(Tl) detectors, cannot be determined. However, if this parameter is defined from experimental data for one source with known activity ((22)Na), the activity of the other source ((26)Al) can be calculated from experimental data for (26)Al decay.

  13. Concepts for Alpha Coincidence Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Dion, Michael P.; Miller, Brian W.; Tatishvili, Gocha

    2015-03-01

    The effectiveness of conventional measurement techniques for environmental monitoring is limited by background and other interferences. We are exploring a new measurement approach involving the detection of α particles in coincidence with conversion electrons as a means to simultaneously assay environmental samples for actinides without chemical separation. The initial target isotopes studied in this work are 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu and 241Am. We explore various aspects of the design, such as impact of the mounting of the source material, resolution requirements and impact of a background on isotopic uncertainties. We conclude that a dual gas proportional counter and a dual-sided, large-area silicon detector could provide similar performance for the measurement scenario examined.

  14. Well coincidence counting and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ming-Shih; Teichmann, T.; Ceo, R.N.; Collins, L.L.

    1994-03-01

    In several recent papers a physical/mathematical model was developed to describe the nuclear multiplicative processes in samples containing fissile material from a general statistical viewpoint, starting with the basic underlying physical phenomena. The results of this model agreed with the established picture used in ``standard`` HLNCC (High Level Neutron Coincidence Counter) measurements, but considerably extended them, and allowed a more detailed interpretation of the underlying physical mechanisms and of the higher moments of the neutron counts. The present paper examines some recent measurements made at Y-12 (Oak Ridge) using the AWCC, in the light of this model. The results show internal consistency under a variety of conditions, and give good agreement between experiment and theory.

  15. A practical method for determining γ-ray full-energy peak efficiency considering coincidence-summing and self-absorption corrections for the measurement of environmental samples after the Fukushima reactor accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Oba, Yurika; Takada, Momo

    2016-09-01

    A method for determining the γ-ray full-energy peak efficiency at positions close to three Ge detectors and at the well port of a well-type detector was developed for measuring environmental volume samples containing 137Cs, 134Cs and 40K. The efficiency was estimated by considering two correction factors: coincidence-summing and self-absorption corrections. The coincidence-summing correction for a cascade transition nuclide was estimated by an experimental method involving measuring a sample at the far and close positions of a detector. The derived coincidence-summing correction factors were compared with those of analytical and Monte Carlo simulation methods and good agreements were obtained. Differences in the matrix of the calibration source and the environmental sample resulted in an increase or decrease of the full-energy peak counts due to the self-absorption of γ-rays in the sample. The correction factor was derived as a function of the densities of several matrix materials. The present method was applied to the measurement of environmental samples and also low-level radioactivity measurements of water samples using the well-type detector.

  16. Neutron Coincidence Counting Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Jeremy L.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2012-08-31

    The efficiency comparison for measured and simulated responses of a 10B-lined proportional counter and a 3He proportional counter in a close, symmetrical geometry are presented. The measurement geometry was modeled in MCNPX to validate the methods used for simulating the response of both the 3He and 10B-lined tubes. The MCNPX models agree within 1% with the 3He tube measurements and within 3% for the 10B-lined tubes when a 0.75-µm boron-metal lining is used.

  17. Investigation of 3-fragment photodissociation of O{sub 3} at 193.4 and 157.6 nm by coincident measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ryazanov, Mikhail; Harrison, Aaron W.; Wang, Gregory; Crider, Paul E.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2014-06-21

    Photodissociation of the ozone molecule at 193.4 nm (6.41 eV) and 157.6 nm (7.87 eV) is studied by fast-beam translational spectroscopy. Coincident detection of the dissociation products allows direct observation of the 3-fragment channel and determination of its kinematic parameters. The results indicate that at each wavelength, 3-fragment dissociation proceeds through synchronous concerted bond breaking, but the energy partitioning among the fragments is different. The branching fraction of the 3-fragment channel increases from 5.2(6)% at 193.4 nm to 26(4)% at 157.6 nm, in agreement with previous studies. It is shown that vibrational excitation of the symmetric stretch mode in O{sub 3} molecules created by photodetachment of O{sub 3}{sup −} anion enhances the absorption efficiency, especially at 193.4 nm, but does not have a strong effect on the 3-fragment dissociation.

  18. Artifacts in digital coincidence timing

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W. W.; Peng, Q.

    2014-10-16

    Digital methods are becoming increasingly popular for measuring time differences, and are the de facto standard in PET cameras. These methods usually include a master system clock and a (digital) arrival time estimate for each detector that is obtained by comparing the detector output signal to some reference portion of this clock (such as the rising edge). Time differences between detector signals are then obtained by subtracting the digitized estimates from a detector pair. A number of different methods can be used to generate the digitized arrival time of the detector output, such as sending a discriminator output into a time to digital converter (TDC) or digitizing the waveform and applying a more sophisticated algorithm to extract a timing estimator.All measurement methods are subject to error, and one generally wants to minimize these errors and so optimize the timing resolution. A common method for optimizing timing methods is to measure the coincidence timing resolution between two timing signals whose time difference should be constant (such as detecting gammas from positron annihilation) and selecting the method that minimizes the width of the distribution (i.e. the timing resolution). Unfortunately, a common form of error (a nonlinear transfer function) leads to artifacts that artificially narrow this resolution, which can lead to erroneous selection of the 'optimal' method. In conclusion, the purpose of this note is to demonstrate the origin of this artifact and suggest that caution should be used when optimizing time digitization systems solely on timing resolution minimization.

  19. Multiverse understanding of cosmological coincidences

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Hall, Lawrence J.; Nomura, Yasunori

    2009-09-15

    There is a deep cosmological mystery: although dependent on very different underlying physics, the time scales of structure formation, of galaxy cooling (both radiatively and against the CMB), and of vacuum domination do not differ by many orders of magnitude, but are all comparable to the present age of the universe. By scanning four landscape parameters simultaneously, we show that this quadruple coincidence is resolved. We assume only that the statistical distribution of parameter values in the multiverse grows towards certain catastrophic boundaries we identify, across which there are drastic regime changes. We find order-of-magnitude predictions for the cosmological constant, the primordial density contrast, the temperature at matter-radiation equality, the typical galaxy mass, and the age of the universe, in terms of the fine structure constant and the electron, proton and Planck masses. Our approach permits a systematic evaluation of measure proposals; with the causal patch measure, we find no runaway of the primordial density contrast and the cosmological constant to large values.

  20. Artifacts in digital coincidence timing

    DOE PAGES

    Moses, W. W.; Peng, Q.

    2014-10-16

    Digital methods are becoming increasingly popular for measuring time differences, and are the de facto standard in PET cameras. These methods usually include a master system clock and a (digital) arrival time estimate for each detector that is obtained by comparing the detector output signal to some reference portion of this clock (such as the rising edge). Time differences between detector signals are then obtained by subtracting the digitized estimates from a detector pair. A number of different methods can be used to generate the digitized arrival time of the detector output, such as sending a discriminator output into amore » time to digital converter (TDC) or digitizing the waveform and applying a more sophisticated algorithm to extract a timing estimator.All measurement methods are subject to error, and one generally wants to minimize these errors and so optimize the timing resolution. A common method for optimizing timing methods is to measure the coincidence timing resolution between two timing signals whose time difference should be constant (such as detecting gammas from positron annihilation) and selecting the method that minimizes the width of the distribution (i.e. the timing resolution). Unfortunately, a common form of error (a nonlinear transfer function) leads to artifacts that artificially narrow this resolution, which can lead to erroneous selection of the 'optimal' method. In conclusion, the purpose of this note is to demonstrate the origin of this artifact and suggest that caution should be used when optimizing time digitization systems solely on timing resolution minimization.« less

  1. An intense state of hard X-ray emission of Cyg X-1 observed by INTEGRAL coincident with TeV measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malzac, J.; Lubiński, P.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Türler, M.; Laurent, P.

    2008-12-01

    Aims: We present INTEGRAL light curves and spectra of the black-hole binary Cyg X-1 during a bright event that occurred in 2006 September, and which was simultaneous with a detection at 0.15-1 TeV energies by the MAGIC telescope. Methods: We analyse the hard X-ray emission from 18 to 700 keV with the INTEGRAL data taken on 2006 September 24-26 by the IBIS and SPI instruments. These data are supplemented with RXTE All Sky Monitor data at lower energy. We present the light curves and fit the high energy spectrum with various spectral models. Results: Despite variations in the flux by a factor of ~2 in the 20-700 keV energy band, the shape of the energy spectrum remained remarkably stable. It is very well represented by an e-folded power law with the photon index of Γ ≃ 1.4 and a high energy cut-off at Ec ≃ 130-140 keV. The spectrum is also well described by thermal Comptonisation including a moderate reflection component, with a solid angle of the reflector of ~ 0.4 × 2π. The temperature of the hot Comptonising electrons is kTe ~ 70 keV and their Thomson optical depth is τ ~ 2.5. These spectral properties are typical of those observed in the low/hard state. This shows that Cyg X-1 may stay in the low hard state at least up to the flux level of 2 Crab, which corresponds to ~2-3% of the Eddington luminosity. It is the first time a persistent high-mass black-hole binary is observed at a few percent of the Eddington luminosity with a stable low/hard state spectrum over a period of a few days. Such a bright hard state has so far been observed only during the rising phase of transient low-mass black-hole binaries. The TeV detection coincides with the peak of a small X-ray flare just after a very fast rise in hard X-ray flux. In contrast, the source remained undetected by MAGIC at the peak of a larger X-ray flare occurring one day later and corresponding to the maximum of the X-ray luminosity of the whole outburst. We do not find any obvious correlation between the

  2. Comparison of CO2 retrievals from IASI-A, IASI-B and GOSAT in the thermal infrared for nearly coincident measurements over the Arctic ocean in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camy-Peyret, Claude; Bureau, Jerome; Payan, Sebastien

    2015-04-01

    The capabilities to retrieve reliable information on the concentration of greenhouse gases in the lower atmosphere from thermal infrared (TIR) spectra collected by nadir sounders is still to be assessed. We have selected the two months period of July-August in the high latitude polar region where it is possible to observe almost coincident or superimposed footprints (IFOV) of the three infrared sounders considered in this study, namely IASI-A, IASI-B (on the MetOp platforms) and TANSO-FTS (on GOSAT). Retrievals of the column averaged mixing ratio of carbon dioxide XCO2 (and of the surface temperature) have been performed for three years i.e. 2010, 2013 and 2014 over Arctic waters. The summer period was chosen because ice free IFOVs (in the latitude band 68N to 82N) can be selected for which retrievals are less sensitive to surface inhomogeneity (as compared to IFOVs located over land). The emissivity of sea water is also better constrained. The inversion configuration (using the atmospheric window covering the so-called CO2 laser band in the interval 940-980 cm-1) will be described. The sensitivity of the retrieved XCO2 to the different layers of the lower atmosphere as a function of thermal contrast, temperature and humidity profiles will be presented. The precision/accuracy of the retrieved XCO2 will be discussed and compared between sounders. The CO2 trends is clearly captured over the years analysed in this work. The retrieved values will be compared to similar XCO2 products available from other sources (Leicester Univ., NIES, SRON/KIT). Some remaining spectroscopic issues in the vicinity of 948 cm-1 have been identified and circumvented. The retrieved sea surface temperature Tsurf used as a control variable is also providing an additional check of the performances of the retrievals and is compared to the Eumetsat IASI Tsurf product. These results are interesting starting points for preparing future missions like IASI-NG on MetOp-SG as well as GOSAT-2.

  3. Development of new analytical method based on beta-alpha coincidence method for selective measurement of 214Bi-214Po-application to dust filter used in radiation management.

    PubMed

    Sanada, Yukihisa; Tanabe, Yoichiro; Iijima, Nobuo; Momose, Takumaro

    2011-07-01

    The radionuclide pair (214)Bi and (214)Po which belongs to the uranium series interferes with airborne radionuclide measurement needed for the radiation management of a nuclear facility. Time intervals between (214)Bi (β) and (214)Po (α) are much shorter than artificial radionuclides due to the short half-life of (214)Po (164 μs). The purpose of this study is to develop of a new analytical method (time interval analysis: TIA) based on the beta-alpha coincidence method for selective measurement of (214)Bi-(214)Po. The developed method was applied to an actual dust-filter measurement. The TIA system was highly effective in measuring of the filter with background subtraction. PMID:21531747

  4. Comparison of Water Vapor Measurements by Airborne Sun Photometer and Near-Coincident in Situ and Satellite Sensors during INTEX/ITCT 2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, J.; Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Ramirez, S. A.; Eilers, J.; Gore, W.; Howard, S.; Pommier, J.; Fetzer, E. J.; Seeman, S. W.; Borbas, E.; Wolfe, D. E.; Thompson, A. M.

    2007-01-01

    We have retrieved columnar water vapor (CWV) from measurements acquired by the 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sun photometer (AATS-14) during 19 Jetstream 31 (J31) flights over the Gulf of Maine in summer 2004 in support of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment (INTEX)/Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation (ITCT) experiments. In this paper we compare AATS-14 water vapor retrievals during aircraft vertical profiles with measurements by an onboard Vaisala HMP243 humidity sensor and by ship radiosondes and with water vapor profiles retrieved from AIRS measurements during eight Aqua overpasses. We also compare AATS CWV and MODIS infrared CWV retrievals during five Aqua and five Terra overpasses. For 35 J31 vertical profiles, mean (bias) and RMS AATS-minus-Vaisala layer-integrated water vapor (LWV) differences are -7.1 percent and 8.8 percent, respectively. For 22 aircraft profiles within 1 hour and 130 km of radiosonde soundings, AATS-minus-sonde bias and RMS LWV differences are -5.4 percent and 10.7 percent, respectively, and corresponding J31 Vaisala-minus-sonde differences are 2.3 percent and 8.4 percent, respectively. AIRS LWV retrievals within 80 lan of J31 profiles yield lower bias and RMS differences compared to AATS or Vaisala retrievals than do AIRS retrievals within 150 km of the J31. In particular, for AIRS-minus-AATS LWV differences, the bias decreases from 8.8 percent to 5.8 percent, and the RMS difference decreases from 2 1.5 percent to 16.4 percent. Comparison of vertically resolved AIRS water vapor retrievals (LWVA) to AATS values in fixed pressure layers yields biases of -2 percent to +6 percent and RMS differences of -20 percent below 700 hPa. Variability and magnitude of these differences increase significantly above 700 hPa. MODIS IR retrievals of CWV in 205 grid cells (5 x 5 km at nadir) are biased wet by 10.4 percent compared to AATS over-ocean near-surface retrievals. The MODIS-Aqua subset (79 grid cells

  5. Comparison of Water Vapor Measurements by Airborne Sun photometer and Near-Coincident In Situ and Satellite Sensors during INTEX-ITCT 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, J.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Russell, P. B.; Ramirez, Samuel; Eilers, J.; Gore, W.; Howard, Samuel; Pommier, J.; Fetzer, E. J.; Seemann, S. W.; Borbas, E.; Wolfe, Daniel; Thompson, Anne M.

    2007-06-06

    We have retrieved columnar water vapor (CWV) from measurements acquired by the 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) during 19 Jetstream 31 (J31) flights over the Gulf of Maine in summer 2004. In this paper we compare AATS-14 water vapor retrievals during aircraft vertical profiles with measurements by an onboard Vaisala HMP243 humidity sensor and by ship radiosondes, and with water vapor profiles retrieved from AIRS measurements during 8 Aqua overpasses. We also compare AATS CWV and MODIS infrared CWV retrievals during 5 Aqua and 5 Terra overpasses. For 35 J31 vertical profiles mean (bias) and rms AATS-minus-Vaisala layer-integrated water vapor (LWV) differences are -7.1% and 8.8%, respectively. For 22 aircraft profiles within 1 h and 130 km of radiosonde soundings, AATS-minus-sonde bias and rms LWV differences are -5.4% and 8.8%, respectively, and corresponding J31 Vaisala-minus-sonde differences are 2.3% and 8.4%, respectively. AIRS LWV retrievals within 80 km of J31 profiles yield lower bias and rms differences compared to AATS or Vaisala retrievals than do AIRS retrievals within 150 km of the J31. In particular, for AIRS-minus-AATS LWV differences, the bias decreases from 8.8% to 5.8%, and the rms difference decreases from 21.5% to 16.4%. Comparison of vertically resolved AIRS water vapor retrievals (LWVA) to AATS values in fixed pressure layers yields biases of -2% to +6% and rms differences of ~20% below 700 hPa. Variability and magnitude of these differences increase significantly above 700 hPa. MODIS IR retrievals of CWV in 205 grid cells (5 x 5-km at nadir) are biased wet by 10.4% compared to AATS over-ocean near surface retrievals. The MODIS Aqua subset (79 grid cells) exhibits a wet bias of 5.1%, and the MODIS-Terra subset (126 grid cells) yields a wet bias of 13.2%.

  6. Soft coincidence in late acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Campo, Sergio del; Herrera, Ramon; Pavon, Diego

    2005-06-15

    We study the coincidence problem of late cosmic acceleration by assuming that the present ratio between dark matter and dark energy is a slowly varying function of the scale factor. As the dark energy component we consider two different candidates, first a quintessence scalar field, and then a tachyon field. In either case analytical solutions for the scale factor, the field, and the potential are derived. Both models show a good fit to the recent magnitude-redshift supernovae data. However, the likelihood contours disfavor the tachyon field model as it seems to prefer a excessively high value for the matter component.

  7. Coincidence detection in phosphoinositide signaling

    PubMed Central

    Carlton, Jez G.; Cullen, Peter J.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphoinositide lipids function as both signaling molecules and as compartment-specific localization signals for phosphoinositide-binding proteins. In recent years, both phosphoinositides and phosphoinositide-binding proteins have been reported to display a restricted, rather than a uniform, distribution across intracellular membranes. Here, we examine recent data documenting the restricted distribution of both phosphoinositides and phosphoinositide-binding proteins and examine how phosphoinositide-binding proteins might engage multiple binding partners to achieve these restricted localizations, effectively acting as detectors of coincident localization signals. PMID:16139503

  8. Alpha Coincidence Spectroscopy studied with GEANT4

    SciTech Connect

    Dion, Michael P.; Miller, Brian W.; Tatishvili, Gocha; Warren, Glen A.

    2013-11-02

    Abstract The high-energy side of peaks in alpha spectra, e.g. 241Am, as measured with a silicon detector has structure caused mainly by alpha-conversion electron and to some extent alphagamma coincidences. We compare GEANT4 simulation results to 241Am alpha spectroscopy measurements with a passivated implanted planar silicon detector. A large discrepancy between the measurements and simulations suggest that the GEANT4 photon evaporation database for 237Np (daughter of 241Am decay) does not accurately describe the conversion electron spectrum and therefore was found to have large discrepancies with experimental measurements. We describe how to improve the agreement between GEANT4 and alpha spectroscopy for actinides of interest by including experimental measurements of conversion electron spectroscopy into the photon evaporation database.

  9. Combining attosecond XUV pulses with coincidence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbar, M.; Heuser, S.; Boge, R.; Lucchini, M.; Gallmann, L.; Cirelli, C.; Keller, U.

    2014-10-01

    Here we present a successful combination of an attosecond beamline with a COLTRIMS apparatus, which we refer to as AttoCOLTRIMS. The setup provides either single attosecond pulses or attosecond pulse trains for extreme ultraviolet-infrared pump-probe experiments. We achieve full attosecond stability by using an active interferometer stabilization. The capability of the setup is demonstrated by means of two measurements, which lie at the heart of the COLTRIMS detector: firstly, we resolve the rotating electric field vector of an elliptically polarized few-cycle infrared laser field by attosecond streaking exploiting the access to the 3D momentum space of the charged particles. Secondly, we show streaking measurements on different atomic species obtained simultaneously in a single measurement making use of the advantage of measuring ions and electrons in coincidence. Both of these studies demonstrate the potential of the AttoCOLTRIMS for attosecond science.

  10. Auger decay of 1{sigma}{sub g} and 1{sigma}{sub u} hole states of the N{sub 2} molecule: Disentangling decay routes from coincidence measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, S. K.; Schoeffler, M. S.; Titze, J.; Petridis, N.; Jahnke, T.; Cole, K.; Schmidt, L. Ph. H.; Czasch, A.; Jagutzki, O.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.; Doerner, R.; Akoury, D.; Williams, J. B.; Landers, A. L.; Osipov, T.; Lee, S.; Prior, M. H.; Belkacem, A.; Weber, Th.; Cherepkov, N. A.

    2010-04-15

    Results of the most sophisticated measurements in coincidence with the angular-resolved K-shell photoelectrons and Auger electrons and with two atomic ions produced by dissociation of N{sub 2} molecule are analyzed. Detection of photoelectrons at certain angles makes it possible to separate the Auger decay processes of the 1{sigma}{sub g} and 1{sigma}{sub u} core-hole states. The Auger electron angular distributions for each of these hole states are measured as a function of the kinetic-energy release of two atomic ions and are compared with the corresponding theoretical angular distributions. From that comparison one can disentangle the contributions of different repulsive doubly charged molecular ion states to the Auger decay. Different kinetic-energy-release values are directly related to the different internuclear distances. In this way one can trace experimentally the behavior of the potential energy curves of dicationic final states inside the Frank-Condon region. Presentation of the Auger-electron angular distributions as a function of kinetic-energy release of two atomic ions opens a new dimension in the study of Auger decay.

  11. Computed neutron coincidence counting applied to passive waste assay

    SciTech Connect

    Bruggeman, M.; Baeten, P.; De Boeck, W.; Carchon, R.

    1997-11-01

    Neutron coincidence counting applied for the passive assay of fissile material is generally realised with dedicated electronic circuits. This paper presents a software based neutron coincidence counting method with data acquisition via a commercial PC-based Time Interval Analyser (TIA). The TIA is used to measure and record all time intervals between successive pulses in the pulse train up to count-rates of 2 Mpulses/s. Software modules are then used to compute the coincidence count-rates and multiplicity related data. This computed neutron coincidence counting (CNCC) offers full access to all the time information contained in the pulse train. This paper will mainly concentrate on the application and advantages of CNCC for the non-destructive assay of waste. An advanced multiplicity selective Rossi-alpha method is presented and its implementation via CNCC demonstrated. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Boron-10 Based Neutron Coincidence Counter for Safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2014-10-01

    The shortage of 3He has triggered the search for effective alternative neutron detection technologies for national security applications, including international nuclear safeguards. Any alternative neutron detection technology must satisfy two basic criteria: it must meet a neutron detection efficiency requirement, and it must be insensitive to gamma-ray interference at a prescribed level while still meeting the neutron detection requirement. For nuclear safeguards, a system must perform measurements in the field with a prescribed precision in a specified time. This paper describes an effort to design, model and test an alternatives-based neutron coincidence counter for nuclear safeguards applications. The technology chosen for use in an alternatives-based uranium neutron coincidence collar was boron-lined proportional counters. Extensive modeling was performed of various system configurations and comparisons were made to measurements on a commercial prototype boron-10 based uranium neutron coincidence collar.

  13. Coincidence anticipation and dynamic visual acuity in young adolescents.

    PubMed

    Millslagle, Duane

    2004-12-01

    Research involving college-age students and women fast pitch softball players indicated that coincidence anticipation and dynamic visual acuity are different visual abilities. This study used an alternative procedure to measure dynamic visual acuity to re-examine their relationship. Coincidence anticipation and dynamic visual acuity were measured in 24 young adolescents (12 boys, 12 girls) 11 to 14 years of age. During the dynamic visual acuity procedure, the subject tracked an object of a constant size while the researcher manipulated the object's velocity. Analysis indicated that they are different visual abilities. Findings indicated that the dynamic visual acuity of boys was significantly better than that of girls, and coincidence anticipation between boys and girls did not differ.

  14. A New Neutron-Capture Detector for Coincidence Counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, Michael C.; Ensslin, Norbert; Geist, William H.; Ianakiev, Kiril; Mayo, Douglas; Russo, Phyllis A.; Sweet, Martin R.

    2000-04-01

    Quantities of special nuclear material (SNM) are measured by counting coincident neutrons. This technique relies on spontaneous fission, in which more than one neutron is released for most events. Neutron coincidence counting (NCC) uses thermal neutron detectors. A problem with measurements of impure materials is that the neutron count rate, which determines the accidental coincidence rate, can be dominated by uncorrelated neutrons. An elevated rate of accidental coincidences can destroy the detection sensitivity. By reducing the detector’s die-away time (t, the time it takes to detect a neutron), true coincidence events are registered more promptly and the accidental rate reduced proportionally. The t of current counters based on 3He proportional detectors is 50 ms. A new detector is being developed with a shorter t of 5 ms for NCC of impure SNM. It uses alternating layers of a scintillator/6Li powder mixture and ribbons of optical fiber for light transport. Neutrons are thermalized and then detected by capture on 6Li. The reaction products deposit energy in the scintillator. The light is transported by the fibers to photomultiplier tubes. However, the detector is sensitive to both gamma rays and neutrons. Separating the two is essential for successful operation. This paper presents a description and evaluation of the new detector. Pulse shape analysis is discussed for discrimination between gamma rays and neutrons.

  15. Coincidence and covariance data acquisition in photoelectron and -ion spectroscopy. II. Analysis and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikosch, Jochen; Patchkovskii, Serguei

    2013-10-01

    We use an analytical theory of noisy Poisson processes, developed in the preceding companion publication, to compare coincidence and covariance measurement approaches in photoelectron and -ion spectroscopy. For non-unit detection efficiencies, coincidence data acquisition (DAQ) suffers from false coincidences. The rate of false coincidences grows quadratically with the rate of elementary ionization events. To minimize false coincidences for rare event outcomes, very low event rates may hence be required. Coincidence measurements exhibit high tolerance to noise introduced by unstable experimental conditions. Covariance DAQ on the other hand is free of systematic errors as long as stable experimental conditions are maintained. In the presence of noise, all channels in a covariance measurement become correlated. Under favourable conditions, covariance DAQ may allow orders of magnitude reduction in measurement times. Finally, we use experimental data for strong-field ionization of 1,3-butadiene to illustrate how fluctuations in experimental conditions can contaminate a covariance measurement, and how such contamination can be detected.

  16. Near Threshold Coincident Electrofission of Uranium -238.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowell, David Harry

    Using the 100% duty cycle electron beam from the University of Illinois MUSL-2 accelerator, inelastic electron scattering form factors have been measured in coincidence with the fission decay of ('238)U. Data was taken at effective elastic momentum transfers of .36, .41 .45 and .59 fm(' -1) and electron-fission fragment angular correlations were measured perpendicular to and along the momentum transfer axis. The beam energies used were 67.11, 56.91 and 46.49 MeV, with the outgoing electron detected at 60(DEGREES) and 80(DEGREES), relative to the beam direction. The electron energy resolution was .1% and the form factors were measured for excitation energies from 2 to 12 MeV. Thin films of scintillator plastic (.5 mg/cm('2)) were used to detect the fission fragments from a 1 mg/cm('2) UF(,4) target evaporated onto a .240 mg/cm('2) aluminum backing. A prominent, anisotropic threshold peak is seen in the coincident form factors. An analysis of the q-dependence of the data and of the angular correlation indicates the observed strength is E2. Fission threshold for this E2 strength is about 5.7 MeV as compared with 6 MeV for E1 decays. The peak itself is due to the onset of neutron competition at 6.15 MeV. The threshold region, when analyzed using a Gaussian K-distribution to describe the statistical density of K -states near the fission barrier, exhibits a step-like change in the value of K(,0)('2) at .7 MeV above threshold. This indicates a possible energy gap in the E2 transition states. The decay is isotropic above 7.5 MeV excitation energy. From 7 to 11.7 MeV, the distribution of E2/EO strength is relatively flat with the total strength in this region exhausting approximately 10% of an energy weighted sum rule. A comparison with hadron scattering experiments suggests that some of the strength near 11.5 MeV is due to the fission decay of the giant monopole resonance with a fission probability similar to that of E2 transitions.

  17. Redesign of the GATE PET coincidence sorter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strydhorst, Jared; Buvat, Irène

    2016-09-01

    The GATE software platform, based on the Geant4 toolkit for simulating particle interactions with matter, enables simulation of, among other medical imaging and treatment systems, positron emission tomography. However, at least one publication (Moraes et al 2015 Phys. Med. 31 43-8) has reported discrepancies between the expected results and those obtained using GATE simulations, specifically with respect to the coincidence sorter which processes single events detected by the scanner to find coincidence pairs. In particular, the current software appears to overestimate the number of ‘true’ coincidence pairs when in multi-window mode, while the delayed coincidence window, used to estimate the randoms present in the prompt coincidence window, underestimates the randoms. Both effects are particularly evident at high count rates. We have investigated this discrepancy and reproduced the reported problems. We have also rewritten the relevant portion of the GATE code to correct the issue. In this note we describe the modifications to the coincidence sorter and repeat the simulations which previously showed unexpected results. Some discrepancies remain in the estimation of the randoms with the single-window mode which are a consequence of the algorithm itself. In multi-window mode however, the simulation agrees exactly with the expected results. The modifications to the coincidence sorter code will be incorporated into the next release of GATE (> version 7.2).

  18. Redesign of the GATE PET coincidence sorter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strydhorst, Jared; Buvat, Irène

    2016-09-01

    The GATE software platform, based on the Geant4 toolkit for simulating particle interactions with matter, enables simulation of, among other medical imaging and treatment systems, positron emission tomography. However, at least one publication (Moraes et al 2015 Phys. Med. 31 43–8) has reported discrepancies between the expected results and those obtained using GATE simulations, specifically with respect to the coincidence sorter which processes single events detected by the scanner to find coincidence pairs. In particular, the current software appears to overestimate the number of ‘true’ coincidence pairs when in multi-window mode, while the delayed coincidence window, used to estimate the randoms present in the prompt coincidence window, underestimates the randoms. Both effects are particularly evident at high count rates. We have investigated this discrepancy and reproduced the reported problems. We have also rewritten the relevant portion of the GATE code to correct the issue. In this note we describe the modifications to the coincidence sorter and repeat the simulations which previously showed unexpected results. Some discrepancies remain in the estimation of the randoms with the single-window mode which are a consequence of the algorithm itself. In multi-window mode however, the simulation agrees exactly with the expected results. The modifications to the coincidence sorter code will be incorporated into the next release of GATE (> version 7.2).

  19. Wigner-Thomas spin precession in polarized coincidence electronuclear scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitrasinovic, V. )

    1993-05-01

    The role of the Wigner-Thomas precession in nucleon recoil polarization measurements in coincidence electron scattering processes is examined. The necessary formalism is developed within the framework of the Jacob-Wick method, and then applied to two processes: the pseudoscalar electroproduction off a nucleon and the deuteron two-body electrodisintegration.

  20. Coincident indices of exons and introns.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Chen, R; Ling, L; Shen, R; Sun, J

    1993-07-01

    In this paper, the coincident index, proposed by W. F. Friedman in cryptology, is made use of in DNA sequence analysis and exon prediction. The coincident index of exons exceeds that of introns by many times, and is mainly affected by window length, which is correlated negatively with the coincident index. An optimal exon prediction scheme was obtained by experimental analysis with an orthogonal table. Besides exons, many other special sites such as tandem repeats can be identified by using the coincident index approach. The application of this approach to the ARV-2 (AIDS associated retrovirus 2) genome found three new possible coding regions and some unusual base composition regions which are probably related to definite biological functions.

  1. Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar Model Utilizing 3He

    SciTech Connect

    Siciliano, Edward R.; Rogers, Jeremy L.; Schweppe, John E.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2012-07-30

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241) is supporting the project 'Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology' at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube based alternative system in a configuration typically used for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. The specific application selected for boron-lined tube replacement in this project was one of the Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (UNCL) designs. This report, providing results for model development of a UNCL, is a deliverable under Task 2 of the project. The current UNCL instruments utilize 3He tubes. As the first step in developing and optimizing a boron-lined proportional counter based version of the UNCL, models of eight different 3He-based UNCL detectors currently in use were developed and evaluated. A comparison was made between the simulated results and measured efficiencies for those systems with values reported in the literature. The reported experimental measurements for efficiencies and die-away times agree to within 10%.

  2. Development of an Apparatus for High-Resolution Auger Photoelectron Coincidence Spectroscopy (APECS) and Electron Ion Coincidence (EICO) Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakiuchi, Takuhiro; Hashimoto, Shogo; Fujita, Narihiko; Mase, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Okusawa, Makoto

    We have developed an electron electron ion coincidence (EEICO) apparatus for high-resolution Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy (APECS) and electron ion coincidence (EICO) spectroscopy. It consists of a coaxially symmetric mirror electron energy analyzer (ASMA), a miniature double-pass cylindrical mirror electron energy analyzer (DP-CMA), a miniature time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), a magnetic shield, an xyz stage, a tilt-adjustment mechanism, and a conflat flange with an outer diameter of 203 mm. A sample surface was irradiated by synchrotron radiation, and emitted electrons were energy-analyzed and detected by the ASMA and the DP-CMA, while desorbed ions were mass-analyzed and detected by the TOF-MS. The performance of the new EEICO analyzer was evaluated by measuring Si 2p photoelectron spectra of clean Si(001)-2×1 and Si(111)-7×7, and by measuring Si-L23VV-Si-2p Auger photoelectron coincidence spectra (Si-L23VV-Si-2p APECS) of clean Si(001)-2×1.

  3. Characteristic evaluation of a Lithium-6 loaded neutron coincidence spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, M; Kaku, D; Watanabe, Y; Sagara, K

    2007-01-01

    Characteristics of a (6)Li-loaded neutron coincidence spectrometer were investigated from both measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. The spectrometer consists of three (6)Li-glass scintillators embedded in a liquid organic scintillator BC-501A, which can detect selectively neutrons that deposit the total energy in the BC-501A using a coincidence signal generated from the capture event of thermalised neutrons in the (6)Li-glass scintillators. The relative efficiency and the energy response were measured using 4.7, 7.2 and 9.0 MeV monoenergetic neutrons. The measured ones were compared with the Monte Carlo calculations performed by combining the neutron transport code PHITS and the scintillator response calculation code SCINFUL. The experimental light output spectra were in good agreement with the calculated ones in shape. The energy dependence of the detection efficiency was reproduced by the calculation. The response matrices for 1-10 MeV neutrons were finally obtained.

  4. Real-time algorithm for robust coincidence search

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, T.; Vencelj, M.; Lipoglavsek, M.; Gajevic, J.; Pelicon, P.

    2012-10-20

    In in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy experiments, we often look for coincident detection events. Among every N events detected, coincidence search is naively of principal complexity O(N{sup 2}). When we limit the approximate width of the coincidence search window, the complexity can be reduced to O(N), permitting the implementation of the algorithm into real-time measurements, carried out indefinitely. We have built an algorithm to find simultaneous events between two detection channels. The algorithm was tested in an experiment where coincidences between X and {gamma} rays detected in two HPGe detectors were observed in the decay of {sup 61}Cu. Functioning of the algorithm was validated by comparing calculated experimental branching ratio for EC decay and theoretical calculation for 3 selected {gamma}-ray energies for {sup 61}Cu decay. Our research opened a question on the validity of the adopted value of total angular momentum of the 656 keV state (J{sup {pi}} = 1/2{sup -}) in {sup 61}Ni.

  5. High-performance reconfigurable coincidence counting unit based on a field programmable gate array.

    PubMed

    Park, Byung Kwon; Kim, Yong-Su; Kwon, Osung; Han, Sang-Wook; Moon, Sung

    2015-05-20

    We present a high-performance reconfigurable coincidence counting unit (CCU) using a low-end field programmable gate array (FPGA) and peripheral circuits. Because of the flexibility guaranteed by the FPGA program, we can easily change system parameters, such as internal input delays, coincidence configurations, and the coincidence time window. In spite of a low-cost implementation, the proposed CCU architecture outperforms previous ones in many aspects: it has 8 logic inputs and 4 coincidence outputs that can measure up to eight-fold coincidences. The minimum coincidence time window and the maximum input frequency are 0.47 ns and 163 MHz, respectively. The CCU will be useful in various experimental research areas, including the field of quantum optics and quantum information. PMID:26192507

  6. Grain-boundary structures in hexagonal materials: Coincident and near coincident grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, Diana

    1994-07-01

    Embedded atom method (EAM) simulations of the structure of grain boundaries in hexagonal metals are presented. The simulations use recently developed interatomic potentials for Ti and Co. Structures were calculated for various symmetrical tilt boundaries with the [1¯100] tilt axis. The structures obtained for both metals are very similar. The energies for the Co boundaries are higher than those for Ti by a factor of 2. The structural unit model was applied to the computed grain-boundary structures in these hexagonal materials. As in cubic materials, the structural unit model can describe a series of symmetrical tilt coincident boundaries. In addition, when the coincidence ratio in the grain-boundary plane varies with the c/a ratio, a structural unit-type model can describe the variation of grain-boundary structure with c/a ratio. This model is adequate for describing series of symmetrical tilt boundaries with the grain-boundary plane oriented perpendicular to a fixed crystallographic direction and varying c/a ratios. For the structures of the so-called near coincident boundaries that appear in these materials, it was concluded that near coincident boundaries behave similarly to exact coincidence boundaries if there is a coincident periodic structure in the grain-boundary plane. This may occur even without a three-dimensional (3-D) coincident site lattice.

  7. Momentum spectrometer for electron-electron coincidence studies on superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wallauer, Robert; Voss, Stefan; Bauer, Tobias; Schneider, Deborah; Titze, Jasmin; Ulrich, Birte; Kreidi, Katharina; Neumann, Nadine; Havermeier, Tilo; Schoeffler, Markus; Jahnke, Till; Czasch, Achim; Schmidt, Lothar; Schmidt-Boecking, Horst; Doerner, Reinhard; Kanigel, Amit; Campuzano, Juan Carlos; Jeschke, Harald; Valenti, Roser [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt and others

    2012-10-15

    We present a new experimental setup to study electron-electron coincidences from superconducting surfaces. In our approach, electrons emitted from a surface are projected onto a time- and position-sensitive microchannel plate detector with delayline position readout. Electrons that are emitted within 2 {pi} solid angle with respect to the surface are detected in coincidence. The detector used is a hexagonal delayline detector with enhanced multiple hit capabilities. It is read out with a Flash analog-to-digital converter. The three-dimensional momentum vector is obtained for each electron. The intrinsic dead time of the detector has been greatly reduced by implementing a new algorithm for pulse analysis. The sample holder has been matched to fit the spectrometer while being capable of cooling down the sample to 4.5 K during the measurement and heating it up to 420 K for the cleaning procedure.

  8. Toward a solution of the coincidence problem

    SciTech Connect

    Campo, Sergio del; Herrera, Ramon; Pavon, Diego

    2008-07-15

    The coincidence problem of late cosmic acceleration constitutes a serious riddle with regard to our understanding of the evolution of the Universe. Here we argue that this problem may someday be solved - or better understood - by expressing the Hubble expansion rate as a function of the ratio of densities (dark matter/dark energy) and observationally determining the said rate in terms of the redshift.

  9. Coincidence studies of diffraction structures in binary encounter electron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.; Hagmann, S.; Richard, P.

    1994-12-31

    The authors have measured binary encounter electron (BEe) production in collisions of 0.3 MeV/u Cu{sup q+} (q=4,12) projectiles on H{sub 2} targets from 0 to 70 degrees with respect to the beam direction. Prominent features are the appearance of the BEe peak splitting and a very strong forward peaked angular distribution which are attributed to the diffractive scattering of the quasifree target electrons in the short range potential of the projectile. Using electron-projectile final charge state coincidence techniques, different collision reaction channels can be separated. Measurements of this type are being pursued.

  10. It takes two-coincidence coding within the dual olfactory pathway of the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Brill, Martin F; Meyer, Anneke; Rössler, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    To rapidly process biologically relevant stimuli, sensory systems have developed a broad variety of coding mechanisms like parallel processing and coincidence detection. Parallel processing (e.g., in the visual system), increases both computational capacity and processing speed by simultaneously coding different aspects of the same stimulus. Coincidence detection is an efficient way to integrate information from different sources. Coincidence has been shown to promote associative learning and memory or stimulus feature detection (e.g., in auditory delay lines). Within the dual olfactory pathway of the honeybee both of these mechanisms might be implemented by uniglomerular projection neurons (PNs) that transfer information from the primary olfactory centers, the antennal lobe (AL), to a multimodal integration center, the mushroom body (MB). PNs from anatomically distinct tracts respond to the same stimulus space, but have different physiological properties, characteristics that are prerequisites for parallel processing of different stimulus aspects. However, the PN pathways also display mirror-imaged like anatomical trajectories that resemble neuronal coincidence detectors as known from auditory delay lines. To investigate temporal processing of olfactory information, we recorded PN odor responses simultaneously from both tracts and measured coincident activity of PNs within and between tracts. Our results show that coincidence levels are different within each of the two tracts. Coincidence also occurs between tracts, but to a minor extent compared to coincidence within tracts. Taken together our findings support the relevance of spike timing in coding of olfactory information (temporal code). PMID:26283968

  11. It takes two—coincidence coding within the dual olfactory pathway of the honeybee

    PubMed Central

    Brill, Martin F.; Meyer, Anneke; Rössler, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    To rapidly process biologically relevant stimuli, sensory systems have developed a broad variety of coding mechanisms like parallel processing and coincidence detection. Parallel processing (e.g., in the visual system), increases both computational capacity and processing speed by simultaneously coding different aspects of the same stimulus. Coincidence detection is an efficient way to integrate information from different sources. Coincidence has been shown to promote associative learning and memory or stimulus feature detection (e.g., in auditory delay lines). Within the dual olfactory pathway of the honeybee both of these mechanisms might be implemented by uniglomerular projection neurons (PNs) that transfer information from the primary olfactory centers, the antennal lobe (AL), to a multimodal integration center, the mushroom body (MB). PNs from anatomically distinct tracts respond to the same stimulus space, but have different physiological properties, characteristics that are prerequisites for parallel processing of different stimulus aspects. However, the PN pathways also display mirror-imaged like anatomical trajectories that resemble neuronal coincidence detectors as known from auditory delay lines. To investigate temporal processing of olfactory information, we recorded PN odor responses simultaneously from both tracts and measured coincident activity of PNs within and between tracts. Our results show that coincidence levels are different within each of the two tracts. Coincidence also occurs between tracts, but to a minor extent compared to coincidence within tracts. Taken together our findings support the relevance of spike timing in coding of olfactory information (temporal code). PMID:26283968

  12. A method for coincidence timing resolution enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermis, E. E.; Celiktas, C.; Pilicer, E.

    2016-05-01

    A method including the coincidence time resolution improvement for a TOF/positron emission tomography system was suggested. The spectrometer for this aim was composed of two NaI(Tl) and two plastic scintillation detectors. Experimental results were supported by FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation program by constructing the detector setup in software medium. Present experimental results verified our previous results and conclusions obtained from the suggested method. It was concluded that better resolutions would help the improvement not only on the TOF gain but also on the spatial resolution, leading to better images and helping the Physician in his/her diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Alpha Coincidence Detection for the Assay of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Dion, Michael P.; Miller, Brian W.; Tatishvili, Gocha

    2013-11-15

    Abstract – Interferences in both decay counting and mass counting techniques limit their application for some environmental monitoring applications. For example, 238U interferes with 238Pu in mass spectrometry measurements, while in conventional alpha spectroscopy measurements it is nearly impossible to separate 238Pu from 241Am and 239Pu from 240Pu. These interferences are typically resolved by using chemical separation and/or different measurement techniques for different isotopes. We are investigating radiation detector concepts to simultaneously assay these four isotopes with minimal sample preparation by exploiting radiation signatures measured in coincidence with the typical alpha decays of these isotopes. Particles in coincidence with the alpha decay include conversion electrons, gamma rays, x-rays, and Auger electrons. Each decay has a unique energy distribution enabling the separation of the isotopes. We are exploring two basic detector concepts to achieve these goals: a silicon-based design and a gas-detector design. The silicon system provides the potential for higher energy resolution at the cost of lower efficiency compared to a gas detector. In this paper, we will describe our evaluation of the different detector concepts, which will include detection efficiency, ability to resolve the isotopes, sample preparation and equipment requirements.

  14. Coincidence corrected efficiency calibration of Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Aucott, T.

    2015-04-20

    The authors present a reliable method to calibrate the full-energy efficiency and the coincidence correction factors using a commonly-available mixed source gamma standard. This is accomplished by measuring the peak areas from both summing and non-summing decay schemes and simultaneously fitting both the full-energy efficiency, as well as the total efficiency, as functions of energy. By using known decay schemes, these functions can then be used to provide correction factors for other nuclides not included in the calibration standard.

  15. Geometric origin of coincidences and hierarchies in the landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Leichenauer, Stefan; Rosenhaus, Vladimir; Freivogel, Ben

    2011-10-15

    We show that the geometry of cutoffs on eternal inflation strongly constrains predictions for the time scales of vacuum domination, curvature domination, and observation. We consider three measure proposals: the causal patch, the fat geodesic, and the apparent horizon cutoff, which is introduced here for the first time. We impose neither anthropic requirements nor restrictions on landscape vacua. For vacua with positive cosmological constant, all three measures predict the double coincidence that most observers live at the onset of vacuum domination and just before the onset of curvature domination. The hierarchy between the Planck scale and the cosmological constant is related to the number of vacua in the landscape. These results require only mild assumptions about the distribution of vacua (somewhat stronger assumptions are required by the fat geodesic measure). At this level of generality, none of the three measures are successful for vacua with negative cosmological constant. Their applicability in this regime is ruled out unless much stronger anthropic requirements are imposed.

  16. Performance of a coincidence based blood activity monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.

    1989-12-01

    A new device has been constructed that measures the positron emitting radio-tracer concentration in arterial blood by extracting blood with a peristaltic pump, then measuring the activity concentration by detecting coincident pairs of 511 keV photons with a pair of heavy inorganic scintillators attached to photomultiplier tubes. The sensitivity of this device is experimentally determined to be 610 counts/second per {mu}Ci/ml, and has a paralyzing dead time of 1.2 {mu}s, so is capable of measuring blood activity concentration as high as 1 mCi/ml. Its performance is compared to two other blood monitoring methods: discrete blood samples counted with a well counter and device that uses a plastic scintillator to directly detect positrons. The positron detection efficiency of this device for {sup 18}F is greater than the plastic scintillation counter, and also eliminates the radioisotope dependent correction factors necessary to convert count rate to absolute concentration. Coincident photon detection also has the potential of reducing the background compared to direct positron detection, thereby increasing the minimum detectable isotope concentration. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy with velocity focusing electron optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodi, Andras; Johnson, Melanie; Gerber, Thomas; Gengeliczki, Zsolt; Sztáray, Bálint; Baer, Tomas

    2009-03-01

    An imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectrometer at the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) beamline of the Swiss Light Source is presented and a few initial measurements are reported. Monochromatic synchrotron VUV radiation ionizes the cooled or thermal gas-phase sample. Photoelectrons are velocity focused, with better than 1 meV resolution for threshold electrons, and also act as start signal for the ion time-of-flight analysis. The ions are accelerated in a relatively low, 40-80 V cm-1 field, which enables the direct measurement of rate constants in the 103-107 s-1 range. All electron and ion events are recorded in a triggerless multiple-start/multiple-stop setup, which makes it possible to carry out coincidence experiments at >100 kHz event frequencies. As examples, the threshold photoelectron spectrum of the argon dimer and the breakdown diagrams for hydrogen atom loss in room temperature methane and the chlorine atom loss in cold chlorobenzene are shown and discussed.

  18. Composition studies based on coincident air shower array and underground muon data

    SciTech Connect

    DasGupta, U.; Ruddick, K. ); Fields, T.H. )

    1991-08-01

    We report on a final analysis of coincident underground muon data measured by the Soudan 1 proton decay detector and air shower data measured by an associated proportional tube array. These data were reported first at the 21st ICRC, Adelaide. We have done further analysis to determine the principal sources of systematic errors in such measurements, including different models of the primary interaction.

  19. Testing Bayesian models of human coincidence timing.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Makoto; Nozaki, Daichi; Nakajima, Yasoichi

    2005-07-01

    A sensorimotor control task often requires an accurate estimation of the timing of the arrival of an external target (e.g., when hitting a pitched ball). Conventional studies of human timing processes have ignored the stochastic features of target timing: e.g., the speed of the pitched ball is not generally constant, but is variable. Interestingly, based on Bayesian theory, it has been recently shown that the human sensorimotor system achieves the optimal estimation by integrating sensory information with prior knowledge of the probabilistic structure of the target variation. In this study, we tested whether Bayesian integration is also implemented while performing a coincidence-timing type of sensorimotor task by manipulating the trial-by-trial variability (i.e., the prior distribution) of the target timing. As a result, within several hundred trials of learning, subjects were able to generate systematic timing behavior according to the width of the prior distribution, as predicted by the optimal Bayesian model. Considering the previous studies showing that the human sensorimotor system uses Bayesian integration in spacing and force-grading tasks, our result indicates that Bayesian integration is fundamental to all aspects of human sensorimotor control. Moreover, it was noteworthy that the subjects could adjust their behavior both when the prior distribution was switched from wide to narrow and vice versa, although the adjustment was slower in the former case. Based on a comparison with observations in a previous study, we discuss the flexibility and adaptability of Bayesian sensorimotor learning.

  20. CSF biomarkers cutoffs: the importance of coincident neuropathological diseases.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Jon B; Brettschneider, Johannes; Grossman, Murray; Arnold, Steven E; Hu, William T; Xie, Sharon X; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q

    2012-07-01

    The effects of applying clinical versus neuropathological diagnosis and the inclusion of cases with coincident neuropathological diagnoses have not been assessed specifically when studying cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker classification cutoffs for patients with neurodegenerative diseases that cause dementia. Thus, 142 neuropathologically diagnosed neurodegenerative dementia patients [71 Alzheimer's disease (AD), 29 frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), 3 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 7 dementia with Lewy bodies, 32 of which cases also had coincident diagnoses] were studied. 96 % had enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) CSF data and 77 % had Luminex CSF data, with 43 and 46 controls for comparison, respectively. Aβ(42), total, and phosphorylated tau(181) were measured. Clinical and neuropathological diagnoses showed an 81.4 % overall agreement. Both assays showed high sensitivity and specificity to classify AD subjects against FTLD subjects and controls, and moderate sensitivity and specificity for classifying FTLD subjects against controls. However, among the cases with neuropathological diagnoses of AD plus another pathology (26.8 % of the sample), 69.4 % (ELISA) and 96.4 % (Luminex) were classified as AD according to their biomarker profiles. Use of clinical diagnosis instead of neuropathological diagnosis led to a 14-17 % underestimation of the biomarker accuracy. These results show that while CSF Aβ and tau assays are useful for diagnosis of AD and neurodegenerative diseases even at MCI stages, CSF diagnostic analyte panels that establish a positive diagnosis of Lewy body disease and FTLD are also needed, and must be established based on neuropathological rather than clinical diagnoses.

  1. X-ray fluorescence/Auger-electron coincidence spectroscopy of vacancy cascades in atomic argon

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, U.; LeBrun, T.; Southworth, S.H.; Jung, M.; MacDonald, M.A.

    1996-12-01

    Argon L{sub 2.3}-M{sub 2.3}M{sub 2.3} Auger-electron spectra were measured in coincidence with K{alpha} fluorescent x-rays in studies of Ar K-shell vacancy decays at several photon energies above the K-threshold and on the 1s-4p resonance in atomic argon. The complex spectra recorded by conventional electron spectroscopy are greatly simplified when recorded in coincidence with fluorescent x-rays, allowing a more detailed analysis of the vacancy cascade process. The resulting coincidence spectra are compared with Hartree-Fock calculations which include shake-up transitions in the resonant case. Small energy shifts of the coincidence electron spectra are attributed to post-collision interaction with 1s photoelectrons.

  2. Interferometric studies from p-p-fragment coincidences

    SciTech Connect

    Korolija, M. Joint Inst. for Heavy Ion Research, Oak Ridge, TN ); Shapira, D.; Gomez del Campo, J.; Kim, H.J. ); Cindro, N. ); Teh, K. ); Shea, J.Y. (Joint Inst. for Heavy Ion Researc

    1991-01-01

    Exclusive p-p correlations from the {sup 58}Ni + {sup 58}Ni reaction have been measured at an incident energy of 850 MeV. The enhancement in the p-p correlation function for small {Delta}p is satisfactorily explained by p-p final-state interaction effects. the observed enhancement is found to depend on the relative angle between the fragment and p-p c.m. velocities. The observed dependence of the p-p coincidence yield on the orientation of {Delta}p with respect to the plane spanned by the fragment and p-p c.m. velocities is attributed to angular momentum effects. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Analysis of 125Xe electron–photon coincidence decay

    DOE PAGES

    Klingberg, Franziska J.; Biegalski, Steven R.; Prinke, Amanda; Haas, Derek A.; Lowrey, Justin D.

    2015-10-26

    In this study, as part of the verification component of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), environmental gas samples originating from nuclear fission are analyzed for the presence of 131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe, and 135Xe. In this work, the non-traditional radioxenon isotope 125Xe was investigated. The isotope was produced as an isotopically pure sample via neutron activation of 124Xe at the University of Texas at Austin Nuclear Engineering Teaching Lab’s TRIGA MARK II Reactor. The sample was then measured using a HPGe detector as well as an ARSA-style β–γ coincidence detector. Potential sources and sensitivities for production of 125Xe are also consideredmore » for relevance to the CTBT verification mission.« less

  4. Introduction to Neutron Coincidence Counter Design Based on Boron-10

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2012-01-22

    The Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation Policy (NA-241) is supporting the project 'Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology' at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is ultimately to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube based alternative system in the configuration of a coincidence counter. This report, providing background information for this project, is the deliverable under Task 1 of the project.

  5. Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar Model Utilizing Boron-10 Lined Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Jeremy L.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2012-09-18

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report, providing results for model development of Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) designs, is a deliverable under Task 2 of the project.

  6. Clifford algebra approach to the coincidence problem for planar lattices.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, M A; Aragón, J L; Verde-Star, L

    2005-03-01

    The problem of coincidences of planar lattices is analyzed using Clifford algebra. It is shown that an arbitrary coincidence isometry can be decomposed as a product of coincidence reflections and this allows planar coincidence lattices to be characterized algebraically. The cases of square, rectangular and rhombic lattices are worked out in detail. One of the aims of this work is to show the potential usefulness of Clifford algebra in crystallography. The power of Clifford algebra for expressing geometric ideas is exploited here and the procedure presented can be generalized to higher dimensions.

  7. Shift-register coincidence electronics system for thermal neutron counters

    SciTech Connect

    Swansen, J.E.; Collinsworth, P.R.; Krick, M.S.

    1980-04-01

    An improved shift-register, coincidence-counting logic circuit, developed for use with thermal neutron well counters, is described in detail. A distinguishing feature of the circuit is its ability to operate usefully at neutron counting rates of several hundred kHz. A portable electronics package incorporating the new coincidence logic and support circuits is also described.

  8. Coincidence Prompt Gamma-Ray Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    R.P. gandner; C.W. Mayo; W.A. Metwally; W. Zhang; W. Guo; A. Shehata

    2002-11-10

    The normal prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis for either bulk or small beam samples inherently has a small signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio due primarily to the neutron source being present while the sample signal is being obtained. Coincidence counting offers the possibility of greatly reducing or eliminating the noise generated by the neutron source. The present report presents our results to date on implementing the coincidence counting PGNAA approach. We conclude that coincidence PGNAA yields: (1) a larger signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio, (2) more information (and therefore better accuracy) from essentially the same experiment when sophisticated coincidence electronics are used that can yield singles and coincidences simultaneously, and (3) a reduced (one or two orders of magnitude) signal from essentially the same experiment. In future work we will concentrate on: (1) modifying the existing CEARPGS Monte Carlo code to incorporate coincidence counting, (2) obtaining coincidence schemes for 18 or 20 of the common elements in coal and cement, and (3) optimizing the design of a PGNAA coincidence system for the bulk analysis of coal.

  9. Level Densities in the actinide region and indirect n,y cross section measurements using the surrogate method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. N.; Gunsing, F.; Bernstein, L.; Bürger, A.; Görgen, A.; Thompson, I. J.; Guttormssen, M.; Larsen, A.-C.; Mansouri, P.; Renstrøm, T.; Rose, S. J.; Siem, S.; Wiedeking, M.; Wiborg, T.

    2012-02-01

    Results from a program of measurements of level densities and gamma ray strength functions in the actinide region are presented. Experiments at the Oslo cyclotron involving the Cactus/Siri detectors and 232Th(d,x) and 232Th(3He,x) reactions were carried out to help answer the question of which level density model is the most appropriate for actinide nuclei, since it will have an impact on cross section calculations important for reactor physics simulations. A new technique for extracting level densities and gamma ray strength functions from particle-gamma coincidence data is proposed and results from the development of this technique are presented. In addition, simultaneous measurements of compound nuclear gamma decay probabilities have been performed for the key thorium cycle nuclei 233Th, 231Th and 232Pa up to around 1MeV above the neutron binding energy and have enabled extraction of indirect neutron induced capture cross sections for the 232Th, 231Pa and 230Th nuclei using the surrogate reaction method. Since the neutron capture cross section for 232Th is already well known from direct measurements a comparison provides a stringent test of the applicability of the surrogate technique in the actinide region.

  10. Recovery and normalization of triple coincidences in PET

    SciTech Connect

    Lage, Eduardo Parot, Vicente; Dave, Shivang R.; Herraiz, Joaquin L.; Moore, Stephen C.; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Park, Mi-Ae; Udías, Jose M.; Vaquero, Juan J.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Triple coincidences in positron emission tomography (PET) are events in which three γ-rays are detected simultaneously. These events, though potentially useful for enhancing the sensitivity of PET scanners, are discarded or processed without special consideration in current systems, because there is not a clear criterion for assigning them to a unique line-of-response (LOR). Methods proposed for recovering such events usually rely on the use of highly specialized detection systems, hampering general adoption, and/or are based on Compton-scatter kinematics and, consequently, are limited in accuracy by the energy resolution of standard PET detectors. In this work, the authors propose a simple and general solution for recovering triple coincidences, which does not require specialized detectors or additional energy resolution requirements. Methods: To recover triple coincidences, the authors’ method distributes such events among their possible LORs using the relative proportions of double coincidences in these LORs. The authors show analytically that this assignment scheme represents the maximum-likelihood solution for the triple-coincidence distribution problem. The PET component of a preclinical PET/CT scanner was adapted to enable the acquisition and processing of triple coincidences. Since the efficiencies for detecting double and triple events were found to be different throughout the scanner field-of-view, a normalization procedure specific for triple coincidences was also developed. The effect of including triple coincidences using their method was compared against the cases of equally weighting the triples among their possible LORs and discarding all the triple events. The authors used as figures of merit for this comparison sensitivity, noise-equivalent count (NEC) rates and image quality calculated as described in the NEMA NU-4 protocol for the assessment of preclinical PET scanners. Results: The addition of triple-coincidence events with the

  11. Neutron coincidence detectors employing heterogeneous materials

    DOEpatents

    Czirr, J. Bartley; Jensen, Gary L.

    1993-07-27

    A neutron detector relies upon optical separation of different scintillators to measure the total energy and/or number of neutrons from a neutron source. In pulse mode embodiments of the invention, neutrons are detected in a first detector which surrounds the neutron source and in a second detector surrounding the first detector. An electronic circuit insures that only events are measured which correspond to neutrons first detected in the first detector followed by subsequent detection in the second detector. In spectrometer embodiments of the invention, neutrons are thermalized in the second detector which is formed by a scintillator-moderator and neutron energy is measured from the summed signals from the first and second detectors.

  12. Self-regulating neutron coincidence counter

    DOEpatents

    Baron, N.

    1980-06-16

    A device for accurately measuring the mass of /sup 240/Pu and /sup 239/Pu in a sample having arbitrary moderation and mixed with various contaminants. The device utilizes a thermal neutron well counter which has two concentric rings of neutron detectors separated by a moderating material surrounding the well. Neutron spectroscopic information derived by the two rings of detectors is used to measure the quantity of /sup 239/Pu and /sup 240/Pu in device which corrects for background radiation, deadtime losses of the detector and electronics and various other constants of the system.

