Science.gov

Sample records for passive environmental radon

  1. Continuous and passive environmental radon monitoring: Measuring methods and health effects. (Latest citations from the INSPEC database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning continuous and passive radon (Rn) monitoring, measurement methods and equipment, and health effects from Rn concentration in air, water, and soils. Citations discuss the design, development, and evaluation of monitoring and detection devices, including alpha spectroscopy and dosimetry, track detecting and scintillation, thermoluminescent, electret, and electrode collection. Sources of Rn concentration levels found in building materials, ventilation systems, soils, and ground water are examined. Lung cancer-associated risks from Rn radiation exposure are explored. Radon monitoring in mining operations is excluded. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  2. Intercomparison of active, passive and continuous instruments for radon and radon progeny

    SciTech Connect

    George, A.C.; Knutson, E.O.; Tu, K.W.; Fisenne, I.

    1995-12-31

    The DOE/OHER radon, thoron and progeny exposure and test facility was set up in 1993 to provide a well controlled, airtight and uniform environment. The new calibration chamber is the primary test facility at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML), in which a large number of an diverse types of monitoring instruments can be accomodated for calibration, evaluation and intercomparison purposes. The test chamber is environmentally controlled for temperature and humidity. Monodispersed or polydispersed aerosols are generated to study radon and thoron progeny attachment and behavior and to investigate instrument performance under different conditions of exposure. Also, particle size measurements are performed to develop techniques for the assessment of the health risk from the inhalation of radon and thoron progeny. The results from the May 1995 intercomparison for active, passive and continuous instruments for radon and radon progeny are presented. Instruments that measure radon were represented by 13 participants with open face and diffusion barrier activated carbon collectors, 10 with nuclear alpha track detectors, 9 with short-term and long-term electret/ionization chambers and 13 with active and passive commercial electronic continuous monitors. For radon progeny, there were 4 participants that came in person to take part in the grab sampling methodology for measuring individual radon progeny and the potential alpha energy (PAEC). The results indicate that all the tested instruments that measure radon are in good standing. All instruments and methods used for grab sampling for radon progeny did very well. However, most of the continuous and integrating electronic instruments used for PAEC (WL), appear to underestimate the potential risk from radon progeny when the concentration of particles onto which the radon progeny are attached is <5,000 cc{sup -1}.

  3. A passive radon dosemeter suitable for workplaces.

    PubMed

    Orlando, C; Orland, P; Patrizii, L; Tommasino, L; Tonnarini, S; Trevisi, R; Viola, P

    2002-01-01

    The results obtained in different international intercomparisons on passive radon monitors have been analysed with the aim of identifying a suitable radon monitoring device for workplaces. From this analysis, the passive radon device, first developed for personal dosimetry in mines by the National Radiation Protection Board, UK (NRPB), has shown the most suitable set of characteristics. This radon monitor consists of a diffusion chamber, made of conductive plastic with less than 2 cm height, containing a CR-39 film (Columbia Resin 1939), as track detector. Radon detectors in workplaces may be exposed only during the working hours, thus requiring the storage of the detectors in low-radon zones when not exposed. This paper describes how this problem can be solved. Since track detectors are also efficient neutron dosemeters, care should be taken when radon monitors are used in workplaces, where they may he exposed to neutrons, such as on high altitude mountains, in the surroundings of high energy X ray facilities (where neutrons are produced by (gamma, n) reactions) or around high energy particle accelerators. To this end, the response of these passive radon monitors to high energy neutron fields has been investigated. PMID:12408493

  4. Intercomparison of active and passive instruments for radon and radon progeny in North America

    SciTech Connect

    George, A.C.; Tu, Keng-Wu; Knutson, E.O.

    1995-02-01

    An intercomparison exercise for radon and radon progeny instruments and methods was held at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) from April 22--May 2, 1994. The exercise was conducted in the new EML radon test and calibration facility in which conditions of exposure are very well controlled. The detection systems of the intercompared instruments consisted of. (1) pulse ionization chambers, (2) electret ionization chambers, (3) scintillation detectors, (4) alpha particle spectrometers with silicon diodes, surface barrier or diffused junction detectors, (5) registration of nuclear tracks in solid-state materials, and (6) activated carbon collectors counted by gamma-ray spectrometry or by alpha- and beta-liquid scintillation counting. 23 private firms, government laboratories and universities participated with a 165 passive integrating devices consisting of: Activated carbon collectors, nuclear alpha track detectors and electret ionization chambers, and 11 active and passive continuous radon monitors. Five portable integrating and continuous instruments were intercompared for radon progeny. Forty grab samples for radon progeny were taken by five groups that participated in person to test and evaluate their primary instruments and methods that measure individual radon progeny and the potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC) in indoor air. Results indicate that more than 80% of the measurements for radon performed with a variety of instruments, are within {plus_minus}10% of actual value. The majority of the instruments that measure individual radon progeny and the PAEC gave results that are in good agreement with the EML reference value. Radon progeny measurements made with continuous and integrating instruments are satisfactory with room for improvement.

  5. Theoretical aspects of the design of a passive radon dosemeter.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, P; Saunders, B J

    1985-10-01

    Some mathematical aspects of the development and design of a passive radon dosemeter are considered. In particular, a mathematical model is presented that is concerned with the gaseous diffusion of radon into a confined region bounded by a plastic material of known diffusion coefficient. The relationship between the time-integrated radon concentrations, inside and outside a sealed plastic container are derived. Estimates of the exposure of people to radon can be made using the time integrated radon concentration inside a calibrated container containing a CR-39 etched-track device. As a consequence of the analysis, it is possible to design a passive radon dosemeter that will be accurate, resistant to moisture and whose response will be independent of rapid variations in radon concentration. The possibility of using a container of this type for the measurement of diffusion coefficients is discussed.

  6. Continuous and passive environmental radon monitoring: Measuring methods and health effects. (Latest citations from the INSPEC: Information services for the Physics and Engineering Communities database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1993-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning continuous and passive radon (Rn) monitoring, measurement methods and equipment, and health effects from Rn concentration in air, water, and soils. Citations discuss the design, development, and evaluation of monitoring and detection devices, including alpha spectroscopy and dosimetry, track detecting and scintillation, thermoluminescent, electret, and electrode collection. Sources of Rn concentration levels found in building materials, ventilation systems, soils, and ground water are examined. Lung cancer-associated risks from Rn radiation exposure are explored. Radon monitoring in mining operations is excluded. (Contains a minimum of 210 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. Proceedings of the technical exchange meeting on passive radon monnitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Duray, J.R.; Langner, H. Jr.; Martz, D.E.

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to bring together a number of scientists active in the development and use of passive radon monitoring instrumentation, primarily activated charcoal detectors and alpha track detectors. Many of those present expressed a desire to receive copies of the viewgraphs and other materials presented. Most have supplied extended abstracts or complete reports. These materials are reproduced here as a Technical Measurements Center Report for the benefit of those attending the meeting and for others interested in passive radon monitoring. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

  8. Error in measuring radon in soil gas by means of passive detectors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    Passive detection of radon isotopes depends on diffusion of radon atoms from the sites of their generation to the location of the detecting or collecting device. Because some radon decays en route to a passive detector in soil, the radon concentration measured by the detector must be less than the concentration in those soil pores where it is undiminished by diffusion to the detector cavity. The true radon concentration may be significantly underestimated in moist soils. -Author

  9. Passive, integrated measurement of indoor radon using activated carbon.

    PubMed

    George, A C

    1984-04-01

    Activated carbon canisters were tested to determine their adsorption and retention characteristics for radon. Our tests conducted indoors under typical conditions of temperature and relative humidity indicate that simple, inexpensive and maintenance-free passive devices containing 150-200 g of activated carbon can measure radon conveniently and adequately. The amount of radon absorbed in the collector is determined by counting the gamma rays from the decay products of radon. The lower limit of detection for radon is 0.2 pCi/l. for an exposure of 72 hr. Greater sensitivity can be obtained with larger counting systems and devices containing carbon with more surface area. Tests in a residential building and in a test chamber indicate that the measured radon in the canister is proportional to the mean concentration of radon during the period of exposure when correction for relative humidity is made. For practical situations encountered indoors, the device yields results accurate to within +/- 20%. Results from field measurements indicate that the use of the device is feasible.

  10. Influence of environmental thoron on radon measurements and related issues

    SciTech Connect

    Tokonami, Shinji; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Yoshinaga, Shinji; Kovacs, Tibor; Kavasi, Norbert; Sugino, Masato

    2008-08-07

    Recently importance of thoron measurements has also been recognized from the viewpoint of accurate radon measurements. The present study covers specification of the NIRS thoron chamber, passive measurement technique of radon and thoron and thoron interference on radon measurements from both experimental studies and field experiences on epidemiological study area.

  11. Intercomparison of active, passive and continuous instruments for radon and radon progeny measurements in the EML chamber and test facility

    SciTech Connect

    George, A.C.; Knutson, E.O.; Tu, K.W.; Fisenne, I.M.

    1995-12-01

    The results from the May 1995 Intercomparison of Active, Passive and Continuous Instruments for Radon and Radon Progeny Measurement conducted in the EML radon exposure and test facility are presented. Represented were 13 participants that measure radon with open faced and diffusion barrier activated carbon collectors, 10 with nuclear alpha track detectors, 9 with short-term and long-term electret/ionization chambers, and 13 with active and passive commercial electronic continuous monitors. For radon progeny, there were four participants that came in person to take part in the grab sampling methodology for measuring individual radon progeny and the potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC). There were 11 participants with continuous and integrating commercial electronic instruments that are used for measuring the PAEC. The results indicate that all the tested instruments that measure radon fulfill their intended purpose. All instruments and methods used for grab sampling for radon progeny did very well. However, most of the continuous and integrating electronic instruments used for measuring the PAEC or working level appear to underestimate the potential risk from radon progeny when the concentration of particles onto which the radon progeny are attached is <5,000 cm{sup -3}.

  12. Radiological risk assessment of environmental radon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, Norafatin; Majid, Amran Ab; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Yasir, Muhammad Samudi

    2013-11-01

    Measurements of radon gas (222Rn) in the environmental are important to assess indoor air quality and to study the potential risk to human health. Generally known that exposure to radon is considered the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The environmental radon concentration depends on the 226Ra concentration, indoor atmosphere, cracking on rocks and building materials. This study was carried out to determine the indoor radon concentration from selected samples of tin tailings (amang) and building materials in an airtight sealed homemade radon chamber. The radiological risk assessment for radon gas was also calculated based on the annual exposure dose, effective dose equivalent, radon exhalation rates and fatal cancer risk. The continuous radon monitor Sun Nuclear model 1029 was used to measure the radon concentration emanates from selected samples for 96 hours. Five types of tin tailings collected from Kampar, Perak and four samples of building materials commonly used in Malaysia dwellings or building constructions were analysed for radon concentration. The indoor radon concentration determined in ilmenite, monazite, struverite, xenotime and zircon samples varies from 219.6 ± 76.8 Bq m-3 to 571.1 ± 251.4 Bq m-3, 101.0 ± 41.0 Bq m-3 to 245.3 ± 100.2 Bq m-3, 53.1 ± 7.5 Bq m-3 to 181.8 ± 9.7 Bq m-3, 256.1 ± 59.3 Bq m-3 to 652.2 ± 222.2 Bq m-3 and 164.5 ± 75.9 Bq m-3 to 653.3 ± 240.0 Bq m-3, respectively. Whereas, in the building materials, the radon concentration from cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and cement showed 396.3 ± 194.3 Bq m-3, 192.1 ± 75.4 Bq m-3, 176.1 ± 85.9 Bq m-3 and 28.4 ± 5.7 Bq m-3, respectively. The radon concentration in tin tailings and building materials were found to be much higher in xenotime and cement brick samples than others. All samples in tin tailings were exceeded the action level for radon gas of 148 Bq m-3 proposed by EPA except monazite 0.15 kg, struverite 0.15 kg and 0.25 kg. Whereas

  13. Radiological risk assessment of environmental radon

    SciTech Connect

    Khalid, Norafatin; Majid, Amran Ab; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Yasir, Muhammad Samudi

    2013-11-27

    Measurements of radon gas ({sup 222}Rn) in the environmental are important to assess indoor air quality and to study the potential risk to human health. Generally known that exposure to radon is considered the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The environmental radon concentration depends on the {sup 226}Ra concentration, indoor atmosphere, cracking on rocks and building materials. This study was carried out to determine the indoor radon concentration from selected samples of tin tailings (amang) and building materials in an airtight sealed homemade radon chamber. The radiological risk assessment for radon gas was also calculated based on the annual exposure dose, effective dose equivalent, radon exhalation rates and fatal cancer risk. The continuous radon monitor Sun Nuclear model 1029 was used to measure the radon concentration emanates from selected samples for 96 hours. Five types of tin tailings collected from Kampar, Perak and four samples of building materials commonly used in Malaysia dwellings or building constructions were analysed for radon concentration. The indoor radon concentration determined in ilmenite, monazite, struverite, xenotime and zircon samples varies from 219.6 ± 76.8 Bq m{sup −3} to 571.1 ± 251.4 Bq m{sup −3}, 101.0 ± 41.0 Bq m{sup −3} to 245.3 ± 100.2 Bq m{sup −3}, 53.1 ± 7.5 Bq m{sup −3} to 181.8 ± 9.7 Bq m{sup −3}, 256.1 ± 59.3 Bq m{sup −3} to 652.2 ± 222.2 Bq m{sup −3} and 164.5 ± 75.9 Bq m{sup −3} to 653.3 ± 240.0 Bq m{sup −3}, respectively. Whereas, in the building materials, the radon concentration from cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and cement showed 396.3 ± 194.3 Bq m{sup −3}, 192.1 ± 75.4 Bq m{sup −3}, 176.1 ± 85.9 Bq m{sup −3} and 28.4 ± 5.7 Bq m{sup −3}, respectively. The radon concentration in tin tailings and building materials were found to be much higher in xenotime and cement brick samples than others. All samples in tin tailings were exceeded the

  14. Radon/radon daughter environmental chamber located in the northwest end of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Radon/radon daughter environmental chamber located in the northwest end of building. VIEW LOOKING WEST - Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office, Building No. 32, 2597 B3/4 Road, Grand Junction, Mesa County, CO

  15. Quality assurance for radon exposure chambers at the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory, Montgomery, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Semler, M.O.; Sensintaffar, E.L.

    1993-12-31

    The Office of Radiation and Indoor Air, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), operates six radon exposure chambers in its two laboratories, the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory (NAREL) in Montgomery, Alabama, and the Las Vegas Facility, Las Vegas, Nevada. These radon exposure chambers are used to calibrate and test portable radon measuring instruments, test commercial suppliers of radon measurement services through the Radon Measurement Proficiency Program, and expose passive measurement devices to known radon concentrations as part of a quality assurance plan for federal and state studies measuring indoor radon concentrations. Both laboratories participate in national and international intercomparisons for the measurement of radon and are presently working with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to receive a certificate of traceability for radon measurements. NAREL has developed an estimate of the total error in its calibration of each chamber`s continuous monitors as part of an internal quality assurance program. This paper discusses the continuous monitors and their calibration for the three chambers located in Montgomery, Alabama, as well as the results of the authors intercomparisons and total error analysis.

  16. Intercomparison of active, passive and continuous instruments for radon and radon progeny measurements in the EML chamber and test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpitta, S.C.; Tu, K.W.; Fisenne, I.M.; Cavallo, A.; Perry, P.

    1996-10-01

    Results are presented from the Fifth Intercomparison of Active, Passive and Continuous Instruments for Radon and Radon Progeny Measurements conducted in the EML radon exposure and test facility in May 1996. In total, thirty-four government, private and academic facilities participated in the exercise with over 170 passive and electronic devices exposed in the EML test chamber. During the first week of the exercise, passive and continuous measuring devices were exposed (usually in quadruplicate) to about 1,280 Bq m{sup {minus}3} {sup 222}Rn for 1--7 days. Radon progeny measurements were made during the second week of the exercise. The results indicate that all of the tested devices that measure radon gas performed well and fulfill their intended purpose. The grand mean (GM) ratio of the participants` reported values to the EML values, for all four radon device categories, was 0.99 {plus_minus} 0.08. Eighty-five percent of all the radon measuring devices that were exposed in the EML radon test chamber were within {plus_minus}1 standard deviation (SD) of the EML reference values. For the most part, radon progeny measurements were also quite good as compared to the EML values. The GM ratio for the 10 continuous PAEC instruments was 0.90 {plus_minus} 0.12 with 75% of the devices within 1 SD of the EML reference values. Most of the continuous and integrating electronic instruments used for measuring the PAEC underestimated the EML values by about 10--15% probably because the concentration of particles onto which the radon progeny were attached was low (1,200--3,800 particles cm{sup {minus}3}). The equilibrium factor at that particle concentration level was 0.10--0.22.

  17. Intercomparison and intercalibration of passive/active radon and active radon progeny instruments and methods in North America

    SciTech Connect

    George, A.C.; Tu, Keng W.

    1993-06-01

    An intercomparison and intercalibration exercise for radon and radon progeny measurements made with active and passive instruments was held at EML from October 22--30,1992. Twenty-five participants submitted 96 passive integrating devices, eight active devices for radon, and seven integrating devices for potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC). In addition, 40 grab samples for radon progeny analysis were taken by five groups that participated in person during the intercomparison. The results reported to EML indicate that the majority of the participants (70%) obtained mean results within 10% of the EML reference value. Although the instruments used in this exercise are based on different principles of collection and detection, they all appear reliable. However, in some instances there seemed to be some minor problems with quality control and calibration bias. Also, the large counting errors for the PAEC experienced by some of the participants can be minimized by using higher sampling air flow rates without sacrificing instrument portability.

  18. Assessment of inhalation and ingestion doses from exposure to radon gas using passive and active detecting techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, A. H.; Jafaar, M. S.

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess an environmental hazard of radon exhalation rate from the samples of soil and drinking water in selected locations in Iraqi Kurdistan, passive (CR-39NTDs) and active (RAD7) detecting techniques has been employed. Long and short term measurements of emitted radon concentrations were estimated for 124 houses. High and lower radon concentration in soil samples was in the cities of Hajyawa and Er. Tyrawa, respectively. Moreover, for drinking water, high and low radon concentration was in the cities of Similan and Kelak, respectively. A comparison between our results with that mentioned in international reports had been done. Average annual dose equivalent to the bronchial epithelium, stomach and whole body in the cities of Kelak and Similan are estimated, and it was varied from 0.04{+-}0.01 mSv to 0.547{+-}0.018 mSv, (2.832{+-}0.22)x10{sup -5} to (11.972{+-}2.09)x10{sup -5} mSv, and (0.056 {+-}0.01) x10{sup -5} to (0.239{+-}0.01)x10{sup -5} mSv, respectively. This indicated that the effects of dissolved radon on the bronchial epithelium are much than on the stomach and whole body. (authors)

  19. Environmental Challenges: Radon and Carbon Dioxide in School Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, James

    1991-01-01

    Many school buildings with high radon levels also exhibit high carbon dioxide levels that starve the minds of students for oxygen. Administrators must realize that the world's best educator cannot teach minds made dysfunctional by their environment. This article describes Environmental Protection Agency testing results and offers radon monitoring…

  20. Anomalous results with the widely used NRPB/SSI-type passive radon dosemeter.

    PubMed

    Paridaens, J

    2010-12-01

    In an industrial hall, with large variations of radon concentration within minutes, simultaneous measurements were done with two types of passive radon detectors and an active radon measuring device. The widely used passive radon detector of the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) [Health Protection Agency (former NRPB) (HPA)]/Statens strålskyddsinstitut (Swedish Radiation Protection Institute) (SSI) type produced anomalous results, seemingly uncorrelated to the radon concentration which was in the order of hundreds of becquerels per metre, usually underestimating but occasionally overestimating. We tried to reproduce similar exposure characteristics in our laboratory, but failed to reproduce the anomalous readings. We suspected, but could not prove, that the anomalous results were due to the combination of high radon concentration gradients, with pressure-driven air exchange between the inside of the detector holder and the outside atmosphere. Moreover, this theory was at least partly contradicted when we drilled holes in the detector holder. Although of interest, this effect is not likely to have substantially influenced any radon surveys, given the unusual nature of the exposure that caused the effect.

  1. Comparison of active and passive methods for radon exhalation from a high-exposure building material.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, A; Mirekhtiary, F

    2013-12-01

    The radon exhalation rates and radon concentrations in granite stones used in Iran were measured by means of a high-resolution high purity Germanium gamma-spectroscopy system (passive method) and an AlphaGUARD model PQ 2000 (active method). For standard rooms (4.0 × 5.0 m area × 2.8 height) where ground and walls have been covered by granite stones, the radon concentration and the radon exhalation rate by two methods were calculated. The activity concentrations of (226)Ra in the selected granite samples ranged from 3.8 to 94.2 Bq kg(-1). The radon exhalation rate from the calculation of the (226)Ra activity concentration was obtained. The radon exhalation rates were 1.31-7.86 Bq m(-2)h(-1). The direction measurements using an AlphaGUARD were from 218 to 1306 Bq m(-3) with a mean of 625 Bq m(-3). Also, the exhalation rates measured by the passive and active methods were compared and the results of this study were the same, with the active method being 22 % higher than the passive method. PMID:23798709

  2. Comparison of active and passive methods for radon exhalation from a high-exposure building material.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, A; Mirekhtiary, F

    2013-12-01

    The radon exhalation rates and radon concentrations in granite stones used in Iran were measured by means of a high-resolution high purity Germanium gamma-spectroscopy system (passive method) and an AlphaGUARD model PQ 2000 (active method). For standard rooms (4.0 × 5.0 m area × 2.8 height) where ground and walls have been covered by granite stones, the radon concentration and the radon exhalation rate by two methods were calculated. The activity concentrations of (226)Ra in the selected granite samples ranged from 3.8 to 94.2 Bq kg(-1). The radon exhalation rate from the calculation of the (226)Ra activity concentration was obtained. The radon exhalation rates were 1.31-7.86 Bq m(-2)h(-1). The direction measurements using an AlphaGUARD were from 218 to 1306 Bq m(-3) with a mean of 625 Bq m(-3). Also, the exhalation rates measured by the passive and active methods were compared and the results of this study were the same, with the active method being 22 % higher than the passive method.

