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Sample records for passivated aluminum interconnect

  1. Hermetic aluminum radio frequency interconnection and method for making

    DOEpatents

    Kilgo, Riley D.; Kovacic, Larry; Brow, Richard K.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a light-weight, hermetic coaxial radio-frequency (RF) interconnection having an electrically conductive outer housing made of aluminum or an aluminum alloy, a central electrical conductor made of ferrous or non-ferrous material, and a cylinder of dielectric material comprising a low-melting-temperature, high-thermal-expansion aluminophosphate glass composition for hermetically sealing between the aluminum-alloy outer housing and the ferrous or non-ferrous center conductor. The entire RF interconnection assembly is made permanently hermetic by thermally fusing the center conductor, glass, and housing concurrently by bringing the glass to the melt point by way of exposure to an atmospheric temperature sufficient to melt the glass, less than 540.degree. C., but that does not melt the center conductor or the outer aluminum or aluminum alloy housing. The composition of the glass used is controlled to provide a suitable low dielectric constant so that an appropriate electrical characteristic impedance, for example 50 ohms, can be achieved for an electrical interconnection that performs well at high radio frequencies and also provides an interconnection maintaining a relatively small physical size.

  2. Hermetic aluminum radio frequency interconnection and method for making

    SciTech Connect

    Kilgo, R.D.; Kovacic, L.; Brow, R.K.

    2000-03-14

    The present invention provides a light-weight, hermetic coaxial radio-frequency (RF) interconnection having an electrically conductive outer housing made of aluminum or an aluminum alloy, a central electrical conductor made of ferrous or non-ferrous material, and a cylinder of dielectric material comprising a low-melting-temperature, high-thermal-expansion aluminophosphate glass composition for hermetically sealing between the aluminum-alloy outer housing and the ferrous or non-ferrous center conductor. The entire RF interconnection assembly is made permanently hermetic by thermally fusing the center conductor, glass, and housing concurrently by bringing the glass to the melt point by way of exposure to an atmospheric temperature sufficient to melt the glass, less than 540 C, but that does not melt the center conductor or the outer aluminum or aluminum alloy housing. The composition of the glass used is controlled to provide a suitable low dielectric constant so that an appropriate electrical characteristic impedance, for example 50 ohms, can be achieved for an electrical interconnection that performs well at high radio frequencies and also provides an interconnection maintaining a relatively small physical size.

  3. Theory of Electromigration of Faceted Voids in Aluminum Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickham, Lisa K.; Sethna, James P.

    1996-03-01

    Void--induced breakage of micron--sized aluminum wires is an important cause of failure in V.L.S.I. circuits. As an electromigration void travels through a grain in such a wire, a corresponding flux of atoms must leave the front face of the void and move to its other side. We give estimated upper bounds on this flux as a function of current density, temperature, various diffusion barriers, and surface step density. To learn about step density, we discuss ways in which the field changes equilibrium void shape and influences step nucleation rates. We conclude that the field enhances faceting on the leading void face, and find evidence for such behavior in previous experiments. In contrast, diffusion barriers from recent density functional calculations produce particle fluxes from our estimates which fall far below that given by observed void velocities, unless the step density on the leading void face is nearly one. We discuss strain, local heating, and impurity effects which might be responsible for enhanced mobility in real interconnects.

  4. Enhanced active aluminum content and thermal behaviour of nano-aluminum particles passivated during synthesis using thermal plasma route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathe, Vikas L.; Varma, Vijay; Raut, Suyog; Nandi, Amiya Kumar; Pant, Arti; Prasanth, Hima; Pandey, R. K.; Bhoraskar, Sudha V.; Das, Asoka K.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we report synthesis and in situ passivation of aluminum nanoparticles using thermal plasma reactor. Both air and palmitc acid passivation was carried out during the synthesis in the thermal plasma reactor. The passivated nanoparticles have been characterized for their structural and morphological properties using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. In order to understand nature of passivation vibrational spectroscopic analysis have been carried out. The enhancement in active aluminum content and shelf life for a palmitic acid passivated nano-aluminum particles in comparison to the air passivated samples and commercially available nano Al powder (ALEX) has been observed. Thermo-gravimetric analysis was used to estimate active aluminum content of all the samples under investigation. In addition cerimetric back titration method was also used to estimate AAC and the shelf life of passivated aluminum particles. Structural, microstructural and thermogravomateric analysis of four year aged passivated sample also depicts effectiveness of palmitic acid passivation.

  5. Passive optical interconnects at top of the rack: offering high energy efficiency for datacenters.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; Hong, Xuezhi; Lu, Yang; He, Sailing; Chen, Jiajia

    2015-03-23

    This paper introduces a new concept, namely passive optical interconnect at top of the rack in the datacenter networks, and investigates several architectures, which use only passive optical components to interconnect different servers. In such a manner, the proposed schemes are able to offer higher bandwidth and significantly improve energy efficiency compared to their electronic counterpart that is based on commodity switches. The proposed passive optical interconnect schemes are experimentally demonstrated in order to validate the transmission performance. Besides, an assessment in terms of energy consumption and cost has also been carried out, which shows our proposed concept can significantly outperform the conventional commodity switches on energy efficiency while keeping the cost in the similar level.

  6. Analysis of local strain in aluminum interconnects by convergent beam electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, Stephan; Mayer, Joachim

    1999-11-01

    Energy filtered convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) was used to investigate localized strain in aluminum interconnects. An analysis of the higher order Laue zone (HOLZ) line positions in CBED patterns makes it possible to measure the lattice strain with high accuracy (˜104) and high spatial resolution (10 to 100 nm). The strain development in a single grain was measured during thermal cycling between -170 °C and +100 °C. The grain showed reversible, elastic behavior over the whole temperature range building up large strains at low temperatures. By comparing with finite element simulations, a detailed understanding of the tri-axial strain state could be achieved.

  7. Passivation process for superfine aluminum powders obtained by electrical explosion of wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Young-Soon; Gromov, Alexander A.; Ilyin, Alexander P.; Rim, Geun-Hie

    2003-04-01

    The process of passivation of superfine aluminum powders (SFAPs) ( as≤100 nm), obtained with the electrical explosion of wires (EEW) method, has been studied. The passivation coatings of different nature (oxides, stearic acid and aluminum diboride) were covered on the particle surface. The process of passivation and analysis of passivated powders was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), XRD, TEM, infrared spectroscopy (IR), mass spectrometry (MS), thermocouple method and bomb calorimetry. After the comprehensive testing of coatings, a model of stabilization of the superfine aluminum particles was suggested, explaining the anomalous high content of aluminum metal in the electroexplosive powders. The main characteristic of the model is a formation of charged structures, which prevent metal oxidation.

  8. CWDM based HDMI interconnect incorporating passively aligned POF linked optical subassembly modules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hak-Soon; Lee, Sang-Shin; Son, Yung-Sung

    2011-08-01

    A four-channel transmitter OSA (TOSA) and a receiver optical sub-assembly (ROSA) module were presented. They take advantage of a coarse WDM (CWDM) scheme, employing two types of VCSELs at 780 and 850 nm, where no wavelength filters are involved in the TOSA. The ROSA and TOSA were constructed through a fully passive alignment process using components produced by virtue of a cost effective plastic injection molding technique. In order to build a high quality optical HDMI interconnect, four channel optical links between these modules ware established via two graded-index plastic optical fibers (GI-POFs). The HDMI interconnect was thoroughly evaluated in terms of the alignment tolerance, the light beam propagation, and the data transmission capability. For the ROSA, the measured tolerance, as affected by the photodiode alignment, was ~45 μm and over 200 μm for the transverse and longitudinal directions, respectively. For the TOSA, the tolerance, which is mostly dependent upon the VCSEL alignment, was ~20 μm and more than 200 μm for the transverse and longitudinal directions, respectively. The beam profiles for the TOSA and ROSA were monitored to confirm their feasibility from the optical coupling perspective. A digital signal at 2.5 Gb/s was efficiently transmitted through the HDMI interconnect with a bit error ratio of below 10-16. A 1080p HDMI signal from a Blu-ray player was delivered through the interconnect to an LCD monitor and successfully displayed a high quality video.

  9. CWDM based HDMI interconnect incorporating passively aligned POF linked optical subassembly modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hak-Soon; Lee, Sang-Shin; Son, Yung-Sung

    2011-08-01

    A four-channel transmitter OSA (TOSA) and a receiver optical sub-assembly (ROSA) module were presented. They take advantage of a coarse WDM (CWDM) scheme, employing two types of VCSELs at 780 and 850 nm, where no wavelength filters are involved in the TOSA. The ROSA and TOSA were constructed through a fully passive alignment process using components produced by virtue of a cost effective plastic injection molding technique. In order to build a high quality optical HDMI interconnect, four channel optical links between these modules ware established via two graded-index plastic optical fibers (GI-POFs). The HDMI interconnect was thoroughly evaluated in terms of the alignment tolerance, the light beam propagation, and the data transmission capability. For the ROSA, the measured tolerance, as affected by the photodiode alignment, was ~45 μm and over 200 μm for the transverse and longitudinal directions, respectively. For the TOSA, the tolerance, which is mostly dependent upon the VCSEL alignment, was ~20 μm and more than 200 μm for the transverse and longitudinal directions, respectively. The beam profiles for the TOSA and ROSA were monitored to confirm their feasibility from the optical coupling perspective. A digital signal at 2.5 Gb/s was efficiently transmitted through the HDMI interconnect with a bit error ratio of below 10-16. A 1080p HDMI signal from a Blu-ray player was delivered through the interconnect to an LCD monitor and successfully displayed a high quality video.

  10. Silicon diffusion in aluminum for rear passivated solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Urrejola, Elias; Peter, Kristian; Plagwitz, Heiko; Schubert, Gunnar

    2011-04-11

    We show that the lateral spread of silicon in a screen-printed aluminum layer increases by (1.50{+-}0.06) {mu}m/ deg. C, when increasing the peak firing temperature within an industrially applicable range. In this way, the maximum spread limit of diffused silicon in aluminum is predictable and does not depend on the contact area size but on the firing temperature. Therefore, the geometry of the rear side pattern can influence not only series resistance losses within the solar cell but the process of contact formation itself. In addition, too fast cooling lead to Kirkendall void formations instead of an eutectic layer.

  11. Characterization of laser transferred contact through aluminum oxide passivation layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urabe, Shunsuke; Irikawa, Junpei; Konagai, Makoto; Miyajima, Shinsuke

    2015-08-01

    The point contact structure of the rear side of crystalline silicon solar cells is used to realize high passivation quality and good electrical contact. A conversion efficiency of 19.8% was achieved on the passivated emitter and rear cell (PERC) structure with a widegap heterojunction emitter. In this solar cell, laser-fired contact (LFC) process is used to make the point contacts. In the LFC process, laser irradiation damage to the surface of crystalline silicon was found to be the big issues for higher passivation quality. We investigated laser-transferred contact (LTC) process as a new contacts formation process. The LTC samples showed higher effective minority carrier lifetime and good contact resistivity compared with the LFC samples.

  12. New single-mode, multi-fiber, expanded-beam, passive optical interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childers, Darrell; Hughes, Mike; Satake, Toshiaki

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of next generation, single-mode, multi-fiber, debris insensitive, expanded beam, interconnect components. This low cost, dense optical interconnect technology combined with recent advances next generation, high bandwidth, SM, silicon photonic based Tx/Rx devices is enabling unprecedented bandwidth densities for extended distances at reduced costs. A monolithic, multi-fiber ferule with integrated collimating lenses was designed with the same overall footprint as a traditional MT-type, multi-fiber rectangular ferrule. The new optical ferrule was designed with precision micro holes for alignment to the lens array allowing for future incorporation of multiple rows of fibers into a single ferrule unit. The monolithic, lensed based ferule design enables a low-cost, no-polish fiber termination methodology. The ferrule tested was manufactured with an array of 16 fibers in the footprint associated with traditional, 12 fiber, physical contact MT ferules via use of novel, molded in, end-face alignment features. Multiple optical models were built with ray tracing methodology to predict the insertion loss and return loss with varying refraction index, transmissivity and surface reflection properties of the ferrule. Empirical optical performance results closely match the optical modeling predictions. Insertion losses of <1.5dB were measured along with return loss values <=-30dB. Further analysis was done to characterize the robustness of the new interconnect with regard to debris insensitivity. Do to the nature of the expanded beam, free-space optical design, the impact of debris on the optical mating surface of the interconnect was significantly reduced when compared to traditional, physical contact single-mode interconnects

  13. Viewing Integrated-Circuit Interconnections By SEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, Russel A.; Gauldin, Robert E.; Ruiz, Ronald P.

    1990-01-01

    Back-scattering of energetic electrons reveals hidden metal layers. Experiment shows that with suitable operating adjustments, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) used to look for defects in aluminum interconnections in integrated circuits. Enables monitoring, in situ, of changes in defects caused by changes in temperature. Gives truer picture of defects, as etching can change stress field of metal-and-passivation pattern, causing changes in defects.

  14. Aluminum oxide passivated radial junction sub-micrometre pillar array textured silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Elam, David; Ayon, Arturo A.

    2013-06-01

    We report radial, p-n junction, sub-micrometre, pillar array textured solar cells, fabricated on an n-type Czochralski silicon wafer. Relatively simple processing schemes such as metal-assisted chemical etching and spin on dopant techniques were employed for the fabrication of the proposed solar cells. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) grown aluminum oxide (Al2O3) was employed as a surface passivation layer on the B-doped emitter surface. In spite of the fact that the sub-micrometre pillar array textured surface has a relatively high surface-to-volume ratio, we observed an open circuit voltage (VOC) and a short circuit current density (JSC) as high as 572 mV and 29.9 mA cm-2, respectively, which leads to a power conversion efficiency in excess of 11.30%, for the optimized structure of the solar cell described herein. Broadband omnidirectional antireflection effects along with the light trapping property of the sub-micrometre, pillar array textured surface and the excellent passivation quality of the ALD-grown Al2O3 on the B-doped emitter surface were responsible for the enhanced electrical performance of the proposed solar cells.

  15. Passivation properties of aluminum oxide films deposited by mist chemical vapor deposition for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, Shohei; Iguchi, Koji; Kitano, Sho; Hayakashi, Koki; Hotta, Yasushi; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Ogura, Atsushi; Satoh, Shin-ichi; Arafune, Koji

    2015-08-01

    Aluminum oxide (AlOx) films were deposited by mist chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) in air for p-type crystalline silicon, and the effects of the deposition temperature (Tdep) and AlOx film thickness on the maximum surface recombination velocities (Smax) were evaluated. It was found that Smax was improved with increasing Tdep. The AlOx film deposited at 400 °C exhibited the best Smax value of 2.8 cm/s, and the passivation quality was comparable to that of AlOx deposited by other vacuum-based techniques. Smax was also improved with increasing film thickness. When the film thickness was above 10 nm, Smax was approximately 10 cm/s. From the Fourier transform infrared spectra, it was found that the AlOx films deposited by MCVD consisted of an AlOx layer and a Si-diffused AlOx layer. In addition, it is important for the layers to be thick enough to obtain high-quality passivation.

  16. High-Temperature Dielectric Properties of Aluminum Nitride Ceramic for Wireless Passive Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Yuan, Yukun; Ren, Zhong; Tan, Qiulin; Xiong, Jijun

    2015-01-01

    The accurate characterization of the temperature-dependent permittivity of aluminum nitride (AlN) ceramic is quite critical to the application of wireless passive sensors for harsh environments. Since the change of the temperature-dependent permittivity will vary the ceramic-based capacitance, which can be converted into the change of the resonant frequency, an LC resonator, based on AlN ceramic, is prepared by the thick film technology. The dielectric properties of AlN ceramic are measured by the wireless coupling method, and discussed within the temperature range of 12 °C (room temperature) to 600 °C. The results show that the extracted relative permittivity of ceramic at room temperature is 2.3% higher than the nominal value of 9, and increases from 9.21 to 10.79, and the quality factor Q is decreased from 29.77 at room temperature to 3.61 at 600 °C within the temperature range. PMID:26370999

  17. High-Temperature Dielectric Properties of Aluminum Nitride Ceramic for Wireless Passive Sensing Applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Yuan, Yukun; Ren, Zhong; Tan, Qiulin; Xiong, Jijun

    2015-09-08

    The accurate characterization of the temperature-dependent permittivity of aluminum nitride (AlN) ceramic is quite critical to the application of wireless passive sensors for harsh environments. Since the change of the temperature-dependent permittivity will vary the ceramic-based capacitance, which can be converted into the change of the resonant frequency, an LC resonator, based on AlN ceramic, is prepared by the thick film technology. The dielectric properties of AlN ceramic are measured by the wireless coupling method, and discussed within the temperature range of 12 °C (room temperature) to 600 °C. The results show that the extracted relative permittivity of ceramic at room temperature is 2.3% higher than the nominal value of 9, and increases from 9.21 to 10.79, and the quality factor Q is decreased from 29.77 at room temperature to 3.61 at 600 °C within the temperature range.

  18. Identity of Passive Film Formed on Aluminum in Li-ion BatteryElectrolytes with LiPF6

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xueyuan; Devine, T.M.

    2006-09-01

    The passive film that forms on aluminum in 1:1 ethylene carbonate + ethylmethyl carbonate with 1.2M LiPF{sub 6} and 1:1 ethylene carbonate + dimethyl carbonate with 1.0M LiPF{sub 6} was investigated by a combination of electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance measurements (EQCM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. During anodic polarization of aluminum a film of AlF{sub 3} forms on top of the air-formed oxide, creating a duplex, or two-layered film. The thickness of the AlF{sub 3} increases with the applied potential. Independent measurements of film thickness by EQCM and EIS indicate that at a potential of 5.5V vs. Li/Li{sup +}, the thickness of the AlF{sub 3} is approximately 1 nm.

  19. Refractory metal superalloys: Design of yttrium aluminum garnet passivating niobium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, David

    A systems-based approach, integrating computational modeling with experimental techniques to approach engineering problems in a time and cost efficient manner, was employed to design a Nb-based refractory superalloy for use at 1300°C. Ashby-type selection criteria for both thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were employed to identify a suitable protective oxide for Nb alloys. Yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) was selected as the most promising candidate for its excellent combination of desirable properties. The alloy microstructural concept was based upon the gamma - gamma' nickel-based superalloys in which the multifunctional gamma' phase serves as both a creep strengthening dispersion and a source of reactive elements for oxide passivation. Candidate ternary Pd-Y-Al and Pt-Y-Al compounds were fabricated and characterized by XRD and DTA. Of the intermetallics studied, only PtYAl had a high enough melting point (1580°C) for use in an alloy operating at 1300°C. The alloy matrix design was based upon Wahl's extension of Wagner's criterion for protective oxidation, requiring a reduction of the product N ODO/DAl by 5 orders of magnitude relative to binary Nb-Al. A thermodynamic and kinetic analysis identified elements with large oxygen affinities as the most beneficial for reducing the magnitude of the quantity NOD O. Construction of a combined thermodynamic and mobility database identified increased Al solubility as the best approach for increasing D Al. Utilizing the thermodynamic and mobility databases, obtained from a combination of model alloys, oxidation experiments, and first principles calculations, theoretical designs predicted the large changes in solubility and transport parameters were achievable. Several prototype alloys were then fabricated and evaluated via oxidation tests at both 1300°C and 1100°C. YAG formation was demonstrated as part of multicomponent oxide scales in the alloys that exhibited the greatest reduction in oxidation rates. The oxidation

  20. Self-stabilized and dispersion-compensated passively mode-locked Yb:Yttrium aluminum garnet laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnesi, A.; Guandalini, A.; Reali, G.

    2005-04-01

    Self-stabilized passive mode-locking of a diode-pumped Yb:yttrium aluminum garnet laser with a semiconductor saturable absorber was achieved using an off-phase-matching second-harmonic crystal. According to the numerical model, such a condition is accomplished by self-defocusing in the nonlinear crystal in the presence of positive intracavity dispersion. Robust mode locking with Fourier-limited 1.0-ps pulses was obtained, whereas mode locking, unassisted by the nonlinear crystal, yielded 2.2-ps pulses, with the laser operating near the edge of the stability region in order to minimize the saturation energy of the semiconductor device.

  1. Passivation of Aluminum in Lithium-ion Battery Electrolytes withLiBOB

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xueyuan; Devine, Thomas M.

    2006-09-09

    A combination of cyclic polarization tests, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) measurements indicate a film is formed when aluminum is polarized above 4.5V in 1:1 EC+DMC with 1M LiBOB. The quantity of film that is formed increases with increasing applied potential. Results of EQCM tests suggest the film is AlBO{sub 3}. The film is very protective against corrosion and inhibits pitting corrosion of aluminum in normally corrosive 1M LiTFSI.

  2. Improving dielectric performance in anodic aluminum oxide via detection and passivation of defect states

    SciTech Connect

    Mibus, M.; Zangari, G.; Jensen, C.; Hu, X.; Reed, M. L.; Knospe, C.

    2014-06-16

    The electronic and ionic transports in 32–56 nm thick anodic aluminum oxide films are investigated before and after a 1-h anneal at 200–400 °C in argon. Results are correlated to their defect density as measured by the Mott-Schottky technique. Solid state measurements show that electronic conduction upon annealing is hindered by an increase in the Schottky emission barrier, induced by a reduction in dopant density. Using an electrochemical contact, the films fail rapidly under cathodic polarization, unless defect density is decreased down to 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}, resulting in a three order of magnitude reduction in current and no visible gas evolution. Under anodic polarization, the decrease in defect density delays the onset of ionic conduction as well as further oxide growth and failure.

  3. Electronic state and distribution of heavy metals and their passivator in aluminum oxide and cracking catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Chukin, G.D.; Zhdan, P.A.; Dagurov, V.G.; Gertsik, B.M.

    1987-07-01

    The authors studies of the electronic state and distribution of nickel, iron, vanadium, and antimony in aluminum oxide and in RSG-6ts cracking catalyst, treated under various conditions, were performed in an ESCALAB-5 x-ray photoelectron spectrometer, using Mg K/sub ..cap alpha.. and AlK/sub ..cap alpha.. radiation. In recording the spectra and working up the spectral data, a DS-4025 data processing system based on a PDP-11 computer was used. The sensitivity of the XPS method restricted the investigate to samples with a metal content of 10,000 ppm or more. In the investigation, therefore, they used samples of the original zeolitic microbead catalyst RSG-6ts and a sample of catalyst poisoned with vanadium, iron, or nickel to a bulk content of 10,000 ppm.

  4. Fully passive-alignment pluggable compact parallel optical interconnection modules based on a direct-butt-coupling structure for fiber-optic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kwon-Seob; Park, Hyoung-Jun; Kang, Hyun Seo; Kim, Young Sun; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2016-02-01

    A low-cost packaging method utilizing a fully passive optical alignment and surface-mounting method is demonstrated for pluggable compact and slim multichannel optical interconnection modules using a VCSEL/PIN-PD chip array. The modules are based on a nonplanar bent right-angle electrical signal path on a silicon platform and direct-butt-optical coupling without a bulky and expensive microlens array. The measured optical direct-butt-coupling efficiencies of each channel without any bulky optics are as high as 33% and 95% for the transmitter and receiver, respectively. Excellent lateral optical alignment tolerance of larger than 60 μm for both the transmitter and receiver module significantly reduces the manufacturing and material costs as well as the packaging time. The clear eye diagrams, extinction ratios higher than 8 dB at 10.3 Gbps for the transmitter module, and receiver sensitivity of better than -13.1 dBm at 10.3 Gbps and a bit error rate of 10-12 for all channels are demonstrated. Considering that the optical output power of the transmitter is greater than 0 dBm, the module has a sufficient power margin of about 13 dB for 10.3 Gbps operations for all channels.

  5. Atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide films for carbon nanotube network transistor passivation.

    PubMed

    Grigoras, Kestutis; Zavodchikova, Marina Y; Nasibulin, Albert G; Kauppinen, Esko I; Ermolov, Vladimir; Franssila, Sami

    2011-10-01

    Ultra-thin (2-5 nm thick) aluminum oxide layers were grown on non-functionalized individual single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and their bundles by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique in order to investigate the mechanism of the coating process. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to examine the uniformity and conformality of the coatings grown at different temperatures (80 degrees C or 220 degrees C) and with different precursors for oxidation (water and ozone). We found that bundles of SWCNTs were coated continuously, but at the same time, bare individual nanotubes remained uncoated. The successful coating of bundles was explained by the formation of interstitial pores between the individual SWCNTs constituting the bundle, where the precursor molecules can adhere, initiating the layer growth. Thicker alumina layers (20-35 nm thick) were used for the coating of bottom-gated SWCNT-network based field effect transistors (FETs). ALD layers, grown at different conditions, were found to influence the performance of the SWCNT-network FETs: low temperature ALD layers caused the ambipolarity of the channel and pronounced n-type conduction, whereas high temperature ALD processes resulted in hysteresis suppression in the transfer characteristics of the SWCNT transistors and preserved p-type conduction. Fixed charges in the ALD layer have been considered as the main factor influencing the conduction change of the SWCNT network based transistors.

  6. Multilevel Dual Damascene copper interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, S.

    Copper has been acknowledged as the interconnect material for future generations of ICs to overcome the bottlenecks on speed and reliability present with the current Al based wiring. A new set of challenges brought to the forefront when copper replaces aluminum, have to be met and resolved to make it a viable option. Unit step processes related to copper technology have been under development for the last few years. In this work, the application of copper as the interconnect material in multilevel structures with SiO2 as the interlevel dielectric has been explored, with emphasis on integration issues and complete process realization. Interconnect definition was achieved by the Dual Damascene approach using chemical mechanical polishing of oxide and copper. The choice of materials used as adhesion promoter/diffusion barrier included Ti, Ta and CVD TiN. Two different polish chemistries (NH4OH or HNO3 based) were used to form the interconnects. The diffusion barrier was removed during polishing (in the case of TiN) or by a post CMP etch (as with Ti or Ta). Copper surface passivation was performed using boron implantation and PECVD nitride encapsulation. The interlevel dielectric way composed of a multilayer stack of PECVD SiO2 and SixNy. A baseline process sequence which ensured the mechanical and thermal compatibility of the different unit steps was first created. A comprehensive test vehicle was designed and test structures were fabricated using the process flow developed. Suitable modifications were subsequently introduced in the sequence as and when processing problems were encountered. Electrical characterization was performed on the fabricated devices, interconnects, contacts and vias. The structures were subjected to thermal stressing to assess their stability and performance. The measurement of interconnect sheet resistances revealed lower copper loss due to dishing on samples polished using HNO3 based slurry. Interconnect resistances remained stable upto 400o

  7. Excellent thermal conductivity and dielectric properties of polyimide composites filled with silica coated self-passivated aluminum fibers and nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yongcun; Bai, Yuanyuan; Yu, Ke; Kang, Yan; Wang, Hong

    2013-06-01

    A polymer based composite was prepared by using modified aluminum fibers and aluminum nanoparticles as fillers in polyimide matrix that resulted in the high thermal conductivity and low relative permittivity. It was found that silica coated aluminum fibers with the multilayer coating structures can significantly reduce the relative permittivity (about 19.6 at 1 MHz) of the composite while keeping lower dielectric loss (0.024 at 1 MHz). The thermal conductivity of composites was significantly increased to 15.2 W/m K. This work shows a useful way to choose proper modifier fillers to improve the composite properties for electronic packaging composite materials.

  8. Effect of low thermal budget annealing on surface passivation of silicon by ALD based aluminum oxide films.

    PubMed

    Vandana; Batra, Neha; Gope, Jhuma; Singh, Rajbir; Panigrahi, Jagannath; Tyagi, Sanjay; Pathi, P; Srivastava, S K; Rauthan, C M S; Singh, P K

    2014-10-21

    Thermal ALD deposited Al2O3 films on silicon show a marked difference in surface passivation quality as a function of annealing time (using a rapid thermal process). An effective and quality passivation is realized in short anneal duration (∼100 s) in nitrogen ambient which is reflected in the low surface recombination velocity (SRV <10 cm s(-1)). The deduced values are close to the best reported SRV obtained by the high thermal budget process (with annealing time between 10-30 min), conventionally used for improved surface passivation. Both as-deposited and low thermal budget annealed films show the presence of positive fixed charges and this is never been reported in the literature before. The role of field and chemical passivation is investigated in terms of fixed charge and interface defect densities. Further, the importance of the annealing step sequence in the MIS structure fabrication protocol is also investigated from the view point of its effect on the nature of fixed charges.

  9. Simultaneous iron gettering and passivation of p-type monocrystalline silicon using a negatively charged aluminum-doped dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Arnab; Rohatgi, Ajeet

    2012-12-01

    Rapid gettering of iron from p-type c-Si has been achieved using a negatively charged spin-on Al-doped glass. After a 10 min oxidation to cure the Al-doped glass, >99% of Fe can be gettered from silicon wafers. This is comparable to, and under some processing conditions better than, the efficiency of conventional POCl3 gettering. In the same short oxidation step, the Al-doped glass also passivates p-Si surfaces with surface recombination velocities of 100 cm/s and 10 600 cm/s achieved for surface doping of 6 × 1015 cm-3 and 4 × 1019 cm-3, respectively. These passivation results are comparable to those achieved with thermal SiO2 layers.

  10. Influence of a Passivated Nanodimensional Aluminum Powder on Physical and Chemical Characteristics of Combustion of Metal Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarova, M. V.; Vorozhtsov, A. B.

    2014-11-01

    The influence of various nanodimensional metal powders on the linear combustion rate of metal compositions is analyzed. It is demonstrated that passivation of nanoaluminum with glycine not only provides its physical and chemical compatibility with other components of a high-energy material and its subsequent physical and chemical stability, but also does not influence the main integral combustion characteristic that opens possibilities for its application as a fuel in high-energy compositions.

  11. Electrical interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Frost, John S.; Brandt, Randolph J.; Hebert, Peter; Al Taher, Omar

    2015-10-06

    An interconnect includes a first set of connector pads, a second set of connector pads, and a continuous central portion. A first plurality of legs extends at a first angle from the continuous central portion. Each leg of the first plurality of legs is connected to a connector pad of a first set of connector pads. A second plurality of legs extends at a second angle from the continuous central portion. Each leg of the second plurality of legs is connected to a connector pad of the second set of connector pads. Gaps are defined between legs. The gaps enable movement of the first set of connector pads relative to the second set of connector pads.

  12. Advanced Interconnect Development

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z.G.; Maupin, G.; Simner, S.; Singh, P.; Stevenson, J.; Xia, G.

    2005-01-27

    The objectives of this project are to develop cost-effective, optimized materials for intermediate temperature SOFC interconnect and interconnect/electrode interface applications and identify and understand degradation processes in interconnects and at their interfaces with electrodes.

  13. Interconnected semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Grimmer, Derrick P.; Paulson, Kenneth R.; Gilbert, James R.

    1990-10-23

    Semiconductor layer and conductive layer formed on a flexible substrate, divided into individual devices and interconnected with one another in series by interconnection layers and penetrating terminals.

  14. Healing Voids In Interconnections In Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, Edward F.; Lawton, Russell A.; Gavin, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    Unusual heat treatment heals voids in aluminum interconnections on integrated circuits (IC's). Treatment consists of heating IC to temperature between 200 degrees C and 400 degrees C, holding it at that temperature, and then plunging IC immediately into liquid nitrogen. Typical holding time at evaluated temperature is 30 minutes.

  15. Interconnection networks

    DOEpatents

    Faber, V.; Moore, J.W.

    1988-06-20

    A network of interconnected processors is formed from a vertex symmetric graph selected from graphs GAMMA/sub d/(k) with degree d, diameter k, and (d + 1)exclamation/ (d /minus/ k + 1)exclamation processors for each d greater than or equal to k and GAMMA/sub d/(k, /minus/1) with degree d /minus/ 1, diameter k + 1, and (d + 1)exclamation/(d /minus/ k + 1)exclamation processors for each d greater than or equal to k greater than or equal to 4. Each processor has an address formed by one of the permutations from a predetermined sequence of letters chosen a selected number of letters at a time, and an extended address formed by appending to the address the remaining ones of the predetermined sequence of letters. A plurality of transmission channels is provided from each of the processors, where each processor has one less channel than the selected number of letters forming the sequence. Where a network GAMMA/sub d/(k, /minus/1) is provided, no processor has a channel connected to form an edge in a direction delta/sub 1/. Each of the channels has an identification number selected from the sequence of letters and connected from a first processor having a first extended address to a second processor having a second address formed from a second extended address defined by moving to the front of the first extended address the letter found in the position within the first extended address defined by the channel identification number. The second address is then formed by selecting the first elements of the second extended address corresponding to the selected number used to form the address permutations. 9 figs.

  16. Platinum-Enhanced Electron Transfer and Surface Passivation through Ultrathin Film Aluminum Oxide (Al₂O₃) on Si(111)-CH₃ Photoelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hark Jin; Kearney, Kara L; Le, Luc H; Pekarek, Ryan T; Rose, Michael J

    2015-04-29

    We report the preparation, stability, and utility of Si(111)-CH3 photoelectrodes protected with thin films of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The photoelectrodes have been characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), photoelectrochemistry (Fc in MeCN, Fc-OH in H2O), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and cyclic voltammetry (CV) simulation. XPS analysis of the growing Al2O3 layer affords both the thickness, and information regarding two-dimensional versus three-dimensional mode of growth. Impedance measurements on Si(111)|CH3|Al2O3 devices reveal that the nascent films (5-30 Å) exhibit significant capacitance, which is attenuated upon surpassing the bulk threshold (∼30 Å). The Al2O3 layer provides enhanced photoelectrochemical (PEC) stability evidenced by an increase in the anodic window of operation in MeCN (up to +0.5 V vs Ag) and enhanced stability in aqueous electrolyte (up to +0.2 V vs Ag). XPS analysis before and after PEC confirms the Al2O3 layer is persistent and prevents surface corrosion (SiOx). Sweep-rate dependent CVs in MeCN at varying thicknesses exhibit a trend of increasingly broad features, characteristic of slow electron transport kinetics. Simulations were modeled as slow electron transfer through a partially resistive and electroactive Al2O3 layer. Lastly, we find that the Al2O3 ultrathin film serves as a support for the ALD deposition of Pt nanoparticles (d ≈ 8 nm) that enhance electron transfer through the Al2O3 layer. Surface recombination velocity (SRV) measurements on the assembled Si(111)|CH3|Al2O3-15 device affords an S value of 4170 cm s(-1) (τ = 4.2 μs) comparable to the bare Si(111)-CH3 surface (3950 cm s(-1); τ = 4.4 μs). Overall, the results indicate that high electronic quality and low surface defect densities can be retained throughout a multistep assembly of an integrated and passivated semiconductor|thin-film|metal device. PMID:25880534

  17. TRANSITIONS IN ELECTROCHEMICAL NOISE DURING PITTING CORROSION OF ALUMINUM IN CHLORIDE ENVIRONMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    SASAKI,K.; ISAACS,H.S.; LEVY,P.W.

    2001-09-02

    Aluminum, in a chloride containing solutions close to its pitting potential, shows vigorous fluctuations in current and potential. Measurements have been made of the freely corroding potential, and the currents between interconnected electrodes. It is shown that there is a transition in the behavior of the transients. The transition occurs when multiple active pits are present and electrochemical communication occurs between them. The major source of current and potential transients is the growth process in the active pits rather than meta-stable pitting at the passive surface.

  18. Printed Module Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Stockert, Talysa R.; Fields, Jeremy D.; Pach, Gregory F.; Mauger, Scott A.; van Hest, Maikel F. A. M.

    2015-06-14

    Monolithic interconnects in photovoltaic modules connect adjacent cells in series, and are typically formed sequentially involving multiple deposition and scribing steps. Interconnect widths of 500 um every 10 mm result in 5% dead area, which does not contribute to power generation in an interconnected solar panel. This work expands on previous work that introduced an alternative interconnection method capable of producing interconnect widths less than 100 um. The interconnect is added to the module in a single step after deposition of the photovoltaic stack, eliminating the need for scribe alignment. This alternative method can be used for all types of thin film photovoltaic modules. Voltage addition with copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS) solar cells using a 2-scribe printed interconnect approach is demonstrated. Additionally, interconnect widths of 250 um are shown.

  19. An Al@Al2O3@SiO2/polyimide composite with multilayer coating structure fillers based on self-passivated aluminum cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yongcun; Wang, Hong

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate a capability in combining two kinds of nanosize and microsize particles of core-shell Al@Al2O3@SiO2 with aluminum cores to form multilayer coating structures as fillers in polyimide matrix for electronic applications. The core-shell Al@Al2O3@SiO2 structure can effectively adjust the relative permittivity (about 12 @1 MHz) of the composite while keeping lower dielectric loss (0.015 @1 MHz) compared to that uncoated aluminum particles. The combination of "macro" and "micro" coating can significantly improve the dielectric properties of the composites. This work provides a useful method to modify the fillers for polymer matrix nanocomposite materials.

  20. Optical Backplane Interconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Herbert D.

    1991-01-01

    Optical backplane interconnection (OBIT), method of optically interconnecting many parallel outputs from data processor to many parallel inputs of other data processors by optically changing wavelength of output optical beam. Requires only one command: exact wavelength necessary to make connection between two desired processors. Many features, including smallness advantageous to incorporate OBIT into integrated optical device. Simplifies or eliminates wiring and speeds transfer of data over existing electrical or optical interconnections. Computer hookups and fiber-optical communication networks benefit from concept.

  1. Alignability of Optical Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, Russell Scott

    With the continuing drive towards higher speed, density, and functionality in electronics, electrical interconnects become inadequate. Due to optics' high speed and bandwidth, freedom from capacitive loading effects, and freedom from crosstalk, optical interconnects can meet more stringent interconnect requirements. But, an optical interconnect requires additional components, such as an optical source and detector, lenses, holographic elements, etc. Fabrication and assembly of an optical interconnect requires precise alignment of these components. The successful development and deployment of optical interconnects depend on how easily the interconnect components can be aligned and/or how tolerant the interconnect is to misalignments. In this thesis, a method of quantitatively specifying the relative difficulty of properly aligning an optical interconnect is described. Ways of using this theory of alignment to obtain design and packaging guidelines for optical interconnects are examined. The measure of the ease with which an optical interconnect can be aligned, called the alignability, uses the efficiency of power transfer as a measure of alignment quality. The alignability is related to interconnect package design through the overall cost measure, which depends upon various physical parameters of the interconnect, such as the cost of the components and the time required for fabrication and alignment. Through a mutual dependence on detector size, the relationship between an interconnect's alignability and its bandwidth, signal-to-noise ratio, and bit-error -rate is examined. The results indicate that a range of device sizes exists for which given performance threshold values are satisfied. Next, the alignability of integrated planar-optic backplanes is analyzed in detail. The resulting data show that the alignability can be optimized by varying the substrate thickness or the angle of reflection. By including the effects of crosstalk, in a multi-channel backplane, the

  2. Perforation patterned electrical interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Frey, Jonathan

    2014-01-28

    This disclosure describes systems and methods for increasing the usable surface area of electrical contacts within a device, such as a thin film solid state device, through the implementation of electrically conductive interconnects. Embodiments described herein include the use of a plurality of electrically conductive interconnects that penetrate through a top contact layer, through one or more multiple layers, and into a bottom contact layer. The plurality of conductive interconnects may form horizontal and vertical cross-sectional patterns. The use of lasers to form the plurality of electrically conductive interconnects from reflowed layer material further aids in the manufacturing process of a device.

  3. Interconnections for fluidic circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangion, C.

    1972-01-01

    Circuit elements are grouped on functional basis in rectangular two-dimensional planar arrays or modules. Another interconnection method brings all connections out to module edge. For smaller fluidic circuits, manifold and interconnections are fabricated as single blocks. Advantages of methods are given.

  4. Solar cell array interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Paul G.; Thompson, Jesse B.; Colella, Nicolas J.; Williams, Kenneth A.

    1995-01-01

    Electrical interconnects for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb-Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb-Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value.

  5. Solar cell array interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Carey, P.G.; Thompson, J.B.; Colella, N.J.; Williams, K.A.

    1995-11-14

    Electrical interconnects are disclosed for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb-Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb-Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value. 4 figs.

  6. Micro-fluidic interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Galambos, Paul C.; Benavides, Gilbert L.; Hetherington, Dale L.

    2006-02-28

    An apparatus for simultaneously aligning and interconnecting microfluidic ports is presented. Such interconnections are required to utilize microfluidic devices fabricated in Micro-Electromechanical-Systems (MEMS) technologies, that have multiple fluidic access ports (e.g. 100 micron diameter) within a small footprint, (e.g. 3 mm.times.6 mm). Fanout of the small ports of a microfluidic device to a larger diameter (e.g. 500 microns) facilitates packaging and interconnection of the microfluidic device to printed wiring boards, electronics packages, fluidic manifolds etc.

  7. Thin film interconnect processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Farid

    Interconnects and associated photolithography and etching processes play a dominant role in the feature shrinkage of electronic devices. Most interconnects are fabricated by use of thin film processing techniques. Planarization of dielectrics and novel metal deposition methods are the focus of current investigations. Spin-on glass, polyimides, etch-back, bias-sputtered quartz, and plasma-enhanced conformal films are being used to obtain planarized dielectrics over which metal films can be reliably deposited. Recent trends have been towards chemical vapor depositions of metals and refractory metal silicides. Interconnects of the future will be used in conjunction with planarized dielectric layers. Reliability of devices will depend to a large extent on the quality of the interconnects.

  8. Stress-induced voiding study in integrated circuit interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yuejin; Tan, Cher Ming

    2008-07-01

    An analytical equation for an ultralarge-scale integration interconnect lifetime due to stress-induced voiding (SIV) is derived from the energy perspective. It is shown that the SIV lifetime is strongly dependent on the passivation quality at the cap layer/interconnect interface, the confinement effect by the surrounding materials to the interconnects, and the available diffusion paths in the interconnects. Contrary to the traditional power-law creep model, we find that the temperature exponent in SIV lifetime formulation is determined by the available diffusion paths for the interconnect atoms and the interconnect geometries. The critical temperature for the SIV is found to be independent of passivation integrity and dielectric confinement effect. Actual stress-free temperature (SFT) during the SIV process is also found to be different from the dielectric/cap layer deposition temperature or the final annealing temperature of the metallization, and it can be evaluated analytically once the activation energy, temperature exponent and critical temperature are determined experimentally. The smaller actual SFT indicates that a strong stress relaxation occurs before the high temperature storage test. Our results show that our SIV lifetime model can be used to predict the SIV lifetime in nano-interconnects.

  9. Zee electrical interconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, Thomas M. (Inventor); Gaddy, Edward M. (Inventor); Herriage, Michael J. (Inventor); Patterson, Robert E. (Inventor); Partin, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An interconnect, having some length, that reliably connects two conductors separated by the length of the interconnect when the connection is made but in which one length if unstressed would change relative to the other in operation. The interconnect comprises a base element an intermediate element and a top element. Each element is rectangular and formed of a conducting material and has opposed ends. The elements are arranged in a generally Z-shape with the base element having one end adapted to be connected to one conductor. The top element has one end adapted to be connected to another conductor and the intermediate element has its ends disposed against the other end of the base and the top element. Brazes mechanically and electrically interconnect the intermediate element to the base and the top elements proximate the corresponding ends of the elements. When the respective ends of the base and the top elements are connected to the conductors, an electrical connection is formed therebetween, and when the conductors are relatively moved or the interconnect elements change length the elements accommodate the changes and the associated compression and tension forces in such a way that the interconnect does not mechanically fatigue.

  10. Release Resistant Electrical Interconnections For Mems Devices

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Garrett, Stephen E.; Reber, Cathleen A.

    2005-02-22

    A release resistant electrical interconnection comprising a gold-based electrical conductor compression bonded directly to a highly-doped polysilicon bonding pad in a MEMS, IMEMS, or MOEMS device, without using any intermediate layers of aluminum, titanium, solder, or conductive adhesive disposed in-between the conductor and polysilicon pad. After the initial compression bond has been formed, subsequent heat treatment of the joint above 363 C creates a liquid eutectic phase at the bondline comprising gold plus approximately 3 wt % silicon, which, upon re-solidification, significantly improves the bond strength by reforming and enhancing the initial bond. This type of electrical interconnection is resistant to chemical attack from acids used for releasing MEMS elements (HF, HCL), thereby enabling the use of a "package-first, release-second" sequence for fabricating MEMS devices. Likewise, the bond strength of an Au--Ge compression bond may be increased by forming a transient liquid eutectic phase comprising Au-12 wt % Ge.