  13. Roles for Coincidence Detection in Coding Amplitude-Modulated Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Ashida, Go; Kretzberg, Jutta; Tollin, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Many sensory neurons encode temporal information by detecting coincident arrivals of synaptic inputs. In the mammalian auditory brainstem, binaural neurons of the medial superior olive (MSO) are known to act as coincidence detectors, whereas in the lateral superior olive (LSO) roles of coincidence detection have remained unclear. LSO neurons receive excitatory and inhibitory inputs driven by ipsilateral and contralateral acoustic stimuli, respectively, and vary their output spike rates according to interaural level differences. In addition, LSO neurons are also sensitive to binaural phase differences of low-frequency tones and envelopes of amplitude-modulated (AM) sounds. Previous physiological recordings in vivo found considerable variations in monaural AM-tuning across neurons. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of the observed temporal tuning properties of LSO and their sources of variability, we used a simple coincidence counting model and examined how specific parameters of coincidence detection affect monaural and binaural AM coding. Spike rates and phase-locking of evoked excitatory and spontaneous inhibitory inputs had only minor effects on LSO output to monaural AM inputs. In contrast, the coincidence threshold of the model neuron affected both the overall spike rates and the half-peak positions of the AM-tuning curve, whereas the width of the coincidence window merely influenced the output spike rates. The duration of the refractory period affected only the low-frequency portion of the monaural AM-tuning curve. Unlike monaural AM coding, temporal factors, such as the coincidence window and the effective duration of inhibition, played a major role in determining the trough positions of simulated binaural phase-response curves. In addition, empirically-observed level-dependence of binaural phase-coding was reproduced in the framework of our minimalistic coincidence counting model. These modeling results suggest that coincidence detection of excitatory

  14. Sex differences in coincidence-anticipation timing (CAT): a review.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Geoff

    2011-02-01

    Coincidence-anticipation timing (CAT) is the ability to judge when a moving stimulus will arrive at a target. 43 articles were reviewed which investigated sex differences in this skill. Performance was typically recorded as one or more of three error measures, absolute error (AE), constant error (CE), and variable error (VE). Despite many null findings, it is argued that the evidence for a male advantage is strong, particularly for AE and VE. 10 parameters typically associated with CAT studies were analyzed (e.g., knowledge of results, number of trials, stimulus duration, and stimulus speed), but none differentiated clearly between the presence and absence of the sex difference. However, when the mean AE score was used as a measure of task difficulty, a male advantage was reliably associated with lower values of AE (easier tasks) and null findings with higher values (more difficult tasks). An attempt to compare sex difference findings from Bassin timer and real-world tasks was thwarted by the lack of studies using real-world tasks. Given little evidence for the influence of socialization on sex differences in CAT, it is suggested that the difference may have originated from the evolutionary selection of women for gathering and men for hunting.

  15. Use of beam stoppers to correct random and scatter coincidence in PET: A Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsin-Hon; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Lu, Cheng-Chang; Ni, Yu-Ching; Jan, Meei-Ling

    2013-05-01

    3D acquisition of positron emission tomography (PET) produce data with improved signal-to-noise ratios compared with conventional 2D PET. However, the sensitivity increase is accompanied by an increase in the number of scattered photons and random coincidences detected. Scatter and random coincidence lead to a loss in image contrast and degrade the accuracy of quantitative analysis. This work examines the feasibility of using beam stoppers (BS) for correcting scatter and random coincidence simultaneously. The origins of the photons are not on the path of non-true event. Therefore, a BS placed on the line of response (LOR) that passes through the source position absorbs a particular fraction of the true events but has little effect on the scatter and random events. The subtraction of the two scanned data, with and without BS, can be employed to estimate the non-true events at the LOR. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of 3D PET on an EEC phantom and a Zubal Phantom are conducted to validate the proposed approach. Both scattered and random coincidences can be estimated and corrected using the proposed method. The mean squared errors measured on the random+scatter sinogram of the phantom obtained by the proposed method are much less than those obtained using the conventional correction method (the delayed coincidence subtraction for random correction combined with single scatter simulation for scatter correction). Preliminary results indicate that the proposed method is feasible for clinical application.

  16. The effect of deadtime and electronic transients on the predelay bias in neutron coincidence counting

    DOE PAGES

    Croft, Stephen; Favalli, Andrea; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Goddard, Braden; Stewart, Scott

    2016-01-13

    In neutron coincidence counting using the shift register autocorrelation technique, a predelay is inserted before the opening of the (R+A)-gate. Operationally the purpose of the predelay is to ensure that the (R+A)- and A-gates have matched effectiveness, otherwise a bias will result when the difference between the gates is used to calculate the accidentals corrected net reals coincidence rate. The necessity for the predelay was established experimentally in the early practical development and deployment of the coincidence counting method. The choice of predelay for a given detection system is usually made experimentally, but even today long standing traditional values (e.g.,more » 4.5 µs) are often used. This, at least in part, reflects the fact that a deep understanding of why a finite predelay setting is needed and how to control the underlying influences has not been fully worked out. We attempt, in this paper, to gain some insight into the problem. One aspect we consider is the slowing down, thermalization, and diffusion of neutrons in the detector moderator. The other is the influence of deadtime and electronic transients. These may be classified as non-ideal detector behaviors because they are not included in the conventional model used to interpret measurement data. From improved understanding of the effect of deadtime and electronic transients on the predelay bias in neutron coincidence counting, the performance of both future and current coincidence counters may be improved.« less

  17. Light-particle-complex-fragment coincidence cross sections from intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Hasselquist, B.E.; Crawley, G.M.; Jacak, B.V.; Koenig, Z.M.; Westfall, G.D.; Yurkon, J.E.; Tickle, R.S.; Dufour, J.P.; Symons, T.J.M.

    1985-07-01

    Light-particle (Zcoincidence spectra have been measured for the reactions 30 MeV/nucleon /sup 12/C+Al and /sup 12/C+Au and 92 MeV/nucleon /sup 40/Ar+Au at angles from 45/sup 0/ to 90/sup 0/. Coincidence triggers for the light-particle spectra were intermediate rapidity fragments (3coincidence data. The coincidence spectra are compared with a model based on the moving source model but incorporating momentum conservation to account for kinematical biases. Little difference between inclusive and complex-fragment-triggered coincidence cross sections is observed, indicating that all the fragments have a common source.

  18. The effect of deadtime and electronic transients on the predelay bias in neutron coincidence counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Stephen; Favalli, Andrea; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Goddard, Braden; Stewart, Scott

    2016-04-01

    In neutron coincidence counting using the shift register autocorrelation technique, a predelay is inserted before the opening of the (R+A)-gate. Operationally the purpose of the predelay is to ensure that the (R+A)- and A-gates have matched effectiveness, otherwise a bias will result when the difference between the gates is used to calculate the accidentals corrected net reals coincidence rate. The necessity for the predelay was established experimentally in the early practical development and deployment of the coincidence counting method. The choice of predelay for a given detection system is usually made experimentally, but even today long standing traditional values (e.g., 4.5 μs) are often used. This, at least in part, reflects the fact that a deep understanding of why a finite predelay setting is needed and how to control the underlying influences has not been fully worked out. In this paper we attempt to gain some insight into the problem. One aspect we consider is the slowing down, thermalization, and diffusion of neutrons in the detector moderator. The other is the influence of deadtime and electronic transients. These may be classified as non-ideal detector behaviors because they are not included in the conventional model used to interpret measurement data. From improved understanding of the effect of deadtime and electronic transients on the predelay bias in neutron coincidence counting, the performance of both future and current coincidence counters may be improved.

  19. Experimental validation of coincidence summing corrections computed by the ETNA software.

    PubMed

    Lépy, Marie-Christine; Brun, Philippe; Collin, Claude; Plagnard, Johann

    2006-01-01

    The ETNA software has been developed to compute efficiency transfer and coincidence summing corrections. Different experiments are combined to test the validity of this last facility. Point sources with multi-gamma emitters are measured at several source-to-detector distances. Experimental correction factors are determined from the variation in the peaks' relative intensities versus the geometrical conditions. The ETNA code is used to compute the corrections due to coincidence summing for the same geometries. The calculated values are compared to the experimental ones.

  20. Simulations of Lithium-Based Neutron Coincidence Counter for Gd-Loaded Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Cowles, Christian C.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2014-10-31

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Lithium-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology Coincidence Counting for Gd-loaded Fuels at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the development of a lithium-based neutron coincidence counter for nondestructively assaying Gd loaded nuclear fuel. This report provides results from MCNP simulations of a lithium-based coincidence counter for the possible measurement of Gd-loaded nuclear fuel. A comparison of lithium-based simulations and UNCL-II simulations with and without Gd loaded fuel is provided. A lithium-based model, referred to as PLNS3A-R1, showed strong promise for assaying Gd loaded fuel.

  1. Moisture corrections in neutron coincidence counting of PuO/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, J.E.; Menlove, H.O.

    1987-01-01

    Passive neutron coincidence counting is capable of 1% assay accuracy for pure, well-characterized PuO/sub 2/ samples that contain plutonium masses from a few tens of grams to several kilograms. Moisture in the sample can significantly bias the assay high by changing the (..cap alpha..,n) neutron production, the sample multiplication, and the detection efficiency. Monte Carlo calculations and an analytical model of coincidence counting have been used to quantify the individual and cumulative effects of moisture biases for two PuO/sub 2/ sample sizes and a range of moisture levels from 0 to 9 wt %. Results of the calculations suggest a simple correction procedure for moisture bias that is effective from 0 to 3 wt % H/sub 2/O. The procedure requires that the moisture level in the sample be known before the coincidence measurement.

  2. Application of a simple asynchronous mechanical light chopper to multielectron coincidence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Kenji; Suzuki, Isao H.; Penent, Francis; Lablanquie, Pascal; Hikosaka, Yasumasa; Shigemasa, Eiji; Eland, John H. D.

    2009-12-15

    A simple asynchronous mechanical light chopper, based on modification of a turbo-molecular pump, has been developed to extend the interval between light pulses in single bunch operation at the Photon Factory storage ring. A pulse repetition rate of 80 kHz was achieved using a cylinder rotating at 48000 rpm, with 100 slits of 80 {mu}m width. This allows absolute timing of particles up to 12.48 {mu}s instead of the single-bunch period of 624 ns. We have applied the chopper together with a light pulse monitor to measure multielectron coincidence spectra using a magnetic bottle time-of-flight electron spectrometer. With such a system, the electron energies are determined without any ambiguity, the folding of coincidence spectra disappears and the effect of false coincidences is drastically reduced.

  3. Systematic effects in neutron coincidence and multiplicity counting

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Louise G; Favorite, Jeffrey A; Swinhoe, Martyn T

    2010-01-01

    Correlated neutron counting, including neutron coincidence and multiplicity counting, is an important tool in nuclear material accountancy verification. The accuracy of such measurements is of interest to the safeguards community because as the accuracy of NDA improves, the number of samples that are required to undergo destructive analysis (DA) decreases. The accuracy of a neutron mUltiplicity measurement can be affected by a number of variables. Monte Carlo neutron transport simulations with MCNPX have been performed to understand how the properties of the sample affect the count rate. These resultant count rates have been analyzed with the 'point model' in order to determine the effect on the deduced plutonium mass. The sample properties that have been investigated are density, sample position within the detector cavity, moisture content, isotopic composition, plutonium to total actinide ratio and heavy metal fraction. These parameters affect the Singles, Doubles and Triples count rates in different ways. In addition, different analysis methods use these measured quantities in different combinations, so that the final sensitivity of the {sup 240}Pu mass to each parameter also depends on the analysis method used. For example, the passive calibration curve method only used the Doubles rate to produce the {sup 240}Pu mass and so is not sensitive to changes in the Singles rate (to first order). The analysis methods considered here were passive calibration curve (non-multiplication corrected), known alpha (multiplication corrected) and multiplicity with known efficiency. The effects were studied on both a small mass MOX sample (1 g Pu) and a large MOX sample (6000 g Pu) both measured in high efficiency neutron multiplicity counters. In order to determine the final effect of each parameter it is necessary to know not only the sensitivity of the plutonium mass to that parameter, but also the range over which the parameter can realistically vary. Some estimates are

  4. Inferring social ties from geographic coincidences

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, David J.; Backstrom, Lars; Cosley, Dan; Suri, Siddharth; Huttenlocher, Daniel; Kleinberg, Jon

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the extent to which social ties between people can be inferred from co-occurrence in time and space: Given that two people have been in approximately the same geographic locale at approximately the same time, on multiple occasions, how likely are they to know each other? Furthermore, how does this likelihood depend on the spatial and temporal proximity of the co-occurrences? Such issues arise in data originating in both online and offline domains as well as settings that capture interfaces between online and offline behavior. Here we develop a framework for quantifying the answers to such questions, and we apply this framework to publicly available data from a social media site, finding that even a very small number of co-occurrences can result in a high empirical likelihood of a social tie. We then present probabilistic models showing how such large probabilities can arise from a natural model of proximity and co-occurrence in the presence of social ties. In addition to providing a method for establishing some of the first quantifiable estimates of these measures, our findings have potential privacy implications, particularly for the ways in which social structures can be inferred from public online records that capture individuals’ physical locations over time. PMID:21148099

  5. Inferring social ties from geographic coincidences.

    PubMed

    Crandall, David J; Backstrom, Lars; Cosley, Dan; Suri, Siddharth; Huttenlocher, Daniel; Kleinberg, Jon

    2010-12-28

    We investigate the extent to which social ties between people can be inferred from co-occurrence in time and space: Given that two people have been in approximately the same geographic locale at approximately the same time, on multiple occasions, how likely are they to know each other? Furthermore, how does this likelihood depend on the spatial and temporal proximity of the co-occurrences? Such issues arise in data originating in both online and offline domains as well as settings that capture interfaces between online and offline behavior. Here we develop a framework for quantifying the answers to such questions, and we apply this framework to publicly available data from a social media site, finding that even a very small number of co-occurrences can result in a high empirical likelihood of a social tie. We then present probabilistic models showing how such large probabilities can arise from a natural model of proximity and co-occurrence in the presence of social ties. In addition to providing a method for establishing some of the first quantifiable estimates of these measures, our findings have potential privacy implications, particularly for the ways in which social structures can be inferred from public online records that capture individuals' physical locations over time.

  6. Coincidence electron/ion imaging with a fast frame camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen; Lee, Suk Kyoung; Lin, Yun Fei; Lingenfelter, Steven; Winney, Alexander; Fan, Lin

    2015-05-01

    A new time- and position- sensitive particle detection system based on a fast frame CMOS camera is developed for coincidence electron/ion imaging. The system is composed of three major components: a conventional microchannel plate (MCP)/phosphor screen electron/ion imager, a fast frame CMOS camera and a high-speed digitizer. The system collects the positional information of ions/electrons from a fast frame camera through real-time centroiding while the arrival times are obtained from the timing signal of MCPs processed by a high-speed digitizer. Multi-hit capability is achieved by correlating the intensity of electron/ion spots on each camera frame with the peak heights on the corresponding time-of-flight spectrum. Efficient computer algorithms are developed to process camera frames and digitizer traces in real-time at 1 kHz laser repetition rate. We demonstrate the capability of this system by detecting a momentum-matched co-fragments pair (methyl and iodine cations) produced from strong field dissociative double ionization of methyl iodide. We further show that a time resolution of 30 ps can be achieved when measuring electron TOF spectrum and this enables the new system to achieve a good energy resolution along the TOF axis.

  7. Super sub-wavelength patterns in photon coincidence detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruifeng; Zhang, Pei; Zhou, Yu; Gao, Hong; Li, Fuli

    2014-02-01

    High-precision measurements implemented with light are desired in all fields of science. However, light acts as a wave, and the Rayleigh criterion in classical optics yields a diffraction limit that prevents obtaining a resolution smaller than the wavelength. Sub-wavelength interference has potential application in lithography because it beats the classical Rayleigh resolution limit. Here, we carefully study second-order correlation theory to establish the physics behind sub-wavelength interference in photon coincidence detection. A Young's double slit experiment with pseudo-thermal light is performed to test the second-order correlation pattern. The results show that when two point detectors are scanned in different ways, super sub-wavelength interference patterns can be obtained. We then provide a theoretical explanation for this surprising result, and demonstrate that this explanation is also suitable for the results found for entangled light. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations of these types of super sub-wavelength interference patterns in quantum lithography.

  8. Super sub-wavelength patterns in photon coincidence detection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruifeng; Zhang, Pei; Zhou, Yu; Gao, Hong; Li, Fuli

    2014-01-01

    High-precision measurements implemented with light are desired in all fields of science. However, light acts as a wave, and the Rayleigh criterion in classical optics yields a diffraction limit that prevents obtaining a resolution smaller than the wavelength. Sub-wavelength interference has potential application in lithography because it beats the classical Rayleigh resolution limit. Here, we carefully study second-order correlation theory to establish the physics behind sub-wavelength interference in photon coincidence detection. A Young's double slit experiment with pseudo-thermal light is performed to test the second-order correlation pattern. The results show that when two point detectors are scanned in different ways, super sub-wavelength interference patterns can be obtained. We then provide a theoretical explanation for this surprising result, and demonstrate that this explanation is also suitable for the results found for entangled light. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations of these types of super sub-wavelength interference patterns in quantum lithography. PMID:24531057

  9. Super sub-wavelength patterns in photon coincidence detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruifeng; Zhang, Pei; Zhou, Yu; Gao, Hong; Li, Fuli

    2014-02-17

    High-precision measurements implemented with light are desired in all fields of science. However, light acts as a wave, and the Rayleigh criterion in classical optics yields a diffraction limit that prevents obtaining a resolution smaller than the wavelength. Sub-wavelength interference has potential application in lithography because it beats the classical Rayleigh resolution limit. Here, we carefully study second-order correlation theory to establish the physics behind sub-wavelength interference in photon coincidence detection. A Young's double slit experiment with pseudo-thermal light is performed to test the second-order correlation pattern. The results show that when two point detectors are scanned in different ways, super sub-wavelength interference patterns can be obtained. We then provide a theoretical explanation for this surprising result, and demonstrate that this explanation is also suitable for the results found for entangled light. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations of these types of super sub-wavelength interference patterns in quantum lithography.

  10. Analytical model of coincidence resolving time in TOF-PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieczorek, H.; Thon, A.; Dey, T.; Khanin, V.; Rodnyi, P.

    2016-06-01

    The coincidence resolving time (CRT) of scintillation detectors is the parameter determining noise reduction in time-of-flight PET. We derive an analytical CRT model based on the statistical distribution of photons for two different prototype scintillators. For the first one, characterized by single exponential decay, CRT is proportional to the decay time and inversely proportional to the number of photons, with a square root dependence on the trigger level. For the second scintillator prototype, characterized by exponential rise and decay, CRT is proportional to the square root of the product of rise time and decay time divided by the doubled number of photons, and it is nearly independent of the trigger level. This theory is verified by measurements of scintillation time constants, light yield and CRT on scintillator sticks. Trapping effects are taken into account by defining an effective decay time. We show that in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, CRT is as important as patient dose, imaging time or PET system sensitivity. The noise reduction effect of better timing resolution is verified and visualized by Monte Carlo simulation of a NEMA image quality phantom.

  11. Performance of Down syndrome subjects during a coincident timing task

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The time synchronization is a very important ability for the acquisition and performance of motor skills that generate the need to adapt the actions of body segments to external events of the environment that are changing their position in space. Down Syndrome (DS) individuals may present some deficits to perform tasks with synchronization demand. We aimed to investigate the performance of individuals with DS in a simple Coincident Timing task. Method 32 individuals were divided into 2 groups: the Down syndrome group (DSG) comprised of 16 individuals with average age of 20 (+/− 5 years old), and a control group (CG) comprised of 16 individuals of the same age. All individuals performed the Simple Timing (ST) task and their performance was measured in milliseconds. The study was conducted in a single phase with the execution of 20 consecutive trials for each participant. Results There was a significant difference in the intergroup analysis for the accuracy adjustment - Absolute Error (Z = 3.656, p = 0.001); and for the performance consistence - Variable Error (Z = 2.939, p = 0.003). Conclusion DS individuals have more difficulty in integrating the motor action to an external stimulus and they also present more inconsistence in performance. Both groups presented the same tendency to delay their motor responses. PMID:23618314

  12. A new 4π(LS)-γ coincidence counter at NCBJ RC POLATOM with TDCR detector in the beta channel.

    PubMed

    Ziemek, T; Jęczmieniowski, A; Cacko, D; Broda, R; Lech, E

    2016-03-01

    A new 4π(LS)-γ coincidence system (TDCRG) was built at the NCBJ RC POLATOM. The counter consists of a TDCR detector in the beta channel and scintillation detector with NaI(Tl) crystal in the gamma channel. The system is equipped with a digital board with FPGA, which records and analyses coincidences in the TDCR detector and coincidences between the beta and gamma channels. The characteristics of the system and a scheme of the FPGA implementation with behavioral simulation are given. The TDCRG counter was validated by activity measurements on (14)C and (60)Co solutions standardized in RC POLATOM using previously validated methods.

  13. A new 4π(LS)-γ coincidence counter at NCBJ RC POLATOM with TDCR detector in the beta channel.

    PubMed

    Ziemek, T; Jęczmieniowski, A; Cacko, D; Broda, R; Lech, E

    2016-03-01

    A new 4π(LS)-γ coincidence system (TDCRG) was built at the NCBJ RC POLATOM. The counter consists of a TDCR detector in the beta channel and scintillation detector with NaI(Tl) crystal in the gamma channel. The system is equipped with a digital board with FPGA, which records and analyses coincidences in the TDCR detector and coincidences between the beta and gamma channels. The characteristics of the system and a scheme of the FPGA implementation with behavioral simulation are given. The TDCRG counter was validated by activity measurements on (14)C and (60)Co solutions standardized in RC POLATOM using previously validated methods. PMID:26701653

  14. The optimum choice of gate width for neutron coincidence counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, S.; Henzlova, D.; Favalli, A.; Hauck, D. K.; Santi, P. A.

    2014-11-01

    In the measurement field of international nuclear safeguards, passive neutron coincidence counting is used to quantify the spontaneous fission rate of certain special nuclear materials. The shift register autocorrelation analysis method is the most commonly used approach. However, the Feynman-Y technique, which is more commonly applied in reactor noise analysis, provides an alternative means to extract the correlation information from a pulse train. In this work we consider how to select the optimum gate width for each of these two time-correlation analysis techniques. The optimum is considered to be that which gives the lowest fractional precision on the net doublets rate. Our theoretical approach is approximate but is instructional in terms of revealing the key functional dependence. We show that in both cases the same performance figure of merit applies so that common design criteria apply to the neutron detector head. Our prediction is that near optimal results, suitable for most practical applications, can be obtained from both techniques using a common gate width setting. The estimated precision is also comparable in the two cases. The theoretical expressions are tested experimentally using 252Cf spontaneous fission sources measured in two thermal well counters representative of the type in common use by international inspectorates. Fast accidental sampling was the favored method of acquiring the Feynman-Y data. Our experimental study confirmed the basic functional dependences predicted although experimental results when available are preferred. With an appropriate gate setting Feynman-Y analysis provides an alternative to shift register analysis for safeguards applications which is opening up new avenues of data collection and data reduction to explore.

  15. Development of Monte Carlo code for coincidence prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaogang

    Prompt Gamma-Ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) offers a non-destructive, relatively rapid on-line method for determination of elemental composition of bulk and other samples. However, PGNAA has an inherently large background. These backgrounds are primarily due to the presence of the neutron excitation source. It also includes neutron activation of the detector and the prompt gamma rays from the structure materials of PGNAA devices. These large backgrounds limit the sensitivity and accuracy of PGNAA. Since most of the prompt gamma rays from the same element are emitted in coincidence, a possible approach for further improvement is to change the traditional PGNAA measurement technique and introduce the gamma-gamma coincidence technique. It is well known that the coincidence techniques can eliminate most of the interference backgrounds and improve the signal-to-noise ratio. A new Monte Carlo code, CEARCPG has been developed at CEAR to simulate gamma-gamma coincidence spectra in PGNAA experiment. Compared to the other existing Monte Carlo code CEARPGA I and CEARPGA II, a new algorithm of sampling the prompt gamma rays produced from neutron capture reaction and neutron inelastic scattering reaction, is developed in this work. All the prompt gamma rays are taken into account by using this new algorithm. Before this work, the commonly used method is to interpolate the prompt gamma rays from the pre-calculated gamma-ray table. This technique works fine for the single spectrum. However it limits the capability to simulate the coincidence spectrum. The new algorithm samples the prompt gamma rays from the nucleus excitation scheme. The primary nuclear data library used to sample the prompt gamma rays comes from ENSDF library. Three cases are simulated and the simulated results are benchmarked with experiments. The first case is the prototype for ETI PGNAA application. This case is designed to check the capability of CEARCPG for single spectrum simulation. The second

  16. Coincidence spectroscopy of high-lying Rydberg states produced in strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larimian, Seyedreza; Erattupuzha, Sonia; Lemell, Christoph; Yoshida, Shuhei; Nagele, Stefan; Maurer, Raffael; Baltuška, Andrius; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Kitzler, Markus; Xie, Xinhua

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the detection of high-lying Rydberg states produced in strong laser fields with coincidence spectroscopy. Electron emission after the interaction of strong laser pulses with atoms and molecules is measured together with the parent ions in coincidence measurements. These electrons originate from high-lying Rydberg states with quantum numbers from n ˜20 up to n ≲120 formed by frustrated field ionization. Ionization rates are retrieved from the measured ionization signal of these Rydberg states. Simulations show that both tunneling ionization by a weak dc field and photoionization by blackbody radiation contribute to delayed electron emission on the nano- to microsecond scale. Furthermore, the dependence of the Rydberg-state production on the ellipticity of the driving laser field indicates that such high-lying Rydberg states are populated through electron recapture. The present experiment provides detailed quantitative information on Rydberg production in strong-field interaction.

  17. Determining interphase boundary orientations from near-coincidence sites

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Q.; Reynolds, W.T. Jr.

    1998-08-01

    A transmission electron microscope (TEM) study was made of the interphase boundary structure of delta plates precipitated from the gamma phase in alloy 718. A variety of interfacial defects were examined and identified. These results, together with available data from bcc laths in fcc Ni-Cr alloys, were used to develop a method for predicting precipitate orientation relationships and boundary orientations. The method employs a geometric matching approach in three dimensions based upon the concept of near-coincidence sites. It is suggested that precipitates in a given system select an orientation relationship which produces the greatest areal density of near-coincidence sites and that the habit plane adopts an orientation that yields the greatest area of boundary containing contiguous near-coincidence sites.

  18. Coincident Observations of Surface Ozone and NMVOCs over Abu Dhabi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Naveed; Majeed, Tariq; Iqbal, Mazhar; Tarasick, David; Davies, Jonathan; Riemer, Daniel; Apel, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The vertical profiles of ozone are measured coincidently with non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) at the meteorological site located at the Abu Dhabi international airport (latitude 24.45N; longitude 54.22E) during the years 2012 - 2014. Some of the profiles show elevated surface ozone >95 ppbv during the winter months (December, January and February). The ground-level NMVOCs obtained from the gas chromatography-flame ionization detection/mass spectrometry system also show elevated values of acetylene, ethane, propane, butane, pentane, benzene, and toluene. NMVOCs and ozone abundances in other seasons are much lower than the values in winter season. NMVOCs are emitted from an extensive number of sources in urban environments including fuel production, distribution, and consumption, and serve as precursor of ozone. Transport sources contribute a substantial portion of the NMVOC burden to the urban atmosphere in developed regions. Abu Dhabi is located at the edge of the Arabian Gulf and is highly affected by emissions from petrochemical industries in the neighboring Gulf region. The preliminary results indicate that wintertime enhancement in ozone is associated with large values of NMVOCs at Abu Dhabi. The domestic production of surface ozone is estimated from the combination of oxygen recombination and NMVOCs and compared with the data. It is estimated that about 40-50% of ozone in Abu Dhabi is transported from the neighbouring petrochemical industries. We will present ozone sounding and NMVOCs data and our model estimates of surface ozone, including a discussion on the high levels of the tropospheric ozone responsible for contaminating the air quality in the UAE. This work is supported by National Research Foundation, UAE.

  19. Active dendrites mediate stratified gamma-range coincidence detection in hippocampal model neurons

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anindita; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons exhibit gamma-phase preference in their spikes, selectively route inputs through gamma frequency multiplexing and are considered part of gamma-bound cell assemblies. How do these neurons exhibit gamma-frequency coincidence detection capabilities, a feature that is essential for the expression of these physiological observations, despite their slow membrane time constant? In this conductance-based modelling study, we developed quantitative metrics for the temporal window of integration/coincidence detection based on the spike-triggered average (STA) of the neuronal compartment. We employed these metrics in conjunction with quantitative measures for spike initiation dynamics to assess the emergence and dependence of coincidence detection and STA spectral selectivity on various ion channel combinations. We found that the presence of resonating conductances (hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated or T-type calcium), either independently or synergistically when expressed together, led to the emergence of spectral selectivity in the spike initiation dynamics and a significant reduction in the coincidence detection window (CDW). The presence of A-type potassium channels, along with resonating conductances, reduced the STA characteristic frequency and broadened the CDW, but persistent sodium channels sharpened the CDW by strengthening the spectral selectivity in the STA. Finally, in a morphologically precise model endowed with experimentally constrained channel gradients, we found that somatodendritic compartments expressed functional maps of strong theta-frequency selectivity in spike initiation dynamics and gamma-range CDW. Our results reveal the heavy expression of resonating and spike-generating conductances as the mechanism underlying the robust emergence of stratified gamma-range coincidence detection in the dendrites of hippocampal and cortical pyramidal neurons. PMID:26018187

  20. Study of inner-shell vacancy cascades by coincidence techniques

    SciTech Connect

    LeBrun, T.; Arp, U.; MacDonald, M.; Southworth, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    An inner-shell vacancy in an atom decays by an intricate combination of Auger and fluorescence processes. The interrelation between these processes is not well understood because traditional studies of core-excited atoms focus on only one of the many particles that participate in the relaxation - largely ignoring the other components and the correlations between them. To understand these correlations we developed a coincidence technique that uses coincident detection of X-rays and electrons to select decay pathways that involve emission of both an X-ray photon and electrons. In the first application of this technique, the Ar 1s photoelectron spectrum was recorded selectively in coincidence with X-ray fluorescence to eliminate the asymmetric broadening and shifting of the energy distribution which results due to post-collision interaction with K-Auger electrons. This allowed the direct observation of the interaction between the photoelectron and the decay of core holes created after the initial photoionization event. We have also applied this technique to the much more complex problem of understanding Auger-electron spectra produced by vacancy cascades following inner-shell excitation. For example, we previously recorded non-coincident electron spectra of L{sub 2,3}MM Auger transitions following K-shell excitation of argon. Interpretation of these spectra is difficult because they are complicated and consist of many overlapping or unresolved Auger transitions between different ionic states.

  1. The Galileo/Mars Observer/Ulysses Coincidence Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    From March 21 to April 11, 1993 the Galileo, Mars Observer and Ulysses spacecraft were tracked in a coincidence experiment, searching for low-frequency (millihertz) gravitational radiation. In the spacecraft Doppler technique, the earth and a distant spacecraft act as separated test masses.

  2. Multiple channel coincidence detector and controller for microseismic data analysis

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1976-11-16

    A multiple channel coincidence detector circuit is provided for analyzing data either in real time or recorded data on a magnetic tape during an experiment for determining location and progression of fractures in an oil field or the like while water is being injected at high pressure in wells located in the field. The circuit is based upon the utilization of a set of parity generator trees combined with monostable multivibrators to detect the occurrence of two events at any pair of channel input terminals that are within a preselected time frame and have an amplitude above a preselected magnitude. The parity generators perform an exclusive OR function in a timing circuit composed of monostable multivibrators that serve to yield an output when two events are present in the preselected time frame. Any coincidences falling outside this time frame are considered either noise or not otherwise useful in the analysis of the recorded data. Input pulses of absolute magnitude below the low-level threshold setting of a bipolar low-level threshold detector are unwanted and therefore rejected. A control output is provided for a utilization device from a coincidence hold circuit that may be used to halt a tape search unit at the time of coincidence or perform other useful control functions.

  3. Light particles emitted in coincidence with evaporation residues in {sup 79}Br(930 MeV) + {sup 27}Al collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez Lomeli, E.; Dacal, A.; Ortiz, M.E.; D`Onofrio, A.; Gomez del Campo, J.; Kim, H.; Korolija, M.; Shapira, D.

    1993-10-01

    Exclusive measurements of light particles, deuterons, tritons and alphas, in coincidence with Evaporation Residues (ER), were performed at the Holified Heavy Ion Research Facility of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the large detector array HILI (Heavy Ion Light Ion). Heavy fragments produced in the reaction (Z 35), were stopped in the Ionisation Chamber, where their energy, atomic number (Z) and position were measured. Coincident light particles, were detected in the 192 element hodoscope placed behind the chamber, where its charge (Z) and energy were measured. Also the time of flight relative to the radio frequency of the cyclotron, allowed identification of protons deuterons and tritons.

  4. Gain Calibration of a Beta/Gamma Coincidence Spectrometer for Automated Radioxenon Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Reeder, Paul L.; Bowyer, Ted W.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Pitts, W. K.; Ringbom, Anders; Johansson, Cecilia

    2004-04-01

    Abstract Detection and measurement of atmospheric radioxenon is an important component of international monitoring systems for nuclear weapons testing. Monitoring stations separate xenon from air and perform isotopic analysis of the radioxenon. In one such radioxenon measurement scheme, the isotopes of interest are identified by coincident spectroscopy of electrons and photons in a bg coincidence spectrometer (BGCS). The b spectrometer is a plastic scintillator, produced as a cylindrical cell containing the separated xenon sample. This cell is surrounded by the NaI(Tl) g spectrometer. We report here the development of a calibration process for the BGCS suitable for use in remote sampling systems. This procedure is based upon g-ray Compton scattering, resulting in a true coincident signal in both detectors, generation of electrons over a wide energy range that matches the energy distribution of electrons from radioxenon decay, and a relative insensitivity to source location. Besides gain calibration, this procedure determines the resolution of the b detector as a function of energy.

  5. Development of a TES-Based Anti-Coincidence Detector for Future X-ray Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Microcalorimeters onboard future x-ray observatories require an anti-coincidence detector to remove environmental backgrounds. In order to most effectively integrate this anticoincidence detector with the main microcalorimeter array, both instruments should use similar read-out technology. The detectors used in the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) use a phonon measurement technique that is well suited for an anti-coincidence detector with a microcalorimeter array using SQUID readout. This technique works by using a transition-edge sensor (TES) connected to superconducting collection fins to measure the athermal phonon signal produced when an event occurs in the substrate crystal. Energy from the event propagates through the crystal to the superconducting collection fins, creating quasiparticles, which are then trapped as they enter the TES where they produce a signal. We are currently developing a prototype anti-coincidence detector for future x-ray missions and have recently fabricated test devices with Mo/Au TESs and Al collection fins. We will present results from the first tests of these devices which indicate a proof of concept that quasiparticle trapping is occurring in these materials.

  6. Development of a TES-Based Anti-Coincidence Detector for Future X-Ray Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Catherine N.; Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S. R.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. J.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Sultana, M.

    2012-01-01

    Microcalorimeters onboard future x-ray observatories require an anticoincidence detector to remove environmental backgrounds. In order to most effectively integrate this anti-coincidence detector with the main microcalorimeter array, both instruments should use similar read-out technology. The detectors used in the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) use a phonon measurement technique that is well suited for an anti-coincidence detector with a microcalorimeter array using SQUID readout. This technique works by using a transition-edge sensor (TES) connected to superconducting collection fins to measure the athermal phonon signal produced when an event occurs in the substrate crystal. Energy from the event propagates through the crystal to the superconducting collection fins, creating quasiparticles, which are then trapped as they enter the TES where they produce a signal. We are currently developing a prototype anti-coincidence detector for future x-ray missions and have recently fabricated test devices with Mo/Au TESs and Al collection fins. We present results from the first tests of these devices which indicate a proof of concept that quasiparticle trapping is occurring in these materials.

  7. A study on a coincidence phenomenon in building partitions using Laser Doppler Vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolejko, Romuald

    2012-06-01

    In the paper results of vibrations measurements of the partitions with finished dimensions done in anechoic environment using scanning laser Doppler vibrometer are presented. It has allowed presentation a complex pattern of vibration and flow of vibration energy caused by bending waves in a partition at coincidence frequencies. A study was done for homogenous aluminum plates, aluminum plate with damping coatings and double-leaf partition composed by aluminum plates with different thickness. It was demonstrated that magnitude and pattern of vibration of each leafs of the double partition is correlated in specific way. The influence of structural modifications (stiffeners) and damping coating of a partition on its vibration and sound insulation was discussed. It was shown that such partition modification could decrease an effect of the coincidence on sound transmission through a partition.

  8. A mechanism for neuronal coincidence revealed in the crayfish antennule

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, DeForest; Christison-Lagay, Kate

    2008-01-01

    Startle reflexes employ specialized neuronal circuits and synaptic features for rapid transmission of information from sense organs to responding muscles. Successful excitation of these pathways requires the coincidence of sensory input at central synaptic contacts with giant fiber targets. Here we describe a pathway feature in the crayfish tailflip reflex: A position-dependent linear gradation in sensory axonal conduction velocities that can ensure the coincident arrival of impulses from near-field hydrodynamic sensilla along the crayfish antennules at their synaptic contacts with central nervous elements that drive startle behavior. This provides a previously unexplored mechanism to ensure optimum responses to sudden threatening stimuli. Preliminary findings indicate that axons supplying distally located sensilla increase their diameters at least ten-fold along the antennular flagella and raise the possibility that more modest, graduated, diameter changes in axons originating from progressively more proximal sensilla along the antennule underlie the observed modifications in axonal conduction velocity. PMID:18794524

  9. Anti-anthropic solutions to the cosmic coincidence problem

    SciTech Connect

    Fedrow, Joseph M.; Griest, Kim E-mail: kgriest@ucsd.edu

    2014-01-01

    A cosmological constant fits all current dark energy data, but requires two extreme fine tunings, both of which are currently explained by anthropic arguments. Here we discuss anti-anthropic solutions to one of these problems: the cosmic coincidence problem- that today the dark energy density is nearly equal to the matter density. We replace the ensemble of Universes used in the anthropic solution with an ensemble of tracking scalar fields that do not require fine-tuning. This not only does away with the coincidence problem, but also allows for a Universe that has a very different future than the one currently predicted by a cosmological constant. These models also allow for transient periods of significant scalar field energy (SSFE) over the history of the Universe that can give very different observational signatures as compared with a cosmological constant, and so can be confirmed or disproved in current and upcoming experiments.

  10. A new opportunity: coincident spectroscopy in neutron-deficient actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gothe, Oliver; Gates, J. M.; Gregorich, K. E.; Baartman, B.; Fallon, P.; Esker, N. E.; Kwarsick, J.; Machiavelli, A. O.; Mudder, P. R.; Olive, D. T.; Pang, G.; Rissanen, J.; Nitsche, H.

    2014-09-01

    Due to high γ-ray background rates heavy element production facilities are usually not sensitive to the electron capture decay of neutron deficient actinides. We have developed new capabilities at the Berkeley Gas Filled Separator (BGS) that allow us to study these isotopes. The highly selective and efficient separation of compound nucleus evaporation residue products using the BGS couple with a rapid delivery to a low-background detector facility, opens up many new possibilities for nuclear decay and structure studies in the neutron deficient actinides. The decay of these actinides produces vacancies in the K-shell resulting in x-rays uniquely identifying the Z of the decay products. We present the first results of this new methodology in studying the nuclear structure of fermium-254 by observing the gamma rays in coincidence with fermium x-rays. Coincident gamma-decay spectroscopy gives us a new tool to study the nuclear structure of previously inaccessible systems.

  11. System for monitoring non-coincident, nonstationary process signals

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Wegerich, Stephan W.

    2005-01-04

    An improved system for monitoring non-coincident, non-stationary, process signals. The mean, variance, and length of a reference signal is defined by an automated system, followed by the identification of the leading and falling edges of a monitored signal and the length of the monitored signal. The monitored signal is compared to the reference signal, and the monitored signal is resampled in accordance with the reference signal. The reference signal is then correlated with the resampled monitored signal such that the reference signal and the resampled monitored signal are coincident in time with each other. The resampled monitored signal is then compared to the reference signal to determine whether the resampled monitored signal is within a set of predesignated operating conditions.

  12. Coincidence probabilities for spacecraft gravitational wave experiments - Massive coalescing binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinto, Massimo; Armstrong, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    Massive coalescing binary systems are candidate sources of gravitational radiation in the millihertz frequency band accessible to spacecraft Doppler tracking experiments. This paper discusses signal processing and detection probability for waves from coalescing binaries in the regime where the signal frequency increases linearly with time, i.e., 'chirp' signals. Using known noise statistics, thresholds with given false alarm probabilities are established for one- and two-spacecraft experiments. Given the threshold, the detection probability is calculated as a function of gravitational wave amplitude for both one- and two-spacecraft experiments, assuming random polarization states and under various assumptions about wave directions. This allows quantitative statements about the detection efficiency of these experiments and the utility of coincidence experiments. In particular, coincidence probabilities for two-spacecraft experiments are insensitive to the angle between the directions to the two spacecraft, indicating that near-optical experiments can be done without constraints on spacecraft trajectories.

  13. A coincidence of addiction to "Kratom" and severe primary hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Sheleg, Sergey V; Collins, Gregory B

    2011-12-01

    Here we present a case of a coincidence of addiction to "Kratom" (botanically known as Mitragyna speciosa Korth) and developed severe primary hypothyroidism. We are discussing a possibility that high dose of indole alkaloid mitragynine (the major alkaloid identified from "Kratom") might reduce the normal response of the thyroid gland to thyroid-stimulating hormone resulting in primary hypothyroidism. Further experimental investigations of mitragynine as a possible suppressor of thyroid gland function would be a matter of interest. PMID:21817918

  14. The 8 Coincidences of Galaxy Photometry - Selection Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disney, M. J.; Phillipps, S.

    When the photometric properties of significant numbers of galaxies are compared, eight remarkable coincidences turn up. No convincing explanation for these have appeared so far. However, it may be that they can all be explained through a single powerful selection effect which brings into prominence only galaxies of certain favourable surface brightnesses. If that is the case, then our current understanding of galaxy populations is a delusion, and there must be many more galaxies about than we presently assume.

  15. Glyphosate applications on arable fields considerably coincide with migrating amphibians.

    PubMed

    Berger, Gert; Graef, Frieder; Pfeffer, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Glyphosate usage is increasing worldwide and the application schemes of this herbicide are currently changing. Amphibians migrating through arable fields may be harmed by Glyphosate applied to field crops. We investigated the population-based temporal coincidence of four amphibian species with Glyphosate from 2006 to 2008. Depending on a) age- and species-specific main migration periods, b) crop species, c) Glyphosate application mode for crops, and d) the presumed DT50 value (12 days or 47 days) of Glyphosate, we calculated up to 100% coincidence with Glyphosate. The amphibians regularly co-occur with pre-sowing/pre-emerging Glyphosate applications to maize in spring and with stubble management prior to crop sowing in late summer and autumn. Siccation treatment in summer coincides only with early pond-leaving juveniles. We suggest in-depth investigations of both acute and long-term effects of Glyphosate applications on amphibian populations not only focussed on exposure during aquatic periods but also terrestrial life stages.

  16. Neural mechanisms of timing control in a coincident timing task.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Hiroaki; Sommer, Werner; Takasawa, Noriyoshi; Yamazaki, Katuo

    2012-04-01

    Many ball sports such as tennis or baseball require precise temporal anticipation of both sensory input and motor output (i.e., receptor anticipation and effector anticipation, respectively) and close performance monitoring. We investigated the neural mechanisms underlying timing control and performance monitoring in a coincident timing task involving both types of anticipations. Peak force for two time-to-peak force (TTP) conditions-recorded with a force-sensitive key-was required to coincide with a specific position of a stimulus rotating either slow or fast on a clock face while the contingent negative variation (CNV) and the motor-elicited negativity were recorded. Absolute timing error was generally smaller for short TTP (high velocity) conditions. CNV amplitudes increased with both faster stimulus velocity and longer TTPs possibly reflecting increased motor programming efforts. In addition, the motor-elicited negativity was largest in the slow stimulus/short TTP condition, probably representing some forms of performance monitoring as well as shorter response duration. Our findings indicate that the coincident timing task is a good model for real-life situations of tool use. PMID:22415201

  17. Neural mechanisms of timing control in a coincident timing task.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Hiroaki; Sommer, Werner; Takasawa, Noriyoshi; Yamazaki, Katuo

    2012-04-01

    Many ball sports such as tennis or baseball require precise temporal anticipation of both sensory input and motor output (i.e., receptor anticipation and effector anticipation, respectively) and close performance monitoring. We investigated the neural mechanisms underlying timing control and performance monitoring in a coincident timing task involving both types of anticipations. Peak force for two time-to-peak force (TTP) conditions-recorded with a force-sensitive key-was required to coincide with a specific position of a stimulus rotating either slow or fast on a clock face while the contingent negative variation (CNV) and the motor-elicited negativity were recorded. Absolute timing error was generally smaller for short TTP (high velocity) conditions. CNV amplitudes increased with both faster stimulus velocity and longer TTPs possibly reflecting increased motor programming efforts. In addition, the motor-elicited negativity was largest in the slow stimulus/short TTP condition, probably representing some forms of performance monitoring as well as shorter response duration. Our findings indicate that the coincident timing task is a good model for real-life situations of tool use.

  18. Volcanism, impact and mass extinctions: incredible or credible coincidences?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Rosalind V.; Saunders, Andrew D.

    2005-02-01

    Massive continental volcanism and/or bolide impacts are considered by many authors to have caused three major mass extinction events during the last 300 million years: the end-Permian, end-Cretaceous and end-Triassic extinctions. However, re-evaluation of the frequency of bolide impacts and plume-related flood basalt provinces indicates that both types of event occur much more frequently than mass extinctions, and so, in isolation, may not be responsible for the largest extinctions. Furthermore, the kill mechanisms associated with either flood basalts or impacts do not appear to be sufficiently powerful to cause worldwide collapse of ecosystems leading to the largest mass extinctions. Contemporaneous flood basalts and bolide impact may be prerequisites for the largest mass extinctions. We present a statistical analysis of the probability of coincidence between volcanism and impact, and show that three random coincidences of these events in the last 300 m.y. are likely. No causal relationship between impact and volcanism is necessary. The lesser mass extinctions, on the other hand, may not require juxtaposition of two such catastrophic events; such coincidences occurring on more than three occasions during the last 300 m.y. become increasingly unlikely.

  19. DIVERSE ACTIVE WELL NEUTRON COINCIDENCE COUNTER UTILITY AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R; Saleem Salaymeh, S

    2007-01-08

    In this paper we describe use of the Aquila active well neutron coincidence counter for nuclear material assays of {sup 235}U in multiple analytical techniques at Savannah River Site (SRS), at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and at Argonne West National Laboratory (AWNL). The uses include as a portable passive neutron counter for field measurements searching for evidence of {sup 252}Cf deposits and storage; as a portable active neutron counter using an external activation source for field measurements searching for trace {sup 235}U deposits and holdup; for verification measurements of U-Al reactor fuel elements; for verification measurements of uranium metal; and for verification measurements of process waste of impure uranium in a challenging cement matrix. The wide variety of uses described demonstrate utility of the technique for neutron coincidence verification measurements over the dynamic ranges of 100 g-5000 g for U metal, 200 g-1300 g for U-Al, and 8 g-35 g for process waste. In addition to demonstrating use of the instrument in both the passive and active modes, we also demonstrate its use in both the fast and thermal neutron modes.

  20. Frequencies of mutagen-induced coincident mitotic recombination at unlinked loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Kathryn M; Hoffmann, George R

    2007-03-01

    Frequencies of coincident genetic events were measured in strain D7 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This diploid strain permits the detection of mitotic gene conversion involving the trp5-12 and trp5-27 alleles, mitotic crossing-over and gene conversion leading to the expression of the ade2-40 and ade2-119 alleles as red and pink colonies, and reversion of the ilv1-92 allele. The three genes are on different chromosomes, and one might expect that coincident (simultaneous) genetic alterations at two loci would occur at frequencies predicted by those of the single alterations acting as independent events. Contrary to this expectation, we observed that ade2 recombinants induced by bleomycin, beta-propiolactone, and ultraviolet radiation occur more frequently among trp5 convertants than among total colonies. This excess among trp5 recombinants indicates that double recombinants are more common than expected for independent events. No similar enrichment was found among Ilv(+) revertants. The possibility of an artifact in which haploid yeasts that mimic mitotic recombinants are generated by a low frequency of cryptic meiosis has been excluded. Several hypotheses that can explain the elevated incidence of coincident mitotic recombination have been evaluated, but the cause remains uncertain. Most evidence suggests that the excess is ascribable to a subset of the population being in a recombination-prone state. PMID:17156798

  1. Imaging photoelectron circular dichroism of chiral molecules by femtosecond multiphoton coincidence detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, C. Stefan; Ram, N. Bhargava; Powis, Ivan; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2013-12-01

    Here, we provide a detailed account of novel experiments employing electron-ion coincidence imaging to discriminate chiral molecules. The full three-dimensional angular scattering distribution of electrons is measured after photoexcitation with either left or right circular polarized light. The experiment is performed using a simplified photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging setup employing only a single particle imaging detector. Results are reported applying this technique to enantiomers of the chiral molecule camphor after three-photon ionization by circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses at 400 nm and 380 nm. The electron-ion coincidence imaging provides the photoelectron spectrum of mass-selected ions that are observed in the time-of-flight mass spectra. The coincident photoelectron spectra of the parent camphor ion and the various fragment ions are the same, so it can be concluded that fragmentation of camphor happens after ionization. We discuss the forward-backward asymmetry in the photoelectron angular distribution which is expressed in Legendre polynomials with moments up to order six. Furthermore, we present a method, similar to one-photon electron circular dichroism, to quantify the strength of the chiral electron asymmetry in a single parameter. The circular dichroism in the photoelectron angular distribution of camphor is measured to be 8% at 400 nm. The electron circular dichroism using femtosecond multiphoton excitation is of opposite sign and about 60% larger than the electron dichroism observed before in near-threshold one-photon ionization with synchrotron excitation. We interpret our multiphoton ionization as being resonant at the two-photon level with the 3s and 3p Rydberg states of camphor. Theoretical calculations are presented that model the photoelectron angular distribution from a prealigned camphor molecule using density functional theory and continuum multiple scattering X alpha photoelectron scattering calculations

  2. Imaging photoelectron circular dichroism of chiral molecules by femtosecond multiphoton coincidence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, C. Stefan; Ram, N. Bhargava; Janssen, Maurice H. M.; Powis, Ivan

    2013-12-21

    Here, we provide a detailed account of novel experiments employing electron-ion coincidence imaging to discriminate chiral molecules. The full three-dimensional angular scattering distribution of electrons is measured after photoexcitation with either left or right circular polarized light. The experiment is performed using a simplified photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging setup employing only a single particle imaging detector. Results are reported applying this technique to enantiomers of the chiral molecule camphor after three-photon ionization by circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses at 400 nm and 380 nm. The electron-ion coincidence imaging provides the photoelectron spectrum of mass-selected ions that are observed in the time-of-flight mass spectra. The coincident photoelectron spectra of the parent camphor ion and the various fragment ions are the same, so it can be concluded that fragmentation of camphor happens after ionization. We discuss the forward-backward asymmetry in the photoelectron angular distribution which is expressed in Legendre polynomials with moments up to order six. Furthermore, we present a method, similar to one-photon electron circular dichroism, to quantify the strength of the chiral electron asymmetry in a single parameter. The circular dichroism in the photoelectron angular distribution of camphor is measured to be 8% at 400 nm. The electron circular dichroism using femtosecond multiphoton excitation is of opposite sign and about 60% larger than the electron dichroism observed before in near-threshold one-photon ionization with synchrotron excitation. We interpret our multiphoton ionization as being resonant at the two-photon level with the 3s and 3p Rydberg states of camphor. Theoretical calculations are presented that model the photoelectron angular distribution from a prealigned camphor molecule using density functional theory and continuum multiple scattering X alpha photoelectron scattering calculations

  3. Verification of light & radiation field coincidence quality assurance for radiation therapy by using a-Se based DR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Young; Park, Eun-Tae; Choi, Yun-Seon; Cho, Heung-Lae; Ahn, Ki-Jung; Park, Sung-Kwang; Kim, Ji-Na; Suh, Tae-Suk; Kim, Jin-Seon; Hong, Ju-Yeon; Park, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Kyo-Tae; Oh, Kyung-Min; Kim, Hyunjung; Jo, Sun-Mi; Oh, Won-Yong; Jin, Seong-Jin; Cho, Woong

    2015-04-01

    Currently, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) recommends measuring the surface field size once a week by using an analog film in order to verify light and radiation field coincidence in the Quality Assurance (QA) of radiotherapy. However, the use of the film does not allow for a quantitative method of evaluation, and measuring the light field with radiation field detectors in a 2D array is difficult. Therefore, we used an amorphous-Se (a-Se) digital radiation detection system to measure the light and radiation fields simultaneously for a quantitative QA system, and the feasibility of using such a system was confirmed by ensuring the coincidence of the light and the radiation field measurements. The characteristics of the analog film and the a-Se digital radiation detection system were compared by delivering to each doses of 100, 10 monitor units(MU) of radiation at a rate of 400 MU/min to a radiation field 100 × 100 mm2 in size from a 100 cm source-surface distance (SSD). A 0.5 mm to 0.6 mm difference was measured in the X-axis, and a 0.3 mm difference was measured in the Y-axis. The difference in the measurements of the coincidence of light and the radiation field was less than 0.3 mm, which is relatively insignificant. These results indicate that the use of an a-Se digital radiation detection system is adequate for quality assurance of radiotherapy using light and radiation field coincidence. In addition, the experiment is considered to have provided valuable results in that the a-Se based digital radiation detection system enables simple and accurate QA for clinical radiation therapy by assessing the coincidence in the alignment of the light and the radiation fields.

  4. Mass spectrometric analysis with cluster projectiles and coincidence counting

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.D.

    1992-01-01

    Methods for maximizing the amount of secondary ion information, per primary projectile, are described. The method is based on time-of-flight mass spectrometry and event-by-event coincidence counting. The information obtained from coincidence counting time-of-flight mass spectrometry includes: (a) surface composition, (b) relative concentrations, and (c) degree of intermolecular mixing. The technique was applied to the study of an important new class of polymers: polymer blends. Secondary ion mass spectrometry, when applied to the analysis of synthetic polymers, induces backbone fragmentation which is characteristic of the homopolymer. The characteristic fingerprint peaks from polystyrene and poly(vinyl methyl ether) were used to identify the presence of these two polymers in a polymer blend. The percent coincidence between the characteristic secondary ions from each component of the blend were used to determine both the relative concentration and the degree of molecular mixing. Results indicate molecular segregation of the two polymers on the film surface. The largest degree of segregation was determined for the phase separated blends. The performance of this technique depends on the desorption efficiency of the primary projectiles. In practice one seeks primary ions which are surface sensitive, have controllable parameters such as size, velocity, and charge state, and generate high secondary ion yields. Focus was placed on the use of keV organic cluster projectiles to meet these criteria. Of interest to this study were C[sub 18] (chrysene), C[sub 24] (coronene), and C[sub 60] (buckminster-fulleren). Results indicate enhanced secondary ion yields for C[sub 60]. For example, when CsI is bombarded with 30 keV C[sub 60], the yields for I[sup [minus

  5. High-level neutron coincidence counter maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect

    Swansen, J.; Collinsworth, P.

    1983-05-01

    High-level neutron coincidence counter operational (field) calibration and usage is well known. This manual makes explicit basic (shop) check-out, calibration, and testing of new units and is a guide for repair of failed in-service units. Operational criteria for the major electronic functions are detailed, as are adjustments and calibration procedures, and recurrent mechanical/electromechanical problems are addressed. Some system tests are included for quality assurance. Data on nonstandard large-scale integrated (circuit) components and a schematic set are also included.

  6. Enhanced PET resolution by combining pinhole collimation and coincidence detection.

    PubMed

    DiFilippo, Frank P

    2015-10-21

    Spatial resolution of clinical PET scanners is limited by detector design and photon non-colinearity. Although dedicated small animal PET scanners using specialized high-resolution detectors have been developed, enhancing the spatial resolution of clinical PET scanners is of interest as a more available alternative. Multi-pinhole 511 keV SPECT is capable of high spatial resolution but requires heavily shielded collimators to avoid significant background counts. A practical approach with clinical PET detectors is to combine multi-pinhole collimation with coincidence detection. In this new hybrid modality, there are three locations associated with each event, namely those of the two detected photons and the pinhole aperture. These three locations over-determine the line of response and provide redundant information that is superior to coincidence detection or pinhole collimation alone. Multi-pinhole collimation provides high resolution and avoids non-colinearity error but is subject to collimator penetration and artifacts from overlapping projections. However the coincidence information, though at lower resolution, is valuable for determining whether the photon passed near a pinhole within the cone acceptance angle and for identifying through which pinhole the photon passed. This information allows most photons penetrating through the collimator to be rejected and avoids overlapping projections. With much improved event rejection, a collimator with minimal shielding may be used, and a lightweight add-on collimator for high resolution imaging is feasible for use with a clinical PET scanner. Monte Carlo simulations were performed of a (18)F hot rods phantom and a 54-pinhole unfocused whole-body mouse collimator with a clinical PET scanner. Based on coincidence information and pinhole geometry, events were accepted or rejected, and pinhole-specific crystal-map projections were generated. Tomographic images then were reconstructed using a conventional pinhole SPECT

  7. Coincident systemic lupus erythematosus and psoriasis vulgaris: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Da, G; Yu, Y; Han, J; Li, H

    2015-12-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is an autoimmune chronic inflammatory skin disease, but its association with other typical autoimmune disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus has only occasionally been reported. We presented a 25-year-old female who developed systemic lupus erythematosus associated with psoriasis vulgaris. Her conditions were in good control after she got administration of prednisolone (5 mg/day) and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook (20 mg/day). It is necessary to integrate past history and physical examination to diagnose coincident SLE and psoriasis, and combined treatment with prednisolone and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook proves effective.

  8. Growth hormone producing prolactinoma in juvenile cystinosis: a simple coincidence?

    PubMed Central

    Besouw, Martine T. P.; Willemsen, Michèl A. A. P.; Noordam, Kees

    2007-01-01

    Juvenile cystinosis was diagnosed in a patient who presented with severe headache attacks and photophobia. Treatment with oral cysteamine and topical cysteamine eye drops was started. One-and-a-half years later, he developed unilateral gynecomastia and elevated prolactin and growth hormone levels. A pituitary macroprolactinoma was discovered and successfully treated with the dopamine agonist cabergoline. Increased serum growth hormone levels were attributed to enhanced growth hormone production by the prolactinoma and somatostatin inhibition by cysteamine. Although the occurrence of prolactinoma in this patient could be a simple coincidence, it might also be a rare yet unrecognised complication of cystinosis. PMID:17638022

  9. An alpha–gamma coincidence spectrometer based on the Photon–Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALS®) system

    DOE PAGES

    Cadieux, J. R.; Fugate, G. A.; King, III, G. S.

    2015-02-07

    Here, an alpha–gamma coincidence spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of selected actinide isotopes in the presence of high beta/gamma fields. The system is based on a PERALS® liquid scintillation counter for beta/alpha discrimination and was successfully tested with both high purity germanium and bismuth germanate, gamma-ray detectors using conventional analog electronics.

  10. Improved β-γ Coincidence Detector For Radioxenon Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Matthew W; Carman, April J; Hayes, James C; Heimbigner, Tom R; Hubbard, Charles W; Litke, Kevin E; McIntyre, Justin I; Morris, Scott J; Ripplinger, Michael D; Suarez, Reynold

    2005-08-31

    The Automated Radio-xenon Analyzer/Sampler (ARSA), built by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), can collect and detect several radioxenon isotopes. ARSA is very sensitive to 133Xe, 131mXe, 133mXe and 135Xe due to the compact high efficiency coincidence detector it uses. For this reason it is an excellent treaty monitoring and environmental sampling device. Although the system is shown to be both robust and reliable, based on several field tests, it is also complex due to a detailed photomultiplier tube gain matching regime. This complexity is a problem from a maintenance and quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) standpoint. To reduce these issues a simplified coincident detector has been developed. A comparison of three different well detectors has been completed. In addition, a new plastic scintillator gas cell was constructed. The new simplified detector system has been demonstrated to equal or better performance compared with the original ARSA design in spectral resolution and efficiency and significantly easier to setup and calibrate.

  11. Coincidently Searching for Gravitational Waves and Low Frequency Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavic, Michael; Yancey, C.; Shawhan, P. S.; Cutchin, S.; Simonetti, J. H.; Bear, B.; Tsai, J.

    2014-01-01

    The transient sky has become an important area of astrophysical study, especially with the appearance of recent fast transients, but little is known about the sources of these transients. One possible approach which can shed light on this area is multi-messenger astronomy using gravitational waves and prompt emission meter-wavelength radio to observe fast transients. This is made possible with gravitational-wave detectors such as LIGO, VIRGO, and GEO (IndIGO and KAGRA proposed or under construction) and phased-array radio-telescopes such LWA, LOFAR, LoFASM, and MWA. This talk presents a method for coincidence of gravitational wave and meter-wavelength radio observations to enable multi-messenger astronomy and discusses the optimization of gravitational-wave and radio sensitivities to attain effective combined observational sensitivities. It is shown that coincidence provides a 52.9% increase to the sensitivity distance for LIGO and a 200% increase to the SNR of radio arrays for particular cases.

