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Sample records for particle-hole strength excited

  1. Excitation energies of particle-hole states in {sup 208}Pb and the surface delta interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Heusler, A.; Jolos, R. V.; Brentano, P. von

    2013-07-15

    The schematic shell model without residual interaction (SSM) assumes the same excitation energy for all spins in each particle-hole configuration multiplet. In {sup 208}Pb, more than forty states are known to contain almost the full strength of a single particle-hole configuration. The experimental excitation energy for a state with a certain spin differs from the energy predicted by the SSM by -0.2 to +0.6 MeV. The multiplet splitting is calculated with the surface delta interaction; it corresponds to the diagonal matrix element of the residual interaction in the SSM. For states containing more than 90% strength of a certain configuration and for the centroid of several completely observed configurations, the calculated multiplet splitting often approximates the experimental excitation energy within 30 keV. The strong mixing within some pairs of states containing the full strengths of two configurations is explained.

  2. Charge-changing particle-hole excitation of 16N and 16F nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taqi Al-Bayati, Ali H.; Darwesh, Sarah S.

    2013-12-01

    The nuclear structure of 16N (closed shell + ν - π) and 16F (closed shell + π - ν) nuclei is studied using particle-hole proton-neutron Tamm-Dancoff Approximation pn TDA and particle-hole proton-neutron Random Phase Approximation pn RPA. The particle-hole Hamiltonian of PSD model space is to be diagonalized in the presence of the PSDMWKPN interaction: for P-space the Cohen-Kurath interaction, for SD-space the Wildenthal Interaction, for the coupling matrix elements between P- and SD-spaces the Millener-Kurath interaction is used, spurious components were eliminated with CM contribution. The results containing energy level schemes and electromagnetic transition strength are compared with the available experimental data.

  3. Charge-changing particle-hole excitation of {sup 16}N and {sup 16}F nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Taqi Al-Bayati, Ali H.; Darwesh, Sarah S.

    2013-12-16

    The nuclear structure of {sup 16}N (closed shell + ν − π) and {sup 16}F (closed shell + π − ν) nuclei is studied using particle-hole proton-neutron Tamm-Dancoff Approximation pn TDA and particle-hole proton-neutron Random Phase Approximation pn RPA. The particle-hole Hamiltonian of PSD model space is to be diagonalized in the presence of the PSDMWKPN interaction: for P-space the Cohen-Kurath interaction, for SD-space the Wildenthal Interaction, for the coupling matrix elements between P- and SD-spaces the Millener-Kurath interaction is used, spurious components were eliminated with CM contribution. The results containing energy level schemes and electromagnetic transition strength are compared with the available experimental data.

  4. Chiral geometry of higher excited bands in triaxial nuclei with particle-hole configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. B.; Yao, J. M.; Zhang, S. Q.; Qi, B.

    2010-12-01

    The lowest six rotational bands have been studied in the particle-rotor model with the particle-hole configuration πh11/21⊗νh11/2-1 and different values of the triaxiality parameter γ. Both constant and spin-dependent variable moments of inertia (CMI and VMI, respectively) are introduced. The energy spectra, electromagnetic transition probabilities, angular momentum components, and K distribution are examined. It is shown that, besides bands 1 and 2, the predicted bands 3 and 4 in the calculations with both CMI and VMI for atomic nuclei with γ=30° could be interpreted as chiral doublet bands.

  5. Particle-hole states in Sn 120

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    The 45 MeV deuteron beam from the Berkeley 88-inch cyclotron was used to study the particle-hole states in Sn-120. The present work resolved a number of individual levels and compared their strength and excitation energy with that observed in the Sn-120(d, He-3) reaction, which was also remeasured. A schematic diagram of the scattering system is given along with a description.

  6. Particle-hole states in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Matyas, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    This work deals with the collective excitations in nuclear matter, from the point of view of the TDA approximation. Our calculations involved the construction of a Hamiltonian, expressed as a matrix in the space of particle-hole excitations with a given momentum transfer. We used in this Hamiltonian an average single nucleon potential, and (in some cases) an effective interaction obtained for the potential HEA in the relativistic Brueckner-Hartree Fock theory. The eigenvectors of the TDA-Hamiltonian were used to compute the strength of the collective response of nuclear matter to external probes. Our results, succinctly described in the last section, are summarized in a set of figures at the end of this monograph. The specific form of the TDA equations that we used, and the procedure to calculate the degree of collectivity of the solutions, is studied in detail in the fifth chapter. A derivation of the TDA equations, and a discussion of the solutions for a separable potential, is given in the fourth chapter. The structure of a non-relativistic potential for a system of two nucleons is examined in the third chapter, in several representations. On the other hand, the particle-hole states relevant to our discussions on the TDA equations are introduced in the first two chapters.

  7. Effect of the particle-hole channel on BCS–Bose-Einstein condensation crossover in atomic Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qijin

    2016-05-01

    BCS–Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) crossover is effected by increasing pairing strength between fermions from weak to strong in the particle-particle channel, and has attracted a lot of attention since the experimental realization of quantum degenerate atomic Fermi gases. Here we study the effect of the (often dropped) particle-hole channel on the zero T gap Δ(0), superfluid transition temperature Tc, the pseudogap at Tc, and the mean-field ratio 2Δ(0)/, from BCS through BEC regimes, using a pairing fluctuation theory which includes self-consistently the contributions of finite-momentum pairs and features a pseudogap in single particle excitation spectrum. Summing over the infinite particle-hole ladder diagrams, we find a complex dynamical structure for the particle-hole susceptibility χph, and conclude that neglecting the self-energy feedback causes a serious over-estimate of χph. While our result in the BCS limit agrees with Gor’kov et al., the particle-hole channel effect becomes more complex and pronounced in the crossover regime, where χph is reduced by both a smaller Fermi surface and a big (pseudo)gap. Deep in the BEC regime, the particle-hole channel contributions drop to zero. We predict a density dependence of the magnetic field at the Feshbach resonance, which can be used to quantify χph and test different theories.

  8. Effect of the particle-hole channel on BCS–Bose-Einstein condensation crossover in atomic Fermi gases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qijin

    2016-01-01

    BCS–Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) crossover is effected by increasing pairing strength between fermions from weak to strong in the particle-particle channel, and has attracted a lot of attention since the experimental realization of quantum degenerate atomic Fermi gases. Here we study the effect of the (often dropped) particle-hole channel on the zero T gap Δ(0), superfluid transition temperature Tc, the pseudogap at Tc, and the mean-field ratio 2Δ(0)/, from BCS through BEC regimes, using a pairing fluctuation theory which includes self-consistently the contributions of finite-momentum pairs and features a pseudogap in single particle excitation spectrum. Summing over the infinite particle-hole ladder diagrams, we find a complex dynamical structure for the particle-hole susceptibility χph, and conclude that neglecting the self-energy feedback causes a serious over-estimate of χph. While our result in the BCS limit agrees with Gor’kov et al., the particle-hole channel effect becomes more complex and pronounced in the crossover regime, where χph is reduced by both a smaller Fermi surface and a big (pseudo)gap. Deep in the BEC regime, the particle-hole channel contributions drop to zero. We predict a density dependence of the magnetic field at the Feshbach resonance, which can be used to quantify χph and test different theories. PMID:27183875

  9. Effect of the particle-hole channel on BCS-Bose-Einstein condensation crossover in atomic Fermi gases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qijin

    2016-01-01

    BCS-Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) crossover is effected by increasing pairing strength between fermions from weak to strong in the particle-particle channel, and has attracted a lot of attention since the experimental realization of quantum degenerate atomic Fermi gases. Here we study the effect of the (often dropped) particle-hole channel on the zero T gap Δ(0), superfluid transition temperature Tc, the pseudogap at Tc, and the mean-field ratio 2Δ(0)/, from BCS through BEC regimes, using a pairing fluctuation theory which includes self-consistently the contributions of finite-momentum pairs and features a pseudogap in single particle excitation spectrum. Summing over the infinite particle-hole ladder diagrams, we find a complex dynamical structure for the particle-hole susceptibility χph, and conclude that neglecting the self-energy feedback causes a serious over-estimate of χph. While our result in the BCS limit agrees with Gor'kov et al., the particle-hole channel effect becomes more complex and pronounced in the crossover regime, where χph is reduced by both a smaller Fermi surface and a big (pseudo)gap. Deep in the BEC regime, the particle-hole channel contributions drop to zero. We predict a density dependence of the magnetic field at the Feshbach resonance, which can be used to quantify χph and test different theories.

  10. Meson self-energies calculated by the relativistic particle-hole-antiparticle representation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, M.; Noda, N.; Mitsumori, T.; Koide, K.; Kouno, H.; Hasegawa, A.; Liu, L.

    1997-12-01

    A new formulation of meson self-energies is introduced for {sigma},{omega},{pi},{rho},{delta}, and {eta} mesons on the basis of the particle-hole-antiparticle representation. We have studied the difference between the meson self-energy (MSE) of this representation and the MSE of the traditional density-Feynman (DF) representation. It is shown that the new formulation describes exactly the physical processes such as particle-hole excitations or particle-antiparticle excitations, and that, on the other hand, the meson self-energy based on the DF representation includes unphysical components. By numerical calculations, the meson self-energies describing the particle-hole excitations are shown to be close to each other for most of the meson self-energy in low momentum (R{lt}500 MeV) and low energy (R{sub 0}{lt}200 MeV). This fact implies that former calculations using the low momentum and low-energy part do not change greatly. The density part of the density-Feynman representation has been shown to have a resonant structure around the energy of particle-antiparticle excitation, which causes a large difference between the two representations in the meson spectrum calculations. Our investigation concludes that the former calculations based on the density-Feynman representation are not invalidated in many cases, but the particle-hole-antiparticle representation is more appropriate to treat exactly the physical processes. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Friction and particle-hole pairs. [in dissipative quantum phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinea, F.

    1984-01-01

    The effect induced by dissipation on quantum phenomena has recently been considered, taking into account as a starting point a phenomenological Hamiltonian in which the environment is simulated by an appropriately chosen set of harmonic oscillators. It is found that this approach should be adequate to describe the low-energy behavior of a wide class of environments. The present investigation is concerned with an analysis of the case in which the environment is a gas (or liquid) of fermions, and the relevant low-energy excitations are particle-hole pairs. A study is conducted regarding the extent to which the quantum results obtained for harmonic oscillators are also valid in the considered situation. Linear-response theory is used to derive an effective action which describes the motion of an external particle coupled to a normal Fermi fluid.

  12. Measurement of Atomic Oscillator Strength Distribution from the Excited States

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Shahid; Saleem, M.; Baig, M. A.

    2008-10-22

    Saturation technique has been employed to measure the oscillator strength distribution in spectra of helium lithium using an electrical discharge cell a thermionic diode ion detector respectively. The photoabsorption cross sections in the discrete or bound region (commonly known as f-values) have been determined form the Rydberg series accessed from a particular excited state calibrating it with the absolute value of the photoionization cross section measured at the ionization threshold. The extracted discrete f-values merge into the oscillator strength densities, estimated from the measured photoionization cross sections at different photon energies above the first ionization threshold. The experimental data on helium and lithium show continuity between the discrete and the continuous oscillator strengths across the ionization threshold.

  13. A particle-hole calculation for pion production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Deutchman, P. A.; Townsend, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    A differential cross section for pi-meson production in peripheral heavy-ion collisions is formulated within the context of a particle-hole model in the Tamm-Dancoff approximation. This is the first attempt at a fully quantum-mechanical particle-hole calculation for pion production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The particular reaction studied is an O-16 projectile colliding with a C-12 target at rest. In the projectile a linear combination of isobar-hole states is formed, with the possibility of a coherent isobar giant resonance. The target can be excited to its giant M1 resonance (J-pi = 1(+), T = 1) at 15.11 MeV, or to its isobar analog neighbors, B-12 at 13.4 MeV and N-12 at 17.5 MeV. The theory is compared to recent experimental results.

  14. Anisotropic Particle-Hole Excitations in Black Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Schuster, R; Trinckauf, J; Habenicht, C; Knupfer, M; Büchner, B

    2015-07-10

    We report on the energy- and momentum-resolved optical response of black phosphorus (BP) in its bulk form. Along the armchair direction of the puckered layers, we find a highly dispersive mode that is strongly suppressed in the perpendicular (zigzag) direction. This mode emerges out of the single-particle continuum for finite values of momentum and is therefore interpreted as an exciton. We argue that this exciton, which has already been predicted theoretically for phosphorene-the monolayer form of BP-can be detected by conventional optical spectroscopy in the two-dimensional case and might pave the way for optoelectronic applications of this emerging material.

  15. New Accurate Oscillator Strengths and Electron Excitation Collision Strengths for N1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2006-01-01

    The nonorthogonal orbitals technique in a multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock approach is used to calculate oscillator strengths and transition probabilities of N(I) lines. The relativistic effects are allowed by means of Breit-Pauli operators. The length and velocity forms of oscillator strengths show good agreement for most transitions. The B-spline R-matrix with pseudostates approach has been used to calculate electron excitation collision strengths and rates. The nonorthogonal orbitals are used for an accurate description of both target wave functions and the R-matrix basis functions. The 24 spectroscopic bound and autoionizing states together with 15 pseudostates are included in the close-coupling expansion. The collision strengths for transitions between fine-structure levels are calculated by transforming the LS-coupled K-matrices to K-matrices in an intermediate coupling scheme. Thermally averaged collision strengths have been determined by integrating collision strength over a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies over a temperature range suitable for the modeling of astrophysical plasmas. The oscillator strengths and thermally averaged collision strengths are presented for transitions between the fine-structure levels of the 2s(sup 2)p(sup 3) (sup 4)S(sup 0), (sup 2)D(sup 0), (sup 2)P(sup 0), 2s2p(sup 4) (sup 4)P, 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3s (sup 4)P, and (sup 2)P terms and from these levels to the levels of the 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3p (sup 2)S(sup 0), (sup 4)D(sup 0), (sup 4)P(sup 0), (sup 4)S(sup 0), (sup 2)D(sup 0), (sup 2)P(sup 0),2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3s(sup 2)D, 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)4s(sup 4)P, (sup 2)P, 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3d(sup 2)P, (sup 4)F,(sup 2)F,(sup 4)P, (sup 4)D, and (sup 2)D terms. Thermally averaged collision strengths are tabulated over a temperature range from 500 to 50,000 K.

  16. Particle-hole symmetry, many-body localization, and topological edge modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Romain; Friedman, Aaron J.; Parameswaran, S. A.; Potter, Andrew C.

    We study the excited states of interacting fermions in one dimension with particle-hole symmetric disorder (equivalently, random-bond XXZ chains) using a combination of renormalization group methods and exact diagonalization. Absent interactions, the entire many-body spectrum exhibits infinite-randomness quantum critical behavior with highly degenerate excited states. We show that though interactions are an irrelevant perturbation in the ground state, they drastically affect the structure of excited states: even arbitrarily weak interactions split the degeneracies in favor of thermalization (weak disorder) or spontaneously broken particle-hole symmetry, driving the system into a many-body localized spin glass phase (strong disorder). In both cases, the quantum critical properties of the non-interacting model are destroyed, either by thermal decoherence or spontaneous symmetry breaking. This system then has the interesting and counterintuitive property that edges of the many-body spectrum are less localized than the center of the spectrum. We argue that our results rule out the existence of certain excited state symmetry-protected topological orders. Supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation's EPiQS Initiative (Grant GBMF4307 (ACP), the Quantum Materials Program at LBNL (RV), NSF Grant DMR-1455366 and UCOP Research Catalyst Award No. CA-15-327861 (SAP).

  17. Particle-hole symmetry, many-body localization, and topological edge modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Romain; Friedman, Aaron J.; Parameswaran, S. A.; Potter, Andrew C.

    2016-04-01

    We study the excited states of interacting fermions in one dimension with particle-hole symmetric disorder (equivalently, random-bond XXZ chains) using a combination of renormalization group methods and exact diagonalization. Absent interactions, the entire many-body spectrum exhibits infinite-randomness quantum critical behavior with highly degenerate excited states. We show that though interactions are an irrelevant perturbation in the ground state, they drastically affect the structure of excited states: Even arbitrarily weak interactions split the degeneracies in favor of thermalization (weak disorder) or spontaneously broken particle-hole symmetry, driving the system into a many-body localized spin glass phase (strong disorder). In both cases, the quantum critical properties of the noninteracting model are destroyed, either by thermal decoherence or spontaneous symmetry breaking. This system then has the interesting and counterintuitive property that edges of the many-body spectrum are less localized than the center of the spectrum. We argue that our results rule out the existence of certain excited state symmetry-protected topological orders.

  18. Particle-hole fluctuations in BCS-BEC crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Floerchinger, S.; Scherer, M.; Wetterich, C.; Diehl, S.

    2008-11-01

    The effect of particle-hole fluctuations for the BCS-BEC crossover is investigated by use of functional renormalization. We compute the Gorkov effect and the critical temperature for the whole range in the scattering length a. On the BCS side for small negative a we recover the Gorkov approximation, while on the BEC side of small positive a the particle-hole fluctuations play no important role, and we find a system of interacting bosons. In the unitarity limit of infinite scattering length our quantitative estimate yields T{sub c}/T{sub F}=0.264. We also investigate the crossover from broad to narrow Feshbach resonances - for the latter we obtain T{sub c}/T{sub F}=0.204 for a{sup -1}=0. A key ingredient for our treatment is the computation of the momentum dependent four-fermion vertex and its bosonization in terms of an effective bound-state exchange.

  19. Core excitation effects on oscillator strengths for transitions in four electron atomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, T. N.; Luo, Yuxiang

    2007-06-01

    By including explicitly the electronic configurations with two and three simultaneously excited electronic orbital, we have extended the BSCI (B-spline based configuration interaction) method [1] to estimate directly the effect of inner shell core excitation to oscillator strengths for transitions in four-electron atomic systems. We will present explicitly the change in oscillator strengths due to core excitations, especially for transitions involving doubly excited states and those with very small oscillator strengths. The length and velocity results are typically in agreement better than 1% or less. [1] Tu-nan Chang, in Many-body Theory of Atomic Structure and Photoionization, edited by T. N. Chang (World Scientific, Singapore, 1993), p. 213-47; and T. N. Chang and T. K. Fang, Elsevier Radiation Physics and Chemistry 70, 173-190 (2004).

  20. Excitation strengths in 109Sn: Single-neutron and collective excitations near 100Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiJulio, D. D.; Cederkall, J.; Fahlander, C.; Ekström, A.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Albers, M.; Bildstein, V.; Blazhev, A.; Darby, I.; Davinson, T.; De Witte, H.; Diriken, J.; Fransen, Ch.; Geibel, K.; Gernhäuser, R.; Görgen, A.; Hess, H.; Iwanicki, J.; Lutter, R.; Reiter, P.; Scheck, M.; Seidlitz, M.; Siem, S.; Taprogge, J.; Tveten, G. M.; Van de Walle, J.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wimmer, K.

    2012-09-01

    A set of B(E2) values for the low-lying excited states in the radioactive isotope 109Sn were deduced from a Coulomb excitation experiment. The 2.87-MeV/u radioactive beam was produced at the REX-ISOLDE facility at CERN and was incident on a secondary 58Ni target. The B(E2) values were determined using the known 2+→0+ reduced transition probability in 58Ni as normalization with the semiclassical Coulomb excitation code gosia2. The transition probabilities are compared to shell-model calculations based on a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction and the predictions of a simple core-excitation model. This measurement represents the first determination of multiple B(E2) values in a light Sn nucleus using the Coulomb excitation technique with low-energy radioactive beams. The results provide constraints for the single-neutron states relative to 100Sn and also indicate the importance of both single-neutron and collective excitations in the light Sn isotopes.

  1. Particle-hole cumulant approach for inelastic losses in x-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kas, J. J.; Rehr, J. J.; Curtis, J. B.

    2016-07-01

    Inelastic losses in core level x-ray spectra arise from many-body excitations, leading to broadening and damping as well as satellite peaks in x-ray photoemission (XPS) and x-ray absorption (XAS) spectra. Here we present a practical approach for calculating these losses based on a cumulant representation of the particle-hole Green's function, a quasiboson approximation, and a partition of the cumulant into extrinsic, intrinsic, and interference terms. The intrinsic losses are calculated using real-time time-dependent density functional theory while the extrinsic losses are obtained from the G W approximation of the photoelectron self-energy and the interference terms are approximated. These effects are included in the spectra using a convolution with an energy dependent particle-hole spectral function. The approach elucidates the nature of the spectral functions in XPS and XAS and explains the significant cancellation between extrinsic and intrinsic losses. Edge-singularity effects in metals are also accounted for. Illustrative results are presented for the XPS and XAS of both weakly and more correlated systems.

  2. Particle-hole configuration interaction and many-body perturbation theory: Application to Hg+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berengut, J. C.

    2016-07-01

    The combination of configuration interaction and many-body perturbation theory methods is extended to nonperturbatively include configurations with electron holes below the designated Fermi level, allowing us to treat systems where holes play an important role. For example, the method can treat valence-hole systems like Ir17 +, particle-hole excitations in noble gases, and difficult transitions such as the 6 s →5 d-16 s2 optical clock transition in Hg+. We take the latter system as our test case for the method and obtain very good accuracy (˜1 %) for the low-lying transition energies. The α dependence of these transitions is calculated and used to reinterpret the existing best laboratory limits on the time dependence of the fine-structure constant.

  3. Electron excitation collision strengths for positive atomic ions: a collection of theoretical data

    SciTech Connect

    Merts, A.L.; Mann, J.B.; Robb, W.D.; Magee, N.H. Jr.

    1980-03-01

    This report contains data on theoretical and experimental cross sections for electron impact excitation of positive atomic ions. It is an updated and corrected version of a preliminary manuscript which was used during an Atomic Data Workshop on Electron Excitation of Ions held at Los Alamos in November 1978. The current status of quantitative knowledge of collisional excitation collision strengths is shown for highly stripped ions where configuration mixing, relativistic and resonance effects may be important. The results show a reasonably satisfactory state for first-row isoelectronic ions and indicate that a considerable amount of work remains to be done for second-row and heavier ions.

  4. Broken particle-hole symmetry in critical fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond E.; Parola, Alberto

    1988-06-01

    The quantitative validity of asymptotic particle-hole symmetry in a fluid at its liquid-vapor critical point is determined by means of the exact mapping of the fluid Hamiltonian onto that of an effective Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson model studied first by Hubbard and Schofield. A particular three-particle correlation of a reference fluid is identified as that which controls the breaking of liquid-vapor symmetry, as manifested in a linear mixing of the pure Ising-like scaling fields and a singularity in the coexistence curve diameter. The inherent smallness of the mixing coefficient in a pair-potential fluid is shown to reflect the weak density dependence of the second moment of the two-particle direct correlation function of the reference system. It is further demonstrated that three-body interactions of the Axilrod-Teller-type enhance the broken particle-hole symmetry found in a purely pairwise-additive Hamiltonian, and detailed calculations give diameter anomaly amplitudes which vary linearly with the fluid polarizability, in quantitative agreement with recent experiments.

  5. Electron impact excitation collision strengths for extreme ultraviolet lines of Fe VII

    SciTech Connect

    Tayal, S. S.; Zatsarinny, O. E-mail: oleg.zatsarinny@drake.edu

    2014-06-10

    Extensive calculations have been performed for electron impact excitation collision strengths and oscillator strengths for the Fe VII extreme ultraviolet lines of astrophysical importance. The collision strengths for fine-structure transitions are calculated in the B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix approach. The target wavefunctions have been calculated in the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method with term-dependent non-orthogonal orbitals. The close-coupling expansion includes 189 fine-structure levels of Fe VII belonging to terms of the ground 3p {sup 6}3d {sup 2} and excited 3p {sup 5}3d {sup 3}, 3p {sup 6}3d4l, 3p {sup 6}3d5s, and 3p {sup 6}3d5p configurations. The effective collision strengths are determined from the electron excitation collision strengths by integration over a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities. The effective collision strengths are provided for 17766 fine-structure transitions at electron temperatures from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 7} K. Our results normally agree with the previous R-matrix frame-transformation calculations by Witthoeft and Badnell. However, there are important differences for some transitions with the previous calculations. The corrections to the previous results are mainly due to more extensive expansions for the Fe VII target states.

  6. Emergent Devil's Staircase without Particle-Hole Symmetry in Rydberg Quantum Gases with Competing Attractive and Repulsive Interactions.

    PubMed

    Lan, Zhihao; Minář, Jiří; Levi, Emanuele; Li, Weibin; Lesanovsky, Igor

    2015-11-13

    The devil's staircase is a fractal structure that characterizes the ground state of one-dimensional classical lattice gases with long-range repulsive convex interactions. Its plateaus mark regions of stability for specific filling fractions which are controlled by a chemical potential. Typically, such a staircase has an explicit particle-hole symmetry; i.e., the staircase at more than half filling can be trivially extracted from the one at less than half filling by exchanging the roles of holes and particles. Here, we introduce a quantum spin chain with competing short-range attractive and long-range repulsive interactions, i.e., a nonconvex potential. In the classical limit the ground state features generalized Wigner crystals that--depending on the filling fraction--are composed of either dimer particles or dimer holes, which results in an emergent complete devil's staircase without explicit particle-hole symmetry of the underlying microscopic model. In our system the particle-hole symmetry is lifted due to the fact that the staircase is controlled through a two-body interaction rather than a one-body chemical potential. The introduction of quantum fluctuations through a transverse field melts the staircase and ultimately makes the system enter a paramagnetic phase. For intermediate transverse field strengths, however, we identify a region where the density-density correlations suggest the emergence of quasi-long-range order. We discuss how this physics can be explored with Rydberg-dressed atoms held in a lattice. PMID:26613435

  7. Emergent Devil's Staircase without Particle-Hole Symmetry in Rydberg Quantum Gases with Competing Attractive and Repulsive Interactions.

    PubMed

    Lan, Zhihao; Minář, Jiří; Levi, Emanuele; Li, Weibin; Lesanovsky, Igor

    2015-11-13

    The devil's staircase is a fractal structure that characterizes the ground state of one-dimensional classical lattice gases with long-range repulsive convex interactions. Its plateaus mark regions of stability for specific filling fractions which are controlled by a chemical potential. Typically, such a staircase has an explicit particle-hole symmetry; i.e., the staircase at more than half filling can be trivially extracted from the one at less than half filling by exchanging the roles of holes and particles. Here, we introduce a quantum spin chain with competing short-range attractive and long-range repulsive interactions, i.e., a nonconvex potential. In the classical limit the ground state features generalized Wigner crystals that--depending on the filling fraction--are composed of either dimer particles or dimer holes, which results in an emergent complete devil's staircase without explicit particle-hole symmetry of the underlying microscopic model. In our system the particle-hole symmetry is lifted due to the fact that the staircase is controlled through a two-body interaction rather than a one-body chemical potential. The introduction of quantum fluctuations through a transverse field melts the staircase and ultimately makes the system enter a paramagnetic phase. For intermediate transverse field strengths, however, we identify a region where the density-density correlations suggest the emergence of quasi-long-range order. We discuss how this physics can be explored with Rydberg-dressed atoms held in a lattice.

  8. Generalized oscillator strengths for some higher valence-shell excitations of argon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Lin-Fan; Yuan, Hui; Jiang, Wei-Chun; Zhang, Fang-Xin; Yuan, Zhen-Sheng; Cheng, Hua-Dong; Xu, Ke-Zun

    2007-03-15

    The valence shell excitations of argon were investigated by an angle-resolved fast-electron energy-loss spectrometer at an incident electron energy of 2500 eV, and the transition multipolarities for the excitations of 3p{yields}3d, 4d, 5s, and 5p were elucidated with the help of the calculated intermediate coupling coefficients using the COWAN code. The generalized oscillator strengths for the excitations to 3p{sup 5}(3d,3d{sup '}), 3p{sup 5}(5p,5p{sup '}), and 3p{sup 5}(5s,4d) were measured, and the profiles of these generalized oscillator strength were analyzed. Furthermore, although the present experimental positions of the maxima for the electric-monopole and electric-quadrupole excitations in 3p{yields}5p are in agreement with the theoretical calculations [Amusia et al., Phys. Rev. A 67, 022703 (2003)], the generalized oscillator strength profiles show obvious differences. In addition, the experimental generalized oscillator strength ratios for the electric-octupole transitions in 3p{yields}3d are different from the theoretical prediction calculated by the COWAN code.

  9. B(E1) Strengths from Coulomb excitation of 11Be

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, N C; Pain, S D; Orr, N A; Catford, W N; Angelique, J C; Ashwood, N I; Bouchat, V; Clarke, N M; Curtis, N; Freer, M; Fulton, B R; Hanappe, F; Labiche, M; Loucey, J L; Lemmon, R C; Mahboub, D; Ninane, A; Normand, G; Nunes, F M; Soic, N; Stuttge, L; Timis, C N; Thompson, I; Winfield, J S; Ziman, V

    2007-03-06

    The B(E1;1/2{sup +}{yields} 1/2{sup -}) strength for {sup 11}Be has been extracted from intermediate energy Coulomb excitation measurements, over a range of beam energies using a new reaction model, the extended continuum discretized coupled channels (XCDCC) method. In addition, a measurement of the excitation cross section for {sup 11}Be+{sup 208}Pb at 38.6 MeV/nucleon is reported. The B(E1) strength of 0.105(12) e{sup 2}fm{sup 2} derived from this measurement is consistent with those made previously at 60 and 64 MeV/nucleon, in contrast to an anomalously low result obtained at 43 MeV/nucleon. By coupling a multi-configuration description of the projectile structure with realistic reaction theory, the XCDCC model provides for the first time a fully quantum mechanical description of Coulomb excitation. The XCDCC calculations reveal that the excitation process involves significant contributions from nuclear, continuum, and higher-order effects. An analysis of the present and two earlier intermediate energy measurements yields a combined B(E1) strength of 0.105(7) e{sup 2}fm{sup 2}. This value is in good agreement with the value deduced independently from the lifetime of the 1/2{sup -} state in {sup 11}Be, and has a comparable precision.

  10. Effect of excitation field strength on magnetic Barkhausen noise profile in case carburized EN 36 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaow, M. M.; Shaw, B. A.

    2015-03-01

    The sensitivity of magnetic Barkhausen noise (MBN) profile to changes in the excitation field strength has been investigated in case carburized EN36 steel. In general, the 0.5 mm case depth EN 36 steel specimen induces a double peak profile indicative of inhomogeneity through the detected depth in the magnetized landscape. Various excitation field amplitudes have been applied to the electromagnet to generate various excitation fields on the specimen surface. Excitation field at the lowest level induced an MBN emission of two peaks of equivalent heights at low current value. The first peak occurs at lower field than the second peak in each half magnetization cycle. As the excitation field increases, the height of both peaks increased but the second peak, at higher field, increases in a higher rate than that of the first peak at lower field. Beyond certain magnetizing voltage, both peaks heights began to saturate and no further increase in the MBN intensity has been noticed. The results are discussed on the basis of the available theories on MBN.

  11. Particle-hole duality, integrability, and Russian doll BCS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bork, L. V.; Pogosov, W. V.

    2015-08-01

    We address a generalized Richardson model (Russian doll BCS model), which is characterized by the breaking of time-reversal symmetry. This model is known to be exactly solvable and integrable. We point out that the Russian doll BCS model, on the level of Hamiltonian, is also particle-hole symmetric. This implies that the same state can be expressed both in the particle and hole representations with two different sets of Bethe roots. We then derive exact relations between Bethe roots in the two representations, which can hardly be obtained staying on the level of Bethe equations. In a quasi-classical limit, similar identities for usual Richardson model, known from literature, are recovered from our results. We also show that these relations for Richardson roots take a remarkably simple form at half-filling and for a symmetric with respect to the middle of the interaction band distribution of one-body energy levels, since, in this special case, the rapidities in the particle and hole representations up to the translation satisfy the same system of equations.

  12. Effective collision strengths for excitation and de-excitation of nebular [O III] optical and infrared lines with κ distributed electron energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, P. J.; Sochi, Taha

    2015-05-01

    We present effective collision strengths for electron excitation and de-excitation of the 10 forbidden transitions between the five lowest energy levels of the astronomically abundant doubly ionized oxygen ion, O2+. The raw collision strength data were obtained from an R-matrix intermediate coupling calculation using the Breit-Pauli relativistic approximation published previously by the authors. The effective collision strengths were calculated with κ-distributed electron energies and are tabulated as a function of the electron temperature and κ.

  13. Particle-hole symmetry without particle-hole symmetry in the quantum Hall effect at ν = 5 / 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Dmitri; Zucker, Philip

    Numerical results suggest that the quantum Hall effect at ν = 5 / 2 is described by the Pfaffian or anti-Pfaffian state in the absence of disorder and Landau level mixing. In realistic samples both disorder and Landau level mixing are strong on the 5 / 2 plateau. The experimental observation of the upstream neutral mode on the sample edge is incompatible with the Pfaffian state. Tunneling experiments give an upper bound on the universal exponent g in the zero bias conductance G ~T 2 g - 2 . That bound is inconsistent with the anti-Pfaffian state. We show that a recent proposal of the PH-Pfaffian topological order by Son is compatible with the tunneling experiments and the observation of the upstream mode. The quasiparticle statistics of the PH-Pfaffian state is similar to the statistics in the Pfaffian and anti-Pfaffian states and its interferometric signatures are also similar to those of the Pfaffian and anti-Pfaffian topological orders. The absence of the particle-hole symmetry at ν = 5 / 2 is not an obstacle to the existence of the PH-Pfaffian order since the order is robust to symmetry breaking. We acknowledge support by the NSF under Grant No. DMR-1205715.

  14. Stabilization of the Particle-Hole Pfaffian Order by Landau-Level Mixing and Impurities That Break Particle-Hole Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Zucker, P T; Feldman, D E

    2016-08-26

    Numerical results suggest that the quantum Hall effect at ν=5/2 is described by the Pfaffian or anti-Pfaffian state in the absence of disorder and Landau-level mixing. Those states are incompatible with the observed transport properties of GaAs heterostructures, where disorder and Landau-level mixing are strong. We show that the recent proposal of a particle-hole (PH)-Pfaffian topological order by Son is consistent with all experiments. The absence of particle-hole symmetry at ν=5/2 is not an obstacle to the existence of the PH-Pfaffian order since the order is robust to symmetry breaking.

  15. Stabilization of the Particle-Hole Pfaffian Order by Landau-Level Mixing and Impurities That Break Particle-Hole Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucker, P. T.; Feldman, D. E.

    2016-08-01

    Numerical results suggest that the quantum Hall effect at ν =5 /2 is described by the Pfaffian or anti-Pfaffian state in the absence of disorder and Landau-level mixing. Those states are incompatible with the observed transport properties of GaAs heterostructures, where disorder and Landau-level mixing are strong. We show that the recent proposal of a particle-hole (PH)-Pfaffian topological order by Son is consistent with all experiments. The absence of particle-hole symmetry at ν =5 /2 is not an obstacle to the existence of the PH-Pfaffian order since the order is robust to symmetry breaking.

  16. Scaling of collision strengths for highly-excited states of ions of the H- and He-like sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Menchero, L.; Del Zanna, G.; Badnell, N. R.

    2016-08-01

    Emission lines from highly-excited states (n ≥ 5) of H- and He-like ions have been detected in astrophysical sources and fusion plasmas. For such excited states, R-matrix or distorted wave calculations for electron-impact excitation are very limited, due to the large size of the atomic basis set needed to describe them. Calculations for n ≥ 6 are also not generally available. We study the behaviour of the electron-impact excitation collision strengths and effective collision strengths for the most important transitions used to model electron collision dominated astrophysical plasmas, solar, for example. We investigate the dependence on the relevant parameters: the principal quantum number n or the nuclear charge Z. We also estimate the importance of coupling to highly-excited states and the continuum by comparing the results of different sized calculations. We provide analytic formulae to calculate the electron-impact excitation collision strengths and effective collision strengths to highly-excited states (n ≥ 8) of H- and He-like ions. These extrapolated effective collision strengths can be used to interpret astrophysical and fusion plasma via collisional-radiative modelling. Tables of atomic data for Si xiii and S xv are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/592/A135

  17. Measurement of shear strength for HOPG with scanning tunneling microscopy by thermal excitation method.

    PubMed

    Ding, X D; Wang, Y Z; Xiong, X M; Du, X S; Zhang, J X

    2012-04-01

    An experimental observation of force interactions in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is presented. A technique for measuring force interactions between a conventional STM probe and a sample by spectra analysis of its thermal fluctuations from tunneling current in STM is developed theoretically and experimentally. Thermally excited fluctuation of the STM probe is exactly discerned in air and then force gradient is determined from its corresponding eigen-frequency with a formula similar to that for a small-amplitude atomic force microscopy (AFM). The observed force interactions are consistent with forces in dynamic AFM. Shear strength of 7 GPa for highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) under compressive stress is obtained from the experiment and using the elastic theory. We believe that this technique is of scientific significance as it enables accurate measurement of short-range force interactions at atomic scale under true STM conditions.

  18. Performance of SOPPA-based methods in the calculation of vertical excitation energies and oscillator strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Pitzner-Frydendahl, Henrik F.; Buse, Mogens; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa.; Thiel, Walter

    2015-07-01

    We present two new modifications of the second-order polarization propagator approximation (SOPPA), SOPPA(SCS-MP2) and SOPPA(SOS-MP2), which employ either spin-component-scaled or scaled opposite-spin MP2 correlation coefficients instead of the regular MP2 coefficients. The performance of these two methods, the original SOPPA method as well as SOPPA(CCSD) and RPA(D) in the calculation of vertical electronic excitation energies and oscillator strengths is investigated for a large benchmark set of 28 medium-sized molecules with 139 singlet and 71 triplet excited states. The results are compared with the corresponding CC3 and CASPT2 results from the literature for both the TZVP set and the larger and more diffuse aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. In addition, the results with the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set are compared with the theoretical best estimates for this benchmark set. We find that the original SOPPA method gives overall the smallest mean deviations from the reference values and the most consistent results.

  19. Particles, holes, and solitons: a matrix product state approach.

    PubMed

    Draxler, Damian; Haegeman, Jutho; Osborne, Tobias J; Stojevic, Vid; Vanderstraeten, Laurens; Verstraete, Frank

    2013-07-12

    We introduce a variational method for calculating dispersion relations of translation invariant (1+1)-dimensional quantum field theories. The method is based on continuous matrix product states and can be implemented efficiently. We study the critical Lieb-Liniger model as a benchmark and excellent agreement with the exact solution is found. Additionally, we observe solitonic signatures of Lieb's type II excitation. In addition, a nonintegrable model is introduced where a U(1)-symmetry breaking term is added to the Lieb-Liniger Hamiltonian. For this model we find evidence of a nontrivial bound-state excitation in the dispersion relation.

  20. Low-energy electromagnetic excitation strengths in 121Sb and 123Sb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryssinck, J.; Govor, L.; Bauwens, F.; Belic, D.; von Brentano, P.; de Frenne, D.; Fransen, C.; Gade, A.; Jacobs, E.; Kneissl, U.; Kohstall, C.; Linnemann, A.; Nord, A.; Pietralla, N.; Pitz, H. H.; Scheck, M.; Stedile, F.; Werner, V.

    2002-02-01

    Results are presented from nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments on the odd-mass nuclei 121Sb and 123Sb with Z=51. The improved sensitivity reached with the present NRF facility, installed at the 4.3 MV Dynamitron accelerator of the Stuttgart University, allowed the detection of huge numbers of weak photoexcitations in the stable Sb nuclei 121Sb (164 transitions) and 123Sb (83 transitions) in the energy range up to 4 MeV and 3.5 MeV, respectively. The data are compared to former results for odd-mass nuclei near the Z=50 and N=82 shell closures (117Sn, 139La, 141Pr, and 143Nd). In the odd-mass nuclei within the Z=50 region, a similar total amount of electromagnetic excitation strength below 4 MeV is found; however, in 121Sb and 123Sb (Z=51) this strength is much more fragmented than in 117Sn with a closed proton shell (Z=50).

  1. Effect of particle-hole symmetry on the behavior of tracer and jump diffusion coefficients.

    PubMed

    Torrez Herrera, J J; Ranzuglia, G A; Manzi, S J; Pereyra, V D

    2013-05-01

    This paper analyzes the effect of particle-hole symmetry on the behavior of the tracer diffusion coefficient as well as the jump diffusion coefficient. The coefficients are obtained by performing a random walk of individual atoms in a two-dimensional square lattice at monolayer, using the n-fold way Monte Carlo simulation. Different hopping mechanisms have been introduced to study the effect of particle-hole symmetry. For hopping kinetics where the initial-state interactions are involved, the diffusion coefficient at high coverage falls several orders of magnitude due to the effect of particle-hole symmetry. For hopping kinetics where the final-state interactions are present, the effect is the opposite. For those involving both initial- and final-state interactions, like the so-called interaction kinetics, the effect of particle-hole symmetry is also discussed. This effect seems to be critical for repulsive lateral interactions, for which the behavior of the diffusion coefficients is modified by introducing the particle-hole symmetry condition. PMID:23767481

  2. Investigation of the energy-averaged double transition density of isoscalar monopole excitations in medium-heavy mass spherical nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelik, M. L.; Shlomo, S.; Tulupov, B. A.; Urin, M. H.

    2016-11-01

    The particle-hole dispersive optical model, developed recently, is applied to study properties of high-energy isoscalar monopole excitations in medium-heavy mass spherical nuclei. The energy-averaged strength functions of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance and its overtone in 208Pb are analyzed. In particular, we analyze the energy-averaged isoscalar monopole double transition density, the key quantity in the description of the hadron-nucleus inelastic scattering, and studied the validity of the factorization approximation using semi classical and microscopic one body transition densities, respectively, in calculating the cross sections for the excitation of isoscalar giant resonances by inelastic alpha scattering.

  3. Stabilization of the Particle-Hole Pfaffian Order by Landau-Level Mixing and Impurities That Break Particle-Hole Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Zucker, P T; Feldman, D E

    2016-08-26

    Numerical results suggest that the quantum Hall effect at ν=5/2 is described by the Pfaffian or anti-Pfaffian state in the absence of disorder and Landau-level mixing. Those states are incompatible with the observed transport properties of GaAs heterostructures, where disorder and Landau-level mixing are strong. We show that the recent proposal of a particle-hole (PH)-Pfaffian topological order by Son is consistent with all experiments. The absence of particle-hole symmetry at ν=5/2 is not an obstacle to the existence of the PH-Pfaffian order since the order is robust to symmetry breaking. PMID:27610872

  4. Spontaneous particle-hole symmetry breaking in the nu=5/2 fractional quantum Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Michael R; Park, Kwon; Das Sarma, S

    2008-10-10

    The essence of the nu=5/2 fractional quantum Hall effect is believed to be captured by the Moore-Read Pfaffian (or anti-Pfaffian) description. However, a mystery regarding the formation of the Pfaffian state is the role of the three-body interaction Hamiltonian H3 that produces it as an exact ground state and the concomitant particle-hole symmetry breaking. We show that a two-body interaction Hamiltonian H2 constructed via particle-hole symmetrization of H3 produces a ground state nearly exactly approximating the Pfaffian and anti-Pfaffian states, respectively, in the spherical geometry. Importantly, the ground state energy of H2 exhibits a "Mexican-hat" structure as a function of particle number in the vicinity of half filling for a given flux indicating spontaneous particle-hole symmetry breaking. This signature is absent for the second Landau level Coulomb interaction at 5/2.

  5. Excitation energies, oscillator strengths and lifetimes in Mg-like vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, G. P.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2013-08-01

    Excitation energies from the ground state for 86 fine-structure levels as well as oscillator strengths and radiative decay rates for all fine-structure transitions among the levels of the terms (1s22s22p6)3s2(1S), 3s3p(1,3Po), 3s3d(1,3D), 3s4s(1,3S), 3s4p(1,3Po), 3s4d(1,3D), 3s4f(1,3Fo), 3p2(1S, 3P, 1D), 3p3d(1,3Po, 1,3Do, 1,3Fo), 3p4s(1,3Po), 3p4p(1,3S, 1,3P, 1,3D), 3p4d(1,3Po, 1,3Do, 1,3Fo), 3p4f(1,3D, 1,3F, 1,3G) and 3d2(1S, 3P, 1D,3F,1G) of V XII are calculated using extensive configuration-interaction wave functions obtained with the configuration-interaction version 3 computer code of Hibbert. The important relativistic effects in intermediate coupling are included through the Breit-Pauli approximation. In order to keep our calculated energy splittings as close as possible to the corresponding experimental values, we have made small adjustments to the diagonal elements of the Hamiltonian matrices. The mixing among several fine-structure levels is found to be very strong. Our fine-tuned excitation energies, including their ordering, are in excellent agreement (better than 0.25%) with the available experimental results. From our calculated radiative decay rates, we have also calculated the radiative lifetimes of fine-structure levels. Generally, our calculated data for the excitation energies and radiative decay rates are found to agree reasonably well with other available calculations. However, significant differences between our calculated lifetimes and those from the calculation of Froese Fischer et al (2006 At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 92 607) for a few fine-structure levels, mainly those belonging to the 3p4d configuration, are noted and discussed. Also, our calculated lifetime for the longer-lived level 3s3p(3P1) is found to be in excellent agreement with the corresponding value of Curtis (1991 Phys. Scr. 43 137). ) for all 1108 transitions in V XII are available with the first author ().

  6. Electron-impact excitation collision strengths and theoretical line intensities for transitions in S III

    SciTech Connect

    Grieve, M. F. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Hudson, C. E.; Keenan, F. P.

    2014-01-01

    We present Maxwellian-averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of S III over a wide range of electron temperatures of astrophysical importance, log T{sub e} (K) = 3.0-6.0. The calculation incorporates 53 fine-structure levels arising from the six configurations—3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}, 3s3p {sup 3}, 3s {sup 2}3p3d, 3s {sup 2}3p4s, 3s {sup 2}3p4p, and 3s {sup 2}3p4d—giving rise to 1378 individual lines and is undertaken using the recently developed RMATRX II plus FINE95 suite of codes. A detailed comparison is made with a previous R-matrix calculation and significant differences are found for some transitions. The atomic data are subsequently incorporated into the modeling code CLOUDY to generate line intensities for a range of plasma parameters, with emphasis on allowed ultraviolet extreme-ultraviolet emission lines detected from the Io plasma torus. Electron density-sensitive line ratios are calculated with the present atomic data and compared with those from CHIANTI v7.1, as well as with Io plasma torus spectra obtained by Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer. The present line intensities are found to agree well with the observational results and provide a noticeable improvement on the values predicted by CHIANTI.

  7. Oscillator strengths for high-excitation Ti II from laboratory measurements and calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundberg, H.; Hartman, H.; Engström, L.; Nilsson, H.; Persson, A.; Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.; Fivet, V.; Malcheva, G.; Blagoev, K.

    2016-07-01

    This work reports new experimental radiative lifetimes of six 3d2(3F)5s levels in singly ionized titanium, with an energy around 63 000 cm-1 and four 3d2(3F)4p odd parity levels where we confirm previous investigations. Combining the new 5s lifetimes with branching fractions measured previously by Pickering et al., we report 57 experimental log gf values for transitions from the 5s levels. The lifetime measurements are performed using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on ions produced by laser ablation. One- and two-step photon excitation is employed to reach the 4p and 5s levels, respectively. Theoretical calculations of the radiative lifetimes of the measured levels as well as of oscillator strengths for 3336 transitions from these levels are reported. The calculations are carried out by a pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock method taking into account core-polarization effects. The theoretical results are in a good agreement with the experiments and are needed for accurate abundance determinations in astronomical objects.

  8. Emergent particle-hole symmetry in the half-filled Landau level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Michael; Raghu, S.; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    2016-08-01

    We provide an effective description of a particle-hole symmetric state of electrons in a half-filled Landau level, starting from the traditional approach pioneered by Halperin, Lee, and Read [Phys. Rev. B 47, 7312 (1993), 10.1103/PhysRevB.47.7312]. Specifically, we study a system consisting of alternating quasi-one-dimensional strips of composite Fermi liquid (CFL) and composite hole liquid (CHL), both of which break particle-hole symmetry. When the CFL and CHL strips are identical in size, the resulting state is manifestly invariant under the combined action of a particle-hole transformation with respect to a single Landau level (which interchanges the CFL and CHL) and translation by one unit, equal to the strip width, in the direction transverse to the strips. At distances long compared to the strip width, we demonstrate that the system is described by a Dirac fermion coupled to an emergent gauge field, with an antiunitary particle-hole symmetry, as recently proposed by Son [Phys. Rev. X 5, 031027 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevX.5.031027].

  9. Electron-impact excitation of Ni II. Collision strengths and effective collision strengths for low-lying fine-structure forbidden transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Scott, M. P.; Burke, P. G.

    2010-04-01

    Context. Considerable demand exists for electron excitation data for ion{Ni}{ii}, since lines from this abundant ion are observed in a wide variety of laboratory and astrophysical spectra. The accurate theoretical determination of these data can present a significant challenge however, due to complications arising from the presence of an open 3d-shell in the description of the target ion. Aims: In this work we present collision strengths and Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of ion{Ni}{ii}. Attention is concentrated on the 153 forbidden fine-structure transitions between the energetically lowest 18 levels of ion{Ni}{ii}. Effective collision strengths have been evaluated at 27 individual electron temperatures ranging from 30-100 000 K. To our knowledge this is the most extensive theoretical collisional study carried out on this ion to date. Methods: The parallel R-matrix package RMATRX II has recently been extended to allow for the inclusion of relativistic effects. This suite of codes has been utilised in the present work in conjunction with PSTGF to evaluate collision strengths and effective collision strengths for all of the low-lying forbidden fine-structure transitions. The following basis configurations were included in the target model - 3d9, 3d84s, 3d84p, 3d74s2 and 3d74s4p - giving rise to a sophisticated 295 jj-level, 1930 coupled channel scattering problem. Results: Comprehensive comparisons are made between the present collisional data and those obtained from earlier theoretical evaluations. While the effective collision strengths agree well for some transitions, significant discrepancies exist for others. Table 2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/513/A55

  10. PARTICLE-HOLE NATURE OF THE LIGHT HIGH-SPIN TOROIDAL ISOMERS

    SciTech Connect

    Staszczak, A.; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Nuclei under non-collective rotation with a large angular momentum above some threshold can assume a toroidal shape. In our previous work, we showed by using cranked Skyrme Hartree Fock approach that even even, N = Z, high-K, toroidal isomeric states may have general occurrences for light nuclei with 28 < A < 52. We present here some additional results and systematics on the particle-hole nature of these high-spin toroidal isomers.

  11. Particle-Hole Symmetry Breaking in the Pseudogap State of Bi2201

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, M.; He, R.-H.; Tanaka, K.; Testaud, J.P.; Meevasana1, W.; Moore, R.G.; Lu, D.H.; Yao, H.; Yoshida, Y.; Eisaki, H.; Devereaux, T.P.; Hussain, Z.; Shen, Z.-X.; /SIMES, Stanford /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2011-08-19

    In conventional superconductors, a gap exists in the energy absorption spectrum only below the transition temperature (T{sub c}), corresponding to the energy price to pay for breaking a Cooper pair of electrons. In high-T{sub c} cuprate superconductors above T{sub c}, an energy gap called the pseudogap exists, and is controversially attributed either to pre-formed superconducting pairs, which would exhibit particle-hole symmetry, or to competing phases which would typically break it. Scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) studies suggest that the pseudogap stems from lattice translational symmetry breaking and is associated with a different characteristic spectrum for adding or removing electrons (particle-hole asymmetry). However, no signature of either spatial or energy symmetry breaking of the pseudogap has previously been observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Here we report ARPES data from Bi2201 which reveals both particle-hole symmetry breaking and dramatic spectral broadening indicative of spatial symmetry breaking without long range order, upon crossing through T* into the pseudogap state. This symmetry breaking is found in the dominant region of the momentum space for the pseudogap, around the so-called anti-node near the Brillouin zone boundary. Our finding supports the STM conclusion that the pseudogap state is a broken-symmetry state that is distinct from homogeneous superconductivity.

  12. Ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and ionic radii of element Uus (Z = 117) and astatine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhiwei; Li, Jiguang; Dong, Chenzhong

    2010-12-30

    Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method was employed to calculate the first five ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and radii for the element Uus and its homologue At. Main valence correlation effects were taken into account. The Breit interaction and QED effects were also estimated. The uncertainties of calculated IPs, EAs, and IR for Uus and At were reduced through an extrapolation procedure. The good consistency with available experimental and other theoretical values demonstrates the validity of the present results. These theoretical data therefore can be used to predict some unknown physicochemical properties of element Uus, Astatine, and their compounds. PMID:21141866

  13. Coulomb excitation of a {sup 242}Am isomeric target : E2, E3 strengths, rotational alignment, and collective enhancement.

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, A. B.; Cline, D.; Moody, K. J.; Ragnarsson, I.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.; Carpenter, M. P.; Carroll, J. J.; Gohlke, D.; Greene, J. P.; Hecht, A. A.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Karamian, S. A.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Macri, R. A.; Propri, R.; Seweryniak, D.; Wang, X.; Wheeler, R.; Zhu, S.

    2010-10-29

    A 98% pure {sup 242m}Am (K=5{sup -}, t{sub 1/2} = 141 years) isomeric target was Coulomb excited with a 170.5-MeV {sup 40}Ar beam. The selectivity of Coulomb excitation, coupled with the sensitivity of Gammasphere plus CHICO, was sufficient to identify 46 new states up to spin 18 {h_bar} in at least four rotational bands; 11 of these new states lie in the isomer band, 13 in a previously unknown yrast K{sup {pi}} = 6{sup -} rotational band, and 13 in a band tentatively identified as the predicted yrast K{sup {pi}} = 5{sup +} band. The rotational bands based on the K{sup {pi}} = 5{sup -} isomer and the 6{sup -} bandhead were populated by Coulomb excitation with unexpectedly equal cross sections. The {gamma}-ray yields are reproduced by Coulomb excitation calculations using a two-particle plus rotor model (PRM), implying nearly complete {Delta}K = 1 mixing of the two almost-degenerate rotational bands, but recovering the Alaga rule for the unperturbed states. The degeneracy of the 5{sup -} and 6{sup -} bands allows for precise determination of the mixing interaction strength V, which approaches the strong-mixing limit; this agrees with the 50% attenuation of the Coriolis matrix element assumed in the model calculations. The fractional admixture of the I{sub K}{sup {pi}} = 6{sub 6{sup -}} state in the nominal 6{sub 5{sup -}} isomer band state is measured within the PRM as 45.6{sub -1.1}{sup +0.3}%. The E2 and M1 strengths coupling the 5{sup -} and 6{sup -} bands are enhanced significantly by the mixing, while E1 and E2 couplings to other low-K bands are not measurably enhanced. The yields of the 5{sup +} band are reproduced by an E3 strength of {approx}15 W.u., competitive with the interband E2 strength. Alignments of the identified two-particle Nilsson states in {sup 242}Am are compared with the single-particle alignments in {sup 241}Am.

  14. Ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and ionic radii of element Uus (Z = 117) and astatine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhiwei; Li, Jiguang; Dong, Chenzhong

    2010-12-30

    Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method was employed to calculate the first five ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and radii for the element Uus and its homologue At. Main valence correlation effects were taken into account. The Breit interaction and QED effects were also estimated. The uncertainties of calculated IPs, EAs, and IR for Uus and At were reduced through an extrapolation procedure. The good consistency with available experimental and other theoretical values demonstrates the validity of the present results. These theoretical data therefore can be used to predict some unknown physicochemical properties of element Uus, Astatine, and their compounds.

  15. Nature of composite fermions and the role of particle-hole symmetry: A microscopic account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balram, Ajit C.; Jain, J. K.

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by the issue of particle-hole symmetry for the composite fermion Fermi sea at the half-filled Landau level, Son has made an intriguing proposal [Phys. Rev. X 5, 031027 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevX.5.031027] that composite fermions are Dirac particles. We ask what features of the Dirac-composite fermion theory and its various consequences may be reconciled with the well-established microscopic theory of the fractional quantum Hall effect and the 1/2 state, which is based on nonrelativistic composite fermions. Starting from the microscopic theory, we derive the assertion of Son that the particle-hole transformation of electrons at filling factor ν =1/2 corresponds to an effective time-reversal transformation (i.e., {kj} →{-kj} ) for composite fermions, and discuss how this connects to the absence of 2 kF backscattering in the presence of a particle-hole symmetric disorder. By considering bare holes in various composite-fermion Λ levels (analogs of electronic Landau levels), we determine the Λ level spacing and find it to be very nearly independent of the Λ level index, consistent with a parabolic dispersion for the underlying composite fermions. Finally, we address the compatibility of the Chern-Simons theory with the lowest Landau level constraint, and find that the wave functions of the mean-field Chern-Simons theory, as well as a class of topologically similar wave functions, are surprisingly accurate when projected into the lowest Landau level. These considerations lead us to introduce a "normal form" for the unprojected wave functions of the n /(2 p n -1 ) states that correctly capture the topological properties even without lowest Landau level projection.