  11. Aluminum Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    Aluminum hydroxide is used for the relief of heartburn, sour stomach, and peptic ulcer pain and to ... Aluminum hydroxide comes as a capsule, a tablet, and an oral liquid and suspension. The dose and ...

  12. SOFC INTERCONNECT DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Diane M. England

    2004-03-16

    An interconnect for an SOFC stack is used to connect fuel cells into a stack. SOFC stacks are expected to run for 40,000 hours and 10 thermal cycles for the stationary application and 10,000 hours and 7000 thermal cycles for the transportation application. The interconnect of a stack must be economical and robust enough to survive the SOFC stack operation temperature of 750 C and must maintain the electrical connection to the fuel cells throughout the lifetime and under thermal cycling conditions. Ferritic and austenitic stainless steels, and nickel-based superalloys were investigated as possible interconnect materials for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. The alloys were thermally cycled in air and in a wet nitrogen-argon-hydrogen (N2-Ar-H2-H2O) atmosphere. Thermogravimetry was used to determine the parabolic oxidation rate constants of the alloys in both atmospheres. The area-specific resistance of the oxide scale and metal substrates were measured using a two-probe technique with platinum contacts. The study identifies two new interconnect designs which can be used with both bonded and compressive stack sealing mechanisms. The new interconnect designs offer a solution to chromium vaporization, which can lead to degradation of some (chromium-sensitive) SOFC cathodes.

  13. Welded solar cell interconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stofel, E. J.; Browne, E. R.; Meese, R. A.; Vendura, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The efficiency of the welding of solar-cell interconnects is compared with the efficiency of soldering such interconnects, and the cases in which welding may be superior are examined. Emphasis is placed on ultrasonic welding; attention is given to the solar-cell welding machine, the application of the welding process to different solar-cell configurations, producibility, and long-life performance of welded interconnects. Much of the present work has been directed toward providing increased confidence in the reliability of welding using conditions approximating those that would occur with large-scale array production. It is concluded that there is as yet insufficient data to determine which of three methods (soldering, parallel gap welding, and ultrasonic welding) provides the longest-duration solar panel life.

  14. SOFC INTERCONNECT DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Diane M. England

    2003-06-06

    This report summarizes the interconnect work being performed at Delphi. Materials were chosen for this interconnect project were chosen from ferritic and austenitic stainless steels, and nickel-based superalloys. The alloys are thermally cycled in air and a wet hydrogen atmosphere. The oxide scale adherence, electrical resistance and oxidation resistance are determined after long-term oxidation of each alloy. The oxide scale adherence will be observed using a scanning electron microscope. The electrical resistance of the oxidized alloys will be determined using an electrical resistance measurement apparatus which has been designed and is currently being built. Data from the electrical resistance measurement is expected to be provided in the second quarter.

  15. Open Systems Interconnection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denenberg, Ray

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the need for standards allowing computer-to-computer communication and gives examples of technical issues. The seven-layer framework of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) Reference Model is explained and illustrated. Sidebars feature public data networks and Recommendation X.25, OSI standards, OSI layer functions, and a glossary.…

  16. Coplanar interconnection module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steward, R. D.; Windsor, H. F.

    1970-01-01

    Module for interconnecting a semiconductor array to external leads or components incorporates a metal external heat sink for cooling the array. Heat sink, extending down from the molded block that supports the array, is immersed in a liquid nitrogen bath which is designed to maintain the desired array temperature.

  17. Interconnecting with VIPs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Interconnectedness changes lives. It can even save lives. Recently the author got to witness and be part of something in his role as a teacher of primary science that has changed lives: it may even have saved lives. It involved primary science teaching--and the climate. Robert Collins describes how it is all interconnected. The "Toilet…

  18. CAISSON: Interconnect Network Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, Paul L.

    2006-01-01

    Cray response to HPCS initiative. Model future petaflop computer interconnect. Parallel discrete event simulation techniques for large scale network simulation. Built on WarpIV engine. Run on laptop and Altix 3000. Can be sized up to 1000 simulated nodes per host node. Good parallel scaling characteristics. Flexible: multiple injectors, arbitration strategies, queue iterators, network topologies.

  19. Capillary interconnect device

    SciTech Connect

    Renzi, Ronald F

    2013-11-19

    An interconnecting device for connecting a plurality of first fluid-bearing conduits to a corresponding plurality of second fluid-bearing conduits thereby providing fluid communication between the first fluid-bearing conduits and the second fluid-bearing conduits. The device includes a manifold and one or two ferrule plates that are held by compressive axial forces.

  20. Fuel cell system with interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Zhien; Goettler, Richard; Delaforce, Philip Mark

    2016-03-08

    The present invention includes a fuel cell system having an interconnect that reduces or eliminates diffusion (leakage) of fuel and oxidant by providing an increased densification, by forming the interconnect as a ceramic/metal composite.

  1. Hydraulically interconnected vehicle suspension: background and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nong; Smith, Wade A.; Jeyakumaran, Jeku

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for the frequency domain analysis of a vehicle fitted with a general hydraulically interconnected suspension (HIS) system. Ideally, interconnected suspensions have the capability, unique among passive systems, to provide stiffness and damping characteristics dependent on the all-wheel suspension mode in operation. A basic, lumped-mass, four-degree-of-freedom half-car model is used to illustrate the proposed methodology. The mechanical-fluid boundary condition in the double-acting cylinders is modelled as an external force on the mechanical system and a moving boundary on the fluid system. The fluid system itself is modelled using the hydraulic impedance method, in which the relationships between the dynamic fluid states, i.e. pressures and flows, at the extremities of a single fluid circuit are determined by the transfer matrix method. A set of coupled, frequency-dependent equations, which govern the dynamics of the integrated half-car system, are then derived and the application of these equations to both free and forced vibration analysis is explained. The fluid system impedance matrix for the two general wheel-pair interconnection types-anti-synchronous and anti-oppositional-is also given. To further outline the application of the proposed methodology, the paper finishes with an example using a typical anti-roll HIS system. The integrated half-car system's free vibration solutions and frequency response functions are then obtained and discussed in some detail. The presented approach provides a scientific basis for investigating the dynamic characteristics of HIS-equipped vehicles, and the results offer further confirmation that interconnected suspension schemes can provide, at least to some extent, individual control of modal stiffness and damping characteristics.

  2. Building interconnected membrane networks.

    PubMed

    Holden, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    Reconstituted replica cell membranes are easily created by contacting two lipid-monolayer-encased aqueous droplets under an oil phase. Called the droplet interface bilayer (DIB), this technique has been used to study a wide range of membrane processes. Importantly, this method is compatible with electrical measurements, meaning that membrane protein activities are easily observed in DIBs. By positioning droplets in two- and three-dimensional networks, sophisticated interconnected systems can be created that possess collective properties. The methods described here summarize the approaches used to create DIB networks and how to operate the devices that have been constructed so far.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Interconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Method and system for fabricating an electrical interconnect capable of supporting very high current densities ( 10(exp 6)-10(exp 10) Amps/sq cm), using an array of one or more carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNT array is grown in a selected spaced apart pattern, preferably with multi-wall CNTs, and a selected insulating material, such as SiOw, or SiuNv is deposited using CVD to encapsulate each CNT in the array. An exposed surface of the insulating material is planarized to provide one or more exposed electrical contacts for one or more CNTs.

  4. Aluminum Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumrall, William J.

    1998-01-01

    Presents three problems based on the price of aluminum designed to encourage students to be cooperative and to use an investigative approach to learning. Students collect and synthesize information, analyze results, and draw conclusions. (AIM)

  5. Passive tamper-indicating secure container

    SciTech Connect

    Bartberger, J.C.

    1993-07-01

    This paper describes a passive tamper-indicating secure container that has been designed to demonstrate concepts, features, and materials that can be used in passive container applications. (In a passive security system, physical phenomena provide visual indication of tampering.) The basic container {open_quotes}volume within a volume{close_quotes} assembly consists of a transparent plastic outer container and an aluminum inner container. Both containers incorporate passive, fingerprinted layers as part of the tamper-indicating container system. Many of the tamper-indicating features can be visually inspected without disassembling the container. The status of container development and potential applications for the container are addressed.

  6. Fuel cell system with interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Goettler, Richard; Liu, Zhien

    2015-03-10

    The present invention includes a fuel cell system having a plurality of adjacent electrochemical cells formed of an anode layer, a cathode layer spaced apart from the anode layer, and an electrolyte layer disposed between the anode layer and the cathode layer. The fuel cell system also includes at least one interconnect, the interconnect being structured to conduct free electrons between adjacent electrochemical cells. Each interconnect includes a primary conductor embedded within the electrolyte layer and structured to conduct the free electrons.

  7. Fuel cell system with interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Goettler, Richard; Liu, Zhien

    2015-08-11

    The present invention includes a fuel cell system having a plurality of adjacent electrochemical cells formed of an anode layer, a cathode layer spaced apart from the anode layer, and an electrolyte layer disposed between the anode layer and the cathode layer. The fuel cell system also includes at least one interconnect, the interconnect being structured to conduct free electrons between adjacent electrochemical cells. Each interconnect includes a primary conductor embedded within the electrolyte layer and structured to conduct the free electrons.

  8. Fuel cell system with interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Zhien; Goettler, Richard

    2015-09-29

    The present invention includes a fuel cell system having a plurality of adjacent electrochemical cells formed of an anode layer, a cathode layer spaced apart from the anode layer, and an electrolyte layer disposed between the anode layer and the cathode layer. The fuel cell system also includes at least one interconnect, the interconnect being structured to conduct free electrons between adjacent electrochemical cells. Each interconnect includes a primary conductor embedded within the electrolyte layer and structured to conduct the free electrons.

  9. Policy issues in interconnecting networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiner, Barry M.

    1989-01-01

    To support the activities of the Federal Research Coordinating Committee (FRICC) in creating an interconnected set of networks to serve the research community, two workshops were held to address the technical support of policy issues that arise when interconnecting such networks. The workshops addressed the required and feasible technologies and architectures that could be used to satisfy the desired policies for interconnection. The results of the workshop are documented.

  10. Solar cell welded interconnection development program. [parallel gap and ultrasonic metal-metal bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzeff, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    Parallel gap welding and ultrasonic bonding techniques were developed for joining selected interconnect materials (silver, aluminum, copper, silver plated molybdenum and Kovar) to silver-titanium and aluminum contact cells. All process variables have been evaluated leading to establishment of optimum solar cell, interconnect, electrodes and equipment criteria for obtainment of consistent high quality welds. Applicability of nondestructive testing of solar cell welds has been studied. A pre-weld monitoring system is being built and will be utilized in the numerically controlled parallel gap weld station.

  11. Process for electrically interconnecting electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Paul G.; Thompson, Jesse B.; Colella, Nicolas J.; Williams, Kenneth A.

    2002-01-01

    Electrical interconnects for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb--Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb--Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value.

  12. Polyguide polymeric technology for optical interconnect circuits and components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Bruce L.; Marchegiano, Joseph E.; Chang, Catherine T.; Furmanak, Robert J.; Graham, Douglas M.; Wagner, Richard G.

    1997-04-01

    The expanding information revolution has been made possible by the development of optical communication technology. To meet the escalating demand for information transmitted and processed at high data rates and the need to circumvent the growing electronic circuit bottlenecks, mass deployment of not only optical fiber networks but manufacturable optical interconnect circuits, components and connectors for interfacing fibers and electronics that meet economic and performance constraints are absolutely necessary. Polymeric waveguide optical interconnection are considered increasingly important to meet these market needs. DuPont's polyguide polymeric integrated optic channel waveguide system is thought by many to have considerable potential for a broad range of passive optical interconnect applications. In this paper the recent advances, status, and unique attributes of the technology are reviewed. Product and technology developments currently in progress including parallel optical ink organization and polymer optical interconnect technology developments funded by DARPA are used as examples to describe polyguide breadth and potential for manufacture and deployment of optical interconnection products for single and multimode telecom and datacom waveguide applications.

  13. Aluminum phosphide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Aluminum phosphide ; CASRN 20859 - 73 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  14. Renewable Systems Interconnection: Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Kroposki, B.; Margolis, R.; Kuswa, G.; Torres, J.; Bower, W.; Key, T.; Ton, D.

    2008-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy launched the Renewable Systems Interconnection (RSI) study in 2007 to address the challenges to high penetrations of distributed renewable energy technologies. The RSI study consists of 14 additional reports.

  15. Passive Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J.; Baugher, Charles; Alexander, Iwan

    1992-01-01

    Motion of ball in liquid indicates acceleration. Passive accelerometer measures small accelerations along cylindrical axis. Principle of operation based on Stokes' law. Provides accurate measurements of small quasi-steady accelerations. Additional advantage, automatically integrates out unwanted higher-frequency components of acceleration.

  16. Heat management in aluminum/air batteries: Sources of heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patnaik, R. S. M.; Ganesh, S.; Ashok, G.; Ganesan, M.; Kapali, V.

    1994-07-01

    One of the problems with the aluminum/air battery is the generation of heat, during both idle and discharge periods. The main sources of heat are: (1) corrosion of the aluminum anode during the idle period; (2) inefficient, or less efficient, dissolution of anode during discharge; (3) Joule heat during discharge, and (4) non-uniform mass transfer during both discharge and idle periods. These components of heat act in a cumulative way because they are all interconnected. This paper addresses the basic reasons for the origin of these sources of heat. Suitable and practical remedial measures for the effective removal of such heat in the aluminum/air battery are suggested.

  17. Manufacturing of planar ceramic interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, B.L.; Coffey, G.W.; Meinhardt, K.D.; Armstrong, T.R.

    1996-12-31

    The fabrication of ceramic interconnects for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and separator plates for electrochemical separation devices has been a perennial challenge facing developers. Electrochemical vapor deposition (EVD), plasma spraying, pressing, tape casting and tape calendering are processes that are typically utilized to fabricate separator plates or interconnects for the various SOFC designs and electrochemical separation devices. For sake of brevity and the selection of a planar fuel cell or gas separation device design, pressing will be the only fabrication technique discussed here. This paper reports on the effect of the characteristics of two doped lanthanum manganite powders used in the initial studies as a planar porous separator for a fuel cell cathode and as a dense interconnect for an oxygen generator.

  18. Tolerancing of board-level-free-space optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaleta, David; Patra, Susant; Ozguz, Volkan; Ma, Jian; Lee, Sing H.

    1996-03-01

    For optical interconnects to become a mature technology they must be amenable to electronic packaging technology. Two main obstacles to including free-space optical interconnects are alignment and heat-dissipation issues. Here we study the issues of alignment tolerancing that are due to assembly and manufacturing variations (passive-element tolerancing) over long board-level distances ( greater than 10 cm) for free-space optical interconnects. We also combine these variations with active optoelectronic device variations (active-element tolerancing). We demonstrate a computer-aided analysis procedure that permits one to determine both active-and passive-element tolerances needed to achieve some system-level specification, such as yield or cost. The procedure that we employ relies on developing a detailed design of the system to be studied in a standard optical design program, such as code v. Using information from this model, we can determine the integrated power falling on the detector, which we term optical throughput, by performing Gaussian propagation or general Fresnel propagation (if significant vignetting occurs). This optical throughput can be used to determine system-level performance criteria, such as bit-error rate. With this computer-aided analysis technique, a sensitivity analysis of all the variations under study is made on a system with realistic board-level interconnect distances to find each perturbation's relative effects (with other perturbations set to 0) on the power falling on the detector. This information is used to set initial tolerances for subsequent tolerancing analysis and design runs. A tolerancing analysis by Monte Carlo techniques is applied to determine if the yield or cost (yield is defined as the percentage of systems that have acceptable system performance) is acceptable. With a technique called parametric sampling, a subsequent tolerancing design run can be applied to optimize this yield or cost with little increase in

  19. [Passive smoking].

    PubMed

    Grandjean, E; Weber, A; Fischer, T

    1979-03-01

    Passive smoking is the involuntary inspiration of smoky indoor air. Based on the information available today, it may be assumed that passive smoking normally is no health hazard as far as the classical smoker's diseases (lung cancer, myocardial infarct, etc.) are concerned. Nevertheless, it is probable that irritations caused by tobacco smoke have an unfavorable influence on the health of small children and that of already sick persons. The main problem of passive smoking is annoyance due to odor and irritations of eyes and respiratory organs. Our investigations in a climatic chamber with healthy subjects show that air pollution caused by tobacco smoke as indicated by 5 ppm CO leads to marked eye irritations--objectively as well as subjectively--in 15 to 20% of the subjects. This corresponds to smoking 10 cigarettes per hour in a small room with an air ventilation rate of four times per hour. If air pollution caused by tobacco smoke lies below the level of 2 ppm CO, irritations and annoyance for healthy persons are regarded as low and tolerable. This corresponds to about four cigarettes per hour under the same circumstances.

  20. Optical interconnection techniques for Hypercube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. R.; Bergman, L. A.; Wu, W. H.

    1988-01-01

    Direct free-space optical interconnection techniques are described for the Hypercube concurrent processor machine using a holographic optical element. Computational requirements and optical constraints on implementation are briefly summarized with regard to topology, power consumption, and available technologies. A hybrid lens/HOE approach is described that can support an eight-dimensional cube of 256 nodes.

  1. 47 CFR 64.1401 - Expanded interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... such equipment to connect interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission... interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission facilities (where reasonably feasible) with... interconnection of fiber optic facilities, local exchange carriers shall provide: (1) An interconnection point...

  2. 47 CFR 64.1401 - Expanded interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... such equipment to connect interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission... interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission facilities (where reasonably feasible) with... interconnection of fiber optic facilities, local exchange carriers shall provide: (1) An interconnection point...

  3. 47 CFR 64.1401 - Expanded interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... such equipment to connect interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission... interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission facilities (where reasonably feasible) with... interconnection of fiber optic facilities, local exchange carriers shall provide: (1) An interconnection point...

  4. 47 CFR 64.1401 - Expanded interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... such equipment to connect interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission... interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission facilities (where reasonably feasible) with... interconnection of fiber optic facilities, local exchange carriers shall provide: (1) An interconnection point...

  5. 47 CFR 64.1401 - Expanded interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... such equipment to connect interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission... interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission facilities (where reasonably feasible) with... interconnection of fiber optic facilities, local exchange carriers shall provide: (1) An interconnection point...

  6. Formation of interconnections to microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Matzke, Carolyn M.; Ashby, Carol I. H.; Griego, Leonardo

    2003-07-29

    A method is disclosed to form external interconnections to a microfluidic device for coupling of a fluid or light or both into a microchannel of the device. This method can be used to form optical or fluidic interconnections to microchannels previously formed on a substrate, or to form both the interconnections and microchannels during the same process steps. The optical and fluidic interconnections are formed parallel to the plane of the substrate, and are fluid tight.

  7. High temperature superconductors for computer interconnect applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, B.J.L.

    1994-12-31

    High temperature superconductors, because of their extremely low loss at high frequencies and their high current handling capability, have the potential for use in computer interconnect boards. They offer the potential advantages of high interconnect density, reduced interconnect delays, and higher data rate. Because silicon CMOS circuits dramatically improve in performance at low temperatures, cooled computers may become attractive in the future to capture both the improved interconnect and circuit benefits.

  8. Rivastigmine reverses aluminum-induced behavioral changes in rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aal, Raafat A; Assi, Abdel-Azim A; Kostandy, Botros B

    2011-06-01

    Aluminum, a known neurotoxin, has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Its exposure is associated with impairment in the cholinergic system in the brain. In this study we investigated the behavioral effects of aluminum in rats and the possible effect of rivastigmine, a cholinesterase inhibitor, on the aluminum-induced behavioral changes. Rats were exposed to aluminum chloride (100 mg/kg/day i.p.) for 60 days before the start of behavioral tests. Rivastigmine was given in doses of 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2.5 mg/kg i.p. 60 min before the behavioral tests. Five tests were investigated; open field test, Morris water maze, radial arm maze, passive avoidance test and rota-rod test. Results showed that aluminum exposure was associated with significant reductions in spontaneous locomotor and exploratory activities in open field test and significant impairments in learning and memory in Morris water maze, radial arm maze and passive avoidance tests. The behavioral impairments caused by aluminum were significantly improved by rivastigmine. Neither aluminum alone nor co-treatment with rivastigmine caused any significant alteration of the animals' performance in rota-rod test. The improvements in activity, learning and memory caused by rivastigmine were found to be dose-dependent, and the maximal improvement was encountered with its large dose (2.5 mg/kg). From these results we can conclude that rivastigmine can reverse behavioral deficits caused by aluminum intoxication.

  9. 47 CFR 69.124 - Interconnection charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interconnection charge. 69.124 Section 69.124... Computation of Charges § 69.124 Interconnection charge. (a) Until December 31, 2001, local exchange carriers not subject to price cap regulation shall assess an interconnection charge expressed in dollars...

  10. 47 CFR 51.305 - Interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interconnection. 51.305 Section 51.305 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Additional Obligations of Incumbent Local Exchange Carriers § 51.305 Interconnection. (a) An incumbent...

  11. The performance of multicomputer interconnection networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Daniel A.; Grunwald, Dirk C.

    1987-01-01

    The interdependency of nodes and multicomputer interconnection networks is examined using simple calculations based on the asymptotic properties of queueing networks. Methods are described for choosing interconnection networks that fit individual classes of applications. It is also shown how analytic models can be extended to benchmark existing interconnection networks.

  12. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flap interconnection. 23.701 Section 23.701... Systems § 23.701 Flap interconnection. (a) The main wing flaps and related movable surfaces as a system must— (1) Be synchronized by a mechanical interconnection between the movable flap surfaces that...

  13. 18 CFR 292.306 - Interconnection costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interconnection costs... § 292.306 Interconnection costs. (a) Obligation to pay. Each qualifying facility shall be obligated to pay any interconnection costs which the State regulatory authority (with respect to any...

  14. Flexible interconnects for fuel cell stacks

    DOEpatents

    Lenz, David J.; Chung, Brandon W.; Pham, Ai Quoc

    2004-11-09

    An interconnect that facilitates electrical connection and mechanical support with minimal mechanical stress for fuel cell stacks. The interconnects are flexible and provide mechanically robust fuel cell stacks with higher stack performance at lower cost. The flexible interconnects replace the prior rigid rib interconnects with flexible "fingers" or contact pads which will accommodate the imperfect flatness of the ceramic fuel cells. Also, the mechanical stress of stacked fuel cells will be smaller due to the flexibility of the fingers. The interconnects can be one-sided or double-sided.

  15. Interconnectivity structure of a general interdependent network.

    PubMed

    Van Mieghem, P

    2016-04-01

    A general two-layer network consists of two networks G_{1} and G_{2}, whose interconnection pattern is specified by the interconnectivity matrix B. We deduce desirable properties of B from a dynamic process point of view. Many dynamic processes are described by the Laplacian matrix Q. A regular topological structure of the interconnectivity matrix B (constant row and column sum) enables the computation of a nontrivial eigenmode (eigenvector and eigenvalue) of Q. The latter eigenmode is independent from G_{1} and G_{2}. Such a regularity in B, associated to equitable partitions, suggests design rules for the construction of interconnected networks and is deemed crucial for the interconnected network to show intriguing behavior, as discovered earlier for the special case where B=wI refers to an individual node to node interconnection with interconnection strength w. Extensions to a general m-layer network are also discussed.

  16. Passivity and Dissipativity as Design and Analysis Tools for Networked Control Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Han

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation, several control problems are studied that arise when passive or dissipative systems are interconnected and controlled over a communication network. Since communication networks can impact the systems' stability and performance, there is a need to extend the results on control of passive or dissipative systems to networked…

  17. A study of current transport in superconductor-semiconductor-superconductor niobium/indium arsenide/niobium devices fabricated by passivated chlorine thermal etching of aluminum gallium antimonide/indium arsenide heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellomi, Giovanni L.

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this project has been to investigate the application of an arsenic passivated Chlorine (Cl2) thermal etching of GaSb/AlGaSb/InAs heterostructure, in order to fabricate superconductor/semiconductor Nb/InAs/Nb structures. No temperature window exists in which the AlGaSb is completely removed from the InAs surface (barrier) and the InAs is not attacked by the Chlorine etch (damage). The Cl 2 etch process presents adequate selectivity to fabricate a standard InAs-base transistor, with higher mobility (˜x4) than wet etch fabricated devices. Conversely, due to the peculiarity of the two-particle coherent Andreev scattering, the presence of an AlGaSb barrier (30--50 A) or InAs damage (roughness ˜40--90 A) in the InAs strongly affects the coherent transport. As the Cl2 etching temperature increases, the SN system passes from a tunneling regime (T < 100°C) to a partially coherent diffusive regime (T > 100°C) showing coherent peak in the conductance. Our calculation shows that as coherence length L φ extends in the normal metal, disorder can increase conductance in SN junctions. The results coincide, for T = 0, zero voltage, and Lφ → infinity, with the Andreev conductance as calculated by Beenakker [1]. Coherent transport in Nb/InAs/Nb structures is primarily characterized by the diffusive nature of the single Nb/InAs interface.

  18. Double interconnection fuel cell array

    DOEpatents

    Draper, R.; Zymboly, G.E.

    1993-12-28

    A fuel cell array is made, containing number of tubular, elongated fuel cells which are placed next to each other in rows (A, B, C, D), where each cell contains inner electrodes and outer electrodes, with solid electrolyte between the electrodes, where the electrolyte and outer electrode are discontinuous, having two portions, and providing at least two opposed discontinuities which contain at least two oppositely opposed interconnections contacting the inner electrode, each cell having only three metallic felt electrical connectors which contact surrounding cells, where each row is electrically connected to the other. 5 figures.

  19. Double interconnection fuel cell array

    DOEpatents

    Draper, Robert; Zymboly, Gregory E.

    1993-01-01

    A fuel cell array (10) is made, containing number of tubular, elongated fuel cells (12) which are placed next to each other in rows (A, B, C, D), where each cell contains inner electrodes (14) and outer electrodes (18 and 18'), with solid electrolyte (16 and 16') between the electrodes, where the electrolyte and outer electrode are discontinuous, having two portions, and providing at least two opposed discontinuities which contain at least two oppositely opposed interconnections (20 and 20') contacting the inner electrode (14), each cell (12) having only three metallic felt electrical connectors (22) which contact surrounding cells, where each row is electrically connected to the other.

  20. Aluminum and Young Artists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Thomas

    1980-01-01

    The author suggests a variety of ways in which aluminum and aluminum foil can be used in elementary and junior high art classes: relief drawing and rubbing; printing; repousse; sculpture; mobiles; foil sculpture; and three dimensional design. Sources of aluminum supplies are suggested. (SJL)

  1. Interconnect fatigue design for terrestrial photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mon, G. R.; Moore, D. M.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The results of comprehensive investigation of interconnect fatigue that has led to the definition of useful reliability-design and life-prediction algorithms are presented. Experimental data indicate that the classical strain-cycle (fatigue) curve for the interconnect material is a good model of mean interconnect fatigue performance, but it fails to account for the broad statistical scatter, which is critical to reliability prediction. To fill this shortcoming the classical fatigue curve is combined with experimental cumulative interconnect failure rate data to yield statistical fatigue curves (having failure probability as a parameter) which enable (1) the prediction of cumulative interconnect failures during the design life of an array field, and (2) the unambiguous--ie., quantitative--interpretation of data from field-service qualification (accelerated thermal cycling) tests. Optimal interconnect cost-reliability design algorithms are derived based on minimizing the cost of energy over the design life of the array field.

  2. Gold-based electrical interconnections for microelectronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Garrett, Stephen E.; Reber, Cathleen A.; Watson, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    A method of making an electrical interconnection from a microelectronic device to a package, comprising ball or wedge compression bonding a gold-based conductor directly to a silicon surface, such as a polysilicon bonding pad in a MEMS or IMEMS device, without using layers of aluminum or titanium disposed in-between the conductor and the silicon surface. After compression bonding, optional heating of the bond above 363 C. allows formation of a liquid gold-silicon eutectic phase containing approximately 3% (by weight) silicon, which significantly improves the bond strength by reforming and enhancing the initial compression bond. The same process can be used for improving the bond strength of Au--Ge bonds by forming a liquid Au-12Ge eutectic phase.

  3. Cascade solar cell having conductive interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Borden, Peter G.; Saxena, Ram R.

    1982-10-26

    Direct ohmic contact between the cells in an epitaxially grown cascade solar cell is obtained by means of conductive interconnects formed through grooves etched intermittently in the upper cell. The base of the upper cell is directly connected by the conductive interconnects to the emitter of the bottom cell. The conductive interconnects preferably terminate on a ledge formed in the base of the upper cell.

  4. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Sadoway, Donald R.

    1988-01-01

    A stable reference electrode for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na.sub.3 AlF.sub.6, wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution.

  5. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Sadoway, D.R.

    1988-08-16

    A stable reference electrode is described for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution. 1 fig.

  6. Visualizing interconnections among climate risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K.; Yokohata, T.; Nishina, K.; Takahashi, K.; Emori, S.; Kiguchi, M.; Iseri, Y.; Honda, Y.; Okada, M.; Masaki, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Shigemitsu, M.; Yoshimori, M.; Sueyoshi, T.; Hanasaki, N.; Ito, A.; Sakurai, G.; Iizumi, T.; Nishimori, M.; Lim, W. H.; Miyazaki, C.; Kanae, S.; Oki, T.

    2015-12-01

    It is now widely recognized that climate change is affecting various sectors of the world. Climate change impact on one sector may spread out to other sectors including those seemingly remote, which we call "interconnections of climate risks". While a number of climate risks have been identified in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report (AR5), there has been no attempt to explore their interconnections comprehensively. Here we present a first and most exhaustive visualization of climate risks drawn based on a systematic literature survey. Our risk network diagrams depict that changes in the climate system impact natural capitals (terrestrial water, crop, and agricultural land) as well as social infrastructures, influencing the socio-economic system and ultimately our access to food, water, and energy. Our findings suggest the importance of incorporating climate risk interconnections into impact and vulnerability assessments and call into question the widely used damage function approaches, which address a limited number of climate change impacts in isolation. Furthermore, the diagram is useful to educate decision makers, stakeholders, and general public about cascading risks that can be triggered by the climate change. Socio-economic activities today are becoming increasingly more inter-dependent because of the rapid technological progress, urbanization, and the globalization among others. Equally complex is the ecosystem that is susceptible to climate change, which comprises interwoven processes affecting one another. In the context of climate change, a number of climate risks have been identified and classified according to regions and sectors. These reports, however, did not fully address the inter-relations among risks because of the complexity inherent in this issue. Climate risks may ripple through sectors in the present inter-dependent world, posing a challenge ahead of us to maintain the resilience of the system. It is

  7. The anisotropy of aluminum and aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosford, William F.

    2006-05-01

    The anisotropy of textured aluminum is approximated by a yield criterion with an exponent of eight. The use of this criterion in metal-forming analyses has improved the understanding of the formability of aluminum and other metals. The effect of anisotropy on the limiting drawing ratio in cupping is less than that expected from the quadratic Hill yield criterion and the effect of texture on forming limit diagrams is negligible. A method of predicting the effect of strain-path changes on forming limit curves of aluminum alloy sheets has proven to agree with experiments.

  8. Holographic optical interconnects for VLSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, L. A.; Wu, W. H.; Johnston, A. R.; Nixon, R.; Esener, Sadik C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper introduces new applications and design trade-offs anticipated for free-space optical interconnections of VLSI chips. New implementation s of VLSI functions are described that use the capability of making optical inputs at any point on a chip and take advantage of greater flexibility in on-chip signal routing. These include n-port addressable memories, CPU clock phase distribution, hardware multipliers, and dynamic memory refresh, as well as enhanced testability. Fault tolerance and production yields may be improved by reprogramming the optical imaging system to circumvent defective elements. These attributes, as well as those related to performance alone, will affect the design methodology of future VLSI ICs. This paper focuses on identifying the design issues, their possible solutions, and their impact on VLSI design techniques and, finally, presents some preliminary measurements on various system components.

  9. Holographic optical interconnects for VLSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, L. A.; Wu, W. H.; Johnston, A. R.; Nixon, R.; Esener, Sadik C.

    1986-10-01

    This paper introduces new applications and design trade-offs anticipated for free-space optical interconnections of VLSI chips. New implementation s of VLSI functions are described that use the capability of making optical inputs at any point on a chip and take advantage of greater flexibility in on-chip signal routing. These include n-port addressable memories, CPU clock phase distribution, hardware multipliers, and dynamic memory refresh, as well as enhanced testability. Fault tolerance and production yields may be improved by reprogramming the optical imaging system to circumvent defective elements. These attributes, as well as those related to performance alone, will affect the design methodology of future VLSI ICs. This paper focuses on identifying the design issues, their possible solutions, and their impact on VLSI design techniques and, finally, presents some preliminary measurements on various system components.

  10. Flexible Chip Scale Package and Interconnect for Implantable MEMS Movable Microelectrodes for the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Nathan; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2009-01-01

    We report here a novel approach called MEMS microflex interconnect (MMFI) technology for packaging a new generation of Bio-MEMS devices that involve movable microelectrodes implanted in brain tissue. MMFI addresses the need for (i) operating space for movable parts and (ii) flexible interconnects for mechanical isolation. We fabricated a thin polyimide substrate with embedded bond-pads, vias, and conducting traces for the interconnect with a backside dry etch, so that the flexible substrate can act as a thin-film cap for the MEMS package. A double gold stud bump rivet bonding mechanism was used to form electrical connections to the chip and also to provide a spacing of approximately 15–20 µm for the movable parts. The MMFI approach achieved a chip scale package (CSP) that is lightweight, biocompatible, having flexible interconnects, without an underfill. Reliability tests demonstrated minimal increases of 0.35 mΩ, 0.23 mΩ and 0.15 mΩ in mean contact resistances under high humidity, thermal cycling, and thermal shock conditions respectively. High temperature tests resulted in an increase in resistance of > 90 mΩ when aluminum bond pads were used, but an increase of ~ 4.2 mΩ with gold bond pads. The mean-time-to-failure (MTTF) was estimated to be at least one year under physiological conditions. We conclude that MMFI technology is a feasible and reliable approach for packaging and interconnecting Bio-MEMS devices. PMID:20160981

  11. Chemical Dynamics in Energetic Materials Incorporating Aluminum Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, William K.; Harruff, Barbara A.; Fernando, K. A. Shiral; Smith, Marcus J.; Guliants, Elena A.; Bunker, Christopher E.

    2010-06-01

    Aluminum nanoparticles are widely considered attractive as fuels due to the high heat of reaction associated with their oxidation, and the potential for fast reaction due to their small size. However, the reaction dynamics can also be strongly influenced by the passivation layer that coats the reactive metal surface. Typically, this takes the form of a naturally-occurring oxide shell on the nanoparticle, but other passivation schemes are now available. We have recently developed a sonochemical synthesis procedure to produce aluminum nanoparticles capped with oleic acid. These nanoparticles have an aluminum metal core, some organic-provided oxide, and an organic shell. To investigate the effect of the passivation method on the chemical dynamics in energetic materials, we have studied samples consisting of a mixture of a metal nanoparticle fuel and an ammonium nitrate or ammonium perchlorate oxidizer. The metal fuel is either commercially available oxide-coated aluminum nanoparticles, or the oleic acid-capped nanoparticles. The energetic samples are ignited with an IR laser pulse. Following ignition, the chemical dynamics are studied using visible emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Preliminary results suggest that our Al-oleic acid nanoparticles are able to react more rapidly than those that are conventionally passivated with a naturally-occurring oxide shell. K. A. S. Fernando, M. J. Smith, B. A. Harruff, W. K. Lewis, E. A. Guliants and C. E. Bunker J. Phys. Chem. C, 113, 500 (2009).

  12. Selective broadcast interconnection - A novel scheme for fiber-optic local-area networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marhic, M. E.; Birk, Y.; Tobagi, F. A.

    1985-01-01

    A passive, unswitched scheme is introduced for directly interconnecting N stations, each of which has C transmitters and receivers. Implementations using fiber optics with spatial multiplexing and optionally wavelength multiplexing are discussed. This scheme utilizes the same resources as standard topologies with C parallel buses but outperforms them in two respects: (1) the aggregate throughput is proportional to C squared rather than to C; and (2) the power of each transmitter need reach only N/C, instead of N, receivers.

  13. 47 CFR 101.519 - Interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interconnection. 101.519 Section 101.519 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.519 Interconnection. (a) All...

  14. 47 CFR 101.519 - Interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interconnection. 101.519 Section 101.519 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.519 Interconnection. (a) All...

  15. 47 CFR 90.477 - Interconnected systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Applicants for new land stations to be interconnected with the public switched telephone network must... switched telephone network only after modifying their license. See § 1.929 of this chapter. In all cases a..., 896-901 MHz, and 935-940 MHz, interconnection with the public switched telephone network is...

  16. Stretchable Si Logic Devices with Graphene Interconnects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonho; Jang, Houk; Jang, Bongkyun; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Ahn, Jong-Hyun

    2015-12-16

    Stretchable integrated circuits consisting of ultrathin Si transistors connected by multilayer graphene are demonstrated. Graphene interconnects act as an effective countervailing component to maintain the electrical performance of Si integrated circuits against external strain. Concentration of the applied strain on the graphene interconnect parts can stably protect the Si active devices against applied strains over 10%.

  17. Updating Technical Screens for PV Interconnection: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Coddington, M.; Ellis, A.; Lynn, K.; Razon, A.; Key, T.; Kroposki, B.; Mather, B.; Hill, R.; Nicole, K.; Smith, J.

    2012-08-01

    Solar photovoltaics (PV) is the dominant type of distributed generation (DG) technology interconnected to electric distribution systems in the United States, and deployment of PV systems continues to increase rapidly. Considering the rapid growth and widespread deployment of PV systems in United States electric distribution grids, it is important that interconnection procedures be as streamlined as possible to avoid unnecessary interconnection studies, costs, and delays. Because many PV interconnection applications involve high penetration scenarios, the process needs to allow for a sufficiently rigorous technical evaluation to identify and address possible system impacts. Existing interconnection procedures are designed to balance the need for efficiency and technical rigor for all DG. However, there is an implicit expectation that those procedures will be updated over time in order to remain relevant with respect to evolving standards, technology, and practical experience. Modifications to interconnection screens and procedures must focus on maintaining or improving safety and reliability, as well as accurately allocating costs and improving expediency of the interconnection process. This paper evaluates the origins and usefulness of the capacity penetration screen, offers potential short-term solutions which could effectively allow fast-track interconnection to many PV system applications, and considers longer-term solutions for increasing PV deployment levels in a safe and reliable manner while reducing or eliminating the emphasis on the penetration screen.

  18. 14 CFR 27.674 - Interconnected controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.674 Interconnected controls. Each primary flight control system must provide for safe flight and landing and operate... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interconnected controls. 27.674 Section...

  19. 14 CFR 27.674 - Interconnected controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.674 Interconnected controls. Each primary flight control system must provide for safe flight and landing and operate... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interconnected controls. 27.674 Section...

  20. 14 CFR 27.674 - Interconnected controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.674 Interconnected controls. Each primary flight control system must provide for safe flight and landing and operate... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interconnected controls. 27.674 Section...

  1. 14 CFR 27.674 - Interconnected controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.674 Interconnected controls. Each primary flight control system must provide for safe flight and landing and operate... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interconnected controls. 27.674 Section...

  2. 14 CFR 29.674 - Interconnected controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.674 Interconnected controls. Each primary flight control system must provide for safe flight and landing and operate... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interconnected controls. 29.674 Section...

  3. 14 CFR 29.674 - Interconnected controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.674 Interconnected controls. Each primary flight control system must provide for safe flight and landing and operate... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interconnected controls. 29.674 Section...

  4. 14 CFR 29.674 - Interconnected controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.674 Interconnected controls. Each primary flight control system must provide for safe flight and landing and operate... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interconnected controls. 29.674 Section...

  5. 14 CFR 27.674 - Interconnected controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.674 Interconnected controls. Each primary flight control system must provide for safe flight and landing and operate... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Interconnected controls. 27.674 Section...

  6. 14 CFR 29.674 - Interconnected controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.674 Interconnected controls. Each primary flight control system must provide for safe flight and landing and operate... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interconnected controls. 29.674 Section...

  7. 14 CFR 29.674 - Interconnected controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.674 Interconnected controls. Each primary flight control system must provide for safe flight and landing and operate... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Interconnected controls. 29.674 Section...

  8. Interconnect fatigue design for terrestrial photovoltaic modules

    SciTech Connect

    Mon, G. R.; Moore, D. M.; Ross, Jr., R. G.

    1982-03-01

    Fatigue of solar cell electrical interconnects due to thermal cycling has historically been a major failure mechanism in photovoltaic arrays; the results of a comprehensive investigation of interconnect fatigue that has led to the definition of useful reliability-design and life-prediction algorithms are presented. Experimental data gathered in this study indicate that the classical strain-cycle (fatigue) curve for the interconnect material is a good model of mean interconnect fatigue performance, but it fails to account for the broad statistical scatter, which is critical to reliability prediction. To fill this shortcoming the classical fatigue curve is combined with experimental cumulative interconnect failure rate data to yield statistical fatigue curves (having failure probability as a parameter) which enable: (1) the prediction of cumulative interconnect failures during the design life of an array field; and (2) the unambiguous - i.e., quantitative - interpretation of data from field-service qualification (accelerated thermal cycling) tests. Optimal interconnect cost-reliability design algorithms are derived based on minimizing the cost of energy over the design life of the array field. This procedure yields not only the minimum break-even cost of delivered energy, but also the required degree of interconnect redundancy and an estimate of array power degradation during the design life of the array field. The usefulness of the design algorithms is demonstrated with realistic examples of design optimization, prediction, and service qualification testing.

  9. Interconnections For Stacked Parallel Computer Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johannesson, Richard T.

    1996-01-01

    Concept for interconnecting modules in parallel computers leads to cheaper, smaller, lighter, lower-power computing systems for aerospace, industrial, business, and consumer applications. Computer modules stacked and interconnected in various configurations. Connections among stacks controlled by switching within gateways and/or by addresses on buses.

  10. 47 CFR 95.141 - Interconnection prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interconnection prohibited. 95.141 Section 95.141 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.141 Interconnection prohibited. No...

  11. Tevatron low-beta quadrupole triplet interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Oleck, A.R.; Carson, J.A.; Koepke, K.; Sorenson, D.

    1992-04-01

    Installation of cold iron quadrupole magnets in the Low Beta (Superconducting High-Luminosity) upgrade at Fermilab required a newly designed magnet interconnect. The interconnect design and construction experience is presented. Considered are the connections carrying cryogenic fluids, beam vacuum, insulating vacuum, superconducting bus leads, their insulation and mechanical support. Details of the assembly and assembly experience are presented. 2 refs.

  12. Government Open Systems Interconnection: Profile in Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Kevin L.

    1990-01-01

    Describes the emergence of Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) as it relates to the U.S. Government Open Systems Interconnection Profile (GOSIP); defines GOSIP; and speculates about its future. Challenges facing GOSIP that are related to test policies and procedures, strategic and tactical planning, additional functionality, and international…

  13. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Song, H.; Biaggio-Rocha, S.; Searson, P.

    1991-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of our fundamental research program on passivity and passivity breakdown. During the past three and one half years in this program (including the three year incrementally-funded grant prior to the present grant), we developed and experimentally tested various physical models for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models belong to a general class termed point defects models'' (PDMs), in which the growth and breakdown of passive films are described in terms of the movement of anion and cation vacancies.