  12. Cross-correlation in the auditory coincidence detectors of owls.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Brian J; Christianson, G Björn; Peña, José Luis

    2008-08-01

    Interaural time difference (ITD) plays a central role in many auditory functions, most importantly in sound localization. The classic model for how ITD is computed was put forth by Jeffress (1948). One of the predictions of the Jeffress model is that the neurons that compute ITD should behave as cross-correlators. Whereas cross-correlation-like properties of the ITD-computing neurons have been reported, attempts to show that the shape of the ITD response function is determined by the spectral tuning of the neuron, a core prediction of cross-correlation, have been unsuccessful. Using reverse correlation analysis, we demonstrate in the barn owl that the relationship between the spectral tuning and the ITD response of the ITD-computing neurons is that predicted by cross-correlation. Moreover, we show that a model of coincidence detector responses derived from responses to binaurally uncorrelated noise is consistent with binaural interaction based on cross-correlation. These results are thus consistent with one of the key tenets of the Jeffress model. Our work sets forth both the methodology to answer whether cross-correlation describes coincidence detector responses and a demonstration that in the barn owl, the result is that expected by theory. PMID:18685035

  13. Coincidence-anticipation timing requirements are different in racket sports.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Selçuk; Devrilmez, Erhan; Kirazci, Sadettin

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the coincidence-anticipation timing accuracy of athletes of different racket sports with various stimulus velocity requirements. Ninety players (15 girls, 15 boys for each sport) from tennis (M age = 12.4 yr., SD = 1.4), badminton (M age = 12.5 yr., SD = 1.4), and table tennis (M age = 12.4 yr., SD = 1.2) participated in this study. Three different stimulus velocities, low, moderate, and high, were used to simulate the velocity requirements of these racket sports. Tennis players had higher accuracy when they performed under the low stimulus velocity compared to badminton and table tennis players. Badminton players performed better under the moderate speed comparing to tennis and table tennis players. Table tennis players had better performance than tennis and badminton players under the high stimulus velocity. Therefore, visual and motor systems of players from different racket sports may adapt to a stimulus velocity in coincidence-anticipation timing, which is specific to each type of racket sports.

  14. TYPE III EXCITABILITY, SLOPE SENSITIVITY AND COINCIDENCE DETECTION

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangying; Huguet, Gemma; Rinzel, John

    2013-01-01

    Some neurons in the nervous system do not show repetitive firing for steady currents. For time-varying inputs, they fire once if the input rise is fast enough. This property of phasic firing is known as Type III excitability. Type III excitability has been observed in neurons in the auditory brainstem (MSO), which show strong phase-locking and accurate coincidence detection. In this paper, we consider a Hodgkin-Huxley type model (RM03) that is widely-used for phasic MSO neurons and we compare it with a modification of it, showing tonic behavior. We provide insight into the temporal processing of these neuron models by means of developing and analyzing two reduced models that reproduce qualitatively the properties of the exemplar ones. The geometric and mathematical analysis of the reduced models allows us to detect and quantify relevant features for the temporal computation such as nearness to threshold and a temporal integration window. Our results underscore the importance of Type III excitability for precise coincidence detection. PMID:23667306

  15. Optimization of a coincidence system using plastic scintillators in 4pi geometry.

    PubMed

    Dias, M S; Piuvezam-Filho, H; Koskinas, M F

    2008-01-01

    Improvements recently developed at the Nuclear Metrology Laboratory of IPEN-CNEN/SP in São Paulo were performed in order to increase the detector efficiency of a 4pibeta-gamma coincidence primary system using plastic scintillators in 4pi geometry. Measurements were undertaken and compared to the original system and Monte Carlo simulations of the extrapolation curves were calculated for this new system and compared to experimental results. For this purpose, the code Penelope was applied for calculating response functions for each detector and the code Esquema, developed at LMN, was used for simulating the decay scheme processes.

  16. Hydrogen analysis for granite using proton-proton elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Komatsubara, T; Sasa, K; Ohshima, H; Kimura, H; Tajima, Y; Takahashi, T; Ishii, S; Yamato, Y; Kurosawa, M

    2008-07-01

    In an effort to develop DS02, a new radiation dosimetry system for the atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, measurements of neutron-induced activities have provided valuable information to reconstruct the radiation situation at the time of the bombings. In Hiroshima, the depth profile of (152)Eu activity measured in a granite pillar of the Motoyasu Bridge (128 m from the hypocenter) was compared with that calculated using the DS02 methodology. For calculation of the (152)Eu production due to the thermal-neutron activation reaction, (151)Eu(n,gamma)(152)Eu, information on the hydrogen content in granite is important because the transport and slowing-down process of neutrons penetrating into the pillar is strongly affected by collisions with the protons of hydrogen. In this study, proton-proton elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry has been used to deduce the proton density in the Motoyasu pillar granite. Slices of granite samples were irradiated by a 20 MeV proton beam, and the energies of scattered and recoil protons were measured with a coincidence method. The water concentration in the pillar granite was evaluated to be 0.30 +/- 0.07%wt. This result is consistent with earlier data on adsorptive water (II) and bound water obtained by the Karl Fisher method. PMID:18509666

  17. Hydrogen analysis for granite using proton-proton elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Komatsubara, T; Sasa, K; Ohshima, H; Kimura, H; Tajima, Y; Takahashi, T; Ishii, S; Yamato, Y; Kurosawa, M

    2008-07-01

    In an effort to develop DS02, a new radiation dosimetry system for the atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, measurements of neutron-induced activities have provided valuable information to reconstruct the radiation situation at the time of the bombings. In Hiroshima, the depth profile of (152)Eu activity measured in a granite pillar of the Motoyasu Bridge (128 m from the hypocenter) was compared with that calculated using the DS02 methodology. For calculation of the (152)Eu production due to the thermal-neutron activation reaction, (151)Eu(n,gamma)(152)Eu, information on the hydrogen content in granite is important because the transport and slowing-down process of neutrons penetrating into the pillar is strongly affected by collisions with the protons of hydrogen. In this study, proton-proton elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry has been used to deduce the proton density in the Motoyasu pillar granite. Slices of granite samples were irradiated by a 20 MeV proton beam, and the energies of scattered and recoil protons were measured with a coincidence method. The water concentration in the pillar granite was evaluated to be 0.30 +/- 0.07%wt. This result is consistent with earlier data on adsorptive water (II) and bound water obtained by the Karl Fisher method.

  18. Determination of the 242Pu Branching Ratio via Alpha-Gamma Coincidence

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T F

    2012-05-24

    When the burn-up is high, the {sup 242}Pu isotopic content becomes more important. The traditional correlation method will fail. The {sup 242}Pu isotopic content in the sample plays an essential role if the neutron coincidence method is used to quantify the total amount of plutonium. In one of the earlier measurements we had a chance to measure an isotopic pure (> 99.95 %) {sup 242}Pu thick sample and realized that the difference in the branching ratio (BR) value among current nuclear data3) for the two important gamma-rays at 103.5-keV and 158.8-keV. In this study, the thick sample was counted on a 15% ORTEC safeguards type HPGe to further improve BR determination of the 159-keV gamma-ray. Furthermore, we have made a thin {sup 242}Pu sample from the thick sample and performed alpha-gamma coincidence measurements. Our preliminary gamma-ray BR results are 4.37(6) E-4, 2.79(8) E-5, and 2.25(8) E-6 for 44.9-keV, 103.5-keV, and 158.9-keV, respectively.

  19. A simultaneous beta and coincidence-gamma imaging system for plant leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, Homayoon; Wen, Jie; Mathews, Aswin J.; Komarov, Sergey; Wang, Qiang; Li, Ke; O’Sullivan, Joseph A.; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2016-05-01

    Positron emitting isotopes, such as 11C, 13N, and 18F, can be used to label molecules. The tracers, such as 11CO2, are delivered to plants to study their biological processes, particularly metabolism and photosynthesis, which may contribute to the development of plants that have a higher yield of crops and biomass. Measurements and resulting images from PET scanners are not quantitative in young plant structures or in plant leaves due to poor positron annihilation in thin objects. To address this problem we have designed, assembled, modeled, and tested a nuclear imaging system (simultaneous beta–gamma imager). The imager can simultaneously detect positrons ({β+} ) and coincidence-gamma rays (γ). The imaging system employs two planar detectors; one is a regular gamma detector which has a LYSO crystal array, and the other is a phoswich detector which has an additional BC-404 plastic scintillator for beta detection. A forward model for positrons is proposed along with a joint image reconstruction formulation to utilize the beta and coincidence-gamma measurements for estimating radioactivity distribution in plant leaves. The joint reconstruction algorithm first reconstructs beta and gamma images independently to estimate the thickness component of the beta forward model and afterward jointly estimates the radioactivity distribution in the object. We have validated the physics model and reconstruction framework through a phantom imaging study and imaging a tomato leaf that has absorbed 11CO2. The results demonstrate that the simultaneously acquired beta and coincidence-gamma data, combined with our proposed joint reconstruction algorithm, improved the quantitative accuracy of estimating radioactivity distribution in thin objects such as leaves. We used the structural similarity (SSIM) index for comparing the leaf images from the simultaneous beta–gamma imager with the ground truth image. The jointly reconstructed images yield SSIM indices of 0.69 and 0.63, whereas

  20. Development of membrane conductance improves coincidence detection in the nucleus laminaris of the chicken

    PubMed Central

    Kuba, Hiroshi; Koyano, Konomi; Ohmori, Harunori

    2002-01-01

    Coincidence detection at the nucleus laminaris (NL) of a chicken was improved between embryos (embryonic days (E) 16 and 17) and chicks (post-hatch days (P) 2–7) in slice preparations. Electrical stimuli were applied bilaterally to the projection fibres to the NL at various intervals. The response window corresponding to the temporal separation of electrical stimuli that resulted in half-maximal firing probability was adopted as the measure of coincidence detection, and was narrower in chicks (1.4 ms) than in embryos (3.9 ms). Between these two ages, the membrane time constant of NL neurons was reduced from 18.4 to 3.2 ms and the membrane conductance was increased 5-fold, while no difference was measured in the input capacitance. Evoked EPSCs decayed slightly faster in chicks, while the size and the time course of miniature EPSCs were unchanged. Action potentials had lower thresholds and larger after-hyperpolarization in chicks than in embryos. Dendrotoxin-I depolarized cells and increased their input resistance significantly at both ages, eliminated the after-hyperpolarization, and delayed the decay phase of action potentials, indicative of the expression of low-threshold K+ channels. Cs+ hyperpolarized the cells, increased the input resistance and eliminated sags during hyperpolarization at both ages, while the hyperpolarization sag was affected by neither Ba2+ nor TEA. These data indicate the expression of hyperpolarization-activated cation channels. Between these two ages, the maximum conductance of low-threshold K+ channels increased 4-fold to about 16 nS, and hyperpolarization-activated channels increased 6-fold to about 10 nS. Improvement of coincidence detection correlated with the acceleration of the EPSP time course as a result of the increase of these conductances. PMID:11956341

  1. A simultaneous beta and coincidence-gamma imaging system for plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Homayoon; Wen, Jie; Mathews, Aswin J; Komarov, Sergey; Wang, Qiang; Li, Ke; O'Sullivan, Joseph A; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2016-05-01

    Positron emitting isotopes, such as (11)C, (13)N, and (18)F, can be used to label molecules. The tracers, such as (11)CO2, are delivered to plants to study their biological processes, particularly metabolism and photosynthesis, which may contribute to the development of plants that have a higher yield of crops and biomass. Measurements and resulting images from PET scanners are not quantitative in young plant structures or in plant leaves due to poor positron annihilation in thin objects. To address this problem we have designed, assembled, modeled, and tested a nuclear imaging system (simultaneous beta-gamma imager). The imager can simultaneously detect positrons ([Formula: see text]) and coincidence-gamma rays (γ). The imaging system employs two planar detectors; one is a regular gamma detector which has a LYSO crystal array, and the other is a phoswich detector which has an additional BC-404 plastic scintillator for beta detection. A forward model for positrons is proposed along with a joint image reconstruction formulation to utilize the beta and coincidence-gamma measurements for estimating radioactivity distribution in plant leaves. The joint reconstruction algorithm first reconstructs beta and gamma images independently to estimate the thickness component of the beta forward model and afterward jointly estimates the radioactivity distribution in the object. We have validated the physics model and reconstruction framework through a phantom imaging study and imaging a tomato leaf that has absorbed (11)CO2. The results demonstrate that the simultaneously acquired beta and coincidence-gamma data, combined with our proposed joint reconstruction algorithm, improved the quantitative accuracy of estimating radioactivity distribution in thin objects such as leaves. We used the structural similarity (SSIM) index for comparing the leaf images from the simultaneous beta-gamma imager with the ground truth image. The jointly reconstructed images yield SSIM indices of 0

  2. A simultaneous beta and coincidence-gamma imaging system for plant leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, Homayoon; Wen, Jie; Mathews, Aswin J.; Komarov, Sergey; Wang, Qiang; Li, Ke; O'Sullivan, Joseph A.; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2016-05-01

    Positron emitting isotopes, such as 11C, 13N, and 18F, can be used to label molecules. The tracers, such as 11CO2, are delivered to plants to study their biological processes, particularly metabolism and photosynthesis, which may contribute to the development of plants that have a higher yield of crops and biomass. Measurements and resulting images from PET scanners are not quantitative in young plant structures or in plant leaves due to poor positron annihilation in thin objects. To address this problem we have designed, assembled, modeled, and tested a nuclear imaging system (simultaneous beta-gamma imager). The imager can simultaneously detect positrons ({β+} ) and coincidence-gamma rays (γ). The imaging system employs two planar detectors; one is a regular gamma detector which has a LYSO crystal array, and the other is a phoswich detector which has an additional BC-404 plastic scintillator for beta detection. A forward model for positrons is proposed along with a joint image reconstruction formulation to utilize the beta and coincidence-gamma measurements for estimating radioactivity distribution in plant leaves. The joint reconstruction algorithm first reconstructs beta and gamma images independently to estimate the thickness component of the beta forward model and afterward jointly estimates the radioactivity distribution in the object. We have validated the physics model and reconstruction framework through a phantom imaging study and imaging a tomato leaf that has absorbed 11CO2. The results demonstrate that the simultaneously acquired beta and coincidence-gamma data, combined with our proposed joint reconstruction algorithm, improved the quantitative accuracy of estimating radioactivity distribution in thin objects such as leaves. We used the structural similarity (SSIM) index for comparing the leaf images from the simultaneous beta-gamma imager with the ground truth image. The jointly reconstructed images yield SSIM indices of 0.69 and 0.63, whereas the

  3. Standardization of 64Cu and 68Ga by the 4π(PC)β-γ coincidence method and calibration of the ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Sahagia, M; Luca, A; Antohe, A; Ivan, C

    2012-09-01

    The paper treats the application of the 4π(PC)β-γ coincidence method for the standardization of the radionuclides (64)Cu and (68)Ga. The general coincidence equations are written. Two types of extrapolation were described and used in measurement: the positron-annihilation coincidence, and the counting of all emitted radiations; both methods are compared with respect to results, advantages and drawbacks. The impurities' content correction was applied. The standardized solutions were used to calibrate the ionization chamber CENTRONIC IG12/20A and to determine the gamma-rays emission intensities.

  4. 2012 DA14 and Chelyabinsk: Same Day Coincidence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Clark R.

    2013-10-01

    A long anticipated near-miss by near-Earth asteroid (NEA) 2012 DA14 on 15 February 2013 was upstaged 16 hours earlier by the impact and atmospheric explosion of a ~20 m NEA over Chelyabinsk, Russia. DA14 was earlier estimated to be 45 m across and passage at a distance under geosynchronous satellites was considered to be a record close approach by an object of that size, a once-in-40-years event. Actual Earth impact by a 20 m NEA had been estimated to be a once-in-200-years event. A simplistic calculation gives a probability of these happening on the same day of 1-in-a-billion. Within hours of the Chelyabinsk impact, it was recognized and widely reported that the two asteroids were in very different orbits and could not, at least in any readily understandable way, be physically related to each other (e.g. fragments of the same precursor body). Also, some early reports suggested that the two asteroids had very different compositions, further undermining the possibility they were pieces of the same body. (It seems unlikely, though certainly conceivable, that the two NEAs could have different compositions yet have some kind of causal connection resulting in the same-day events.) Nevertheless, incredibly tiny probabilities beg for an explanation. Here, with the benefit of hindsight, I re-examine issues that affect the probabilities, such as size, albedo, probable composition, and numbers of NEAs of these sizes. I also consider difficult issues of framing the apparent coincidence, which dominate other uncertainties. Updated information about the physical nature of the two asteroids somewhat modifies the original estimates of probabilities. Moreover, more proper ways of framing elements of the coincidence considerably reduce the improbability of the same-day events, but not nearly to the level (e.g. 1-in-1000 or perhaps 1-in-10,000) where we could rationalize dismissing the events as “just a coincidence.” The events of 15 February 2013 deserve more sophisticated

  5. IXO-XMS LVSID Anti-Coincidence Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Scott F.; Kilbourne, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    This document describes a high-TRL backup implementation of the anti-coincidence detector for the IXO/XMS instrument. The backup detector, hereafter referred to as the low-voltage silicon ionization detector (LVSID), has been successfully flown on Astro-E2 (Suzaku)/XRS and is currently being implemented, without significant changes, on the Astro-H/SXS instrument. The LVSID anti-coincidence detector on Astro-E2/XRS operated successfully for almost 2 years, and was not affected by the loss of liquid helium in that instrument. The LVSID continues to operate after almost 5 years on-orbit (LEO, 550 km) but with slightly increased noise following the expected depletion of solid Neon after 22 months. The noise of the device is increased after the loss of sNe due to thermally induced bias and readout noise. No radiation damage, or off-nominal affects have been observed with the LVSID on-orbit during the Astro-E2/XRS program. A detector die from the same fabrication run will be used on the Astro-H/SXS mission. The LVSID technology and cryogenic JFET readout system is thus TRL 9. The technology is described in detail in section 2. The IXO/XMS "backup-up" anti-coincidence detector is a small array of LVSID detectors that are almost identical to those employed for Astro -E2/XRS as described in this document. The readout system is identical and, infact would use the same design as the Astro -E2/XRS JFET amplifier module (19 channels) essentially without changes except for its mechanical mount. The changes required for the IXO/XMS LVSID array are limited to the mounting of the LVSID detectors, and the mechanical mounting of the JFET amplifier sub-assembly. There is no technical development needed for the IXO/XMS implementation and the technology is ready for detailed design-work leading to PDR. The TRL level is thus at least 6, and possibly higher. Characteristics of an IXO/XMS LVSID anti-co detector are given in Table 1 and described in detail in section 3.

  6. Coincident UVI and Wind Observations of Pseudo-Breakups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Brittnacher, M.; Parks, G. K.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.; Lin, R. P.

    1998-01-01

    Using images taken by the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) onboard the Polar spacecraft, we identify periods of pseudo-breakup activity coincident with perigee passes of the WIND spacecraft through the magnetotail. Previous studies have shown that from both observations on the ground and in the magnetotail there is very little difference phenomenologically between substorm onset and pseudo-breakups except for the degree of localization and the absence of global expansion. This raises the question of what prevents a pseudo-breakup from expanding globally. For the time intervals studied, we find a high correlation between pseudo-breakups and short-lived particle flux enhancements in the magnetotail. The velocity distribution of the plasma during some of these flux enhancements are indicative of bursty bulk flows.

  7. Endometrial metastasis of colorectal cancer with coincident endometrial adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Colling, Richard; Lopes, Tito; Das, Nagiindra; Mathew, Joe

    2010-01-01

    Metastasis to the uterine corpus is uncommon and secondary colorectal tumours of the endometrium are rare. We describe a uterine tumour with components of both primary endometrial and metastatic colorectal carcinomata. In this case, a 72-year-old obese woman presented with a 2-week history of postmenopausal bleeding per vaginum and weight loss. She had an abdominoperineal resection 3 years previously for a Dukes stage B rectal carcinoma. A transvaginal ultrasonography showed a thickened endometrium. Histology immunophenotyping showed a CK7+, CK20+, CA125− and CEA+ colorectal metastasis (a profile consistent with her previous cancer) associated with a primary CK7+, CK20−, CA125+ and CEA− endometroid endometrial adenocarcinoma. We conclude this represents endometrial metastasis of colorectal carcinoma with coincident primary endometrial adenocarcinoma. We speculate as to whether the endometrial carcinoma arose de novo or was induced by the colorectal metastasis, or whether the primary endometrial tumour provided a fertile site for the colorectal metastasis. PMID:22791861

  8. Serendipity in Cancer Drug Discovery: Rational or Coincidence?

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Gupta, Subash C; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2016-06-01

    Novel drug development leading to final approval by the US FDA can cost as much as two billion dollars. Why the cost of novel drug discovery is so expensive is unclear, but high failure rates at the preclinical and clinical stages are major reasons. Although therapies targeting a given cell signaling pathway or a protein have become prominent in drug discovery, such treatments have done little in preventing or treating any disease alone because most chronic diseases have been found to be multigenic. A review of the discovery of numerous drugs currently being used for various diseases including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular, pulmonary, and autoimmune diseases indicates that serendipity has played a major role in the discovery. In this review we provide evidence that rational drug discovery and targeted therapies have minimal roles in drug discovery, and that serendipity and coincidence have played and continue to play major roles. The primary focus in this review is on cancer-related drug discovery. PMID:27083322

  9. Serendipity in Cancer Drug Discovery: Rational or Coincidence?

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Gupta, Subash C; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2016-06-01

    Novel drug development leading to final approval by the US FDA can cost as much as two billion dollars. Why the cost of novel drug discovery is so expensive is unclear, but high failure rates at the preclinical and clinical stages are major reasons. Although therapies targeting a given cell signaling pathway or a protein have become prominent in drug discovery, such treatments have done little in preventing or treating any disease alone because most chronic diseases have been found to be multigenic. A review of the discovery of numerous drugs currently being used for various diseases including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular, pulmonary, and autoimmune diseases indicates that serendipity has played a major role in the discovery. In this review we provide evidence that rational drug discovery and targeted therapies have minimal roles in drug discovery, and that serendipity and coincidence have played and continue to play major roles. The primary focus in this review is on cancer-related drug discovery.

  10. Coincident vortices in Antarctic wind fields and sea ice motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassermann, S.; Schmitt, C.; Kottmeier, C.; Simmonds, I.

    2006-08-01

    This study introduces a method to examine the coincidence of rotational ice drift and winds caused by the forcing of ice motion by Antarctic cyclones. Vortices are automatically detected using the algorithm of Murray and Simmonds (1991) from both ECMWF surface pressures and SSM/I sea ice motions. For compatibility with this algorithm sea ice motion vectors are transformed to a scalar stream function. During a seven-day test period positions of pressure minima and stream function maxima (SFM) of ice drift are within 300 km in 96% of the cases. Lowest pressure minima are related to highest stream function maxima. The results promise the method to provide a complementary tool of detecting and localizing low-pressure systems over sea ice, adding to numerical pressure analyses.

  11. Coincidence landscapes for three-channel linear optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Guise, Hubert; Tan, Si-Hui; Poulin, Isaac P.; Sanders, Barry C.

    2014-06-01

    We use permutation-group methods plus SU(3) group-theoretic methods to determine the action of a three-channel passive optical interferometer on controllably delayed single-photon pulse inputs to each channel. Permutation-group techniques allow us to relate directly expressions for rates and, in particular, investigate symmetries in the coincidence landscape. These techniques extend the traditional Hong-Ou-Mandel effect analysis for two-channel interferometry to valleys and plateaus in three-channel interferometry. Our group-theoretic approach is intuitively appealing because the calculus of Wigner D functions partially accounts for permutational symmetries and directly reveals the connections among D functions, partial distinguishability, and immanants.

  12. Testable solution of the cosmological constant and coincidence problems

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Douglas J.; Barrow, John D.

    2011-02-15

    We present a new solution to the cosmological constant (CC) and coincidence problems in which the observed value of the CC, {Lambda}, is linked to other observable properties of the Universe. This is achieved by promoting the CC from a parameter that must be specified, to a field that can take many possible values. The observed value of {Lambda}{approx_equal}(9.3 Gyrs){sup -2}[{approx_equal}10{sup -120} in Planck units] is determined by a new constraint equation which follows from the application of a causally restricted variation principle. When applied to our visible Universe, the model makes a testable prediction for the dimensionless spatial curvature of {Omega}{sub k0}=-0.0056({zeta}{sub b}/0.5), where {zeta}{sub b}{approx}1/2 is a QCD parameter. Requiring that a classical history exist, our model determines the probability of observing a given {Lambda}. The observed CC value, which we successfully predict, is typical within our model even before the effects of anthropic selection are included. When anthropic selection effects are accounted for, we find that the observed coincidence between t{sub {Lambda}={Lambda}}{sup -1/2} and the age of the Universe, t{sub U}, is a typical occurrence in our model. In contrast to multiverse explanations of the CC problems, our solution is independent of the choice of a prior weighting of different {Lambda} values and does not rely on anthropic selection effects. Our model includes no unnatural small parameters and does not require the introduction of new dynamical scalar fields or modifications to general relativity, and it can be tested by astronomical observations in the near future.

  13. Algorithms for Identification of Nearly-Coincident Events in Calorimetric Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, B.; Ferri, E.; Bennett, D.; Faverzani, M.; Fowler, J.; Giachero, A.; Hays-Wehle, J.; Maino, M.; Nucciotti, A.; Puiu, A.; Swetz, D.; Ullom, J.

    2016-07-01

    For experiments with high arrival rates, reliable identification of nearly-coincident events can be crucial. For calorimetric measurements to directly measure the neutrino mass such as HOLMES, unidentified pulse pile-ups are expected to be a leading source of experimental error. Although Wiener filtering can be used to recognize pile-up, it suffers from errors due to pulse shape variation from detector nonlinearity, readout dependence on subsample arrival times, and stability issues from the ill-posed deconvolution problem of recovering Dirac delta-functions from smooth data. Due to these factors, we have developed a processing method that exploits singular value decomposition to (1) separate single-pulse records from piled-up records in training data and (2) construct a model of single-pulse records that accounts for varying pulse shape with amplitude, arrival time, and baseline level, suitable for detecting nearly-coincident events. We show that the resulting processing advances can reduce the required performance specifications of the detectors and readout system or, equivalently, enable larger sensor arrays and better constraints on the neutrino mass.

  14. A near-infrared SETI experiment: probability distribution of false coincidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maire, Jérôme; Wright, Shelley A.; Werthimer, Dan; Treffers, Richard R.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Stone, Remington P. S.; Drake, Frank; Siemion, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    A Search for Extraterrestrial Life (SETI), based on the possibility of interstellar communication via laser signals, is being designed to extend the search into the near-infrared spectral region (Wright et al, this conference). The dedicated near-infrared (900 to 1700 nm) instrument takes advantage of a new generation of avalanche photodiodes (APD), based on internal discrete amplification. These discrete APD (DAPD) detectors have a high speed response (< 1 GHz) and gain comparable to photomultiplier tubes, while also achieving significantly lower noise than previous APDs. We are investigating the use of DAPD detectors in this new astronomical instrument for a SETI search and transient source observations. We investigated experimentally the advantages of using a multiple detector device operating in parallel to remove spurious signals. We present the detector characterization and performance of the instrument in terms of false positive detection rates both theoretically and empirically through lab measurements. We discuss the required criteria that will be needed for laser light pulse detection in our experiment. These criteria are defined to optimize the trade between high detection efficiency and low false positive coincident signals, which can be produced by detector dark noise, background light, cosmic rays, and astronomical sources. We investigate experimentally how false coincidence rates depend on the number of detectors in parallel, and on the signal pulse height and width. We also look into the corresponding threshold to each of the signals to optimize the sensitivity while also reducing the false coincidence rates. Lastly, we discuss the analytical solution used to predict the probability of laser pulse detection with multiple detectors.

  15. Feynman variance-to-mean in the context of passive neutron coincidence counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, S.; Favalli, A.; Hauck, D. K.; Henzlova, D.; Santi, P. A.

    2012-09-01

    Passive Neutron Coincidence Counting (PNCC) based on shift register autocorrelation time analysis of the detected neutron pulse train is an important Nondestructive Assay (NDA) method. It is used extensively in the quantification of plutonium and other spontaneously fissile materials for purposes of nuclear materials accountancy. In addition to the totals count rate, which is also referred to as the singles, gross or trigger rate, a quantity known as the reals coincidence rate, also called the pairs or doubles, is obtained from the difference between the measured neutron multiplicities in two measurement gates triggered by the incoming events on the pulse train. The reals rate is a measure of the number of time correlated pairs present on the pulse train and this can be related to the fission rates (and hence material mass) since fissions emit neutrons in bursts which are also detected in characteristic clusters. A closely related measurement objective is the determination of the reactivity of systems as they approach criticality. In this field an alternative autocorrelation signature is popular, the so called Feynman variance-to-mean technique which makes use of the multiplicity histogram formed the periodic, or clock-triggered opening of a coincidence gate. Workers in these two application areas share common challenges and improvement opportunities but are often separated by tradition, problem focus and technical language. The purpose of this paper is to recognize the close link between the Feynman variance-to-mean metric and traditional PNCC using shift register logic applied to correlated pulse trains. We, show using relationships for the late-gate (or accidentals) histogram recorded using a multiplicity shift register, how the Feynman Y-statistic, defined as the excess variance-to-mean ratio, can be expressed in terms of the singles and doubles rates familiar to the safeguards and waste assay communities. These two specialisms now have a direct bridge between

  16. Direct fissile assay of enriched uranium using random self-interrogation and neutron coincidence response

    DOEpatents

    Menlove, Howard O.; Stewart, James E.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for the direct, nondestructive evaluation of the .sup.235 U nuclide content of samples containing UF.sub.6, UF.sub.4, or UO.sub.2 utilizing the passive neutron self-interrogation of the sample resulting from the intrinsic production of neutrons therein. The ratio of the emitted neutron coincidence count rate to the total emitted neutron count rate is determined and yields a measure of the bulk fissile mass. The accuracy of the method is 6.8% (1.sigma.) for cylinders containing UF.sub.6 with enrichments ranging from 6% to 98% with measurement times varying from 3-6 min. The samples contained from below 1 kg to greater than 16 kg. Since the subject invention relies on fast neutron self-interrogation, complete sampling of the UF.sub.6 takes place, reducing difficulties arising from inhomogeneity of the sample which adversely affects other assay procedures.

  17. Direct fissile assay of enriched uranium using random self-interrogation and neutron coincidence response

    DOEpatents

    Menlove, H.O.; Stewart, J.E.

    1985-02-04

    Apparatus and method for the direct, nondestructive evaluation of the /sup 235/U nuclide content of samples containing UF/sub 6/, UF/sub 4/, or UO/sub 2/ utilizing the passive neutron self-interrogation of the sample resulting from the intrinsic production of neutrons therein. The ratio of the emitted neutron coincidence count rate to the total emitted neutron count rate is determined and yields a measure of the bulk fissile mass. The accuracy of the method is 6.8% (1sigma) for cylinders containing UF/sub 6/ with enrichments ranging from 6% to 98% with measurement times varying from 3-6 min. The samples contained from below 1 kg to greater than 16 kg. Since the subject invention relies on fast neutron self-interrogation, complete sampling of the UF/sub 6/ takes place, reducing difficulties arising from inhomogeneity of the sample which adversely affects other assay procedures. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Thyroid Storm and Incidental Anterior Mediastinal Teratoma: Coincidence or Correlation?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng-An; Chen, Wei-Ta; Cheng, Ho-Shun; Chung, Cheng-Chih; Chen, Yu-Ju; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    Teratoma is a rare cause of thyrotoxicosis. Among the different types of teratoma, struma ovarii is the main type which contains thyroid tissue. There is no evidence in the literature that would indicate mediasternal teratoma would also lead to thyrotoxicosis or thyroid storm. Herein we report a 37-year-old woman who suffered from palpitation. Her chest X-ray showed a mass lesion at the left hilum, and chest computed tomography scan yielded a suspicion of pericardial cyst. Thereafter, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery was performed, and thymic cyst was diagnosed during the operation. However, subsequent pathological studies confirmed a diagnosis of mature cystic teratoma. A thyroid function test demonstrating hyperthyroidism was completed prior to the patient’s operation, and thyroid storm was diagnosed by clinical presentation. The patient’s symptoms did not improve after the operation until we added beta blocker and anti-thyroid agents. Therefore, was the presence of thyroid storm and anterior mediastinal teratoma coincident or correlative in this case? The special stain of teratoma tissues did not reveal any thyroid tissues. In conclusion, thyroid storm and anterior mediastinal teratoma in our case occurred coincidentally. However, a survey of possible hyperthyroidism in patients with anterior mediastinal tumor before operation is critical to avoid perioperative complications. PMID:27122746

  19. Line identification studies using traditional techniques and wavelength coincidence statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, Charles R.; Adelman, Saul J.

    1990-01-01

    Traditional line identification techniques result in the assignment of individual lines to an atomic or ionic species. These methods may be supplemented by wavelength coincidence statistics (WCS). The strength and weakness of these methods are discussed using spectra of a number of normal and peculiar B and A stars that have been studied independently by both methods. The present results support the overall findings of some earlier studies. WCS would be most useful in a first survey, before traditional methods have been applied. WCS can quickly make a global search for all species and in this way may enable identifications of an unexpected spectrum that could easily be omitted entirely from a traditional study. This is illustrated by O I. WCS is a subject to well known weakness of any statistical technique, for example, a predictable number of spurious results are to be expected. The danger of small number statistics are illustrated. WCS is at its best relative to traditional methods in finding a line-rich atomic species that is only weakly present in a complicated stellar spectrum.

  20. Coincident Phosphatidic Acid Interaction Restrains Drp1 in Mitochondrial Division.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yoshihiro; Itoh, Kie; Yamada, Tatsuya; Cerveny, Kara L; Suzuki, Takamichi L; Macdonald, Patrick; Frohman, Michael A; Ramachandran, Rajesh; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2016-09-15

    Mitochondria divide to control their size, distribution, turnover, and function. Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) is a critical mechanochemical GTPase that drives constriction during mitochondrial division. It is generally believed that mitochondrial division is regulated during recruitment of Drp1 to mitochondria and its oligomerization into a division apparatus. Here, we report an unforeseen mechanism that regulates mitochondrial division by coincident interactions of Drp1 with the head group and acyl chains of phospholipids. Drp1 recognizes the head group of phosphatidic acid (PA) and two saturated acyl chains of another phospholipid by penetrating into the hydrophobic core of the membrane. The dual phospholipid interactions restrain Drp1 via inhibition of oligomerization-stimulated GTP hydrolysis that promotes membrane constriction. Moreover, a PA-producing phospholipase, MitoPLD, binds Drp1, creating a PA-rich microenvironment in the vicinity of a division apparatus. Thus, PA controls the activation of Drp1 after the formation of the division apparatus. PMID:27635761

  1. Coincident loss of consciousness and ventricular tachycardia during +GZ stress.

    PubMed

    Whinnery, J E; Laughlin, M H; Uhl, G S

    1980-08-01

    The environment of the advanced fighter aircraft represents a unique combination of stressful factors. Each of the individual stresses is hazardous, with the summation of these factors possibly resulting in an additional risk for sudden in-flight incapacitation. Advanced fighter aircraft are capabble of producing both rapid onset and high sustained +GZ forces which, on occasion, can exceed the tolerance limits of the pilot. The +GZ forces encountered during aerial combat maneuvering are physiologically stressful and have a profound effect on the regulatory mechanisms of the body. The influence of these stresses, including +GZ stress, on the autonomic nervous system is complex. The overall normal regulation of the cardiovascular system depends on a balance between both branches of the autonomic nervous system. An imbalance between sympathetic and parasympathetic tone can result in cardiac dysrhythmias and symptoms not conducive to safe and effective flight. An episode of ventricular tachycardia, coincident with an episode of loss of consciousness, was observed in an apparently healthy aircrewman during +GZ stress on the USAF School of Aerospace Medicine human centrifuge. The implications of autonomic imbalance in the production of similar potentially hazardous dysrhythmias and symptoms in the multistress environment deserve more in-depth investigation. PMID:7417151

  2. Coincidence of asthma and bronchospasm during anesthesia in tympanomastoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Nima; Samadi, Shahram; Amali, Amin; Jafari Javid, Mihan

    2014-01-01

    High prevalence of asthma and bronchospasm was observed during induction of anesthesia in patients with chronic suppurative otitis mMedia (CSOM) who underwent tympanomastoidectomy. Although several studies have proposed association of allergic diseases with CSOM but no consensus about it has been established. Current study was designed to determine the coincidence of asthma in CSOM patients. In a cross-sectional study, authors investigated medical records of 106 CSOM patients underwent tympanomastoidectomy, aged 15 to 65 years, and 95 controls, which were matched by age and sex. Participants were admitted to Valiasr Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from April of 2011 to March of 2013. Required information, such as demographic characteristics and history of allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma were obtained from patients' medical records. The prevalence of AR in the CSOM group was higher than controls' group (19.8% and 15.8%, respectively) (P>0.05). Asthma prevalence was significantly higher in patients with CSOM (P=0.03) (OR=7.67, 95% CI:  0.9-62.5). No significant association was found between history of AR and chronic ear infections. However, asthma was significantly more common in CSOM patients. Current study indicates that asthma and risk of bronchospasm need particular attention in patients with CSOM underwent tympanomastoidectomy before and during anesthesia. PMID:25530053

  3. Coincidence ion imaging with a fast frame camera

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Suk Kyoung; Cudry, Fadia; Lin, Yun Fei; Lingenfelter, Steven; Winney, Alexander H.; Fan, Lin; Li, Wen

    2014-12-15

    A new time- and position-sensitive particle detection system based on a fast frame CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductors) camera is developed for coincidence ion imaging. The system is composed of four major components: a conventional microchannel plate/phosphor screen ion imager, a fast frame CMOS camera, a single anode photomultiplier tube (PMT), and a high-speed digitizer. The system collects the positional information of ions from a fast frame camera through real-time centroiding while the arrival times are obtained from the timing signal of a PMT processed by a high-speed digitizer. Multi-hit capability is achieved by correlating the intensity of ion spots on each camera frame with the peak heights on the corresponding time-of-flight spectrum of a PMT. Efficient computer algorithms are developed to process camera frames and digitizer traces in real-time at 1 kHz laser repetition rate. We demonstrate the capability of this system by detecting a momentum-matched co-fragments pair (methyl and iodine cations) produced from strong field dissociative double ionization of methyl iodide.

  4. Timing of coincidence anticipation by NCAA division I softball athletes.

    PubMed

    Molstad, S M; Kluka, D A; Love, P A; Baylor, K A; Covington, N K; Cook, T L

    1994-12-01

    After visual screening, 44 NCAA Division I softball athletes qualified to participate in this study conducted at the 1993 National Invitational Championship Tournament to assess anticipation of coincidence of these athletes. A full-swing batting motion was used to intercept a stimulus apparently moving at 45 or 70 mph, using the Bassin Anticipation Timer. Scores were recorded as early or late after each subject swung a standardized bat which interrupted a photoelectric beam when each of 20 randomly administered slow or fast simulated pitches was presented. Analyses of variance of AE, CE, and VE showed athletes swung significantly early on the 45-mph and late on the 70-mph simulated pitch speed. More specifically, less AE and CE error was recorded at the slow speed; athletes were more consistent (VE) in response to the fast speed. Results supported prior findings in which simulated-pitch speeds were similar to the present ones. Runway length, simulated-pitch speed, and the degree of swing simulation were suggested as variables to consider in similar investigations. PMID:7870534

  5. Coincidence ion imaging with a fast frame camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Suk Kyoung; Cudry, Fadia; Lin, Yun Fei; Lingenfelter, Steven; Winney, Alexander H.; Fan, Lin; Li, Wen

    2014-12-01

    A new time- and position-sensitive particle detection system based on a fast frame CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductors) camera is developed for coincidence ion imaging. The system is composed of four major components: a conventional microchannel plate/phosphor screen ion imager, a fast frame CMOS camera, a single anode photomultiplier tube (PMT), and a high-speed digitizer. The system collects the positional information of ions from a fast frame camera through real-time centroiding while the arrival times are obtained from the timing signal of a PMT processed by a high-speed digitizer. Multi-hit capability is achieved by correlating the intensity of ion spots on each camera frame with the peak heights on the corresponding time-of-flight spectrum of a PMT. Efficient computer algorithms are developed to process camera frames and digitizer traces in real-time at 1 kHz laser repetition rate. We demonstrate the capability of this system by detecting a momentum-matched co-fragments pair (methyl and iodine cations) produced from strong field dissociative double ionization of methyl iodide.

  6. Coincident Phosphatidic Acid Interaction Restrains Drp1 in Mitochondrial Division.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yoshihiro; Itoh, Kie; Yamada, Tatsuya; Cerveny, Kara L; Suzuki, Takamichi L; Macdonald, Patrick; Frohman, Michael A; Ramachandran, Rajesh; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2016-09-15

    Mitochondria divide to control their size, distribution, turnover, and function. Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) is a critical mechanochemical GTPase that drives constriction during mitochondrial division. It is generally believed that mitochondrial division is regulated during recruitment of Drp1 to mitochondria and its oligomerization into a division apparatus. Here, we report an unforeseen mechanism that regulates mitochondrial division by coincident interactions of Drp1 with the head group and acyl chains of phospholipids. Drp1 recognizes the head group of phosphatidic acid (PA) and two saturated acyl chains of another phospholipid by penetrating into the hydrophobic core of the membrane. The dual phospholipid interactions restrain Drp1 via inhibition of oligomerization-stimulated GTP hydrolysis that promotes membrane constriction. Moreover, a PA-producing phospholipase, MitoPLD, binds Drp1, creating a PA-rich microenvironment in the vicinity of a division apparatus. Thus, PA controls the activation of Drp1 after the formation of the division apparatus.

  7. Nonlinear Dynamics of Neuronal Excitability, Oscillations, and Coincidence Detection

    PubMed Central

    RINZEL, JOHN; HUGUET, GEMMA

    2014-01-01

    We review some widely studied models and firing dynamics for neuronal systems, both at the single cell and network level, and dynamical systems techniques to study them. In particular, we focus on two topics in mathematical neuroscience that have attracted the attention of mathematicians for decades: single-cell excitability and bursting. We review the mathematical framework for three types of excitability and onset of repetitive firing behavior in single-neuron models and their relation with Hodgkin’s classification in 1948 of repetitive firing properties. We discuss the mathematical dissection of bursting oscillations using fast/slow analysis and demonstrate the approach using single-cell and mean-field network models. Finally, we illustrate the properties of Type III excitability in which case repetitive firing for constant or slow inputs is absent. Rather, firing is in response only to rapid enough changes in the stimulus. Our case study involves neuronal computations for sound localization for which neurons in the auditory brain stem perform extraordinarily precise coincidence detection with submillisecond temporal resolution. PMID:25392560

  8. Timing of coincidence anticipation by NCAA division I softball athletes.

    PubMed

    Molstad, S M; Kluka, D A; Love, P A; Baylor, K A; Covington, N K; Cook, T L

    1994-12-01

    After visual screening, 44 NCAA Division I softball athletes qualified to participate in this study conducted at the 1993 National Invitational Championship Tournament to assess anticipation of coincidence of these athletes. A full-swing batting motion was used to intercept a stimulus apparently moving at 45 or 70 mph, using the Bassin Anticipation Timer. Scores were recorded as early or late after each subject swung a standardized bat which interrupted a photoelectric beam when each of 20 randomly administered slow or fast simulated pitches was presented. Analyses of variance of AE, CE, and VE showed athletes swung significantly early on the 45-mph and late on the 70-mph simulated pitch speed. More specifically, less AE and CE error was recorded at the slow speed; athletes were more consistent (VE) in response to the fast speed. Results supported prior findings in which simulated-pitch speeds were similar to the present ones. Runway length, simulated-pitch speed, and the degree of swing simulation were suggested as variables to consider in similar investigations.

  9. Differential conduction velocity regulation in ipsilateral and contralateral collaterals innervating brainstem coincidence detector neurons.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Armin H; Rubel, Edwin W; Barría, Andrés

    2014-04-01

    Information processing in the brain relies on precise timing of signal propagation. The highly conserved neuronal network for computing spatial representations of acoustic signals resolves microsecond timing of sounds processed by the two ears. As such, it provides an excellent model for understanding how precise temporal regulation of neuronal signals is achieved and maintained. The well described avian and mammalian brainstem circuit for computation of interaural time differences is composed of monaural cells in the cochlear nucleus (CN; nucleus magnocellularis in birds) projecting to binaurally innervated coincidence detection neurons in the medial superior olivary nucleus (MSO) in mammals or nucleus laminaris (NL) in birds. Individual axons from CN neurons issue a single axon that bifurcates into an ipsilateral branch and a contralateral branch that innervate segregated dendritic regions of the MSO/NL coincidence detector neurons. We measured conduction velocities of the ipsilateral and contralateral branches of these bifurcating axon collaterals in the chicken by antidromic stimulation of two sites along each branch and whole-cell recordings in the parent neurons. At the end of each experiment, the individual CN neuron and its axon collaterals were filled with dye. We show that the two collaterals of a single axon adjust the conduction velocities individually to achieve the specific conduction velocities essential for precise temporal integration of information from the two ears, as required for sound localization. More generally, these results suggest that individual axonal segments in the CNS interact locally with surrounding neural structures to determine conduction velocity.

  10. Activity determination of a 201Tl solution by 4πβ-γ and sum-peak coincidence methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzzarin, A.; da Silva, M. A. L.; Iwahara, A.; da Silva, R. L.; Filho, O. L. T.; Poledna, R.; Lopes, R. T.

    2016-07-01

    201Tl is used in nuclear medicine in cardiac imaging for evaluating the injury level in cardiac muscle at rest and exercise. In this work the activity concentration of a 201 Tl radioactive solution has been absolutely determined using the 4πβ-γ coincidence and sum-peak coincidence methods. The presence of 202Tl radioactive impurity that imposes some difficult in the activity measurements was taken into account in the measurements. In the sum-peak method a planar germanium detector was used. The half-lives were evaluated by the reference source method and the results obtained were (3.033 ± 0.004) d and (12.320 ± 0.163) d, respectively, for 201Tl and 202Tl.

  11. Gravitational wave and high energy neutrino coincidences : Results of the first Antares - Virgo/LIGO coincident search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradier, T.

    2012-12-01

    Sources of gravitational waves (GW) and emitters of high energy neutrinos (HEN) both involve compact objects and matter moving at relativistic speeds. GW emission requires a departure from spherical symmetry, which is the case if clumps of matter are accreted around black holes or neutron stars, and ejected in relativistic jets, where neutrinos are believed to be produced. Both messengers interact weakly with the surrounding matter, hence point directly to the heart of the engines that power these emissions. Coincidences between GW and HEN detectors would then give a unique insight on the physics of the most powerful objects in the Universe. This contribution describes the results of the first joint GW+HEN search using concomitant data taken with the ant, ǒand lo detectors in 2007, when ant was operating with 5 of its 12 lines, and ǒ/lo joint runs VSR1/S5 were underway. This search allowed to put the first constraints on the density of possible GW+HEN astrophysical sources.

  12. Revised Correlation between Odin/OSIRIS PMC Properties and Coincident TIMED/SABER Mesospheric Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feofilov, A. G.; Petelina, S V.; Kutepov, A. A.; Pesnell, W. D.; Goldberg, R. A.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Russell, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    The Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imaging System (OSIRIS) instrument on board the Odin satellite detects Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) through the enhancement in the limb scattered solar radiance. The Sounding of the Atmosphere using the Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on board the TIMED satellite is a limb scanning infrared radiometer that measures temperature and vertical profiles and energetic parameters for minor constituents in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The combination of OSIRIS and SABER data has been previously used to statistically derive thermal conditions for PMC existence [Petelina et al., 2005]. In this work, we employ the simultaneous common volume measurements of PMCs by OSIRIS and temperature profiles measured by SABER for the Northern Hemisphere summers of 2002-2005 and corrected in the polar region by accounting for the vibrational-vibrational energy exchange among the CO2 isotopes [Kutepov et al., 2006]. For each of 20 coincidences identified within plus or minus 1 degree latitude, plus or minus 2 degrees longitude and less than 1 hour time the frost point temperatures were calculated using the corresponding SABER temperature profile and water vapor densities of 1,3, and 10 ppmv. We found that the PMC presence and brightness correlated only with the temperature threshold that corresponds to the frost point. The absolute value of the temperature below the frost point, however, didn't play a significant role in the intensity of PMC signal for the majority of selected coincidences. The presence of several bright clouds at temperatures above the frost point is obviously related to the limitation of the limb geometry when some near- or far-field PMCs located at higher (and warmer) altitudes appear to be at lower altitudes.

  13. Revised Correlation between Odin/OSIRIS PMC Properties and Coincident TIMED/SABER Mesospheric Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feofilov, A. G.; Petelina, S. V.; Kutepov, A. A.; Pesnell, W. D.; Goldberg, R. A.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Russell, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    The Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imaging System (OSIRIS) instrument on board the Odin satellite detects Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) through the enhancement in the limb-scattered solar radiance. The Sounding of the Atmosphere using the Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on board the TIMED satellite is a limb scanning infrared radiometer that measures temperature and vertical profiles and energetic parameters for minor constituents in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The combination of OSIRIS and SABER data has been previously used to statistically derive thermal conditions for PMC existence [Petelina et al., 2005]. a, A.A. Kutepov, W.D. Pesnell, In this work, we employ the simultaneous common volume measurements of PMCs by OSIRIS and temperature profiles measured by SABER for the Northern Hemisphere summers of 2002-2005 and corrected in the polar region by accounting for the vibrational-vibrational energy exchange among the CO2 isotopes [Kutepov et al., 2006]. For each of 20 coincidences identified within plus or minus 1 degree latitude, plus or minus 2 degrees longitude and less than 1 hour time the frost point temperatures were calculated using the corresponding SABER temperature profile and water vapor densities of 1,3, and 10 ppmv. We found that the PMC presence and brightness correlated only with the temperature threshold that corresponds to the frost point. The absolute value of the temperature below the frost point, however, didn't play a significant role in the intensity of PMC signal for the majority of selected coincidences. The presence of several bright clouds at temperatures above the frost point is obviously related to the limitation of the limb geometry when some near- or far-field PMCs located at higher (and warmer) altitudes appear to be at lower altitudes.

  14. [Horton's disease and aortic aneurysm: coincidence or causality? 5 cases].

    PubMed

    Cormier, J M; Cormier, F; Laridon, D; Vuong, P N

    2000-04-01

    Five inflammatory aortopathies were disclosed 3 to 16 years after inaugural giant cell arteritis. Three patients were symptomatic: one aneurysm of the subrenal abdominal aorta discovered at work-up for an inferior arteriopathy, one thoraco-abdominal aneurysm with a "fissuration" episode, one calcified thoraco-abdominal aortopathy suggesting dissection. In these three cases, there was a severe inflammatory syndrome with asthenia, fever, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and a large inflammatory crown around the aortopathy. In the two asymptomatic cases, the diagnosis was made during the follow-up of Horton's disease, in one patient with active disease, the other late after the initial episode. Two aneurysms required surgical cure, with resection-prosthesis of the thoraco-abdominal aneurysm and revascularization of the digestive and renal arteries. In the 4 active cases, corticosteroid therapy cured the inflammatory process both on the basis of laboratory results and the involution of the periaortic crown and, in one case, the total regression of ureteral compression causing pyeloureteral dilatation on the left. The diagnosis of giant cell arteritis was confirmed histologically in the two operated cases. Extra-cervical localizations of aortic aneurysm of dissection in patients with giant cell arteritis is not a fortuitous coincidence but an association as demonstrated by the Mayo Clinic epidemiology. On the basis of these reported cases and data in the literature, the practical conclusions are: in case of aorta involvement, particularly with inflammation in subjects under 50, giant cell arteritis should be entertained as a possible diagnosis; in patients with giant cell arteritis, follow-up should include yearly thoracic radiograms to search for thoracic aorta involvement and Doppler and ultrasound explorations to identify any abdomino-iliac lesions. This protocol is required to avoid the life-threatening complications of dissection or rupture of an aortic

  15. Expression of the Arabidopsis Gene Akr Coincides with Chloroplast Development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H.; Wang, J.; Goodman, H. M.

    1994-12-01

    Reduced expression of a nuclear gene of Arabidopsis thaliana, Akr, results in the formation of chlorotic plants due to a block in the proplastid-to-chloroplast development pathway (H. Zhang, D.C. Scheirer, W. Fowle, H.M. Goodman [1992] Plant Cell 4: 1575-1588). In an effort to discern the function of the Akr gene product in chloroplast development, transgenic plants containing an Akr::[beta]-glucuronidase gene fusion were constructed to monitor the spatial and temporal patterns of Akr expression. Akr is expressed only in chloroplast-containing tissues and maximal expression occurs during the seedling stage, coincident with chloroplast development. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that Akr is required at an early stage of chloroplast development. The effects of an AKR deficiency on the expression of nuclear and plastid genes required for photosynthetic activity were also examined. Within chloroplast-deficient leaves of plants in which Akr expression is limited by the presence of Akr antisense transgenes or truncated Akr sense transgenes, mRNAs for the nuclear genes Cab2, Cab4, RbcS, and GapA are present at wild-type levels; similarly, levels of mRNAs for the plastid genes rbcL and psbA are not affected by the AKR deficiency. Thus, although expression of these photosynthetic genes is tightly coordinated with the development and maintenance of chloroplasts in wild-type plants, their expression is unaffected in AKR-deficient chlorotic leaves. Therefore, we propose that Akr functions in a pathway different from the one controlling the expression and regulation of the photosynthetic genes during chloroplast development, and at a specific developmental stage after the putative plastid factor is made.

  16. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of Narrow-Swath Imaging Sensors with Reference to Non-Coincident Wide-Swath Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCorkel, Joel; Thome, Kurtis; Lockwood, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    An inter-calibration method is developed to provide absolute radiometric calibration of narrow-swath imaging sensors with reference to non-coincident wide-swath sensors. The method predicts at-sensor radiance using non-coincident imagery from the reference sensor and knowledge of spectral reflectance of the test site. The imagery of the reference sensor is restricted to acquisitions that provide similar view and solar illumination geometry to reduce uncertainties due to directional reflectance effects. Spectral reflectance of the test site is found with a simple iterative radiative transfer method using radiance values of a well-understood wide-swath sensor and spectral shape information based on historical ground-based measurements. At-sensor radiance is calculated for the narrow-swath sensor using this spectral reflectance and atmospheric parameters that are also based on historical in situ measurements. Results of the inter-calibration method show agreement on the 2 5 percent level in most spectral regions with the vicarious calibration technique relying on coincident ground-based measurements referred to as the reflectance-based approach. While the variability of the inter-calibration method based on non-coincident image pairs is significantly larger, results are consistent with techniques relying on in situ measurements. The method is also insensitive to spectral differences between the sensors by transferring to surface spectral reflectance prior to prediction of at-sensor radiance. The utility of this inter-calibration method is made clear by its flexibility to utilize image pairings with acquisition dates differing in excess of 30 days allowing frequent absolute calibration comparisons between wide- and narrow-swath sensors.

  17. A simultaneous beta and coincidence-gamma imaging system for plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Homayoon; Wen, Jie; Mathews, Aswin J; Komarov, Sergey; Wang, Qiang; Li, Ke; O'Sullivan, Joseph A; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2016-05-01

    Positron emitting isotopes, such as (11)C, (13)N, and (18)F, can be used to label molecules. The tracers, such as (11)CO2, are delivered to plants to study their biological processes, particularly metabolism and photosynthesis, which may contribute to the development of plants that have a higher yield of crops and biomass. Measurements and resulting images from PET scanners are not quantitative in young plant structures or in plant leaves due to poor positron annihilation in thin objects. To address this problem we have designed, assembled, modeled, and tested a nuclear imaging system (simultaneous beta-gamma imager). The imager can simultaneously detect positrons ([Formula: see text]) and coincidence-gamma rays (γ). The imaging system employs two planar detectors; one is a regular gamma detector which has a LYSO crystal array, and the other is a phoswich detector which has an additional BC-404 plastic scintillator for beta detection. A forward model for positrons is proposed along with a joint image reconstruction formulation to utilize the beta and coincidence-gamma measurements for estimating radioactivity distribution in plant leaves. The joint reconstruction algorithm first reconstructs beta and gamma images independently to estimate the thickness component of the beta forward model and afterward jointly estimates the radioactivity distribution in the object. We have validated the physics model and reconstruction framework through a phantom imaging study and imaging a tomato leaf that has absorbed (11)CO2. The results demonstrate that the simultaneously acquired beta and coincidence-gamma data, combined with our proposed joint reconstruction algorithm, improved the quantitative accuracy of estimating radioactivity distribution in thin objects such as leaves. We used the structural similarity (SSIM) index for comparing the leaf images from the simultaneous beta-gamma imager with the ground truth image. The jointly reconstructed images yield SSIM indices of 0

  18. A new approach to the kinematic coincidence method in heavy ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casini, G.; Maurenzig, P. R.; Olmi, A.; Stefanini, A. A.

    1989-05-01

    A new approach to the kinematic coincidence method (KCM) is proposed, which makes use of the whole kinematic information of heavy ion experiments in a self-consistent way. It takes advantage of the overdetermination of the measurement yielding not only solutions for the primary masses of the fragments, but also "improved values" for their velocity vectors. A statistical variable, Δν, indicates to what extent the secondary quantities violate the kinematics of the reaction. The ability of the present approach to reproduce the primary quantities of a binary or ternary reaction is compared with that of older approaches on the basis of realistic Monte Carlo simulations. The background of incompletely detected events of higher multiplicity can be effectively subtracted using the results of the present analysis.

  19. Time-and-frequency-gated photon coincidence counting; a novel multidimensional spectroscopy tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-08-01

    Coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy is broadly applied across the electromagnetic spectrum ranging from NMR to UV. These techniques reveal the properties of matter through the correlation plots of signal fields generated in response to sequences of short pulses with variable delays. Here we discuss a new class of multidimensional techniques obtained by the time-and-frequency-resolved photon coincidence counting measurements of N photons, which constitute a 2N dimensional spectrum. A compact description of these signals is developed based on time-ordered superoperators rather than the normally ordered ordinary operators used in Glauber's photon counting formalism. The independent control of the time and frequency gate parameters reveals fine details of matter dynamics not available otherwise. These signal are illustrated for application to an anharmonic oscillator model with fluctuating energy and anharmonicity.

  20. Calculation of Coincidence Summing Correction Factors for an HPGe detector using GEANT4.

    PubMed

    Giubrone, G; Ortiz, J; Gallardo, S; Martorell, S; Bas, M C

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this paper was to calculate the True Coincidence Summing Correction Factors (TSCFs) for an HPGe coaxial detector in order to correct the summing effect as a result of the presence of (88)Y and (60)Co in a multigamma source used to obtain a calibration efficiency curve. Results were obtained for three volumetric sources using the Monte Carlo toolkit, GEANT4. The first part of this paper deals with modeling the detector in order to obtain a simulated full energy peak efficiency curve. A quantitative comparison between the measured and simulated values was made across the entire energy range under study. The True Summing Correction Factors were calculated for (88)Y and (60)Co using the full peak efficiencies obtained with GEANT4. This methodology was subsequently applied to (134)Cs, and presented a complex decay scheme. PMID:27085040

  1. Characterizations of double pulsing in neutron multiplicity and coincidence counting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Katrina E.; Henzl, Vladimir; Croft, Stephen S.; Henzlova, Daniela; Santi, Peter A.

    2016-10-01

    Passive neutron coincidence/multiplicity counters are subject to non-ideal behavior, such as double pulsing and dead time. It has been shown in the past that double-pulsing exhibits a distinct signature in a Rossi-alpha distribution, which is not readily noticed using traditional Multiplicity Shift Register analysis. However, it has been assumed that the use of a pre-delay in shift register analysis removes any effects of double pulsing. In this work, we use high-fidelity simulations accompanied by experimental measurements to study the effects of double pulsing on multiplicity rates. By exploiting the information from the double pulsing signature peak observable in the Rossi-alpha distribution, the double pulsing fraction can be determined. Algebraic correction factors for the multiplicity rates in terms of the double pulsing fraction have been developed. We discuss the role of these corrections across a range of scenarios.

  2. Analysis of 125Xe electron–photon coincidence decay

    SciTech Connect

    Klingberg, Franziska J.; Biegalski, Steven R.; Prinke, Amanda; Haas, Derek A.; Lowrey, Justin D.

    2015-10-26

    In this study, as part of the verification component of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), environmental gas samples originating from nuclear fission are analyzed for the presence of 131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe, and 135Xe. In this work, the non-traditional radioxenon isotope 125Xe was investigated. The isotope was produced as an isotopically pure sample via neutron activation of 124Xe at the University of Texas at Austin Nuclear Engineering Teaching Lab’s TRIGA MARK II Reactor. The sample was then measured using a HPGe detector as well as an ARSA-style β–γ coincidence detector. Potential sources and sensitivities for production of 125Xe are also considered for relevance to the CTBT verification mission.

  3. True coincidence summing corrections for an extended energy range HPGe detector

    SciTech Connect

    Venegas-Argumedo, Y.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.

    2015-07-23

    True coincidence summing (TCS) effect for natural radioactive families of U-238 and Th-232 represents a problem when an environmental sample with a close source-detector geometry measurement is performed. By using a certified multi-nuclide standard source to calibrate an energy extended range (XtRa) HPGe detector, it is possible to obtain an intensity spectrum slightly affected by the TCS effect with energies from 46 to 1836 keV. In this work, the equations and some other considerations required to calculate the TCS correction factor for isotopes of natural radioactive chains are described. It is projected a validation of the calibration, performed with the IAEA-CU-2006-03 samples (soil and water)

  4. Design and performance of A 3He-free coincidence counter based on parallel plate boron-lined proportional technology

    DOE PAGES

    Henzlova, D.; Menlove, H. O.; Marlow, J. B.