  3. Assessment of lifetime lung cancer risks induced by environmental radon

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, G.T.; Schutz, D.F.

    1987-01-01

    Radon and its progeny in air (/sup 218/Po, /sup 214/Pb, /sup 214/Bi, and /sup 214/Po) may enter the human body by inhalation and cause radiation damage to the respiratory tract to induce lung cancer. Among uranium miners, lung cancer induced by long term exposure to elevated levels of radon progeny is well established. The epidemiological evidence provided by such miners is the principal basis for determining the numerical relationship between environmental levels of radon exposure and lung cancer incidence. A number of lung cancer risk models have been published. All of these models are based on an intensity of radon or radon progeny exposure, referring to an average exposure over time, and on an assumed percentage of occupancy. However, the differences in life-styles among individuals or the seasonal variation in radon levels found in a home, which may influence the level of radon exposure, have not been considered in the published risk models. An assessment of the possible lifetime lung cancer risk from exposure to environmental levels of radon is presented.

  4. Radon

    MedlinePlus

    ... with elevated radon underwent changes to reduce radon pollution. 1 How Can Radon Be Detected? The only ... Association Applauds EPA’s Update to Cross-State Air Pollution Rule News: New Truck Efficiency Standards Expected to ...

  5. Radon Update: Facts concerning environmental radon: Levels, mitigation strategies, dosimetry, effects and guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Brill, A.B.; Becker, D.V.; Donahoe, K.

    1994-02-01

    The risk from environmental radon levels is not higher now than in the past, when residential exposures were not considered to be a significant health hazard. The majority of the radon dose is not from radon itself, but from short-lived alpha-emitting radon daughters, most notably {sup 218}Po (T{sub {1/2}}3min) and {sup 214}Po(T{sub {1/2}}19.7 min). Radon gas can penetrate homes from many sources and in various fashions. Measuring radon in homes is simple and relatively inexpensive and may be accomplished in a variety of ways. Although it is not possible to radon-proof a house, it is possible to reduce the level. In high radon areas, if the average level is higher than 4-8 pCi/liter (NCRP recommended level is 8 pCi/liter; EPA recommmended level is 4 PCi/liter), appropriate action is advised. The shape of the dose response curves for miners exposed to alpha-emitting particles in the workplace is consistent with current biologic knowledge. It is linear in the low dose range and saturates in the high dose range. No detectable increase in lung cancer frequency is seen in the lowest exposed miners (those with exposures <120 WLM, the relevant dose interval for most homes). Evidence for a health effect from radon exposure is based on data from animal studies and epidemiologic studies of mines. Extensive radiobiologic data predict a linear dose-response curve in the low dose region due to poor biological repair mechanisms for the high density of ionizing events that alpha particles create. However, no compelling evidence for increased cancer risks has yet been demonstrated from {open_quotes}acceptable{close_quotes}levels (<4-8 pCi/liter). 58 refs., 11 figs., 12 tabs.

  6. The use of radon as tracer in environmental sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quindos Poncela, Luis; Sainz Fernandez, Carlos; Fuente Merino, Ismael; Gutierrez Villanueva, Jose; Gonzalez Diez, Alberto

    2013-08-01

    Radon can be used as a naturally occurring tracer for environmental processes. By means of grab-sampling or continuous monitoring of radon concentration, it is possible to assess several types of dynamic phenomena in air and water. We present a review of the use of radon and its progeny at the University of Cantabria. Radon can be an atmospheric dynamics indicator related with air mass interchange near land-sea discontinuities as well as for the study of vertical variations of air parameters (average values of different types of stability: 131-580 Bq m-3). Concerning indoor gas, we present some results obtained at Altamira Cave (Spain): from 222 to 6549 Bq m-3 (Hall) and from 999 to 6697 Bq m-3 (Paintings Room). Finally, variations of radon concentration in soil (0.3 to 9.1 kBq m-3) and underground water (values up to 500 Bq l-1) provide relevant information about different geophysical phenomena.

  7. Invited Article: In situ comparison of passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors at subsurface workplaces in Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kávási, Norbert; Vigh, Tamás; Németh, Csaba; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Omori, Yasutaka; Janik, Miroslaw; Yonehara, Hidenori

    2014-02-01

    During a one-year long measurement period, radon and thoron data obtained by two different passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors were compared at subsurface workplaces in Hungary, such as mines (bauxite and manganese ore) and caves (medical and touristic). These workplaces have special environmental conditions, such as, stable and high relative humidity (100%), relatively stable temperature (12°C-21°C), low or high wind speed (max. 2.4 m s-1) and low or elevated aerosol concentration (130-60 000 particles m-3). The measured radon and thoron concentrations fluctuated in a wide range among the different workplaces. The respective annual average radon concentrations and their standard deviations (in brackets) measured by the passive radon-thoron discriminative monitor with cellulose filter (CF) and the passive radon-thoron discriminative monitor with sponge filter (SF) were: 350(321) Bq m-3 and 550(497) Bq m-3 in the bauxite mine; 887(604) Bq m-3 and 1258(788) Bq m-3 in the manganese ore mine; 2510(2341) Bq m-3 and 3403(3075) Bq m-3 in the medical cave (Hospital Cave of Tapolca); and 6239(2057) Bq m-3 and 8512(1955) Bq m-3 in the touristic cave (Lake Cave of Tapolca). The respective average thoron concentrations and their standard deviation (in brackets) measured by CF and SF monitors were: 154(210) Bq m-3 and 161(148) Bq m-3 in the bauxite mine; 187(191) Bq m-3 and 117(147) Bq m-3 in the manganese-ore mine; 360(524) Bq m-3 and 371(789) Bq m-3 in the medical cave (Hospital Cave of Tapolca); and 1420(1184) Bq m-3 and 1462(3655) Bq m-3 in the touristic cave (Lake Cave of Tapolca). Under these circumstances, comparison of the radon data for the SF and CF monitors showed the former were consistently 51% higher in the bauxite mine, 38% higher in the manganese ore mine, and 34% higher in the caves. Consequently, correction is required on previously obtained radon data acquired by CF monitors at subsurface workplaces to gain comparable data for SF monitors. In the

  8. Invited Article: In situ comparison of passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors at subsurface workplaces in Hungary

    SciTech Connect

    Kávási, Norbert; Vigh, Tamás; Németh, Csaba; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Omori, Yasutaka; Janik, Miroslaw; Yonehara, Hidenori

    2014-02-15

    During a one-year long measurement period, radon and thoron data obtained by two different passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors were compared at subsurface workplaces in Hungary, such as mines (bauxite and manganese ore) and caves (medical and touristic). These workplaces have special environmental conditions, such as, stable and high relative humidity (100%), relatively stable temperature (12°C–21°C), low or high wind speed (max. 2.4 m s{sup −1}) and low or elevated aerosol concentration (130–60 000 particles m{sup −3}). The measured radon and thoron concentrations fluctuated in a wide range among the different workplaces. The respective annual average radon concentrations and their standard deviations (in brackets) measured by the passive radon-thoron discriminative monitor with cellulose filter (CF) and the passive radon-thoron discriminative monitor with sponge filter (SF) were: 350(321) Bq m{sup −3} and 550(497) Bq m{sup −3} in the bauxite mine; 887(604) Bq m{sup −3} and 1258(788) Bq m{sup −3} in the manganese ore mine; 2510(2341) Bq m{sup −3} and 3403(3075) Bq m{sup −3} in the medical cave (Hospital Cave of Tapolca); and 6239(2057) Bq m{sup −3} and 8512(1955) Bq m{sup −3} in the touristic cave (Lake Cave of Tapolca). The respective average thoron concentrations and their standard deviation (in brackets) measured by CF and SF monitors were: 154(210) Bq m{sup −3} and 161(148) Bq m{sup −3} in the bauxite mine; 187(191) Bq m{sup −3} and 117(147) Bq m{sup −3} in the manganese-ore mine; 360(524) Bq m{sup −3} and 371(789) Bq m{sup −3} in the medical cave (Hospital Cave of Tapolca); and 1420(1184) Bq m{sup −3} and 1462(3655) Bq m{sup −3} in the touristic cave (Lake Cave of Tapolca). Under these circumstances, comparison of the radon data for the SF and CF monitors showed the former were consistently 51% higher in the bauxite mine, 38% higher in the manganese ore mine, and 34% higher in the caves

  9. Active-passive measurements and CFD based modelling for indoor radon dispersion study.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Neetika; Chauhan, R P

    2015-06-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) play a significant role in indoor pollutant dispersion study. Radon is an indoor pollutant which is radioactive and inert gas in nature. The concentration level and spatial distribution of radon may be affected by the dwelling's ventilation conditions. Present work focus at the study of indoor radon gas distribution via measurement and CFD modeling in naturally ventilated living room. The need of the study is the prediction of activity level and to study the effect of natural ventilation on indoor radon. Two measurement techniques (Passive measurement using pin-hole dosimeters and active measurement using continuous radon monitor (SRM)) were used for the validation purpose of CFD results. The CFD simulation results were compared with the measurement results at 15 points, 3 XY planes at different heights along with the volumetric average concentration. The simulation results found to be comparable with the measurement results. The future scope of these CFD codes is to study the effect of varying inflow rate of air on the radon concentration level and dispersion pattern.

  10. Radon

    MedlinePlus

    You can't see radon. And you can't smell it or taste it. But it may be a problem in your home. Radon comes from the natural breakdown of uranium in soil, rock, and water. Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer ...

  11. Laboratory assessment of flexible thin-film membranes as a passive barrier to radon gas diffusion.

    PubMed

    Daoud, W Z; Renken, K J

    2001-05-14

    This paper presents the experimental results of utilizing a flexible thin-film membrane as a passive barrier to radon gas diffusion. Nine commercially available membranes of various compositions and thicknesses were evaluated as retardant to radon gas diffusion. The radon gas concentration ratios across the thin-film membranes alone and in combination with an adjacent concrete sample (effective diffusion coefficient) were measured in a laboratory system with state-of-the-art instrumentation. An 8.89-cm diameter, 10.2-cm thick concrete sample of standard composition (w/c = 0.5 and cement:sand:gravel = 1:2:4) was used to simulate a basement and slab-on-grade foundation typical of Wisconsin. The radon gas transport characteristics of this concrete sample (porosity, permeability and diffusion) are documented. The experimentation has identified two superior flexible thin-film membranes that may be employed as effective barriers to radon gas diffusion. These include: Polyethylene Naphthalate (7.62 x 10(-5) m) and Polyethylene Terephthalate Glycol, PETG (7.62 x 10(-5) and 1.27 x 10(-4) m) which had average diffusion coefficients, D, of 4.10 x 10(-14) and 1.66 x 10(-14) m2 s(-1), respectively. Measurements of the effective membrane/concrete diffusion coefficient yielded a further average reduction in D of 98% for the Polyethylene Naphthalate and 96% for the PETG. Details of the experimental set-ups and procedures are described. The results of this investigation have shown that the application of an effective thin-film membrane adjacent to an intact concrete slab can significantly reduce the diffusion of radon gas entry. Therefore, the employment of a flexible thin-film membrane should be considered as a viable radon reduction technology method for residential new construction.

  12. Identification of high radon areas with passive methods and geological assessments in some Italian regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetti, Marta; Bartolomei, Paolo; Esposito, Massimo; Marrocchino, Elena; Vaccaro, Carmela

    2010-05-01

    Internationally the indoor radon exposition as health hazard is widely recognized; so in many countries specific laws and regulations and so-called radon - risk maps have been introduced. Few Italian Regions have started surveys for the identification of 'radon prone areas', with independent standards and protocols and this involves a bigger uncertainty on the definition of a national risk map failing guidelines. In the present work a standardized methodology for indoor radon measurements has been set up by U-Series Srl (Bologna), with attention to the development of a passive measurement technique (solid state nuclear track detectors) on large scale. The developed technique has been validated through an inter-laboratory comparison conducted by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) in 2008 and repeated in 2009. An indoor radon monitoring survey has been conducted in all Italian Regions with the developed methodology and 5425 measurements have been elaborated to obtain the annual average radon concentration in regional scale and the relapse of seasonal fluctuations on radon concentrations were verified. For the survey, the detectors were installed in underground rooms in workplaces and the measurements were performed over one solar year. As a consequence of our developed methodology (measurements only in underground rooms), indoor radon concentrations resulted generally higher than the concentrations obtained in the National Survey; we estimated an annual mean radon concentration of 110 Bqm3 compared to 70 Bq/m3 obtained by the National Survey. Only for the Italian Regions with the largest number of sampling (Lombardia, with the case studies of Milano Province and Milano city, Emilia Romagna, Toscana, Puglia) the data obtained were georeferentiated and we elaborated these data using geostatistical technique in order to produce distribution maps of the annual average indoor radon concentration. We have integrated the elaborated maps with the

  13. Indoor radon monitoring in Northern Iran using passive and active measurements.

    PubMed

    Hadad, Kamal; Doulatdar, R; Mehdizadeh, S

    2007-01-01

    In this work we present the results of a 2-year survey of indoor radon variations in four cities of Lahijan, Ardabil, Sar-Ein and Namin in North and Northwest Iran. We used both passive and active measurements by solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) with CR-39 polycarbonate and PRASSI Portable radon Gas Surveyor. A total of 1124 samplers in Lahijan, Ardabil, Sar-Ein and Namin were installed. Sampling frequency was seasonal and sampling locations were randomly chosen based on dwelling structures, floors, geological formations, elevation and temperature variation parameters. For quality assurance, 281 active measurements and double sampling were carried out. Based on our results and the results of previous surveys, Ardabil and Lahijan have the second and third highest radon concentration in Iran, respectively (Ramsar is first). The average radon concentration during the year in Lahijan, Ardabil, Sar-Ein and Namin were 163, 240, 160 and 144 Bq/m(3) with medians of 160, 168, 124 and 133 Bq/m(3), respectively. These concentrations give rise to annual effective doses of 3.43 mSv/y for Lahijan and 5.00 mSv/y for Ardabil. The maximum recorded concentration was 2386 Bq/m(3) during winter in Ardabil and the minimum concentration was 55 Bq/m(3) during spring in Lahijan. Relationships between radon concentration and building materials and room ventilation were also studied. The dosimetry calculations showed that these four cities could be categorized as average natural radiation zones. The correlation coefficients relating warm and cold season radon variation data were obtained.

  14. Environmental radon and cancer correlations in Maine.

    PubMed

    Hess, C T; Weiffenbach, C V; Norton, S A

    1983-08-01

    The distribution of 222Rn has been measured in the sixteen counties of Maine, U.S.A. by liquid scintillation counting of water samples from more than two thousand public and private wells. Three hundred and fifty of these wells have been characterized for geology and hydrology. Airborne radon has been measured in seventy houses with grab samples and in eighteen houses for 5-7 days each with continuously recording diffusion-electrostatic radon detectors. Concentrations of radon in water ranged from 20 to 180,000 pCi/l. Granite areas yielded the highest average levels (mean = 22,100 pCi/l.; n = 136), with considerable intra-granite variation. Metasedimentary rocks yielded levels characteristic of the lithology for metamorphic grades ranging from chlorite to andalusite. Sillimanite and higher-grade rocks yielded higher 222Rn levels, probably due to the intrusion of uranium-bearing pegmatites in these terranes. Airborne 222Rn in homes ranged from 0.05 to 210 pCi/l. At the high end of this range, doses will exceed recommended industrial limits. In some homes only a small fraction of the airborne 222Rn was due to the water supply. Average 222Rn levels in domestic water supplies for each of the 16 counties, calculated by areally averaging rock types and their associated 222Rn levels, were found to be significantly correlated with rates for all cancers combined and rates for lung and reproductive cancers in the counties. Although numerous factors other than cancer induction by indoor daughter exposures may be responsible for the observed correlations, these have not been investigated in detail. PMID:6885433

  15. Environmental radon and cancer correlations in Maine.

    PubMed

    Hess, C T; Weiffenbach, C V; Norton, S A

    1983-08-01

    The distribution of 222Rn has been measured in the sixteen counties of Maine, U.S.A. by liquid scintillation counting of water samples from more than two thousand public and private wells. Three hundred and fifty of these wells have been characterized for geology and hydrology. Airborne radon has been measured in seventy houses with grab samples and in eighteen houses for 5-7 days each with continuously recording diffusion-electrostatic radon detectors. Concentrations of radon in water ranged from 20 to 180,000 pCi/l. Granite areas yielded the highest average levels (mean = 22,100 pCi/l.; n = 136), with considerable intra-granite variation. Metasedimentary rocks yielded levels characteristic of the lithology for metamorphic grades ranging from chlorite to andalusite. Sillimanite and higher-grade rocks yielded higher 222Rn levels, probably due to the intrusion of uranium-bearing pegmatites in these terranes. Airborne 222Rn in homes ranged from 0.05 to 210 pCi/l. At the high end of this range, doses will exceed recommended industrial limits. In some homes only a small fraction of the airborne 222Rn was due to the water supply. Average 222Rn levels in domestic water supplies for each of the 16 counties, calculated by areally averaging rock types and their associated 222Rn levels, were found to be significantly correlated with rates for all cancers combined and rates for lung and reproductive cancers in the counties. Although numerous factors other than cancer induction by indoor daughter exposures may be responsible for the observed correlations, these have not been investigated in detail.

  16. Passive environmental temperature control system

    DOEpatents

    Corliss, John M.; Stickford, George H.

    1981-01-01

    Passive environmental heating and cooling systems are described, which utilize heat pipes to transmit heat to or from a thermal reservoir. In a solar heating system, a heat pipe is utilized to carry heat from a solar heat absorber plate that receives sunlight, through a thermal insulation barrier, to a heat storage wall, with the outer end of the pipe which is in contact with the solar absorber being lower than the inner end. The inclining of the heat pipe assures that the portion of working fluid, such as Freon, which is in a liquid phase will fall by gravity to the outer end of the pipe, thereby assuring diode action that prevents the reverse transfer of heat from the reservoir to the outside on cool nights. In a cooling system, the outer end of the pipe which connects to a heat dissipator, is higher than the inner end that is coupled to a cold reservoir, to allow heat transfer only out of the reservoir to the heat dissipator, and not in the reverse direction.

  17. US Environmental Protection Agency`s radon mitigation standards: A status report

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, G.L.; Fisher, E.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s Radon Mitigation Standards (RMS) and complementary standards developed through the American Society for Testing and Materials, E-6 committee on Performance of Building Constructions. In addition, the paper also discusses the application of the Radon Mitigation Standards through the voluntary EPA Radon Contractor Proficiency (RCP) Program and enforcement issues encountered during their first year of application. Adherance to Interim Radon Mitigation Standards was required of all program participants starting in December 1991. These interim standards were superseded by the final RMS as revised in April 1994. The EPA Radon Mitigation Standards have been incorporated into the radon certification programs in a number of states, including New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Iowa. The standards serve to ensure the quality, performance and long-term effectiveness of residential radon mitigation systems. They are also incorporated into hands-on radon mitigation training which is required of all newly entering RCP Program participants.

  18. Deposition-based passive monitors for assigning radon, thoron inhalation doses for epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Mayya, Y S; Mishra, R; Prajith, R; Gole, A C; Sapra, B K; Chougaonkar, M P; Nair, R R K; Ramola, R C; Karunakara, N; Koya, P K M

    2012-11-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection dose limits for radiation protection have been based on linearly extrapolating the high-dose risk coefficients obtained from the Japanese A bomb survivor data to low doses. The validity of these extrapolations has been questioned from time to time. To overcome this, epidemiological studies have been undertaken across the world on populations chronically exposed to low-radiation levels. In the past decade, the results of these studies have yielded widely differing, and sometimes, contradictory, conclusions. While recent residential radon studies have shown statistically significant radon risks at low doses, high-level natural radiation (HLNR) studies in China and India have not shown any low-dose risks. Similar is the case of a congenital malformation study conducted among the HLNR area populations in Kerala, India. It is thus necessary to make efforts at overcoming the uncertainties in epidemiological studies. In the context of HLNR studies, assigning radon and thoron doses has largely been an area of considerable uncertainty. Conventionally, dosimetry is carried out using radon concentration measurements, and doses have been assigned using assumed equilibrium factors for the progeny species. Gas-based dose assignment is somewhat inadequate due to variations in equilibrium factors and possibly due to significant thoron. In this context, passive, deposition-based progeny dosimetry appears to be a promising alternative method to assess inhalation doses directly. It has been deployed in various parts of India, including HBRAs and countries in Europe. This presentation discusses the method, the results obtained and their relevance to dose assignment in Indian epidemiological studies.