  14. Modeling interconnect corners under double patterning misalignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Daijoon; Shin, Youngsoo

    2016-03-01

    Publisher's Note: This paper, originally published on March 16th, was replaced with a corrected/revised version on March 28th. If you downloaded the original PDF but are unable to access the revision, please contact SPIE Digital Library Customer Service for assistance. Interconnect corners should accurately reflect the effect of misalingment in LELE double patterning process. Misalignment is usually considered separately from interconnect structure variations; this incurs too much pessimism and fails to reflect a large increase in total capacitance for asymmetric interconnect structure. We model interconnect corners by taking account of misalignment in conjunction with interconnect structure variations; we also characterize misalignment effect more accurately by handling metal pitch at both sides of a target metal independently. Identifying metal space at both sides of a target metal.

  15. Aspects of aluminum toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Hewitt, C.D.; Savory, J.; Wills, M.R. )

    1990-06-01

    Aluminum is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust. The widespread occurrence of aluminum, both in the environment and in foodstuffs, makes it virtually impossible for man to avoid exposure to this metal ion. Attention was first drawn to the potential role of aluminum as a toxic metal over 50 years ago, but was dismissed as a toxic agent as recently as 15 years ago. The accumulation of aluminum, in some patients with chronic renal failure, is associated with the development of toxic phenomena; dialysis encephalopathy, osteomalacic dialysis osteodystrophy, and an anemia. Aluminum accumulation also occurs in patients who are not on dialysis, predominantly infants and children with immature or impaired renal function. Aluminum has also been implicated as a toxic agent in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, Guamiam amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and parkinsonism-dementia. 119 references.

  16. The high speed interconnect system architecture and operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Steven C.

    The design and operation of a fiber-optic high-speed interconnect system (HSIS) being developed to meet the requirements of future avionics and flight-control hardware with distributed-system architectures are discussed. The HSIS is intended for 100-Mb/s operation of a local-area network with up to 256 stations. It comprises a bus transmission system (passive star couplers and linear media linked by active elements) and network interface units (NIUs). Each NIU is designed to perform the physical, data link, network, and transport functions defined by the ISO OSI Basic Reference Model (1982 and 1983) and incorporates a fiber-optic transceiver, a high-speed protocol based on the SAE AE-9B linear token-passing data bus (1986), and a specialized application interface unit. The operating modes and capabilities of HSIS are described in detail and illustrated with diagrams.

  17. Surface passivation of an implantable semiconductor multielectrode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Steven P.

    1986-12-01

    An effective passivation material was needed for the protection of a semiconductor multielectrode array during long-term bio-implantations. The following properties were required: a large electrical resistivity, a small relative dielectric constant, good adhesion to silicon dioxide and aluminum, impermeability to water and ionic contaminants, chemical stability in water, and a thermal coefficient of expansion compatible with those of aluminum and silicon dioxide. Three materials were examined: Du Pont PI-2555, Accuglass 407, and Diffusion Technology U-1A. The first is a polyimide, and the latter two are polysiloxanes. The latter were found to be permeable to ionic contaminants and eliminated. The polyimide possesses all of the desired properties. Several multielectrode arrays were passivated with polyimide using conventional photolithography and wet etching techniques. These arrays were tested in vitro in a saline solution for thirty days. The aluminum metallization on the multielectrode array was heavily corroded by the saline solution, resulting in changes in the integrated circuits's electrical parameters.

  18. BONDING ALUMINUM METALS

    DOEpatents

    Noland, R.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1961-06-13

    A process is given for bonding aluminum to aluminum. Silicon powder is applied to at least one of the two surfaces of the two elements to be bonded, the two elements are assembled and rubbed against each other at room temperature whereby any oxide film is ruptured by the silicon crystals in the interface; thereafter heat and pressure are applied whereby an aluminum-silicon alloy is formed, squeezed out from the interface together with any oxide film, and the elements are bonded.

  19. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    SciTech Connect

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  20. Fundamental studies on passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.

    1993-06-01

    Using photoelectrochemical impedance and admittance spectroscopies, a fundamental and quantitative understanding of the mechanisms for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal and alloy surfaces in contact with aqueous environments is being developed. A point defect model has been extended to explain the breakdown of passive films, leading to pitting and crack growth and thus development of damage due to localized corrosion.

  1. EPRI PEAC Corp.: Certification Model Program and Interconnection Agreement Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2003-10-01

    Summarizes the work of EPRI PEAC Corp., under contract to DOE's Distribution and Interconnection R&D, to develop a certification model program and interconnection agreement tools to support the interconnection of distributed energy resources.

  2. Carbothermic Aluminum Production Using Scrap Aluminum As A Coolant

    DOEpatents

    LaCamera, Alfred F.

    2002-11-05

    A process for producing aluminum metal by carbothermic reduction of alumina ore. Alumina ore is heated in the presence of carbon at an elevated temperature to produce an aluminum metal body contaminated with about 10-30% by wt. aluminum carbide. Aluminum metal or aluminum alloy scrap then is added to bring the temperature to about 900-1000.degree. C. and precipitate out aluminum carbide. The precipitated aluminum carbide is filtered, decanted, or fluxed with salt to form a molten body having reduced aluminum carbide content.

  3. Synchrotron X-Ray Microdiffraction Studies of Electromigration in Interconnect lines at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai; Kunz, Martin

    2009-05-01

    Synchrotron polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction is a particularly suitable technique to study in situ the effect of electromigration in metal interconnects as add spatial resolution to grain orientation and strain sensitivity. This technique has been extensively used at the Advanced Light Source to monitor changes in aluminum and copper interconnect test structures while high-density current is passed into them during accelerated tests at elevated temperature. One of the principal findings is the observation of electromigration-induced plasticity in the metal lines that appear during the very early stages of electromigration. In some of the lines, high density of geometrically necessary dislocation are formed leading to additional diffusion paths causing an enhancement of electromigration effect at test temperature. This paper presents an overview of the principal results obtained from X-ray microdiffraction studies of electromigration effects on aluminum and copper interconnects at the ALS throughout continuous efforts that spanned over a decade (1998-2008) from approximately 40 weeks of combined beamtime.

  4. Metastable nanosized aluminum powder as a reactant in energetic formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.; Tepper, F.; Ivanov, G.V.; Lerner, M.I.; Davidovich, V.

    1998-12-01

    Aluminum powder is an important ingredient in many propellant, explosives and pyrotechnic applications. The production of nanosized aluminum powder by the electroexplosion of metal wire has been practices in the former USSR since the mid 1970`s. Differential scanning calorimetry, differential thermal analysis and x-ray phase analysis was performed on aluminum powder both before and after air passivation, as well as aluminum that was protected under kerosene, pentane, toluene and hexane. Earlier Soviet reports of unexplained thermal releases and metastable behavior have been investigated. Anomalous behavior previously reported included phase transformations at temperatures far below melting with the release of heat and chemoluminescence and self sintering of particles with a heat release large enough to melt the powders.

  5. MTBE OXIDATION BY BIFUNCTIONAL ALUMINUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bifunctional aluminum, prepared by sulfating zero-valent aluminum with sulfuric acid, has a dual functionality of simultaneously decomposing both reductively- and oxidatively-degradable contaminants. In this work, the use of bifunctional aluminum for the degradation of methyl te...

  6. Tropospheric Passive Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keafer, L. S., Jr. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The long term role of airborne/spaceborne passive remote sensing systems for tropospheric air quality research and the identification of technology advances required to improve the performance of passive remote sensing systems were discussed.

  7. Interconnection of VSAT and public data networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Angel; Solana, Jesus; Berberana, Ignacio; Jimenez, Jose

    1991-10-01

    Technology advancements have made it possible to think of Very Small Aperture Terminals (VSAT) networks as a good technical alternative for WAN's development. With the foreseen single European market and the legal frame changes expected a rapid development of these systems is likely. A draft of standards for the interconnection of VSAT systems to Packet Switched Public Data Network (PSPDN's) has been issued in such an environment. An experiment with a two way VSAT system is being performed. The experiment covers several topics including sizing availability and reliability. Those related to the interconnection to the Spanish PSPDN, IBERPAC; interconnection scenarios, connection quality requirements, addressing and facilities are considered.

  8. High energy density aluminum battery

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Gilbert M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Dudney, Nancy J.; Manthiram, Arumugan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Hansan

    2016-10-11

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for a high energy density aluminum battery. The battery comprises an anode comprising aluminum metal. The battery further comprises a cathode comprising a material capable of intercalating aluminum or lithium ions during a discharge cycle and deintercalating the aluminum or lithium ions during a charge cycle. The battery further comprises an electrolyte capable of supporting reversible deposition and stripping of aluminum at the anode, and reversible intercalation and deintercalation of aluminum or lithium at the cathode.

  9. Method for fabricating an interconnected array of semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Grimmer, Derrick P.; Paulson, Kenneth R.; Gilbert, James R.

    1989-10-10

    Semiconductor layer and conductive layer formed on a flexible substrate, divided into individual devices and interconnected with one another in series by interconnection layers and penetrating terminals.

  10. Interlanguage Passive Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simargool, Nirada

    2008-01-01

    Because the appearance of the passive construction varies cross linguistically, differences exist in the interlanguage (IL) passives attempted by learners of English. One such difference is the widely studied IL pseudo passive, as in "*new cars must keep inside" produced by Chinese speakers. The belief that this is a reflection of L1 language…

  11. Is the Aluminum Hypothesis Dead?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Aluminum Hypothesis, the idea that aluminum exposure is involved in the etiology of Alzheimer disease, dates back to a 1965 demonstration that aluminum causes neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of rabbits. Initially the focus of intensive research, the Aluminum Hypothesis has gradually been abandoned by most researchers. Yet, despite this current indifference, the Aluminum Hypothesis continues to attract the attention of a small group of scientists and aluminum continues to be viewed with concern by some of the public. This review article discusses reasons that mainstream science has largely abandoned the Aluminum Hypothesis and explores a possible reason for some in the general public continuing to view aluminum with mistrust. PMID:24806729

  12. Is the Aluminum Hypothesis dead?

    PubMed

    Lidsky, Theodore I

    2014-05-01

    The Aluminum Hypothesis, the idea that aluminum exposure is involved in the etiology of Alzheimer disease, dates back to a 1965 demonstration that aluminum causes neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of rabbits. Initially the focus of intensive research, the Aluminum Hypothesis has gradually been abandoned by most researchers. Yet, despite this current indifference, the Aluminum Hypothesis continues to attract the attention of a small group of scientists and aluminum continues to be viewed with concern by some of the public. This review article discusses reasons that mainstream science has largely abandoned the Aluminum Hypothesis and explores a possible reason for some in the general public continuing to view aluminum with mistrust.

  13. Anodizing Aluminum with Frills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doeltz, Anne E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    "Anodizing Aluminum" (previously reported in this journal) describes a vivid/relevant laboratory experience for general chemistry students explaining the anodizing of aluminum in sulfuric acid and constrasting it to electroplating. Additions to this procedure and the experiment in which they are used are discussed. Reactions involved are also…

  14. Aluminum space frame technology

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, S.

    1994-01-01

    This article examines the increased application of aluminum to the construction of automobile frames. The topics of the article include a joint venture between Audi and Alcoa, forms in which aluminum is used, new alloys and construction methods, meeting rigidity and safety levels, manufacturing techniques, the use of extrusions, die casting, joining techniques, and pollution control during manufacturing.

  15. Aluminum structural applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, G.

    1996-05-01

    Extensive research by aluminum producers and automakers in the 1980s resulted in the development of technologies that enable building of aluminum cars that meet and exceed all the expectations of today`s drivers and passengers, yet weigh several hundred pounds less than their steel counterparts. The Acura NSX sports car, the Audi A8, and the Jaguar XJ220 have all been introduced. Ford has built 40 aluminum-intensive automobiles based on the Taurus/Sable for test purposes, and General Motors recently announced an aluminum-structured electric vehicle. The design flexibility that aluminum allows is shown by these examples. Each uses a somewhat different technology that is particularly suited to the vehicle and its market.

  16. The Aluminum Smelting Process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The metal's flexibility for shaping and extruding has led to architectural advances in energy-saving building construction. The high strength-to-weight ratio has meant a substantial reduction in energy consumption for trucks and other vehicles. The aluminum industry is therefore a pivotal one for ecological sustainability and strategic for technological development. PMID:24806722

  17. The aluminum smelting process.

    PubMed

    Kvande, Halvor

    2014-05-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The metal's flexibility for shaping and extruding has led to architectural advances in energy-saving building construction. The high strength-to-weight ratio has meant a substantial reduction in energy consumption for trucks and other vehicles. The aluminum industry is therefore a pivotal one for ecological sustainability and strategic for technological development.

  18. [Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.

    1993-07-01

    We developed and experimentally tested physical models for growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models are ``point defect models,`` in which the growth and breakdown are described in terms of movement of anion and cation vacancies. The work during the past 5 years resulted in: theory of growth and breakdown of passive films, theory of corrosion-resistant alloys, electronic structure of passive films, and estimation of damage functions for energy systems. Proposals are give for the five ongoing tasks. 10 figs.

  19. Traffic congestion in interconnected complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Fei; Wu, Jiajing; Xia, Yongxiang; Tse, Chi K.

    2014-06-01

    Traffic congestion in isolated complex networks has been investigated extensively over the last decade. Coupled network models have recently been developed to facilitate further understanding of real complex systems. Analysis of traffic congestion in coupled complex networks, however, is still relatively unexplored. In this paper, we try to explore the effect of interconnections on traffic congestion in interconnected Barabási-Albert scale-free networks. We find that assortative coupling can alleviate traffic congestion more readily than disassortative and random coupling when the node processing capacity is allocated based on node usage probability. Furthermore, the optimal coupling probability can be found for assortative coupling. However, three types of coupling preferences achieve similar traffic performance if all nodes share the same processing capacity. We analyze interconnected Internet autonomous-system-level graphs of South Korea and Japan and obtain similar results. Some practical suggestions are presented to optimize such real-world interconnected networks accordingly.

  20. Recent Development of SOFC Metallic Interconnect

    SciTech Connect

    Wu JW, Liu XB

    2010-04-01

    Interest in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) stems from their higher e±ciencies and lower levels of emitted pollu- tants, compared to traditional power production methods. Interconnects are a critical part in SOFC stacks, which connect cells in series electrically, and also separate air or oxygen at the cathode side from fuel at the anode side. Therefore, the requirements of interconnects are the most demanding, i:e:, to maintain high elec- trical conductivity, good stability in both reducing and oxidizing atmospheres, and close coe±cient of thermal expansion (CTE) match and good compatibility with other SOFC ceramic components. The paper reviewed the interconnect materials, and coatings for metallic interconnect materials.

  1. Implementation of optical interconnections for VLSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Wennie H.; Bergman, Larry A.; Johnston, Alan R.; Guest, Clark C.; Esener, Sadik C.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on the progress in implementing optical interconnections for VLSI. Four areas are covered: (1) the holographic optical element (HOE), (2) the laser sources, (3) the detectors and associated circuits forming an optically addressed gate, and (4) interconnection experiments in which five gates are actuated from one source. A laser scanner system with a resolution of 12 x 20 microns has been utilized to generate the HOEs. Diffraction efficiency of the HOE and diffracted spot size have been measured. Stock lasers have been modified with a high-frequency package for interconnect experiments, and buried heterostructure fabrication techniques have been pursued. Measurements have been made on the fabricated photodetectors to determine dark current, responsivity, and response time. The optical gates and the overall chip have been driven successfully with an input light beam, as well as with the optical signal interconnected through the one to five holograms.

  2. One-dimensional nano-interconnection formation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jianlong; Zhou, Zhaoying; Yang, Xing; Zhang, Wendong; Sang, Shengbo; Li, Pengwei

    2013-09-23

    Interconnection of one-dimensional nanomaterials such as nanowires and carbon nanotubes with other parts or components is crucial for nanodevices to realize electrical contacts and mechanical fixings. Interconnection has been being gradually paid great attention since it is as significant as nanomaterials properties, and determines nanodevices performance in some cases. This paper provides an overview of recent progress on techniques that are commonly used for one-dimensional interconnection formation. In this review, these techniques could be categorized into two different types: two-step and one-step methods according to their established process. The two-step method is constituted by assembly and pinning processes, while the one-step method is a direct formation process of nano-interconnections. In both methods, the electrodeposition approach is illustrated in detail, and its potential mechanism is emphasized.

  3. Epidemics in interconnected small-world networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Li, Daqing; Qin, Pengju; Liu, Chaoran; Wang, Huijuan; Wang, Feilong

    2015-01-01

    Networks can be used to describe the interconnections among individuals, which play an important role in the spread of disease. Although the small-world effect has been found to have a significant impact on epidemics in single networks, the small-world effect on epidemics in interconnected networks has rarely been considered. Here, we study the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) model of epidemic spreading in a system comprising two interconnected small-world networks. We find that the epidemic threshold in such networks decreases when the rewiring probability of the component small-world networks increases. When the infection rate is low, the rewiring probability affects the global steady-state infection density, whereas when the infection rate is high, the infection density is insensitive to the rewiring probability. Moreover, epidemics in interconnected small-world networks are found to spread at different velocities that depend on the rewiring probability.

  4. INTERCONNECTIONS BETWEEN HUMAN HEALTH AND ECOLOGICAL INTEGRITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interconnections between Human Health and Ecological Integrity emanates from a June 2000 Pellston Workshop in Snowbird, Utah, USA. Jointly sponsored by the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) and the Society of Toxicology (SOT), the workshop was motivated by...

  5. Selective Broadcast Interconnection (sbi) For Wideband Fiber-Optic Local Area Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birk, Yitzhak; Marhic, Michel E.; Tobagi, Fouad A.

    1986-07-01

    The selective broadcast interconnection (SBI) is a scheme for directly interconnecting transmitting stations, each equipped with CT transmitters, and receiving stations, each equipped with CR receivers, such that each transmitting station is always connected to all receiving stations through passive communication channels with no intermediate switches. S BI consists of CT CR separate broadcast subnetworks, each of which interconnects a subset of transmitting stations and a subset of receiving stations, such that each transmitting station and receiving station are interconnected through a single subnetwork. Each subnetwork is shared by its transmitting members via some multiple-access scheme. Comparing S B I with CT=CR=C with the use of C broadcast buses, each connecting all transmitting stations to all receiving stations, one finds that in some cases, including that of equal single-destination traffic requirements for all source-destination pairs, the aggregate throughput with S B I can be higher by a factor of C, while the stations' hardware is the same. For nonuniform traffic requirements, however, the maximum aggregate throughput with S B 1 can be C times lower (in extreme situations). For fiber-optic implementations employing a central wiring closet, the two schemes require the same amount of fiber and, if the same elementary couplers are used to construct the required star couplers, SBI requires fewer couplers. Clearly, the same number of couplers and up to C times more fibers may be required for S B I in a linear-bus implementation. In all cases, transmitter power need only reach N/C receivers with S B I (instead of N with C parallel buses); this allows to accommodate a larger number of stations when implementing the interconnection with passive components.

  6. Five-Segment Interconnection For Electromigration Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannaman, David J.; Buehler, Martin G.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed integrated-circuit conductive pattern intended for use in electromigration lifetime testing of interconnection lines of integrated circuits. Designed for collection of statistics on electromigration from smallest possible area. Includes 5 interconnection segments with Kelvin voltage taps, with total of 12 contact pads, and provides for simultaneous measurements on all of segments. Attempts to minimize thermal gradients within each segment and conforms to guidelines on electromigration test structures promulgated by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  7. Extended Range Passive Wireless Tag System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Kennedy, Timothy F. (Inventor); Lin, Gregory Y. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A passive wireless tag assembly comprises a plurality of antennas and transmission lines interconnected with circuitry and constructed and arranged in a Van Atta array or configuration to reflect an interrogator signal in the direction from where it came. The circuitry may comprise at least one surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based circuit that functions as a signal reflector and is operatively connected with an information circuit. In another embodiment, at least one delay circuit and/or at least one passive modulation circuit(s) are utilized. In yet another embodiment, antennas connected to SAW-based devices are mounted to at least one of the orthogonal surfaces of a corner reflector.

  8. Synchrotron X-Ray Microdiffraction Studies of Electromigration in Interconnect lines at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai; Kunz, Martin

    2009-12-01

    Synchrotron polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction is a particularly suitable technique to study in situ the effect of electromigration in metal interconnects as add spatial resolution to grain orientation and strain sensitivity. This technique has been extensively used at the Advanced Light Source to monitor changes in aluminum and copper interconnect test structures while high-density current is passed into them during accelerated tests at elevated temperature. One of the principal findings is the observation of electromigration-induced plasticity in the metal lines that appear during the very early stages of electromigration. In some of the lines, high density of geometrically necessary dislocation are formed leading to additional diffusion paths causing an enhancement of electromigration effect at test temperature.

  9. Clinical biochemistry of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    King, S.W.; Savory, J.; Wills, M.R.

    1981-05-01

    Aluminum toxicity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of clinical disorders in patients with chronic renal failure on long-term intermittent hemodialysis treatment. The predominant disorders have been those involving either bone (osteomalacic dialysis osteodystrophy) or brain (dialysis encephalopathy). In nonuremic patients, an increased brain aluminum concentration has been implicated as a neurotoxic agent in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and was associated with experimental neurofibrillary degeneration in animals. The brain aluminum concentrations of patients dying with the syndrome of dialysis encephalopathy (dialysis dementia) are significantly higher than in dialyzed patients without the syndrome and in nondialyzed patients. Two potential sources for the increased tissue content of aluminum in patients on hemodialysis have been proposed: (1) intestinal absorption from aluminum containing phosphate-binding gels, and (2) transfer across the dialysis membrane from aluminum in the water used to prepare the dialysate. These findings, coupled with our everyday exposure to the ubiquitous occurrence of aluminum in nature, have created concerns over the potential toxicity of this metal.

  10. Susceptibility of Aluminum Alloys to Corrosion in Simulated Fuel Blends Containing Ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Jeffery K; Pawel, Steven J; Wilson, Dane F

    2013-01-01

    The compatibility of aluminum and aluminum alloys with synthetic fuel blends comprised of ethanol and reference fuel C (a 50/50 mix of toluene and iso-octane) was examined as a function of water content and temperature. Commercially pure wrought aluminum and several cast aluminum alloys were observed to be similarly susceptible to substantial corrosion in dry (< 50 ppm water) ethanol. Corrosion rates of all the aluminum materials examined was accelerated by increased temperature and ethanol content in the fuel mixture, but inhibited by increased water content. Pretreatments designed to stabilize passive films on aluminum increased the incubation time for onset of corrosion, suggesting film stability is a significant factor in the mechanism of corrosion.

  11. Purifying Aluminum by Vacuum Distillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Proposed method for purifying aluminum employs one-step vacuum distillation. Raw material for process impure aluminum produced in electrolysis of aluminum ore. Impure metal melted in vacuum. Since aluminum has much higher vapor pressure than other constituents, boils off and condenses on nearby cold surfaces in proportions much greater than those of other constituents.

  12. Committed regional electrical interconnection projects in the Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    Azzam, M.; Al-Said, A.

    1994-12-01

    Due to the well-known advantages of electrical interconnections and their consequent benefits, Jordan considers the interconnection of its electrical network with the neighboring electrical networks as one of its main corporate strategies. At present the electrical interconnection project of the networks of Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Syria, and Turkey is progressing. To achieve this interconnection project, two feasibility studies were conducted: interconnection of the Egyptian and Jordanian electrical power systems; interconnection of the electrical networks of Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Syria, and Turkey (EIJST interconnection). This presentation reviews these studies and their results.

  13. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  14. Walnut Hulls Clean Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colberg, W. R.; Gordon, G. H.; Jackson, C. H.

    1984-01-01

    Hulls inflict minimal substrate damage. Walnut hulls found to be best abrasive for cleaning aluminum surfaces prior to painting. Samples blasted with walnut hulls showed no compressive stress of surface.

  15. 76 FR 39870 - PJM Interconnection, LLC; PJM Power Providers Group v. PJM Interconnection, LLC; Notice of Date...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission PJM Interconnection, LLC; PJM Power Providers Group v. PJM Interconnection... applicability of the PJM Interconnection, LLC (PJM) Minimum Offer Price Rule (MOPR) as it relates to self-supply... base residual auction.\\2\\ \\1\\ PJM Interconnection, LLC, 135 FERC ] 61,022 (2011). \\2\\...

  16. Corrosion Protection of Aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R. S.; Nelson, W. B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred.

  17. CORROSION PROTECTION OF ALUMINUM

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R.S.; Nelson, W.B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred. (D.C.W.)

  18. Light weight aluminum optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catura, R. C.; Vieira, J. R.

    1985-09-01

    Light weight mirror blanks were fabricated by dip-brazing a core of low mass aluminum foam material to thin face sheets of solid aluminum. The blanks weigh 40% of an equivalent size solid mirror and were diamond turned to provide reflective surfaces. Optical interferometry was used to assess their dimensional stability over 7 months. No changes in flatness are observed (to the sensitivity of the measurements of a half wavelength of red light).

  19. Evolution of intrachip interconnects and performance constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caignet, Fabrice; Collet, Jacques H.; Sellaye, F.

    2003-04-01

    This work aims at defining the marks that optoelectronic solutions will have to beat for replacing electric interconnects at chip level. Thus, we first anlayze the communication performance of future electrical interconnects considering the reduction of the lithographic feature size λ from 0.7 to 0.05 μm. We mostly analyze the results with reduced units: Lengths are calculated in multiples of λ times are compared to the chip clock cycle Tc that we estimate from the foreseeable evolution of the processor operation frequency. From our simulations, we conclude that: 1) it does not seem necessary to consider the integration of optical interconnects (OI) over distance shorter than 1000λ, because the performacne of electric interconnects is sufficient; 2) The penetration of IOs between blocks separated by more than 10λ could be envisaged provided that the present performence of OIs could be dramatically improved to beat electric solutions at chip level. New generations of low-threshold high-effieincy VCSELs and ultra-fast high-efficiency photodiode are needed; 3) The first possible application of OIs in chips is likely not for inter-block communication but for clock distribution as the energy constaints are weaker and because the clock tree is an extremely long interconnect.

  20. Communication Requirements and Interconnect Optimization forHigh-End Scientific Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kamil, Shoaib; Oliker, Leonid; Pinar, Ali; Shalf, John

    2007-11-12

    The path towards realizing peta-scale computing isincreasingly dependent on building supercomputers with unprecedentednumbers of processors. To prevent the interconnect from dominating theoverall cost of these ultra-scale systems, there is a critical need forhigh-performance network solutions whose costs scale linearly with systemsize. This work makes several unique contributions towards attaining thatgoal. First, we conduct one of the broadest studies to date of high-endapplication communication requirements, whose computational methodsinclude: finite-difference, lattice-bolzmann, particle in cell, sparselinear algebra, particle mesh ewald, and FFT-based solvers. Toefficiently collect this data, we use the IPM (Integrated PerformanceMonitoring) profiling layer to gather detailed messaging statistics withminimal impact to code performance. Using the derived communicationcharacterizations, we next present fit-trees interconnects, a novelapproach for designing network infrastructure at a fraction of thecomponent cost of traditional fat-tree solutions. Finally, we propose theHybrid Flexibly Assignable Switch Topology (HFAST) infrastructure, whichuses both passive (circuit) and active (packet) commodity switchcomponents to dynamically reconfigure interconnects to suit thetopological requirements of scientific applications. Overall ourexploration leads to a promising directions for practically addressingthe interconnect requirements of future peta-scale systems.

  1. Interconnection Testing of Distributed Resources: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kroposki, B.; Basso, T.; DeBlasio, R.

    2004-02-01

    With the publication of IEEE 1547-2003(TM) Standard for Interconnecting Distributed Resources With Electric Power Systems, the electric power industry has a need to develop tests and procedures to verify that interconnection equipment meets 1547 technical requirements. A new standard, IEEE P1547.1(TM), is being written to give detailed tests and procedures for confirming that equipment meets the interconnection requirements. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has been validating test procedures being developed as part of IEEE P1547.1. As work progresses on the validation of those procedures, information and test reports are passed on to the working group of IEEE P1547.1 for future revisions.

  2. Ssip-a processor interconnection simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Navaux, P.; Weber, R.; Prezzi, J.; Tazza, M.

    1982-01-01

    Recent growing interest in multiple processor architectures has given rise to the study of procesor-memory interconnections for the determination of better architectures. This paper concerns the development of the SSIP-sistema simulador de interconexao de processadores (processor interconnection simulating system) which allows the evaluation of different interconnection structures comparing its performance in order to provide parameters which would help the designer to define an architcture. A wide spectrum of systems may be evaluated, and their behaviour observed due to the features incorporated into the simulator program. The system modelling and the simulator program implementation are described. Some results that can be obtained are shown, along with the discussion of their usefulness. 12 references.

  3. Global optical free-space smart interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilfoyle, Peter S.; Hessenbruch, John M.; Zeise, Frederick F.

    1993-07-01

    High fan-in/fan-out, low power (1 fJ per gate), high performance computing (HPC) modules are being developed that integrate global (multidimensional) free space `smart' optical interconnects with GaAs DANE technology. This new architecture implements N4 global free space optical interconnects coupled with 2-D arrays of N-bit Boolean multiplications by DeMorgan's theorem on wide word fan-ins. `Smart' interconnects provide a high speed inter- module alternative without the power requirements and cross-talk limitations of GaAs circuitry. Selected algorithms such as 64-bit addition can operate at lower power and higher speeds using global technology and GaAs logic. Thus, faster processing can be fully realized which allows for a reduction in pipeline delays.

  4. The motion of interconnected flexible bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, A. S.

    1975-01-01

    The equations of motion for an arbitrarily interconnected collection of substructures are derived. The substructures are elastic bodies which may be idealized as finite element assemblies and are subject to small deformations relative to a nominal state. Interconnections between the elastic substructures permit large relative translations and rotations between substructures, governed by Pfaffian constraints describing the connections. Screw connections (permitting rotation about and translation along a single axis) eliminate constraint forces and incorporate modal coupling. The problem of flexible spacecraft simulation is discussed. Hurty's component mode approach is extended by permitting interconnected elastic substructures large motions relative to each other and relative to inertial space. The hybrid coordinate methods are generalized by permitting all substructures to be flexible (rather than only the terminal members of a topological tree of substructures). The basic relationships of continuum mechanics are developed.

  5. Random walk centrality in interconnected multilayer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solé-Ribalta, Albert; De Domenico, Manlio; Gómez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex

    2016-06-01

    Real-world complex systems exhibit multiple levels of relationships. In many cases they require to be modeled as interconnected multilayer networks, characterizing interactions of several types simultaneously. It is of crucial importance in many fields, from economics to biology and from urban planning to social sciences, to identify the most (or the less) influent nodes in a network using centrality measures. However, defining the centrality of actors in interconnected complex networks is not trivial. In this paper, we rely on the tensorial formalism recently proposed to characterize and investigate this kind of complex topologies, and extend two well known random walk centrality measures, the random walk betweenness and closeness centrality, to interconnected multilayer networks. For each of the measures we provide analytical expressions that completely agree with numerically results.

  6. Laser printing of 3D metallic interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniam, Iyoel; Mathews, Scott A.; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Piqué, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The use of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) techniques for the printing of functional materials has been demonstrated for numerous applications. The printing gives rise to patterns, which can be used to fabricate planar interconnects. More recently, various groups have demonstrated electrical interconnects from laser-printed 3D structures. The laser printing of these interconnects takes place through aggregation of voxels of either molten metal or of pastes containing dispersed metallic particles. However, the generated 3D structures do not posses the same metallic conductivity as a bulk metal interconnect of the same cross-section and length as those formed by wire bonding or tab welding. An alternative is to laser transfer entire 3D structures using a technique known as lase-and-place. Lase-and-place is a LIFT process whereby whole components and parts can be transferred from a donor substrate onto a desired location with one single laser pulse. This paper will describe the use of LIFT to laser print freestanding, solid metal foils or beams precisely over the contact pads of discrete devices to interconnect them into fully functional circuits. Furthermore, this paper will also show how the same laser can be used to bend or fold the bulk metal foils prior to transfer, thus forming compliant 3D structures able to provide strain relief for the circuits under flexing or during motion from thermal mismatch. These interconnect "ridges" can span wide gaps (on the order of a millimeter) and accommodate height differences of tens of microns between adjacent devices. Examples of these laser printed 3D metallic bridges and their role in the development of next generation electronics by additive manufacturing will be presented.

  7. Demonstration of heterogeneous III-V/Si integration with a compact optical vertical interconnect access.

    PubMed

    Ng, Doris Keh Ting; Wang, Qian; Pu, Jing; Lim, Kim Peng; Wei, Yongqiang; Wang, Yadong; Lai, Yicheng; Ho, Seng Tiong

    2013-12-15

    Heterogeneous III-V/Si integration with a compact optical vertical interconnect access is fabricated and the light coupling efficiency between the III-V/Si waveguide and the silicon nanophotonic waveguide is characterized. The III-V semiconductor material is directly bonded to the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate and etched to form the III-V/Si waveguide for a higher light confinement in the active region. The compact optical vertical interconnect access is formed through tapering a III-V and an SOI layer in the same direction. The measured III-V/Si waveguide has a light coupling efficiency above ~90% to the silicon photonic layer with the tapering structure. This heterogeneous and light coupling structure can provide an efficient platform for photonic systems on chip, including passive and active devices.

  8. Exabits/s integrated photonic interconnection technology for flexible data-centric optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binh, Le N.; Tao, Thomas W.; Ning, Gordon L.

    2016-03-01

    Optical networking is evolving from classical service-provider base data-center centric (DCC) internetworking environment with massive capacity, hence demanding novel optical switching and interconnecting technologies. The traditional telecom networks are under a flattening transformation to meet challenges from DCC networks for massive capacity serving in order of multi-Pb/s. We present proposed distributed and concentric data center based networks and the essential optical interconnection technologies, from the photonic kernels to electronic and optoelectronic server clusters, in both passive and active structures. Optical switching devices and integrated matrices are proposed composing of tunable (bandwidth and center wavelength) optical filters and switches as well as resonant microring modulators (μRM)(switching and spectral demux/mux) for multi-wavelength flexible-bandwidth optical channels of aggregate capacity reaching Ebps. The design principles and some experimental results are also reported.

  9. Fiber optic interconnects: physical design for reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhir, E.

    2010-02-01

    The paper deals with the application of methods and approaches of the engineering mechanics to fiber optics systems. The emphasis is on fiber optics interconnects. We address traditional problems of the mechanical behavior of optical fiber interconnects subjected to mechanical and/or thermally induced loading, as well as the application of nanotechnology in optical fiber engineering. Particularly, we elaborate on the application of a newly developed advanced nano-particle material (NPM) as an attractive substitute for the existing optical fiber coatings and perhaps even claddings. The solutions to the majority of the examined problems were obtained using analytical ("mathematical") modeling, i.e., methods of classical structural analysis.

  10. Planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Tuckerman, David B.

    1987-01-01

    In the fabrication of multilevel integrated circuits, each metal layer is anarized by heating to momentarily melt the layer. The layer is melted by sweeping laser pulses of suitable width, typically about 1 microsecond duration, over the layer in small increments. The planarization of each metal layer eliminates irregular and discontinuous conditions between successive layers. The planarization method is particularly applicable to circuits having ground or power planes and allows for multilevel interconnects. Dielectric layers can also be planarized to produce a fully planar multilevel interconnect structure. The method is useful for the fabrication of VLSI circuits, particularly for wafer-scale integration.

  11. Planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Tuckerman, David B.

    1989-01-01

    In the fabrication of multilevel integrated circuits, each metal layer is anarized by heating to momentarily melt the layer. The layer is melted by sweeping laser pulses of suitable width, typically about 1 microsecond duration, over the layer in small increments. The planarization of each metal layer eliminates irregular and discontinuous conditions between successive layers. The planarization method is particularly applicable to circuits having ground or power planes and allows for multilevel interconnects. Dielectric layers can also be planarized to produce a fully planar multilevel interconnect structure. The method is useful for the fabrication of VLSI circuits, particularly for wafer-scale integration.

  12. Planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Tuckerman, D.B.

    1985-06-24

    In the fabrication of multilevel integrated circuits, each metal layer is planarized by heating to momentarily melt the layer. The layer is melted by sweeping lase pulses of suitable width, typically about 1 microsecond duration, over the layer in small increments. The planarization of each metal layer eliminates irregular and discontinuous conditions between successive layers. The planarization method is particularly applicable to circuits having ground or power planes and allows for multilevel interconnects. Dielectric layers can also be planarized to produce a fully planar multilevel interconnect structure. The method is useful for the fabrication of VLSI circuits, particularly for wafer-scale integration.

  13. Graphene Nanoribbons (GNRs) for Future Interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saptono Duryat, Rahmat

    2016-05-01

    Selecting and developing materials for the future devices require a sound understanding of design requirements. Miniaturization of electronic devices, as commonly expressed by Moore Law, has involved the integration level. Increase of the level has caused some consequences in the design and selection of materials for interconnection. The present paper deals with the challenge of materials design and selection beyond the nanoscale limit and the ability of traditional materials to cope with. One of the emerging materials, i.e. Graphene, will be reviewed with particular reference to its characteristics and potentials for future interconnection.

  14. Planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Tuckerman, D.B.

    1985-08-23

    In the fabrication of multilevel integrated circuits, each metal layer is planarized by heating to momentarily melt the layer. The layer is melted by sweeping laser pulses of suitable width, typically about 1 microsecond duration, over the layer in small increments. The planarization of each metal layer eliminates irregular and discontinuous conditions between successive layers. The planarization method is particularly applicable to circuits having ground or power planes and allows for multilevel interconnects. Dielectric layers can also be planarized to produce a fully planar multilevel interconnect structure. The method is useful for the fabrication of VLSI circuits, particularly for wafer-scale integration.

  15. A partially passive magnetic suspension for a discoidal wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeMarquand, Guy; Yonnet, Jean-Paul

    1988-11-01

    For discoidal or annular rotors, a magnetic suspension made only with one passive axial bearing and one active radial bearing is very well adapted. This suspension is relatively simple, and can operate without any additional damping system. A flywheel prototype has been built to test this magnetic suspension. The rotor is a 300-mm-diam aluminum disk (7.3 kg weight) rotating at 9000 rpm. In operation, the crossing of the different critical frequencies occurs without any problem, because the only one excited mode (cylindrical motion) is actively controlled, and the others which are passively stabilized (axial and conical modes) are not excited.

  16. Aluminum, parathyroid hormone, and osteomalacia

    SciTech Connect

    Burnatowska-Hledin, M.A.; Kaiser, L.; Mayor, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    Aluminum exposure in man is unavoidable. The occurrence of dialysis dementia, vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia, and hypochromic microcytic anemia in dialysis patients underscores the potential for aluminum toxicity. Although exposure via dialysate and hyperalimentation leads to significant tissue aluminum accumulation, the ubiquitous occurrence of aluminum and the severe pathology associated with large aluminum burdens suggest that smaller exposures via the gastrointestinal tract and lungs could represent an important, though largely unrecognized, public health problem. It is clear that some aluminum absorption occurs with the ingestion of small amounts of aluminum in the diet and medicines, and even greater aluminum absorption is seen in individuals consuming large amounts of aluminum present in antacids. Aluminum absorption is enhanced in the presence of elevated circulating parathyroid hormone. In addition, elevated PTH leads to the preferential deposition of aluminum in brain and bone. Consequently, PTH is likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of toxicities in those organs. PTH excess also seems to lead to the deposition of aluminum in the parathyroid gland. The in vitro demonstration that aluminum inhibits parathyroid hormone release is consistent with the findings of a euparathyroid state in dialysis patients with aluminum related vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia. Nevertheless, it seems likely that hyperparathyroidism is at least initially involved in the pathogenesis of aluminum neurotoxicity and osteomalacia; the increases in tissue aluminum stores are followed by suppression of parathyroid hormone release, which is required for the evolution of osteomalacia. Impaired renal function is not a prerequisite for increased tissue aluminum burdens, nor for aluminum-related organ toxicity. Consequently, it is likely that these diseases will be observed in populations other than those with chronic renal disease.

  17. Passive magnetic bearing configurations

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2011-01-25

    A journal bearing provides vertical and radial stability to a rotor of a passive magnetic bearing system when the rotor is not rotating and when it is rotating. In the passive magnetic bearing system, the rotor has a vertical axis of rotation. Without the journal bearing, the rotor is vertically and radially unstable when stationary, and is vertically stable and radially unstable when rotating.

  18. Overcoming Passive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Marilyn

    1986-01-01

    Passivity in learning disabled children is identified as either inborn or as "learned helplessness," and the role of the teacher in overcoming passivity is noted. Teachers can help students understand themselves, become active agents in learning, and use self monitoring devices. (CL)

  19. Passive solar heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, David E.; Mowris, Robert J.

    1985-11-01

    Buildings have been designed to use solar gains for winter heating for several millenia, but the quantitative basis for passive solar design has only been developed in the last decade. A simplified lumped capacitance model is used to provide insight into the physics of passive building behavior. Three passive design methods are described: the Solar Load Ratio (SLR) method based on correlations to simulation results; the Gordon/Zarmi closed form analytical mode;; and the ``unutilizability'' model of Monsen and Klein. Model predictions are compared with measured results; agreement is good if measured building characteristics are used. Numerous passive houses use less than 2 Btu/ft2-DD for auxiliary heating and consensus is developing that modest levels of passive glazing combined with superinsulation techniques can provide the best feature of both approaches.

  20. Passive solar construction handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, E.; Evans, D.; Gardstein, C.

    1981-08-01

    Many of the basic elements of passive solar design are reviewed. The unique design constraints presented in passive homes are introduced and many of the salient issues influencing design decisions are described briefly. Passive solar construction is described for each passive system type: direct gain, thermal storage wall, attached sunspace, thermal storage roof, and convective loop. For each system type, important design and construction issues are discussed and case studies illustrating designed and built examples of the system type are presented. Construction details are given and construction and thermal performance information is given for the materials used in collector components, storage components, and control components. Included are glazing materials, framing systems, caulking and sealants, concrete masonry, concrete, brick, shading, reflectors, and insulators. The Load Collector Ratio method for estimating passive system performance is appended, and other analysis methods are briefly summarized. (LEW)

  1. 47 CFR 95.1313 - Interconnection prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... facilities of the public switched telephone network to permit the transmission of messages or signals between points in the wireline or radio network of a public telephone company and persons served by multi-use... prohibited. MURS stations are prohibited from interconnection with the public switched...

  2. Electric network interconnection of Mashreq Arab Countries

    SciTech Connect

    El-Amin, I.M.; Al-Shehri, A.M.; Opoku, G.; Al-Baiyat, S.A.; Zedan, F.M.

    1994-12-01

    Power system interconnection is a well established practice for a variety of technical and economical reasons. Several interconnected networks exist worldwide for a number of factors. Some of these networks cross international boundaries. This presentation discusses the future developments of the power systems of Mashreq Arab Countries (MAC). MAC consists of Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates (UAE), and Yemen. Mac power systems are operated by government or semigovernment bodies. Many of these countries have national or regional electric grids but are generally isolated from each other. With the exception of Saudi Arabia power systems, which employ 60 Hz, all other MAC utilities use 50 Hz frequency. Each country is served by one utility, except Saudi Arabia, which is served by four major utilities and some smaller utilities serving remote towns and small load centers. The major utilities are the Saudi Consolidated electric Company in the Eastern Province (SCECO East), SCECO Center, SCECO West, and SCECO South. These are the ones considered in this study. The energy resources in MAC are varied. Countries such as Egypt, Iraq, and Syria have significant hydro resources.The gulf countries and Iraq have abundant fossil fuel, The variation in energy resources as well as the characteristics of the electric load make it essential to look into interconnections beyond the national boundaries. Most of the existing or planned interconnections involve few power systems. A study involving 12 countries and over 20 utilities with different characteristics represents a very large scale undertaking.

  3. Demonstrated results of welded and soldered interconnections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, R. E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Solar cell modules with welded and soldered interconnections were constructed using a flexible substrate material. These modules were thermally cycled between approx. 80 deg C at rates 100 cycles/day to demonstrate survivability under simulated low Earth orbit (LEO) temperature conditions. The modules, cycled in an inert atmosphere, show durability for 36,000 cycles.