    2015-07-01

    Thermal neutron counters utilized and developed for deployment as non-destructive assay (NDA) instruments in the field of nuclear safeguards traditionally rely on 3He-based proportional counting systems. 3He-based proportional counters have provided core NDA detection capabilities for several decades and have proven to be extremely reliable with range of features highly desirable for nuclear facility deployment. Facing the current depletion of 3He gas supply and the continuing uncertainty of options for future resupply, a search for detection technologies that could provide feasible short-term alternative to 3He gas was initiated worldwide. As part of this effort, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) designedmore » and built a 3He-free full scale thermal neutron coincidence counter based on boron-lined proportional technology. The boronlined technology was selected in a comprehensive inter-comparison exercise based on its favorable performance against safeguards specific parameters. This paper provides an overview of the design and initial performance evaluation of the prototype High Level Neutron counter – Boron (HLNB). The initial results suggest that current HLNB design is capable to provide ~80% performance of a selected reference 3He-based coincidence counter (High Level Neutron Coincidence Counter, HLNCC). Similar samples are expected to be measurable in both systems, however, slightly longer measurement times may be anticipated for large samples in HLNB. The initial evaluation helped to identify potential for further performance improvements via additional tailoring of boron-layer thickness.« less

  5. Improvements of low-level radioxenon detection sensitivity by a state-of-the art coincidence setup.

    PubMed

    Cagniant, A; Le Petit, G; Gross, P; Douysset, G; Richard-Bressand, H; Fontaine, J-P

    2014-05-01

    The ability to quantify isotopic ratios of 135, 133 m, 133 and 131 m radioxenon is essential for the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). In order to improve detection limits, CEA has developed a new on-site setup using photon/electron coincidence (Le Petit et al., 2013. J. Radioanal. Nucl. Chem., DOI : 10.1007/s 10697-013-2525-8.). Alternatively, the electron detection cell equipped with large silicon chips (PIPS) can be used with HPGe detector for laboratory analysis purpose. This setup allows the measurement of β/γ coincidences for the detection of (133)Xe and (135)Xe; and K-shell Conversion Electrons (K-CE)/X-ray coincidences for the detection of (131m)Xe, (133m)Xe and (133)Xe as well. Good energy resolution of 11 keV at 130 keV and low energy threshold of 29 keV for the electron detection were obtained. This provides direct discrimination between K-CE from (133)Xe, (133m)Xe and (131m)Xe. Estimation of Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) for (131m)Xe is in the order of 1mBq over a 4 day measurement. An analysis of an environmental radioxenon sample using this method is shown. PMID:24332879

  6. Using anisotropies in prompt fission neutron coincidences to assess the neutron multiplication of highly multiplying subcritical plutonium assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, J. M.; Mattingly, J.

    2016-07-01

    There is a significant and well-known anisotropy between the prompt neutrons emitted from a single fission event; these neutrons are most likely to be observed at angles near 0° or 180° relative to each other. However, the propagation of this anisotropy through different generations of a fission chain reaction has not been previously studied. We have measured this anisotropy in neutron-neutron coincidences from a subcritical highly-multiplying assembly of plutonium metal. The assembly was a 4.5 kg α-phase plutonium metal sphere composed of 94% 239Pu and 6% 240Pu by mass. Data were collected using two EJ-309 liquid scintillators and two EJ-299 plastic scintillators. The angular distribution of neutron-neutron coincidences was measured at 90° and 180° and found to be largely isotropic. Simulations were performed using MCNPX-PoliMi of similar plutonium metal spheres of varying sizes and a correlation between the neutron multiplication of the assembly and the anisotropy of neutron-neutron coincidences was observed. In principle, this correlation could be used to assess the neutron multiplication of an unknown assembly.

  7. Synchrotron-based double imaging photoelectron/photoion coincidence spectroscopy of radicals produced in a flow tube: OH and OD

    DOE PAGES

    Garcia, Gustavo A.; Tang, Xiaofeng; Gil, Jean -Francois; Nahon, Laurent; Ward, Michael; Batut, Sebastien; Fittschen, Christa; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Loison, Jean -Christophe

    2015-04-23

    In this study, we present a microwave discharge flow tube coupled with a double imaging electron/ion coincidence device and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation. The system has been applied to the study of the photoelectron spectroscopy of the well-known radicals OH and OD. The coincidence imaging scheme provides a high selectivity and yields the spectra of the pure radicals, removing the ever-present contributions from excess reactants, background, or secondary products, and therefore obviating the need for a prior knowledge of all possible byproducts. The photoelectron spectra encompassing the X3Σ– ground state of the OH+ and OD+ cations have been extractedmore » and the vibrational constants compared satisfactorily to existing literature values. Future advantages of this approach include measurement of high resolution VUV spectroscopy of radicals, their absolute photoionization cross section, and species/isomer identification in chemical reactions as a function of time.« less

  8. Synchrotron-based double imaging photoelectron/photoion coincidence spectroscopy of radicals produced in a flow tube: OH and OD

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Gustavo A.; Tang, Xiaofeng; Gil, Jean-François; Nahon, Laurent; Ward, Michael; Batut, Sebastien; Fittschen, Christa; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Loison, Jean-Christophe

    2015-04-28

    We present a microwave discharge flow tube coupled with a double imaging electron/ion coincidence device and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation. The system has been applied to the study of the photoelectron spectroscopy of the well-known radicals OH and OD. The coincidence imaging scheme provides a high selectivity and yields the spectra of the pure radicals, removing the ever-present contributions from excess reactants, background, or secondary products, and therefore obviating the need for a prior knowledge of all possible byproducts. The photoelectron spectra encompassing the X{sup 3}Σ{sup −} ground state of the OH{sup +} and OD{sup +} cations have been extracted and the vibrational constants compared satisfactorily to existing literature values. Future advantages of this approach include measurement of high resolution VUV spectroscopy of radicals, their absolute photoionization cross section, and species/isomer identification in chemical reactions as a function of time.

  9. Synchrotron-based double imaging photoelectron/photoion coincidence spectroscopy of radicals produced in a flow tube: OH and OD

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Gustavo A.; Tang, Xiaofeng; Gil, Jean -Francois; Nahon, Laurent; Ward, Michael; Batut, Sebastien; Fittschen, Christa; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Loison, Jean -Christophe

    2015-04-23

    In this study, we present a microwave discharge flow tube coupled with a double imaging electron/ion coincidence device and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation. The system has been applied to the study of the photoelectron spectroscopy of the well-known radicals OH and OD. The coincidence imaging scheme provides a high selectivity and yields the spectra of the pure radicals, removing the ever-present contributions from excess reactants, background, or secondary products, and therefore obviating the need for a prior knowledge of all possible byproducts. The photoelectron spectra encompassing the X3Σ ground state of the OH+ and OD+ cations have been extracted and the vibrational constants compared satisfactorily to existing literature values. Future advantages of this approach include measurement of high resolution VUV spectroscopy of radicals, their absolute photoionization cross section, and species/isomer identification in chemical reactions as a function of time.

  10. Rapidly evolving narcolepsy-like syndrome coinciding with severe OSA following pharyngoplasty in Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blecher, Gregory; Wainbergas, Natalie; McGlynn, Michael; Teng, Arthur

    2014-09-01

    Our patient with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) not only displayed many typical syndromic features but also presented several unique challenges, with gross velopharyngeal insufficiency necessitating repair and severe obstructive sleep apnea developing thereafter, requiring ongoing non-invasive ventilation. This coincided with development of a narcolepsy-like syndrome, treated with dexamphetamine. Cataplexy, hypnogogic/hypnopompic hallucinations, sleep paralysis were absent and HLA-DQB1*06:02 was negative. Growth hormone (GH) therapy was commenced at 8 months of age and, as recommended, regular polysomnograms were conducted. Adenotonsillar growth on GH therapy is reported as well as several reports of sudden death in PWS patients on GH. Despite GH, lifestyle measures with regular dietician review, and an exercise program, there was progressive excessive weight gain. Our patient also developed moderate tonsil hypertrophy. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of severe obstructive sleep apnea secondary to sphincter pharyngoplasty coinciding with rapidly evolving narcolepsy-like syndrome. PMID:25473585

  11. Synchrotron-based double imaging photoelectron/photoion coincidence spectroscopy of radicals produced in a flow tube: OH and OD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Gustavo A.; Tang, Xiaofeng; Gil, Jean-François; Nahon, Laurent; Ward, Michael; Batut, Sebastien; Fittschen, Christa; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Loison, Jean-Christophe

    2015-04-01

    We present a microwave discharge flow tube coupled with a double imaging electron/ion coincidence device and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation. The system has been applied to the study of the photoelectron spectroscopy of the well-known radicals OH and OD. The coincidence imaging scheme provides a high selectivity and yields the spectra of the pure radicals, removing the ever-present contributions from excess reactants, background, or secondary products, and therefore obviating the need for a prior knowledge of all possible byproducts. The photoelectron spectra encompassing the X3Σ- ground state of the OH+ and OD+ cations have been extracted and the vibrational constants compared satisfactorily to existing literature values. Future advantages of this approach include measurement of high resolution VUV spectroscopy of radicals, their absolute photoionization cross section, and species/isomer identification in chemical reactions as a function of time.

  12. The use of computed radiography plates to determine light and radiation field coincidence

    PubMed Central

    Kerns, James R.; Anand, Aman

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Photo-stimulable phosphor computed radiography (CR) has characteristics that allow the output to be manipulated by both radiation and optical light. The authors have developed a method that uses these characteristics to carry out radiation field and light field coincidence quality assurance on linear accelerators. Methods: CR detectors from Kodak were used outside their cassettes to measure both radiation and light field edges from a Varian linear accelerator. The CR detector was first exposed to a radiation field and then to a slightly smaller light field. The light impinged on the detector's latent image, removing to an extent the portion exposed to the light field. The detector was then digitally scanned. A MATLAB-based algorithm was developed to automatically analyze the images and determine the edges of the light and radiation fields, the vector between the field centers, and the crosshair center. Radiographic film was also used as a control to confirm the radiation field size. Results: Analysis showed a high degree of repeatability with the proposed method. Results between the proposed method and radiographic film showed excellent agreement of the radiation field. The effect of varying monitor units and light exposure time was tested and found to be very small. Radiation and light field sizes were determined with an uncertainty of less than 1 mm, and light and crosshair centers were determined within 0.1 mm. Conclusions: A new method was developed to digitally determine the radiation and light field size using CR photo-stimulable phosphor plates. The method is quick and reproducible, allowing for the streamlined and robust assessment of light and radiation field coincidence, with no observer interpretation needed. PMID:24320415

  13. Alpha particle spectra in coincidence with normal and superdeformed states in {sup 150}Tb

    SciTech Connect

    Viesti, G.; Lunardon, M.; Bazzacco, D. |

    1996-12-31

    The study of correlations between particle evaporation from highly excited compound nuclei at large angular momenta and the states in the final evaporation residues (ER) is a field of investigation which has been opened, in the last years, with the advent of the new large {gamma}-ray arrays. It is now possible to correlate the evaporation spectra to various bands with shapes ranging from spherical to superdeformed (SD) in the same final nucleus. It is generally accepted that the particle evaporation from the compound nucleus is chaotic and that only in the near-yrast {gamma} cascade, where the feeding of different classes of states takes place, the ordered motion is restored. The sensitivity of the particle spectra on the feeding of specific states in the residual nuclei can be taken as an indication that additional degrees of freedom might be important in the evaporation process or that particular regions of the phase space open to the decay populate preferentially some selected structures in the final cold nucleus. This latter point is important for the understanding of the feeding mechanism of SD states. Several experiments performed so far did not find a clear dependence of the shapes of the particle spectra on the excited states having different deformations in the ER. For example, the proton spectra in coincidence with transitions in the SD bands of {sup 133}Nd and {sup 152}Dy nuclei were found to be similar to those in coincidence with transitions in the normal deformed (ND) bands. Alpha particles have been proposed since long as a sensitive probe of the deformation of the emitting nucleus. Results are presented here of an experiment in which the authors have measured the energy spectra of alpha particles associated with different classes of states (ND and SD) in the {sup 150}Tb nucleus populated in the reaction {sup 37}Cl({sup 120}Sn, {alpha}3n{gamma}){sup 150}Tb.

  14. Anomalous coincidences between valley split Landau levels in a Si/SiGe heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, H. W.; Nauen, A.; Zeitler, U.; Haug, R. J.; Weitz, P.; Jansen, A. G. M.; Schäffler, F.

    1998-12-01

    We have performed magneto-transport experiments on a high mobility 2DEG in a Si/SiGe heterojunction in tilted magnetic fields up to 26 T at temperatures down to 450 mK. When tilting the sample in the magnetic field the value of the spin splitting increases with respect to the Landau level splitting leading to an overlap of spin-split sub-levels of different Landau levels, the so-called coincidences. Coincidences between up to five neighbouring Landau levels are found. From their positions we deduce a Landé factor g ∗≈3.4 . Coincidences between the lowest Landau levels with fully resolved individual valley states show extremely high SdH peaks compared to the individual SdH maxima outside the coincidence suggesting strong exchange enhancement effects in the occurrence of the coincidence.

  15. A Rapid Coordinate Transformation Method Applied in Industrial Robot Calibration Based on Characteristic Line Coincidence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bailing; Zhang, Fumin; Qu, Xinghua; Shi, Xiaojia

    2016-02-18

    Coordinate transformation plays an indispensable role in industrial measurements, including photogrammetry, geodesy, laser 3-D measurement and robotics. The widely applied methods of coordinate transformation are generally based on solving the equations of point clouds. Despite the high accuracy, this might result in no solution due to the use of ill conditioned matrices. In this paper, a novel coordinate transformation method is proposed, not based on the equation solution but based on the geometric transformation. We construct characteristic lines to represent the coordinate systems. According to the space geometry relation, the characteristic line scan is made to coincide by a series of rotations and translations. The transformation matrix can be obtained using matrix transformation theory. Experiments are designed to compare the proposed method with other methods. The results show that the proposed method has the same high accuracy, but the operation is more convenient and flexible. A multi-sensor combined measurement system is also presented to improve the position accuracy of a robot with the calibration of the robot kinematic parameters. Experimental verification shows that the position accuracy of robot manipulator is improved by 45.8% with the proposed method and robot calibration.

  16. A Rapid Coordinate Transformation Method Applied in Industrial Robot Calibration Based on Characteristic Line Coincidence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bailing; Zhang, Fumin; Qu, Xinghua; Shi, Xiaojia

    2016-01-01

    Coordinate transformation plays an indispensable role in industrial measurements, including photogrammetry, geodesy, laser 3-D measurement and robotics. The widely applied methods of coordinate transformation are generally based on solving the equations of point clouds. Despite the high accuracy, this might result in no solution due to the use of ill conditioned matrices. In this paper, a novel coordinate transformation method is proposed, not based on the equation solution but based on the geometric transformation. We construct characteristic lines to represent the coordinate systems. According to the space geometry relation, the characteristic line scan is made to coincide by a series of rotations and translations. The transformation matrix can be obtained using matrix transformation theory. Experiments are designed to compare the proposed method with other methods. The results show that the proposed method has the same high accuracy, but the operation is more convenient and flexible. A multi-sensor combined measurement system is also presented to improve the position accuracy of a robot with the calibration of the robot kinematic parameters. Experimental verification shows that the position accuracy of robot manipulator is improved by 45.8% with the proposed method and robot calibration. PMID:26901203

  17. A Rapid Coordinate Transformation Method Applied in Industrial Robot Calibration Based on Characteristic Line Coincidence

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bailing; Zhang, Fumin; Qu, Xinghua; Shi, Xiaojia

    2016-01-01

    Coordinate transformation plays an indispensable role in industrial measurements, including photogrammetry, geodesy, laser 3-D measurement and robotics. The widely applied methods of coordinate transformation are generally based on solving the equations of point clouds. Despite the high accuracy, this might result in no solution due to the use of ill conditioned matrices. In this paper, a novel coordinate transformation method is proposed, not based on the equation solution but based on the geometric transformation. We construct characteristic lines to represent the coordinate systems. According to the space geometry relation, the characteristic line scan is made to coincide by a series of rotations and translations. The transformation matrix can be obtained using matrix transformation theory. Experiments are designed to compare the proposed method with other methods. The results show that the proposed method has the same high accuracy, but the operation is more convenient and flexible. A multi-sensor combined measurement system is also presented to improve the position accuracy of a robot with the calibration of the robot kinematic parameters. Experimental verification shows that the position accuracy of robot manipulator is improved by 45.8% with the proposed method and robot calibration. PMID:26901203

  18. Revised correlation between Odin/OSIRIS PMC properties and coincident TIMED/SABER mesospheric temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feofilov, A.; Petelina, S. V.; Kutepov, A. A.; Pesnell, W. D.; Goldberg, R. A.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Russell, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    The Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imaging System (OSIRIS) instrument on board the Odin satellite detects Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) through the enhancement in the limb-scattered solar radiance. The Sounding of the Atmosphere using the Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on board the TIMED satellite is a limb scanning infrared radiometer that measures temperature and vertical profiles and energetic parameters for minor constituents in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The combination of OSIRIS and SABER data has been previously used to statistically derive thermal conditions for PMC existence [Petelina et al., 2005]. In this work, we employ the simultaneous common volume measurements of PMCs by OSIRIS and temperature profiles measured by SABER for the Northern Hemisphere summers of 2002--2005 and corrected in the polar region by accounting for the vibrational-vibrational energy exchange among the CO2 isotopes [Kutepov et al., 2006]. For each coincidence identified within ±1 degree latitude, ±2 degrees longitude and ≤1 hour time the frost point temperatures were calculated using the corresponding SABER temperature profile and water vapor densities of 1, 3, and 10 ppmv. We found that the PMC presence and brightness correlated only with the temperature threshold that corresponds to the frost point. The absolute value of the temperature below the frost point, however, didn't play a significant role in the intensity of PMC signal for the majority of selected coincidences. The presence of several bright clouds at temperatures above the frost point is obviously related to the limitation of the limb geometry when some near- or far-field PMCs, actually located at higher (and colder) altitudes are detected at lower altitudes. S.V. Petelina, D.A. Degenstein, E.J. Llewellyn, N.D. Lloyd, C.J. Mertens, M.G. Mlynczak, and J.M. Russell III, "Thermal conditions for PMC existence derived from Odin/OSIRIS and TIMED/SABER data", Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L

  19. Intrinsic coincident linear polarimetry using stacked organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Roy, S Gupta; Awartani, O M; Sen, P; O'Connor, B T; Kudenov, M W

    2016-06-27

    Polarimetry has widespread applications within atmospheric sensing, telecommunications, biomedical imaging, and target detection. Several existing methods of imaging polarimetry trade off the sensor's spatial resolution for polarimetric resolution, and often have some form of spatial registration error. To mitigate these issues, we have developed a system using oriented polymer-based organic photovoltaics (OPVs) that can preferentially absorb linearly polarized light. Additionally, the OPV cells can be made semitransparent, enabling multiple detectors to be cascaded along the same optical axis. Since each device performs a partial polarization measurement of the same incident beam, high temporal resolution is maintained with the potential for inherent spatial registration. In this paper, a Mueller matrix model of the stacked OPV design is provided. Based on this model, a calibration technique is developed and presented. This calibration technique and model are validated with experimental data, taken with a cascaded three cell OPV Stokes polarimeter, capable of measuring incident linear polarization states. Our results indicate polarization measurement error of 1.2% RMS and an average absolute radiometric accuracy of 2.2% for the demonstrated polarimeter.

  20. Intrinsic coincident linear polarimetry using stacked organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Roy, S Gupta; Awartani, O M; Sen, P; O'Connor, B T; Kudenov, M W

    2016-06-27

    Polarimetry has widespread applications within atmospheric sensing, telecommunications, biomedical imaging, and target detection. Several existing methods of imaging polarimetry trade off the sensor's spatial resolution for polarimetric resolution, and often have some form of spatial registration error. To mitigate these issues, we have developed a system using oriented polymer-based organic photovoltaics (OPVs) that can preferentially absorb linearly polarized light. Additionally, the OPV cells can be made semitransparent, enabling multiple detectors to be cascaded along the same optical axis. Since each device performs a partial polarization measurement of the same incident beam, high temporal resolution is maintained with the potential for inherent spatial registration. In this paper, a Mueller matrix model of the stacked OPV design is provided. Based on this model, a calibration technique is developed and presented. This calibration technique and model are validated with experimental data, taken with a cascaded three cell OPV Stokes polarimeter, capable of measuring incident linear polarization states. Our results indicate polarization measurement error of 1.2% RMS and an average absolute radiometric accuracy of 2.2% for the demonstrated polarimeter. PMID:27410627

  1. Spectroscopy of {sup 189,187}Pb from gamma-FMA coincidences

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, R.V.F.; Davids, C.N.; Blumenthal, D.

    1995-08-01

    The very neutron-deficient Pb isotopes are of much current interest because they exhibit shape coexistence between a spherical groundstate and a deformed prolate excited configuration located very low in excitation energy. Last year the nucleus {sup 186}Pb was studied at the FMA in an FMA-{gamma}-{gamma} coincidence experiment. The purpose of the present measurement was to delineate, for the first time, the groundstate and near groundstate excitations in the odd Pb isotopes {sup 189,187}Pb in order to identify the orbitals which have an important role in driving the nuclear shape. The experiment was performed only very recently at the FMA with 10 Compton-suppressed Ge detectors from the Argonne Notre Dame BGO Gamma-Ray facility. {sup 187}Pb was studied with the {sup 155}Gd({sup 36}Ar,4n) reaction at 179 MeV, while {sup 189}Pb was reached with the {sup 158}Gd({sup 36}Ar,5n) reaction at the same beam energy. The analysis just began. It can already be stated that transitions in both Pb isotopes were identified and that it should be possible to establish level schemes. The presence of possible isomeric states in {sup 189}Pb will be checked in a follow-up experiment planned in Canberra. A similar measurement on {sup 187}Pb appears very difficult because of the very small cross section involved.

  2. Coincident Occurrences of Tropical Individual Cirrus Clouds and Deep Convective Systems Derived from TRMM Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing; Xu, Kuan-Man; Minnis, Patrick; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Hu, Yongxiang; Chambers, Lin; Fan, Alice; Sun, Wenbo

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of cloud properties and atmospheric radiation taken between January and August 1998 by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite were used to investigate the effect of spatial and temporal scales on the coincident occurrences of tropical individual cirrus clouds (ICCs) and deep convective systems (DCSs). It is found that there is little or even negative correlation between instantaneous occurrences of ICC and DCS in small areas, in which both types of clouds cannot grow and expand simultaneously. When spatial and temporal domains are increased, ICCs become more dependent on DCSs due to the origination of many ICCs from DCSs and moisture supply from the DCS in the upper troposphere for the ICCs to grow, resulting in significant positive correlation between the two types of tropical high clouds in large spatial and long temporal scales. This result may suggest that the decrease of tropical high clouds with SST from model simulations is likely caused by restricted spatial domains and limited temporal periods. Finally, the radiative feedback due to the change in tropical high cloud area coverage with sea surface temperature appears small and about -0.14 W/sq m per degree Kelvin.

  3. Photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectroscopy for multiplexed detection of intermediate species in a flame.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Julia; Garcia, Gustavo A; Felsmann, Daniel; Moshammer, Kai; Lackner, Alexander; Brockhinke, Andreas; Nahon, Laurent; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2014-11-01

    Complex reactive processes in the gas phase often proceed via numerous reaction steps and intermediate species that must be identified and quantified to develop an understanding of the reaction pathways and establish suitable reaction mechanisms. Here, photoelectron-photoion coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy has been applied to analyse combustion intermediates present in a premixed fuel-rich (ϕ = 1.7) ethene-oxygen flame diluted with 25% argon, burning at a reduced pressure of 40 mbar. For the first time, multiplexing fixed-photon-energy PEPICO measurements were demonstrated in a chemically complex reactive system such as a flame in comparison with the scanning "threshold" TPEPICO approach used in recent pioneering combustion investigations. The technique presented here is capable of detecting and identifying multiple species by their cations' vibronic fingerprints, including radicals and pairs or triplets of isomers, from a single time-efficient measurement at a selected fixed photon energy. Vibrational structures for these species have been obtained in very good agreement with scanning-mode threshold photoelectron spectra taken under the same conditions. From such spectra, the temperature in the ionisation volume was determined. Exemplary analysis of species profiles and mole fraction ratios for isomers shows favourable agreement with results obtained by more common electron ionisation and photoionisation mass spectrometry experiments. It is expected that the multiplexing fixed-photon-energy PEPICO technique can contribute effectively to the analysis of chemical reactivity and kinetics in and beyond combustion. PMID:25237782

  4. Radioisotope studies of the farmville meteorite using γγ-coincidence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Howard, Chris; Ferm, Megan; Cesaratto, John; Daigle, Stephen; Iliadis, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Radionuclides are cosmogenically produced in meteorites before they fall to the surface of the Earth. Measurement of the radioactive decay of such nuclides provides a wealth of information on the irradiation conditions of the meteorite fragment, the intensity of cosmic rays in the inner solar system, and the magnetic activity of the Sun. We report here on the detection of (26)Al using a sophisticated spectrometer consisting of a HPGe detector and a NaI(Tl) annulus. It is shown that modern γ-ray spectrometers represent an interesting alternative to other detection techniques. Data are obtained for a fragment of the Farmville meteorite and compared to results from Geant4 simulations. In particular, we report on optimizing the detection sensitivity by using suitable coincidence gates for deposited energy and event multiplicity. We measured an (26)Al activity of 48.5±3.5dpm/kg for the Farmville meteorite, in agreement with previously reported values for other H chondrites. PMID:25063942

  5. Radioisotope studies of the farmville meteorite using γγ-coincidence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Howard, Chris; Ferm, Megan; Cesaratto, John; Daigle, Stephen; Iliadis, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Radionuclides are cosmogenically produced in meteorites before they fall to the surface of the Earth. Measurement of the radioactive decay of such nuclides provides a wealth of information on the irradiation conditions of the meteorite fragment, the intensity of cosmic rays in the inner solar system, and the magnetic activity of the Sun. We report here on the detection of (26)Al using a sophisticated spectrometer consisting of a HPGe detector and a NaI(Tl) annulus. It is shown that modern γ-ray spectrometers represent an interesting alternative to other detection techniques. Data are obtained for a fragment of the Farmville meteorite and compared to results from Geant4 simulations. In particular, we report on optimizing the detection sensitivity by using suitable coincidence gates for deposited energy and event multiplicity. We measured an (26)Al activity of 48.5±3.5dpm/kg for the Farmville meteorite, in agreement with previously reported values for other H chondrites.

  6. A Maximum NEC Criterion for Compton Collimation to Accurately Identify True Coincidences in PET

    PubMed Central

    Chinn, Garry; Levin, Craig S.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we propose a new method to increase the accuracy of identifying true coincidence events for positron emission tomography (PET). This approach requires 3-D detectors with the ability to position each photon interaction in multi-interaction photon events. When multiple interactions occur in the detector, the incident direction of the photon can be estimated using the Compton scatter kinematics (Compton Collimation). If the difference between the estimated incident direction of the photon relative to a second, coincident photon lies within a certain angular range around colinearity, the line of response between the two photons is identified as a true coincidence and used for image reconstruction. We present an algorithm for choosing the incident photon direction window threshold that maximizes the noise equivalent counts of the PET system. For simulated data, the direction window removed 56%–67% of random coincidences while retaining > 94% of true coincidences from image reconstruction as well as accurately extracted 70% of true coincidences from multiple coincidences. PMID:21317079

  7. Calculation of extrapolation curves in the 4π(LS)β-γ coincidence technique with the Monte Carlo code Geant4.

    PubMed

    Bobin, C; Thiam, C; Bouchard, J

    2016-03-01

    At LNE-LNHB, a liquid scintillation (LS) detection setup designed for Triple to Double Coincidence Ratio (TDCR) measurements is also used in the β-channel of a 4π(LS)β-γ coincidence system. This LS counter based on 3 photomultipliers was first modeled using the Monte Carlo code Geant4 to enable the simulation of optical photons produced by scintillation and Cerenkov effects. This stochastic modeling was especially designed for the calculation of double and triple coincidences between photomultipliers in TDCR measurements. In the present paper, this TDCR-Geant4 model is extended to 4π(LS)β-γ coincidence counting to enable the simulation of the efficiency-extrapolation technique by the addition of a γ-channel. This simulation tool aims at the prediction of systematic biases in activity determination due to eventual non-linearity of efficiency-extrapolation curves. First results are described in the case of the standardization (59)Fe. The variation of the γ-efficiency in the β-channel due to the Cerenkov emission is investigated in the case of the activity measurements of (54)Mn. The problem of the non-linearity between β-efficiencies is featured in the case of the efficiency tracing technique for the activity measurements of (14)C using (60)Co as a tracer.

  8. Towards component-based validation of GATE: aspects of the coincidence processor

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Eder R.; Poon, Jonathan K.; Balakrishnan, Karthikayan; Wang, Wenli; Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2014-01-01

    GATE is public domain software widely used for Monte Carlo simulation in emission tomography. Validations of GATE have primarily been performed on a whole-system basis, leaving the possibility that errors in one sub-system may be offset by errors in others. We assess the accuracy of the GATE PET coincidence generation sub-system in isolation, focusing on the options most closely modeling the majority of commercially available scanners. Independent coincidence generators were coded by teams at Toshiba Medical Research Unit (TMRU) and UC Davis. A model similar to the Siemens mCT scanner was created in GATE. Annihilation photons interacting with the detectors were recorded. Coincidences were generated using GATE, TMRU and UC Davis code and results compared to “ground truth” obtained from the history of the photon interactions. GATE was tested twice, once with every qualified single event opening a time window and initiating a coincidence check (the “multiple window method”), and once where a time window is opened and a coincidence check initiated only by the first single event to occur after the end of the prior time window (the “single window method”). True, scattered and random coincidences were compared. Noise equivalent count rates were also computed and compared. The TMRU and UC Davis coincidence generators agree well with ground truth. With GATE, reasonable accuracy can be obtained if the single window method option is chosen and random coincidences are estimated without use of the delayed coincidence option. However in this GATE version, other parameter combinations can result in significant errors. PMID:25240897

  9. Towards component-based validation of GATE: aspects of the coincidence processor.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Eder R; Poon, Jonathan K; Balakrishnan, Karthikayan; Wang, Wenli; Badawi, Ramsey D

    2015-02-01

    GATE is public domain software widely used for Monte Carlo simulation in emission tomography. Validations of GATE have primarily been performed on a whole-system basis, leaving the possibility that errors in one sub-system may be offset by errors in others. We assess the accuracy of the GATE PET coincidence generation sub-system in isolation, focusing on the options most closely modeling the majority of commercially available scanners. Independent coincidence generators were coded by teams at Toshiba Medical Research Unit (TMRU) and UC Davis. A model similar to the Siemens mCT scanner was created in GATE. Annihilation photons interacting with the detectors were recorded. Coincidences were generated using GATE, TMRU and UC Davis code and results compared to "ground truth" obtained from the history of the photon interactions. GATE was tested twice, once with every qualified single event opening a time window and initiating a coincidence check (the "multiple window method"), and once where a time window is opened and a coincidence check initiated only by the first single event to occur after the end of the prior time window (the "single window method"). True, scattered and random coincidences were compared. Noise equivalent count rates were also computed and compared. The TMRU and UC Davis coincidence generators agree well with ground truth. With GATE, reasonable accuracy can be obtained if the single window method option is chosen and random coincidences are estimated without use of the delayed coincidence option. However in this GATE version, other parameter combinations can result in significant errors. PMID:25240897

  10. Complete intrinsic coincident polarimetry using stacked organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta Roy, S.; Awartani, O. M.; Sen, P.; O'Connor, B. T.; Kudenov, M. W.

    2015-09-01

    Measuring the 2 dimensional Stokes vector, to determine the polarization state of light, finds application in multiple areas, including the characterization of aerosol size distributions, target identification, quality control by evaluating the distribution of stress birefringence, resolving data channels in telecommunications, and for evaluating biological tissues in medical imaging. Conventional methods, such as channeled and division of focal plane polarimeters, usually limit spatial resolution, while others, like division of aperture or division of amplitude polarimeters, have higher complexity and less compactness. To help solve these issues, we have developed a system that uses semitransparent organic photovoltaics (OPVs) as photodetectors. The active area of the devices consist of biaxially oriented polymer films, which enables the device to preferentially absorb certain polarized states of incident light, depending on the orientation of the polymer chains. Taking advantage of the cells' transparency and ease of processing, compared to inorganic materials, enables multiple devices to be "stacked" along the optical axis. Presently, experiments have been conducted to detect linear polarization states of light. We use three stacked OPVs, where each device can measure one of the first three Stokes parameters simultaneously, thereby ensuring high spatial and temporal resolution with inherent spatial registration. In this paper, the fabrication of the OPVs and the design and calibration technique is documented, along with experimental data, supporting the hypothesis.

  11. Neutron Production in Coincidence with Fragments from the {sup 40}Ca + H Reactions at E{sub lab} = 357 and 565 A MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Tuve, C.; Albergo, S.; Boemi, D.; Caccia, Z.; Chen, C.-X.; Costa, S.; Crawford, H.J.; Cronqvist, M.; Engelage, J.; Greiner, L.; Guzik, T.G.; Insolia, A.; Knott, C.N.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Mitchell, J.W.; Potenza, R.; Russo, G.V.; Soutoul, A.; Testard, O.; Tricomi, A.; Tull, C.E.; Waddington, C.J.; Webber, W.R.; Wefel, J.P.

    2000-12-31

    In the frame of the Transport Collaboration neutrons in coincidence with charged fragments produced in the {sup 40}Ca + H reaction at E{sub lab} = 357 and 565 AMeV have been measured at the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) facility of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, using the multifunctional neutron spectrometer MUFFINS. The detector covered a narrow angular range about the beam in the forward direction (0? - 3.2?). In this contribution we report absolute neutron production cross sections in coincidence with charged fragments (10 {<=} Z {<=} 20). The neutron multiplicities have been estimated from the comparison between the neutron cross sections, in coincidence with the fragments, and the elemental cross sections. We have found evidence for a pre-equilibrium emission of prompt neutrons in superposition to a 'slower' deexcitation of the equilibrated remnant by emission of nucleons and fragments, as already seen in the inclusive rapidity distributions.

  12. Comparison of satellite reflectance algorithms for estimating chlorophyll-a in a temperate reservoir using coincident hyperspectral aircraft imagery and dense coincident surface observations

    EPA Science Inventory

    We analyzed 10 established and 4 new satellite reflectance algorithms for estimating chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) in a temperate reservoir in southwest Ohio using coincident hyperspectral aircraft imagery and dense water truth collected within one hour of image acquisition to develop si...

  13. Development and Testing of the Positron Identification By Coincident Annihilation Photons (PICAP) System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, D.; Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.; Bickford, B.

    2014-12-01

    Moderate energy positrons (~few to 10 MeV) have seldom been observed in the Heliosphere, due primarily to there not having been dedicated instruments for such measurements. Their detection would have implications in the study of Solar energetic particle events and the transport and modulation of the Solar wind and Galactic cosmic rays. The Positron Identification by Coincident Annihilation Photons (PICAP) system is designed specifically to measure these moderate energy positrons by simultaneously detecting the two 511-keV γ-ray photons that result from a positron stopping in the instrument and the subsequent electron-positron annihilation. This method is also expected to effectively discriminate positrons from protons by measuring the amount of energy deposited in the detectors (dE/dx versus residual energy). PICAP offers a low-mass, low-power option for measuring positrons, electrons, and ions in space. Following Monte Carlo modeling, a PICAP laboratory prototype, adaptable to a space-flight design, was designed, built, and tested. This instrument is comprised of (Si) solid-state detectors, plastic scintillation detectors, and high-Z BGO crystal scintillator suitable for detecting the 511-keV γ rays. The prototype underwent preliminary laboratory testing and calibration using radioactive sources for the purpose of establishing functionality. It has since been exposed to beams of energetic protons (up to ~200 MeV) at Massachusetts General Hospital's Francis H. Burr Proton Beam Therapy Center and positrons and electrons (up to ~10 MeV) at Idaho State University's Idaho Accelerator Center. The goal is to validate modeling and determine the performance of the instrument concept. We will present a summary of modeling calculations and analysis of data taken at the accelerator tests. This work is 95% supported by NASA Grant NNX10AC10G.

  14. A geometric solution to the coincidence problem, and the size of the landscape as the origin of hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Bousso, Raphael; Freivogel, Ben; Leichenauer, Stefan; Rosenhaus, Vladimir

    2011-03-11

    Weinberg's seminal prediction of the cosmological constant relied on a provisional method for regulating eternal inflation which has since been put aside. We show that a modern regulator, the causal patch, improves agreement with observation, removes many limiting assumptions, and yields additional powerful results. Without assuming necessary conditions for observers such as galaxies or entropy production, the causal patch measure predicts the coincidence of vacuum energy and present matter density. Their common scale, and thus the enormous size of the visible Universe, originates in the number of metastable vacua in the landscape.

  15. A geometric solution to the coincidence problem, and the size of the landscape as the origin of hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Bousso, Raphael; Freivogel, Ben; Leichenauer, Stefan; Rosenhaus, Vladimir

    2011-03-11

    Weinberg's seminal prediction of the cosmological constant relied on a provisional method for regulating eternal inflation which has since been put aside. We show that a modern regulator, the causal patch, improves agreement with observation, removes many limiting assumptions, and yields additional powerful results. Without assuming necessary conditions for observers such as galaxies or entropy production, the causal patch measure predicts the coincidence of vacuum energy and present matter density. Their common scale, and thus the enormous size of the visible Universe, originates in the number of metastable vacua in the landscape. PMID:21469783

  16. Line-coincidence schemes for producing laser action at soft-x-ray wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G.F.

    1983-01-12

    Line-coincidence schemes for producing laser action in the wavelength regime 100-30A are reviewed. Schemes involving pumping of 2..-->..4 transitions in neon-like ions are singled out as particularly attractive.

  17. Direction of an approaching stimulus on coincident timing performance of a ballistic striking task.

    PubMed

    Coker, Cheryl A

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of stimulus direction and velocity on the coincident timing performance of a ballistic striking task. 26 subjects randomly performed 20 trials at each of two stimulus velocities (4 and 8 mph) and two striking variations (moving with an approaching stimulus or in opposition to it). Analysis indicated the direction of an approaching stimulus does not appear to influence the coincident timing of a ballistic striking action.

  18. Coincidence and covariance data acquisition in photoelectron and -ion spectroscopy. I. Formal theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikosch, Jochen; Patchkovskii, Serguei

    2013-10-01

    We derive a formal theory of noisy Poisson processes with multiple outcomes. We obtain simple, compact expressions for the probability distribution function of arbitrarily complex composite events and its moments. We illustrate the utility of the theory by analyzing properties of coincidence and covariance photoelectron-photoion detection involving single-ionization events. The results and techniques introduced in this work are directly applicable to more general coincidence and covariance experiments, including multiple ionization and multiple-ion fragmentation pathways.

  19. Shift Register Clock Rate Effects on Coincidence Collection 50MHz versus 4MHz Comparison Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, Matthew R.; Bourret, Steven C.; Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas

    2015-11-03

    The following report identifies and quantifies the timing differences between the older slower Shift Register Coincidence/Multiplicity modules and today’s modern higher speed devices. Modern high speed Shift Register Coincidence/Multiplicity instruments employ high speed internal clocks that run at frequencies more than ten times the older units, typically 50MHz. These higher speed clocks allow for a finer time resolution when recording input pulses.

  20. Jovian Auroral X-ray Emission Coinciding with an Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, W.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Elsner, R.; Vogt, M.; Lamy, L.; Ford, P. G.; Coates, A. J.; Gladstone, R.; Jackman, C. M.; Nichols, J. D.; Rae, J.; Varsani, A.; Kimura, T.; Hansen, K. C.; Jasinski, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The extent of the Solar Wind influence on Jupiter's X-ray aurora is yet to be understood. To probe this relationship, we compare two Chandra X-ray observations of Jupiter: one coinciding with the predicted arrival of an Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME) and another observation two days later. During the observation coincident with the ICME, we observe a bright auroral enhancement of a factor of 8 in a region normally absent of X-rays. This enhancement occurs ~1 hour before a burst of non-Io Decametric radio emission, believed to be associated with solar wind forward shocks [Hess et al. 2012, 2014]. We also find variation in X-ray auroral periodic behaviour, spatial and spectral distributions. We use magnetosphere-ionosphere mapping [Vogt et al. 2011] to identify the source of ions generating the X-rays and find that they originate from 10:30-18:00 magnetospheric local time (MLT) in regions of the outer magnetosphere close to the magnetopause. The model also maps some precipitation to open field lines. This suggests that X-rays may provide an excellent tool for analysing the Jovian outer magnetosphere and the processes occurring between the Jovian magnetopause and the solar wind. As discovered by Gladstone et al. [2002] discovery, we find an X-ray hot spot that pulses with quasi-periodicity. Measurements of this periodicity suggest 2 distinct ion populations generate the Jovian X-ray aurora: a sulphur/carbon dominated population from the middle to outer magnetosphere with a period of 26 minutes, and a combined oxygen and carbon/sulphur population from close to the magnetopause with a period of 12 minutes. The source region and periodicity support findings by Bunce et al. [2004] that pulsed dayside reconnection could energise the outer magnetosphere and drive X-ray emission To better understand the persistence of these features and/or their relationship to the ICME, we compare these 2011 observations with preliminary analysis of Chandra X-ray observations

  1. Modeling time-coincident ultrafast electron transfer and solvation processes at molecule-semiconductor interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lesheng; Giokas, Paul G.; Moran, Andrew M. E-mail: ammoran@email.unc.edu; Kanai, Yosuke E-mail: ammoran@email.unc.edu

    2014-06-21

    Kinetic models based on Fermi's Golden Rule are commonly employed to understand photoinduced electron transfer dynamics at molecule-semiconductor interfaces. Implicit in such second-order perturbative descriptions is the assumption that nuclear relaxation of the photoexcited electron donor is fast compared to electron injection into the semiconductor. This approximation breaks down in systems where electron transfer transitions occur on 100-fs time scale. Here, we present a fourth-order perturbative model that captures the interplay between time-coincident electron transfer and nuclear relaxation processes initiated by light absorption. The model consists of a fairly small number of parameters, which can be derived from standard spectroscopic measurements (e.g., linear absorbance, fluorescence) and/or first-principles electronic structure calculations. Insights provided by the model are illustrated for a two-level donor molecule coupled to both (i) a single acceptor level and (ii) a density of states (DOS) calculated for TiO{sub 2} using a first-principles electronic structure theory. These numerical calculations show that second-order kinetic theories fail to capture basic physical effects when the DOS exhibits narrow maxima near the energy of the molecular excited state. Overall, we conclude that the present fourth-order rate formula constitutes a rigorous and intuitive framework for understanding photoinduced electron transfer dynamics that occur on the 100-fs time scale.

  2. Declining pine growth in Central Spain coincides with increasing diurnal temperature range since the 1970s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büntgen, Ulf; Martínez-Peña, Fernando; Aldea, Jorge; Rigling, Andreas; Fischer, Erich M.; Camarero, J. Julio; Hayes, Michael J.; Fatton, Vincent; Egli, Simon

    2013-08-01

    Growing evidence suggests environmental change to be most severe across the semi-arid subtropics, with past, present and projected drying of the Mediterranean Basin posing a key multidisciplinary challenge. Consideration of a single climatic factor, however, often fails to explain spatiotemporal growth dynamics of drought-prone ecosystems. Here, we present annually resolved and absolutely dated ring width measurements of 871 Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris) from 18 individual plot sites in the Central Spanish Pinar Grande forest reserve. Although comprising tree ages from 6 to 175 years, this network correlates surprisingly well with the inverse May-July diurnal temperature range (r = 0.84; p < 0.00011956-2011). Ring width extremes were triggered by pressure anomalies of the North Atlantic Oscillation, and the long-term growth decline coincided with Iberian-wide drying since the mid-1970s. Climate model simulations not only confirm this negative trend over the last decades but also project drought to continuously increase over the 21st century. Associated ecological effects and socio-economic consequences should be considered to improve adaptation strategies of agricultural and forest management, as well as biodiversity conservation and ecosystem service.

  3. Signal-to-noise ratio in the membrane potential of the owl's auditory coincidence detectors

    PubMed Central

    Funabiki, Kazuo; Kuokkanen, Paula T.; Kempter, Richard; Carr, Catherine E.

    2012-01-01

    Owls use interaural time differences (ITDs) to locate a sound source. They compute ITD in a specialized neural circuit that consists of axonal delay lines from the cochlear nucleus magnocellularis (NM) and coincidence detectors in the nucleus laminaris (NL). Recent physiological recordings have shown that tonal stimuli induce oscillatory membrane potentials in NL neurons (Funabiki K, Ashida G, Konishi M. J Neurosci 31: 15245–15256, 2011). The amplitude of these oscillations varies with ITD and is strongly correlated to the firing rate. The oscillation, termed the sound analog potential, has the same frequency as the stimulus tone and is presumed to originate from phase-locked synaptic inputs from NM fibers. To investigate how these oscillatory membrane potentials are generated, we applied recently developed signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) analysis techniques (Kuokkanen PT, Wagner H, Ashida G, Carr CE, Kempter R. J Neurophysiol 104: 2274–2290, 2010) to the intracellular waveforms obtained in vivo. Our theoretical prediction of the band-limited SNRs agreed with experimental data for mid- to high-frequency (>2 kHz) NL neurons. For low-frequency (≤2 kHz) NL neurons, however, measured SNRs were lower than theoretical predictions. These results suggest that the number of independent NM fibers converging onto each NL neuron and/or the population-averaged degree of phase-locking of the NM fibers could be significantly smaller in the low-frequency NL region than estimated for higher best-frequency NL. PMID:22933726

  4. In-Situ Transfer Standard and Coincident-View Intercomparisons for Sensor Cross-Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurt; McCorkel, Joel; Czapla-Myers, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    There exist numerous methods for accomplishing on-orbit calibration. Methods include the reflectance-based approach relying on measurements of surface and atmospheric properties at the time of a sensor overpass as well as invariant scene approaches relying on knowledge of the temporal characteristics of the site. The current work examines typical cross-calibration methods and discusses the expected uncertainties of the methods. Data from the Advanced Land Imager (ALI), Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection and Radiometer (ASTER), Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and Thematic Mapper (TM) are used to demonstrate the limits of relative sensor-to-sensor calibration as applied to current sensors while Landsat-5 TM and Landsat-7 ETM+ are used to evaluate the limits of in situ site characterizations for SI-traceable cross calibration. The current work examines the difficulties in trending of results from cross-calibration approaches taking into account sampling issues, site-to-site variability, and accuracy of the method. Special attention is given to the differences caused in the cross-comparison of sensors in radiance space as opposed to reflectance space. The results show that cross calibrations with absolute uncertainties lesser than 1.5 percent (1 sigma) are currently achievable even for sensors without coincident views.

  5. Co-incident 3D mapping of sea ice surface elevation and ice draft in the Beaufort Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doble, M. J.; Forsberg, R.; Haas, C.; Hanson, S.; Hendriks, S.; Martin, T.; Skourup, H.; Wadhams, P.

    2007-12-01

    Co-incident measurements of sea ice freeboard, thickness and draft were made during the Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station (APLIS), in April 2007. The campaign was the first time that full three-dimensional mapping of sea ice freeboard and sea ice draft have been achieved simultaneously. Freeboard was measured across a swath width of 300 m at 1 m spatial resolution, using a laser profilometer flown aboard a Twin Otter aircraft. Ice draft was measured across a swath width of approximately 80 m at 0.5 m spatial resolution, using a Gavia AUV fitted with a GeoAcoustics phase-measuring swath sonar. Ice thickness was also measured along co-incident tracks using a helicopter-borne electromagnetic sounding instrument (HEM bird). The laser profilometer and AUV-mounted sonar rely on the assumption of isostatic balance when deriving ice thickness estimates from the ice surface and underside profiles, while the HEM bird records both surfaces simultaneously and independently, though averaging over a significant footprint (30 m) for the underside of the ice. Though the extent of the APLIS dataset was limited by the radius of AUV operations, the dataset will significantly improve our understanding of ice volume in deformed ice areas, particularly our understanding of the contribution of ridges and rubble fields to total Arctic ice volume, their isostatic balance and questions of block-scale porosity. The data will serve to better constrain the effects of porosity and footprint on the operational HEM measurements and, conversely, the HEM measurements will allow conclusions about the impact of the isostatic balance assumption on ice thickness estimates derived from mapping of one surface.

  6. A spectrometer for lifetime determination by β-γ-γ delayed coincidence technique at KUR-ISOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Y.; Hayashi, H.; Shibata, M.; Endo, S.; Shizuma, K.; Taniguchi, A.

    2011-12-01

    A new spectrometer for measuring nuclear level lifetimes has been installed at the on-line isotope separator of the Kyoto University Reactor. The spectrometer consists of a LaBr3(Ce), Ge and a thin plastic scintillation detector, and the lifetimes are determined using a β-γ-γ delayed coincidence technique. In this study, the LaBr3 detector was used to obtain time spectra, whereas the Ge detector was used to select a desired γ branch. The energy dependence of the time resolutions was measured down to a photon energy of 100 keV. The lifetimes measured for the excited levels in 93Sr and 148Ce agree well with their evaluated values. The lifetime of 8.5(5) ns was obtained for the first time for the 98.2 keV level in 148Pr.

  7. [Validation of simultaneously acquired blood pressure data by statistical coincidence determination of heart rate variability and blood pressure variability].

    PubMed

    Hopfe, J; Schütze, J; Voss, A

    2002-01-01

    We report on the comparison of simultaneous non-invasive measurements of finger blood pressure obtained at both hands with two Portapres systems. We investigated the impact of altering the measurement location on heart rate and blood pressure variability (HRV,BPV) parameters. Two 30 minutes recordings were done twice in 21 volunteers swapPing the systems. HRV and BPV parameters meanNN, sdNN, HF/P and Fw-Shannon were determined. Left and right side corresponding parameters were compared by U-test and correlations. Coincidence matrices were analysed by Mahalanobis distance. The minimal total divergence in HRV was 4.8%, in systolic BPV 6.7% and diastolic BPV 12.1%. These estimates recommend those parameters for multi-center studies that are insensitive to the measurement location. PMID:12465313

  8. Clonal integration of Fragaria orientalis in reciprocal and coincident patchiness resources: cost-benefit analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunchun; Zhang, Qiaoying

    2013-01-01

    Clonal growth allows plants to spread horizontally and to experience different levels of resources. If ramets remain physiologically integrated, clonal plants can reciprocally translocate resources between ramets in heterogeneous environments. But little is known about the interaction between benefits of clonal integration and patterns of resource heterogeneity in different patches, i.e., coincident patchiness or reciprocal patchiness. We hypothesized that clonal integration will show different effects on ramets in different patches and more benefit to ramets under reciprocal patchiness than to those under coincident patchiness, as well as that the benefit from clonal integration is affected by the position of proximal and distal ramets under reciprocal or coincident patchiness. A pot experiment was conducted with clonal fragments consisting of two interconnected ramets (proximal and distal ramet) of Fragaria orientalis. In the experiment, proximal and distal ramets were grown in high or low availability of resources, i.e., light and water. Resource limitation was applied either simultaneously to both ramets of a clonal fragment (coincident resource limitation) or separately to different ramets of the same clonal fragment (reciprocal resource limitation). Half of the clonal fragments were connected while the other half were severed. From the experiment, clonal fragments growing under coincident resource limitation accumulated more biomass than those under reciprocal resource limitation. Based on a cost-benefit analysis, the support from proximal ramets to distal ramets was stronger than that from distal ramets to proximal ramets. Through division of labour, clonal fragments of F. orientalis benefited more in reciprocal patchiness than in coincident patchiness. While considering biomass accumulation and ramets production, coincident patchiness were more favourable to clonal plant F. orientalis. PMID:24265832

  9. Gravity Wave Energetics Determined From Coincident Space-Based and Ground-Based Observations of Airglow Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Significant progress was made toward the goals of this proposal in a number of areas during the covered period. Section 5.1 contains a copy of the originally proposed schedule. The tasks listed below have been accomplished: (1) Construction of space-based observing geometry gravity wave model. This model has been described in detail in the paper accompanying this report (Section 5.2). It can simulate the observing geometry of both ground-based, and orbital instruments allowing comparisons to be made between them. (2) Comparisons of relative emission intensity, temperatures, and Krassovsky's ratio for space- and ground-based observing geometries. These quantities are used in gravity wave literature to describe the effects of the waves on the airglow. (3) Rejection of Bates [1992], and Copeland [1994] chemistries for gravity wave modeling purposes. Excessive 02(A(sup 13)(Delta)) production led to overproduction of O2(b(sup 1)(Sigma)), the state responsible for the emission of O2. Atmospheric band. Attempts were made to correct for this behavior, but could not adequately compensate for this. (4) Rejection of MSX dataset due to lack of coincident data, and resolution necessary to characterize the waves. A careful search to identify coincident data revealed only four instances, with only one of those providing usable data. Two high latitude overpasses and were contaminated by auroral emissions. Of the remaining two mid-latitude coincidences, one overflight was obscured by cloud, leaving only one ten minute segment of usable data. Aside from the statistical difficulties involved in comparing measurements taken in this short period, the instrument lacks the necessary resolution to determine the vertical wavelength of the gravity wave. This means that the wave cannot be uniquely characterized from space with this dataset. Since no observed wave can be uniquely identified, model comparisons are not possible.

  10. Recovering the triple coincidence of non-pure positron emitters in preclinical PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsin-Hon; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Chen, Szu-Yu; Jan, Meei-Ling

    2016-03-01

    Non-pure positron emitters, with their long half-lives, allow for the tracing of slow biochemical processes which cannot be adequately examined by the commonly used short-lived positron emitters. Most of these isotopes emit high-energy cascade gamma rays in addition to positron decay that can be detected and create a triple coincidence with annihilation photons. Triple coincidence is discarded in most scanners, however, the majority of the triple coincidence contains true photon pairs that can be recovered. In this study, we propose a strategy for recovering triple coincidence events to raise the sensitivity of PET imaging for non-pure positron emitters. To identify the true line of response (LOR) from a triple coincidence, a framework utilizing geometrical, energy and temporal information is proposed. The geometrical criterion is based on the assumption that the LOR with the largest radial offset among the three sub pairs of triple coincidences is least likely to be a true LOR. Then, a confidence time window is used to test the valid LOR among those within triple coincidence. Finally, a likelihood ratio discriminant rule based on the energy probability density distribution of cascade and annihilation gammas is established to identify the true LOR. An Inveon preclinical PET scanner was modeled with GATE (GEANT4 application for tomographic emission) Monte Carlo software. We evaluated the performance of the proposed method in terms of identification fraction, noise equivalent count rates (NECR), and image quality on various phantoms. With the inclusion of triple coincidence events using the proposed method, the NECR was found to increase from 11% to 26% and 19% to 29% for I-124 and Br-76, respectively, when 7.4-185 MBq of activity was used. Compared to the reconstructed images using double coincidence, this technique increased the SNR by 5.1-7.3% for I-124 and 9.3-10.3% for Br-76 within the activity range of 9.25-74 MBq, without compromising the spatial resolution or

  11. The coincidence theory of consonance: A re-evaluation based on modern scientific evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitcomb, Benjamin Dwight

    The coincidence theory was a theory of consonance advocated by many of the scientists of the period 1550-1800, including Galileo, Mersenne, Descartes, and Euler. It was the first truly scientific explanation of consonance, addressing the way that sound waves interact with each other either constructively or destructively. Within the present century, historians of music and science have turned their attention to the coincidence theory and the important role it played in both fields in the 17th century. Many of these same authors have charged the theory with having had serious faults. However, an investigation of modern scientific evidence reveals that these alleged problems are either answerable or irrelevant to the coincidence theory. Furthermore, a survey of the major theories of consonance since the 18th century shows that the premises of the coincidence theory pervade and underlie many of these more recent theories. Examples of such theories include those of Helmholtz, Lipps, Boomsliter and Creel, and Terhardt. In the process of establishing these theses, many relevant secondary issues are addressed. For example, this dissertation contains a discussion of the different meanings of the word consonance, the relationship between integer ratios and musical intervals, and the similarities between pitch perception and rhythmic perception. Also, several different versions of the coincidence theory are identified and evaluated.

  12. Monte Carlo calculation of the efficiency calibration curve and coincidence-summing corrections in low-level gamma-ray spectrometry using well-type HPGe detectors

    PubMed

    Laborie; Le Petit G; Abt; Girard

    2000-07-01

    Well-type high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are well suited to the analysis of small amounts of environmental samples, as they can combine both low background and high detection efficiency. A low-background well-type detector is installed in the Modane underground Laboratory. In the well geometry, coincidence-summing effects are high and make the construction of the full energy peak efficiency curve a difficult task with an usual calibration standard, especially in the high energy range. Using the GEANT code and taking into account a detailed description of the detector and the source, efficiency curves have been modelled for several filling heights of the vial. With a special routine taking into account the decay schemes of the radionuclides, corrections for coincidence-summing effects that occur when measuring samples containing 238U, 232Th or 134Cs have been computed. The results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. It is shown that triple coincidences effect on counting losses accounts for 7-15% of pair coincidences effect in the case of 604 and 796 keV lines of 134Cs.

  13. Coincidence of collective relaxation anomaly and specific heat peak in a bulk metallic glass-forming liquid

    DOE PAGES

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Podlesynak, Andrey; Ehlers, Georg; Mills, Rebecca; O'Keeffe, Stephanie; Stevick, Joseph; Kempton, James; Jelbert, Glenton; Dmowski, Wojciech; Lokshin, Konstantin; et al

    2015-07-21

    The study of multicomponent metallic liquids' relaxational behavior is still the key to understanding and improving the glass-forming abilities of bulk metallic glasses. Here, we report measurements of the collective relaxation times in a melted bulk metallic glass (LM601Zr51Cu36Ni4Al9) in the kinetic regime (Q: 1.5–4.0Å–1) using quasielastic neutron scattering. The results reveal an unusual slope change in the Angell plots of this metallic liquid's collective relaxation time around 950°C, beyond the material's melting point. Measurement of specific heat capacity also reveals a peak around the same temperature. Adams-Gibbs theory is used to rationalize the coincidence, which motivates more careful experimentalmore » and computational studies of the metallic liquids in the future.« less

  14. Coincidence of collective relaxation anomaly and specific heat peak in a bulk metallic glass-forming liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Podlesynak, Andrey; Ehlers, Georg; Mills, Rebecca; O'Keeffe, Stephanie; Stevick, Joseph; Kempton, James; Jelbert, Glenton; Dmowski, Wojciech; Lokshin, Konstantin; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-07-01

    The study of relaxational behavior of multicomponent metallic liquids still holds the key to understanding and improving the glass-forming abilities of bulk metallic glasses. Herein, we report measurements of the collective relaxation times in a melted bulk metallic glass (LM 601 Zr51Cu36Ni4Al9 ) in the kinetic regime (Q : 1.5 -4.0 Å-1) using quasielastic neutron scattering. The results reveal an unusual slope change in the Angell plots of the collective relaxation time of this metallic liquid around 950 ∘C , beyond the melting point of the material. Specific heat capacity measurement also reveals the presence of a peak around the same temperature. The coincidence is rationalized using Adams-Gibbs theory, and motivates more careful experimental and computational studies of the metallic liquids in the future.

  15. Coincidence of collective relaxation anomaly and specific heat peak in a bulk metallic glass-forming liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Podlesynak, Andrey; Ehlers, Georg; Mills, Rebecca; O'Keeffe, Stephanie; Stevick, Joseph; Kempton, James; Jelbert, Glenton; Dmowski, Wojciech; Lokshin, Konstantin; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-07-21

    The study of multicomponent metallic liquids' relaxational behavior is still the key to understanding and improving the glass-forming abilities of bulk metallic glasses. Here, we report measurements of the collective relaxation times in a melted bulk metallic glass (LM601Zr51Cu36Ni4Al9) in the kinetic regime (Q: 1.5–4.0Å–1) using quasielastic neutron scattering. The results reveal an unusual slope change in the Angell plots of this metallic liquid's collective relaxation time around 950°C, beyond the material's melting point. Measurement of specific heat capacity also reveals a peak around the same temperature. Adams-Gibbs theory is used to rationalize the coincidence, which motivates more careful experimental and computational studies of the metallic liquids in the future.