  19. Factors Affecting the Estimation of Indoor Radon Using Passive Activated Charcoal Canisters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpitta, Salvatore Charles

    1990-01-01

    Adsorption and desorption studies of 20 activated charcoals were conducted in a monolayer and a packed bed utilizing tracer gases. Kinetic studies, using xenon-133, demonstrate the existence of a two-compartment micropore volume with entrance capillaries which together determine the response characteristics of the charcoal to external concentration gradients of tracer gases. This new two -compartment model adequately describes the adsorption and desorption dynamics of radon in the presence of water vapor. Measurements with charcoal exposed to water vapor and Rn-222 in a monolayer and packed bed for exposure intervals of 1-7 days demonstrate that the uptake rate and total quantity of adsorbed Rn-222 are highly dependent upon the amount of water adsorbed. The effect of CO_2 on radon adsorption is small in any charcoal. The measured effective diffusion coefficient of radon in a packed bed of a peat based charcoal at 15% humidity and 25^circC is 7.97 times 10^{-6} cm^2/s. Condensed water vapor in the entrance capillaries reduces the effective pore radius, increasing the diffusion half-time, both into and out of the charcoal. The amount of adsorbed water per gram of charcoal required to block the entrance capillaries varies with the charcoal type. The proposed term for this quantity is the "break-point". A two-stage diffusion barrier charcoal monitor with a long diffusion path length was developed. This design inhibits passive airflow while maintaining the amount of adsorbed water vapor in the primary charcoal adsorbent below the break-point. Water removal at the entry port allows for longer exposure times improving the integrating capability necessary for indoor exposure assessment. The long diffusion path length increases the integration time -constant for radon adsorption normally 24 hours for conventional open-faced canisters to 50 hours for the improved canister. The increased integration time-constant allows for a 7 day sample to be measured at 70% humidity and 23

  20. An Environmental Chemistry Experiment: The Determination of Radon Levels in Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Lawrence E.; Mossman, Daniel M.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a radiation experiment developed to complement a new environmental chemistry laboratory curriculum. A scintillation counter is used to measure radon in water. The procedure relies on the fact that toluene will preferentially extract radon from water. Sample preparation is complete in less than 90 minutes. Because the level of…

  1. Comparative Measurements of Radon Concentration in Soil Using Passive and Active Methods in High Level Natural Radiation Area (HLNRA) of Ramsar

    PubMed Central

    Amanat, B; Kardan, M R; Faghihi, R; Hosseini Pooya, S M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Radon and its daughters are amongst the most important sources of natural exposure in the world. Soil is one of the significant sources of radon/thoron due to both radium and thorium so that the emanated thoron from it may cause increased uncertainties in radon measurements. Recently, a diffusion chamber has been designed and optimized for passive discriminative measurements of radon/thoron concentrations in soil. Objective: In order to evaluate the capability of the passive method, some comparative measurements (with active methods) have been performed. Method: The method is based upon measurements by a diffusion chamber, including two Lexan polycarbonate SSNTDs, which can discriminate the emanated radon/thorn from the soil by delay method. The comparative measurements have been done in ten selected points of HLNRA of Ramsar in Iran. The linear regression and correlation between the results of two methods have been studied. Results: The results show that the radon concentrations are within the range of 12.1 to 165 kBq/m3 values. The correlation between the results of active and passive methods was measured by 0.99 value. As well, the thoron concentrations have been measured between 1.9 to 29.5 kBq/m3 values at the points. Conclusion: The sensitivity as well as the strong correlation with active measurements shows that the new low-cost passive method is appropriate for accurate seasonal measurements of radon and thoron concentration in soil. PMID:25505760

  2. Dual home screening and tailored environmental feedback to reduce radon and secondhand smoke: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Ellen J; Rayens, Mary Kay; Kercsmar, Sarah E; Adkins, Sarah M; Wright, Ashton Potter; Robertson, Heather E; Rinker, Gwendolyn

    2014-01-01

    Combined exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) and radon increases lung cancer risk 10-fold. The authors assessed the feasibility and impact of a brief home screening and environmental feedback intervention to reduce radon and SHS (Freedom from Radon and Smoking in the Home [FRESH]) and measured perceived risk of lung cancer and synergistic risk perception (SHS x radon). Participants (N = 50) received home radon and SHS kits and completed baseline surveys. Test results were shared using an intervention guided by the Teachable Moment Model. Half of the participants completed online surveys two months later. Most (76%) returned the radon test kits; 48% returned SHS kits. Of the returned radon test kits, 26% were >4.0 pCi/L. Of the returned SHS kits, 38% had nicotine > .1 microg/m3. Of those with high radon, more than half had contacted a mitigation specialist or planned contact. Of those with positive air nicotine, 75% had adopted smoke-free homes. A significant increase occurred in perceived risk for lung cancer and synergistic risk perception after FRESH.

  3. EGFR Somatic Mutations in Lung Tumors: Radon Exposure and Passive-smoking in Former- and Never-smoking U.S. Women

    PubMed Central

    Taga, Masataka; Mechanic, Leah E.; Hagiwara, Nobutoshi; Vähäkangas, Kirsi H.; Bennett, William P.; Alavanja, Michael C. R.; Welsh, Judith A.; Khan, Mohammed A.; Lee, Adam; Diasio, Robert; Edell, Eric; Bungum, Aaron; Jang, Jin Sung; Yang, Ping; Jen, Jin; Harris, Curtis C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Lung cancer patients with mutations in EGFR tyrosine kinase have improved prognosis when treated with EGFR inhibitors. We hypothesized that EGFR mutations may be related to residential radon or passive tobacco smoke. Methods This hypothesis was investigated by analyzing EGFR mutations in seventy lung tumors from a population of never and long-term former female smokers from Missouri with detailed exposure assessments. The relationship with passive-smoking was also examined in never-smoking female lung cancer cases from the Mayo clinic. Results Overall, the frequency of EGFR mutation was 41% [95% Confidence Interval (CI): 32-49%]. Neither radon nor passive-smoking exposure was consistently associated with EGFR mutations in lung tumors. Conclusions The results suggest that EGFR mutations are common in female, never-smoking, lung cancer cases from the U.S, and EGFR mutations are unlikely due to exposure to radon or passive-smoking. PMID:22523180

  4. Intercomparison of passive radon-detectors under field conditions in epidemiological studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kreienbrock, L. ); Poffijn, A. ); Tirmarche, M. ); Feider, M. ); Kies, A. ); Darby, S.C. )

    1999-05-01

    The Ardennes and Eifel region is a geologically distinct area covering parts of Germany, Belgium, France, and Luxembourg where enhanced concentrations of radon occur in some houses and other buildings. An international case-control study is being conducted to examine the role of radon in the etiology of lung cancer in this area. The radon detectors used are issued by different laboratories involving a variety of detector types and processes. A series of intercomparisons in houses was therefore conducted under similar conditions of exposure in the field. In most situations the different detectors gave similar results. Nevertheless, in some situations open and closed detectors yielded different results. Therefore, estimates of radon exposure have to be adjusted if results are to be pooled.

  5. An equilibrium-based model for measuring environmental radon using charcoal canisters.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, A L; Kearfott, K J

    2010-08-01

    Radon in indoor air is often measured using canisters of activated charcoal that function by adsorbing radon gas. The use of a diffusion barrier charcoal canister (DBCC) minimizes the effects of environmental humidity and extends the useful exposure time by several days. Many DBCC protocols model charcoal canisters as simple integrating detectors, which introduces errors due to the fact that radon uptake changes over the exposure period. Errors are compensated for by calculating a calibration factor that is nonlinear with respect to exposure time. This study involves the development and testing of an equilibrium-based model and corresponding measurement protocol that treats the charcoal canisters as a system coming into equilibrium with the surrounding radon environment. This model applies to both constant and temporally varying radon concentration situations, which was essential, as efforts are currently underway using a temporally varying radon chamber. It was found that the DBCCs equilibrate following the relationship E = (1 - e) where E is a measure of how close the DBCC is to equilibrium, t is exposure time, and q is the equilibration constant. This equilibration constant was empirically determined to be 0.019 h. The proposed model was tested in a blind test as well as compared with the currently accepted U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) model. Comparisons between the two methods showed a slight decrease in measurement error when using the equilibrium-based method as compared to the U.S. EPA method.

  6. Portable apparatus for the measurement of environmental radon and thoron

    DOEpatents

    Negro, Vincent C.

    2001-01-01

    The radometer is a portable instrument for the measurement of the concentration of atmospheric radon/thoron in a test area. A constant velocity pump pulls the air from the outside at a constant flow rate. If the air is too moist, some or all of the sample is passed through a desiccant filter prior to encountering an electrostatic filter. The electrostatic filter prevents any charged particles from entering the sampling chamber. Once the sample has entered the chamber, the progeny of the decay of radon/thoron are collected on a detector and measured. The measured data is compiled by a computer and displayed.

  7. Ambient Radon-222 Monitoring in Amargosa Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    L.H. Karr; J.J. Tappen; D. Shafer; K.J. Gray

    2008-06-05

    As part of a program to characterize and baseline selected environmental parameters in the region around the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, ambient radon-222 monitoring was conducted in the rural community of Amargosa Valley, the community closest to the proposed repository site. Passive integrating radon monitors and a continuous radon monitoring instrument were deployed adjacent to the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) (http://www.cemp.dri.edu/index.html) station located in the Amargosa Valley Community Center near the library. The CEMP station provided real-time ambient gamma exposure and meteorological data used to correct the integrated radon measurements as well as verify meteorological data collected by the continuous radon monitoring instrument. Additionally, different types of environmental enclosures that housed the monitors and instrument were used to determine if particular designs influenced the ambient radon measurements.

  8. Relations among soil radon, environmental parameters, volcanic and seismic events at Mt. Etna (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giammanco, S.; Ferrera, E.; Cannata, A.; Montalto, P.; Neri, M.

    2013-12-01

    From November 2009 to April 2011 soil radon activity was continuously monitored using a Barasol probe located on the upper NE flank of Mt. Etna volcano (Italy), close both to the Piano Provenzana fault and to the NE-Rift. Seismic, volcanological and radon data were analysed together with data on environmental parameters, such as air and soil temperature, barometric pressure, snow and rain fall. In order to find possible correlations among the above parameters, and hence to reveal possible anomalous trends in the radon time-series, we used different statistical methods: i) multivariate linear regression; ii) cross-correlation; iii) coherence analysis through wavelet transform. Multivariate regression indicated a modest influence on soil radon from environmental parameters (R2 = 0.31). When using 100-day time windows, the R2 values showed wide variations in time, reaching their maxima (~0.63-0.66) during summer. Cross-correlation analysis over 100-day moving averages showed that, similar to multivariate linear regression analysis, the summer period was characterised by the best correlation between radon data and environmental parameters. Lastly, the wavelet coherence analysis allowed a multi-resolution coherence analysis of the time series acquired. This approach allowed to study the relations among different signals either in the time or in the frequency domain. It confirmed the results of the previous methods, but also allowed to recognize correlations between radon and environmental parameters at different observation scales (e.g., radon activity changed during strong precipitations, but also during anomalous variations of soil temperature uncorrelated with seasonal fluctuations). Using the above analysis, two periods were recognized when radon variations were significantly correlated with marked soil temperature changes and also with local seismic or volcanic activity. This allowed to produce two different physical models of soil gas transport that explain the

  9. The Radon Project: A Study in Environmental Hazard Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himes, Lori; And Others

    1996-01-01

    An extension project sold 4,000 radon kits; 46% were returned for testing and 23% of homes were at risk. Interviews with 100 of those at risk found that only 41% believed they had a problem; women and college graduates were more likely than men and high school graduates to believe it. Of those who believed they had a problem, only 63% took any…

  10. Effects of air exchange property of passive-type radon-thoron discriminative detectors on performance of radon and thoron measurements.

    PubMed

    Omori, Y; Janik, M; Sorimachi, A; Ishikawa, T; Tokonami, S

    2012-11-01

    Pairs of diffusion chambers with different air exchange rates are used in a large-scale survey to determine radon and thoron, separately. When they are enclosed in radon-proof bags for keeping after the exposure, since radon does not escape out immediately from the low-diffusion chamber, it leads to further exposure in the bags and disturbs the estimation of radon and thoron concentrations. In this study, the effects of the different air exchange properties of the radon-thoron discriminative detectors with CR-39 chips on the estimations of radon and thoron concentrations were investigated. The commercially available and frequently used detectors, Raduet, are examined in this study. The result shows that radon escapes out in 10 h. When degassing is not enough after the exposure in a calibration experiment or high-background radiation area, the residual radon causes the overestimation of the radon concentration and increase in the uncertainty in the thoron concentration, i.e. a low-performance quality of radon and thoron measurements.

  11. Radon flux measurements on Gardinier and Royster phosphogypsum piles near Tampa and Mulberry, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.

    1986-01-01

    As part of the planned Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radon flux monitoring program for the Florida phosphogypsum piles, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), under contract to the EPA, constructed 50 large-area passive radon collection devices and demonstrated their use at two phosphogypsum piles near Tampa and Mulberry, Florida. The passive devices were also compared to the PNL large-area flow-through system. The main objectives of the field tests were to demonstrate the use of the large-area passive radon collection devices to EPA and PEI personnel and to determine the number of radon flux measurement locations needed to estimate the average radon flux from a phosphogypsum pile. This report presents the results of the field test, provides recommendations for long-term monitoring, and includes a procedure for making the radon flux measurements.

  12. Laboratory measurements on Radon exposure effects on local environmental temperature: implications for satellite TIR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinelli, Giovanni; Tomasz Solecki, Andrzej; Eulalia Tchorz-Trzeciakiewicz, Dagmara; Karolina Grudzinska, Katarzyna

    2014-05-01

    Surface latent heat flux (SLHF) is proportional to the heat released by phase changes during solidification or evaporation or melting. Effects of SLHF on earth's surface have also been measured by satellite techniques able to measure thermal infrared radiation (TIR). Recent studies found a possible correlation between SLHF and earthquakes thus satellite techniques are widely utilized in researches on the possible link between SLHF and earthquakes. Possible fluctuations on SLHF values during seismic periods have been attributed to different causes like the expulsion from the ground of greenhouse gases or by Radon. In particular ionization processes due to Radon decay could lead to changes in air temperature. Laboratory experiments have been carried out to highlight the possible role of Radon in thermal environmental conditions of a laboratory controlled atmospheric volume. Samples of highly radioactive granite powder containing 600 Bq/kg of Radium that is 20 times higher than the average continental lithosphere content has been stored in a desiccator of 0,005 m3 volume for 30 days to accumulate radon 222Rn in the desiccator air. After radon accumulation the desiccator was placed inside a styrofoam chamber of 1x0.5x0.5 m size and the cover removed. The relative humidity of chamber air was 72% and temperature 24 oC. Experiment was monitored by an infrared camera Flir Therma CAM PM695 operating in the spectrum band 7,5-13 µm with thermal resolution 0,01ºC and a RadStar RS300-I Radon Detector/Monitor with 1 hour time resolution. Air temperature and humidity were monitored by a digital Terdens thermohygrometer. No significant thermal or humidity effects were observed.

  13. Three-dimensional passive seismic waveform imaging around the SAFOD site, California, using the generalized Radon transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haijiang; Wang, Ping; van der Hilst, Robert D.; Toksoz, M. Nafi; Thurber, Clifford; Zhu, Lupei

    2009-12-01

    We apply a three-dimensional (3D) generalized Radon transform (GRT) to scattered P-waves from 575 local earthquakes recorded at 68 temporary network stations for passive-source imaging of (near-vertical) structures close to the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) site. The GRT image profiles through or close by the SAFOD site reveal near-vertical reflectors close to the fault zone as well as in the granite to the southwest and the Franciscan mélange to the northeast of the main fault. Although slightly lower in resolution, these structures are generally similar to features in 2D images produced with steep-dip prestack seismic migration of data from active source seismic reflection and refraction surveys. Our GRT images, however, also reveal several vertical reflectors to the northeast of the SAF that do not appear in the migration images but which are consistent with local geology. These results suggest that in a seismically active area, inverse scattering of earthquake data (for instance with the GRT) can be a viable and, in 3D, economic alternative to an active source survey.

  14. [General environmental pollutants and passive smoking].

    PubMed

    Meister, R

    1990-02-01

    Epidemiological studies-especially data from smog episodes-indicate that antropogenous outdoor air pollution exercises a deleterious effect on health and particularly on the respiratory organs. Controlled exposure test in animals and man confirm this. The main pollutants are SO2, suspended dust particles (dust aerosols or solid atmospheric condensation nuclei) as well as NO2 (NOx) and O3. The adverse influence of quite a number of meteorological factors such as low temperature and inversion cannot be denied. During smog conditions in January 1985 in the Federal Republic of Germany there was a highly significant negative correlation between atmospheric temperature and the rate of exacerbations of bronchitis. Indoor air pollution is gaining in importance. Airtight sealing of buildings associated with reduced indoor ventilation results in novel health upsets ("sick building syndrome"). Interiors are characterised by an accumulation of CO2, CO, NO2, dust aerosols and various organic substances such as benzene, benzypyrene, formaldehyde, nitrosamines etc. Cigarette smoke is a frequent cause of indoor air pollution. The possible unhealthy effects of passive smoking (mainly the inhalation of sidestream smoke) have been frequently studied. Infants of smoking parents are more often affected by respiratory diseases than non-exposed children. The same applies to schoolchildren: the incidence of bronchial signs and symptoms increases with increasing smoke consumptions of the parents. However, no definitely established effect on lung function has been seen in children, adults and asthmatics. The important question as to whether passive smoking increases lung cancer risk is still a subject of controversial discussion among experts. PMID:2195521

  15. Public perceptions of radon risk

    SciTech Connect

    Mainous, A.G. III; Hagen, M.D. )

    1993-03-01

    Since 1984, a significant amount of media attention has focused on health threats from radon gas exposure. Using a probability telephone survey of adults (n = 685), we studied public perceptions of risk from radon exposure versus other environmental health risks. The results indicated that 92% of those individuals who had heard of radon believe radon to be a health risk, although only 4% believe they are currently exposed to high levels of radon gas. Perception of risk from radon was positively related to other perceptions of environmental risks. Younger and less educated individuals were more likely to perceive radon as a health risk. Women were three-and-one-half times as likely as men to perceive risk from radon. However, there was no significant relationship between perceived risk from radon and cigarette smoking. Media attention has apparently led to public awareness of radon hazards, but further attention is needed to improve smokers' awareness of their special risks from radon.

  16. Environmental Assessment for moving the Pacific Northwest Laboratory radon generators from Life Sciences Laboratory II, Richland North Area, to Life Sciences Laboratory I, 300 Area, and their continued use in physical and biological research

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, I.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) radon generators are a core resource of the overall U. S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Radon Research Program and are administratively controlled within the ``Radon Hazards in Homes`` project. This project primarily focuses on radon exposures of animals and addresses the major biologic effects and factors influencing risks of indoor radon exposures. For example, the ``Mechanisms of Radon Injury`` and ``In vivo/In vitro Radon-Induced Cellular Damage`` projects specifically address the cytogenetic and DNA damage produced by radon exposure as part of a larger effort to understand radon carcinogenesis. Several other ongoing PNL projects, namely: ``Biological Effectiveness of Radon Alpha Particles: A Microbeam Study of Dose Rate Effects,`` ``Laser Measurements of Pb-210,`` ``Radon Transport Modeling in Soils,`` ``Oncogenes in Radiation Carcinogenesis,`` ``Mutation of DNA Targets,`` ``Dosimetry of Radon Progeny,`` and ``Aerosol Technology Development`` also use the radon exposure facilities in the conduct of their work. While most, but not all, studies in the PNL Radon Research Program are funded through DOE`s Office of Health and Environmental Research, PNL also has ongoing collaborative radon studies with investigators worldwide; many of these use the radon exposure facilities. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide for relocation of the radon generators to a DOE-owned facility and to continue to provide a controlled source of radon-222 for continued use in physical and biological research.

  17. Indoor Radon Measurement in Van

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kam, E.; Osmanlioglu, A. E.; Dogan, I.; Celebi, N.

    2007-04-01

    In this study, indoor radon concentrations obtained from the radon surveys conducted in the Van. Radon monitoring was performed by applying a passive, time-integrating measuring technique. For this purpose, CR-39 nuclear track detectors were installed in dwellings for 2 months. After the monitoring period, detectors were collected. In order to make the alpha tracks visible, chemical etching was applied to the exposed detectors. Nuclear track numbers and the corresponding indoor radon concentrations were determined. Annual effective dose equivalents and the risk probabilities caused by indoor radon inhalation were calculated, and the found results compared with the indoor radon concentrations' data measured in different provinces of Turkey.

  18. Indoor Radon Measurement in Van

    SciTech Connect

    Kam, E.; Osmanlioglu, A. E.; Celebi, N.; Dogan, I.

    2007-04-23

    In this study, indoor radon concentrations obtained from the radon surveys conducted in the Van. Radon monitoring was performed by applying a passive, time-integrating measuring technique. For this purpose, CR-39 nuclear track detectors were installed in dwellings for 2 months. After the monitoring period, detectors were collected. In order to make the alpha tracks visible, chemical etching was applied to the exposed detectors. Nuclear track numbers and the corresponding indoor radon concentrations were determined. Annual effective dose equivalents and the risk probabilities caused by indoor radon inhalation were calculated, and the found results compared with the indoor radon concentrations' data measured in different provinces of Turkey.