  4. Laser printed interconnects for flexible electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pique, Alberto; Beniam, Iyoel; Mathews, Scott; Charipar, Nicholas

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) can be used to generate microscale 3D structures for interconnect applications non-lithographically. The laser printing of these interconnects takes place through aggregation of voxels of either molten metal or dispersed metallic nanoparticles. However, the resulting 3D structures do not achieve the bulk conductivity of metal interconnects of the same cross-section and length as those formed by wire bonding or tab welding. It is possible, however, to laser transfer entire structures using a LIFT technique known as lase-and-place. Lase-and-place allows whole components and parts to be transferred from a donor substrate onto a desired location with one single laser pulse. This talk will present the use of LIFT to laser print freestanding solid metal interconnects to connect individual devices into functional circuits. Furthermore, the same laser can bend or fold the thin metal foils prior to transfer, thus forming compliant 3D structures able to provide strain relief due to flexing or thermal mismatch. Examples of these laser printed 3D metallic bridges and their role in the development of next generation flexible electronics by additive manufacturing will be presented. This work was funded by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) through the Naval Research Laboratory Basic Research Program.

  5. Safety evaluation of dietary aluminum.

    PubMed

    Soni, M G; White, S M; Flamm, W G; Burdock, G A

    2001-02-01

    Aluminum is a nonessential metal to which humans are frequently exposed. Aluminum in the food supply comes from natural sources, water used in food preparation, food ingredients, and utensils used during food preparations. The amount of aluminum in the diet is small, compared with the amount of aluminum in antacids and some buffered analgesics. The healthy human body has effective barriers (skin, lungs, gastrointestinal tract) to reduce the systemic absorption of aluminum ingested from water, foods, drugs, and air. The small amount of aluminum (<1%) that is systemically absorbed is excreted principally in the urine and, to a lesser extent, in the feces. No reports of dietary aluminum toxicity to healthy individuals exist in the literature. Aluminum can be neurotoxic, when injected directly into the brains of animals and when accidentally introduced into human brains (by dialysis or shrapnel). A study from Canada reports cognitive and other neurological deficits among groups of workers occupationally exposed to dust containing high levels of aluminum. While the precise pathogenic role of aluminum in Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains to be defined, present data do not support a causative role for aluminum in AD. High intake of aluminum from antacid for gastrointestinal ailments has not been reported to cause any adverse effects and has not been correlated with neurotoxicity or AD. Foods and food ingredients are generally the major dietary sources of aluminum in the United States. Cooking in aluminum utensils often results in statistically significant, but relatively small, increases in aluminum content of food. Common aluminum-containing food ingredients are used mainly as preservatives, coloring agents, leavening agents, anticaking agents, etc. Safety evaluation and approval of these ingredients by the Food and Drug Administration indicate that these aluminum-containing compounds are safe for use in foods.

  6. Towards energy-efficient photonic interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Yigit; Hardavellas, Nikos

    2015-03-01

    Silicon photonics have emerged as a promising solution to meet the growing demand for high-bandwidth, low-latency, and energy-efficient on-chip and off-chip communication in many-core processors. However, current silicon-photonic interconnect designs for many-core processors waste a significant amount of power because (a) lasers are always on, even during periods of interconnect inactivity, and (b) microring resonators employ heaters which consume a significant amount of power just to overcome thermal variations and maintain communication on the photonic links, especially in a 3D-stacked design. The problem of high laser power consumption is particularly important as lasers typically have very low energy efficiency, and photonic interconnects often remain underutilized both in scientific computing (compute-intensive execution phases underutilize the interconnect), and in server computing (servers in Google-scale datacenters have a typical utilization of less than 30%). We address the high laser power consumption by proposing EcoLaser+, which is a laser control scheme that saves energy by predicting the interconnect activity and opportunistically turning the on-chip laser off when possible, and also by scaling the width of the communication link based on a runtime prediction of the expected message length. Our laser control scheme can save up to 62 - 92% of the laser energy, and improve the energy efficiency of a manycore processor with negligible performance penalty. We address the high trimming (heating) power consumption of the microrings by proposing insulation methods that reduce the impact of localized heating induced by highly-active components on the 3D-stacked logic die.

  7. Interconnect assembly for an electronic assembly and assembly method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Gerbsch, Erich William

    2003-06-10

    An interconnect assembly and method for a semiconductor device, in which the interconnect assembly can be used in lieu of wirebond connections to form an electronic assembly. The interconnect assembly includes first and second interconnect members. The first interconnect member has a first surface with a first contact and a second surface with a second contact electrically connected to the first contact, while the second interconnect member has a flexible finger contacting the second contact of the first interconnect member. The first interconnect member is adapted to be aligned and registered with a semiconductor device having a contact on a first surface thereof, so that the first contact of the first interconnect member electrically contacts the contact of the semiconductor device. Consequently, the assembly method does not require any wirebonds, but instead merely entails aligning and registering the first interconnect member with the semiconductor device so that the contacts of the first interconnect member and the semiconductor device make electrically contact, and then contacting the second contact of the first interconnect member with the flexible finger of the second interconnect member.

  8. Hierarchical optical ring interconnection (HORN): scalable interconnection network for multiprocessors and multicomputers.

    PubMed

    Louri, A; Gupta, R

    1997-01-10

    A new interconnection network for massively parallel computing is introduced. This network is called a hierarchal optical ring interconnection (HORN). The HORN consists of a single-hop, scalable, constant-degree, strictly nonblocking, fault-tolerant interconnection topology that uses wavelength-division multiple access to provide better utilization of the terahertz bandwidth offered by optics. The proposed optical network integrates the attractive features of hierarchical ring interconnections, e.g., a simple node interface, a constant node degree, better support for the locality of reference, and fault tolerance, with the advantages of optics. The HORN topology is presented, its architectural properties are analyzed, and an optical design methodology for it is described. Furthermore, a brief feasibility study of the HORN is conducted. The study shows that the topology is highly amenable to optical implementation with commercially available optical elements.

  9. Aluminum Hydroxide and Magnesium Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are antacids used together to relieve heartburn, acid indigestion, and upset stomach. They ... They combine with stomach acid and neutralize it. Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are available without a prescription. ...

  10. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    DOEpatents

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J.

    2009-04-21

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  11. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    DOEpatents

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J; Wegrzyn, James E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, and by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  12. PROCESS FOR REMOVING ALUMINUM COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Flox, J.

    1959-07-01

    A process is presented for removing aluminum jackets or cans from uranium slugs. This is accomplished by immersing the aluminum coated uranium slugs in an aqueous solution of 9 to 20% sodium hydroxide and 35 to 12% sodium nitrate to selectively dissolve the aluminum coating, the amount of solution being such as to obtain a molar ratio of sodium hydroxide to aluminum of at least

  13. Drinking water aluminum and bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Reiber, S.H.; Kukull, W.; Standish-Lee, P.

    1995-05-01

    This article discusses chemical considerations relative to aluminum uptake in the body and reviews aluminum concentrations, species, and distribution in natural and treated waters. The issues of bioavailability and the likelihood that aluminum in drinking water is more readily assimilated than other forms of aluminum is reviewed and rejected based on issues of solubility and likely chemical transformations that take place in the human gut.

  14. High temperature solid electrolyte fuel cell configurations and interconnections

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.

    1984-01-01

    High temperature fuel cell configurations and interconnections are made including annular cells having a solid electrolyte sandwiched between thin film electrodes. The cells are electrically interconnected along an elongated axial outer surface.

  15. National Offshore Wind Energy Grid Interconnection Study Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, John P.; Liu, Shu; Ibanez, Eduardo; Pennock, Ken; Reed, Gregory; Hanes, Spencer

    2014-07-30

    The National Offshore Wind Energy Grid Interconnection Study (NOWEGIS) considers the availability and potential impacts of interconnecting large amounts of offshore wind energy into the transmission system of the lower 48 contiguous United States.

  16. National Offshore Wind Energy Grid Interconnection Study Full Report

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, John P.; Liu, Shu; Ibanez, Eduardo; Pennock, Ken; Reed, Gregory; Hanes, Spencer

    2014-07-30

    The National Offshore Wind Energy Grid Interconnection Study (NOWEGIS) considers the availability and potential impacts of interconnecting large amounts of offshore wind energy into the transmission system of the lower 48 contiguous United States.

  17. Tuning of the droplet motion in interconnected microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guoqing; Song, Kui; Zhang, Li

    2010-11-01

    The problem of controlling the droplet motions in multiphase flows on the microscale has gained increasing attention because the droplet-based microfluidic devices provide great potentials for chemical/biological applications such as drug discovery, chemical kinetics study, material synthesis, and DNA/cell assays. It is critical to understand the relevant physics on droplet hydrodynamics and thus control the generation, motion, splitting, and coalescence of droplets in complex microfluidic networks. The operation of those applications sometimes requires the arrival of droplets from different branch microchannels at a designated location within a transit time. We propose a simple design for interconnected microfluidic devices that implement the feedback mechanism to synchronize the droplet motion via a passive way. Numerical simulations using the Volume of Fluid (VOF) algorithm are conducted to investigate the time-dependent dynamics of droplets in both gas-liquid and liquid-liquid systems. An analytical mode based on the electronic-hydraulic analogy is also developed to describe the transit behavior of the droplet traffic. Both the numerical and theoretical results agree well with the corresponding experimental results. Furthermore, we optimize the microfluidic networks to control the motion of a series of droplets.

  18. Electrically conductive anodized aluminum coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alwitt, Robert S. (Inventor); Liu, Yanming (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing anodized aluminum with enhanced electrical conductivity, comprising anodic oxidation of aluminum alloy substrate, electrolytic deposition of a small amount of metal into the pores of the anodized aluminum, and electrolytic anodic deposition of an electrically conductive oxide, including manganese dioxide, into the pores containing the metal deposit; and the product produced by the process.

  19. Integrated silicon photonic interconnect with surface-normal optical interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zanyun; Huang, Beiju; Zhang, Zan; Cheng, Chuantong; Liu, Hongwei; Li, Hongqiang; Chen, Hongda

    2016-05-01

    An integrated silicon photonic interconnect with surface-normal optical interface is demonstrated by connecting a bidirectional grating based E-O modulator and a germanium waveguide photodetector. To investigate this photonic interconnect, both static and dynamic performance of the discrete devices are characterized respectively. Based on the characterization work, data transmission experiment is carried out for the photonic interconnect. Eye diagram results indicate the photonic interconnect can operate up to 7 Gb/s.

  20. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2013-03-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  1. Mapping the global journey of anthropogenic aluminum: a trade-linked multilevel material flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Müller, Daniel B

    2013-10-15

    Material cycles have become increasingly coupled and interconnected in a globalizing era. While material flow analysis (MFA) has been widely used to characterize stocks and flows along technological life cycle within a specific geographical area, trade networks among individual cycles have remained largely unexplored. Here we developed a trade-linked multilevel MFA model to map the contemporary global journey of anthropogenic aluminum. We demonstrate that the anthropogenic aluminum cycle depends substantially on international trade of aluminum in all forms and becomes highly interconnected in nature. While the Southern hemisphere is the main primary resource supplier, aluminum production and consumption concentrate in the Northern hemisphere, where we also find the largest potential for recycling. The more developed countries tend to have a substantial and increasing presence throughout the stages after bauxite refining and possess highly consumption-based cycles, thus maintaining advantages both economically and environmentally. A small group of countries plays a key role in the global redistribution of aluminum and in the connectivity of the network, which may render some countries vulnerable to supply disruption. The model provides potential insights to inform government and industry policies in resource criticality, supply chain security, value chain management, and cross-boundary environmental impacts mitigation.

  2. Mapping the global journey of anthropogenic aluminum: a trade-linked multilevel material flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Müller, Daniel B

    2013-10-15

    Material cycles have become increasingly coupled and interconnected in a globalizing era. While material flow analysis (MFA) has been widely used to characterize stocks and flows along technological life cycle within a specific geographical area, trade networks among individual cycles have remained largely unexplored. Here we developed a trade-linked multilevel MFA model to map the contemporary global journey of anthropogenic aluminum. We demonstrate that the anthropogenic aluminum cycle depends substantially on international trade of aluminum in all forms and becomes highly interconnected in nature. While the Southern hemisphere is the main primary resource supplier, aluminum production and consumption concentrate in the Northern hemisphere, where we also find the largest potential for recycling. The more developed countries tend to have a substantial and increasing presence throughout the stages after bauxite refining and possess highly consumption-based cycles, thus maintaining advantages both economically and environmentally. A small group of countries plays a key role in the global redistribution of aluminum and in the connectivity of the network, which may render some countries vulnerable to supply disruption. The model provides potential insights to inform government and industry policies in resource criticality, supply chain security, value chain management, and cross-boundary environmental impacts mitigation. PMID:24025046

  3. Aluminum Sulfate 18 Hydrate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical, aluminum sulfate 18 hydrate, is presented. The profile lists physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  4. Aluminum Corrosion and Turbidity

    SciTech Connect

    Longtin, F.B.

    2003-03-10

    Aluminum corrosion and turbidity formation in reactors correlate with fuel sheath temperature. To further substantiate this correlation, discharged fuel elements from R-3, P-2 and K-2 cycles were examined for extent of corrosion and evidence of breaking off of the oxide film. This report discusses this study.

  5. Aluminum-ferricyanide battery

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, C.; Licht, S.L.

    1993-11-29

    A battery capable of producing high current densities with high charge capacity is described which includes an aluminum anode, a ferricyanide electrolyte and a second electrode capable of reducing ferricyanide electrolyte which is either dissolved in an alkaline solution or alkaline seawater solution. The performance of the battery is enhanced by high temperature and high electrolyte flow rates.

  6. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, D.S.; Scott, D.H.

    1984-09-28

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cells are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  7. Fluxless aluminum brazing

    DOEpatents

    Werner, W.J.

    1974-01-01

    This invention relates to a fluxless brazing alloy for use in forming brazed composites made from members of aluminum and its alloys. The brazing alloy consists of 35-55% Al, 10--20% Si, 25-60% Ge; 65-88% Al, 2-20% Si, 2--18% In; 65--80% Al, 15-- 25% Si, 5- 15% Y. (0fficial Gazette)

  8. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David S.; Scott, Darwin H.

    1985-01-01

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cs are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  9. Real-Time Reconfigurable Interconnections for Parallel Optical Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArdle, Neil; Taghizadeh, Mohammad R.

    1995-06-01

    In this letter we describe the advantages of a dynamic optical interconnection system for parallel information processing applications. The system is based on a liquid crystal television which acts as a binary phase-only spatial light modulator. We describe example algorithms where reconfigurable interconnects would be useful and present results of several interconnection topologies which have been implemented.

  10. 14 CFR 23.957 - Flow between interconnected tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flow between interconnected tanks. 23.957... Fuel System § 23.957 Flow between interconnected tanks. (a) It must be impossible, in a gravity feed system with interconnected tank outlets, for enough fuel to flow between the tanks to cause an...

  11. 14 CFR 29.957 - Flow between interconnected tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flow between interconnected tanks. 29.957... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.957 Flow between interconnected tanks. (a) Where tank outlets are interconnected and allow fuel to flow...

  12. 14 CFR 23.957 - Flow between interconnected tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flow between interconnected tanks. 23.957... Fuel System § 23.957 Flow between interconnected tanks. (a) It must be impossible, in a gravity feed system with interconnected tank outlets, for enough fuel to flow between the tanks to cause an...

  13. 14 CFR 29.957 - Flow between interconnected tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flow between interconnected tanks. 29.957... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.957 Flow between interconnected tanks. (a) Where tank outlets are interconnected and allow fuel to flow...

  14. 14 CFR 29.957 - Flow between interconnected tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flow between interconnected tanks. 29.957... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.957 Flow between interconnected tanks. (a) Where tank outlets are interconnected and allow fuel to flow...

  15. 14 CFR 29.957 - Flow between interconnected tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flow between interconnected tanks. 29.957... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.957 Flow between interconnected tanks. (a) Where tank outlets are interconnected and allow fuel to flow...

  16. 14 CFR 23.957 - Flow between interconnected tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flow between interconnected tanks. 23.957... Fuel System § 23.957 Flow between interconnected tanks. (a) It must be impossible, in a gravity feed system with interconnected tank outlets, for enough fuel to flow between the tanks to cause an...

  17. 14 CFR 23.957 - Flow between interconnected tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flow between interconnected tanks. 23.957... Fuel System § 23.957 Flow between interconnected tanks. (a) It must be impossible, in a gravity feed system with interconnected tank outlets, for enough fuel to flow between the tanks to cause an...

  18. Passive Resonant Bidirectional Converter with Galvanic Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenblad, Nathan S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A passive resonant bidirectional converter system that transports energy across a galvanic barrier includes a converter using at least first and second converter sections, each section including a pair of transfer terminals, a center tapped winding; a chopper circuit interconnected between the center tapped winding and one of the transfer terminals; an inductance feed winding interconnected between the other of the transfer terminals and the center tap and a resonant tank circuit including at least the inductance of the center tap winding and the parasitic capacitance of the chopper circuit for operating the converter section at resonance; the center tapped windings of the first and second converter sections being disposed on a first common winding core and the inductance feed windings of the first and second converter sections being disposed on a second common winding core for automatically synchronizing the resonant oscillation of the first and second converter sections and transferring energy between the converter sections until the voltage across the pairs of transfer terminals achieves the turns ratio of the center tapped windings.

  19. Mesoporous aluminum phosphite

    SciTech Connect

    El Haskouri, Jamal; Perez-Cabero, Monica; Guillem, Carmen; Latorre, Julio; Beltran, Aurelio; Beltran, Daniel; Amoros, Pedro

    2009-08-15

    High surface area pure mesoporous aluminum-phosphorus oxide-based derivatives have been synthesized through an S{sup +}I{sup -} surfactant-assisted cooperative mechanism by means of a one-pot preparative procedure from aqueous solution and starting from aluminum atrane complexes and phosphoric and/or phosphorous acids. A soft chemical extraction procedure allows opening the pore system of the parent as-prepared materials by exchanging the surfactant without mesostructure collapse. The nature of the pore wall can be modulated from mesoporous aluminum phosphate (ALPO) up to total incorporation of phosphite entities (mesoporous aluminum phosphite), which results in a gradual evolution of the acidic properties of the final materials. While phosphate groups in ALPO act as network building blocks (bridging Al atoms), the phosphite entities become basically attached to the pore surface, what gives practically empty channels. The mesoporous nature of the final materials is confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption isotherms. The materials present regular unimodal pore systems whose order decreases as the phosphite content increases. NMR spectroscopic results confirm the incorporation of oxo-phosphorus entities to the framework of these materials and also provide us useful information concerning the mechanism through which they are formed. - Abstract: TEM image of the mesoporous aluminum phosphite showing the hexagonal disordered pore array that is generated by using surfactant micelles as template. Also a scheme emphasizing the presence of an alumina-rich core and an ALPO-like pore surface is presented.

  20. Optical interconnects for multiprocessors in computer backplane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae-Jin; Tu, Kun-Yii; Ramsey, Darrell; Oh, Tchang-Hun; Kostuk, Raymond K.

    1995-04-01

    Optical interconnects have potential advantage over electrical methods at the backplane level. In this paper we present a free-space optical connection cube for backplane interconnect applications. The connection cube has a symmetric structure which reduces skew between boards. It can be expanded into a 3-dimensional configuration for parallel communication using vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) and receiver arrays. Fan-out and fan-in of propagation beams for the connection cube are realized using volume holographic optical elements formed in dichromated gelatin (DCG) emulsion. A four-port communication system has been demonstrated using the connection cube and tested at 500 MHz. In this paper, advantages and detailed implementation of the free-space optical connection cube are presented. Design considerations for fan-out/in holographic gratings and alignment tolerances for the connection cube are discussed. Characteristics of the connection cube are also presented.

  1. Interconnection of bundled solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Michael; Bessette, II, Norman F; Litka, Anthony F; Schmidt, Douglas S

    2014-01-14

    A system and method for electrically interconnecting a plurality of fuel cells to provide dense packing of the fuel cells. Each one of the plurality of fuel cells has a plurality of discrete electrical connection points along an outer surface. Electrical connections are made directly between the discrete electrical connection points of adjacent fuel cells so that the fuel cells can be packed more densely. Fuel cells have at least one outer electrode and at least one discrete interconnection to an inner electrode, wherein the outer electrode is one of a cathode and and anode and wherein the inner electrode is the other of the cathode and the anode. In tubular solid oxide fuel cells the discrete electrical connection points are spaced along the length of the fuel cell.

  2. Epidemic spread on interconnected metapopulation networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Gouhei; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-09-01

    Numerous real-world networks have been observed to interact with each other, resulting in interconnected networks that exhibit diverse, nontrivial behavior with dynamical processes. Here we investigate epidemic spreading on interconnected networks at the level of metapopulation. Through a mean-field approximation for a metapopulation model, we find that both the interaction network topology and the mobility probabilities between subnetworks jointly influence the epidemic spread. Depending on the interaction between subnetworks, proper controls of mobility can efficiently mitigate epidemics, whereas an extremely biased mobility to one subnetwork will typically cause a severe outbreak and promote the epidemic spreading. Our analysis provides a basic framework for better understanding of epidemic behavior in related transportation systems as well as for better control of epidemics by guiding human mobility patterns.

  3. Development of Interconnect Technologies for Particle Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Mani

    2015-01-29

    This final report covers the three years of this grant, for the funding period 9/1/2010 - 8/31/2013. The project consisted of generic detector R&D work at UC Davis, with an emphasis on developing interconnect technologies for applications in HEP. Much of the work is done at our Facility for Interconnect Technologies (FIT) at UC Davis. FIT was established using ARRA funds, with further studies supported by this grant. Besides generic R&D work at UC Davis, FIT is engaged in providing bump bonding help to several DOE supported detector R&D efforts. Some of the developmental work was also supported by funding from other sources: continuing CMS project funds and the Linear Collider R&D funds. The latter program is now terminated. The three year program saw a good deal of progress on several fronts, which are reported here.

  4. Architecture for on-die interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Khare, Surhud; More, Ankit; Somasekhar, Dinesh; Dunning, David S.

    2016-03-15

    In an embodiment, an apparatus includes: a plurality of islands configured on a semiconductor die, each of the plurality of islands having a plurality of cores; and a plurality of network switches configured on the semiconductor die and each associated with one of the plurality of islands, where each network switch includes a plurality of output ports, a first set of the output ports are each to couple to the associated network switch of an island via a point-to-point interconnect and a second set of the output ports are each to couple to the associated network switches of a plurality of islands via a point-to-multipoint interconnect. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  5. Copper Nanowire Production for Interconnect Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jin-Woo (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of fabricating metallic Cu nanowires with lengths up to about 25 micrometers and diameters in a range 20-100 nanometers, or greater if desired. Vertically oriented or laterally oriented copper oxide structures (CuO and/or Cu2O) are grown on a Cu substrate. The copper oxide structures are reduced with 99+ percent H or H2, and in this reduction process the lengths decrease (to no more than about 25 micrometers), the density of surviving nanostructures on a substrate decreases, and the diameters of the surviving nanostructures have a range, of about 20-100 nanometers. The resulting nanowires are substantially pure Cu and can be oriented laterally (for local or global interconnects) or can be oriented vertically (for standard vertical interconnects).

  6. A covariance analysis algorithm for interconnected systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Victor H. L.; Curley, Robert D.; Lin, Ching-An

    1987-01-01

    A covariance analysis algorithm for propagation of signal statistics in arbitrarily interconnected nonlinear systems is presented which is applied to six-degree-of-freedom systems. The algorithm uses statistical linearization theory to linearize the nonlinear subsystems, and the resulting linearized subsystems are considered in the original interconnection framework for propagation of the signal statistics. Some nonlinearities commonly encountered in six-degree-of-freedom space-vehicle models are referred to in order to illustrate the limitations of this method, along with problems not encountered in standard deterministic simulation analysis. Moreover, the performance of the algorithm shall be numerically exhibited by comparing results using such techniques to Monte Carlo analysis results, both applied to a simple two-dimensional space-intercept problem.

  7. SOLDERING OF ALUMINUM BASE METALS

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, G.F.

    1958-02-25

    This patent deals with the soldering of aluminum to metals of different types, such as copper, brass, and iron. This is accomplished by heating the aluminum metal to be soldered to slightly above 30 deg C, rubbing a small amount of metallic gallium into the part of the surface to be soldered, whereby an aluminum--gallium alloy forms on the surface, and then heating the aluminum piece to the melting point of lead--tin soft solder, applying lead--tin soft solder to this alloyed surface, and combining the aluminum with the other metal to which it is to be soldered.

  8. Active holographic interconnects for interfacing volume storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domash, Lawrence H.; Schwartz, Jay R.; Nelson, Arthur R.; Levin, Philip S.

    1992-04-01

    In order to achieve the promise of terabit/cm3 data storage capacity for volume holographic optical memory, two technological challenges must be met. Satisfactory storage materials must be developed and the input/output architectures able to match their capacity with corresponding data access rates must also be designed. To date the materials problem has received more attention than devices and architectures for access and addressing. Two philosophies of parallel data access to 3-D storage have been discussed. The bit-oriented approach, represented by recent work on two-photon memories, attempts to store bits at local sites within a volume without affecting neighboring bits. High speed acousto-optic or electro- optic scanners together with dynamically focused lenses not presently available would be required. The second philosophy is that volume optical storage is essentially holographic in nature, and that each data write or read is to be distributed throughout the material volume on the basis of angle multiplexing or other schemes consistent with the principles of holography. The requirements for free space optical interconnects for digital computers and fiber optic network switching interfaces are also closely related to this class of devices. Interconnects, beamlet generators, angle multiplexers, scanners, fiber optic switches, and dynamic lenses are all devices which may be implemented by holographic or microdiffractive devices of various kinds, which we shall refer to collectively as holographic interconnect devices. At present, holographic interconnect devices are either fixed holograms or spatial light modulators. Optically or computer generated holograms (submicron resolution, 2-D or 3-D, encoding 1013 bits, nearly 100 diffraction efficiency) can implement sophisticated mathematical design principles, but of course once fabricated they cannot be changed. Spatial light modulators offer high speed programmability but have limited resolution (512 X 512 pixels

  9. Bioactive macroporous titanium implants highly interconnected.

    PubMed

    Caparrós, Cristina; Ortiz-Hernandez, Mónica; Molmeneu, Meritxell; Punset, Miguel; Calero, José Antonio; Aparicio, Conrado; Fernández-Fairén, Mariano; Perez, Román; Gil, Francisco Javier

    2016-10-01

    Intervertebral implants should be designed with low load requirements, high friction coefficient and low elastic modulus in order to avoid the stress shielding effect on bone. Furthermore, the presence of a highly interconnected porous structure allows stimulating bone in-growth and enhancing implant-bone fixation. The aim of this study was to obtain bioactive porous titanium implants with highly interconnected pores with a total porosity of approximately 57 %. Porous Titanium implants were produced by powder sintering route using the space holder technique with a binder phase and were then evaluated in an in vivo study. The size of the interconnection diameter between the macropores was about 210 μm in order to guarantee bone in-growth through osteblastic cell penetration. Surface roughness and mechanical properties were analyzed. Stiffness was reduced as a result of the powder sintering technique which allowed the formation of a porous network. Compression and fatigue tests exhibited suitable properties in order to guarantee a proper compromise between mechanical properties and pore interconnectivity. Bioactivity treatment effect in novel sintered porous titanium materials was studied by thermo-chemical treatments and were compared with the same material that had undergone different bioactive treatments. Bioactive thermo-chemical treatment was confirmed by the presence of sodium titanates on the surface of the implants as well as inside the porous network. Raman spectroscopy results suggested that the identified titanate structures would enhance in vivo apatite formation by promoting ion exchange for the apatite formation process. In vivo results demonstrated that the bioactive titanium achieved over 75 % tissue colonization compared to the 40 % value for the untreated titanium. PMID:27582071

  10. Stackable Electronic Computer Modules And Interconnections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolotin, Gary S.

    1996-01-01

    Design concept for multiprocessor computer system calls for digital electronic processing circuits of various functionalities contained within identically shaped and sized regular polygonal modules interconnected and stacked by use of rings around edges. Rings contain wide-band bus circuits configured to provide connections to adjacent modules in same layer of stack and/or to modules in different layers. Provides flexibility of configuration to implement any of large variety of designs.

  11. Bioactive macroporous titanium implants highly interconnected.

    PubMed

    Caparrós, Cristina; Ortiz-Hernandez, Mónica; Molmeneu, Meritxell; Punset, Miguel; Calero, José Antonio; Aparicio, Conrado; Fernández-Fairén, Mariano; Perez, Román; Gil, Francisco Javier

    2016-10-01

    Intervertebral implants should be designed with low load requirements, high friction coefficient and low elastic modulus in order to avoid the stress shielding effect on bone. Furthermore, the presence of a highly interconnected porous structure allows stimulating bone in-growth and enhancing implant-bone fixation. The aim of this study was to obtain bioactive porous titanium implants with highly interconnected pores with a total porosity of approximately 57 %. Porous Titanium implants were produced by powder sintering route using the space holder technique with a binder phase and were then evaluated in an in vivo study. The size of the interconnection diameter between the macropores was about 210 μm in order to guarantee bone in-growth through osteblastic cell penetration. Surface roughness and mechanical properties were analyzed. Stiffness was reduced as a result of the powder sintering technique which allowed the formation of a porous network. Compression and fatigue tests exhibited suitable properties in order to guarantee a proper compromise between mechanical properties and pore interconnectivity. Bioactivity treatment effect in novel sintered porous titanium materials was studied by thermo-chemical treatments and were compared with the same material that had undergone different bioactive treatments. Bioactive thermo-chemical treatment was confirmed by the presence of sodium titanates on the surface of the implants as well as inside the porous network. Raman spectroscopy results suggested that the identified titanate structures would enhance in vivo apatite formation by promoting ion exchange for the apatite formation process. In vivo results demonstrated that the bioactive titanium achieved over 75 % tissue colonization compared to the 40 % value for the untreated titanium.

  12. Implementation of interconnect simulation tools in spice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satsangi, H.; Schutt-Aine, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    Accurate computer simulation of high speed digital computer circuits and communication circuits requires a multimode approach to simulate both the devices and the interconnects between devices. Classical circuit analysis algorithms (lumped parameter) are needed for circuit devices and the network formed by the interconnected devices. The interconnects, however, have to be modeled as transmission lines which incorporate electromagnetic field analysis. An approach to writing a multimode simulator is to take an existing software package which performs either lumped parameter analysis or field analysis and add the missing type of analysis routines to the package. In this work a traditionally lumped parameter simulator, SPICE, is modified so that it will perform lossy transmission line analysis using a different model approach. Modifying SPICE3E2 or any other large software package is not a trivial task. An understanding of the programming conventions used, simulation software, and simulation algorithms is required. This thesis was written to clarify the procedure for installing a device into SPICE3E2. The installation of three devices is documented and the installations of the first two provide a foundation for installation of the lossy line which is the third device. The details of discussions are specific to SPICE, but the concepts will be helpful when performing installations into other circuit analysis packages.

  13. Optimizing Baseload Power of Interconnected Wind Farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobrin, B. H.

    2010-12-01

    Interconnecting wind farms has been proposed as a way to reduce the natural unreliability of wind power caused by the intermittency of winds. In a previous study, the benefits of interconnecting up to 19 sites in the Midwestern United States were evaluated with the assumption that the same number of turbines would be installed at each site. The goal of this study was to avoid this assumption and examine the advantages of optimizing the ratio of turbines at each site. An optimization algorithm based on the gradient method was used to maximize the baseload power, or guaranteed power 87.5% of the year, using hourly wind speed data for the same 19 sites. The result was a significant improvement in the reliability of the array, increasing the baseload power by 38% compared to the array with equally-weighted sites. Further analysis showed that the turbines were generally distributed according to the average wind power at each site and the wind correlation among sites. In addition to optimizing the average baseload of the array, this study examined the benefits of optimizing the baseload for peak usage time (between noon and 7 p.m), and thus a simplified model was created to analyze how interconnecting wind farms could increase correlation with energy consumption. Optimization for peak usage hours, however, provided no additional benefit over the original optimized array because the variation of average hourly wind speeds was well-correlated among the sites.

  14. Integrated nanophotonic devices for optical interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yidong; Feng, Xue; Cui, Kaiyu; Li, Yongzhuo; Wang, Yu

    2016-03-01

    Nanostructure is an effective solution for realizing optoelectronic devices with compact size and high performances simultaneously. This paper reports our research progress on integrated nanophotonic devices for optical interconnections. We proposed a parent-sub micro ring structure for optical add-drop multiplexer (OADM) with compact footprint, large free spectral range, and uniform channel spacing. All eight channels can be multiplexed and de-multiplexed with 2.6 dB drop loss, 0.36 nm bandwidth (>40 GHz), -20 dB channel crosstalk, and high thermal tuning efficiency of 0.15 nm/mW. A novel principle of optical switch was proposed and demonstrated based on the coupling of the defect modes in photonic crystal waveguide. Switching functionality with bandwidth up to 24 nm and extinction ratio in excess of 15 dB over the entire bandwidth was achieved, while the footprint was only 8 μm×17.6 μm. We proposed an optical orbital angular momentum (OAM) coding and decoding method to increase the data-carrying capacity of wireless optical interconnect. An integrated OAM emitter, where the topological charge can be continuously varied from -4 to 4 was realized. Also we studied ultrafast modulated nLED as the integrated light source for optical interconnections using a nanobeam cavity with stagger holes.

  15. Modeling and synthesis of multicomputer interconnection networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Standley, Hilda M.; Auxter, D. Steve

    1990-01-01

    The type of interconnection network employed has a profound effect on the performance of a multicomputer and multiprocessor design. Adequate models are needed to aid in the design and development of interconnection networks. A novel modeling approach using statistical and optimization techniques is described. This method represents an attempt to compare diverse interconnection network designs in a way that allows not only the best of existing designs to be identified but to suggest other, perhaps hybrid, networks that may offer better performance. Stepwise linear regression is used to develop a polynomial surface representation of performance in a (k+1) space with a total of k quantitative and qualitative independent variables describing graph-theoretic characteristics such as size, average degree, diameter, radius, girth, node-connectivity, edge-connectivity, minimum dominating set size, and maximum number of prime node and edge cutsets. Dependent variables used to measure performance are average message delay and the ratio of message completion rate to network connection cost. Response Surface Methodology (RSM) optimizes a response variable from a polynomial function of several independent variables. Steepest ascent path may also be used to approach optimum points.

  16. Dimensioning of nearby substations interconnected ground system

    SciTech Connect

    Sobral, S.T. ); Costa, V.S. ); Campos, M.S.; Goldman, B. ); Mukhedkar, D. )

    1988-10-01

    This paper deals with the ground mat dimensioning of two or more neighbor interconnected substations, a situation that is very common in the Electrical Industry. The paper recalls that the external ground circuits connected to the ground grid of each substation can drastically reduce the percentage of total ground current injected into the soil through the mat (from 40% up to 2% of the total fault current). The paper presents a set of specific calculation procedures to deal with nearby interconnected ground mats. These procedures correspond to a particular illustration of the general ''Decoupled Method'' (3,4,5), showing how to apply its 8 sequencial steps to solve this type of circuit. The paper shows that the electric neighborhood of nearby substations depends on the ''Space Constant'' (or ''Characteristic Length'') of the ground circuits interconnecting them such as transmission line ground-wires, power cable sheaths, etc. This paper complements also Ref. (3,4), introducing the complete derivation of useful expressions used to solve lumped parameter ladder circuits of any size (from one pi to an infinite number of pis). The derivation of these expressions also used in (3,4) were not included in these References due to lack of space. In the paper it is also shown a simple procedure to determine the suitable number of ACSR ground-wire spans near a substation necessary to allow a reduction of the ground grid conductor extension.

  17. Reconfigurable Optical Interconnections Using Dynamic Optoelectronic Holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Elmar

    1988-04-01

    Increasing complexity and processing speed of electronic circuits and a high device density have led to serious problems in electrical interconnections. Their limitations arise from their signal transmission capacity. power consumption. crosstalk. and reliability. Optical links may solve such problems by offering high data rates of several gigabits per second. large fanouts of up to 100 loads. good reliability and less power expenditure. Optical fibers, integrated optical waveguides or free-space transmission links may be applicable. For the free-space links, lenses. mirrors and holograms can be used to guide the light waves. In this paper, reconfigurable optical interconnection schemes are proposed and described which are based on optoelectronic holograms. Their interference patterns can be changed dynamically. To establish connections as free-space links, the light beams emitted from even hundreds of light sources are imaged onto an array of small dynamic holograms. Their interference patterns are optically and electronically controllable. These holograms diffract and focus each of the incident light beams individually onto the receiving photo-diodes. By changing the hologram interference patterns dynamically. an optical switch is obtained. It renders the establishment of reconfigurable optical interconnections. As optoelectronic holograms very-high-resolution spatial light modulators are proposed.

  18. Potential roles of optical interconnections within broadband switching modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalk, Gail R.; Habiby, Sarry F.; Hartman, Davis H.; Krchnavek, Robert R.; Wilson, Donald K.; Young, Kenneth C., Jr.

    1991-04-01

    An investigation of potential physical design bottlenecks in future broadband telecommunication switches has led to the identification of several areas where optical interconnections may play a role in the practical realization of required system performance. In the model used the speed and interconnection densities as well as requirements for ease-of-access and efficient power utilization challenge conventional partitioning and packaging strategies. Potential areas where optical interconnections may relieve some of the physical design bottlenecks include fiber management at the customer interface to the switch routing and distribution of high-density interconnections within the fabric of the switch and backplane interconnections to increase system throughput.

  19. Upgrade of the LHC magnet interconnections thermal shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musso, Andrea; Barlow, Graeme; Bastard, Alain; Charrondiere, Maryline; Chrul, Anna; Damianoglou, Dimitrios; Deferne, Guy; Dib, Gaëlle; Duret, Max; Guinchard, Michael; Prin, Hervé; Strychalski, Michał; Craen, Arnaud Vande; Villiger, Gilles; Wright, Loren

    2014-01-01

    The about 1700 interconnections (ICs) between the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) superconducting magnets include thermal shielding at 50-75 K, providing continuity to the thermal shielding of the magnet cryostats to reduce the overall radiation heat loads to the 1.9 K helium bath of the magnets. The IC shield, made of aluminum, is conduction-cooled via a welded bridge to the thermal shield of the adjacent magnets which is actively cooled. TIG welding of these bridges made in the LHC tunnel at installation of the magnets induced a considerable risk of fire hazard due to the proximity of the multi-layer insulation of the magnet shields. A fire incident occurred in one of the machine sectors during machine installation, but fortunately with limited consequences thanks to prompt intervention of the operators. LHC is now undergoing a 2 years technical stop during which all magnet's ICs will have to be opened to consolidate the magnet electrical connections. The IC thermal shields will therefore have to be removed and re-installed after the work is completed. In order to eliminate the risk of fire hazard when re-welding, it has been decided to review the design of the IC shields, by replacing the welded bridges with a mechanical clamping which also preserves its thermal function. An additional advantage of this new solution is the ease in dismantling for maintenance, and eliminating weld-grinding operations at removal needing radioprotection measures because of material activation after long-term operation of the LHC. This paper describes the new design of the IC shields and in particular the theoretical and experimental validation of its thermal performance. Furthermore a status report of the on-going upgrade work in the LHC is given.

  20. Upgrade of the LHC magnet interconnections thermal shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Musso, Andrea; Barlow, Graeme; Bastard, Alain; Charrondiere, Maryline; Deferne, Guy; Dib, Gaëlle; Duret, Max; Guinchard, Michael; Prin, Hervé; Craen, Arnaud Vande; Villiger, Gilles; Chrul, Anna; Damianoglou, Dimitrios; Strychalski, Michał; Wright, Loren

    2014-01-29

    The about 1700 interconnections (ICs) between the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) superconducting magnets include thermal shielding at 50-75 K, providing continuity to the thermal shielding of the magnet cryostats to reduce the overall radiation heat loads to the 1.9 K helium bath of the magnets. The IC shield, made of aluminum, is conduction-cooled via a welded bridge to the thermal shield of the adjacent magnets which is actively cooled. TIG welding of these bridges made in the LHC tunnel at installation of the magnets induced a considerable risk of fire hazard due to the proximity of the multi-layer insulation of the magnet shields. A fire incident occurred in one of the machine sectors during machine installation, but fortunately with limited consequences thanks to prompt intervention of the operators. LHC is now undergoing a 2 years technical stop during which all magnet's ICs will have to be opened to consolidate the magnet electrical connections. The IC thermal shields will therefore have to be removed and re-installed after the work is completed. In order to eliminate the risk of fire hazard when re-welding, it has been decided to review the design of the IC shields, by replacing the welded bridges with a mechanical clamping which also preserves its thermal function. An additional advantage of this new solution is the ease in dismantling for maintenance, and eliminating weld-grinding operations at removal needing radioprotection measures because of material activation after long-term operation of the LHC. This paper describes the new design of the IC shields and in particular the theoretical and experimental validation of its thermal performance. Furthermore a status report of the on-going upgrade work in the LHC is given.

  1. Comparison of electromigration failure rates and grain boundary kinetics in aluminum lines and films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, H. Marc

    2000-10-01

    Electromigration failure times for aluminum-1% silicon interconnects, (0.8 mum thick and linewidths of 3--4 mum) were used to develop a self-consistent thermodynamic treatment of the kinetic process controlling the failure rate. The results imply a power law relationship exists between the driving force and the failure rate, rather than the linear relationship predicted by basic electromigration flux theory. Additionally, the rate controlling process is predicted to require the coordinated motion of multiple atoms, rather than that of individual vacancy diffusion. Evolution of the grain structure during electromigration testing was evaluated for interconnects with-and without an impressed current. The grain structure and the behavior of individual grain boundaries for these aluminum films were evaluated by generating images that revealed the individual grains within the aluminum. These images were obtained using a dual beam FEI 620 Focused Ion Beam scanning electron microscope (FIB), which relies on differences in ion channeling between grain orientations to develop contrast in the secondary electron signal due to ion bombardment. Significant microstructural evolution was observed in regions exhibiting typical electromigration induced damage of void nucleation and growth. No significant changes to the basic microstructure of the interconnects was observed in regions away from the damage sites nor in the interconnects without an impressed current. These observations suggest the microstructural evolution was not solely driven by thermal activation, but possessed a contribution from the impressed current or electric field. In each case, the microstructural development resulted in void nucleation and growth. It was concluded, interactions between the applied field and the aluminum's microstructure contributed to localized microstructural evolution that resulted in void nucleation and growth.

  2. Aluminum permanganate battery

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, C.; Licht, S.L.

    1993-11-30

    A battery is provided comprising an aluminum anode, an aqueous solution of permanganate as the cathodic species and a second electrode capable of reducing permanganate. Such a battery system is characterized by its high energy density and low polarization losses when operating at high temperatures in a strong caustic electrolyte, i.e., high concentration of hydroxyl ions. A variety of anode and electrocatalyst materials are suitable for the efficient oxidation-reduction process and are elucidated.

  3. Improved cryogenic aluminum mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukobratovich, Daniel; Don, Ken; Sumner, Richard E.

    1998-09-01

    Optical surface deformation of metal mirrors used at cryogenic temperatures is reduced through the use of a new process of plating amorphous aluminum on aluminum. The AlumiPlateTM process (produced by AlumiPlate, Inc. in Minneapolis, MN) plates a layer of 99.9+% high purity aluminum about 125 micrometers thick atop the substrate. Very good surface finishes are produced by direct diamond turning of the plating, with some samples below 40 angstroms RMS. Optical testing of a 175-mm diameter, 550-mm optical radius of curvature 6061-T651/AlumiPlateTM aluminum sphere was performed at 65 K to determine cryogenic optical surface figure stability. In five cycles from 300 to 65 K, an average optical surface change of 0.047 wave RMS (1 wave equals 633 nm) was observed. A total optical figure change of 0.03 wave RMS at 65 K was observed from the first to last cycle. The cause of this relatively small long-term change is not yet determined. The test mirror is bi-concave, with a semi- kinematic toroidal mount, and is machined from the axis of a billet. An `uphill quench' heat treatment consisting of five cycles from liquid nitrogen to boiling water temperatures is used to minimize residual stress in the test mirror. Initial diamond turning of the mirror by the Optical Filter Corp., Keene, NH, produced a 300 K unmounted optical surface figure of 0.380 wave peak-to-valley and 0.059 wave RMS. A second effort at diamond turning by II-VI, Inc., Saxonburg, PA produced a 300 K optical figure of 0.443 wave peak-to-valley and 0.066 wave RMS, with a surface roughness varying from 29 to 42 angstroms.