  16. Three-particle coincidence of the long range pseudorapidity correlation in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alakhverdyants, A V; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baumgart, S; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Betancourt, M J; Betts, R R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Biritz, B; Bland, L C; Bnzarov, I; Bonner, B E; Bouchet, J; Braidot, E; Brandin, A V; Bridgeman, A; Bruna, E; Bueltmann, S; Burton, T P; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, K E; Christie, W; Chung, P; Clarke, R F; Codrington, M J M; Corliss, R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; DePhillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Didenko, L; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Efimov, L G; Elhalhuli, E; Elnimr, M; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Eun, L; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Fersch, R G; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Ganti, M S; Garcia-Solis, E J; Geromitsos, A; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y N; Gordon, A; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Grube, B; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Harris, J W; Hays-Wehle, J P; Heinz, M; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Huo, L; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jena, C; Jin, F; Jones, C L; Jones, P G; Joseph, J; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kajimoto, K; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kauder, K; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kikola, D P; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Kopytine, M; Koralt, I; Korsch, W; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Krus, M; Kumar, L; Kurnadi, P; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; LaPointe, S; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lee, J H; Leight, W; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, L; Li, N; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z; Lin, G; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mall, O I; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Meschanin, A; Milner, R; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, A; Mitrovski, M K; Mohanty, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Ng, M J; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okada, H; Okorokov, V; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Ploskon, M A; Pluta, J; Plyku, D; Poljak, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potukuchi, B V K S; Powell, C B; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Redwine, R; Reed, R; Rehberg, J M; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Sahoo, R; Sakai, S; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schuster, T R; Seele, J; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shi, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarini, L H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tian, J; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Tram, V N; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; van Leeuwen, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Wada, M; Walker, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, Q; Wang, X; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wingfield, E; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y; Xie, W; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, W; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Xue, L; Yang, Y; Yepes, P; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Zawisza, M; Zbroszczyk, H; Zhan, W; Zhang, S; Zhang, W M; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zhou, W; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y-H; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y

    2010-07-01

    We report the first three-particle coincidence measurement in pseudorapidity (Δη) between a high transverse momentum (p⊥) trigger particle and two lower p⊥ associated particles within azimuth |Δϕ|<0.7 in square root of s(NN)=200 GeV d+Au and Au+Au collisions. Charge ordering properties are exploited to separate the jetlike component and the ridge (long range Δη correlation). The results indicate that the correlation of ridge particles are uniform not only with respect to the trigger particle but also between themselves event by event in our measured Δη. In addition, the production of the ridge appears to be uncorrelated to the presence of the narrow jetlike component. PMID:20867701

  17. Remote preparation of complex spatial states of single photons and verification by two-photon coincidence experiment.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yoonshik; Cho, Kiyoung; Noh, Jaewoo; Vitullo, Dashiell L P; Leary, Cody; Raymer, M G

    2010-01-18

    We propose and provide experimental evidence in support of a theory for the remote preparation of a complex spatial state of a single photon. An entangled two-photon source was obtained by spontaneous parametric down-conversion, and a double slit was placed in the path of the signal photon as a scattering object. The signal photon was detected after proper spatial filtering so that the idler photon was prepared in the corresponding single-photon state. By using a two-photon coincidence measurement, we obtained the Radon transform, at several longitudinal distances, of the single-photon Wigner distribution function modified by the double slit. The experimental results are consistent with the idler photon being in a pure state. An inverse Radon transformation can, in principle, be applied to the measured data to reconstruct the modified single-photon Wigner function, which is a complete representation of the amplitude and phase structure of the scattering object.

  18. In vivo coincidence detection in mammalian sound localization generates phase delays

    PubMed Central

    Franken, Tom P.; Roberts, Michael T.; Wei, Liting; NL, Nace L. Golding; Joris, Philip X.

    2015-01-01

    Sound localization critically depends on detection of differences in arrival time of sounds at the two ears (acoustic delay). The fundamental mechanisms are debated, but all proposals include a process of coincidence detection and a separate source of internal delay which offsets the acoustic delay and determines neural tuning. We obtained in vivo patch clamp recordings of binaural neurons in the Mongolian gerbil, combined with pharmacological manipulations, to directly compare neuronal input to output and to separate excitation from inhibition. The results cannot be accounted for by existing models and reveal that coincidence detection is not an instantaneous process but is shaped by the interaction of intrinsic conductances with preceding synaptic activity. This interaction generates an internal delay as an intrinsic part of the process of coincidence detection. The multiplication and time-shifting stages thought to extract synchronous activity in many brain areas can thus be combined in a single operation. PMID:25664914

  19. Coincident orientation of objects and viewpoint-dependence in scene recognition.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Kan

    2012-02-01

    Viewpoint-dependence is a well-known phenomenon in which participants' spatial memory is better for previously experienced points of view than for novel ones. In the current study, partial-scene-recognition was used to examine the effect of coincident orientation of all the objects on viewpoint-dependence in spatial memory. When objects in scenes had no clear orientations (e.g., balls), participants' recognition of experienced directions was better than that of novel ones, indicating that there was viewpoint-dependence. However, when the objects in scenes were toy bears with clear orientations, the coincident orientation of objects (315 degrees), which was not experienced, shared the advantage of the experienced direction (0 degrees), and participants were equally likely to choose either direction when reconstructing the spatial representation in memory. These findings suggest that coincident orientation of objects may affect egocentric representations in spatial memory. PMID:22582697

  20. Velocity map photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging on a single detector.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, C Stefan; Ram, N Bhargava; Janssen, Maurice H M

    2012-09-01

    Here we report on a new simplified setup for velocity map photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging using only a single particle detector. We show that both photoelectrons and photoions can be extracted toward the same micro-channel-plate delay line detector by fast switching of the high voltages on the ion optics. This single detector setup retains essentially all the features of a standard two-detector coincidence imaging setup, viz., the high spatial resolution for electron and ion imaging, while only slightly decreasing the ion time-of-flight mass resolution. The new setup paves the way to a significant cost reduction in building a coincidence imaging setup for experiments aiming to obtain the complete correlated three-dimensional momentum distribution of electrons and ions.

  1. Velocity map photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging on a single detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, C. Stefan; Ram, N. Bhargava; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2012-09-15

    Here we report on a new simplified setup for velocity map photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging using only a single particle detector. We show that both photoelectrons and photoions can be extracted toward the same micro-channel-plate delay line detector by fast switching of the high voltages on the ion optics. This single detector setup retains essentially all the features of a standard two-detector coincidence imaging setup, viz., the high spatial resolution for electron and ion imaging, while only slightly decreasing the ion time-of-flight mass resolution. The new setup paves the way to a significant cost reduction in building a coincidence imaging setup for experiments aiming to obtain the complete correlated three-dimensional momentum distribution of electrons and ions.

  2. CoINcIDE: A framework for discovery of patient subtypes across multiple datasets.

    PubMed

    Planey, Catherine R; Gevaert, Olivier

    2016-03-09

    Patient disease subtypes have the potential to transform personalized medicine. However, many patient subtypes derived from unsupervised clustering analyses on high-dimensional datasets are not replicable across multiple datasets, limiting their clinical utility. We present CoINcIDE, a novel methodological framework for the discovery of patient subtypes across multiple datasets that requires no between-dataset transformations. We also present a high-quality database collection, curatedBreastData, with over 2,500 breast cancer gene expression samples. We use CoINcIDE to discover novel breast and ovarian cancer subtypes with prognostic significance and novel hypothesized ovarian therapeutic targets across multiple datasets. CoINcIDE and curatedBreastData are available as R packages.

  3. Standardization of 241Am by digital coincidence counting, liquid scintillation counting and defined solid angle counting.

    PubMed

    Balpardo, C; Capoulat, M E; Rodrigues, D; Arenillas, P

    2010-01-01

    The nuclide (241)Am decays by alpha emission to (237)Np. Most of the decays (84.6%) populate the excited level of (237)Np with energy of 59.54 keV. Digital coincidence counting was applied to standardize a solution of (241)Am by alpha-gamma coincidence counting with efficiency extrapolation. Electronic discrimination was implemented with a pressurized proportional counter and the results were compared with two other independent techniques: Liquid scintillation counting using the logical sum of double coincidences in a TDCR array and defined solid angle counting taking into account activity inhomogeneity in the active deposit. The results show consistency between the three methods within a limit of a 0.3%. An ampoule of this solution will be sent to the International Reference System (SIR) during 2009. Uncertainties were analysed and compared in detail for the three applied methods. PMID:20031433

  4. Standardization of 241Am by digital coincidence counting, liquid scintillation counting and defined solid angle counting.

    PubMed

    Balpardo, C; Capoulat, M E; Rodrigues, D; Arenillas, P

    2010-01-01

    The nuclide (241)Am decays by alpha emission to (237)Np. Most of the decays (84.6%) populate the excited level of (237)Np with energy of 59.54 keV. Digital coincidence counting was applied to standardize a solution of (241)Am by alpha-gamma coincidence counting with efficiency extrapolation. Electronic discrimination was implemented with a pressurized proportional counter and the results were compared with two other independent techniques: Liquid scintillation counting using the logical sum of double coincidences in a TDCR array and defined solid angle counting taking into account activity inhomogeneity in the active deposit. The results show consistency between the three methods within a limit of a 0.3%. An ampoule of this solution will be sent to the International Reference System (SIR) during 2009. Uncertainties were analysed and compared in detail for the three applied methods.

  5. Performance demonstration of 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system for standardization of radionuclides with complex decay scheme.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, D B; Anuradha, R; Joseph, Leena; Kulkarni, M S; Tomar, B S

    2016-02-01

    A standardization of (134)Cs and (131)I was carried out in order to demonstrate the performance and applicability of the 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system for standardization of radionuclides with complex decay scheme. The coincidence analyzer, capable of analyzing coincidence between beta and two gamma windows simultaneously, was developed and used for the standardization. The use of this dual coincidence analyzer has reduced the total experimental time by half. The activity concentrations obtained using the 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system, a 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence counting system, and the CIEMAT/NIST method are in excellent agreement with each other within uncertainty limits and hence demonstrates its performance for standardization of radionuclides decaying with complex decay scheme. Hence use of this 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system can be an alternative method suitable to standardize radionuclides with complex decay scheme with acceptable precision.

  6. Performance demonstration of 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system for standardization of radionuclides with complex decay scheme.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, D B; Anuradha, R; Joseph, Leena; Kulkarni, M S; Tomar, B S

    2016-02-01

    A standardization of (134)Cs and (131)I was carried out in order to demonstrate the performance and applicability of the 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system for standardization of radionuclides with complex decay scheme. The coincidence analyzer, capable of analyzing coincidence between beta and two gamma windows simultaneously, was developed and used for the standardization. The use of this dual coincidence analyzer has reduced the total experimental time by half. The activity concentrations obtained using the 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system, a 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence counting system, and the CIEMAT/NIST method are in excellent agreement with each other within uncertainty limits and hence demonstrates its performance for standardization of radionuclides decaying with complex decay scheme. Hence use of this 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system can be an alternative method suitable to standardize radionuclides with complex decay scheme with acceptable precision. PMID:26678524

  7. True coincidence summing correction and mathematical efficiency modeling of a well detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäderström, H.; Mueller, W. F.; Atrashkevich, V.; Adekola, A. S.

    2015-06-01

    True coincidence summing (TCS) occurs when two or more photons are emitted from the same decay of a radioactive nuclide and are detected within the resolving time of the gamma ray detector. TCS changes the net peak areas of the affected full energy peaks in the spectrum and the nuclide activity is rendered inaccurate if no correction is performed. TCS is independent of the count rate, but it is strongly dependent on the peak and total efficiency, as well as the characteristics of a given nuclear decay. The TCS effects are very prominent for well detectors because of the high efficiencies, and make accounting for TCS a necessity. For CANBERRA's recently released Small Anode Germanium (SAGe) well detector, an extension to CANBERRA's mathematical efficiency calibration method (In Situ Object Calibration Software or ISOCS, and Laboratory SOurceless Calibration Software or LabSOCS) has been developed that allows for calculation of peak and total efficiencies for SAGe well detectors. The extension also makes it possible to calculate TCS corrections for well detectors using the standard algorithm provided with CANBERRAS's Spectroscopy software Genie 2000. The peak and total efficiencies from ISOCS/LabSOCS have been compared to MCNP with agreements within 3% for peak efficiencies and 10% for total efficiencies for energies above 30 keV. A sample containing Ra-226 daughters has been measured within the well and analyzed with and without TCS correction and applying the correction factor shows significant improvement of the activity determination for the energy range 46-2447 keV. The implementation of ISOCS/LabSOCS for well detectors offers a powerful tool for efficiency calibration for these detectors. The automated algorithm to correct for TCS effects in well detectors makes nuclide specific calibration unnecessary and offers flexibility in carrying out gamma spectral analysis.

  8. Coincidence of a high-fluence blazar outburst with a PeV-energy neutrino event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadler, M.; Krauß, F.; Mannheim, K.; Ojha, R.; Müller, C.; Schulz, R.; Anton, G.; Baumgartner, W.; Beuchert, T.; Buson, S.; Carpenter, B.; Eberl, T.; Edwards, P. G.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Elsässer, D.; Gehrels, N.; Gräfe, C.; Gulyaev, S.; Hase, H.; Horiuchi, S.; James, C. W.; Kappes, A.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kreikenbohm, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Langejahn, M.; Leiter, K.; Litzinger, E.; Longo, F.; Lovell, J. E. J.; McEnery, J.; Natusch, T.; Phillips, C.; Plötz, C.; Quick, J.; Ros, E.; Stecker, F. W.; Steinbring, T.; Stevens, J.; Thompson, D. J.; Trüstedt, J.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Weston, S.; Wilms, J.; Zensus, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    The astrophysical sources of the extraterrestrial, very high-energy neutrinos detected by the IceCube collaboration remain to be identified. Gamma-ray (γ-ray) blazars have been predicted to yield a cumulative neutrino signal exceeding the atmospheric background above energies of 100 TeV, assuming that both the neutrinos and the γ-ray photons are produced by accelerated protons in relativistic jets. As the background spectrum falls steeply with increasing energy, the individual events with the clearest signature of being of extraterrestrial origin are those at petaelectronvolt energies. Inside the large positional-uncertainty fields of the first two petaelectronvolt neutrinos detected by IceCube, the integrated emission of the blazar population has a sufficiently high electromagnetic flux to explain the detected IceCube events, but fluences of individual objects are too low to make an unambiguous source association. Here, we report that a major outburst of the blazar PKS B1424-418 occurred in temporal and positional coincidence with a third petaelectronvolt-energy neutrino event (HESE-35) detected by IceCube. On the basis of an analysis of the full sample of γ-ray blazars in the HESE-35 field, we show that the long-term average γ-ray emission of blazars as a class is in agreement with both the measured all-sky flux of petaelectronvolt neutrinos and the spectral slope of the IceCube signal. The outburst of PKS B1424-418 provides an energy output high enough to explain the observed petaelectronvolt event, suggestive of a direct physical association.

  9. Time-correlated coincidences at the sudbury neutrino observatory: An antineutrino search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokair, Timothy Milad

    This dissertation presents a search for antineutrinos in all three phases of data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. This work presents a new method for detecting time correlated coincidences in water detectors. There are two separate searches: an outside search for the inverse beta decay of antineutrinos on protons and an inside search for the inverse beta decay of antineutrinos on deuterons. The inside search found 3 antineutrino candidates in Phase I with an expected background of 3.83+0.71-0.72 events, 28 antineutrino candidates in Phase II with an expected background of 21.25+3.72-3.75 events, 4 antineutrino candidates in Phase III with an expected background of 6.06 +/- 1.14 events. The outside search found 4 antineutrino candidates in Phase I with an expected background of 1.21+0.14-0.17 events, 8 antineutrino candidates in Phase II with an expected background of 9.77+1.06-1.34 events, 0 antineutrino candidates in Phase III with an expected background of 0.46 +/- 0.29 events. Including the expected contribution of antineutrinos from nuclear reactors after oscillations, a limit on the solar antineutrino flux is computed to be F8Bn¯ ≤ 2.5 x 103 cm-2s -1. Taking the flux limit and the measured 8B solar neutrino flux, a limit on the neutrino to antineutrino conversion probability of P(nu → nu) ≤ 5.0 x 10-4. These limits are the best limits from a water detector.

  10. Greenland ice sheet initiation and Arctic sea ice coincide with Eocene and Oligocene CO2 changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripati, Aradhna; Darby, Dennis

    2016-04-01

    Earth's modern ocean-climate system is largely defined by the presence of glacial ice on landmasses in both hemispheres. Northern Hemisphere ice was previously thought to have formed no earlier than the Miocene or Oligocene, about 20-30 million years after the widespread onset of Antarctic glaciation at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. Controversially, the episodic presence of seasonal Arctic sea ice and glacial ice in the Northern Hemisphere beginning in the early Oligocene to Middle Eocene has been inferred from multiple observations. Here we use precise source determinations based on geochemical measurements of ice-rafted debris (IRD) from an ODP core in the Greenland Sea (75° N) to constrain glacial ice and sea ice-rafting in the Northern Hemisphere during the middle Eocene through early Oligocene. The chemical fingerprint of 2,334 detrital Fe oxide grains indicates most of these grains are from Greenland with >98% certainty. Thus the coarse IRD in the Greenland Sea originates from widespread areas of east Greenland as far south as the Denmark Strait area (~68° N), with additional IRD sources from the circum-Arctic Ocean. This is the first definitive evidence that mid-Eocene IRD in the Greenland Sea is from Greenland. Episodic glaciation of different source regions on Greenland is synchronous with times of ice-rafting in the western Arctic and ephemeral perennial Arctic ice cover. Intervals of bipolar glacial ice storage in the middle Eocene through early Oligocene coincide with evidence for periods of reduced CO2, associated with carbon cycle perturbations.

  11. Cosmic ray neutron background reduction using localized coincidence veto neutron counting

    DOEpatents

    Menlove, Howard O.; Bourret, Steven C.; Krick, Merlyn S.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to both the apparatus and method for increasing the sensitivity of measuring the amount of radioactive material in waste by reducing the interference caused by cosmic ray generated neutrons. The apparatus includes: (a) a plurality of neutron detectors, each of the detectors including means for generating a pulse in response to the detection of a neutron; and (b) means, coupled to each of the neutrons detectors, for counting only some of the pulses from each of the detectors, whether cosmic ray or fission generated. The means for counting includes a means that, after counting one of the pulses, vetos the counting of additional pulses for a prescribed period of time. The prescribed period of time is between 50 and 200 .mu.s. In the preferred embodiment the prescribed period of time is 128 .mu.s. The veto means can be an electronic circuit which includes a leading edge pulse generator which passes a pulse but blocks any subsequent pulse for a period of between 50 and 200 .mu.s. Alternately, the veto means is a software program which includes means for tagging each of the pulses from each of the detectors for both time and position, means for counting one of the pulses from a particular position, and means for rejecting those of the pulses which originate from the particular position and in a time interval on the order of the neutron die-away time in polyethylene or other shield material. The neutron detectors are grouped in pods, preferably at least 10. The apparatus also includes means for vetoing the counting of coincidence pulses from all of the detectors included in each of the pods which are adjacent to the pod which includes the detector which produced the pulse which was counted.

  12. Distinct coincidence detectors govern the corticostriatal spike timing-dependent plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Fino, Elodie; Paille, Vincent; Cui, Yihui; Morera-Herreras, Teresa; Deniau, Jean-Michel; Venance, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Corticostriatal projections constitute the main input to the basal ganglia, an ensemble of interconnected subcortical nuclei involved in procedural learning. Thus, long-term plasticity at corticostriatal synapses would provide a basic mechanism for the function of basal ganglia in learning and memory. We had previously reported the existence of a corticostriatal anti-Hebbian spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) at synapses onto striatal output neurons, the medium-sized spiny neurons. Here, we show that the blockade of GABAergic transmission reversed the time dependence of corticostriatal STDP. We explored the receptors and signalling mechanisms involved in the corticostriatal STDP. Although classical models for STDP propose NMDA receptors as the unique coincidence detector, the involvement of multiple coincidence detectors has also been demonstrated. Here, we show that corticostriatal STDP depends on distinct coincidence detectors. Specifically, long-term potentiation is dependent on NMDA receptor activation, while long-term depression requires distinct coincidence detectors: the phospholipase Cβ (PLCβ) and the inositol-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R)-gated calcium stores. Furthermore, we found that PLCβ activation is controlled by group-I metabotropic glutamate receptors, type-1 muscarinic receptors and voltage-sensitive calcium channel activities. Activation of PLCβ and IP3Rs leads to robust retrograde endocannabinoid signalling mediated by 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol and cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Interestingly, the same coincidence detectors govern the corticostriatal anti-Hebbian STDP and the Hebbian STDP reported at cortical synapses. Therefore, LTP and LTD induced by STDP at corticostriatal synapses are mediated by independent signalling mechanisms, each one being controlled by distinct coincidence detectors. PMID:20603333

  13. Non-proportionality study of CaMoO4 and GAGG:Ce scintillation crystals using Compton coincidence technique.

    PubMed

    Kaewkhao, J; Limkitjaroenporn, P; Chaiphaksa, W; Kim, H J

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the CCT technique and nuclear instrument module (NIM) setup for the measurements of coincidence electron energy spectra of calcium molybdate (CaMoO4) and cerium doped gadolinium aluminium gallium garnet (Gd3Al2Ga3O12:Ce or GAGG:Ce) scintillation crystals were carried out. The (137)Cs irradiated gamma rays with an energy (Eγ) of 662keV was used as a radioactive source. The coincidence electron energy spectra were recorded at seven scattering angles of 30°-120°. It was found that seven corresponding electron energies were in the range of 100.5-435.4keV. The results show that, for all electron energies, the electron energy peaks of CaMoO4 crystal yielded higher number of counts than those of GAGG:Ce crystal. The electron energy resolution, the light yield and non-proportionality were also determined. It was found that the energy resolutions are inverse proportional to the square root of electron energy for both crystals. Furthermore, the results show that the light yield of GAGG:Ce crystal is much higher than that of CaMoO4 crystal. It was also found that both CaMoO4 and GAGG:Ce crystals demonstrated good proportional property in the electron energy range of 260-435.4keV. PMID:27423926

  14. Investigation of the coincidence resolving time performance of a PET scanner based on liquid xenon: a Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Benlloch-Rodríguez, J. M.; Ferrario, P.; Monrabal, F.; Rodríguez, J.; Toledo, J. F.

    2016-09-01

    The measurement of the time of flight of the two 511 keV gammas recorded in coincidence in a PET scanner provides an effective way of reducing the random background and therefore increases the scanner sensitivity, provided that the coincidence resolving time (CRT) of the gammas is sufficiently good. The best commercial PET-TOF system today (based in LYSO crystals and digital SiPMs), is the VEREOS of Philips, boasting a CRT of 316 ps (FWHM). In this paper we present a Monte Carlo investigation of the CRT performance of a PET scanner exploiting the scintillating properties of liquid xenon. We find that an excellent CRT of 70 ps (depending on the PDE of the sensor) can be obtained if the scanner is instrumented with silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) sensitive to the ultraviolet light emitted by xenon. Alternatively, a CRT of 160 ps can be obtained instrumenting the scanner with (much cheaper) blue-sensitive SiPMs coated with a suitable wavelength shifter. These results show the excellent time of flight capabilities of a PET device based in liquid xenon.

  15. Realistic PET Monte Carlo Simulation With Pixelated Block Detectors, Light Sharing, Random Coincidences and Dead-Time Modeling.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Bastein; Fakhri, Georges El

    2008-01-01

    We have developed and validated a realistic simulation of random coincidences, pixelated block detectors, light sharing among crystal elements and dead-time in 2D and 3D positron emission tomography (PET) imaging based on the SimSET Monte Carlo simulation software. Our simulation was validated by comparison to a Monte Carlo transport code widely used for PET modeling, GATE, and to measurements made on a PET scanner. METHODS: We have modified the SimSET software to allow independent tracking of single photons in the object and septa while taking advantage of existing voxel based attenuation and activity distributions and validated importance sampling techniques implemented in SimSET. For each single photon interacting in the detector, the energy-weighted average of interaction points was computed, a blurring model applied to account for light sharing and the associated crystal identified. Detector dead-time was modeled in every block as a function of the local single rate using a variance reduction technique. Electronic dead-time was modeled for the whole scanner as a function of the prompt coincidences rate. Energy spectra predicted by our simulation were compared to GATE. NEMA NU-2 2001 performance tests were simulated with the new simulation as well as with SimSET and compared to measurements made on a Discovery ST (DST) camera. RESULTS: Errors in simulated spatial resolution (full width at half maximum, FWHM) were 5.5% (6.1%) in 2D (3D) with the new simulation, compared with 42.5% (38.2%) with SimSET. Simulated (measured) scatter fractions were 17.8% (21.3%) in 2D and 45.8% (45.2%) in 3D. Simulated and measured sensitivities agreed within 2.3 % in 2D and 3D for all planes and simulated and acquired count rate curves (including NEC) were within 12.7% in 2D in the [0: 80 kBq/cc] range and in 3D in the [0: 35 kBq/cc] range. The new simulation yielded significantly more realistic singles' and coincidences' spectra, spatial resolution, global sensitivity and lesion

  16. Standardization of (99m)Tc by means of a software coincidence system.

    PubMed

    Brito, A B; Koskinas, M F; Litvak, F; Toledo, F; Dias, M S

    2012-09-01

    The procedure followed by the Nuclear Metrology Laboratory, at IPEN, for the primary standardization of (99m)Tc is described. The primary standardization has been accomplished by the coincidence method. The beta channel efficiency was varied by electronic discrimination using a software coincidence counting system. Two windows were selected for the gamma channel: one at 140 keV gamma-ray and the other at 20 keV X-ray total absorption peaks. The experimental extrapolation curves were compared with Monte Carlo simulations by means of code ESQUEMA.

  17. Line-on-Line Coincidence: A New Type of Epitaxy Found in Organic-Organic Heterolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannsfeld, Stefan C.; Leo, Karl; Fritz, Torsten

    2005-02-01

    We propose a new type of epitaxy, line-on-line coincidence (LOL), which explains the ordering in the organic-organic heterolayer system PTCDA on HBC on graphite. LOL epitaxy is similar to point-on-line coincidence (POL) in the sense that all overlayer molecules lie on parallel, equally spaced lines. The key difference to POL is that these lines are not restricted to primitive lattice lines of the substrate lattice. Potential energy calculations demonstrate that this new type of epitaxy is indeed characterized by a minimum in the overlayer-substrate interaction potential.

  18. Changes in Sensory Evoked Responses Coincide with Rapid Improvement in Speech Identification Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alain, Claude; Campeanu, Sandra; Tremblay, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Perceptual learning is sometimes characterized by rapid improvements in performance within the first hour of training (fast perceptual learning), which may be accompanied by changes in sensory and/or response pathways. Here, we report rapid physiological changes in the human auditory system that coincide with learning during a 1-hour test session…

  19. Towards a possible solution for the coincidence problem: f(G) gravity as background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudra, Prabir

    2016-07-01

    In this article we address the well-known cosmic coincidence problem in the framework of the f(G) gravity. In order to achieve this, an interaction between dark energy and dark matter is considered. A set-up is designed and a constraint equation is obtained which generates the f(G) models that do not suffer from the coincidence problem. Due to the absence of a universally accepted interaction term introduced by a fundamental theory, the study is conducted over three different forms of logically chosen interaction terms. To illustrate the set-up three widely known models of f(G) gravity are taken into consideration and the problem is studied under the designed set-up. The study reveals that the popular f(G) gravity models does not approve of a satisfactory solution of the long standing coincidence problem, thus proving to be a major setback for them as successful models of universe. Finally, two non-conventional models of f(G) gravity have been proposed and studied in the framework of the designed set-up. It is seen that a complete solution of the coincidence problem is achieved for these models. The study also reveals that the 'b-interaction' term is much more preferable compared to the other interactions, due to its greater compliance with the recent observational data.

  20. Data acquisition schemes for continuous two-particle time-of-flight coincidence experiments.

    PubMed

    Bodi, Andras; Sztáray, Bálint; Baer, Tomas; Johnson, Melanie; Gerber, Thomas

    2007-08-01

    Three data acquisition schemes for two-particle coincidence experiments with a continuous source are discussed. The single-start/single-stop technique, implemented with a time-to-pulse-height converter, results in a complicated spectrum and breaks down severely at high count rates. The single-start/multiple-stop setup, based on a time-to-digital converter and the first choice in today's similar coincidence experiments, performs significantly better at high count rates, but its performance is still hampered if the time-of-flight range is large, and the false coincidence background is variable if the event frequency and the collection efficiency of the starts are both high. A straightforward, multistart/multistop setup is proposed for coincidence experiments. By collecting all detector data, it ensures the highest signal-to-noise ratio, constant background, and fast data acquisition and can now be easily constructed with commercially available time-to-digital converters. Analytical and numerically evaluated formulas are derived to characterize the performance of each setup in a variety of environments. Computer simulated spectra are presented to illustrate the analytically predicted features of the various raw time-of-flight distributions obtained with each technique.

  1. Coincidence of Homophone Spelling Errors and Attention Problems in Schoolchildren: A Survey Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Li-Hui; Meng, Ling-Fu; Hung, Li-Yu; Chen, Hsin-Yu; Lu, Chiu-Ping

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between writing and attention problems and hypothesizes that homophone spelling errors coincide with attention deficits. We analyze specific types of attention deficits, which may contribute to Attention Deficits Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD); rather than studying ADHD, however, we focus on the inattention…

  2. A curious genetic coincidence found in a study of palmoplantar keratoderma.

    PubMed

    Gamborg Nielsen, P

    1983-01-01

    In a study of hereditary palmoplantar keratoderma of the Unna Thost variety in the northernmost county of Sweden (Norrbotten) a genetic coincident between this inherited disorder and the autosomal dominant form of ichthyosis vulgaris was found. In the same family a patient with ichthyosis vulgaris combined with palmoplantar hyperkeratosis and hyperkeratotic plaques on the knees and the elbows appeared.

  3. Plastic scintillators in coincidence for the study of multi-particle production of sea level cosmic rays in dense medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, L. S.; Chan, K. W.; Wada, M.

    1985-01-01

    Cosmic ray particles at sea level penetrate a thick layer of dense medium without appreciable interaction. These penetrating particles are identified with muons. The only appreciable interaction of muons are by knock on processes. A muon may have single, double or any number of knock on with atoms of the material so that one, two, three or more particles will come out from the medium in which the knock on processes occur. The probability of multiparticle production is expected to decrease with the increase of multiplicity. Measurements of the single, double, and triple particles generated in a dense medium (Fe and Al) by sea level cosmic rays at 22.42 N. Lat. and 114.20 E. Long. (Hong Kong) are presented using a detector composed of two plastic scintillators connected in coincidence.

  4. Determination of the 235U Mass and Enrichment within Small UF6 Cylinders via a Neutron Coincidence Well Counting System

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, Robert Dennis; Croft, Dr. Stephen; Young, Brian M; Venkataraman, Ram

    2011-01-01

    The construction of three new uranium enrichment facilities in the United States has sparked renewed interest in the development and enhancement of methods to determine the enrichment and fissile mass content of UF6 cylinders. We describe the design and examine the expected performance of a UF6 bottle counter developed for the assay of Type 5A cylinders. The counter, as designed and subsequently constructed, is a tall passive neutron well counter with a clam-shell configuration and graphite end plugs operated in fast neutron mode. Factory performance against expectation is described. The relatively high detection efficiency and effectively 4 detection geometry provide a near-ideal measurement configuration, making the UF6 bottle counter a valuable tool for the evaluation of the neutron coincidence approach to UF6 cylinder assay. The impacts of non-uniform filling, voids, enrichment, and mixed enrichments are examined

  5. Statistical Analysis of Bursty Langmuir Waves and Coincident VLF Waves in the Cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrowski, M. P.; Labelle, J. W.; Rowland, D. E.; Pfaff, R. F.; Kletzing, C.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite and rocket experiments in the cusp ionosphere have measured Langmuir wave bursts of duration 10's to 100's of ms. The waves show a complex frequency structure with multiple peaks separated by <1 to >50 kHz. This structure has been interpreted as the result of the superposition of multiple Langmuir normal-mode waves, with the resultant modulation producing a beat pattern between waves with ~10 kHz frequency differences. The multiple normal-mode waves could be generated either through wave-wave interactions involving VLF waves, or could be excited independently through linear instability. The Twin Rockets to Investigate Cusp Electrodynamics (TRICE) high-flyer was launched 10 Dec 2007 at 0900 from the Andoya Rocket Range, Norway, reaching an apogee of 1145 km. The payload included an ensemble of electric-field wave instruments. Dartmouth College supplied an HF receiver with double probes parallel to B_0, separated by 0.3 m, and the NASA GSFC supplied a VLF receiver with double probes perpendicular to B_0, separated by 3 m. The TRICE high-flyer encountered regions of strong Langmuir wave activity throughout the flight, including ~1,000 discrete Langmuir wave bursts [LaBelle et al., 2010]. Close analysis of a 10-second interval showed no correlation between bursty Langmuir waves and VLF emissions; however, analysis of the full flight shows some periods of correlation. We examine a longer interval of TRICE-HIGH data to address the questions: What fraction of the approximately 1000 Langmuir bursts are accompanied by VLF wave power? For those that are, what fraction have coincident VLF waves with peak frequencies corresponding to normal-mode frequency differences in the Langmuir wave spectrum? This study will help distinguish between the theories of Langmuir modulation. A high degree of correlation favors the three-wave hypothesis, whereas a low degree of correlation favors the independent linear excitation of the Langmuir modes. Reference LaBelle, J., I. H

  6. Design and performance of A 3He-free coincidence counter based on parallel plate boron-lined proportional technology

    SciTech Connect

    Henzlova, D.; Menlove, H. O.; Marlow, J. B.

    2015-07-01

    Thermal neutron counters utilized and developed for deployment as non-destructive assay (NDA) instruments in the field of nuclear safeguards traditionally rely on 3He-based proportional counting systems. 3He-based proportional counters have provided core NDA detection capabilities for several decades and have proven to be extremely reliable with range of features highly desirable for nuclear facility deployment. Facing the current depletion of 3He gas supply and the continuing uncertainty of options for future resupply, a search for detection technologies that could provide feasible short-term alternative to 3He gas was initiated worldwide. As part of this effort, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) designed and built a 3He-free full scale thermal neutron coincidence counter based on boron-lined proportional technology. The boronlined technology was selected in a comprehensive inter-comparison exercise based on its favorable performance against safeguards specific parameters. This paper provides an overview of the design and initial performance evaluation of the prototype High Level Neutron counter – Boron (HLNB). The initial results suggest that current HLNB design is capable to provide ~80% performance of a selected reference 3He-based coincidence counter (High Level Neutron Coincidence Counter, HLNCC). Similar samples are expected to be measurable in both systems, however, slightly longer measurement times may be anticipated for large samples in HLNB. The initial evaluation helped to identify potential for further performance improvements via additional tailoring of boron-layer thickness.

  7. Coincidences between light particles, evaporation residues, and complex fragments emitted in the reaction {sup 58}Ni + {sup 58}Ni at 500 MeV bombarding energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez del Campo, J.; Shapira, D.; Chavez, E.; Ortiz, M.E.; Dacal, A.; D`Onofrio, A.; Terrasi, F.

    1996-03-01

    Light particles (protons and alphas) were measured in coincidence with complex fragments (4 < Z < 10) and evaporation residues (Z > 40) using the large detector array HILI. A {sup 58}Ni beam of 500 MeV extracted from the HHIRF tandem accelerator was used to bombard a {sup 58}Ni target of 99% enrichment. A good account of the proton and alpha spectra in coincidences with the residues can be achieved only by including in the statistical model calculation the emission of complex fragments and allowing a small emission of a dinuclear configuration formed prior to fusion. The relative kinetic energy spectra between the complex fragments and the residues show a typical Coulomb peak consistent with emission from the compound nucleus and the out of plane angular correlation shows that the emission is coplanar.

  8. Development of a miniature double-pass cylindrical mirror electron energy analyzer (DPCMA), and its application to Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy (APECS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Eiichi; Seo, Junya; Nambu, Akira; Mase, Kazuhiko

    2007-09-01

    We have developed a miniature double-pass cylindrical mirror electron energy analyzer (DPCMA) with an outer diameter of 26 mm. The DPCMA consists of a shield for the electric field, inner and outer cylinders, two pinholes with a diameter of 2.0 mm, and an electron multiplier. By assembling the DPCMA in a coaxially symmetric mirror electron energy analyzer (ASMA) coaxially and confocally we developed an analyzer for Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy (APECS). The performance was estimated by measuring the Si-LVV-Auger Si-1s-photoelectron coincidence spectra of clean Si(1 1 1). The electron-energy resolution of the DPCMA was estimated to be E/Δ E = 20. This value is better than that of the miniature single-pass CMA ( E/Δ E = 12) that was used in the previous APECS analyzer.

  9. A coincidence detection algorithm for improving detection rates in coulomb explosion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wales, Benji; Bisson, Eric; Karimi, Reza; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Légaré, Francois; Sanderson, Joseph

    2012-03-01

    A scheme for determining true coincidence events in Coulomb Explosion Imaging experiments is reported and compared with a simple design used in recently published work. The new scheme is able to identify any possible coincidence without the use of a priori knowledge of the fragmentation mechanism. Using experimental data from the triatomic molecule OCS, the advanced algorithm is shown to improve acquisition yield by a factor of between 2 and 6 depending on the amount of a priori knowledge included in the simple design search. Monte Carlo simulations for both systems suggest that detection yield can be improved by increasing the number of molecules in the laser focus from the standard ≤1 up to 3.5 and employing the advanced algorithm. Count rates for larger molecules would be preferentially improved with the rate for 6 atom molecules improved by a factor of up to five.

  10. Detection of coincident radiations in a single transducer by pulse shape analysis

    DOEpatents

    Warburton, William K.

    2008-03-11

    Pulse shape analysis determines if two radiations are in coincidence. A transducer is provided that, when it absorbs the first radiation produces an output pulse that is characterized by a shorter time constant and whose area is nominally proportional to the energy of the absorbed first radiation and, when it absorbs the second radiation produces an output pulse that is characterized by a longer time constant and whose area is nominally proportional to the energy of the absorbed second radiation. When radiation is absorbed, the output pulse is detected and two integrals are formed, the first over a time period representative of the first time constant and the second over a time period representative of the second time constant. The values of the two integrals are examined to determine whether the first radiation, the second radiation, or both were absorbed in the transducer, the latter condition defining a coincident event.

  11. A Coincident Search for Radio and Gravitational Waves from Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardena, Brett

    2011-05-01

    The merger of neutron star-neutron star binary pairs may be accompanied by the prompt emission of a coherent low-frequency radio pulse. This radio transient is produced as synchrotron radiation caused by the spin and rotation of the surface charge density of a pulsar through the magnetosphere of a larger neutron star, usually referred to as a Magnetar . This type of merger event would also result in the release of a gravitational coalescence wave-form. We will discuss a coincident radio transient and gravitational wave search. This search is being conducted by two radio telescope arrays: The Long Wave Array (LWA) and the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA) in coordination with the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). We will outline this ongoing coincident search and discuss some preliminary results.

  12. Coincidence in the two-photon spectra of Li and Li2 at 735 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGraffenreid, W.; Sansonetti, Craig J.

    2005-02-01

    A coincidence between the 22S1/2-32S1/2 two-photon transition in the atomic spectrum of 6Li and the X 1Σ+g→ E 1Σ+g two-photon ro-vibrational series of 7Li2 was observed near 735 nm in a heat pipe oven using a tunable laser and thermionic diode detection scheme. The molecular transition obscures one component of the 6Li atomic transition. Selective detection of the atomic transition was obtained by adding an intensity-modulated laser that drives atoms from the 3S to 16P state. The coincident molecular transition and four nearby molecular lines were identified using previously determined Dunham coefficients.

  13. Coincident site lattice-matched growth of semiconductors on substrates using compliant buffer layers

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew

    2016-08-23

    A method of producing semiconductor materials and devices that incorporate the semiconductor materials are provided. In particular, a method is provided of producing a semiconductor material, such as a III-V semiconductor, on a silicon substrate using a compliant buffer layer, and devices such as photovoltaic cells that incorporate the semiconductor materials. The compliant buffer material and semiconductor materials may be deposited using coincident site lattice-matching epitaxy, resulting in a close degree of lattice matching between the substrate material and deposited material for a wide variety of material compositions. The coincident site lattice matching epitaxial process, as well as the use of a ductile buffer material, reduce the internal stresses and associated crystal defects within the deposited semiconductor materials fabricated using the disclosed method. As a result, the semiconductor devices provided herein possess enhanced performance characteristics due to a relatively low density of crystal defects.

  14. Disentangling Multichannel Photodissociation Dynamics in Acetone by Time-Resolved Photoelectron-Photoion Coincidence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maierhofer, Paul; Bainschab, Markus; Thaler, Bernhard; Heim, Pascal; Ernst, Wolfgang E; Koch, Markus

    2016-08-18

    For the investigation of photoinduced dynamics in molecules with time-resolved pump-probe photoionization spectroscopy, it is essential to obtain unequivocal information about the fragmentation behavior induced by the laser pulses. We present time-resolved photoelectron-photoion coincidence (PEPICO) experiments to investigate the excited-state dynamics of isolated acetone molecules triggered by two-photon (269 nm) excitation. In the complex situation of different relaxation pathways, we unambiguously identify three distinct pump-probe ionization channels. The high selectivity of PEPICO detection allows us to observe the fragmentation behavior and to follow the time evolution of each channel separately. For channels leading to fragment ions, we quantitatively obtain the fragment-to-parent branching ratio and are able to determine experimentally whether dissociation occurs in the neutral molecule or in the parent ion. These results highlight the importance of coincidence detection for the interpretation of time-resolved photochemical relaxation and dissociation studies if multiple pathways are present.

  15. Efficiency-optimized low-cost TDPAC spectrometer using a versatile routing/coincidence unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rentería, M.; Bibiloni, A. G.; Darriba, G. N.; Errico, L. A.; Muñoz, E. L.; Richard, D.; Runco, J.

    2008-01-01

    A highly efficient, reliable, and low-cost γ γ TDPAC spectrometer, PACAr, optimized for 181Hf-implanted low-activity samples, is presented. A versatile EPROM-based routing/coincidence unit was developed and implemented to be use with the memory-card-based multichannel analyzer hosted in a personal computer. The excellent energy resolution and very good overall resolution and efficiency of PACAr are analyzed and compare with advanced and already tested fast fast and slow fast PAC spectrometers.

  16. Interacting models may be key to solve the cosmic coincidence problem

    SciTech Connect

    Campo, Sergio del; Herrera, Ramon; Pavon, Diego E-mail: ramon.herrera@ucv.cl

    2009-01-15

    It is argued that cosmological models that feature a flow of energy from dark energy to dark matter may solve the coincidence problem of late acceleration (i.e., ''why the energy densities of both components are of the same order precisely today?{sup )}. However, much refined and abundant observational data of the redshift evolution of the Hubble factor are needed to ascertain whether they can do the job.

  17. The efficiency variation method for 4pibeta-gamma coincidence counting by ink-jet printing.

    PubMed

    Sato, Y; Yamada, T; Hata, T; Moriyama, K; Yunoki, A; Hino, Y

    2008-01-01

    In order to vary the counting efficiencies in the 4pibeta-gamma coincidence extrapolation technique, a radioactive source was coated directly with varying amounts of an electrical conducting pigment using an ink-jet printer. This method can be used to efficiently prepare the multiple sources needed to generate efficiency extrapolation curves, and was successfully applied to the standardization of a (54)Mn source.

  18. Coincidence of Incomplete Pentalogy of Cantrell and Meningomyelocele in a Dizygotic Twin Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Timur, Hakan; Tokmak, Aytekin; Bayram, Hatice; Şükran Çakar, Esra; Danışman, Nuri

    2015-01-01

    Pentalogy of Cantrell is an extremely rare and lethal syndrome. Ectopia cordis is frequently found in fetuses with POC but not required for incomplete forms. Likewise, meningomyelocele is a relatively uncommon neural tube defect affecting central nervous system and associated with neurological problems. Herein, we presented a woman with dizygotic twin pregnancy having coincidence of incomplete POC and MMC in each individual fetus, which has never been reported previously. PMID:26421202

  19. Modelling Random Coincidences in Positron Emission Tomography by Using Singles and Prompts: A Comparison Study.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Josep F; Rafecas, M

    2016-01-01

    Random coincidences degrade the image in Positron Emission Tomography, PET. To compensate for their degradation effects, the rate of random coincidences should be estimated. Under certain circumstances, current estimation methods fail to provide accurate results. We propose a novel method, "Singles-Prompts" (SP), that includes the information conveyed by prompt coincidences and models the pile-up. The SP method has the same structure than the well-known "Singles Rate" (SR) approach. Hence, SP can straightforwardly replace SR. In this work, the SP method has been extensively assessed and compared to two conventional methods, SR and the delayed window (DW) method, in a preclinical PET scenario using Monte-Carlo simulations. SP offers accurate estimates for the randoms rates, while SR and DW tend to overestimate the rates (∼10%, and 5%, respectively). With pile-up, the SP method is more robust than SR (but less than DW). At the image level, the contrast is overestimated in SR-corrected images, +16%, while SP produces the correct value. Spill-over is slightly reduced using SP instead of SR. The DW images values are similar to those of SP except for low-statistic scenarios, where DW behaves as if randoms were not compensated for. In particular, the contrast is reduced, -16%. In general, the better estimations of SP translate into better image quality. PMID:27603143

  20. Modelling Random Coincidences in Positron Emission Tomography by Using Singles and Prompts: A Comparison Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Random coincidences degrade the image in Positron Emission Tomography, PET. To compensate for their degradation effects, the rate of random coincidences should be estimated. Under certain circumstances, current estimation methods fail to provide accurate results. We propose a novel method, “Singles–Prompts” (SP), that includes the information conveyed by prompt coincidences and models the pile–up. The SP method has the same structure than the well-known “Singles Rate” (SR) approach. Hence, SP can straightforwardly replace SR. In this work, the SP method has been extensively assessed and compared to two conventional methods, SR and the delayed window (DW) method, in a preclinical PET scenario using Monte–Carlo simulations. SP offers accurate estimates for the randoms rates, while SR and DW tend to overestimate the rates (∼10%, and 5%, respectively). With pile-up, the SP method is more robust than SR (but less than DW). At the image level, the contrast is overestimated in SR-corrected images, +16%, while SP produces the correct value. Spill–over is slightly reduced using SP instead of SR. The DW images values are similar to those of SP except for low-statistic scenarios, where DW behaves as if randoms were not compensated for. In particular, the contrast is reduced, −16%. In general, the better estimations of SP translate into better image quality. PMID:27603143

  1. New approach to calculate the true-coincidence effect of HpGe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alnour, I. A.; Wagiran, H.; Ibrahim, N.; Hamzah, S.; Siong, W. B.; Elias, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    The corrections for true-coincidence effects in HpGe detector are important, especially at low source-to-detector distances. This work established an approach to calculate the true-coincidence effects experimentally for HpGe detectors of type Canberra GC3018 and Ortec GEM25-76-XLB-C, which are in operation at neutron activation analysis lab in Malaysian Nuclear Agency (NM). The correction for true-coincidence effects was performed close to detector at distances 2 and 5 cm using 57Co, 60Co, 133Ba and 137Cs as standard point sources. The correction factors were ranged between 0.93-1.10 at 2 cm and 0.97-1.00 at 5 cm for Canberra HpGe detector; whereas for Ortec HpGe detector ranged between 0.92-1.13 and 0.95-100 at 2 and 5 cm respectively. The change in efficiency calibration curve of the detector at 2 and 5 cm after correction was found to be less than 1%. Moreover, the polynomial parameters functions were simulated through a computer program, MATLAB in order to find an accurate fit to the experimental data points.

  2. A theoretical basis for the analysis of redundant software subject to coincident errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckhardt, D. E., Jr.; Lee, L. D.

    1985-01-01

    Fundamental to the development of redundant software techniques fault-tolerant software, is an understanding of the impact of multiple-joint occurrences of coincident errors. A theoretical basis for the study of redundant software is developed which provides a probabilistic framework for empirically evaluating the effectiveness of the general (N-Version) strategy when component versions are subject to coincident errors, and permits an analytical study of the effects of these errors. The basic assumptions of the model are: (1) independently designed software components are chosen in a random sample; and (2) in the user environment, the system is required to execute on a stationary input series. The intensity of coincident errors, has a central role in the model. This function describes the propensity to introduce design faults in such a way that software components fail together when executing in the user environment. The model is used to give conditions under which an N-Version system is a better strategy for reducing system failure probability than relying on a single version of software. A condition which limits the effectiveness of a fault-tolerant strategy is studied, and it is posted whether system failure probability varies monotonically with increasing N or whether an optimal choice of N exists.

  3. Functional brain abnormalities localized in 55 chronic tinnitus patients: fusion of SPECT coincidence imaging and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Farhadi, Mohammad; Mahmoudian, Saeid; Saddadi, Fariba; Karimian, Ali Reza; Mirzaee, Mohammad; Ahmadizadeh, Majid; Ghasemikian, Khosro; Gholami, Saeid; Ghoreyshi, Esmaeel; Beyty, Saeid; Shamshiri, Ahmadreza; Madani, Sedighe; Bakaev, Valery; Moradkhani, Seddighe; Raeisali, Gholamreza

    2010-01-01

    Tinnitus is often defined as the perception of sounds or noise in the absence of any external auditory stimuli. The pathophysiology of subjective idiopathic tinnitus remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the functional brain activities and possible involved cerebral areas in subjective idiopathic tinnitus patients by means of single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) coincidence imaging, which was fused with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this cross-sectional study, 56 patients (1 subject excluded) with subjective tinnitus and 8 healthy controls were enrolled. After intravenous injection of 5 mCi F18-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose), all subjects underwent a brain SPECT coincidence scan, which was then superimposed on their MRIs. In the eight regions of interest (middle temporal, inferotemporal, medial temporal, lateral temporal, temporoparietal, frontal, frontoparietal, and parietal areas), the more pronounced values were represented in medial temporal, inferotemporal, and temporoparietal areas, which showed more important proportion of associative auditory cortices in functional attributions of tinnitus than primary auditory cortex. Brain coincidence SPECT scan, when fused on MRI is a valuable technique in the assessment of patients with tinnitus and could show the significant role of different regions of central nervous system in functional attributions of tinnitus. PMID:20068582

  4. Functional brain abnormalities localized in 55 chronic tinnitus patients: fusion of SPECT coincidence imaging and MRI.

    PubMed

    Farhadi, Mohammad; Mahmoudian, Saeid; Saddadi, Fariba; Karimian, Ali Reza; Mirzaee, Mohammad; Ahmadizadeh, Majid; Ghasemikian, Khosro; Gholami, Saeid; Ghoreyshi, Esmaeel; Beyty, Saeid; Shamshiri, Ahmadreza; Madani, Sedighe; Bakaev, Valery; Moradkhani, Seddighe; Raeisali, Gholamreza

    2010-04-01

    Tinnitus is often defined as the perception of sounds or noise in the absence of any external auditory stimuli. The pathophysiology of subjective idiopathic tinnitus remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the functional brain activities and possible involved cerebral areas in subjective idiopathic tinnitus patients by means of single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) coincidence imaging, which was fused with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this cross-sectional study, 56 patients (1 subject excluded) with subjective tinnitus and 8 healthy controls were enrolled. After intravenous injection of 5 mCi F18-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose), all subjects underwent a brain SPECT coincidence scan, which was then superimposed on their MRIs. In the eight regions of interest (middle temporal, inferotemporal, medial temporal, lateral temporal, temporoparietal, frontal, frontoparietal, and parietal areas), the more pronounced values were represented in medial temporal, inferotemporal, and temporoparietal areas, which showed more important proportion of associative auditory cortices in functional attributions of tinnitus than primary auditory cortex. Brain coincidence SPECT scan, when fused on MRI is a valuable technique in the assessment of patients with tinnitus and could show the significant role of different regions of central nervous system in functional attributions of tinnitus.

  5. Action-sound coincidence-related attenuation of auditory ERPs is not modulated by affordance compatibility.

    PubMed

    Horváth, János

    2013-04-01

    A couple of studies showed that auditory processing of sounds presented concurrently with one's own actions is attenuated. Because in these studies actions were key-presses, it was hypothesized that attenuation might be caused by robust key-press-effect associations formed by long-term interactions with everyday devices. Key-pressing may be special because most everyday devices are designed to comply with the perceived affordance that a key/button should be pressed to trigger an effect. Therefore, key-presses would attenuate auditory processing, but key-releases would not. In the present experiment, participants marked time intervals by pressing or releasing a key. Independently, a random sequence of tones was presented. Tones coinciding with a key-press or -release elicited similarly attenuated Tb, vertex N1, and P2 ERPs, suggesting that coincidence-related auditory attenuation is not brought about by special key-press-effect associations. Whereas Tb and P2 attenuations were pure amplitude modulations, vertex N1 was attenuated (partly) by an overlapping coincidence-related ERP.

  6. Hydrogen scrambling in ethane induced by intense laser fields: statistical analysis of coincidence events.

    PubMed

    Kanya, Reika; Kudou, Tatsuya; Schirmel, Nora; Miura, Shun; Weitzel, Karl-Michael; Hoshina, Kennosuke; Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2012-05-28

    Two-body Coulomb explosion processes of ethane (CH(3)CH(3)) and its isotopomers (CD(3)CD(3) and CH(3)CD(3)) induced by an intense laser field (800 nm, 1.0 × 10(14) W/cm(2)) with three different pulse durations (40 fs, 80 fs, and 120 fs) are investigated by a coincidence momentum imaging method. On the basis of statistical treatment of the coincidence data, the contributions from false coincidence events are estimated and the relative yields of the decomposition pathways are determined with sufficiently small uncertainties. The branching ratios of the two body decomposition pathways of CH(3)CD(3) from which triatomic hydrogen molecular ions (H(3)(+), H(2)D(+), HD(2)(+), D(3)(+)) are ejected show that protons and deuterons within CH(3)CD(3) are scrambled almost statistically prior to the ejection of a triatomic hydrogen molecular ion. The branching ratios were estimated by statistical Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations by assuming a transition state with a hindered-rotation of a diatomic hydrogen moiety. The hydrogen scrambling dynamics followed by the two body decomposition processes are discussed also by using the anisotropies in the ejection directions of the fragment ions and the kinetic energy distribution of the two body decomposition pathways.

  7. A model of spike-timing dependent plasticity: one or two coincidence detectors?

    PubMed

    Karmarkar, Uma R; Buonomano, Dean V

    2002-07-01

    In spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP), synapses exhibit LTD or LTP depending on the order of activity in the presynaptic and postsynaptic cells. LTP occurs when a single presynaptic spike precedes a postsynaptic one (a positive interspike interval, or ISI), while the reverse order of activity (a negative ISI) produces LTD. A fundamental question is whether the "standard model" of plasticity in which moderate increases in Ca(2+) influx through the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) channels induce LTD and large increases induce LTP, can account for the order and interval sensitivity of STDP. To examine this issue we developed a model that captures postsynaptic Ca(2+) influx dynamics and the associativity of the NMDA receptors. While this model can generate both LTD and LTP, it predicts that LTD will be observed at both negative and positive ISIs. This is because longer and longer positive ISIs induce monotonically decreasing levels of Ca(2+), which eventually fall into the same range that produced LTD at negative ISIs. A second model that incorporated a second coincidence detector in addition to the NMDA receptor generated LTP at positive intervals and LTD only at negative ones. Our findings suggest that a single coincidence detector model based on the standard model of plasticity cannot account for order-specific STDP, and we predict that STDP requires two coincidence detectors. PMID:12091572

  8. Coincident bursts of auroral kilometric radiation and VLF emissions associated with a type III solar radio noise event

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, T.J.; Singh, S.; Wu, C.S.; LaBelle, J.; Treumann, R.A.; Inan, U.S.; Lanzerotti, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines an isolated magnetospheric VLF/radio noise event that is highly suggestive of the triggering of terrestrial auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) by solar type III radio emission and of a close relation between AKR and broadband hiss. The solar type III burst was measured on polar HF riometers and was coincident with local dayside VLF/LF noise emission bursts at South Pole station. It was also coincident with AKR bursts detected on the AMPTE/IRM satellite, at the same magnetic local time as South Pole. On the basis of the close association of AKR and VLF bursts, and from geometrical considerations relating to wave propagnation, it is likely that the AKR source was on the dayside and on field lines near South Pole station. The general level of geomagnetic activity was very low. However, an isolated magnetic impulse event (MIE) accompanied by a riometer absorption pulse was in progress when all of the VLF/radio noise bursts occurred. The very close association of the type III burst at HF with the AKR is consistent with external stimulation of the AKR, if a different, more immediate, triggering process than that implied by Calvert is invoked. It is suggested here that some of the HF solar radiant energy may decay into waves with frequencies comparable to those of the AKR by parametric excitation or some other process, thus providing the few background photons required for the generation of AKR by the Wu and Lee cyclotron maser instability. The AKR, perhaps by modifying the magnetospheric electron velocity distribution, might have produced the observed VLF emissions. Alternatively, the VLF emissions may have arisen from the same anisotropic and unstable electron distribution function responsible for the AKR. 41 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Coincident bursts of auroral kilometric radiation and VLF emissions associted with a type 3 solar radio noise event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, T. J.; Singh, S.; Wu, C. S.; Labelle, J.; Treumann, R. A.; Inan, U. S.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines an isolated magnetospheric VLF/radio noise event that is highly suggestive of the triggering of terrestrial auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) bu solar type III radio emission and of a close relation between AKR and broadband hiss. The solar type III burst was measured on polar HF riometers and was coincident with local dayside VLF/LF noise emission bursts at South Pole station. It was also coincident with AKR bursts detected onthe AMPTE/IRM satellite, at the same magnetic local time as South Pole. On the basis of the close association of AKR and VLF bursts, and from geometric considerations relating to wave propagation, it is likely that the AKR source was on the dayside and on field lines near South Pole station. The general level of geomagnetic activity was very low. However, an isolated magnetic impulse event (MIE) accompanied by a riometer absorption pulse was in progress when all of the VLF/radio noise bursts occurred. The very close association of the typew III burst at HF with the AKR is consistent with external stimulation of the AKR, is different, more immediate,triggering process than that implied by Calvert (1981) is invoked. It is suggested here that some of the HF solar radiant energy may decay into waves with frequences comparable to those of the AKR by paraetric excitation or some other process, thus providing the few background photons required for the generation of AKR by the WU and Lee (1979) cyclotron maser instability. The AKR, perhaps by modifying the magnetospheric electron velocity distribution, might have produced the observed VLF emissions. Alternatively, the VLF emissions may have arisen from the same anisotropic and unstable electron distribution function responsible for the AKR.

  10. Walther Bothe and Bruno Rossi: The birth and development of coincidence methods in cosmic-ray physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonolis, Luisa

    2011-11-01

    In 1924, Walther Bothe and Hans Geiger applied a coincidence method to the study of Compton scattering with Geiger needle counters. Their experiment confirmed the existence of radiation quanta and established the validity of conservation principles in elementary processes. At the end of the 1920s, Bothe and Werner Kolhörster coupled the coincidence technique with the new Geiger-Müller counter to study cosmic rays, marking the start of cosmic-ray research as a branch of physics. The coincidence method was further refined by Bruno Rossi, who developed a vacuum-tube device capable of registering the simultaneous occurrence of electrical pulses from any number of counters with a tenfold improvement in time resolution. The electronic coincidence circuit bearing Rossi's name was instrumental in his research on the corpuscular nature and the properties of cosmic radiation during the early 1930s, a period characterized by a lively debate between Millikan and followers of the corpuscular interpretation. The Rossi coincidence circuit was also at the core of the counter-controlled cloud chamber developed by Patrick Blackett and Giuseppe Occhialini, and became one of the important ingredients of particle and nuclear physics. During the late 1930s and 1940s, coincidences, anti-coincidences and delayed coincidences played a crucial role in a series of experiments on the decay of the muon, which inaugurated the current era of particle physics.

  11. Standardization of (241)Am, (124)Sb and (131)I by live-timed anti-coincidence counting with extending dead time.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Carlos J; Iwahara, A; Poledna, R; de Oliveira, E M; de Prinzio, M A R R; Delgado, José U; Lopes, Ricardo T

    2008-01-01

    The National Metrology Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation (LNMRI)/Brazil has implemented a live-timed anti-coincidence system with extending dead time to complement the existing systems in its Radionuclide Laboratory for activity measurements of radioactive sources. In this new system, the proportional counter has been replaced by a liquid-scintillation-counter for alpha and beta detection. In order to test the performance of the new system, radioactive solutions of (131)I, (124)Sb and (241)Am have been standardized. In this work the measurement method, the results and the associated uncertainties are described and discussed. PMID:18356060

  12. USING A PHENOMENOLOGICAL MODEL TO TEST THE COINCIDENCE PROBLEM OF DARK ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yun; Zhu Zonghong; Alcaniz, J. S.; Gong Yungui

    2010-03-01

    By assuming a phenomenological form for the ratio of the dark energy and matter densities rho{sub X} {proportional_to} rho{sub m} a {sup x}i, we discuss the cosmic coincidence problem in light of current observational data. Here, xi is a key parameter to denote the severity of the coincidence problem. In this scenario, xi = 3 and xi = 0 correspond to LAMBDACDM and the self-similar solution without the coincidence problem, respectively. Hence, any solution with a scaling parameter 0 < xi < 3 makes the coincidence problem less severe. In addition, the standard cosmology without interaction between dark energy and dark matter is characterized by xi + 3omega{sub X} = 0, where omega{sub X} is the equation of state of the dark energy component, whereas the inequality xi + 3omega{sub X} {ne} 0 represents non-standard cosmology. We place observational constraints on the parameters (OMEGA{sub X,0}, omega{sub X}, xi) of this model, where OMEGA{sub X,0} is the present value of density parameter of dark energy OMEGA{sub X}, by using the Constitution Set (397 supernovae of type Ia data, hereafter SNeIa), the cosmic microwave background shift parameter from the five-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey baryon acoustic peak. Combining the three samples, we get OMEGA{sub X,0} = 0.72 +- 0.02, omega{sub X} = -0.98 +- 0.07, and xi = 3.06 +- 0.35 at 68.3% confidence level. The result shows that the LAMBDACDM model still remains a good fit to the recent observational data, and the coincidence problem indeed exists and is quite severe, in the framework of this simple phenomenological model. We further constrain the model with the transition redshift (deceleration/acceleration). It shows that if the transition from deceleration to acceleration happens at the redshift z > 0.73, within the framework of this model, we can conclude that the interaction between dark energy and dark matter is necessary.