  16. Effective collision strengths for electron impact excitations in S II. [Plasma torus of Io

    SciTech Connect

    Tayal, S.S.; Henry, R.J.W.; Nakazaki, S.

    1987-02-01

    Electron impact collision strengths for forbidden, semiforbidden, and allowed transitions in S II calculated using the R-matrix method are presented. Configuration interaction wave functions are used to represent the six target states included in the calculation. At low impact energies the collision strengths are dominated by resonances for several transitions. The contribution from higher partial waves is obtained in the close-coupling approximation with exchange terms omitted. Results are presented for the effective collision strengths over a wide temperature range (5000-150,000 K) of astrophysical interest. The present results for the 4S(0) yields 2P(0) transition are 20-30 percent lower than previous calculations, while for the 4S(0) yields 2D(0) transition they are in good agreement. The results are approximately 30 percent higher than those of Ho and Henry (1983) for the 4S(0) yields 2P(0) transition at 80,000 K, and the difference between the two results increases with decreasing temperatures (under 80,000 K). 38 references.

  17. Mean excitation energies for stopping powers in various materials using local plasma oscillator strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Xu, Y. J.; Kamaratos, E.; Chang, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    The basic model of Lindhard and Scharff, known as the local plasma model, is used to study the effects on stopping power of the chemical and physical state of the medium. Unlike previous work with the local plasma model, in which individual electron shifts in the plasma frequency were estimated empirically, he Pines correction derived for a degenerate Fermi gas is shown herein to provide a reasonable estimate, even on the atomic scale. Thus, the model is moved to a complete theoretical base requiring no empirical adjustments, as characteristic of past applications. The principal remaining error is in the overestimation of the low-energy absorption properties that are characteristic of the plasma model in the region of the atomic discrete spectrum, although higher-energy phenomena are accurately represented, and even excitation-to-ionization ratios are given to fair accuracy. Mean excitation energies for covalent-bonded gases and solids, for ionic gases and crystals, and for metals are calculated using first-order models of the bonded states.

  18. Absolute optical oscillator strengths for the electronic excitation of atoms at high resolution: Experimental methods and measurements for helium

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, W.F.; Cooper, G.; Brion, C.E. )

    1991-07-01

    An alternative method is described for the measurement of absolute optical oscillator strengths (cross sections) for electronic excitation of free atoms and molecules throughout the discrete region of the valence-shell spectrum at high energy resolution (full width at half maximum of 0.048 eV). The technique, utilizing the virtual-photon field of a fast electron inelastically scattered at negligible momentum transfer, avoids many of the difficulties associated with the various direct optical techniques that have traditionally been used for absolute optical oscillator strength measurements. The method is also free of the bandwidth (line saturation) effects that can seriously limit the accuracy of photoabsorption cross-section measurements for discrete transitions of narrow linewidth obtained using the Beer-Lambert law ({ital I}{sub 0}/{ital I}=exp({ital nl}{sigma}{sub {ital p}})). Since the line-saturation effects are not widely appreciated and are only usually considered in the context of peak heights, a detailed analysis of this problem is presented, with consideration of the integrated cross section (oscillator strength) over the profile of each discrete peak.

  19. Finite-temperature exact diagonalization cluster dynamical mean-field study of the two-dimensional Hubbard model: Pseudogap, non-Fermi-liquid behavior, and particle-hole asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebsch, Ansgar; Tong, Ning-Hua

    2009-10-01

    The effect of doping in the two-dimensional Hubbard model is studied within finite-temperature exact diagonalization combined with cluster dynamical mean-field theory. By employing a mixed basis involving cluster sites and bath molecular orbitals for the projection of the lattice Green’s function onto 2×2 clusters, a considerably more accurate description of the low-frequency properties of the self-energy is achieved than in a pure site picture. To evaluate the phase diagram, the transition from Fermi-liquid to non-Fermi-liquid behavior for decreasing hole doping is studied as a function of Coulomb energy, next-nearest-neighbor hopping, and temperature. The self-energy component ΣX associated with X=(π,0) is shown to develop a collective mode above EF , whose energy and strength exhibits a distinct dispersion with doping. This low-energy excitation gives rise to non-Fermi-liquid behavior as the hole doping decreases below a critical value δc , and to an increasing particle-hole asymmetry, in agreement with recent photoemission data. This behavior is consistent with the removal of spectral weight from electron states above EF and the opening of a pseudogap, which increases with decreasing doping. The phase diagram reveals that δc≈0.15…0.20 for various system parameters. For electron doping, the collective mode of ΣX(ω) and the concomitant pseudogap are located below the Fermi energy, which is consistent with the removal of spectral weight from the hole states just below EF . The critical doping, which marks the onset of non-Fermi-liquid behavior, is systematically smaller than for hole doping.

  20. Dipole strength distributions in stable odd-mass nuclei in the vicinity of the N=82 isotones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheck, Marcus

    2006-10-01

    The low-lying dipole strength distributions in the odd-mass nuclei ^135Ba, ^137Ba, ^139La and ^141Pr were studied in nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) experiments performed at the Stuttgart Dynamitron facility. experiments used bremsstrahlung beams with endpoint energies of 4.1 MeV. The spin selective NRF reaction allowed the excitation of states through dipole transitions, up to 4 MeV. A special focus is the fragmented E1-strength of transitions connecting the ground state to states of the [2^+ 3^-] particle/hole coupling. The summed strength of the odd-mass nuclei is compared with the E1-strength of the [2^+ 3^-]1^- two-phonon states of the neighboring even-even core nuclei.

  1. Generalized oscillator strengths for 5s, 5s{sup '}, and 5p excitations of krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Li Wenbin; Zhu Linfan; Yuan Zhensheng; Sun Jianmin; Cheng Huadong; Xu Kezun; Zhong Zhiping; Liu Xiaojing

    2003-06-01

    The absolute generalized oscillator strengths (GOSs) for 5s, 5s{sup '}, 5p [5/2]{sub 3,2}, 5p [3/2]{sub 1,2}, and 5p [1/2]{sub 0} transitions of krypton have been determined in a large K{sup 2} region at a high electron-impact energy of 2500 eV. The positions of the minima and maxima of these GOSs have been determined. The present results show that the angular resolution and pressure effect have great influence on the position and the amplitude of the minimum for the GOS of 5s+5s{sup '} transitions. When these effects are considered, the measured minimum position for the GOS of 5s+5s{sup '} transitions is in excellent agreement with the calculation of Chen and Msezane [J. Phys. B 33, 5397 (2000)].

  2. Dual AC Dipole Excitation for the Measurement of Magnetic Multipole Strength from Beam Position Monitor Data

    SciTech Connect

    M. Spata, G.A. Krafft

    2011-09-01

    An experiment was conducted at Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility to develop a technique for characterizing the nonlinear fields of the beam transport system. Two air-core dipole magnets were simultaneously driven at two different frequencies to provide a time-dependent transverse modulation of the electron beam. Fourier decomposition of beam position monitor data was then used to measure the amplitude of these frequencies at different positions along the beamline. For a purely linear transport system one expects to find solely the frequencies that were applied to the dipoles with amplitudes that depend on the phase advance of the lattice. In the presence of nonlinear fields one expects to also find harmonics of the driving frequencies that depend on the order of the nonlinearity. The technique was calibrated using one of the sextupole magnets in a CEBAF beamline and then applied to a dipole to measure the sextupole and octupole strength of the magnet. A comparison is made between the beam-based measurements, results from TOSCA and data from our Magnet Measurement Facility.

  3. Length and velocity form calculations of generalized oscillator strengths of dipole, quadrupole and monopole excitations of argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomis, L.; Faye, I. G.; Diallo, S.; Tall, M. S.; Diedhiou, I.; Hibbert, A.; Daul, C. A.; Diatta, C. S.

    2016-01-01

    The quadrupole, monopole and dipole generalized oscillator strengths (GOSs) as a function of momentum transfer are respectively calculated for these 3p6 → 3p5 (4p, 5p, 6p) and 3p6 → 3p5 (4s, 5s, 6s) transitions. Configuration interaction (CI) and random phase approximation with exchange (RPAE) methods are used in the determination of these GOS, in the length and velocity forms. The code of Hibbert has been used to generate the wavefunctions from which a partial of argon GOSs are been computed. The present work has reduced the gap between the absolute values of the theoretical calculations of GOSs and those of the experimental results of Zhu et al for the quadrupole excitations to 3p5 (4p, 5p). The profile of our quadrupole GOS 3p6 → 3p55p transition agrees well with the experimental result of Zhu. The best agreement (0.7%) is observed between the (length) first maximum position and the experimental one for the quadrupole GOS 3p6 → 3p54p transition. The present velocity GOS minimum position for the dipole excitation in 3p6 → 3p54s and the calculated velocity GOS maximum position of the monopole 3p6 → 3p54p transition are in good agreement with the experimental observations (differences of 1.82% and 3.08%, respectively). Correlation effects decrease with increasing of the excited state principal quantum number and have no great influence on the extrema positions.

  4. Modulation of inhibitory strength and kinetics facilitates regulation of persistent inward currents and motoneuron excitability following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Sharmila; Hamm, Thomas M.; Crook, Sharon M.

    2011-01-01

    Spasticity is commonly observed after chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) and many other central nervous system disorders (e.g., multiple sclerosis, stroke). SCI-induced spasticity has been associated with motoneuron hyperexcitability partly due to enhanced activation of intrinsic persistent inward currents (PICs). Disrupted spinal inhibitory mechanisms also have been implicated. Altered inhibition can result from complex changes in the strength, kinetics, and reversal potential (ECl−) of γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) and glycine receptor currents. Development of optimal therapeutic strategies requires an understanding of the impact of these interacting factors on motoneuron excitability. We employed computational methods to study the effects of conductance, kinetics, and ECl− of a dendritic inhibition on PIC activation and motoneuron discharge. A two-compartment motoneuron with enhanced PICs characteristic of SCI and receiving recurrent inhibition from Renshaw cells was utilized in these simulations. This dendritic inhibition regulated PIC onset and offset and exerted its strongest effects at motoneuron recruitment and in the secondary range of the current-frequency relationship during PIC activation. Increasing inhibitory conductance compensated for moderate depolarizing shifts in ECl− by limiting PIC activation and self-sustained firing. Furthermore, GABAA currents exerted greater control on PIC activation than glycinergic currents, an effect attributable to their slower kinetics. These results suggest that modulation of the strength and kinetics of GABAA currents could provide treatment strategies for uncontrollable spasms. PMID:21775715

  5. Particle-Particle Hole-Hole Tda - and Beyond - for the Nuclear Pairing Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molique, Hervé; Dudek, Jerzy

    A comparison of different seniority zero solutions to the picket-fence model for the nuclear pairing hamiltonian problem is performed. These solutions are calculated, in the normal regime, within the self-consistent Random Phase Approximation (SCRPA) and various simplifications of this formalism, and also with the Tamm-Dancoff approach in the particle-particle-hole-hole channel (pphh-TDA). The latter formalism represents a first approximation to the earlier developped so-called P-Symmetric Many-Body method (PSY-MB). In the superfluid regime, the solutions are compared with the BCS results. By comparing the results with the exact ones, obtained by the Richardson method, it is shown that the PSY-MB method provides a powerful tool in solving the problem with good accuracy both in the normal and the superfluid regime, for single-particle space sizes adapted to typical nuclear structure calculations.

  6. Multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations of excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and hyperfine structure constants for low-lying levels of Sm I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fuyang; Qu, Yizhi; Li, Jiguang; Wang, Jianguo

    2015-11-01

    The multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock method was employed to calculate the total and excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and hyperfine structure constants for low-lying levels of Sm i. In the first-order perturbation approximation, we systematically analyzed correlation effects from individual electrons and electron pairs. It was found that the core correlations are of importance for the physical quantities concerned. Based on the analysis, the important configuration state wave functions were selected to constitute atomic state wave functions. By using this computational model, our excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and hyperfine structure constants are in better agreement with experimental values than earlier theoretical works.

  7. Blackbody radiation shift, multipole polarizabilities, oscillator strengths, lifetimes, hyperfine constants, and excitation energies in Ca{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, M. S.; Safronova, U. I.

    2011-01-15

    A systematic study of Ca{sup +} atomic properties is carried out using a high-precision relativistic all-order method where all single, double, and partial triple excitations of the Dirac-Fock wave functions are included to all orders of perturbation theory. Reduced matrix elements, oscillator strengths, transition rates, and lifetimes are determined for the levels up to n=7. Recommended values and estimates of their uncertainties are provided for a large number of electric-dipole transitions. Electric-dipole scalar polarizabilities for the 5s, 6s, 7s, 8s, 4p{sub j}, 5p{sub j}, 3d{sub j}, and 4d{sub j} states and tensor polarizabilities for the 4p{sub 3/2}, 5p{sub 3/2}, 3d{sub j}, and 4d{sub j} states in Ca{sup +} are calculated. Methods are developed to accurately treat the contributions from highly excited states, resulting in significant (factor of 3) improvement in the accuracy of the 3d{sub 5/2} static polarizability value, 31.8(3)a{sub 0}{sup 3}, in comparison with the previous calculation [Arora et al., Phys. Rev. A 76, 064501 (2007).]. The blackbody radiation shift of the 4s-3d{sub 5/2} clock transition in Ca{sup +} is calculated to be 0.381(4) Hz at room temperature, T=300 K. Electric-quadrupole 4s-nd and electric-octupole 4s-nf matrix elements are calculated to obtain the ground-state multipole E2 and E3 static polarizabilities. Excitation energies of the ns, np, nd, nf, and ng states with n{<=} 7 in are evaluated and compared with experiment. Recommended values are provided for the 7p{sub 1/2}, 7p{sub 3/2}, 8p{sub 1/2}, and 8p{sub 3/2} removal energies for which experimental measurements are not available. The hyperfine constants A are determined for the low-lying levels up to n=7. The quadratic Stark effect on hyperfine structure levels of {sup 43}Ca{sup +} ground state is investigated. These calculations provide recommended values critically evaluated for their accuracy for a number of Ca{sup +} atomic properties for use in planning and analysis of

  8. Topological density-wave states in a particle-hole symmetric Weyl metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuxuan; Ye, Peng

    2016-08-01

    We study the instabilities of a particle-hole symmetric Weyl metal with both electron and hole Fermi surfaces (FSs) around the Weyl points. For a repulsive interaction we find that the leading instability is towards a longitudinal spin-density-wave (SDWz) order. Besides, there exist three degenerate subleading instabilities: a charge-density-wave (CDW) instability, and two transverse spin-density-wave (SDWx ,y) instabilities. For an attractive interaction the leading instabilities are towards two pair-density-wave (PDW) orders which pair the two FSs separately. Both the PDW and SDWz order parameters fully gap out the FSs, while the CDW and SDWx ,y ones leave line nodes on both FSs. For the SDWz and the PDW states, the surface Fermi arc in the metallic state evolves to a chiral Fermi line which passes the projection of the Weyl points and traverses the full momentum space. For the CDW state, the line node projects to a "drumhead" band localized on the surface, which can lead to a topological charge polarization. We verify the surface states by computing the angular-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data.

  9. Calculation of the oscillator strengths and of the Judd-Ofelt parameters for Eu +3 ion in solutions taking the transitions from the first excited state into consideration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legendziewicz, J.; Oczko, G.; Strȩk, W.

    1984-03-01

    The oscillator strengths of the f-f transitions for the europium perchlorate, chloride and nitrate in mono- and disubstituted amides have been measured at 25°C. The obtained values were used for the computation of the Judd-Ofelt parameters, not only from the 7F 0 ground state, but also from the 7F 1 excited state. Using the enlarged number of the electron transitions, we have found a set of the good estimated Ω λ parameters.

  10. Blackbody radiation shift, multipole polarizabilities, oscillator strengths, lifetimes, hyperfine constants, and excitation energies in Hg{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, M.; Safronova, M. S.; Safronova, U. I.

    2011-11-15

    Excitation energies of the [Xe]4f{sup 14}5d{sup 10}ns, [Xe]4f{sup 14}5d{sup 10}np{sub j}, [Xe]4f{sup 14}5d{sup 10}nd{sub j}, [Xe]4f{sup 14}5d{sup 10}n{sup '}f{sub j}, and [Xe]4f{sup 14}5d{sup 10}n{sup '}g{sub j} states in Hg{sup +} are evaluated (n{<=}10, n{sup '}{<=}9, and [Xe]=1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6}3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6}3d{sup 10}4s{sup 2}4p{sup 6}4d{sup 10}5s{sup 2}5p{sup 6}). First-, second-, third-, and all-order Coulomb energies and first- and second-order Coulomb-Breit energies are calculated. Reduced matrix elements, oscillator strengths, and transition rates are determined for electric-dipole transitions, including the ns (n=6-11), np (n=6-10), nd (n=6-10), nf (n=5-9), and ng (n=5-9) states. Lifetime values are determined for all above-mentioned states. The ground state E1, E2, and E3 polarizabilities are evaluated. The hyperfine structure in {sup 199}Hg{sup +} and {sup 201}Hg{sup +} ions is investigated. The hyperfine A and B values are determined for the first low-lying levels up to n = 7. The quadratic Stark effect on hyperfine structure levels of {sup 199}Hg{sup +} and {sup 201}Hg{sup +} ground states is investigated. The calculated shift for the {sup 199}Hg{sup +} (F = 1, M = 0) {r_reversible} (F = 0, M = 0) transition is -0.0597(2) Hz/(kV/cm){sup 2}, in agreement with previous theoretical result -0.060(3) Hz/(kV/cm){sup 2}. These calculations provide a theoretical benchmark for comparison with experiment and theory and provide values of blackbody radiation shifts for microwave frequency standards with {sup 199}Hg{sup +} and {sup 201}Hg{sup +} ions.

  11. Experimental radiative lifetimes for highly excited states and calculated oscillator strengths for lines of astrophysical interest in singly ionized cobalt (Co II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinet, P.; Fivet, V.; Palmeri, P.; Engström, L.; Hartman, H.; Lundberg, H.; Nilsson, H.

    2016-11-01

    This work reports new experimental radiative lifetimes and calculated oscillator strengths for transitions of astrophysical interest in singly ionized cobalt. More precisely, 19 radiative lifetimes in Co+ have been measured with the time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique using one- and two-step excitations. Out of these, seven belonging to the high lying 3d7(4F)4d configuration in the energy range 90 697-93 738 cm-1 are new, and the other 12 from the 3d7(4F)4p configuration with energies between 45 972 and 49 328 cm-1 are compared with previous measurements. In addition, a relativistic Hartree-Fock model including core-polarization effects has been employed to compute transition rates. Supported by the good agreement between theory and experiment for the lifetimes, new reliable transition probabilities and oscillator strengths have been deduced for 5080 Co II transitions in the spectral range 114-8744 nm.

  12. Landau-Level Mixing and Particle-Hole Symmetry Breaking for Spin Transitions in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuhe; Wójs, A; Jain, J K

    2016-09-01

    The spin transitions in the fractional quantum Hall effect provide a direct measure of the tiny energy differences between differently spin-polarized states and thereby serve as an extremely sensitive test of the quantitative accuracy of the theory of the fractional quantum Hall effect, and, in particular, of the role of Landau-level mixing in lifting the particle-hole symmetry. We report on an accurate quantitative study of this physics, evaluating the effect of Landau-level mixing in a nonperturbative manner using a fixed-phase diffusion Monte Carlo method. We find excellent agreement between our calculated critical Zeeman energies and the experimentally measured values. In particular, we find, as also do experiments, that the critical Zeeman energies for fractional quantum Hall states at filling factors ν=2-n/(2n±1) are significantly higher than those for ν=n/(2n±1), a quantitative signature of the lifting of particle-hole symmetry due to Landau-level mixing. PMID:27661711

  13. Landau-Level Mixing and Particle-Hole Symmetry Breaking for Spin Transitions in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuhe; Wójs, A.; Jain, J. K.

    2016-09-01

    The spin transitions in the fractional quantum Hall effect provide a direct measure of the tiny energy differences between differently spin-polarized states and thereby serve as an extremely sensitive test of the quantitative accuracy of the theory of the fractional quantum Hall effect, and, in particular, of the role of Landau-level mixing in lifting the particle-hole symmetry. We report on an accurate quantitative study of this physics, evaluating the effect of Landau-level mixing in a nonperturbative manner using a fixed-phase diffusion Monte Carlo method. We find excellent agreement between our calculated critical Zeeman energies and the experimentally measured values. In particular, we find, as also do experiments, that the critical Zeeman energies for fractional quantum Hall states at filling factors ν =2 -n /(2 n ±1 ) are significantly higher than those for ν =n /(2 n ±1 ), a quantitative signature of the lifting of particle-hole symmetry due to Landau-level mixing.

  14. Landau-Level Mixing and Particle-Hole Symmetry Breaking for Spin Transitions in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuhe; Wójs, A; Jain, J K

    2016-09-01

    The spin transitions in the fractional quantum Hall effect provide a direct measure of the tiny energy differences between differently spin-polarized states and thereby serve as an extremely sensitive test of the quantitative accuracy of the theory of the fractional quantum Hall effect, and, in particular, of the role of Landau-level mixing in lifting the particle-hole symmetry. We report on an accurate quantitative study of this physics, evaluating the effect of Landau-level mixing in a nonperturbative manner using a fixed-phase diffusion Monte Carlo method. We find excellent agreement between our calculated critical Zeeman energies and the experimentally measured values. In particular, we find, as also do experiments, that the critical Zeeman energies for fractional quantum Hall states at filling factors ν=2-n/(2n±1) are significantly higher than those for ν=n/(2n±1), a quantitative signature of the lifting of particle-hole symmetry due to Landau-level mixing.

  15. On the particle excitations in the XXZ spin chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    We continue to study the excited states for the XXZ spin chain corresponding to the complex roots of the Bethe Ansatz equations with the imaginary part equal to π/2. We propose the particle-hole symmetry which relates the eigenstates build up from the two different pseudovacuum states. We find the XXX spin chain limit for the eigenstates with the complex roots. We also comment on the low-energy excited states for the XXZ spin chain.

  16. Kondo effect at low electron density and high particle-hole asymmetry in 1D, 2D, and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žitko, Rok; Horvat, Alen

    2016-09-01

    Using the perturbative scaling equations and the numerical renormalization group, we study the characteristic energy scales in the Kondo impurity problem as a function of the exchange coupling constant J and the conduction-band electron density. We discuss the relation between the energy gain (impurity binding energy) Δ E and the Kondo temperature TK. We find that the two are proportional only for large values of J , whereas in the weak-coupling limit the energy gain is quadratic in J , while the Kondo temperature is exponentially small. The exact relation between the two quantities depends on the detailed form of the density of states of the band. In the limit of low electron density the Kondo screening is affected by the strong particle-hole asymmetry due to the presence of the band-edge van Hove singularities. We consider the cases of one- (1D), two- (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) tight-binding lattices (linear chain, square lattice, cubic lattice) with inverse-square-root, step-function, and square-root onsets of the density of states that are characteristic of the respective dimensionalities. We always find two different regimes depending on whether TK is higher or lower than μ , the chemical potential measured from the bottom of the band. For 2D and 3D, we find a sigmoidal crossover between the large-J and small-J asymptotics in Δ E and a clear separation between Δ E and TK for TK<μ . For 1D, there is, in addition, a sizable intermediate-J regime where the Kondo temperature is quadratic in J due to the diverging density of states at the band edge. Furthermore, we find that in 1D the particle-hole asymmetry leads to a large decrease of TK compared to the standard result obtained by approximating the density of states to be constant (flat-band approximation), while in 3D the opposite is the case; this is due to the nontrivial interplay of the exchange and potential scattering renormalization in the presence of particle-hole asymmetry. The 2D square

  17. Restricted second random phase approximations and Tamm-Dancoff approximations for electronic excitation energy calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Degao; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Weitao

    2014-12-01

    In this article, we develop systematically second random phase approximations (RPA) and Tamm-Dancoff approximations (TDA) of particle-hole and particle-particle channels for calculating molecular excitation energies. The second particle-hole RPA/TDA can capture double excitations missed by the particle-hole RPA/TDA and time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), while the second particle-particle RPA/TDA recovers non-highest-occupied-molecular-orbital excitations missed by the particle-particle RPA/TDA. With proper orbital restrictions, these restricted second RPAs and TDAs have a formal scaling of only O(N4). The restricted versions of second RPAs and TDAs are tested with various small molecules to show some positive results. Data suggest that the restricted second particle-hole TDA (r2ph-TDA) has the best overall performance with a correlation coefficient similar to TDDFT, but with a larger negative bias. The negative bias of the r2ph-TDA may be induced by the unaccounted ground state correlation energy to be investigated further. Overall, the r2ph-TDA is recommended to study systems with both single and some low-lying double excitations with a moderate accuracy. Some expressions on excited state property evaluations, such as < hat{S}2rangle are also developed and tested.

  18. Restricted second random phase approximations and Tamm-Dancoff approximations for electronic excitation energy calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Degao; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Weitao

    2014-12-07

    In this article, we develop systematically second random phase approximations (RPA) and Tamm-Dancoff approximations (TDA) of particle-hole and particle-particle channels for calculating molecular excitation energies. The second particle-hole RPA/TDA can capture double excitations missed by the particle-hole RPA/TDA and time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), while the second particle-particle RPA/TDA recovers non-highest-occupied-molecular-orbital excitations missed by the particle-particle RPA/TDA. With proper orbital restrictions, these restricted second RPAs and TDAs have a formal scaling of only O(N{sup 4}). The restricted versions of second RPAs and TDAs are tested with various small molecules to show some positive results. Data suggest that the restricted second particle-hole TDA (r2ph-TDA) has the best overall performance with a correlation coefficient similar to TDDFT, but with a larger negative bias. The negative bias of the r2ph-TDA may be induced by the unaccounted ground state correlation energy to be investigated further. Overall, the r2ph-TDA is recommended to study systems with both single and some low-lying double excitations with a moderate accuracy. Some expressions on excited state property evaluations, such as 〈S{sup ^2}〉 are also developed and tested.

  19. High Pressure and [Ca2+] Produce an Inverse Modulation of Synaptic Input Strength and Network Excitability in the Rat Dentate Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Talpalar, Thomas I.; Talpalar, Adolfo E.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperbaric environments induce the high pressure neurological syndrome (HPNS) characterized by hyperexcitability of the central nervous system (CNS) and memory impairment. Human divers and other animals experience the HPNS at pressures beyond 1.1 MPa. High pressure depresses synaptic transmission and alters its dynamics in various animal models. Medial perforant path (MPP) synapses connecting the medial entorhinal cortex with the hippocampal formation are suppressed by 50% at 10.1MPa. Reduction of synaptic inputs is paradoxically associated with enhanced ability of dentate gyrus (DG)’ granule cells (GCs) to generate spikes at high pressure. This mechanism allows MPP inputs to elicit standard GC outputs at 0.1–25 Hz frequencies under hyperbaric conditions. An increased postsynaptic gain of MPP inputs probably allows diving animals to perform in hyperbaric environments, but makes them vulnerable to high intensity/frequency stimuli producing hyperexcitability. Increasing extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]o) partially reverted pressure-mediated depression of MPP inputs and increased MPP’s low-pass filter properties. We postulated that raising [Ca2+]o in addition to increase synaptic inputs may reduce network excitability in the DG potentially improving its function and reducing sensitivity to high intensity and pathologic stimuli. For this matter, we activated the MPP with single and 50 Hz frequency stimuli that simulated physiologic and deleterious conditions, while assessing the GC’s output under various conditions of pressure and [Ca2+]o. Our results reveal that the pressure and [Ca2+]o produce an inverse modulation on synaptic input strength and network excitability. These coincident phenomena suggest a potential general mechanism of networks that adjusts gain as an inverse function of synaptic inputs’ strength. Such mechanism may serve for adaptation to variable pressure and other physiological and pathological conditions and may explain the increased

  20. Ground and excited states Gamow-Teller strength distributions of iron isotopes and associated capture rates for core-collapse simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports on the microscopic calculation of ground and excited states Gamow-Teller (GT) strength distributions, both in the electron capture and electron decay direction, for 54,55,56Fe. The associated electron and positron capture rates for these isotopes of iron are also calculated in stellar matter. These calculations were recently introduced and this paper is a follow-up which discusses in detail the GT strength distributions and stellar capture rates of key iron isotopes. The calculations are performed within the framework of the proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory. The pn-QRPA theory allows a microscopic state-by-state calculation of GT strength functions and stellar capture rates which greatly increases the reliability of the results. For the first time experimental deformation of nuclei are taken into account. In the core of massive stars isotopes of iron, 54,55,56Fe, are considered to be key players in decreasing the electron-to-baryon ratio ( Y e ) mainly via electron capture on these nuclide. The structure of the presupernova star is altered both by the changes in Y e and the entropy of the core material. Results are encouraging and are compared against measurements (where possible) and other calculations. The calculated electron capture rates are in overall good agreement with the shell model results. During the presupernova evolution of massive stars, from oxygen shell burning stages till around end of convective core silicon burning, the calculated electron capture rates on 54Fe are around three times bigger than the corresponding shell model rates. The calculated positron capture rates, however, are suppressed by two to five orders of magnitude.

  1. The correlation contracted Schrödinger equation: An accurate solution of the G-particle-hole hypervirial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcoba, D. R.; Valdemoro, C.; Tel, L. M.; Pérez-Romero, E.

    The equation obtained by mapping the matrix representation of the Schrödinger equation with the 2nd-order correlation transition matrix elements into the 2-body space is the so called correlation contracted Schrödinger equation (CCSE) (Alcoba, Phys Rev A 2002, 65, 032519). As shown by Alcoba (Phys Rev A 2002, 65, 032519) the solution of the CCSE coincides with that of the Schrödinger equation. Here the attention is focused in the vanishing hypervirial of the correlation operator (GHV), which can be identified with the anti-Hermitian part of the CCSE. A comparative analysis of the GHV and the anti-Hermitian part of the contracted Schrödinger equation (ACSE) indicates that the former is a stronger stationarity condition than the latter. By applying a Heisenberg-like unitary transformation to the G-particle-hole operator (Valdemoro et al., Phys Rev A 2000, 61, 032507), a good approximation of the expectation value of this operator as well as of the GHV is obtained. The method is illustrated for the case of the Beryllium isoelectronic series as well as for the Li2 and BeH2 molecules. The correlation energies obtained are within 98.80-100.09% of the full-configuration interaction ones. The convergence of these calculations was faster when using the GHV than with the ACSE.

  2. Information Content of the Low-Energy Electric Dipole Strength: Correlation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhard, P.-G.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2013-01-01

    Background: Recent experiments on the electric dipole (E1) polarizability in heavy nuclei have stimulated theoretical interest in the low-energy electric dipole strength, both isovector and isoscalar. Purpose: We study the information content carried by the electric dipole strength with respect to isovector and isoscalar indicators characterizing bulk nuclear matter and finite nuclei. To separate isoscalar and isovector modes, and low-energy strength and giant resonances, we analyze the E1 strength as a function of the excitation energy E and momentum transfer q. Methods: We use the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme energy density functionals, augmented by the random phase approximation, to compute the E1 strength and covariance analysis to assess correlations between observables. Calculations are performed for the spherical, doubly magic nuclei 208Pb and 132Sn. Results: We demonstrate that E1 transition densities in the low-energy region below the giant dipole resonance exhibit appreciable state dependence and multinodal structures, which are fingerprints of weak collectivity. The correlation between the accumulated low-energy strength and the symmetry energy is weak, and dramatically depends on the energy cutoff assumed. On the other hand, a strong correlation is predicted between isovector indicators and the accumulated isovector strength at E around 20 MeV and momentum transfer q 0.65 fm 1. Conclusions: Momentum- and coordinate-space patterns of the low-energy dipole modes indicate a strong fragmentation into individual particle-hole excitations. The global measure of low-energy dipole strength correlates poorly with the nuclear symmetry energy and other isovector characteristics. Consequently, our results do not support the suggestion that there exists a collective pygmy dipole resonance, which is a strong indicator of nuclear isovector properties. By considering nonzero values of momentum transfer, one can isolate individual

  3. Excitation spectra of bosons in optical lattices from the Schwinger-Keldysh calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Grass, T. D.; Santos, F. E. A. dos; Pelster, A.

    2011-07-15

    Within the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism we derive a Ginzburg-Landau theory for the Bose-Hubbard model which describes the real-time dynamics of the complex order parameter field. Analyzing the excitations in the vicinity of the quantum phase transition, it turns out that particle-hole dispersions in the Mott phase map continuously onto corresponding amplitude-phase excitations in the superfluid phase, which have been detected recently by Bragg spectroscopy measurements.

  4. On the oscillator realization of conformal U(2, 2) quantum particles and their particle-hole coherent states

    SciTech Connect

    Calixto, M. Pérez-Romero, E.

    2014-08-01

    We revise the unireps. of U(2, 2) describing conformal particles with continuous mass spectrum from a many-body perspective, which shows massive conformal particles as compounds of two correlated massless particles. The statistics of the compound (boson/fermion) depends on the helicity h of the massless components (integer/half-integer). Coherent states (CS) of particle-hole pairs (“excitons”) are also explicitly constructed as the exponential action of exciton (non-canonical) creation operators on the ground state of unpaired particles. These CS are labeled by points Z (2×2 complex matrices) on the Cartan-Bergman domain D₄=U(2,2)/U(2)², and constitute a generalized (matrix) version of Perelomov U(1, 1) coherent states labeled by points z on the unit disk D₁=U(1,1)/U(1)². First, we follow a geometric approach to the construction of CS, orthonormal basis, U(2, 2) generators and their matrix elements and symbols in the reproducing kernel Hilbert space H{sub λ}(D₄) of analytic square-integrable holomorphic functions on D₄, which carries a unitary irreducible representation of U(2, 2) with index λϵN (the conformal or scale dimension). Then we introduce a many-body representation of the previous construction through an oscillator realization of the U(2, 2) Lie algebra generators in terms of eight boson operators with constraints. This particle picture allows us for a physical interpretation of our abstract mathematical construction in the many-body jargon. In particular, the index λ is related to the number 2(λ – 2) of unpaired quanta and to the helicity h = (λ – 2)/2 of each massless particle forming the massive compound.

  5. On the oscillator realization of conformal U(2, 2) quantum particles and their particle-hole coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calixto, M.; Pérez-Romero, E.

    2014-08-01

    We revise the unireps. of U(2, 2) describing conformal particles with continuous mass spectrum from a many-body perspective, which shows massive conformal particles as compounds of two correlated massless particles. The statistics of the compound (boson/fermion) depends on the helicity h of the massless components (integer/half-integer). Coherent states (CS) of particle-hole pairs ("excitons") are also explicitly constructed as the exponential action of exciton (non-canonical) creation operators on the ground state of unpaired particles. These CS are labeled by points Z (2 × 2 complex matrices) on the Cartan-Bergman domain {D}_4=U(2,2)/U(2)^2, and constitute a generalized (matrix) version of Perelomov U(1, 1) coherent states labeled by points z on the unit disk {D}_1=U(1,1)/U(1)^2. First, we follow a geometric approach to the construction of CS, orthonormal basis, U(2, 2) generators and their matrix elements and symbols in the reproducing kernel Hilbert space H_λ ({D}_4) of analytic square-integrable holomorphic functions on {D}_4, which carries a unitary irreducible representation of U(2, 2) with index λ in {N} (the conformal or scale dimension). Then we introduce a many-body representation of the previous construction through an oscillator realization of the U(2, 2) Lie algebra generators in terms of eight boson operators with constraints. This particle picture allows us for a physical interpretation of our abstract mathematical construction in the many-body jargon. In particular, the index λ is related to the number 2(λ - 2) of unpaired quanta and to the helicity h = (λ - 2)/2 of each massless particle forming the massive compound.

  6. Communication: Projected Hartree Fock theory as a polynomial similarity transformation theory of single excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yiheng; Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2016-09-01

    Spin-projected Hartree-Fock is written as a particle-hole excitation ansatz over a symmetry-adapted reference determinant. Remarkably, this expansion has an analytic expression that we were able to decipher. While the form of the polynomial expansion is universal, the excitation amplitudes need to be optimized. This is equivalent to the optimization of orbitals in the conventional projected Hartree-Fock framework of non-orthogonal determinants. Using the inverse of the particle-hole expansion, we similarity transform the Hamiltonian in a coupled-cluster style theory. The left eigenvector of the non-Hermitian Hamiltonian is constructed in a similar particle-hole expansion fashion, and we show that to numerically reproduce variational projected Hartree-Fock results, one needs as many pair excitations in the bra as the number of strongly correlated entangled pairs in the system. This single-excitation polynomial similarity transformation theory is an alternative to our recently presented double excitation theory, but supports projected Hartree-Fock and coupled cluster simultaneously rather than interpolating between them.

  7. Determination of the B(E3, 0+ → 3-)-excitation strength in octupole-correlated nuclei near A ≈ 224 by the means of Coulomb excitation at REX-ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheck, M.; Gaffney, L. P.; Butler, P. A.; Hayes, A. B.; Wenander, F.; Albers, M.; Bastin, B.; Bauer, C.; Blazhev, A.; Bönig, S.; Bree, N.; Cederkäil, J.; Chupp, T.; Cline, D.; Cocolios, T. E.; Davinson, T.; De Witte, H.; Diriken, J.; Grahn, T.; Gregor, E. T.; Herzan, A.; Huyse, M.; Jenkins, D. G.; Joss, D. T.; Kesteloot, N.; Konki, J.; Kowalczyk, M.; Kröll, Th; Kwan, E.; Lutter, R.; Moschner, K.; Napiorkowski, P.; Pakarinen, J.; Pfeiffer, M.; Radeck, D.; Reiter, P.; Reynders, K.; Rigby, S. V.; Robledo, L. M.; Rudigier, M.; Sambi, S.; Seidlitz, M.; Siebeck, B.; Stora, T.; Thoele, P.; Van Duppen, P.; Vermeulen, M. J.; von Schmid, M.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wimmer, K.; Wrzosek-Lipska, K.; Wu, C. Y.; Zielińska, M.

    2014-09-01

    The IS475 collaboration conducted Coulomb-excitation experiments with postaccelerated radioactive 220Rn and 224Ra beams at the REX-ISOLDE facility. The beam particles (Ebeam ≈ 2.83 MeV/u) were Coulomb excited using 60Ni, 114Cd, and 120Sn scattering targets. De-excitation γ-rays were detected employing the Miniball array and scattered particles were detected in a silicon detector. Exploiting the Coulomb-excitation code GOSIA for each nucleus several matrix elements could be obtained from the measured γ-ray yields. The extracted langle3-||Ê3||0+rangle matrix element allows for the conclusion that, while 220Rn represents an octupole vibrational system, 224Ra has already substantial octupole correlations in its ground state. An observation that has implications for the search of CP-violating Schiff moments in the atomic systems of the adjacent odd-mass nuclei.

  8. Role of rut adenylyl cyclase in the ensemble regulation of presynaptic terminal excitability: reduced synaptic strength and precision in a Drosophila memory mutant.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Atsushi; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2009-01-01

    Although modulation of presynaptic terminal excitability can profoundly affect transmission efficacy, how excitability along axonal terminal branches is regulated requires further investigations. We performed focal patch recording in Drosophila larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) to monitor the activity of individual synaptic boutons along the presynaptic terminal. Analysis of the learning mutant rutabaga (rut) suggests a tight regulation of presynaptic terminal excitability by rut adenylyl cyclase (AC) that is responsible for Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent cAMP synthesis. Focal excitatory junctional currents (ejcs) demonstrated that disrupted cAMP metabolism in rut mutant boutons leads to decreased transmitter release, coupled with temporal dispersion and amplitude fluctuation of ejcs during repetitive activity. Strikingly, rut motor terminals displayed greatly increased variability among corresponding terminal branches of identified NMJs in different preparations. However, boutons throughout single terminal branches were relatively uniform in either WT or rut mutant larvae. The use of electrotonic depolarization to directly evoke transmitter release from axonal terminals revealed that variability in neurotransmission originated from varying degrees of weakened excitability in rut terminals. Pharmacological treatments and axonal action potential recordings raised the possibility that defective rut AC resulted in reduced Ca2+ currents in the nerve terminal. Thus, our data indicate that rut AC not only affects transmitter release machinery, but also plays a previously unsuspected role in local excitability control, both contributing to transmission level and precision along the entire axonal terminal. PMID:19101836

  9. Role of nuclear couplings in the inelastic excitation of weakly-bound neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Dasso, C.H.; Lenzi, S.M.; Vitturi, A.

    1996-12-31

    Much effort is presently devoted to the study of nuclear systems far from the stability line. Particular emphasis has been placed in light systems such as {sup 11}Li, {sup 8}B and others, where the very small binding energy of the last particles causes their density distribution to extend considerably outside of the remaining nuclear core. Some of the properties associated with this feature are expected to characterize also heavier systems in the vicinity of the proton or neutron drip lines. It is by now well established that low-lying concentrations of multipole strength arise from pure configurations in which a peculiar matching between the wavelength of the continuum wavefunction of the particles and the range of the weakly-bound hole states occurs. To this end the authors consider the break-up of a weakly-bound system in a heavy-ion collision and focus attention in the inelastic excitation of the low-lying part of the continuum. They make use of the fact that previous investigations have shown that the multipole response in this region is not of a collective nature and describe their excited states as pure particle-hole configurations. Since the relevant parameter determining the strength distributions is the binding energy of the last bound orbital they find it most convenient to use single-particle wavefunctions generated by a sperical square-well potential with characteristic nuclear dimensions and whose depth has been adjusted to give rise to a situation in which the last occupied neutron orbital is loosely-bound. Spin-orbit couplings are, for the present purpose, ignored. The results of this investigation clearly indicate that nuclear couplings have the predominant role in causing projectile dissociation in many circumstances, even at bombarding energies remarkably below the Coulomb barrier.

  10. Stretched-state excitations with the (neutron,proton) reaction at 278 MeV on carbon-14, magnesium-26 and silicon-30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao-Dong

    1997-11-01

    The reactions 12C(n,p)12B,/ 14C(n,p)14B,/ 16O(n,p)16N,/ 26Mg(n,p)26Na and 30Si(n,p)30Al were studied at a neutron energy of 278 MeV using the charge-exchange facility at the TRIUMF accelerator laboratory in Vancouver, Canada. Excitation-energy spectra and differential cross sections for the observed excitations in these reactions were extracted over the momentum-transfer range from 1.2 to 2.5 fm-1 (θlab in 19o,/ 23o,/ 27o,/ 31o and 35o). The primary goal of this work was the study of T = 2 'stretched' particle-hole states, more specifically (/nu d5/2,/ /pi p3/2-1)/ 4/sp- states excited in 14B,/ (/nu f7/2,/pi d5/2-1)/ 6/sp- states excited in 26Na, and (/nu f7/2,/ /pi d5/2-1)/ 6/sp- states excited in 30Al. The identification of these states was based on: (1) comparison of the experimental cross section angular distribution with theoretical differential cross sections calculated with the distorted-wave-impulse approximation (DWIA); (2) comparison of the measured excitation energies with excitation energies of analog stretched states; and (3) comparison of the spectroscopic strength for these (n,p) reactions to (p,n) and (e,e') spectroscopic strengths. The T = 1 (/nu d5/2,/ /pi p3/2-1)/ 4/sp- 'stretched' states excited in 12B and 16N were also studied. For the 12C(n,p)12B reaction (on targets of CH2 and graphite), 4/sp- T = 1 strength at Ex = 4.25 MeV was observed and found to be consistent with previous measurements; this state was used for calibrating excitation-energy scales for the other targets and as a consistency check among the different experimental runs for this project.

  11. String Hypothesis for [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] Spin Chains: A Particle/Hole Democracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volin, Dmytro

    2012-10-01

    This paper is devoted to integrable {{{g}{l} ({n} | {m})}} spin chains, which allow for formulation of the string hypothesis. Considering the thermodynamic limit of such spin chains, we derive linear functional equations that symmetrically treat holes and particles. The functional equations naturally organize different types of excitations into a pattern equivalent to the one of Y-system, and, not surprisingly, the Y-system can be easily derived from the functional equations. The Y-system is known to contain most of the information about the symmetry of the model, therefore we map the symmetry knowledge directly to the description of string excitations. Our analysis is applicable for highest weight representations which for some choice of the Kac-Dynkin diagram have only one nonzero Dynkin label. This generalizes known results for the AdS/CFT spectral problem and for the Hubbard model.

  12. Relativistic distorted wave collision strengths for excitation to the 88 n = 3 and n = 4 levels in all 71 neon-like ions with 22 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 92

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hong Lin; Sampson, D. H.

    1989-02-01

    Relativistic distorted wave collision strengths are given for the 88 possible transitions between the ground level and the excited levels with n = 3 and n = 4 in the 71 neon-like ions with nuclear charge number Z in the range 22 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 92. The calculations are made for the six final, or scattered, electron energies E' = 0.008, 0.04, 0.10, 0.21, 0.41 and 0.75, where E' is in units of Z/sub eff//sup 2/ Rydbergs with Z/sub eff/ = Z /minus/ 7.5. In addition, the transition energies and electric dipole oscillator strengths are given. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  13. Crew Strength Training

    NASA Video Gallery

    Train to develop your upper and lower body strength in your muscles and bones by performing body-weight squats and push-ups.The Train Like an Astronaut project uses the excitement of exploration to...

  14. Angle-resolved electron-energy-loss study of core-level electron excitation in molecules: Determination of the generalized oscillator strength for the carbon 1 s (2. sigma. sub g r arrow 2. pi. sub u ) excitation in CO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Boechat Roberty, H.M.; Bielschowsky, C.E.; de Souza, G.G.B. )

    1991-08-01

    As part of a systematic, quantitative study of the angle dependence of core-level-electron excitation by electron impact, we have determined the generalized oscillator strength (GOS) for the carbon 1{ital s}(2{sigma}{sub {ital g}}{r arrow}2{pi}{sub {ital u}}) transition in CO{sub 2}. The experimental results were obtained at an impact energy of 1290 eV, in the angular range of 2{degree}--14{degree}, with an energy resolution of 0.9 eV. Theoretical values for the GOS were also obtained, using {ital ab} {ital initio} Hartree-Fock molecular wave functions and allowing for the relaxation of all the molecular orbitals in the determination of the excited-state wave function.

  15. Studies of Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena: I. Origin of Broken Particle-Hole Symmetry in Critical Fluids. I. Phase Transitions of Interacting Membranes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond Ethan

    The longstanding problem of the precise correspondence between critical phenomena in fluids and ferromagnets is resolved in Part I through a synthesis of mean field theory, exact results for lattice models, field-theoretic techniques, and by extensive quantitative comparison with experiment. Emphasis is placed on the origin of broken particle-hole symmetry in fluids as reflected in the form of the critical point scaling fields and in systematic variations in certain nonuniversal critical amplitudes with molecular polarizability. Those trends and the degree to which the scaling axes are linearly mixed versions of the bare "thermal" and "magnetic" fields in particle-hole symmetric systems are shown both for lattice models and real fluids to be intimately related to the presence of many-body interactions of the Axilrod-Teller type. A quantitatively accurate microscopic expression for the field-mixing operator of fluids is derived on the basis of an exact Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation relating the fluid Hamiltonian to that of a Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson model. A phenomenological theory of the phase behavior of multilamellar liquid crystals of hydrated phospholipid bilayers is developed in Part II, and its predictions tested by extensive comparison with experiment. A Ginzburg-Landau free energy functional based on the elastic properties of two coupled monolayers is proposed to describe intrabilayer ordering, and the phenomenon of structural phase transitions driven by membrane interactions is described by incorporating in addition the attractive dispersion interactions and repulsive "hydration" forces acting between membranes. The theory indicates and experiments support a connection between the pseudocriticality of the bilayer transitions and the large susceptibility of the in-plane order to membrane interactions. The pseudocriticality in turn is suggested to arise from the analog of a capillary critical point accessible by finite-size effects. Theoretical phase

  16. E2 excitation strength in {sup 55}Ni: Coupling of the {sup 56}Ni 2{sub 1}{sup +} collective core vibration to the f{sub 7/2} odd neutron hole

    SciTech Connect

    Yurkewicz, K.L.; Brown, B.A.; Campbell, C.M.; Church, J.A.; Dinca, D.-C.; Glasmacher, T.; Olliver, H.; Terry, J.R.; Bazin, D.; Gade, A.; Mueller, W.F.; Honma, M.; Mizusaki, T.; Otsuka, T.; Riley, L.A.

    2004-12-01

    The collectivity of the odd-mass nucleus {sup 55}Ni was explored via intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation using a powerful combination of particle and {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. A {gamma}-ray at 2879(18) keV was observed and is interpreted to deexcite a member of the core-coupled quintuplet 2{sub 1}{sup +}({sup 56}Ni)x{nu}f{sub 7/2}{sup -1} at the same energy. By similarity with the mirror nucleus {sup 55}Co, transition probabilities were calculated assuming J{sup {pi}}=9/2{sup -} and J{sup {pi}}=11/2{sup -} for this state. Both assumptions lead to a transition strength higher than predicted by a large-scale shell-model calculation using the GXPF1 effective interaction and exceed the value predicted within a simple weak-coupling approach.

  17. High-contrast fluorescence sensing of aqueous Cu(I) with triaryl-pyrazoline probes: Dissecting the roles of ligand donor strength and excited state proton transfer

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, M. Thomas; Bagchi, Pritha; Fahrni, Christoph J.

    2012-01-01

    Cu(I)-responsive fluorescent probes based on a photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism generally show incomplete fluorescence recovery relative to the intrinsic quantum yield of the fluorescence reporter. Previous studies on probes with an N-aryl thiazacrown Cu(I)-receptor revealed that the recovery is compromised by incomplete Cu(I)-N coordination and resultant ternary complex formation with solvent molecules. Building upon a strategy that successfully increased the fluorescence contrast and quantum yield of Cu(I) probes in methanol, we integrated the arylamine PET donor into the backbone of a hydrophilic thiazacrown ligand with a sulfonated triarylpyrazoline as a water-soluble fluorescence reporter. This approach was not only expected to disfavor ternary complex formation in aqueous solution but also to maximize PET switching through a synergistic Cu(I)-induced conformational change. The resulting water-soluble probe 1 gave a strong 57-fold fluorescence enhancement upon saturation with Cu(I) with high selectivity over other cations, including Cu(II), Hg(II), and Cd(II); however, the recovery quantum yield did not improve over probes with the original N-aryl thiazacrown design. Concluding from detailed photophysical data, including responses to acidification, solvent isotope effects, quantum yields, and time-resolved fluorescence decay profiles, the fluorescence contrast of 1 is compromised by inadequate coordination of Cu(I) to the weakly basic arylamine nitrogen of the PET donor and by fluorescence quenching via two distinct excited state proton transfer pathways operating under neutral and acidic conditions. PMID:23169532

  18. Oscillator strengths and collision strengths for S III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. K.; Henry, R. J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The present calculation, in a close-coupled approximation for the energy range up to 1,000,000 K, yields collision strengths for the electron impact excitation of S III from the ground 3p2 3P state to the excited states 3s3p3 3D0, 3P0, 3S0, 3d 3D0, 3P0, and 4s 3P0. Also obtained are those transitions' oscillator strengths, and strengths for others involving 3p2 1D and 1S. Configuration-interaction target wave functions yielding oscillator strengths that are accurate to 20 percent are used in collision strength calculations.

  19. Cryogenic exciter

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, James William; Garces, Luis Jose

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  20. Itinerant Magnetic Excitations in Antiferromagnetic CaFe2As2

    SciTech Connect

    Diallo, S.; Antropov, V.; Perring, T.; Broholm, C.; Pulikkotil, J.; Ni, N.; Bud'ko, S.; Canfield, P.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A.; McQueeney, R.

    2009-05-07

    Neutron scattering measurements of the magnetic excitations in single crystals of antiferromagnetic CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} reveal steeply dispersive and well-defined spin waves up to an energy of {approx}100 meV. Magnetic excitations above 100 meV and up to the maximum energy of 200 meV are however broader in energy and momentum than the experimental resolution. While the low energy modes can be fit to a Heisenberg model, the total spectrum cannot be described as arising from excitations of a local moment system. Ab initio calculations of the dynamic magnetic susceptibility suggest that the high energy behavior is dominated by the damping of spin waves by particle-hole excitations.

  1. Particle-hole symmetry breaking in the pseudogap state of Pb0.55Bi1.5Sr1.6La0.4CuO6+δ: A quantum chemical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panas, Itai

    2011-01-01

    Two Bi2201 model systems are employed to demonstrate how, beside the Cu-O σ band, a second band of purely O 2pπ character can be made to cross the Fermi level due to its sensitivity to the local crystal field. This result is employed to explain the particle-hole symmetry breaking across the pseudogap recently reported by Shen and co-workers [see M. Hashimoto , Nature Phys.10.1038/nphys1632 6, 414 (2010).]. Support for a two-bands-on-a-checkerboard candidate mechanism for high-Tc superconductivity is claimed. Analysis based on band structures, partial density of states, and sum over states densities scanning-tunneling-microscopy-type images is provided.

  2. Excited Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Asia; Ahern, Terence L.; Henderson, Sean O.

    2011-01-01

    Excited (or agitated) delirium is characterized by agitation, aggression, acute distress and sudden death, often in the pre-hospital care setting. It is typically associated with the use of drugs that alter dopamine processing, hyperthermia, and, most notably, sometimes with death of the affected person in the custody of law enforcement. Subjects typically die from cardiopulmonary arrest, although the cause is debated. Unfortunately an adequate treatment plan has yet to be established, in part due to the fact that most patients die before hospital arrival. While there is still much to be discovered about the pathophysiology and treatment, it is hoped that this extensive review will provide both police and medical personnel with the information necessary to recognize and respond appropriately to excited delirium. PMID:21691475

  3. Excited baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested. (LEW)

  4. Strength Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londeree, Ben R.

    1981-01-01

    Postural deviations resulting from strength and flexibility imbalances include swayback, scoliosis, and rounded shoulders. Screening tests are one method for identifying strength problems. Tests for the evaluation of postural problems are described, and exercises are presented for the strengthening of muscles. (JN)

  5. Plasmon excitations in layered high-Tc cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Andrés; Yamase, Hiroyuki; Bejas, Matías

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the recent resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) experiment for the electron-doped cuprates Nd2 -xCexCuO4 with x ≈0.15 , we compute the density-density correlation function in the t -J model on a square lattice by including interlayer hopping and the long-range Coulomb interaction. We find that collective charge excitations are realized not inside the particle-hole continuum, but above the continuum as plasmons. The plasmon mode has a rather flat dispersion near the in-plane momentum q∥=(0 ,0 ) with a typical excitation energy of the order of the intralayer hopping t when the out-of-plane momentum qz is zero. However, when qz becomes finite, the plasmon dispersion changes drastically near q∥=(0 ,0 ) , leading to a strong dispersive feature with an excitation gap scaled by the interlayer hopping tz. We discuss the mode recently observed by RIXS near q∥=(0 ,0 ) in terms of the plasmon mode with a finite qz.

  6. Sexual excitement.

    PubMed

    Stoller, R J

    1976-08-01

    Sexual excitement depends on a scenario the person to be aroused has been writing since childhood. The story is an adventure, an autobiography disguised as fiction, in which the hero/heroine hides crucial intrapsychic conflicts, mysteries, screen memories of actual traumatic events and the resolution of these elements into a happy ending, best celebrated by orgasm. The function of the fantasy is to take these painful experiences and convert them to pleasure-triumph. In order to sharpen excitement-the vibration between the fear of original traumas repeating and the hope of a pleasurable conclusion this time-one introduces into the story elements of risk (approximations of the trauma) meant to prevent boredom and safety factors (sub-limnal signals to the storyteller that the risk are not truly dangerous). Sexual fantasy can be studied by means of a person's daydreams (including those chosen in magazines, books, plays, television, movies, and outright pornography), masturbatory behavior, object choice, foreplay, techniques of intercourse, or postcoital behavior. PMID:949223

  7. Sexual excitement.

    PubMed

    Stoller, R J

    1976-08-01

    Sexual excitement depends on a scenario the person to be aroused has been writing since childhood. The story is an adventure, an autobiography disguised as fiction, in which the hero/heroine hides crucial intrapsychic conflicts, mysteries, screen memories of actual traumatic events and the resolution of these elements into a happy ending, best celebrated by orgasm. The function of the fantasy is to take these painful experiences and convert them to pleasure-triumph. In order to sharpen excitement-the vibration between the fear of original traumas repeating and the hope of a pleasurable conclusion this time-one introduces into the story elements of risk (approximations of the trauma) meant to prevent boredom and safety factors (sub-limnal signals to the storyteller that the risk are not truly dangerous). Sexual fantasy can be studied by means of a person's daydreams (including those chosen in magazines, books, plays, television, movies, and outright pornography), masturbatory behavior, object choice, foreplay, techniques of intercourse, or postcoital behavior.