  4. FT-IR standoff detection of thermally excited emissions of trinitrotoluene (TNT) deposited on aluminum substrates.

    PubMed

    Castro-Suarez, John R; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C; Vélez-Reyes, Miguel; Diem, Max; Tague, Thomas J; Hernandez-Rivera, Samuel P

    2013-02-01

    A standoff detection system was assembled by coupling a reflecting telescope to a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer equipped with a cryo-cooled mercury cadmium telluride detector and used for detection of solid-phase samples deposited on substrates. Samples of highly energetic materials were deposited on aluminum substrates and detected at several collector-target distances by performing passive-mode, remote, infrared detection measurements on the heated analytes. Aluminum plates were used as support material, and 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) was used as the target. For standoff detection experiments, the samples were placed at different distances (4 to 55 m). Several target surface temperatures were investigated. Partial least squares regression analysis was applied to the analysis of the intensities of the spectra obtained. Overall, standoff detection in passive mode was useful for quantifying TNT deposited on the aluminum plates with high confidence up to target-collector distances of 55 m.

  5. Examination of the corrosion behavior of aluminum current collectors in lithium/polymer batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Devine, T.M.; Evans, J.W. |; Monteiro, O.R.; Brown, I.G.

    1999-04-01

    The corrosion behavior of aluminum, a candidate material for the current collectors of the positive electrodes of lithium-polymer batteries, in contact with a lithium polymer electrolyte was examined in both batteries and three-electrode electrochemical cells. The results indicate aluminum is resistant to uniform corrosion in the polymer electrolyte: poly(ethylene oxide)-LiN(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2} but can be susceptible to pitting corrosion. Localized pitting corrosion occurs on the aluminum current collector during overcharging of the battery. Pitting corrosion only occurred in the electrochemical cells when the aluminum electrode was anodically polarized to potentials that were considerably greater than those that resulted in pitting corrosion in batteries. The greater susceptibility of the aluminum current collectors of batteries to pitting corrosion is attributed to inhomogeneous current flow through the current collector. This results in local breakdown of the passive film on aluminum at sites of locally high current density. The inhomogeneous current density that flows through the aluminum/cathode interface is caused by the presence of discrete paths through the cathode with low electrical resistance. In an effort to improve the localized corrosion behavior of aluminum electrodes, it was found that surfaces impregnated by ion implantation with {approximately}20 atom % tungsten exhibited enhanced resistance to pitting corrosion in poly(ethylene oxide)-LiN(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2}.

  6. EVALUATION OF A TWO-STAGE PASSIVE TREATMENT APPROACH FOR MINING INFLUENCE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A two-stage passive treatment approach was assessed at bench-scale using two Colorado Mining Influenced Waters (MIWs). The first-stage was a limestone drain with the purpose of removing iron and aluminum and mitigating the potential effects of mineral acidity. The second stage w...

  7. Wireless passive radiation sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

    2013-12-03

    A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

  8. Aluminum Carbothermic Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, Marshall J.

    2005-03-31

    This report documents the non-proprietary research and development conducted on the Aluminum Carbothermic Technology (ACT) project from contract inception on July 01, 2000 to termination on December 31, 2004. The objectives of the program were to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new carbothermic process for producing commercial grade aluminum, designated as the ''Advanced Reactor Process'' (ARP). The scope of the program ranged from fundamental research through small scale laboratory experiments (65 kW power input) to larger scale test modules at up to 1600 kW power input. The tasks included work on four components of the process, Stages 1 and 2 of the reactor, vapor recovery and metal alloy decarbonization; development of computer models; and economic analyses of capital and operating costs. Justification for developing a new, carbothermic route to aluminum production is defined by the potential benefits in reduced energy, lower costs and more favorable environmental characteristics than the conventional Hall-Heroult process presently used by the industry. The estimated metrics for these advantages include energy rates at approximately 10 kWh/kg Al (versus over 13 kWh/kg Al for Hall-Heroult), capital costs as low as $1250 per MTY (versus 4,000 per MTY for Hall-Heroult), operating cost reductions of over 10%, and up to 37% reduction in CO2 emissions for fossil-fuel power plants. Realization of these benefits would be critical to sustaining the US aluminum industries position as a global leader in primary aluminum production. One very attractive incentive for ARP is its perceived ability to cost effectively produce metal over a range of smelter sizes, not feasible for Hall-Heroult plants which must be large, 240,000 TPY or more, to be economical. Lower capacity stand alone carbothermic smelters could be utilized to supply molten metal at fabrication facilities similar to the mini-mill concept employed by the steel industry. Major

  9. Supramolecular Organic Nanowires as Plasmonic Interconnects.

    PubMed

    Armao, Joseph J; Domoto, Yuya; Umehara, Teruhiko; Maaloum, Mounir; Contal, Christophe; Fuks, Gad; Moulin, Emilie; Decher, Gero; Javahiraly, Nicolas; Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2016-02-23

    Metallic nanostructures are able to interact with an incident electromagnetic field at subwavelength scales by plasmon resonance which involves the collective oscillation of conduction electrons localized at their surfaces. Among several possible applications of this phenomenon, the theoretical prediction is that optical circuits connecting multiple plasmonic elements will surpass classical electronic circuits at nanoscale because of their much faster light-based information processing. However, the placement and coupling of metallic elements smaller than optical wavelengths currently remain a formidable challenge by top-down manipulations. Here, we show that organic supramolecular triarylamine nanowires of ≈1 nm in diameter are able to act as plasmonic waveguides. Their self-assembly into plasmonic interconnects between arrays of gold nanoparticles leads to the bottom-up construction of basic optical nanocircuits. When the resonance modes of these metallic nanoparticles are coupled through the organic nanowires, the optical conductivity of the plasmonic layer dramatically increases from 259 to 4271 Ω(-1)·cm(-1). We explain this effect by the coupling of a hot electron/hole pair in the nanoparticle antenna with the half-filled polaronic band of the organic nanowire. We also demonstrate that the whole hybrid system can be described by using the abstraction of the lumped circuit theory, with a far field optical response which depends on the number of interconnects. Overall, our supramolecular bottom-up approach opens the possibility to implement processable, soft, and low cost organic plasmonic interconnects into a large number of applications going from sensing to metamaterials and information technologies.

  10. Supramolecular Organic Nanowires as Plasmonic Interconnects.

    PubMed

    Armao, Joseph J; Domoto, Yuya; Umehara, Teruhiko; Maaloum, Mounir; Contal, Christophe; Fuks, Gad; Moulin, Emilie; Decher, Gero; Javahiraly, Nicolas; Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2016-02-23

    Metallic nanostructures are able to interact with an incident electromagnetic field at subwavelength scales by plasmon resonance which involves the collective oscillation of conduction electrons localized at their surfaces. Among several possible applications of this phenomenon, the theoretical prediction is that optical circuits connecting multiple plasmonic elements will surpass classical electronic circuits at nanoscale because of their much faster light-based information processing. However, the placement and coupling of metallic elements smaller than optical wavelengths currently remain a formidable challenge by top-down manipulations. Here, we show that organic supramolecular triarylamine nanowires of ≈1 nm in diameter are able to act as plasmonic waveguides. Their self-assembly into plasmonic interconnects between arrays of gold nanoparticles leads to the bottom-up construction of basic optical nanocircuits. When the resonance modes of these metallic nanoparticles are coupled through the organic nanowires, the optical conductivity of the plasmonic layer dramatically increases from 259 to 4271 Ω(-1)·cm(-1). We explain this effect by the coupling of a hot electron/hole pair in the nanoparticle antenna with the half-filled polaronic band of the organic nanowire. We also demonstrate that the whole hybrid system can be described by using the abstraction of the lumped circuit theory, with a far field optical response which depends on the number of interconnects. Overall, our supramolecular bottom-up approach opens the possibility to implement processable, soft, and low cost organic plasmonic interconnects into a large number of applications going from sensing to metamaterials and information technologies. PMID:26814600

  11. Development of Ceramic Interconnect Materials for SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Kyung J.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Marina, Olga A.

    2010-08-05

    Currently, acceptor-doped lanthanum chromite is the state-of-the-art ceramic interconnect material for high temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) due to its fairly good electronic conductivity and chemical stability in both oxidizing and reducing atmospheres, and thermal compatibility with other cell components. The major challenge for acceptor-doped lanthanum chromite for SOFC interconnect applications is its inferior sintering behavior in air, which has been attributed to the development of a thin layer of Cr2O3 at the interparticle necks during the initial stages of sintering. In addition, lanthanum chromite is reactive with YSZ electrolyte at high temperatures, forming a highly resistive lanthanum zirconate phase (La2Zr2O7), which further complicates co-firing processes. Acceptor-doped yttrium chromite is considered to be one of the promising alternatives to acceptor-doped lanthanum chromite because it is more stable with respect to the formation of hydroxides in SOFC operating conditions, and the formation of impurity phases can be effectively avoided at co-firing temperatures. In addition, calcium-doped yttrium chromite exhibits higher mechanical strength than lanthanum chromite-based materials. The major drawback of yttrium chromite is considered to be its lower electrical conductivity than lanthanum chromite. The properties of yttrium chromites could possibly be improved and optimized by partial substitution of chromium with various transition metals. During FY10, PNNL investigated the effect of various transition metal doping on chemical stability, sintering and thermal expansion behavior, microstructure, electronic and ionic conductivity, and chemical compatibility with other cell components to develop the optimized ceramic interconnect material.

  12. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  13. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  14. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  15. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  16. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum....

  17. Updating Interconnection Screens for PV System Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Coddington, M.; Mather, B.; Kroposki, B.; Lynn, K.; Razon, A.; Ellis, A.; Hill, R.; Key, T.; Nicole, K.; Smith, J.

    2012-02-01

    This white paper evaluates the origins and usefulness of the capacity penetration screen, offer short-term solutions which could effectively allow fast-track interconnection to many PV system applications, and considers longer-term solutions for increasing PV deployment levels in a safe and reliable manner while reducing or eliminating the emphasis on the penetration screen. Short-term and longer-term alternatives approaches are offered as examples; however, specific modifications to screening procedures should be discussed with stakeholders and must ultimately be adopted by state and federal regulatory bodies.

  18. Metallic Nanowire Interconnections for Integrated Circuit Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Hou Tee (Inventor); Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method for fabricating an electrical interconnect between two or more electrical components. A conductive layer is provided on a substarte and a thin, patterned catalyst array is deposited on an exposed surface of the conductive layer. A gas or vapor of a metallic precursor of a metal nanowire (MeNW) is provided around the catalyst array, and MeNWs grow between the conductive layer and the catalyst array. The catalyst array and a portion of each of the MeNWs are removed to provide exposed ends of the MeNWs.

  19. Repairable chip bonding/interconnect process

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Contolini, Robert J.; Malba, Vincent; Riddle, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    A repairable, chip-to-board interconnect process which addresses cost and testability issues in the multi-chip modules. This process can be carried out using a chip-on-sacrificial-substrate technique, involving laser processing. This process avoids the curing/solvent evolution problems encountered in prior approaches, as well is resolving prior plating problems and the requirements for fillets. For repairable high speed chip-to-board connection, transmission lines can be formed on the sides of the chip from chip bond pads, ending in a gull wing at the bottom of the chip for subsequent solder.

  20. Repairable chip bonding/interconnect process

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Contolini, R.J.; Malba, V.; Riddle, R.A.

    1997-08-05

    A repairable, chip-to-board interconnect process which addresses cost and testability issues in the multi-chip modules is disclosed. This process can be carried out using a chip-on-sacrificial-substrate technique, involving laser processing. This process avoids the curing/solvent evolution problems encountered in prior approaches, as well is resolving prior plating problems and the requirements for fillets. For repairable high speed chip-to-board connection, transmission lines can be formed on the sides of the chip from chip bond pads, ending in a gull wing at the bottom of the chip for subsequent solder. 10 figs.

  1. Optical Interconnection Via Computer-Generated Holograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang; Zhou, Shaomin

    1995-01-01

    Method of free-space optical interconnection developed for data-processing applications like parallel optical computing, neural-network computing, and switching in optical communication networks. In method, multiple optical connections between multiple sources of light in one array and multiple photodetectors in another array made via computer-generated holograms in electrically addressed spatial light modulators (ESLMs). Offers potential advantages of massive parallelism, high space-bandwidth product, high time-bandwidth product, low power consumption, low cross talk, and low time skew. Also offers advantage of programmability with flexibility of reconfiguration, including variation of strengths of optical connections in real time.

  2. Environmental Regulation Impacts on Eastern Interconnection Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Markham, Penn N; Liu, Yilu; Young II, Marcus Aaron

    2013-07-01

    In the United States, recent environmental regulations will likely result in the removal of nearly 30 GW of oil and coal-fired generation from the power grid, mostly in the Eastern Interconnection (EI). The effects of this transition on voltage stability and transmission line flows have previously not been studied from a system-wide perspective. This report discusses the results of power flow studies designed to simulate the evolution of the EI over the next few years as traditional generation sources are replaced with environmentally friendlier ones such as natural gas and wind.

  3. Interconnection of Europe`s power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Manos, P.

    1996-03-01

    More than six years have passed since the Berlin Wall fell during Christmas of 1989, and a unified pan-European electricity-supply system is still not a reality. Progress toward that goal has been certain but slow. Technical and political differences still block the final step in the integration process: a full hookup between the grids of western and northern Europe and the transmission networks of the former Warsaw Pact nations. It has fallen to unified Germany, as the bridge between East and West, to serve as the catalyst of Europe`s electrical congress. This paper discusses the existing and planned interconnection along with a historical perspective.

  4. Spatial-light-modulator interconnected computers

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Aulay, A.D.

    1987-10-01

    Optical technologies perform the basic computer operations of communications, switching, and storage, have already proven superior to electronics for many communications situations, and advances in devices and materials suggest that optics are important for switching and storage. The spatial light modulator (SLM) is one of the devices expected to play an important role in optical computing. An SLM acts as a piece of film whose transmittance or reflectance may be varied spatially and temporally by electronic or optical means. Types of SLMs, the use of optics for computation and three proposed, as well as diverse optical computing systems that use SLMs for interconnections are described in this article.

  5. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W.

    1990-01-01

    A method of passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  6. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1990-06-19

    A method is described for passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  7. Cathodic phenomena in aluminum electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouteillon, J.; Poignet, J. C.; Rameau, J. J.

    1993-02-01

    Although aluminum is one of the world's highest production-volume primary metals, it is particularly costly to produce for a variety of factors, not the least of which are the expenses associated with electrolytic reduction. Based on the scale of global aluminum processing, even minor improvements in the electrowinning technology can result in significant savings of resources. Thus, from this perspective, the following reviews recent studies of cathodic phenomena in aluminum electrowinning.

  8. Quasicrystalline particulate reinforced aluminum composite

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.E.; Biner, S.B.; Sordelet, D.J.; Unal, O.

    1997-07-01

    Particulate reinforced aluminum and aluminum alloy composites are rapidly emerging as new commercial materials for aerospace, automotive, electronic packaging and other high performance applications. However, their low processing ductility and difficulty in recyclability have been the key concern. In this study, two composite systems having the same aluminum alloy matrix, one reinforced with quasicrystals and the other reinforced with the conventional SiC reinforcements were produced with identical processing routes. Their processing characteristics and tensile mechanical properties were compared.

  9. Aluminum-lithium for aerospace

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding, P.S.; Wolf, G.J.

    1996-10-01

    Aluminum-lithium alloys were developed primarily to reduce the weight of aircraft and aerospace structures. Lithium is the lightest metallic element, and each 1% of lithium added to aluminum reduces alloy density by about 3% and increases modulus by about 5%. Though lithium has a solubility limit of 4.2% in aluminum, the amount of lithium ranges between 1 and 3% in commercial alloys. Aluminum-lithium alloys are most often selected for aerospace components because of their low density, high strength, and high specific modulus. However, other applications now exploit their excellent fatigue resistance and cryogenic toughness.

  10. Mineral of the month: aluminum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plunkert, Patricia A.

    2005-01-01

    Aluminum is the second most abundant metallic element in Earth’s crust after silicon. Even so, it is a comparatively new industrial metal that has been produced in commercial quantities for little more than 100 years. Aluminum is lightweight, ductile, malleable and corrosion resistant, and is a good conductor of heat and electricity. Weighing about one-third as much as steel or copper per unit of volume, aluminum is used more than any other metal except iron. Aluminum can be fabricated into desired forms and shapes by every major metalworking technique to add to its versatility.

  11. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, David

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  12. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  13. A charge transport study in diamond, surface passivated by high-k dielectric oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Kovi, Kiran Kumar Majdi, Saman; Gabrysch, Markus; Isberg, Jan

    2014-11-17

    The recent progress in the growth of high-quality single-crystalline diamond films has sparked interest in the realization of efficient diamond power electronic devices. However, finding a suitable passivation is essential to improve the reliability and electrical performance of devices. In the current work, high-k dielectric materials such as aluminum oxide and hafnium oxide were deposited by atomic layer deposition on intrinsic diamond as a surface passivation layer. The hole transport properties in the diamond films were evaluated and compared to unpassivated films using the lateral time-of-flight technique. An enhancement of the near surface hole mobility in diamond films of up to 27% is observed when using aluminum oxide passivation.

  14. Modular assembly and interconnects for fluidic microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Carlos; Collins, Scott D.; Smith, Rosemary L.

    1998-03-01

    At this early phase in the development of microfabricated fluidic systems, only a few components or functions have been microfabricated. Some sort of interface to the remaining 'off chip' components is required. For example, a variety of analysis techniques have been demonstrated in microfabricated channels, and cells, but sample preparation is to date still mostly performed off chip, involving pipetting, tubing and titer plate interfacing. The transition from micro to macro components has been to date rather crude, consisting mostly of tubing glued into or over holes etched into silicon or glass substrates. This paper presents new, micromachinable, joining and interconnecting structures that enable the modular, plug-in assembly of fluidic components to one another, to tubing, and into a fluid channel breadboard. Micro-to-miniature interfacing elements for making connections between microchannels and standard tubing, and both horizontal and vertical channel- to-channel interconnects will be demonstrated. Excellent seals are created using photopatternable silicone O-rings that are held in compression by the connecting structure. This technology allows one to assemble a fluidic microsystem with both custom and off the shelf, micro or miniature components. The connections are all reversible, making the system design reconfigurable and components easily exchanged.

  15. National Offshore Wind Energy Grid Interconnection Study

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, John P.; Liu, Shu; Ibanez, Eduardo; Pennock, Ken; Reed, Greg; Hanes, Spencer

    2014-07-30

    The National Offshore Wind Energy Grid Interconnection Study (NOWEGIS) considers the availability and potential impacts of interconnecting large amounts of offshore wind energy into the transmission system of the lower 48 contiguous United States. A total of 54GW of offshore wind was assumed to be the target for the analyses conducted. A variety of issues are considered including: the anticipated staging of offshore wind; the offshore wind resource availability; offshore wind energy power production profiles; offshore wind variability; present and potential technologies for collection and delivery of offshore wind energy to the onshore grid; potential impacts to existing utility systems most likely to receive large amounts of offshore wind; and regulatory influences on offshore wind development. The technologies considered the reliability of various high-voltage ac (HVAC) and high-voltage dc (HVDC) technology options and configurations. The utility system impacts of GW-scale integration of offshore wind are considered from an operational steady-state perspective and from a regional and national production cost perspective.

  16. European Transmission Interconnection; Eurasian power grid

    SciTech Connect

    Posch, J. )

    1991-09-01

    Systems and philosophies perceived on a grand scale, encompassing new ideas, are often characterized as a dream. But in fact, such dreams often lead to the first step to fruitful development. This article is based on a preliminary study of the existing electrical high-tension networks of Western Europe, Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union - which, as explained herein, may be merged into a multinational energy supply system. Such a system would constitute a completely interconnected Eurasian Power Grid. The idea of a Eurasian super grid, spanning from the Atlantic to the Ural and Siberia, is not new. Various studies have been conducted by both western Europe and the Soviet Union on this topic. Our world is currently in an era of extra high voltage (EHV) and ultra high voltage (UHV) electrical systems. This translates into existing UHV lines of 1150 kV which have already been proven in successful operation. Such UHV systems are capable of transmitting thousands of megawatts over a distance of a 1000 miles. Furthermore, national boundaries are not more a hindrance than the challenge of interconnecting complete networks into an overall synchronized working system with load exchange capabilities in all directions.

  17. IETI – Isogeometric Tearing and Interconnecting

    PubMed Central

    Kleiss, Stefan K.; Pechstein, Clemens; Jüttler, Bert; Tomar, Satyendra

    2012-01-01

    Finite Element Tearing and Interconnecting (FETI) methods are a powerful approach to designing solvers for large-scale problems in computational mechanics. The numerical simulation problem is subdivided into a number of independent sub-problems, which are then coupled in appropriate ways. NURBS- (Non-Uniform Rational B-spline) based isogeometric analysis (IGA) applied to complex geometries requires to represent the computational domain as a collection of several NURBS geometries. Since there is a natural decomposition of the computational domain into several subdomains, NURBS-based IGA is particularly well suited for using FETI methods. This paper proposes the new IsogEometric Tearing and Interconnecting (IETI) method, which combines the advanced solver design of FETI with the exact geometry representation of IGA. We describe the IETI framework for two classes of simple model problems (Poisson and linearized elasticity) and discuss the coupling of the subdomains along interfaces (both for matching interfaces and for interfaces with T-joints, i.e. hanging nodes). Special attention is paid to the construction of a suitable preconditioner for the iterative linear solver used for the interface problem. We report several computational experiments to demonstrate the performance of the proposed IETI method. PMID:24511167

  18. Thermoelectric Coolers with Sintered Silver Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kähler, Julian; Stranz, Andrej; Waag, Andreas; Peiner, Erwin

    2014-06-01

    The fabrication and performance of a sintered Peltier cooler (SPC) based on bismuth telluride with sintered silver interconnects are described. Miniature SPC modules with a footprint of 20 mm2 were assembled using pick-and-place pressure-assisted silver sintering at low pressure (5.5 N/mm2) and moderate temperature (250°C to 270°C). A modified flip-chip bonder combined with screen/stencil printing for paste transfer was used for the pick-and-place process, enabling high positioning accuracy, easy handling of the tiny bismuth telluride pellets, and immediate visual process control. A specific contact resistance of (1.4 ± 0.1) × 10-5 Ω cm2 was found, which is in the range of values reported for high-temperature solder interconnects of bismuth telluride pellets. The realized SPCs were evaluated from room temperature to 300°C, considerably outperforming the operating temperature range of standard commercial Peltier coolers. Temperature cycling capability was investigated from 100°C to 235°C over more than 200 h, i.e., 850 cycles, during which no degradation of module resistance or cooling performance occurred.

  19. Towards energy aware optical networks and interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesk, Ivan; Osadola, Tolulope; Idris, Siti

    2013-10-01

    In a today's world, information technology has been identified as one of the major factors driving economic prosperity. Datacenters businesses have been growing significantly in the past few years. The equipments in these datacenters need to be efficiently connected to each other and also to the outside world in order to enable effective exchange of information. This is why there is need for highly scalable, energy savvy and reliable network connectivity infrastructure that is capable of accommodating the large volume of data being exchanged at any time within the datacenter network and the outside network in general. These devices that can ensure such effective connectivity currently require large amount of energy in order to meet up with these increasing demands. In this paper, an overview of works being done towards realizing energy aware optical networks and interconnects for datacenters is presented. Also an OCDMA approach is discussed as potential multiple access technique for future optical network interconnections. We also presented some challenges that might inhibit effective implementation of the OCDMA multiplexing scheme.

  20. Interconnected ponds operation for flood hazard distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putra, S. S.; Ridwan, B. W.

    2016-05-01

    The climatic anomaly, which comes with extreme rainfall, will increase the flood hazard in an area within a short period of time. The river capacity in discharging the flood is not continuous along the river stretch and sensitive to the flood peak. This paper contains the alternatives on how to locate the flood retention pond that are physically feasible to reduce the flood peak. The flood ponds were designed based on flood curve number criteria (TR-55, USDA) with the aim of rapid flood peak capturing and gradual flood retuning back to the river. As a case study, the hydrologic condition of upper Ciliwung river basin with several presumed flood pond locations was conceptually designed. A fundamental tank model that reproducing the operation of interconnected ponds was elaborated to achieve the designed flood discharge that will flows to the downstream area. The flood hazard distribution status, as the model performance criteria, will be computed within Ciliwung river reach in Manggarai Sluice Gate spot. The predicted hazard reduction with the operation of the interconnected retention area result had been bench marked with the normal flow condition.

  1. Aspects of short-range interconnect packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfeld, Denis; Brenner, Karl-Heinz

    2012-01-01

    In short-range interconnect applications, one question arises frequently: When should optical solutions be chosen over electrical wiring? The answer to this question of course depends on several factors like costs, performance, reliability, availability of testing equipment and knowledge about optical technologies, and last but not least, it strongly depends on the application itself. Networking in high performance computing (HPC) is one such example. With bit rates around 10 Gbit/s per channel and cable length above 2 m, the high attenuation of electrical cables leads to a clear preference of optical or active optical cables (AOC) for most planned HPC systems. For AOCs, the electro-optical conversion is realized inside the connector housing, while for purely optical cables, the conversion is done at the edge of the board. Proceeding to 25 Gbit/s and higher, attenuation and loss of signal quality become critical. Therefore, either significantly more effort has to be spent on the electrical side, or the package for conversion has to be integrated closer to the chip, thus requiring new packaging technologies. The paper provides a state of the art overview of packaging concepts for short range interconnects, it describes the main challenges of optical package integration and illustrates new concepts and trends in this research area.

  2. Message Passing Framework for Globally Interconnected Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafeez, M.; Asghar, S.; Malik, U. A.; Rehman, A.; Riaz, N.

    2011-12-01

    In prevailing technology trends it is apparent that the network requirements and technologies will advance in future. Therefore the need of High Performance Computing (HPC) based implementation for interconnecting clusters is comprehensible for scalability of clusters. Grid computing provides global infrastructure of interconnecting clusters consisting of dispersed computing resources over Internet. On the other hand the leading model for HPC programming is Message Passing Interface (MPI). As compared to Grid computing, MPI is better suited for solving most of the complex computational problems. MPI itself is restricted to a single cluster. It does not support message passing over the internet to use the computing resources of different clusters in an optimal way. We propose a model that provides message passing capabilities between parallel applications over the internet. The proposed model is based on Architecture for Java Universal Message Passing (A-JUMP) framework and Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) named as High Performance Computing Bus. The HPC Bus is built using ActiveMQ. HPC Bus is responsible for communication and message passing in an asynchronous manner. Asynchronous mode of communication offers an assurance for message delivery as well as a fault tolerance mechanism for message passing. The idea presented in this paper effectively utilizes wide-area intercluster networks. It also provides scheduling, dynamic resource discovery and allocation, and sub-clustering of resources for different jobs. Performance analysis and comparison study of the proposed framework with P2P-MPI are also presented in this paper.

  3. Simulation of void formation in interconnect lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholeslami, Alireza; Heitzinger, Clemens; Puchner, Helmut; Badrieh, Fuad; Selberherr, Siegfried

    2003-04-01

    The predictive simulation of the formation of voids in interconnect lines is important for improving capacitance and timing in current memory cells. The cells considered are used in wireless applications such as cell phones, pagers, radios, handheld games, and GPS systems. In backend processes for memory cells, ILD (interlayer dielectric) materials and processes result in void formation during gap fill. This approach lowers the overall k-value of a given metal layer and is economically advantageous. The effect of the voids on the overall capacitive load is tremendous. In order to simulate the shape and positions of the voids and thus the overall capacitance, the topography simulator ELSA (Enhanced Level Set Applications) has been developed which consists of three modules, a level set module, a radiosity module, and a surface reaction module. The deposition process considered is deposition of silicon nitride. Test structures of interconnect lines of memory cells were fabricated and several SEM images thereof were used to validate the corresponding simulations.

  4. Method of doping interconnections for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Pal, Uday B.; Singhal, Subhash C.; Moon, David M.; Folser, George R.

    1990-01-01

    A dense, electronically conductive interconnection layer 26 is bonded on a porous, tubular, electronically conductive air electrode structure 16, optionally supported by a ceramic support 22, by (A) forming a layer of oxide particles of at least one of the metals Ca, Sr, Co, Ba or Mg on a part 24 of a first surface of the air electrode 16, (B) heating the electrode structure, (C) applying a halide vapor containing at least lanthanum halide and chromium halide to the first surface and applying a source of oxygen to a second opposite surface of the air electrode so that they contact at said first surface, to cause a reaction of the oxygen and halide and cause a dense lanthanum-chromium oxide structure to grow, from the first electrode surface, between and around the oxide particles, where the metal oxide particles get incoporated into the lanthanum-chromium oxide structure as it grows thicker with time, and the metal ions in the oxide particles diffuse into the bulk of the lanthamum-chromium oxide structure, to provide a dense, top, interconnection layer 26 on top of the air electrode 16. A solid electrolyte layer 18 can be applied to the uncovered portion of the air electrode, and a fuel electrode 20 can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to provide an electrochemical cell 10.

  5. Reconfigurable optical interconnections via dynamic computer-generated holograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang (Inventor); Zhou, Shaomin (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A system is proposed for optically providing one-to-many irregular interconnections, and strength-adjustable many-to-many irregular interconnections which may be provided with strengths (weights) w(sub ij) using multiple laser beams which address multiple holograms and means for combining the beams modified by the holograms to form multiple interconnections, such as a cross-bar switching network. The optical means for interconnection is based on entering a series of complex computer-generated holograms on an electrically addressed spatial light modulator for real-time reconfigurations, thus providing flexibility for interconnection networks for largescale practical use. By employing multiple sources and holograms, the number of interconnection patterns achieved is increased greatly.

  6. Reconfigurable Optical Interconnections Via Dynamic Computer-Generated Holograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang (Inventor); Zhou, Shao-Min (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A system is presented for optically providing one-to-many irregular interconnections, and strength-adjustable many-to-many irregular interconnections which may be provided with strengths (weights) w(sub ij) using multiple laser beams which address multiple holograms and means for combining the beams modified by the holograms to form multiple interconnections, such as a cross-bar switching network. The optical means for interconnection is based on entering a series of complex computer-generated holograms on an electrically addressed spatial light modulator for real-time reconfigurations, thus providing flexibility for interconnection networks for large-scale practical use. By employing multiple sources and holograms, the number of interconnection patterns achieved is increased greatly.

  7. Fundamental studies on electrochemical production of dendrite-free aluminum and titanium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Debabrata

    -Al alloys were determined. The Ti-Al alloys containing about 13-27 atom % Ti were produced using both electrolytes. The current efficiency of AlCl3-BMIC was varies between 79-87%. But lower current efficiency (25-38%) was obtained for AlCl3-BMIC-TiCl4 electrolytes due to the formation of TiCl3 passive layer on the electrodes. To increase the productivity, constant current method (160-210 A/m2) was implemented. This fundamental study on low temperature production of dendrite-free aluminum and Al-Ti alloys is not only efficient but also opens a novel route in aluminum and titanium process metallurgy.

  8. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Minh, Nguyen Q.; Loutfy, Raouf O.; Yao, Neng-Ping

    1984-01-01

    Production of metallic aluminum by the electrolysis of Al.sub.2 S.sub.3 at 700.degree.-800.degree. C. in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  9. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Minh, N.Q.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1982-04-01

    Metallic aluminum may be produced by the electrolysis of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ at 700 to 800/sup 0/C in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  10. Optical passive athermalization for infrared zoom system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shenghui; Yang, Changcheng; Zheng, Jia; Lan, Ning; Xiong, Tao; Li, Yong

    2007-12-01

    In an infrared zoom system, it is difficult to obtain the best thermal compensation for all effective focal length (EFL) simultaneously by moving a single lens group. According to the principle of optical passive athermalization, the equations of focal length, achromatization and athermalization of both long and short EFL are established respectively. By analyzing the thermal aberration value relations between long EFL and short EFL, the thermal aberration values of the switching groups for short EFL athermalization are calculated. Firstly, the athermalization of long EFL is designed. Then through reasonable optical materials matching of the switching groups, the short EFL achieves athermalization as well. In this paper, a re-imaging switching zoom system is designed. It has a relative aperture of f/4.0, 100% cold shield efficiency, the EFL of 180mm/30mm at 3.7-4.8μm. The long EFL includes four refractive elements and one hybrid refractive/diffractive element. The switching groups of short EFL have two types, one is composed of four refractive elements, and the other is composed of two refractive elements and one hybrid refractive/diffractive element. Both of the short EFL achieve athermalization. With the aluminum materials of system structures, the zoom system achieves optical passive athermalization. It has the diffraction limited image quality and stable image plane from -30°C to 70°C.

  11. Characterization of ultradispersed aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, R.L.; Maienschein, J.L.; Swansiger, R.W.; Garcia, F.; Darling, D.H.

    1994-12-08

    Samples of ultradispersed Al were received, which were produced by electrically exploding Al wires in argon. These samples comprised very small particles that were not significantly oxidized and that were stable in air. Particle morphology were studied with SE, micropycnometry, and gas adsorption surface area. Composition were determined using various techniques, as were thermal stability and reaction exotherms. The inexplicable reports of an Al-Ar compound and of an exothermic reaction were not confirmed. The material is a stable, nonoxidized, small-particle, highly reactive form of aluminum that is of interest in energetic materials formulations.

  12. Aluminum nitride grating couplers.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Siddhartha; Doerr, Christopher R; Piazza, Gianluca

    2012-06-10

    Grating couplers in sputtered aluminum nitride, a piezoelectric material with low loss in the C band, are demonstrated. Gratings and a waveguide micromachined on a silicon wafer with 600 nm minimum feature size were defined in a single lithography step without partial etching. Silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) was used for cladding layers. Peak coupling efficiency of -6.6 dB and a 1 dB bandwidth of 60 nm have been measured. This demonstration of wire waveguides and wideband grating couplers in a material that also has piezoelectric and elasto-optic properties will enable new functions for integrated photonics and optomechanics.

  13. Probability density function modeling for sub-powered interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pater, Flavius; Amaricǎi, Alexandru

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes three mathematical models for reliability probability density function modeling the interconnect supplied at sub-threshold voltages: spline curve approximations, Gaussian models,and sine interpolation. The proposed analysis aims at determining the most appropriate fitting for the switching delay - probability of correct switching for sub-powered interconnects. We compare the three mathematical models with the Monte-Carlo simulations of interconnects for 45 nm CMOS technology supplied at 0.25V.

  14. Application of optical interconnect technology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Haigh, R.E.; Lowry, M.E.; McCammon, K.; Hills, R.; Mitchell, R.; Sweider, D.

    1995-08-10

    Optical interconnects will be required to meet the information bandwidth requirements of future communication and computing applications. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the authors are involved in applying optical interconnect technologies in two distinct application areas: Multi-Gigabit/sec Computer Backplanes and Gigabit/sec Wide Area Networking using Wavelength Division Multiplexing. In this paper, the authors discuss their efforts to integrate optical interconnect technologies into prototype computing and communication systems.

  15. Selective Adsorption of Sodium Aluminum Fluoride Salts from Molten Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard S. Aubrey; Christine A. Boyle; Eddie M. Williams; David H. DeYoung; Dawid D. Smith; Feng Chi

    2007-08-16

    Aluminum is produced in electrolytic reduction cells where alumina feedstock is dissolved in molten cryolite (sodium aluminum fluoride) along with aluminum and calcium fluorides. The dissolved alumina is then reduced by electrolysis and the molten aluminum separates to the bottom of the cell. The reduction cell is periodically tapped to remove the molten aluminum. During the tapping process, some of the molten electrolyte (commonly referred as “bath” in the aluminum industry) is carried over with the molten aluminum and into the transfer crucible. The carryover of molten bath into the holding furnace can create significant operational problems in aluminum cast houses. Bath carryover can result in several problems. The most troublesome problem is sodium and calcium pickup in magnesium-bearing alloys. Magnesium alloying additions can result in Mg-Na and Mg-Ca exchange reactions with the molten bath, which results in the undesirable pickup of elemental sodium and calcium. This final report presents the findings of a project to evaluate removal of molten bath using a new and novel micro-porous filter media. The theory of selective adsorption or removal is based on interfacial surface energy differences of molten aluminum and bath on the micro-porous filter structure. This report describes the theory of the selective adsorption-filtration process, the development of suitable micro-porous filter media, and the operational results obtained with a micro-porous bed filtration system. The micro-porous filter media was found to very effectively remove molten sodium aluminum fluoride bath by the selective adsorption-filtration mechanism.

  16. Oscillations in interconnected complex networks under intentional attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Ping; Xia, Yongxiang; Tan, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Many real-world networks are interconnected with each other. In this paper, we study the traffic dynamics in interconnected complex networks under an intentional attack. We find that with the shortest time delay routing strategy, the traffic dynamics can show the stable state, periodic, quasi-periodic and chaotic oscillations, when the capacity redundancy parameter changes. Moreover, compared with isolated complex networks, oscillations always take place in interconnected networks more easily. Thirdly, in interconnected networks, oscillations are affected strongly by the coupling probability and coupling preference.

  17. Reaction-diffusion processes on interconnected scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garas, Antonios

    2015-08-01

    We study the two-particle annihilation reaction A +B →∅ on interconnected scale-free networks, using different interconnecting strategies. We explore how the mixing of particles and the process evolution are influenced by the number of interconnecting links, by their functional properties, and by the interconnectivity strategies in use. We show that the reaction rates on this system are faster than what was observed in other topologies, due to the better particle mixing that suppresses the segregation effect, in line with previous studies performed on single scale-free networks.

  18. Reliability Testing of Advanced Interconnect Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, R. R.; Strus, M. C.; Chiaramonti, A. N.; Kim, Y. L.; Jung, Y. J.; Read, D. T.

    2011-11-01

    We describe the development of electrical test methods to evaluate damage that determines reliability in advanced, small-scale conductors, including damascene copper and aligned carbon nanotube networks. Rapid thermal cycling induced during high-current AC stressing provides a means for measuring lifetimes associated with cyclic plasticity and/or diffusive damage in damascene copper. The specific type of damage that develops depends on the line geometry and the nature of the stress state induced within the lines during cycling. Voids form in both fully passivated and partially passivated lines under high levels of hydrostatic tension. Dislocation activity takes place in partially passivated lines in the presence of high shears. High-current DC stressing provides a means for evaluating the fabrication quality of aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) networks, in what we believe to be the first lifetime degradation tests of such materials. While classic electromigration is unlikely in nanocarbon, we observed through resistance changes two forms of degradation that we believe are tied to the nanotube packing and resulting conduction path density through the network: a gradual build-up of damage, and a more abrupt, unpredictable form of damage accumulation, which may be linked to sudden changes in network morphology due to stressing.

  19. The Benefits of Aluminum Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goyal, R. C.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses benefits of aluminum windows for college construction and renovation projects, including that aluminum is the most successfully recycled material, that it meets architectural glass deflection standards, that it has positive thermal energy performance, and that it is a preferred exterior surface. (EV)

  20. Lost-Soap Aluminum Casting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihalow, Paula

    1980-01-01

    Lost-wax casting in sterling silver is a costly experience for the average high school student. However, this jewelry process can be learned at no cost if scrap aluminum is used instead of silver, and soap bars are used instead of wax. This lost-soap aluminum casting process is described. (Author/KC)

  1. Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide - 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1999-01-01

    The 1990 U.S. Bureau of Mines publication, Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide, has been updated and is now available. The 1998 USGS edition of Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide is published in two parts. Part I—Detail contains information on individual primary smelter capacity, location, ownership, sources of energy, and other miscellaneous information. Part II—Summary summarizes the capacity data by country

  2. Aluminum Nanoholes for Optical Biosensing.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Carlos Angulo; Canalejas-Tejero, Víctor; Herranz, Sonia; Urraca, Javier; Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz; Avella-Oliver, Miquel; Maquieira, Ángel; Puchades, Rosa

    2015-07-09

    Sub-wavelength diameter holes in thin metal layers can exhibit remarkable optical features that make them highly suitable for (bio)sensing applications. Either as efficient light scattering centers for surface plasmon excitation or metal-clad optical waveguides, they are able to form strongly localized optical fields that can effectively interact with biomolecules and/or nanoparticles on the nanoscale. As the metal of choice, aluminum exhibits good optical and electrical properties, is easy to manufacture and process and, unlike gold and silver, its low cost makes it very promising for commercial applications. However, aluminum has been scarcely used for biosensing purposes due to corrosion and pitting issues. In this short review, we show our recent achievements on aluminum nanohole platforms for (bio)sensing. These include a method to circumvent aluminum degradation--which has been successfully applied to the demonstration of aluminum nanohole array (NHA) immunosensors based on both, glass and polycarbonate compact discs supports--the use of aluminum nanoholes operating as optical waveguides for synthesizing submicron-sized molecularly imprinted polymers by local photopolymerization, and a technique for fabricating transferable aluminum NHAs onto flexible pressure-sensitive adhesive tapes, which could facilitate the development of a wearable technology based on aluminum NHAs.

  3. Aluminum Nanoholes for Optical Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Carlos Angulo; Canalejas-Tejero, Víctor; Herranz, Sonia; Urraca, Javier; Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz; Avella-Oliver, Miquel; Maquieira, Ángel; Puchades, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Sub-wavelength diameter holes in thin metal layers can exhibit remarkable optical features that make them highly suitable for (bio)sensing applications. Either as efficient light scattering centers for surface plasmon excitation or metal-clad optical waveguides, they are able to form strongly localized optical fields that can effectively interact with biomolecules and/or nanoparticles on the nanoscale. As the metal of choice, aluminum exhibits good optical and electrical properties, is easy to manufacture and process and, unlike gold and silver, its low cost makes it very promising for commercial applications. However, aluminum has been scarcely used for biosensing purposes due to corrosion and pitting issues. In this short review, we show our recent achievements on aluminum nanohole platforms for (bio)sensing. These include a method to circumvent aluminum degradation—which has been successfully applied to the demonstration of aluminum nanohole array (NHA) immunosensors based on both, glass and polycarbonate compact discs supports—the use of aluminum nanoholes operating as optical waveguides for synthesizing submicron-sized molecularly imprinted polymers by local photopolymerization, and a technique for fabricating transferable aluminum NHAs onto flexible pressure-sensitive adhesive tapes, which could facilitate the development of a wearable technology based on aluminum NHAs. PMID:26184330

  4. Compact Interconnection Networks Based on Quantum Dots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Toomarian, Nikzad; Modarress, Katayoon; Spotnitz, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Architectures that would exploit the distinct characteristics of quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) have been proposed for digital communication networks that connect advanced digital computing circuits. In comparison with networks of wires in conventional very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuitry, the networks according to the proposed architectures would be more compact. The proposed architectures would make it possible to implement complex interconnection schemes that are required for some advanced parallel-computing algorithms and that are difficult (and in many cases impractical) to implement in VLSI circuitry. The difficulty of implementation in VLSI and the major potential advantage afforded by QCA were described previously in Implementing Permutation Matrices by Use of Quantum Dots (NPO-20801), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 10 (October 2001), page 42. To recapitulate: Wherever two wires in a conventional VLSI circuit cross each other and are required not to be in electrical contact with each other, there must be a layer of electrical insulation between them. This, in turn, makes it necessary to resort to a noncoplanar and possibly a multilayer design, which can be complex, expensive, and even impractical. As a result, much of the cost of designing VLSI circuits is associated with minimization of data routing and assignment of layers to minimize crossing of wires. Heretofore, these considerations have impeded the development of VLSI circuitry to implement complex, advanced interconnection schemes. On the other hand, with suitable design and under suitable operating conditions, QCA-based signal paths can be allowed to cross each other in the same plane without adverse effect. In principle, this characteristic could be exploited to design compact, coplanar, simple (relative to VLSI) QCA-based networks to implement complex, advanced interconnection schemes. The proposed architectures require two advances in QCA-based circuitry beyond basic QCA-based binary

  5. Producing thin film photovoltaic modules with high integrity interconnects and dual layer contacts

    DOEpatents

    Jansen, Kai W.; Maley, Nagi

    2000-01-01

    High performance photovoltaic modules are produced with improved interconnects by a special process. Advantageously, the photovoltaic modules have a dual layer back (rear) contact and a front contact with at least one layer. The front contact and the inner layer of the back contact can comprise a transparent conductive oxide. The outer layer of the back contact can comprise a metal or metal oxide. The front contact can also have a dielectric layer. In one form, the dual layer back contact comprises a zinc oxide inner layer and an aluminum outer layer and the front contact comprises a tin oxide inner layer and a silicon dioxide dielectric outer layer. One or more amorphous silicon-containing thin film semiconductors can be deposited between the front and back contacts. The contacts can be positioned between a substrate and an optional superstrate. During production, the transparent conductive oxide layer of the front contact is scribed by a laser, then the amorphous silicon-containing semiconductors and inner layer of the dual layer back contact are simultaneously scribed and trenched (drilled) by the laser and the trench is subsequently filled with the same metal as the outer layer of the dual layer back contact to provide a superb mechanical and electrical interconnect between the front contact and the outer layer of the dual layer back contact. The outer layer of the dual layer back contact can then be scribed by the laser. For enhanced environmental protection, the photovoltaic modules can be encapsulated.