  19. Radon-contaminated drinking water from private wells: an environmental health assessment examining a rural Colorado mountain community's exposure.

    PubMed

    Cappello, Michael Anthony; Ferraro, Aimee; Mendelsohn, Aaron B; Prehn, Angela Witt

    2013-11-01

    In the study discussed in this article, 27 private drinking water wells located in a rural Colorado mountain community were sampled for radon contamination and compared against (a) the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA's) proposed maximum contaminant level (MCL), (b) the U.S. EPA proposed alternate maximum contaminate level (AMCL), and (c) the average radon level measured in the local municipal drinking water system. The data from the authors' study found that 100% of the wells within the study population had radon levels in excess of the U.S. EPA MCL, 37% were in excess of the U.S. EPA AMCL, and 100% of wells had radon levels greater than that found in the local municipal drinking water system. Radon contamination in one well was found to be 715 times greater than the U.S. EPA MCL, 54 times greater than the U.S. EPA AMLC, and 36,983 times greater than that found in the local municipal drinking water system. According to the research data and the reviewed literature, the results indicate that this population has a unique and elevated contamination profile and suggest that radon-contaminated drinking water from private wells can present a significant public health concern.

  20. Using radon as environmental tracer for the assessment of subsurface Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (NAPL) contamination - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, M.

    2015-05-01

    The radioactive noble gas radon has an ambivalent nature: on the one hand is it of main concern with regard to radiation protection, on the other hand can it be applied as powerful tracer tool in various fields of applied geosciences. Due to its omnipresence in nature, its chemical and physical properties, and its uncomplicated detectability radon fulfils all requirements for being used as environmental tracer. This application is discussed in the paper with focus on the use of radon as tracer for subsurface contamination with Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (NAPL). After a short introduction in the ambivalence and ubiquitous presence of radon in nature, the theoretical background of its suitability as NAPL tracer is summarized. Finally three potential applications are discussed. Background information and practical examples are given for (i) the investigation of residual NAPL contamination in soils, (ii) the investigation of residual NAPL contamination in aquifers and (iii) the monitoring of the remediation of dissolved NAPL contamination in groundwater. The presented information reveals that radon is an ideal tracer for the assessment of a wide range of subsurface NAPL contamination. Still, its application is not without restrictions. Problems may occur due to mineralogical heterogeneity of the soil or aquifer matrix. Furthermore, local changes in the permeability of the subsurface may be associated with preferential groundwater or soil gas flow paths bypassing isolated sub-domains of an investigated NAPL source zone. Moreover, NAPL aging may result in alterations in the composition of a complex NAPL mixture thus giving rise to significant changes of the radon partition coefficient between NAPL and water or soil gas. However, since radon shows a strong affinity to NAPLs in general, semi-quantitative results will always be possible.

  1. Lung Cancer Risk from Occupational and Environmental Radon and Role of Smoking in Two Czech Nested Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Tomasek, Ladislav

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the risk of lung cancer from combined exposure to radon and smoking. Methodologically, it is based on case-control studies nested within two Czech cohort studies of nearly 11,000 miners followed-up for mortality in 1952–2010 and nearly 12,000 inhabitants exposed to high levels of radon in homes, with mortality follow-up in 1960–2010. In addition to recorded radon exposure, these studies use information on smoking collected from the subjects or their relatives. A total of 1,029 and 370 cases with smoking information have been observed in the occupational and environmental (residential) studies, respectively. Three or four control subjects have been individually matched to cases according to sex, year of birth, and age. The combined effect from radon and smoking is analyzed in terms of geometric mixture models of which the additive and multiplicative models are special cases. The resulting models are relatively close to the additive interaction (mixing parameter 0.2 and 0.3 in the occupational and residential studies, respectively). The impact of the resulting model in the residential radon study is illustrated by estimates of lifetime risk in hypothetical populations of smokers and non-smokers. In comparison to the multiplicative risk model, the lifetime risk from the best geometric mixture model is considerably higher, particularly in the non-smoking population. PMID:23470882

  2. Lung cancer risk from occupational and environmental radon and role of smoking in two Czech nested case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Tomasek, Ladislav

    2013-03-07

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the risk of lung cancer from combined exposure to radon and smoking. Methodologically, it is based on case-control studies nested within two Czech cohort studies of nearly 11,000 miners followed-up for mortality in 1952-2010 and nearly 12,000 inhabitants exposed to high levels of radon in homes, with mortality follow-up in 1960-2010. In addition to recorded radon exposure, these studies use information on smoking collected from the subjects or their relatives. A total of 1,029 and 370 cases with smoking information have been observed in the occupational and environmental (residential) studies, respectively. Three or four control subjects have been individually matched to cases according to sex, year of birth, and age. The combined effect from radon and smoking is analyzed in terms of geometric mixture models of which the additive and multiplicative models are special cases. The resulting models are relatively close to the additive interaction (mixing parameter 0.2 and 0.3 in the occupational and residential studies, respectively). The impact of the resulting model in the residential radon study is illustrated by estimates of lifetime risk in hypothetical populations of smokers and non-smokers. In comparison to the multiplicative risk model, the lifetime risk from the best geometric mixture model is considerably higher, particularly in the non-smoking population.

  3. Radon in Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Weiffenbach, C; Anderson, H A

    2000-11-01

    Owners of about 15% to 20% of the homes in Wisconsin have tested their indoor air for the carcinogenic gas radon. Five percent to 10% of homes have year-average main-floor radon levels that exceed the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) exposure guideline, and they are found in most regions of the state. Attempting to retroactively seal foundations to keep radon from the ground out of a home is largely ineffective. However, a soil-depressurization radon mitigation system is highly effective for existing houses, and new homes can easily be built radon-resistant. As the number of homeowners obtaining needed repairs increases, significant lung cancer risk reduction is being achieved in a voluntary, non-regulatory setting. In coming years, as radon in community drinking water supplies becomes regulated under the federal 1996 Safe Drinking Water Act, the "multimedia" option of the act may result in additional attention to mitigation of radon in indoor air. PMID:11149257

  4. Exposure to radon and radon progeny in the indoor environment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Socolow, R.H.

    1994-10-01

    This report discusses the work done by the Center for Energy and Environmental Studies at Princeton University as part of the radon research program. It involves radon measurements in various buildings, as well as the use of natural ventilation to mitigate radon levels. The report is divided into four chapters: The use of radon entry rate measurements to understand radon concentration in buildings; Use of natural basement ventilation to control radon in single family dwellings; The effect of natural ventilation on radon and radon progeny levels in houses; and Comparison of natural and forced ventilation for radon mitigation in houses.

  5. Active-to-Passive Environmental Cleanup Transition Strategies - 13220

    SciTech Connect

    Gaughan, Thomas F.; Aylward, Robert S.; Denham, Miles E.; Looney, Brian B.; Whitaker, Wade C.; Mills, Gary L.

    2013-07-01

    The Savannah River Site uses a graded approach to environmental cleanup. The selection of groundwater and vadose zone remediation technologies for a specific contamination area is based on the size, contaminant type, contaminant concentration, and configuration of the plume. These attributes are the result of the nature and mass of the source of contamination and the subsurface characteristics in the area of the plume. Many large plumes consist of several zones that are most efficiently addressed with separate complementary corrective action/remedial technologies. The highest concentrations of contaminants are found in the source zone. The most robust, high mass removal technologies are often best suited for remediation of the source zone. In the primary plume zone, active remedies, such as pump-and-treat, may be necessary to remove contaminants and exert hydraulic control of the plume. In the dilute fringe zone, contaminants are generally lower in concentration and can often be treated with passive techniques. A key determination in achieving an acceptable and cost-effective end state for a given waste unit is when to transition from an active treatment system to a more passive or natural approach (e.g., monitored natural attenuation or enhanced attenuation). This paper will discuss the considerations for such a transition as well as provide examples of successful transitions at the Savannah River Site. (authors)

  6. A comparative study between the dynamic method and passive can technique of radon exhalation measurements from samples.

    PubMed

    Raj Menon, Sreeja; Sahoo, B K; Balasundar, S; Gaware, J J; Jose, M T; Venkatraman, B; Mayya, Y S

    2015-05-01

    A comparative study has been carried out between the SSNTD based 'can' technique and active monitors based dynamic method using nine different samples, eight of granite and one of phosphogypsum. Besides radon ((222)Rn) exhalation, thoron((220)Rn) exhalation and (226)Ra and (232)Th content were also measured. The results are: (i) presence of significant thoron exhalation from samples and (ii) observation of thoron interference and leak (~0.05h(-1)) from the 'can' in the SSNTD based 'can' technqiue. The study unequivocally demonstrates the presence of intrinsic uncertainty in SSNTD based 'can' technique. Instead, dynamic method offers a more reliable and faster method. PMID:25770859

  7. A comparative study between the dynamic method and passive can technique of radon exhalation measurements from samples.

    PubMed

    Raj Menon, Sreeja; Sahoo, B K; Balasundar, S; Gaware, J J; Jose, M T; Venkatraman, B; Mayya, Y S

    2015-05-01

    A comparative study has been carried out between the SSNTD based 'can' technique and active monitors based dynamic method using nine different samples, eight of granite and one of phosphogypsum. Besides radon ((222)Rn) exhalation, thoron((220)Rn) exhalation and (226)Ra and (232)Th content were also measured. The results are: (i) presence of significant thoron exhalation from samples and (ii) observation of thoron interference and leak (~0.05h(-1)) from the 'can' in the SSNTD based 'can' technqiue. The study unequivocally demonstrates the presence of intrinsic uncertainty in SSNTD based 'can' technique. Instead, dynamic method offers a more reliable and faster method.

  8. Natural distribution of environmental radon daughters in the different brain areas of an Alzheimer Disease victim

    PubMed Central

    Momčilović, Berislav; Lykken, Glenn I; Cooley, Marvin

    2006-01-01

    Background Radon is a ubiquitous noble gas in the environment and a primary source of harmful radiation exposure for humans; it decays in a cascade of daughters (RAD) by releasing the cell damaging high energy alpha particles. Results We studied natural distribution of RAD 210Po and 210Bi in the different parts of the postmortem brain of 86-year-old woman who had suffered from Alzheimer's disease (AD). A distinct brain map emerged, since RAD distribution was different among the analyzed brain areas. The highest RAD irradiation (mSv·year-1) occurred in the decreasing order of magnitude: amygdale (Amy) >> hippocampus (Hip) > temporal lobe (Tem) ~ frontal lobe (Fro) > occipital lobe (Occ) ~ parietal lobe (Par) > substantia nigra (SN) >> locus ceruleus (LC) ~ nucleus basalis (NB); generally more RAD accumulated in the proteins than lipids of gray and white (gray > white) brain matter. Amy and Hip are particularly vulnerable brain structure targets to significant RAD internal radiation damage in AD (5.98 and 1.82 mSv·year-1, respectively). Next, naturally occurring RAD radiation for Tem and Fro, then Occ and Par, and SN was an order of magnitude higher than that in LC and NB; the later was within RAD we observed previously in the healthy control brains. Conclusion Naturally occurring environmental RAD exposure may dramatically enhance AD deterioration by selectively targeting brain areas of emotions (Amy) and memory (Hip). PMID:16965619

  9. Environmental factors affecting long-term stabilization of radon suppression covers for uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.K.; Long, L.W.; Reis, J.W.

    1982-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is investigating the use of a rock armoring blanket (riprap) to mitigate wind and water erosion of an earthen radon suppression cover applied to uranium mill tailings. To help determine design stresses for the tailings piles, environmental parameters are characterized for the five active uranium-producing regions on a site-specific basis. Only conventional uranium mills that are currently operating or that are scheduled to open in the mid 1980s are considered. Available data indicate that flooding has the most potential for disrupting a tailings pile. The arid regions of the Wyoming Basins and the Colorado Plateau are subject to brief storms of high intensity. The Texas Gulf Coast has the highest potential for extreme precipitation from hurricane-related storms. Wind data indicate average wind speeds from 3 to 6 m/sec for the sites, but extremes of 40 m/sec can be expected. Tornado risks range from low to moderate. The Colorado Plateau has the highest seismic potential, with maximum acceleration caused by earthquakes ranging from 0.2 to 0.4 g. Any direct effect from volcanic eruption is negligible, as all mills are located 90 km or more from an igneous or hydrothermal system.

  10. Effect of environmental conditions on radon concentration-track density calibration factor of solid-state nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sersy, A.; Mansy, M.; Hussein, A.

    2004-04-01

    In this work, the effect of environmental conditions viz., temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) on the track density--radon concentrations calibration factor (K) has been studied for CR-39 and LR-115 track detectors. The factor K was determined using a reference radon chamber in the National Institute for Standards (NIS) in Egypt. Track detectors were etched at the recommended optimum etching conditions. It is found that, the calibration factor K varies with both T and RH, so they should be considered for the sake of uncertainty reduction. Good agreement is found between the calculated and measured values of K and the compatibility between them is in the range of experimental uncertainty.

  11. Comparative study of various techniques for environmental radon, thoron and progeny measurements.

    PubMed

    Ramola, R C; Prasad, Mukesh; Rawat, Mukesh; Dangwal, Anoop; Gusain, G S; Mishra, Rosaline; Sahoo, S K; Tokonami, S

    2015-11-01

    Long-term average concentrations of radon, thoron and progeny were measured in normal and high background radiation areas in India using different techniques. Radon, thoron and progeny concentrations were measured using Raduet, Pin-Hole dosimeter, deposition-based CR-39 and deposition-based direct radon/thoron progeny sensor (DRPS/DTPS) detector system. All these techniques were used at a same time inside an individual dwelling. Radon concentration was recorded higher than thoron concentration in Garhwal Homes (NBRA) while thoron concentration was found relatively higher in the houses of Chhatarpur area (HBRA) in Odisha, India. The values measured with the CR-39 detector-based technique were found comparable with the values measured with the LR-115 detector-based technique. The comparisons of results using various techniques and their usefulness in radiation measurements are discussed in detail.

  12. Radon and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Tarsheen K; El-Ghamry, Moataz N; Kloecker, Goetz H

    2012-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Radon exposure is the second leading cause of lung cancer, following tobacco smoke. Radon is not only an independent risk factor; it also increases the risk of lung cancer in smokers. Numerous cohort, case-control, and experimental studies have established the carcinogenic potential of radon. The possibility of radon having a causative effect on other cancers has been explored but not yet proven. One of the postulated mechanisms of carcinogenesis is DNA damage by alpha particles mediated by the production of reactive oxygen species. The latter are also thought to constitute one of the common mechanisms underlying the synergistic effect of radon and tobacco smoke. With an estimated 21,000 lung cancer deaths attributable to radon in the United States annually, the need for radon mitigation is well acknowledged. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established an indoor limit of 4 picocuries (pCi)/L, and various methods are available for indoor radon reduction when testing shows higher levels. Radon mitigation should accompany smoking cessation measures in lung cancer prevention efforts.

  13. Evaluating Cost when Selecting Performance Reference Compounds for the Environmental Deployment of Polyethylene Passive Samplers

    EPA Science Inventory

    A challenge in environmental passive sampling is determining when equilibrium is achieved between the sampler, target contaminants, and environmental phases. A common approach is the use of performance reference compounds (PRCs) to indicate degree of equilibrium. One logistical...

  14. Radon measurements at the FEMP

    SciTech Connect

    Tomczak, L.M.; Daniels, R.D.; Dennis, C.; Glassey, H.G.; Lohner, W.G.; Ray, E.C.; Selasky, J.A.; Spitz, H.B.; Roush, K.

    1993-08-01

    Environmental radon monitoring activities at the DOE Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) have been conducted extensively since the early 1980`s. Monitoring has been conducted at ambient concentration levels (< 1 pCi/L Rn-222), inside buildings, and at significantly elevated levels (hundreds of thousands pCi/L Rn-222) within the K-65 silo that store concentrated radium bearing wastes. The purpose of this paper/presentation is to present and discuss some of the difficulties encountered/solutions (e.g. reliability, detection limits, affects of environmental factors, data transfer, etc.) that have been discovered while taking measurements using both alpha track-etch passive integrating detectors and alpha scintillation real-time detectors. A short summary and conclusion section is provided following each topic presented.

  15. Radon: counseling patients about risk.

    PubMed

    Birrer, R B

    1990-09-01

    Exposure to radon and its decay products has increased as the United States has changed from an outdoor society to a largely indoor society. Radon, which is found primarily in the soil, enters houses and buildings through cracks, holes and pipes in foundation walls and floors. Although radon is suspected of being a significant cause of lung cancer, comparisons with other risk factors cannot yet be made. Radon levels in the home can be measured with commercially available kits. Guidelines for reducing the amount of radon in a home are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. PMID:2203238

  16. Experience in using radon and thoron data to solve environmental and water problems.

    PubMed

    Chanyotha, S; Burnett, W C; Taniguchi, M; Kritsananuwat, R; Sriploy, P

    2010-10-01

    This study aims to introduce thoron ((220)Rn), a naturally occurring isotope, as a new groundwater tracer for detecting groundwater seepage into Bangkok canals. Previous studies by the group using radioactive radon ((222)Rn) and conductivity as groundwater tracers suggested that there is shallow groundwater seeping into the man-made canals ('klongs') around Bangkok. Furthermore, the groundwater was shown to be an important pathway of nutrient contamination to the surface waters. Thoron is a member of the natural (232)Th decay chain, has exactly the same chemical properties as radon, but has a much shorter half-life (56 s) than radon (3.84 d). By using its advantage of rapid decay, if one detects thoron in the environment, there must be a source nearby. Thus, thoron is potentially an excellent prospecting tool. In the case of measurements in natural waters, sources of thoron should indicate the point of groundwater discharges more precisely than radon. During the surveys in the canals of Bangkok, thoron was successfully measured and its distribution was more variable than that of radon, suggesting that seepage into the canals is not uniform.

  17. Environmental Influence on Passive Films Formed on Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Szmodis, A W; Anderson, K L; Farmer, J C; Lian, T; Orme, C A

    2002-10-07

    The passive corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is exceptionally low in a wide range of aqueous solutions, temperatures and electrochemical potentials, Alloy 22 contains approximately 22% chromium (Cr) by weight; thus, it forms a Cr-rich passive film in most environments. Very little is known about the composition, thickness and other properties of this passive film. The aim of this research was to determine the general characteristics of the oxide film that forms on Alloy 22, as a function of solution pH, temperature and applied electrochemical potential.

  18. Indoor radon measurements in Turkey dwellings.

    PubMed

    Celebi, N; Ataksor, B; Taskın, H; Bingoldag, N Albayrak

    2015-12-01

    In this work, indoor radon radioactivity concentration levels have been measured in dwellings of Turkey within the frame of the National Radon Monitoring Programme. The (222)Rn concentrations were measured with time-integrating passive nuclear etched track detectors in 7293 dwellings in 153 residential units of 81 provinces, and the radon map of Turkey was prepared. Indoor radon concentrations were distributed in the range of 1-1400 Bq m(-3). The arithmetic mean of the radon gas concentration was found to be 81 Bq m(-3); the geometric mean was 57 Bq m(-3) with a geometric standard deviation of 2.3.

  19. Radon and radon daughter measurements in solar buildings.

    PubMed

    George, A C; Knutson, E O; Franklin, H

    1983-08-01

    Measurements of radon and radon daughters in 11 buildings in five states, using active or passive solar heating, showed no significant excess in concentrations over the levels measured in buildings with conventional heating systems. Radon levels in two buildings using rock storage in their active solar systems exceeded the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's limit of 3 pCi/l. for continuous exposure in uncontrolled areas. In the remainder of the buildings, radon concentrations were found to be at levels considered to be normal. It appears that the slightly elevated indoor radon concentrations result from the local geological formations and from the tightening of the buildings rather than as a result of the solar heating technology. PMID:6885442

  20. A creeping suspicion about radon

    SciTech Connect

    Alderson, L.

    1994-10-01

    Who would expect an odorless, invisible gas that occurs nearly everywhere on earth to cause such trouble Yet radon, the gas emitted by decay of uranium in the earth's crust, is one of America's most significant environmental risks, according to the EPA, which estimates that residential radon levels lead to approximately 13,600 lung cancer deaths each year. A new National Cancer Institute analysis of multiple studies of miners confirms early estimates, putting the number at 15,000. No other risk comes close, not even environmental tobacco smoke, which is estimates to cause some 3,000 deaths each year. Hot debate surrounds the assessment of risk from radon exposure to Americans via indoor air and water supplies. The primary culprit is not radon gas itself, but its decay products, including polonium-214 and polonium-218, which have long half-lives and emit alpha particles - positively charged particles - and lung cancer when inhaled. Radon seeps into homes from the ground or is present in water supplies. Waterborne radon may be inhaled as radon or its progeny during household use - cooking or showering - or it may be ingested. But the EPA estimates that water sources contribute only about 5% of total airborne radon exposure, leaving indoor air as the worst offender. While the EPA estimates that approximately 200 cancer cases per year result from exposure to radon from public groundwater systems, estimates of annual lung cancer deaths from indoor air radon range from 7,000 to 30,000.

  1. The health risk of radon

    SciTech Connect

    Conrath, S.M.; Kolb, L.