  8. Strength nutrition.

    PubMed

    Volek, Jeff S

    2003-08-01

    Muscle strength is determined by muscle size and factors related to neural recruitment. Resistance training is a potent stimulus for increasing muscle size and strength. These increases are, to a large extent, influenced and mediated by changes in hormones that regulate important events during the recovery process following exercise. Provision of nutrients in the appropriate amounts and at the appropriate times is necessary to optimize the recovery process. This review discusses the results of research that has examined the potential for nutrition and dietary supplements to impact the acute response to resistance exercise and chronic adaptations to resistance training. To date, the most promising strategies to augment gains in muscle size and strength appear to be consumption of protein-carbohydrate calories before and after resistance exercise, and creatine supplementation.

  9. Recurrent Excitation in Neocortical Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Rodney J.; Koch, Christof; Mahowald, Misha; Martin, Kevan A. C.; Suarez, Humbert H.

    1995-08-01

    The majority of synapses in the mammalian cortex originate from cortical neurons. Indeed, the largest input to cortical cells comes from neighboring excitatory cells. However, most models of cortical development and processing do not reflect the anatomy and physiology of feedback excitation and are restricted to serial feedforward excitation. This report describes how populations of neurons in cat visual cortex can use excitatory feedback, characterized as an effective "network conductance," to amplify their feedforward input signals and demonstrates how neuronal discharge can be kept proportional to stimulus strength despite strong, recurrent connections that threaten to cause runaway excitation. These principles are incorporated into models of cortical direction and orientation selectivity that emphasize the basic design principles of cortical architectures.

  10. Oscillator strengths and collision strengths for S v

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Wyngaarden, W. L.; Henry, R. J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of the optical extreme-ultraviolet spectrum of the Jupiter planetary system during the Voyager space mission revealed bright emission lines of some sulfur ions. The spectra of the torus at the orbit of Io are likely to contain S V lines. The described investigation provides oscillator strengths and collision strengths for the first four UV lines. The collision strengths from the ground state to four other excited states are also obtained. Use is made of a two-state calculation which is checked for convergence for some transitions by employing a three-state or a four-state approximation. Target wave functions for S V are calculated so that the oscillator strengths calculated in dipole length and dipole velocity approximations agree within 5%.

  11. Anisotropic softening of magnetic excitations along the nodal direction in superconducting cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarise, M.; Piazza, B. Dalla; Berger, H.; Giannini, E.; Schmitt, T.; Rønnow, H. M.; Sawatzky, G. A.; van den Brink, J.; Altenfeld, D.; Eremin, I.; Grioni, M.

    2014-12-01

    The high-Tc cuprate superconductors are close to antiferromagnetic order. Recent measurements of magnetic excitations have reported an intriguing similarity to the spin waves—magnons—of the antiferromagnetic insulating parent compounds, suggesting that magnons may survive in damped, broadened form throughout the phase diagram. Here we show by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi-2212) that the analogy with spin waves is only partial. The magnon-like features collapse along the nodal direction in momentum space and exhibit a photon energy dependence markedly different from the Mott-insulating case. These observations can be naturally described by the continuum of charge and spin excitations of correlated electrons. The persistence of damped magnons could favour scenarios for superconductivity built from quasiparticles coupled to spin fluctuations. However, excitation spectra composed of particle-hole excitations suggest that superconductivity emerges from a coherent treatment of electronic spin and charge in the form of quasiparticles with very strong magnetic correlations.

  12. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Kerns, Q.A.; Riedel, J.

    1959-01-13

    An apparatus is presented for exciting a cavity resonator with a minimum of difficulty and, more specifically describes a sub-exciter and an amplifier type pre-exciter for the high-frequency cxcitation of large cavities. Instead of applying full voltage to the main oscillator, a sub-excitation voltage is initially used to establish a base level of oscillation in the cavity. A portion of the cavity encrgy is coupled to the input of the pre-exciter where it is amplified and fed back into the cavity when the pre-exciter is energized. After the voltage in the cavity resonator has reached maximum value under excitation by the pre-exciter, full voltage is applied to the oscillator and the pre-exciter is tunned off. The cavity is then excited to the maximum high voltage value of radio frequency by the oscillator.

  13. Pseudopotential Calculation of the Excited States of Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Andrew; Wang, Lin-Wang; Fu, Hiauxiang; Zunger, Alex

    1998-03-01

    We present the results of our pseudopotential calculations of up to 10 single-exciton states in free standing InP, InAs and CdSe quantum dots with diameters ranging from 10 to 50ÅIn the first step we solve for ≈20-40 single particle hole and electron states using a screened atomic pseudopotential Hamiltonian[1], solved within a plane wave basis using the Folded Spectrum Method[2]. In the second step, we calculate the electron-hole Coulomb energy[3] and the dipole transition probability for each of the ≈1000 possible single particle excitations. We present a comparison of the size scaling of the peaks in absorption and emission spectra obtained in our calculations with those from recent experiments and those of the effective mass based, k.p method. We also compare pseudopotential and k.p predictions of the character of the initial and final single particle states associated with each of these emission peaks. [1] J. Kim, A.J. Williamson, L.W. Wang, S.H-. Wei and A. Zunger, submitted to Phys. Rev. B [2] L. W. Wang and A. Zunger, J. Chem. Phys. 100, 2394 (1994). [3] A. Franceschetti and A. Zunger, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 915 (1997). *Supported under BES/OER/DMS contract No. DE---AC36---83CH10093

  14. Dipole excitations in 96Ru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnemann, A.; Fransen, C.; Gorska, M.; Jolie, J.; Kneissl, U.; Knoch, P.; Mücher, D.; Pitz, H. H.; Scheck, M.; Scholl, C.; Brentano, P. Von

    2005-12-01

    Candidates for the two-phonon quadrupole-octupole 1- state and the two-phonon mixed-symmetry 1+ms state have been identified in the N=52 isotope 96Ru using the nuclear resonance fluorescence technique at the bremsstrahlung facility of the Stuttgart Dynamitron accelerator. Detailed information on energies, spins, branching ratios, and transition strengths of four new dipole excitations in 96Ru have been obtained. The observed dipole excitations are nearly at the same energies as in 94Mo, and the transition probabilities are comparable to those for the decay of the (2+1⊗3-1)1- and the (2+1⊗2+ms)1+ms states in 94Mo.

  15. First-order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between excited states: A Lagrangian formulation at the CIS, RPA, TD-HF, and TD-DFT levels

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhendong; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-07-07

    Analytic expressions for the first-order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between electronically excited states are first formulated exactly via both time-independent equation of motion and time-dependent response theory, and are then approximated at the configuration interaction singles, particle-hole/particle-particle random phase approximation, and time-dependent density functional theory/Hartree-Fock levels of theory. Note that, to get the Pulay terms arising from the derivatives of basis functions, the standard response theory designed for electronic perturbations has to be extended to nuclear derivatives. The results are further recast into a Lagrangian form that is similar to that for excited-state energy gradients and allows to use atomic orbital based direct algorithms for large molecules.

  16. Crossover from spin waves to diffusive spin excitations in underdoped Ba(Fe1-xCox)2 As2

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, G S; Fernandes, R M; Pratt, D K; Thaler, A; Ni, N; Marty, K; Christianson, A D; Lumsden, M D; Sales, B C; Sefat, A S; Bud'ko, S L; Canfield, P C; Kreyssig, A; Goldman, A I; McQueeney, R J

    2014-05-01

    Using inelastic neutron scattering, we show that the onset of superconductivity in underdoped Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 coincides with a crossover from well-defined spin waves to overdamped and diffusive spin excitations. This crossover occurs despite the presence of long-range stripe antiferromagnetic order for samples in a compositional range from x=0.04 to 0.055, and is a consequence of the shrinking spin-density wave gap and a corresponding increase in the particle-hole (Landau) damping. The latter effect is captured by a simple itinerant model relating Co doping to changes in the hot spots of the Fermi surface. We argue that the overdamped spin fluctuations provide a pairing mechanism for superconductivity in these materials.

  17. Broadband single-molecule excitation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Piatkowski, Lukasz; Gellings, Esther; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, single-molecule spectroscopy has developed into a widely used tool in multiple disciplines of science. The diversity of routinely recorded emission spectra does underpin the strength of the single-molecule approach in resolving the heterogeneity and dynamics, otherwise hidden in the ensemble. In early cryogenic studies single molecules were identified by their distinct excitation spectra, yet measuring excitation spectra at room temperature remains challenging. Here we present a broadband Fourier approach that allows rapid recording of excitation spectra of individual molecules under ambient conditions and that is robust against blinking and bleaching. Applying the method we show that the excitation spectra of individual molecules exhibit an extreme distribution of solvatochromic shifts and distinct spectral shapes. Importantly, we demonstrate that the sensitivity and speed of the broadband technique is comparable to that of emission spectroscopy putting both techniques side-by-side in single-molecule spectroscopy. PMID:26794035

  18. Broadband single-molecule excitation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatkowski, Lukasz; Gellings, Esther; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, single-molecule spectroscopy has developed into a widely used tool in multiple disciplines of science. The diversity of routinely recorded emission spectra does underpin the strength of the single-molecule approach in resolving the heterogeneity and dynamics, otherwise hidden in the ensemble. In early cryogenic studies single molecules were identified by their distinct excitation spectra, yet measuring excitation spectra at room temperature remains challenging. Here we present a broadband Fourier approach that allows rapid recording of excitation spectra of individual molecules under ambient conditions and that is robust against blinking and bleaching. Applying the method we show that the excitation spectra of individual molecules exhibit an extreme distribution of solvatochromic shifts and distinct spectral shapes. Importantly, we demonstrate that the sensitivity and speed of the broadband technique is comparable to that of emission spectroscopy putting both techniques side-by-side in single-molecule spectroscopy.

  19. Acoustically excited heated jets. 1: Internal excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.; Salikuddin, M.; Morris, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of relatively strong upstream acoustic excitation on the mixing of heated jets with the surrounding air are investigated. To determine the extent of the available information on experiments and theories dealing with acoustically excited heated jets, an extensive literature survey was carried out. The experimental program consisted of flow visualization and flowfield velocity and temperature measurements for a broad range of jet operating and flow excitation conditions. A 50.8-mm-diam nozzle was used for this purpose. Parallel to the experimental study, an existing theoretical model of excited jets was refined to include the region downstream of the jet potential core. Excellent agreement was found between theory and experiment in moderately heated jets. However, the theory has not yet been confirmed for highly heated jets. It was found that the sensitivity of heated jets to upstream acoustic excitation varies strongly with the jet operating conditions and that the threshold excitation level increases with increasing jet temperature. Furthermore, the preferential Strouhal number is found not to change significantly with a change of the jet operating conditions. Finally, the effects of the nozzle exit boundary layer thickness appear to be similar for both heated and unheated jets at low Mach numbers.

  20. Excitation of interstellar hydrogen chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufild, David A.; Green, Sheldon

    1994-01-01

    We have computed new rate coefficients for the collisional excitation of HCl by He, in the close-coupled formalism and using an interaction potential determined recently by Willey, Choong, & DeLucia. Results have been obtained for temperatures between 10 K and 300 K. With the use of the infinite order sudden approximation, we have derived approximate expressions of general applicability which may be used to estimate how the rate constant for a transition (J to J prime) is apportioned among the various hyperfine states F prime of the final state J prime. Using these new rate coefficients, we have obtained predictions for the HCl rotational line strengths expected from a dense clump of interstellar gas, as a function of the HCl fractional abundance. Over a wide range of HCl abundances, we have found that the line luminosities are proportional to abundance(exp 2/3), a general result which can be explained using a simple analytical approximation. Our model for the excitation of HCl within a dense molecular cloud core indicates that the J = 1 goes to 0 line strengths measured by Blake, Keene, & Phillips toward the Orion Molecular Cloud (OMC-1) imply a fractional abundance n(HCl)/n(H2) approximately 2 x 10(exp -9), a value which amounts to only approximately 0.3% of the cosmic abundance of chlorine nuclei. Given a fractional abundance of 2 x 10(exp -9), the contribution of HCl emission to the total radiative cooling of a dense clump is small. For Orion, we predict a flux approximately 10(exp -19) W/sq cm for the HCl J = 3 goes to 2 line near 159.8 micrometers, suggesting that the strength of this line could be measured using the Infrared Space Observatory.

  1. Application of Strength Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Robert U.; Dugan, Eric

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the various strength qualities (maximum strength, high- and low-load speed strength, reactive strength, rate of force development, and skill performance), noting why a training program design based on strength diagnosis can lead to greater efficacy and better performance gains for the athlete. Examples of tests used to assess strength…

  2. Where Is the Electronic Oscillator Strength? Mapping Oscillator Strength across Molecular Absorption Spectra.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lianjun; Polizzi, Nicholas F; Dave, Adarsh R; Migliore, Agostino; Beratan, David N

    2016-03-24

    The effectiveness of solar energy capture and conversion materials derives from their ability to absorb light and to transform the excitation energy into energy stored in free carriers or chemical bonds. The Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn (TRK) sum rule mandates that the integrated (electronic) oscillator strength of an absorber equals the total number of electrons in the structure. Typical molecular chromophores place only about 1% of their oscillator strength in the UV-vis window, so individual chromophores operate at about 1% of their theoretical limit. We explore the distribution of oscillator strength as a function of excitation energy to understand this circumstance. To this aim, we use familiar independent-electron model Hamiltonians as well as first-principles electronic structure methods. While model Hamiltonians capture the qualitative electronic spectra associated with π electron chromophores, these Hamiltonians mistakenly focus the oscillator strength in the fewest low-energy transitions. Advanced electronic structure methods, in contrast, spread the oscillator strength over a very wide excitation energy range, including transitions to Rydberg and continuum states, consistent with experiment. Our analysis rationalizes the low oscillator strength in the UV-vis spectral region in molecules, a step toward the goal of oscillator strength manipulation and focusing.

  3. Relativistic many-body calculations of excitation energies and transition rates from core-excited states in copperlike ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, U. I.; Johnson, W. R.; Shlyaptseva, A.; Hamasha, S.

    2003-05-01

    Energies of (3s23p63d94l4l'), (3s23p53d104l4l'), and (3s3p63d104l4l') states for Cu-like ions with Z=30 100 are evaluated to second order in relativistic many-body perturbation theory (RMBPT) starting from a Ni-like Dirac-Fock potential. Second-order Coulomb and Breit-Coulomb interactions are included. Correction for the frequency dependence of the Breit interaction is taken into account in lowest order. The Lamb shift correction to energies is also included in lowest order. Intrinsic particle-particle-hole contributions to energies are found to be 20 30 % of the sum of one- and two-body contributions. Transition rates and line strengths are calculated for the 3l-4l' electric-dipole (E1) transitions in Cu-like ions with nuclear charge Z=30 100. RMBPT including the Breit interaction is used to evaluate retarded E1 matrix elements in length and velocity forms. First-order RMBPT is used to obtain intermediate coupling coefficients, and second-order RMBPT is used to calculate transition matrix elements. A detailed discussion of the various contributions to the dipole- matrix elements and energy levels is given for copperlike tungsten (Z=74). The transition energies used in the calculation of oscillator strengths and transition rates are from second-order RMBPT. Trends of the transition rates as functions of Z are illustrated graphically for selected transitions. Comparisons are made with available experimental data. These atomic data are important in the modeling of M-shell radiation spectra of heavy ions generated in electron-beam ion trap experiments and in M-shell diagnostics of plasmas.

  4. Resonant plasmon-axion excitations induced by charge density wave order in a Weyl semimetal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redell, Matthew D.; Mukherjee, Shantanu; Lee, Wei-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the charge excitations of a Weyl semimetal in the axionic charge density wave (axionic CDW) state. While it has been shown that the topological response (anomalous Hall conductivity) is protected against the CDW state, we find that the long-wavelength plasmon excitation is radically influenced by the dynamics of the CDW order parameter. In the normal state, we show that an undamped collective mode should exist at q ⃗≈Q⃗CDW if there is an attractive interaction favoring the formation of the CDW state. The undamped nature of this collective mode is attributed to a gaplike feature in the particle-hole continuum at q ⃗≈Q⃗CDW due to the chirality of the Weyl nodes, which is not seen in other materials with CDW instability. In the CDW state, the long-wavelength plasmon excitations become more dispersive due to the additional interband scattering not allowed in the normal state. Moreover, because the translational symmetry is spontaneously broken, umklapp scattering, the process conserving the total momentum only up to n Q⃗CDW , with n an integer and Q⃗CDW the ordering wave vector, emerges in the CDW state. We find that the plasmon excitation couples to the phonon mode of the CDW order via the umklapp scattering, leading to two branches of resonant collective modes observable in the density-density correlation function at q ⃗≈0 and q ⃗≈Q⃗CDW . Based on our analysis, we propose that measuring these resonant plasmon-axion excitations around q ⃗≈0 and q ⃗≈Q⃗CDW by momentum-resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy could serve as a reliable way to detect the axionic CDW state in Weyl semimetals.

  5. Coulomb excitation of 107Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiJulio, D. D.; Cederkall, J.; Fahlander, C.; Ekström, A.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Albers, M.; Bildstein, V.; Blazhev, A.; Darby, I.; Davinson, T.; De Witte, H.; Diriken, J.; Fransen, Ch.; Geibel, K.; Gernhäuser, R.; Görgen, A.; Hess, H.; Iwanicki, J.; Lutter, R.; Reiter, P.; Scheck, M.; Seidlitz, M.; Siem, S.; Taprogge, J.; Tveten, G. M.; Van de Walle, J.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wimmer, K.

    2012-07-01

    The radioactive isotope 107Sn was studied using Coulomb excitation at the REX-ISOLDE facility at CERN. This is the lightest odd-Sn nucleus examined using this technique. The reduced transition probability of the lowest-lying 3/2+ state was measured and is compared to shell-model predictions based on several sets of single-neutron energies relative to 100Sn . Similar to the transition probabilities for the 2+ states in the neutron-deficient even-even Sn nuclei, the measured value is underestimated by shell-model calculations. Part of the strength may be recovered by considering the ordering of the d_{5/2} and g_{7/2} single-neutron states.

  6. 8. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1 IN FOREGROUND, EXCITER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1 IN FOREGROUND, EXCITER No. 2., AND GENERATOR UNITS BEHIND EXCITER No. 2 IN BACKGROUND. EXCITER No. 1 GENERATOR HAS A COVER OVER TOP HALF OF COMMUTATOR ELEMENT. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  7. Nanoscale control of phonon excitations in graphene

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Won; Ko, Wonhee; Ku, JiYeon; Jeon, Insu; Kim, Donggyu; Kwon, Hyeokshin; Oh, Youngtek; Ryu, Seunghwa; Kuk, Young; Hwang, Sung Woo; Suh, Hwansoo

    2015-01-01

    Phonons, which are collective excitations in a lattice of atoms or molecules, play a major role in determining various physical properties of condensed matter, such as thermal and electrical conductivities. In particular, phonons in graphene interact strongly with electrons; however, unlike in usual metals, these interactions between phonons and massless Dirac fermions appear to mirror the rather complicated physics of those between light and relativistic electrons. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the underlying physics through systematic studies of phonon interactions and excitations in graphene is crucial for realising graphene-based devices. In this study, we demonstrate that the local phonon properties of graphene can be controlled at the nanoscale by tuning the interaction strength between graphene and an underlying Pt substrate. Using scanning probe methods, we determine that the reduced interaction due to embedded Ar atoms facilitates electron–phonon excitations, further influencing phonon-assisted inelastic electron tunnelling. PMID:26109454

  8. Excitation spectrum of the attractive Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Micnas, R.; Pedersen, M.H.; Schafroth, S.; Schneider, T.; Rodriguez-Nunez, J.J.; Beck, H.

    1995-12-01

    We study excitation-spectrum and normal-state properties of the two-dimensional attractive Hubbard model using the conserving, self-consistent {ital T}-matrix formalism in the intermediate coupling regime and at low electron concentration. Numerical results are presented for one-particle and two-particle excitation spectra, the one-particle momentum distribution, the chemical potential, and the static spin susceptibility. For a coupling strength of {ital U}/{ital t}=4.0, the one-particle spectral function, {ital A}(k,{omega}), shows two peaks of different weights. One peak can be associated with pair formation, whereas the other corresponds to renormalized quasiparticle excitation. It turns out that the two-band feature is reasonably well described by an ansatz for {ital A}(k,{omega}), which satisfies the first four frequency moments.

  9. Coulomb excitation of Ga73

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diriken, J.; Stefanescu, I.; Balabanski, D.; Blasi, N.; Blazhev, A.; Bree, N.; Cederkäll, J.; Cocolios, T. E.; Davinson, T.; Eberth, J.; Ekström, A.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Fraile, L. M.; Franchoo, S.; Georgiev, G.; Gladnishki, K.; Huyse, M.; Ivanov, O. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Iwanicki, J.; Jolie, J.; Konstantinopoulos, T.; Kröll, Th.; Krücken, R.; Köster, U.; Lagoyannis, A.; Lo Bianco, G.; Maierbeck, P.; Marsh, B. A.; Napiorkowski, P.; Patronis, N.; Pauwels, D.; Reiter, P.; Seliverstov, M.; Sletten, G.; van de Walle, J.; van Duppen, P.; Voulot, D.; Walters, W. B.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wrzosek, K.

    2010-12-01

    The B(E2;Ii→If) values for transitions in 3171Ga40 and 3173Ga42 were deduced from a Coulomb excitation experiment at the safe energy of 2.95 MeV/nucleon using post-accelerated beams of Ga71,73 at the REX-ISOLDE on-line isotope mass separator facility. The emitted γ rays were detected by the MINIBALL γ-detector array, and B(E2;Ii→If) values were obtained from the yields normalized to the known strength of the 2+→0+ transition in the Sn120 target. The comparison of these new results with the data of less neutron-rich gallium isotopes shows a shift of the E2 collectivity toward lower excitation energy when adding neutrons beyond N=40. This supports conclusions from previous studies of the gallium isotopes, which indicated a structural change in this isotopic chain between N=40 and 42. Combined with recent measurements from collinear laser spectroscopy showing a 1/2- spin and parity for the ground state, the extracted results revealed evidence for a 1/2-,3/2- doublet near the ground state in 3173Ga42 differing by at most 0.8 keV in energy.

  10. 16. EXCITERS, AND SYNCHROSCOPE GAUGE ON WALL. ACTIVE ELECTRIC EXCITER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. EXCITERS, AND SYNCHROSCOPE GAUGE ON WALL. ACTIVE ELECTRIC EXCITER AT REAR; UNUSED WATER-DRIVEN EXCITER IN FOREGROUND. VIEW TO SOUTH-SOUTHWEST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  11. Self-energy of an impurity in an ideal Fermi gas to second order in the interaction strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefzger, Christian; Castin, Yvan

    2014-09-01

    We study in three dimensions the problem of a spatially homogeneous zero-temperature ideal Fermi gas of spin-polarized particles of mass m perturbed by the presence of a single distinguishable impurity of mass M. The interaction between the impurity and the fermions involves only the partial s wave through the scattering length a and has negligible range b compared to the inverse Fermi wave number 1/kF of the gas. Through the interactions with the Fermi gas the impurity gives birth to a quasiparticle, which will be here a Fermi polaron (or more precisely a monomeron). We consider the general case of an impurity moving with wave vector K ≠0: Then the quasiparticle acquires a finite lifetime in its initial momentum channel because it can radiate particle-hole pairs in the Fermi sea. A description of the system using a variational approach, based on a finite number of particle-hole excitations of the Fermi sea, then becomes inappropriate around K =0. We rely thus upon perturbation theory, where the small and negative parameter kFa→0- excludes any branches other than the monomeronic one in the ground state (as, e.g., the dimeronic one), and allows us a systematic study of the system. We calculate the impurity self-energy Σ(2)(K,ω) up to second order included in a. Remarkably, we obtain an analytical explicit expression for Σ(2)(K,ω), allowing us to study its derivatives in the plane (K,ω). These present interesting singularities, which in general appear in the third-order derivatives ∂3Σ(2)(K,ω). In the special case of equal masses, M =m, singularities appear already in the physically more accessible second-order derivatives ∂2Σ(2)(K,ω); using a self-consistent heuristic approach based on Σ(2) we then regularize the divergence of the second-order derivative ∂K2ΔE(K) of the complex energy of the quasiparticle found in Trefzger and Castin [Europhys. Lett. 104, 50005 (2013), 10.1209/0295-5075/104/50005] at K =kF, and we predict an interesting scaling

  12. Flexibility and Muscular Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell

    1988-01-01

    This definition of flexibility and muscular strength also explores their roles in overall physical fitness and focuses on how increased flexibility and muscular strength can help decrease or eliminate lower back pain. (CB)

  13. Excitation Control: Balancing PSD-95 Function at the Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Dove; El-Husseini, Alaa

    2008-01-01

    Excitability of individual neurons dictates the overall excitation in specific brain circuits. This process is thought to be regulated by molecules that regulate synapse number, morphology and strength. Neuronal excitation is also influenced by the amounts of neurotransmitter receptors and signaling molecules retained at particular synaptic sites. Recent studies revealed a key role for PSD-95, a scaffolding molecule enriched at glutamatergic synapses, in modulation of clustering of several neurotransmitter receptors, adhesion molecules, ion channels, cytoskeletal elements and signaling molecules at postsynaptic sites. In this review we will highlight mechanisms that control targeting of PSD-95 at the synapse, and discuss how this molecule influences the retention and clustering of diverse synaptic proteins to regulate synaptic structure and strength. We will also discuss how PSD-95 may maintain a balance between excitation and inhibition in the brain and how alterations in this balance may contribute to neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:18946537

  14. Intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation of {sup 52}Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Yurkewicz, K.L.; Brown, B.A.; Campbell, C.M.; Church, J.A.; Dinca, D.-C.; Glasmacher, T.; Olliver, H.; Terry, J.R.; Bazin, D.; Gade, A.; Mueller, W.F.; Honma, M.; Mizusaki, T.; Otsuka, T.; Riley, L.A.

    2004-09-01

    The nucleus {sup 52}Fe with (N=Z=26) has been investigated using intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation in inverse kinematics. A reduced transition probability of B(E2;0{sub 1}{sup +}{yields}2{sub 1}{sup +})=817(102) e{sup 2} fm{sup 4} to the first excited 2{sup +} state at 849.0(5) keV was deduced. The increase in excitation strength B(E2{up_arrow}) with respect to the even-mass neighbor {sup 54}Fe (B(E2{up_arrow})=620(50) e{sup 2} fm{sup 4}) agrees with shell-model expectations as the magic number N=28 is approached. This measurement completes the systematics of reduced transition strengths to the first excited 2{sup +} state for the even-even N=Z nuclei up to mass A=56.

  15. What Is a Strength?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolin, Sybil

    2003-01-01

    As the strength-based perspective gains recognition, it is important to describe what constitutes strengths and to develop a specific vocabulary to name them. This article draws on resilience research to help identify specific competencies and areas of strengths in youth. (Contains 1 table.)

  16. Strength Training for Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connaughton, Daniel; Connaughton, Angela; Poor, Linda

    2001-01-01

    Strength training can be fun, safe, and appropriate for young girls and women and is an important component of any fitness program when combined with appropriate cardiovascular and flexibility activities. Concerns and misconceptions regarding girls' strength training are discussed, presenting general principles of strength training for children…

  17. Strength Modeling Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badler, N. I.; Lee, P.; Wong, S.

    1985-01-01

    Strength modeling is a complex and multi-dimensional issue. There are numerous parameters to the problem of characterizing human strength, most notably: (1) position and orientation of body joints; (2) isometric versus dynamic strength; (3) effector force versus joint torque; (4) instantaneous versus steady force; (5) active force versus reactive force; (6) presence or absence of gravity; (7) body somatotype and composition; (8) body (segment) masses; (9) muscle group envolvement; (10) muscle size; (11) fatigue; and (12) practice (training) or familiarity. In surveying the available literature on strength measurement and modeling an attempt was made to examine as many of these parameters as possible. The conclusions reached at this point toward the feasibility of implementing computationally reasonable human strength models. The assessment of accuracy of any model against a specific individual, however, will probably not be possible on any realistic scale. Taken statistically, strength modeling may be an effective tool for general questions of task feasibility and strength requirements.

  18. Pairing Strengths for a Two Orbital Model of the Fe-pnictides

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Xiao-Liang; Raghu, S.; Liu, Chao-Xing; Scalapino, D.J.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-25

    Using an RPA approximation, we have calculated the strengths of the singlet and triplet pairing interactions which arise from the exchange of spin and orbital fluctuations for a 2-orbital model of the Fe-pnictide superconductors. When the system is doped with F, the electron pockets become dominant and we find that the strongest pairing occurs in the singlet d-wave pairing and the triplet p-wave pairing channels, which compete closely. The pairing structure in the singlet d-wave channel corresponds to a superposition of near neighbor intra-orbital singlets with a minus sign phase difference between the d{sub xz} and d{sub yz} pairs. The leading pairing configuration in the triplet channel also involves a nearest neighbor intra-orbital pairing. We find that the strengths of both the singlet and triplet pairing grow, with the singlet pairing growing faster, as the onsite Coulomb interaction approaches the value where the S = 1 particle-hole susceptibility diverges.

  19. Excitation Methods for Bridge Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Duffy, T.A.; Cornwell, P.J.; Doebling, S.W.

    1999-02-08

    This paper summarizes the various methods that have been used to excited bridge structures during dynamic testing. The excitation methods fall into the general categories of ambient excitation methods and measured-input excitation methods. During ambient excitation the input to the bridge is not directly measured. In contrast, as the category label implies, measured-input excitations are usually applied at a single location where the force input to the structure can be monitored. Issues associated with using these various types of measurements are discussed along with a general description of the various excitation methods.

  20. Barrier penetration and rotational damping of thermally excited superdeformed nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.; Matsuo, M.; Shimizu, Y. R.

    2001-12-01

    We construct a microscopic model of thermally excited superdeformed states that describes both the barrier penetration mechanism, leading to the decay-out transitions to normal deformed states, and the rotational damping causing fragmentation of rotational E2 transitions. We describe the barrier penetration by means of a tunneling path in the two-dimensional deformation energy surface, which is calculated with the cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky model. The individual excited superdeformed states and associated E2 transition strengths are calculated by the shell-model diagonalization of the many-particle-many-hole excitations interacting with the delta-type residual two-body force. The effects of the decay-out on the excited superdeformed states are discussed in detail for 152Dy, 143Eu and 192Hg. The model predicts that the decay-out brings about a characteristic decrease in the effective number of excited superdeformed rotational bands.

  1. Collective excitations in a superfluid of color-flavor locked quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, Kenji; Iida, Kei

    2005-04-01

    We investigate collective excitations coupled with baryon density in a system of massless three-flavor quarks in the collisionless regime. By using the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model in the mean-field approximation, we field-theoretically derive the spectra both for the normal and color-flavor locked (CFL) superfluid phases at zero temperature. In the normal phase, we obtain usual zero sound as a low-lying collective mode in the particle-hole (vector) channel. In the CFL phase, the nature of collective excitations varies in a way dependent on whether the excitation energy, {omega}, is larger or smaller than the threshold given by twice the pairing gap {delta}, at which pair excitations with nonzero total momentum become allowed to break up into two quasiparticles. For {omega}<<2{delta}, a phonon corresponding to fluctuations in the U(1) phase of {delta} appears as a sharp peak in the particle-particle ('H') channel. We reproduce the property known from low-energy effective theories that this mode propagates at a velocity of v{sub H}=1/{radical}(3) in the low momentum regime; the decay constant f{sub H} obtained in the NJL model is identical with the QCD result obtained in the mean-field approximation. We also find that, as the momentum of the phonon increases, the excitation energy goes up and asymptotically approaches {omega}=2{delta}. Above the threshold for pair excitations ({omega}>2{delta}), zero sound manifests itself in the vector channel. By locating the zero sound pole of the vector propagator in the complex energy plane, we investigate the attenuation and energy dispersion relation of zero sound. In the long wavelength limit, the phonon mode, the only low-lying excitation, has its spectral weight in the H channel alone, while the spectral function vanishes in the vector channel. This is due to nontrivial mixing between the H and vector channels in the superfluid medium. We finally extend our study to the case of nonzero temperature. We demonstrate how

  2. A benchmark study of electronic excitation energies, transition moments, and excited-state energy gradients on the nicotine molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Egidi, Franco Segado, Mireia; Barone, Vincenzo; Koch, Henrik; Cappelli, Chiara

    2014-12-14

    In this work, we report a comparative study of computed excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state energy gradients of (S)-nicotine, chosen as a test case, using multireference methods, coupled cluster singles and doubles, and methods based on time-dependent density functional theory. This system was chosen because its apparent simplicity hides a complex electronic structure, as several different types of valence excitations are possible, including n-π{sup *}, π-π{sup *}, and charge-transfer states, and in order to simulate its spectrum it is necessary to describe all of them consistently well by the chosen method.

  3. A benchmark study of electronic excitation energies, transition moments, and excited-state energy gradients on the nicotine molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egidi, Franco; Segado, Mireia; Koch, Henrik; Cappelli, Chiara; Barone, Vincenzo

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we report a comparative study of computed excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state energy gradients of (S)-nicotine, chosen as a test case, using multireference methods, coupled cluster singles and doubles, and methods based on time-dependent density functional theory. This system was chosen because its apparent simplicity hides a complex electronic structure, as several different types of valence excitations are possible, including n-π*, π-π*, and charge-transfer states, and in order to simulate its spectrum it is necessary to describe all of them consistently well by the chosen method.

  4. Decoherence at constant excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, J. M.; Sadurní, E.; Seligman, T. H.

    2012-02-01

    We present a simple exactly solvable extension of the Jaynes-Cummings model by adding dissipation. This is done such that the total number of excitations is conserved. The Liouville operator in the resulting master equation can be reduced to blocks of 4×4 matrices.

  5. Excited states in hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Lipsky, S.

    1987-01-01

    In this brief review we first summarize some pertinent features of the photophysical properties of excited states of hydrocarbons and the mechanisms by which they transfer energy to solutes and then review their yields and their behavior under fast-electron irradiation conditions. 33 refs.

  6. Positron excitation of neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parcell, L. A.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    The differential and total cross section for the excitation of the 3s1P10 and 3p1P1 states of neon by positron impact were calculated using a distorted-wave approximation. The results agree well with experimental conclusions.

  7. Plasmon Excitations of Multi-layer Graphene on a Conducting Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Gumbs, Godfrey; Iurov, Andrii; Wu, Jhao-Ying; Lin, M. F.; Fekete, Paula

    2016-01-01

    We predict the existence of low-frequency nonlocal plasmons at the vacuum-surface interface of a superlattice of N graphene layers interacting with conducting substrate. We derive a dispersion function that incorporates the polarization function of both the graphene monolayers and the semi-infinite electron liquid at whose surface the electrons scatter specularly. We find a surface plasmon-polariton that is not damped by particle-hole excitations or the bulk modes and which separates below the continuum mini-band of bulk plasmon modes. The surface plasmon frequency of the hybrid structure always lies below , the surface plasmon frequency of the conducting substrate. The intensity of this mode depends on the distance of the graphene layers from the conductor’s surface, the energy band gap between valence and conduction bands of graphene monolayer and, most importantly, on the number of two-dimensional layers. For a sufficiently large number of layers the hybrid structure has no surface plasmon. The existence of plasmons with different dispersion relations indicates that quasiparticles with different group velocity may coexist for various ranges of wavelengths determined by the number of layers in the superlattice. PMID:26883086

  8. Plasmon Excitations of Multi-layer Graphene on a Conducting Substrate.

    PubMed

    Gumbs, Godfrey; Iurov, Andrii; Wu, Jhao-Ying; Lin, M F; Fekete, Paula

    2016-02-17

    We predict the existence of low-frequency nonlocal plasmons at the vacuum-surface interface of a superlattice of N graphene layers interacting with conducting substrate. We derive a dispersion function that incorporates the polarization function of both the graphene monolayers and the semi-infinite electron liquid at whose surface the electrons scatter specularly. We find a surface plasmon-polariton that is not damped by particle-hole excitations or the bulk modes and which separates below the continuum mini-band of bulk plasmon modes. The surface plasmon frequency of the hybrid structure always lies below ωs = ωp/√2, the surface plasmon frequency of the conducting substrate. The intensity of this mode depends on the distance of the graphene layers from the conductor's surface, the energy band gap between valence and conduction bands of graphene monolayer and, most importantly, on the number of two-dimensional layers. For a sufficiently large number of layers (N ≥ 7) the hybrid structure has no surface plasmon. The existence of plasmons with different dispersion relations indicates that quasiparticles with different group velocity may coexist for various ranges of wavelengths determined by the number of layers in the superlattice.

  9. Alumina fiber strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, R. T.; Nelson, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The effective fiber strength of alumina fibers in an aluminum composite was increased to 173,000 psi. A high temperature heat treatment, combined with a glassy carbon surface coating, was used to prevent degradation and improve fiber tensile strength. Attempts to achieve chemical strengthening of the alumina fiber by chromium oxide and boron oxide coatings proved unsuccessful. A major problem encountered on the program was the low and inconsistent strength of the Dupont Fiber FP used for the investigation.

  10. Excitation of millimeter and submillimeter water masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Melnick, Gary J.

    1991-01-01

    The excitation of maser emission in millimeter and submillimeter transitions of interstellar and circumstellar water is considered. An escape probability method is used to determine the equilibrium populations in 349 rotational states of both ortho- and para-water under varying conditions of gas temperature, density, water abundance, and radiation field. It is shown that, under those conditions believed to prevail around late-type stars and within star-forming regions, strong millimeter and submillimeter water maser emission can be generated by collisional excitations by H2. Several maser transitions can have strengths close to that of the 22 GHz line. The water maser line which can be observed from mountaintop facilities and those which will require air- or space-borne platforms are indicated. The exact portion of parameter space in which each maser transition exhibits peak emission is shown.

  11. Strength Training and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Strength Training and Your Child KidsHealth > For Parents > Strength Training ... help prevent injuries and speed up recovery. About Strength Training Strength training is the practice of using free ...

  12. Study of M1 and E1 excitations by high-resolution proton inelastic scattering measurement at forward angles

    SciTech Connect

    Tamii, A.; Adachi, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Kaneda, T.; Matsubara, H.; Okamura, H.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Yosoi, M.; Carter, J.; Dozono, M.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Itoh, M.; Kawabata, T.; Nakanishi, K.; Sasamoto, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von

    2007-06-13

    Experimental technique for measuring proton inelastic scattering with high-resolution at 295 MeV and at forward angles including zero degrees is described. The method is useful for extracting spin part of the M1 strength via nuclear excitation as well as E1 strength via Coulomb excitation. An excitation energy resolution of 20 keV, good scattering angle resolution, and low background condition have been achieved. The experimental technique was applied for several sd and pf shell nuclei.

  13. Spike Bursts from an Excitable Optical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios Leite, Jose R.; Rosero, Edison J.; Barbosa, Wendson A. S.; Tredicce, Jorge R.

    Diode Lasers with double optical feedback are shown to present power drop spikes with statistical distribution controllable by the ratio of the two feedback times. The average time between spikes and the variance within long time series are studied. The system is shown to be excitable and present bursting of spikes created with specific feedback time ratios and strength. A rate equation model, extending the Lang-Kobayashi single feedback for semiconductor lasers proves to match the experimental observations. Potential applications to construct network to mimic neural systems having controlled bursting properties in each unit will be discussed. Brazilian Agency CNPQ.

  14. Excited bands in even-even rare-earth nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos E.; Hirsch, Jorge G.

    2004-09-13

    The energetics of states belonging to normal parity bands in even-even dysprosium isotopes, and their B(E2) transition strengths, are studied using an extended pseudo-SU(3) shell model. States with pseudospin 1 are added to the standard pseudospin 0 space, allowing for a proper description of known excited normal parity bands.

  15. Building on Our Strengths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Robert

    1978-01-01

    Comments on the feeling that the American family is disintegrating, and that many criticisms traditionally made about Black families are now made about White families. Suggests that people need to stress family strengths. As an example, five major strengths of Black families are described: flexibility, work and achievement ethics, religiosity, and…

  16. Strengths of Remarried Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knaub, Patricia Kain; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Focuses on remarried families' (N=80) perceptions of family strengths, marital satisfaction, and adjustment to the remarried situation. Results indicated that although most would like to make some changes, scores on the measurements used were high. A supportive environment was the most important predictor of family strength and success. (JAC)

  17. Magnetostrictive resonance excitation

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Ricardo B.; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani

    1992-01-01

    The resonance frequency spectrum of a magnetostrictive sample is remotely determined by exciting the magnetostrictive property with an oscillating magnetic field. The permeability of a magnetostrictive material and concomitant coupling with a detection coil varies with the strain in the material whereby resonance responses of the sample can be readily detected. A suitable sample may be a magnetostrictive material or some other material having at least one side coated with a magnetostrictive material. When the sample is a suitable shape, i.e., a cube, rectangular parallelepiped, solid sphere or spherical shell, the elastic moduli or the material can be analytically determined from the measured resonance frequency spectrum. No mechanical transducers are required and the sample excitation is obtained without contact with the sample, leading to highly reproducible results and a measurement capability over a wide temperature range, e.g. from liquid nitrogen temperature to the Curie temperature of the magnetostrictive material.

  18. Nature of low-lying electric dipole resonance excitations in 74Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negi, D.; Wiedeking, M.; Lanza, E. G.; Litvinova, E.; Vitturi, A.; Bark, R. A.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bvumbi, S.; Bucher, T. D.; Daub, B. H.; Dinoko, T. S.; Easton, J. L.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Jones, P.; Kheswa, B. V.; Khumalo, N. A.; Larsen, A. C.; Lawrie, E. A.; Lawrie, J. J.; Majola, S. N. T.; Masiteng, L. P.; Nchodu, M. R.; Ndayishimye, J.; Newman, R. T.; Noncolela, S. P.; Orce, J. N.; Papka, P.; Pellegri, L.; Renstrøm, T.; Roux, D. G.; Schwengner, R.; Shirinda, O.; Siem, S.

    2016-08-01

    Isospin properties of dipole excitations in 74Ge are investigated using the (α ,α'γ ) reaction and compared to (γ ,γ' ) data. The results indicate that the dipole excitations in the energy region of 6 to 9 MeV adhere to the scenario of the recently found splitting of the region of dipole excitations into two separated parts: one at low energy, being populated by both isoscalar and isovector probes, and the other at high energy, excited only by the electromagnetic probe. Relativistic quasiparticle time blocking approximation (RQTBA) calculations show a reduction in the isoscalar E 1 strength with an increase in excitation energy, which is consistent with the measurement.

  19. Harmonically excited orbital variations

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, T.

    1985-08-06

    Rephrasing the equations of motion for orbital maneuvers in terms of Lagrangian generalized coordinates instead of Newtonian rectangular cartesian coordinates can make certain harmonic terms in the orbital angular momentum vector more readily apparent. In this formulation the equations of motion adopt the form of a damped harmonic oscillator when torques are applied to the orbit in a variationally prescribed manner. The frequencies of the oscillator equation are in some ways unexpected but can nonetheless be exploited through resonant forcing functions to achieve large secular variations in the orbital elements. Two cases are discussed using a circular orbit as the control case: (1) large changes in orbital inclination achieved by harmonic excitation rather than one impulsive velocity change, and (2) periodic and secular changes to the longitude of the ascending node using both stable and unstable excitation strategies. The implications of these equations are also discussed for both artificial satellites and natural satellites. For the former, two utilitarian orbits are suggested, each exploiting a form of harmonic excitation. 5 refs.

  20. Aperture excited dielectric antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswell, W. F.; Chatterjee, J. S.; Mason, V. B.; Tai, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the effect of placing dielectric objects over the aperture of waveguide antennas are presented. Experimental measurements of the radiation patterns, gain, impedance, near-field amplitude, and pattern and impedance coupling between pairs of antennas are given for various Plexiglas shapes, including the sphere and the cube, excited by rectangular, circular, and square waveguide feed apertures. The waveguide excitation of a dielectric sphere is modeled using the Huygens' source, and expressions for the resulting electric fields, directivity, and efficiency are derived. Calculations using this model show good overall agreement with experimental patterns and directivity measurements. The waveguide under an infinite dielectric slab is used as an impedance model. Calculations using this model agree qualitatively with the measured impedance data. It is concluded that dielectric loaded antennas such as the waveguide excited sphere, cube, or sphere-cylinder can produce directivities in excess of that obtained by a uniformly illuminated aperture of the same cross section, particularly for dielectric objects with dimensions of 2 wavelengths or less. It is also shown that for certain configurations coupling between two antennas of this type is less than that for the same antennas without dielectric loading.

  1. Shell-model description of E1 excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Noritaka; Utsuno, Yutaka; Togashi, Tomoaki; Otsuka, Takaharu; Honma, Michio

    2014-09-01

    We discuss a microscopic description of E1 excitations based on shell-model calculations. We performed large-scale shell-model calculations for Ca isotopes with Lanczos-strength-function method and sd - pf - sdg model space allowing up to 3 ℏω excitation and obtained their photoabsorption cross sections. It gives a very good description of giant dipole and low-lying pygmy resonances rather independently of smoothing parameter. We also present the feasiblity of the Monte Carlo shell model (MCSM) to study the E1 excitation in order to to treat larger model space. By using the MCSM we discuss some results about light nuclei. We discuss a microscopic description of E1 excitations based on shell-model calculations. We performed large-scale shell-model calculations for Ca isotopes with Lanczos-strength-function method and sd - pf - sdg model space allowing up to 3 ℏω excitation and obtained their photoabsorption cross sections. It gives a very good description of giant dipole and low-lying pygmy resonances rather independently of smoothing parameter. We also present the feasiblity of the Monte Carlo shell model (MCSM) to study the E1 excitation in order to to treat larger model space. By using the MCSM we discuss some results about light nuclei. This study is supported by HPCI strategic program field 5 and KAKENHI Grand 25870168.

  2. An Improved Multidimensional MPA Procedure for Bidirectional Earthquake Excitations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Sun, Jian-Gang; Zhang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Presently, the modal pushover analysis procedure is extended to multidimensional analysis of structures subjected to multidimensional earthquake excitations. an improved multidimensional modal pushover analysis (IMMPA) method is presented in the paper in order to estimate the response demands of structures subjected to bidirectional earthquake excitations, in which the unidirectional earthquake excitation applied on equivalent SDOF system is replaced by the direct superposition of two components earthquake excitations, and independent analysis in each direction is not required and the application of simplified superposition formulas is avoided. The strength reduction factor spectra based on superposition of earthquake excitations are discussed and compared with the traditional strength reduction factor spectra. The step-by-step procedure is proposed to estimate seismic demands of structures. Two examples are implemented to verify the accuracy of the method, and the results of the examples show that (1) the IMMPA method can be used to estimate the responses of structure subjected to bidirectional earthquake excitations. (2) Along with increase of peak of earthquake acceleration, structural response deviation estimated with the IMMPA method may also increase. (3) Along with increase of the number of total floors of structures, structural response deviation estimated with the IMMPA method may also increase. PMID:25140333

  3. An improved multidimensional MPA procedure for bidirectional earthquake excitations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Sun, Jian-Gang; Zhang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Presently, the modal pushover analysis procedure is extended to multidimensional analysis of structures subjected to multidimensional earthquake excitations. an improved multidimensional modal pushover analysis (IMMPA) method is presented in the paper in order to estimate the response demands of structures subjected to bidirectional earthquake excitations, in which the unidirectional earthquake excitation applied on equivalent SDOF system is replaced by the direct superposition of two components earthquake excitations, and independent analysis in each direction is not required and the application of simplified superposition formulas is avoided. The strength reduction factor spectra based on superposition of earthquake excitations are discussed and compared with the traditional strength reduction factor spectra. The step-by-step procedure is proposed to estimate seismic demands of structures. Two examples are implemented to verify the accuracy of the method, and the results of the examples show that (1) the IMMPA method can be used to estimate the responses of structure subjected to bidirectional earthquake excitations. (2) Along with increase of peak of earthquake acceleration, structural response deviation estimated with the IMMPA method may also increase. (3) Along with increase of the number of total floors of structures, structural response deviation estimated with the IMMPA method may also increase. PMID:25140333

  4. Electric Monopole Transition Strengths in 62Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evitts, L. J.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Kibédi, T.; Moukaddam, M.; Alshahrani, B.; Eriksen, T. K.; Holt, J. D.; Hota, S. S.; Lane, G. J.; Lee, B. Q.; McCormick, B. P.; Palalani, N.; Reed, M. W.; Stroberg, S. R.; Stuchbery, A. E.

    2016-09-01

    Excited states in 62Ni were populated with a (p, p') reaction using the 14UD Pelletron accelerator at the Australian National University. Electric monopole transition strengths, ρ2(E0), were measured through simultaneous detection of the internal conversion electrons and γ rays emitted from the de-excitation of populated states, using the Super-e spectrometer coupled with a germanium detector. The strength of the 02+ to 01+ transition has been measured to be 77-34+23 × 10-3 and agrees with previously reported values. Upper limits have been placed on the 03+ to 01+ and 03+ to 02+ transitions. The measured ρ2(E0) value of the 22+ to 21+ transition in 62Ni has been measured for the first time and found to be one of the largest ρ2(E0) values measured to date in nuclei heavier than Ca. The low-lying states of 62Ni have previously been classified as one- and two-phonon vibrational states based on level energies. The measured electric quadrupole transition strengths are consistent with this interpretation. However as electric monopole transitions are forbidden between states which differ by one phonon number, the simple harmonic quadrupole vibrational picture is not suffcient to explain the large ρ2(E0) value for the 22+ to 21+ transition.

  5. SHOCK-EXCITED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.

    1957-12-17

    S> A shock-excited quartz crystal oscillator is described. The circuit was specifically designed for application in micro-time measuring work to provide an oscillator which immediately goes into oscillation upon receipt of a trigger pulse and abruptly ceases oscillation when a second pulse is received. To achieve the instant action, the crystal has a prestressing voltage applied across it. A monostable multivibrator receives the on and off trigger pulses and discharges a pulse through the crystal to initiate or terminate oscillation instantly.

  6. Search for Gluonic Excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Eugenio

    2007-10-01

    Studies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenological models for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as exotics, hybrids, multi-quarks, and glueballs. First discussion of the status of exotic meson searches is given followed by a discussion of plans at Jefferson Lab to double the energy of the machine to 12 GeV, which will allow us to access photoproduction of mesons in search for gluonic excited states.

  7. Search for Gluonic Excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Eugenio, Paul

    2007-10-26

    Studies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenological models for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as exotics, hybrids, multi-quarks, and glueballs. First discussion of the status of exotic meson searches is given followed by a discussion of plans at Jefferson Lab to double the energy of the machine to 12 GeV, which will allow us to access photoproduction of mesons in search for gluonic excited states.

  8. Developing Strengths in Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Ted

    1976-01-01

    There are few descriptions of growth experiences for total families. This paper describes one such model. It expresses the conviction that families need opportunities to come together with other families to identify strengths, sharpen communication skills, and establish goals. (Author)

  9. Analysis of excitation and collection geometries for planar waveguide immunosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Douglas A.; Dyer, Shellee; Fowers, David; Herron, James N.

    1993-05-01

    We demonstrate the use of a two-channel flowcell for fluorescent immunoassays. The flowcell contains a planar silica waveguide for evanescent excitation of the fluorophores, and the planar waveguide surface provides the solid support for immobilization of the antibodies. The detection system is composed of a grating spectrometer and a CCD camera for spectral characterization of the emitted signals. Two methods of sensing have been studied: a displacement-type technique and a sandwich-type assay. The sensitivity achieved for measuring concentrations of HCG by the sandwich method is sub-picomolar. Also, we have experimentally compared the signal strengths for two alternative ways of excitation and collection, and determine that waveguide excitation/side collection has some practical advantages over side excitation/waveguide collection.

  10. Electromagnetic transition strengths in {sup 156}Dy

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, O.; Dewald, A.; Saha, B.; Fitzler, A.; Jessen, K.; Klug, T.; Heinze, S.; Jolie, J.; Brentano, P. von; Petkov, P.; Tonev, D.; Bazzacco, D.; Ur, C. A.; Lunardi, S.; Farnea, E.; Axiotis, M.; Angelis, G. de; Napoli, D. R.; Marginean, N.; Martinez, T.

    2006-08-15

    Reliable and precise lifetimes of excited states in {sup 156}Dy were measured by means of the recoil distance Doppler-shift technique in the coincidence mode. The experiment was performed at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro with the GASP array and the Cologne coincidence plunger apparatus using the reaction {sup 124}Sn({sup 36}S,4n){sup 156}Dy at a beam energy of 155 MeV. New values of the branching ratios of transitions depopulating the levels of the first excited band have been derived. The measured transition probabilities of {sup 156}Dy in the ground-state band and the first excited band as well as the energy spectra are compared to the predictions of the recently proposed X(5) model and to an interacting boson approximation fit. The comparison reveals a different behavior of the intraband transition strengths and indicates a possible coexistence of a normal deformed ground-state band and an X(5)-like first excited band. It also reveals that in {sup 156}Dy, the {gamma} degree of freedom plays a more important role than it does in the well-established X(5) nuclei with N=90. A fit of the data using the general collective model suggests that a deeper collective potential V({beta},{gamma}) may also be a reason for the differences in the spectroscopic properties of {sup 156}Dy and those nuclei.

  11. Apple Strength Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C

    2009-12-22

    Strength of the apple parts has been noticed to decrease, especially those installed by the new induction heating system since the LEP campaign started. Fig. 1 shows the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength (YS), and elongation of the installed or installation-simulated apples on various systems. One can clearly see the mean values of UTS and YS of the post-LEP parts decreased by about 8 ksi and 6 ksi respectively from those of the pre-LEP parts. The slight increase in elongation seen in Fig.1 can be understood from the weak inverse relationship between the strength and elongation in metals. Fig.2 shows the weak correlation between the YS and elongation of the parts listed in Fig. 1. Strength data listed in Figure 1 were re-plotted as histograms in Figs. 3 and 4. Figs. 3a and 4a show histograms of all UTS and YS data. Figs. 3b and 4b shows histograms of pre-LEP data and Figs. 3c and 4c of post-LEP data. Data on statistical scatter of tensile strengths have been rarely published by material suppliers. Instead, only the minimum 'guaranteed' strength data are typically presented. An example of strength distribution of aluminum 7075-T6 sheet material, listed in Fig. 5, show that its scatter width of both UTS and YS for a single sheet can be about 6 ksi and for multi-lot scatter can be as large as 11 ksi even though the sheets have been produced through well-controlled manufacturing process. By approximating the histograms shown in Figs. 3 and 4 by a Gaussian or similar type of distribution curves, one can plausibly see the strength reductions in the later or more recent apples. The pre-LEP data in Figs. 3b and 4b show wider scatter than the post-LEP data in Figs. 3c and 4c and seem to follow the binomial distribution of strength indicating that the apples might have been made from two different lots of material, either from two different vendors or from two different melts of perhaps slightly different chemical composition by a single vendor. The post

  12. The response characteristics of long cylindrical marine structures under different excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.I.

    1994-12-31

    Long cylindrical marine structures such as risers, TLP tendons, ocean pipes are subjected to several kinds of excitations of forcing, parametric, combined, self-excited etc. In this work, the response characteristics of the slender marine structures is investigated for the first three excitations. The governing partial differential equation of lateral motion of a slender structure is reduced to a non-linear differential equation with an integrand. The non-linear equation is solved numerically. The time histories of response amplitudes of the three excitations are obtained for actual TLP tethers: Hutton, Jolliet and Snoore TLPs. The response of combined excitation is most dominant for all three tethers. The total displacement is largest in the case of the Jolliet tether which corresponds to the second instability region. The response curves of combined excitation are also obtained. When the strength of forcing excitation is increased, the response amplitude of combined excitation evenly increases. However, when the strength of parametric excitation is increased, the response amplitude of combined excitation increases strongly and slightly in the even and odd numbers of instability regions, respectively.

  13. Hydrological excitation of polar motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastula, Y.; Kolaczek, B.

    2006-08-01

    Hydrological excitation of the polar motion (HAM) were computed from the available recently hydrological data series (NCEP, ECMWF, CPC water storage and LaD World simulations of global continental water) and compared. Time variable seasonal spectra of these hydrological excitation functions and of the geodetic excitation function of polar motion computed from the polar motion COMB03 data were compared showing big differences in their temporal characteristics and the necessity of the further improvement of the HAM models. Seasonal oscillations of the global geophysical excitation functions (AAM + OAM + HAM) and their time variations were compared also. These hydrological excitation functions do not close the budget of the global geophysical excitation function of polar motion.