  6. Producing thin film photovoltaic modules with high integrity interconnects and dual layer contacts

    DOEpatents

    Jansen, Kai W.; Maley, Nagi

    2001-01-01

    High performance photovoltaic modules are produced with improved interconnects by a special process. Advantageously, the photovoltaic modules have a dual layer back (rear) contact and a front contact with at least one layer. The front contact and the inner layer of the back contact can comprise a transparent conductive oxide. The outer layer of the back contact can comprise a metal or metal oxide. The front contact can also have a dielectric layer. In one form, the dual layer back contact comprises a zinc oxide inner layer and an aluminum outer layer and the front contact comprises a tin oxide inner layer and a silicon dioxide dielectric outer layer. One or more amorphous silicon-containing thin film semiconductors can be deposited between the front and back contacts. The contacts can be positioned between a substrate and an optional superstrate. During production, the transparent conductive oxide layer of the front contact is scribed by a laser, then the amorphous silicon-containing semiconductors and inner layer of the dual layer back contact are simultaneously scribed and trenched (drilled) by the laser and the trench is subsequently filled with the same metal as the outer layer of the dual layer back contact to provide a superb mechanical and electrical interconnect between the front contact and the outer layer of the dual layer back contact. The outer layer of the dual layer back contact can then be scribed by the laser. For enhanced environmental protection, the photovoltaic modules can be encapsulated.

  7. Passivated niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Hjorvarsson, Bjorgvin; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2006-12-19

    A niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided by treating a niobium cavity through a process comprising: 1) removing surface oxides by plasma etching or a similar process; 2) removing hydrogen or other gases absorbed in the bulk niobium by high temperature treatment of the cavity under ultra high vacuum to achieve hydrogen outgassing; and 3) assuring the long term chemical stability of the niobium cavity by applying a passivating layer of a superconducting material having a superconducting transition temperature higher than niobium thereby reducing losses from electron (cooper pair) scattering in the near surface region of the interior of the niobium cavity. According to a preferred embodiment, the passivating layer comprises niobium nitride (NbN) applied by reactive sputtering.

  8. Passive broadband acoustic thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Klin'shov, V. V.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Subochev, P. V.

    2016-04-01

    The 1D internal (core) temperature profiles for the model object (plasticine) and the human hand are reconstructed using the passive acoustothermometric broadband probing data. Thermal acoustic radiation is detected by a broadband (0.8-3.5 MHz) acoustic radiometer. The temperature distribution is reconstructed using a priori information corresponding to the experimental conditions. The temperature distribution for the heated model object is assumed to be monotonic. For the hand, we assume that the temperature distribution satisfies the heat-conduction equation taking into account the blood flow. The average error of reconstruction determined for plasticine from the results of independent temperature measurements is 0.6 K for a measuring time of 25 s. The reconstructed value of the core temperature of the hand (36°C) generally corresponds to physiological data. The obtained results make it possible to use passive broadband acoustic probing for measuring the core temperatures in medical procedures associated with heating of human organism tissues.

  9. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Hall, Earl T. (Inventor); Baker, Donald A. (Inventor); Bryant, Timothy D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  10. Passively actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Modro, S. Michael; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.

    2005-09-20

    A passively actuated valve for isolating a high pressure zone from a low pressure zone and discontinuing the isolation when the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below a preset threshold. If the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below the preset threshold, the valve opens and allows flow from the high pressure zone to the low pressure zone. The valve remains open allowing pressure equalization and back-flow should a pressure inversion between the two pressure zone occur.

  11. Virtual interconnection platform initiative scoping study

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yong; Kou, Gefei; Pan, Zuohong; Liu, Yilu; King Jr., Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Due to security and liability concerns, the research community has limited access to realistic large-scale power grid models to test and validate new operation and control methodologies. It is also difficult for industry to evaluate the relative value of competing new tools without a common platform for comparison. This report proposes to develop a large-scale virtual power grid model that retains basic features and represents future trends of major U.S. electric interconnections. This model will include realistic power flow and dynamics information as well as a relevant geospatial distribution of assets. This model will be made widely available to the research community for various power system stability and control studies and can be used as a common platform for comparing the efficacies of various new technologies.

  12. Microfabricated structures with electrical isolation and interconnections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, William A. (Inventor); Juneau, Thor N. (Inventor); Roessig, Allen W. (Inventor); Lemkin, Mark A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The invention is directed to a microfabricated device. The device includes a substrate that is etched to define mechanical structures at least some of which are anchored laterally to the remainder of the substrate. Electrical isolation at points where mechanical structures are attached to the substrate is provided by filled isolation trenches. Filled trenches may also be used to electrically isolate structure elements from each other at points where mechanical attachment of structure elements is desired. The performance of microelectromechanical devices is improved by 1) having a high-aspect-ratio between vertical and lateral dimensions of the mechanical elements, 2) integrating electronics on the same substrate as the mechanical elements, 3) good electrical isolation among mechanical elements and circuits except where electrical interconnection is desired.

  13. Efficient hierarchical interconnection for multiprocessor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Sizheng; Levy, Saul

    1992-01-01

    The authors present a novel approach to the design of a class of hierarchical interconnection networks for multiprocessor systems. This approach, based on an architecture providing separate networks for each level, gives a general and flexible way to construct efficient hierarchical networks. The performance and cost-effectiveness of the resulting networks are analyzed and compared in detail, using both unbuffered and buffered network models. It is shown that, if the design parameters are determined based on the degree of locality, the cost-effectiveness of a hierarchical network can be significantly improved. In addition, the authors investigate how to construct a cost-effectiveness hierarchical network by determining appropriate design parameters. Two associated algorithms are developed for this purpose.

  14. Forming electrical interconnections through semiconductor wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, T. R.

    1981-01-01

    An information processing system based on CMOS/SOS technology is being developed by NASA to process digital image data collected by satellites. An array of holes is laser drilled in a semiconductor wafer, and a conductor is formed in the holes to fabricate electrical interconnections through the wafers. Six techniques are used to form conductors in the silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) wafers, including capillary wetting, wedge extrusion, wire intersection, electroless plating, electroforming, double-sided sputtering and through-hole electroplating. The respective strengths and weaknesses of these techniques are discussed and compared, with double-sided sputtering and the through-hole plating method achieving best results. In addition, hollow conductors provided by the technique are available for solder refill, providing a natural way of forming an electrically connected stack of SOS wafers.

  15. High throughput network for multiprocessor interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raatikainen, Pertti; Zidbeck, Juha

    1993-05-01

    Multiprocessor architectures are needed to support modern broadband applications, since traditional bus structures are not capable of providing high throughput. New bus structures are needed, especially in the area of network components and terminals. A study to find an efficient and cost effective interconnection topology for the future high speed products is presented. The most common bus topologies are introduced, and their characteristics are estimated to decide which one of them offers best performance and lowest implementation cost. The ring topology is chosen to be studied in more detail. Four competing bus access schemes for the high throughput ring are introduced as well as simulation models for each of them. Using transfer delay and throughput results, as well as keeping the implementation point of view in mind, the best candidate is selected to be studied and experimented in the succeeding research project.

  16. Interconnection capacitance models for VLSI circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Shyh-Chyi; Liu, Patrick S.; Ru, Jien-Wen; Lin, Shi-Tron

    1998-06-01

    A new set of capacitance models is developed for delay estimation of VLSI interconnections. The set of models is derived for five representative wiring structures, with their combinations covering arbitrary VLSI layouts. A semi-empirical approach is adopted to deal with complicated geometry nature in VLSI and to allow for closed-form capacitance formulas to be developed to provide direct observation of capacitance variation vs process parameters as well as computational efficiency for circuit simulation. The formulas are given explicitly in terms of wire width, wire thickness, dielectric thickness and inter-wire spacing. The models show good agreement with numerical solutions from RAPHAEL and measurement data of fabricated capacitance test structures. The models are further applied and validated on a ring oscillator. It is shown that the frequency of the ring oscillator obtained from HSPICE simulation with our models agrees well with the bench measurement.

  17. Interconnecting compressors control coalbed gas production

    SciTech Connect

    Payton, R.; Niederhofer, J. )

    1992-10-05

    This paper reports that centralized compressors afford Taurus Exploration Inc.'s coalbed gas operations optimum control of gas production. Unlike satellite stations, the centralized system allows methane gas to e shifted from station to station via the interconnecting low-pressure pipeline network. The operations area encompasses approximately 40,000 acres, about 40 miles southwest of Birmingham, Ala. The project includes about 250-miles of low-pressure gas flow lines to almost 400 wells. The centralized system is less costly than a satellite station to build and operate. Unlike a satellite station that requires each compressor to have a complete set of ancillary equipment, the centralized system requires only one suction manifold, one dehydration setup, and one metering facility for every five compressor sets.

  18. Aluminum Zintl anion moieties within sodium aluminum clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Grubisic, Andrej; Li, Xiang; Ganteför, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H. E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Eichhorn, Bryan W.; Lee, Mal-Soon; Jena, P.; Kandalam, Anil K. E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu; Kiran, Boggavarapu E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu

    2014-02-07

    Through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we have established that aluminum moieties within selected sodium-aluminum clusters are Zintl anions. Sodium–aluminum cluster anions, Na{sub m}Al{sub n}{sup −}, were generated in a pulsed arc discharge source. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle, electron energy analyzer. Calculations on a select sub-set of stoichiometries provided geometric structures and full charge analyses for both cluster anions and their neutral cluster counterparts, as well as photodetachment transition energies (stick spectra), and fragment molecular orbital based correlation diagrams.

  19. Aluminum Zintl anion moieties within sodium aluminum clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Grubisic, Andrej; Li, Xiang; Ganteför, Gerd; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Eichhorn, Bryan W.; Lee, Mal-Soon; Jena, P.; Kandalam, Anil K.; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Bowen, Kit H.

    2014-02-01

    Through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we have established that aluminum moieties within selected sodium-aluminum clusters are Zintl anions. Sodium-aluminum cluster anions, NamAln-, were generated in a pulsed arc discharge source. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle, electron energy analyzer. Calculations on a select sub-set of stoichiometries provided geometric structures and full charge analyses for both cluster anions and their neutral cluster counterparts, as well as photodetachment transition energies (stick spectra), and fragment molecular orbital based correlation diagrams.

  20. Aluminum anode for aluminum-air battery - Part I: Influence of aluminum purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young-Joo; Park, In-Jun; Lee, Hyeok-Jae; Kim, Jung-Gu

    2015-03-01

    2N5 commercial grade aluminum (99.5% purity) leads to the lower aluminum-air battery performances than 4N high pure grade aluminum (99.99% purity) due to impurities itself and formed impurity complex layer which contained Fe, Si, Cu and others. The impurity complex layer of 2N5 grade Al declines the battery voltage on standby status. It also depletes discharge current and battery efficiency at 1.0 V which is general operating voltage of aluminum-air battery. However, the impurity complex layer of 2N5 grade Al is dissolved with decreasing discharge voltage to 0.8 V. This phenomenon leads to improvement of discharge current density and battery efficiency by reducing self-corrosion reaction. This study demonstrates the possibility of use of 2N5 grade Al which is cheaper than 4N grade Al as the anode for aluminum-air battery.

  1. H₂O Dissociation-Induced Aluminum Oxide Growth on Oxidized Al(111) Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qianqian; Tong, Xiao; Zhou, Guangwen

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of water vapor with amorphous aluminum oxide films on Al(111) is studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to elucidate the passivation mechanism of the oxidized Al(111) surfaces. Exposure of the aluminum oxide film to water vapor results in self-limiting Al2O3/Al(OH)3 bilayer film growth via counter-diffusion of both ions, Al outward and OH inward, where a thinner starting aluminum oxide film is more reactive toward H2O dissociation-induced oxide growth because of the thickness-dependent ionic transport in the aluminum oxide film. The aluminum oxide film exhibits reactivity toward H2O dissociation in both low-vapor pressure [p(H2O) = 1 × 10(-6) Torr] and intermediate-vapor pressure [p(H2O) = 5 Torr] regimes. Compared to the oxide film growth by exposure to a p(H2O) of 1 × 10(-6) Torr, the exposure to a p(H2O) of 5 Torr results in the formation of a more open structure of the inner Al(OH)3 layer and a more compact outer Al2O3 layer, demonstrating the vapor-pressure-dependent atomic structure in the passivating layer.

  2. H₂O Dissociation-Induced Aluminum Oxide Growth on Oxidized Al(111) Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qianqian; Tong, Xiao; Zhou, Guangwen

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of water vapor with amorphous aluminum oxide films on Al(111) is studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to elucidate the passivation mechanism of the oxidized Al(111) surfaces. Exposure of the aluminum oxide film to water vapor results in self-limiting Al2O3/Al(OH)3 bilayer film growth via counter-diffusion of both ions, Al outward and OH inward, where a thinner starting aluminum oxide film is more reactive toward H2O dissociation-induced oxide growth because of the thickness-dependent ionic transport in the aluminum oxide film. The aluminum oxide film exhibits reactivity toward H2O dissociation in both low-vapor pressure [p(H2O) = 1 × 10(-6) Torr] and intermediate-vapor pressure [p(H2O) = 5 Torr] regimes. Compared to the oxide film growth by exposure to a p(H2O) of 1 × 10(-6) Torr, the exposure to a p(H2O) of 5 Torr results in the formation of a more open structure of the inner Al(OH)3 layer and a more compact outer Al2O3 layer, demonstrating the vapor-pressure-dependent atomic structure in the passivating layer. PMID:26550986

  3. A proposed holistic approach to on-chip, off-chip, test, and package interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelink, Dirk J.

    1998-11-01

    recognize—test is also performed using IC's. A system interconnection is proposed using multiple chips fabricated with conventional silicon processes, including MEMS technology. The system resembles an MCM that can be joined without committing to final assembly to perform at-speed testing. 50-Ohm test probes never load the circuit; only intended neighboring chips are ever connected. A `back-plane' chip provides the connection layers for both inter- and intra-chip signals and also serves as the probe card, in analogy with membrane probes now used for single-chip testing. Intra-chip connections, which require complicated connections during test that exactly match the product, are then properly made and all waveforms and loading conditions under test will be identical to those of the product. The major benefit is that all front-end chip technologies can be merged—logic, memory, RF, even passives. ESD protection is required only on external system connections. Manufacturing test information will accurately characterize process faults and thus avoid the Known-Good-Die problem that has slowed the arrival of conventional MCM's.

  4. Surface-normal cascaded planar interconnection with easy alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakizaki, Sunao; Horan, Paul; Hegarty, John

    1995-11-01

    A robust scheme for the surface-normal optical interconnection of arrays of optoelectronic devices is demonstrated. Allowing for inversion, the optical system maintains registration between input and image planes in one direction and full registration between every second plane, thus making for stable and accurate interconnection between elements of arrays.

  5. 78 FR 73239 - Small Generator Interconnection Agreements and Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-05

    ... about system conditions at a Point of Interconnection in order to help that customer select the best... Interconnection Customer with the option of requesting from the Transmission Provider a pre-application report... SGIP; revise the customer options meeting and the supplemental review following failure of the...

  6. Updating Small Generator Interconnection Procedures for New Market Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Coddington, M.; Fox, K.; Stanfield, S.; Varnado, L.; Culley, T.; Sheehan, M.

    2012-12-01

    Federal and state regulators are faced with the challenge of keeping interconnection procedures updated against a backdrop of evolving technology, new codes and standards, and considerably transformed market conditions. This report is intended to educate policymakers and stakeholders on beneficial reforms that will keep interconnection processes efficient and cost-effective while maintaining a safe and reliable power system.

  7. 14 CFR 25.701 - Flap and slat interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... sides of the plane of symmetry must be synchronized by a mechanical interconnection or approved... engines on one side of the plane of symmetry inoperative and the remaining engines at takeoff power. (c... resulting when interconnected flap or slat surfaces on one side of the plane of symmetry are jammed...

  8. 14 CFR 25.701 - Flap and slat interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... sides of the plane of symmetry must be synchronized by a mechanical interconnection or approved... engines on one side of the plane of symmetry inoperative and the remaining engines at takeoff power. (c... resulting when interconnected flap or slat surfaces on one side of the plane of symmetry are jammed...

  9. 14 CFR 25.701 - Flap and slat interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... sides of the plane of symmetry must be synchronized by a mechanical interconnection or approved... engines on one side of the plane of symmetry inoperative and the remaining engines at takeoff power. (c... resulting when interconnected flap or slat surfaces on one side of the plane of symmetry are jammed...

  10. 14 CFR 25.701 - Flap and slat interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... sides of the plane of symmetry must be synchronized by a mechanical interconnection or approved... engines on one side of the plane of symmetry inoperative and the remaining engines at takeoff power. (c... resulting when interconnected flap or slat surfaces on one side of the plane of symmetry are jammed...

  11. 14 CFR 25.701 - Flap and slat interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... sides of the plane of symmetry must be synchronized by a mechanical interconnection or approved... engines on one side of the plane of symmetry inoperative and the remaining engines at takeoff power. (c... resulting when interconnected flap or slat surfaces on one side of the plane of symmetry are jammed...

  12. 14 CFR 25.957 - Flow between interconnected tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flow between interconnected tanks. 25.957 Section 25.957 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.957 Flow between interconnected tanks. If fuel can be...

  13. 14 CFR 29.957 - Flow between interconnected tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flow between interconnected tanks. 29.957 Section 29.957 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.957 Flow between interconnected tanks. (a) Where...

  14. Determining the Utility Value of Water-Supply Interconnections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardman, James L.; Cheremisinoff, Paul N.

    1979-01-01

    This article is the third in a series which discusses a mathematical methodology for evaluating interconnections of water supply systems. The model can be used to analyze the carrying capacity of proposed links or predict the impact of abandoning interconnections. (AS)

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL-HUMAN HEALTH INTERCONNECTIONS: A WORKSHOP REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Pellston Workshop jointly sponsored by SETAC and SOT to discuss this topic of "Interconnections" was held in June, 2000 in Snowbird, Utah. This workshop was motivated by a deep concern shared by many human health, environmental, and social scientists for the interconnections, ...

  16. Aluminum plasmonic photocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qi; Wang, Chenxi; Huang, Hao; Li, Wan; Du, Deyang; Han, Di; Qiu, Teng; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of photocatalytic processes is dictated largely by plasmonic materials with the capability to enhance light absorption as well as the energy conversion efficiency. Herein, we demonstrate how to improve the plasmonic photocatalytic properties of TiO2/Al nano-void arrays by overlapping the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) modes with the TiO2 band gap. The plasmonic TiO2/Al arrays exhibit superior photocatalytic activity boasting an enhancement of 7.2 folds. The underlying mechanisms concerning the radiative energy transfer and interface energy transfer processes are discussed. Both processes occur at the TiO2/Al interface and their contributions to photocatalysis are evaluated. The results are important to the optimization of aluminum plasmonic materials in photocatalytic applications. PMID:26497411

  17. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip

    SciTech Connect

    Lavernia, E.J.; Delplanque, J-P; McHugh, K.M.

    2006-05-10

    Spray forming is a competitive low-cost alternative to ingot metallurgy for manufacturing ferrous and non-ferrous alloy shapes. It produces materials with a reduced number of processing steps, while maintaining materials properties, with the possibility of near-net-shape manufacturing. However, there are several hurdles to large-scale commercial adoption of spray forming: 1) ensuring strip is consistently flat, 2) eliminating porosity, particularly at the deposit/substrate interface, and 3) improving material yield. Through this program, a new strip/sheet casting process, termed spray rolling, has been developed, which is an innovative manufacturing technique to produce aluminum net-shape products. Spray rolling combines the benefits of twin-roll casting and conventional spray forming, showing a promising potential to overcome the above hurdles associated with spray forming. Spray rolling requires less energy and generates less scrap than conventional processes and, consequently, enables the development of materials with lower environmental impacts in both processing and final products. Spray Rolling was developed as a collaborative project between the University of California-Davis, the Colorado School of Mines, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and an industry team. The following objectives of this project were achieved: (1) Demonstration of the feasibility of the spray rolling process at the bench-scale level and evaluation of the materials properties of spray rolled aluminum strip alloys; and (2) Demonstration of 2X scalability of the process and documentation of technical hurdles to further scale up and initiate technology transfer to industry for eventual commercialization of the process.

  18. Aluminum toxicity. Hematological effects.

    PubMed

    Mahieu, S; del Carmen Contini, M; Gonzalez, M; Millen, N; Elias, M M

    2000-01-01

    Sequential effects of intoxication with aluminum hydroxide (Al) (80 mg/Kg body weight, i.p., three times a week), were studied on rats from weaning and up to 28 weeks. The study was carried out on hematological and iron metabolism-related parameters on peripheral blood, at the end of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th months of exposure. As it was described that hematotoxic effects of Al are mainly seen together with high levels of uremia, renal function was measured at the same periods. The animals treated developed a microcytosis and was accompanied by a decrease in mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH). Significantly lower red blood cell counts (RBC million/microl) were found in rats treated during the 1st month. These values matched those obtained for control rats during the 2nd month. From the 3rd month onwards, a significant increase was observed as compared to control groups, and the following values were obtained by the 6th month: (T) 10.0 +/- 0.3 versus (C) 8.7 +/- 0.2 (million/microl). Both MCH and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) were found to be significantly lower in groups treated from the 2nd month. At the end of the 6th month the following values were found: MCH (T) 13.3 +/- 0.1 versus (C) 16.9 +/- 0.3 (pg); MCV (T) 42.1 +/- 0.7 versus (C) 51.8 +/- 0.9 (fl). Al was found responsible for lower serum iron concentration levels and in the percentage of transferrin saturation. Thus, although microcytic anemia constitutes an evidence of chronic aluminum exposure, prolonged exposure could lead to a recovery of hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration values with an increase in red cell number. Nevertheless, both microcytosis and the decrease of MCH would persist. These modifications took place without changes being observed in the renal function during the observation period. PMID:10643868

  19. Aluminum toxicity. Hematological effects.

    PubMed

    Mahieu, S; del Carmen Contini, M; Gonzalez, M; Millen, N; Elias, M M

    2000-01-01

    Sequential effects of intoxication with aluminum hydroxide (Al) (80 mg/Kg body weight, i.p., three times a week), were studied on rats from weaning and up to 28 weeks. The study was carried out on hematological and iron metabolism-related parameters on peripheral blood, at the end of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th months of exposure. As it was described that hematotoxic effects of Al are mainly seen together with high levels of uremia, renal function was measured at the same periods. The animals treated developed a microcytosis and was accompanied by a decrease in mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH). Significantly lower red blood cell counts (RBC million/microl) were found in rats treated during the 1st month. These values matched those obtained for control rats during the 2nd month. From the 3rd month onwards, a significant increase was observed as compared to control groups, and the following values were obtained by the 6th month: (T) 10.0 +/- 0.3 versus (C) 8.7 +/- 0.2 (million/microl). Both MCH and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) were found to be significantly lower in groups treated from the 2nd month. At the end of the 6th month the following values were found: MCH (T) 13.3 +/- 0.1 versus (C) 16.9 +/- 0.3 (pg); MCV (T) 42.1 +/- 0.7 versus (C) 51.8 +/- 0.9 (fl). Al was found responsible for lower serum iron concentration levels and in the percentage of transferrin saturation. Thus, although microcytic anemia constitutes an evidence of chronic aluminum exposure, prolonged exposure could lead to a recovery of hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration values with an increase in red cell number. Nevertheless, both microcytosis and the decrease of MCH would persist. These modifications took place without changes being observed in the renal function during the observation period.

  20. Optical backplane interconnect switch for data processors and computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Herbert D.; Benz, Harry F.; Hammer, Jacob M.

    1989-01-01

    An optoelectronic integrated device design is reported which can be used to implement an all-optical backplane interconnect switch. The switch is sized to accommodate an array of processors and memories suitable for direct replacement into the basic avionic multiprocessor backplane. The optical backplane interconnect switch is also suitable for direct replacement of the PI bus traffic switch and at the same time, suitable for supporting pipelining of the processor and memory. The 32 bidirectional switchable interconnects are configured with broadcast capability for controls, reconfiguration, and messages. The approach described here can handle a serial interconnection of data processors or a line-to-link interconnection of data processors. An optical fiber demonstration of this approach is presented.

  1. Solar-cell interconnect design for terrestrial photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mon, G. R.; Moore, D. M.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Useful solar cell interconnect reliability design and life prediction algorithms are presented, together with experimental data indicating that the classical strain cycle (fatigue) curve for the interconnect material does not account for the statistical scatter that is required in reliability predictions. This shortcoming is presently addressed by fitting a functional form to experimental cumulative interconnect failure rate data, which thereby yields statistical fatigue curves enabling not only the prediction of cumulative interconnect failures during the design life of an array field, but also the quantitative interpretation of data from accelerated thermal cycling tests. Optimal interconnect cost reliability design algorithms are also derived which may allow the minimization of energy cost over the design life of the array field.

  2. Fuel cell electrode interconnect contact material encapsulation and method

    DOEpatents

    Derose, Anthony J.; Haltiner, Jr., Karl J.; Gudyka, Russell A.; Bonadies, Joseph V.; Silvis, Thomas W.

    2016-05-31

    A fuel cell stack includes a plurality of fuel cell cassettes each including a fuel cell with an anode and a cathode. Each fuel cell cassette also includes an electrode interconnect adjacent to the anode or the cathode for providing electrical communication between an adjacent fuel cell cassette and the anode or the cathode. The interconnect includes a plurality of electrode interconnect protrusions defining a flow passage along the anode or the cathode for communicating oxidant or fuel to the anode or the cathode. An electrically conductive material is disposed between at least one of the electrode interconnect protrusions and the anode or the cathode in order to provide a stable electrical contact between the electrode interconnect and the anode or cathode. An encapsulating arrangement segregates the electrically conductive material from the flow passage thereby, preventing volatilization of the electrically conductive material in use of the fuel cell stack.

  3. Optimum intermediate fibers for reducing interconnection loss: exact solution.

    PubMed

    Yablon, Andrew D; Sumetsky, M

    2007-03-15

    We derive an exact analytical solution for a transmission line of N single-mode intermediate optical fibers that minimize the interconnection loss between any two dissimilar fiber modes that are well described by that paraxial scalar wave equation. Our solution shows that N optimum intermediate fibers reduce the original interconnection loss by a factor of least 1/(N+1) and that the total interconnection loss is only a function of N and the original direct interconnection loss. Our solution is not restricted to axisymmetric fibers or mode fields and therefore could be useful for reducing the interconnection loss between microstructured optical fibers, between certain slab waveguides, or between fibers and optical sources or detectors.

  4. Solid-state energy storage module employing integrated interconnect board

    DOEpatents

    Rouillard, Jean; Comte, Christophe; Daigle, Dominik; Hagen, Ronald A.; Knudson, Orlin B.; Morin, Andre; Ranger, Michel; Ross, Guy; Rouillard, Roger; St-Germain, Philippe; Sudano, Anthony; Turgeon, Thomas A.

    2004-09-28

    An electrochemical energy storage device includes a number of solid-state thin-film electrochemical cells which are selectively interconnected in series or parallel through use of an integrated interconnect board. The interconnect board is typically disposed within a sealed housing which also houses the electrochemical cells, and includes a first contact and a second contact respectively coupled to first and second power terminals of the energy storage device. The interconnect board advantageously provides for selective series or parallel connectivity with the electrochemical cells, irrespective of electrochemical cell position within the housing. Fuses and various electrical and electro-mechanical devices, such as bypass, equalization, and communication devices for example, may also be mounted to the interconnect board and selectively connected to the electrochemical cells.

  5. Solid-state energy storage module employing integrated interconnect board

    DOEpatents

    Rouillard, Jean; Comte, Christophe; Daigle, Dominik; Hagen, Ronald A.; Knudson, Orlin B.; Morin, Andre; Ranger, Michel; Ross, Guy; Rouillard, Roger; St-Germain, Philippe; Sudano, Anthony; Turgeon, Thomas A.

    2003-11-04

    The present invention is directed to an improved electrochemical energy storage device. The electrochemical energy storage device includes a number of solid-state, thin-film electrochemical cells which are selectively interconnected in series or parallel through use of an integrated interconnect board. The interconnect board is typically disposed within a sealed housing which also houses the electrochemical cells, and includes a first contact and a second contact respectively coupled to first and second power terminals of the energy storage device. The interconnect board advantageously provides for selective series or parallel connectivity with the electrochemical cells, irrespective of electrochemical cell position within the housing. Fuses and various electrical and electromechanical devices, such as bypass, equalization, and communication devices for example, may also be mounted to the interconnect board and selectively connected to the electrochemical cells.

  6. LDEF (Prelaunch), AO171 : Solar-Array-Materials Passive LDEF Experiment, Tray A08

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch), AO171 : Solar-Array-Materials Passive LDEF Experiment, Tray A08 EL-1994-00044 LDEF (Prelaunch), AO171 : Solar-Array-Materials Passive LDEF Experiment, Tray A08 The prelaunch photograph was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to installation of the Solar Array Materials Passive LDEF Experiment (SAMPLE) on the LDEF. Six (6) plates of passive components, provided by various experiment organizations and designated plate I thru plate VI, are shown mounted in a three (3) inch deep LDEF peripheral tray. All six plates are aluminum and attach to the LDEF experiment tray with non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners. Plate I, located in the upper right corner, consist of a combination of solar cells with and without covers, solar cell modules and solar arrays assembled on the baseplate. Plate II in the upper center section, has twenty seven (27) composite samples, carbon fiber and glass fiber, mounted on the baseplate. Plate III, in the upper left corner, consist mostly of metallized and thin polymeric films (Kapton, Mylar, TEFLON® , white Tedlar,etc.). Plate IV located in the lower right corner consist of metals and coatings mounted in an aluminum baseplate and covered with a thin aluminum coverplate that partially mask the specimen. Plate V contained thermal plastics and structural film configured into tensile and shear specimen. Plate VI was populated with solar cells and associate components (covers, encapsulants,adhesives, etc.).

  7. Energy and water in the Western and Texas interconnects.

    SciTech Connect

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll

    2010-08-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Electricity has initiated a $60M program to assist the electric industry in interconnection-level analysis and planning. The objective of this effort is to facilitate the development or strengthening of capabilities in each of the three interconnections serving the lower 48 states of the United States, to prepare analyses of transmission requirements under a broad range of alternative futures and develop long-term interconnection-wide transmission expansion plans. The interconnections are the Western Interconnection, the Eastern Interconnection, and the Texas Interconnection. One element of this program address the support and development of an integrated energy-water Decision Support System (DSS) that will enable planners in the Western and Texas Interconnections to analyze the potential implications of water stress for transmission and resource planning (the Eastern Interconnection is not participating in this element). Specific objectives include: (1) Develop an integrated Energy-Water Decision Support System (DSS) that will enable planners in the Western and Texas Interconnections to analyze the potential implications of water stress for transmission and resource planning. (2) Pursue the formulation and development of the Energy-Water DSS through a strongly collaborative process between members of this proposal team and the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC), Western Governors Association (WGA), the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) and their associated stakeholder teams. (3) Exercise the Energy-Water DSS to investigate water stress implications of the transmission planning scenarios put forward by WECC, WGA, and ERCOT. The goals of this project are: (1) Develop an integrated Energy-Water Decision Support System (DSS) that will enable planners to analyze the potential implications of water stress for transmission and resource planning. (2) Pursue the formulation and development of the Energy

  8. Subsurface Aluminum Nitride Formation in Iron-Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bott, June H.

    Transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels containing higher amounts of aluminum than conventional steels are ideal for structural automotive parts due to their mechanical properties. However, the aluminum tends to react with any processing environment at high temperatures and therefore presents significant challenges during manufacturing. One such challenge occurs during secondary cooling, reheating, and hot-rolling and is caused by a reaction with nitrogen-rich atmospheres wherein subsurface aluminum nitride forms in addition to internal and external oxides. The nitrides are detrimental to mechanical properties and cause surface cracks. It is important to understand how these nitrides and oxides form and their consequences for the quality of steel products. This study looks at model iron-aluminum (up to 8 wt.% aluminum) alloys and uses confocal laser scanning microscopy, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy to study the effect of various conditions on the growth and development of these precipitates in a subsurface oxygen-depleted region. By using model alloys and controlling the experimental atmosphere, this study is able to understand some of the more fundamental materials science behind aluminum nitride formation in aluminum-rich iron alloys and the relationship between internal nitride and oxide precipitation and external oxide scale morphology and composition. The iron-aluminum alloys were heated in N2 atmospheres containing oxygen impurities. It was found that nitrides formed when bulk aluminum content was below 8 wt.% when oxygen was sufficiently depleted due to the internal oxidation. In the samples containing 1 wt.% aluminum, the depth of the internal oxide and nitride zones were in agreement with a diffusion-based model. Increasing aluminum content to 3 and 5 wt% had the effects of modifying the surface-oxide scale composition and increasing its continuity

  9. Aluminum-air battery crystallizer

    SciTech Connect

    Maimoni, A.

    1987-01-01

    A prototype crystallizer system for the aluminum-air battery operated reliably through simulated startup and shutdown cycles and met its design objectives. The crystallizer system allows for crystallization and removal of the aluminum hydroxide reaction product; it is required to allow steady-state and long-term operation of the aluminum-air battery. The system has to minimize volume and maintain low turbulence and shear to minimize secondary nucleation and energy consumption while enhancing agglomeration. A lamella crystallizer satisfies system constraints.

  10. Ge-rich silicon germanium as a new platform for optical interconnects on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakarin, Vladyslav; Chaisakul, Papichaya; Frigerio, Jacopo; Ballabio, Andrea; Le Roux, Xavier; Coudevylle, Jean Rene; Vivien, Laurent; Isella, Giovanni; Marris-Morini, Delphine

    2016-05-01

    We propose germanium-rich silicon-germanium (SiGe) as a new platform for optical interconnects. The platform viability is experimentally and theoretically investigated through the realization of main building blocks of passive circuitry. Germanium-rich Si1-xGex guiding layer on a graded SiGe layer is used to experimentally show 12μm radius bends by light confinement tuning at a wavelength of 1550nm. As a next step, Mach Zehnder interferometer with 10 dB extinction ratio is demonstrated. High Ge content of the proposed platform allows the coupling with Ge-based active devices, relying on a high quality epitaxial growth. Hence, the integration on Silicon of high speed and low power consumption Ge-rich active components is possible, despite the high lattice mismatch between silicon and germanium.

  11. PREPARATION OF URANIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for preparing uranium--aluminum alloys from a solution of uranium halide in an about equimolar molten alkali metal halide-- aluminum halide mixture and excess aluminum. The uranium halide is reduced and the uranium is alloyed with the excess aluminum. The alloy and salt are separated from each other. (AEC)

  12. 76 FR 45248 - PJM Interconnection, L.L.C., PJM Power Providers Group v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission PJM Interconnection, L.L.C., PJM Power Providers Group v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.; Supplemental Notice of Staff Technical Conference On June 13, 2011, the Commission issued... Resources Services, Inc., Maryland Public Service Commission, Monitoring Analytics, L.L.C., National...

  13. Gettering and passivation of high efficiency multicrystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohatgi, A.; Narasimha, S.; Cai, L.

    1997-02-01

    A detailed study was conducted on aluminum and phosphorus gettering in HEM mc-Si and defect passivation by PECVD SiN in EFG mc-Si to achieve high efficiency solar cells on these promising photovoltaic materials. Solar cells with efficiencies as high as 18.6% (1 cm2 area) were achieved on multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) grown by the heat exchanger method (HEM) by a process which implements impurity gettering, an effective back surface field, front surface passivation, and forming gas annealing. This represents the highest reported solar cell efficiency on mc-Si to date. PCD analysis revealed that the bulk lifetime in certain HEM samples after phosphorus gettering can be as high as 135 μs. By incorporating a deeper aluminum back surface field (Al-BSF), the back surface recombination velocity (Sb) for 0.65 Ω-cm HEM mc-Si solar cells was lowered from 10,000 cm/s to 2,000 cm/s resulting in the 18.6% efficient device. It was also observed that a screen-printed/RTP alloyed Al-BSF process could raise the efficiency of both float zone and relatively defect-free mc-Si solar cells by lowering Sb. However, this process was found to increase the electrical activity of extended defects so that mc-Si devices with a significant defect density showed an overall degradation in performance. In the case of EFG mc-Si, neural network modeling in conjunction with a study of post deposition annealing was used to provide guidelines for effective defect passivation by PECVD SiN films. Appropriate deposition and annealing conditions resulted in a 45% increase in cell efficiency due to AR coating and another 25-30% increase due to defect passivation by atomic hydrogen.

  14. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Song, H.; Biaggio-Rocha, S.; Searson, P.

    1991-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of our fundamental research program on passivity and passivity breakdown. During the past three and one half years in this program (including the three year incrementally-funded grant prior to the present grant), we developed and experimentally tested various physical models for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models belong to a general class termed ``point defects models`` (PDMs), in which the growth and breakdown of passive films are described in terms of the movement of anion and cation vacancies.

  15. Mapping of interconnection of climate risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokohata, Tokuta; Tanaka, Katsumasa; Nishina, Kazuya; Takanashi, Kiyoshi; Emori, Seita; Kiguchi, Masashi; Iseri, Yoshihiko; Honda, Yasushi; Okada, Masashi; Masaki, Yoshimitsu; Yamamoto, Akitomo; Shigemitsu, Masahito; Yoshimori, Masakazu; Sueyoshi, Tetsuo; Iwase, Kenta; Hanasaki, Naota; Ito, Akihiko; Sakurai, Gen; Iizumi, Toshichika; Oki, Taikan

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic climate change possibly causes various impacts on human society and ecosystem. Here, we call possible damages or benefits caused by the future climate change as "climate risks". Many climate risks are closely interconnected with each other by direct cause-effect relationship. In this study, the major climate risks are comprehensively summarized based on the survey of studies in the literature using IPCC AR5 etc, and their cause-effect relationship are visualized by a "network diagram". This research is conducted by the collaboration between the experts of various fields, such as water, energy, agriculture, health, society, and eco-system under the project called ICA-RUS (Integrated Climate Assessment - Risks, Uncertainties and Society). First, the climate risks are classified into 9 categories (water, energy, food, health, disaster, industry, society, ecosystem, and tipping elements). Second, researchers of these fields in our project survey the research articles, and pick up items of climate risks, and possible cause-effect relationship between the risk items. A long list of the climate risks is summarized into ~130, and that of possible cause-effect relationship between the risk items is summarized into ~300, because the network diagram would be illegible if the number of the risk items and cause-effect relationship is too large. Here, we only consider the risks that could occur if climate mitigation policies are not conducted. Finally, the chain of climate risks is visualized by creating a "network diagram" based on a network graph theory (Fruchtman & Reingold algorithm). Through the analysis of network diagram, we find that climate risks at various sectors are closely related. For example, the decrease in the precipitation under the global climate change possibly causes the decrease in river runoff and the decrease in soil moisture, which causes the changes in crop production. The changes in crop production can have an impact on society by

  16. 1064 nm laser emission of highly doped Nd: Yttrium aluminum garnet under 885 nm diode laser pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupei, V.; Pavel, N.; Taira, T.

    2002-06-01

    Highly efficient 1064 nm continuous-wave laser emission under 885 nm diode pumping in concentrated Nd: Yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) crystals (up to 3.5 at. % Nd) and ceramics (up to 3.8 at. % Nd) is reported. A highly doped (2.4 at. %) Nd:YAG laser, passively Q switched by a Cr4+:YAG saturable absorber, is demonstrated.

  17. Electrolyte treatment for aluminum reduction

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.; Brooks, Richard J.; Frizzle, Patrick B.; Juric, Drago D.

    2002-01-01

    A method of treating an electrolyte for use in the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum employing an anode and a cathode, the alumina dissolved in the electrolyte, the treating improving wetting of the cathode with molten aluminum during electrolysis. The method comprises the steps of providing a molten electrolyte comprised of ALF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF and LiF, and treating the electrolyte by providing therein 0.004 to 0.2 wt. % of a transition metal or transition metal compound for improved wettability of the cathode with molten aluminum during subsequent electrolysis to reduce alumina to aluminum.

  18. Adaptive optical interconnects: the ADDAPT project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henker, Ronny; Pliva, Jan; Khafaji, Mahdi; Ellinger, Frank; Toifl, Thomas; Offrein, Bert; Cevrero, Alessandro; Oezkaya, Ilter; Seifried, Marc; Ledentsov, Nikolay; Kropp, Joerg-R.; Shchukin, Vitaly; Zoldak, Martin; Halmo, Leos; Turkiewicz, Jaroslaw; Meredith, Wyn; Eddie, Iain; Georgiades, Michael; Charalambides, Savvas; Duis, Jeroen; van Leeuwen, Pieter

    2015-09-01

    Existing optical networks are driven by dynamic user and application demands but operate statically at their maximum performance. Thus, optical links do not offer much adaptability and are not very energy-efficient. In this paper a novel approach of implementing performance and power adaptivity from system down to optical device, electrical circuit and transistor level is proposed. Depending on the actual data load, the number of activated link paths and individual device parameters like bandwidth, clock rate, modulation format and gain are adapted to enable lowering the components supply power. This enables flexible energy-efficient optical transmission links which pave the way for massive reductions of CO2 emission and operating costs in data center and high performance computing applications. Within the FP7 research project Adaptive Data and Power Aware Transceivers for Optical Communications (ADDAPT) dynamic high-speed energy-efficient transceiver subsystems are developed for short-range optical interconnects taking up new adaptive technologies and methods. The research of eight partners from industry, research and education spanning seven European countries includes the investigation of several adaptive control types and algorithms, the development of a full transceiver system, the design and fabrication of optical components and integrated circuits as well as the development of high-speed, low loss packaging solutions. This paper describes and discusses the idea of ADDAPT and provides an overview about the latest research results in this field.

  19. Maximizing algebraic connectivity in interconnected networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeri, Heman; Albin, Nathan; Darabi Sahneh, Faryad; Poggi-Corradini, Pietro; Scoglio, Caterina

    2016-03-01

    Algebraic connectivity, the second eigenvalue of the Laplacian matrix, is a measure of node and link connectivity on networks. When studying interconnected networks it is useful to consider a multiplex model, where the component networks operate together with interlayer links among them. In order to have a well-connected multilayer structure, it is necessary to optimally design these interlayer links considering realistic constraints. In this work, we solve the problem of finding an optimal weight distribution for one-to-one interlayer links under budget constraint. We show that for the special multiplex configurations with identical layers, the uniform weight distribution is always optimal. On the other hand, when the two layers are arbitrary, increasing the budget reveals the existence of two different regimes. Up to a certain threshold budget, the second eigenvalue of the supra-Laplacian is simple, the optimal weight distribution is uniform, and the Fiedler vector is constant on each layer. Increasing the budget past the threshold, the optimal weight distribution can be nonuniform. The interesting consequence of this result is that there is no need to solve the optimization problem when the available budget is less than the threshold, which can be easily found analytically.