  13. Measuring $\

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Jessica Sarah

    2011-01-01

    The MINOS Experiment consists of two steel-scintillator calorimeters, sampling the long baseline NuMI muon neutrino beam. It was designed to make a precise measurement of the ‘atmospheric’ neutrino mixing parameters, Δm2 atm. and sin2 (2 atm.). The Near Detector measures the initial spectrum of the neutrino beam 1km from the production target, and the Far Detector, at a distance of 735 km, measures the impact of oscillations in the neutrino energy spectrum. Work performed to validate the quality of the data collected by the Near Detector is presented as part of this thesis. This thesis primarily details the results of a vμ disappearance analysis, and presents a new sophisticated fitting software framework, which employs a maximum likelihood method to extract the best fit oscillation parameters. The software is entirely decoupled from the extrapolation procedure between the detectors, and is capable of fitting multiple event samples (defined by the selections applied) in parallel, and any combination of energy dependent and independent sources of systematic error. Two techniques to improve the sensitivity of the oscillation measurement were also developed. The inclusion of information on the energy resolution of the neutrino events results in a significant improvement in the allowed region for the oscillation parameters. The degree to which sin2 (2θ )= 1.0 could be disfavoured with the exposure of the current dataset if the true mixing angle was non-maximal, was also investigated, with an improved neutrino energy reconstruction for very low energy events. The best fit oscillation parameters, obtained by the fitting software and incorporating resolution information were: | Δm2| = 2.32+0.12 -0.08×10-3 eV2 and sin2 (2θ ) > 0.90(90% C.L.). The analysis provides the current world best measurement of the atmospheric neutrino mass

  14. Monte Carlo simulation to positron emitter standardized by means of 4pibeta-gamma coincidence system--application to 22Na.

    PubMed

    Dias, Mauro S; Tongu, Margareth L O; Takeda, Mauro N; Koskinas, Marina F

    2010-01-01

    The present work describes the methodology for predicting the behavior of extrapolation curves obtained in radionuclide standardization by 4pibeta-gamma coincidence measurements, applied to (22)Na, developed at the Laboratório de Metrologia Nuclear of IPEN-CNEN/SP (LMN-Nuclear Metrology Laboratory). The LMN system consists of a proportional counter (PC) in 4pi geometry coupled to a single or a pair of NaI(Tl) scintillation crystals. Two standardization techniques were used: the Sum-Peak and the Nuclear-Peak methods. The theoretical response functions of each detector have been calculated using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The code ESQUEMA, developed at LMN, has been used for calculating the extrapolation curve in the 4pibeta-gamma coincidence experiment. Modifications were performed in order to include response tables for positrons and coincidences with annihilation photons. From the calibration results it was possible to extract both the activity value and the positron emission probability per decay. The latter was compared with results from the literature.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation to positron emitter standardized by means of 4pibeta-gamma coincidence system--application to 22Na.

    PubMed

    Dias, Mauro S; Tongu, Margareth L O; Takeda, Mauro N; Koskinas, Marina F

    2010-01-01

    The present work describes the methodology for predicting the behavior of extrapolation curves obtained in radionuclide standardization by 4pibeta-gamma coincidence measurements, applied to (22)Na, developed at the Laboratório de Metrologia Nuclear of IPEN-CNEN/SP (LMN-Nuclear Metrology Laboratory). The LMN system consists of a proportional counter (PC) in 4pi geometry coupled to a single or a pair of NaI(Tl) scintillation crystals. Two standardization techniques were used: the Sum-Peak and the Nuclear-Peak methods. The theoretical response functions of each detector have been calculated using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The code ESQUEMA, developed at LMN, has been used for calculating the extrapolation curve in the 4pibeta-gamma coincidence experiment. Modifications were performed in order to include response tables for positrons and coincidences with annihilation photons. From the calibration results it was possible to extract both the activity value and the positron emission probability per decay. The latter was compared with results from the literature. PMID:20056429

  16. Marrow Adipose Tissue Expansion Coincides with Insulin Resistance in MAGP1-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Walji, Tezin A; Turecamo, Sarah E; Sanchez, Alejandro Coca; Anthony, Bryan A; Abou-Ezzi, Grazia; Scheller, Erica L; Link, Daniel C; Mecham, Robert P; Craft, Clarissa S

    2016-01-01

    Marrow adipose tissue (MAT) is an endocrine organ with the potential to influence skeletal remodeling and hematopoiesis. Pathologic MAT expansion has been studied in the context of severe metabolic challenge, including caloric restriction, high fat diet feeding, and leptin deficiency. However, the rapid change in peripheral fat and glucose metabolism associated with these models impedes our ability to examine which metabolic parameters precede or coincide with MAT expansion. Microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1 (MAGP1) is a matricellular protein that influences cellular processes by tethering signaling molecules to extracellular matrix structures. MAGP1-deficient (Mfap2 (-/-)) mice display a progressive excess adiposity phenotype, which precedes insulin resistance and occurs without changes in caloric intake or ambulation. Mfap2 (-/-) mice were, therefore, used as a model to associate parameters of metabolic disease, bone remodeling, and hematopoiesis with MAT expansion. Marrow adiposity was normal in Mfap2 (-/-) mice until 6 months of age; however, by 10 months, marrow fat volume had increased fivefold relative to wild-type control at the same age. Increased gonadal fat pad mass and hyperglycemia were detectable in Mfap2 (-/-) mice by 2 months, but peaked by 6 months. The development of insulin resistance coincided with MAT expansion. Longitudinal characterization of bone mass demonstrated a disconnection in MAT volume and bone volume. Specifically, Mfap2 (-/-) mice had reduced trabecular bone volume by 2 months, but this phenotype did not progress with age or MAT expansion. Interestingly, MAT expansion in the 10-month-old Mfap2 (-/-) mice was associated with modest alterations in basal hematopoiesis, including a shift from granulopoiesis to B lymphopoiesis. Together, these findings indicate MAT expansion is coincident with insulin resistance, but not excess peripheral adiposity or hyperglycemia in Mfap2 (-/-) mice; and substantial MAT accumulation does

  17. Marrow Adipose Tissue Expansion Coincides with Insulin Resistance in MAGP1-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Walji, Tezin A; Turecamo, Sarah E; Sanchez, Alejandro Coca; Anthony, Bryan A; Abou-Ezzi, Grazia; Scheller, Erica L; Link, Daniel C; Mecham, Robert P; Craft, Clarissa S

    2016-01-01

    Marrow adipose tissue (MAT) is an endocrine organ with the potential to influence skeletal remodeling and hematopoiesis. Pathologic MAT expansion has been studied in the context of severe metabolic challenge, including caloric restriction, high fat diet feeding, and leptin deficiency. However, the rapid change in peripheral fat and glucose metabolism associated with these models impedes our ability to examine which metabolic parameters precede or coincide with MAT expansion. Microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1 (MAGP1) is a matricellular protein that influences cellular processes by tethering signaling molecules to extracellular matrix structures. MAGP1-deficient (Mfap2 (-/-)) mice display a progressive excess adiposity phenotype, which precedes insulin resistance and occurs without changes in caloric intake or ambulation. Mfap2 (-/-) mice were, therefore, used as a model to associate parameters of metabolic disease, bone remodeling, and hematopoiesis with MAT expansion. Marrow adiposity was normal in Mfap2 (-/-) mice until 6 months of age; however, by 10 months, marrow fat volume had increased fivefold relative to wild-type control at the same age. Increased gonadal fat pad mass and hyperglycemia were detectable in Mfap2 (-/-) mice by 2 months, but peaked by 6 months. The development of insulin resistance coincided with MAT expansion. Longitudinal characterization of bone mass demonstrated a disconnection in MAT volume and bone volume. Specifically, Mfap2 (-/-) mice had reduced trabecular bone volume by 2 months, but this phenotype did not progress with age or MAT expansion. Interestingly, MAT expansion in the 10-month-old Mfap2 (-/-) mice was associated with modest alterations in basal hematopoiesis, including a shift from granulopoiesis to B lymphopoiesis. Together, these findings indicate MAT expansion is coincident with insulin resistance, but not excess peripheral adiposity or hyperglycemia in Mfap2 (-/-) mice; and substantial MAT accumulation does

  18. Application of the coincidence counting technique to DD neutron spectrometry data at the NIF, OMEGA, and Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmann, B.; Milanese, L. M.; Han, W.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Hahn, K. D.; Jones, B.

    2016-11-01

    A compact neutron spectrometer, based on a CH foil for the production of recoil protons and CR-39 detection, is being developed for the measurements of the DD-neutron spectrum at the NIF, OMEGA, and Z facilities. As a CR-39 detector will be used in the spectrometer, the principal sources of background are neutron-induced tracks and intrinsic tracks (defects in the CR-39). To reject the background to the required level for measurements of the down-scattered and primary DD-neutron components in the spectrum, the Coincidence Counting Technique (CCT) must be applied to the data. Using a piece of CR-39 exposed to 2.5-MeV protons at the MIT HEDP accelerator facility and DD-neutrons at Z, a significant improvement of a DD-neutron signal-to-background level has been demonstrated for the first time using the CCT. These results are in excellent agreement with previous work applied to DT neutrons.

  19. Application of the coincidence counting technique to DD neutron spectrometry data at the NIF, OMEGA, and Z

    DOE PAGES

    Lahmann, B.; Milanese, L. M.; Han, W.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Hahn, K. D.; Jones, B.

    2016-07-20

    A compact neutron spectrometer, based on a CH foil for the production of recoil protons and CR-39 detection, is being developed for the measurements of the DD-neutron spectrum at the NIF, OMEGA, and Z facilities. As a CR-39 detector will be used in the spectrometer, the principal sources of background are neutron-induced tracks and intrinsic tracks (defects in the CR-39). To reject the background to the required level for measurements of the down-scattered and primary DD-neutron components in the spectrum, the Coincidence Counting Technique (CCT) must be applied to the data. Using a piece of CR-39 exposed to 2.5-MeV protonsmore » at the MIT HEDP accelerator facility and DD-neutrons at Z, a significant improvement of a DD-neutron signal-to-background level has been demonstrated for the first time using the CCT. In conclusion, these results are in excellent agreement with previous work applied to DT neutrons.« less

  20. Sub-100 ps coincidence time resolution for positron emission tomography with LSO:Ce codoped with Ca.

    PubMed

    Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Gundacker, Stefan; Lecoq, Paul; Auffray, Etiennette; Ferri, Alessandro; Gola, Alberto; Piemonte, Claudio

    2015-06-21

    The coincidence time resolution (CTR) becomes a key parameter of 511 keV gamma detection in time of flight positron emission tomography (TOF-PET). This is because additional information obtained through timing leads to a better noise suppression and therefore a better signal to noise ratio in the reconstructed image. In this paper we present the results of CTR measurements on two different SiPM technologies from FBK coupled to LSO:Ce codoped 0.4%Ca crystals. We compare the measurements performed at two separate test setups, i.e. at CERN and at FBK, showing that the obtained results agree within a few percent. We achieve a best CTR value of 85 ± 4 ps FWHM for 2 × 2 × 3 mm(3) LSO:Ce codoped 0.4%Ca crystals, thus breaking the 100 ps barrier with scintillators similar to LSO:Ce or LYSO:Ce. We also demonstrate that a CTR of 140 ± 5 ps can be achieved for longer 2 × 2 × 20 mm(3) crystals, which can readily be implemented in the current generation PET systems to achieve the desired increase in the signal to noise ratio.

  1. Comparison of Coincident Terrestrial and Airborne Lidar Datasets with Respect to Detection of Ground Metrics and Topographic Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayen, R. E.; Stewart, J. P.; Lembo, A. J.; Hu, J.; Davis, C. A.; Hogue, T.; Collins, B. D.; Minasian, D.; Louis-Kayen, N. M.; O'Rourke, T. D.

    2008-12-01

    The Multidisciplinary Center for Earthquake Engineering Research and National Science Foundation, in collaboration with the City of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP), coordinated a controlled study of the use of pulse-based terrestrial lidar and phase-based airborne lidar systems to detect topographic changes and ground deformations in areas of buried pipelines subject to earthquakes and storm-induced landslides. Terrestrial and airborne lidar scans were performed at three LADWP sites in the Los Angeles region and their accuracy was evaluated using coincident high-precision total station survey measurements as a control. Horizontal accuracy was evaluated through the measurement of latitude Northing and longitude Easting (standardized to WGS84) residuals for distances separating well defined objects in the lidar scans, such as buildings and tanks. The bias and dispersion of lidar elevation measurements (standardized to NGVD88) was assessed at a flat un-vegetated site near the Los Angeles Reservoir before and after carefully measured trenching, and at a heavily vegetated and steeply sloping site at Power Plant 2 in San Francisquito Canyon. At the trench site, airborne lidar showed minimal bias and standard deviation (6-20 cm), whereas terrestrial lidar was nearly unbiased with very low dispersion (4-6 cm). Pre- and post-trench bias-adjusted normalized residuals are essentially randomly scattered, but elevation change was affected by relative bias within epochs. At the PP2 site, airborne lidar showed minimal elevation bias and a standard deviation of approximately 50 cm, whereas terrestrial lidar demonstrated large bias and dispersion (on order of meters) due the inability of side-looking ground-based lidar to penetrate heavy vegetation. With careful calibration, both terrestrial and airborne lidar are capable of measuring centimeter-to decimeter level ground displacements for large features in areas of minimal vegetation, whereas their application is

  2. Coincidence summing corrections for volume samples using the PENELOPE/penEasy Monte Carlo code.

    PubMed

    Vargas, A; Camp, A; Serrano, I; Duch, M A

    2014-05-01

    The coincidence summing correction factors estimated with penEasy, a steering program for the Monte Carlo simulation code PENELOPE, and with penEasy-eXtended, an in-house modified version of penEasy, are presented and discussed for (152)Eu and (134)Cs in volume sources. The geometries and experimental data were obtained from an intercomparison study organized by the International Committee for Radionuclide Metrology (ICRM). A significant improvement in the results calculated with PENELOPE/penEasy was obtained when X-rays are included in the (152)Eu simulations. PMID:24326316

  3. Reseau astrometry with Palomar Schmidt plates - Position-coincidence optical identification of radio sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, K.J.; Condon, J.J.; Warnock, A., III

    1981-10-01

    The simple, inexpensive method for determining celestial coordinates on original Palomar Schmidt plates developed previously is here inverted and shown to be a useful way of finding and identifying objects with known celestial coordinates. The method is especially suited for rapidly identifying large numbers of radio sources having accurate radio positions which are found in surveys made with large aperture-synthesis instruments. The average position error (approximately 0.9 arc sec) for stellar objects, galaxies, and faint objects near the plate limit is sufficient for making reliable optical identifications of objects as faint as J magnitude +24 on the basis of position coincidence alone, without regard to color or morphology.

  4. Efficiency-optimized low-cost TDPAC spectrometer using a versatile routing/coincidence unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rentería, M.; Bibiloni, A. G.; Darriba, G. N.; Errico, L. A.; Muñoz, E. L.; Richard, D.; Runco, J.

    A highly efficient, reliable, and low-cost μ-μ TDPAC spectrometer, PACAr, optimized for 181Hf-implanted low-activity samples, is presented. A versatile EPROM-based routing/coincidence unit was developed and implemented to be use with the memory-card-based multichannel analyzer hosted in a personal computer. The excellent energy resolution and very good overall resolution and efficiency of PACAr are analyzed and compare with advanced and already tested fast-fast and slow-fast PAC spectrometers.

  5. Coincidence of congenital infiltrative facial lipoma and lingual myxoma in a newborn Holstein calf.

    PubMed

    Hobbenaghi, R; Dalir-Naghadeh, B; Nazarizadeh, A

    2015-01-01

    A one-day-old male Holstein calf was presented with a palpable subcutaneous mass, extending from the parotid to the orbital region, involving the entire right side of the face and a large flabby mass without any evidence of inflammation or edema on the tongue. Macroscopically, the cut surface of the lingual mass appeared slightly lobulated, pink, with a mucoid appearance and gelatinous consistency. Histopathological examination confirmed the infiltrative subcutaneous lipoma and lingual myxoma evidenced by low cellularity and abundant basophilic, mucinous stroma. In this report, clinical and detailed histhopathological findings of congenital infiltrative myxoma and its coincidence with infiltrative facial lipoma is reported in a newborn calf.

  6. Equivalence of computer codes for calculation of coincidence summing correction factors - Part II.

    PubMed

    Vidmar, T; Camp, A; Hurtado, S; Jäderström, H; Kastlander, J; Lépy, M-C; Lutter, G; Ramebäck, H; Sima, O; Vargas, A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to check for equivalence of computer codes that are capable of performing calculations of true coincidence summing (TCS) correction factors. All calculations were performed for a set of well-defined detector parameters, sample parameters and decay scheme data. The studied geometry was a point source of (133)Ba positioned directly on the detector window of a low-energy (n-type) detector. Good agreement was established between the TCS correction factors computed by the different codes. PMID:26651169

  7. Experimental studies in vortex pair motion coincident with a liquid reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karagozian, A. R.; Suganuma, Y.; Strom, B. D.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental examination of the coincidence of a liquid reaction (acid/base) with the formation of a vortex pair structure is described in which emphasis is placed on the evolution of the strained diffusion layer and reacted core structures. Flow visualization of the reaction process is achieved via the technique of chemically sensitive LIF. The observed growth of reacted core structures associated with each vortex is compared with theoretically predicted behavior (Marble, 1983; Karagozian and Marble, 1986). Vortex pair separation is also compared with theoretical correlations, and the relevance of the analogy between a fast liquid reaction and a gaseous reaction is discussed.

  8. Uterine expression of leukemia inhibitory factor coincides with the onset of blastocyst implantation.

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, H; Brunet, L J; Stewart, C L

    1991-01-01

    We have analyzed the expression of the cytokine leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) during embryogenesis and in tissues of neonatal and adult mice. The site of the most abundant LIF expression is the uterine endometrial glands, specifically on day 4 of pregnancy. Analysis of LIF expression in pseudopregnant mice and in females undergoing delayed implantation showed that it is under maternal control and that its expression coincides with blastocyst formation and always precedes implantation. These results suggest that a principal function of LIF in vivo may be to regulate the growth and to initiate implantation of blastocysts. Images PMID:1722331

  9. Search for Coincidences in Time and Arrival Direction of Auger Data with Astrophysical Transients

    SciTech Connect

    Anchordoqui, Luis; Collaboration, for the Pierre Auger

    2007-06-01

    The data collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory are analyzed to search for coincidences between the arrival directions of high-energy cosmic rays and the positions in the sky of astrophysical transients. Special attention is directed towards gamma ray observations recorded by NASA's Swift mission, which have an angular resolution similar to that of the Auger surface detectors. In particular, we check our data for evidence of a signal associated with the giant flare that came from the soft gamma repeater 1806-20 on December 27, 2004.

  10. IMPLEMENTING THE STANDARD SPECTRUM METHOD FOR ANALYSIS OF β-γ COINCIDENCE SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Biegalski, S.; Flory, Adam E.; Schrom, Brian T.; Ely, James H.; Haas, Derek A.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.

    2011-09-14

    The standard deconvolution analysis tool (SDAT) algorithms were developed and tested at the University of Texas at Austin. These algorithms utilize the standard spectrum technique for spectral analysis of {beta}-{gamma} coincidence spectra for nuclear explosion monitoring. Work has been conducted under this contract to implement these algorithms into a useable scientific software package with a graphical user interface. Improvements include the ability to read in PHD formatted data, gain matching, and data visualization. New auto-calibration algorithms were developed and implemented based on 137Cs spectra for assessment of the energy vs. channel calibrations. Details on the user tool and testing are included.

  11. [Glycogenosis type III and Crohn disease with associated ankylopoietic spondylitis and secondary amyloidosis. An unusual coincidence].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Creus, P; Martínez López de Letona, J; Ladero Quesada, J M; Gilsanz Rico, G

    1994-12-01

    We present a member of a family with glycogen deposit disease (GDD) type III (Forbes-Cori's disease) confirmed postmortem through enzymatic analysis of the hepatic and muscular tissues, coinciding with a Crohn's disease associated to ankylopoietic spondylitis, with final development of an extended secondary amiloidosis, all of these diagnosis established in life of the patient and verified in necropsy. We comment this rare finding, the absence of similar cases in the bibliography and the fortuitous nature of this association given the impossibility to suggest another relationship.

  12. Coincidence of congenital infiltrative facial lipoma and lingual myxoma in a newborn Holstein calf.

    PubMed

    Hobbenaghi, R; Dalir-Naghadeh, B; Nazarizadeh, A

    2015-01-01

    A one-day-old male Holstein calf was presented with a palpable subcutaneous mass, extending from the parotid to the orbital region, involving the entire right side of the face and a large flabby mass without any evidence of inflammation or edema on the tongue. Macroscopically, the cut surface of the lingual mass appeared slightly lobulated, pink, with a mucoid appearance and gelatinous consistency. Histopathological examination confirmed the infiltrative subcutaneous lipoma and lingual myxoma evidenced by low cellularity and abundant basophilic, mucinous stroma. In this report, clinical and detailed histhopathological findings of congenital infiltrative myxoma and its coincidence with infiltrative facial lipoma is reported in a newborn calf. PMID:27175195

  13. Dynamic spike threshold and nonlinear dendritic computation for coincidence detection in neuromorphic circuits.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chih-Chieh; Parker, Alice C

    2014-01-01

    We present an electronic cortical neuron incorporating dynamic spike threshold and active dendritic properties. The circuit is simulated using a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor SPICE model. We demonstrate that our neuron has lower spike threshold for coincident synaptic inputs; however when the synaptic inputs are not in synchrony, it requires larger depolarization to evoke the neuron to fire. We also demonstrate that a dendritic spike is key to precisely-timed input-output transformation, produces reliable firing and results in more resilience to input jitter within an individual neuron.

  14. Identification of a supernova remnant coincident with the soft gamma-ray repeater SGR1806-20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, S. R.; Frail, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown here that the well-localized soft gamma-ray repeater (SGR) SGR1806-20 coincides with an SNR: the amorphous radio nebula G10.0-0.3. Together with the coincident of SGR0526-66 with the SNR N49, this argues strongly in favor of a neutron-star origin for SGRs. It is suggested that all young pulsars pass through a brief phase of SGR activity. The detection of pulsar-powered synchrotron nebulae in, or pulsations from, the two SNRs coincident with SGRs would confirm this model.

  15. Fast Neutron Dose Evaluation Using CR39 by Coincidence Counting Process

    SciTech Connect

    Vilela, Eudice; Freitas, F. F. de; Brandao, J. O. C.; Santos, J. A. L.

    2008-08-07

    The solid state nuclear tracks detection (SSNTD) technique is widely used in the area of radiation dosimetry. Different materials can be used applying this technique as glass and the most used in the dosimetry field that are the polycarbonates, CR39 and Makrofol-DE. Both are very rich in hydrogenous, that enables the SSNTD to detect fast neutrons through recoils of protons in the own detector material, without need of converters. The low reproducibility of its backgroundhas often been the major drawback in the assessment of low fluences of fast neutrons with SSNTDs. This problem can be effectively solved by counting coincidence of tracks in two detectors foils irradiated in close contact. After processing and counting only tracks produced by the same recoil nuclei on the surfaces of both detectors are considered as a track. This procedure enables the reduction of the background counts in the response of the detectors. In this work a preliminary study on the application of the coincidence technique for neutron dosimetry is presented. The CR39 material was investigated aiming to achieve the personal dose equivalent for fast neutrons. Using this method of analysis a significant reduction on the lower detectable dose was observed resulting even one order of magnitude smaller value. Reading, however, needs to be automated due to the large areas necessary to achieve a satisfactory number of tracks for statistical significance of results.

  16. Beyond contact-based transmission networks: the role of spatial coincidence

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Thomas O.; Gorochowski, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Animal societies rely on interactions between group members to effectively communicate and coordinate their actions. To date, the transmission properties of interaction networks formed by direct physical contacts have been extensively studied for many animal societies and in all cases found to inhibit spreading. Such direct interactions do not, however, represent the only viable pathways. When spreading agents can persist in the environment, indirect transmission via ‘same-place, different-time’ spatial coincidences becomes possible. Previous studies have neglected these indirect pathways and their role in transmission. Here, we use rock ant colonies, a model social species whose flat nest geometry, coupled with individually tagged workers, allowed us to build temporally and spatially explicit interaction networks in which edges represent either direct physical contacts or indirect spatial coincidences. We show how the addition of indirect pathways allows the network to enhance or inhibit the spreading of different types of agent. This dual-functionality arises from an interplay between the interaction-strength distribution generated by the ants' movement and environmental decay characteristics of the spreading agent. These findings offer a general mechanism for understanding how interaction patterns might be tuned in animal societies to control the simultaneous transmission of harmful and beneficial agents. PMID:26400200

  17. Coincidences in analysis: Sigmund Freud and the strange case of Dr Forsyth and Herr von Vorsicht.

    PubMed

    Pierri, Maria

    2010-08-01

    Freud's interest in thought transference opens the possibility for psychoanalytic research on the primary preverbal language and the maternal function, which the emphasis on verbal and paternal communication had hidden in the background of the setting. The author advances a new interpretation of coincidences in analysis and of the psychopathology of everyday life of the setting. Starting from a strange coincidence, new hypotheses are submitted following additional readings of the unpublished manuscript of the 'Forsyth case', recovered by the author, in regard to a significant moment of transformation, both in Freud and in psychoanalysis, at the end of the war. This phase corresponds first to a change of language, from German to English, as well as to the foundation of the International Journal of Psychoanalysis by Ernest Jones. In particular, the roots of the metapsychological turn of the 1920s are explored, together with the opening of private and productive thoughts in the area of 'telepathy' that joined Freud, Ferenczi, and Anna Freud in a true 'dialogue of unconsciouses'. The free association between A Child Is Being Beaten, Beyond the Pleasure Principle, and the clinical experience with 'Herr B.' is outlined in order to understand Freud's heroic self-analysis at the time when he was treating his daughter Anna and grieving the death of his beloved Sophie. PMID:20840637

  18. Compton coincidence volumetric imaging: a new x-ray volumetric imaging modality based on Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaochao

    2014-03-01

    Compton scattering is a dominant interaction during radiography and computed tomography x-ray imaging. However, the scattered photons are not used for extracting imaging information, but seriously degrade image quality. Here we introduce a new scheme that overcomes most of the problems associated with existing Compton scattering imaging schemes and allows Compton scattered photons to be effectively used for imaging. In our scheme, referred as Compton coincidence volumetric imaging (CCVI), a collimated monoenergetic x-ray beam is directed onto a thin semiconductor detector. A small portion of the photons is Compton scattered by the detector and their energy loss is detected. Some of the scattered photons intersect the imaging object, where they are Compton scattered a second time. The finally scattered photons are recorded by an areal energy resolving detector panel around the object. The two detectors work in coincidence mode. CCVI images the spatial electron density distribution in the imaging object. Similar to PET imaging, the event location can be located within a curve; therefore the imaging reconstruction algorithms are also similar to those of PET. Two statistical iterative imaging reconstruction algorithms are tested. Our study verifies the feasibility of CCVI in imaging acquisition and reconstruction. Various aspects of CCVI are discussed. If successfully implemented, it will offer a great potential for imaging dose reduction compared with x-ray CT. Furthermore, a CCVI modality will have no moving parts, which potentially offers cost reduction and faster imaging speed.

  19. Disentangling Multichannel Photodissociation Dynamics in Acetone by Time-Resolved Photoelectron-Photoion Coincidence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maierhofer, Paul; Bainschab, Markus; Thaler, Bernhard; Heim, Pascal; Ernst, Wolfgang E; Koch, Markus

    2016-08-18

    For the investigation of photoinduced dynamics in molecules with time-resolved pump-probe photoionization spectroscopy, it is essential to obtain unequivocal information about the fragmentation behavior induced by the laser pulses. We present time-resolved photoelectron-photoion coincidence (PEPICO) experiments to investigate the excited-state dynamics of isolated acetone molecules triggered by two-photon (269 nm) excitation. In the complex situation of different relaxation pathways, we unambiguously identify three distinct pump-probe ionization channels. The high selectivity of PEPICO detection allows us to observe the fragmentation behavior and to follow the time evolution of each channel separately. For channels leading to fragment ions, we quantitatively obtain the fragment-to-parent branching ratio and are able to determine experimentally whether dissociation occurs in the neutral molecule or in the parent ion. These results highlight the importance of coincidence detection for the interpretation of time-resolved photochemical relaxation and dissociation studies if multiple pathways are present. PMID:27459051

  20. Coincidence of calcified carotid atheromatous plaque, osteoporosis, and periodontal bone loss in dental panoramic radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Soroushian, Sheila; Ganguly, Rumpa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to assess the correlation of calcified carotid atheromatous plaque (CCAP), the mandibular cortical index, and periodontal bone loss in panoramic radiographs. Materials and Methods One hundred eighty-five panoramic radiographs with CCAP and 234 without this finding were evaluated by 3 observers for the presence of osseous changes related to osteoporosis and periodontal bone loss. Chi-squared and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare the two groups for an association of CCAP with the mandibular cortical index and periodontal bone loss, respectively. Results There was a statistically significant coincidence of CCAP and osseous changes related to osteopenia/osteoporosis, with a p-value <0.001. There was no statistically significant coincidence of CCAP and periodontal bone loss. When comparing the 2 groups, "With CCAP" and "Without CCAP", there was a statistically significant association with the mean body mass index (BMI), number of remaining teeth, positive history of diabetes mellitus, and vascular accidents. There was no statistically significant association with gender or a history of smoking. Conclusion This study identified a possible concurrence of CCAP and mandibular cortical changes secondary to osteopenia/osteoporosis in panoramic radiographs. This could demonstrate the important role of dental professionals in screening for these systemic conditions, leading to timely and appropriate referrals resulting in early interventions and thus improving overall health. PMID:24380062

  1. Coincidences in analysis: Sigmund Freud and the strange case of Dr Forsyth and Herr von Vorsicht.

    PubMed

    Pierri, Maria

    2010-08-01

    Freud's interest in thought transference opens the possibility for psychoanalytic research on the primary preverbal language and the maternal function, which the emphasis on verbal and paternal communication had hidden in the background of the setting. The author advances a new interpretation of coincidences in analysis and of the psychopathology of everyday life of the setting. Starting from a strange coincidence, new hypotheses are submitted following additional readings of the unpublished manuscript of the 'Forsyth case', recovered by the author, in regard to a significant moment of transformation, both in Freud and in psychoanalysis, at the end of the war. This phase corresponds first to a change of language, from German to English, as well as to the foundation of the International Journal of Psychoanalysis by Ernest Jones. In particular, the roots of the metapsychological turn of the 1920s are explored, together with the opening of private and productive thoughts in the area of 'telepathy' that joined Freud, Ferenczi, and Anna Freud in a true 'dialogue of unconsciouses'. The free association between A Child Is Being Beaten, Beyond the Pleasure Principle, and the clinical experience with 'Herr B.' is outlined in order to understand Freud's heroic self-analysis at the time when he was treating his daughter Anna and grieving the death of his beloved Sophie.

  2. A new MCNPX PTRAC coincidence capture file capability: a tool for neutron detector design

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Louise G; Schear, Melissa A; Hendricks, John S; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Tobin, Stephen J; Croft, Stephen

    2011-02-16

    The existing Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNPX) particle tracking (PTRAC) coincidence capture file allows a full list of neutron capture events to be recorded in any simulated detection medium. The originating event history number (e.g. spontaneous fission events), capture time, location and source particle number are tracked and output to file for post-processing. We have developed a new MCNPX PTRAC coincidence capture file capability to aid detector design studies. New features include the ability to track the nuclides that emitted the detected neutrons as well as induced fission chains in mixed samples before detection (both generation number and nuclide that underwent induced fission). Here, the power of this tool is demonstrated using a detector design developed for the non-destructive assay (NDA) of spent nuclear fuel. Individual capture time distributions have been generated for neutrons originating from Curium-244 source spontaneous fission events and induced fission events in fissile nuclides of interest: namely Plutonium-239, Plutonium-241, and Uranium-235. Through this capability, a full picture for the attribution of neutron capture events in the detector can be simulated.

  3. Simulating γ-γ coincidences of β-delayed γ-rays from fission product nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgett, Stephen; Wang, Tzu-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing radiation from material that has undergone neutron induced fission is important for fields such as nuclear forensics, reactor physics, and nonproliferation monitoring. The γ-ray spectroscopy of fission products is a major part of the characterization of a material's fissile inventory and the energy of incident neutrons inducing fission. Cumulative yields and γ-ray intensities from nuclear databases are inputs into a GEANT4 simulation to create expected γ-ray spectra from irradiated 235U. The simulations include not only isotropically emitted γ-rays but also γ-γ cascades from certain fission products, emitted with their appropriate angular correlations. Here γ singles spectra as well as γ-γ coincidence spectra are simulated in detectors at both 90° and 180° pairings. The ability of these GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations to duplicate experimental data is explored in this work. These simulations demonstrate potential in exploiting angular correlations of γ-γ cascades in fission product decays to determine isotopic content. Analyzing experimental and simulated γ-γ coincidence spectra as opposed to singles spectra should improve the ability to identify fission product nuclei since such spectra are cleaner and contain more resolved peaks when compared to γ singles spectra.

  4. Beyond contact-based transmission networks: the role of spatial coincidence.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Thomas O; Gorochowski, Thomas E

    2015-10-01

    Animal societies rely on interactions between group members to effectively communicate and coordinate their actions. To date, the transmission properties of interaction networks formed by direct physical contacts have been extensively studied for many animal societies and in all cases found to inhibit spreading. Such direct interactions do not, however, represent the only viable pathways. When spreading agents can persist in the environment, indirect transmission via 'same-place, different-time' spatial coincidences becomes possible. Previous studies have neglected these indirect pathways and their role in transmission. Here, we use rock ant colonies, a model social species whose flat nest geometry, coupled with individually tagged workers, allowed us to build temporally and spatially explicit interaction networks in which edges represent either direct physical contacts or indirect spatial coincidences. We show how the addition of indirect pathways allows the network to enhance or inhibit the spreading of different types of agent. This dual-functionality arises from an interplay between the interaction-strength distribution generated by the ants' movement and environmental decay characteristics of the spreading agent. These findings offer a general mechanism for understanding how interaction patterns might be tuned in animal societies to control the simultaneous transmission of harmful and beneficial agents.

  5. Cerebellar Dysfunction and Ataxia in Patients with Epilepsy: Coincidence, Consequence, or Cause?

    PubMed Central

    Marcián, Václav; Filip, Pavel; Bareš, Martin; Brázdil, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Basic epilepsy teachings assert that seizures arise from the cerebral cortex, glossing over infratentorial structures such as the cerebellum that are believed to modulate rather than generate seizures. Nonetheless, ataxia and other clinical findings in epileptic patients are slowly but inevitably drawing attention to this neural node. Tracing the evolution of this line of inquiry from the observed coincidence of cerebellar atrophy and cerebellar dysfunction (most apparently manifested as ataxia) in epilepsy to their close association, this review considers converging clinical, physiological, histological, and neuroimaging evidence that support incorporating the cerebellum into epilepsy pathology. We examine reports of still controversial cerebellar epilepsy, studies of cerebellar stimulation alleviating paroxysmal epileptic activity, studies and case reports of cerebellar lesions directly associated with seizures, and conditions in which ataxia is accompanied by epileptic seizures. Finally, the review substantiates the role of this complex brain structure in epilepsy whether by coincidence, as a consequence of deleterious cortical epileptic activity or antiepileptic drugs, or the very cause of the disease. PMID:27375960

  6. Beyond contact-based transmission networks: the role of spatial coincidence.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Thomas O; Gorochowski, Thomas E

    2015-10-01

    Animal societies rely on interactions between group members to effectively communicate and coordinate their actions. To date, the transmission properties of interaction networks formed by direct physical contacts have been extensively studied for many animal societies and in all cases found to inhibit spreading. Such direct interactions do not, however, represent the only viable pathways. When spreading agents can persist in the environment, indirect transmission via 'same-place, different-time' spatial coincidences becomes possible. Previous studies have neglected these indirect pathways and their role in transmission. Here, we use rock ant colonies, a model social species whose flat nest geometry, coupled with individually tagged workers, allowed us to build temporally and spatially explicit interaction networks in which edges represent either direct physical contacts or indirect spatial coincidences. We show how the addition of indirect pathways allows the network to enhance or inhibit the spreading of different types of agent. This dual-functionality arises from an interplay between the interaction-strength distribution generated by the ants' movement and environmental decay characteristics of the spreading agent. These findings offer a general mechanism for understanding how interaction patterns might be tuned in animal societies to control the simultaneous transmission of harmful and beneficial agents. PMID:26400200

  7. Synthesis of fast qudit gates by a train of coincident pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amniat-Talab, Mahdi; Saadati-Niari, Maghsoud

    2015-09-01

    We propose an exact analytical method for the production of fast quantum gates in a system of d degenerate states, using a technique of a train of coincident pulses. It is an alternative to the adiabatic passage technique. This study exploits the Morris-Shore transformation and generalized quantum Householder reflection in which each of Householder reflection is implemented by n + m (n and m are arbitrary integers) sets of coincident pulses. Decoherence due to the population of the upper state is efficiently suppressed as the number of pulse sets (n and m) increases. It is remarkable that the upper state population is damped considerably, even for a small number of pulse sets, despite the fact that all the fields applied were on resonance with their transitions. In this method, simple Gaussian pulses with minimal pulse areas were used, which is easy to achieve experimentally. As a case study to validate the method, we implement the quantum Fourier transform in qutrit and ququad by a proper pulse train.

  8. Coincidence of homophone spelling errors and attention problems in schoolchildren: a survey study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Li-Hui; Meng, Ling-Fu; Hung, Li-Yu; Chen, Hsin-Yu; Lu, Chiu-Ping

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between writing and attention problems and hypothesizes that homophone spelling errors coincide with attention deficits. We analyze specific types of attention deficits, which may contribute to Attention Deficits Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD); rather than studying ADHD, however, we focus on the inattention dimension of behavior. Our methodology was to develop a survey study for exploring the coincidence of homophone errors and attention problems in schoolchildren. Two sets of parent-questionnaires characterizing individually types of Chinese handwriting errors and behavioral problems in schoolchildren were developed by the research team. Our participants were 491 Taiwanese children from the first to fifth grades in an elementary school in Taipei; they all used traditional Chinese as their primary written language of communication. Based on the ratings of the parent-questionnaires, two groups with proficient and non-proficient homophonic writing were formed. One consisted of children known to have made heterographic homophone errors (words with correct pronunciation but different spellings). The other (control group) consisted of children known to be proficient in Chinese homophone spellings. In each group, there were 54 boy and girl pupils, matched by gender, age, school and grade. A significant correlation was found between attention deficits and homophone errors. This survey study confirms our hypothesis and strengthens a currently underdeveloped theory in the literature of handwriting that attention impairments play an important role in the production of homophone errors.

  9. Flowering time and seed dormancy control use external coincidence to generate life history strategy

    PubMed Central

    Springthorpe, Vicki; Penfield, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is accelerating plant developmental transitions coordinated with the seasons in temperate environments. To understand the importance of these timing advances for a stable life history strategy, we constructed a full life cycle model of Arabidopsis thaliana. Modelling and field data reveal that a cryptic function of flowering time control is to limit seed set of winter annuals to an ambient temperature window which coincides with a temperature-sensitive switch in seed dormancy state. This coincidence is predicted to be conserved independent of climate at the expense of flowering date, suggesting that temperature control of flowering time has evolved to constrain seed set environment and therefore frequency of dormant and non-dormant seed states. We show that late flowering can disrupt this bet-hedging germination strategy. Our analysis shows that life history modelling can reveal hidden fitness constraints and identify non-obvious selection pressures as emergent features. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05557.001 PMID:25824056

  10. Obtaining coincident image observations for Mission to Planet Earth science data return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Lauri Kraft; Folta, David C.; Farrell, James P.

    1994-01-01

    One objective of the Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) program involves comparing data from various instruments on multiple spacecraft to obtain a total picture of the Earth's systems. To correlate image data from instruments on different spacecraft, these spacecraft must be able to image the same location on the Earth at approximately the same time. Depending on the orbits of the spacecraft involved, complicated operational details must be considered to obtain such observations. If the spacecraft are in similar orbits, close formation flying or synchronization techniques may be used to assure coincident observations. If the orbits are dissimilar, the launch time of the second satellite may need to be restricted in order to align its orbit with that of the first satellite launched. This paper examines strategies for obtaining coincident observations for spacecraft in both similar and dissimilar orbits. Although these calculations may be performed easily for coplanar spacecraft, the non-coplanar case involves additional considerations which are incorporated into the algorithms presented herein.

  11. A new MCNPX PTRAC coincidence capture file capability: a tool for neutron detector design

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Louise G; Schear, Melissa A; Hendricks, John S; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Tobin, Stephen J; Croft, Stephen

    2010-12-14

    The existing MCNPX{trademark} PTRAC coincidence capture file allows a full list of neutron capture events to be recorded in any simulated detection medium. The originating event history number (e.g. spontaneous fission events), capture time, location and source particle number are tracked and output to file for post-processing. We have developed a new MCNPX PTRAC coincidence capture file capability to aid detector design studies. New features include the ability to track the isotopes that emitted the detected neutrons as well as induced fission chains in mixed samples before detection (both generation number and isotope). Here, the power of this tool is demonstrated using a detector design that has been developed for the non-destructive assay (NDA) of spent nuclear fuel. Individual capture time distributions have been generated for neutrons originating from Curium-244 source spontaneous fission events and induced fission events in fissile isotopes of interest: namely Plutonium-239, Plutonium-241, and Uranium-235. Through this capability, a full picture for the attribution of neutron capture events in the detector can be simulated.

  12. A new NCNPX PTRAC coincidence capture file capability: a tool for neutron detector design

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Louise G; Schear, Melissa A; Hendricks, John S; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Tobin, Stephen J; Croft, Stephen

    2011-01-13

    The existing Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNPX) particle tracking (PTRAC) coincidence capture file allows a full list of neutron capture events to be recorded in any simulated detection medium. The originating event history number (e.g. spontaneous fission events), capture time, location and source particle number are tracked and output to file for post-processing. We have developed a new MCNPX PTRAC coincidence capture file capability to aid detector design studies. New features include the ability to track the nuclides that emitted the detected neutrons as well as induced fission chains in mixed samples before detection (both generation number and nuclide that underwent induced fission). Here, the power of this tool is demonstrated using a detector design developed for the non-destructive assay (NDA) of spent nuclear fuel. Individual capture time distributions have been generated for neutrons originating from Curium-244 source spontaneous fission events and induced fission events in fissile nuclides of interest: namely Plutonium-239, Plutonium-241, and Uranium-235. Through this capability, a full picture for the attribution of neutron capture events in the detector can be simulated.

  13. Classical signal model reproducing quantum probabilities for single and coincidence detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei; Nilsson, Börje; Nordebo, Sven

    2012-05-01

    We present a simple classical (random) signal model reproducing Born's rule. The crucial point of our approach is that the presence of detector's threshold and calibration procedure have to be treated not as simply experimental technicalities, but as the basic counterparts of the theoretical model. We call this approach threshold signal detection model (TSD). The experiment on coincidence detection which was done by Grangier in 1986 [22] played a crucial role in rejection of (semi-)classical field models in favour of quantum mechanics (QM): impossibility to resolve the wave-particle duality in favour of a purely wave model. QM predicts that the relative probability of coincidence detection, the coefficient g(2) (0), is zero (for one photon states), but in (semi-)classical models g(2)(0) >= 1. In TSD the coefficient g(2)(0) decreases as 1/ɛ2d, where ɛd > 0 is the detection threshold. Hence, by increasing this threshold an experimenter can make the coefficient g(2) (0) essentially less than 1. The TSD-prediction can be tested experimentally in new Grangier type experiments presenting a detailed monitoring of dependence of the coefficient g(2)(0) on the detection threshold. Structurally our model has some similarity with the prequantum model of Grossing et al. Subquantum stochasticity is composed of the two counterparts: a stationary process in the space of internal degrees of freedom and the random walk type motion describing the temporal dynamics.

  14. Dynamic visual acuity and coincidence-anticipation timing by experienced and inexperienced women players of fast pitch softball.

    PubMed

    Millslagle, D G

    2000-04-01

    This study examined the relationship between dynamic visual acuity and coincidence-anticipation timing in 16 inexperienced and 16 experienced women's fast pitch softball players. Pearson-product correlations indicated a low relationship between dynamic visual acuity and coincidence-anticipation timing. The correlations for dynamic visual acuity and coincidence anticipation between experienced and inexperienced dynamic visual acuity were not significant. A significant difference was found between the mean dynamic visual acuity of the two groups, i.e., experienced players had better dynamic visual acuity than inexperienced players. Analysis of variance of constant errors, variable errors, and absolute errors of coincidence anticipation indicated no significant differences between groups or across the three accuracy scores. The interaction between experience and accuracy was not significant.

  15. Gross Motor Coincidence Timing by Children with Learning Difficulties and Children Matched on Mean Chronological and Mental Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacklin, Susan M.

    1987-01-01

    This study examines the learning of a gross motor coincidence timing task by children with learning difficulties, compared with that by children of average intelligence of an equivalent chronological age and mental age. Results are discussed. (Author/MT)

  16. The Design, Implementation, and Performance of the Astro-H SXS Calorimeter Array and Anti-Coincidence Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Adams, Joseph S.; Brekosky, Regis P.; Chiao, Meng P.; Chervenak, James A.; Eckart, Megan E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Galeazzi, Masimilliano; Grein, Christoph; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Kelley, Richard L.; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; McCammon, Dan; Porter, F. Scott; Szymkowiak, Andrew E.; Watanabe, Tomomi; Zhao, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The calorimeter array of the JAXA Astro-H (renamed Hitomi) Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) was designed to provide unprecedented spectral resolution of spatially extended cosmic x-ray sources and of all cosmic x-ray sources in the Fe-K band around 6 keV, enabling essential plasma diagnostics. The SXS has a square array of 36 microcalorimeters at the focal plane. These calorimeters consist of ion-implanted silicon thermistors and HgTe thermalizing x-ray absorbers. These devices have demonstrated a resolution of better than 4.5 eV at 6 keV when operated at a heat-sink temperature of 50 mK. We will discuss the basic physical parameters of this array, including the array layout, thermal conductance of the link to the heat sink, resistance function, absorber details, and means of attaching the absorber to the thermistor-bearing element. We will also present the thermal characterization of the whole array, including thermal conductance and crosstalk measurements and the results of pulsing the frame temperature via alpha particles, heat pulses, and the environmental background. A silicon ionization detector is located behind the calorimeter array and serves to reject events due to cosmic rays. We will briefly describe this anti-coincidence detector and its performance.

  17. Coincidence Anticipation Timing Performance during an Acute Bout of Brisk Walking in Older Adults: Effect of Stimulus Speed.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Michael J; Stanley, Michelle; Smith, Mike; Price, Michael J; Wright, Sheila Leddington

    2015-01-01

    This study examined coincidence anticipation timing (CAT) performance at slow and fast stimulus speeds before, during, and after an acute bout of walking in adults aged 60-76 years. Results from a series of repeated measures ANOVAs indicated significant rest versus exercise × stimulus speed × time interactions for absolute and variable errors (both P = 0.0001) whereby absolute and variable error scores, when stimulus speed was slow, improved as the duration of exercise increased. When stimulus speed was fast there were significantly greater absolute and variable errors at 18 minutes of the walking bout. There was also greater error at 18 minutes during walking compared to rest. These results suggest that, in a task involving walking and CAT, stimulus speeds plays an important role; specifically walking (exercise) enhances CAT performance at slow stimulus speeds but reduces CAT performance at fast stimulus speeds. The implications are that in everyday situations, where events require dual-task responses to be made at different speeds, for example, walking on the pavement whilst avoiding a crowd, compared to crossing a busy road, an understanding of how different stimulus speeds influence dual-task performance is extremely important, particularly in the older adult population.

  18. Coincidence Anticipation Timing Performance during an Acute Bout of Brisk Walking in Older Adults: Effect of Stimulus Speed.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Michael J; Stanley, Michelle; Smith, Mike; Price, Michael J; Wright, Sheila Leddington

    2015-01-01

    This study examined coincidence anticipation timing (CAT) performance at slow and fast stimulus speeds before, during, and after an acute bout of walking in adults aged 60-76 years. Results from a series of repeated measures ANOVAs indicated significant rest versus exercise × stimulus speed × time interactions for absolute and variable errors (both P = 0.0001) whereby absolute and variable error scores, when stimulus speed was slow, improved as the duration of exercise increased. When stimulus speed was fast there were significantly greater absolute and variable errors at 18 minutes of the walking bout. There was also greater error at 18 minutes during walking compared to rest. These results suggest that, in a task involving walking and CAT, stimulus speeds plays an important role; specifically walking (exercise) enhances CAT performance at slow stimulus speeds but reduces CAT performance at fast stimulus speeds. The implications are that in everyday situations, where events require dual-task responses to be made at different speeds, for example, walking on the pavement whilst avoiding a crowd, compared to crossing a busy road, an understanding of how different stimulus speeds influence dual-task performance is extremely important, particularly in the older adult population. PMID:26417457

  19. Temporal Dynamics of L5 Dendrites in Medial Prefrontal Cortex Regulate Integration Versus Coincidence Detection of Afferent Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Zemelman, Boris V.; Johnston, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Distinct brain regions are highly interconnected via long-range projections. How this inter-regional communication occurs depends not only upon which subsets of postsynaptic neurons receive input, but also, and equally importantly, upon what cellular subcompartments the projections target. Neocortical pyramidal neurons receive input onto their apical dendrites. However, physiological characterization of these inputs thus far has been exclusively somatocentric, leaving how the dendrites respond to spatial and temporal patterns of input unexplored. Here we used a combination of optogenetics with multisite electrode recordings to simultaneously measure dendritic and somatic responses to afferent fiber activation in two different populations of layer 5 (L5) pyramidal neurons in the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). We found that commissural inputs evoked monosynaptic responses in both intratelencephalic (IT) and pyramidal tract (PT) dendrites, whereas monosynaptic hippocampal input primarily targeted IT, but not PT, dendrites. To understand the role of dendritic integration in the processing of long-range inputs, we used dynamic clamp to simulate synaptic currents in the dendrites. IT dendrites functioned as temporal integrators that were particularly responsive to dendritic inputs within the gamma frequency range (40–140 Hz). In contrast, PT dendrites acted as coincidence detectors by responding to spatially distributed signals within a narrow time window. Thus, the PFC extracts information from different brain regions through the combination of selective dendritic targeting and the distinct dendritic physiological properties of L5 pyramidal dendrites. PMID:25788669

  20. Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) Global Aerosol Optical Depth Validation Based on 2 Years of Coincident Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Gaitley, Barbara J.; Martonchik, John V.; Diner, David J.; Crean, Kathleen A.; Holben, Brent

    2005-01-01

    Performance of the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) early postlaunch aerosol optical thickness (AOT) retrieval algorithm is assessed quantitatively over land and ocean by comparison with a 2-year measurement record of globally distributed AERONET Sun photometers. There are sufficient coincident observations to stratify the data set by season and expected aerosol type. In addition to reporting uncertainty envelopes, we identify trends and outliers, and investigate their likely causes, with the aim of refining algorithm performance. Overall, about 2/3 of the MISR-retrieved AOT values fall within [0.05 or 20% x AOT] of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). More than a third are within [0.03 or 10% x AOT]. Correlation coefficients are highest for maritime stations (approx.0.9), and lowest for dusty sites (more than approx.0.7). Retrieved spectral slopes closely match Sun photometer values for Biomass burning and continental aerosol types. Detailed comparisons suggest that adding to the algorithm climatology more absorbing spherical particles, more realistic dust analogs, and a richer selection of multimodal aerosol mixtures would reduce the remaining discrepancies for MISR retrievals over land; in addition, refining instrument low-light-level calibration could reduce or eliminate a small but systematic offset in maritime AOT values. On the basis of cases for which current particle models are representative, a second-generation MISR aerosol retrieval algorithm incorporating these improvements could provide AOT accuracy unprecedented for a spaceborne technique.

  1. Dissociation of H{sub 2}{sup +} in intense femtosecond laser fields studied by coincidence three-dimensional momentum imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P. Q.; Sayler, A. M.; Carnes, K. D.; Xia, J. F.; Smith, M. A.; Esry, B. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.

    2006-10-15

    The dissociation of H{sub 2}{sup +} in an intense laser field has been experimentally studied using femtosecond laser pulses at 790 nm in the intensity range of 10{sup 13}-10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Kinematically complete measurements of both the ionic H{sup +} and neutral H fragments dissociated from a vibrationally excited H{sub 2}{sup +} beam have been achieved by a coincidence three-dimensional momentum imaging system. Angular-resolved kinetic energy release spectra for a series of different intensity ranges have been obtained using the intensity-difference spectrum method, thus disentangling the problem caused by the intensity volume effect. Our results indicate that the dissociation dynamics are drastically different for 'long' (135 fs) and 'short' (45 fs) laser pulses at similar high laser intensities. Specifically, bond softening is found to be the main feature in long pulses, while above threshold dissociation is dominant in short pulses whose durations are comparable with the vibrational period of the molecule. Bond softening in short pulses appears at low kinetic energy release with a narrow angular distribution. The experimental results are well interpreted by solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in the Born-Oppenheimer representation without nuclear rotation.

  2. Coincidence Anticipation Timing Performance during an Acute Bout of Brisk Walking in Older Adults: Effect of Stimulus Speed

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Michael J.; Stanley, Michelle; Smith, Mike; Price, Michael J.; Leddington Wright, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    This study examined coincidence anticipation timing (CAT) performance at slow and fast stimulus speeds before, during, and after an acute bout of walking in adults aged 60–76 years. Results from a series of repeated measures ANOVAs indicated significant rest versus exercise × stimulus speed × time interactions for absolute and variable errors (both P = 0.0001) whereby absolute and variable error scores, when stimulus speed was slow, improved as the duration of exercise increased. When stimulus speed was fast there were significantly greater absolute and variable errors at 18 minutes of the walking bout. There was also greater error at 18 minutes during walking compared to rest. These results suggest that, in a task involving walking and CAT, stimulus speeds plays an important role; specifically walking (exercise) enhances CAT performance at slow stimulus speeds but reduces CAT performance at fast stimulus speeds. The implications are that in everyday situations, where events require dual-task responses to be made at different speeds, for example, walking on the pavement whilst avoiding a crowd, compared to crossing a busy road, an understanding of how different stimulus speeds influence dual-task performance is extremely important, particularly in the older adult population. PMID:26417457

  3. Characterization of a Prototype TES-Based Anti-coincidence Detector for Use with Future X-ray Calorimeter Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, S. E.; Yoon, W. S.; Adams, J. S.; Bailey, C. N.; Bandler, S. R.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. J.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Lee, S.-J.; Porst, J.-P.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Sultana, M.

    2016-07-01

    For future X-ray observatories utilizing transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters, an anti-coincidence detector (anti-co) is required to discriminate X-ray (˜ 0.1-10 keV) signals from non-X-ray background events, such as ionizing particles. We have developed a prototype anti-co that utilizes TESs, which will be compatible with the TES focal-plane arrays planned for future X-ray observatories. This anti-co is based upon the cryogenic dark matter search II detector design. It is a silicon wafer covered with superconducting collection fins and TES microcalorimeters. Minimum ionizing particles deposit energy while passing through the silicon. The athermal phonons produced by these events are absorbed in the superconducting fins, breaking Cooper pairs. The resulting quasiparticles diffuse along the superconducting fin, producing a signal when they reach the TES. By determining a correlation between detections in the anti-co and the X-ray detector one can identify and flag these background events. We have fabricated and tested a single-channel prototype anti-co device on a 1.5 × 1.9 cm^2 chip. We have measured the signals in this device from photons of several energies between 1.5 and 60 keV, as well as laboratory background events, demonstrating a threshold ˜ 100 times lower than is needed to detect minimum ionizing particles.

  4. Polarisation-based coincidence event discrimination: an in silico study towards a feasible scheme for Compton-PET.

    PubMed

    Toghyani, M; Gillam, J E; McNamara, A L; Kuncic, Z

    2016-08-01

    Current positron emission tomography (PET) systems use temporally localised coincidence events discriminated by energy and time-of-flight information. The two annihilation photons are in an entangled polarisation state and, in principle, additional information from the polarisation correlation of photon pairs could be used to improve the accuracy of coincidence classification. In a previous study, we demonstrated that in principle, the polarisation correlation information could be transferred to an angular correlation in the distribution of scattered photon pairs in a planar Compton camera system. In the present study, we model a source-phantom-detector system using Geant4 and we develop a coincidence classification scheme that exploits the angular correlation of scattered annihilation quanta to improve the accuracy of coincidence detection. We find a [Formula: see text] image quality improvement in terms of the peak signal-to-noise ratio when scattered coincidence events are discriminated solely by their angular correlation, thus demonstrating the feasibility of this novel classification scheme. By integrating scatter events (both single-single and single-only) with unscattered coincidence events discriminated using conventional methods, our results suggest that Compton-PET may be a promising candidate for optimal emission tomographic imaging. PMID:27405797

  5. Polarisation-based coincidence event discrimination: an in silico study towards a feasible scheme for Compton-PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toghyani, M.; Gillam, J. E.; McNamara, A. L.; Kuncic, Z.

    2016-08-01

    Current positron emission tomography (PET) systems use temporally localised coincidence events discriminated by energy and time-of-flight information. The two annihilation photons are in an entangled polarisation state and, in principle, additional information from the polarisation correlation of photon pairs could be used to improve the accuracy of coincidence classification. In a previous study, we demonstrated that in principle, the polarisation correlation information could be transferred to an angular correlation in the distribution of scattered photon pairs in a planar Compton camera system. In the present study, we model a source-phantom-detector system using Geant4 and we develop a coincidence classification scheme that exploits the angular correlation of scattered annihilation quanta to improve the accuracy of coincidence detection. We find a 22% image quality improvement in terms of the peak signal-to-noise ratio when scattered coincidence events are discriminated solely by their angular correlation, thus demonstrating the feasibility of this novel classification scheme. By integrating scatter events (both single-single and single-only) with unscattered coincidence events discriminated using conventional methods, our results suggest that Compton-PET may be a promising candidate for optimal emission tomographic imaging.

  6. Effects of Calcium Spikes in the Layer 5 Pyramidal Neuron on Coincidence Detection and Activity Propagation.

    PubMed

    Chua, Yansong; Morrison, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    The role of dendritic spiking mechanisms in neural processing is so far poorly understood. To investigate the role of calcium spikes in the functional properties of the single neuron and recurrent networks, we investigated a three compartment neuron model of the layer 5 pyramidal neuron with calcium dynamics in the distal compartment. By performing single neuron simulations with noisy synaptic input and occasional large coincident input at either just the distal compartment or at both somatic and distal compartments, we show that the presence of calcium spikes confers a substantial advantage for coincidence detection in the former case and a lesser advantage in the latter. We further show that the experimentally observed critical frequency phenomenon, in which action potentials triggered by stimuli near the soma above a certain frequency trigger a calcium spike at distal dendrites, leading to further somatic depolarization, is not exhibited by a neuron receiving realistically noisy synaptic input, and so is unlikely to be a necessary component of coincidence detection. We next investigate the effect of calcium spikes in propagation of spiking activities in a feed-forward network (FFN) embedded in a balanced recurrent network. The excitatory neurons in the network are again connected to either just the distal, or both somatic and distal compartments. With purely distal connectivity, activity propagation is stable and distinguishable for a large range of recurrent synaptic strengths if the feed-forward connections are sufficiently strong, but propagation does not occur in the absence of calcium spikes. When connections are made to both the somatic and the distal compartments, activity propagation is achieved for neurons with active calcium dynamics at a much smaller number of neurons per pool, compared to a network of passive neurons, but quickly becomes unstable as the strength of recurrent synapses increases. Activity propagation at higher scaling factors can be

  7. Marrow Adipose Tissue Expansion Coincides with Insulin Resistance in MAGP1-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Walji, Tezin A.; Turecamo, Sarah E.; Sanchez, Alejandro Coca; Anthony, Bryan A.; Abou-Ezzi, Grazia; Scheller, Erica L.; Link, Daniel C.; Mecham, Robert P.; Craft, Clarissa S.