  14. Neural Excitability and Singular Bifurcations.

    PubMed

    De Maesschalck, Peter; Wechselberger, Martin

    2015-12-01

    We discuss the notion of excitability in 2D slow/fast neural models from a geometric singular perturbation theory point of view. We focus on the inherent singular nature of slow/fast neural models and define excitability via singular bifurcations. In particular, we show that type I excitability is associated with a novel singular Bogdanov-Takens/SNIC bifurcation while type II excitability is associated with a singular Andronov-Hopf bifurcation. In both cases, canards play an important role in the understanding of the unfolding of these singular bifurcation structures. We also explain the transition between the two excitability types and highlight all bifurcations involved, thus providing a complete analysis of excitability based on geometric singular perturbation theory.

  15. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  16. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  17. Spin resonance strength calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Courant,E.D.

    2008-10-06

    In calculating the strengths of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  18. Electron impact excitation of highly charged sodium-like ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaha, M.; Davis, J.

    1978-01-01

    Optical transition probabilities and electron collision strengths for Ca X, Fe XVI, Zn XX, Kr XXVI and Mo XXXII are calculated for transitions between n equal to 3 and n equal to 4 levels. The calculations neglect relativistic effects on the radial functions. A semi-empirical approach provides wave functions of the excited states; a distorted wave function without exchange is employed to obtain the excitation cross sections. The density dependence of the relative intensities of certain emission lines in the sodium isoelectronic sequence is also discussed.

  19. Ultrafast electronic dynamics in laser-excited crystalline bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, Alexey A.; Misochko, Oleg V.; Chekalin, Sergey V.

    2013-07-01

    Femtosecond spectroscopy is applied to study transient electronic processes in bismuth. The components with relaxation times of 1 ps, 7 ps, and ˜1 ns are detected in the photoinduced reflectivity response of the crystal. To facilitate assignment of the observed relaxation to the decay of particular excited electronic states, we use pump pulses with central wavelengths ranging from 400 to 2300 nm. Additionally, we examine the variation of parameters of coherent A1g phonons upon the change of excitation and probing conditions. Data analysis reveals significant wavevector dependence of electron-hole and electron-phonon coupling strength along Γ-T direction of the Brillouin zone.

  20. Pattern Formation in Excitable Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, William Nash

    1992-01-01

    The phenomenon of excitability is observed in a wide variety of physical and biological systems. In this work, spatially extended excitable systems are examined from several different perspectives. First, a pedagogical introduction is used to motivate the derivation of the dynamics of one dimensional excitable pulses. In the second part, coupled map techniques for numerical simulation of excitable media and other interfacial systems are described. Examples are given for both excitable media and crystal growth. The third chapter addresses the phenomenon of spiral formation in excitable media. Exact rotating solutions are found for a class of models of excitable media. The solutions consist of two regions: an outer region, consisting of the spiral proper, which exhibits a singularity at its tip, and the core region, obtained by rescaling space in the vicinity of the tip. The tip singularity is resolved in the core region, leading to a consistent solution in all of space. The stability of both the spiral and the core is investigated, with the result that the spiral is found to be stable, and the core unstable. Finally, the stability of excitable waves of the chemical cAMP traveling over aggregating colonies of the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is examined by coupling the excitable dynamics of the cAMP signalling system to a simple model of chemotaxis, with result that cellular motion is found to destabilize the waves, causing the initially uniform field of cells to break up into streams.

  1. Fission fragment excited laser system

    DOEpatents

    McArthur, David A.; Tollefsrud, Philip B.

    1976-01-01

    A laser system and method for exciting lasing action in a molecular gas lasing medium which includes cooling the lasing medium to a temperature below about 150 K and injecting fission fragments through the lasing medium so as to preferentially excite low lying vibrational levels of the medium and to cause population inversions therein. The cooled gas lasing medium should have a mass areal density of about 5 .times. 10.sup.-.sup.3 grams/square centimeter, relaxation times of greater than 50 microseconds, and a broad range of excitable vibrational levels which are excitable by molecular collisions.

  2. Notch strength of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    The notch strength of composites is discussed. The point stress and average stress criteria relate the notched strength of a laminate to the average strength of a relatively long tensile coupon. Tests of notched specimens in which microstrain gages have been placed at or near the edges of the holes have measured strains much larger that those measured in an unnotched tensile coupon. Orthotropic stress concentration analyses of failed notched laminates have also indicated that failure occurred at strains much larger than those experienced on tensile coupons with normal gage lengths. This suggests that the high strains at the edge of a hole can be related to the very short length of fiber subjected to these strains. Lockheed has attempted to correlate a series of tests of several laminates with holes ranging from 0.19 to 0.50 in. Although the average stress criterion correlated well with test results for hole sizes equal to or greater than 0.50 in., it over-estimated the laminate strength in the range of hole sizes from 0.19 to 0.38 in. It thus appears that a theory is needed that is based on the mechanics of failure and is more generally applicable to the range of hole sizes and the varieties of laminates found in aircraft construction.

  3. High strength composites evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, S.M.

    1992-02-01

    A high-strength, thick-section, graphite/epoxy composite was identified. The purpose of this development effort was to evaluate candidate materials and provide LANL with engineering properties. Eight candidate materials (Samples 1000, 1100, 1200, 1300, 1400, 1500, 1600, and 1700) were chosen for evaluation. The Sample 1700 thermoplastic material was the strongest overall.

  4. Gender Differences in Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyward, Vivian H.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This investigation examined gender differences of 103 physically active men and women in upper and lower body strength as a function of lean body weight and the distribution of muscle and subcutaneous fat in the upper and lower limbs. Results are discussed. (Author/MT)

  5. Exotic modes of excitation in deformed neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kenichi

    2011-05-06

    Low-lying dipole excitation mode in neutron-rich Mg isotopes close to the drip line is investigated in the framework of the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov and the quasiparticle random-phase approximation employing the Skyrme and the pairing energy-density functionals. It is found that the low-lying dipole-strength distribution splits into the K{sup {pi}} = 0{sup -} and 1{sup -} components due to the nuclear deformation. The low-lying dipole strength increases as the neutron drip-line is approached.

  6. Probing the neutron skin thickness in collective modes of excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paar, N.; Horvat, A.

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear collective motion provides valuable constraint on the size of neutron-skin thickness and the properties of nuclear matter symmetry energy. By employing relativistic nuclear energy density functional (RNEDF) and covariance analysis related to χ2 fitting of the model parameters, relevant observables are identified for dipole excitations, which strongly correlate with the neutron-skin thickness (rnp), symmetry energy at saturation density (J) and slope of the symmetry energy (L). Using the RNEDF framework and experimental data on pygmy dipole strength (68Ni, 132Sn, 208Pb) and dipole polarizability (208Pb), it is shown how the values of J, and L, and rnp are constrained. The isotopic dependence of moments associated to dipole excitations in 116-136Sn shows that the low-energy dipole strength and polarizability in neutron-rich nuclei display strong sensitivity to the symmetry energy parameter J, more pronounced than in isotopes with moderate neutron-to-proton number ratios.

  7. Bulk Properties of Nuclear Matter From Excitations of Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Shlomo, Shalom

    2007-10-26

    We consider the predictive power of Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation in determining properties of finite nuclei and thereby in extracting bulk properties of infinite nuclear matter (NM) by extrapolation. In particular, we review the current status of determining the value of NM incompressibility coefficient K, considering the most sensitive method of analyzing the recent accurate experimental data on excitation strengths of compression modes of nuclei within microscopic relativistic and non-relativistic theoretical models. We discuss the consequences of common violations of self-consistency in HF based random-phase-approximation calculations of strength functions and present results of highly accurate calculations of centroid energies and excitation cross sections of giant resonances. Explanations (resolutions) of long standing discrepancies in the value of K are presented.

  8. Coulomb excitation of 31Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidlitz, M.; Mücher, D.; Reiter, P.; Bildstein, V.; Blazhev, A.; Bree, N.; Bruyneel, B.; Cederkäll, J.; Clement, E.; Davinson, T.; Van Duppen, P.; Ekström, A.; Finke, F.; Fraile, L. M.; Geibel, K.; Gernhäuser, R.; Hess, H.; Holler, A.; Huyse, M.; Ivanov, O.; Jolie, J.; Kalkühler, M.; Kotthaus, T.; Krücken, R.; Lutter, R.; Piselli, E.; Scheit, H.; Stefanescu, I.; Van de Walle, J.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wiens, A.

    2011-06-01

    The ground state properties of 31Mg indicate a change of nuclear shape at N = 19 with a deformed Jπ = 1 /2+ intruder state as a ground state, implying that 31Mg is part of the "island of inversion". The collective properties of excited states were the subject of a Coulomb excitation experiment at REX-ISOLDE, CERN, employing a radioactive 31Mg beam. De-excitation γ-rays were detected by the MINIBALL γ-spectrometer in coincidence with scattered particles in a segmented Si-detector. The level scheme of 31Mg was extended. Spin and parity assignment of the 945 keV state yielded 5 /2+ and its de-excitation is dominated by a strong collective M1 transition. Comparison of the transition probabilities of 30,31,32Mg establishes that for the N = 19 magnesium isotope not only the ground state but also excited states are largely dominated by a deformed pf intruder configuration.

  9. Excited waves in shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  10. Vibrational excitation induces double reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai; Leung, Lydie; Lim, Tingbin; Ning, Zhanyu; Polanyi, John C

    2014-12-23

    Electron-induced reaction at metal surfaces is currently the subject of extensive study. Here, we broaden the range of experimentation to a comparison of vibrational excitation with electronic excitation, for reaction of the same molecule at the same clean metal surface. In a previous study of electron-induced reaction by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we examined the dynamics of the concurrent breaking of the two C-I bonds of ortho-diiodobenzene physisorbed on Cu(110). The energy of the incident electron was near the electronic excitation threshold of E0=1.0 eV required to induce this single-electron process. STM has been employed in the present work to study the reaction dynamics at the substantially lower incident electron energies of 0.3 eV, well below the electronic excitation threshold. The observed increase in reaction rate with current was found to be fourth-order, indicative of multistep reagent vibrational excitation, in contrast to the first-order rate dependence found earlier for electronic excitation. The change in mode of excitation was accompanied by altered reaction dynamics, evidenced by a different pattern of binding of the chemisorbed products to the copper surface. We have modeled these altered reaction dynamics by exciting normal modes of vibration that distort the C-I bonds of the physisorbed reagent. Using the same ab initio ground potential-energy surface as in the prior work on electronic excitation, but with only vibrational excitation of the physisorbed reagent in the asymmetric stretch mode of C-I bonds, we obtained the observed alteration in reaction dynamics.

  11. High-energy excited states in 98Cd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazhev, A.; Braun, N.; Grawe, H.; Boutachkov, P.; Nara Singh, B. S.; Brock, T.; Liu, Zh; Wadsworth, R.; Górska, M.; Jolie, J.; Nowacki, F.; Pietri, S.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Kojouharov, I.; Caceres, L.; Engert, T.; Farinon, F.; Gerl, J.; Goel, N.; Grȩbosz, J.; Hoischen, R.; Kurz, N.; Nociforo, C.; Prochazka, A.; Schaffner, H.; Steer, S.; Weick, H.; Wollersheim, H.-J.; Ataç, A.; Bettermann, L.; Eppinger, K.; Faestermann, T.; Finke, F.; Geibel, K.; Hinke, C.; Gottardo, A.; Ilie, G.; Iwasaki, H.; Krücken, R.; Merchan, E.; Nyberg, J.; Pfützner, M.; Podolyák, Zs; Regan, P.; Reiter, P.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Rudolph, D.; Scholl, C.; Söderström, P.-A.; Warr, N.; Woods, P.

    2010-01-01

    In 98Cd a new high-energy isomeric γ-ray transition was identified, which confirms previous spin-parity assignments and enables for the first time the measurement of the E2 and E4 strength for the two decay branches of the isomer. Preliminary results on the 98Cd high-excitation level scheme are presented. A comparison to shell-model calculations as well as implications for the nuclear structure around 100Sn are discussed.

  12. Corium crust strength measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Lomperski, S.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-11-01

    Corium strength is of interest in the context of a severe reactor accident in which molten core material melts through the reactor vessel and collects on the containment basemat. Some accident management strategies involve pouring water over the melt to solidify it and halt corium/concrete interactions. The effectiveness of this method could be influenced by the strength of the corium crust at the interface between the melt and coolant. A strong, coherent crust anchored to the containment walls could allow the yet-molten corium to fall away from the crust as it erodes the basemat, thereby thermally decoupling the melt from the coolant and sharply reducing the cooling rate. This paper presents a diverse collection of measurements of the mechanical strength of corium. The data is based on load tests of corium samples in three different contexts: (1) small blocks cut from the debris of the large-scale MACE experiments, (2) 30 cm-diameter, 75 kg ingots produced by SSWICS quench tests, and (3) high temperature crusts loaded during large-scale corium/concrete interaction (CCI) tests. In every case the corium consisted of varying proportions of UO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and the constituents of concrete to represent a LWR melt at different stages of a molten core/concrete interaction. The collection of data was used to assess the strength and stability of an anchored, plant-scale crust. The results indicate that such a crust is likely to be too weak to support itself above the melt. It is therefore improbable that an anchored crust configuration could persist and the melt become thermally decoupled from the water layer to restrict cooling and prolong an attack of the reactor cavity concrete.

  13. Strength calculations on airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, A

    1925-01-01

    Every strength calculation, including those on airplanes, must be preceded by a determination of the forces to be taken into account. In the following discussion, it will be assumed that the magnitudes of these forces are known and that it is only a question of how, on the basis of these known forces, to meet the prescribed conditions on the one hand and the practical requirements on the other.

  14. Dipole excitations in the vibrational nucleus 112Cd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, H.; Nord, A.; de Almeida Pinto, A. E.; Beck, O.; Besserer, J.; von Brentano, P.; Drissi, S.; Eckert, T.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Jäger, D.; Jolie, J.; Kneissl, U.; Margraf, J.; Maser, H.; Pietralla, N.; Pitz, H. H.

    1999-08-01

    The strength distribution of low-lying dipole excitations in the medium-weight vibrational nucleus 112Cd was investigated by means of nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments (NRF) performed at the bremsstrahlung beam of the Stuttgart Dynamitron accelerator (end-point energy 4.1 MeV). Detailed information on excitation energies, spins, decay widths, and transition probabilities of about 20 new spin-1 states in 112Cd has been obtained. In comparison with comprehensive spectroscopic information available for 112Cd conclusions on the parities of the lowest states can be made. A strongly excited Jπ=1- state is interpreted as the 1- member of the quadrupole-octupole coupled quintuplet. The observed transition intensities are described in the framework of the interacting boson model and compared with those obtained from recent nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments on the neighboring Cd isotopes 113,114Cd.

  15. Coulomb Excitation of the N = 50 nucleus 80Zn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Walle, J.; Aksouh, F.; Ames, F.; Behrens, T.; Bildstein, V.; Blazhev, A.; Cederkäll, J.; Clément, E.; Cocolios, T. E.; Davinson, T.; Delahaye, P.; Eberth, J.; Ekström, A.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Fraile, L. M.; Franchoo, S.; Gernhauser, R.; Georgiev, G.; Habs, D.; Heyde, K.; Huber, G.; Huyse, M.; Ibrahim, F.; Ivanov, O.; Iwanicki, J.; Jolie, J.; Kester, O.; Köster, U.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Lauer, M.; Lisetskiy, A. F.; Lutter, R.; Marsh, B. A.; Mayet, P.; Niedermaier, O.; Nilsson, T.; Pantea, M.; Perru, O.; Raabe, R.; Reiter, P.; Sawicka, M.; Scheit, H.; Schrieder, G.; Schwalm, D.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Sieber, T.; Sletten, G.; Smirnova, N.; Stanoiu, M.; Stefanescu, I.; Thomas, J.-C.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; van Duppen, P.; Verney, D.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Weisshaar, D.; Wenander, F.; Wolf, B. H.; Zielińska, M.

    2008-05-01

    Neutron rich Zinc isotopes, including the N = 50 nucleus 80Zn, were produced and post-accelerated at the Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility REX-ISOLDE (CERN). Low-energy Coulomb excitation was induced on these isotopes after post-acceleration, yielding B(E2) strengths to the first excited 2+ states. For the first time, an excited state in 80Zn was observed and the 21+ state in 78Zn was established. The measured B(E2,21+-->01+) values are compared to two sets of large scale shell model calculations. Both calculations reproduce the observed B(E2) systematics for the full Zinc isotopic chain. The results for N = 50 isotones indicate a good N = 50 shell closure and a strong Z = 28 proton core polarization. The new results serve as benchmarks to establish theoretical models, predicting the nuclear properties of the doubly magic nucleus 78Ni.

  16. Excitation energies along a range-separated adiabatic connection

    SciTech Connect

    Rebolini, Elisa Toulouse, Julien Savin, Andreas; Teale, Andrew M.; Helgaker, Trygve

    2014-07-28

    We present a study of the variation of total energies and excitation energies along a range-separated adiabatic connection. This connection links the non-interacting Kohn–Sham electronic system to the physical interacting system by progressively switching on the electron–electron interactions whilst simultaneously adjusting a one-electron effective potential so as to keep the ground-state density constant. The interactions are introduced in a range-dependent manner, first introducing predominantly long-range, and then all-range, interactions as the physical system is approached, as opposed to the conventional adiabatic connection where the interactions are introduced by globally scaling the standard Coulomb interaction. Reference data are reported for the He and Be atoms and the H{sub 2} molecule, obtained by calculating the short-range effective potential at the full configuration-interaction level using Lieb's Legendre-transform approach. As the strength of the electron–electron interactions increases, the excitation energies, calculated for the partially interacting systems along the adiabatic connection, offer increasingly accurate approximations to the exact excitation energies. Importantly, the excitation energies calculated at an intermediate point of the adiabatic connection are much better approximations to the exact excitation energies than are the corresponding Kohn–Sham excitation energies. This is particularly evident in situations involving strong static correlation effects and states with multiple excitation character, such as the dissociating H{sub 2} molecule. These results highlight the utility of long-range interacting reference systems as a starting point for the calculation of excitation energies and are of interest for developing and analyzing practical approximate range-separated density-functional methodologies.

  17. Fragmentation of low-lying dipole strength in the odd-mass nucleus 133Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besserer, J.; Beck, O.; von Brentano, P.; Eckert, T.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Jäger, D.; Kneissl, U.; Margraf, J.; Maser, H.; Nord, A.; Pietralla, N.; Pitz, H. H.; Zilges, A.

    1997-09-01

    The fragmentation of low-lying dipole strength in the odd-mass nucleus 133Cs has been investigated in nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) experiments performed at the bremsstrahlung beam of the Stuttgart Dynamitron accelerator at an end-point energy of 4.1 MeV. In the excitation energy range 2.3 - 3.7 MeV in total 22 new dipole excitations were observed. From the high-resolution γ-ray spectra measured by three high-efficiency Ge detectors the reduced excitation probabilities B(E1)↑ or B(M1)↑ were deduced. The fragmentation and absolute total strengths of the detected dipole excitations are compared with results for the neighboring even-even, γ-soft nucleus 134Ba, where both, rather strong scissors mode-like M1 and two-phonon E1 excitations are known from recent NRF experiments.

  18. Collisional excitation of the highly excited hydrogen atoms in the dipole form of the semiclassical impact parameter and Born approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1971-01-01

    Expressions for the excitation cross section of the highly excited states of the hydrogenlike atoms by fast charged particles have been derived in the dipole approximation of the semiclassical impact parameter and the Born approximations, making use of a formula for the asymptotic expansion of the oscillator strength of the hydrogenlike atoms given by Menzel. When only the leading term in the asymptotic expansion is retained, the expression for the cross section becomes identical to the expression obtained by the method of the classical collision and correspondence principle given by Percival and Richards. Comparisons are made between the Bethe coefficients obtained here and the Bethe coefficients of the Born approximation for transitions where the Born calculation is available. Satisfactory agreement is obtained only for n yields n + 1 transitions, with n the principal quantum number of the excited state.

  19. Raman signal enhancement by multiple beam excitation and its application for the detection of chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sakshi; Ahmad, Azeem; Mehta, Dalip S.; Gambhir, Vijayeta; Reddy, Martha N.

    2015-08-31

    In a typical Raman based sensor, a single laser beam is used for exciting the sample and the backscattered or forward scattered light is collected using collection optics and is analyzed by a spectrometer. We have investigated that by means of exciting the sample with multiple beams, i.e., by dividing the same input power of the single beam into two or three or more beams and exciting the sample from different angles, the Raman signal enhances significantly. Due to the presence of multiple beams passing through the same volume of the sample, an interference pattern is formed and the volume of interaction of excitation beams with the sample increases. By means of this geometry, the enhancement in the Raman signal is observed and it was found that the signal strength increases linearly with the increase in number of excitation beams. Experimental results of this scheme for excitation of the samples are reported for explosive detection at a standoff distance.

  20. Coulomb excitation of 107In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiJulio, D. D.; Cederkall, J.; Fahlander, C.; Ekström, A.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Albers, M.; Bildstein, V.; Blazhev, A.; Darby, I.; Davinson, T.; De Witte, H.; Diriken, J.; Fransen, Ch.; Geibel, K.; Gernhäuser, R.; Görgen, A.; Hess, H.; Heyde, K.; Iwanicki, J.; Lutter, R.; Reiter, P.; Scheck, M.; Seidlitz, M.; Siem, S.; Taprogge, J.; Tveten, G. M.; Van de Walle, J.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wimmer, K.

    2013-01-01

    The radioactive isotope 107In was studied using sub-barrier Coulomb excitation at the REX-ISOLDE facility at CERN. Two γ rays were observed during the experiment, corresponding to the low-lying 11/2+ and 3/2- states. The reduced transition probability of the 11/2+ state was determined with the semiclassical Coulomb excitation code gosia2. The result is discussed in comparison to large-scale shell-model calculations, previous unified-model calculations, and earlier Coulomb excitation measurements in the odd-mass In isotopes.

  1. Resonance Radiation and Excited Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Allan C. G.; Zemansky, Mark W.

    2009-06-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Physical and chemical effects connected with resonance radiation; 3. Absorption lines and measurements of the lifetime of the resonance state; 4. Collision processes involving excited atoms; 5. The polarization of resonance radiation; Appendix; Index.

  2. Functional organization of excitatory synaptic strength in primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Dylan R.; Houlton, Rachael; Sader, Elie N.; Ko, Ho; Hofer, Sonja B.; Mrsic-Flogel, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    The strength of synaptic connections fundamentally determines how neurons influence each other’s firing. Excitatory connection amplitudes between pairs of cortical neurons vary over two orders of magnitude, comprising only very few strong connections among many weaker ones1–9. Although this highly skewed distribution of connection strengths is observed in diverse cortical areas1–9, its functional significance remains unknown: it is not clear how connection strength relates to neuronal response properties, nor how strong and weak inputs contribute to information processing in local microcircuits. Here we reveal that the strength of connections between layer 2/3 (L2/3) pyramidal neurons in mouse primary visual cortex (V1) obeys a simple rule—the few strong connections occur between neurons with most correlated responses, while only weak connections link neurons with uncorrelated responses. Moreover, we show that strong and reciprocal connections occur between cells with similar spatial receptive field structure. Although weak connections far outnumber strong connections, each neuron receives the majority of its local excitation from a small number of strong inputs provided by the few neurons with similar responses to visual features. By dominating recurrent excitation, these infrequent yet powerful inputs disproportionately contribute to feature preference and selectivity. Therefore, our results show that the apparently complex organization of excitatory connection strength reflects the similarity of neuronal responses, and suggest that rare, strong connections mediate stimulus-specific response amplification in cortical microcircuits. PMID:25652823

  3. Collisional excitation of interstellar formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.; Garrison, B. J.; Lester, W. A., Jr.; Miller, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Previous calculations for rates of excitation of ortho-H2CO by collisions with He have been extended to higher rotational levels and kinetic temperatures to 80 K. Rates for para-H2CO have also been computed. Pressure-broadening widths for several spectral lines have been obtained from these calculations and are found to agree with recent data within the experimental uncertainty of 10%. Excitation of formaldehyde by collisions with H2 molecules is also discussed.

  4. Excitations of strange bottom baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woloshyn, R. M.

    2016-09-01

    The ground-state and first-excited-state masses of Ωb and Ω_{bb} baryons are calculated in lattice QCD using dynamical 2 + 1 flavour gauge fields. A set of baryon operators employing different combinations of smeared quark fields was used in the framework of the variational method. Results for radial excitation energies were confirmed by carrying out a supplementary multiexponential fitting analysis. Comparison is made with quark model calculations.

  5. Exciting Polaritons with Quantum Light.

    PubMed

    López Carreño, J C; Sánchez Muñoz, C; Sanvitto, D; del Valle, E; Laussy, F P

    2015-11-01

    We discuss the excitation of polaritons-strongly coupled states of light and matter-by quantum light, instead of the usual laser or thermal excitation. As one illustration of the new horizons thus opened, we introduce "Mollow spectroscopy"-a theoretical concept for a spectroscopic technique that consists of scanning the output of resonance fluorescence onto an optical target-from which weak nonlinearities can be read with high precision even in strongly dissipative environments. PMID:26588401

  6. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Christophorou, L.G. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 7} times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs.

  7. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  8. Dynamic Strength of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhabildas, Lalit

    2011-06-01

    Historically when shock loading techniques became accessible in the early fifties it was assumed that materials behave like fluids implying that materials cannot support any shear stresses. Early and careful investigation in the sixties by G. R. Fowles in aluminum indicated otherwise. When he compared his Hugoniot compression measurements to hydrostatic pressure compression measurements in the pressure volume plane he noticed that the shock data lay above the hydrostatic compression curve - which laid the ground work for what is the basis for elastic-plastic theories that exist today. In this talk, a brief historical perspective on strength measurements in materials will be discussed including how time-resolved techniques have played a role in allowing estimates of the strength of materials at over Mbar stress. This is crucial especially at high stresses since we are determining values that are small compared to the loading stress. Even though we have made considerable progress in our understanding of materials, there are still many anomalies and unanswered questions. Some of these anomalies are fertile grounds for further and future research and will be mentioned.

  9. Octupole Excitation of Trapped Ion Motion for Precision Mass Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollen, G.; Ringle, R.; Schury, P.; Schwarz, S.; Sun, T.

    2005-04-01

    National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA An azimuthal octupole radiofrequency field has been used to excite the ion motion of ^40Ar^+ ions stored in a Penning trap. A resonant response was observed at twice the ions' true cyclotron frequency φc=q/m.B. The experiment has been performed with the 9.4-T Penning trap system of the recently commissioned LEBIT facility at the NSCL at MSU [1]. Similar to the excitation with an azimuthal quadrupole field at φc [2,3], octupole excitation at 2φc gives rise to a periodic beating of the ion motion between magnetron and reduced cyclotron motion. Differences are observed in the dependence of the excited ion motion on initial amplitudes and phases of the radial eigen motions. The observed behavior of the ions is found to be in good agreement with the results of numerical simulations. The technique still requires further testing but the first results indicate that 2φc excitation may provide benefits that are similar to doubling the magnetic field strength B. In particular precision mass measurements of short-lived rare isotopes may benefit from this technique by being able to reach a given precision with shorter ion storage and observation times. [1] S. Schwarz et al, Nucl. Instr. Meth. B204 (2004) 507 [2] G. Bollen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 68 (1990) 4355 [3] M. König et al., Int. J. Mass Spec. Ion. Proc. 142 (1995) 95

  10. Vibronic coupling in the excited-states of carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Miki, Takeshi; Buckup, Tiago; Krause, Marie S; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J; Motzkus, Marcus

    2016-04-28

    The ultrafast femtochemistry of carotenoids is governed by the interaction between electronic excited states, which has been explained by the relaxation dynamics within a few hundred femtoseconds from the lowest optically allowed excited state S2 to the optically dark state S1. Extending this picture, some additional dark states (3A(g)(-) and 1B(u)(-)) and their interaction with the S2 state have also been suggested to play a major role in the ultrafast deactivation of carotenoids and their properties. Here, we investigate the interaction between such dark and bright electronic excited states of open chain carotenoids, particularly its dependence on the number of conjugated double bonds (N). We focus on the ultrafast wave packet motion on the excited potential surface, which is modified by the interaction between bright and dark electronic states. Such a coupling between electronic states leads to a shift of the vibrational frequency during the excited-state evolution. In this regard, pump-degenerate four-wave mixing (pump-DFWM) is applied to a series of carotenoids with different numbers of conjugated double bonds N = 9, 10, 11 and 13 (neurosporene, spheroidene, lycopene and spirilloxanthin, respectively). Moreover, we demonstrate in a closed-chain carotenoid (lutein) that the coupling strength and therefore the vibrational shift can be tailored by changing the energy degeneracy between the 1B(u)(+) and 1B(u)(-) states via solvent interaction.

  11. Strength Training and Children's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faigenbaum, Avery D.

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of the potential health benefits of strength training for children, discussing the role of strength training in preventing sports-related injuries and highlighting design considerations for such programs. The focus is on musculoskeletal adaptations to strength training that are observable in healthy children. Guidelines for…

  12. Strength Development for Young Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Larry W.; Jackson, Allen; Gaudet, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Participation in strength training is important for older children or young adolescences who wish to improve fitness or participate in sports. When designing strength training programs for our youth this age group is immature anatomically, physiologically, and psychologically. For the younger or inexperienced group the strength training activities…

  13. The fracture strength and frictional strength of Weber Sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    The fracture strength and frictional strength of Weber Sandstone have been measured as a function of confining pressure and pore pressure. Both the fracture strength and the frictional strength obey the law of effective stress, that is, the strength is determined not by the confining pressure alone but by the difference between the confining pressure and the pore pressure. The fracture strength of the rock varies by as much as 20 per cent depending on the cement between the grains, but the frictional strength is independent of lithology. Over the range 0 2 kb, ??=0??5 + 0??6??n. This relationship also holds for other rocks such as gabbro, dunite, serpentinite, granite and limestone. ?? 1975.

  14. Configuration-interaction relativistic-many-body-perturbation-theory calculations of photoionization cross sections from quasicontinuum oscillator strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Savukov, I. M.; Filin, D. V.

    2014-12-29

    Many applications are in need of accurate photoionization cross sections, especially in the case of complex atoms. Configuration-interaction relativistic-many-body-perturbation theory (CI-RMBPT) has been successful in predicting atomic energies, matrix elements between discrete states, and other properties, which is quite promising, but it has not been applied to photoionization problems owing to extra complications arising from continuum states. In this paper a method that will allow the conversion of discrete CI-(R)MPBT oscillator strengths (OS) to photoionization cross sections with minimal modifications of the codes is introduced and CI-RMBPT cross sections of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe are calculated. A consistent agreement with experiment is found. RMBPT corrections are particularly significant for Ar, Kr, and Xe and improve agreement with experimental results compared to the particle-hole CI method. As a result, the demonstrated conversion method can be applied to CI-RMBPT photoionization calculations for a large number of multivalence atoms and ions.

  15. Configuration-interaction relativistic-many-body-perturbation-theory calculations of photoionization cross sections from quasicontinuum oscillator strengths

    DOE PAGES

    Savukov, I. M.; Filin, D. V.

    2014-12-29

    Many applications are in need of accurate photoionization cross sections, especially in the case of complex atoms. Configuration-interaction relativistic-many-body-perturbation theory (CI-RMBPT) has been successful in predicting atomic energies, matrix elements between discrete states, and other properties, which is quite promising, but it has not been applied to photoionization problems owing to extra complications arising from continuum states. In this paper a method that will allow the conversion of discrete CI-(R)MPBT oscillator strengths (OS) to photoionization cross sections with minimal modifications of the codes is introduced and CI-RMBPT cross sections of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe are calculated. A consistent agreementmore » with experiment is found. RMBPT corrections are particularly significant for Ar, Kr, and Xe and improve agreement with experimental results compared to the particle-hole CI method. As a result, the demonstrated conversion method can be applied to CI-RMBPT photoionization calculations for a large number of multivalence atoms and ions.« less

  16. Failure strength of icy lithospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Banerdt, W. B.

    1987-01-01

    Lithospheric strengths derived from friction on pre-existing fractures and ductile flow laws show that the tensile strength of intact ice under applicable conditions is actually an order of magnitude stronger than widely assumed. It is demonstrated that this strength is everywhere greater than that required to initiate frictional sliding on pre-existing fractures and faults. Because the tensile strength of intact ice increases markedly with confining pressure, it actually exceeds the frictional strength at all depths. Thus, icy lithospheres will fail by frictional slip along pre-existing fractures at yeild stresses greater than previously assumed rather than opening tensile cracks in intact ice.

  17. QM02 Strength Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2010-11-24

    In late April, Paul Emma reported that his orbit fitting program could find a reasonably good fit only if the strength of QM02 was changed from design value of -5.83 kG to -6.25 kG - a strength change of 7.3%. In late May, we made a focal length measurement of QM02 by turning off all focusing optics between YC07 and BPMS1 (in the spectrometer line) except for QM02 and adjusted the strength of QM02 so that vertical kicks by YC07 did not produce any displacements at BPMS1 (see Figure 1). The result was quoted in the LCLS elog was that QM02 appeared to 6% too weak, and approximately agreed with Paul's observation. The analysis used for the entry in the log book was based on the thin lens approximation and used the following numbers: Distance YC07 to QM02 - 5.128 m; Distance QM02 to BPMS1 - 1.778 m; and Energy - 135 MeV. These distances were computed from the X,Z coordinates given the on the large plot of the Injector on the wall of the control room. On review of the MAD output file coordinates, it seems that the distance used for QM02 to BPMS1 is not 1.778 m. The correct value is Distance, center of QM02 to BPMS1 - 1.845 m. There may be a typo on the wall chart values for the coordinates of BPMS1, or perhaps there was a misinterpretation of edge versus center of QM02. In any case, the effect of this change is that the thin lens estimate changes from 6% too weak to 9% too weak. At John Galayda's suggestion, we looked into the thin lens versus thick lens approximation. A Mathematica program was written to solve for the K value of the QM02, in the thick lens approximation, that provides point to point focusing from YC07 to BPMS1, and to compare this number with the value obtained using the thin lens approximation. The length of QM02 used in the thick lens calculation is the effective length determined by magnetic measurements of 0.108 m. The result of the Mathematica calculation is that the thin lens approximation predicts less magnet strength is required to produce the

  18. Gaussian discriminating strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigovacca, L.; Farace, A.; De Pasquale, A.; Giovannetti, V.

    2015-10-01

    We present a quantifier of nonclassical correlations for bipartite, multimode Gaussian states. It is derived from the Discriminating Strength measure, introduced for finite dimensional systems in Farace et al., [New J. Phys. 16, 073010 (2014), 10.1088/1367-2630/16/7/073010]. As the latter the new measure exploits the quantum Chernoff bound to gauge the susceptibility of the composite system with respect to local perturbations induced by unitary gates extracted from a suitable set of allowed transformations (the latter being identified by posing some general requirements). Closed expressions are provided for the case of two-mode Gaussian states obtained by squeezing or by linearly mixing via a beam splitter a factorized two-mode thermal state. For these density matrices, we study how nonclassical correlations are related with the entanglement present in the system and with its total photon number.

  19. High strength ferritic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high-strength ferritic alloy useful for fast reactor duct and cladding applications where an iron base contains from about 9% to about 13% by weight chromium, from about 4% to about 8% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight niobium, from about 0.1% to about 0.3% by weight vanadium, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight silicon, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight manganese, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, and from about 0.04% to about 0.12% by weight carbon.

  20. Systematics of strength function sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Calvin W.

    2015-08-28

    Sum rules provide useful insights into transition strength functions and are often expressed as expectation values of an operator. In this letter I demonstrate that non-energy-weighted transition sum rules have strong secular dependences on the energy of the initial state. Such non-trivial systematics have consequences: the simplification suggested by the generalized Brink–Axel hypothesis, for example, does not hold for most cases, though it weakly holds in at least some cases for electric dipole transitions. Furthermore, I show the systematics can be understood through spectral distribution theory, calculated via traces of operators and of products of operators. Seen through this lens, violation of the generalized Brink–Axel hypothesis is unsurprising: one expectssum rules to evolve with excitation energy. Moreover, to lowest order the slope of the secular evolution can be traced to a component of the Hamiltonian being positive (repulsive) or negative (attractive).

  1. Systematics of strength function sum rules

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Calvin W.

    2015-08-28

    Sum rules provide useful insights into transition strength functions and are often expressed as expectation values of an operator. In this letter I demonstrate that non-energy-weighted transition sum rules have strong secular dependences on the energy of the initial state. Such non-trivial systematics have consequences: the simplification suggested by the generalized Brink–Axel hypothesis, for example, does not hold for most cases, though it weakly holds in at least some cases for electric dipole transitions. Furthermore, I show the systematics can be understood through spectral distribution theory, calculated via traces of operators and of products of operators. Seen through this lens,more » violation of the generalized Brink–Axel hypothesis is unsurprising: one expectssum rules to evolve with excitation energy. Moreover, to lowest order the slope of the secular evolution can be traced to a component of the Hamiltonian being positive (repulsive) or negative (attractive).« less

  2. Properties of Shell-Model Wavefunctions at High Excitation Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, Njema Jioni

    Within the framework of the nuclear shell model with a realistic residual hamiltonian one can obtain the exact solution of the many-body problem. This makes it possible to study the interrelation between regular and chaotic features of dynamics in a generic many-body system with strong interaction. As an important application, we analyse the fragmentation of simple configurations as a function of excitation energy and interaction strength and examine the transition strengths induced by simple operators as a function of excitation energy. The analysis is performed for two systems; that of 12 valence particles in the sd-shell, or 28Si, and that of 8 valence particles in the sd-shell, or 24Mg. For the system of 12 valence particles in the sd-shell, we examine the fragmentation of shell-model basis states. For the system of 8 valence nucleons in the sd-shell, we examine the fragmentation associated with single-nucleon transfer and Gamow-Teller transitions. For the fragmentation of basis states, we use our statistics to establish the generic shape of the strength function distribution in the region of strong mixing. For the realistic interaction, the strength function distribution is close to Gaussian in the central part of the energy spectra. The width of the distribution is larger than predicted by Fermi's golden rule (4). We then take this one step further and examine the strength distributions associated with the one-nucleon transfer operator, aλ†, and the Gamow-Teller (GT) operator, Σλλ'(σμ τ±) λλ'aλ†a λ'. The spectroscopic factor, which is proportional to the square of the matrix element for the aλ† operator, is the simplest quantity used in predicting experimental observables. In our discussion of Gamow-Teller transitions, we examine both the GT strength function distribution and the values of total strength B(GT). For all the cases we examine, we take advantage of the reliability of our model for low-lying levels and our statistics to explore

  3. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    PubMed Central

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H.; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; Lambert, Guillaume; Zeitoun, Philippe; Gutt, Christian; Jal, Emmanuelle; Reid, Alexander H.; Granitzka, Patrick W.; Jaouen, Nicolas; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P.; Mitra, Ankush; Carron, Sebastian; Pfau, Bastian; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Schneider, Michael; Eisebitt, Stefan; Lüning, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset and at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. Our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions. PMID:26733106

  4. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization.

    PubMed

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bharati; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; Lambert, Guillaume; Zeitoun, Philippe; Gutt, Christian; Jal, Emmanuelle; Reid, Alexander H; Granitzka, Patrick W; Jaouen, Nicolas; Dakovski, Georgi L; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P; Mitra, Ankush; Carron, Sebastian; Pfau, Bastian; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Schneider, Michael; Eisebitt, Stefan; Lüning, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset and at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. Our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions. PMID:26733106

  5. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    DOE PAGES

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H.; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; et al

    2016-01-06

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset andmore » at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. As a result, our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions.« less

  6. Excitation optimization for damage detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bement, Matthew T; Bewley, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    A technique is developed to answer the important question: 'Given limited system response measurements and ever-present physical limits on the level of excitation, what excitation should be provided to a system to make damage most detectable?' Specifically, a method is presented for optimizing excitations that maximize the sensitivity of output measurements to perturbations in damage-related parameters estimated with an extended Kalman filter. This optimization is carried out in a computationally efficient manner using adjoint-based optimization and causes the innovations term in the extended Kalman filter to be larger in the presence of estimation errors, which leads to a better estimate of the damage-related parameters in question. The technique is demonstrated numerically on a nonlinear 2 DOF system, where a significant improvement in the damage-related parameter estimation is observed.

  7. Pair Excitations in Fermi Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Helga M.; Krotscheck, Eckhard; Schörkhuber, Karl; Springer, Josef

    2006-09-01

    We present a theory of multi-pair excitations in strongly interacting Fermi systems. Based on an equations-of-motion approach for time-dependent pair correlations it leads to a qualitatively new structure of the density-density response function. Our theory reduces to both, i) the "correlated" random-phase approximation (RPA) for fermions if the two-pair excitations are ignored, and ii) the correlated Brillouin-Wigner perturbation theory for bosons in the appropriate limit. The theory preserves the two first energy-weighted sum rules. A familiar problem of the standard RPA is that its zero-sound mode is energetically much higher than found in experiments. The popular cure of introducing an average effective mass in the Lindhard function violates sum rules and describes the physics incorrectly. We demonstrate that the inclusion of correlated pair excitations gives the correct dispersion. As in 4He, a modification of the effective mass is unnecessary also in 3He.

  8. Calculation of molecular excitation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, George

    1993-01-01

    State-to-state collisional excitation rates for interstellar molecules observed by radio astronomers continue to be required to interpret observed line intensities in terms of local temperatures and densities. A problem of particular interest is collisional excitation of water which is important for modeling the observed interstellar masers. In earlier work supported by a different NASA Grant, excitation of water in collisions with He atoms was studied; after many years of successively more refined calculations that problem now seems to be well understood, and discrepancies with earlier experimental data for related (pressure broadening) phenomena are believed to reflect experimental errors. Because of interstellar abundances, excitation by H2, the dominant interstellar species, is much more important than excitation by He, although it has been argued that rates for excitation by these are similar. Under the current grant theoretical study of this problem has begun which is greatly complicated by the additional degrees of freedom which must be included both in determining the interaction potential and also in the molecular scattering calculation. We have now computed the interaction forces for nearly a thousand molecular geometries and are close to having an acceptable global fit to these points which is necessary for the molecular dynamics calculations. Also, extensive modifications have been made to the molecular scattering code, MOLSCAT. These included coding the rotational basis sets and coupling matrix elements required for collisions of an asymmetric top with a linear rotor. A new method for numerical solution of the coupled equations has been incorporated. Because of the long-ranged nature of the water-hydrogen interaction it is necessary to integrate the equations to rather large intermolecular separations, and the integration methods previously available in MOLSCAT are not ideal for such cases. However, the method used by Alexander in his HIBRIDON code is

  9. Magnetically induced pulser laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.S.; Leopold, K.E.

    1985-02-15

    A novel excitation scheme has been developed for excimer discharge lasers. The technique uses pulse transformer technology to induce a fast, high voltage pulse directly onto a ground potential laser electrode resulting in the breakdown of the laser gas mix. Saturation of the pulse transformer core inductance then permits efficient energy transfer from the main energy storage circuit into the discharge. When this excitation technique was used in a XeCl laser an output energy density of 2.5 J/l and an overall electrical to optical efficiency of 2% were obtained. The technique appears promising for the development of high energy, high average power excimer lasers.

  10. Autoresonant excitation of antiproton plasmas.

    PubMed

    Andresen, G B; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Carpenter, P T; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hurt, J L; Hydomako, R; Jonsell, S; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2011-01-14

    We demonstrate controllable excitation of the center-of-mass longitudinal motion of a thermal antiproton plasma using a swept-frequency autoresonant drive. When the plasma is cold, dense, and highly collective in nature, we observe that the entire system behaves as a single-particle nonlinear oscillator, as predicted by a recent theory. In contrast, only a fraction of the antiprotons in a warm plasma can be similarly excited. Antihydrogen was produced and trapped by using this technique to drive antiprotons into a positron plasma, thereby initiating atomic recombination.

  11. Autoresonant Excitation of Antiproton Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; So, C.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Carpenter, P. T.; Hurt, J. L.; Robicheaux, F.; Cesar, C. L.

    2011-01-14

    We demonstrate controllable excitation of the center-of-mass longitudinal motion of a thermal antiproton plasma using a swept-frequency autoresonant drive. When the plasma is cold, dense, and highly collective in nature, we observe that the entire system behaves as a single-particle nonlinear oscillator, as predicted by a recent theory. In contrast, only a fraction of the antiprotons in a warm plasma can be similarly excited. Antihydrogen was produced and trapped by using this technique to drive antiprotons into a positron plasma, thereby initiating atomic recombination.

  12. Directional excitation without breaking reciprocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezani, Hamidreza; Dubois, Marc; Wang, Yuan; Shen, Y. Ron; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-09-01

    We propose a mechanism for directional excitation without breaking reciprocity. This is achieved by embedding an impedance matched parity-time symmetric potential in a three-port system. The amplitude distribution within the gain and loss regions is strongly influenced by the direction of the incoming field. Consequently, the excitation of the third port is contingent on the direction of incidence while transmission in the main channel is immune. Our design improves the four-port directional coupler scheme, as there is no need to implement an anechoic termination to one of the ports.

  13. Excitation of positive ions by low-energy electrons - Relevance to the Io Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Williams, I. D.; Shemansky, D. E.

    1993-03-01

    The importance of measuring electron-ion excitation cross sections in singly and multiply charged positive ions is outlined, and recent results for Mg II and O II ions are given using the JPL's electron energy-loss merged-beams apparatus. Theoretical comparisons are given with two five-state close-coupling calculations. The energy variation of the collision strength is fitted with a semiempirical analytic function which includes approximations to polarization, resonance, and exchange contributions. In O II, first spectra anywhere of electron excitation of the optically allowed transitions are presented. In addition, excitations of two low lying, optically forbidden transitions are detected for the first time.

  14. Electromagnetic excitation of ultrasonic oscillations by yttrium iron garnet films on gallium gadolinium garnet substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarnatskii, V. M.; Mavlonazarov, I. O.; Lutsev, L. V.

    2014-07-01

    We have studied the phenomenon of contactless excitation of ultrasonic oscillations by thin yttrium iron garnet (YIG) films on gallium gadolinium garnet (GGG) substrates upon application of the superposition of a constant magnetic bias field and alternating magnetic field. Dimensional resonance effects that cannot be explained in the framework of existing theoretical notions have been discovered, in particular, in dependences of the amplitude of excited longitudinal oscillations on the YIG film thickness, frequency of ultrasound, and degree of homogeneity and strength of the magnetic bias field. It is suggested that the observed phenomenon is caused by resonant participation of the intrinsic oscillations of domain walls in the excitation of ultrasound.

  15. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1), except that those for mobile offshore drilling units must meet... 46 CFR 110.10-1). In particular, no static exciter may be used for excitation of an emergency... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must...

  16. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1), except that those for mobile offshore drilling units must meet... 46 CFR 110.10-1). In particular, no static exciter may be used for excitation of an emergency... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must...

  17. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1), except that those for mobile offshore drilling units must meet... 46 CFR 110.10-1). In particular, no static exciter may be used for excitation of an emergency... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must...

  18. Strength of Chemical Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, Jerry D.

    1973-01-01

    Students are not generally made aware of the extraordinary magnitude of the strengths of chemical bonds in terms of the forces required to pull them apart. Molecular bonds are usually considered in terms of the energies required to break them, and we are not astonished at the values encountered. For example, the Cl2 bond energy, 57.00 kcal/mole, amounts to only 9.46 x 10(sup -20) cal/molecule, a very small amount of energy, indeed, and impossible to measure directly. However, the forces involved in realizing the energy when breaking the bond operate over a very small distance, only 2.94 A, and, thus, f(sub ave) approx. equals De/(r - r(sub e)) must be very large. The forces involved in dissociating the molecule are discussed in the following. In consideration of average forces, the molecule shall be assumed arbitrarily to be dissociated when the atoms are far enough separated so that the potential, relative to that of the infinitely separated atoms, is reduced by 99.5% from the potential of the molecule at the equilibrium bond length (r(sub e)) for Cl2 of 1.988 A this occurs at 4.928 A.

  19. Parametric excitation and squeezing in a many-body spinor condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, T. M.; Anquez, M.; Robbins, B. A.; Yang, X. Y.; Land, B. J.; Hamley, C. D.; Chapman, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    Atomic spins are usually manipulated using radio frequency or microwave fields to excite Rabi oscillations between different spin states. These are single-particle quantum control techniques that perform ideally with individual particles or non-interacting ensembles. In many-body systems, inter-particle interactions are unavoidable; however, interactions can be used to realize new control schemes unique to interacting systems. Here we demonstrate a many-body control scheme to coherently excite and control the quantum spin states of an atomic Bose gas that realizes parametric excitation of many-body collective spin states by time varying the relative strength of the Zeeman and spin-dependent collisional interaction energies at multiples of the natural frequency of the system. Although parametric excitation of a classical system is ineffective from the ground state, we show that in our experiment, parametric excitation from the quantum ground state leads to the generation of quantum squeezed states.

  20. Parametric excitation and squeezing in a many-body spinor condensate.

    PubMed

    Hoang, T M; Anquez, M; Robbins, B A; Yang, X Y; Land, B J; Hamley, C D; Chapman, M S

    2016-01-01

    Atomic spins are usually manipulated using radio frequency or microwave fields to excite Rabi oscillations between different spin states. These are single-particle quantum control techniques that perform ideally with individual particles or non-interacting ensembles. In many-body systems, inter-particle interactions are unavoidable; however, interactions can be used to realize new control schemes unique to interacting systems. Here we demonstrate a many-body control scheme to coherently excite and control the quantum spin states of an atomic Bose gas that realizes parametric excitation of many-body collective spin states by time varying the relative strength of the Zeeman and spin-dependent collisional interaction energies at multiples of the natural frequency of the system. Although parametric excitation of a classical system is ineffective from the ground state, we show that in our experiment, parametric excitation from the quantum ground state leads to the generation of quantum squeezed states. PMID:27044675

  1. Parametric excitation and squeezing in a many-body spinor condensate

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, T. M.; Anquez, M.; Robbins, B. A.; Yang, X. Y.; Land, B. J.; Hamley, C. D.; Chapman, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Atomic spins are usually manipulated using radio frequency or microwave fields to excite Rabi oscillations between different spin states. These are single-particle quantum control techniques that perform ideally with individual particles or non-interacting ensembles. In many-body systems, inter-particle interactions are unavoidable; however, interactions can be used to realize new control schemes unique to interacting systems. Here we demonstrate a many-body control scheme to coherently excite and control the quantum spin states of an atomic Bose gas that realizes parametric excitation of many-body collective spin states by time varying the relative strength of the Zeeman and spin-dependent collisional interaction energies at multiples of the natural frequency of the system. Although parametric excitation of a classical system is ineffective from the ground state, we show that in our experiment, parametric excitation from the quantum ground state leads to the generation of quantum squeezed states. PMID:27044675

  2. Study of gamma-ray strength functions

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.; Dietrich, F.S.

    1980-08-07

    The use of gamma-ray strength function systematics to calculate neutron capture cross sections and capture gamma-ray spectra is discussed. The ratio of the average capture width, GAMMA/sub ..gamma../-bar, to the average level spacing, D/sub obs/, both at the neutron separation energy, can be derived from such systematics with much less uncertainty than from separate systematics for values of GAMMA/sub ..gamma../-bar and D/sub obs/. In particular, the E1 gamma-ray strength function is defined in terms of the giant dipole resonance (GDR). The GDR line shape is modeled with the usual Lorentzian function and also with a new energy-dependent, Breit-Wigner (EDBW) function. This latter form is further parameterized in terms of two overlapping resonances, even for nuclei where photonuclear measurements do not resolve two peaks. In the mass ranges studied, such modeling is successful for all nuclei away from the N = 50 closed neutron shell. Near the N = 50 shell, a one-peak EDBW appears to be more appropriate. Examples of calculated neutron capture excitation functions and capture gamma-ray spectra using the EDBW form are given for target nuclei in the mass-90 region and also in the Ta-Au mass region. 20 figures.

  3. Collective magnetic multipole excitations in open shells: 48Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Zamick, L.

    1987-11-01

    The magnetic multipole even-parity transitions are calculated in 48Ti with a mind to finding interesting collective behavior and to study the effects of increasing the model space. The single-j shell signature selection rules are compared to those in the neutron-proton interacting boson model with good F spin. There are similarities but also differences. Some behavior of the single-j shell calculation survives as the model space increases, e.g., low lying collective M1 and M7 modes. Configuration mixing is, however, vital to describe the M3 and M5 modes as well as the spin flip M1 modes. The distribution of strength between lower and higher isospins is discussed. Results are compared with calculated transitions in 42Sc. It appears that allowing one-particle excitations from the single-j shell gives the pattern of the strength distribution; the further addition of two-particle excitations leads to a quenching of the strength distribution.

  4. Tensile strength of restorative resins.

    PubMed

    Zidan, O; Asmussen, E; Jørgensen, K D

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of the present work was to measure the tensile strength of restorative resins and to study the effect of the method of measurement on the recorded results. A direct pull method using dumb-bell shaped specimens was used. The tensile strength of the resins was also tested using the diametral compression method suggested by the A.D.A. It was found that the method of testing affects the results. Although the diametral compression method is a simple method, it cannot be considered reliable for all types of material. The tensile strength of the conventional composites was significantly higher than the tensile strength of the microfilled composites.

  5. Elementary Excitations in Quantum Liquids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pines, David

    1981-01-01

    Discusses elementary excitations and their role in condensed matter physics, focusing on quantum plasma, helium liquids, and superconductors. Considers research primarily conducted in the 1950s and concludes with a brief survey of some closely related further developments. (Author/JN)

  6. Communicating the Excitement of Science

    ScienceCinema

    Michael Turner

    2016-07-12

    In this talk (which will include some exciting science) I will discuss some lessons I have learned about communicating science to scientists (in my own field and others), students, the public, the press, and policy makers in giving 500+ colloquia and seminars, 300+ public lectures and many informal presentations (including cocktail parties).

  7. Collisional excitation of interstellar water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palma, Amedeo; Green, Sheldon; Defrees, D. J.; Mclean, A. D.

    1988-01-01

    Rates for rotational excitation of water molecules in collisions with He atoms have been obtained from a new, accurate theoretical interaction potential. Rates among the lowest 40 ortho levels are given for kinetic temperatures to 1400 K and among the lowest 29 para levels for kinetic temperatures to 800 K.

  8. Launch Excitement with Water Rockets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Juan Carlos; Penick, John

    2007-01-01

    Explosions and fires--these are what many students are waiting for in science classes. And when they do occur, students pay attention. While we can't entertain our students with continual mayhem, we can catch their attention and cater to their desires for excitement by saying, "Let's make rockets." In this activity, students make simple, reusable…

  9. Pseudorandom selective excitation in NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Jamie D.; Coomes, Alexandra

    2011-09-01

    In this work, average Hamiltonian theory is used to study selective excitation under a series of small flip-angle θ-pulses θ ≪ {π}/{3} applied either periodically [corresponding to the DANTE pulse sequence] or aperiodically to a spin-1/2 system. First, an average Hamiltonian description of the DANTE pulse sequence is developed that is valid for frequencies either at or very far from integer multiples of {1}/{τ}, where τ is the interpulse delay. For aperiodic excitation, a single resonance, νsel, can be selectively excited if the θ-pulse phases are modulated in concert with the interpulse delays. The conditions where average Hamiltonian theory can be accurately applied to describe the dynamics under aperiodic selective pulses, which are referred to as pseudorandom-DANTE or p-DANTE sequences, are similar to those found for the DANTE sequence. Signal averaging over different p-DANTE sequences improves the apparent selectivity at νsel by reducing the excitations at other frequencies. Experimental demonstrations of p-DANTE sequences and comparisons with the theory are presented.

  10. Communicating the Excitement of Science

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Turner

    2009-06-05

    In this talk (which will include some exciting science) I will discuss some lessons I have learned about communicating science to scientists (in my own field and others), students, the public, the press, and policy makers in giving 500+ colloquia and seminars, 300+ public lectures and many informal presentations (including cocktail parties).

  11. Perceptual Load Alters Visual Excitability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmel, David; Thorne, Jeremy D.; Rees, Geraint; Lavie, Nilli

    2011-01-01

    Increasing perceptual load reduces the processing of visual stimuli outside the focus of attention, but the mechanism underlying these effects remains unclear. Here we tested an account attributing the effects of perceptual load to modulations of visual cortex excitability. In contrast to stimulus competition accounts, which propose that load…

  12. Physiological Effects of Strength Training and Various Strength Training Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmore, Jack H.

    Current knowledge in the area of muscle physiology is a basis for a discussion on strength training programs. It is now recognized that the expression of strength is related to, but not dependent upon, the size of the muscle and is probably more related to the ability to recruit more muscle fibers in the contraction, or to better synchronize their…

  13. New two-photon excitation chromophores for cellular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alfonso, Laura; Chirico, Giuseppe; Collini, Maddalena; Baldini, Giancarlo; Diaspro, Alberto; Ramoino, Paola; Abbotto, Alessandro; Beverina, Luca; Pagani, Giorgio A.