    1995-10-01

    Although radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States, second only to cigarette smoking, many members of the public are not aware that radon is one of the most serious environmental cancer risks in the US. Based on extensive data from epidemiological studies of underground miners, radon has been classified as a known human carcinogen. In contrast to most pollutants, the assessment of human risk from radon is based on human occupational exposure data rather than animal data. That radon causes lung cancer has been well established by the scientific community. More is known about radon than most other cancer causing environmental carcinogens. While there are some uncertainties involved when estimating radon risk to the public, it is important to recognize that the risk information is based on human data and that the uncertainties have been addressed in the risk assessment. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that the number of annual US lung cancer deaths due to residential radon exposures is approximately 14,000 with an uncertainty range of 7,000 to 30,000. The abundant information on radon health risks that supports EPA`s risk assessment indicates that recommendations for public action by the federal government and other public health organizations constitute prudent public policy.

  2. New Methods of Energy Efficient Radon Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, W.J.; Prill, R.J.; Wooley, J.; Bonnefous, Y.C.; Gadgil, A.J.; Riley, W.J.

    1994-05-01

    Two new radon mitigation techniques are introduced and their evaluation in a field study complemented by numerical model predictions is described. Based on numerical predictions, installation of a sub gravel membrane at the study site resulted in a factor of two reduction in indoor radon concentrations. Experimental data indicated that installation of 'short-circuit' pipes extending between the subslab gravel and outdoors, caused an additional factor of two decrease in the radon concentration. Consequently, the combination of these two passive radon mitigation features, called the membrane and short-circuit (MASC) technique, was associated with a factor of four reduction in indoor radon concentration. The energy-efficient active radon mitigation method, called efficient active subslab pressurization (EASP), required only 20% of the fan energy of conventional active subslab depressurization and reduced the indoor radon concentration by approximately a factor of 15, including the numerically-predicted impact of the sub-gravel membrane.

  3. New methods of energy efficient radon mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, W.J.; Wooley, J.; Gadgil, A.J.

    1995-05-01

    Two new radon mitigation techniques are introduced and their evaluation in a field study complemented by numerical model predictions is described. Based on numerical predictions, installation of a sub gravel membrane at the study site resulted in a factor of 2 reduction in indoor radon concentrations. Experimental data indicated that installation of {open_quotes}short-circuit{close_quotes} pipes extending between the subslab gravel and outdoors caused an additional factor of 2 decrease in the radon concentration. Consequently, the combination of these two passive radon mitigation features, called the membrane and short-circuit (MASC) technique, was associated with a factor of 4 reduction in indoor radon concentration. The energy-efficient active radon mitigation method, called efficient active subslab pressurization (EASP), required only 20% of the fan energy of conventional active subslab depressurization and reduced the indoor radon concentration by approximately a factor of 15, including the numerically-predicted impact of the sub-gravel membrane.

  4. Radon free storage container and method

    SciTech Connect

    Langner, Jr., G. Harold; Rangel, Mark J.

    1991-01-01

    A radon free containment environment for either short or long term storage of radon gas detectors can be provided as active, passive, or combined active and passive embodiments. A passive embodiment includes a resealable vessel containing a basket capable of holding and storing detectors and an activated charcoal adsorbing liner between the basket and the containment vessel wall. An active embodiment includes the resealable vessel of the passive embodiment, and also includes an external activated charcoal filter that circulates the gas inside the vessel through the activated charcoal filter. An embodiment combining the active and passive embodiments is also provided.

  5. Measurement of Indoor Radon-222 and Radon-220 Concentrations in Central Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Mitsuaki; Shimo, Michikuni; Tokonami, Shinji; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Takahashi, Hiromichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuo

    2008-08-07

    A passive-type radon/thoron detector was used for measuring indoor radon and thoron concentrations at 90 dwellings in Aichi and Gifu prefectures in central Japan during 90 days from December, 2006 to March, 2007. The radon and thoron concentrations were 21.1 Bq/m3 and 25.1 Bq/m3, respectively. The dose due to radon and thoron in dwellings was roughly evaluated as 0.7 mSv/y and 2.4 mSv/y, respectively. The examination of the geological factor and house condition having an effect on indoor radon concentration was performed.

  6. Radon Research Program, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy, Office of Health and Environmental Research (DOE/OHER) is the principal federal agency conducting basic research related to indoor radon. The scientific information being sought in this program encompasses research designed to determine radon availability and transport outdoors, modeling transport into and within buildings, physics and chemistry of radon and radon progeny, dose response relationships, lung cancer risk, and mechanisms of radon carcinogenesis. There still remains a significant number of uncertainties in the currently available knowledge that is used to estimate lung cancer risk from exposure to environmental levels of radon and its progeny. The main goal of the DOE/OHER Radon Research Program is to develop information to reduce these uncertainties and thereby provide an improved health risk estimate of exposure to radon and its progeny and to identify and understand biological mechanisms of lung cancer development and required copollutants at low levels of exposure. Information useful in radon control strategies is also provided by the basic science undertaken in this program.

  7. Indoor radon

    SciTech Connect

    Rabkin, M.A.; Bodansky, D.

    1988-12-31

    The first awareness of radon as a health hazard came from observations of increased lung cancer incidence among uranium and other miners. During the past decade there has been increasing recognition of the importance of radon in the indoor environment as well. Extrapolations from radon exposures in mines to those in homes indicate that radon will cause a significant number of lung cancer deaths among the general population if its effects are linearly proportional to the magnitude of the exposure. For example, in the United States roughly 5000 to 20,000 lung cancer deaths per year are now attributed to indoor radon. Consistent with this, the effective dose equivalent from indoor radon is larger than the dose from any other radiation source for most people in temperate climates. Radon is a noble gas and can diffuse freely through the air. The most important isotope of radon, Rn-222, is produced in the alpha-particle decay of Ra-226, which is present in all soil and rock as a product of the U-238 decay series. In consequence, radon is present in both the outdoor and indoor environments, primarily due to its escape from the soil into the open air or into houses. The indoor concentrations are usually much higher than the outdoor concentrations, because the radon that enters into houses escapes relatively slowly. 120 refs., 12 tabs.

  8. Indoor radon.

    PubMed

    Polpong, P; Bovornkitti, S

    1998-01-01

    The naturally radioactive but chemically inert gas, radon, is formed from the radioactive decay of radium which is part of the uranium series. Radon gas, which has a half life of 3.8 days, must escape from soil particles through air-filled pores in order to enter the atmosphere following the decay of radium. The concentration of radon in the atmosphere varies, depending on the place, time, height above the ground and meteorological conditions. It is thus an inescapable source of radiation exposure, both at home and at work. The potential hazards posed by exposure to radiation from indoor radon gas and its daughter products are of great concern worldwide. Noting of an excessive lung cancer risk among several groups of underground miners exposed to radon and its daughter products, studies on radon concentrations in the workplace and in dwellings have been conducted in many countries. The results have shown that the distribution of radon concentrations are approximately lognormal from which population weighted; the arithmetic mean of radon concentration of 40 Bq.m-3 has been adopted worldwide for dwellings and workplaces. The principal methods for reducing a high indoor radon concentration are: reducing the radon supply by reversing the pressure difference between the building and the soil; raising the resistance of the foundations to soil gas entry; removing the radon sources such as water or underlying soil; diluting the concentration by increasing the ventilation rate; and reducing the concentration of radon progeny by filtering and increasing the circulation of indoor air. Buildings which have a radon concentration higher than 200 Bq.m-3 should be investigated by the national authorities concerned; meanwhile, householders should be advised to take simple temporary precautions, such as increasing ventilation, until a permanent remedy can be effected. PMID:9470322

  9. Indoor radon.

    PubMed

    Polpong, P; Bovornkitti, S

    1998-01-01

    The naturally radioactive but chemically inert gas, radon, is formed from the radioactive decay of radium which is part of the uranium series. Radon gas, which has a half life of 3.8 days, must escape from soil particles through air-filled pores in order to enter the atmosphere following the decay of radium. The concentration of radon in the atmosphere varies, depending on the place, time, height above the ground and meteorological conditions. It is thus an inescapable source of radiation exposure, both at home and at work. The potential hazards posed by exposure to radiation from indoor radon gas and its daughter products are of great concern worldwide. Noting of an excessive lung cancer risk among several groups of underground miners exposed to radon and its daughter products, studies on radon concentrations in the workplace and in dwellings have been conducted in many countries. The results have shown that the distribution of radon concentrations are approximately lognormal from which population weighted; the arithmetic mean of radon concentration of 40 Bq.m-3 has been adopted worldwide for dwellings and workplaces. The principal methods for reducing a high indoor radon concentration are: reducing the radon supply by reversing the pressure difference between the building and the soil; raising the resistance of the foundations to soil gas entry; removing the radon sources such as water or underlying soil; diluting the concentration by increasing the ventilation rate; and reducing the concentration of radon progeny by filtering and increasing the circulation of indoor air. Buildings which have a radon concentration higher than 200 Bq.m-3 should be investigated by the national authorities concerned; meanwhile, householders should be advised to take simple temporary precautions, such as increasing ventilation, until a permanent remedy can be effected.

  10. Environmentally friendly education: A passive solar, straw-bale school

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, L.; Dickinson, J.

    1999-07-01

    The Waldorf students in the Roaring Fork Valley of western Colorado are learning their reading, writing and arithmetic in the cozy confines of a solar heated, naturally lit, straw-bale school. The Waldorf education system, founded in 1919 by Austrian Rudolph Steiner, stresses what's appropriate for the kids, not what's easiest to teach. In constructing a new school, the Waldorf community wanted a building that would reflect their philosophy. There was a long list of requirements: natural, energy efficient, light, warm, alive, and earthy. Passive solar straw-bale construction brought together all those qualities.

  11. Anomalous indoor radon concentration in a dwelling in Qatif City, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Jarallah, M I; Fazal-ur-Rehman

    2005-01-01

    An indoor radon survey was carried out recently in nine cities of Saudi Arabia using nuclear track detectors (NTD)-based passive radon detectors. The survey included Qatif City in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia, where 225 detectors were collected back successfully. It was found that the average indoor radon concentration in the dwellings was 22 +/- 15 Bq m(-3). However, one of the dwellings showed an anomalous radon concentration of 535 +/- 23 Bq m(-3). This finding led to a detailed investigation of this dwelling using active and passive techniques. In the active technique, an AlphaGUARD 2000 PRQ radon gas analyser was used. In the passive technique, CR-39 based passive radon detectors were used in all the rooms of the dwelling. Radon exhalation from the wall and the floor was also measured using the can technique. The active measurement confirms the passive one. Before placing the passive radon detectors in all the rooms of the two-storey building, the inhabitant was advised to ventilate his house regularly. The radon concentration in the different rooms was found to vary from 124 to 302 Bq m(-3). Radon exhalation from the floor and the wall of the room with the anomalous radon concentration was found to vary from 0.5 to 0.8 Bq m(-2) h(-1). These low radon exhalation rates suggest that the anomalous radon concentration is most probably due to underground radon diffusion into the dwelling through cracks and joints in the concrete floor.

  12. Anomalous indoor radon concentration in a dwelling in Qatif City, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Jarallah, M I; Fazal-ur-Rehman

    2005-01-01

    An indoor radon survey was carried out recently in nine cities of Saudi Arabia using nuclear track detectors (NTD)-based passive radon detectors. The survey included Qatif City in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia, where 225 detectors were collected back successfully. It was found that the average indoor radon concentration in the dwellings was 22 +/- 15 Bq m(-3). However, one of the dwellings showed an anomalous radon concentration of 535 +/- 23 Bq m(-3). This finding led to a detailed investigation of this dwelling using active and passive techniques. In the active technique, an AlphaGUARD 2000 PRQ radon gas analyser was used. In the passive technique, CR-39 based passive radon detectors were used in all the rooms of the dwelling. Radon exhalation from the wall and the floor was also measured using the can technique. The active measurement confirms the passive one. Before placing the passive radon detectors in all the rooms of the two-storey building, the inhabitant was advised to ventilate his house regularly. The radon concentration in the different rooms was found to vary from 124 to 302 Bq m(-3). Radon exhalation from the floor and the wall of the room with the anomalous radon concentration was found to vary from 0.5 to 0.8 Bq m(-2) h(-1). These low radon exhalation rates suggest that the anomalous radon concentration is most probably due to underground radon diffusion into the dwelling through cracks and joints in the concrete floor. PMID:15944144

  13. Spacecraft Environmental Testing SMAP (Soil, Moisture, Active, Passive)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Testing a complete full up spacecraft to verify it will survive the environment, in which it will be exposed to during its mission, is a formidable task in itself. However, the ''test like you fly'' philosophy sometimes gets compromised because of cost, design and or time. This paper describes the thermal-vacuum and mass properties testing of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) earth orbiting satellite. SMAP will provide global observations of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state (the hydrosphere state). SMAP hydrosphere state measurements will be used to enhance understanding of processes that link the water, energy, and carbon cycles, and to extend the capabilities of weather and climate prediction models. It will explain the problems encountered, and the solutions developed, which minimized the risk typically associated with such an arduous process. Also discussed, the future of testing on expensive long lead-time spacecraft. Will we ever reach the ''build and shoot" scenario with minimal or no verification testing?

  14. The Japanese Radon and Thoron Reference Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Tokonami, Shinji; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Miyahara, Nobuyuki

    2008-08-07

    Passive detectors used for large-scale and long-term surveys are generally calibrated in a well-controlled environment such as a radon chamber. It has been also pointed out that some of them are sensitive to thoron. Thus it is necessary to check the thoron contribution to the detector response with the proposed or similar test before practical use. The NIRS accommodates radon/aerosol and thoron chambers for quality assurance and quality control of radon measurements. Thus both chambers work so well that they can supply us with the calibration technique and consequently, a good level of knowledge of the radon and thoron issue.

  15. Measurements of radon around closed uranium mines.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Sadaaki; Ito, Kimio; Ishimori, Yuu

    2002-01-01

    There are several waste rock yards at closed uranium mines around Ningyo-toge, in the Western Honshu Island of Japan, and measurements of radon were carried out by both the passive method and the sampling method around these yards. As comparatively high radon concentrations were observed in two districts through routine measurements, more detailed measurements were made by the passive method in these districts. The impact of radon emanation from the waste rock yards was small for both residential districts and around these yards when considering the natural background level of radon. In addition, by simultaneous continuous measurements of radon and its progeny at two locations, it was estimated that the effective dose caused by the representative uranium waste rock yards was less than the public effective dose limit of 1 mSv year(-1) at the fenced boundary of the waste rock site.

  16. Researching Radon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucidi, Louis; Mecca, Peter M.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a project in which students examined the physics, chemistry, and geology of radon and used available technology to measure radon concentrations in their homes. Uses the inquiry process, analytical skills, communication skills, content knowledge, and production of authentic products for student assessment. (YDS)

  17. Radon concentration measurements in bituminous coal mines.

    PubMed

    Fisne, Abdullah; Okten, Gündüz; Celebi, Nilgün

    2005-01-01

    Radon measurements were carried out in Kozlu, Karadon and Uzülmez underground coal mines of Zonguldak bituminous coal basin in Turkey. Passive-time integrating method, which is the most widely used technique for the measurement of radon concentration in air, was applied by using nuclear etched track detectors (CR-39) in the study area. The radon concentration measurements were performed on a total of 42 points in those three mines. The annual exposure, the annual effective dose and lifetime fatality risk, which are the important parameters for the health of workers, were estimated based on chronic occupational exposure to the radon gas, which is calculated using UNCEAR-2000 and ICRP-65 models. The radon concentrations at several coal production faces are higher than the action level of 1000 Bq m(-3). It is suggested that the ventilation rates should be rearranged to reduce the radon concentration.

  18. Environmental and indoor study of Radon concentration in San Joaquin area, Querétaro, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsarenko, A.; Hernandez Silva, G.; Hinojo Alonso, N. A.; Yutsis, V.; Grimalsky, V.; Koshevaya, S.; Martínez Reyes, J.

    2012-04-01

    Highly contaminated zone with a maximum over 57,000 Bq/m3 was discovered in low-populated area "Agua de Venados" during the 2009-2011 soil Radon survey in San Joaquin, Querétaro state, Mexico. Indoor Radon monitoring accomplished in 2 different époques in a nearby 4 dwellings have shown increased Radon contamination in 1 of the 4 building (up to 300 Bq/m3) during a raining season and a highly elevated indoor level (over 400 Bq/m3) already in 3 buildings during a dry season. Averaged diurnal indoor Radon variations are in a correlation with atmosphere pressure and air humidity and are independent on air temperature. The daily interval 5-10 a.m. was estimated as a maximum risky period in terms of Radon contamination hazard for inhabitants in mentioned zone.

  19. Alerting patients to the risk of radon

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.T.; Stewart, K.M.

    1993-06-01

    The potential lung cancer risk from exposure to radon gas and the development of appropriate public health policy have been the subject of much discussion for several years. The American Lung Association has taken a leading role in educating the public on radon and other environmental hazards. This article presents background on radon, including the issues of risk assessment and policy development; reviews the current understanding of the hazards of exposure and the scope of the problem; describes how to test for radon; and discusses how to decrease radon levels.

  20. Investigation of environmental perturbations on passive asymmetric satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tate, V.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of environmental perturbations on the attitude of a slow tumbling earth-oriented satellite are investigated. The environmental perturbations considered were aerodynamic drag, gravity-gradient, solar radiation pressure, and magnetic torques. The Euler attitude equations were solved numerically for the Skylab spacecraft. Results are presented for both torque-free motion and for cases in which aerodynamic and gravity-gradient torques are acting in a slow tumble mode. Simulations show gravity-gradient effects on satellite momentum to be cyclic and to increase the precession rate of the angular momentum vector about the radius vector. This also tends to align the minor axis along the radius vector. Aerodynamic drag initially decreases angular momentum, slowly precesses the momentum vector about the radius vector, and finally drives the satellite into an unstable mode. Combined gravity-gradient and aerodynamic torques reduce angular momentum and energy, and induce a steady precession rate of the momentum vector about the radius vector.

  1. Radon and radon progeny in the Carlsbad Caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Y.S.; Chen, T.R.; Wasiolek, P.T; Van Engen, A.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements were made in July 1994 to determine air exchange rate, aerosol characteristics, radon concentrations, and radon progeny activity size distributions in the Carlsbad Caverns. The measured radon concentrations were stable at a level of 1821{+-}55 Bq m{sup -3}(mean {+-}SD). Using a SF{sub 6} trace gas method, it was determined that stagnant air in the Caverns was exchanged once every 18 days. The stagnant air was a key factor in maintaining stable environmental conditions and radon concentration. The low air exchange and few aerosol sources inside the Caverns also contributed to the low aerosol concentrations of between 200 and 400 cm{sup -3} - orders of magnitude lower than mining, indoor, and outdoor environments. The alpha spectrum showed radon progeny but no thoron progeny. The activity size distribution of radon progeny showed typical bimodal distributions with higher unattached fractions than other natural environments. The high unattached fraction was attributed to the extremely low aerosol concentration. Considering the seasonal variation in radon concentration, the estimated cumulative exposure of 1.65 working level months (WLMs) for a worker spending 2000 h in the Carlsbad Caverns with the observed radon concentration seems high, but it is still below the recommended occupational exposure limit for underground uranium miners. 43 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Radon monitoring and hazard prediction in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elio, Javier; Crowley, Quentin; Scanlon, Ray; Hodgson, Jim; Cooper, Mark; Long, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas which forms as a decay product from uranium. It is the largest source of natural ionizing radiation affecting the global population. When radon is inhaled, its short-lived decay products can interact with lung tissue leading to DNA damage and development of lung cancer. Ireland has among the highest levels of radon in Europe and eighth highest of an OECD survey of 29 countries. Every year some two hundred and fifty cases of lung cancer in Ireland are linked to radon exposure. This new research project will build upon previous efforts of radon monitoring in Ireland to construct a high-resolution radon hazard map. This will be achieved using recently available high-resolution airborne gamma-ray spectrometry (radiometric) and soil geochemistry data (http://www.tellus.ie/), indoor radon concentrations (http://www.epa.ie/radiation), and new direct measurement of soil radon. In this regard, legacy indoor radon concentrations will be correlated with soil U and Th concentrations and other geogenic data. This is a new approach since the vast majority of countries with a national radon monitoring programme rely on indoor radon measurements, or have a spatially limited dataset of soil radon measurements. Careful attention will be given to areas where an indicative high radon hazard based on geogenic factors does not match high indoor radon concentrations. Where such areas exist, it may imply that some parameter(s) in the predictive model does not match that of the environment. These areas will be subjected to measurement of radon soil gas using a combination of time averaged (passive) and time dependant (active) measurements in order to better understand factors affecting production, transport and accumulation of radon in the natural environment. Such mapping of radon-prone areas will ultimately help to inform when prevention and remediation measures are necessary, reducing the radon exposure of the population. Therefore, given

  3. A review on mathematical models for estimating indoor radon concentrations.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Hyun; Kang, Dae Ryong; Kim, Jinheum

    2016-01-01

    Radiation from natural sources is one of causes of the environmental diseases. Radon is the leading environmental cause of lung cancer next to smoking. To investigate the relationship between indoor radon concentrations and lung cancer, researchers must be able to estimate an individual's cumulative level of indoor radon exposure and to do so, one must first be able to assess indoor radon concentrations. In this article, we outline factors affecting indoor radon concentrations and review related mathematical models based on the mass balance equation and the differential equations. Furthermore, we suggest the necessities of applying time-dependent functions for indoor radon concentrations and developing stochastic models. PMID:26925235

  4. Calibration of the Politrack® system based on CR39 solid-state nuclear track detectors for passive indoor radon concentration measurements.