    2016-01-01

    Marrow adipose tissue (MAT) is an endocrine organ with the potential to influence skeletal remodeling and hematopoiesis. Pathologic MAT expansion has been studied in the context of severe metabolic challenge, including caloric restriction, high fat diet feeding, and leptin deficiency. However, the rapid change in peripheral fat and glucose metabolism associated with these models impedes our ability to examine which metabolic parameters precede or coincide with MAT expansion. Microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1 (MAGP1) is a matricellular protein that influences cellular processes by tethering signaling molecules to extracellular matrix structures. MAGP1-deficient (Mfap2−/−) mice display a progressive excess adiposity phenotype, which precedes insulin resistance and occurs without changes in caloric intake or ambulation. Mfap2−/− mice were, therefore, used as a model to associate parameters of metabolic disease, bone remodeling, and hematopoiesis with MAT expansion. Marrow adiposity was normal in Mfap2−/− mice until 6 months of age; however, by 10 months, marrow fat volume had increased fivefold relative to wild-type control at the same age. Increased gonadal fat pad mass and hyperglycemia were detectable in Mfap2−/− mice by 2 months, but peaked by 6 months. The development of insulin resistance coincided with MAT expansion. Longitudinal characterization of bone mass demonstrated a disconnection in MAT volume and bone volume. Specifically, Mfap2−/− mice had reduced trabecular bone volume by 2 months, but this phenotype did not progress with age or MAT expansion. Interestingly, MAT expansion in the 10-month-old Mfap2−/− mice was associated with modest alterations in basal hematopoiesis, including a shift from granulopoiesis to B lymphopoiesis. Together, these findings indicate MAT expansion is coincident with insulin resistance, but not excess peripheral adiposity or hyperglycemia in Mfap2−/− mice; and substantial MAT

  8. Effects of Calcium Spikes in the Layer 5 Pyramidal Neuron on Coincidence Detection and Activity Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Yansong; Morrison, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    The role of dendritic spiking mechanisms in neural processing is so far poorly understood. To investigate the role of calcium spikes in the functional properties of the single neuron and recurrent networks, we investigated a three compartment neuron model of the layer 5 pyramidal neuron with calcium dynamics in the distal compartment. By performing single neuron simulations with noisy synaptic input and occasional large coincident input at either just the distal compartment or at both somatic and distal compartments, we show that the presence of calcium spikes confers a substantial advantage for coincidence detection in the former case and a lesser advantage in the latter. We further show that the experimentally observed critical frequency phenomenon, in which action potentials triggered by stimuli near the soma above a certain frequency trigger a calcium spike at distal dendrites, leading to further somatic depolarization, is not exhibited by a neuron receiving realistically noisy synaptic input, and so is unlikely to be a necessary component of coincidence detection. We next investigate the effect of calcium spikes in propagation of spiking activities in a feed-forward network (FFN) embedded in a balanced recurrent network. The excitatory neurons in the network are again connected to either just the distal, or both somatic and distal compartments. With purely distal connectivity, activity propagation is stable and distinguishable for a large range of recurrent synaptic strengths if the feed-forward connections are sufficiently strong, but propagation does not occur in the absence of calcium spikes. When connections are made to both the somatic and the distal compartments, activity propagation is achieved for neurons with active calcium dynamics at a much smaller number of neurons per pool, compared to a network of passive neurons, but quickly becomes unstable as the strength of recurrent synapses increases. Activity propagation at higher scaling factors can be

  9. Sparse Auto-Calibration for Radar Coincidence Imaging with Gain-Phase Errors

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Wang, Hongqiang; Cheng, Yongqiang; Qin, Yuliang

    2015-01-01

    Radar coincidence imaging (RCI) is a high-resolution staring imaging technique without the limitation of relative motion between target and radar. The sparsity-driven approaches are commonly used in RCI, while the prior knowledge of imaging models needs to be known accurately. However, as one of the major model errors, the gain-phase error exists generally, and may cause inaccuracies of the model and defocus the image. In the present report, the sparse auto-calibration method is proposed to compensate the gain-phase error in RCI. The method can determine the gain-phase error as part of the imaging process. It uses an iterative algorithm, which cycles through steps of target reconstruction and gain-phase error estimation, where orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) and Newton’s method are used, respectively. Simulation results show that the proposed method can improve the imaging quality significantly and estimate the gain-phase error accurately. PMID:26528981

  10. A novel approach for determining level schemes from γ-ray coincidence data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demand, G. A.; Garrett, P. E.; Green, K. L.; Leach, K. G.; Phillips, A. A.; Schumaker, M. A.; Svensson, C. E.; Wong, J.; Ball, G. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Hackman, G.; Morton, A. C.; Pearson, C. J.; Austin, R. A. E.; Colosimo, S.; Wood, J. L.; Kulp, W. D.; Furse, D.; Brown, N.; Grinyer, G. F.; Yates, S. W.; Cross, D.

    2008-10-01

    Nuclear structure studies often rely on understanding trends amongst the excited states of large numbers of nuclei. Experiments performed using powerful γ-ray spectrometers, like GAMMASPHERE or the 8π array, can often reveal many hundreds of transitions in the nuclei of interest. As a result, the determination of level schemes and the precise calculation of the associated properties, such as transition branching ratios, can become a substantial obstacle to the rapid development and formulation of new ideas. Recent increases in computational power, while insufficient to solve the problem by brute force, make an algorithmic approach possible. We will present results of applying a new algorithm based on evolutionary computation to γ-ray coincidence data obtained from β-decay studies of ^112Ag and ^160Tm, using the 8π array at TRIUMF-ISAC, to demonstrate the usefulness of this approach for nuclear structure studies. Work supported in part by NSERC.

  11. Do climate extreme events foster violent civil conflicts? A coincidence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleussner, Carl-Friedrich; Donges, Jonathan F.; Donner, Reik V.

    2014-05-01

    Civil conflicts promoted by adverse environmental conditions represent one of the most important potential feedbacks in the global socio-environmental nexus. While the role of climate extremes as a triggering factor is often discussed, no consensus is yet reached about the cause-and-effect relation in the observed data record. Here we present results of a rigorous statistical coincidence analysis based on the Munich Re Inc. extreme events database and the Uppsala conflict data program. We report evidence for statistically significant synchronicity between climate extremes with high economic impact and violent conflicts for various regions, although no coherent global signal emerges from our analysis. Our results indicate the importance of regional vulnerability and might aid to identify hot-spot regions for potential climate-triggered violent social conflicts.

  12. Coincident multispectral satellite observations of marine stratocumulus clouds near the Azores Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Miletta, J.; Katsaros, K.B.

    1994-12-31

    Marine stratocumulus clouds (MSC) have been the subject of much climate research because of their effect on the earth`s radiative energy budget. The radiative properties of MSC are determined primarily by their water content and spatial distribution. Satellite data provide an excellent opportunity to characterize these parameters. In this study, the authors use coincident observations from two sensors on the same Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) platform: visible and infrared data are provided by the Operational Linescan System (OLS), and passive microwave data are provided by the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI). The OLS data facilitate the interpretation of the atmospheric parameters retrieved from the SSMI by putting them in a familiar context and allowing a subpixel analysis of the relatively large SSMI footprint. The objective is to explore the relationships between the SSMI-derived and the OLS-derived cloud parameters.

  13. Performance of the Anti-Coincidence Detector on the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.J.; Charles, E.; Hartman, R.C.; Moiseev, A.A.; Ormes, J.F.; /NASA, Goddard /Denver U.

    2007-10-22

    The Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD), the outermost detector layer in the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT), is designed to detect and veto incident cosmic ray charged particles, which outnumber cosmic gamma rays by 3-4 orders of magnitude. The challenge in ACD design is that it must have high (0.9997) detection efficiency for singly-charged relativistic particles, but must also have a low probability for self-veto of high-energy gammas by backsplash radiation from interactions in the LAT calorimeter. Simulations and tests demonstrate that the ACD meets its design requirements. The performance of the ACD has remained stable through stand-alone environmental testing, shipment across the U.S., installation onto the LAT, shipment back across the U.S., LAT environmental testing, and shipment to Arizona. As part of the fully-assembled GLAST observatory, the ACD is being readied for final testing before launch.

  14. 3D Coincidence Imaging Disentangles Intense Field Double Detachment of SF6(–).

    PubMed

    Kandhasamy, Durai Murugan; Albeck, Yishai; Jagtap, Krishna; Strasser, Daniel

    2015-07-23

    The efficient intense field double detachment of molecular anions observed in SF6(–) is studied by 3D coincidence imaging of the dissociation products. The dissociation anisotropy and kinetic energy release distributions are determined for the energetically lowest double detachment channel by virtue of disentangling the SF5(+) + F fragmentation products. The observed nearly isotropic dissociation with respect to the linear laser polarization and surprisingly high kinetic energy release events suggest that the dissociation occurs on a highly excited state. Rydberg (SF6(+))* states composed of a highly repulsive dication core and a Rydberg electron are proposed to explain the observed kinetic energy release, accounting also for the efficient production of all possible cationic fragments at equivalent laser intensities.

  15. Frequent floods in the European Alps coincide with cooler periods of the past 2500 years.

    PubMed

    Glur, Lukas; Wirth, Stefanie B; Büntgen, Ulf; Gilli, Adrian; Haug, Gerald H; Schär, Christoph; Beer, Jürg; Anselmetti, Flavio S

    2013-09-26

    Severe floods triggered by intense precipitation are among the most destructive natural hazards in Alpine environments, frequently causing large financial and societal damage. Potential enhanced flood occurrence due to global climate change would thus increase threat to settlements, infrastructure, and human lives in the affected regions. Yet, projections of intense precipitation exhibit major uncertainties and robust reconstructions of Alpine floods are limited to the instrumental and historical period. Here we present a 2500-year long flood reconstruction for the European Alps, based on dated sedimentary flood deposits from ten lakes in Switzerland. We show that periods with high flood frequency coincide with cool summer temperatures. This wet-cold synchronism suggests enhanced flood occurrence to be triggered by latitudinal shifts of Atlantic and Mediterranean storm tracks. This paleoclimatic perspective reveals natural analogues for varying climate conditions, and thus can contribute to a better understanding and improved projections of weather extremes under climate change.

  16. Growth of coincident site lattice matched semiconductor layers and devices on crystalline substrates

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew G; Ptak, Aaron J

    2013-08-13

    Methods of fabricating a semiconductor layer or device and said devices are disclosed. The methods include but are not limited to providing a substrate having a crystalline surface with a known lattice parameter (a). The method further includes growing a crystalline semiconductor layer on the crystalline substrate surface by coincident site lattice matched epitaxy, without any buffer layer between the crystalline semiconductor layer and the crystalline surface of the substrate. The crystalline semiconductor layer will be prepared to have a lattice parameter (a') that is related to the substrate lattice parameter (a). The lattice parameter (a') maybe related to the lattice parameter (a) by a scaling factor derived from a geometric relationship between the respective crystal lattices.

  17. Pair neutron transfer in 60Ni+116Sn probed via γ -particle coincidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, D.; Corradi, L.; Szilner, S.; Pollarolo, G.; Goasduff, A.; Mijatović, T.; Bazzacco, D.; Birkenbach, B.; Bracco, A.; Charles, L.; Courtin, S.; Désesquelles, P.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Grebosz, J.; Haas, F.; Hess, H.; Jelavić Malenica, D.; Jungclaus, A.; Karolak, M.; Leoni, S.; Maj, A.; Menegazzo, R.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Montagnoli, G.; Napoli, D. R.; Pullia, A.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Rosso, D.; Salsac, M. D.; Scarlassara, F.; Söderström, P.-A.; Soić, N.; Stefanini, A. M.; Stezowski, O.; Theisen, Ch.; Ur, C. A.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Varga Pajtler, M.

    2016-05-01

    We performed a γ -particle coincidence experiment for the 60Ni + 116Sn system to investigate whether the population of the two-neutron pickup channel leading to 62Ni is mainly concentrated in the ground-state transition, as has been found in a previous work [D. Montanari et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 052501 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.052501]. The experiment has been performed by employing the PRISMA magnetic spectrometer coupled to the Advanced Gamma Tracking Array (AGATA) demonstrator. The strength distribution of excited states corresponding to the inelastic, one- and two-neutron transfer channels has been extracted. We found that in the two-neutron transfer channel the strength to excited states corresponds to a fraction (less than 24%) of the total, consistent with the previously obtained results that the 2 n channel is dominated by the ground-state to ground-state transition.

  18. Radar coincidence imaging with phase error using Bayesian hierarchical prior modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Wang, Hongqiang; Cheng, Yongqiang; Qin, Yuliang

    2016-01-01

    Radar coincidence imaging (RCI) is a high-resolution imaging technique without the limitation of relative motion between target and radar. In sparsity-driven RCI, the prior knowledge of imaging model requires to be known accurately. However, the phase error generally exists as a model error, which may cause inaccuracies of the model and defocus the image. The problem is formulated using Bayesian hierarchical prior modeling, and the self-calibration variational message passing (SC-VMP) algorithm is proposed to improve the performance of RCI with phase error. The algorithm determines the phase error as part of the imaging process. The scattering coefficient and phase error are iteratively estimated using VMP and Newton's method, respectively. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can estimate the phase error accurately and improve the imaging quality significantly.

  19. Coincidence Doppler broadening study of Eurofer 97 irradiated in spallation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabelová, V.; Kršjak, V.; Kuriplach, J.; Dai, Y.; Slugeň, V.

    2015-03-01

    The behavior of transmutation helium during isochronal annealing of irradiated Eurofer 97 was investigated using coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopy (CDBS). The investigated ferritic martensitic steel was irradiated in 2000 and 2001 in the frame of the STIP-II project at the Swiss neutron spallation source (SINQ) (irradiation with neutrons and protons) at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). During isochronal annealing experiment, coarsening of vacancy clusters and/or growth of helium bubbles was observed at T ⩾ 500 °C. This process causes an increase of low-momentum annihilation events and related increase of the S parameter during thermal treatment of material. On the other hand, the maximum concentration of helium in small vacancy clusters (Vn) was observed after annealing at 400 °C, where an excellent correlation with the calculated CDBS profiles of Vn + Hem clusters was found.

  20. The Anti-Coincidence Detector for the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseev, A.A.; Hartman, R.C.; Ormes, J.F.; Thompson, D.J.; Amato, M.J.; Johnson, T.E.; Segal, K.N.; Sheppard, D.A.

    2007-03-23

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and testing of the Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT). The ACD is LAT's first-level defense against the charged cosmic ray background that outnumbers the gamma rays by 3-5 orders of magnitude. The ACD covers the top and 4 sides of the LAT tracking detector, requiring a total active area of {approx}8.3 square meters. The ACD detector utilizes plastic scintillator tiles with wave-length shifting fiber readout. In order to suppress self-veto by shower particles at high gamma-ray energies, the ACD is segmented into 89 tiles of different sizes. The overall ACD efficiency for detection of singly charged relativistic particles entering the tracking detector from the top or sides of the LAT exceeds the required 0.9997.

  1. Pressure oscillations on the surface of Gale Crater and coincident observations of global circulation patterns.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Torre Juarez, M.; Kass, D. M.; Haberle, R. M.; Gómez-Elvira, J.; Harri, A. M.; Kleinboehl, A.; Kahanpää, H.; Kahre, M. A.; Lemmon, M. T.; Martín-Torres, J.; Newman, C. E.; Rafkin, S. C.; Rodriguez-Manfredi, J. A.; Peinado, V.; Vasavada, A. R.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    The annual cycle of mean diurnal surface pressures observed by Curiosity's Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) has shown oscillations after two Southern Hemispheric storms that occurred before the annual pressure maxima and minima of the dusty season (Ls~250 and 330). The oscillations had a period of ~7 sols and were less visible or absent during the dust free seasons (Ls ~ 0). Martian airborne dust alters the atmosphere's response to solar radiation and the resulting heating profiles. Since the atmospheric circulation responds to thermal forcing by the Sun, atmospheric dust can alter the large-scale circulation. We use coincident global observations by the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) to examine the global circulation. We find that the observed surface pressure oscillations relate to oscillations of the Hadley cell. We also analyze the potential impacts of these coupled oscillations especially as related to traveling waves and thermal tides.

  2. Reduction of elevated IGF-1 levels in coincident amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Erlick A C; Turner, Martin R; Wass, John A H; Talbot, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    We report a patient presenting with ALS in whom acromegaly was later confirmed. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) has been tried in the treatment of ALS and despite equivocal results from clinical trials, efforts have continued to try to harness the significant positive effects on motor neuron growth observed in vitro and in survival of mouse models of the disease. One subsequent study has reported an association between higher circulating serum IGF-1 levels and longer disease duration in ALS patients. Concern therefore arose in our case that treatment of the acromegaly with a somatostatin analogue might adversely affect the natural course of his ALS through lowering of potentially beneficial IGF-1 levels. Through clinical observation and prognostic modelling we suggest that this concern was unfounded. The potential interaction of these two rarely coincident disorders in our patient is discussed.

  3. Synaptic diversity enables temporal coding of coincident multi-sensory inputs in single neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chabrol, François P.; Arenz, Alexander; Wiechert, Martin T.; Margrie, Troy W.; DiGregorio, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of the brain to rapidly process information from multiple pathways is critical for reliable execution of complex sensory-motor behaviors, yet the cellular mechanisms underlying a neuronal representation of multimodal stimuli are poorly understood. Here we explored the possibility that the physiological diversity of mossy fiber (MF) to granule cell (GC) synapses within the mouse vestibulocerebellum may contribute to the processing of coincident multisensory information at the level of individual GCs. We found that the strength and short-term dynamics of individual MF-GC synapses can act as biophysical signatures for primary vestibular, secondary vestibular and visual input pathways. The majority of GCs receive inputs from different modalities, which when co-activated, produced enhanced GC firing rates and distinct first spike latencies. Thus, pathway-specific synaptic response properties permit temporal coding of correlated multisensory input by single GCs, thereby enriching sensory representation and facilitating pattern separation. PMID:25821914

  4. Sensing muscle ischemia: coincident detection of acid and ATP via interplay of two ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Birdsong, William T.; Fierro, Leonardo; Williams, Frank G.; Spelta, Valeria; Naves, Ligia A.; Knowles, Michelle; Marsh-Haffner, Josephine; Adelman, John P.; Almers, Wolfhard; Elde, Robert P.; McCleskey, Edwin W.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Ischemic pain – examples include the chest pain of a heart attack and the leg pain of a 30 second sprint – occurs when muscle gets too little oxygen for its metabolic need. Lactic acid cannot act alone to trigger ischemic pain because the pH change is so small. Here we show that another compound released from ischemic muscle, ATP (adenosine tri-phosphate), works together with acid by increasing the pH sensitivity of ASIC3 (acid sensing ion channel #3), the molecule used by sensory neurons to detect lactic acidosis. Our data argue that ATP acts by binding to P2X receptors that form a molecular complex with ASICs; the receptor on sensory neurons appears to be P2X5, an electrically quiet ion channel. Coincident detection of acid and ATP should confer sensory selectivity for ischemia over other conditions of acidosis. PMID:21092862

  5. Observation of autoionization in O 2 by an electron-electron coincidence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doering, J. P.; Yang, J.; Cooper, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    A strong transition to an autoionizing stata has been observed in O 2 at 16.83 ± 0.11 eV by means of a new electron-electron conincidence method. The method uses the fact that electrons arising from autoionizing states appear at a constant energy loss corresponding to the excitation energy of the autoionizing state rather than at a constant ionization potential as do electrons produced by direct ionization. Comparison of the present data with previous photoionization studies suggests that the autoionizing O 2 state is the same state deduced to be responsible for abnormal vibrational intensities in the O 2+X 2Πg ground state when 16.85 eV Ne(I) photons are used. These electron-electron coincidence experiments provide a direct new method for the study of autoionization produced by electron impact.

  6. Coincidence, historical repetition, and self-knowledge: Jung, Vico, and Joyce.

    PubMed

    Verene, Donald Phillip

    2002-07-01

    Jung develops synchronicity as an a causal principle of connection by recounting various examples of meaningful coincidence from experience and by analysing various systems of divination, notably the I Ching. Philosophical theory of causality has given no significant attention to synchronicity; the events of synchronicity are regarded as chance. The Neapolitan philosopher Giambattista Vico (1668-1744) developed a doctrine of historical experience and of self-knowledge that grounds the phenomenon of synchronicity in a metaphysics. James Joyce employed Vico's conception of language and historical cycles as the basis of Joyce's final literary work, Finnegans Wake. Vico's metaphysical sense of synchronicity and Joyce's literary formulation offer a grounding of this principle in non-divinatory sources in modern Western thought, something which Jung's discussion does not provide. These philosophical and literary perspectives complement Jung's to offer an expanded context in which to recognize synchronicity and to make sense of it. PMID:12174547

  7. ΛXCDM: a cosmon model solution to the cosmological coincidence problem?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grande, Javier; Solà, Joan; Stefancic, Hrvoje

    2006-08-01

    We consider the possibility that the total dark energy (DE) of the Universe is made out of two dynamical components of different nature: a variable cosmological term, Λ, and a dynamical 'cosmon', X, possibly interacting with Λ but not with matter—which remains conserved. We call this scenario the ΛXCDM model. One possibility for X would be a scalar field χ, but it is not the only one. The overall equation of state (EOS) of the ΛXCDM model can effectively appear as quintessence or phantom energy depending on the mixture of the two components. Both the dynamics of Λ and that of X could be linked to high energy effects near the Planck scale. In the case of Λ it may be related to the running of this parameter under quantum effects, whereas X might be identified with some fundamental field (say, a dilaton) left over as a low energy 'relic' by e.g. string theory. We find that the dynamics of the ΛXCDM model can trigger a future stopping of the Universe expansion and can keep the ratio ρD/ρm (DE density to matter radiation density) bounded and of order 1. Therefore, the model could explain the so-called 'cosmological coincidence problem'. This is in part related to the possibility that the present value of the cosmological term can be Λ0 < 0 in this framework (the current total DE density nevertheless being positive). However, a cosmic halt could occur even if Λ0 > 0 because of the peculiar behaviour of X as 'phantom matter'. We describe various cosmological scenarios made possible by the composite and dynamical nature of ΛXCDM, and discuss in detail their impact on the cosmological coincidence problem.

  8. The human endogenous retrovirus K Rev response element coincides with a predicted RNA folding region.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J; Bogerd, H; Le, S Y; Cullen, B R

    2000-01-01

    Human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) is the name given to an approximately 30-million-year-old family of endogenous retroviruses present at >50 copies per haploid human genome. Previously, the HERV-K were shown to encode a nuclear RNA export factor, termed K-Rev, that is the functional equivalent of the H-Rev protein encoded by human immunodeficiency virus type 1. HERV-K was also shown to contain a cis-acting target element, the HERV-K Rev response element (K-RRE), that allowed the nuclear export of linked RNA transcripts in the presence of either K-Rev or H-Rev. Here, we demonstrate that the functionally defined K-RRE coincides with a statistically highly significant unusual RNA folding region and present a potential RNA secondary structure for the approximately 416-nt K-RRE. Both in vitro and in vivo assays of sequence specific RNA binding were used to map two primary binding sites for K-Rev, and one primary binding site for H-Rev, within the K-RRE. Of note, all three binding sites map to discrete predicted RNA stem-loop subdomains within the larger K-RRE structure. Although almost the entire 416-nt K-RRE was required for the activation of nuclear RNA export in cells expressing K-Rev, mutational inactivation of the binding sites for K-Rev resulted in the selective loss of the K-RRE response to K-Rev but not to H-Rev. Together, these data strongly suggest that the K-RRE, like the H-RRE, coincides with an extensive RNA secondary structure and identify specific sites within the K-RRE that can recruit either K-Rev or H-Rev to HERV-K RNA transcripts. PMID:11105755

  9. The coincidence counting technique for orders of magnitude background reduction in data obtained with the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF.

    PubMed

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H; Manuel, M J-E; Gatu Johnson, M; Schaeffer, J C; Frankel, R; Sinenian, N; Childs, R A; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Sangster, T C; Burke, M; Roberts, S

    2011-07-01

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been built and successfully used at OMEGA for measurements of down-scattered neutrons (DS-n), from which an areal density in both warm-capsule and cryogenic-DT implosions have been inferred. Another MRS is currently being commissioned on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for diagnosing low-yield tritium-hydrogen-deuterium implosions and high-yield DT implosions. As CR-39 detectors are used in the MRS, the principal sources of background are neutron-induced tracks and intrinsic tracks (defects in the CR-39). The coincidence counting technique was developed to reduce these types of background tracks to the required level for the DS-n measurements at OMEGA and the NIF. Using this technique, it has been demonstrated that the number of background tracks is reduced by a couple of orders of magnitude, which exceeds the requirement for the DS-n measurements at both facilities.

  10. Nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Savignac, Noel Felix; Gomez, Leo S; Yelton, William Graham; Robinson, Alex; Limmer, Steven

    2013-06-04

    This invention is a nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance of silver-silver halide on an interdigitated electrode to detect light or radiation comprised of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, X rays, and/or neutrons. The detector is comprised of an interdigitated electrode covered by a layer of silver halide. After exposure to alpha particles, beta particles, X rays, gamma rays, neutron radiation, or light, the silver halide is reduced to silver in the presence of a reducing solution. The change from the high electrical resistance (impedance) of silver halide to the low resistance of silver provides the radiation warning that detected radiation levels exceed a predetermined radiation dose threshold.

  11. Allergic Sensitization Underlies Hyperreactive Antigen-Specific CD4+ T Cell Responses in Coincident Filarial Infection.

    PubMed

    Gazzinelli-Guimarães, Pedro H; Bonne-Année, Sandra; Fujiwara, Ricardo T; Santiago, Helton C; Nutman, Thomas B

    2016-10-01

    Among the various hypotheses put forward to explain the modulatory influence of helminth infection on allergic effector responses in humans, the IL-10-induced suppression of Th2-associated responses has been the leading candidate. To explore this helminth/allergy interaction more fully, parasite- and allergen-specific CD4(+) T cell responses in 12 subjects with filarial infections, and coincident allergic sensitization (filarial [Fil](+)allergy [A](+)) were compared with the responses to three appropriate control groups (Fil(-)A(-) [n = 13], Fil(-)A(+) [n = 12], Fil(+)A(-) [n = 11]). The most important findings revealed that Fil(+)A(+) had marked (p < 0.0001 for all cytokines) increases in parasite Ag-driven Th2 (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13), Th9 (IL-9), and the regulatory (IL-10) cytokines when compared with Fil(+)A(-) Moreover, using multiparameter flow cytometry, filarial parasite Ag induced a marked increase in not only the frequency of CD4(+) T cells producing IL-4, IL-5, IL-2, and TNF-α in Fil(+)A(+) when compared with Fil(+)A(-) patients, but also in the frequencies of polyfunctional Th2-like (CD4(+)IL-4(+)IL-5(+) and CD4(+)IL-2(+)IL-4(+)IL-5(+)TNF-α(+)) cells. The Th2-associated responses seen in the Fil(+)A(+) group were correlated with serum IgE levels (p < 0.01, r = 0.5165 for IL-4; p < 0.001, r = 0.5544 for IL-5; and p < 0.001, r = 0.4901 for IL-13) and levels of circulating eosinophils (p < 0.0116, r = 0.5656) and their degranulation/activation products (major basic protein [p < 0.001, r = 0.7353] and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin [p < 0.01, r = 0.7059]). CD4(+) responses to allergen were not different (to a large extent) among the groups. Taken together, our data suggest that allergic sensitization coincident with filarial infection drives parasite Ag-specific T cell hyperresponsiveness, which is characterized largely by an augmented Th2-dominated immune response. PMID:27566825

  12. Search for transient gravitational waves in coincidence with short-duration radio transients during 2007-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, K. N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Pereira, R.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stiles, D.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Archibald, A. M.; Banaszak, S.; Berndsen, A.; Boyles, J.; Cardoso, R. F.; Chawla, P.; Cherry, A.; Dartez, L. P.; Day, D.; Epstein, C. R.; Ford, A. J.; Flanigan, J.; Garcia, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hinojosa, J.; Jenet, F. A.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Keane, E. F.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; Leake, S.; Lorimer, D.; Lunsford, G.; Lynch, R. S.; Martinez, J. G.; Mata, A.; McLaughlin, M. A.; McPhee, C. A.; Penucci, T.; Ransom, S.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Rohr, M. D. W.; Stairs, I. H.; Stovall, K.; van Leeuwen, J.; Walker, A. N.; Wells, B. L.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We present an archival search for transient gravitational-wave bursts in coincidence with 27 single-pulse triggers from Green Bank Telescope pulsar surveys, using the LIGO, Virgo, and GEO interferometer network. We also discuss a check for gravitational-wave signals in coincidence with Parkes fast radio bursts using similar methods. Data analyzed in these searches were collected between 2007 and 2013. Possible sources of emission of both short-duration radio signals and transient gravitational-wave emission include starquakes on neutron stars, binary coalescence of neutron stars, and cosmic string cusps. While no evidence for gravitational-wave emission in coincidence with these radio transients was found, the current analysis serves as a prototype for similar future searches using more sensitive second-generation interferometers.

  13. A First Search for Coincident Gravitational Waves and High Energy Neutrinos Using LIGO, Virgo and ANTARES Data from 2007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Samarai, Al; Albert, A.; Andre, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhou, B.; Bowhuis, M. C.; Bertin, V.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Blackburn, L.; Camp, J. B.; Kanner, J. B.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of the first search for gravitational wave bursts associated with high energy neutrinos. Together, these messengers could reveal new, hidden sources that are not observed by conventional photon astronomy, particularly at high energy. Our search uses neutrinos detected by the underwater neutrino telescope ANTARES in its 5 line configuration during the period January - September 2007, which coincided with the fifth and first science runs of LIGO and Virgo, respectively. The LIGO-Virgo data were analysed for candidate gravitational-wave signals coincident in time and direction with the neutrino events. No significant coincident events were observed. We place limits on the density of joint high energy neutrino - gravitational wave emission events in the local universe, and compare them with densities of merger and core-collapse events.

  14. A first search for coincident gravitational waves and high energy neutrinos using LIGO, Virgo and ANTARES data from 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Samarai, I. Al; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhou, B.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Cârloganu, C.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charif, Z.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Core, L.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Curtil, C.; De Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehn, K.; Fermani, P.; Ferri, M.; Ferry, S.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.-L.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geyer, K.; Giacomelli, G.; Giordano, V.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Hallewell, G.; Hamal, M.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hößl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefèvre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Martini, S.; Meli, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payet, K.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Richter, R.; Rivière, C.; Robert, A.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Ruiz-Rivas, J.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Sapienza, P.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Trovato, A.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Visser, E.; Wagner, S.; Wijnker, G.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Bao, Y.; Barayoga, J. C. B.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Beck, D.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet–Castell, J.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, W.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colacino, C. N.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J.-P.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorsher, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Endrőczi, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Farr, B. F.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M. A.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P. J.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gelencser, G.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, Y. J.; Jaranowski, P.; Jesse, E.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasprzack, M.; Kasturi, R.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufman, K.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Keresztes, Z.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, C.; Kim, H.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y. M.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kurdyumov, R.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Langley, A.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Le Roux, A.; Leaci, P.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Lhuillier, V.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Lindquist, P. E.; Litvine, V.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Logue, J.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macarthur, J.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menéndez, D. F.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Mori, T.; Morriss, S. R.; Mosca, S.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow–Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Necula, V.; Nelson, J.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nishizawa, A.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Oldenberg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoletti, R.; Papa, M. A.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pihlaja, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Pöld, J.; Postiglione, F.; Poux, C.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, C.; Rodruck, M.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Röver, C.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sankar, S.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Santostasi, G.; Saracco, E.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R. L.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G. R.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Speirits, F. C.; Sperandio, L.; Stefszky, M.; Steinert, E.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szeifert, G.; Tacca, M.; Taffarello, L.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, R.; ter Braack, A. P. M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Ugolini, D.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Villar, A. E.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wan, Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2013-06-01

    We present the results of the first search for gravitational wave bursts associated with high energy neutrinos. Together, these messengers could reveal new, hidden sources that are not observed by conventional photon astronomy, particularly at high energy. Our search uses neutrinos detected by the underwater neutrino telescope ANTARES in its 5 line configuration during the period January - September 2007, which coincided with the fifth and first science runs of LIGO and Virgo, respectively. The LIGO-Virgo data were analysed for candidate gravitational-wave signals coincident in time and direction with the neutrino events. No significant coincident events were observed. We place limits on the density of joint high energy neutrino - gravitational wave emission events in the local universe, and compare them with densities of merger and core-collapse events.

  15. Excited state dynamics in SO2. I. Bound state relaxation studied by time-resolved photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Iain; Boguslavskiy, Andrey E; Mikosch, Jochen; Bertrand, Julien B; Wörner, Hans Jakob; Villeneuve, David M; Spanner, Michael; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Stolow, Albert

    2014-05-28

    The excited state dynamics of isolated sulfur dioxide molecules have been investigated using the time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and time-resolved photoelectron-photoion coincidence techniques. Excited state wavepackets were prepared in the spectroscopically complex, electronically mixed (B̃)(1)B1/(Ã)(1)A2, Clements manifold following broadband excitation at a range of photon energies between 4.03 eV and 4.28 eV (308 nm and 290 nm, respectively). The resulting wavepacket dynamics were monitored using a multiphoton ionisation probe. The extensive literature associated with the Clements bands has been summarised and a detailed time domain description of the ultrafast relaxation pathways occurring from the optically bright (B̃)(1)B1 diabatic state is presented. Signatures of the oscillatory motion on the (B̃)(1)B1/(Ã)(1)A2 lower adiabatic surface responsible for the Clements band structure were observed. The recorded spectra also indicate that a component of the excited state wavepacket undergoes intersystem crossing from the Clements manifold to the underlying triplet states on a sub-picosecond time scale. Photoelectron signal growth time constants have been predominantly associated with intersystem crossing to the (c̃)(3)B2 state and were measured to vary between 750 and 150 fs over the implemented pump photon energy range. Additionally, pump beam intensity studies were performed. These experiments highlighted parallel relaxation processes that occurred at the one- and two-pump-photon levels of excitation on similar time scales, obscuring the Clements band dynamics when high pump beam intensities were implemented. Hence, the Clements band dynamics may be difficult to disentangle from higher order processes when ultrashort laser pulses and less-differential probe techniques are implemented.

  16. Momentum distribution of positronium and its interactions with oxygen molecules studied by coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yawei; Li, Jingjing; Yin, Chongshan; Mao, Wenfeng; Wang, Juncheng; He, Chunqing

    2016-08-01

    The coincidence Doppler broadening (CDB) technique was applied to study the momentum distribution of positronium (Ps) and its interactions with oxygen molecules in free spaces of silica aerogels filled with nitrogen and oxygen mixtures of various ratios. The deconvoluted CDB spectra become narrower and narrower with increasing oxygen partial pressure, which is due to electron exchange collision of ortho-Ps (o-Ps) with oxygen molecules. The momentum distribution of para-Ps (p-Ps) was successfully derived from deconvoluted CDB spectra by a two-Gaussian-function fitting. The bimodal distribution of Ps momentum reveals that o-Ps atoms (with enough kinetic energy) can be moderated effectively by exciting oxygen molecules from the ground state to the excited state (a'Δg or b'Σg + ) through inelastic collisions. It is interesting to find that the energy difference Δ E between two components of p-Ps momentum distributions decreases gradually because more and more o-Ps atoms lose energy through elastic collisions prior to inelastic collisions as oxygen partial pressure increases.

  17. Severe mammal declines coincide with proliferation of invasive Burmese pythons in Everglades National Park.

    PubMed

    Dorcas, Michael E; Willson, John D; Reed, Robert N; Snow, Ray W; Rochford, Michael R; Miller, Melissa A; Meshaka, Walter E; Andreadis, Paul T; Mazzotti, Frank J; Romagosa, Christina M; Hart, Kristen M

    2012-02-14

    Invasive species represent a significant threat to global biodiversity and a substantial economic burden. Burmese pythons, giant constricting snakes native to Asia, now are found throughout much of southern Florida, including all of Everglades National Park (ENP). Pythons have increased dramatically in both abundance and geographic range since 2000 and consume a wide variety of mammals and birds. Here we report severe apparent declines in mammal populations that coincide temporally and spatially with the proliferation of pythons in ENP. Before 2000, mammals were encountered frequently during nocturnal road surveys within ENP. In contrast, road surveys totaling 56,971 km from 2003-2011 documented a 99.3% decrease in the frequency of raccoon observations, decreases of 98.9% and 87.5% for opossum and bobcat observations, respectively, and failed to detect rabbits. Road surveys also revealed that these species are more common in areas where pythons have been discovered only recently and are most abundant outside the python's current introduced range. These findings suggest that predation by pythons has resulted in dramatic declines in mammals within ENP and that introduced apex predators, such as giant constrictors, can exert significant top-down pressure on prey populations. Severe declines in easily observed and/or common mammals, such as raccoons and bobcats, bode poorly for species of conservation concern, which often are more difficult to sample and occur at lower densities.

  18. In situ flame chemistry tracing by imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Oßwald, P.; Köhler, M.; Hemberger, P.; Bodi, A.; Gerber, T.; Bierkandt, T.; Akyildiz, E.; Kasper, T.

    2014-02-15

    Adaptation of a low-pressure flat flame burner with a flame-sampling interface to the imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectrometer (iPEPICO) of the VUV beamline at the Swiss Light Source is presented. The combination of molecular-beam mass spectrometry and iPEPICO provides a new powerful analytical tool for the detailed investigation of reaction networks in flames. First results demonstrate the applicability of the new instrument to comprehensive flame diagnostics and the potentially high impact for reaction mechanism development for conventional and alternative fuels. Isomer specific identification of stable and radical flame species is demonstrated with unrivaled precision. Radical detection and identification is achieved for the initial H-abstraction products of fuel molecules as well as for the reaction controlling H, O, and OH radicals. Furthermore, quantitative evaluation of changing species concentrations during the combustion process and the applicability of respective results for kinetic model validation are demonstrated. Utilization of mass-selected threshold photoelectron spectra is shown to ensure precise signal assignment and highly reliable spatial profiles.

  19. High proportion of smaller ranged hummingbird species coincides with ecological specialization across the Americas.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Jesper; Martín González, Ana M; Maruyama, Pietro K; Sandel, Brody; Vizentin-Bugoni, Jeferson; Schleuning, Matthias; Abrahamczyk, Stefan; Alarcón, Ruben; Araujo, Andréa C; Araújo, Francielle P; Mendes de Azevedo, Severino; Baquero, Andrea C; Cotton, Peter A; Ingversen, Tanja Toftemark; Kohler, Glauco; Lara, Carlos; Guedes Las-Casas, Flor Maria; Machado, Adriana O; Machado, Caio Graco; Maglianesi, María Alejandra; Moura, Alan Cerqueira; Nogués-Bravo, David; Oliveira, Genilda M; Oliveira, Paulo E; Ornelas, Juan Francisco; Rodrigues, Licléia da Cruz; Rosero-Lasprilla, Liliana; Rui, Ana Maria; Sazima, Marlies; Timmermann, Allan; Varassin, Isabela Galarda; Wang, Zhiheng; Watts, Stella; Fjeldså, Jon; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Rahbek, Carsten; Dalsgaard, Bo

    2016-02-10

    Ecological communities that experience stable climate conditions have been speculated to preserve more specialized interspecific associations and have higher proportions of smaller ranged species (SRS). Thus, areas with disproportionally large numbers of SRS are expected to coincide geographically with a high degree of community-level ecological specialization, but this suggestion remains poorly supported with empirical evidence. Here, we analysed data for hummingbird resource specialization, range size, contemporary climate, and Late Quaternary climate stability for 46 hummingbird-plant mutualistic networks distributed across the Americas, representing 130 hummingbird species (ca 40% of all hummingbird species). We demonstrate a positive relationship between the proportion of SRS of hummingbirds and community-level specialization, i.e. the division of the floral niche among coexisting hummingbird species. This relationship remained strong even when accounting for climate, furthermore, the effect of SRS on specialization was far stronger than the effect of specialization on SRS, suggesting that climate largely influences specialization through species' range-size dynamics. Irrespective of the exact mechanism involved, our results indicate that communities consisting of higher proportions of SRS may be vulnerable to disturbance not only because of their small geographical ranges, but also because of their high degree of specialization. PMID:26842573

  20. Evolution of multicellularity coincided with increased diversification of cyanobacteria and the Great Oxidation Event.

    PubMed

    Schirrmeister, Bettina E; de Vos, Jurriaan M; Antonelli, Alexandre; Bagheri, Homayoun C

    2013-01-29

    Cyanobacteria are among the most diverse prokaryotic phyla, with morphotypes ranging from unicellular to multicellular filamentous forms, including those able to terminally (i.e., irreversibly) differentiate in form and function. It has been suggested that cyanobacteria raised oxygen levels in the atmosphere around 2.45-2.32 billion y ago during the Great Oxidation Event (GOE), hence dramatically changing life on the planet. However, little is known about the temporal evolution of cyanobacterial lineages, and possible interplay between the origin of multicellularity, diversification of cyanobacteria, and the rise of atmospheric oxygen. We estimated divergence times of extant cyanobacterial lineages under Bayesian relaxed clocks for a dataset of 16S rRNA sequences representing the entire known diversity of this phylum. We tested whether the evolution of multicellularity overlaps with the GOE, and whether multicellularity is associated with significant shifts in diversification rates in cyanobacteria. Our results indicate an origin of cyanobacteria before the rise of atmospheric oxygen. The evolution of multicellular forms coincides with the onset of the GOE and an increase in diversification rates. These results suggest that multicellularity could have played a key role in triggering cyanobacterial evolution around the GOE.

  1. Co-incident insertion enables high efficiency genome engineering in mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Shy, Brian R.; MacDougall, Matthew S.; Clarke, Ryan; Merrill, Bradley J.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 nucleases have enabled powerful, new genome editing capabilities; however, the preponderance of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) mediated repair events over homology directed repair (HDR) in most cell types limits the ability to engineer precise changes in mammalian genomes. Here, we increase the efficiency of isolating precise HDR-mediated events in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells by more than 20-fold through the use of co-incidental insertion (COIN) of independent donor DNA sequences. Analysis of on:off-target frequencies at the Lef1 gene revealed that bi-allelic insertion of a PGK-Neo cassette occurred more frequently than expected. Using various selection cassettes targeting multiple loci, we show that the insertion of a selectable marker at one control site frequently coincided with an insertion at an unlinked, independently targeted site, suggesting enrichment of a sub-population of HDR-proficient cells. When individual cell events were tracked using flow cytometry and fluorescent protein markers, individual cells frequently performed either a homology-dependent insertion event or a homology-independent event, but rarely both types of insertions in a single cell. Thus, when HDR-dependent selection donors are used, COIN enriches for HDR-proficient cells among heterogeneous cell populations. When combined with a self-excising selection cassette, COIN provides highly efficient and scarless genome editing. PMID:27484482

  2. Theoretical foundations of the sound analog membrane potential that underlies coincidence detection in the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Go; Funabiki, Kazuo; Carr, Catherine E

    2013-01-01

    A wide variety of neurons encode temporal information via phase-locked spikes. In the avian auditory brainstem, neurons in the cochlear nucleus magnocellularis (NM) send phase-locked synaptic inputs to coincidence detector neurons in the nucleus laminaris (NL) that mediate sound localization. Previous modeling studies suggested that converging phase-locked synaptic inputs may give rise to a periodic oscillation in the membrane potential of their target neuron. Recent physiological recordings in vivo revealed that owl NL neurons changed their spike rates almost linearly with the amplitude of this oscillatory potential. The oscillatory potential was termed the sound analog potential, because of its resemblance to the waveform of the stimulus tone. The amplitude of the sound analog potential recorded in NL varied systematically with the interaural time difference (ITD), which is one of the most important cues for sound localization. In order to investigate the mechanisms underlying ITD computation in the NM-NL circuit, we provide detailed theoretical descriptions of how phase-locked inputs form oscillating membrane potentials. We derive analytical expressions that relate presynaptic, synaptic, and postsynaptic factors to the signal and noise components of the oscillation in both the synaptic conductance and the membrane potential. Numerical simulations demonstrate the validity of the theoretical formulations for the entire frequency ranges tested (1-8 kHz) and potential effects of higher harmonics on NL neurons with low best frequencies (<2 kHz). PMID:24265616

  3. Purifying selection shapes the coincident SNP distribution of primate coding sequences.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Ying; Hung, Li-Yuan; Wu, Chan-Shuo; Chuang, Trees-Juen

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide analysis has observed an excess of coincident single nucleotide polymorphisms (coSNPs) at human-chimpanzee orthologous positions, and suggested that this is due to cryptic variation in the mutation rate. While this phenomenon primarily corresponds with non-coding coSNPs, the situation in coding sequences remains unclear. Here we calculate the observed-to-expected ratio of coSNPs (coSNPO/E) to estimate the prevalence of human-chimpanzee coSNPs, and show that the excess of coSNPs is also present in coding regions. Intriguingly, coSNPO/E is much higher at zero-fold than at nonzero-fold degenerate sites; such a difference is due to an elevation of coSNPO/E at zero-fold degenerate sites, rather than a reduction at nonzero-fold degenerate ones. These trends are independent of chimpanzee subpopulation, population size, or sequencing techniques; and hold in broad generality across primates. We find that this discrepancy cannot fully explained by sequence contexts, shared ancestral polymorphisms, SNP density, and recombination rate, and that coSNPO/E in coding sequences is significantly influenced by purifying selection. We also show that selection and mutation rate affect coSNPO/E independently, and coSNPs tend to be less damaging and more correlated with human diseases than non-coSNPs. These suggest that coSNPs may represent a "signature" during primate protein evolution. PMID:27255481

  4. Fetal Lymphoid Progenitors Become Restricted to B-1 Fates Coincident with IL-7Rα Expression

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Ryuji; Shinoda, Kaori; Hayano, Yuki; Nagai, Yoshinori; Takatsu, Kiyoshi; Kouro, Taku

    2016-01-01

    B-1 cells represent a sub-fraction of B lymphocytes that participate in T cell-independent antibody production and contribute to innate immunity. While the production of B-1 cells is favored during the fetal waves of lymphopoiesis, it has been unclear when and how that differentiation option is specified. To clarify this, lymphoid and hematopoietic progenitors of fetal liver (FL) and adult bone marrow (ABM) were examined for the B cell differentiation potential. Mouse common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs) and more primitive KSL fraction of FL and ABM were transferred to SCID mice and donor-derived B cell subsets were analyzed 4 weeks later. CLPs were also cultured on ST2 stromal cells for 6 days prior to transplantation. While Lin- IL-7Rα+ CLPs from ABM differentiated to B-1, B-2 and marginal zone B (MZB) cells, equivalent cells from d15 FL differentiated mostly to B-1a cells. We found that fetal CLPs had less ability to colonize the bone marrow than adult CLPs. However, the fetal/adult difference was already present when progenitors were cultured in an identical condition before transplantation. More primitive KSL fraction of FL could generate the same broad spectrum of B cells typical of adults, including splenic MZB cells. In conclusion, we argue that FL and ABM-CLPs are intrinsically different regarding B-1/B-2 fates and the difference is acquired just before or coincident with the acquisition of IL-7Rα expression. PMID:27792746

  5. Theoretical foundations of the sound analog membrane potential that underlies coincidence detection in the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Go; Funabiki, Kazuo; Carr, Catherine E

    2013-01-01

    A wide variety of neurons encode temporal information via phase-locked spikes. In the avian auditory brainstem, neurons in the cochlear nucleus magnocellularis (NM) send phase-locked synaptic inputs to coincidence detector neurons in the nucleus laminaris (NL) that mediate sound localization. Previous modeling studies suggested that converging phase-locked synaptic inputs may give rise to a periodic oscillation in the membrane potential of their target neuron. Recent physiological recordings in vivo revealed that owl NL neurons changed their spike rates almost linearly with the amplitude of this oscillatory potential. The oscillatory potential was termed the sound analog potential, because of its resemblance to the waveform of the stimulus tone. The amplitude of the sound analog potential recorded in NL varied systematically with the interaural time difference (ITD), which is one of the most important cues for sound localization. In order to investigate the mechanisms underlying ITD computation in the NM-NL circuit, we provide detailed theoretical descriptions of how phase-locked inputs form oscillating membrane potentials. We derive analytical expressions that relate presynaptic, synaptic, and postsynaptic factors to the signal and noise components of the oscillation in both the synaptic conductance and the membrane potential. Numerical simulations demonstrate the validity of the theoretical formulations for the entire frequency ranges tested (1-8 kHz) and potential effects of higher harmonics on NL neurons with low best frequencies (<2 kHz).

  6. Theoretical foundations of the sound analog membrane potential that underlies coincidence detection in the barn owl

    PubMed Central

    Ashida, Go; Funabiki, Kazuo; Carr, Catherine E.

    2013-01-01

    A wide variety of neurons encode temporal information via phase-locked spikes. In the avian auditory brainstem, neurons in the cochlear nucleus magnocellularis (NM) send phase-locked synaptic inputs to coincidence detector neurons in the nucleus laminaris (NL) that mediate sound localization. Previous modeling studies suggested that converging phase-locked synaptic inputs may give rise to a periodic oscillation in the membrane potential of their target neuron. Recent physiological recordings in vivo revealed that owl NL neurons changed their spike rates almost linearly with the amplitude of this oscillatory potential. The oscillatory potential was termed the sound analog potential, because of its resemblance to the waveform of the stimulus tone. The amplitude of the sound analog potential recorded in NL varied systematically with the interaural time difference (ITD), which is one of the most important cues for sound localization. In order to investigate the mechanisms underlying ITD computation in the NM-NL circuit, we provide detailed theoretical descriptions of how phase-locked inputs form oscillating membrane potentials. We derive analytical expressions that relate presynaptic, synaptic, and postsynaptic factors to the signal and noise components of the oscillation in both the synaptic conductance and the membrane potential. Numerical simulations demonstrate the validity of the theoretical formulations for the entire frequency ranges tested (1–8 kHz) and potential effects of higher harmonics on NL neurons with low best frequencies (<2 kHz). PMID:24265616

  7. Severe cerebral congophilic angiopathy coincident with increased brain aluminium in a resident of Camelford, Cornwall, UK.

    PubMed

    Exley, C; Esiri, M M

    2006-07-01

    In July 1988, 20 tonnes of aluminium sulphate was discharged by the South West Water Authority into the drinking water supplied to a large region of North Cornwall. Up to 20,000 people were exposed to concentrations of aluminium which were 500-3000 times the acceptable limit under European Union legislation (0.200 mg/l). Although this incident is currently the topic of a government inquiry, nothing is known about its longer-term repercussions on human health. The first neuropathological examination of a person who was exposed and died of an unspecified neurological condition was carried out. A rare form of sporadic early-onset beta amyloid angiopathy in cerebral cortical and leptomeningeal vessels, and in leptomeningeal vessels over the cerebellum was identified. In addition, high concentrations of aluminium were found coincident with the severely affected regions of the cortex. Although the presence of aluminium is highly unlikely to be adventitious, determining its role in the observed neuropathology is impossible. A clearer understanding of aluminium's role in this rare form of Alzheimer's related disease should be provided by future research on other people from the exposed population as well as similar neuropathologies in people within or outside this group.

  8. High proportion of smaller ranged hummingbird species coincides with ecological specialization across the Americas.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Jesper; Martín González, Ana M; Maruyama, Pietro K; Sandel, Brody; Vizentin-Bugoni, Jeferson; Schleuning, Matthias; Abrahamczyk, Stefan; Alarcón, Ruben; Araujo, Andréa C; Araújo, Francielle P; Mendes de Azevedo, Severino; Baquero, Andrea C; Cotton, Peter A; Ingversen, Tanja Toftemark; Kohler, Glauco; Lara, Carlos; Guedes Las-Casas, Flor Maria; Machado, Adriana O; Machado, Caio Graco; Maglianesi, María Alejandra; Moura, Alan Cerqueira; Nogués-Bravo, David; Oliveira, Genilda M; Oliveira, Paulo E; Ornelas, Juan Francisco; Rodrigues, Licléia da Cruz; Rosero-Lasprilla, Liliana; Rui, Ana Maria; Sazima, Marlies; Timmermann, Allan; Varassin, Isabela Galarda; Wang, Zhiheng; Watts, Stella; Fjeldså, Jon; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Rahbek, Carsten; Dalsgaard, Bo

    2016-02-10

    Ecological communities that experience stable climate conditions have been speculated to preserve more specialized interspecific associations and have higher proportions of smaller ranged species (SRS). Thus, areas with disproportionally large numbers of SRS are expected to coincide geographically with a high degree of community-level ecological specialization, but this suggestion remains poorly supported with empirical evidence. Here, we analysed data for hummingbird resource specialization, range size, contemporary climate, and Late Quaternary climate stability for 46 hummingbird-plant mutualistic networks distributed across the Americas, representing 130 hummingbird species (ca 40% of all hummingbird species). We demonstrate a positive relationship between the proportion of SRS of hummingbirds and community-level specialization, i.e. the division of the floral niche among coexisting hummingbird species. This relationship remained strong even when accounting for climate, furthermore, the effect of SRS on specialization was far stronger than the effect of specialization on SRS, suggesting that climate largely influences specialization through species' range-size dynamics. Irrespective of the exact mechanism involved, our results indicate that communities consisting of higher proportions of SRS may be vulnerable to disturbance not only because of their small geographical ranges, but also because of their high degree of specialization.

  9. Multi-electron coincidence spectroscopy: double photoionization from molecular inner-shell orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lablanquie, P.; Penent, F.; Hikosaka, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The interest of molecular double core holes was predicted in 1986 by Cederbaum et al who showed that their spectroscopy can be more informative than that of single core holes, especially when the holes are located at different sites in the molecule (Cederbaum et al 1986 J. Chem. Phys. 85 6513). Their experimental study of single photon formation had to wait until 2009-2010 with progress in synchrotron sources and the development of efficient multi-electron coincidence experiments based on a magnetic bottle time-of-flight spectrometer. At the same time the advent of x-ray free electron lasers opened the possibilty of creating them in a two-photon process, and motivated new theoretical studies of their properties. We will illustrate here the progress made recently in the field with a few examples, including the formation of double core holes by double core photoionization, their spectroscopy and decay paths, and the related process of simultaneous core ionization and core excitation.

  10. Severe mammal declines coincide with proliferation of invasive Burmese pythons in Everglades National Park

    PubMed Central

    Dorcas, Michael E.; Willson, John D.; Reed, Robert N.; Snow, Ray W.; Rochford, Michael R.; Miller, Melissa A.; Meshaka, Walter E.; Andreadis, Paul T.; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Romagosa, Christina M.; Hart, Kristen M.

    2012-01-01

    Invasive species represent a significant threat to global biodiversity and a substantial economic burden. Burmese pythons, giant constricting snakes native to Asia, now are found throughout much of southern Florida, including all of Everglades National Park (ENP). Pythons have increased dramatically in both abundance and geographic range since 2000 and consume a wide variety of mammals and birds. Here we report severe apparent declines in mammal populations that coincide temporally and spatially with the proliferation of pythons in ENP. Before 2000, mammals were encountered frequently during nocturnal road surveys within ENP. In contrast, road surveys totaling 56,971 km from 2003–2011 documented a 99.3% decrease in the frequency of raccoon observations, decreases of 98.9% and 87.5% for opossum and bobcat observations, respectively, and failed to detect rabbits. Road surveys also revealed that these species are more common in areas where pythons have been discovered only recently and are most abundant outside the python's current introduced range. These findings suggest that predation by pythons has resulted in dramatic declines in mammals within ENP and that introduced apex predators, such as giant constrictors, can exert significant top-down pressure on prey populations. Severe declines in easily observed and/or common mammals, such as raccoons and bobcats, bode poorly for species of conservation concern, which often are more difficult to sample and occur at lower densities. PMID:22308381

  11. Severe mammal declines coincide with proliferation of invasive Burmese pythons in Everglades National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorcas, Michael E.; Wilson, John D.; Reed, Robert N.; Snow, Ray W.; Rochford, Michael R.; Miller, Melissa A.; Meshaka, Walter E.; Andreadis, Paul T.; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Romagosa, Christina M.; Hart, Kristen M.

    2012-01-01

    Invasive species represent a significant threat to global biodiversity and a substantial economic burden. Burmese pythons, giant constricting snakes native to Asia, now are found throughout much of southern Florida, including all of Everglades National Park (ENP). Pythons have increased dramatically in both abundance and geographic range since 2000 and consume a wide variety of mammals and birds. Here we report severe apparent declines in mammal populations that coincide temporally and spatially with the proliferation of pythons in ENP. Before 2000, mammals were encountered frequently during nocturnal road surveys within ENP. In contrast, road surveys totaling 56,971 km from 2003–2011 documented a 99.3% decrease in the frequency of raccoon observations, decreases of 98.9% and 87.5% for opossum and bobcat observations, respectively, and failed to detect rabbits. Road surveys also revealed that these species are more common in areas where pythons have been discovered only recently and are most abundant outside the python's current introduced range. These findings suggest that predation by pythons has resulted in dramatic declines in mammals within ENP and that introduced apex predators, such as giant constrictors, can exert significant top-down pressure on prey populations. Severe declines in easily observed and/or common mammals, such as raccoons and bobcats, bode poorly for species of conservation concern, which often are more difficult to sample and occur at lower densities.

  12. XPB mediated retroviral cDNA degradation coincides with entry to the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder, Kristine E.; Roddick, William; Hoellerbauer, Pia; Fishel, Richard

    2011-02-20

    Retroviruses must integrate their cDNA to a host chromosome, but a significant fraction of retroviral cDNA is degraded before integration. XPB and XPD are part of the TFIIH complex which mediates basal transcription and DNA nucleotide excision repair. Retroviral infection increases when XPB or XPD are mutant. Here we show that inhibition of mRNA or protein synthesis does not affect HIV cDNA accumulation suggesting that TFIIH transcription activity is not required for degradation. Other host factors implicated in the stability of cDNA are not components of the XPB and XPD degradation pathway. Although an increase of retroviral cDNA in XPB or XPD mutant cells correlates with an increase of integrated provirus, the integration efficiency of pre-integration complexes is unaffected. Finally, HIV and MMLV cDNA degradation appears to coincide with nuclear import. These results suggest that TFIIH mediated cDNA degradation is a nuclear host defense against retroviral infection.

  13. Coincident ruddy turnstone migration and horseshoe crab spawning creates an ecological 'hot spot' for influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Scott; Stallknecht, David E; Negovetich, Nicholas J; Niles, Lawrence J; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G

    2010-11-22

    Since 1985, avian influenza virus surveillance has been conducted annually from mid-May to early June in charadriiform species from the families Scolopacidae and Laridae (shorebirds and gulls) at Delaware Bay in the northeast United States. The mass migrations of shorebirds, gulls and horseshoe crabs (Limulus polyphemus) coincide at that time, and large numbers of migrating birds pause at Delaware Bay to feed on horseshoe crab eggs deposited at the high-tide line. Influenza viruses are consistently isolated from charadriiform birds at Delaware Bay, at an overall rate approximately 17 times the combined rate of isolation at all other surveillance sites worldwide (490 isolates/9474 samples, 5.2% versus 49 isolates per 15,848 samples, 0.3%, respectively; Proportion test, p < 0.0001). The likelihood of isolating influenza viruses at Delaware Bay is dependent on the presence of ruddy turnstone (Arenaria interpres) at the sampling site (G-test of independence, p < 0.001). The convergence of host factors and environmental factors results in a unique ecological 'hot spot' for influenza viruses in Charadriiformes.

  14. Severe mammal declines coincide with proliferation of invasive Burmese pythons in Everglades National Park.

    PubMed

    Dorcas, Michael E; Willson, John D; Reed, Robert N; Snow, Ray W; Rochford, Michael R; Miller, Melissa A; Meshaka, Walter E; Andreadis, Paul T; Mazzotti, Frank J; Romagosa, Christina M; Hart, Kristen M

    2012-02-14

    Invasive species represent a significant threat to global biodiversity and a substantial economic burden. Burmese pythons, giant constricting snakes native to Asia, now are found throughout much of southern Florida, including all of Everglades National Park (ENP). Pythons have increased dramatically in both abundance and geographic range since 2000 and consume a wide variety of mammals and birds. Here we report severe apparent declines in mammal populations that coincide temporally and spatially with the proliferation of pythons in ENP. Before 2000, mammals were encountered frequently during nocturnal road surveys within ENP. In contrast, road surveys totaling 56,971 km from 2003-2011 documented a 99.3% decrease in the frequency of raccoon observations, decreases of 98.9% and 87.5% for opossum and bobcat observations, respectively, and failed to detect rabbits. Road surveys also revealed that these species are more common in areas where pythons have been discovered only recently and are most abundant outside the python's current introduced range. These findings suggest that predation by pythons has resulted in dramatic declines in mammals within ENP and that introduced apex predators, such as giant constrictors, can exert significant top-down pressure on prey populations. Severe declines in easily observed and/or common mammals, such as raccoons and bobcats, bode poorly for species of conservation concern, which often are more difficult to sample and occur at lower densities. PMID:22308381

  15. CREB Phosphorylation Coincides with Transient Synapse Formation in the Rat Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus Following Avoidance Learning

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Cormac; Gallagher, Helen C.; O'Malley, Aoibheinn; Bourke, Mary; Regan, Ciaran M.

    2000-01-01

    Spine density change in the hippocampal dentate gyrus accompanies memory consolidation and coincides with the increased expression of ribosome-rich, hyperchromatic granule cells. Although this suggests increased protein synthesis to be required for synaptic growth in the 5 to 7 h post-training period, little temporal mapping of the associated molecular mechanisms has been done. Here, we demonstrate a similar frequency of hyperchromatic cells in naïve animals and in those sacrificed 6 h post-training, suggesting a transient repression of protein synthesis in the early post-training period. Immunoblot analysis of CREB phosphorylation in the dentate gyrus supported this view, with downregulation from basal levels observed at 2 to 3 h and at 12 h posttraining. Protein synthesis reactivation appears to be specific for de novo spine production as no change in spine frequency accompanies the immediate post-training period of depressed protein synthesis. These findings support the view that CREB-mediated gene transcription is a requirement for long-term memory consolidation and may be directly implicated in the process of synaptic growth. PMID:11486487

  16. Assessment of the co-incidence between non alcoholic fatty liver disease and carotid atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Sohair Abd El-Kader; El-Folly, Runia Fouad; Ahmed, Amr Mahmmoud

    2014-04-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently the most common cause of abnormal liver biochemistry and cryptogenic cirrhosis. Those with NAFLD have a higher prevalence of atherosclerosis, as shown by increased carotid artery intimal media thickness (CIMT). The aim of this study is to assess the co-incidence and prevalence between NAFLD and carotid atherosclerosis. In this study seventy-two subjects were categorized into 2 groups. GI: 52 patients diagnosed as NAFLD with diabetes mellitus type 2 or obesity or hyperlipedemia. GII: 20 diseased controls diagnosed as NAFLD without other predisposing factor. CIMT and plaque prevalence were estimated by carotid ultrasonography as a single trained operator who was blind to clinical characteristics of participants. The results showed that CIMT by carotid duplex ultrasonography was significantly higher in group A than group B but CIMT did not reveal any significant difference as regards to the etiology of NAFLD. CIMT was significantly higher in cases with bright liver than those with homogenous liver (by abdominal US) in group I and II. CIMT was significantly higher in those with moderate steatosis than those with mild steatosis (in GI & GII).