    2003-10-01

    The one photon and two photon excitation spectral properties (absorption, emission spectra, singlet lifetime) of a very efficient two photon absorber, dimethyl-pepep, have been measured in solution. The one photon excitation peak lye near 525 nm and the emission falls at 600 nm, where autofluorescence of cells is weak. The value of the singlet-triplet conversion rate, obtained by two-photon excitation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, has a quadratic dependence on the excitation power and is comparable to that shown by the dye rhodamine. Preliminary results on stained cells from yeast Saccaromices cerevisiae and Paramecium primaurelia show that the dye preferentially stains DNA in the cell. A direct comparison with a DNA stainer, Dapi, is also performed. Some measurements of the dye functionalized to react with lysine and n-terminal residues of protein are presented. Moreover, this dye can be employed in order to follow in detail some cellular processes such as nuclei division. In vitro fluorescence titration of dimethyl-pepep with calf thymus DNA allowed to estimate the values of the dye-DNA association constant versus ionic strength, and an affinity close to that of ethidium bromide is found.

  14. Production of Excited Atomic Hydrogen and Deuterium from HD Photodissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machacek, J. R.; Bozek, J. D.; Furst, J. E.; Gay, T. J.; Gould, H.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; McLaughlin, K. W.

    2008-05-01

    We have measured the production of Lyα, Hα, and Hβ fluorescence from atomic H and D for the photodissociation of HD by linearly-polarized photons with energies between 20 and 66 eV. In this energy range, excited photofragments result primarily from the production of doubly-excited molecular species which promptly autoionize or dissociate into two neutrals. Theoretical calculation are not yet available for HD, but comparison between the relative cross sections for H2, D2 and HD targets and the available theory for H2 and D2 [1] allow for an estimate of the relative strength of each dissociation channel in this energy range. [1] J. D. Bozek et al., J. Phys. B 39, 4871 (2006). Support provided by the NSF (Grant PHY-0653379), DOE (LBNL/ALS) and ANSTO (Access to Major Research Facilities Programme).

  15. Excitation waves on a minimal small-world model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isele, Thomas; Hartung, Benedikt; Hövel, Philipp; Schöll, Eckehard

    2015-04-01

    We examine traveling-wave solutions on a regular ring network with one additional long-range link that spans a distance d. The nodes obey the FitzHugh-Nagumo kinetics in the excitable regime. The additional shortcut induces a plethora of spatio-temporal behavior that is not present without it. We describe the underlying mechanisms for different types of patterns: propagation failure, period decreasing, bistability, shortcut blocking and period multiplication. For this purpose, we investigate the dependence on d, the network size, the coupling range in the original ring and the global coupling strength and present a phase diagram summarizing the different scenarios. Furthermore, we discuss the scaling behavior of the critical distance by analytical means and address the connection to spatially continuous excitable media.

  16. Band excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy utilizing photothermal excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Liam E-mail: liq1@ORNL.gov; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei; Li, Qian E-mail: liq1@ORNL.gov

    2015-03-09

    A multifrequency open loop Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) approach utilizing photothermal as opposed to electrical excitation is developed. Photothermal band excitation (PthBE)-KPFM is implemented here in a grid mode on a model test sample comprising a metal-insulator junction with local charge-patterned regions. Unlike the previously described open loop BE-KPFM, which relies on capacitive actuation of the cantilever, photothermal actuation is shown to be highly sensitive to the electrostatic force gradient even at biases close to the contact potential difference (CPD). PthBE-KPFM is further shown to provide a more localized measurement of true CPD in comparison to the gold standard ambient KPFM approach, amplitude modulated KPFM. Finally, PthBE-KPFM data contain information relating to local dielectric properties and electronic dissipation between tip and sample unattainable using conventional single frequency KPFM approaches.

  17. Low-Energy Enhancement in the Photon Strength of Mo95

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedeking, M.; Bernstein, L. A.; Krtička, M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Allmond, J. M.; Basunia, M. S.; Burke, J. T.; Fallon, P.; Firestone, R. B.; Goldblum, B. L.; Hatarik, R.; Lake, P. T.; Lee, I.-Y.; Lesher, S. R.; Paschalis, S.; Petri, M.; Phair, L.; Scielzo, N. D.

    2012-04-01

    A new experimental technique is presented using proton-γ-γ correlations from Mo94(d,p)Mo95 reactions which allows for the model-independent extraction of the photon strength function at various excitation energies using primary γ-ray decay from the quasicontinuum to individual low-lying levels. Detected particle energies provide the entrance excitation energies into the residual nucleus while γ-ray transitions from low-lying levels specify the discrete states being fed. Results strongly support the existence of the previously reported low-energy enhancement in the photon strength function.

  18. Effective collision strengths for optically allowed transitions among degenerate levels of hydrogenic ions with 2{<=}Z{<=}30

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, K.; Aggarwal, K.M.; Akita, K.; Igarashi, A.; Keenan, F.P.; Nakazaki, S.

    2010-09-15

    The Coulomb-Born approximation is used to calculate electron-impact excitation collision strengths and effective collision strengths for optically allowed transitions among degenerate fine-structure levels of hydrogenic ions with 2{<=}Z{<=}30 and n{<=}5. Collision strengths are calculated over a wide range of energies up to E{sub j}/Z{sup 2}=10Ryd. Effective collision strengths are obtained over a wide temperature range up to 10{sup 8}K by integrating the collision strengths over a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities.

  19. Strength Training for Young Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraemer, William J.; Fleck, Steven J.

    This guide is designed to serve as a resource for developing strength training programs for children. Chapter 1 uses research findings to explain why strength training is appropriate for children. Chapter 2 explains some of the important physiological concepts involved in children's growth and development as they apply to developing strength…

  20. Effects of Frequency-Dependent Membrane Capacitance on Neural Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Grill, Warren M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Models of excitable cells consider the membrane specific capacitance as a ubiquitous and constant parameter. However, experimental measurements show that the membrane capacitance declines with increasing frequency, i.e., exhibits dispersion. We quantified the effects of frequency-dependent membrane capacitance, c(f), on the excitability of cells and nerve fibers across the frequency range from dc to hundreds of kilohertz. Approach We implemented a model of c(f) using linear circuit elements, and incorporated it into several models of neurons with different channel kinetics: the Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model of an unmyelinated axon, the McIntyre-Richardson-Grill (MRG) of a mammalian myelinated axon, and a model of a cortical neuron from prefrontal cortex. We calculated thresholds for excitation and kHz frequency conduction block, the conduction velocity, recovery cycle, strength-distance relationship and firing rate. Main results The impact of c(f) on activation thresholds depended on the stimulation waveform and channel kinetics. We observed no effect using rectangular pulse stimulation, and a reduction for frequencies of 10 kHz and above using sinusoidal signals only for the MRG model. c(f) had minimal impact on the recovery cycle and the strength-distance relationship, whereas the conduction velocity increased by up to 7.9% and 1.7% for myelinated and unmyelinated fibers, respectively. Block thresholds declined moderately when incorporating c(f), the effect was greater at higher frequencies, and the maximum reduction was 11.5%. Finally, c(f) marginally altered the firing pattern of a model of a prefrontal cortex cell, reducing the median interspike interval by less than 2%. Significance This is the first comprehensive analysis of the effects of dispersive capacitance on neural excitability, and as the interest on stimulation with kHz signals gains more attention, it defines the regions over which frequency-dependent membrane capacitance, c(f), should be

  1. Role of momentum transfer in the quenching of the Gamow-Teller strength

    SciTech Connect

    Marketin, T.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.

    2012-10-20

    A recent analysis of (p,n) and (n,p) reaction data from {sup 90}Zr was performed recently, where a significant amount of Gamow-Teller strength was found above the resonance, an energy region previously unreachable by experimental setups. The extracted strengths in the {beta}{sub -} and the {beta}{sub +} channel indicate that approximately 10% of the total strength necessary to satisfy the model independent Ikeda sum rule is missing. One possible source of this discrepancy is the treatment of the isovector spin monopole (IVSM) mode of excitation which has been found to occurr at high excitation energies. Employing the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model and the protonneutron relativistic quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-RQRPA) to calculate the nuclear response, we explore the contribution of the IVSM mode to the total L= 0 strength and apply our results to the available data.

  2. Vibrational resonance in excitable neuronal systems.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Liu, Chen; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of a high-frequency driving on the dynamical response of excitable neuronal systems to a subthreshold low-frequency signal by numerical simulation. We demonstrate the occurrence of vibrational resonance in spatially extended neuronal networks. Different network topologies from single small-world networks to modular networks of small-world subnetworks are considered. It is shown that an optimal amplitude of high-frequency driving enhances the response of neuron populations to a low-frequency signal. This effect of vibrational resonance of neuronal systems depends extensively on the network structure and parameters, such as the coupling strength between neurons, network size, and rewiring probability of single small-world networks, as well as the number of links between different subnetworks and the number of subnetworks in the modular networks. All these parameters play a key role in determining the ability of the network to enhance the outreach of the localized subthreshold low-frequency signal. Considering that two-frequency signals are ubiquity in brain dynamics, we expect the presented results could have important implications for the weak signal detection and information propagation across neuronal systems. PMID:22225338

  3. Fluorescent excitation of interstellar H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, John H.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    1987-01-01

    The infrared emission spectrum of H2 excited by ultraviolet absorption, followed by fluorescence, was investigated using comprehensive models of interstellar clouds for computing the spectrum and to assess the effects on the intensity to various cloud properties, such as density, size, temperature, and the intensity of the UV radiation field. It is shown that the absolute H2 IR line intensities depend primarily on the density of the cloud and the strength of the incident UV radiation, and to a much lesser exent on the temperature of the gas, the total thickness of the cloud, and the optical properties of the grains. A variety of recent observational results are discussed with reference to theoretical models. It is shown that the rich H2 emission spectrum of the reflection nebula NGC 2023 can be reproduced by a model with density of about 10,000/cu cm, temperature of about 80 K, and UV flux approximately 300 times that of the Galactic background starlight.

  4. Strength properties of fly ash based controlled low strength materials.

    PubMed

    Türkel, S

    2007-08-25

    Controlled low strength material (CLSM) is a flowable mixture that can be used as a backfill material in place of compacted soils. Flowable fill requires no tamping or compaction to achieve its strength and typically has a load carrying capacity much higher than compacted soils, but it can still be excavated easily. The selection of CLSM type should be based on technical and economical considerations for specific applications. In this study, a mixture of high volume fly ash (FA), crushed limestone powder (filler) and a low percentage of pozzolana cement have been tried in different compositions. The amount of pozzolana cement was kept constant for all mixes as, 5% of fly ash weight. The amount of mixing water was chosen in order to provide optimum pumpability by determining the spreading ratio of CLSM mixtures using flow table method. The shear strength of the material is a measure of the materials ability to support imposed stresses on the material. The shear strength properties of CLSM mixtures have been investigated by a series of laboratory tests. The direct shear test procedure was applied for determining the strength parameters Phi (angle of shearing resistance) and C(h) (cohesion intercept) of the material. The test results indicated that CLSM mixtures have superior shear strength properties compared to compacted soils. Shear strength, cohesion intercept and angle of shearing resistance values of CLSM mixtures exceeded conventional soil materials' similar properties at 7 days. These parameters proved that CLSM mixtures are suitable materials for backfill applications.

  5. Excitation-energy dependence of the giant dipole resonance width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enders, G.; Berg, F. D.; Hagel, K.; Kühn, W.; Metag, V.; Novotny, R.; Pfeiffer, M.; Schwalb, O.; Charity, R. J.; Gobbi, A.; Freifelder, R.; Henning, W.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Holzmann, R.; Mayer, R. S.; Simon, R. S.; Wessels, J. P.; Casini, G.; Olmi, A.; Stefanini, A. A.

    1992-07-01

    High-energy γ rays have been measured in coincidence with heavy fragents in deeply inelastic reactions of 136Xe+48Ti at 18.5 MeV/nucleon. The giant dipole resonance (GDR) strength function is deduced from an analysis of the photon spectra within the statistical model. The GDR width Γ is studied as a function of the fragment excitation energy E*. A saturation at about Γ=10 MeV is observed for E*/A>=1.0 MeV/nucleon.

  6. The Coulomb excitations of Bernal bilayer graphene under external fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jhao-Ying; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2014-03-31

    We study the field effects on the Coulomb excitation spectrum of Bernal bilayer graphene by using the tight-binding model and the random-phase approximation. The electric field opens the band gap and creates the saddle points, the latter brings about a prominent interband plasmon. On the other hand, the magnetic field induces the dispersionless Landau levels (LLs) that causes the inter-LL plasmons. The two kinds of field-induced plasmon modes can be further tuned by the magnitude of momentum transfer and the field strength. The predicted results may be further validated by the inelastic light-scattering or high-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELLS)

  7. Exciting circular TEmn modes at low terahertz region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, T. H.; Li, C. H.; Wu, C. N.; Yu, C. F.

    2008-09-01

    This work proposes an approach to generate circular TEmn modes at low terahertz region through sidewall couplings. With proper arrangement of the couplings on the circumference of the waveguide, they then jointly excite the desired mode. A model is developed to calculate the coupling strength and to analyze the mode purity. Accordingly, three mode converters TE21, TE01, and TE41, were designed, built, and tested at W-band. Back-to-back transmission measurements exhibit excellent agreement with the results of simulations. The measured optimal transmissions are 91%, 95%, and 89% with 3 dB bandwidths of 18.3, 24.0, and 20.2 GHz, respectively.

  8. Low-lying dipole excitations in the odd-proton, midshell nucleus 103Rh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stedile, F.; Fill, E.; Belic, D.; von Brentano, P.; Fransen, C.; Gade, A.; Kneissl, U.; Kohstall, C.; Linnemann, A.; Matschinsky, P.; Nord, A.; Pietralla, N.; Pitz, H. H.; Scheck, M.; Werner, V.

    2001-02-01

    Low-lying dipole excitations in the odd-proton, midshell nucleus 103Rh were investigated in photon scattering experiments at the Stuttgart Dynamitron facility using bremsstrahlung beams with end point energies of 4.1 and 2.4 MeV. In total, 106 excited levels, most of them unknown so far, could be observed in the excitation energy range from 1.2 to 4.0 MeV. In addition to 106 transitions to the ground state (Jπ0=1/2-), 20 transitions to the low-lying Jπ=3/2- level at 295 keV and 10 transitions to the Jπ=5/2- state at 357 keV were detected. For 20 photoexcited levels spins could be suggested from the measured angular distribution data. The reduced ground-state transition strengths summed up in the energy range 2-4 MeV amount to ΣgΓred0=(16.3+/-1.9) meV/MeV3 corresponding, under the assumption of an electric character for all excitations, to a total excitation strength of ΣB(E1)↑=(15.6+/-1.8)×10-3 e2 fm2. The fragmentation of the dipole strength and the decay branchings of the photoexcited levels are discussed. The observed feedings of the 295 and 357 keV levels result in a population inversion, the precondition for a possible γ-ray laser.

  9. Low-lying dipole excitations in the heavy, odd-mass nucleus 181Ta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolpert, A.; Beck, O.; Belic, D.; Besserer, J.; von Brentano, P.; Eckert, T.; Fransen, C.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Kneissl, U.; Margraf, J.; Maser, H.; Nord, A.; Pietralla, N.; Pitz, H. H.

    1998-08-01

    The strength distribution of low-lying dipole excitations in the heavy odd-mass nucleus 181Ta was studied in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments performed at the bremsstrahlung beam of the Stuttgart 4.3 MV Dynamitron accelerator. To increase the detection sensitivity in the whole range of excitation energies between 1.8 and 4 MeV two measurements were carried out at different bremsstrahlung end-point energies of 2.7 and 4.1 MeV using two large-volume HPGe detectors of a relative efficiency of 100%. Detailed information on excitation energies, decay widths, transition probabilities, and branching ratios of 37 new low-lying states in the energy range 1.8-3.5 MeV have been obtained. The observed dipole strength is rather fragmented, apart from a strong excitation at 2.297 MeV. The total strength in the investigated range of excitation energies (1.8-4 MeV) is reduced by a factor of ~3.5 as compared to the neighboring even-even nucleus 180Hf.

  10. Excitation energies from ensemble DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgoo, Alex; Teale, Andy M.; Helgaker, Trygve

    2015-12-01

    We study the evaluation of the Gross-Oliveira-Kohn expression for excitation energies E1-E0=ɛ1-ɛ0+∂E/xc,w[ρ] ∂w | ρ =ρ0. This expression gives the difference between an excitation energy E1 - E0 and the corresponding Kohn-Sham orbital energy difference ɛ1 - ɛ0 as a partial derivative of the exchange-correlation energy of an ensemble of states Exc,w[ρ]. Through Lieb maximisation, on input full-CI density functions, the exchange-correlation energy is evaluated accurately and the partial derivative is evaluated numerically using finite difference. The equality is studied numerically for different geometries of the H2 molecule and different ensemble weights. We explore the adiabatic connection for the ensemble exchange-correlation energy. The latter may prove useful when modelling the unknown weight dependence of the exchange-correlation energy.

  11. Collisional excitation of interstellar cyclopropenylidene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Sheldon; Defrees, D. J.; Mclean, A. D.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical rotational excitation rates were computed for C3H2 in collisions with He atoms at temperatures from 30 to 120 K. The intermolecular forces were obtained from accurate self-consistent field and perturbation theory calculations, and collision dynamics were treated within the infinite-order sudden approximation. The accuracy of the latter was examined by comparing with the more exact coupled states approximation.

  12. Excitation rates of heavy quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canal, C. A.; Santangelo, E. M.; Ducati, M. B.

    1985-06-01

    We obtain the production rates for c, b, and t quarks in deep-inelastic neutrino- (antineutrino-) nucleon interactions, in the standard six-quark model with left-handed couplings. The results are obtained with the most recent mixing parameters and we include a comparison between quark parametrizations. The excitations are calculated separately for each flavor, allowing the understanding of the role of threshold effects when considered through different rescaling variables.

  13. Wedding ring shaped excitation coil

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Tsai, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency.

  14. Local Optical Excitations in Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, Laurence Kay Doon

    Core spectra of p('6) (--->) p('5)s excitations of rare gas, halogen, and alkali impurities located on the surface and in the bulk of host alkali and Mg metals are presented. The data were obtained by means of differential reflectance spectroscopy in the energy range 5-20 eV using synchrotron radiation. In striking contrast to the absorption profiles of the pure alkalis, linear redshifted profiles are observed at dilution for rare gas adsorbates on alkali surfaces, for Cs adsorbed on Mg, and for Cs dispersed in bulk Na as an alloy. When Cs is dispersed in bulk K the sharp edge characteristic of the pure alkalis is observed. The spectra of Cs and Rb adsorbates on alkali surfaces mirror these same trends, but retain a distinct atomic character. A central result of the present research is that the linear profile may be associated with strong coupling of the excitation to the conduction electrons. A criterion for strong coupling is given which depends on the degree to which the excited impurity level mixes with the host conduction band. There is not at present any theory which can explain these observations. Spectra of halogen adsorbates on alkali and Mg surfaces are also presented; it is found that the ground configuration of isolated halogen atoms on these surfaces is ionic. All the impurity-metal complexes are studied at high concentration when impurity-impurity interactions are important.

  15. Entanglement entropy of electronic excitations.

    PubMed

    Plasser, Felix

    2016-05-21

    A new perspective into correlation effects in electronically excited states is provided through quantum information theory. The entanglement between the electron and hole quasiparticles is examined, and it is shown that the related entanglement entropy can be computed from the eigenvalue spectrum of the well-known natural transition orbital (NTO) decomposition. Non-vanishing entanglement is obtained whenever more than one NTO pair is involved, i.e., in the case of a multiconfigurational or collective excitation. An important implication is that in the case of entanglement it is not possible to gain a complete description of the state character from the orbitals alone, but more specific analysis methods are required to decode the mutual information between the electron and hole. Moreover, the newly introduced number of entangled states is an important property by itself giving information about excitonic structure. The utility of the formalism is illustrated in the cases of the excited states of two interacting ethylene molecules, the conjugated polymer para-phenylene vinylene, and the naphthalene molecule.

  16. Channelopathies of skeletal muscle excitability

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Familial disorders of skeletal muscle excitability were initially described early in the last century and are now known to be caused by mutations of voltage-gated ion channels. The clinical manifestations are often striking, with an inability to relax after voluntary contraction (myotonia) or transient attacks of severe weakness (periodic paralysis). An essential feature of these disorders is fluctuation of symptoms that are strongly impacted by environmental triggers such as exercise, temperature, or serum K+ levels. These phenomena have intrigued physiologists for decades, and in the past 25 years the molecular lesions underlying these disorders have been identified and mechanistic studies are providing insights for therapeutic strategies of disease modification. These familial disorders of muscle fiber excitability are “channelopathies” caused by mutations of a chloride channel (ClC-1), sodium channel (NaV1.4), calcium channel (CaV1.1) and several potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir2.6, Kir3.4). This review provides a synthesis of the mechanistic connections between functional defects of mutant ion channels, their impact on muscle excitability, how these changes cause clinical phenotypes, and approaches toward therapeutics. PMID:25880512

  17. Synaptic Control of Motoneuronal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Rekling, Jens C.; Funk, Gregory D.; Bayliss, Douglas A.; Dong, Xiao-Wei; Feldman, Jack L.

    2016-01-01

    Movement, the fundamental component of behavior and the principal extrinsic action of the brain, is produced when skeletal muscles contract and relax in response to patterns of action potentials generated by motoneurons. The processes that determine the firing behavior of motoneurons are therefore important in understanding the transformation of neural activity to motor behavior. Here, we review recent studies on the control of motoneuronal excitability, focusing on synaptic and cellular properties. We first present a background description of motoneurons: their development, anatomical organization, and membrane properties, both passive and active. We then describe the general anatomical organization of synaptic input to motoneurons, followed by a description of the major transmitter systems that affect motoneuronal excitability, including ligands, receptor distribution, pre- and postsynaptic actions, signal transduction, and functional role. Glutamate is the main excitatory, and GABA and glycine are the main inhibitory transmitters acting through ionotropic receptors. These amino acids signal the principal motor commands from peripheral, spinal, and supraspinal structures. Amines, such as serotonin and norepinephrine, and neuropeptides, as well as the glutamate and GABA acting at metabotropic receptors, modulate motoneuronal excitability through pre- and postsynaptic actions. Acting principally via second messenger systems, their actions converge on common effectors, e.g., leak K+ current, cationic inward current, hyperpolarization-activated inward current, Ca2+ channels, or presynaptic release processes. Together, these numerous inputs mediate and modify incoming motor commands, ultimately generating the coordinated firing patterns that underlie muscle contractions during motor behavior. PMID:10747207

  18. Entanglement entropy of electronic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plasser, Felix

    2016-05-01

    A new perspective into correlation effects in electronically excited states is provided through quantum information theory. The entanglement between the electron and hole quasiparticles is examined, and it is shown that the related entanglement entropy can be computed from the eigenvalue spectrum of the well-known natural transition orbital (NTO) decomposition. Non-vanishing entanglement is obtained whenever more than one NTO pair is involved, i.e., in the case of a multiconfigurational or collective excitation. An important implication is that in the case of entanglement it is not possible to gain a complete description of the state character from the orbitals alone, but more specific analysis methods are required to decode the mutual information between the electron and hole. Moreover, the newly introduced number of entangled states is an important property by itself giving information about excitonic structure. The utility of the formalism is illustrated in the cases of the excited states of two interacting ethylene molecules, the conjugated polymer para-phenylene vinylene, and the naphthalene molecule.

  19. Convective Excitation of Internal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoanet, Daniel; Le Bars, Michael; Burns, Keaton; Vasil, Geoffrey; Quataert, Eliot; Brown, Benjamin; Oishi, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    We will present a joint experimental & computational study of internal wave generation by convection. First we describe an experiment using the peculiar property of water that its density maximum is at 4° C . A tank of water cooled from below and heated from above develops a cold, convective layer near 4° C at the bottom of the tank, adjacent to a hot stably stratified layer at the top of the tank. We simulate this setup in 2D using the open-source Dedalus code (dedalus-project.org). Our simulations show that waves are excited from within the convection zone, opposed to at the interface between the convective and stably stratified regions. Finally, we will present 3D simulations of internal wave excitation by convection in a fully compressible atmosphere with multiple density scaleheights. These simulations provide greater freedom in choosing the thermal equilibrium of the system, and are run at higher Rayleigh number. The simulated waves are then compared to analytic predictions of the bulk excitation model.

  20. Self-excited multifractal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonov, V.; Sornette, D.

    2011-05-01

    We introduce the self-excited multifractal (SEMF) model, defined such that the amplitudes of the increments of the process are expressed as exponentials of a long memory of past increments. The principal novel feature of the model lies in the self-excitation mechanism combined with exponential nonlinearity, i.e. the explicit dependence of future values of the process on past ones. The self-excitation captures the microscopic origin of the emergent endogenous self-organization properties, such as the energy cascade in turbulent flows, the triggering of aftershocks by previous earthquakes and the "reflexive" interactions of financial markets. The SEMF process has all the standard stylized facts found in financial time series, which are robust to the specification of the parameters and the shape of the memory kernel: multifractality, heavy tails of the distribution of increments with intermediate asymptotics, zero correlation of the signed increments and long-range correlation of the squared increments, the asymmetry (called "leverage" effect) of the correlation between increments and absolute value of the increments and statistical asymmetry under time reversal.

  1. Measurement of tune spread in the Tevatron versus octupole strength

    SciTech Connect

    Marriner, John; Martens, Mike; /Fermilab

    1996-08-01

    An experiment was performed in the Tevatron to measure the tune spread versus octupole strength. The experiment is sensitive to the relationship between octupole strength and current in the T:OZF circuit and to the octupole (and other non-linear focusing fields) in the Tevatron. The major motivation for the experiment was to determine the value of octupole excitation that minimizes the tune spread: this value is an estimate of the value required to obtain ''zero'' total octupole excitation in the extraction process. The experiment was performed using the strip-line kickers at A17 and the resonant Schottky pickups. The horizontal proton kicker was excited with a sine-wave from a vector signal analyzer (HP-89440A) and the horizontal proton signal was received. The gating circuitry normally used to select proton or antiproton bunches was by-passed. The response function was measured and recorded on a floppy disk. Measurements were initially made with a 200 Hz span (0.250 Hz frequency bins) and later with a 100 Hz span (0.125 Hz frequency bins).

  2. Effect of exciton oscillator strength on upconversion photoluminescence in GaAs/AlAs multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, Osamu Okumura, Shouhei; Kita, Takashi; Akahane, Kouichi

    2014-11-03

    We report upconversion photoluminescence (UCPL) in GaAs/AlAs multiple quantum wells. UCPL from the AlAs barrier is caused by the resonant excitation of the excitons in the GaAs well. When the quantum well has sufficient miniband width, UCPL is hardly observed because of the small exciton oscillator strength. The excitation-energy and excitation-density dependences of UCPL intensity show the exciton resonant profile and a linear increase, respectively. These results demonstrate that the observed UCPL caused by the saturated two-step excitation process requires a large number of excitons.

  3. Electron capture and excitation processes in H+‑H collisions in dense quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakimovski, D.; Markovska, N.; Janev, R. K.

    2016-10-01

    Electron capture and excitation processes in proton–hydrogen atom collisions taking place in dense quantum plasmas are studied by employing the two-centre atomic orbital close-coupling (TC-AOCC) method. The Debye–Hückel cosine (DHC) potential is used to describe the plasma screening effects on the Coulomb interaction between charged particles. The properties of a hydrogen atom with DHC potential are investigated as a function of the screening strength of the potential. It is found that the decrease in binding energy of nl levels with increasing screening strength is considerably faster than in the case of the Debye–Hückel (DH) screening potential, appropriate for description of charged particle interactions in weakly coupled classical plasmas. This results in a reduction in the number of bound states in the DHC potential with respect to that in the DH potential for the same plasma screening strength, and is reflected in the dynamics of excitation and electron capture processes for the two screened potentials. The TC-AOCC cross sections for total and state-selective electron capture and excitation cross sections with the DHC potential are calculated for a number of representative screening strengths in the 1–300 keV energy range and compared with those for the DH and pure Coulomb potential. The total capture cross sections for a selected number of screening strengths are compared with the available results from classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations.

  4. Spurious Excitations in Semiclassical Scattering Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, D. H. E.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Shows how through proper handling of the nonuniform motion of semiclassical coordinates spurious excitation terms are eliminated. An application to the problem of nuclear Coulomb excitation is presented as an example. (HM)

  5. Discovering work excitement among navy nurses.

    PubMed

    Savage, S; Simms, L M; Williams, R A; Erbin-Roesemann, M

    1993-01-01

    An interest in what makes work exciting among Navy Nurse Corps officers led to the use of Simms' work excitement data collection protocol in Navy Medical Centers. Significant levels of work excitement were found among Navy nurses when compared to civilian nurses in non-military settings. Overall, results indicated that Navy nurses are excited about the variety, the leadership/management experiences, and the opportunities for teaching and learning--elements that are the very essence of Navy nursing practice. PMID:8345880

  6. Two-photon excitation of aluminium phthalocyanines

    SciTech Connect

    Meshalkin, Yu P; Alfimov, E E; Makukha, V K; Vasil'ev, N E; Denisov, A N; Ogirenko, A P

    1999-12-31

    A demonstration is given of the feasibility of two-photon excitation of aluminium phthalocyanine and of the pharmaceutical preparation 'Fotosens', used in photodynamic therapy. The excitation source was an Nd:YAG laser emitting at the 1064 nm wavelength. The spectra of the two-photon-excited luminescence were obtained and the two-photon absorption cross sections were determined. (lasers in medicine)

  7. Resource Paper: Molecular Excited State Relaxation Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, William

    1979-01-01

    Develops the concept of oscillatory v dissipative limits as it applies to electronic excited state processes in molecular systems. Main emphasis is placed on the radiative and nonradiative dynamics of the excited state of a molecule prepared by interaction with light or some other excitation source. (BT)

  8. Compressive strength of carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Prandy, J.M. ); Hahn, H.T. )

    1991-01-01

    Most composites are weaker in compression than in tension, which is due to the poor compressive strength of the load bearing fibers. The present paper discusses the compressive strengths and failure modes of 11 different carbon fibers: PAN-AS1, AS4, IM6, IM7, T700, T300, GY-30, pitch-75, ultra high modulus (UHM), high modulus (HM), and high strength (HS). The compressive strength was determined by embedding a fiber bundle in a transparent epoxy matrix and testing in compression. The resin allows for the containment and observation of failure during and after testing while also providing lateral support to the fibers. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to determine the global failure modes of the fibers.

  9. Collective excitations of the hybrid atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Moumita; Dastidar, Krishna Rai

    2010-06-15

    We investigate the low-energy excitations of the spherically and axially trapped atomic Bose-Einstein condensate coupled to a molecular Bose gas by coherent Raman transitions. We apply the sum-rule approach of many-body response theory to derive the low-lying collective excitation frequencies of the hybrid atom-molecular system. The atomic and molecular ground-state densities obtained in Gross-Pitaevskii and modified Gross-Pitaevskii (including the higher order Lee-Huang-Yang term in interatomic interaction) approaches are used to find out the individual energy components and hence the excitation frequencies. We obtain different excitation energies for different angular momenta and study their characteristic dependence on the effective Raman detuning, the scattering length for atom-atom interaction, and the intensities of the coupling lasers. We show that the inclusion of the higher-order nonlinear interatomic interaction in modified Gross-Pitaevskii approach introduces significant corrections to the ground-state properties and the excitation frequencies both for axially and spherically trapped coupled {sup 87}Rb condensate system with the increase in the s-wave scattering length (for peak gas-parameter {>=}10{sup -3}). It has been shown that the excitation frequencies decrease with the increase in the effective Raman detuning as well as the s-wave scattering length, whereas excitation frequencies increase with the increase in the atom-molecular coupling strength. The frequencies in modified Gross-Pitaevskii approximation exhibit an upward trend after a certain value of scattering length and also largely deviate from the Gross-Pitaevskii results with the increase in s-wave scattering length. The strong dependence of excitation frequencies on the laser intensities used for Raman transitions manifests the role of atom-molecular coupling strength on the control of collective excitations. The collective excitation frequencies for the hybrid atom-molecular BEC differ

  10. Turbulent swirling jets with excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi, Rahmat; Farokhi, Saeed

    1988-01-01

    An existing cold-jet facility at NASA Lewis Research Center was modified to produce swirling flows with controllable initial tangential velocity distribution. Two extreme swirl profiles, i.e., one with solid-body rotation and the other predominated by a free-vortex distribution, were produced at identical swirl number of 0.48. Mean centerline velocity decay characteristics of the solid-body rotation jet flow exhibited classical decay features of a swirling jet with S - 0.48 reported in the literature. However, the predominantly free-vortex distribution case was on the verge of vortex breakdown, a phenomenon associated with the rotating flows of significantly higher swirl numbers, i.e., S sub crit greater than or equal to 0.06. This remarkable result leads to the conclusion that the integrated swirl effect, reflected in the swirl number, is inadequate in describing the mean swirling jet behavior in the near field. The relative size (i.e., diameter) of the vortex core emerging from the nozzle and the corresponding tangential velocity distribution are also controlling factors. Excitability of swirling jets is also investigated by exciting a flow with a swirl number of 0.35 by plane acoustic waves at a constant sound pressure level and at various frequencies. It is observed that the cold swirling jet is excitable by plane waves, and that the instability waves grow about 50 percent less in peak r.m.s. amplitude and saturate further upstream compared to corresponding waves in a jet without swirl having the same axial mass flux. The preferred Strouhal number based on the mass-averaged axial velocity and nozzle exit diameter for both swirling and nonswirling flows is 0.4.

  11. Volumetric Light-Field Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Schedl, David C.; Bimber, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We explain how to concentrate light simultaneously at multiple selected volumetric positions by means of a 4D illumination light field. First, to select target objects, a 4D imaging light field is captured. A light field mask is then computed automatically for this selection to avoid illumination of the remaining areas. With one-photon illumination, simultaneous generation of complex volumetric light patterns becomes possible. As a full light-field can be captured and projected simultaneously at the desired exposure and excitation times, short readout and lighting durations are supported. PMID:27363565

  12. Multiarmed Spirals in Excitable Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiev, Bakthier; Siegert, Florian; Weijer, Cornelis

    1997-03-01

    Numerical studies of the properties of multiarmed spirals show that they can form spontaneously in low excitability media. The maximum number of arms in a multiarmed spiral is proportional to the ratio of the single spiral period to the refractoriness of the medium. Multiarmed spirals are formed due to attraction of single spirals if these spirals rotate in the same direction and their tips are less than one wavelength apart, i.e., a spiral broken not far from its tip can evolve into a 2-armed spiral. We propose this mechanism to be responsible for the formation of multiarmed spirals in mounds of the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum.

  13. High Frequency Chandler Wobble Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, F.; Stuck, J.; Thomas, M.

    2003-04-01

    Variations of Earth rotation on sub-daily to secular timescales are caused by mass redistributions in the Earth system as a consequence of geophysical processes and gravitational influences. Forced oscillations of polar motion are superposed by free oscillations of the Earth, i.e. the Chandler wobble and the free core nutation. In order to study the interactions between externally induced polar motion and the Earth's free oscillations, a non-linear gyroscopic model has been developed. In most of the former investigations on polar motion, the Chandler wobble is introduced as a damped oscillation with predetermined frequency and amplitude. However, as the effect of rotational deformation is a backcoupling mechanism of polar motion on the Earth's rotational dynamics, both period and amplitude of the Chandler wobble are time-dependent when regarding additional excitations from, e.g., atmospheric or oceanic mass redistributions. The gyroscopic model is free of any explicit information concerning amplitude, phase, and period of free oscillations. The characteristics of the Earth's free oscillation is reproduced by the model from rheological and geometrical parameters and rotational deformation is taken into account. This enables to study the time variable Chandler oscillation when the gyro is forced with atmospheric and oceanic angular momentum from the global atmospheric ECHAM3-T21 general circulation model together with the ocean model for circulation and tides OMCT driven by ECHAM including surface pressure. Besides, mass redistributions in the Earth's body due to gravitational and loading deformations are regarded and external torques exerted by Moon and Sun are considered. The numerical results of the gyro are significantly related with the geodetically observed time series of polar motion published by the IERS. It is shown that the consistent excitation is capable to counteract the damping and thus to maintain the Chandler amplitude. Spectral analyses of the ECHAM

  14. Nucleon resonance excitation with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    R. De Vita; CLAS Collaboration

    2004-09-01

    The study of the baryon spectrum is a fundamental part of the scientific program in Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory. The so called N* program indeed concerns the measurement of the electromagnetic production of exclusive hadronic final states, with the purpose of extracting information on baryon excited states. CLAS, the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, is explicitly designed for conducting a broad experimental program in hadronic physics, using the continuous electron beam provided by the laboratory. An overview of the most recent results is presented.

  15. Volumetric Light-Field Excitation.

    PubMed

    Schedl, David C; Bimber, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We explain how to concentrate light simultaneously at multiple selected volumetric positions by means of a 4D illumination light field. First, to select target objects, a 4D imaging light field is captured. A light field mask is then computed automatically for this selection to avoid illumination of the remaining areas. With one-photon illumination, simultaneous generation of complex volumetric light patterns becomes possible. As a full light-field can be captured and projected simultaneously at the desired exposure and excitation times, short readout and lighting durations are supported. PMID:27363565

  16. Mechanically-Excited Sessile Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Bostwick, Joshua; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul

    2010-11-01

    The volume and contact-line mobility of a sessile drop determine the frequency response of the drop to mechanical excitation. A useful signature of the drop is its response to a sweep of frequency. At particular frequencies the drop exhibits standing wave patterns of different mode numbers and/or azimuthal, spinning motion. We report observations of the spectrum of standing wave patterns and compare to predictions of a linear stability theory. On the side of application, the results suggest how to tune the pinning-unpinning of a sessile drop in order to maximize its translation.

  17. [Neurosteroids. Neuromodulators of cerebral excitability].

    PubMed

    Calixto González, E; Brailowsky, S

    1998-01-01

    Steroids which are produced by the brain are called neurosteroids, and they are able to modulate neurotransmissions: GABAergic; glutamatergic; glycinergic, and cholinergic (nicotine receptor). These effects are of short latency and duration, and do not implicate the cellular genome. The interaction of these neurosteroids with membrane receptors contribute to the regulation of neuronal excitability, and their study has allowed a better understanding of cognitive, hormonal, and epileptic phenomena as well as the development of new drugs with anxiolytic, antidepressive, anesthetic and anti-epileptic effects. PMID:9658699

  18. Volumetric Light-Field Excitation.

    PubMed

    Schedl, David C; Bimber, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We explain how to concentrate light simultaneously at multiple selected volumetric positions by means of a 4D illumination light field. First, to select target objects, a 4D imaging light field is captured. A light field mask is then computed automatically for this selection to avoid illumination of the remaining areas. With one-photon illumination, simultaneous generation of complex volumetric light patterns becomes possible. As a full light-field can be captured and projected simultaneously at the desired exposure and excitation times, short readout and lighting durations are supported.

  19. [Neurosteroids. Neuromodulators of cerebral excitability].

    PubMed

    Calixto González, E; Brailowsky, S

    1998-01-01

    Steroids which are produced by the brain are called neurosteroids, and they are able to modulate neurotransmissions: GABAergic; glutamatergic; glycinergic, and cholinergic (nicotine receptor). These effects are of short latency and duration, and do not implicate the cellular genome. The interaction of these neurosteroids with membrane receptors contribute to the regulation of neuronal excitability, and their study has allowed a better understanding of cognitive, hormonal, and epileptic phenomena as well as the development of new drugs with anxiolytic, antidepressive, anesthetic and anti-epileptic effects.

  20. Volumetric Light-Field Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schedl, David C.; Bimber, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We explain how to concentrate light simultaneously at multiple selected volumetric positions by means of a 4D illumination light field. First, to select target objects, a 4D imaging light field is captured. A light field mask is then computed automatically for this selection to avoid illumination of the remaining areas. With one-photon illumination, simultaneous generation of complex volumetric light patterns becomes possible. As a full light-field can be captured and projected simultaneously at the desired exposure and excitation times, short readout and lighting durations are supported.

  1. Modeling the nonradiative decay rate of electronically excited thioflavin T.

    PubMed

    Erez, Yuval; Liu, Yu-Hui; Amdursky, Nadav; Huppert, Dan

    2011-08-01

    A computational model of nonradiative decay is developed and applied to explain the time-dependent emission spectrum of thioflavin T (ThT). The computational model is based on a previous model developed by Glasbeek and co-workers (van der Meer, M. J.; Zhang, H.; Glasbeek, M. J. Chem. Phys. 2000, 112, 2878) for auramine O, a molecule that, like ThT, exhibits a high nonradiative rate. The nonradiative rates of both auramine O and ThT are inversely proportional to the solvent viscosity. The Glasbeek model assumes that the excited state consists of an adiabatic potential surface constructed by adiabatic coupling of emissive and dark states. For ThT, the twist angle between the benzothiazole and the aniline is responsible for the extensive mixing of the two excited states. At a twist angle of 90°, the S(1) state assumes a charge-transfer-state character with very small oscillator strength, which causes the emission intensity to be very small as well. In the ground state, the twist angle of ThT is rather small. The photoexcitation leads first to a strongly emissive state (small twist angle). As time progresses, the twist angle increases and the oscillator strength decreases. The fit of the experimental results by the model calculations is good for times longer than 3 ps. When a two-coordinate model is invoked or a solvation spectral-shift component is added, the fit to the experimental results is good at all times. PMID:21711024

  2. Excitation of Love waves in a thin film layer by a line source.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuan, H.-S.; Ponamgi, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    The excitation of a Love surface wave guided by a thin film layer deposited on a semiinfinite substrate is studied in this paper. Both the thin film and the substrate are considered to be elastically isotropic. Amplitudes of the surface wave in the thin film region and the substrate are found in terms of the strength of a line source vibrating in a direction transverse to the propagating wave. In addition to the surface wave, the bulk shear wave excited by the source is also studied. Analytical expressions for the bulk wave amplitude as a function of the direction of propagation, the acoustic powers transported by the surface and bulk waves, and the efficiency of surface wave excitation are obtained. A numerical example is given to show how the bulk wave radiation pattern depends upon the source frequency, the film thickness and other important parameters of the problem. The efficiency of surface wave excitation is also calculated for various parameter values.

  3. The role of electron-impact vibrational excitation in electron transport through gaseous tetrahydrofuran

    SciTech Connect

    Duque, H. V.; Do, T. P. T.; Konovalov, D. A.; White, R. D.; Brunger, M. J. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au; Jones, D. B. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au

    2015-03-28

    In this paper, we report newly derived integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact vibrational excitation of tetrahydrofuran (THF) at intermediate impact energies. These cross sections extend the currently available data from 20 to 50 eV. Further, they indicate that the previously recommended THF ICS set [Garland et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 062712 (2013)] underestimated the strength of the electron-impact vibrational excitation processes. Thus, that recommended vibrational cross section set is revised to address those deficiencies. Electron swarm transport properties were calculated with the amended vibrational cross section set, to quantify the role of electron-driven vibrational excitation in describing the macroscopic swarm phenomena. Here, significant differences of up to 17% in the transport coefficients were observed between the calculations performed using the original and revised cross section sets for vibrational excitation.

  4. Electric quadrupole transition probabilities and line strengths of Ti{sup 11+}

    SciTech Connect

    Gökçe, Yasin; Çelik, Gültekin; Yıldız, Murat

    2014-07-15

    Electric quadrupole transition probabilities and line strengths have been calculated using the weakest bound electron potential model for sodium-like titanium, considering many transition arrays. We employed numerical Coulomb approximation and non-relativistic Hartree–Fock wavefunctions for the expectation values of radii in determination of parameters of the model. The necessary energy values have been taken from experimental data in the literature. The calculated electric quadrupole line strengths have been compared with available data in the literature and good agreement has been obtained. Moreover, some electric quadrupole transition probability and line strength values not existing in the literature for some highly excited levels have been obtained using this method.

  5. Gene circuit designs for noisy excitable dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rué, Pau; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2011-05-01

    Certain cellular processes take the form of activity pulses that can be interpreted in terms of noise-driven excitable dynamics. Here we present an overview of different gene circuit architectures that exhibit excitable pulses of protein expression, when subject to molecular noise. Different types of excitable dynamics can occur depending on the bifurcation structure leading to the specific excitable phase-space topology. The bifurcation structure is not, however, linked to a particular circuit architecture. Thus a given gene circuit design can sustain different classes of excitable dynamics depending on the system parameters.

  6. Theoretical studies of electronically excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Besley, Nicholas A.

    2014-10-06

    Time-dependent density functional theory is the most widely used quantum chemical method for studying molecules in electronically excited states. However, excited states can also be computed within Kohn-Sham density functional theory by exploiting methods that converge the self-consistent field equations to give excited state solutions. The usefulness of single reference self-consistent field based approaches for studying excited states is demonstrated by considering the calculation of several types of spectroscopy including the infrared spectroscopy of molecules in an electronically excited state, the rovibrational spectrum of the NO-Ar complex, core electron binding energies and the emission spectroscopy of BODIPY in water.

  7. Peculiarities of collisional excitation transfer with excited screened energy levels of atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimov, V. A.; Gerasimov, V. V.; Pavlinskiy, A. V.

    2007-09-15

    We report an experimental discovery of deviations from the known regularities in collisional excitation transfer processes for metal atoms. The collisional excitation transfer with excited screened energy levels of thulium and dysprosium atoms is studied. The selecting role of the screening 6s shell in collisional excitation transfer is shown.

  8. Low-lying excitations of polydiacetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Race, A.; Barford, W.; Bursill, R. J.

    2001-07-01

    The Pariser-Parr-Pople Hamiltonian is used to calculate and identify the nature of the low-lying vertical transition energies of polydiacetylene. The model is solved using the density matrix renormalization group method for a fixed acetylenic geometry for chains of up to 102 atoms. The nonlinear optical properties of polydiacetylene are considered, which are determined by the third-order susceptibility. The experimental 1Bu data of Giesa and Schultz are used as the geometric model for the calculation. For short chains, the calculated E(1Bu) agrees with the experimental value, within solvation effects (~0.3 eV). The charge gap is used to characterize bound and unbound states. The nBu state is above the charge gap and hence a continuum state; the 1Bu, 2Ag, and mAg states are not and hence are bound excitons. For large chain lengths, the nBu state tends towards the charge gap as expected, strongly suggesting that the nBu state is the conduction band edge. The conduction band edge for polydiacetylene is agreed in the literature to be ~3.0 eV. Accounting for the strong polarization effects of the medium and polaron formation gives our calculated E∞(nBu)~3.6 eV, with an exciton binding energy of ~1.0 eV. The 2Ag state is found to be above the 1Bu state, which does not agree with relaxed transition experimental data. However, this could be resolved by including explicit lattice relaxation in the Pariser-Parr-Pople-Peierls model. Particle-hole separation data further suggest that the 1Bu, 2Ag, and mAg states are bound excitons, and that the nBu is an unbound exciton.

  9. Dual excitation multiphase electrostatic drive

    SciTech Connect

    Niino, Toshiki; Higuchi, Toshiro |; Egawa, Saku

    1995-12-31

    A novel electrostatic drive technology named Dual Excitation Multiphase Electrostatic Drive (DEMED) was presented. A basic DEMED consisted of two plastic films in which 3-phase parallel electrodes were embedded and was driven by a 3-phase ac excitation to the electrodes. Static characteristics of DEMED were calculated and tested and the results agreed very well. Three prototype motors of DEMED were fabricated using commercially available technique. The first prototype consisted of a single slider and stator and generated a linear motion with a slider`s motion range of about 5mm. It weighed 7g and generated a power of 1.6W and a thrust force of 4.4N. The second prototype consisted of 50 layer stack of linear motors, summing their outputs. It weighed 3.6kg and generated a propulsive force of 310N being powered with boosted commercial 3-phase electricity. The third prototype consisted of a rotor and a stator in which electrodes were arranged radially and generated rotational motion. The maximum power of 36mW was generated by the prototype weighing only 260mg for its rotor and stator. From the results of the numerical calculation, a practical design methodology for the motor was determined. An optimal design for a motor employing currently available material and fabrication techniques is provided as an example. Analyses predict that force generation over the interfacial area between the slider and stator of this motor would be 3,900N/m{sup 2}.

  10. Systematics of photon strength functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, Richard

    2015-10-01

    The photon strength of high energy E1 transitions is well described by Brink-Axel theory based on the contribution of the Giant Dipole Resonance. No adequate theory is available for M1 and E2 transitions which do not generally compete strongly with high energy E1 transitions. Measurements with the 57Fe(3He,3He') reaction at the Oslo cyclotron have revealed that the photon strength below 2 MeV greatly exceeds BA predictions. Similar results have been found for numerous other nuclides. In this paper I will discuss my analysis of the 56Fe(n,γ)57Fe reaction which we investigated with both cold neutrons from the Budapest Reactor and thermal neutrons from the Rez Reactor (Prague). A >99% complete 57Fe capture γ-ray decay scheme containing 449 γ-rays deexciting 100 levels has been constructed on the basis of γ-ray singles and γγ -coincidence data. The photon strengths for 90 primary γ-rays with energies ranging from 92-7646 keV were calculated and compared with the predictions of Brink-Axel (BA) theory. Excellent agreement has been attained for the high energy transitions while the strength below 2 MeV exceeds BA predictions confirming the earlier Oslo (3He,3He' γ) results. Photon strengths for another 95 secondary M1, E1, and E2 γ-rays were also determined to also exceed BA predictions for transitions below 4 MeV. The dependence of photon strength on level energy and the statistical distribution of photon strengths will also be discussed in this talk.

  11. Inner-shell excitation of acetylene by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Michelin, S.E.; Pessoa, O.; Oliveira, H.L.; Veiteinheimer, E.; Santos, A.M.S.; Fujimoto, M.M.; Iga, I.; Lee, M.-T.

    2005-08-15

    The distorted-wave approximation (DWA) is applied to study K-shell excitation in C{sub 2}H{sub 2} by electron impact. More specifically, calculated differential and integral cross sections for the X {sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}{yields}{sup 1,3}{pi}{sub g}(1s{sigma}{sub g}{yields}1p{pi}{sub g}) and X {sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}{yields}{sup 1,3}{pi}{sub u}(1s{sigma}{sub u}{yields}1p{pi}{sub g}) transitions in this target in the 300-800 eV incident energy range are reported. The triplet-to-singlet ratios of respective integral cross sections, namely, RI(3:1), calculated by dividing the integral cross sections for transitions leading to the triplet core-excited states by those leading to the corresponding singlet states, are also reported as a function of incident energies. In general, our calculated sums of the generalized oscillator strength for transitions leading to the {sup 1}{pi}{sub g} and {sup 1}{pi}{sub u} excited states are in good agreement with the available experimental data. On the other hand, the present calculated integral cross sections and the corresponding data for its isoelectronic species CO are significantly different. Possible physical origins for this difference are discussed.

  12. New Insights in 4f(12)5d(1) Excited States of Tm(2+) through Excited State Excitation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Mathijs; Biner, Daniel; Krämer, Karl W; Barandiarán, Zoila; Seijo, Luis; Meijerink, Andries

    2016-07-21

    Optical excitation of ions or molecules typically leads to an expansion of the equilibrium bond lengths in the excited electronic state. However, for 4f(n-1)5d(1) excited states in lanthanide ions both expansion and contraction relative to the 4f(n) ground state have been reported, depending on the crystal field and nature of the 5d state. To probe the equilibrium distance offset between different 4f(n-1)5d(1) excited states, we report excited state excitation (ESE) spectra for Tm(2+) doped in CsCaBr3 and CsCaCl3 using two-color excited state excitation spectroscopy. The ESE spectra reveal sharp lines at low energies, confirming a similar distance offset for 4f(n-1)5d(t2g)(1) states. At higher energies, broader bands are observed, which indicate the presence of excited states with a different offset. On the basis of ab initio embedded-cluster calculations, the broad bands are assigned to two-photon d-d absorption from the excited state. In this work, we demonstrate that ESE is a powerful spectroscopic tool, giving access to information which cannot be obtained through regular one-photon spectroscopy. PMID:27347766

  13. New Insights in 4f(12)5d(1) Excited States of Tm(2+) through Excited State Excitation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Mathijs; Biner, Daniel; Krämer, Karl W; Barandiarán, Zoila; Seijo, Luis; Meijerink, Andries

    2016-07-21

    Optical excitation of ions or molecules typically leads to an expansion of the equilibrium bond lengths in the excited electronic state. However, for 4f(n-1)5d(1) excited states in lanthanide ions both expansion and contraction relative to the 4f(n) ground state have been reported, depending on the crystal field and nature of the 5d state. To probe the equilibrium distance offset between different 4f(n-1)5d(1) excited states, we report excited state excitation (ESE) spectra for Tm(2+) doped in CsCaBr3 and CsCaCl3 using two-color excited state excitation spectroscopy. The ESE spectra reveal sharp lines at low energies, confirming a similar distance offset for 4f(n-1)5d(t2g)(1) states. At higher energies, broader bands are observed, which indicate the presence of excited states with a different offset. On the basis of ab initio embedded-cluster calculations, the broad bands are assigned to two-photon d-d absorption from the excited state. In this work, we demonstrate that ESE is a powerful spectroscopic tool, giving access to information which cannot be obtained through regular one-photon spectroscopy.

  14. Collision strengths for nebular [O III] optical and infrared lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, P. J.; Sochi, Taha; Badnell, N. R.

    2014-07-01

    We present electron collision strengths and their thermally averaged values for the nebular forbidden lines of the astronomically abundant doubly ionized oxygen ion, O2+, in an intermediate coupling scheme using the Breit-Pauli relativistic terms as implemented in an R-matrix atomic scattering code. We use several atomic targets for the R-matrix scattering calculations including one with 72 atomic terms. We also compare with new results obtained using the intermediate coupling frame transformation method. We find spectroscopically significant differences against a recent Breit-Pauli calculation for the excitation of the [O III] λ4363 transition but confirm the results of earlier calculations.

  15. Crystal strength by direct computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatov, Vasily

    2007-03-01

    The art of making materials stronger goes back to medieval and even ancient times. Swords forged from Damascus steels more than 10 centuries ago possessed a unique combination of hardness and flexibility, two qualities that are difficult to attain simultaneously. The skills of metalworking were based on empirical knowledge and were passed from the master smith to his pupils. The science of physical metallurgy came about only in the XX century bringing with it new methods for finding out why some materials are strong while others are not. Soon it was realized that, when it comes to metal strength, it is all about crystal defects -- impurities, dislocations, grain boundaries, etc. - and how they are organized into crystal microstructure. This understanding has since resulted in new effective methods of material processing aiming to modify crystal microstructure in order to affect material's properties, e.g. strength and/or hardness. Remarkably and disappointingly, general understanding that microstructure defines material's response to external loads has not yet resulted in a workable physical theory of metal strength accounting for the realistic complexity of material microstructure. In this presentation I would like to discuss a few tidbits from computational and experimental research in our group at LLNL on crystal defects and their contributions to material strength. My selection of the examples aims to illustrate the major premise of our work that the mechanisms by which the microstructure affects crystal strength are multiple and complex but that there is hope to bring some order to this complexity.

  16. Lifting strength in two-person teamwork.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzu-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of lifting range, hand-to-toe distance, and lifting direction on single-person lifting strengths and two-person teamwork lifting strengths. Six healthy males and seven healthy females participated in this study. Two-person teamwork lifting strengths were examined in both strength-matched and strength-unmatched groups. Our results showed that lifting strength significantly decreased with increasing lifting range or hand-to-toe distance. However, lifting strengths were not affected by lifting direction. Teamwork lifting strength did not conform to the law of additivity for both strength-matched and strength-unmatched groups. In general, teamwork lifting strength was dictated by the weaker of the two members, implying that weaker members might be exposed to a higher potential danger in teamwork exertions. To avoid such overexertion in teamwork, members with significantly different strength ability should not be assigned to the same team.

  17. Ultraviolet high-excitation Fe II fluorescence lines excited by O VI, C IV, and H I resonance emission as seen in IUE spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feibelman, Walter A.; Bruhweiler, Frederick C.; Johansson, Sveneric

    1991-01-01

    Archival high-dispersion spectra from the IUE are used in a search for Bowen emission lines of Fe II excited by the stronger transition of the O VI resonance doublet. The possibility of using these Fe II emission lines as a diagnostic of the strength of the far-ultraviolet emission of O VI at 1032 A is explored. It is found that the Fe II emission lines are quite common and strong in symbiotic stars, particularly those of the type known as 'symbiotic novae', as well as in normal novae. The lines are observed in central stars of some planetary nebulae of the O VI sequence besides a few central stars of type WR. High density, high excitation, and high temperature are suggested to be requirements for the excitation of the Fe II fluorescence lines. It is pointed out that while these lines were observed in PG 1159-035 and K1-16, they were not observed in AGNs.