    PubMed

    Kropat, G; Baechler, S; Bailat, C; Barazza, F; Bochud, F; Damet, J; Meyer, N; Palacios Gruson, M; Butterweck, G

    2015-11-01

    Swiss national requirements for measuring radon gas exposures demand a lower detection limit of 50 kBq h m(-3), representing the Swiss concentration average of 70 Bq m(-3) over a 1-month period. A solid-state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) system (Politrack, Mi.am s.r.l., Italy) has been acquired to fulfil these requirements. This work was aimed at the calibration of the Politrack system with traceability to international standards and the development of a procedure to check the stability of the system. A total of 275 SSNTDs was exposed to 11 different radon exposures in the radon chamber of the Secondary Calibration Laboratory at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. The exposures ranged from 50 to 15000 kBq h m(-3). For each exposure of 20 detectors, 5 SSNTDs were used to monitor possible background exposures during transport and storage. The response curve and the calibration factor of the whole system were determined using a Monte Carlo fitting procedure. A device to produce CR39 samples with a reference number of tracks using a (241)Am source was developed for checking the long-term stability of the Politrack system. The characteristic limits for the detection of a possible system drift were determined following ISO Standard 11929.

  5. Radon Measurement in Schools. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other major national and international scientific organizations have concluded that radon is a human carcinogen and a serious environmental health problem. The EPA has conducted extensive research on the presence and measurement of radon in schools. This report provides school administrators and…

  6. National Radon Contractor Proficiency (RCP) Program. Proficiency report, June 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The primary objective of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) efforts to address the indoor radon problem is to reduce radon levels in buildings throughout the country. Achieving the objective requires a nationwide supply of capable radon mitigation contractors. In the Indoor Radon Abatement Act of 1988, Congress authorized EPA to establish a program to evaluate radon mitigation contractors and to provide the information to the public in cooperation with the States. The Radon Contractor Proficiency (RCP) Program was developed to assist States, EPA Regions, local government officials, and the public in selecting contractors who have demonstrated their proficiency in reducing indoor radon levels. The program is managed by the EPA Office of Radiation Programs' Radon Division. Under the voluntary program, radon contractors demonstrate their proficiency by meeting specific Program requirements. Individual contractors who meet these requirements are then listed in periodic RCP Proficiency Reports.

  7. National radon contractor proficiency (RCP) program. Proficiency report, January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The primary objective of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) efforts to address the indoor radon problem is to reduce radon levels in buildings throughout the country. Achieving the objective requires a nationwide supply of capable radon mitigation contractors. In the Indoor Radon Abatement Act of 1988, Congress authorized EPA to establish a program to evaluate radon mitigation contractors and to provide the information to the public in cooperation with the States. The Radon Contractor Proficiency (RCP) Program was developed to assist States, EPA Regions, local government officials, and the public in selecting contractors who have demonstrated their proficiency in reducing indoor radon levels. The program is managed by the EPA Office of Radiation Programs' Radon Division. Under the voluntary program, radon contractors demonstrate their proficiency by meeting specific Program requirements. Individual contractors who meet these requirements are then listed in the Report.

  8. National Radon Contractor Proficiency (RCP) program. Proficiency report, September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The primary objective of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) efforts to address the indoor radon problem is to reduce radon levels in buildings throughout the country. Achieving this objective requires a nationwide supply of capable radon mitigation contractors. In the Indoor Radon Abatement Act of 1988, Congress authorized EPA to establish a program to evaluate radon mitigation contractors and to provide this information to the public in cooperation with the States. The Radon Contractor Proficiency (RCP) Program was developed to assist States, EPA Regions, local government officials, and the public in selecting contractors who have demonstrated their proficiency in reducing indoor radon levels. The program is managed by the EPA Office of Radiation Programs' Radon Division. Under this voluntary program, radon contractors demonstrate their proficiency by meeting specific Program requirements. Individual contractors who meet these requirements are then listed in the Report.

  9. National Radon Contractor Proficiency (RCP) program. Proficiency report, July 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The primary objective of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) efforts to address the indoor radon problem is to reduce radon levels in buildings throughout the country. Achieving this objective requires a nationwide supply of capable radon mitigation contractors. In the Indoor Radon Abatement Act of 1988, Congress authorized EPA to establish a program to evaluate radon mitigation contractors and to provide this information to the public in cooperation with the States. The Radon Contractor Proficiency (RCP) Program was developed to assist States, EPA Regions, local government officials, and the public in selecting contractors who have demonstrated their proficiency in reducing indoor radon levels. This program is managed by the EPA Office of Radiation Programs' Radon Division. Under this voluntary program, radon contractors demonstrate their proficiency by meeting specific Program requirements. Individual contractors who meet these requirements are then listed in the Report.

  10. National Radon Contractor Proficiency (RCP) Program. Proficiency report, January 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) efforts to address the indoor radon problem is to reduce radon levels in buildings throughout the country. Achieving the objective requires a nationwide supply of capable radon mitigation contractors. In the Indoor Radon Abatement Act of 1988, Congress authorized EPA to establish a program to evaluate radon mitigation contractors and to provide the information to the public in cooperation with the States. The Radon Contractor Proficiency (RCP) Program was developed to assist States, EPA Regions, local government officials, and the public in selecting contractors who have demonstrated their proficiency in reducing indoor radon levels. The program is managed by the EPA Office of Radiation Programs' Radon Division. Under the voluntary program, radon contractors demonstrate their proficiency by meeting specific Program requirements. Individual contractors who meet these requirements are then listed in the Report.

  11. International intercomparison of measuring instruments for radon/thoron gas and radon short-lived daughter products in the NRPI Prague.

    PubMed

    Jílek, K; Hýža, M; Kotík, L; Thomas, J; Tomášek, L

    2014-07-01

    During the 7th European Conference on Protection Against Radon at Home and at Work held in the autumn of 2013 in Prague, the second intercomparison of measuring instruments for radon and its short-lived decay products and the first intercomparison of radon/thoron gas discriminative passive detectors in mix field of radon/thoron were organised by and held at the Natural Radiation Division of the National Radiation Protection Institute (NRPI) in Prague. In total, 14 laboratories from 11 different countries took part in the 2013 NRPI intercomparison. They submitted both continuous monitors for the measurement of radon gas and equivalent equilibrium radon concentration in a big NRPI chamber (48 m3) and sets of passive detectors including radon/thoron discriminative for the measurement of radon gas in the big chamber and thoron gas in a small thoron chamber (150 dm3).

  12. Intercomparison of Retrospective Radon Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R W.; Steck, D J.; Parkhurst, Maryann ); Mahaffey, Judith A. ); Alavanja, M C.

    1998-11-01

    We performed both a laboratory and field intercomparison of two novel glass-based retrospective radon detectors previously used in major radon case-control studies performed in Missouri and Iowa. The new detectors estimate retrospective residential radon exposure from the accumulation of a long-lived radon decay product, Pb-210, in glass. The detectors use track registration material in direct contact with glass surfaces to measure the alpha emission of a Pb-210 decay product, Po-210. The detector's track density generation rate (tracks cm{sup -2} hr{sup -1}) is proportional to the surface alpha activity. In the absence of other strong sources of alpha emission in the glass, the implanted surface alpha activity should be proportional to the accumulated Po-210 and hence, the cumulative radon gas exposure. The goals of the intercomparison were to: (1) perform collocated measurements using two different glass-based retrospective radon detectors in a controlled laboratory environment to compare their relative response to implanted polonium in the absence of environmental variation, (2) perform collocated measurements using two different retrospective radon progeny detectors in a variety of residential settings to compare their detection of glass implanted polonium activities, and (3) examine the correlation between track density rates and contemporary radon gas concentrations. The laboratory results suggested that the materials and methods used by the studies produced similar track densities in detectors exposed to the same implanted Po-210 activity. The field phase of the intercomparison found excellent agreement between the track density rates for the two types of retrospective detectors. The correlation between the track density rates and direct contemporary radon concentration measurements was relatively high, considering that no adjustments were performed to account for either the residential depositional environment or glass surface type.

  13. Radon detection

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Allander, Krag S.; Bounds, John A.

    1994-01-01

    A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding.

  14. Radon detection

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1994-01-25

    A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element is described. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding. 3 figures.

  15. Characterisation of an electronic radon gas personal dosemeter.

    PubMed

    Gründel, M; Postendörfer, J

    2003-01-01

    The monitoring of radon exposure at workplaces is of great importance. Up to now passive measurement systems have been used for the registration of radon gas. Recently an electronic radon gas personal dosemeter came onto the market as an active measurement system for the registration of radon exposure (DOSEman; Sarad GmbH, Dresden, Germany). In this personal monitor, the radon gas diffuses through a membrane into a measurement chamber. A silicon detector system records spectroscopically the alpha decays of the radon gas and of the short-lived progeny 218Po and 214Po gathered onto the detector by an electrical field. In this work the calibration was tested and a proficiency test of this equipment was made. The diffusion behaviour of the radon gas into the measurement chamber, susceptibility to thoron, efficiency, influence of humidity, accuracy and the detection limit were checked. PMID:14756187

  16. Radon mitigation of groundwater at a commercial fish hatchery

    SciTech Connect

    Kitto, M.; Kunz, C.; McNulty, C.; Kuhland, M.

    1995-12-31

    Groundwater radon levels of 83 Bq/L (2240 pCi/L) generated indoor radon levels >3300 Bq/m{sup 3} (89 pCi/L) at a commercial fish hatchery. Passive and active mitigation strategies to reduce the waterborne radon levels included a packed column, a waterfall through perforated grates, surface aeration, and bottom bubblers. Though waterborne concentrations were reduced up to 83% using a combination of mitigation procedures, a comparable reduction in indoor radon concentrations was not observed. Measurements by two continuous radon detectors agreed with those from grab flasks. A diurnal cycle showed that indoor radon levels peaked in early afternoon, probably as a result of warmer air being dissolved in the water during mitigation. Reduction of indoor radon levels below 148 Bq/m{sup 3} (4 Ci/L) was achieved by direct air ventilation at high flow rates.

  17. Problems Found Using a Radon Stripping Algorithm for Retrospective Assessment of Air Filter Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Hayes

    2008-04-01

    An evaluation of a large number of air sample filters was undertaken using a commercial alpha and beta spectroscopy system employing a passive implanted planar silicon (PIPS) detector. Samples were only measured after air flow through the filters had ceased. Use of a commercial radon stripping algorithm was implemented to discriminate anthropogenic alpha activity on the filters from the radon progeny. When uncontaminated air filters were evaluated, the results showed that there was a time-dependent bias in both average estimates and measurement dispersion of anthropogenic activity estimates with the relative bias being small compared to the dispersion, indicating that the system would not give false positive indications for an appropriately set decision level. By also measuring environmental air sample filters simultaneously with electroplated alpha filters, use of the radon stripping algorithm demonstrated a number of substantial unexpected deviations from calibrated values indicating that the system would give false negative indications. Use of the current algorithm is, therefore, not recommended for general assay applications. Use of the PIPS detector should only be utilized for gross counting without appropriate modifications to the curve-fitting algorithm. As a screening method, the radon stripping algorithm might be expected to see elevated alpha activities on air sample filters (not due to radon progeny) around the 200 disintegrations per minute level.

  18. Use of a Radon Stripping Algorithm for Retrospective Assessment of Air Filter Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Hayes

    2009-01-23

    An evaluation of a large number of air sample filters was undertaken using a commercial alpha and beta spectroscopy system employing a passive implanted planar silicon (PIPS) detector. Samples were only measured after air flow through the filters had ceased. Use of a commercial radon stripping algorithm was implemented to discriminate anthropogenic alpha and beta activity on the filters from the radon progeny. When uncontaminated air filters were evaluated, the results showed that there was a time-dependent bias in both average estimates and measurement dispersion with the relative bias being small compared to the dispersion. By also measuring environmental air sample filters simultaneously with electroplated alpha and beta sources, use of the radon stripping algorithm demonstrated a number of substantial unexpected deviations. Use of the current algorithm is therefore not recommended for assay applications and so use of the PIPS detector should only be utilized for gross counting without appropriate modifications to the curve fitting algorithm. As a screening method, the radon stripping algorithm might be expected to see elevated alpha and beta activities on air sample filters (not due to radon progeny) around the 200 dpm level.

  19. Indoor radon in New York State schools

    SciTech Connect

    Condon, W.; Ort, S.V.; Rimawi, K.; Papura, T.

    1995-12-31

    New York State participated in a project to study radon in schools funded in part through a grant from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Candidate schools were selected from areas in which existing information suggested there may be a high risk for indoor radon. These schools were invited to participate in an indoor radon survey that included short-term, confirmatory, long-term and post-mitigation measurements. Additionally, the soils under and around eighteen of the schools were measured for indoor radon potential through soil gas measurements and examined for correlation with indoor radon concentrations. Fifty-nine schools were surveyed during the project. Thirty-four of the schools were found to have one or more rooms with long-term radon levels exceeding EPA guidelines. Five of the thirty-four schools have successfully completed mitigation measures.

  20. Intercomparison of retrospective radon detectors.

    PubMed Central

    Field, R W; Steck, D J; Parkhurst, M A; Mahaffey, J A; Alavanja, M C

    1999-01-01

    We performed both a laboratory and a field intercomparison of two novel glass-based retrospective radon detectors previously used in major radon case-control studies performed in Missouri and Iowa. The new detectors estimate retrospective residential radon exposure from the accumulation of a long-lived radon decay product, (210)Pb, in glass. The detectors use track registration material in direct contact with glass surfaces to measure the alpha-emission of a (210)Pb-decay product, (210)Po. The detector's track density generation rate (tracks per square centimeter per hour) is proportional to the surface alpha-activity. In the absence of other strong sources of alpha-emission in the glass, the implanted surface alpha-activity should be proportional to the accumulated (210)Po, and hence to the cumulative radon gas exposure. The goals of the intercomparison were to a) perform collocated measurements using two different glass-based retrospective radon detectors in a controlled laboratory environment to compare their relative response to implanted polonium in the absence of environmental variation, b) perform collocated measurements using two different retrospective radon progeny detectors in a variety of residential settings to compare their detection of glass-implanted polonium activities, and c) examine the correlation between track density rates and contemporary radon gas concentrations. The laboratory results suggested that the materials and methods used by the studies produced similar track densities in detectors exposed to the same implanted (210)Po activity. The field phase of the intercomparison found excellent agreement between the track density rates for the two types of retrospective detectors. The correlation between the track density rates and direct contemporary radon concentration measurements was relatively high, considering that no adjustments were performed to account for either the residential depositional environment or glass surface type

  1. Radon 222

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Radon 222 ; CASRN 14859 - 67 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  2. Removal of Radon from Household Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Research and Development.

    By far, the greatest risk to health from radon occurs when the gas enters the house from underlying soil and is inhaled. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is studying ways to reduce radon in houses, including methods to remove the gas from water to prevent its release in houses when the water is used. While this research has not…

  3. Radon Measurements in Schools: An Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Radiation Programs.

    Radon-222 is a colorless, odorless, tasteless, radioactive gas that occurs naturally in soil, rocks, underground water, and air. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other scientific organizations have identified an increased risk of lung cancer associated with exposure to elevated levels of radon in homes. Schools in many…

  4. Radon Reduction Methods: A Homeowner's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is studying the effectiveness of various ways to reduce high concentrations of radon in houses. This booklet was produced to share what has been learned with those whose radon problems demand immediate action. The booklet describes nine methods that have been tested successfully--by EPA and/or other…

  5. Application of the can technique and radon gas analyzer for radon exhalation measurements.

    PubMed

    Fazal-ur-Rehman; Al-Jarallah, M I; Musazay, M S; Abu-Jarad, F

    2003-01-01

    A passive "can technique" and an active radon gas analyzer with an emanation container were applied for radon exhalation rate measurements from different construction materials, viz. five marble seven ceramic and 100 granite tiles used in Saudi Arabia. The marble and ceramic tiles did not show detectable radon exhalation using the active radon gas analyzer system. However the granite tiles showed relatively high radon exhalations, indicating a relatively high uranium content. A comparison of the radon exhalation rates measured by the two techniques showed a linear correlation coefficient of 0.57. The radon exhalation rates from the granites varied from 0.02 to 6.58 Bqm(-2)h(-1) with an average of 1.35+/-1.40 Bqm(-2)h(-1). The geometric mean and the geometric standard deviation of the frequency distribution were found to be 0.80 and 3.1, respectively. The track density found on the nuclear track detectors in the can technique exposed to the granites, having high exhalation rates, varied linearly with exposure time with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.99. This experimental finding agrees with the theoretical prediction. The can technique showed sensitivity to low radon exhalation rates from ceramic, marble and some granite over a period of 2 months, which were not detectable by the active radon gas analyzer system. The reproducibility of data with both measuring techniques was found to be within a 7% deviation.

  6. Radon: The Invisible Invader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Leader, 1987

    1987-01-01

    A brief background on indoor radon and the health risks associated with radon exposure, with special emphasis on nonresidential buildings. One school district's experience in radon testing and monitoring is included. (MLF)

  7. Radon Testing in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Schools may be a significant source of radon exposure for children and staff. Describes radon detection kits and technologies, when to use them, and what action to take given the results of a radon test. (MLF)

  8. Radon in homes of the Portland, Oregon Area: Radon data from local radon testing companies collected by CRM (Continuous Radon Measurement) machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, H.; Lindsey, K.; Linde, T.; Burns, S. F.

    2013-12-01

    Students from the Department of Geology at Portland State University paired up with the Oregon Health Authority to better understand radon gas values in homes of the Portland metropolitan area. This study focuses on radon values collected by continuous radon measurement (CRM) machines, taken by local radon testing companies. The local companies participating in this study include Alpha Environmental Services, Inc., Cascade Radon, Environmental Works, The House Detectives, LLC, and Soil Solutions Environmental Services, Inc. In total, 2491 radon readings spanning across 77 zip codes were collected from local companies in the Portland metropolitan area. The maximum value, average value, percentage of homes greater than 4 pCi/L and total rank sum was calculated and used to determine the overall radon potential for each zip code (Burns et al., 1998). A list and four maps were produced showing the results from each category. Out of the total records, 24 zip codes resulted in high radon potential and the average reading for the entire Portland Metropolitan area was 3.7 pCi/L. High potential zip codes are thought to be a result of sand and gravel (Missoula Flood deposits) and faults present in the subsurface. The CRM data was compared with both long-term and short-term data provided by the Oregon Health Authority to validate radon potentials in each zip code. If a home is located in a zip code with high or moderate radon potential across two types of data sets, it is recommended that those homes be tested for radon gas.

  9. AN OVERVIEW OF INDOOR RADON RISK REDUCTION IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radon in the indoor environment is a recognized environmental hazard. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established several programs to develop, demonstrate, and transfer radon mitigation technology. Administration and management of these programs are shared by EPA's ...

  10. Environmental forensics in groundwater coupling passive sampling and high resolution mass spectrometry for screening.

    PubMed

    Soulier, Coralie; Coureau, Charlotte; Togola, Anne

    2016-09-01

    One of the difficulties encountered when monitoring groundwater quality is low and fluctuating concentration levels and complex mixtures of micropollutants, including emerging substances or transformation products. Combining passive sampling techniques with analysis by high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) should improve environmental metrology. Passive samplers accumulate compounds during exposure, which improves the detection of organic compounds and integrates pollution fluctuations. The Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler (POCIS) were used in this study to sequester polar to semi-polar compounds. The methodology described here improves our knowledge of environmental pollution by highlighting and identifying pertinent compounds to be monitored in groundwater. The advantage of combining these two approaches is demonstrated on two different sites impacted by agricultural and/or urban pollution sources where groundwater was sampled for several months. Grab and passive sampling were done and analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LC-QTOF). Various data processing approaches were used (target, suspect and non-target screening). Target screening was based on research from compounds listed in a homemade database and suspect screening used a database compiled using literature data. The non-target screening was done using statistical tools such as principal components analysis (PCA) with direct connections between original chromatograms and ion intensity. Trend plots were used to highlight relevant compounds for their identification. The advantage of using POCIS to improve screening of polar organic compounds was demonstrated. Compounds undetected in water samples were detected with these tools. The subsequent data processing identified sentinel molecules, molecular clusters as compounds never revealed in these sampling sites, and molecular fingerprints. Samples were compared and multidimensional

  11. Environmental forensics in groundwater coupling passive sampling and high resolution mass spectrometry for screening.