  20. PCB with fully integrated optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Gregor; Satzinger, Valentin; Schmidt, Volker; Schmid, Gerhard; Leeb, Walter R.

    2011-01-01

    The increasing demand for miniaturization and design flexibility of polymer optical waveguides integrated into electrical printed circuit boards (PCB) calls for new coupling and integration concepts. We report on a method that allows the coupling of optical waveguides to electro-optical components as well as the integration of an entire optical link into the PCB. The electro-optical devices such as lasers and photodiodes are assembled on the PCB and then embedded in an optically transparent material. A focused femtosecond laser beam stimulates a polymerization reaction based on a two-photon absorption effect in the optical material and locally increases the refractive index of the material. In this way waveguide cores can be realized and the embedded components can be connected optically. This approach does not only allow a precise alignment of the waveguide end faces to the components but also offers a truly 3-dimensional routing capability of the waveguides. Using this technology we were able to realize butt-coupling and mirror-coupling interface solutions in several demonstrators. We were also manufacturing demonstrator boards with fully integrated driver and preamplifier chips, which show very low power consumption of down to 10 mW for about 2.5 Gbit/s. Furthermore, demonstrators with interconnects at two different optical layers were realized.

  1. Ceramic Interconnects with Low Sintering Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, Zhi-Min; Goldsby, Jon C.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic interconnects for use in solid oxide he1 cells are expected to operate between 900 to approximately 1000 C, sinter below 1400 C to allow co-firing and meet a number thermal mechanical requirements. The pervoskite type (ABO3) lanthanum chromite based materials have emerged as a leading candidate that will meet these criteria by varying the composition on the A and B sites. A need therefore exists to determine this material's temperature dependent electrical and mechanical properties with respect to these site substitutions. In this investigation oxide powders were prepared by the glycine-nitrate process. Ionic substitutions were carried out on A sites with Ca or Sr, and B sites with Co and Al, respectively. Only stoichiometric compositions were considered for the sake of stability. The powders and their ability to sinter were investigated by XRD, SEM, dilatometry and density measurements. The sintered materials were further examined by SEM, thermal expansion and electric conductivity measurements in order to elucidate the resulting microstructure, electrical and mechanical properties. In addition quantum mechanical calculations were performed to obtain insight into the effects of these dopants on the materials electronic band structure and lattice parameter.

  2. Maximizing algebraic connectivity in interconnected networks.

    PubMed

    Shakeri, Heman; Albin, Nathan; Darabi Sahneh, Faryad; Poggi-Corradini, Pietro; Scoglio, Caterina

    2016-03-01

    Algebraic connectivity, the second eigenvalue of the Laplacian matrix, is a measure of node and link connectivity on networks. When studying interconnected networks it is useful to consider a multiplex model, where the component networks operate together with interlayer links among them. In order to have a well-connected multilayer structure, it is necessary to optimally design these interlayer links considering realistic constraints. In this work, we solve the problem of finding an optimal weight distribution for one-to-one interlayer links under budget constraint. We show that for the special multiplex configurations with identical layers, the uniform weight distribution is always optimal. On the other hand, when the two layers are arbitrary, increasing the budget reveals the existence of two different regimes. Up to a certain threshold budget, the second eigenvalue of the supra-Laplacian is simple, the optimal weight distribution is uniform, and the Fiedler vector is constant on each layer. Increasing the budget past the threshold, the optimal weight distribution can be nonuniform. The interesting consequence of this result is that there is no need to solve the optimization problem when the available budget is less than the threshold, which can be easily found analytically. PMID:27078276

  3. Interconnected Cavernous Structure of Bacterial Fruiting Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Cameron W.; Du, Huijing; Xu, Zhiliang; Kaiser, Dale; Aranson, Igor; Alber, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The formation of spore-filled fruiting bodies by myxobacteria is a fascinating case of multicellular self-organization by bacteria. The organization of Myxococcus xanthus into fruiting bodies has long been studied not only as an important example of collective motion of bacteria, but also as a simplified model for developmental morphogenesis. Sporulation within the nascent fruiting body requires signaling between moving cells in order that the rod-shaped self-propelled cells differentiate into spores at the appropriate time. Probing the three-dimensional structure of myxobacteria fruiting bodies has previously presented a challenge due to limitations of different imaging methods. A new technique using Infrared Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) revealed previously unknown details of the internal structure of M. xanthus fruiting bodies consisting of interconnected pockets of relative high and low spore density regions. To make sense of the experimentally observed structure, modeling and computer simulations were used to test a hypothesized mechanism that could produce high-density pockets of spores. The mechanism consists of self-propelled cells aligning with each other and signaling by end-to-end contact to coordinate the process of differentiation resulting in a pattern of clusters observed in the experiment. The integration of novel OCT experimental techniques with computational simulations can provide new insight into the mechanisms that can give rise to the pattern formation seen in other biological systems such as dictyostelids, social amoeba known to form multicellular aggregates observed as slugs under starvation conditions. PMID:23300427

  4. Process Developed for Generating Ceramic Interconnects With Low Sintering Temperatures for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, Zhi-Min; Goldsby, Jon C.

    2005-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have been considered as premium future power generation devices because they have demonstrated high energy-conversion efficiency, high power density, and extremely low pollution, and have the flexibility of using hydrocarbon fuel. The Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) initiative, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and private industries, is leading the development and commercialization of SOFCs for low-cost stationary and automotive markets. The targeted power density for the initiative is rather low, so that the SECA SOFC can be operated at a relatively low temperature (approx. 700 C) and inexpensive metallic interconnects can be utilized in the SOFC stack. As only NASA can, the agency is investigating SOFCs for aerospace applications. Considerable high power density is required for the applications. As a result, the NASA SOFC will be operated at a high temperature (approx. 900 C) and ceramic interconnects will be employed. Lanthanum chromite-based materials have emerged as a leading candidate for the ceramic interconnects. The interconnects are expected to co-sinter with zirconia electrolyte to mitigate the interface electric resistance and to simplify the processing procedure. Lanthanum chromites made by the traditional method are sintered at 1500 C or above. They react with zirconia electrolytes (which typically sinter between 1300 and 1400 C) at the sintering temperature of lanthanum chromites. It has been envisioned that lanthanum chromites with lower sintering temperatures can be co-fired with zirconia electrolyte. Nonstoichiometric lanthanum chromites can be sintered at lower temperatures, but they are unstable and react with zirconia electrolyte during co-sintering. NASA Glenn Research Center s Ceramics Branch investigated a glycine nitrate process to generate fine powder of the lanthanum-chromite-based materials. By simultaneously doping calcium on the lanthanum site, and cobalt and aluminum on the

  5. Passive bistatic radar analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hagan, Daniel W.; Kuschel, H.; Schiller, Joachim

    2009-06-01

    Passive Bistatic Radar (PBR) research is at its zenith with several notable PBR systems currently operational, or available for deployment. Such PBRs include the Manastash Ridge Radar (MRR) developed for and by academia; Silent Sentry developed as a commercial concern by Lockheed Martin; and Homeland Alerter (HA100) also a commercial system developed by Thales. However at present, despite the existence of numerous PBR prototypes, take up of commercial passive radar technology remains slow. This is due in part to technology immaturity, in part to politics, and particularly due to the fact that monostatic radars perform so well. If PBRs are to enjoy longevity as a viable technology then it is imperative that they address certain niche application areas, with the aforementioned MRR being one prime example of this. The focus of this paper will be an analysis of a PBR system that utilised FM radio signals of opportunity to detect aircraft targets with an RCS generally not lower than 20 m2. The paper will demonstrate the theoretical detection coverage of an FM based PBR operating in a severe interference environment.

  6. Fly ash carbon passivation

    DOEpatents

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  7. Passive damping technology demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Robert E.; Spencer, Susan M.; Austin, Eric M.; Johnson, Conor D.

    1995-05-01

    A Hughes Space Company study was undertaken to (1) acquire the analytical capability to design effective passive damping treatments and to predict the damped dynamic performance with reasonable accuracy; (2) demonstrate reasonable test and analysis agreement for both baseline and damped baseline hardware; and (3) achieve a 75% reduction in peak transmissibility and 50% reduction in rms random vibration response. Hughes Space Company teamed with CSA Engineering to learn how to apply passive damping technology to their products successfully in a cost-effective manner. Existing hardware was selected for the demonstration because (1) previous designs were lightly damped and had difficulty in vibration test; (2) multiple damping concepts could be investigated; (3) the finite element model, hardware, and test fixture would be available; and (4) damping devices could be easily implemented. Bracket, strut, and sandwich panel damping treatments that met the performance goals were developed by analysis. The baseline, baseline with damped bracket, and baseline with damped strut designs were built and tested. The test results were in reasonable agreement with the analytical predictions and demonstrated that the desired reduction in dynamic response could be achieved. Having successfully demonstrated this approach, it can now be used with confidence for future designs as a means for reducing weight and enhancing reliability.

  8. Volcanic passive margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geoffroy, Laurent

    2005-12-01

    Compared to non-volcanic ones, volcanic passive margins mark continental break-up over a hotter mantle, probably subject to small-scale convection. They present distinctive genetic and structural features. High-rate extension of the lithosphere is associated with catastrophic mantle melting responsible for the accretion of a thick igneous crust. Distinctive structural features of volcanic margins are syn-magmatic and continentward-dipping crustal faults accommodating the seaward flexure of the igneous crust. Volcanic margins present along-axis a magmatic and tectonic segmentation with wavelength similar to adjacent slow-spreading ridges. Their 3D organisation suggests a connection between loci of mantle melting at depths and zones of strain concentration within the lithosphere. Break-up would start and propagate from localized thermally-softened lithospheric zones. These 'soft points' could be localized over small-scale convection cells found at the bottom of the lithosphere, where adiabatic mantle melting would specifically occur. The particular structure of the brittle crust at volcanic passive margins could be interpreted by active and sudden oceanward flow of both the unstable hot mantle and the ductile part of the lithosphere during the break-up stage. To cite this article: L. Geoffroy, C. R. Geoscience 337 (2005).

  9. Chrome - Free Aluminum Coating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, John H.; Gugel, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation concerns the program to qualify a chrome free coating for aluminum. The program was required due to findings by OSHA and EPA, that hexavalent chromium, used to mitigate corrosion in aerospace aluminum alloys, poses hazards for personnel. This qualification consisted of over 4,000 tests. The tests revealed that a move away from Cr+6, required a system rather than individual components and that the maximum corrosion protection required pretreatment, primer and topcoat.

  10. Optics vs copper: from the perspective of "Thunderbolt" interconnect technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hengju; Krause, Christine; Ko, Jamyuen; Gao, Miaobin; Liu, Guobin; Wu, Huichin; Qi, Mike; Lam, Chun-Chit

    2013-02-01

    Interconnect technology has been progressed at a very fast pace for the past decade. The signaling rates have steadily increased from 100:Mb/s to 25Gb/s. In every generation of interconnect technology evolution, optics always seems to take over at first, however, at the end, the cost advantage of copper wins over. Because of this, optical interconnects are limited to longer distance links where the attenuation in copper cable is too large for the integrated circuits to compensate. Optical interconnect has long been viewed as the premier solution in compared with copper interconnect. With the release of Thunderbolt technology, we are entering a new era in consumer electronics that runs at 10Gb/s line rate (20Gb/s throughput per connector interface). Thunderbolt interconnect technology includes both active copper cables and active optical cables as the transmission media which have very different physical characteristics. In order for optics to succeed in consumer electronics, several technology hurdles need to be cleared. For example, the optical cable needs to handle the consumer abuses such as pinch and bend. Also, the optical engine used in the active optical cable needs to be physically very small so that we don't change the looks and feels of the cable/connector. Most importantly, the cost of optics needs to come down significantly to effectively compete with the copper solution. Two interconnect technologies are compared and discussed on the relative cost, power consumption, form factor, density, and future scalability.

  11. Passive-solar construction handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, E.; Evans, D.; Gardstein, C.

    1981-02-01

    Many of the basic elements of passive solar design are reviewed. Passive solar construction is covered according to system type, each system type discussion including a general discussion of the important design and construction issues which apply to the particular system and case studies illustrating designed and built examples of the system type. The three basic types of passive solar systems discussed are direct gain, thermal storage wall, and attached sunspace. Thermal performance and construction information is presented for typical materials used in passive solar collector components, storage components, and control components. Appended are an overview of analysis methods and a technique for estimating performance. (LEW)

  12. A Virtual Aluminum Reduction Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Zhou, Chenn Q.; Wu, Bing; Li, Jie

    2013-11-01

    The most important component in the aluminum industry is the aluminum reduction cell; it has received considerable interests and resources to conduct research to improve its productivity and energy efficiency. The current study focused on the integration of numerical simulation data and virtual reality technology to create a scientifically and practically realistic virtual aluminum reduction cell by presenting complex cell structures and physical-chemical phenomena. The multiphysical field simulation models were first built and solved in ANSYS software (ANSYS Inc., Canonsburg, PA, USA). Then, the methodology of combining the simulation results with virtual reality was introduced, and a virtual aluminum reduction cell was created. The demonstration showed that a computer-based world could be created in which people who are not analysis experts can see the detailed cell structure in a context that they can understand easily. With the application of the virtual aluminum reduction cell, even people who are familiar with aluminum reduction cell operations can gain insights that make it possible to understand the root causes of observed problems and plan design changes in much less time.

  13. Anodized aluminum on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    1993-01-01

    A compilation of reported analyses and results obtained for anodized aluminum flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was prepared. Chromic acid, sulfuric acid, and dyed sulfuric acid anodized surfaces were exposed to the space environment. The vast majority of the anodized surface on LDEF was chromic acid anodize because of its selection as a thermal control coating for use on the spacecraft primary structure, trays, tray clamps, and space end thermal covers. Reports indicate that the chromic acid anodize was stable in solar absorptance and thermal emittance, but that contamination effects caused increases in absorptance on surfaces exposed to low atomic oxygen fluences. There were some discrepancies, however, in that some chromic acid anodized specimens exhibited significant increases in absorptance. Sulfuric acid anodized surfaces also appeared stable, although very little surface area was available for evaluation. One type of dyed sulfuric acid anodize was assessed as an optical baffle coating and was observed to have improved infrared absorptance characteristics with exposure on LDEF.

  14. Aluminum-air battery development. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-12-31

    Aluminum dissolution studies have been completed for pure aluminum and the high rate alloy RX808. These studies were performed primarily using a rotating disc electrode system. The focus of this work was on the development of a substantial basis by which future investigations of alloys for automotive propulsion applications may be directed. Studies undertaken consisted of examinations of polarization curves under both controlled potential and controlled current conditions, temperature effects on polarization behavior and corrosion current, current efficiency under conditions suitable to the automotive propulsion application, mass transfer effects on the polarization behavior, and effects of changes in electrolyte composition on the polarization behavior and corrosion current. The results of these studies have provided insights into the fundamental processes controlling the anodic dissolution of aluminum in alkaline electrolyte. The rate-determining step of the process appears to be the dissolution of Al(OH) at the anode surface. Precipitation of Al(OH)/sub 3/, leading to passivation, occurrs when the AL(OH)/sub 4//sup -/ concentration at the surface exceeds the saturation level and/or the OH/sup -/ concentration at the surface is reduced to a level which initiates precipitation.

  15. Stability of chromite interconnections in dual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, T. R.; Stevenson, J. W.; Raney, P.; Pederson, L. R.

    1994-11-01

    One of the most critical technical concerns in high-temperature SOFC's is the physical, chemical, and electrical stability of the interconnect (typically a doped lanthanum chromite) in the dual (oxidizing and reducing atmosphere) SOFC environment. The reducing or fuel side may experience oxygen partial pressures (P(O2)) from 10(exp -18) to 10(exp -6) atmospheres, while the oxidizing side may have P(O2) from 10(exp -6) to greater than 1 atm. These conditions limit the possible candidate materials to lanthanum or yttrium chromites. In the past decade, much work has centered on development of air-sinterable chromites and understanding their physical properties; little work, however, has focused on the stability of these chromites in dual environments. Chromite powders were synthesized using the glycine-nitrate process. The powders were calcined at 1,000 C for 1 hour and then uniaxially pressed into bars (46mm x 16mm x 3mm) at 55 MPa and isostatically pressed at 138 MPa. Samples were sintered in air. The dependence of the physical properties of sintered lanthanum chromites upon ambient P(O2) and temperature (using dilatometry, thermogravimetric analysis, and oxygen permeation measurements) were studied. La(1-x)A(x)CrO3 and Y(1-x)Ca(x)CrO3, where A is Ca or Sr and x was varied from 0.1 to 0.4 were evaluated in this study. The P(O2) was varied using a buffered CO2/Ar-4%H2 gas system, enabling expansion measurements to be made over a partial pressure range from 10(exp -5) to 10(exp -18) atmosphere at 800, 900, and 1,000 C.

  16. Interacting Social Processes on Interconnected Networks

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Zuzek, Lucila G.; La Rocca, Cristian E.; Vazquez, Federico; Braunstein, Lidia A.

    2016-01-01

    We propose and study a model for the interplay between two different dynamical processes –one for opinion formation and the other for decision making– on two interconnected networks A and B. The opinion dynamics on network A corresponds to that of the M-model, where the state of each agent can take one of four possible values (S = −2,−1, 1, 2), describing its level of agreement on a given issue. The likelihood to become an extremist (S = ±2) or a moderate (S = ±1) is controlled by a reinforcement parameter r ≥ 0. The decision making dynamics on network B is akin to that of the Abrams-Strogatz model, where agents can be either in favor (S = +1) or against (S = −1) the issue. The probability that an agent changes its state is proportional to the fraction of neighbors that hold the opposite state raised to a power β. Starting from a polarized case scenario in which all agents of network A hold positive orientations while all agents of network B have a negative orientation, we explore the conditions under which one of the dynamics prevails over the other, imposing its initial orientation. We find that, for a given value of β, the two-network system reaches a consensus in the positive state (initial state of network A) when the reinforcement overcomes a crossover value r*(β), while a negative consensus happens for r < r*(β). In the r − β phase space, the system displays a transition at a critical threshold βc, from a coexistence of both orientations for β < βc to a dominance of one orientation for β > βc. We develop an analytical mean-field approach that gives an insight into these regimes and shows that both dynamics are equivalent along the crossover line (r*, β*). PMID:27689698

  17. Hybrid silicon evanescent approach to optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Di; Fang, Alexander W.; Chen, Hui-Wen; Sysak, Matthew N.; Koch, Brian R.; Lively, Erica; Raday, Omri; Kuo, Ying-Hao; Jones, Richard; Bowers, John E.

    2009-06-01

    We discuss the recently developed hybrid silicon evanescent platform (HSEP), and its application as a promising candidate for optical interconnects in silicon. A number of key discrete components and a wafer-scale integration process are reviewed. The motivation behind this work is to realize silicon-based photonic integrated circuits possessing unique advantages of III-V materials and silicon-on-insulator waveguides simultaneously through a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor fabrication process. Electrically pumped hybrid silicon distributed feedback and distributed Bragg reflector lasers with integrated hybrid silicon photodetectors are demonstrated coupled to SOI waveguides, serving as the reliable on-chip single-frequency light sources. For the external signal processing, Mach-Zehnder interferometer modulators are demonstrated, showing a resistance-capacitance-limited, 3 dB electrical bandwidth up to 8 GHz and a modulation efficiency of 1.5 V mm. The successful implementation of quantum well intermixing technique opens up the possibility to realize multiple III-V bandgaps in this platform. Sampled grating DBR devices integrated with electroabsorption modulators (EAM) are fabricated, where the bandgaps in gain, mirror, and EAM regions are 1520, 1440 and 1480 nm, respectively. The high-temperature operation characteristics of the HSEP are studied experimentally and theoretically. An overall characteristic temperature ( T 0) of 51°C, an above threshold characteristic temperature ( T 1) of 100°C, and a thermal impedance ( Z T ) of 41.8°C/W, which agrees with the theoretical prediction of 43.5°C/W, are extracted from the Fabry-Perot devices. Scaling this platform to larger dimensions is demonstrated up to 150 mm wafer diameter. A vertical outgassing channel design is developed to accomplish high-quality III-V epitaxial transfer to silicon in a timely and dimension-independent fashion.

  18. Stability of chromite interconnections in dual environments

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, T.R.; Stevenson, J.W.; Raney, P.; Pederson, L.R.

    1994-11-01

    One of the most critical technical concerns in high-temperature SOFCs is the physical, chemical, and electrical stability of the interconnect (typically a doped lanthanum chromite) in the dual (oxidizing and reducing atmosphere) SOFC environment. The reducing or fuel side may experience oxygen partial pressures (P(O{sub 2})) from 10{sup {minus}18} to 10{sup {minus}6} atmospheres, while the oxidizing side may have P(O{sub 2}) from 10{sup {minus}6} to greater than 1 atm. These conditions limit the possible candidate materials to lanthanum or yttrium chromites. In the past decade, much work has centered on development of air-sinterable chromites and understanding their physical properties; little work, however, has focused on the stability of these chromites in dual environments. Chromite powders were synthesized using the glycine-nitrate process. The powders were calcined at 1,000 C for 1 hour and then uniaxially pressed into bars (46mm x 16mm x 3mm) at 55 MPa and isostatically pressed at 138 MPa. Samples were sintered in air. The dependence of the physical properties of sintered lanthanum chromites upon ambient P(O{sub 2}) and temperature (using dilatometry, thermogravimetric analysis, and oxygen permeation measurements) were studied. La{sub 1{minus}x}A{sub x}CrO{sub 3} and Y{sub 1{minus}x}Ca{sub x}CrO{sub 3}, where A is Ca or Sr and x was varied from 0.1 to 0.4 were evaluated in this study. The P(O{sub 2}) was varied using a buffered CO{sub 2}/Ar-4%H{sub 2} gas system, enabling expansion measurements to be made over a partial pressure range from 10{sup {minus}5} to 10{sup {minus}18} atmosphere at 800, 900, and 1,000 C.

  19. Novel structures in ceramic interconnect technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Kenneth Allen; Rohde, Steven Barney; Casias, Adrian Luther; Stokes, Robert Neal; Turner, Timothy Shawn

    2003-02-01

    Ceramic interconnect technology has been adapted to new structures. In particular, the ability to customize processing order and material choices in Low Temperature Cofired Ceramic (LTCC) has enabled new features to be constructed, which address needs in MEMS packaging as well as other novel structures. Unique shapes in LTCC permit the simplification of complete systems, as in the case of a miniature ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). In this case, a rolled tube has been employed to provide hermetic external contacts to electrodes and structures internal to the tube. Integral windows in LTCC have been fabricated for use in both lids and circuits where either a short term need for observation or a long-term need for functionality exists. These windows are fabricated without adhesive, are fully compatible with LTCC processing, and remain optically clear. Both vented and encapsulated functional volumes have been fabricated using a sacrificial material technique. These hold promise for self-assembly of systems, as well as complex internal structures in cavities, micro fluidic and optical channels, and multilevel integration techniques. Separation of the burnout and firing cycles has permitted custom internal environments to be established. Existing commercial High Temperature Cofired Ceramic (HTCC) and LTCC systems can also be rendered to have improved properties. A rapid prototyping technique for patterned HTCC packages has permitted prototypes to be realized in a few days, and has further applications to micro fluidics, heat pipes, and MEMS, among others. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Commonwealth Aluminum: Manufacturer Conducts Plant-Wide Energy Assessments at Two Aluminum Sheet Production Operations;

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-04-01

    DOE Industrial Technologies Program case study describes the savings possible if Commonwealth Aluminum (now Aleris Rolled Products) makes improvements noted in energy assessments at two aluminum mills.

  1. Commonwealth Aluminum: Manufacturer Conducts Plant-Wide Energy Assessments at Two Aluminum Sheet Production Operations

    SciTech Connect

    2006-04-01

    DOE Industrial Technologies Program case study describes the savings possible if Commonwealth Aluminum (now Aleris Rolled Products) makes improvements noted in energy assessments at two aluminum mills.

  2. Adaptive passive fathometer processing.

    PubMed

    Siderius, Martin; Song, Heechun; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S; Hursky, Paul; Harrison, Chris

    2010-04-01

    Recently, a technique has been developed to image seabed layers using the ocean ambient noise field as the sound source. This so called passive fathometer technique exploits the naturally occurring acoustic sounds generated on the sea-surface, primarily from breaking waves. The method is based on the cross-correlation of noise from the ocean surface with its echo from the seabed, which recovers travel times to significant seabed reflectors. To limit averaging time and make this practical, beamforming is used with a vertical array of hydrophones to reduce interference from horizontally propagating noise. The initial development used conventional beamforming, but significant improvements have been realized using adaptive techniques. In this paper, adaptive methods for this process are described and applied to several data sets to demonstrate improvements possible as compared to conventional processing.

  3. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, Paul F.; Cooke, Franklin E.; Fitch, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA.

  4. Passive Ball Capture Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cloyd, Richard A. (Inventor); Bryan, Thomas C. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A passive ball capture joint has a sleeve with a plurality of bores distributed about a circumference thereof and formed therethrough at an acute angle relative to the sleeve's longitudinal axis. A spring-loaded retainer is slidingly fitted in each bore and is biased such that, if allowed, will extend at least partially into the sleeve to retain a ball therein. A ring, rotatably mounted about the bores, has an interior wall defining a plurality of shaped races that bear against the spring-loaded retainers. A mechanized rotational force producer is coupled to the ring. The ring can be rotated from a first position (that presses the retainers into the sleeve to lock the ball in place) to a second position (that allows the retainers to springback out of the sleeve to release the ball).

  5. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, P.F.; Cooke, F.E.; Fitch, J.R.

    1994-01-25

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA. 1 figure.

  6. Passive focus sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Kai; Knop, Karl

    1995-05-01

    A focus-sensor module that could take the place of the visual-image control for professional large-format cameras was fabricated. In addition, a passive focus-sensing method was shown to work at arbitrary locations and orientations in the recording plane of large-format professional cameras. A focus resolution of better than 0.1 mm and a range of measurement of +/- 5 mm at the image side were obtained at a minimum level of illuminance and with an aperture f/5.6 of the imaging lens. In the current method, three out of four images that arose from various sections of the camera's objective lens were applied for triangulation. The demonstrated approach was based on a linear photodiode array and employed one-dimensional image information for focus sensing.

  7. Passive magnetic bearing system

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Richard F.

    2014-09-02

    An axial stabilizer for the rotor of a magnetic bearing provides external control of stiffness through switching in external inductances. External control also allows the stabilizer to become a part of a passive/active magnetic bearing system that requires no external source of power and no position sensor. Stabilizers for displacements transverse to the axis of rotation are provided that require only a single cylindrical Halbach array in its operation, and thus are especially suited for use in high rotation speed applications, such as flywheel energy storage systems. The elimination of the need of an inner cylindrical array solves the difficult mechanical problem of supplying support against centrifugal forces for the magnets of that array. Compensation is provided for the temperature variation of the strength of the magnetic fields of the permanent magnets in the levitating magnet arrays.

  8. Commentary on "Capturing the Evasive Passive"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillo-Martin, Diane; Snyder, William

    2009-01-01

    Passives has been the focus of much research in language acquisition since the 1970s. It has been clear from this research that young children seldom produce passives spontaneously, particularly "long" or "full" passives with a by-phrase; and they usually perform poorly on experimental tests of the comprehension of passives, especially passives of…

  9. Low-aluminum content iron-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Goodwin, G.M.; Alexander, D.J.

    1995-06-01

    The low-aluminum-content iron-aluminum program deals with the development of a Fe-Al alloy with aluminum content such as a produce the minimum environmental effect at room temperature. The FAPY is an Fe-16 at. % Al-based alloy developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as the highest aluminum-containing alloy with essentially no environmental effect. The chemical composition for FAPY in weight percent is: aluminum = 8.46, chromium = 5.50, zirconium = 0.20, carbon = 0.03, molybdenum = 2.00, yttrium = 0.10 and iron = 83.71. The ignots of the alloy can be hot worked by extrusion, forging, and rolling processes. The hot-worked cast structure can be cold worked with intermediate anneals at 800{degrees}C. Typical room-temperature ductility of the fine-grained wrought structure is 20 to 25% for this alloy. In contrast to the wrought structure, the cast ductility at room temperature is approximately 1% with a transition temperature of approximately 100 to 150{degrees}C, above which ductility values exceed 20%. The alloy has been melted and processed into bar, sheet, and foil. The alloy has also been cast into slabs, step-blocks of varying thicknesses, and shapes. The purpose of this section is to describe the welding response of cast slabs of three different thicknesses of FAPY alloy. Tensile, creep, and Charpy-impact data of the welded plates are also presented.

  10. Assessing the health risks of aluminum.

    PubMed

    Orme, J; Ohanian, E V

    1990-03-01

    Aluminum is a ubiquitous substance with over 4,000 uses. Aluminum, as aluminum sulfate, is commonly used in the United States as a coagulant in the treatment of drinking water. For many years aluminum was not considered to be toxic to humans. However, reports associating aluminum with several skeletal and neurological disorders in humans suggest that exposure to aluminum may pose a health hazard. In 1983 the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced plans to regulate a number of substances, including aluminum, in drinking water. Aluminum was considered because of its occurrence and apparent toxicity. Upon further evaluation of the health effects data the EPA proposed not to regulate aluminum as a result of the uncertainty of the toxicity of ingested aluminum. Putative causal associations between aluminum exposure and neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease have yet to be substantiated. Although several issues regarding the toxicity of ingested aluminum are unresolved, aluminum has been specified in the 1986 Amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act, as one of 83 substances in drinking water to be regulated by 1989. Additional data are needed before the potential risk of aluminum can be assessed; therefore the EPA has deferred possible regulation until 1991. PMID:24202565

  11. Semi-passivity and synchronization of diffusively coupled neuronal oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steur, Erik; Tyukin, Ivan; Nijmeijer, Henk

    2009-11-01

    We discuss synchronization in networks of neuronal oscillators which are interconnected via diffusive coupling, i.e. linearly coupled via gap junctions. In particular, we present sufficient conditions for synchronization in these networks using the theory of semi-passive and passive systems. We show that the conductance based neuronal models of Hodgkin-Huxley, Morris-Lecar, and the popular reduced models of FitzHugh-Nagumo and Hindmarsh-Rose all satisfy a semi-passivity property, i.e. that is the state trajectories of such a model remain oscillatory but bounded provided that the supplied (electrical) energy is bounded. As a result, for a wide range of coupling configurations, networks of these oscillators are guaranteed to possess ultimately bounded solutions. Moreover, we demonstrate that when the coupling is strong enough the oscillators become synchronized. Our theoretical conclusions are confirmed by computer simulations with coupled Hindmarsh-Rose and Morris-Lecar oscillators. Finally we discuss possible “instabilities” in networks of oscillators induced by the diffusive coupling.

  12. Hydrogenation of defects in edge-defined film-fed grown aluminum-enhanced plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride multicrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Ji-Weon; Rosenblum, Mark D.; Kalejs, Juris P.; Rohatgi, Ajeet

    2000-05-01

    Gettering of impurities and hydrogen passivation of defects in edge-defined film-fed grown (EFG) multicrystalline silicon were studied by low-cost manufacturable technologies such as emitter diffusion by a spin-on phosphorus dopant source, back surface field formation by screen-printed aluminum, and a post-deposition anneal of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD) silicon nitride antireflection coating. These processes were carried out in a high-throughput lamp-heated conveyor belt furnace. PECVD silicon nitride-induced hydrogenation of defects in EFG silicon was studied in conjunction with screen-printed aluminum back surface field formation to investigate the synergistic effect of aluminum gettering and silicon nitride hydrogenation of bulk defects. It was found that post-deposition anneal of PECVD silicon nitride at temperatures ranging from 450 to 850 °C, without the coformation of aluminum back surface field on the back, does not provide appreciable passivation or hydrogenation of bulk defects in EFG material. However, simultaneous anneal of PECVD silicon nitride and formation of aluminum back surface field at 850 °C significantly enhanced the hydrogenation ability of the PECVD silicon nitride film. PECVD silicon nitride deposition and a subsequent anneal, after the aluminum back surface field formation, was found to be less effective in passivating bulk defects. It is proposed that aluminum-enhanced hydrogenation from a PECVD silicon nitride film is the result of vacancy generation at the aluminum-silicon interface due to the alloying process. The affinity of hydrogen to react with vacancies provides a chemical potential gradient that increases the flux of atomic hydrogen from the silicon nitride film into the bulk silicon. In addition, vacancies can dissociate hydrogen molecules, increasing the atomic hydrogen content of the bulk silicon. This enhances defect passivation and improves the minority carrier lifetime.

  13. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

  14. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1994-01-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

  15. Free-Space Optical Interconnect Employing VCSEL Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Savich, Gregory R.; Torres, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Sensor signal processing is widely used on aircraft and spacecraft. The scheme employs multiple input/output nodes for data acquisition and CPU (central processing unit) nodes for data processing. To connect 110 nodes and CPU nodes, scalable interconnections such as backplanes are desired because the number of nodes depends on requirements of each mission. An optical backplane consisting of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), VCSEL drivers, photodetectors, and transimpedance amplifiers is the preferred approach since it can handle several hundred megabits per second data throughput.The next generation of satellite-borne systems will require transceivers and processors that can handle several Gb/s of data. Optical interconnects have been praised for both their speed and functionality with hopes that light can relieve the electrical bottleneck predicted for the near future. Optoelectronic interconnects provide a factor of ten improvement over electrical interconnects.

  16. 15. Control Area, Interconnecting Corridor VIEW NORTHEAST, SOUTH AND WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Control Area, Interconnecting Corridor VIEW NORTHEAST, SOUTH AND WEST ELEVATION - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Control Area, Tucker Hollow Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  17. 14. Control Area, Interconnecting Corridor and Frequency Changer and Generator ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Control Area, Interconnecting Corridor and Frequency Changer and Generator Building, general view VIEW SOUTHWEST, NORTH ELEVATION - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Control Area, Tucker Hollow Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  18. IEEE P1547 Series of Standards for Interconnection: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Basso, T. S.; DeBlasio, R.

    2003-05-01

    The IEEE P1547 Standard For Interconnecting Distributed Resources With Electric Power Systems is the first in the P1547 series of planned interconnection standards, and additional standards are needed. There are major issues and obstacles to an orderly transition to the use and integration of distributed power resources with electric power systems (grid or utility grid). The lack of uniform national interconnection standards and tests for interconnection operation and certification-as well as the lack of uniform national building, electrical, and safety codes-is understood, and resolving this needs reasonable lead time to develop and promulgate consensus. The P1547 standard is a benchmark milestone for the IEEE standards consensus process and successfully demonstrates a model for ongoing success in the development of further national standards and for moving forward in modernizing our nation's electric power system.

  19. Design of an optical interconnect for photonic backplane applications.

    PubMed

    Robertson, B

    1998-05-10

    A compact alignment-tolerant interconnect has been developed for use within a prototype modulator-based free-space photonic backplane. The interconnect design encompasses several unique features. Microlens arrays are used, and several beams share each microlens by clustering the optical input-output in a small field about the optical axis of each lens. For simplifying the layout, the optical input and output of each smart-pixel array are clustered separately, thereby allowing a Fourier plane patterned-mirror array to be used in the beam-combination optics. This allows a suitable balance between high interconnection densities and reasonable optical relay distances between adjacent boards to be achieved. The primary advantages of this scheme are the simplicity of the optical design and its alignability, making it ideally suited for high-density interconnection applications. PMID:18273244

  20. Printing Stretchable Spiral Interconnects Using Reactive Ink Chemistries.

    PubMed

    Mamidanna, Avinash; Song, Zeming; Lv, Cheng; Lefky, Christopher S; Jiang, Hanqing; Hildreth, Owen J

    2016-05-25

    Stretchable electronics have important applications in health monitoring and integrated lab-on-a-chip devices. This paper discusses the performance of serpentine stretchable interconnects printed using self-reducing, silver reactive inks. It details process optimization, device fabrication, and device characterization, while demonstrating the potential applications for reactive inks and new design strategies in stretchable electronics. Devices were printed with an ethanol stabilized silver diamine reactive ink and cycled to stretch ratios of 140 and 160% over 1000 cycles with less than 2.5% variation in electrical resistance. Maximum deformation before failure was measured at 180% elongation. Additionally, interconnect deformation was compared to finite element analysis (FEA) simulations to show that FEA can be used to accurately model the deformation of low-strain printed interconnects. Overall, this paper demonstrates a simple and affordable route toward stretchable electrical interconnects. PMID:27158736

  1. Fault-tolerant interconnection networks for multiprocessor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nassar, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Interconnection networks represent the backbone of multiprocessor systems. A failure in the network, therefore, could seriously degrade the system performance. For this reason, fault tolerance has been regarded as a major consideration in interconnection network design. This thesis presents two novel techniques to provide fault tolerance capabilities to three major networks: the Beneline network and the Clos network. First, the Simple Fault Tolerance Technique (SFT) is presented. The SFT technique is in fact the result of merging two widely known interconnection mechanisms: a normal interconnection network and a shared bus. This technique is most suitable for networks with small switches, such as the Baseline network and the Benes network. For the Clos network, whose switches may be large for the SFT, another technique is developed to produce the Fault-Tolerant Clos (FTC) network. In the FTC, one switch is added to each stage. The two techniques are described and thoroughly analyzed.

  2. Manufacturing and quality control of interconnecting wire harnesses, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Interconnecting wire harnesses defined in the design standard are considered, including type 4, open bundle (not enclosed). Knowledge gained through experience on the Saturn 5 program coupled with recent advances in techniques, materials, and processes was incorporated into the document.

  3. Design of an optical interconnect for photonic backplane applications.

    PubMed

    Robertson, B

    1998-05-10

    A compact alignment-tolerant interconnect has been developed for use within a prototype modulator-based free-space photonic backplane. The interconnect design encompasses several unique features. Microlens arrays are used, and several beams share each microlens by clustering the optical input-output in a small field about the optical axis of each lens. For simplifying the layout, the optical input and output of each smart-pixel array are clustered separately, thereby allowing a Fourier plane patterned-mirror array to be used in the beam-combination optics. This allows a suitable balance between high interconnection densities and reasonable optical relay distances between adjacent boards to be achieved. The primary advantages of this scheme are the simplicity of the optical design and its alignability, making it ideally suited for high-density interconnection applications.

  4. On the Equilibrium States of Interconnected Bubbles or Balloons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinhaus, F.; Barker, W.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the equilibrium states of a system composed of two interconnected, air-filled spherical membranes of different sizes. The equilibrium configurations are determined by the method of minimization of the availability of the system at constant temperature. (GA)

  5. In-plane biocompatible microfluidic interconnects for implantable microsystems.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Dean G; Frisina, Robert D; Borkholder, David A

    2011-04-01

    Small mammals, particularly mice, are very useful animal models for biomedical research. Extremely small anatomical dimensions, however, make design of implantable microsystems quite challenging. A method for coupling external fluidic systems to microfluidic channels via in-plane interconnects is presented. Capillary tubing is inserted into channels etched in the surface of a Si wafer with a seal created by Parylene-C deposition. Prediction of Parylene-C deposition into tapered channels based on Knudsen diffusion and deposition characterizations allows for design optimization. Low-volume interconnects using biocompatible, chemical resistant materials have been demonstrated and shown to withstand pressure as high as 827 kPa (120 psi) with an average pull test strength of 2.9 N. Each interconnect consumes less than 0.018 mm3 (18 nL) of volume. The low added volume makes this an ideal interconnect technology for medical applications where implant volume is critical.

  6. In-Plane Biocompatible Microfluidic Interconnects for Implantable Microsystems

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Dean G.; Frisina, Robert D.; Borkholder, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Small mammals, particularly mice, are very useful animal models for biomedical research. Extremely small anatomical dimensions, however, make design of implantable microsystems quite challenging. A method for coupling external fluidic systems to microfluidic channels via in-plane interconnects is presented. Capillary tubing is inserted into channels etched in the surface of a Si wafer with a seal created by Parylene-C deposition. Prediction of Parylene-C deposition into tapered channels based on Knudsen diffusion and deposition characterizations allows for design optimization. Low-volume interconnects using biocompatible, chemical resistant materials have been demonstrated and shown to withstand pressure as high as 827 kPa (120 psi) with an average pull test strength of 2.9 N. Each interconnect consumes less than 0.018 mm3 (18 nL) of volume. The low added volume makes this an ideal interconnect technology for medical applications where implant volume is critical. PMID:21147591

  7. Effect of alloying elements on passivity and breakdown of passivity of Fe- and Ni-based alloys mechanistics aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Szklarska-Amialowska, Z.

    1992-06-01

    On the basis of the literature data and the current results, the mechanism of pitting corrosion of Al-alloys is proposed. An assumption is made that the transport of Cl- ions through defects in the passive film of aluminum an aluminum alloys is not a rate determining step in pitting. The pit development is controlled by the solubility of the oxidized alloying elements in acid solutions. A very good correlation was found between the pitting potential and the oxidized alloying elements for metastable Al-Cr, Al-Zr, Al-W, and Al-Zn alloys. We expect that the effect of oxidized alloying elements in other passive alloys will be the same as in Al-alloys. To verify this hypothesis, susceptibility to pitting in the function of alloying elements in the binary alloys and the composition of the oxide film has to be measured. We propose studying Fe- and Ni-alloys produced by a sputtering deposition method. Using this method one-phaseous alloy can be obtained, even when the two metals are immiscible using conventional methods. Another advantage to studying sputtered alloys is to find new materials with superior resistance to localized corrosion.

  8. The organization of permutation architectures with bussed interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, Joe; Kipnis, Sholomo; Leiserson, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of efficiently permuting data stored in VLSI chips is explored in accordance with a predetermined set of permutations. By connecting chips with shared bus interconnections, as opposed to point-to-point interconnections, it is shown that the number of pins per chip can often be reduced. Uniform permutation architectures were also considered that realize permutations in several clock ticks, instead of one, and show that further savings in the number of pins per chip can be obtained.

  9. The organization of permutation architectures with bused interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, Joe; Kipnis, Shlomo; Leiserson, Charles E.

    1990-11-01

    The problem of efficiently permuting data stored in VLSI chips is explored, in accordance with a predetermined set of permutations. By connecting chips with shared bus interconnections, as opposed to point-to-point interconnections, it is shown that the number of pins per chip can often be reduced. Uniform permutation architectures are also considered that realize permutations in several clock ticks, instead of one, and it is demonstrated that further savings in the number of pins per chip can be obtained.

  10. Light emitters and modulators on SOI for optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yikai; Qiu, Ciyuan; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Ruili

    2016-03-01

    We discuss light emitters and modulators in silicon photonic interconnects. In particular, we experimentally demonstrate resonant luminescence from Ge quantum dots embedded in a photonic crystal ring resonator (PCRR) at room temperature. Six sharp resonant peaks are observed, which correspond to the resonant modes supported by the PCRR. We further study a high speed silicon-graphene nanobeam modulator, and a silicon spatial light modulator. These devices show great potential in future high density and high capacity interconnection systems.

  11. Preliminary reliability evaluation of flip chip on flex interconnect technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Jack J.; Virmani, Naresh

    1997-01-01

    The study was carried out to evaluate the flip-chip-on-flex (FCOF) interconnection process in order to determine its feasibility for space flight applications. The key objectives were to: develop and apply simple and cost effective process steps needed to manufacture FCOFs and build test samples; perform a preliminary technology validation, and determine any initial environmental or application risks. The FCOF was shown to be simpler and more economical than other chip interconnection schemes.

  12. Monolithic microwave integrated circuits: Interconnections and packaging considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Downey, A. N.; Ponchak, G. E.; Romanofsky, R. R.; Anzic, G.; Connolly, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    Monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC's) above 18 GHz were developed because of important potential system benefits in cost reliability, reproducibility, and control of circuit parameters. The importance of interconnection and packaging techniques that do not compromise these MMIC virtues is emphasized. Currently available microwave transmission media are evaluated to determine their suitability for MMIC interconnections. An antipodal finline type of microstrip waveguide transition's performance is presented. Packaging requirements for MMIC's are discussed for thermal, mechanical, and electrical parameters for optimum desired performance.