  18. Isoscalar monopole and dipole excitations of cluster states and giant resonances in 12C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko

    2016-05-01

    The isoscalar monopole (ISM) and dipole (ISD) excitations in 12C are investigated theoretically with the shifted antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) plus 3 α -cluster generator coordinate method (GCM). The small-amplitude vibration modes are described by coherent one-particle one-hole excitations expressed by a small shift of single-nucleon Gaussian wave functions within the AMD framework, whereas the large-amplitude cluster modes are incorporated by superposing 3 α -cluster wave functions in the GCM. The coupling of the excitations in the intrinsic frame with the rotation and parity transformation is taken into account microscopically by the angular-momentum and parity projections. The present a calculation that describes the ISM and ISD excitations over a wide energy region covering cluster modes in the low-energy region and the giant resonances in the high-energy region, although the quantitative description of the high-energy part is not satisfactory. The low-energy ISM and ISD strengths of the cluster modes are enhanced by the distance motion between α clusters, and they split into a couple of states because of the angular motion of α clusters. The low-energy ISM strengths exhaust 26% of the energy-weighted sum rule, which is consistent with the experimental data for the 12C(02+; 7.65 MeV) and 12C(03+; 10.3 MeV) measured by (e ,e') ,(α ,α') , and (6Li,6Li' ) scatterings. In the calculated low-energy ISD strengths, two 1- states (the 11- and 12- states) with the significant strengths are obtained over E =10 -15 MeV. The results indicate that the ISD excitations can be a good probe to experimentally search for new cluster states such as the 12C(12-) obtained in the present calculation.

  19. Microwave Excitation In ECRIS plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Consoli, F.; Gammino, S.; Maimone, F.; Barbarino, S.; Catalano, R. S.; Mascali, D.; Tumino, L.

    2007-09-28

    A number of phenomena related to the electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) has been better understood recently by means of the improvement of comprehension of the coupling mechanism between microwave generators and ECR plasma. In particular, the two frequency heating and the frequency tuning effect, that permit a remarkable increase of the current for the highest charge states ions, can be explained in terms of modes excitation in the cylindrical cavity of the plasma chamber. Calculations based on this theoretical approach have been performed, and the major results will be presented. It will be shown that the electric field pattern completely changes for a few MHz frequency variations and the changes in ECRIS performances can be correlated to the efficiency of the power transfer between electromagnetic field and plasma.

  20. Collective excitations of supersymmetric plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Czajka, Alina; Mrowczynski, Stanislaw

    2011-02-15

    Collective excitations of N=1 supersymmetric electromagnetic plasma are studied. Since the Keldysh-Schwinger approach is used, not only equilibrium but also nonequilibrium plasma, which is assumed to be ultrarelativistic, is under consideration. The dispersion equations of photon, photino, electron, and selectron modes are written down and the self-energies, which enter the equations, are computed in the hard loop approximation. The self-energies are discussed in the context of effective action which is also given. The photon modes and electron ones appear to be the same as in the usual ultrarelativistic plasma of electrons, positrons, and photons. The photino modes coincide with the electron ones and the selectron modes are as of a free relativistic massive particle.

  1. Excited Baryons in Holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    de Teramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins

    2011-11-08

    The light-front holographic QCD approach is used to describe baryon spectroscopy and the systematics of nucleon transition form factors. Baryon spectroscopy and the excitation dynamics of nucleon resonances encoded in the nucleon transition form factors can provide fundamental insight into the strong-coupling dynamics of QCD. The transition from the hard-scattering perturbative domain to the non-perturbative region is sensitive to the detailed dynamics of confined quarks and gluons. Computations of such phenomena from first principles in QCD are clearly very challenging. The most successful theoretical approach thus far has been to quantize QCD on discrete lattices in Euclidean space-time; however, dynamical observables in Minkowski space-time, such as the time-like hadronic form factors are not amenable to Euclidean numerical lattice computations.

  2. The torsional strength of wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, C P

    1930-01-01

    This report describes a simple method for calculating the position of the elastic axis of a wing structure having any number of spars. It is shown that strong drag bracing near the top and bottom of a wing greatly increases the torsional strength. An analytical procedure for finding the contribution of the drag bracing to the torsional strength and stiffness is described, based upon the principle of least work, and involving only one unknown quantity. A coefficient for comparing the torsional rigidity of different wings is derived in this report.

  3. Cross Sections for Electron Impact Excitation of Astrophysically Abundant Atoms and Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2006-01-01

    Electron collisional excitation rates and transition probabilities are important for computing electron temperatures and densities, ionization equilibria, and for deriving elemental abundances from emission lines formed in the collisional and photoionized astrophysical plasmas. Accurate representation of target wave functions that properly account for the important correlation and relaxation effects and inclusion of coupling effects including coupling to the continuum are essential components of a reliable collision calculation. Non-orthogonal orbitals technique in multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock approach is used to calculate oscillator strengths and transition probabilities. The effect of coupling to the continuum spectrum is included through the use of pseudostates which are chosen to account for most of the dipole polarizabilities of target states. The B-spline basis is used in the R-matrix approach to calculate electron excitation collision strengths and rates. Results for oscillator strengths and electron excitation collision strengths for transitions in N I, O I, O II, O IV, S X and Fe XIV have been produced

  4. Statistical dynamo theory: Mode excitation.

    PubMed

    Hoyng, P

    2009-04-01

    We compute statistical properties of the lowest-order multipole coefficients of the magnetic field generated by a dynamo of arbitrary shape. To this end we expand the field in a complete biorthogonal set of base functions, viz. B= summation operator_{k}a;{k}(t)b;{k}(r) . The properties of these biorthogonal function sets are treated in detail. We consider a linear problem and the statistical properties of the fluid flow are supposed to be given. The turbulent convection may have an arbitrary distribution of spatial scales. The time evolution of the expansion coefficients a;{k} is governed by a stochastic differential equation from which we infer their averages a;{k} , autocorrelation functions a;{k}(t)a;{k *}(t+tau) , and an equation for the cross correlations a;{k}a;{l *} . The eigenfunctions of the dynamo equation (with eigenvalues lambda_{k} ) turn out to be a preferred set in terms of which our results assume their simplest form. The magnetic field of the dynamo is shown to consist of transiently excited eigenmodes whose frequency and coherence time is given by Ilambda_{k} and -1/Rlambda_{k} , respectively. The relative rms excitation level of the eigenmodes, and hence the distribution of magnetic energy over spatial scales, is determined by linear theory. An expression is derived for |a;{k}|;{2}/|a;{0}|;{2} in case the fundamental mode b;{0} has a dominant amplitude, and we outline how this expression may be evaluated. It is estimated that |a;{k}|;{2}/|a;{0}|;{2} approximately 1/N , where N is the number of convective cells in the dynamo. We show that the old problem of a short correlation time (or first-order smoothing approximation) has been partially eliminated. Finally we prove that for a simple statistically steady dynamo with finite resistivity all eigenvalues obey Rlambda_{k}<0 .

  5. An experimental investigation of an acoustically excited laminar premixed flame

    SciTech Connect

    Kartheekeyan, S.; Chakravarthy, S.R.

    2006-08-15

    A two-dimensional laminar premixed flame is stabilized over a burner in a confined duct and is subjected to external acoustic forcing from the downstream end. The equivalence ratio of the flame is 0.7. The flame is stabilized in the central slot of a three-slotted burner. The strength of the shear layer of the cold reactive mixture through the central slot is controlled by the flow rate of cold nitrogen gas through the side slots. The frequency range of acoustic excitation is 400-1200 Hz, and the amplitude levels are such that the acoustic velocity is less than the mean flow velocity of the reactants. Time-averaged chemiluminescence images of the perturbed flame front display time-mean changes as compared to the unperturbed flame shape at certain excitation frequencies. Prominent changes to the flame front are in the form of stretching or shrinkage, asymmetric development of its shape, increased/preferential lift-off of one or both of the stabilization points of the flame, and nearly random three-dimensional fluctuations over large time scales under some conditions. The oscillations of the shear layer and the response of the confined jet of the hot products to the acoustic forcing, such as asymmetric flow development and jet spreading, are found to be responsible for the observed mean changes in the flame shape. A distinct low-frequency component ({approx}60-90 Hz) relative to the excitation frequency is observed in the fluctuations of the chemiluminescent intensity in the flame under most conditions. It is observed that fluctuations in the flame area predominantly contribute to the origin of the low-frequency component. This is primarily due to the rollup of vortices and the generation of enthalpy waves at the burner lip. Both of these processes are excited at the externally imposed acoustic time scale, but convect/propagate downstream at the flow time scale, which is much larger. (author)

  6. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Julien Q. M.; Gaggioni, Giulia; Chellappa, Sarah L.; Papachilleos, Soterios; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Borsu, Chloé; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Middleton, Benita; Luxen, André; Archer, Simon N.; Phillips, Christophe; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre; Massimini, Marcello; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness alters cortical excitability, which is essential for proper brain function and cognition. However, besides prior wakefulness, brain function and cognition are also affected by circadian rhythmicity. Whether the regulation of cognition involves a circadian impact on cortical excitability is unknown. Here, we assessed cortical excitability from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in 22 participants during 29 h of wakefulness under constant conditions. Data reveal robust circadian dynamics of cortical excitability that are strongest in those individuals with highest endocrine markers of circadian amplitude. In addition, the time course of cortical excitability correlates with changes in EEG synchronization and cognitive performance. These results demonstrate that the crucial factor for cortical excitability, and basic brain function in general, is the balance between circadian rhythmicity and sleep need, rather than sleep homoeostasis alone. These findings have implications for clinical applications such as non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation. PMID:27339884

  7. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability.

    PubMed

    Ly, Julien Q M; Gaggioni, Giulia; Chellappa, Sarah L; Papachilleos, Soterios; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Borsu, Chloé; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Middleton, Benita; Luxen, André; Archer, Simon N; Phillips, Christophe; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre; Massimini, Marcello; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-06-24

    Prolonged wakefulness alters cortical excitability, which is essential for proper brain function and cognition. However, besides prior wakefulness, brain function and cognition are also affected by circadian rhythmicity. Whether the regulation of cognition involves a circadian impact on cortical excitability is unknown. Here, we assessed cortical excitability from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in 22 participants during 29 h of wakefulness under constant conditions. Data reveal robust circadian dynamics of cortical excitability that are strongest in those individuals with highest endocrine markers of circadian amplitude. In addition, the time course of cortical excitability correlates with changes in EEG synchronization and cognitive performance. These results demonstrate that the crucial factor for cortical excitability, and basic brain function in general, is the balance between circadian rhythmicity and sleep need, rather than sleep homoeostasis alone. These findings have implications for clinical applications such as non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation.

  8. Standing excitation waves in the heart induced by strong alternating electric fields.

    PubMed

    Gray, R A; Mornev, O A; Jalife, J; Aslanidi, O V; Pertsov, A M

    2001-10-15

    We studied the effect of sinusoidal electric fields on cardiac tissue both experimentally and numerically. We found that periodic forcing at 5-20 Hz using voltage applied in the bathing solution could stop the propagation of excitation waves by producing standing waves of membrane depolarization. These patterns were independent of the driving frequency in contrast to classical standing waves. The stimulus strength required for pattern formation was large compared to the excitation threshold. A novel tridomain representation of cardiac tissue was required to reproduce this behavior numerically.

  9. Standing Excitation Waves in the Heart Induced by Strong Alternating Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Richard A.; Mornev, Oleg A.; Jalife, José; Aslanidi, Oleg V.; Pertsov, Arkady M.

    2001-10-01

    We studied the effect of sinusoidal electric fields on cardiac tissue both experimentally and numerically. We found that periodic forcing at 5-20 Hz using voltage applied in the bathing solution could stop the propagation of excitation waves by producing standing waves of membrane depolarization. These patterns were independent of the driving frequency in contrast to classical standing waves. The stimulus strength required for pattern formation was large compared to the excitation threshold. A novel tridomain representation of cardiac tissue was required to reproduce this behavior numerically.

  10. Global and short-range entanglement properties in excited, many-body localized spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Colin; Wei, Tzu-Chieh

    Many-body localization is a manifestation of the violation of the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis. As one of many characteristic features, eigenstates in a many-body localized regime have been observed to obey an area law in the scaling of the entanglement entropy. Consequently, such states can be efficiently represented by matrix product states (MPS). Here, we use the SIMPS algorithm proposed by Yu, Pekker, and Clark to numerically access these excited states in spin chains with disorder, and study them from the perspective of their global and short range entanglement properties, as well as through other local observables. We compare the behavior across excited states as the strength of disorder varies.

  11. Nonequilibrium generalization of Förster Dexter theory for excitation energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seogjoo; Jung, YounJoon; Silbey, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Förster-Dexter theory for excitation energy transfer (EET) is generalized for the account of short time nonequilibrium kinetics due to the nonstationary bath relaxation. The final rate expression is presented as a spectral overlap between the time dependent stimulated emission and the stationary absorption profiles, which allows experimental determination of the time dependent rate. For a harmonic oscillator bath model, an explicit rate expression is derived and model calculations are performed in order to examine the dependence of the nonequilibrium kinetics on the excitation-bath coupling strength and the temperature. Relevance of the present theory with recent experimental findings and possible future theoretical directions are discussed.

  12. A Hamiltonian approach to the parametric excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, V.; Bacri, J.-C.; Hocquet, T.; Devaud, M.

    2006-05-01

    We propose a solution of the parametrically excited oscillator problem using the Hamiltonian formalism introduced by Glauber. The main advantage is that, within the framework of this formalism, the different possible approximations appear much more naturally than in the standard textbook presentation. Experiments on adiabatic and resonant parametric excitations of a pendulum are presented as an illustration, with particular attention being paid to the role played by the phase of the excitation.

  13. The Dynamics of Small Excitable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Peter; Shuai, Jian-Wei

    2005-03-01

    We consider clusters of sodium ion channels similar as found in the nodes of Ranvier in myelinated neurons. The cluster behaves like excitable systems in the limit of large numbers of ion channels. Small clusters of channels, i.e. small excitable systems, exhibit spontaneous action potentials. We show that small excitable systems exhibit maxima of the spontaneous firing rate and of the response to external stimuli at multiple specific cluster sizes that are universally determined by arithmetic properties of small numbers.

  14. An interlaminar tension strength specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Wade C.; Martin, Roderick H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine interlaminar tension strength, sigma(sub 3c) of a fiber reinforced composite material using a curved beam. The specimen was a unidirectional curved beam, bent 90 degrees, with straight arms. Attached to each arm was a hinged loading mechanism which was held by the grips of a tensile testing machine. Geometry effects of the specimen, including the effects of loading arm length, inner radius, thickness, and width, were studied. The data sets fell into two categories: low strength corresponding to a macroscopic flaw related failure and high strength corresponding to a microscopic flaw related failure. From the data available, the loading arm length had no effect on sigma(sub 3c). The inner radius was not expected to have a significant effect on sigma(sub 3c), but this conclusion could not be confirmed because of differences in laminate quality for each curve geometry. The thicker specimens had the lowest value of sigma(sub 3c) because of poor laminate quality. Width was found to affect the value of sigma(sub 3c) only slightly. The wider specimens generally had a slightly lower strength since more material was under high stress, and hence, had a larger probability of containing a significant flaw.

  15. Prepubescent Strength Training Gains Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duda, Marty

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies have stimulated greater support for prepubescent weight training. There seems to be general agreement that strength and weight training, when practiced under properly controlled conditions, is safe and efficacious for prepubescents. Weight lifting is not supported. Recommendations for weight training are made, and reservations are…

  16. Building Strengths through Adventure Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughmiller, Grover C.

    2007-01-01

    Campbell Loughmiller (1906-1993) is widely recognized as a leader in therapeutic work with troubled youngsters in outdoor settings. Rejecting punitive or institutional models of intervention, Loughmiller set out to demonstrate that every young person has strengths, desires to make positive changes, can grow in responsibility, and contribute to…

  17. Doubly Excited States in Be III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, T.; Bentzen, S. M.; Poulsen, O.

    1980-01-01

    The triplet spectrum of doubly excited Be III has been studied in the wavelength region of 75-5000 Å in order to test the validity of the theoretical term values reported by Lipsky et al. The beam-foil excitation technique was applied to effectively populate the doubly excited states. The identified lower-lying, doubly excited states 2p2 3P, 2pnp 3P, or 3D, and 2pnd 3P, or 3D (n = 3, 4) show that the theoretical term values should be slightly modified.

  18. Two-photon excitation fluorescence bioassays.

    PubMed

    Hänninen, Pekka; Soukka, Jori; Soini, Juhani T

    2008-01-01

    Application of two-photon excitation of fluorescence in microscopy is one of the major discoveries of the "renaissance" of light microscopy that started in the 1980s. The technique derives its advantages from the biologically "smooth" wavelength of the excitation light and the confinement of the excitation. Difficult, and seemingly nontransparent, samples may be imaged with the technique with good resolution. Although the bioresearch has been concentrating mostly on the positive properties of the technique for imaging, the same properties may be applied successfully to nonimaging bioassays. This article focuses on the development path of two-photon excitation-based assay system. PMID:18596366

  19. Laser Excited Fluorescence Studies Of Black Liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, J. J.; Semerjian, H. G.

    1986-10-01

    Laser excited fluorescence of black liquor was investigated as a possible monitoring technique for pulping processes. A nitrogen pumped dye laser was used to examine the fluorescence spectrum of black liquor solutions. Various excitation wavelengths were used between 290 and 403 nm. Black liquor fluorescence spectra were found to vary with both excitation wavelength and black liquor concentration. Laser excited fluorescence was found to be a sensitive technique for measurement of black liquor with good detection limits and linear response over a large dynamic range.

  20. Oscillator Strength Determinations of Diatomic Molecular Transitions of Astrophysical Interest.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Glenn

    Lifetimes of six individual rotational levels in the (nu) = 0 vibrational level of the d('3)(PI)(,g) state of C(,2) were measured by monitoring the fluorescent decay after pulsed laser excitation. A value of 92 (+OR -) 5 nanoseconds was obtained, 25% lower than previous measurements. The corresponding oscillator strength for the Swan (0-0) band is f(,0,0) = 0.032 (+OR-) 0.002, in agreement with recent theoretical work. Attempts were made to measure the oscillator strengths of transitions in the C(,2)D('1)(SIGMA)(,u)('+) - X('1)(SIGMA)(,g)('+) Mulliken system. Absorption measurements were unsuccessful, primarily due to low number densities in the C(,2) absorption cell (a high temperature King-type furnace) and to the inadequacies of continuum radiation sources in the 230 nm region. The Mulliken system was photographed in emission from a vacuum carbon arc. A rotational analysis of the 0-0, 1-1, and 2-2 bands yielded improved molecular constants for the D('1)(SIGMA)(,u)('+) state. The radiative lifetime of a single rotational level in the (nu) = 0 vibrational level of the B('2)(SIGMA)('+) state of the CN molecule was determined by observation of fluorescent decay following pulsed laser excitation. A value of 62 (+OR-) 6 nanoseconds was obtained, consistent with previous experimental determinations.

  1. The Strength-Based Counseling Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Elsie J.

    2006-01-01

    This article proposes a strength-based model for counseling at-risk youth. The author presents the assumptions, basic concepts, and values of the strength perspective in counseling and offers strength categories as a conceptual model for viewing clients' behavior. Propositions leading toward a theory of strength-based counseling and stages of this…

  2. First observation of γ rays emitted from excited states south-east of 132Sn: The π g9/2 -1⊗ν f7 /2 multiplet of In13283

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungclaus, A.; Gargano, A.; Grawe, H.; Taprogge, J.; Nishimura, S.; Doornenbal, P.; Lorusso, G.; Shimizu, Y.; Simpson, G. S.; Söderström, P.-A.; Sumikama, T.; Xu, Z. Y.; Baba, H.; Browne, F.; Fukuda, N.; Gernhäuser, R.; Gey, G.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Jung, H. S.; Kameda, D.; Kim, G. D.; Kim, Y.-K.; Kojouharov, I.; Kubo, T.; Kurz, N.; Kwon, Y. K.; Li, Z.; Sakurai, H.; Schaffner, H.; Steiger, K.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Vajta, Zs.; Watanabe, H.; Wu, J.; Yagi, A.; Yoshinaga, K.; Bönig, S.; Coraggio, L.; Daugas, J.-M.; Drouet, F.; Gadea, A.; Ilieva, S.; Itaco, N.; Kröll, T.; Montaner-Pizá, A.; Moschner, K.; Mücher, D.; Nishibata, H.; Odahara, A.; Orlandi, R.; Wendt, A.

    2016-04-01

    For the first time, the γ decay of excited states has been observed in a nucleus situated in the quadrant south-east of doubly magic 132Sn, a region in which experimental information so far is limited to ground-state properties. Six γ rays with energies of 50, 86, 103, 227, 357, and 602 keV were observed following the β -delayed neutron emission from Cd13385, populated in the projectile fission of a 238U beam at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory at RIKEN within the EURICA project. The new experimental information is compared to the results of a modern realistic shell-model calculation, the first one in this region very far from stability, focusing in particular on the π 0 g9/2 -1⊗ν 1 f7 /2 particle-hole multiplet in In13283. In addition, theoretical estimates based on a scaling of the two-body matrix elements for the π h11/2 -1⊗ν g9 /2 analog multiplet in Tl208127, one major proton and one major neutron shell above, are presented.

  3. Branching and Fragmentation of Dipole Strength in 181Ta in the Region of the Scissors Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angell, C. T.; Hajima, R.; Shizuma, T.; Ludewigt, B.; Quiter, B. J.

    2016-09-01

    In recent measurements of the scissors mode in radiative decay experiments, transition strengths were observed that were double that expected from theory and systematics well established from measurements on the radiative excitation channel, that is, using nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF). Additional strength as measured with NRF can only be present as heretofore unobserved branching or fragmentation of the scissors mode. Such possibilities were investigated in a transmission NRF measurement on the deformed, odd-mass 181Ta , using a quasimonoenergetic γ -ray beam at two beam energies. This measurement further influences applications using transmission NRF to assay or detect odd-mass fissile isotopes. A large branching, ≈75 %, of small resonances to excited states was discovered. In contrast, previous studies using NRF of the scissors-mode strength in odd-mass nuclei assumed no branching existed. The presently observed branching, combined with the observed highly fragmented elastic strength, could reconcile the scissors-mode strength observed in NRF measurements with the expectations for enhanced scissors-mode strength from radiative decay experiments.

  4. Effective collision strengths for fine-structure transitions in Si VII

    SciTech Connect

    Sossah, A. M.; Tayal, S. S.

    2014-05-20

    The effective collision strengths for electron-impact excitation of fine-structure transitions in Si VII are calculated as a function of electron temperature in the range 5000-2,000,000 K. The B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix method has been used to calculate collision strengths by electron impact. The target wave functions have been obtained using the multi-configuration Hartree-Fock method with term-dependent non-orthogonal orbitals. The 92 fine-structure levels belonging to the 46 LS states of 2s {sup 2}2p {sup 4}, 2s2p {sup 5}, 2p {sup 6}, 2s {sup 2}2p {sup 3}3s, 2s {sup 2}2p {sup 3}3p, 2s {sup 2}2p {sup 3}3d, and 2s2p {sup 4}3s configurations are included in our calculations of oscillator strengths and collision strengths. There are 4186 possible fine-structure allowed and forbidden transitions among the 92 levels. The present excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and collision strengths have been compared with previous theoretical results and available experimental data. Generally, a good agreement is found with the 6 LS-state close-coupling approximation results of Butler and Zeippen and the 44 LS-state distorted wave calculation of Bhatia and Landi.

  5. Multi-photon excitation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments. PMID:16756664

  6. Multi-photon excitation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments.

  7. Multi-photon excitation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments. PMID:16756664

  8. M 1 excitation in Sm isotopes and the proton-neutron sdg interacting boson model

    SciTech Connect

    Mizusaki, T.; Otsuka, T. ); Sugita, M. )

    1991-10-01

    The magnetic-dipole scissors mode in spherical to deformed Sm isotopes is studied in terms of the proton-neutron {ital sdg} interacting boson model, providing a good agreement with recent experiment by Ziegler {ital et} {ital al}. The present calculation correctly reproduces the increase of {ital M}1 excitation strength in going from spherical to deformed nuclei. It is suggested that there may be 1{sup +} states which do not correspond to the scissors mode but absorb certain {ital M}1 strength from the ground state.

  9. Corticomotor excitability of wrist flexor and extensor muscles during active and passive movement.

    PubMed

    Chye, Lilian; Nosaka, Ken; Murray, Lynda; Edwards, Dylan; Thickbroom, Gary

    2010-08-01

    The excitability of the corticospinal projection to upper and lower limbs is constantly modulated during voluntary and passive movement; however a direct comparison during a comparable movement has not been reported. In the present study we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to compare corticomotor excitability to the extensor and flexor carpi radialis (ECR/FCR) muscles of the forearm during voluntary rhythmic wrist movement (through 45 degrees of range), during a matched (for range and rhythm) passive movement of the wrist, and while the wrist was stationary (in mid-range). TMS was delivered when the wrist was in the neutral position. With passive and active movement, and for both FCR and ECR, corticomotor excitability was reduced during lengthening relative to shortening phases of movement. With active movement, this pattern was maintained and superimposed on an overall increase in excitability to both muscles that was greater for the ECR. The results favor a common pattern of excitability changes shared by extensor and flexor muscles as they undergo lengthening and shortening, which may be mediated by afferent input during both passive and active movement. This is combined with an overall increase in excitability associated with active movement that is greater for extensor muscles perhaps due to differences in the strength of the corticomotor projection to these muscles.

  10. Coulomb excitation of radioactive {sup 79}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, C.J.; Blumenthal, D.; Davids, C.N.

    1995-08-01

    The technical challenges expected in experiments with radioactive beams can already be explored by using ions produced in primary reactions. In addition, the re-excitation of these ions by Coulomb excitation allows a sensitive search for collective states that are well above the yrast line. We are building an experiment to study Coulomb excitation of radioactive ions which are separated from beam particles by the Fragment Mass Analyzer. An array of gamma detectors will be mounted at the focal plane to measure the gamma radiation following re-excitation. Five Compton-suppressed Ge detectors and five planar LEPS detectors will be used. The optimum experiment of this type appears to be the study of {sup 79}Rb following the {sup 24}Mg ({sup 58}Ni,3p) reaction. We calculate that about 5 x 10{sup 5} {sup 79}Rb nuclei/second will reach the excitation foil. This rubidium isotope was selected for study as it is strongly produced and is highly deformed, so easily re-excited. The use of a {sup 58}Ni re-excitation foil offers the best yields. After re-excitation the ions will be subsequently transported into a shielded beamdump to prevent the accumulation of activity.

  11. The Excited State Spectrum of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Edwards

    2010-08-01

    The determination of the highly excited state spectrum of baryons within QCD is a major theoretical and experimental challenge. I will present recent results from lattice QCD that give some indications on the structure of these highly excited states, and outline on-going and future work needed for a full determination of the spectrum, including strong decays.

  12. Vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen near Herschel 36

    SciTech Connect

    Rachford, Brian L.; Snow, Theodore P.; Ross, Teresa L.

    2014-05-10

    We present the first high resolution UV spectra toward Herschel 36, a Trapezium-like system of high-mass stars contained within the Lagoon Nebula (M8, NGC 6523). The spectra reveal extreme rovibrational excitation of molecular hydrogen in material at a single velocity or very small range of velocities, with this component presumably lying near the star system and undergoing fluorescent excitation. The overall H{sub 2} excitation is similar to, but apparently larger than, that seen toward HD 37903 which previously showed the largest vibrationally excited H{sub 2} column densities seen in UV absorption spectra. While the velocities of the highly excited H{sub 2} lines are consistent within each observation, it appears that they underwent a ∼60 km s{sup –1} redshift during the 3.6 yr between observations. In neither case does the velocity of the highly excited material match the velocity of the bulk of the line-of-sight material which appears to mostly be in the foreground of M8. Recent work shows unusually excited CH and CH{sup +} lines and several unusually broad diffuse interstellar bands toward Herschel 36. Along with the H{sub 2} excitation, all of these findings appear to be related to the extreme environment within ∼0.1 pc of the massive young stellar system.

  13. Excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging microscope.

    PubMed

    Favreau, Peter F; Hernandez, Clarissa; Heaster, Tiffany; Alvarez, Diego F; Rich, Thomas C; Prabhat, Prashant; Leavesley, Silas J

    2014-04-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is a versatile tool that has recently been applied to a variety of biomedical applications, notably live-cell and whole-tissue signaling. Traditional hyperspectral imaging approaches filter the fluorescence emission over a broad wavelength range while exciting at a single band. However, these emission-scanning approaches have shown reduced sensitivity due to light attenuation from spectral filtering. Consequently, emission scanning has limited applicability for time-sensitive studies and photosensitive applications. In this work, we have developed an excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging microscope that overcomes these limitations by providing high transmission with short acquisition times. This is achieved by filtering the fluorescence excitation rather than the emission. We tested the efficacy of the excitation-scanning microscope in a side-by-side comparison with emission scanning for detection of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing endothelial cells in highly autofluorescent lung tissue. Excitation scanning provided higher signal-to-noise characteristics, as well as shorter acquisition times (300  ms/wavelength band with excitation scanning versus 3  s/wavelength band with emission scanning). Excitation scanning also provided higher delineation of nuclear and cell borders, and increased identification of GFP regions in highly autofluorescent tissue. These results demonstrate excitation scanning has utility in a wide range of time-dependent and photosensitive applications. PMID:24727909

  14. What Gets a Cell Excited? Kinky Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Hodgkin and Huxley's (5) revealing the origins of cellular excitability is one of the great triumphs of physiology. In an extraordinarily deft series of papers, they were able to measure the essential electrical characteristics of neurons and synthesize them into a quantitative model that accounts for the excitability of neurons and other…

  15. Excitation of helium ion by positron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, P.; Ghosh, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    Three (1s,2s,2p) and five (1s,2s,2p,3s-bar,3p-bar) -state close-coupling methods have been employed to calculate the n = 2 excitation cross sections of helium ion by positron impact. The effect of pseudostate is found to be very pronounced in the case of 1s-2s excitation.

  16. Study of excited nucleons and their structure

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, Volker D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the study of excited nucleons are discussed. Much of the progress has been achieved due to the availability of high precision meson production data in the photoproduction and electroproduction sectors, the development of multi-channel partial wave analysis techniques, and advances in Lattice QCD with predictions of the full excitation spectrum.

  17. Excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging microscope

    PubMed Central

    Favreau, Peter F.; Hernandez, Clarissa; Heaster, Tiffany; Alvarez, Diego F.; Rich, Thomas C.; Prabhat, Prashant; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Hyperspectral imaging is a versatile tool that has recently been applied to a variety of biomedical applications, notably live-cell and whole-tissue signaling. Traditional hyperspectral imaging approaches filter the fluorescence emission over a broad wavelength range while exciting at a single band. However, these emission-scanning approaches have shown reduced sensitivity due to light attenuation from spectral filtering. Consequently, emission scanning has limited applicability for time-sensitive studies and photosensitive applications. In this work, we have developed an excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging microscope that overcomes these limitations by providing high transmission with short acquisition times. This is achieved by filtering the fluorescence excitation rather than the emission. We tested the efficacy of the excitation-scanning microscope in a side-by-side comparison with emission scanning for detection of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing endothelial cells in highly autofluorescent lung tissue. Excitation scanning provided higher signal-to-noise characteristics, as well as shorter acquisition times (300  ms/wavelength band with excitation scanning versus 3  s/wavelength band with emission scanning). Excitation scanning also provided higher delineation of nuclear and cell borders, and increased identification of GFP regions in highly autofluorescent tissue. These results demonstrate excitation scanning has utility in a wide range of time-dependent and photosensitive applications. PMID:24727909

  18. Ensemble density functional theory method correctly describes bond dissociation, excited state electron transfer, and double excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Filatov, Michael; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-05-14

    State-averaged (SA) variants of the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham (REKS) method, SA-REKS and state-interaction (SI)-SA-REKS, implement ensemble density functional theory for variationally obtaining excitation energies of molecular systems. In this work, the currently existing version of the SA-REKS method, which included only one excited state into the ensemble averaging, is extended by adding more excited states to the averaged energy functional. A general strategy for extension of the REKS-type methods to larger ensembles of ground and excited states is outlined and implemented in extended versions of the SA-REKS and SI-SA-REKS methods. The newly developed methods are tested in the calculation of several excited states of ground-state multi-reference systems, such as dissociating hydrogen molecule, and excited states of donor–acceptor molecular systems. For hydrogen molecule, the new method correctly reproduces the distance dependence of the lowest excited state energies and describes an avoided crossing between the doubly excited and singly excited states. For bithiophene–perylenediimide stacked complex, the SI-SA-REKS method correctly describes crossing between the locally excited state and the charge transfer excited state and yields vertical excitation energies in good agreement with the ab initio wavefunction methods.

  19. Ensemble density functional theory method correctly describes bond dissociation, excited state electron transfer, and double excitations.

    PubMed

    Filatov, Michael; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-05-14

    State-averaged (SA) variants of the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham (REKS) method, SA-REKS and state-interaction (SI)-SA-REKS, implement ensemble density functional theory for variationally obtaining excitation energies of molecular systems. In this work, the currently existing version of the SA-REKS method, which included only one excited state into the ensemble averaging, is extended by adding more excited states to the averaged energy functional. A general strategy for extension of the REKS-type methods to larger ensembles of ground and excited states is outlined and implemented in extended versions of the SA-REKS and SI-SA-REKS methods. The newly developed methods are tested in the calculation of several excited states of ground-state multi-reference systems, such as dissociating hydrogen molecule, and excited states of donor-acceptor molecular systems. For hydrogen molecule, the new method correctly reproduces the distance dependence of the lowest excited state energies and describes an avoided crossing between the doubly excited and singly excited states. For bithiophene-perylenediimide stacked complex, the SI-SA-REKS method correctly describes crossing between the locally excited state and the charge transfer excited state and yields vertical excitation energies in good agreement with the ab initio wavefunction methods.

  20. Supersolid structure and excitation spectrum of soft-core bosons in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancilotto, Francesco; Rossi, Maurizio; Toigo, Flavio

    2013-09-01

    By means of a mean-field method, we have studied the zero-temperature structure and excitation spectrum of a three-dimensional soft-core bosonic system for a value of the interaction strength that favors a crystal structure made of atomic nanoclusters arranged with fcc ordering. In addition to the longitudinal and transverse phonon branches expected for a normal crystal, the excitation spectrum shows a soft mode related to the breaking of gauge symmetry, which signals a partial superfluid character of the solid. Additional evidence of supersolidity is provided by the calculation of the superfluid fraction, which shows a first-order drop, from 1 to 0.4, at the liquid-supersolid transition and a monotonic decrease as the interaction strength parameter is increased. The conditions for the coexistence of the supersolid with the homogeneous superfluid are discussed, and the surface tension of a representative solid-liquid interface is calculated.

  1. Excited State Lifetime Measurements in Rare Earth Nuclei with Fast Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, V.; Cooper, N.; Bonett-Matiz, M.; Williams, E.; Régis, J.-M.; Rudigier, M.; Ahn, T.; Anagnostatou, V.; Berant, Z.; Bunce, M.; Elvers, M.; Heinz, A.; Ilie, G.; Jolie, J.; Radeck, D.; Savran, D.; Smith, M.

    2011-09-01

    We investigated the collectivity of the lowest excited 2+ states of even-even rare earth nuclei. The B(E2) excitation strengths of these nuclei should directly correlate to the size of the valence space, and maximize at mid-shell. The previously identified saturation of B(E2) strength in well-deformed rotors at mid-shell is put to a high precision test in this series of measurements. Lifetimes of the 2+1 states in 168Hf and 174W have been measured using the newly developed LaBr3 scintillation detectors. The excellent energy resolution in conjunction with superb time properties of the new material allows for reliable handling of background, which is a source of systematic error in such experiments. Preliminary lifetime values are obtained and discussed in the context of previous and ongoing work.

  2. Strength Scaling in Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Morton, John

    1990-01-01

    A research program was initiated to study and isolate the factors responsible for scale effects in the tensile strength of graphite/epoxy composite laminates. Four layups were chosen with appropriate stacking sequences so as to highlight individual and interacting failure modes. Four scale sizes were selected for investigation including full scale size, 3/4, 2/4, and 1/4, with n = to 4, 3, 2, and 1, respectively. The full scale specimen sizes was 32 piles thick as compared to 24, 16, and 8 piles for the 3/4, 2/4, and 1/4 specimen sizes respectively. Results were obtained in the form of tensile strength, stress-strain curves and damage development. Problems associated with strength degradation with increasing specimen sizes are isolated and discussed. Inconsistencies associated with strain measurements were also identified. Enhanced x ray radiography was employed for damage evaluation, following step loading. It was shown that fiber dominated layups were less sensitive to scaling effects compared to the matrix dominated layups.

  3. An Interlaminar Tensile Strength Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.; Jackson, Wade C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine interlaminar tensile strength, sigma(sub 3c), of a fiber reinforced composite material using a curved beam. The specimen was a unidirectional curved beam, bent 90 deg, with straight arms. Attached to each arm was a hinged loading mechanism that was held by the grips of a tension testing machine. Geometry effects of the specimen, including the effects of loading arm length, inner radius, thickness, and width, were studied. The data sets fell into two categories: low strength corresponding to a macroscopic flaw related failure and high strength corresponding to a microscopic flaw related failure. From the data available, the specimen width and loading arm length had little effect on sigma(sub 3c). The inner radius was not expected to have a significant effect on sigma(sub 3c), but this conclusion could not be confirmed because of differences in laminate quality for each curve geometry. The thicker specimens had the lowest value of sigma(sub 3c) because of poor laminate quality.

  4. Nerve excitability changes in critical illness polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Z'Graggen, W J; Lin, C S Y; Howard, R S; Beale, R J; Bostock, H

    2006-09-01

    Patients in intensive care units frequently suffer muscle weakness and atrophy due to critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP), an axonal neuropathy associated with systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiple organ failure. CIP is a frequent and serious complication of intensive care that delays weaning from mechanical ventilation and increases mortality. The pathogenesis of CIP is not well understood and no specific therapy is available. The aim of this project was to use nerve excitability testing to investigate the changes in axonal membrane properties occurring in CIP. Ten patients (aged 37-76 years; 7 males, 3 females) were studied with electrophysiologically proven CIP. The median nerve was stimulated at the wrist and compound action potentials were recorded from abductor pollicis brevis muscle. Strength-duration time constant, threshold electrotonus, current-threshold relationship and recovery cycle (refractoriness, superexcitability and late subexcitability) were recorded using a recently described protocol. In eight patients a follow-up investigation was performed. All patients underwent clinical examination and laboratory investigations. Compared with age-matched normal controls (20 subjects; aged 38-79 years; 7 males, 13 females), CIP patients exhibited reduced superexcitability at 7 ms, from -22.3 +/- 1.6% to -7.6 +/- 3.1% (mean +/- SE, P approximately 0.0001) and increased accommodation to depolarizing (P < 0.01) and hyperpolarizing currents (P < 0.01), indicating membrane depolarization. Superexcitability was reduced both in patients with renal failure and without renal failure. In the former, superexcitability correlated with serum potassium (R = 0.88), and late subexcitability was also reduced (as also occurs owing to hyperkalaemia in patients with chronic renal failure). In patients without renal failure, late subexcitability was normal, and the signs of membrane depolarization correlated with raised serum bicarbonate and base excess

  5. Reexamination of the excited states of C12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, M.; Boztosun, I.; Bremner, C. A.; Chappell, S. P. G.; Cowin, R. L.; Dillon, G. K.; Fulton, B. R.; Greenhalgh, B. J.; Munoz-Britton, T.; Nicoli, M. P.; Rae, W. D. M.; Singer, S. M.; Sparks, N.; Watson, D. L.; Weisser, D. C.

    2007-09-01

    An analysis of the C12(C12,3α)C12 reaction was made at beam energies between 82 and 106 MeV. Decays to both the ground state and the excited states of Be8 were isolated, allowing states of different characters to be identified. In particular, evidence was found for a previously observed state at 11.16 MeV. An analysis of the angular distributions of the unnatural parity states at 11.83 and 13.35 MeV, previously assigned Jπ=2-, calls into question the validity of these assignments, suggesting that at least one of the states may correspond to Jπ=4-. Evidence is also found for 1- and 3- strengths associated with broad states between 11 and 14 MeV.

  6. Quadrupole moments of wobbling excitations in 163Lu

    SciTech Connect

    Gorgen, A.; Clark, R.M.; Cromaz, M.; Fallon, P.; Hagemann, G.B.; Hubel, H.; Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Sletten, G.; Ward, D.; Bengtsson, R.

    2004-01-01

    Lifetimes of states in the triaxial strongly deformed bands of {sup 163}Lu have been measured in a Gammasphere experiment using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. The bands are interpreted as wobbling-phonon excitations from the characteristic electromagnetic properties of the transitions connecting the bands. Quadrupole moments were extracted for the 0-phonon yrast band and, for the first time, for the 1-phonon wobbling band. The very similar results found for both bands suggest a similar intrinsic structure confirming the wobbling interpretation. While the in-band quadrupole moments for the bands show a decreasing trend towards higher spin, the strength of the inter-band transitions remains constant. Both features can be understood by a small increase in triaxiality towards higher spin. Such a change in triaxiality is also found in cranking calculations, to which the experimental results are compared.

  7. 48. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT EXCITER RESISTANCE GRIDS LOCATED UNDER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT EXCITER RESISTANCE GRIDS LOCATED UNDER THE CONTROL ROOM ON SOUTH SIDE OF TURBINE HALL. THE GRIDS WERE AN ESSENTIAL PART OF THE CONTROL SYSTEM THAT MAINTAINED CONSTANT VOLTAGE ON THE RAILROAD POWER LINES. TIRRILL VOLTAGE REGULATORS (SEE CT-142A-100) SENSED VOLTAGE VARIATIONS AND INITIATED SWITCHING SEQUENCES TO REGULATE THE VOLTAGE AND MAINTAIN A SYSTEM STANDARD VOLTAGE. THE RESISTANCE GRIDS WERE SEQUENTIALLY ADDED TO OR REMOVED FROM THE GENERATOR FIELD COIL CIRCUITS. THIS RESISTANCE LOAD DISSIPATED EXCITIR GENERATOR POWER AS HEAT. THIS IN TURN WOULD VARY THE STRENGTH OF THE FIELD MAGNET AND CONSEQUENTLY RAISE OR LOWER THE OUTPUT VOLTAGE FROM THE MAIN GENERATOR ARMATURE. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  8. Localization of electrons and excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Sven

    2006-07-01

    Electrons, electron holes, or excitations in finite or infinite 'multimer systems' may be localized or delocalized. In the theory of Hush, localization depends on the ratio Δ/ λ ( Δ/2 = coupling; λ = reorganization energy). The latter theory has been extended to the infinite system [S. Larsson, A. Klimkāns, Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst. 355 (2000) 217]. The metal/insulator transition often takes place abruptly as a function of Δ/ λ. It is argued that localization in a system with un-filled bands cannot be determined on the basis of Mott-Hubbard U alone, but depends on the number of accessible valence states, reorganization energy λ and coupling Δ (=2t). In fact U = 0 does not necessarily imply delocalization. The analysis here shows that there are many different situations for an insulator to metal transition. Charge transfer in doped NiO is characterized by Ni 2+ - Ni 3+ exchange while charge transfer in pure NiO is characterized by a disproportionation 2Ni 2+ → Ni + + Ni 3+. In spite of the great differences between these two cases, U has been applied without discrimination to both. The relevant localization parameters appear to be Δ and λ in the first case, with only two oxidation states, and U, Δ and λ in the second case with three oxidation states. The analysis is extended to insulator-metal transitions, giant magnetic resistance (GMR) and high Tc superconductivity (SC). λ and Δ can be determined quite accurately in quantum mechanical calculations involving only one and two monomers, respectively.

  9. Impact of ground- and excited-state aromaticity on cyclopentadiene and silole excitation energies and excited-state polarities.

    PubMed

    Jorner, Kjell; Emanuelsson, Rikard; Dahlstrand, Christian; Tong, Hui; Denisova, Aleksandra V; Ottosson, Henrik

    2014-07-21

    A new qualitative model for estimating the properties of substituted cyclopentadienes and siloles in their lowest ππ* excited states is introduced and confirmed through quantum chemical calculations, and then applied to explain earlier reported experimental excitation energies. According to our model, which is based on excited-state aromaticity and antiaromaticity, siloles and cyclopentadienes are cross-hyperconjugated "aromatic chameleons" that adapt their electronic structures to conform to the various aromaticity rules in different electronic states (Hückel's rule in the π(2) electronic ground state (S0) and Baird's rule in the lowest ππ* excited singlet and triplet states (S1 and T1)). By using pen-and-paper arguments, one can explain polarity changes upon excitation of substituted cyclopentadienes and siloles, and one can tune their lowest excitation energies by combined considerations of ground- and excited-state aromaticity/antiaromaticity effects. Finally, the "aromatic chameleon" model can be extended to other monocyclic compound classes of potential use in organic electronics, thereby providing a unified view of the S0, T1, and S1 states of a range of different cyclic cross-π-conjugated and cross-hyperconjugated compound classes. PMID:25043523

  10. Low lying electric dipole excitations in nuclei of the rare earth region

    SciTech Connect

    von Brentano, P.; Zilges, A.; Herzberg, R.D. . Inst. fuer Kernphysik); Zamfir, N.V. ); Kneissl, U.; Heil, R.D.; Pitz, H.H. . Inst. fuer Strahlenphysik); Wesselborg, C. . Inst. fuer Kernphysik)

    1992-01-01

    From many experiments with low energy photon scattering on deformed rare earth nuclei we have obtained detailed information about the distribution of electric dipole strength below 4 MeV. Apart from some weaker transitions between 2 and 4 MeV we observed one, and sometimes two, very strong El-groundstate transitions around 1.5 MeV in all examined nuclei. They arise from the de-excitation of the bandheads of the (J[sup [pi

  11. Di-lepton yield from the decay of excited 28Si states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacelar, J. C.; Buda, A.; Bałanda, A.; Krasznahorkay, A.; van der Ploeg, H.; Sujkowski, Z.; van der Woude, A.

    1994-03-01

    The first dilepton yield measurements from excited nuclear states obtained with a new Positron-Electron Pair Spectroscopic Instrument (PEPSI) are reported. Nuclear states in 28Si, with an initial excitation energy E∗ = 50 MeV, were populated via the isospin T = 0 reaction 4He + 24Mg and the mixed-isospin 3He + 25Mg reaction. In both reactions the dilepton (e +e -) and photon decay yields were measured concurrently. An excess of counts in the e +e - spectrum, over the converted photon yield, is observed in the energy region above 15 MeV. An analyses is discussed whereby the observed excess counts are assumed to represent the isoscalar E0 strength in excited nuclear states.

  12. Hopf bifurcation and bursting synchronization in an excitable systems with chemical delayed coupling.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lixia; Fan, Denggui; Lu, Qishao

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we consider the Hopf bifurcation and synchronization in the two coupled Hindmarsh-Rose excitable systems with chemical coupling and time-delay. We surveyed the conditions for Hopf bifurcations by means of dynamical bifurcation analysis and numerical simulation. The results show that the coupled excitable systems with no delay have supercritical Hopf bifurcation, while the delayed system undergoes Hopf bifurcations at critical time delays when coupling strength lies in a particular region. We also investigated the effect of the delay on the transition of bursting synchronization in the coupled system. The results are helpful for us to better understand the dynamical properties of excitable systems and the biological mechanism of information encoding and cognitive activity.

  13. ELECTRODYNAMIC CONSTRAINTS ON HOMOGENEITY AND RF POWER DEPOSITION IN MULTIPLE COIL EXCITATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Lattanzi, Riccardo; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Grant, Aaron K.; Zhu, Yudong

    2009-01-01

    The promise of increased SNR and spatial/spectral resolution continues to drive MR technology toward higher magnetic field strengths. SAR management and B1 inhomogeneity correction become critical issues at the high frequencies associated with high field MR. In recent years, multiple coil excitation techniques have been recognized as potentially powerful tools for controlling SAR while simultaneously compensating for B1 inhomogeneities. This work explores electrodynamic constraints on transmit homogeneity and SAR, for both fully parallel transmission and its time-independent special case known as RF shimming. Ultimate intrinsic SAR – the lowest possible SAR consistent with electrodynamics for a particular excitation profile but independent of transmit coil design – is studied for different field strengths, object sizes and pulse acceleration factors. The approach to the ultimate intrinsic limit with increasing numbers of finite transmit coils is also studied, and the tradeoff between homogeneity and SAR is explored for various excitation strategies. In the case of fully parallel transmission, ultimate intrinsic SAR shows flattening or slight reduction with increasing field strength, in contradiction to the traditionally cited quadratic dependency, but consistent with established electrodynamic principles. PMID:19165885

  14. Inert strength of pristine silica glass fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.L.; Michalske, T.A.

    1993-11-01

    Silica glass fibers have been produced and tested under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions to investigate the inert strength of pristine fibers in absence of reactive agents. Analysis of the coefficient of variation in diameter ({upsilon}{sub d}) vs the coefficient of variation of breaking strength ({upsilon}{sub {sigma}}) does not adequately explain the variation of breaking stress. Distribution of fiber tensile strength data suggests that the inert strength of such fibers is not single valued and that the intrinsic strength is controlled by defects in the glass. Furthermore, comparison of room temperature UHV data with LN{sub 2} data indicates that these intrinsic strengths are not temperature dependent.

  15. Rotationally Excited H2 in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Rui; Welty, Daniel; Wong, Tony

    2013-03-01

    We have performed a survey study of rotational excited-state H2 Lyman-Werner absorption lines in the entire FUSE Magellanic Clouds Legacy archive. These lines reflect the UV pumping and formation conditions of H2, enabling a more comprehensive study of H2 gas properties, e.g. J-level populations N(J) and b-values (generally indicating the velocity dispersion). Combining with our previous measurements of N(Hi) and N(H2), we derived H2 excitation temperatures, gas volume density n(H), and local UV radiation field strength I UV for each sight line. The results indicate a weaker correlation between n(H) and I UV in Magellanic Clouds than the Galactic sight lines. We also obtained N(H)/E(B - V) ratios from the Spitzer-SAGE and previous CO J = 1 - 0 / Hi 21 cm surveys at sight line locations, using dust modeling and standard line brightness-column density conversion factors. They show a roughly linear correlation with absorption-based N(H)/E(B - V) values, and have a similar scatter (˜0.7 dex) across the LMC and SMC.

  16. Magnetic dipole excitations of the 163Dy nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenginerler, Zemine; Tabar, Emre; Yakut, Hakan; Kuliev, Ali Akbar; Guliyev, Ekber

    2014-03-01

    In this study some properties of the magnetic dipole excitations of the deformed odd mass 163Dy nucleus were studied by using Quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model (QPNM). The several of the ground-state and low-lying magnetic dipole (M1) mode characteristics were calculated for deformed odd-mass nuclei using a separable Hamiltonian within the QPNM. The M1 excited states, reduced transition probabilities B(M1), the ground-state magnetic properties such as magnetic moment (μ), intrinsic magnetic moment (gK) , effective spin factor (gseff.) are the fundamental characteristics of the odd-mass nucleus and provide key information to understand nuclear structure. The theoretical results were compared with the available experimental data and other theoretical approaches. Calculations show that the spin-spin interaction in this isotopes leads to polarization effect influencing the magnetic moments. Furthermore we found a strong fragmentation of the M1 strength in 163Dy nucleus which was in qualitative agreement with the experimental data. Sakarya University, Project Number: 2012-50-02-007 and Z.Zenginerler acknowledge to TUBITAK-TURKEY 2013, fellowship No: 2219.

  17. Impulse excitation of piezoelectric bimorphs for energy harvesting: a dimensionless model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, Michele

    2014-04-01

    Energy harvesting (EH) is a multidisciplinary research area, involving physics, materials science and engineering, with the objective of providing renewable sources of power sufficient to operate targeted low-power applications. Piezoelectric transducers are often used for inertial vibrational as well as direct excitation EH. However, due to the stiffness of the most common material (PZT), compact and light-weight harvesters have high resonant frequencies, making them inefficient at extracting low-frequency power from the environment. The technique of frequency up-conversion, in the form of either plucking or impulse excitation, aims to bridge this frequency gap. In this paper, the technique is modelled analytically with focus on impulse excitation via impact or shock. An analytical model is developed in a standard way starting from the Euler-Bernoulli beam equations adapted to a piezoelectric bimorph. A set of dimensionless variables and parameters is defined and a system of differential equations derived. Here the system is solved numerically for a wide range of the two group parameters present, covering piezoelectric coupling strength between PVDF and PMN-PT. One major result is that the strength of the coupling strongly affects the timescale of the process, but has only a minor effect on the total energy converted. The model can be readily adapted to different excitation profiles.

  18. Suppression of off-resonant carrier excitations via a standing wave gate beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaubenfels, Thomas; Burkhardt, Karl; Vittorini, Grahame; Brown, Kenneth; Brown, Kenton; Merrill, J. True; Amini, Jason; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa

    2015-05-01

    The motional dynamics of ions in rf traps lead to secular sidebands in their excitation spectra. The relative coupling strengths of the carrier and the sidebands are usually fixed by the Lamb-Dicke factor and ion temperature. We show that the strengths of the carrier resonance and the first order sidebands may be selectively emphasized or suppressed relative to one another. Using 40Ca+ ions trapped in a surface electrode trap, we excite the | S1 / 2 > --> | D5 / 2 > electric quadrupole (E2) transition with laser light that is normally incident to the trap's surface. Retroreflection off the trap surface produces a standing wave. For an E2 transition, the carrier couples to the gradient of the electric field and the sidebands to the magnitude. By moving the ion through the standing wave we alternatively suppress and excite the carrier and sideband transitions with the two sets of fringes 180 degrees out of phase. This technique could be used to suppress off-resonant carrier excitations in two qubit gates, and the fringes themselves provide a measure of the ion displacement that can be used to map out the trapping potentials. This work has been funded by the Georgia Tech Research Institute.

  19. Seismic excitation by space shuttles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kanamori, H.; Mori, J.; Sturtevant, B.; Anderson, D.L.; Heaton, T.

    1992-01-01

    Shock waves generated by the space shuttles Columbia (August 13, 1989), Atlantis (April 11, 1991) and Discovery (September 18, 1991) on their return to Edwards Air Force Base, California, were recorded by TERRAscope (Caltech's broadband seismic network), the Caltech-U.S.G.S Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN), and the University of Southern California (USC) Los Angeles Basin Seismic Network. The spatial pattern of the arrival times exhibits hyperbolic shock fronts from which the path, velocity and altitude of the space shuttle could be determined. The shock wave was acoustically coupled to the ground, converted to a seismic wave, and recorded clearly at the broadband TERRAscope stations. The acoustic coupling occurred very differently depending on the conditions of the Earth's surface surrounding the station. For a seismic station located on hard bedrock, the shock wave (N wave) was clearly recorded with little distortion. Aside from the N wave, very little acoustic coupling of the shock wave energy to the ground occurred at these sites. The observed N wave record was used to estimate the overpressure of the shock wave accurately; a pressure change of 0.5 to 2.2 mbars was obtained. For a seismic station located close to the ocean or soft sedimentary basins, a significant amount of shock wave energy was transferred to the ground through acoustic coupling of the shock wave and the oceanic Rayleigh wave. A distinct topography such as a mountain range was found effective to couple the shock wave energy to the ground. Shock wave energy was also coupled to the ground very effectively through large man made structures such as high rise buildings and offshore oil drilling platforms. For the space shuttle Columbia, in particular, a distinct pulse having a period of about 2 to 3 seconds was observed, 12.5 s before the shock wave, with a broadband seismograph in Pasadena. This pulse was probably excited by the high rise buildings in downtown Los Angeles which were

  20. Reduction in corticospinal inhibition in the trained and untrained limb following unilateral leg strength training.

    PubMed

    Latella, Christopher; Kidgell, Dawson J; Pearce, Alan J

    2012-08-01

    This study used transcranial magnetic stimulation to measure the corticospinal responses following 8 weeks of unilateral leg strength training. Eighteen healthy, non-strength trained participants (14 male, 4 female; 18-35 years of age) were matched for age, gender, and pre-training strength; and assigned to a training or control group. The trained group participated in unilateral horizontal leg press strength training, progressively overloaded and wave periodised, thrice per week for 8 weeks. Testing occurred prior to the intervention, at the end of 4 weeks and at the completion of training at 8 weeks. Participants were tested in both legs for one repetition maximum strength, muscle thickness, maximal electromyography (EMG) activity, and corticospinal excitability and inhibition. No changes were observed in muscle thickness in either leg. The trained leg showed an increase in strength of 21.2% (P = 0.001) and 29.0% (P = 0.007, compared to pre-testing) whilst the untrained contralateral leg showed 17.4% (P = 0.01) and 20.4% (P = 0.004, compared to pre-testing) increases in strength at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively. EMG and corticospinal excitability did not change; however, corticospinal inhibition was significantly reduced by 17.7 ms (P = 0.003) and 17.3 ms (P = 0.001) at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively, in the trained leg, and 25.1 ms (P = 0.001) and 20.8 ms (P = 0.001) at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively, in the contralateral untrained leg. This data support the theory of corticospinal adaptations underpinning cross-education gains in the lower limbs following unilateral strength training. PMID:22200796

  1. Dielectric strength of parylene HT

    SciTech Connect

    Diaham, S. Bechara, M.; Locatelli, M.-L.; Khazaka, R.; Tenailleau, C.