  17. Purifying selection shapes the coincident SNP distribution of primate coding sequences

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Ying; Hung, Li-Yuan; Wu, Chan-Shuo; Chuang, Trees-Juen

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide analysis has observed an excess of coincident single nucleotide polymorphisms (coSNPs) at human-chimpanzee orthologous positions, and suggested that this is due to cryptic variation in the mutation rate. While this phenomenon primarily corresponds with non-coding coSNPs, the situation in coding sequences remains unclear. Here we calculate the observed-to-expected ratio of coSNPs (coSNPO/E) to estimate the prevalence of human-chimpanzee coSNPs, and show that the excess of coSNPs is also present in coding regions. Intriguingly, coSNPO/E is much higher at zero-fold than at nonzero-fold degenerate sites; such a difference is due to an elevation of coSNPO/E at zero-fold degenerate sites, rather than a reduction at nonzero-fold degenerate ones. These trends are independent of chimpanzee subpopulation, population size, or sequencing techniques; and hold in broad generality across primates. We find that this discrepancy cannot fully explained by sequence contexts, shared ancestral polymorphisms, SNP density, and recombination rate, and that coSNPO/E in coding sequences is significantly influenced by purifying selection. We also show that selection and mutation rate affect coSNPO/E independently, and coSNPs tend to be less damaging and more correlated with human diseases than non-coSNPs. These suggest that coSNPs may represent a “signature” during primate protein evolution. PMID:27255481

  18. SPECTROMÉTRIE NUCLÉAIBE Par Compteurs Proportionnels EN Coincidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpak, G.; Suzor, F.

    Description d'un spectromètre à compteurs proportionnels spécialement adapté à l'étude des radiations de faible énergie (électrons ou photons au-dessous de 20 keV) émis par des atomes radioactifs avec une très faible probabilité. Deux compteurs proportionnels sont en contact, dans un plan qui contient le ports source. La source est en contact direct avec le gaz de l'un des compteurs. Les impulsions de ce compteur en coïncidence avec celles de l'autre sont analysées par un analyseur à canaux multiples. On décrit le montage électronique associé, en insistant sur le fait que lea amplificateurs ont été rendus non saturables. Description of a proportional counter spectrometer specially adapted to the study of low energy radiations (electrons or photons below 20 keV) emitted by radioactive atoms with very small probability. Two proportional counters of 18 cm diameter are in contact along a plane which contains the source holder. The source is in direct contact with the gas of one of the counters. Impulses of this counter in coincidence with impulses of the other are analyzed by a multichannel analyzer. The associated electronics in described with particular emphasis on the problems of non overloading qualities of the amplifiers.

  19. Evolution of multicellularity coincided with increased diversification of cyanobacteria and the Great Oxidation Event

    PubMed Central

    Schirrmeister, Bettina E.; de Vos, Jurriaan M.; Antonelli, Alexandre; Bagheri, Homayoun C.

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are among the most diverse prokaryotic phyla, with morphotypes ranging from unicellular to multicellular filamentous forms, including those able to terminally (i.e., irreversibly) differentiate in form and function. It has been suggested that cyanobacteria raised oxygen levels in the atmosphere around 2.45–2.32 billion y ago during the Great Oxidation Event (GOE), hence dramatically changing life on the planet. However, little is known about the temporal evolution of cyanobacterial lineages, and possible interplay between the origin of multicellularity, diversification of cyanobacteria, and the rise of atmospheric oxygen. We estimated divergence times of extant cyanobacterial lineages under Bayesian relaxed clocks for a dataset of 16S rRNA sequences representing the entire known diversity of this phylum. We tested whether the evolution of multicellularity overlaps with the GOE, and whether multicellularity is associated with significant shifts in diversification rates in cyanobacteria. Our results indicate an origin of cyanobacteria before the rise of atmospheric oxygen. The evolution of multicellular forms coincides with the onset of the GOE and an increase in diversification rates. These results suggest that multicellularity could have played a key role in triggering cyanobacterial evolution around the GOE. PMID:23319632

  20. Never Ignore a Coincidence: Rapid Identification of Advanced LIGO Sources with Electromagnetic Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Alex; LIGO-Virgo Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    When two ultra-compact objects inspiral and merge it is a rare cosmic event, resulting in ``luminous'' gravitational wave emission. It is also fleeting, staying in Advanced LIGO's current sensitive band only for at most a few minutes. But when there is at least one neutron star, disk formation during the merger may power a slew of bright electromagnetic counterparts, including short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and their afterglows. Here we present efforts to localize LIGO signal candidates on the sky in under a minute after detection, and to identify coincidences in time with GRBs from the Swift and Fermi satellites on a similar timescale. We also report on the population of Swift and Fermi GRBs that occurred during Advanced LIGO's first Observing Run, and discuss follow-up observations of GRB 150906B, a short-duration burst discovered by the InterPlanetary Network of satellite observatories, which may have occurred in a galaxy within LIGO's sensitive volume. This research was supported by NSF Grants PHY-0970074 and PHY-1307429 as well as the UW-Milwaukee Research Growth Initiative.

  1. A huge 6.2 kilogram uterine myoma coinciding with omental leiomyosarcoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Ruan, C W; Lee, C L; Yen, C F; Wang, C J; Soong, Y K

    1999-12-01

    Surgery for massive abdominal tumors is both interesting and challenging. We present a case involving a multiple uterine myoma weighing 6.2 Kg which coincided with omental leiomyosarcoma. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this type of condition in the English literature. A 44-year-old nulliparous woman had suffered from abdominal pain for a long time. A huge abdominal mass was palpated on physical examination. Computed tomography scanning revealed a huge pelvic-abdominal mass with the possibility of small bowel loops invaded by the mass. A 6-cm omental mass was incidentally found during the subsequent hysterectomy procedure. Perforation of the urinary bladder occurred during the dissection of adhesion. Resection of the omental mass, wide wedge resection of the invaded small bowel, primary repair of the bladder, and hysterectomy were performed. The final pathologic diagnosis was uterine leiomyomata with omental leiomyosarcoma. The patient returned home on postoperative day 14 and was well at the 18-month follow-up examination. The challenge of these tumors lies in their proper diagnosis and surgical management. More case reports and follow-up studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of their management.

  2. Multi-electron coincidence spectroscopy: double photoionization from molecular inner-shell orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lablanquie, P.; Penent, F.; Hikosaka, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The interest of molecular double core holes was predicted in 1986 by Cederbaum et al who showed that their spectroscopy can be more informative than that of single core holes, especially when the holes are located at different sites in the molecule (Cederbaum et al 1986 J. Chem. Phys. 85 6513). Their experimental study of single photon formation had to wait until 2009–2010 with progress in synchrotron sources and the development of efficient multi-electron coincidence experiments based on a magnetic bottle time-of-flight spectrometer. At the same time the advent of x-ray free electron lasers opened the possibilty of creating them in a two-photon process, and motivated new theoretical studies of their properties. We will illustrate here the progress made recently in the field with a few examples, including the formation of double core holes by double core photoionization, their spectroscopy and decay paths, and the related process of simultaneous core ionization and core excitation.

  3. Instruction in learning a temporal pattern on an anticipation-coincidence task.

    PubMed

    Albinet, C; Fezzani, K

    2003-08-01

    Using a computer-simulated anticipation-coincidence task, the main aim of the study was to examine the effect of the type of instruction on learning a temporal pattern. For this task, participants must learn to anticipate the appropriate time to launch a projectile to hit a moving target. The experiment involved three instructional conditions. In the Explicit-rule Discover Instruction Condition participants were informed that target speed could change from trial to trial and that change is controlled by a regular pattern. Their task was then to search, to identify, and to use such pattern to enhance their anticipation. In the Explicit-Informative Instruction Condition, participants were, however, allowed before practice to examine attentively the regular pattern. Participants were also explicitly urged to use the pattern they observed to ensure a better interception of the target. Finally, in the Implicit Instruction Condition, participants were only informed that their task was to hit, or at least, to place the projectile as near as possible to the target. No additional information was provied about the target's behaviour. Analysis indicated that learning the temporal pattern was more important in Implicit than in Explicit-rule Discover Instruction Condion. However, the Explicit-Informative Instruction Condition produced unambiguouslly the highest learning. Overall, the study highlights the role of information over guidance in the understanding of the effect of the instructions on learning. Finally, we discussed the implications of these results on the comprehension of the variability of the effects of the instruction on learning.

  4. In situ flame chemistry tracing by imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oßwald, P.; Hemberger, P.; Bierkandt, T.; Akyildiz, E.; Köhler, M.; Bodi, A.; Gerber, T.; Kasper, T.

    2014-02-01

    Adaptation of a low-pressure flat flame burner with a flame-sampling interface to the imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectrometer (iPEPICO) of the VUV beamline at the Swiss Light Source is presented. The combination of molecular-beam mass spectrometry and iPEPICO provides a new powerful analytical tool for the detailed investigation of reaction networks in flames. First results demonstrate the applicability of the new instrument to comprehensive flame diagnostics and the potentially high impact for reaction mechanism development for conventional and alternative fuels. Isomer specific identification of stable and radical flame species is demonstrated with unrivaled precision. Radical detection and identification is achieved for the initial H-abstraction products of fuel molecules as well as for the reaction controlling H, O, and OH radicals. Furthermore, quantitative evaluation of changing species concentrations during the combustion process and the applicability of respective results for kinetic model validation are demonstrated. Utilization of mass-selected threshold photoelectron spectra is shown to ensure precise signal assignment and highly reliable spatial profiles.

  5. Multielectron coincidence study of the double Auger decay of 3d-ionized krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, E.; Hedin, L.; Rubensson, J.-E.; Karlsson, L.; Feifel, R.; Fritzsche, S.; Linusson, P.; Eland, J. H. D.

    2010-10-15

    Multielectron coincidence data for triple ionization of krypton have been recorded above the 3d ionization threshold at two photon energies (140 and 150 eV). Three principal transition pathways have been observed, two involving double Auger transitions from Kr{sup +}, and one involving single Auger transitions from Kr{sup 2+} created by direct single-photon double ionization. The decay of the 3d{sup 9} {sup 2}D{sub 5/2,3/2} states in Kr{sup +} has been analyzed in some detail and is found to be strongly dominated by cascade processes where two electrons with well-defined energies are emitted. The decay paths leading to the 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 3} {sup 4}S, {sup 2}D, and {sup 2}P states of Kr{sup 3+} are analyzed and energies of seven intermediate states in Kr{sup 2+} are given. A preliminary investigation of the decay paths from Kr{sup +} 3d{sup 9}4p{sup 5}nl shake-up states has also been carried out.

  6. A photoionization investigation of small, homochiral clusters of glycidol using circularly polarized radiation and velocity map electron-ion coincidence imaging.

    PubMed

    Powis, Ivan; Daly, Steven; Tia, Maurice; de Miranda, Barbara Cunha; Garcia, Gustavo A; Nahon, Laurent

    2014-01-14

    A detailed study of the valence photoionization of small homochiral glycidol (C3O2H6) clusters is carried out with the help of circularly-polarized VUV synchrotron radiation by recording photoionization-based spectroscopic data detected by velocity map electron imaging with coincidence ion selection. We show that information on the stability of cationic as well as neutral chiral clusters can be obtained with enhanced sensitivity by examining the chiral fingerprint encapsulated in Photoelectron Circular Dichroism (PECD) spectra. In particular, by varying the clustering conditions we demonstrate that the PECD signal effectively carries the signature of the neutral precursor species, prior to any fragmentation of the ion, as may be inferred from the below-threshold monomer measurements (including ion imaging). Here the monomer's direct ionization channel is closed and the monomer ion hence must result exclusively as a fragment from dissociative ionization of the dimer (or higher) clusters. At higher photon energies, the mass-selection on the electron spectroscopy data, achieved through filtering the electron images in coincidence with selected ion masses, evidently succeeds in providing a degree of size-selection on the neutral clusters being ionized with, in particular, a clear differentiation of monomer and dimer PECD, showing the strong sensitivity of this chiroptical effect to the non-local long-range molecular potential.

  7. Inexpensive read-out for coincident electron spectroscopy with a transmission electron microscope at nanometer scale using micro channel plates and multistrip anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollander, R. W.; Bom, V. R.; van Eijk, C. W. E.; Faber, J. S.; Hoevers, H.; Kruit, P.

    1994-09-01

    The elemental composition of a sample at nanometer scale is determined by measurement of the characteristic energy of Auger electrons, emitted in coincidence with incoming primary electrons from a microbeam in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). Single electrons are detected with position sensitive detectors, consisting of MicroChannel Plates (MCP) and MultiStrip Anodes (MSA), one for the energy of the Auger electrons (Auger-detector) and one for the energy loss of primary electrons (EELS-detector). The MSAs are sensed with LeCroy 2735DC preamplifiers. The fast readout is based on LeCroy's PCOS III system. On the detection of a coincidence (Event) energy data of Auger and EELS are combined with timing data to an Event word. Event words are stored in list mode in a VME memory module. Blocks of Event words are scanned by transputers in VME and two-dimensional energy histograms are filled using the timing information to obtain a maximal true/accidental ratio. The resulting histograms are stored on disk of a PC-386, which also controls data taking. The system is designed to handle 10 5 Events per second, 90% of which are accidental. In the histograms the "true" to "accidental" ratio will be 5. The dead time is 15%.

  8. High-repetition-rate and high-photon-flux 70 eV high-harmonic source for coincidence ion imaging of gas-phase molecules.

    PubMed

    Rothhardt, Jan; Hädrich, Steffen; Shamir, Yariv; Tschnernajew, Maxim; Klas, Robert; Hoffmann, Armin; Tadesse, Getnet K; Klenke, Arno; Gottschall, Thomas; Eidam, Tino; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas; Boll, Rebecca; Bomme, Cedric; Dachraoui, Hatem; Erk, Benjamin; Di Fraia, Michele; Horke, Daniel A; Kierspel, Thomas; Mullins, Terence; Przystawik, Andreas; Savelyev, Evgeny; Wiese, Joss; Laarmann, Tim; Küpper, Jochen; Rolles, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Unraveling and controlling chemical dynamics requires techniques to image structural changes of molecules with femtosecond temporal and picometer spatial resolution. Ultrashort-pulse x-ray free-electron lasers have significantly advanced the field by enabling advanced pump-probe schemes. There is an increasing interest in using table-top photon sources enabled by high-harmonic generation of ultrashort-pulse lasers for such studies. We present a novel high-harmonic source driven by a 100 kHz fiber laser system, which delivers 1011 photons/s in a single 1.3 eV bandwidth harmonic at 68.6 eV. The combination of record-high photon flux and high repetition rate paves the way for time-resolved studies of the dissociation dynamics of inner-shell ionized molecules in a coincidence detection scheme. First coincidence measurements on CH3I are shown and it is outlined how the anticipated advancement of fiber laser technology and improved sample delivery will, in the next step, allow pump-probe studies of ultrafast molecular dynamics with table-top XUV-photon sources. These table-top sources can provide significantly higher repetition rates than the currently operating free-electron lasers and they offer very high temporal resolution due to the intrinsically small timing jitter between pump and probe pulses. PMID:27505779

  9. Analytical study of the inside-out Gimbal dynamics. Volume 1: Analytical study of inside-out/coincident Gimbal dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybak, S. C.

    1976-01-01

    The performance capabilities and limitations of the instrument pointing system (IPS) are described. Suggestions of design modifications that result in overall improved IPS performance are included. Since the design and configuration of the IPS was modified a portion of the study was performed with the inside-out Gimbal configuration which was updated to the present coincident Gimbal system configuration. Due to the similarity of the two systems, the results obtained for the inside-out Gimbal also apply to the coincident Gimbal system.

  10. The neutrino velocity anomaly as an explanation of the missing observation of neutrinos in coincidence with GRB

    SciTech Connect

    Autiero, D.

    2011-11-01

    The search for neutrinos emitted in coincidence with Gamma-Bay Burst has been so far unsuccessfully. In this paper we show that the recent result reported by the OPERA Collaboration on an early arrival time of muon neutrinos with respect to the one computed assuming the speed of light in vacuum could explain the null search for neutrinos in coincidence with Gamma-Ray Burst. Conversely, the detection of neutrino would falsify (or severely constraint) the interpretation of the OPERA anomaly in terms of super-luminal neutrinos.

  11. High-resolution threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence experiments performed on beamline 9.0.2.2: Kinetic energy release study of the process SF{sub 6} + hv {yields} SF{sub 5}{sup +} F + e{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.; Ng, C.Y.; Hsu, C.W.; Heimann, P.

    1997-04-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry has been used extensively to determine the energetics of neutral radicals and radical cations, as well as to study the dynamics of the dissociative photoionization process. Very often these measurements are concerned with determining the appearance energy (AE) for a dissociative ionization process, as well as determining the heats of formation of the species involved. One such photoionization mass spectrometric technique employed on End Station 2 of the Chemical Dynamics Beamline (9.0.2.2) at the Advanced Light Source is the threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence (TPEPICO) method. TPEPICO involves measuring the time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrum of a given cation in coincidence with threshold photoelectrons at a known photoionization energy.

  12. Coincident mass extirpation of neotropical amphibians with the emergence of the infectious fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tina L; Rovito, Sean M; Wake, David B; Vredenburg, Vance T

    2011-06-01

    Amphibians highlight the global biodiversity crisis because ∼40% of all amphibian species are currently in decline. Species have disappeared even in protected habitats (e.g., the enigmatic extinction of the golden toad, Bufo periglenes, from Costa Rica). The emergence of a fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has been implicated in a number of declines that have occurred in the last decade, but few studies have been able to test retroactively whether Bd emergence was linked to earlier declines and extinctions. We describe a noninvasive PCR sampling technique that detects Bd in formalin-preserved museum specimens. We detected Bd by PCR in 83-90% (n = 38) of samples that were identified as positive by histology. We examined specimens collected before, during, and after major amphibian decline events at established study sites in southern Mexico, Guatemala, and Costa Rica. A pattern of Bd emergence coincident with decline at these localities is revealed-the absence of Bd over multiple years at all localities followed by the concurrent emergence of Bd in various species at each locality during a period of population decline. The geographical and chronological emergence of Bd at these localities also indicates a southbound spread from southern Mexico in the early 1970s to western Guatemala in the 1980s/1990s and to Monteverde, Costa Rica by 1987. We find evidence of a historical "Bd epidemic wave" that began in Mexico and subsequently spread to Central America. We describe a technique that can be used to screen museum specimens from other amphibian decline sites around the world.

  13. Temporal coincidence between synaptic vesicle fusion and quantal secretion of acetylcholine

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We applied the quick-freezing technique to investigate the precise temporal coincidence between the onset of quantal secretion and the appearance of fusions of synaptic vesicles with the prejunctional membrane. Frog cutaneous pectoris nerve-muscle preparations were soaked in modified Ringer's solution with 1 mM 4-aminopyridine, 10 mM Ca2+, and 10(-4) M d-Tubocurarine and quick-frozen 1-10 ms after a single supramaximal shock. The frozen muscles were then either freeze- fractured or cryosubstituted in acetone with 13% OsO4 and processed for thin section electron microscopy. Temporal resolution of less than 1 ms can be achieved using a quick-freeze device that increases the rate of freezing of the muscle after it strikes the chilled copper block (15 degrees K) and that minimizes the precooling of the muscle during its descent toward the block. We minimized variations in transmission time by examining thin sections taken only from the medial edge of the muscle, which was at a fixed distance from the point of stimulation of the nerve. The ultrastructure of the cryosubstituted preparations was well preserved to a depth of 5 - 10 micron, and within this narrow band vesicles were found fused with the axolemma after a minimum delay of 2.5 ms after stimulation of the nerve. Since the total transmission time to this edge of the muscle was approximately 3 ms, these results indicate that the vesicles fuse with the axolemma precisely at the same time the quanta are released. Freeze-fracture does not seem to be an adequate experimental technique for this work because in the well- preserved band of the muscle the fracture plane crosses, but does not cleave, the inner hydrophobic domain of the plasmalemma. Fracture faces may form in deeper regions of the muscle where tissue preservation is unsatisfactory and freezing is delayed. PMID:2995407

  14. Coincident mass extirpation of neotropical amphibians with the emergence of the infectious fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tina L.; Rovito, Sean M.; Wake, David B.; Vredenburg, Vance T.

    2011-01-01

    Amphibians highlight the global biodiversity crisis because ∼40% of all amphibian species are currently in decline. Species have disappeared even in protected habitats (e.g., the enigmatic extinction of the golden toad, Bufo periglenes, from Costa Rica). The emergence of a fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has been implicated in a number of declines that have occurred in the last decade, but few studies have been able to test retroactively whether Bd emergence was linked to earlier declines and extinctions. We describe a noninvasive PCR sampling technique that detects Bd in formalin-preserved museum specimens. We detected Bd by PCR in 83–90% (n = 38) of samples that were identified as positive by histology. We examined specimens collected before, during, and after major amphibian decline events at established study sites in southern Mexico, Guatemala, and Costa Rica. A pattern of Bd emergence coincident with decline at these localities is revealed—the absence of Bd over multiple years at all localities followed by the concurrent emergence of Bd in various species at each locality during a period of population decline. The geographical and chronological emergence of Bd at these localities also indicates a southbound spread from southern Mexico in the early 1970s to western Guatemala in the 1980s/1990s and to Monteverde, Costa Rica by 1987. We find evidence of a historical “Bd epidemic wave” that began in Mexico and subsequently spread to Central America. We describe a technique that can be used to screen museum specimens from other amphibian decline sites around the world. PMID:21543713

  15. Biophysical basis of the sound analog membrane potential that underlies coincidence detection in the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Go; Funabiki, Kazuo; Carr, Catherine E

    2013-01-01

    Interaural time difference (ITD), or the difference in timing of a sound wave arriving at the two ears, is a fundamental cue for sound localization. A wide variety of animals have specialized neural circuits dedicated to the computation of ITDs. In the avian auditory brainstem, ITDs are encoded as the spike rates in the coincidence detector neurons of the nucleus laminaris (NL). NL neurons compare the binaural phase-locked inputs from the axons of ipsi- and contralateral nucleus magnocellularis (NM) neurons. Intracellular recordings from the barn owl's NL in vivo showed that tonal stimuli induce oscillations in the membrane potential. Since this oscillatory potential resembled the stimulus sound waveform, it was named the sound analog potential (Funabiki et al., 2011). Previous modeling studies suggested that a convergence of phase-locked spikes from NM leads to an oscillatory membrane potential in NL, but how presynaptic, synaptic, and postsynaptic factors affect the formation of the sound analog potential remains to be investigated. In the accompanying paper, we derive analytical relations between these parameters and the signal and noise components of the oscillation. In this paper, we focus on the effects of the number of presynaptic NM fibers, the mean firing rate of these fibers, their average degree of phase-locking, and the synaptic time scale. Theoretical analyses and numerical simulations show that, provided the total synaptic input is kept constant, changes in the number and spike rate of NM fibers alter the ITD-independent noise whereas the degree of phase-locking is linearly converted to the ITD-dependent signal component of the sound analog potential. The synaptic time constant affects the signal more prominently than the noise, making faster synaptic input more suitable for effective ITD computation. PMID:24265615

  16. Dense chitosan surgical membranes produced by a coincident compression-dehydration process

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, Thomas P.; Ellis, April L.; Belousova, Maria; Petersen, Don; DeCarlo, Arthur A.

    2012-01-01

    High density chitosan membranes were produced via a novel manufacturing process for use as implantable resorbable surgical membranes. The innovative method utilizes the following three sequential steps: (1) casting an acidic chitosan solution within a silicon mold, followed by freezing; (2) neutralizing the frozen acidic chitosan solution in alkaline solution to facilitate polymerization; and (3) applying coincident compression-dehydration under a vacuum. Resulting membranes of 0.2 – 0.5 mm thickness have densities as high as 1.6 g/cm3. Inclusion of glycerol prior to the compression-dehydration step provides additional physical and clinical handling benefits. The biomaterials exhibit tensile strength with a maximum load as high as 10.9 N at ~ 2.5 mm width and clinically-relevant resistance to suture pull-out with a maximum load as high as 2.2 N. These physical properties were superior to those of a commercial reconstituted collagen membrane. The dense chitosan membranes have excellent clinical handling characteristics, such as pliability and “memory” when wet. They are semi-permeable to small molecules, biodegradable in vitro in lysozyme solution, and the rates of degradation are inversely correlated to the degree of deacetylation. Furthermore, the dense chitosan membranes are biocompatible and resorbable in vivo as demonstrated in a rat oral wound healing model. The unique combination of physical, in vitro, in vivo, and clinical handling properties demonstrate the high utility of dense chitosan membranes produced by this new method. The materials may be useful as surgical barrier membranes, scaffolds for tissue engineering, wound dressings, and as delivery devices for active ingredients. PMID:23565872

  17. Functional recovery of hibernating myocardium after coronary bypass surgery: Does it coincide with improvement in perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Takeishi, Y.; Tono-oka, I.; Kubota, I.; Ikeda, K.; Masakane, I.; Chiba, J.; Abe, S.; Tsuiki, K.; Komatani, A.; Yamaguchi, I. )

    1991-09-01

    To determine the relationship between functional recovery and improvement in perfusion after coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), 49 patients were studied. Radionuclide angiography was performed before, 1 month after, and 6 to 12 months after CABG to evaluate regional wall motion. Exercise thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging was done before and 1 month after CABG to assess regional perfusion. Preoperative asynergy was observed in 108 segments, and 74 of them showed an improvement in wall motion 1 month after CABG (segment A). Sixty-six of these segments (89%) were associated with an improvement in perfusion. Eight segments that had not improved 1 month after CABG demonstrated a delayed recovery of wall motion 6 to 12 months after CABG (segment B). However, seven of eight segments (88%) already showed an improvement in perfusion 1 month after CABG. A total of 82 segments exhibited functional recovery after CABG and were considered hibernating segments. In the preoperative study segment B more frequently had areas of akinesis or dyskinesis than segment A (75% vs 34%, p less than 0.05). The mean percent thallium-201 uptake in segment B was lower than that in segment A (74% {plus minus} 9% vs 83% {plus minus} 8%, p less than 0.05). Functional recovery of hibernating myocardium usually coincided with an improvement in perfusion. However, delayed functional recovery after reperfusion was observed in some instances. Severe asynergy and severe thallium-201 defects were more frequently observed in these segments with delayed recovery. Hibernating myocardium might remain stunned during those recovery periods.

  18. Comparing Auroral Far Ultraviolet Images and Coincident Ionosonde Observations of the Auroral E Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, H. K., Jr.; Galkin, I. A.; Reinisch, B. W.

    2014-12-01

    Comparisons are being made between auroral ionospheric E region parameters derived from two types of observations: satellite-based far ultraviolet (FUV) imagers and ground-based ionosondes. The FUV imagers are: 1) NASA's Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics Global Ultraviolet Imager (TIMED/GUVI) and 2) DMSP's Special Sensor Ultraviolet Spectrographic Imager (SSUSI). The ionosondes are five high latitude Digisondes included in the Global Ionospheric Radio Observatory (GIRO) (Reinisch and Galkin, EPS, 2011). The purpose of the comparisons is to determine whether auroral FUV remote sensing algorithms that derive E region parameters from Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) emissions are biased in the presence of proton aurora. Earlier comparisons between FUV images and in situ auroral particle flux observations (e.g., Knight et al., JGR, 2012) indicate that proton aurora is much more efficient than electron aurora in producing LBH emission, and to be consistent with these findings the FUV-ionosonde comparisons would have to show that auroral FUV-derived NmE (maximum E region electron density) is biased high in the presence of proton precipitation. The advantage of making comparisons with Digisonde observations of the E region (as opposed to incoherent scatter radar) is that Digisondes remain in operation continuously over extended periods of time (i.e. years) and record observations every few minutes, making it possible to gather large numbers of FUV image-coincident observations for statistical studies. The subject of how to interpret auroral E region traces in ionograms has not been studied much up to now, however, and we are making progress in that area. We have found that a modified version of the rules from Piggott and Rawer, U.R.S.I. Handbook of Ionogram Interpretation and Reduction(1972) gives a large number of usable ionograms and good correlation with auroral FUV observations. The figure shows an example of an auroral FUV image with the locations

  19. Sec24 is a coincidence detector that simultaneously binds two signals to drive ER export

    PubMed Central

    Pagant, Silvere; Wu, Alexander; Edwards, Samuel; Diehl, Frances; Miller, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Incorporation of secretory proteins into ER-derived vesicles involves recognition of cytosolic signals by the COPII coat protein, Sec24. Additional cargo diversity is achieved through cargo receptors, which include the Erv14/Cornichon family that mediate export of transmembrane proteins despite the potential for such clients to directly interact with Sec24. The molecular function of Erv14 thus remains unclear, with possible roles in COPII-binding, membrane domain chaperoning and lipid organization. Results Using a targeted mutagenesis approach to define the mechanism of Erv14 function, we identify conserved residues in the second transmembrane domain of Erv14 that mediate interaction with a subset of Erv14 clients. We further show that interaction of Erv14 with a novel cargo-binding surface on Sec24 is necessary for efficient trafficking of all of its clients. However, we also determine that some Erv14 clients also engage directly an adjacent cargo-binding domain of Sec24, suggesting a novel mode of dual interaction between cargo and coat. Conclusions We conclude that Erv14 functions as a canonical cargo receptor that couples membrane proteins to the COPII coat, but that maximal export requires a bivalent signal that derives from motifs on both the cargo protein and Erv14. Sec24 can thus be considered a coincidence detector that binds simultaneously to multiple signals to drive packaging of polytopic membrane proteins. This mode of dual signal binding to a single coat protein might serve as a general mechanism to trigger efficient capture, or may be specifically employed in ER export to control deployment of nascent proteins. PMID:25619760

  20. Biophysical basis of the sound analog membrane potential that underlies coincidence detection in the barn owl

    PubMed Central

    Ashida, Go; Funabiki, Kazuo; Carr, Catherine E.

    2013-01-01

    Interaural time difference (ITD), or the difference in timing of a sound wave arriving at the two ears, is a fundamental cue for sound localization. A wide variety of animals have specialized neural circuits dedicated to the computation of ITDs. In the avian auditory brainstem, ITDs are encoded as the spike rates in the coincidence detector neurons of the nucleus laminaris (NL). NL neurons compare the binaural phase-locked inputs from the axons of ipsi- and contralateral nucleus magnocellularis (NM) neurons. Intracellular recordings from the barn owl's NL in vivo showed that tonal stimuli induce oscillations in the membrane potential. Since this oscillatory potential resembled the stimulus sound waveform, it was named the sound analog potential (Funabiki et al., 2011). Previous modeling studies suggested that a convergence of phase-locked spikes from NM leads to an oscillatory membrane potential in NL, but how presynaptic, synaptic, and postsynaptic factors affect the formation of the sound analog potential remains to be investigated. In the accompanying paper, we derive analytical relations between these parameters and the signal and noise components of the oscillation. In this paper, we focus on the effects of the number of presynaptic NM fibers, the mean firing rate of these fibers, their average degree of phase-locking, and the synaptic time scale. Theoretical analyses and numerical simulations show that, provided the total synaptic input is kept constant, changes in the number and spike rate of NM fibers alter the ITD-independent noise whereas the degree of phase-locking is linearly converted to the ITD-dependent signal component of the sound analog potential. The synaptic time constant affects the signal more prominently than the noise, making faster synaptic input more suitable for effective ITD computation. PMID:24265615

  1. Imaging breakdown diagrams for bromobutyne isomers with photoelectron-photoion coincidence.

    PubMed

    Bodi, Andras; Hemberger, Patrick

    2014-01-14

    Internal energy selected C4H5Br(+) ions were prepared by vacuum ultraviolet photoionization from the bromobutyne constitutional isomers 4-bromo-1-butyne, 1-bromo-2-butyne, and 3-bromo-1-butyne. The lowest energy dissociative photoionization channel is Br-loss. 1-Bromo-2-butyne and 3-bromo-1-butyne cations are not metastable, and based on the threshold photoionization breakdown diagrams and neutral internal energy distributions, 0 K appearance energies of E0 = 10.375 ± 0.010 and 10.284 ± 0.010 eV are obtained, respectively. A kinetic shift has been observed in the Br loss of the 4-bromo-1-butyne cation, and the experimental dissociation rates were also modeled to obtain E0 = 10.616 ± 0.030 eV. The energetics of the samples and nine C4H5 and C4H5(+) structures are explored using G4 theory, which suggests that only the staggered 4-bromo-1-butyne rotamer cation loses Br to form a high-energy cyclic C4H5(+) isomer, while the relative appearance energies indicate that 1-bromo-2-butyne and 3-bromo-1-butyne form the linear CH2CCCH3(+) ion. The subtraction scheme for hot electron suppression in threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence (TPEPICO) is discussed, and is used to introduce velocity map imaging (VMI-)PEPICO and data analysis. The derived onsets and the dissociation rate curve show that modeling VMI-PEPICO data taken close above or below the disappearance energy of the parent ion to obtain imaging breakdown diagrams is a feasible approach also in the presence of a kinetic shift. Imaging breakdown diagrams are advantageous when signal levels are low or short acquisition times necessary, such as in the case of reactive intermediates or in time resolved experiments, and can also be used as a fast molecular thermometer. PMID:24108175

  2. Epidemic pasteurellosis in a bighorn sheep population coinciding with the appearance of a domestic sheep.

    PubMed

    George, Janet L; Martin, Daniel J; Lukacs, Paul M; Miller, Michael W

    2008-04-01

    A pneumonia epidemic reduced bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) survival and recruitment during 1997-2000 in a population comprised of three interconnected wintering herds (Kenosha Mountains, Sugarloaf Mountain, Twin Eagles) that inhabited the Kenosha and Tarryall Mountain ranges in central Colorado, USA. The onset of this epidemic coincided temporally and spatially with the appearance of a single domestic sheep (Ovis aires) on the Sugarloaf Mountain herd's winter range in December 1997. Although only bighorns in the Sugarloaf Mountain herd were affected in 1997-98, cases also occurred during 1998-99 in the other two wintering herds, likely after the epidemic spread via established seasonal movements of male bighorns. In all, we located 86 bighorn carcasses during 1997-2000. Three species of Pasteurella were isolated in various combinations from affected lung tissues from 20 bighorn carcasses where tissues were available and suitable for diagnostic evaluation; with one exception, beta-hemolytic mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica (primarily reported as biogroup 1(G) or 1(alphaG)) was isolated from lung tissues of cases evaluated during winter 1997-98. The epidemic dramatically lowered adult bighorn monthly survival in all three herds; a model that included an acute epidemic effect, differing between sexes and with vaccination status, that diminished linearly over the next 12 mo best represented field data. In addition to the direct mortality associated with epidemics in these three herds, lamb recruitment in years following the pneumonia epidemic also was depressed as compared to years prior to the epidemic. Based on observations presented here, pasteurellosis epidemics in free-ranging bighorn sheep can arise through incursion of domestic sheep onto native ranges, and thus minimizing contact between domestic and bighorn sheep appears to be a logical principle for bighorn sheep conservation.

  3. Modulation of mycobacterial-specific Th1 and Th17 cells in latent tuberculosis by coincident hookworm infection.

    PubMed

    George, Parakkal Jovvian; Anuradha, Rajamanickam; Kumaran, Paramasivam Paul; Chandrasekaran, Vedachalam; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2013-05-15

    Hookworm infections and tuberculosis (TB) are coendemic in many parts of the world. It has been suggested that infection with helminth parasites could suppress the predominant Th1 (IFN-γ-mediated) response needed to control Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and enhance susceptibility to infection and/or disease. To determine the role of coincident hookworm infection on responses at steady-state and on M. tuberculosis-specific immune responses in latent TB (LTB), we examined the cellular responses in individuals with LTB with or without concomitant hookworm infection. By analyzing the expression of Th1, Th2, and Th17 subsets of CD4(+) T cells, we were able to demonstrate that the presence of coincident hookworm infection significantly diminished both spontaneously expressed and M. tuberculosis-specific mono- and dual-functional Th1 and Th17 cells. Hookworm infection, in contrast, was associated with expanded frequencies of mono- and dual-functional Th2 cells at both steady-state and upon Ag stimulation. This differential induction of CD4(+) T cell subsets was abrogated upon mitogen stimulation. Additionally, coincident hookworm infection was associated with increased adaptive T regulatory cells but not natural regulatory T cells in LTB. Finally, the CD4(+) T cell cytokine expression pattern was also associated with alterations in the systemic levels of Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Thus, coincident hookworm infection exerts a profound inhibitory effect on protective Th1 and Th17 responses in LTB and may predispose toward the development of active tuberculosis in humans.

  4. DNA rearrangements in Euplotes crassus coincide with discrete periods of DNA replication during the polytene chromosome stage of macronuclear development

    SciTech Connect

    Frels, J.S.; Jahn, C.L.

    1995-12-01

    This report demonstrates that the timing of excision of transposon-like elements (Tecs) in Euplotes crassus coincides with distinct replication periods, even at a single locus. It relates this to the macronuclear development and DNA synthesis. 36 refs., 5 figs.

  5. SU-E-J-48: Imaging Origin-Radiation Isocenter Coincidence for Linac-Based SRS with Novalis Tx

    SciTech Connect

    Geraghty, C; Workie, D; Hasson, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To implement and evaluate an image-based Winston-Lutz (WL) test to measure the displacement between ExacTrac imaging origin and radiation isocenter on a Novalis Tx system using RIT V6.2 software analysis tools. Displacement between imaging and radiation isocenters was tracked over time. The method was applied for cone-based and MLC-based WL tests. Methods The Brainlab Winston-Lutz phantom was aligned to room lasers. The ExacTrac imaging system was then used to detect the Winston- Lutz phantom and obtain the displacement between the center of the phantom and the imaging origin. EPID images of the phantom were obtained at various gantry and couch angles and analyzed with RIT calculating the phantom center to radiation isocenter displacement. The RIT and Exactrac displacements were combined to calculate the displacement between imaging origin and radiation isocenter. Results were tracked over time. Results Mean displacements between ExacTrac origin and radiation isocenter were: VRT: −0.1mm ± 0.3mm, LNG: 0.5mm ± 0.2mm, LAT: 0.2mm ± 0.2mm (vector magnitude of 0.7 ± 0.2mm). Radiation isocenter was characterized by the mean of the standard deviations of the WL phantom displacements: σVRT: 0.2mm, σLNG: 0.4mm, σLAT: 0.6mm. The linac couch base was serviced to reduce couch walkout. This reduced σLAT to 0.2mm. These measurements established a new baseline of radiation isocenter-imaging origin coincidence. Conclusion The image-based WL test has ensured submillimeter localization accuracy using the ExacTrac imaging system. Standard deviations of ExacTrac-radiation isocenter displacements indicate that average agreement within 0.3mm is possible in each axis. This WL test is a departure from the tradiational WL in that imaging origin/radiation isocenter agreement is the end goal not lasers/radiation isocenter.

  6. A spatial analysis of population dynamics and climate change in Africa: potential vulnerability hot spots emerge where precipitation declines and demographic pressures coincide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    López-Carr, David; Pricope, Narcisa G.; Aukema, Juliann E.; Jankowska, Marta M.; Funk, Christopher C.; Husak, Gregory J.; Michaelsen, Joel C.

    2014-01-01

    We present an integrative measure of exposure and sensitivity components of vulnerability to climatic and demographic change for the African continent in order to identify “hot spots” of high potential population vulnerability. Getis-Ord Gi* spatial clustering analyses reveal statistically significant locations of spatio-temporal precipitation decline coinciding with high population density and increase. Statistically significant areas are evident, particularly across central, southern, and eastern Africa. The highly populated Lake Victoria basin emerges as a particularly salient hot spot. People located in the regions highlighted in this analysis suffer exceptionally high exposure to negative climate change impacts (as populations increase on lands with decreasing rainfall). Results may help inform further hot spot mapping and related research on demographic vulnerabilities to climate change. Results may also inform more suitable geographical targeting of policy interventions across the continent.

  7. Effect of time walk in the use of single channel analyzer/discriminator for saturated pulses in the 4πβ-γ coincidence experiments.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Yasushi; Yunoki, Akira; Yamada, Takahiro; Hino, Yoshio

    2016-03-01

    Using the TAC technique, the timing properties of a 4πβ-γ coincidence counting system were experimentally studied with an emphasis on saturated pulses. Experiments were performed for several discriminators (integral mode of TSCA) each with different kinds of timing techniques. Timing spectra were measured at various applied voltage to the 4π proportional detector covering the entire region of the plateau. Most of timing discriminators show good timing property when the pulses remain the linear region, but suddenly deteriorate after the pulses was saturated, and the timing spectra expands seriously up to a few μs in some types of timing discriminator. To overcome this problem, two techniques were proposed. PMID:26699675

  8. A photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging apparatus for femtosecond time-resolved molecular dynamics with electron time-of-flight resolution of {sigma}=18 ps and energy resolution {delta}E/E=3.5%

    SciTech Connect

    Vredenborg, Arno; Roeterdink, Wim G.; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2008-06-15

    We report on the construction and performance of a novel photoelectron-photoion coincidence machine in our laboratory in Amsterdam to measure the full three-dimensional momentum distribution of correlated electrons and ions in femtosecond time-resolved molecular beam experiments. We implemented sets of open electron and ion lenses to time stretch and velocity map the charged particles. Time switched voltages are operated on the particle lenses to enable optimal electric field strengths for velocity map focusing conditions of electrons and ions separately. The position and time sensitive detectors employ microchannel plates (MCPs) in front of delay line detectors. A special effort was made to obtain the time-of-flight (TOF) of the electrons at high temporal resolution using small pore (5 {mu}m) MCPs and implementing fast timing electronics. We measured the TOF distribution of the electrons under our typical coincidence field strengths with a temporal resolution down to {sigma}=18 ps. We observed that our electron coincidence detector has a timing resolution better than {sigma}=16 ps, which is mainly determined by the residual transit time spread of the MCPs. The typical electron energy resolution appears to be nearly laser bandwidth limited with a relative resolution of {delta}E{sub FWHM}/E=3.5% for electrons with kinetic energy near 2 eV. The mass resolution of the ion detector for ions measured in coincidence with electrons is about {delta}m{sub FWHM}/m=1/4150. The velocity map focusing of our extended source volume of particles, due to the overlap of the molecular beam with the laser beams, results in a parent ion spot on our detector focused down to {sigma}=115 {mu}m.

  9. Solar Wind Compression Generation of Coincident EMIC and Whistler Mode Chorus and Hiss Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halford, Alexa; Mann, Ian

    2016-07-01

    Electron radiation belt dynamics are controlled by the competition of multiple acceleration and loss mechanisms. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC), chorus, and hiss waves have all been implicated as potential loss mechanisms of radiation belt electrons along with Chorus waves proposed as a mechanism for accelerating the lower energy source population to MeV energies. Understanding the relative importance of these waves as well as where and under what conditions they are generated is vital to predicting radiation belt dynamics. Although the size of the solar wind compression on 9 January 2014 event discussed here was modest, it has given us an opportunity to observe clearly how a magnetospheric compression can lead to the generation of EMIC, chorus, and hiss waves. The ICME generated shock encountered the Earth's magnetosphere on 9 January 2014 at ~20:11 UT, and the Van Allen Probes observe the coincident excitation of EMIC and Chorus waves outside the plasmasphere, and hiss weaves inside the plasmasphere. As the shock encountered the magnetosphere, an electric field impulse was observed to generate an increase in temperature anisotropy for both ions and electrons. This increased temperature anisotropy led to increased wave growth on both the ion and electron cyclotron branches. The simultaneous generation of multiple types of waves may lead to significant impacts on the acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons, especially during geomagnetic compressions observed during the substorms, and the storm sudden commencement and main phases of geomagnetic storms, as well as during quiet time sudden impulse events. For example, the excitation of both EMIC and chorus waves at the same place, and at the same time, may complicate studies seeking a causal connection between specific individual plasma wave bursts and observations of particle precipitation into the atmosphere. During this relatively small event BARREL had three payloads in conjunction with the Van

  10. Monte Carlo calculations of PET coincidence timing: single and double-ended readout

    PubMed Central

    Derenzo, Stephen E; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W

    2016-01-01

    We present Monte Carlo computational methods for estimating the coincidence resolving time (CRT) of scintillator detector pairs in positron emission tomography (PET) and present results for Lu2SiO5 : Ce (LSO), LaBr3 : Ce, and a hypothetical ultra-fast scintillator with a 1 ns decay time. The calculations were applied to both single-ended and double-ended photodetector readout with constant-fraction triggering. They explicitly include (1) the intrinsic scintillator properties (luminosity, rise time, decay time, and index of refraction), (2) the exponentially distributed depths of interaction, (3) the optical photon transport efficiency, delay, and time dispersion, (4) the photodetector properties (fill factor, quantum efficiency, transit time jitter, and single electron response), and (5) the determination of the constant fraction trigger level that minimizes the CRT. The calculations for single-ended readout include the delayed photons from the opposite reflective surface. The calculations for double-ended readout include (1) the simple average of the two photodetector trigger times, (2) more accurate estimators of the annihilation photon entrance time using the pulse height ratio to estimate the depth of interaction and correct for annihilation photon, optical photon, and trigger delays, and (3) the statistical lower bound for interactions at the center of the crystal. For time-of-flight (TOF) PET we combine stopping power and TOF information in a figure of merit equal to the sensitivity gain relative to whole-body non-TOF PET using LSO. For LSO crystals 3 mm × 3 mm × 30 mm, a decay time of 37 ns, a total photoelectron count of 4000, and a photodetector with 0.2 ns full-width at half-maximum (fwhm) timing jitter, single-ended readout has a CRT of 0.16 ns fwhm and double-ended readout has a CRT of 0.111 ns fwhm. For LaBr3 : Ce crystals 3 mm × 3 mm × 30 mm, a rise time of 0.2 ns, a decay time of 18 ns, and a total of 7600 photoelectrons the CRT numbers are 0

  11. The Cryogenic AntiCoincidence detector for ATHENA: the progress towards the final pixel design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macculi, Claudio; Piro, Luigi; Cea, Donatella; Colasanti, Luca; Lotti, Simone; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Gatti, Flavio; Bagliani, Daniela; Biasotti, Michele; Corsini, Dario; Pizzigoni, Giulio; Torrioli, Guido; Barbera, Marco; Mineo, Teresa; Perinati, Emanuele

    2014-07-01

    "The Hot and Energetic Universe" is the scientific theme approved by the ESA SPC for a Large mission to be flown in the next ESA slot (2028th) timeframe. ATHENA is a space mission proposal tailored on this scientific theme. It will be the first X-ray mission able to perform the so-called "Integral field spectroscopy", by coupling a high-resolution spectrometer, the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU), to a high performance optics so providing detailed images of its field of view (5' in diameter) with an angular resolution of 5" and fine energy-spectra (2.5eV@E<7keV). The X-IFU is a kilo-pixel array based on TES (Transition Edge Sensor) microcalorimeters providing high resolution spectroscopy in the 0.2-12 keV range. Some goals is the detection of faint and diffuse sources as Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) or galaxies outskirts. To reach its challenging scientific aims, it is necessary to shield efficiently the X-IFU instrument against background induced by external particles: the goal is 0.005 cts/cm^2/s/keV. This scientific requirement can be met by using an active Cryogenic AntiCoincidence (CryoAC) detector placed very close to X-IFU (~ 1 mm below). This is shown by our GEANT4 simulation of the expected background at L2 orbit. The CryoAC is a TES based detector as the X-IFU sharing with it thermal and mechanical interfaces, so increasing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of the payload. It is a 2x2 array of microcalorimeter detectors made by Silicon absorber (each of about 80 mm^2 and 300 μm thick) and sensed by an Ir TES. This choice shows that it is possible to operate such a detector in the so-called athermal regime which gives a response faster than the X-IFU (< 30 μs), and low energy threshold (above few keV). Our consortium has developed and tested several samples, some of these also featured by the presence of Al-fins to efficiently collect the athermal phonons, and increased x-ray absorber area (up to 1 cm^2). Here the results of deep test

  12. Geographic coincidence of richness, mass, conservation value, and response to climate of U.S. land birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grundel, Ralph; Frohnapple, Krystal; Zaya, David N.; Glowacki, Gary A.; Weiskerger, Chelsea J.; Patterson, Tamatha A.; Pavlovic, Noel B.

    2014-01-01

    Distributional patterns across the United States of five avian community breeding-season characteristics—community biomass, richness, constituent species' vulnerability to extirpation, percentage of constituent species' global abundance present in the community (conservation index, CI), and the community's position along the ecological gradient underlying species composition (principal curve ordination score, PC)—were described, their covariation was analyzed, and projected effects of climate change on the characteristics and their covariation were modeled. Higher values of biomass, richness, and CI were generally preferred from a conservation perspective. However, higher values of these characteristics often did not coincide geographically; thus regions of the United States would differ in their value for conservation depending on which characteristic was chosen for setting conservation priorities. For instance, correlation patterns between characteristics differed among Landscape Conservation Cooperatives. Among the five characteristics, community richness and the ecological gradient underlying community composition (PC) had the highest correlations with longitude, with richness declining from east to west across the contiguous United States. The ecological gradient underlying composition exhibited a demarcation near the 100th meridian, separating the contiguous United States grossly into two similar-sized avian ecological provinces. The combined score (CS), a measure of species' threat of decline or extirpation, exhibited the strongest latitudinal pattern, declining from south to north. Over ∼75% of the lower United States, projected changes in June temperature and precipitation to year 2080 were associated with decreased averaged values of richness, biomass, and CI, implying decreased conservation value for birds. The two ecological provinces demarcated near the 100th meridian diverged from each other, with projected changes in June temperatures and

  13. Geographic coincidence of richness, mass, conservation value, and response to climate of U.S. land birds.

    PubMed

    Grundel, Ralph; Frohnapple, Krystalynn J; Zaya, David N; Glowacki, Gary A; Weiskerger, Chelsea J; Patterson, Tamatha A; Pavlovic, Noel B

    2014-06-01

    Distributional patterns across the United States of five avian community breeding-season characteristics--community biomass, richness, constituent species' vulnerability to extirpation, percentage of constituent species' global abundance present in the community (conservation index, CI), and the community's position along the ecological gradient underlying species composition (principal curve ordination score, PC--were described, their covariation was analyzed, and projected effects of climate change on the characteristics and their covariation were modeled. Higher values of biomass, richness, and CI were generally preferred from a conservation perspective. However, higher values of these characteristics often did not coincide geographically; thus regions of the United States would differ in their value for conservation depending on which characteristic was chosen for setting conservation priorities. For instance, correlation patterns between characteristics differed among Landscape Conservation Cooperatives. Among the five characteristics, community richness and the ecological gradient underlying community composition (PC) had the highest correlations with longitude, with richness declining from east to west across the contiguous United States. The ecological gradient underlying composition exhibited a demarcation near the 100th meridian, separating the contiguous United States grossly into two similar-sized avian ecological provinces. The combined score (CS), a measure of species' threat of decline or extirpation, exhibited the strongest latitudinal pattern, declining from south to north. Over -75% of the lower United States, projected changes in June temperature and precipitation to year 2080 were associated with decreased averaged values of richness, biomass, and CI, implying decreased conservation value for birds. The two ecological provinces demarcated near the 100th meridian diverged from each other, with projected changes in June temperatures and

  14. The Feynman-Y Statistic in Relation to Shift-Register Neutron Coincidence Counting: Precision and Dead Time

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, Stephen; Santi, Peter A.; Henzlova, Daniela; Hauck, Danielle K.; Favalli, Andrea

    2012-07-13

    The Feynman-Y statistic is a type of autocorrelation analysis. It is defined as the excess variance-to-mean ratio, Y = VMR - 1, of the number count distribution formed by sampling a pulse train using a series of non-overlapping gates. It is a measure of the degree of correlation present on the pulse train with Y = 0 for Poisson data. In the context of neutron coincidence counting we show that the same information can be obtained from the accidentals histogram acquired using the multiplicity shift-register method, which is currently the common autocorrelation technique applied in nuclear safeguards. In the case of multiplicity shift register analysis however, overlapping gates, either triggered by the incoming pulse stream or by a periodic clock, are used. The overlap introduces additional covariance but does not alter the expectation values. In this paper we discuss, for a particular data set, the relative merit of the Feynman and shift-register methods in terms of both precision and dead time correction. Traditionally the Feynman approach is applied with a relatively long gate width compared to the dieaway time. The main reason for this is so that the gate utilization factor can be taken as unity rather than being treated as a system parameter to be determined at characterization/calibration. But because the random trigger interval gate utilization factor is slow to saturate this procedure requires a gate width many times the effective 1/e dieaway time. In the traditional approach this limits the number of gates that can be fitted into a given assay duration. We empirically show that much shorter gates, similar in width to those used in traditional shift register analysis can be used. Because the way in which the correlated information present on the pulse train is extracted is different for the moments based method of Feynman and the various shift register based approaches, the dead time losses are manifested differently for these two approaches. The resulting

  15. Estimation of Performance of an Active Well Coincidence Counter Equipped with Boron-Coated Straw Neutron Detectors - 13401

    SciTech Connect

    Young, B.M.; Lacy, J.L.; Athanasiades, A.

    2013-07-01

    He-3, a very rare isotope of natural helium gas, has ideal properties for the detection of thermal neutrons. As such it has become the standard material for neutron detectors and sees ubiquitous use within many radiometric applications that require neutron sensitivity. Until recently, there has been a fairly abundant supply of He-3. However, with the reduction in nuclear weapons, production of tritium ceased decades ago and the stockpile has largely decayed away, reducing the available He-3 supply to a small fraction of that needed for neutron detection. A suitable and rapidly-deployable replacement technology for neutron detectors must be found. Many potential replacement technologies are under active investigation and development. One broad class of technologies utilizes B-10 as a neutron capture medium in coatings on the internal surfaces of proportional detectors. A particular implementation of this sort of technology is the boron-coated 'straw' (BCS) detectors under development by Proportional Technologies, Inc. (PTi). This technology employs a coating of B-10 enriched boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) on the inside of narrow tubes, roughly 4 mm in diameter. A neutron counter (e.g. a slab, a well counter, or a large assay counter designed to accommodate 200 liter drums) could be constructed by distributing these narrow tubes throughout the polyethylene body of the counter. One type of neutron counter that is of particular importance to safeguards applications is the Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC), which is a Los Alamos design that traditionally employs 42 He-3 detectors. This is a very flexible design which can accurately assay small samples of uranium- and plutonium-bearing materials. Utilizing the MCNPX code and benchmarking against measurements where possible, the standard AWCC has been redesigned to utilize the BCS technology. Particular aspects of the counter performance include the single-neutron ('singles') detection efficiency and the time constant for

  16. SU-E-T-204: Improving Multiple Isocenter Coincidence: Elekta Beam Modulator with HexaPOD Six Degrees Couchtop

    SciTech Connect

    Duggar, W; Rajaguru, P; Yang, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: With evolution from frame-based to image-guided SRS/SRT technique, the coincidence of multiple isocenters must be within a tight tolerance: MV, kV, table mechanical, and, in this case, HexaPOD 6° patient positioning system. Reported here is a method for improving the effectiveness of an isocenter alignment procedure which ultimately led to isocenter coincidence on an Elekta Beam Modulator LINAC equipped with 4 mm MLC leaves and a fixed secondary jaw to within a radius of 1mm. Methods: Utilizing a self-leveling laser, the Elekta ball (BB) bearing phantom (8mm steel ball), the Modus QA Isocenter Cube software, and a colleague-provided isocenter alignment method, the kV, table mechanical, and HexaPOD isocenters were localized to the MV isocenter. Isocenter coincidence was tested using the Isocenter Cube from Modus QA, brought to kV isocenter using CBCT and the HexaPOD system. MV images were taken at various gantry, collimator, and couch angles and then analyzed with the aforementioned software to determine coincidence of the 5mm steel ball at cube center with MV isocenter. To improve overall coincidence, two errors were addressed iteratively: (1) LINAC mechanical and radiation isocenter coincidence allowing each isocenter volume to have similar variations during gantry and collimator rotation and (2) collimator rotational walkout which reduced the size of both mechanical and radiation isocenters. Beam steering was performed to bring MV isocenter closer to mechanical and collimator walkout was adjusted by physically shifting the MLC bank. Initial procedures were repeated to align all isocenters and perform regular checks for consistency. Results: Post-initial alignment revealed a maximum diameter of 1.8mm for MV isocenter and maximum isocenter alignment error of up to 1.22mm radius which improved to roughly 1.0mm MV isocenter diameter and <0.71mm radius alignment error with a consistency within 0.25mm. Conclusion: With the methods described, all isocenters

  17. Monte Carlo calculations of PET coincidence timing: single and double-ended readout.

    PubMed

    Derenzo, Stephen E; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W

    2015-09-21

    We present Monte Carlo computational methods for estimating the coincidence resolving time (CRT) of scintillator detector pairs in positron emission tomography (PET) and present results for Lu2SiO5 : Ce (LSO), LaBr3 : Ce, and a hypothetical ultra-fast scintillator with a 1 ns decay time. The calculations were applied to both single-ended and double-ended photodetector readout with constant-fraction triggering. They explicitly include (1) the intrinsic scintillator properties (luminosity, rise time, decay time, and index of refraction), (2) the exponentially distributed depths of interaction, (3) the optical photon transport efficiency, delay, and time dispersion, (4) the photodetector properties (fill factor, quantum efficiency, transit time jitter, and single electron response), and (5) the determination of the constant fraction trigger level that minimizes the CRT. The calculations for single-ended readout include the delayed photons from the opposite reflective surface. The calculations for double-ended readout include (1) the simple average of the two photodetector trigger times, (2) more accurate estimators of the annihilation photon entrance time using the pulse height ratio to estimate the depth of interaction and correct for annihilation photon, optical photon, and trigger delays, and (3) the statistical lower bound for interactions at the center of the crystal. For time-of-flight (TOF) PET we combine stopping power and TOF information in a figure of merit equal to the sensitivity gain relative to whole-body non-TOF PET using LSO. For LSO crystals 3 mm  ×  3 mm  ×  30 mm, a decay time of 37 ns, a total photoelectron count of 4000, and a photodetector with 0.2 ns full-width at half-maximum (fwhm) timing jitter, single-ended readout has a CRT of 0.16 ns fwhm and double-ended readout has a CRT of 0.111 ns fwhm. For LaBr3 : Ce crystals 3 mm  ×  3 mm  ×  30 mm, a rise time of 0.2 ns, a decay time of 18

  18. REVISITING COINCIDENCE RATE BETWEEN GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTION AND SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST FOR THE ADVANCED AND THIRD GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Regimbau, T.; Siellez, K.; Meacher, D.; Gendre, B.; Boër, M.

    2015-01-20

    We use realistic Monte Carlo simulations including both gravitational-wave (GW) and short gamma-ray burst (sGRB) selection effects to revisit the coincident rate of binary systems composed of two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole. We show that the fraction of GW triggers that can be observed in coincidence with sGRBs is proportional to the beaming factor at z = 0, but increases with the distance until it reaches 100% at the GW detector horizon distance. When this is taken into account the rate is improved by a factor of three compared to the simple beaming factor correction. We provide an estimate of the performance future GRB detectors should achieve in order to fully exploit the potentiality of the planned third-generation GW antenna Einstein Telescope, and we propose a simple method to constrain the beaming angle of sGRBs.

  19. Stability and dissociation dynamics of N2++ ions following core ionization studied by an Auger-electron-photoion coincidence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwayama, H.; Kaneyasu, T.; Hikosaka, Y.; Shigemasa, E.

    2016-07-01

    An Auger-electron-photoion coincidence (AEPICO) method has been applied to study the stability and dissociation dynamics of dicationic states after the N K-shell photoionization of nitrogen molecules. From time-of-flight and kinetic energy analyses of the product ions, we have obtained coincident Auger spectra associated with metastable states of N2++ ions and dissociative states leading to N2++ → N+ + N+ and N++ + N. To investigate the production of dissociative states, we present two-dimensional AEPICO maps which reveal the correlations between the binding energies of the Auger final states and the ion kinetic energy release. These correlations have been used to determine the dissociation limits of individual Auger final states.

  20. Coincidence theory: Seeking a perceptual preference for just intonation, equal temperament, and Pythagorean intonation in excerpts for wind instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Derle Ray

    Coincidence theory states that when the components of harmony are in enhanced alignment the sound will be more consonant to the human auditory system. An objective method of examining the components of harmony is by investigating alignment of the mathematics of a particular sound or harmony. The study examined preference responses to excerpts tuned in just intonation, Pythagorean intonation, and equal temperament. Musical excerpts were presented in pairs and study subjects simply picked one version from the pair that they perceived as the most consonant. Results of the study revealed an overall preference for equal temperament in contradiction to coincidence theory. Several additional areas for research are suggested to further investigate the results of this study.