  13. Hybrid interconnection structures for real-time parallel processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. H.; Samson, John R., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The use of hybrid interconnection structures that combine link connections and bus connections for real-time parallel processing is discussed. Idealistic parallel computation models for two real-time computing applications are described with attention given to a tightly coupled network model for object tracking and a network model for image processing. Consideration is given to the following different interconnection structures: the crossbar, the hypercube, the circular linked array, and the bus array.

  14. Developing Generic Dynamic Models for the 2030 Eastern Interconnection Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Kou, Gefei; Hadley, Stanton W; Markham, Penn N; Liu, Yilu

    2013-12-01

    The Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) has built three major power flow cases for the 2030 Eastern Interconnection (EI) based on various levels of energy/environmental policy conditions, technology advances, and load growth. Using the power flow cases, this report documents the process of developing the generic 2030 dynamic models using typical dynamic parameters. The constructed model was validated indirectly using the synchronized phasor measurements by removing the wind generation temporarily.

  15. Method for fabricating an interconnected array of semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimmer, Derrick P. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method of forming an array of interconnected solar cells. A flexible substrate carrying semiconductor and conductive layers is divided into individual devices by slitting the substrate along the web length. The individual devices are then connected with one another in series by laminating the substrate onto an insulating backing and by depositing conducting interconnection layers which join the lower conductor of one device with the top conductor of the adjoining device.

  16. Feasibility of optically interconnected parallel processors using wavelength division multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Deri, R.J.; De Groot, A.J.; Haigh, R.E.

    1996-03-01

    New national security demands require enhanced computing systems for nearly ab initio simulations of extremely complex systems and analyzing unprecedented quantities of remote sensing data. This computational performance is being sought using parallel processing systems, in which many less powerful processors are ganged together to achieve high aggregate performance. Such systems require increased capability to communicate information between individual processor and memory elements. As it is likely that the limited performance of today`s electronic interconnects will prevent the system from achieving its ultimate performance, there is great interest in using fiber optic technology to improve interconnect communication. However, little information is available to quantify the requirements on fiber optical hardware technology for this application. Furthermore, we have sought to explore interconnect architectures that use the complete communication richness of the optical domain rather than using optics as a simple replacement for electronic interconnects. These considerations have led us to study the performance of a moderate size parallel processor with optical interconnects using multiple optical wavelengths. We quantify the bandwidth, latency, and concurrency requirements which allow a bus-type interconnect to achieve scalable computing performance using up to 256 nodes, each operating at GFLOP performance. Our key conclusion is that scalable performance, to {approx}150 GFLOPS, is achievable for several scientific codes using an optical bus with a small number of WDM channels (8 to 32), only one WDM channel received per node, and achievable optoelectronic bandwidth and latency requirements. 21 refs. , 10 figs.

  17. Scaling of Metal Interconnects: Challenges to Functionality and Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Engelhardt, M.; Schindler, G.; Traving, M.; Stich, A.; Gabric, Z.; Pamler, W.; Hoenlein, W.

    2006-02-07

    Copper-based nano interconnects featuring CDs well beyond today's chip generations and air gap structures were fabricated and subjected to electrical characterization and tests to get already today insight on functionality and reliability aspects of metallization schemes in future semiconductor products. Size effects observed already in today's advanced products will definitely limit the resistivity in future interconnects. Copper diffusion barrier layers were scaled down to the 1nm regime of thicknesses without observable degradation effects regarding adhesion properties and functionality. Interconnect reliability was found to decrease with decreasing barrier thickness. Worst results regarding adhesion properties and interconnect reliability were obtained for vanishing barrier thickness which promotes unrestricted mass flow of copper along the interconnect line. Air gaps were developed and characterized as an alternative approach to porous ultra low-k materials. They allowed the realization of effective k-values of the insulation of 2.4, which meet requirements of chip generations far in the future, while avoiding the integration issues associated with these soft materials. First reliability results obtained with air gaps are comparable with those obtained on full structures. Whereas leakage current behavior with electrical field strength expected to be present between neighboring lines in chip generations during the next 10 years were similar for air gaps and oxide, interconnects insulated by air gaps displayed lower breakdown fields than those insulated by oxide.

  18. Isothermal test as a WLR monitor for Cu interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marathe, Amit P.; Pham, Van; Chan, Jay; Weidner, Jorg-Oliver; Heinig, Volker; Thierbach, Steffi

    2000-08-01

    The need for higher interconnect current densities has been increasing rapidly for advanced integrated circuits. Cu interconnects have emerged as viable candidates to replace Aluminium due to the lower sheet resistivity and increased electro migration lifetime of Cu. Previously, we had reported the use of the isothermal test as a WLR monitor for detecting process defects such as voids in the Aluminium interconnects. This paper further extends the application of the isothermal test methodology for detecting and characterizing process defects in Cu interconnect technology. Package electro migration test are time consuming and may be impractical in detecting process defects in a timely manner. Isothermal test, on the other hand, can be effectively used as a fast WLR process monitor. This paper reports the influence of direction of test current as well as different types of test structures, such as a single level NIST structure and a via chain structure and a via chain structure, on the isothermal test results for Cu interconnects. The isothermal test data has been shown to be helpful in evaluating the location and severity of the process defects through a proper choice of test structures. Joule heating due to high current density is found to be the major driving force for the sensitivity of isothermal test failures. A good correlation is also seen with the package electro migration data. A simple wafer level isothermal test has thus been successfully demonstrated as a reliability tool for process monitoring in Cu VLSI interconnects.

  19. Reconfigurable Hybrid Interconnection for Static and DynamicScientific Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kamil, Shoaib; Pinar, Ali; Gunter, Daniel; Lijewski, Michael; Oliker, Leonid; Shalf, John; Skinner, David

    2006-04-25

    As we enter the era of petascale computing, system architects must plan for machines composed of tens of thousands or even hundreds of thousands of processors. Although fully connected networks such as fat-tree interconnects currently dominate HPC network designs, such approaches are inadequate for thousands of processors due to the superlinear growth of component costs. Traditional low-degree interconnect topologies, such as the 3D torus, have reemerged as a competitive solution because the number of switch components scales linearly with the node count, but such networks are poorly suited for the requirements of many scientific applications. We present our latest work on a hybrid switch architecture called HFAST that uses circuit switches to dynamically reconfigure a lower-degree interconnect to suit the topological requirements of each scientific application. This paper expands upon our prior work on the requirements of non-adaptive applications by analyzing the communication characteristics of dynamically adapting AMR code and presents a methodology that captures the evolving communication requirements. We also present a new optimization that computes the under-utilization of fat-tree interconnects for a given communication topology, showing the potential of constructing a ''fit-tree'' for the application by using the HFAST circuit switches to provision an optimal interconnect topology for each application. Finally, we apply our new optimization technique to the communication requirements of the AMR code to demonstrate the potential of using dynamic reconfiguration of the HFAST interconnect between the communication intensive phases of a dynamically adapting application.

  20. Solid-state energy storage module employing integrated interconnect board

    DOEpatents

    Rouillard, Jean; Comte, Christophe; Daigle, Dominik; Hagen, Ronald A.; Knudson, Orlin B.; Morin, Andre; Ranger, Michel; Ross, Guy; Rouillard, Roger; St-Germain, Philippe; Sudano, Anthony; Turgeon, Thomas A.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an improved electrochemical energy storage device. The electrochemical energy storage device includes a number of solid-state, thin-film electrochemical cells which are selectively interconnected in series or parallel through use of an integrated interconnect board. The interconnect board is typically disposed within a sealed housing which also houses the electrochemical cells, and includes a first contact and a second contact respectively coupled to first and second power terminals of the energy storage device. The interconnect board advantageously provides for selective series or parallel connectivity with the electrochemical cells, irrespective of electrochemical cell position within the housing. In one embodiment, a sheet of conductive material is processed by employing a known milling, stamping, or chemical etching technique to include a connection pattern which provides for flexible and selective interconnecting of individual electrochemical cells within the housing, which may be a hermetically sealed housing. Fuses and various electrical and electro-mechanical devices, such as bypass, equalization, and communication devices for example, may also be mounted to the interconnect board and selectively connected to the electrochemical cells.

  1. Aluminum industry applications for OTEC

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.S.; Leshaw, D.; Sathyanarayana, K.; Sprouse, A.M.; Thiagarajan, V.

    1980-12-01

    The objective of the program is to study the integration issues which must be resolved to realize the market potential of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power for the aluminum industry. The study established, as a baseline, an OTEC plant with an electrical output of 100 MWe which would power an aluminum reduction plant. The reduction plant would have a nominal annual output of about 60,000 metric tons of aluminum metal. Three modes of operation were studied, viz: 1. A reduction plant on shore and a floating OTEC power plant moored offshore supplying energy by cable. 2. A reduction plant on shore and a floating OTEC power plant at sea supplying energy by means of an ''energy bridge.'' 3. A floating reduction plant on the same platform as the OTEC power plant. For the floating OTEC/aluminum plantship, three reduction processes were examined. 1. The conventional Hall process with prebaked anodes. 2. The drained cathode Hall cell process. 3. The aluminum chloride reduction process.

  2. Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Das, S.K.

    2008-02-15

    The project entitled 'Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems' was a Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Secat Inc. The three-year project was initially funded for the first year and was then canceled due to funding cuts at the DOE headquarters. The limited funds allowed the research team to visit industrial sites and investigate the status of using immersion heaters for aluminum melting applications. Primary concepts were proposed on the design of furnaces using immersion heaters for melting. The proposed project can continue if the funding agency resumes the funds to this research. The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate integrated, retrofitable technologies for clean melting systems for aluminum in both the Metal Casting and integrated aluminum processing industries. The scope focused on immersion heating coupled with metal circulation systems that provide significant opportunity for energy savings as well as reduction of melt loss in the form of dross. The project aimed at the development and integration of technologies that would enable significant reduction in the energy consumption and environmental impacts of melting aluminum through substitution of immersion heating for the conventional radiant burner methods used in reverberatory furnaces. Specifically, the program would couple heater improvements with furnace modeling that would enable cost-effective retrofits to a range of existing furnace sizes, reducing the economic barrier to application.

  3. Engineering Glass Passivation Layers -Model Results

    SciTech Connect

    Skorski, Daniel C.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Lepry, William C.

    2011-08-08

    The immobilization of radioactive waste into glass waste forms is a baseline process of nuclear waste management not only in the United States, but worldwide. The rate of radionuclide release from these glasses is a critical measure of the quality of the waste form. Over long-term tests and using extrapolations of ancient analogues, it has been shown that well designed glasses exhibit a dissolution rate that quickly decreases to a slow residual rate for the lifetime of the glass. The mechanistic cause of this decreased corrosion rate is a subject of debate, with one of the major theories suggesting that the decrease is caused by the formation of corrosion products in such a manner as to present a diffusion barrier on the surface of the glass. Although there is much evidence of this type of mechanism, there has been no attempt to engineer the effect to maximize the passivating qualities of the corrosion products. This study represents the first attempt to engineer the creation of passivating phases on the surface of glasses. Our approach utilizes interactions between the dissolving glass and elements from the disposal environment to create impermeable capping layers. By drawing from other corrosion studies in areas where passivation layers have been successfully engineered to protect the bulk material, we present here a report on mineral phases that are likely have a morphological tendency to encrust the surface of the glass. Our modeling has focused on using the AFCI glass system in a carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate rich environment. We evaluate the minerals predicted to form to determine the likelihood of the formation of a protective layer on the surface of the glass. We have also modeled individual ions in solutions vs. pH and the addition of aluminum and silicon. These results allow us to understand the pH and ion concentration dependence of mineral formation. We have determined that iron minerals are likely to form a complete incrustation layer and we plan

  4. Understanding the synthesis, performance, and passivation of metal oxide photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Cory James

    Metal oxides are ubiquitous in semiconductor technologies for their ease of synthesis, chemical stability, and tunable optical/electronic properties. These properties are especially important to fabricating efficient photoelectrodes for solar-energy applications. To counter inherent problems in these materials, new strategies were developed and successfully implemented on the widely-utilized p-type semiconductor, NiO. As the size of semiconductor materials shrink, the surface-to-volume ratio increases and surface defects dominate the performance of the materials. Surface defects can alter the optical and electronic characteristics of materials by changing the Fermi level, charge-carrier mobility, and surface reactivity. We first present a strategy to increase the electrical mobility of mesoporous metal oxide electrode materials by optimizing shape morphology. Transitioning from nanospheres to hexagonal nanoplatelets increased the charge-carrier mobility by one order of magnitude. We then employed this improved material with a new vapor-phase deposition method termed targeted atomic deposition (TAD) to selectively passivate defect sites in semiconductor nanomaterials. We demonstrated the capabilities of this passivation method by applying a TAD of aluminum onto NiO. By exploiting a temperature-dependent deposition process, we selectively passivated the highly reactive sites in NiO: oxygen dangling bonds associated with Ni vacancies. The TAD treatment completely passivated all measurable surface defects, optically bleached the material, and significantly improved all photovoltaic performance metrics in dye-sensitized solar cells. The technique was proven to be generic to numerous forms of NiO. While the implementation of TAD of Al was successful, the process involved pulsing two precursors to passivate the material. Ideally, the TAD process should require only a single precursor and continuous exposure. We utilized a continuous flow of diborane to perform a TAD of B

  5. Rechargeable Aluminum-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Liu, Hansan; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng; Brown, Gilbert M

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reports on the development of rechargeable aluminum-ion batteries. A possible concept of rechargeable aluminum/aluminum-ion battery based on low-cost, earth-abundant Al anode, ionic liquid EMImCl:AlCl3 (1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloroaluminate) electrolytes and MnO2 cathode has been proposed. Al anode has been reported to show good reversibility in acid melts. However, due to the problems in demonstrating the reversibility in cathodes, alternate battery cathodes and battery concepts have also been presented. New ionic liquid electrolytes for reversible Al dissolution and deposition are needed in the future for replacing corrosive EMImCl:AlCl3 electrolytes.

  6. PREPARATION OF DIBASIC ALUMINUM NITRATE

    DOEpatents

    Gresky, A.T.; Nurmi, E.O.; Foster, D.L.; Wischow, R.P.; Savolainen, J.E.

    1960-04-01

    A method is given for the preparation and recovery of basic aluminum nltrates having an OH: Al ratio of at least two, comprising two steps. First, metallic aluminum is dissolved in aqueous Al(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, in the presence of a small quantity of elemental or ionic mercury, to increase its Al: NO/sub 3/ ratio into the range 1 to 1.2. The resulting aqueous solution is then added to an excess of a special organic solvent, typically a mixture of five parts methanol and six parts diethyl ether, whereupon the basic aluminum nitrate, e.g. Al/sub 6/(OH)/sub 13/-(NO/sub 3/)/sub 5/, recoverably precipitates.

  7. Recycling of aluminum salt cake

    SciTech Connect

    Jody, B.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Bonsignore, P.V.; Karvelas, D.E.

    1991-12-01

    The secondary aluminum industry generates more than 110 {times} 10{sup 3} tons of salt-cake waste every year. This waste stream contains about 3--5% aluminum, 15--30% aluminum oxide, 30--40% sodium chloride, and 20--30% potassium chloride. As much as 50% of the content of this waste is combined salt (sodium and potassium chlorides). Salt-cake waste is currently disposed of in conventional landfills. In addition, over 50 {times} 10{sup 3} tons of black dross that is not economical to reprocess a rotary furnace for aluminum recovery ends up in landfills. The composition of the dross is similar to that of salt cake, except that it contains higher concentrations of aluminum (up to 20%) and correspondingly lower amounts of salts. Because of the high solubility of the salts in water, these residues, when put in landfills, represent a potential source of pollution to surface-water and groundwater supplies. The increasing number of environmental regulations on the generation and disposal of industrial wastes are likely to restrict the disposal of these salt-containing wastes in conventional landfills. Processes exist that employ the dissolution and recovery of the salts from the waste stream. These wet-processing methods are economical only when the aluminum concentration in that waste exceeds about 10%. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a study in which existing technologies were reviewed and new concepts that are potentially more cost-effective than existing processes were developed and evaluated. These include freeze crystallization, solvent/antisolvent extraction, common-ion effect, high-pressure/high-temperature process, and capillary-effect systems. This paper presents some of the technical and economic results of the aforementioned ANL study.

  8. Imparting passivity to vapor deposited magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Ryan C.

    Magnesium has the lowest density of all structural metals. Utilization of low density materials is advantageous from a design standpoint, because lower weight translates into improved performance of engineered products (i.e., notebook computers are more portable, vehicles achieve better gas mileage, and aircraft can carry more payload). Despite their low density and high strength to weight ratio, however, the widespread implementation of magnesium alloys is currently hindered by their relatively poor corrosion resistance. The objective of this research dissertation is to develop a scientific basis for the creation of a corrosion resistant magnesium alloy. The corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys is affected by several interrelated factors. Among these are alloying, microstructure, impurities, galvanic corrosion effects, and service conditions, among others. Alloying and modification of the microstructure are primary approaches to controlling corrosion. Furthermore, nonequilibrium alloying of magnesium via physical vapor deposition allows for the formation of single-phase magnesium alloys with supersaturated concentrations of passivity-enhancing elements. The microstructure and surface morphology is also modifiable during physical vapor deposition through the variation of evaporation power, pressure, temperature, ion bombardment, and the source-to-substrate distance. Aluminum, titanium, yttrium, and zirconium were initially chosen as candidates likely to impart passivity on vapor deposited magnesium alloys. Prior to this research, alloys of this type have never before been produced, much less studied. All of these metals were observed to afford some degree of corrosion resistance to magnesium. Due to the especially promising results from nonequilibrium alloying of magnesium with yttrium and titanium, the ternary magnesium-yttrium-titanium system was investigated in depth. While all of the alloys are lustrous, surface morphology is observed under the scanning

  9. Imparting passivity to vapor deposited magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Ryan C.

    Magnesium has the lowest density of all structural metals. Utilization of low density materials is advantageous from a design standpoint, because lower weight translates into improved performance of engineered products (i.e., notebook computers are more portable, vehicles achieve better gas mileage, and aircraft can carry more payload). Despite their low density and high strength to weight ratio, however, the widespread implementation of magnesium alloys is currently hindered by their relatively poor corrosion resistance. The objective of this research dissertation is to develop a scientific basis for the creation of a corrosion resistant magnesium alloy. The corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys is affected by several interrelated factors. Among these are alloying, microstructure, impurities, galvanic corrosion effects, and service conditions, among others. Alloying and modification of the microstructure are primary approaches to controlling corrosion. Furthermore, nonequilibrium alloying of magnesium via physical vapor deposition allows for the formation of single-phase magnesium alloys with supersaturated concentrations of passivity-enhancing elements. The microstructure and surface morphology is also modifiable during physical vapor deposition through the variation of evaporation power, pressure, temperature, ion bombardment, and the source-to-substrate distance. Aluminum, titanium, yttrium, and zirconium were initially chosen as candidates likely to impart passivity on vapor deposited magnesium alloys. Prior to this research, alloys of this type have never before been produced, much less studied. All of these metals were observed to afford some degree of corrosion resistance to magnesium. Due to the especially promising results from nonequilibrium alloying of magnesium with yttrium and titanium, the ternary magnesium-yttrium-titanium system was investigated in depth. While all of the alloys are lustrous, surface morphology is observed under the scanning

  10. Passive blast pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

    2013-03-19

    A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

  11. New passive helicopter detector

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sandia has developed a new helicopter detector. The device relies on the correlation between the acoustic wave from the helicopter and the resulting coupled seismic wave. A significant feature of this approach is that the detector is completely passive; there is no radio frequency radiation. Intended for deployment as a perimeter sensor around a site, the unit offers a low nuisance/false alarm rate and a high probability of detection for a wide range of helicopters. Reliable detection occurs when the target is at high altitude and also very near the earth's surface. Detection ranges start at one kilometer for the small, four-place, civilian helicopter and approach five kilometers for heavier, military types. The system has two parts: a transducer package containing a microphone and a geophone and a digital processor. Development is underway for a model which will be AC powered and well suited to permanent facilities. A prototype unit using a lightweight, battery powered processor is being constructed for rapid-deployment applications. 6 figs.

  12. Passive-solar greenhouse

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Our project objective was to design, construct, and operate a commercialized (16' x 50') passive, solar greenhouse. The structure was originally intended as a vegetable forcing facility to produce vegetable crops in the off-season. Building and size constraints and economic considerations convinced us to use the greenhouse for producing bedding plants and vegetable starts in the spring, high value vegetables (tomatoes, cucumbers) in the fall and forced bulbs in the winter. This crop sequence allows us to use the greenhouse all year without additional heat as the crops are adopted to the temperature regime of the greenhouse during each particular season. In our first season, the greenhouse performed beautifully. The lowest temperature recorded was 38/sup 0/F after 4 cold, cloudy days in February. The production of bedding plants has allowed us to diversify our products and the early transplants we produced were a great asset to our vegetable farming operation. Although construction cost (4.57 sq. ft.) is higher than that of a conventional polyethylene-covered, quonset-type greenhouse (approx. $1.92 sq. ft.), our annual operating cost is cheaper than that of a conventional greenhouse (0.49 cents sq. ft. versus 0.67 cents sq. ft.) due to a longer usable lifetime of the structure and the elimination of heating costs. Our structure has been toured by interested individuals, school and farm groups. We plan to publicize the structure and its advantages by promoting more visits to the site.

  13. Passive Acoustic Vessel Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwal, Pasang Sherpa

    This thesis investigates the development of a low-cost passive acoustic system for localizing moving vessels to monitor areas where human activities such as fishing, snorkeling and poaching are restricted. The system uses several off-the-shelf sensors with unsynchronized clocks where the Time Difference of Arrival (TDOA) or time delay is extracted by cross-correlation of the signal between paired sensors. The cross-correlation function uses phase correlation or Phase Transform (PHAT) which whitens the cross-spectrum in order to de-emphasize dominant frequency components. Using the locations of pairs of sensors as foci, hyperbolic equations can be defined using the time delay between them. With three or more sensors, multiple hyperbolic functions can be calculated which intersect at a unique point: the boat's location. It is also found that increasing separation distances between sensors decreased the correlation between the signals. However larger separation distances have better localization capability than with small distances. Experimental results from the Columbia and Willamette Rivers are presented to demonstrate performance.

  14. Passive Vaporizing Heat Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, TImothy R.; Ashford, Victor A.; Carpenter, Michael G.; Bier, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    A passive vaporizing heat sink has been developed as a relatively lightweight, compact alternative to related prior heat sinks based, variously, on evaporation of sprayed liquids or on sublimation of solids. This heat sink is designed for short-term dissipation of a large amount of heat and was originally intended for use in regulating the temperature of spacecraft equipment during launch or re-entry. It could also be useful in a terrestrial setting in which there is a requirement for a lightweight, compact means of short-term cooling. This heat sink includes a hermetic package closed with a pressure-relief valve and containing an expendable and rechargeable coolant liquid (e.g., water) and a conductive carbon-fiber wick. The vapor of the liquid escapes when the temperature exceeds the boiling point corresponding to the vapor pressure determined by the setting of the pressure-relief valve. The great advantage of this heat sink over a melting-paraffin or similar phase-change heat sink of equal capacity is that by virtue of the =10x greater latent heat of vaporization, a coolant-liquid volume equal to =1/10 of the paraffin volume can suffice.

  15. Dissolution and Separation of Aluminum and Aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Joanna; Benker, Dennis; DePaoli, David W.; Felker, Leslie Kevin; Mattus, Catherine H.

    2015-12-19

    The selection of an aluminum alloy for target irradiation affects post-irradiation target dissolution and separations. Recent tests with aluminum alloy 6061 yielded greater than expected precipitation in the dissolver, forming up to 10 wt.% solids of aluminum hydroxides and aluminosilicates. Aluminosilicate dissolution presents challenges in a number of different areas, metals extraction from minerals, flyash treatment, and separations from aluminum alloys. We present experimental work that attempts to maximize dissolution of aluminum metal, along with silicon, magnesium, and copper impurities, through control of temperature, the rate of reagent addition, and incubation time. Aluminum phase transformations have been identified as a function of time and temperature, using X-ray diffraction. Solutions have been analyzed using wet chemical methods and X-ray fluorescence. Our data have been compared with published calculations of aluminum phase diagrams. Approaches are given to enhance the dissolution of aluminum and aluminosilicate phases in caustic solution.

  16. Dissolution and Separation of Aluminum and Aluminosilicates

    DOE PAGES

    McFarlane, Joanna; Benker, Dennis; DePaoli, David W.; Felker, Leslie Kevin; Mattus, Catherine H.

    2015-12-19

    The selection of an aluminum alloy for target irradiation affects post-irradiation target dissolution and separations. Recent tests with aluminum alloy 6061 yielded greater than expected precipitation in the dissolver, forming up to 10 wt.% solids of aluminum hydroxides and aluminosilicates. Aluminosilicate dissolution presents challenges in a number of different areas, metals extraction from minerals, flyash treatment, and separations from aluminum alloys. We present experimental work that attempts to maximize dissolution of aluminum metal, along with silicon, magnesium, and copper impurities, through control of temperature, the rate of reagent addition, and incubation time. Aluminum phase transformations have been identified as amore » function of time and temperature, using X-ray diffraction. Solutions have been analyzed using wet chemical methods and X-ray fluorescence. Our data have been compared with published calculations of aluminum phase diagrams. Approaches are given to enhance the dissolution of aluminum and aluminosilicate phases in caustic solution.« less

  17. Aluminum-carbon composite electrode

    DOEpatents

    Farahmandi, C.J.; Dispennette, J.M.

    1998-07-07

    A high performance double layer capacitor having an electric double layer formed in the interface between activated carbon and an electrolyte is disclosed. The high performance double layer capacitor includes a pair of aluminum impregnated carbon composite electrodes having an evenly distributed and continuous path of aluminum impregnated within an activated carbon fiber preform saturated with a high performance electrolytic solution. The high performance double layer capacitor is capable of delivering at least 5 Wh/kg of useful energy at power ratings of at least 600 W/kg. 3 figs.

  18. Aluminum-carbon composite electrode

    DOEpatents

    Farahmandi, C. Joseph; Dispennette, John M.

    1998-07-07

    A high performance double layer capacitor having an electric double layer formed in the interface between activated carbon and an electrolyte is disclosed. The high performance double layer capacitor includes a pair of aluminum impregnated carbon composite electrodes having an evenly distributed and continuous path of aluminum impregnated within an activated carbon fiber preform saturated with a high performance electrolytic solution. The high performance double layer capacitor is capable of delivering at least 5 Wh/kg of useful energy at power ratings of at least 600 W/kg.

  19. Aluminum-air battery crystallizer

    SciTech Connect

    Maimoni, A.

    1987-01-23

    A prototype crystallizer system for the aluminum-air battery operated reliably through simulated startup and shutdown cycles and met its design objectives. The crystallizer system allows for crystallization and removal of the aluminium hydroxide reaction product; it is required to allow steady-state and long-term operation of the aluminum-air battery. The system has to minimize volume and maintain low turbulence and shear to minimize secondary nucleation and energy consumption while enhancing agglomeration. A lamella crystallizer satisfies system constraints.

  20. Electronic interconnects and devices with topological surface states and methods for fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Yazdani, Ali; Ong, N. Phuan; Cava, Robert J.

    2016-05-03

    An interconnect is disclosed with enhanced immunity of electrical conductivity to defects. The interconnect includes a material with charge carriers having topological surface states. Also disclosed is a method for fabricating such interconnects. Also disclosed is an integrated circuit including such interconnects. Also disclosed is a gated electronic device including a material with charge carriers having topological surface states.

  1. Electrode and interconnect for miniature fuel cells using direct methanol feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor); Clara, Filiberto (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An improved system for interconnects in a fuel cell. In one embodiment, the membranes are located in parallel with one another, and current flow between them is facilitated by interconnects. In another embodiment, all of the current flow is through the interconnects which are located on the membranes. The interconnects are located between two electrodes.

  2. Effects of low fluence neutron bombardment on material properties of aluminum 2024 t-3 and aluminum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Jesse Lee

    The purpose of this work was to explore the impact of neutron irradiation (1018 n/m2 to 1021 n/m 2) on the aluminum alloy 2024 T-3, and several corrosion resistant treatments commonly used. The irradiation was conducted in the Utah Nuclear Engineering Programs Reactor facility using the Fast Neutron Irradiation Facility (FNIF) with a 1 MeV equivalent beam and the Center Irradiator (CI) with average neutron energy of 0.58 MeV. Historically, materials tests have focused on mechanical failures occurring at very high fluence. These same tests have generally been conducted for pure materials: the limited research existing for alloyed materials focuses on power plant materials such as zircaloy and steel. This body of information is mainly used to avoid catastrophic performance failures. Small research and test reactors operating at low power will subject core materials to fluence from 1014 n/m2 to 1024 n/m2. Aluminum alloys are very common in these systems. Materials used in research reactors, such as aluminum, have been deemed adequate due to high radiation tolerance and low mechanical failure rates. While aluminum and its alloys are a well-defined set of materials in nonradiation environments, there are very little published data for them for low fluence neutron radiation. This work measured Al 2024's (T-3) thermal conductivity, electrical resistivity, oxide layer thickness, oxide/metal interface and corrosion resistance (using passive current density) for Alodine, Anodize type II, Anodize type III and native oxide. These measurements were taken before and after irradiation and results were examined. Over the course of 30 to 50 years, property changes will likely impact thermal diffusion, corrosion properties and electrical properties. Defining these changes may give future engineers the tools needed to safely justify life extensions and build inspection methods to identify pre-failure conditions.

  3. Cadmium-Aluminum Layered Double Hydroxide Microspheres for Photocatalytic CO2 Reduction.

    PubMed

    Saliba, Daniel; Ezzeddine, Alaa; Sougrat, Rachid; Khashab, Niveen M; Hmadeh, Mohamad; Al-Ghoul, Mazen

    2016-04-21

    We report the synthesis of cadmium-aluminum layered double hydroxide (CdAl LDH) using the reaction-diffusion framework. As the hydroxide anions diffuse into an agar gel matrix containing the mixture of aluminum and cadmium salts at a given ratio, they react to give the LDH. The LDH self-assembles inside the pores of the gel matrix into a unique spherical-porous shaped microstructure. The internal and external morphologies of the particles are studied by electron microscopy and tomography revealing interconnected channels and a high surface area. This material is shown to exhibit a promising performance in the photoreduction of carbon dioxide using solar light. Moreover, the palladium-decorated version shows a significant improvement in its reduction potential at room temperature. PMID:27028104

  4. 75 FR 70689 - Kaiser Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC; Kaiser Aluminum-Greenwood Forge Division; Currently...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... in the Federal Register on November 17, 2009 (74 FR 59254). At the request of the State agency and a... Employment and Training Administration Kaiser Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC; Kaiser Aluminum- Greenwood... Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC, Kaiser Aluminum-Greenwood Forge Division, including on- site...

  5. The effect of zinc on the aluminum anode of the aluminum-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yougen; Lu, Lingbin; Roesky, Herbert W.; Wang, Laiwen; Huang, Baiyun

    Aluminum is an ideal material for batteries, due to its excellent electrochemical performance. Herein, the effect of zinc on the aluminum anode of the aluminum-air battery, as an additive for aluminum alloy and electrolytes, has been studied. The results show that zinc can decrease the anodic polarization, restrain the hydrogen evolution and increase the anodic utilization rate.

  6. RECOVERY OF ALUMINUM FROM FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Blanco, R.E.; Higgins, I.R.

    1962-11-20

    A method is given for recovertng aluminum values from aqueous solutions containing said values together with fission products. A mixture of Fe/sub 2/O/ sub 3/ and MnO/sub 2/ is added to a solution containing aluminum and fission products. The resulting aluminum-containing supernatant is then separated from the fission product-bearing metal oxide precipitate and is contacted with a cation exchange resin. The aluminum sorbed on the resin is then eluted and recovered. (AEC)

  7. Mineral resource of the month: aluminum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bray, E. Lee

    2012-01-01

    The article offers information on aluminum, a mineral resource which is described as the third-most abundant element in Earth's crust. According to the article, aluminum is the second-most used metal. Hans Christian Oersted, a Danish chemist, was the first to isolate aluminum in the laboratory. Aluminum is described as lightweight, corrosion-resistant and an excellent conductor of electricity and heat.

  8. Blood aluminum levels as a function of aluminum intake from drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Turnquest, E.M.; Hallenbeck, W.H. )

    1991-04-01

    Questions regarding the health effects of aluminum are still unanswered. The speciation, pharmacokinetics, and toxicity of aluminum are not well understood. Furthermore, no animal or human studies of aluminum absorption have been reported using drinking water as the source of aluminum. The following experiment attempted to reach a better understanding of the bioavailability of aluminum from drinking water. Its objective was to determine whether or not increased aluminum ingestion from drinking water would be reflected in increased serum and whole blood aluminum levels in the baboon experimental model.

  9. Metal/ceramic composites via infiltration of an interconnected wood-derived ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Thomas E.

    The use of composites is increasing as they afford scientists and engineers the ability to combine the advantageous properties of each constituent phase, e.g. metal ductility and ceramic stiffness. With respect to materials design, biomimetics is garnering increasing attention due to the complex, yet efficient, natural microstructures. One such biomimetic, or in this case 'bio-derived,' curiosity is wood-derived ceramic, which is made by either replicating or converting wood into a ceramic. The resulting porous and anisotropic material retains the precursor microstructure. The wide variety of precursors can yield materials with a range of pore sizes and distribution of pores. The purpose of this work was to study the processing, microstructure, and properties of aluminum/silicon carbide composites. The composites were made by infiltrating molten aluminum into porous wood-derived SIC, which was produced by the reactive melt-infiltration of silicon into pyrolyzed wood. The composite microstructure consisted of interconnected SiC surrounding Al-alloy 'fibers.' The strength, modulus, and toughness were measured in both longitudinal and transverse orientations. The Al → SiC load transfer was investigated with high-energy X-ray diffraction in combination with in-situ compressive loading. The properties in flexure were found to decrease with increasing temperature. Despite the complex microstructure, predictions of the composite flexural modulus and longitudinal fracture toughness were obtained using simple models: Halpin-Tsai bounds and the Ashby et al. model of the effect of ductile particle-reinforcements on the toughness of brittle materials (Ashby et al. 1989), respectively. In addition, the Al/SiC research inspired the investigation of carbon-reinforced copper composites. The goal was to explore the feasibility of making a high-thermal conductivity composite by infiltrating copper into wood-derived carbon. Results indicated that Cu/C composites could be made with

  10. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.2645 Section 73.2645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive aluminum powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  11. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  12. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be...

  13. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  14. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  16. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be...

  17. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.2645 Section 73.2645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive aluminum powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  18. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  19. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  20. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be safely used as a source of niacin...

  1. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  2. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  3. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.2645 Section 73.2645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive aluminum powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  4. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  5. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.2645 Section 73.2645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive aluminum powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  6. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be...

  7. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be...

  8. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.2645 Section 73.2645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive aluminum powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  9. 75 FR 80527 - Aluminum Extrusions From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ... Affirmative Countervailing Duty Determination, 75 FR 54302, September 7, 2010, and Aluminum Extrusions From... Antidumping Duty Determination, 75 FR 57441, September 21, 2010. \\3\\ See Aluminum Extrusions From the People's... Determination of Targeted Dumping, 75 FR 69403, November 12, 2010, and Aluminum Extrusions From the...

  10. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  11. Orion Passive Thermal: Control Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez-Hermandez, Angel; Miller, Stephen W.

    2009-01-01

    A general overview of the NASA Orion Passive Thermal Control System (PTCS) is presented. The topics include: 1) Orion in CxP Hierarchy; 2) General Orion Description/Orientation; and 3) Orion PTCS Overview.

  12. [Passive smoking. Effects on health].

    PubMed

    Trédaniel, J; Zalcman, G; Boffetta, P; Hirsch, A

    1993-05-15

    Passive smoking--also called involuntary or environmental smoking--is the exposure of non-smokers to the tobacco smoke released by smokers. The physico-chemical composition of tobacco smoke, and notably its contents in toxic and carcinogenic substances, is the same in the secondary stream between puffs as in the primary stream released by the smoker. The pathogenic effects of passive smoking are increasingly well known and accepted. A high incidence of respiratory tract infections and of chronic respiratory and asthmatic symptoms is observed in children. In adults, passive smoking seems to be one of the main risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Its repercussions on the respiratory tracts is difficult to evaluate, but there are marked by an increase of respiratory symptoms and perhaps of chronic obstructive lung diseases. Finally, it is now recognized that passive smoking is a major risk factor for primary lung cancer in non-smokers exposed to tobacco smoke. PMID:8235360

  13. Passivating metals on cracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mckay, D.L.

    1980-01-15

    Metals such as nickel, vanadium and iron contaminating a cracking catalyst are passivated by contacting the cracking catalyst under elevated temperature conditions with antimony selenide, antimony sulfide, antimony sulfate, bismuth selenide, bismuth sulfide, or bismuth phosphate.

  14. Microcoil Spring Interconnects for Ceramic Grid Array Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strickland, S. M.; Hester, J. D.; Gowan, A. K.; Montgomery, R. K.; Geist, D. L.; Blanche, J. F.; McGuire, G. D.; Nash, T. S.

    2011-01-01

    As integrated circuit miniaturization trends continue, they drive the need for smaller higher input/output (I/O) packages. Hermetically sealed ceramic area array parts are the package of choice by the space community for high reliability space flight electronic hardware. Unfortunately, the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between the ceramic area array package and the epoxy glass printed wiring board limits the life of the interconnecting solder joint. This work presents the results of an investigation by Marshall Space Flight Center into a method to increase the life of this second level interconnection by the use of compliant microcoil springs. The design of the spring and its attachment process are presented along with thermal cycling results of microcoil springs (MCS) compared with state-of-the-art ball and column interconnections. Vibration testing has been conducted on MCS and high lead column parts. Radio frequency simulation and measurements have been made and the MCS has been modeled and a stress analysis performed. Thermal cycling and vibration testing have shown MCS interconnects to be significantly more reliable than solder columns. Also, MCS interconnects are less prone to handling damage than solder columns. Future work that includes shock testing, incorporation into a digital signal processor board, and process evaluation of expansion from a 400 I/O device to a device with over 1,100 I/O is identified.

  15. Impact of photolithography and mask variability on interconnect parasitics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yuxin; Shi, Weiping; Mercer, M. Ray

    2005-11-01

    Due to photolithography effects and manufacture process variations, the actual features printed on wafer are different from the designed ones. This difference results in the inaccuracy on parasitic extraction, which is critical for timing verification and design for manufacturability. Most of the current layout parasitic extraction (LPE) tools ignore these effects and can cause as high as 20% errors. This paper proposes a new strategy to extract interconnect parasitics with the consideration of photolithography effects and process variations. Based on the feedback from lithography simulation, a shape correction process is setup to adjust the interconnect structure for LPE tools. Compared with the traditional extraction methodology, the parasitics extracted from this adjusted geometry are more accurate. This method can be implanted into the current design flow with minimum change. Meanwhile, this paper studies the impacts of mask critical dimension (CD) variations on interconnect parasitics. The variability analysis is based on PROLITH lithography simulation software and is tested on RAPHAEL interconnect library. The results show a high nonlinear relationship between the mask variation and the interconnect parasitics.

  16. Aluminum: The Next Twenty Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, M. Desmond; Pollio, Gerald

    1982-12-01

    This report concludes that the outlook for the world aluminum industry is quite favorable. Demand is expected to expand at a more rapid rate than for other basic metals, but not sufficiently to put undue strain on productive capacity. Capital requirements of the world aluminum industry are projected at 95.5 billion in 1980 prices — more than 200 billion in current prices—over the balance of the century. Given the aluminum industry's past success in generating internal funds, this level of capital expanditure should not cause undue financing problems. Finally, we expect changes to occur in the structure of the industry over the forecast period, with virtually all new alumina capacity being installed in proximity to bauxite production, and—with the exception of Australia—a major shift in smelting capacity away from other industrialized economies. While the large multinational companies will still play a dominant role in the world aluminum market, their share of production and ownership is likely to decline progressively during the period.

  17. Directly polished lightweight aluminum mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ter Horst, Rik; Tromp, Niels; de Haan, Menno; Navarro, Ramon; Venema, Lars; Pragt, Johan

    2008-07-01

    During the last ten years, Astron has been a major contractor for the design and manufacturing of astronomical instruments for Space- and Earth based observatories, such as VISIR, MIDI, SPIFFI, X-Shooter and MIRI. The collaboration between optical- and mechanical designers at Astron led to new design philosophies and strategies. Driven by the need to reduce the weight of optically ultra-stiff structures, two promising techniques have been developed in the last years: ASTRON Extreme Lightweighting for mechanical structures and an improved Polishing Technique for Aluminum Mirrors. Using one single material for both optical components and mechanical structure simplifies the design of a cryogenic instrument significantly, it is very beneficial during instrument test and verification, and makes the instrument insensitive to temperature changes. Aluminum has been the main material used for cryogenic optical instruments, and optical aluminum mirrors are generally diamond turned. The application of a polishable hard top coating like nickel removes excess stray light caused by the groove pattern, but limits the degree of lightweighting of the mirrors due to the bi-metal effect. By directly polishing the aluminum mirror surface, the recent developments at Astron allow for using a non-exotic material for light weighted yet accurate optical mirrors, with a lower surface roughness (~1nm RMS), higher surface accuracy and reduced light scattering. This paper presents the techniques, obtained results and a global comparison with alternative lightweight mirror solutions.

  18. Creep of laminated aluminum composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, W.; Davies, T. J.

    1980-08-01

    The creep behavior of a laminate system consisting of alternate layers of pure aluminum and SAP (sintered aluminum powder) sheet has been examined in the temperature range 323 to 473 K and in the stress range 35 to 68 MN m-2. It was observed that secondary creep strain in the laminates was greater than in elemental SAP; the secondary creep strain rate in laminates was lower than that in pure aluminum and the creep rate decreased with increasing fracture of SAP. A stress exponent ( n) value of ˜20 was observed for most of the laminates and was reasonably constant for 3, 5, 7, and 9 ply laminates and volume fractions V f ) in the range 0.3 < V f < 0.65. For higher volume fractions of SAP the mechanical behavior of the laminates was similar to that of SAP. The experimental activation energy for creep of 30.5 ± 5 Kcal mol-1 correlates well with that for self-diffusion in aluminum. Laminating induced appreciable ductility to the SAP.

  19. Inert anodes for aluminum smelting

    SciTech Connect

    Weyand, J.D.; Ray, S.P.; Baker, F.W.; DeYoung, D.H.; Tarcy, G.P.

    1986-02-01

    The use of nonconsumable or inert anodes for replacement of consumable carbon anodes in Hall electrolysis cells for the production of aluminum has been a technical and commercial goal of the aluminum industry for many decades. This report summarizes the technical success realized in the development of an inert anode that can be used to produce aluminum of acceptable metal purity in small scale Hall electrolysis cells. The inert anode material developed consists of a cermet composition containing the phases: copper, nickel ferrite and nickel oxide. This anode material has an electrical conductivity comparable to anode carbon used in Hall cells, i.e., 150 ohm {sup {minus}1}cm{sup {minus}1}. Metal purity of 99.5 percent aluminum has been produced using this material. The copper metal alloy present in the anode is not removed by anodic dissolution as does occur with cermet anodes containing a metallic nickel alloy. Solubility of the oxide phases in the cryolite electrolyte is reduced by: (1) saturated concentration of alumina, (2) high nickel oxide content in the NiO-NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} composition, (3) lowest possible cell operating temperature, (4) additions of alkaline or alkaline earth fluorides to the bath to reduce solubilities of the anode components, and (5) avoiding bath contaminants such as silica. Dissolution rate measurements indicate first-order kinetics and that the rate limiting step for dissolution is mass transport controlled. 105 refs., 234 figs., 73 tabs.

  20. Aluminum and its light alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merica, Paul D

    1920-01-01

    Report is a summary of research work which has been done here and abroad on the constitution and mechanical properties of the various alloy systems with aluminum. The mechanical properties and compositions of commercial light alloys for casting, forging, or rolling, obtainable in this country are described.