    PubMed

    Soulier, Coralie; Coureau, Charlotte; Togola, Anne

    2016-09-01

    One of the difficulties encountered when monitoring groundwater quality is low and fluctuating concentration levels and complex mixtures of micropollutants, including emerging substances or transformation products. Combining passive sampling techniques with analysis by high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) should improve environmental metrology. Passive samplers accumulate compounds during exposure, which improves the detection of organic compounds and integrates pollution fluctuations. The Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler (POCIS) were used in this study to sequester polar to semi-polar compounds. The methodology described here improves our knowledge of environmental pollution by highlighting and identifying pertinent compounds to be monitored in groundwater. The advantage of combining these two approaches is demonstrated on two different sites impacted by agricultural and/or urban pollution sources where groundwater was sampled for several months. Grab and passive sampling were done and analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LC-QTOF). Various data processing approaches were used (target, suspect and non-target screening). Target screening was based on research from compounds listed in a homemade database and suspect screening used a database compiled using literature data. The non-target screening was done using statistical tools such as principal components analysis (PCA) with direct connections between original chromatograms and ion intensity. Trend plots were used to highlight relevant compounds for their identification. The advantage of using POCIS to improve screening of polar organic compounds was demonstrated. Compounds undetected in water samples were detected with these tools. The subsequent data processing identified sentinel molecules, molecular clusters as compounds never revealed in these sampling sites, and molecular fingerprints. Samples were compared and multidimensional

  12. Passive and active imaging at 94 GHz for environmental remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfarlane, David G.; Robertson, Duncan A.; Cassidy, Scott L.; Odbert, Henry M.; James, Mike R.; Pinkerton, Harry; Wadge, Geoff

    2013-05-01

    We report on the use of the All-weather Volcano Topography Imaging Sensor (AVTIS) 94 GHz dual mode radar/radiometric imager for environmental monitoring. The FMCW radar yields 3D maps of the terrain whilst the passive radiometer records brightness temperature maps of the scene. AVTIS is a low power portable instrument and has been used operationally to survey terrain at ranges up to 6 km. AVTIS was originally developed for the ground-based measurement of active volcanoes and has been used successfully to measure the Arenal Volcano in Costa Rica and the Soufrière Hills Volcano on Montserrat. However, additional environmental remote sensing applications are emerging for this technology and we will present details of how the instrument is used to perform terrain mapping and thermal surveys of outdoor scenes. The extraction of digital elevation maps is the primary function of the AVTIS radar mode. We review this process covering range drift compensation, radar cross section (RCS) histogram analysis and thresholding, and georeferencing to GPS. Additionally, we will present how careful calibration enables RCS imaging of terrain and the extraction of the intrinsic reflectivity of the terrain material (normalized RCS, or sigma-nought) which can potentially be used to classify terrain types. We have validated the passive mode imagery against infrared thermal imagery and they show good agreement once the differences in spatial resolution are accounted for. This comparison also reveals differences in propagation due to obscurants (steam, gas, ash) in the two wavebands.

  13. Assessment of PDMS-water partition coefficients: implications for passive environmental sampling of hydrophobic organic compounds.

    PubMed

    DiFilippo, Erica L; Eganhouse, Robert P

    2010-09-15

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has shown potential as an in situ passive-sampling technique in aquatic environments. The reliability of this method depends upon accurate determination of the partition coefficient between the fiber coating and water (K(f)). For some hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs), K(f) values spanning 4 orders of magnitude have been reported for polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and water. However, 24% of the published data examined in this review did not pass the criterion for negligible depletion, resulting in questionable K(f) values. The range in reported K(f) is reduced to just over 2 orders of magnitude for some polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) when these questionable values are removed. Other factors that could account for the range in reported K(f), such as fiber-coating thickness and fiber manufacturer, were evaluated and found to be insignificant. In addition to accurate measurement of K(f), an understanding of the impact of environmental variables, such as temperature and ionic strength, on partitioning is essential for application of laboratory-measured K(f) values to field samples. To date, few studies have measured K(f) for HOCs at conditions other than at 20° or 25 °C in distilled water. The available data indicate measurable variations in K(f) at different temperatures and different ionic strengths. Therefore, if the appropriate environmental variables are not taken into account, significant error will be introduced into calculated aqueous concentrations using this passive sampling technique. A multiparameter linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) was developed to estimate log K(f) in distilled water at 25 °C based on published physicochemical parameters. This method provided a good correlation (R(2) = 0.94) between measured and predicted log K(f) values for several compound classes. Thus, an LSER approach may offer a reliable means of predicting log K(f) for HOCs whose experimental log K(f) values are presently

  14. Assessment of PDMS-water partition coefficients: implications for passive environmental sampling of hydrophobic organic compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DiFilippo, Erica L.; Eganhouse, Robert P.

    2010-01-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has shown potential as an in situ passive-sampling technique in aquatic environments. The reliability of this method depends upon accurate determination of the partition coefficient between the fiber coating and water (Kf). For some hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs), Kf values spanning 4 orders of magnitude have been reported for polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and water. However, 24% of the published data examined in this review did not pass the criterion for negligible depletion, resulting in questionable Kf values. The range in reported Kf is reduced to just over 2 orders of magnitude for some polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) when these questionable values are removed. Other factors that could account for the range in reported Kf, such as fiber-coating thickness and fiber manufacturer, were evaluated and found to be insignificant. In addition to accurate measurement of Kf, an understanding of the impact of environmental variables, such as temperature and ionic strength, on partitioning is essential for application of laboratory-measured Kf values to field samples. To date, few studies have measured Kf for HOCs at conditions other than at 20 degrees or 25 degrees C in distilled water. The available data indicate measurable variations in Kf at different temperatures and different ionic strengths. Therefore, if the appropriate environmental variables are not taken into account, significant error will be introduced into calculated aqueous concentrations using this passive sampling technique. A multiparameter linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) was developed to estimate log Kf in distilled water at 25 degrees C based on published physicochemical parameters. This method provided a good correlation (R2 = 0.94) between measured and predicted log Kf values for several compound classes. Thus, an LSER approach may offer a reliable means of predicting log Kf for HOCs whose experimental log Kf values are presently unavailable. Future

  15. Diffusion of radon through concrete block walls: A significant source of indoor radon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lively, R.S.; Goldberg, L.F.

    1999-01-01

    Basement modules located in southern Minnesota have been the site of continuous radon and environmental measurements during heating seasons since 1993. Concentrations of radon within the basement modules ranged from 70 Bq.m-3 to over 4000 Bq.m-3 between November to April during the three measurement periods. In the soil gas for the same times, concentrations of radon ranged between 25,000 and 70,000 Bq.m-3. Levels of radon within the basement modules changed by factors of five or more within 24 h, in concert with pressure gradients of 4 to 20 Pa that developed between the basement modules and their surroundings. Diffusion is identified as the principal method by which radon is transferred into and out of the basement modules, and appears to be relatively independent of insulating materials and vapour retarders. The variability of radon and correlations with differential pressure gradients may be related to air currents in the block walls and soil that interrupt radon diffusing inward. This yields a net decrease of radon in the basement modules by decay and outward diffusion. Levels of radon within the basement modules increase when the pressure differential is zero and air flow ceases, allowing diffusion gradients to be re-established. Radon levels in both the soil and the basement modules then increase until an equilibrium is achieved.

  16. The effects of environmental parameters on diffuse degassing at Stromboli volcano: Insights from joint monitoring of soil CO2 flux and radon activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laiolo, M.; Ranaldi, M.; Tarchini, L.; Carapezza, M. L.; Coppola, D.; Ricci, T.; Cigolini, C.

    2016-04-01

    Soil CO2 flux and 222Rn activity measurements may positively contribute to the geochemical monitoring of active volcanoes. The influence of several environmental parameters on the gas signals has been substantially demonstrated. Therefore, the implementation of tools capable of removing (or minimising) the contribution of the atmospheric effects from the acquired time series is a challenge in volcano surveillance. Here, we present 4 years-long continuous monitoring (from April 2007 to September 2011) of radon activity and soil CO2 flux collected on the NE flank of Stromboli volcano. Both gases record higher emissions during fall-winter (up to 2700 Bq * m- 3 for radon and 750 g m- 2 day- 1 for CO2) than during spring-summer seasons. Short-time variations on 222Rn activity are modulated by changes in soil humidity (rainfall), and changes in soil CO2 flux that may be ascribed to variations in wind speed and direction. The spectral analyses reveal diurnal and semi-diurnal cycles on both gases, outlining that atmospheric variations are capable to modify the gas release rate from the soil. The long-term soil CO2 flux shows a slow decreasing trend, not visible in 222Rn activity, suggesting a possible difference in the source depth of the of the gases, CO2 being deeper and likely related to degassing at depth of the magma batch involved in the February-April 2007 effusive eruption. To minimise the effect of the environmental parameters on the 222Rn concentrations and soil CO2 fluxes, two different statistical treatments were applied: the Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) and the Principal Component Regression (PCR). These approaches allow to quantify the weight of each environmental factor on the two gas species and show a strong influence of some parameters on the gas transfer processes through soils. The residual values of radon and CO2 flux, i.e. the values obtained after correction for the environmental influence, were then compared with the eruptive episodes that

  17. A Radon Progeny Deposition Model

    SciTech Connect

    Guiseppe, V. E.; Elliott, S. R.; Hime, A.; Rielage, K.; Westerdale, S.

    2011-04-27

    The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly {sup 222}Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of {sup 210}Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

  18. A Radon Progeny Deposition Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiseppe, V. E.; Elliott, S. R.; Hime, A.; Rielage, K.; Westerdale, S.

    2011-04-01

    The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly 222Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of 210Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

  19. A radon progeny deposition model

    SciTech Connect

    Rielage, Keith; Elliott, Steven R; Hime, Andrew; Guiseppe, Vincente E; Westerdale, S.

    2010-12-01

    The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly {sup 222}Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of {sup 210}Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

  20. Radon in earth-sheltered structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landa, E.R.

    1984-01-01

    Radon concentration in the indoor air of six residential and three non-residential earth-sheltered buildings in eastern Colorado was monitored quarterly over a nine-month period using passive, integrating detectors. Average radon concentrations during the three-month sampling periods ranged from about 1 to 9 pCi/L, although one building, a poorly ventilated storage bunker, had concentrations as high as 39 pCi/L. These radon concentrations are somewhat greater than those typically reported for conventional buildings (around 1 pCi/L); but they are of the same order of magnitude as radon concentrations reported for energy-efficient buildings which are not earth-sheltered. ?? 1984.

  1. Comparative analysis of radon, thoron and thoron progeny concentration measurements

    PubMed Central

    Janik, Miroslaw; Tokonami, Shinji; Kranrod, Chutima; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Hosoda, Masahiro; Mclaughlin, James; Chang, Byung-Uck; Kim, Yong Jae

    2013-01-01

    This study examined correlations between radon, thoron and thoron progeny concentrations based on surveys conducted in several different countries. For this purpose, passive detectors developed or modified by the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) were used. Radon and thoron concentrations were measured using passive discriminative radon-thoron detectors. Thoron progeny measurements were conducted using the NIRS-modified detector, originally developed by Zhuo and Iida. Weak correlations were found between radon and thoron as well as between thoron and thoron progeny. The statistical evaluation showed that attention should be paid to the thoron equilibrium factor for calculation of thoron progeny concentrations based on thoron measurements. In addition, this evaluation indicated that radon, thoron and thoron progeny were independent parameters, so it would be difficult to estimate the concentration of one from those of the others. PMID:23297318

  2. Mineralogy and aeroradioactivity as indicators of radon hazard zones

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, K.T.; Mose, D.G.; Mushrush, G.W.

    1997-08-01

    The concentrations of indoor radon in the basements of homes located in southern Maryland average 1.3 times the first-floor radon concentrations. Particular geological units tend to be associated with higher indoor radon. In the study area, homes underlain by phyllite are generally above 4 pCi/L (the US Environmental Protection Agency action level). Comparative studies between indoor radon and total-gamma aeroradioactivity show that aeroradioactivity can be accurately used to estimate community radon hazards. When combined, geology and aeroradioactivity can be used to identify problem homes.

  3. Comparisons between soil radon and indoor radon

    SciTech Connect

    Mose, D.G.; Mushrush, G.W.

    1999-10-01

    Several thousand indoor radon measurements have been obtained for homes in northern Virginia. Compilations of these data according to the geologic units under the homes show that some units have relatively high or relatively low medium indoor radon levels, and that these differences persist through all four seasons. An attempt to determine if soil radon and soil permeability could yield similar results, in terms of relative indoor radon, was not successful. Care should be taken in using such measurements to characterize the potential for radon problems in established communities and in areas of as-yet undeveloped property.

  4. Environmentally stable, simple passively mode-locked fiber ring laser using a four-port circulator.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Shin; Niki, Shoji; Nakazawa, Masataka

    2009-04-13

    We present here a self-starting passively mode-locked fiber ring laser with a novel cavity configuration using a four-port optical circulator. Our special ring cavity design enables highly stable mode-locked operation between 25 and 60 degrees C to be maintained without the need for any polarization-adjusting devices. The pulse width and the integrated timing jitter from 10 Hz to 10 MHz of our fiber ring laser were measured to be 120 fs and 39.1 fs, respectively. As a result, a robust and environmentally stable all-fiber mode-locked fiber ring laser with a simple ring cavity configuration in a small package has been achieved.

  5. Radon: implications for the health professional

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Radon is a colorless, odorless gas formed by radioactive decay of radium and uranium, which are naturally present in the earth's crust. When concentrated indoors, this invisible gas becomes a potential health hazard. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that up to 20,000 lung cancer deaths annually can be attributed to prolonged radon exposure. Radon is an important health issue that should be understood by all health care professionals. This paper discusses some of the important issues regarding radon, such as the incidences of lung cancer believed to be attributable to radon, the high-risk areas in the United States, federal safety guidelines, and public apathy. These issues and their impact on the health care required by professionals, especially nurse practitioners, are discussed.

  6. Methodology issues in risk assessment for radon

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H. )

    1991-01-01

    The alpha dose per unit radon daughter exposure in mines and homes is comparable at about 5 mGy/WLM. This means that excess lung cancer risk determined in follow-up studies of miners should be valid to extrapolating to environmental populations. There are several models currently used for risk projection to estimate lung cancer in the US from indoor radon exposure. The accuracy of the estimated depends upon the quality of the exposure data and the models. Recent miner epidemiology confirms that excess lung cancer risk decreases with time subsequent to cessation of exposure. The most rigorous ecological study, to date, shows a persistent negative relationship between average measured indoor radon in US counties and lung cancer mortality. A model for lung cancer risk is proposed that includes smoking, urbanization, and radon exposure. The model helps to explain the difficulties in observing the direct effects of indoor radon in the environment.

  7. Review of radon and lung cancer risk

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.M.; Hornung, R.W. )

    1990-03-01

    Radon, a long-established cause of lung cancer in uranium and other underground miners, has recently emerged as a potentially important cause of lung cancer in the general population. The evidence for widespread exposure of the population to radon and the well-documented excess of lung cancer among underground miners exposed to radon decay products have raised concern that exposure to radon progeny might also be a cause of lung cancer in the general population. To date, epidemiological data on the lung cancer risk associated with environmental exposure to radon have been limited. Consequently, the lung cancer hazard posed by radon exposure in indoor air has been addressed primarily through risk estimation procedures. The quantitative risks of lung cancer have been estimated using exposure-response relations derived from the epidemiological investigations of uranium and other underground miners. We review five of the more informative studies of miners and recent risk projection models for excess lung cancer associated with radon. The principal models differ substantially in their underlying assumptions and consequently in the resulting risk projections. The resulting diversity illustrates the substantial uncertainty that remains concerning the most appropriate model of the temporal pattern of radon-related lung cancer. Animal experiments, further follow-up of the miner cohorts, and well-designed epidemiological studies of indoor exposure should reduce this uncertainty. 18 references.

  8. Radon levels can be predicted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainger, Lisa A.

    Scientists doing a yearlong study of radon levels in houses have identified several major factors that affect concentrations and have developed a method for predicting indoor radon levels before a house is built. Douglas Mose and George Mushrush (George Mason University, Fairfax, Va.) studied 1500 homes in northern Virginia and central Maryland near Washington, D.C.Radon is a radioactive decay product of uranium that occurs in many rock types. The gas can accumulate in buildings and pose a serious health hazard. Results from the Washington-area study show that ˜35% of the houses had average yearly radon concentrations above 4 pico-Curies per liter (pCi/L), the level at which the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) suggests that a homeowner should take steps to reduce radon concentrations. At a level of 4-10 pCi/L an estimated 13-120 lung cancer deaths would be expected for every 1000 people exposed. Such a risk is comparable to having 200 chest X rays per year, according to EPA statistics.

  9. Monitoring trends in civil engineering and their effect on indoor radon.

    PubMed

    Ringer, W

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, the importance of monitoring new building concepts is discussed. The effect of energy-efficient construction technologies on indoor radon is presented in more detail. Comparing the radon levels of about 100 low-energy and passive houses in Austria with radon levels in conventional new houses show that, in energy-efficient new houses, the radon level is about one-third lower than in conventional new houses. Nevertheless, certain features or bad practice may cause high radon levels in energy-efficient new houses. Recommendations to avoid adverse effects were set up. Furthermore, the paper deals with the effect of thermal retrofitting on indoor radon. Results from a Swiss study where 163 dwellings were measured before and after thermal retrofit yield an increase of the radon level of 26% in average. Among the various retrofit measures, replacing windows has the greatest impact on the indoor radon level.

  10. Compilation of geogenic radon potential map of Pest County, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, K. Zs.; Pásztor, L.; Horváth, Á.; Bakacsi, Zs.; Szabó, J.; Szabó, Cs.

    2010-05-01

    222Rn and its effect on the human health have recently received major importance in environmental studies. This natural radioactive gas accounts for about 9% of lung cancer death and about 2% of all deaths from cancer in Europe due to indoor radon concentrations. It moves into the buildings from the natural decay chain of uranium in soils, rocks and building materials. Radon mapping regionalizes the average hazard from radon in a selected area as a radon risk map. Two major methods (concerning the applied radon data) have been used for mapping. One uses indoor radon data whereas the other is based on soil gas radon data. The outputs of the second approach are the geogenic radon potential maps. The principal objective of our work is to take the first step in geogenic radon mapping in Hungary. Soil samples collected in Pest County (Central Region of Hungary) in the frame of a countrywide soil survey (Soil Information and Monitoring System) were studied to have empirical information of the potential radon risk. As the first two steps radium concentration of soil samples, collected at 43 locations sampling soil profiles by genetic horizons from the surface level down to 60-150 cm, were determined using HPGe gamma-spectroscopy technique, as well as measurement of radon exhalation on the soil samples were carried out applying closed radon accumulation chamber coupled with RAD7 radon monitor detector. From these data the exhalation coefficient was calculated, which shows how many percent of the produced radon can come out from the sample. This rate strongly depends on the depth: at circa 100 cm a drastic decrease have been noticed, which is explained by the change in soil texture. The major source of indoor radon is the soil gas radon concentration (Barnet et al., 2005). We estimated this value from the measured radon exhalation and calculated soil porosity and density. The soil gas radon concentration values were categorized after Kemski et al. (2001) and then the

  11. Measurement of Radon, Thoron, Isotopic Uranium and Thorium to Determine Occupational and Environmental Exposure and Risk at Fernald Feed Material Production Center

    SciTech Connect

    Naomi H. Harley, Ph.D.

    2004-07-01

    To develop a new and novel area and personal radon/thoron detector for both radon isotopes to better measure the exposure to low airborne concentrations of these gases at Fernald. These measurements are to be used to determine atmospheric dispersion and exposure to radon and thoron prior to and during retrieval and removal of the 4000 Ci of radium in the two silos at Fernald.

  12. 41 CFR 102-80.20 - What are Federal agencies' responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... agencies' responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon? 102-80.20 Section 102-80.20 Public Contracts... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Safety and Environmental Management Radon § 102-80.20 What are Federal agencies' responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon?...

  13. 41 CFR 102-80.20 - What are Federal agencies' responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... agencies' responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon? 102-80.20 Section 102-80.20 Public Contracts... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Safety and Environmental Management Radon § 102-80.20 What are Federal agencies' responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon?...

  14. 41 CFR 102-80.20 - What are Federal agencies' responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... agencies' responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon? 102-80.20 Section 102-80.20 Public Contracts... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Safety and Environmental Management Radon § 102-80.20 What are Federal agencies' responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon?...

  15. 41 CFR 102-80.20 - What are Federal agencies' responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... agencies' responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon? 102-80.20 Section 102-80.20 Public Contracts... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Safety and Environmental Management Radon § 102-80.20 What are Federal agencies' responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon?...

  16. 41 CFR 102-80.20 - What are Federal agencies' responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... agencies' responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon? 102-80.20 Section 102-80.20 Public Contracts... REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Safety and Environmental Management Radon § 102-80.20 What are Federal agencies' responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon?...

  17. Annual average radon concentrations in California residences.

    PubMed

    Liu, K S; Hayward, S B; Girman, J R; Moed, B A; Huang, F Y

    1991-09-01

    A study was conducted to determine the annual average radon concentrations in California residences, to determine the approximate fraction of the California population regularly exposed to radon concentrations of 4 pCi/l or greater, and to the extent possible, to identify regions of differing risk for high radon concentrations within the state. Annual average indoor radon concentrations were measured with passive (alpha track) samplers sent by mail and deployed by home occupants, who also completed questionnaires on building and occupant characteristics. For the 310 residences surveyed, concentrations ranged from 0.10 to 16 pCi/l, with a geometric mean of whole-house (bedroom and living room) average concentrations of 0.85 pCi/l and a geometric standard deviation of 1.91. A total of 88,000 California residences (0.8 percent) were estimated to have radon concentrations exceeding 4 pCi/l. When the state was divided into six zones based on geology, significant differences in geometric mean radon concentrations were found between several of the zones. Zones with high geometric means were the Sierra Nevada mountains, the valleys east of the Sierra Nevada, the central valley (especially the southern portion), and Ventura and Santa Barbara Counties. Zones with low geometric means included most coastal counties and the portion of the state from Los Angeles and San Bernardino Counties south.

  18. Radon entry control in new house construction

    SciTech Connect

    Najafi, F.T.; Lalwani, L.; Li, W.G.