    2014-02-07

    The dielectric strength of parylene HT (PA-HT) films was studied at room temperature in a wide thickness range from 500 nm to 50 μm and was correlated with nano- and microstructure analyses. X-ray diffraction and polarized optical microscopy have revealed an enhancement of crystallization and spherulites development, respectively, with increasing the material thickness (d). Moreover, a critical thickness d{sub C} (between 5 and 10 μm) is identified corresponding to the beginning of spherulite developments in the films. Two distinct behaviors of the dielectric strength (F{sub B}) appear in the thickness range. For d ≥ d{sub C}, PA-HT films exhibit a decrease in the breakdown field following a negative slope (F{sub B} ∼ d{sup −0.4}), while for d < d{sub C}, it increases with increasing the thickness (F{sub B} ∼ d{sup 0.3}). An optimal thickness d{sub optim} ∼ 5 μm corresponding to a maximum dielectric strength (F{sub B} ∼ 10 MV/cm) is obtained. A model of spherulite development in PA-HT films with increasing the thickness is proposed. The decrease in F{sub B} above d{sub C} is explained by the spherulites development, whereas its increase below d{sub C} is induced by the crystallites growth. An annealing of the material shows both an enhancement of F{sub B} and an increase of the crystallites and spherulites dimensions, whatever the thickness. The breakdown field becomes thickness-independent below d{sub C} showing a strong influence of the nano-scale structural parameters. On the contrary, both nano- and micro-scale structural parameters appear as influent on F{sub B} for d ≥ d{sub C}.

  2. Strength Training and Shoulder Proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Salles, José Inácio; Velasques, Bruna; Cossich, Victor; Nicoliche, Eduardo; Ribeiro, Pedro; Amaral, Marcus Vinicius; Motta, Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    Context: Proprioception is essential to motor control and joint stability during daily and sport activities. Recent studies demonstrated that athletes have better joint position sense (JPS) when compared with controls matched for age, suggesting that physical training could have an effect on proprioception. Objective: To evaluate the result of an 8-week strength-training program on shoulder JPS and to verify whether using training intensities that are the same or divergent for the shoulder's dynamic-stabilizer muscles promote different effects on JPS. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting: We evaluated JPS in a research laboratory and conducted training in a gymnasium. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 90 men, right handed and asymptomatic, with no history of any type of injury or shoulder instability. Intervention(s): For 8 weeks, the participants performed the strength-training program 3 sessions per week. We used 4 exercises (bench press, lat pull down, shoulder press, and seated row), with 2 sets each. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured shoulder JPS acuity by calculating the absolute error. Results: We found an interaction between group and time. To examine the interaction, we conducted two 1-way analyses of variance comparing groups at each time. The groups did not differ at pretraining; however, a difference among groups was noted posttraining. Conclusions: Strength training using exercises at the same intensity produced an improvement in JPS compared with exercises of varying intensity, suggesting that the former resulted in improvements in the sensitivity of muscle spindles and, hence, better neuromuscular control in the shoulder. PMID:25594912

  3. High strength, tough alloy steel

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other substitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  4. Slow excited state phototautomerization in 3-hydroxyisoquinoline.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Neeraj Kumar; Arora, Priyanka; Pant, Sanjay; Joshi, Hem Chandra

    2014-06-01

    In the present work we report the spectral and photophysical properties of 3-hydroxyisoquinoline in various protic/aprotic solvents. Our steady state and time resolved fluorescence data indicates that in the monomer form of 3HIQ phototautomerization can take place in the excited state through excited state intramolecular proton, while as per earlier suggestions phototautomerization in 3HIQ occurs in dimer or complex (in the presence of acetic acid) form. Moreover, we find rather slow tautomerization (occurring on the nanosecond scale). It is found that proton transfer occurs both in the ground as well as excited states and is controlled by the polarity of the solvent.

  5. Surface and bulk excitations in condensed matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    In this lecture collective and single-particle electron excitations of solids will be discussed with emphasis on the properties of metallic and semiconducting materials. However, some of the general properties of long-wavelength collective modes to be discussed are valid for insulators as well, and some considerations apply to nuclear excitations such as optical or acoustical phonons, dipolar plasmons, etc. The concept of elementary excitations in solids, pioneered by Bohm and Pines almost 4 decades ago, has proved to be extremely useful in understanding the properties of systems of many particles, especially in respect to the response to the action of external probes. 32 refs., 12 figs.

  6. Pulse Vector-Excitation Speech Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Grant; Gersho, Allen

    1989-01-01

    Proposed pulse vector-excitation speech encoder (PVXC) encodes analog speech signals into digital representation for transmission or storage at rates below 5 kilobits per second. Produces high quality of reconstructed speech, but with less computation than required by comparable speech-encoding systems. Has some characteristics of multipulse linear predictive coding (MPLPC) and of code-excited linear prediction (CELP). System uses mathematical model of vocal tract in conjunction with set of excitation vectors and perceptually-based error criterion to synthesize natural-sounding speech.

  7. Helicon wave excitation with helical antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Light, M.; Chen, F.F.

    1995-04-01

    Components of the wave magnetic field in a helicon discharge have been measured with a single-turn, coaxial magnetic probe. Left- and right-handed helical antennas, as well as plane-polarized antennas, were used; and the results were compared with the field patterns computed for a nonuniform plasma. The results show that the right-hand circularly polarized mode is preferentially excited with all antennas, even those designed to excite the left-hand mode. For right-hand excitation, the radial amplitude profiles are in excellent agreement with computations. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  8. Self-pulsations and excitability in optically injected quantum-dot lasers: Impact of the excited states and spontaneous emission noise

    SciTech Connect

    Olejniczak, Lukasz; Panajotov, Krassimir; Thienpont, Hugo; Sciamanna, Marc

    2010-08-15

    We study the dynamics of an optically injected quantum-dot laser accounting for excited states. Mapping of the bifurcations in the plane frequency detuning vs. injection strength shows that the relaxation rate scales the regions of locking and single- and double-period solutions, while the capture rate has a minor effect. Within the regions of time-periodic solutions, close to the saddle-node bifurcation boundary, we identify subregions where the output signal resembles excitable pulses as a result of the bottleneck phenomenon. We show that such emission is determined mainly by fluctuations in the occupation of the excited states. The interpulse time follows an inverse square root scaling law as a function of the detuning. In a deterministic system the pulses are periodic regardless of the detuning, but in the presence of noise, close to the locking region, the interpulse time follows a positively skewed normal distribution. For a fixed frequency detuning, increasing the noise strength can shift the mean of the interpulse time distribution and make the pulsations more periodic.

  9. Self-pulsations and excitability in optically injected quantum-dot lasers: Impact of the excited states and spontaneous emission noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olejniczak, Lukasz; Panajotov, Krassimir; Thienpont, Hugo; Sciamanna, Marc

    2010-08-01

    We study the dynamics of an optically injected quantum-dot laser accounting for excited states. Mapping of the bifurcations in the plane frequency detuning vs. injection strength shows that the relaxation rate scales the regions of locking and single- and double-period solutions, while the capture rate has a minor effect. Within the regions of time-periodic solutions, close to the saddle-node bifurcation boundary, we identify subregions where the output signal resembles excitable pulses as a result of the bottleneck phenomenon. We show that such emission is determined mainly by fluctuations in the occupation of the excited states. The interpulse time follows an inverse square root scaling law as a function of the detuning. In a deterministic system the pulses are periodic regardless of the detuning, but in the presence of noise, close to the locking region, the interpulse time follows a positively skewed normal distribution. For a fixed frequency detuning, increasing the noise strength can shift the mean of the interpulse time distribution and make the pulsations more periodic.

  10. Rapid Feedforward Inhibition and Asynchronous Excitation Regulate Granule Cell Activity in the Mammalian Main Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Shawn D.

    2015-01-01

    Granule cell-mediated inhibition is critical to patterning principal neuron activity in the olfactory bulb, and perturbation of synaptic input to granule cells significantly alters olfactory-guided behavior. Despite the critical role of granule cells in olfaction, little is known about how sensory input recruits granule cells. Here, we combined whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology in acute mouse olfactory bulb slices with biophysical multicompartmental modeling to investigate the synaptic basis of granule cell recruitment. Physiological activation of sensory afferents within single glomeruli evoked diverse modes of granule cell activity, including subthreshold depolarization, spikelets, and suprathreshold responses with widely distributed spike latencies. The generation of these diverse activity modes depended, in part, on the asynchronous time course of synaptic excitation onto granule cells, which lasted several hundred milliseconds. In addition to asynchronous excitation, each granule cell also received synchronous feedforward inhibition. This inhibition targeted both proximal somatodendritic and distal apical dendritic domains of granule cells, was reliably recruited across sniff rhythms, and scaled in strength with excitation as more glomeruli were activated. Feedforward inhibition onto granule cells originated from deep short-axon cells, which responded to glomerular activation with highly reliable, short-latency firing consistent with tufted cell-mediated excitation. Simulations showed that feedforward inhibition interacts with asynchronous excitation to broaden granule cell spike latency distributions and significantly attenuates granule cell depolarization within local subcellular compartments. Collectively, our results thus identify feedforward inhibition onto granule cells as a core feature of olfactory bulb circuitry and establish asynchronous excitation and feedforward inhibition as critical regulators of granule cell activity. SIGNIFICANCE

  11. ON THE EXCITATION AND FORMATION OF CIRCUMSTELLAR FULLERENES

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard-Salas, J.; Jones, A. P.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.

    2012-09-20

    We compare and analyze the Spitzer mid-infrared spectrum of three fullerene-rich planetary nebulae in the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds: Tc1, SMP SMC 16, and SMP LMC 56. The three planetary nebulae share many spectroscopic similarities. The strongest circumstellar emission bands correspond to the infrared active vibrational modes of the fullerene species C{sub 60} and little or no emission is present from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The strengths of the fullerene bands in the three planetary nebulae are very similar, while the ratios of the [Ne III]15.5 {mu}m/[Ne II]12.8 {mu}m fine structure lines, an indicator of the strength of the radiation field, are markedly different. This raises questions about their excitation mechanism and we compare the fullerene emission to fluorescent and thermal models. In addition, the spectra show other interesting and common features, most notably in the 6-9 {mu}m region, where a broad plateau with substructure dominates the emission. These features have previously been associated with mixtures of aromatic/aliphatic hydrocarbon solids. We hypothesize on the origin of this band, which is likely related to the fullerene formation mechanism, and compare it with modeled hydrogenated amorphous carbon that present emission in this region.

  12. The strength of Miranda's lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappalardo, Robert; Greeley, Ronald

    1991-01-01

    In attempting to understand the endogenic processes which have shaped the surface of an icy satellite, it is desirable to quantify the failure strength of the satellite's lithosphere. In a crust that is fractured on a large scale, frictional sliding along pre-existing fractures occurs in response to lower differential stresses than required to initiate fracture of pristine rock, thus governing failure of a brittle lithosphere. Failure is predicted along favorably oriented fracture planes; if fractures of all orientations are assumed to be present in the crust (as is expected of a heavily cratered lithosphere), frictional failure relations are directly applicable. The Coulomb criterion predicts that the shear stress (sigma sub t) and normal stress (sigma sub n) components on a fracture plane at failure are related as sigma sub t = mu-sigma sub n + S sub o, where S sub o is the cohesion and mu is the coefficient of friction. At moderate to high pressures, the frictional sliding strength of most materials is found to be sigma sub t = 0.85 sigma sub n.

  13. Strength evaluation of socket joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, Larry C.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the development of a set of equations that can be used to provide a relatively simple solution for identifying the strength of socket joints and for most cases avoid the need of more lengthy analyses. The analytical approach was verified by comparison of the contact load distributions to results obtained from a finite element analysis. The contacting surfaces for the specific joint in this analysis are in the shape of frustrums of a cone and are representative of the tapered surfaces in the socket-type joints used to join segments of model support systems for wind tunnels. The results are in the form of equations that can be used to determine the contact loads and stresses in the joint from the given geometry and externally applied loads. Equations were determined to define the bending moments and stresses along the length of the joints based on strength and materials principles. The results have also been programmed for a personal computer and a copy of the program is included.

  14. Asteroid airburst altitude vs. strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Darrel; Wheeler, Lorien; Mathias, Donovan

    2016-10-01

    Small NEO asteroids (<Ø140m) may not be a threat on a national or global level but can still cause a significant amount of local damage as demonstrated by the Chelyabinsk event where there was over $33 million worth of damage (1 billion roubles) and 1500 were injured, mostly due to broken glass. The ground damage from a small asteroid depends strongly on the altitude at which they "burst" where most of the energy is deposited in the atmosphere. The ability to accurately predict ground damage is useful in determining appropriate evacuation or shelter plans and emergency management.Strong asteroids, such as a monolithic boulder, fail and create peak energy deposition close to the altitude at which ram dynamic pressure exceeds the material cohesive strength. Weaker asteroids, such as a rubble pile, structurally fail at higher altitude, but it requires the increased aerodynamic pressure at lower altitude to disrupt and disperse the rubble. Consequently the resulting airbursts have a peak energy deposition at similar altitudes.In this study hydrocode simulations of the entry and break-up of small asteroids were performed to examine the effect of strength, size, composition, entry angle, and speed on the resulting airburst. This presentation will show movies of the simulations, the results of peak burst height, and the comparison to semi-analytical models.

  15. Strength of Shocked Aluminum Oxynitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Feng, R.; Dandekar, D. P.

    2009-06-01

    Aluminum oxynitride (AlON) is a polycrystalline and transparent ceramic. An accurate characterization of its shock response is critically important for its applications as transparent armor. Shock wave profiles measured in a series of plate impact experiments on AlON [Thornhill, et al., SCCM-2005, 143-146 (2006)] have been reanalyzed using finite element wave propagation simulations and considering an effective strength behavior that is pressure- and time-dependent. The results show a stiffer shock response than that calculated previously using the jump conditions. The material has a Hugoniot elastic limit of 10.37 GPa and sustains a maximum shear stress of 4.38 GPa for shock compressions up to a shock stress of 96 GPa. The mean stress response determined from the simulations displays no sign of phase transformation and corresponds to a linear shock speed-particle velocity relation with a slope of 0.857. These results have been successfully summarized into an AlON material model consisting of compression-dependent nonlinear elasticity, pressure-dependent equilibrium strength, and over-stress relaxation. The wave profiles simulated with the model show very good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  16. Strength distribution in commercial silicon carbide materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Sunil

    1988-01-01

    Four-point flexural strength testing has been conducted in order to establish the baseline strength and reliability of four different commercial SiC types, in conjunction with reliable Weibull modulus values. Average strength of the samples ranged from 380 to 482 MPa at room temperature and 307 to 470 MPa at 1370 C. The strength scatter reflects the effect of flaw variability, which must be minimized to improve reliability in sintered SiC.

  17. Bonded joint strength - Static versus fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Mall, S.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesives are commonly characterized only by their static strength even though they are used in structural joints that are subjected to fatigue loads. This paper reviews the relationship between static and fatigue strength for four different specimen types: single-lap-shear, edge-delamination, double cantilever beam, and cracked-lap-shear. It was found that the ratio of static strength to fatigue strength varied from 2.3 to 4.7, depending on the adhesive and specimen configuration.

  18. Students Excited by Stellar Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    In the constellation of Ophiuchus, above the disk of our Milky Way Galaxy, there lurks a stellar corpse spinning 30 times per second -- an exotic star known as a radio pulsar. This object was unknown until it was discovered last week by three high school students. These students are part of the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) project, run by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, WV, and West Virginia University (WVU). The pulsar, which may be a rare kind of neutron star called a recycled pulsar, was discovered independently by Virginia students Alexander Snider and Casey Thompson, on January 20, and a day later by Kentucky student Hannah Mabry. "Every day, I told myself, 'I have to find a pulsar. I better find a pulsar before this class ends,'" said Mabry. When she actually made the discovery, she could barely contain her excitement. "I started screaming and jumping up and down." Thompson was similarly expressive. "After three years of searching, I hadn't found a single thing," he said, "but when I did, I threw my hands up in the air and said, 'Yes!'." Snider said, "It actually feels really neat to be the first person to ever see something like that. It's an uplifting feeling." As part of the PSC, the students analyze real data from NRAO's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to find pulsars. The students' teachers -- Debra Edwards of Sherando High School, Leah Lorton of James River High School, and Jennifer Carter of Rowan County Senior High School -- all introduced the PSC in their classes, and interested students formed teams to continue the work. Even before the discovery, Mabry simply enjoyed the search. "It just feels like you're actually doing something," she said. "It's a good feeling." Once the pulsar candidate was reported to NRAO, Project Director Rachel Rosen took a look and agreed with the young scientists. A followup observing session was scheduled on the GBT. Snider and Mabry traveled to West Virginia to assist in the

  19. Nonlinear excited waves on the interventricular septum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekki, Naoaki; Harada, Yoshifumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    Using a novel ultrasonic noninvasive imaging method, we observe some phase singularities in propagating excited waves on a human cardiac interventricular septum (IVS) for a healthy young male. We present a possible physical model explaining one-dimensional dynamics of phase singularities in nonlinearly excited waves on the IVS. We show that at least one of the observed phase singularities in the excited waves on the IVS can be explained by the Bekki-Nozaki hole solution of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation without any adjustable parameters. We conclude that the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation is such a suitable model for one-dimensional dynamics of cardiac phase singularities in nonlinearly excited waves on the IVS.

  20. Acoustics of Excited Jets: A Historical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cliffard A.

    2005-01-01

    The idea that a jet may be excited by external forcing is not new. The first published demonstration of a jet responding to external pressure waves occurred in the mid-1800's. It was not, however, until the 1950's, with the advent of commercial jet aircraft, that interest in the subject greatly increased. Researchers first used excited jets to study the structure of the jet and attempt to determine the nature of the noise sources. The jet actuators of the time limited the range (Reynolds and Mach numbers) of jets that could be excited. As the actuators improved, more realistic jets could be studied. This has led to a better understanding of how jet excitation may be used not only as a research tool to understand the flow properties and noise generation process, but also as a method to control jet noise.

  1. Mode Selective Excitation Using Coherent Control Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ajay K.; Konradi, Jakow; Materny, Arnulf; Sarkar, Sisir K.

    2008-11-14

    Femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) gives access to ultrafast molecular dynamics. However, femtosecond laser pulses are spectrally broad and therefore coherently excite several molecular modes. While the temporal resolution is high, usually no mode-selective excitation is possible. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of selectively exciting specific molecular vibrations in solution phase with shaped fs laser excitation using a feedback-controlled optimization technique guided by an evolutionary algorithm. This approach is also used to obtain molecule-specific CARS spectra from a mixture of different substances. The optimized phase structures of the fs pulses are characterized to get insight into the control process. Possible applications of the spectrum control are discussed.

  2. Geophysical excitation of nutation and geomagnetic jerks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrák, Jan; Ron, Cyril

    2014-05-01

    Recently Zinovy Malkin (2013) proposed that the observed changes of Free Core Nutation parameters (phase, amplitude) might be related to geomagnetic jerks (rapid changes of the secular variations of geomagnetic field). We tested this hypothesis and found that if the numerical integration of Brzezinski broad-band Liouville equations of atmospheric/oceanic excitations is re-initialized at the epochs of geomagnetic jerks, the agreement between the integrated and observed celestial pole offsets is improved significantly. This approach however tacitly assumes that the influence of geomagnetic jerks has a stepwise character, which is physically not acceptable. The present study continues in this effort by introducing a simple continuous excitation function (hypothetically due to geomagnetic jerks). The results of numerical integration of atmospheric/oceanic excitations plus this newly introduced excitation are then compared with the observed celestial pole offsets.

  3. The aeronomy of vibrationally excited ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, J. E.; Allen, J. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical calculations show that above 80 km in the earth's atmosphere the production of vibrationally excited ozone by chemical processes leads to number densities which are usually larger than those expected for local thermodynamic equilibrium. Quenching of highly excited molecules produced in O+O2+M, O3+M provided a significant source of the lower lying states above the mesopause while the 9.6 microns emission of O3 (0,0,1) was a major sink. Analysis of available laboratory results implied that reactions involving excited ozone play a significant role in the global ozone balance despite the relatively small abundance of the molecule. However, this effect is implicit in many of the rate coefficients currently used in stratospheric calculations. In the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, where the excited state populations differ from those for thermal equilibrium, published reaction rate data are not necessarily applicable to aeronomic calculations.

  4. Hydrogen Bonds in Excited State Proton Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horke, D. A.; Watts, H. M.; Smith, A. D.; Jager, E.; Springate, E.; Alexander, O.; Cacho, C.; Chapman, R. T.; Minns, R. S.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen bonding interactions between biological chromophores and their surrounding protein and solvent environment significantly affect the photochemical pathways of the chromophore and its biological function. A common first step in the dynamics of these systems is excited state proton transfer between the noncovalently bound molecules, which stabilizes the system against dissociation and principally alters relaxation pathways. Despite such fundamental importance, studying excited state proton transfer across a hydrogen bond has proven difficult, leaving uncertainties about the mechanism. Through time-resolved photoelectron imaging measurements, we demonstrate how the addition of a single hydrogen bond and the opening of an excited state proton transfer channel dramatically changes the outcome of a photochemical reaction, from rapid dissociation in the isolated chromophore to efficient stabilization and ground state recovery in the hydrogen bonded case, and uncover the mechanism of excited state proton transfer at a hydrogen bond, which follows sequential hydrogen and charge transfer processes.

  5. Faraday Waves under Time-Reversed Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietschmann, Dirk; Stannarius, Ralf; Wagner, Christian; John, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Do parametrically driven systems distinguish periodic excitations that are time mirrors of each other? Faraday waves in a Newtonian fluid are studied under excitation with superimposed harmonic wave forms. We demonstrate that the threshold parameters for the stability of the ground state are insensitive to a time inversion of the driving function. This is a peculiarity of some dynamic systems. The Faraday system shares this property with standard electroconvection in nematic liquid crystals [J. Heuer , Phys. Rev. E 78, 036218 (2008)PLEEE81539-3755]. In general, time inversion of the excitation affects the asymptotic stability of a parametrically driven system, even when it is described by linear ordinary differential equations. Obviously, the observed symmetry has to be attributed to the particular structure of the underlying differential equation system. The pattern selection of the Faraday waves above threshold, on the other hand, discriminates between time-mirrored excitation functions.

  6. Building on Family Strengths: Research and Services in Support of Children and Their Families. Proceedings of the Building on Family Strengths Annual Conference (12th, Portland, Oregon, June 23-25, 2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Lyn, Ed.; Bradley, Jennifer, Ed.; Aue, Nicole, Ed.; Holman, Ariel, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    The 12th Annual Building on Family Strengths Conference was held from June 23rd through June 25th 2005 in Portland, Oregon. Highlights included: (1) An information-packed keynote address by Dr. Richard M. Lerner on promoting positive youth development through enhancing the assets of communities; (2) An exciting research plenary panel session that…

  7. Excited state absorption properties of Pt(II) terpyridyl complexes bearing π-conjugated arylacetylides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianghuai; Goeb, Sébastien; Ji, Zhiqiang; Castellano, Felix N

    2010-11-18

    The synthesis, photophysics, and excited state absorption properties of three platinum(II) terpyridyl acetylide charge transfer (CT) complexes possessing a lone ancillary ligand systematically varied in phenylacetylide (PA) π-conjugation length, [Pt((t)Bu(3)tpy)([C≡C-C(6)H(4)](n)-H)]ClO(4) (n = 1, 2, 3), are described. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations performed on the ground states of complexes 1, 2, and 3 reveal that their HOMOs reside mainly on the ancillary π-conjugated PA moiety, ranging from 86 to 97%, with LUMOs predominantly centered on the terpyridyl acceptor ligand (91-92%). This electronic structure leads to the production of a triplet ligand-to-ligand CT ((3)LLCT) excited state upon visible light excitation with minor contributions from the corresponding triplet metal-to-ligand CT ((3)MLCT) excited state. Unusually strong red-to-near-IR transient absorptions are produced in the excited states of these molecules following selective long wavelength visible excitation of the low energy CT bands that do not emanate from the terpyridyl radical anion produced in the CT excited state or from an arylacetylide-based triplet intraligand ((3)IL) excited state. The extinction coefficients of these low energy absorption transients were determined using the energy transfer method with anthracene serving as the triplet acceptor. A detailed theoretical investigation using DFT and TDDFT methods reveals that these intense near-IR transient absorptions involve transitions resulting from transient oxidation of the PA subunit. In essence, the production of the (3)LLCT excited state transiently oxidizes the PA moiety by one electron, producing the corresponding highly absorbing radical cation-like species, analogous to that experienced in related intramolecular photoinduced electron transfer reactions. The computational work successfully predicts the oscillator strength and peak wavelength of the measured excited state absorption transients across this series

  8. Strengths and Satisfaction across the Adult Lifespan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacowitz, Derek M.; Vaillant, George E.; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2003-01-01

    Positive psychology has recently developed a classification of human strengths (Peterson & Seligman, in press). We aimed to evaluate these strengths by investigating the strengths and life satisfaction in three adult samples recruited from the community (young adult, middle-aged, and older adult), as well as in the surviving men of the Grant study…

  9. Improving the toughness of ultrahigh strength steel

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Koji

    2002-08-15

    The ideal structural steel combines high strength with high fracture toughness. This dissertation discusses the toughening mechanism of the Fe/Co/Ni/Cr/Mo/C steel, AerMet 100, which has the highest toughness/strength combination among all commercial ultrahigh strength steels. The possibility of improving the toughness of this steel was examined by considering several relevant factors.

  10. Probing the excitation spectrum of polariton condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, Michiel; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2009-03-15

    We propose a four-wave mixing experiment to probe the elementary excitation spectrum of a nonequilibrium Bose-Einstein condensate of exciton-polaritons under nonresonant pumping. Analytical calculations based on mean-field theory show that this method is able to reveal the characteristic negative energy feature of the Bogoliubov dispersion. Numerical simulations including the finite spatial profile of the excitation laser spot and a weak disorder confirm the practical utility of the method for realistic condensates.

  11. Plasmoelectronics: coupling plasmonic excitation with electron flow.

    PubMed

    Warren, Scott C; Walker, David A; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2012-06-19

    Explorations of the coupling of light and charge via localized surface plasmons have led to the discovery that plasmonic excitation can influence macroscopic flows of charge and, conversely, that charging events can change the plasmonic excitation. We discuss recent theory and experiments in the emerging field of plasmoelectronics, with particular emphasis on the application of these materials to challenges in nanotechnology, energy use, and sensing. PMID:22385329

  12. Fast pulsed excitation wiggler or undulator

    DOEpatents

    van Steenbergen, Arie

    1990-01-01

    A fast pulsed excitation, electromagnetic undulator or wiggler, employing geometrically alternating substacks of thin laminations of ferromagnetic material, together with a single turn current loop excitation of the composite assembly, of such shape and configuration that intense, spatially alternating, magnetic fields are generated; for use as a pulsed mode undulator or wiggler radiator, for use in a Free Electron Laser (FEL) type radiation source or, for use in an Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) charged particle accelerator.

  13. Collision strengths for dipole-allowed transitions in S II. [Observation of ultraviolet spectra of Io

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Y.K.; Henry, R.J.W. Auburn Univ., AL )

    1990-03-01

    Calculations of collision strengths for electron-impact excitations of S II from the ground state 3p3 4S0 to excited states 3p4 4P, 3d 4F, 3d 4D, 4s 4P, and 3d 4P were carried out using the R-matrix code described by Berrington et al. (1978) and the NIEM code described by Henry et al. (1981). Results are presented for the thermally averaged collision strengths for the five-state and six-state calculations. Convergence behaviors were examined by comparison with the six-state calculations and the previously obtained two-state calculations. Uncertainties for these transitions were estimated to be within 20 percent, except for the 4S0 - 3p4 4P transition in which a 40 percent uncertainty was estimated. 22 refs.

  14. Large-scale deformed QRPA calculations of the gamma-ray strength function based on a Gogny force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, M.; Goriely, S.; Hilaire, S.; Péru, S.; Minato, F.

    2016-01-01

    The dipole excitations of nuclei play an important role in nuclear astrophysics processes in connection with the photoabsorption and the radiative neutron capture that take place in stellar environment. We present here the results of a large-scale axially-symmetric deformed QRPA calculation of the γ-ray strength function based on the finite-range Gogny force. The newly determined γ-ray strength is compared with experimental photoabsorption data for spherical as well as deformed nuclei. Predictions of γ-ray strength functions and Maxwellian-averaged neutron capture rates for Sn isotopes are also discussed.

  15. Identifying and Enhancing the Strengths of Gifted Learners, K-8: Easy-to-Use Activities and Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maccagnano, Ann Marie

    2007-01-01

    Educators can identify children's strengths early on and gain insight into each student's unique abilities by using the numerous ideas and informal assessments in this exciting guide. Gifted and talented specialist Ann Maccagnano offers K-8 teachers challenging activities and engaging lessons to develop and nurture gifted learners' talents.…

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SiXIII and SXV collision strengths (Fernandez-Menchero+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Menchero, L.; Del Zanna, G.; Badnell, N. R.

    2016-07-01

    In present online material we provide in CDS format the extrapolated values of energies, radiative parameters (gf), and electron-impact excitation effective collision strengths (Upsilon) obtained with the extrapolation rules described in the manuscript for the two test ions: He-like Si XIII and S XV. (6 data files).

  17. Densification, microstructure and strength evolution in sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoping

    2000-10-01

    Powder metallurgy has the ability to fabricate high quality, complex components to close tolerances in an economical manner. In many applications, a high sintered density is desirable for an improved performance. However, sintering to a high density demands a large shrinkage, often resulting in difficulties with dimensional control. Recent studies indicate the occurrence of a sufficient densification requires a low in situ strength at high sintering temperatures. On the other hand, the low in situ strength often leads to component's distortion in response to the external forces, such as gravity. Unfortunately, lack of knowledge on strength evolution in sintering has been a major challenge to achieve an optimized combination of densification and shape retention. Therefore, the present study investigates strength evolution in sintering and the effects of processing factors. Experiments are performed on prealloyed bronze and elemental mixture of Fe-2Ni powders. For the bronze, a loose casting method is used to fabricate transverse rupture bars, while bars are injection molded for the Fe-2Ni. The in situ transverse rupture strength is measured using the Penn State Flaming Tensile Tester. Experimental results indicate a dependence of densification and strength on sintering temperature. High temperatures enhance densification and interparticle bonding, resulting in strong sintered structures. However, a low in situ strength at high test temperatures indicates the dominance of thermal softening. A strength model combining sintering theories and microstructural parameters is developed to predict both the in situ strength and the post-sintering strength. The model demonstrates the strength of the sintered materials depends on the inherent material strength, the square of neck size ratio, sintered density, and thermal softening. The model is verified by comparison of model predictions with experimental data of the bronze and Fe-2Ni. Compared to prior strength models, this

  18. Urges for food and money spill over into motor system excitability before action is taken.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nitin; Aron, Adam R

    2011-01-01

    Much human behavior is driven by urges. Yet research into urges is hampered by a paucity of tools to objectively index their strength, timing and control. Here we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and concurrent electromyography to examine whether urges for food and money are detectable via motor system excitability. In Experiment 1, we used a naturalistic food paradigm to show that food items that were most strongly wanted elicited the largest motor excitability, even before participants knew which response to make to get them. In Experiment 2a, we replicated the results using money - motor excitability was greater for larger monetary amounts. In Experiment 2b we show that monetary amount does not modulate motor excitability when participants simply observe, without having to take action. As the chief effect occurred prior to the subject knowing which motor response to make, it is not merely related to response preparation, and as the effect was present only when action was required, it is not merely related to increased arousal. Instead, the increased motor excitability likely indexes the degree of motivation a subject has to perform an action. Thus, we have used TMS to demonstrate that urges for food and money 'spill over' into the motor system. This is likely mediated by interactions between the limbic system (including the orbital frontal cortex) and the motor system, probably at the level of the basal ganglia. Implications are discussed for theories of embodied cognition and for methodological progress in studying urge control.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Nebular [OIII] collision strengths - SSB (Storey+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, P. J.; Sochi, T.; Badnell, N. R.

    2014-05-01

    The data set consists of ten files which are labeled as 'OMEGAmn_OIII.dat' where m=1,2,3,4 and n=2,3,4,5 with mexcitation energy in Rydberg and the second column represents the collision strength for the transition between the indicated levels. (2 data files).

  20. Conditioned Reinforcement and Response Strength

    PubMed Central

    Shahan, Timothy A

    2010-01-01

    Stimuli associated with primary reinforcers appear themselves to acquire the capacity to strengthen behavior. This paper reviews research on the strengthening effects of conditioned reinforcers within the context of contemporary quantitative choice theories and behavioral momentum theory. Based partially on the finding that variations in parameters of conditioned reinforcement appear not to affect response strength as measured by resistance to change, long-standing assertions that conditioned reinforcers do not strengthen behavior in a reinforcement-like fashion are considered. A signposts or means-to-an-end account is explored and appears to provide a plausible alternative interpretation of the effects of stimuli associated with primary reinforcers. Related suggestions that primary reinforcers also might not have their effects via a strengthening process are explored and found to be worthy of serious consideration. PMID:20885815

  1. Cobalt: for strength and color

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boland, Maeve A.; Kropschot, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Cobalt is a shiny, gray, brittle metal that is best known for creating an intense blue color in glass and paints. It is frequently used in the manufacture of rechargeable batteries and to create alloys that maintain their strength at high temperatures. It is also one of the essential trace elements (or "micronutrients") that humans and many other living creatures require for good health. Cobalt is an important component in many aerospace, defense, and medical applications and is a key element in many clean energy technologies. The name cobalt comes from the German word kobold, meaning goblin. It was given this name by medieval miners who believed that troublesome goblins replaced the valuable metals in their ore with a substance that emitted poisonous fumes when smelted. The Swedish chemist Georg Brandt isolated metallic cobalt-the first new metal to be discovered since ancient times-in about 1735 and identified some of its valuable properties.

  2. Conditioned reinforcement and response strength.

    PubMed

    Shahan, Timothy A

    2010-03-01

    Stimuli associated with primary reinforcers appear themselves to acquire the capacity to strengthen behavior. This paper reviews research on the strengthening effects of conditioned reinforcers within the context of contemporary quantitative choice theories and behavioral momentum theory. Based partially on the finding that variations in parameters of conditioned reinforcement appear not to affect response strength as measured by resistance to change, long-standing assertions that conditioned reinforcers do not strengthen behavior in a reinforcement-like fashion are considered. A signposts or means-to-an-end account is explored and appears to provide a plausible alternative interpretation of the effects of stimuli associated with primary reinforcers. Related suggestions that primary reinforcers also might not have their effects via a strengthening process are explored and found to be worthy of serious consideration.

  3. An indentation fatigue strength law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Baoxing; Yonezu, Akio; Chen, Xi

    2010-05-01

    Indentation fatigue, where a cyclic load is applied on the sample via an indenter, emerges as an alternative approach for measuring the fatigue properties of materials. We have carried out indentation fatigue tests on a poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) bulk material, as well as on TiN and NiP films/coatings deposited on SUS304 steel substrates, and demonstrate that a simple power-law relationship can be established between the indentation load amplitude and number of cycles to failure. Such a law is very similar to the conventional fatigue strength law obtained from uniaxial tests. The agreement between the fatigue stress exponents obtained by uniaxial and indentation fatigue tests suggests the potential applicability of the indentation fatigue technique for extracting the fatigue properties of materials.

  4. Conditioned reinforcement and response strength.

    PubMed

    Shahan, Timothy A

    2010-03-01

    Stimuli associated with primary reinforcers appear themselves to acquire the capacity to strengthen behavior. This paper reviews research on the strengthening effects of conditioned reinforcers within the context of contemporary quantitative choice theories and behavioral momentum theory. Based partially on the finding that variations in parameters of conditioned reinforcement appear not to affect response strength as measured by resistance to change, long-standing assertions that conditioned reinforcers do not strengthen behavior in a reinforcement-like fashion are considered. A signposts or means-to-an-end account is explored and appears to provide a plausible alternative interpretation of the effects of stimuli associated with primary reinforcers. Related suggestions that primary reinforcers also might not have their effects via a strengthening process are explored and found to be worthy of serious consideration. PMID:20885815

  5. Tailoring dye-sensitized upconversion nanoparticle excitation bands towards excitation wavelength selective imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xiang; Lee, Hyungseok; Bilsel, Osman; Zhang, Yuanwei; Li, Zhanjun; Chen, Teresa; Liu, Yi; Duan, Chunying; Shen, Jie; Punjabi, Amol; Han, Gang

    2015-01-01

    One of the key roadblocks in UCNP development is its extremely limited choices of excitation wavelengths. We report a generic design to program UCNPs to possess highly tunable dye characteristic excitation bands. Using such distinctive properties, we were able to develop a new excitation wavelength selective security imaging. Finally, this work unleashed the greater freedom of the excitation wavelengths of the upconversion nanoparticles and we believe it is a game-changer in the field and this method will enable numerous applications that are currently limited by existing UCNPs.

  6. Tailoring Dye-sensitized Upconversion Nanoparticles Excitation Bands towards Excitation Wavelength Selective Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiang; Lee, Hyungseok; Bilsel, Osman; Zhang, Yuanwei; Li, Zhanjun; Chen, Teresa; Liu, Yi; Duan, Chunying; Shen, Jie; Punjabi, Amol; Han, Gang

    2015-01-01

    One of key roadblocks in UCNP development is its extremely limited choices of excitation wavelengths. We report a generic design to program UCNPs to possess highly tunable dye characteristic excitation bands. Using such distinctive properties, we were able to develop a new excitation wavelength selective security imaging. This work unleashed the greater freedom of the excitation wavelengths of the upconversion nanoparticles and we believe it is a game-changer in the field and this method will enable numerous applications that are currently limited by existing UCNPs. PMID:26499208

  7. Symplectic structure and monopole strength in {sup 12}C

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, T.; Itagaki, N.; Kato, K.

    2011-02-15

    The relation between the monopole transition strength and existence of cluster structure in the excited states is discussed based on an algebraic cluster model. The structure of {sup 12}C is studied with a 3{alpha} model, and the wave function for the relative motions between {alpha} clusters are described by the symplectic algebra Sp(2, R){sub z}, which corresponds to the linear combinations of SU(3) states with different multiplicities. Introducing Sp(2,R){sub z} algebra works well for reducing the number of the basis states, and it is also shown that states connected by the strong monopole transition are classified by a quantum number {Lambda} of the Sp(2,R){sub z} algebra.

  8. Monopole strength as a probe of nuclear shape mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.A.

    1987-08-17

    The monopole strength, MS, within a single set of nuclear shape excitations is compared with the MS between different shapes. After misconceptions are pointed out concerning the spin dependence of B(E2) values, MS properties are juxtaposed with gamma-ray and beta-decay properties of /sup 70/Se, /sup 96/Zr, /sup 102/Pd, and the N = 60 isotones to illustrate the utility of combined investigations and evidence is given for the observation of a two-phonon octupole multiplet. Finally, consideration is given to the dominance of the /sup 3/S/sub 1/ force in producing deformation in the N > 50 1g nuclei. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Dielectronic recombination as a function of electric field strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisenfeld, Daniel B.

    1992-01-01

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) is the dominant recombination mechanism at coronal temperatures and densities. We present a procedure for calculating DR rate coefficients as a function of electric field strength and apply this method to carbon ions. We focus on the competing effects of enhancement by plasma microfields and rate decrease through collisional excitation and ionization. We find that, in the case of C(3+), a significant rate enhancement results, leading to a reinterpretation of C IV emission-line intensities in the sun and late-type stars. We further consider how macroscopic electric fields, in particular motional electric fields, can affect DR rate coefficients, demonstrating dramatic rate increases for a number of the carbon ions.

  10. The Distribution of Subjective Memory Strength: List Strength and Response Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criss, Amy H.

    2009-01-01

    Models of recognition memory assume that memory decisions are based partially on the subjective strength of the test item. Models agree that the subjective strength of targets increases with additional time for encoding however the origin of the subjective strength of foils remains disputed. Under the fixed strength assumption the distribution of…

  11. Mechanoelectrical feedback: independent role of preload and contractility in modulation of canine ventricular excitability.

    PubMed Central

    Lerman, B B; Burkhoff, D; Yue, D T; Franz, M R; Sagawa, K

    1985-01-01

    Mechanoelectrical feedback, defined as changes in mechanical state that precede and alter transmembrane potential, may have potential importance in understanding the role of altered load and contractility in the initiation and modulation of ventricular arrhythmias. To assess the independent effects of preload and contractility on myocardial excitability and action potential duration, we determined the stimulus strength-interval relationship and recorded monophasic action potentials in isolated canine left ventricles contracting isovolumically. The strength-interval relationship was characterized by three parameters: threshold excitability, relative refractory period, and absolute refractory period. The effects of a threefold increase in left ventricular volume or twofold increase in contractility on these parameters were independently assessed. An increase in preload did not change threshold excitability in 11 ventricles but significantly shortened the absolute refractory period from 205 +/- 15 to 191 +/- 14 ms (P less than 0.001) (mean +/- SD). Similarly, the relative refractory period decreased from 220 +/- 18 to 208 +/- 19 ms (P less than 0.002). Comparable results were observed when contractility was increased as a result of dobutamine infusion in 10 ventricles. That is, threshold excitability was unchanged but the absolute refractory period decreased from 206 +/- 14 to 181 +/- 9 ms (P less than 0.003), and the relative refractory period decreased from 225 +/- 17 to 205 +/- 18 ms (P less than 0.003). Similar results were obtained when contractility was increased with CaCl2, indicating that contractility associated changes were independent of beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation. An increase in preload or contractility was associated with shortening of the action potential. A threefold increase in preload and twofold increase in contractility were associated with a decrease in action potential duration of 22 and 24 ms, respectively. There was a significant

  12. Modelling Feedback Excitation, Pacemaker Properties and Sensory Switching of Electrically Coupled Brainstem Neurons Controlling Rhythmic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Michael J.; Soffe, Stephen R.; Willshaw, David J.; Roberts, Alan

    2016-01-01

    What cellular and network properties allow reliable neuronal rhythm generation or firing that can be started and stopped by brief synaptic inputs? We investigate rhythmic activity in an electrically-coupled population of brainstem neurons driving swimming locomotion in young frog tadpoles, and how activity is switched on and off by brief sensory stimulation. We build a computational model of 30 electrically-coupled conditional pacemaker neurons on one side of the tadpole hindbrain and spinal cord. Based on experimental estimates for neuron properties, population sizes, synapse strengths and connections, we show that: long-lasting, mutual, glutamatergic excitation between the neurons allows the network to sustain rhythmic pacemaker firing at swimming frequencies following brief synaptic excitation; activity persists but rhythm breaks down without electrical coupling; NMDA voltage-dependency doubles the range of synaptic feedback strengths generating sustained rhythm. The network can be switched on and off at short latency by brief synaptic excitation and inhibition. We demonstrate that a population of generic Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons coupled by glutamatergic excitatory feedback can generate sustained asynchronous firing switched on and off synaptically. We conclude that networks of neurons with NMDAR mediated feedback excitation can generate self-sustained activity following brief synaptic excitation. The frequency of activity is limited by the kinetics of the neuron membrane channels and can be stopped by brief inhibitory input. Network activity can be rhythmic at lower frequencies if the neurons are electrically coupled. Our key finding is that excitatory synaptic feedback within a population of neurons can produce switchable, stable, sustained firing without synaptic inhibition. PMID:26824331

  13. Modelling Feedback Excitation, Pacemaker Properties and Sensory Switching of Electrically Coupled Brainstem Neurons Controlling Rhythmic Activity.

    PubMed

    Hull, Michael J; Soffe, Stephen R; Willshaw, David J; Roberts, Alan

    2016-01-01

    What cellular and network properties allow reliable neuronal rhythm generation or firing that can be started and stopped by brief synaptic inputs? We investigate rhythmic activity in an electrically-coupled population of brainstem neurons driving swimming locomotion in young frog tadpoles, and how activity is switched on and off by brief sensory stimulation. We build a computational model of 30 electrically-coupled conditional pacemaker neurons on one side of the tadpole hindbrain and spinal cord. Based on experimental estimates for neuron properties, population sizes, synapse strengths and connections, we show that: long-lasting, mutual, glutamatergic excitation between the neurons allows the network to sustain rhythmic pacemaker firing at swimming frequencies following brief synaptic excitation; activity persists but rhythm breaks down without electrical coupling; NMDA voltage-dependency doubles the range of synaptic feedback strengths generating sustained rhythm. The network can be switched on and off at short latency by brief synaptic excitation and inhibition. We demonstrate that a population of generic Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons coupled by glutamatergic excitatory feedback can generate sustained asynchronous firing switched on and off synaptically. We conclude that networks of neurons with NMDAR mediated feedback excitation can generate self-sustained activity following brief synaptic excitation. The frequency of activity is limited by the kinetics of the neuron membrane channels and can be stopped by brief inhibitory input. Network activity can be rhythmic at lower frequencies if the neurons are electrically coupled. Our key finding is that excitatory synaptic feedback within a population of neurons can produce switchable, stable, sustained firing without synaptic inhibition.

  14. A STUDY OF THE ROLE OF Ly{beta} FLUORESCENCE ON O I LINE STRENGTHS IN Be STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Blesson; Banerjee, D. P. K.; Ashok, N. M.; Subramaniam, A.

    2012-07-01

    The possibility of the Ly{beta} fluorescence mechanism being operational in classical Be (CBe) stars and thereby contributing to the strength of the O I {lambda}8446 line has been recognized for long. However, this supposition needs to be quantified by comparing observed and predicted O I line ratios. In the present work, optical and near-infrared spectra of CBe stars are presented. We analyze the observed strengths of the O I {lambda}7774, {lambda}8446, {lambda}11287, and {lambda}13165 lines, which have been theoretically proposed as diagnostics for identifying the excitation mechanism. We have considered and examined the effects of Ly{beta} fluorescence, collisional excitation, recombination, and continuum fluorescence on these O I line strengths. From our analysis it appears that the Ly{beta} fluorescence process is indeed operative in Be stars.

  15. Precision measurement of the electromagnetic dipole strengths in Be11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, E.; Wu, C. Y.; Summers, N. C.; Hackman, G.; Drake, T. E.; Andreoiu, C.; Ashley, R.; Ball, G. C.; Bender, P. C.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Chester, A.; Close, A.; Cline, D.; Cross, D. S.; Dunlop, R.; Finlay, A.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Hayes, A. B.; Laffoley, A. T.; Nano, T.; Navrátil, P.; Pearson, C. J.; Pore, J.; Quaglioni, S.; Svensson, C. E.; Starosta, K.; Thompson, I. J.; Voss, P.; Williams, S. J.; Wang, Z. M.

    2014-05-01

    The electromagnetic dipole strength in Be11 between the bound states has been measured using low-energy projectile Coulomb excitation at bombarding energies of 1.73 and 2.09 MeV/nucleon on a Pt196 target. An electric dipole transition probability B(E1;1/2-→1/2+)=0.102(2) e2fm was determined using the semi-classical code Gosia, and a value of 0.098(4) e2fm was determined using the Extended Continuum Discretized Coupled Channels method with the quantum mechanical code FRESCO. These extracted B(E1) values are consistent with the average value determined by a model-dependent analysis of intermediate energy Coulomb excitation measurements and are approximately 14% lower than that determined by a lifetime measurement. The much-improved precisions of 2% and 4% in the measured B(E1) values between the bound states deduced using Gosia and the Extended Continuum Discretized Coupled Channels method, respectively, compared to the previous accuracy of ˜10% will help in our understanding of and better improve the realistic inter-nucleon interactions.

  16. Atmospheric Excitation of Planetary Normal Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanimoto, Toshiro

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) understand the phenomenon of continuous free oscillations of the Earth and (2) examine the idea of using this phenomenon for planetary seismology. We first describe the results on (1) and present our evaluations of the idea (2) in the final section. In 1997, after almost forty years since the initial attempt by Benioff et al, continuous free oscillations of the Earth were discovered. Spheroidal fundamental modes between 2 and 7 millihertz are excited continuously with acceleration amplitudes of about 0.3-0.5 nanogals. The signal is now commonly found in virtually all data recorded by STS-1 type broadband seismometers at quiet sites. Seasonal variation in amplitude and the existence of two coupled modes between the atmosphere and the solid Earth support that these oscillations are excited by the atmosphere. Stochastic excitation due to atmospheric turbulence is a favored mechanism, providing a good match between theory and data. The atmosphere has ample energy to support this theory because excitation of these modes require only 500-10000 W whereas the atmosphere contains about 117 W of kinetic energy. An application of this phenomenon includes planetary seismology, because other planets may be oscillating due to atmospheric excitation. The interior structure of planets could be learned by determining the eigenfrequencies in the continuous free oscillations. It is especially attractive to pursue this idea for tectonically quiet planets, since quakes may be too infrequent to be recorded by seismic instruments.

  17. Tone-excited jet: Theory and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Lepicovsky, J.; Tam, C. K. W.; Morris, P. J.; Burrin, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed study to understand the phenomenon of broadband jet-noise amplification produced by upstream discrete-tone sound excitation has been carried out. This has been achieved by simultaneous acquisition of the acoustic, mean velocity, turbulence intensities, and instability-wave pressure data. A 5.08 cm diameter jet has been tested for this purpose under static and also flight-simulation conditions. An open-jet wind tunnel has been used to simulate the flight effects. Limited data on heated jets have also been obtained. To improve the physical understanding of the flow modifications brought about by the upstream discrete-tone excitation, ensemble-averaged schlieren photographs of the jets have also been taken. Parallel to the experimental study, a mathematical model of the processes that lead to broadband-noise amplification by upstream tones has been developed. Excitation of large-scale turbulence by upstream tones is first calculated. A model to predict the changes in small-scale turbulence is then developed. By numerically integrating the resultant set of equations, the enhanced small-scale turbulence distribution in a jet under various excitation conditions is obtained. The resulting changes in small-scale turbulence have been attributed to broadband amplification of jet noise. Excellent agreement has been found between the theory and the experiments. It has also shown that the relative velocity effects are the same for the excited and the unexcited jets.

  18. Electron impact excitation of Astrophysically Important C III Ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.; KEENAN, FRANCIS P.

    2015-08-01

    Emission lines of many Be-like ions, including C~III, have been observed in the solar and stellar plasmas and are useful for density and temperature diagnostics. C~III is also important for studies of fusion plasmas. For modelling and diagnostics, atomic data for energy levels, radiative rates (A-values) and excitation rates (equivalently effective collision strengths) are required. Therefore, we have adopted the GRASP code to calculate energy levels, A-values (for E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions) and lifetimes among 166 levels of the n <= 5 configurations. Energy levels are assessed to be accurate to better than 1% for most levels, and A-values to better than 20% for most transitions. For A-values and lifetimes there are no large discrepancies between theory and measurement. For collision strengths DARC is adopted, resonances are resolved in a fine energy mesh and are averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution to determine effective collision strengths up to a temperature of 800,000 K. Unfortunately, a comparison with the similar R-matrix calculations of Fernandez-Menchero et al [A&A 566 (2014) A104] shows differences up to over an order of magnitude for about 20% transitions (among the lowest 78 levels) over the complete temperature range of the results. In most cases their results are larger, up to a factor of 20, and the differences are similar and comparable to those already noted for other Be-like ions, namely Al~X, Cl~XIV, K~XVI, Ti~XIX and Ge~XXIX - see Aggarwal & Keenan [MNRAS 447 (2015) 3849]. Based on several comparisons and considering the wide range of partial waves included (up to 40.5) and the energy range adopted for collision strengths (up to 21 Ryd), our results are estimated to be accurate to better than 20% for a majority of transitions, allowed and forbidden. Detailed comparisons for all parameters for C~III and possible reasons for discrepancies will be presented during the conference and will also be soon available in MNRAS.

  19. Low-lying dipole excitations in vibrational nuclei: The Cd isotopic chain studied in photon scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohstall, C.; Belic, D.; von Brentano, P.; Fransen, C.; Gade, A.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Jolie, J.; Kneissl, U.; Linnemann, A.; Nord, A.; Pietralla, N.; Pitz, H. H.; Scheck, M.; Stedile, F.; Werner, V.; Yates, S. W.

    2005-09-01

    High-resolution nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments (NRF) were performed on 110,111,112,114,116Cd at the bremsstrahlung facility of the 4.3-MV Dynamitron accelerator in Stuttgart to study the low-lying dipole strength distributions in these vibrational nuclei. Numerous excited states, most of them previously unknown, were observed in the excitation energy range up to 4 MeV. Detailed spectroscopic information has been obtained on excitation energies, spins, decay widths, decay branchings, and transition probabilities. For states in the even-even isotopes 110,112,114,116Cd, parities could be assigned from linear polarization measurements. Together with our previous results for 108,112,113,114Cd from NRF studies without polarization measurements, systematics was established for the dipole strength distributions of the stable nuclei within the Cd isotopic chain. The results are discussed with respect to the systematics of E1 two-phonon excitations and mixed-symmetry states in even-even nuclei near the Z=50 shell closure and the fragmentation of these excitation modes in the odd-mass Cd isotopes.

  20. Analytical approach for the excited-state Hessian in time-dependent density functional theory: Formalism, implementation, and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Liang, WanZhen

    2011-11-01

    The paper presents the formalism, implementation, and performance of the analytical approach for the excited-state Hessian in the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) that extends our previous work [J. Liu and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 014113 (2011)] on the analytical Hessian in TDDFT within Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) to full TDDFT. In contrast to TDA-TDDFT, an appreciable advantage of full TDDFT is that it maintains the oscillator strength sum rule, and therefore yields more precise results for the oscillator strength and other related physical quantities. For the excited-state harmonic vibrational frequency calculation, however, full TDDFT does not seem to be advantageous since the numerical tests demonstrate that the accuracy of TDDFT with and without TDA are comparable to each other. As a common practice, the computed harmonic vibrational frequencies are scaled by a suitable scale factor to yield good agreement with the experimental fundamental frequencies. Here we apply both the optimized ground-state and excited-state scale factors to scale the calculated excited-state harmonic frequencies and find that the scaling decreases the root-mean-square errors. The optimized scale factors derived from the excited-state calculations are slightly smaller than those from the ground-state calculations.

  1. Converging finite-strength shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axford, R. A.; Holm, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    The converging shock problem was first solved by Guderley and later by Landau and Stanyukovich for infinitely strong shocks in an ideal gas with spherical and cylindrical symmetry. This problem is solved herein for finite-strength shocks and a non-ideal-gas equation of state with an adiabatic bulk modulus of the type Bs= {- v∂ p}/{∂ v| s} = ( p +B) f( v) , where B is a constant with the dimensions of pressure, and f(v) is an arbitrary function of the specific volume. Self-similar profiles of the particle velocity and thermodynamic variables are studied explicitly for two cases with constant specific heat at constant volume; the Tait-Kirkwood-Murnaghan equation, f(v) = constant, and the Walsh equation, f(v) = v/A, where A = constant. The first case reduces to the ideal gas when B = 0. In both cases the flow behind the shock front exhibits an unbalanced buoyant force instability at a critical Mach number which depends upon equation-of-state parameters.

  2. "Safe" Coulomb excitation of 30Mg.

    PubMed

    Niedermaier, O; Scheit, H; Bildstein, V; Boie, H; Fitting, J; von Hahn, R; Köck, F; Lauer, M; Pal, U K; Podlech, H; Repnow, R; Schwalm, D; Alvarez, C; Ames, F; Bollen, G; Emhofer, S; Habs, D; Kester, O; Lutter, R; Rudolph, K; Pasini, M; Thirolf, P G; Wolf, B H; Eberth, J; Gersch, G; Hess, H; Reiter, P; Thelen, O; Warr, N; Weisshaar, D; Aksouh, F; Van den Bergh, P; Van Duppen, P; Huyse, M; Ivanov, O; Mayet, P; Van de Walle, J; Aystö, J; Butler, P A; Cederkäll, J; Delahaye, P; Fynbo, H O U; Fraile, L M; Forstner, O; Franchoo, S; Köster, U; Nilsson, T; Oinonen, M; Sieber, T; Wenander, F; Pantea, M; Richter, A; Schrieder, G; Simon, H; Behrens, T; Gernhäuser, R; Kröll, T; Krücken, R; Münch, M; Davinson, T; Gerl, J; Huber, G; Hurst, A; Iwanicki, J; Jonson, B; Lieb, P; Liljeby, L; Schempp, A; Scherillo, A; Schmidt, P; Walter, G

    2005-05-01

    We report on the first radioactive beam experiment performed at the recently commissioned REX-ISOLDE facility at CERN in conjunction with the highly efficient gamma spectrometer MINIBALL. Using 30Mg ions accelerated to an energy of 2.25 MeV/u together with a thin (nat)Ni target, Coulomb excitation of the first excited 2+ states of the projectile and target nuclei well below the Coulomb barrier was observed. From the measured relative deexcitation gamma-ray yields the B(E2;0(+)gs-->2(+)1) value of 30Mg was determined to be 241(31)e2 fm4. Our result is lower than values obtained at projectile fragmentation facilities using the intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation method, and confirms the theoretical conjecture that the neutron-rich magnesium isotope 30Mg resides outside the "island of inversion."

  3. Bernoulli excitation and detection of gas bubbles.

    PubMed

    Telling, R H; Walton, A J

    2001-10-01

    A simple method is proposed for detecting and sizing bubbles in pipeline fluid flow. This is based on changing the pressure of the fluid, which in turn excites volume oscillations in the bubble. If the change in pressure is of sufficient brevity and magnitude, the transient distortion results in excitation of the bubble into radiative oscillation at its natural frequency. In a moving fluid, the Bernoulli equation predicts that such a pressure change can be achieved through a suitable gradient in the flow velocity. In the experiments described here, this is achieved by altering the cross-sectional area of the pipe in which the fluid is flowing. We demonstrate the efficacy of this excitation method and, by detecting the radiated sound using a nearby hydrophone, determine the size of individual bubbles from their characteristic oscillation frequency.

  4. Charge-displacement analysis for excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Ronca, Enrico Tarantelli, Francesco; Pastore, Mariachiara Belpassi, Leonardo; De Angelis, Filippo; Angeli, Celestino; Cimiraglia, Renzo

    2014-02-07

    We extend the Charge-Displacement (CD) analysis, already successfully employed to describe the nature of intermolecular interactions [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 13046 (2010)] and various types of controversial chemical bonds [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130, 1048 (2008); N. Salvi et al., Chem. Eur. J. 16, 7231 (2010)], to study the charge fluxes accompanying electron excitations, and in particular the all-important charge-transfer (CT) phenomena. We demonstrate the usefulness of the new approach through applications to exemplary excitations in a series of molecules, encompassing various typical situations from valence, to Rydberg, to CT excitations. The CD functions defined along various spatial directions provide a detailed and insightful quantitative picture of the electron displacements taking place.

  5. Charge-displacement analysis for excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronca, Enrico; Pastore, Mariachiara; Belpassi, Leonardo; De Angelis, Filippo; Angeli, Celestino; Cimiraglia, Renzo; Tarantelli, Francesco

    2014-02-01

    We extend the Charge-Displacement (CD) analysis, already successfully employed to describe the nature of intermolecular interactions [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 13046 (2010)] and various types of controversial chemical bonds [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130, 1048 (2008); N. Salvi et al., Chem. Eur. J. 16, 7231 (2010)], to study the charge fluxes accompanying electron excitations, and in particular the all-important charge-transfer (CT) phenomena. We demonstrate the usefulness of the new approach through applications to exemplary excitations in a series of molecules, encompassing various typical situations from valence, to Rydberg, to CT excitations. The CD functions defined along various spatial directions provide a detailed and insightful quantitative picture of the electron displacements taking place.

  6. Asymptotic wave propagation in excitable media.

    PubMed

    Bernus, Olivier; Vigmond, Edward

    2015-07-01

    Wave shape and velocity are important issues in reaction-diffusion systems, and are often the result of competition in media with heterogeneous conduction properties. Asymptotic wave front propagation at maximal conduction velocity has been previously reported in the context of anisotropic cardiac tissue, but it is unknown whether this is a universal property of excitable tissues where conduction velocity can be locally modulated by mechanisms other than anisotropy. Here, we investigate the impact of conduction heterogeneities and boundary effects on wave propagation in excitable media. Following a theoretical analysis, we find that wave-front cusps occur where local velocity is reduced and that asymptotic wave fronts propagate at the maximal translational conduction velocity. Simulations performed in different reaction-diffusion systems, including cardiac tissue, confirm our theoretical findings. We conclude that this property can be found in a wide range of reaction-diffusion systems with excitable dynamics and that asymptotic wave-front shapes can be predicted.

  7. Shear layer excitation, experiment versus theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.; Stahl, B.

    1984-01-01

    The acoustical excitation of shear layers is investigated. Acoustical excitation causes the so-called orderly structures in shear layers and jets. Also, the deviations in the spreading rate between different shear layer experiments are due to the same excitation mechanism. Measurements in the linear interaction region close to the edge from which the shear layer is shed are examined. Two sets of experiments (Houston 1981 and Berlin 1983/84) are discussed. The measurements were carried out with shear layers in air using hot wire anemometers and microphones. The agreement between these measurements and the theory is good. Even details of the fluctuating flow field correspond to theoretical predictions, such as the local occurrence of negative phase speeds.

  8. Artificial Excitation of Schumann Resonance with HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streltsov, A. V.; Chang, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    We report results from the experiment aimed at the artificial excitation of extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic waves with frequencies corresponding to the frequency of Schumann resonance (typically, 7.5 - 8.0 Hz frequency range). Electromagnetic waves with these frequencies can form a standing pattern inside the spherical cavity formed by the surface of the earth and the ionosphere. In the experiment the ELF waves were excited by heating the ionosphere with X-mode HF electromagnetic waves generated by the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska. The experiment demonstrates that heating of the ionosphere can excite relatively large-amplitude electromagnetic waves with frequencies in the range of the Schumann resonance, when the ionosphere has a strong F-layer and an electric field greater than 5 mV/m is present in the E-region.

  9. Asymmetric Magnon Excitation by Spontaneous Toroidal Ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayami, Satoru; Kusunose, Hiroaki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-05-01

    The effects of spontaneous toroidal ordering on magnetic excitation are theoretically investigated for a localized spin model that includes a staggered Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction and anisotropic exchange interactions, which arise from the antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling and the multiorbital correlation effect. We show that the model exhibits a Néel-type antiferromagnetic order, which simultaneously accompanies a ferroic toroidal order. We find that the occurrence of toroidal order modulates the magnon dispersion in an asymmetric way with respect to the wave number: a toroidal dipole order on the zigzag chain leads to a band-bottom shift, while a toroidal octupole order on the honeycomb lattice gives rise to a valley splitting. These asymmetric magnon excitations could be a source of unusual magnetic responses, such as nonreciprocal magnon transport. A variety of modulations are discussed while changing the lattice and magnetic symmetries. The implications regarding candidate materials for asymmetric magnon excitations are presented.

  10. Excitation of gravity waves in common envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soker, Noam

    1992-01-01

    We study the excitation of gravity waves by a low-mass companion orbiting inside the envelope of a giant star, concentrating on brown dwarfs inside the envelope of asymptotic giant branch stars. Efficient g-wave excitations occur only after the brown dwarf has spiraled-in to the radiative zone, well inside the envelope, of the asymptotic giant branch star. The brown dwarf excites g-waves when its orbital radius is about 3-10 solar radii. At this stage of the evolution the envelope mass is below 0.1 solar mass. The g-waves propagate inward from the secondary orbit, carrying angular momentum and energy. We find that the angular momentum transport leads to an efficient spin-up of the inner envelopes. The differential rotation between the envelope and core and nonlinear wave effects, can cause a mixing of heavy elements from the core to the envelope.

  11. Excited light meson spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Thomas, Hadron Spectrum Collaboration

    2012-04-01

    I report on recent progress in calculating excited meson spectra using lattice QCD, emphasizing results and phenomenology. With novel techniques we can now extract extensive spectra of excited mesons with high statistical precision, including spin-four states and those with exotic quantum numbers. As well as isovector meson spectra, I will present new calculations of the spectrum of excited light isoscalar mesons, something that has up to now been a challenge for lattice QCD. I show determinations of the flavor content of these mesons, including the eta-eta' mixing angle, providing a window on annihilation dynamics in QCD. I will also discuss recent work on using lattice QCD to map out the energy-dependent phase shift in pi-pi scattering and future applications of the methodology to the study of resonances and decays.

  12. Electron-impact vibrational excitation of cyclopropane

    SciTech Connect

    Čurík, R. Čársky, P.; Allan, M.

    2015-04-14

    We report a very detailed test of the ab initio discrete momentum representation (DMR) method of calculating vibrational excitation of polyatomic molecules by electron impact, by comparison of its results with an extensive set of experimental data, covering the entire range of scattering angles from 10{sup ∘} to 180{sup ∘} and electron energies from 0.4 to 20 eV. The DMR calculations were carried out by solving the two-channel Lippmann-Schwinger equation in the momentum space, and the interaction between the scattered electron and the target molecule was described by exact static-exchange potential corrected by a density functional theory (DFT) correlation-polarization interaction that models target’s response to the field of incoming electron. The theory is found to quantitatively reproduce the measured spectra for all normal modes, even at the difficult conditions of extreme angles and at low energies, and thus provides full understanding of the excitation mechanism. It is shown that the overlap of individual vibrational bands caused by limited experimental resolution and rotational excitation must be properly taken into account for correct comparison of experiment and theory. By doing so, an apparent discrepancy between published experimental data could be reconciled. A substantial cross section is found for excitation of the non-symmetric HCH twisting mode ν{sub 4} of A{sub 1}{sup ″} symmetry by the 5.5 eV A{sub 2}{sup ′} resonance, surprisingly because the currently accepted selection rules predict this process to be forbidden. The DMR theory shows that the excitation is caused by an incoming electron in an f-wave of A{sub 2}{sup ′} symmetry which causes excitation of the non-symmetric HCH twisting mode ν{sub 4} of the A{sub 1}{sup ″} symmetry and departs in p- and f-waves of A{sub 2}{sup ″} symmetry.

  13. BROADBAND EXCITATION IN NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tycko, R.

    1984-10-01

    Theoretical methods for designing sequences of radio frequency (rf) radiation pulses for broadband excitation of spin systems in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are described. The sequences excite spins uniformly over large ranges of resonant frequencies arising from static magnetic field inhomogeneity, chemical shift differences, or spin couplings, or over large ranges of rf field amplitudes. Specific sequences for creating a population inversion or transverse magnetization are derived and demonstrated experimentally in liquid and solid state NMR. One approach to broadband excitation is based on principles of coherent averaging theory. A general formalism for deriving pulse sequences is given, along with computational methods for specific cases. This approach leads to sequences that produce strictly constant transformations of a spin system. The importance of this feature in NMR applications is discussed. A second approach to broadband excitation makes use of iterative schemes, i.e. sets of operations that are applied repetitively to a given initial pulse sequences, generating a series of increasingly complex sequences with increasingly desirable properties. A general mathematical framework for analyzing iterative schemes is developed. An iterative scheme is treated as a function that acts on a space of operators corresponding to the transformations produced by all possible pulse sequences. The fixed points of the function and the stability of the fixed points are shown to determine the essential behavior of the scheme. Iterative schemes for broadband population inversion are treated in detail. Algebraic and numerical methods for performing the mathematical analysis are presented. Two additional topics are treated. The first is the construction of sequences for uniform excitation of double-quantum coherence and for uniform polarization transfer over a range of spin couplings. Double-quantum excitation sequences are demonstrated in a liquid crystal system. The

  14. Electron-impact vibrational excitation of cyclopropane.

    PubMed

    Čurík, R; Čársky, P; Allan, M

    2015-04-14

    We report a very detailed test of the ab initio discrete momentum representation (DMR) method of calculating vibrational excitation of polyatomic molecules by electron impact, by comparison of its results with an extensive set of experimental data, covering the entire range of scattering angles from 10° to 180° and electron energies from 0.4 to 20 eV. The DMR calculations were carried out by solving the two-channel Lippmann-Schwinger equation in the momentum space, and the interaction between the scattered electron and the target molecule was described by exact static-exchange potential corrected by a density functional theory (DFT) correlation-polarization interaction that models target's response to the field of incoming electron. The theory is found to quantitatively reproduce the measured spectra for all normal modes, even at the difficult conditions of extreme angles and at low energies, and thus provides full understanding of the excitation mechanism. It is shown that the overlap of individual vibrational bands caused by limited experimental resolution and rotational excitation must be properly taken into account for correct comparison of experiment and theory. By doing so, an apparent discrepancy between published experimental data could be reconciled. A substantial cross section is found for excitation of the non-symmetric HCH twisting mode ν4 of A1 (″) symmetry by the 5.5 eV A2 (') resonance, surprisingly because the currently accepted selection rules predict this process to be forbidden. The DMR theory shows that the excitation is caused by an incoming electron in an f-wave of A2 (') symmetry which causes excitation of the non-symmetric HCH twisting mode ν4 of the A1 (″) symmetry and departs in p- and f-waves of A2 (″) symmetry. PMID:25877583

  15. Dynamic Strength Ceramic Nanocomposites Under Pulse Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnyak, Evgeniya G.; Skripnyak, Vladimir V.; Vaganova, Irina K.; Skripnyak, Vladimir A.

    2015-06-01

    Multi-scale computer simulation approach has been applied to research of strength of nanocomposites under dynamic loading. The influence of mesoscopic substructures on the dynamic strength of ceramic and hybrid nanocomposites, which can be formed using additive manufacturing were numerically investigated. At weak shock wave loadings the shear strength and the spall strength of ceramic and hybrid nanocomposites depends not only phase concentration and porosity, but size parameters of skeleton substructures. The influence of skeleton parameter on the shear strength and the spall strength of ceramic nanocomposites with the same concentration of phases decreases with increasing amplitude of the shock pulse of microsecond duration above the double amplitude of the Hugoniot elastic limit of nanocomposites. This research carried out in 2014 -2015 was supported by grant from The Tomsk State University Academic D.I. Mendeleev Fund Program and also Ministry of Sciences and Education of Russian Federation (State task 2014/223, project 1943, Agreement 14.132.

  16. Fracture toughness and strength of 96% alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.B.; Chinn, R.E.; McNerney, K.R.; Brog, T.K.; Kim, C.Y.; Krutyholowa, M.W.; Chen, N.W.; Haun, M.J.

    1997-05-01

    There exists a need to understand the controlling factors that simultaneously impact strength and toughness in 96% alumina. The enhancement of both strength and toughness enables designers to extend the use limits and reliability for structural ceramics. This article presents mechanical property results from a group study examining the use of different alkaline-earth aluminosilicate intergranular compositions containing magnesium, calcium and strontium oxides (RO) in 96% alumina. Principal results address trends in indentation strength toughness and modulus of rupture. Trends in the data are presented relative to existing theories of thermal expansion mismatch toughening, grain-bridging crack-wake effect and crack deflection mechanisms. Strength is addressed in terms of strength after indentation, crack growth of indentation flaws and Weibull characterization for the strength distribution.

  17. ‘True’ bosonic coupling strength in strongly correlated superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Iwasawa, Hideaki; Yoshida, Yoshiyuki; Hase, Izumi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Aiura, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Clarifying the coupling between electrons and bosonic excitations (phonons or magnetic fluctuations) that mediate the formation of Cooper pairs is pivotal to understand superconductivity. Such coupling effects are contained in the electron self-energy, which is experimentally accessible via angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). However, in unconventional superconductors, identifying the nature of the electron-boson coupling remains elusive partly because of the significant band renormalization due to electron correlation. Until now, to quantify the electron-boson coupling, the self-energy is most often determined by assuming a phenomenological ‘bare’ band. Here, we demonstrate that the conventional procedure underestimates the electron-boson coupling depending on the electron-electron coupling, even if the self-energy appears to be self-consistent via the Kramers-Kronig relation. Our refined method explains well the electron-boson and electron-electron coupling strength in ruthenate superconductor Sr2RuO4, calling for a critical revision of the bosonic coupling strength from ARPES self-energy in strongly correlated electron systems. PMID:23722675

  18. Photon strength and the low-energy enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedeking, M.; Bernstein, L. A.; Krtička, M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Allmond, J. M.; Basunia, M. S.; Burke, J. T.; Fallon, P.; Firestone, R. B.; Goldblum, B. L.; Hatarik, R.; Lake, P. T.; Lee, I.-Y.; Lesher, S. R.; Paschalis, S.; Petri, M.; Phair, L.; Scielzo, N. D.

    2014-08-01

    Several measurements in medium mass nuclei have reported a low-energy enhancement in the photon strength function. Although, much effort has been invested in unraveling the mysteries of this effect, its physical origin is still not conclusively understood. Here, a completely model-independent experimental approach to investigate the existence of this enhancement is presented. The experiment was designed to study statistical feeding from the quasi-continuum (below the neutron separation energy) to individual low-lying discrete levels in 95Mo produced in the (d, p) reaction. A key aspect to successfully study gamma decay from the region of high-level density is the detection and extraction of correlated particle-gamma-gamma events which was accomplished using an array of Clover HPGe detectors and large area annular silicon detectors. The entrance channel excitation energy into the residual nucleus produced in the reaction was inferred from the detected proton energies in the silicon detectors. Gating on gamma-transitions originating from low-lying discrete levels specifies the state fed by statistical gamma-rays. Any particle-gamma-gamma event in combination with specific energy sum requirements ensures a clean and unambiguous determination of the initial and final state of the observed gamma rays. With these requirements the statistical feeding to individual discrete levels is extracted on an event-by-event basis. The results are presented and compared to 95Mo photon strength function data measured at the University of Oslo.

  19. Photon strength and the low-energy enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedeking, M.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Burke, J. T.; Hatarik, R.; Lesher, S. R.; Scielzo, N. D.; Krtička, M.; Allmond, J. M.; Basunia, M. S.; Fallon, P.; Firestone, R. B.; Lake, P. T.; Lee, I-Y.; Paschalis, S.; Petri, M.; Phair, L.; Goldblum, B. L.

    2014-08-14

    Several measurements in medium mass nuclei have reported a low-energy enhancement in the photon strength function. Although, much effort has been invested in unraveling the mysteries of this effect, its physical origin is still not conclusively understood. Here, a completely model-independent experimental approach to investigate the existence of this enhancement is presented. The experiment was designed to study statistical feeding from the quasi-continuum (below the neutron separation energy) to individual low-lying discrete levels in {sup 95}Mo produced in the (d, p) reaction. A key aspect to successfully study gamma decay from the region of high-level density is the detection and extraction of correlated particle-gamma-gamma events which was accomplished using an array of Clover HPGe detectors and large area annular silicon detectors. The entrance channel excitation energy into the residual nucleus produced in the reaction was inferred from the detected proton energies in the silicon detectors. Gating on gamma-transitions originating from low-lying discrete levels specifies the state fed by statistical gamma-rays. Any particle-gamma-gamma event in combination with specific energy sum requirements ensures a clean and unambiguous determination of the initial and final state of the observed gamma rays. With these requirements the statistical feeding to individual discrete levels is extracted on an event-by-event basis. The results are presented and compared to {sup 95}Mo photon strength function data measured at the University of Oslo.

  20. Photoionization cross sections and oscillator strengths of neutral cesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, S. U.; Nadeem, Ali; Nawaz, M.

    2012-11-01

    The absolute photoionization cross sections from the 6p 2P1/2 excited state of cesium at threshold and above the threshold region have been measured using the saturation absorption technique. The photoionization cross section at the ionization threshold is determined as 22.6±3.6 Mb, whereas in the region above threshold its value ranges from 22 to 20 Mb for photoelectron energies up to 0.1 eV. A comparison of the photoionization cross sections with earlier reported theoretical and experimental data have been presented and are in good agreement within the uncertainty. In addition, the oscillator strengths of the 6p 2P1/2→n d 2D3/2 (21≤n≤60) Rydberg transitions of cesium have been calibrated using the threshold value of the photoionization cross section. A complete picture of the oscillator strengths from the present work and previously reported data from n=5-60 is presented.

  1. B-spline calculations of oscillator strengths in noble gases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus

    2006-05-01

    The B-spline box-based close-coupling method [1] was applied for extensive calculations of the transition probabilities in the noble gases Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe for energy levels up to n = 12. An individually optimized, term-dependent set of non-orthogonal one-electron radial functions was used to account for the strong term dependence in the valence orbitals. The core-valence correlation was introduced through multi-channel expansions, which include the ns^2np^5, nsnp^6 and ns^2np^4(n+1)l target states. The inner-core correlation was accounted for by employing multi-configuration target states. Energy levels and oscillator strengths for transitions from the np^6 ground-state configuration as well as transitions between excited states were computed in the Breit-Pauli approximation. The inner-core correlation was found to be very important for most of the transitions considered. The good agreement with the available experimental data shows that the B-spline method can be used for accurate calculations of oscillator strengths for states with intermediate n-values, i.e. exactly the region where it is difficult to apply standard MCHF methods. At the same time the accuracy for the low-lying states is close to the accuracy obtained in large-scale MCHF calculations [2]. [1] O. Zatsarinny and C. Froese Fischer, J. Phys. B 35, 4669 (2002). [2] A. Irimia and C. Froese Fischer, J. Phys. B 37, 1659 (2004).

  2. Synchronisation in networks of delay-coupled type-I excitable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, A.; Dahms, T.; Lehnert, J.; Suryanarayana, S. A.; Hövel, P.; Schöll, E.

    2012-12-01

    We use a generic model for type-I excitability (known as the SNIPER or SNIC model) to describe the local dynamics of nodes within a network in the presence of non-zero coupling delays. Utilising the method of the Master Stability Function, we investigate the stability of the zero-lag synchronised dynamics of the network nodes and its dependence on the two coupling parameters, namely the coupling strength and delay time. Unlike in the FitzHugh-Nagumo model (a model for type-II excitability), there are parameter ranges where the stability of synchronisation depends on the coupling strength and delay time. One important implication of these results is that there exist complex networks for which the adding of inhibitory links in a small-world fashion may not only lead to a loss of stable synchronisation, but may also restabilise synchronisation or introduce multiple transitions between synchronisation and desynchronisation. To underline the scope of our results, we show using the Stuart-Landau model that such multiple transitions do not only occur in excitable systems, but also in oscillatory ones.

  3. Excitation energy and nuclear dissipation probed with evaporation-residue cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, W.

    2011-04-15

    Using a Langevin equation coupled with a statistical decay model, we calculate the excess of evaporation-residue cross sections over its standard statistical-model value as a function of nuclear dissipation strength for {sup 200}Hg compound nuclei (CNs) under two distinct types of initial conditions for populated CNs: (i) high excitation energy but low angular momentum (produced via proton-induced spallation reactions at GeV energies and via peripheral heavy-ion collisions at relativistic energies) and (ii) high angular momentum but low excitation energy (produced through fusion mechanisms). We find that the conditions of case (ii) not only amplify the effect of dissipation on the evaporation residues, but also substantially increase the sensitivity of this excess to nuclear dissipation. These results suggest that, in experiments, to obtain accurate information of presaddle nuclear dissipation strength by measuring evaporation-residue cross sections, it is best to choose the heavy-ion-induced fusion reaction approach to yield excited compound nuclei.

  4. Optical Excitation and Probing of Bottle Microresonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, G. Senthil; Wilkinson, J. S.; Zervas, M. N.

    2010-11-01

    Fiber bottle microresonators supporting helical whispering gallery modes and exhibiting field maxima symmetrically located on either side of the neck of the bottle have been demonstrated. Channel dropping characteristics have been studied experimentally for the first time in this type of microresonator, using tapered excitation and probe fibers symmetrically placed on both sides of the bottle microresonator. Selective excitation on one side of the bottle microresonator leads to symmetrically located turning points and power localization on both sides of the bottle, leading to the potential to construct add-drop filters.

  5. The resonance Raman excitation profile of fucoxanthin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, L. J.; Glasgow, L. A.; Hoskins, L. C.; Krohe, T.

    1989-01-01

    The resonance Raman excitation profiles (RREPs) of the ν 1 and ν 2 vibrations of fucoxanthin in acetone and toluene solvents have been studied. Fucoxanthin, which is a predominant pigment in marine seaweed and phytoplankton, has several structural differences from carotenoids for which excitation profiles have been determined. The RREPs for fucoxanthin are interpreted in terms of a two-mode model and show a B2 value which is approximately 20% lower than for carotenoids like β-carotene and lutein which occur in higher plants. Excellent fits between experimental data and the theoretical model were observed in both solvents.

  6. Charmonium excited state spectrum in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; Nilmani Mathur; David Richards

    2008-02-01

    Working with a large basis of covariant derivative-based meson interpolating fields we demonstrate the feasibility of reliably extracting multiple excited states using a variational method. The study is performed on quenched anisotropic lattices with clover quarks at the charm mass. We demonstrate how a knowledge of the continuum limit of a lattice interpolating field can give additional spin-assignment information, even at a single lattice spacing, via the overlap factors of interpolating field and state. Excited state masses are systematically high with respect to quark potential model predictions and, where they exist, experimental states. We conclude that this is most likely a result of the quenched approximation.

  7. Selective form of an excitable membrane plasticity.

    PubMed

    Tsitolovsky, L E; Babkina, N V

    1992-11-01

    This work describes the change in an active electrogenesis of the command neurons responsible for defensive closure of a snail's pneumostome during elaborating, extinction and restoration of a classical conditioned defensive reflex to a tactile stimulus. Tactile stimulations applied to different parts of a snail's body served as a differential stimulus. As the biological value of a conditioned stimulus increases due to learning, the excitability of command neurons in response to conditioned stimulus rises. At the same time the neurons demonstrated a reduced excitability in response to a differentiating stimulus.

  8. Wave instabilities in an excitable electrochemical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otterstedt, R. D.; Jaeger, N. I.; Plath, P. J.; Hudson, J. L.

    1998-11-01

    Spatiotemporal pattern formation under potentiostatic control in the excitable potential range at the active/passive transition of cobalt in buffered phosphoric acid has been investigated in a ribbon electrode geometry. The propagation of an active area with modulation and wave splitting has been observed, depending on the parameters potential and time of passivation prior to excitation. The modulation and wave splitting are influenced both by the kinetics of repassivation on the electrode surface and by long-range coupling and positive feedback through the electric field. Modulation in the vicinity of the system boundary gives rise to an apparent reflection of the active area at the boundary.

  9. Collective charge excitations along cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manousakis, E.

    2005-07-01

    A significant part of the thin layers of counter-ions adjacent to the exterior and interior surfaces of a cell membrane form quasi-two-dimensional (2D) layers of mobile charge. Collective charge density oscillations, known as plasmon modes, in these 2D charged systems of counter-ions are predicted in the present paper. This is based on a calculation of the self-consistent response of this system to a fast electric field fluctuation. The possibility that the membrane channels might be using these excitations to carry out fast communication is suggested and experiments are proposed to reveal the existence of such excitations.

  10. Exciting Baryons: now and in the future

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Pennington

    2012-04-01

    This is the final talk of NSTAR2011 conference. It is not a summary talk, but rather a looking forward to what still needs to be done in excited baryon physics. In particular, we need to hone our tools connecting experimental inputs with QCD. At present we rely on models that often have doubtful connections with the underlying theory, and this needs to be dramatically improved, if we are to reach definitive conclusions about the relevant degrees of freedom of excited baryons. Conclusions that we want to have by NSTAR2021.

  11. Exciting baryons: Now and in the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, M. R.

    2012-04-01

    This is the final talk of NSTAR2011 conference. It is not a summary talk, but rather a looking forward to what still needs to be done in excited baryon physics. In particular, we need to hone our tools connecting experimental inputs with QCD. At present we rely on models that often have doubtful connections with the underlying theory, and this needs to be dramatically improved, if we are to reach definitive conclusions about the relevant degrees of freedom of excited baryons. Conclusions that we want to have by NSTAR2021.

  12. Double Photoionization of excited Lithium and Beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, Frank L.; McCurdy, C. William; Rescigno, Thomas N.

    2010-05-20

    We present total, energy-sharing and triple differential cross sections for one-photon, double ionization of lithium and beryllium starting from aligned, excited P states. We employ a recently developed hybrid atomic orbital/ numerical grid method based on the finite-element discrete-variable representation and exterior complex scaling. Comparisons with calculated results for the ground-state atoms, as well as analogous results for ground-state and excited helium, serve to highlight important selection rules and show some interesting effects that relate to differences between inter- and intra-shell electron correlation.

  13. Elementary spin excitations in ultrathin itinerant magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakeri, Khalil

    2014-12-01

    Elementary spin excitations (magnons) play a fundamental role in condensed matter physics, since many phenomena e.g. magnetic ordering, electrical (as well as heat) transport properties, ultrafast magnetization processes, and most importantly electron/spin dynamics can only be understood when these quasi-particles are taken into consideration. In addition to their fundamental importance, magnons may also be used for information processing in modern spintronics. Here the concept of spin excitations in ultrathin itinerant magnets is discussed and reviewed. Starting with a historical introduction, different classes of magnons are introduced. Different theoretical treatments of spin excitations in solids are outlined. Interaction of spin-polarized electrons with a magnetic surface is discussed. It is shown that, based on the quantum mechanical conservation rules, a magnon can only be excited when a minority electron is injected into the system. While the magnon creation process is forbidden by majority electrons, the magnon annihilation process is allowed instead. These fundamental quantum mechanical selection rules, together with the strong interaction of electrons with matter, make the spin-polarized electron spectroscopies as appropriate tools to excite and probe the elementary spin excitations in low-dimensional magnets e.g ultrathin films and nanostructures. The focus is put on the experimental results obtained by spin-polarized electron energy loss spectroscopy and spin-polarized inelastic tunneling spectroscopy. The magnon dispersion relation, lifetime, group and phase velocity measured using these approaches in various ultrathin magnets are discussed in detail. The differences and similarities with respect to the bulk excitations are addressed. The role of the temperature, atomic structure, number of atomic layers, lattice strain, electronic complexes and hybridization at the interfaces are outlined. A possibility of simultaneous probing of magnons and phonons

  14. Laser Excited Fluorescence For Forensic Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, Robert E.

    1986-07-01

    The application of laser excited fluorescence to the detection and identification of latent fingerprints was first accomplished ten years ago. The development of the technology has progressed rapidly with the introduction of commercial equipment by several manufacturers. Systems based on Argon-ion, Copper-vapor, and frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers are compared. The theoretical basis of detection by fluorescence is discussed along with the more useful techniques of dye staining. Other applications of the laser excited fluorescence in forensic investigation include gunshot residue analysis, serology, collection of trace evidence, and document examination.

  15. Optimal Parametric Feedback Excitation of Nonlinear Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, David J.

    2016-01-01

    An optimal parametric feedback excitation principle is sought, found, and investigated. The principle is shown to provide an adaptive resonance condition that enables unprecedentedly robust movement generation in a large class of oscillatory dynamical systems. Experimental demonstration of the theory is provided by a nonlinear electronic circuit that realizes self-adaptive parametric excitation without model information, signal processing, and control computation. The observed behavior dramatically differs from the one achievable using classical parametric modulation, which is fundamentally limited by uncertainties in model information and nonlinear effects inevitably present in real world applications.

  16. Optimal Parametric Feedback Excitation of Nonlinear Oscillators.

    PubMed

    Braun, David J

    2016-01-29

    An optimal parametric feedback excitation principle is sought, found, and investigated. The principle is shown to provide an adaptive resonance condition that enables unprecedentedly robust movement generation in a large class of oscillatory dynamical systems. Experimental demonstration of the theory is provided by a nonlinear electronic circuit that realizes self-adaptive parametric excitation without model information, signal processing, and control computation. The observed behavior dramatically differs from the one achievable using classical parametric modulation, which is fundamentally limited by uncertainties in model information and nonlinear effects inevitably present in real world applications. PMID:26871336

  17. PUTTING CORONAL SEISMOLOGY ESTIMATES OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH TO THE TEST

    SciTech Connect

    De Moortel, I.; Pascoe, D. J.

    2009-07-10

    The magnetic field strength inside a model coronal loop is 'estimated' using coronal seismology, to examine the reliability of magnetic field strengths derived from observed, transverse coronal loop oscillations. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of the interaction of an external pressure pulse with a coronal loop (modeled as a three-dimensional density enhancement inside a two-dimensional magnetic arcade) are analyzed and the 'observed' properties of the excited transverse loop oscillations are used to derive the value of the local magnetic field strength, following the method of Nakariakov and Ofman. Due to the (unexpected) change in periodicity, the magnetic field derived from our 'observed' oscillation is substantially different from the actual (input) magnetic field value (approximately 50%). Coronal seismology can derive useful information about the local magnetic field, but the combined effect of the loop curvature, the density ratio, and aspect ratio of the loop appears to be more important than previously expected.

  18. New probe of M1 and E1 strengths in GDR regions

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, T.; Ogata, K.; Miyamoto, S.; Mochizuki, T.; Horikawa, K.; Amano, S.; Imazaki, K.; Li, D.; Izawa, Y.; Chiba, S.

    2014-05-02

    The M1 strengths (or level density of 1{sup +} states) are of importance for estimation of interaction strengths between neutrinos and nuclei for the study of the supernova neutrino-process. In 1957, Agodi predicted theoretically angular distribution of neutrons emitted from states excited via dipole transitions with linearly polarized gamma-ray beam at the polar angle of θ=90° should be followed by a simple function, a + b cos(2φ), where φ, is azimuthal angel. However, this theoretical prediction has not been verified over the wide mass region except for light nuclei as deuteron. We have measured neutron angular distributions with (polarized gamma, n) reactions on Au, Nal, and Cu. We have verified the Agodi's prediction for the first time over the wide mass region. This suggests that (polarized gamma, n) reactions may be useful tools to study M1 strengths in giant resonance regions.

  19. Fracture strength of silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1979-01-01

    A test program was developed to determine the nature and source of the flaw controlling the fracture of silicon solar cells and to provide information regarding the mechanical strength of cells. Significant changes in fracture strengths were found in seven selected in-process wafer-to-cell products from a manufacturer's production line. The fracture strength data were statistically analyzed and interpreted in light of the exterior flaw distribution of the samples.

  20. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-08-04

    Scanning probe microscopy may include a method for generating a band excitation (BE) signal and simultaneously exciting a probe at a plurality of frequencies within a predetermined frequency band based on the excitation signal. A response of the probe is measured across a subset of frequencies of the predetermined frequency band and the excitation signal is adjusted based on the measured response.

  1. Ferrimagnetic resonance and magnetoelastic excitations in magnetoelectric hexaferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittoria, Carmine

    2015-08-01

    Static field properties of magnetoelectric hexaferrites have been explored extensively in the past five years. In this paper, dynamic properties of magnetoelectric hexaferrites are being explored. In particular, effects of the linear magnetoelectric coupling (α ) on ferrimagnetic resonance (FMR) and magnetoelastic excitations are being investigated. A magnetoelastic free energy which includes Landau-Lifshitz mathematical description of a spin spiral configuration is proposed to calculate FMR and magnetoelastic excitations in magnetoelectric hexaferrites. It is predicted that the ordinary uniform precession FMR mode contains resonance frequency shifts that are proportional to magnetoelectric static and dynamic fields. The calculated FMR fields are in agreement with experiments. Furthermore, it is predicted at low frequencies (approximately megahertz ranges), near zero magnetic field FMR frequencies, there is an extra uniform precession FMR mode besides the ordinary FMR mode which can only be accounted by dynamic magnetoelectric fields. Whereas the FMR frequency shifts in the ordinary FMR mode due to the α coupling scale as α , the shifts in the new discovered FMR mode scale as α2. Also, magnetoelastic dispersions were calculated, and it is predicted that the effect of the α coupling are the following: (1) The strength of admixture of modes and splitting in energy between spin waves and transverse acoustic waves is proportional to α . (2) The degeneracy of the two transverse acoustic wave modes is lifted even for relatively low values of α . Interestingly, at low frequencies near zero field FMR frequencies, the surface spin wave mode branch flip-flops with the volume spin wave branch whereby one branch assumes real values of the propagation constant and the other purely imaginary upon the application of a static electric field.

  2. Plasmonic decay in a metallic grating after femtosecond pulse excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Roland; Bethge, Jens

    2010-09-15

    The paper presents a theoretical study on the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and their decay by reradiation to light. We consider a free-standing metallic transmission grating being illuminated with a TM-polarized light pulse of 10 fs duration at normal incidence. The SPP decay time is assumed to be much larger than the pulse duration. In particular, we analyze the SPP decay after the exciting pulse disappeared. We find periodic amplitude modulation of the declining light field both in close proximity to the grating, where evanescent waves are dominant and in the far-field region, where the light field consists mainly of propagating waves. Using the example of the magnetic field, we demonstrate that the amplitude modulation of the near field exhibits increasing strength with time due to a drop of the evanescent wave density associated with the SPP decay. The far field above and below the grating shows frequency beating with periods corresponding to the reciprocal width of a frequency gap in the transmission spectrum. Strong coupling between SPP modes on the top and bottom interfaces leads to fixed phase relations between the beat notes of the transmitted and reflected light fields. This coupling is confirmed by a periodic change in the Poynting flow direction perpendicular to the interfaces. Finally, we study also the dynamics of the SPP decay by employing Gabor wavelet transforms for the calculated fields far above and below the grating. In this way, we get access to the spectral contents of the light field at different times. This novel spectral-temporal analysis shows a narrowing of the initial pulse spectrum and reveals spectral features not seen in the Fourier spectrum.

  3. Mechanical strength and stability of lithium aluminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimhall, J. L.

    1992-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) investigated the strength and resistance to thermal shock of lithium aluminate annular pellets. The room temperature, axial compressive fracture strength of pellets made at Westinghouse Advanced Energy Systems (WAES) varied from 80 to 133 ksi. The strength at 430 C (806 F) was to 30 to 40 percent lower. The strength at 900 C (1652 F) showed a wide variation with one measurement near 90 ksi. These strength values are consistent with other data and predictions made in the literature when the grain size and porosity of the microstructure are taken into account. In diametral compression tests, the fracture strengths were much lower due to the existence of tensile stresses in some pellet regions from this type of loading. However, the fracture stresses were still generally higher than those reported in the literature; this fracture resistance probably reflects the better quality of the pellets tested in this study. Measurements on pellets made at PNL indicated lower strengths compared to the WAES material. This strength difference could be accounted for by different processing technologies: material made at PNL was cold-pressed and sintered with high porosity whereas the WAES material was isostatically hot-pressed with high density. Thermal shocking of the material by ramping to 900 C in two minutes did not have an observable effect on the microstructure or the strength of any of the pellets.

  4. Accelerated Strength Testing of Thermoplastic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, J. R.; Allen, D. H.; Bradley, W. L.

    1998-01-01

    Constant ramp strength tests on unidirectional thermoplastic composite specimens oriented in the 90 deg. direction were conducted at constant temperatures ranging from 149 C to 232 C. Ramp rates spanning 5 orders of magnitude were tested so that failures occurred in the range from 0.5 sec. to 24 hrs. (0.5 to 100,000 MPa/sec). Below 204 C, time-temperature superposition held allowing strength at longer times to be estimated from strength tests at shorter times but higher temperatures. The data indicated that a 50% drop in strength might be expected for this material when the test time is increased by 9 orders of magnitude. The shift factors derived from compliance data applied well to the strength results. To explain the link between compliance and strength, a viscoelastic fracture model was investigated. The model, which used compliance as input, was found to fit the strength data only if the critical fracture energy was allowed to vary with temperature reduced stress rate. This variation in the critical parameter severely limits its use in developing a robust time-dependent strength model. The significance of this research is therefore seen as providing both the indication that a more versatile acceleration method for strength can be developed and the evidence that such a method is needed.

  5. Pitch strength of normal and dysphonic voices

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastav, Rahul; Eddins, David A.; Anand, Supraja

    2012-01-01

    Two sounds with the same pitch may vary from each other based on saliency of their pitch sensation. This perceptual attribute is called “pitch strength.” The study of voice pitch strength may be important in quantifying of normal and pathological qualities. The present study investigated how pitch strength varies across normal and dysphonic voices. A set of voices (vowel /a/) selected from the Kay Elemetrics Disordered Voice Database served as the stimuli. These stimuli demonstrated a wide range of voice quality. Ten listeners judged the pitch strength of these stimuli in an anchored magnitude estimation task. On a given trial, listeners heard three different stimuli. The first stimulus represented very low pitch strength (wide-band noise), the second stimulus consisted of the target voice and the third stimulus represented very high pitch strength (pure tone). Listeners estimated pitch strength of the target voice by positioning a continuous slider labeled with values between 0 and 1, reflecting the two anchor stimuli. Results revealed that listeners can judge pitch strength reliably in dysphonic voices. Moderate to high correlations with perceptual judgments of voice quality suggest that pitch strength may contribute to voice quality judgments. PMID:22423721

  6. Muscular strength after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Winther, Siri B; Husby, Vigdis S; Foss, Olav A; Wik, Tina S; Svenningsen, Svein; Engdal, Monika; Haugan, Kristin; Husby, Otto S

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Minimizing the decrease in muscular strength after total hip arthroplasty (THA) might allow patients to recover faster. We evaluated muscular strength in patients who were operated on using 3 surgical approaches. Patients and methods In a prospective cohort study, 60 patients scheduled for primary THA were allocated to the direct lateral, posterior, or anterior approach. Leg press and abduction strength were evaluated 2 weeks or less preoperatively, 2 and 8 days postoperatively, and at 6-week and 3-month follow-up. Results Differences in maximal strength change were greatest after 2 and 8 days. The posterior and anterior approaches produced less decrease in muscular strength than the direct lateral approach. 6 weeks postoperatively, the posterior approach produced greater increase in muscular strength than the direct lateral approach, and resulted in a greater increase in abduction strength than the anterior approach. At 3-month follow-up, no statistically significant differences between the groups were found. The operated legs were 18% weaker in leg press and 15% weaker in abduction than the unoperated legs, and the results were similar between groups. Interpretation The posterior and anterior approaches appeared to have the least negative effect on abduction and leg press muscular strength in the first postoperative week; the posterior approach had the least negative effect, even up to 6 weeks postoperatively. THA patients have reduced muscle strength in the operated leg (compared to the unoperated leg) 3 months after surgery. PMID:26141371

  7. Correlated Strength in the Nuclear Spectral Function

    SciTech Connect

    D. Rohe; C. S. Armstrong; R. Asaturyan; O. K. Baker; S. Bueltmann; C. Carasco; D. Day; R. Ent; H. C. Fenker; K. Garrow; A. Gasparian; P. Gueye; M. Hauger; A. Honegger; J. Jourdan; C. E. Keppel; G. Kubon; R. Lindgren; A. Lung; D. J. Mack; J. H. Mitchell; H. Mkrtchyan; D. Mocelj; K. Normand; T. Petitjean; O. Rondon; E. Segbefia; I. Sick; S. Stepanyan; L. Tang; F. Tiefenbacher; W. F. Vulcan; G. Warren; S. A. Wood; L. Yuan; M. Zeier; H. Zhu; B. Zihlmann

    2004-10-01

    We have carried out an (e,ep) experiment at high momentum transfer and in parallel kinematics to measure the strength of the nuclear spectral function S(k,E) at high nucleon momenta k and large removal energies E. This strength is related to the presence of short-range and tensor correlations, and was known hitherto only indirectly and with considerable uncertainty from the lack of strength in the independent-particle region. This experiment locates by direct measurement the correlated strength predicted by theory.

  8. Unified calculation of generalized oscillator strength of argon ranging from bound to continuum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang; Jin, Rui; Zeng, De-Ling; Han, Xiao-Ying; Yan, Jun; Li, Jia-Ming

    2015-11-01

    The electron and photon scattering data of an atom are crucial for many scientific fields, including plasma physics, astrophysics, and so on. For high enough but nonrelativistic incident energies, the first Born approximation is applicable for calculating these data, in which the key physics quantity is the generalized oscillator strength (GOS). In high-energy electron impact excitation processes, atoms will be excited into various excited states including strongly perturbed Rydberg and adjacent continuum states. How to calculate these quantities of a nontrivial many-electron atom rapidly and accurately is still a great challenge. Based on our eigenchannel R -matrix method R -eigen, we further extend it to calculate the GOS of a whole channel in an atom, which includes all Rydberg and adjacent continuum states. The Jπ=1- states of argon are chosen as an illustrating example. The calculation results are in good agreement with the available benchmark absolute experimental measurements. The calculated eigenchannel GOS matrix elements are smooth functions of the excitation energy and momentum transfer. From such smooth eigenchannel GOS matrix elements, we can obtain the GOS of any specific excited state through multichannel quantum defect theory, e.g., infinite Rydberg (including a strongly perturbed one), autoionization, and continuum states.

  9. Lung models: strengths and limitations.

    PubMed

    Martonen, T B; Musante, C J; Segal, R A; Schroeter, J D; Hwang, D; Dolovich, M A; Burton, R; Spencer, R M; Fleming, J S

    2000-06-01

    The most widely used particle dosimetry models are those proposed by the National Council on Radiation Protection, International Commission for Radiological Protection, and the Netherlands National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (the RIVM model). Those models have inherent problems that may be regarded as serious drawbacks: for example, they are not physiologically realistic. They ignore the presence and commensurate effects of naturally occurring structural elements of lungs (eg, cartilaginous rings, carinal ridges), which have been demonstrated to affect the motion of inhaled air. Most importantly, the surface structures have been shown to influence the trajectories of inhaled particles transported by air streams. Thus, the model presented herein by Martonen et al may be perhaps the most appropriate for human lung dosimetry. In its present form, the model's major "strengths" are that it could be used for diverse purposes in medical research and practice, including: to target the delivery of drugs for diseases of the respiratory tract (eg, cystic fibrosis, asthma, bronchogenic carcinoma); to selectively deposit drugs for systemic distribution (eg, insulin); to design clinical studies; to interpret scintigraphy data from human subject exposures; to determine laboratory conditions for animal testing (ie, extrapolation modeling); and to aid in aerosolized drug delivery to children (pediatric medicine). Based on our research, we have found very good agreement between the predictions of our model and the experimental data of Heyder et al, and therefore advocate its use in the clinical arena. In closing, we would note that for the simulations reported herein the data entered into our computer program were the actual conditions of the Heyder et al experiments. However, the deposition model is more versatile and can simulate many aerosol therapy scenarios. For example, the core model has many computer subroutines that can be enlisted to simulate the

  10. Investigating the Photon Strength Function to Discrete Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedeking, M.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Burke, J. T.; Hatarik, R.; Lesher, S. R.; Scielzo, N. D.; Krtička, M.; Allmond, J. M.; Basunia, M. S.; Fallon, P.; Firestone, R. B.; Goldblum, B. L.; Lake, P. T.; Lee, I.-Y.; Paschalis, S.; Petri, M.; Phair, L.

    2015-11-01

    Over the last decade several measurements in medium mass nuclei have reported a low-energy enhancement in the photon strength function. Although, much effort has been invested in unravelling the mysteries of this effect, its physical origin is still not understood. Here, a completely model-independent experimental approach to investigate the possible existence of this enhancement is presented. The experiment was designed to study statistical feeding from the quasi-continuum (below the neutron separation energy) to individual low-lying discrete levels in 95Mo produced in the (d,p) reaction. A key aspect to successfully study gamma decay from the region of high level-density is the detection and extraction of correlated particle-gamma-gamma events which was accomplished using an array of Clover HPGe detectors and large area annular silicon detectors. The entrance channel excitation energy into the residual nucleus produced in the reaction was inferred from the detected proton energies in the silicon detectors. Gating on gamma-transitions originating from low-lying discrete levels specifies the state fed by statistical gamma-rays. Any particle-gamma-gamma event in combination with specific energy sum requirements ensures a clean and unambiguous determination of the initial and final state of the observed gamma rays. With these requirements the statistical feeding to individual discrete levels is extracted on an event-by-event basis. The latest results are presented and compared to 95Mo photon strength function data measured at the University of Oslo by Guttormsen et al. In particular, questions regarding the existence of the low-energy enhancement in the photon strength function are addressed.

  11. Evidence for strong mixing between the LC and MLCT excited states in Bis(2-phenylpyridinato-C[sup 2], N')(2, 2'-bipyridine)iridium(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Colombo, M.G.; Hauser, A.; Guedel, H.U. )

    1993-07-07

    The well-resolved absorption, excitation, and luminescence spectra of [Ir(ppy)[sub 2]bpy][sup +] (ppyH = 2-phenylpyridine, bpy = 2, 2'-bipyridine) in different media at cryogenic temperatures are presented. In solutions and glasses at ambient temperature the lowest energy excited state corresponds to an Ir [yields] bpy charge-transfer excitation whereas in the crystalline host lattice [Rh(ppy)[sub 2]bpy]PF[sub 6] the lowest excited state at 21,450 cm[sup [minus]1] is assigned to a [sup 3][pi]-[pi]* excitation localized on the cyclometalating ppy[minus] ligands. The next higher excited Ir [yields] bpy charge-transfer state has shifted to 21,820 cm[sup [minus]1], only 300 cm[sup [minus]1] above the [sup 3]LC excited state. The close proximity of the [sup 3]LC and [sup 3]MLCT excited states and the large spin-orbit coupling constant of Ir[sup 3+] induce a strong mixing of charge-transfer character into the [sup 3]LC lowest excited states, resulting in increased oscillator strengths, reduced lifetimes, short axis polarized transitions, and a large zero-field splitting of 10-15 cm[sup [minus]1].

  12. Relaxation channels of multi-photon excited xenon clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Serdobintsev, P. Yu.; Melnikov, A. S.; Rakcheeva, L. P. Murashov, S. V.; Khodorkovskii, M. A.; Lyubchik, S.; Timofeev, N. A.; Pastor, A. A.

    2015-09-21

    The relaxation processes of the xenon clusters subjected to multi-photon excitation by laser radiation with quantum energies significantly lower than the thresholds of excitation of atoms and ionization of clusters were studied. Results obtained by means of the photoelectron spectroscopy method showed that desorption processes of excited atoms play a significant role in the decay of two-photon excited xenon clusters. A number of excited states of xenon atoms formed during this process were discovered and identified.

  13. Nonperturbative analysis of the two-level atom: Applications to multiphoton excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Duvall, R.E.; Valeo, E.J.; Oberman, C.R.

    1987-08-01

    Selective excitation in an atomic system subjected to a slowly varying external electromagnetic field is studied using a two-level model. Time evolution of the system is found using an approach which is nonperturbative in the field strength. There is no constraint to small values of the applied field, that is, the field (in appropriate energy units) need not be small compared to the difference in energies of the two levels. Rather, we prey upon the fact that the situation of interest to us is where the frequency of the exciting field is small compared to the frequency associated with the level difference. Transition probabilities and resonance conditions are found which circumscribe both the large and small field limits. In the weak field limit the previous results of high-order perturbation theory are readily recovered. For a monochromatic field the characteristic features of resonance excitation at high harmonic number of the applied field are (a) extremely narrow resonance widths and (b) shifts in resonance positions which are strong functions of field intensity. Because of this sensitivity, we are able to demonstrate that when slow temporal evolution of the field amplitude is taken into account (e.g., due to finite pulse duration) the appropriate mean excitation rate is that due to the uncorrelated contribution of many resonances. The results of this analysis are used to estimate excitation rates in a specific atomic system, Cd/sup 12 +/, which are then compared to multiphoton ionization rates. Our calculations suggest that the ionization rate exceeds the excitation rate by several orders of magnitude. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  14. SDO/AIA Observation and Modeling of Flare-excited Slow Waves in Hot Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Ofman, L.; Provornikova, E.; Sun, X.; Davila, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The flare-excited standing slow waves were first detected by SOHO/SUMER as Doppler shift oscillations in hot (>6 MK) coronal loops. It has been suggested that they are excited by small or micro- flares at one loop's footpoint. However, the detailed excitation mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we report an oscillation event observed by SDO/AIA in the 131 channel. The intensity disturbances excited by a C-class flare propagated back and forth along a hot loop for about two period with a strong damping. From the measured oscillation period and loop length, we estimate the wave phase speed to be about 410 km/s. Using a regularized DEM analysis we determine the loop temperature and electron density evolution and find that the loop plasma is heated to a temperature of 8-12 MK with a mean about 9 MK. These measurements support the interpretation as slow magnetoacousic waves. Magnetic field extrapolation suggests that the flare is triggered by slipping and null-point-type reconnections in a fan-spine magnetic topology, and the injected (or impulsively evaporated) hot plasmas flowing along the large spine field lines form the oscillating hot loops. To understand why the propagating waves but not the standing waves as observed previously are excited in this event, we preform simulations using a 3D MHD model based on the observed magnetic configuration including full energy equation. Our simulations indicate that the nature of loop temperature structure is critical for the excitation of whether propagating or standing waves in a hot loop. Our result demonstrates that the slow waves may be used for heating diagnostics of coronal loops with coronal seismology. We also discuss the application of coronal seismology for estimating the average magnetic field strength in the hot loop based on the observed slow waves.

  15. Probabilistic Modeling of Ceramic Matrix Composite Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shan, Ashwin R.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Mital, Subodh K.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1998-01-01

    Uncertainties associated with the primitive random variables such as manufacturing process (processing temperature, fiber volume ratio, void volume ratio), constituent properties (fiber, matrix and interface), and geometric parameters (ply thickness, interphase thickness) have been simulated to quantify the scatter in the first matrix cracking strength (FMCS) and the ultimate tensile strength of SCS-6/RBSN (SiC fiber (SCS-6) reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride composite) ceramic matrix composite laminate at room temperature. Cumulative probability distribution function for the FMCS and ultimate tensile strength at room temperature (RT) of (0)(sub 8), (0(sub 2)/90(sub 2), and (+/-45(sub 2))(sub S) laminates have been simulated and the sensitivity of primitive variables to the respective strengths have been quantified. Computationally predicted scatter of the strengths for a uniaxial laminate have been compared with those from limited experimental data. Also the experimental procedure used in the tests has been described briefly. Results show a very good agreement between the computational simulation and the experimental data. Dominating failure modes in (0)(sub 8), (0/90)(sub s) and (+/-45)(sub S) laminates have been identified. Results indicate that the first matrix cracking strength for the (0)(sub S), and (0/90)(sub S) laminates is sensitive to the thermal properties, modulus and strengths of both the fiber and matrix whereas the ultimate tensile strength is sensitive to the fiber strength and the fiber volume ratio. In the case of a (+/-45)(sub S), laminate, both the FMCS and the ultimate tensile strengths have a small scatter range and are sensitive to the fiber tensile strength as well as the fiber volume ratio.

  16. A review of floc strength and breakage.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, P; Jefferson, B; Gregory, J; Parsons, S A

    2005-09-01

    The main focus of the paper is to review current understanding of floc structure and strength. This has been done by reviewing current theoretical understanding of floc growth and breakage and an analysis of different techniques used for measuring floc strength. An overview has also been made of the general trends seen in floc strength analysis. The rate of floc formation is a balance between breakage and aggregation with flocs eventually reaching a steady-state size for a given shear rate. The steady-state floc size for a particular shear rate can, therefore, be a good indicator of floc strength. This has resulted in the development of a range of techniques to measure floc size at different applied shear levels using a combination of one or more of the following tools: light scattering and transmission; microscopy; photography; video and image analysis software. Floc strength may be simply quantified using the initial floc size for a given shear rate and the floc strength factor. More complex techniques have used theoretical modelling to determine whether flocs break by large-scale fragmentation or smaller-scale surface erosion effects, although this interpretation is open to debate. Impeller-based mixing, ultrasound and vibrating columns have all been used to provide a uniform, accurate and controllable dissipation of energy onto a floc suspension to determine floc strength. Other more recent techniques have used sensitive micromanipulators to measure the force required to break or compress individual flocs, although these techniques have been limited to the measurement of only a few hundred flocs. General trends emerge showing that smaller flocs tend to have greater strength than larger flocs, whilst the use of polymer seems to give increased strength to only some types of floc. Finally, a comparison of the strength of different types of floc (activated sludge flocs, organic matter flocs, sweep flocs and charge neutralised flocs) has been made highlighting

  17. Multipurpose exciter with low phase noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conroy, B.; Le, D.

    1989-01-01

    Results of an effort to develop a lower-cost exciter with high stability, low phase noise, and controllable phase and frequency for use in Deep Space Network and Goldstone Solar System Radar applications are discussed. Included is a discussion of the basic concept, test results, plans, and concerns.

  18. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... generator unless it is provided with a permanent magnet or a residual-magnetism-type exciter that has the... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1), except that those for mobile offshore drilling units must...

  19. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... generator unless it is provided with a permanent magnet or a residual-magnetism-type exciter that has the... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1), except that those for mobile offshore drilling units must...

  20. Contemporary continuum QCD approaches to excited hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bennich, Bruno; Rojas, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    Amongst the bound states produced by the strong interaction, radially excited meson and nucleon states offer an important phenomenological window into the long-range behavior of the coupling constant in Quantum Chromodynamics. We here report on some technical details related to the computation of the bound state's eigenvalue spectrum in the framework of Bethe-Salpeter and Faddeev equations.