    1995-07-01

    People exposed to high concentration levels of radon face an increased risk of developing lung cancer. The risk is directly proportional to the length and level of radon exposure. Because of health reasons, it is safer to build new houses with radon mitigation systems installed in slab-on-grade houses. However, the interrelationships between parameters and factors governing radon entry and control are highly complex. A study performed by the University of Florida has examined the effectiveness of different radon entry control approaches. The analysis was based on 47 houses from three research projects conducted by the University of Florida (14 houses), Florida Solar Energy Center (13 houses), and GEOMET Technologies (20 houses). The evaluation of the performance and effectiveness of improved floor slabs, space conditioning, and ventilating systems were analyzed. Statistical analyses of the interrelationship between various parameters were also performed. Study findings such as the important factors in reducing radon entry and the effectiveness of passive construction approach and active subslab depressurization systems are presented in this paper. 9 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Carcinogenic and cocarcinogenic effects of radon and radon daughters in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Monchaux, G.; Morlier, J.P.; Morin, M.; Lafuma, J.; Masse, R. ); Chameaud, J. )

    1994-01-01

    It has been previously established that lung cancer could be induced in rats by exposure to radon and radon daughters. Although the oat-cell carcinomas that are common in humans were not found in rats, other histological types of lung carcinomas, especially squamous cell carcinomas and primitive lung adenocarcinomas, were similar to those observed in humans. A dose-effect relationship was established for cumulative doses varying from 25 to 300 working-level-months (WLM), which was similar for medium and high cumulative doses to that observed in uranium miners. This experimental protocol was also used to study the potential cocarcinogenic effects of other environmental or industrial airborne pollutants such as tobacco smoke, mineral fibers, diesel exhausts, or minerals from metallic mine ores that may act synergistically with radon exposure. In rats exposed to radon and tobacco smoke combined, the incidence of malignant thoracic tumors was observed in rats exposed to radon and fibers combined, but synergistic effects resulted in additivity. With diesel exhausts or minerals from metallic ores, a slight, nonsignificant increase in the incidence of lung carcinomas was observed compared with rats exposed to radon alone. These results demonstrated that it is possible to establish the potential cocarcinogenic action, showing either multiplicative, additive, or no effect of various environmental or industrial airborne pollutants combined with radon exposure. This radon model is valid for investigating possible interactions between two occupational exposures. 62 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. Modeled atmospheric radon concentrations from uranium mines

    SciTech Connect

    Droppo, J.G.

    1985-04-01

    Uranium mining and milling operations result in the release of radon from numerous sources of various types and strengths. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the Clean Air Act, is assessing the health impact of air emissions of radon from underground uranium mines. In this case, the radon emissions may impact workers and residents in the mine vicinity. To aid in this assessment, the EPA needs to know how mine releases can affect the radon concentrations at populated locations. To obtain this type of information, Pacific Northwest Laboratory used the radon emissions, release characteristics and local meterological conditions for a number of mines to model incremental radon concentrations. Long-term, average, incremental radon concentrations were computed based on the best available information on release rates, plume rise parameters, number and locations of vents, and local dispersion climatology. Calculations are made for a model mine, individual mines, and multiple mines. Our approach was to start with a general case and then consider specific cases for comparison. A model underground uranium mine was used to provide definition of the order of magnitude of typical impacts. Then computations were made for specific mines using the best mine-specific information available for each mine. These case study results are expressed as predicted incremental radon concentration contours plotted on maps with local population data from a previous study. Finally, the effect of possible overlap of radon releases from nearby mines was studied by calculating cumulative radon concentrations for multiple mines in a region with many mines. The dispersion model, modeling assumptions, data sources, computational procedures, and results are documented in this report. 7 refs., 27 figs., 18 tabs.

  1. TESTING OF INDOOR RADON REDUCTION TECHNIQUES IN 19 MARYLAND HOUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of testing of indoor radon reduction techniques in 19 existing houses in Maryland. The focus was on passive measures: various passive soil depressurization methods, where natural wind and temperature effects are utilized to develop suction in the system; ...

  2. What Is Radon?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Learn About Cancer » What Causes Cancer? » Other Carcinogens » Pollution » Radon Share this Page Close Push escape to ... can move into the air and into underground water and surface water. Radon is present outdoors and ...

  3. Radon: A health problem

    SciTech Connect

    Pucci, J.; Gaston, S.

    1990-01-01

    Nurses can and should function as effective teachers about the potential hazards to health of radon contamination in the home as well as become activists in the development of health care policy on radon.

  4. Calibrating passive acoustic monitoring: correcting humpback whale call detections for site-specific and time-dependent environmental characteristics.

    PubMed

    Helble, Tyler A; D'Spain, Gerald L; Campbell, Greg S; Hildebrand, John A

    2013-11-01

    This paper demonstrates the importance of accounting for environmental effects on passive underwater acoustic monitoring results. The situation considered is the reduction in shipping off the California coast between 2008-2010 due to the recession and environmental legislation. The resulting variations in ocean noise change the probability of detecting marine mammal vocalizations. An acoustic model was used to calculate the time-varying probability of detecting humpback whale vocalizations under best-guess environmental conditions and varying noise. The uncorrected call counts suggest a diel pattern and an increase in calling over a two-year period; the corrected call counts show minimal evidence of these features.

  5. Residential Radon Appears to Prevent Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Bobby R.

    2011-01-01

    Residential radon has been found to be associated with lung cancer in epidemiological/ecological studies and the researchers have inappropriately concluded that residential radon causes lung cancer. Their conclusion relates to the linear-no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis-based, risk-assessment paradigm; however, the LNT hypothesis has been invalidated in numerous studies. It is shown in this paper that our hormetic relative risk (HRR) model is consistent with lung cancer data where detailed measurements of radon in each home were carried out. Based on the HRR model, low-level radon radioactive progeny is credited for activated natural protection (ANP) against lung cancer including smoking-related lung cancer. The proportion B(x) (benefit function) of ANP beneficiaries increases as the average radon level x increases to near the Environmental Protection Agency’s action level of 4 picocuries/L (approximately 150 Bq m−3). As the average level of radon increases to somewhat above the action level, ANP beneficiaries progressively decrease to zero (B(x) decreases to 0), facilitating the occurrence of smoking-related lung cancers as well as those related to other less important risk factors. Thus, residential radon does not appear to cause lung cancer but rather to protect, in an exposure-level-dependent manner, from its induction by other agents (e.g., cigarette-smoke-related carcinogens). PMID:22461755

  6. Indoor Radon Measurement In The City Of Edirne, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkurt, A.; Kam, E.

    2007-04-01

    This study assesses the indoor radon concentrations for the city of Edirne situated in the European part of Turkey (Eastern Thrace). A total of 88 CR-39 nuclear track detectors were kept in basements of the selected apartment buildings and houses for passively determining the indoor radon levels of the dwellings for a period of three months. The detectors were then collected and a chemical process of etching was applied to the films. At this stage, the tracks left by alpha particles on the films exposed to radon gas were visible and were counted with a microscope (500×magnification) to estimate the corresponding indoor radon concentrations. The average indoor radon concentration was found to be 49.2 Bq/m3 equivalent to an annual effective dose of 1.24 mSv. The measurement results obtained in this study show no significant departure from the other parts of the country.

  7. Indoor Radon Measurement In The City Of Edirne, Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Bozkurt, A.; Kam, E.

    2007-04-23

    This study assesses the indoor radon concentrations for the city of Edirne situated in the European part of Turkey (Eastern Thrace). A total of 88 CR-39 nuclear track detectors were kept in basements of the selected apartment buildings and houses for passively determining the indoor radon levels of the dwellings for a period of three months. The detectors were then collected and a chemical process of etching was applied to the films. At this stage, the tracks left by alpha particles on the films exposed to radon gas were visible and were counted with a microscope (500xmagnification) to estimate the corresponding indoor radon concentrations. The average indoor radon concentration was found to be 49.2 Bq/m3 equivalent to an annual effective dose of 1.24 mSv. The measurement results obtained in this study show no significant departure from the other parts of the country.

  8. A holistic passive integrative sampling approach for assessing the presence and potential impacts of waterborne environmental contaminants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petty, J.D.; Huckins, J.N.; Alvarez, D.A.; Brumbaugh, W. G.; Cranor, W.L.; Gale, R.W.; Rastall, A.C.; Jones-Lepp, T. L.; Leiker, T.J.; Rostad, C. E.; Furlong, E.T.

    2004-01-01

    As an integral part of our continuing research in environmental quality assessment approaches, we have developed a variety of passive integrative sampling devices widely applicable for use in defining the presence and potential impacts of a broad array of contaminants. The semipermeable membrane device has gained widespread use for sampling hydrophobic chemicals from water and air, the polar organic chemical integrative sampler is applicable for sequestering waterborne hydrophilic organic chemicals, the stabilized liquid membrane device is used to integratively sample waterborne ionic metals, and the passive integrative mercury sampler is applicable for sampling vapor phase or dissolved neutral mercury species. This suite of integrative samplers forms the basis for a new passive sampling approach for assessing the presence and potential toxicological significance of a broad spectrum of environmental contaminants. In a proof-of-concept study, three of our four passive integrative samplers were used to assess the presence of a wide variety of contaminants in the waters of a constructed wetland, and to determine the effectiveness of the constructed wetland in removing contaminants. The wetland is used for final polishing of secondary-treatment municipal wastewater and the effluent is used as a source of water for a state wildlife area. Numerous contaminants, including organochlorine pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organophosphate pesticides, and pharmaceutical chemicals (e.g., ibuprofen, oxindole, etc.) were detected in the wastewater. Herein we summarize the results of the analysis of the field-deployed samplers and demonstrate the utility of this holistic approach.

  9. Radon awareness and testing behavior: Findings from the behavioral risk factor surveillance system, 1989-1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, E.S.; Eheman, C.R.; Garbe, P.L.

    1996-03-01

    Radon is considered an important environmental risk factor for lung cancer. Previous studies have shown that relatively few homes have been tested for radon. Results from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System from 1989-1992 show significant interstate and demographic variation in levels of radon awareness and home testing. There was evidence that levels of radon awareness and testing homes for radon have increased from 1989 through 1992. Although these trends in the data are encouraging, the data also suggest that continued education and other interventions may be necessary to reach the Public Health Service`s testing and mitigating objectives for residential radon. 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  10. Radon and lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.M.

    1989-05-10

    Radon, an inert gas released during the decay of uranium-238, is ubiquitous in indoor and outdoor air and contaminates many underground mines. Extensive epidemiologic evidence from studies of underground miners and complementary animal data have documented that radon causes lung cancer in smokers and nonsmokers. Radon must also be considered a potentially important cause of lung cancer for the general population, which is exposed through contamination of indoor air by radon from soil, water, and building materials. This review describes radon's sources, levels in U.S. homes, dosimetry, the epidemiologic evidence from studies of miners and the general population, and the principal, recent risk assessments.91 references.

  11. Radon: Detection and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Loken, S.; Loken, T. )

    1989-11-01

    Within the last few years, natural radon exposure in non-industrial settings, primarily homes, has become a health concern. Research has demonstrated that many homes throughout the United States have radon concentrations much higher than the legal federal limits set for miners. Thousands of unsuspecting people are being exposed to high levels of radiation. It is estimated that up to 15 percent of lung cancers are caused from radon. This is a significant health risk. With basic knowledge of the current information on radon, a primary health care provider can address patients' radon concerns and make appropriate referrals.

  12. Radon and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Samet, J M

    1989-05-10

    Radon, an inert gas released during the decay of uranium-238, is ubiquitous in indoor and outdoor air and contaminates many underground mines. Extensive epidemiologic evidence from studies of underground miners and complementary animal data have documented that radon causes lung cancer in smokers and nonsmokers. Radon must also be considered a potentially important cause of lung cancer for the general population, which is exposed through contamination of indoor air by radon from soil, water, and building materials. This review describes radon's sources, levels in U.S. homes, dosimetry, the epidemiologic evidence from studies of miners and the general population, and the principal, recent risk assessments.

  13. Ground and indoor radon measurements in a geothermal area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyis, Cemil; İnan, Sedat; Streil, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Geothermally active sites compared to a relatively passive site (no geothermal activity) contain much higher radon in the soil. As expected, the maximum soil radon content is at or near the major fracture zone where hot water emanates to the surface. Thus, buildings in geothermal sites nearby or at top of cracks that facilitate hot-water transfer to the surface may be extremely dangerous in terms of high radon concentrations and this situation may pose a big threat for the inhabitants. Controlled aeration of such high-risk buildings must be carefully and continuously conducted.

  14. Radon is out

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, J.H.

    1992-12-31

    This paper discusses some facets of outdoor radon. There is only one source of radon - the decay of radium. Radium is everywhere but the bulk is in soil, rock, and ocean sediments. Soil porosity is a prime factor in radon movement. Exhalation from soil is fed by the high concentrations of radon in soil gas. Because the surface soil is losing radon to the atmosphere, soil gas concentration would be expected to increase with depth. There is a wide range of air radon concentrations, with marked seasonal and diurnal variations. Atmospheric stability is certainly a major factor - radon increases during inversions and decreases when the inversion breaks up. In addition, temperature, soil moisture, snow cover, and wind direction all play a part. Different investigators sometimes come to contrary conclusions on the effects of these factors. They are probably all correct - for the conditions in effect at the time - since no simple generalities exist for most factors.

  15. Estimation of the residential radon levels and the annual effective dose in dwellings of Shiraz, Iran, in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Yarahmadi, Maryam; Shahsavani, Abbas; Mahmoudian, Mohammad Hassan; Shamsedini, Narges; Rastkari, Noushin; Kermani, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Radon is the second most important cause of lung cancer after smoking. Thus, the determination of indoor radon concentrations in dwellings and workplaces is an important public health concern. The purpose of this research was to measure the concentration of radon gas in residential homes and public places in the city of Shiraz and its relationship with the type and age of the buildings as well as the type of materials used to construct the building (brick, block). We also determined the radon dosages that occupants of the building would receive. Methods The present study is a descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional research that was conducted on the building’s indoor air in the city of Shiraz in 2015. Using geographic information system (GIS) software and a spatial sampling cell with an area of 25 square kilometers, 200 points were selected. In this study, we used passive diffusive samplers as Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTD) CR-39 polycarbonate films for three months in the winter. Sampling was conducted in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s protocol. We determined the concentrations of radon gas at the time of sampling, and calibration factors were determined. The data were analyzed by IBM-SPSS, version 20, descriptive statistics, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann–Whitney tests. Results This study showed that the average radon concentration was 57.6 ± 33.06 Bq/m3 in residential dwellings. The average effective dose was 1.45 mSv/y. The concentration of radon in 5.4% of the houses was found to be greater than 100 Bq/m3, which is above the level allowed by the World Health Organization (WHO). Conclusion Since radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer, it seems necessary to increase the public’s awareness of this issue and to take action to reduce radon in homes when the concentrations are above the WHO’s guideline. PMID:27504164

  16. A representative survey of indoor radon in the sixteen regions in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, G; Gammage, R B

    2003-01-01

    Mexico City, also called Federal District, covers an area of 1504 km(2), and has more than 8 million inhabitants. It is located more than 2200 m above sea level in a zone of high seismic activity, and founded on an ancient lake. At present it is one of the most crowded and contaminated cities in the world, with thermal inversions. Chemical contaminants and aerosol particles in the environmental air are high most of the year. Due to these geological, environmental and socioeconomic conditions, Federal District presents very peculiar characteristics, which are important for understanding the distribution and measurements of indoor radon concentration. In this work the results of 3 year (1998-2000) measurements of indoor radon levels in the Federal District are presented. For the detector distribution and measurements, the actual political administrative divisions of the Federal District, consisting of 16 very well defined zones, was used. Nuclear track detection methodology was selected for the measurement, with a passive device close-end-cup system with CR-39 (Lantrack) polycarbonate as the detection material, with one step chemical etching, following a very well established protocol developed at the Instituto de Física, UNAM. Calibration was carried out at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and verification at the Instituto de Física chamber. The results show that the arithmetical mean values of the indoor radon concentration for each region of the Federal District follow a non-homogenous distribution.

  17. Correction factors for determination of annual average radon concentration in dwellings of Poland resulting from seasonal variability of indoor radon.

    PubMed

    Kozak, K; Mazur, J; Kozłowska, B; Karpińska, M; Przylibski, T A; Mamont-Cieśla, K; Grządziel, D; Stawarz, O; Wysocka, M; Dorda, J; Zebrowski, A; Olszewski, J; Hovhannisyan, H; Dohojda, M; Kapała, J; Chmielewska, I; Kłos, B; Jankowski, J; Mnich, S; Kołodziej, R

    2011-10-01

    The method for the calculation of correction factors is presented, which can be used for the assessment of the mean annual radon concentration on the basis of 1-month or 3-month indoor measurements. Annual radon concentration is an essential value for the determination of the annual dose due to radon inhalation. The measurements have been carried out in 132 houses in Poland over a period of one year. The passive method of track detectors with CR-39 foil was applied. Four thermal-precipitation regions in Poland were established and correction factors were calculated for each region, separately for houses with and without basements.

  18. Controlling the Radon Threat Needn't Be Another Costly Nightmare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freije, Matthew R.

    1989-01-01

    After a study of 3,000 classrooms in 130 schools in 16 states, the Environmental Protection Agency urged all schools to conduct tests for radon. Explains a 6-step screening test, methods of reducing radon concentrations, and how the risk from radon exposure compares with other risks. (MLF)

  19. Radon Concentration in the Cataniapo-Autana River Basin, Amazonas State, Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajo-Bohus, L.; Greaves, E. D.; Alvarez, H.; Liendo, J.; Vásquez, G.

    2007-10-01

    Radon activity concentration is measured in rivers of the Autana-Cataniapo hydrologic basin. The region experiments mining and it is forecasted that the basin will be perturbed. Radon activity monitoring is one of the methods to measure environmental changes. Values of radon concentration in water range between 0.4 and 30 Bq L-1.

  20. Assessment of SPME Partitioning Coefficients: Implications for Passive Environmental Sampling of Hydrophobic Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Difilippo, E. L.; Eganhouse, R. P.

    2009-12-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has shown potential as an in situ passive sampling technique in aqueous environments. The reliability of this method depends upon accurate determination of the partitioning coefficient between the fiber coating and water (Kf) for the compounds of interest. Kf values for poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and water spanning 4 orders of magnitude have been reported for hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs). However, most of the published data (86%) do not pass the criterion for negligible depletion (Vw > 100KfVf , where Vw is the sample volume [μl] and Vf is the fiber coating volume [μl]), resulting in erroneous Kf values. The range in reported Kf values is reduced to just over 2 orders of magnitude for some polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) when these erroneous values are removed. We conducted a two-tailed t-test comparing Kf values for the same compounds (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and PCBs) measured with different fiber coating thicknesses and fiber manufacturers; the majority (85%) of these Kf values are not statistically different (p = 0.10). In addition to an accurate measurement of Kf, the impact of environmental factors on partitioning, such as temperature and ionic strength, are essential in applying laboratory-measured Kf values to field samples. To date, few studies have measured Kf at conditions other than at 25° C in distilled water. While the available data indicate slight differences in Kf at different temperatures and ionic strength, the data are too limited to make an accurate assessment of the impact of these factors on the accuracy of in situ concentration measurements. Because of the challenges in measuring Kf for HOCs, it may be useful to develop predictive models for calculating Kf using known or measured physico-chemical properties. A multi-parameter linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) was developed to estimate Kf in distilled water at 25° C for HOCs based on published physico

  1. Study of indoor radon distribution using measurements and CFD modeling.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Neetika; Chauhan, R P; Joshi, M; Agarwal, T K; Aggarwal, Praveen; Sahoo, B K

    2014-10-01

    Measurement and/or prediction of indoor radon ((222)Rn) concentration are important due to the impact of radon on indoor air quality and consequent inhalation hazard. In recent times, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based modeling has become the cost effective replacement of experimental methods for the prediction and visualization of indoor pollutant distribution. The aim of this study is to implement CFD based modeling for studying indoor radon gas distribution. This study focuses on comparison of experimentally measured and CFD modeling predicted spatial distribution of radon concentration for a model test room. The key inputs for simulation viz. radon exhalation rate and ventilation rate were measured as a part of this study. Validation experiments were performed by measuring radon concentration at different locations of test room using active (continuous radon monitor) and passive (pin-hole dosimeters) techniques. Modeling predictions have been found to be reasonably matching with the measurement results. The validated model can be used to understand and study factors affecting indoor radon distribution for more realistic indoor environment.

  2. Indoor radon concentrations in Adana, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Degerlier, M; Celebi, N

    2008-01-01

    The indoor radon concentration in Adana, Turkey was measured in living rooms of 52 houses during winter 2005 and 57 houses during summer 2005. Forty-four houses were selected for both winter and summer researches for estimating seasonal variations. Indoor radon concentrations were measured seasonally over hotter and colder 2 months over the whole year, using CR-39 passive nuclear track radon detectors. The radon concentrations were ranged from 15 to 97 Bq m(-3) on January-February 2005 for 60 d and from 5 to 70 Bq m(-3) on June-July 2005 for 60 d. The average summer concentration measured was 25.8 Bq m(-3) and the average winter concentration was 48.9 Bq m(-3) in 44 houses that observed seasonal variations. The differences between winter and summer periods were ranged from 1 to 77 Bq m(-3). The average value in both winter and summer periods is 37 Bq m(-3) in 44 houses that observed seasonal variations. This value is below the worldwide indoor radon concentration distribution of 46 Bq m(-3). The annual effective dose equivalent from (222)Rn was 0.9 mSv y(-1).

  3. Radon optical processing in radon space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, H. H.

    1986-06-01

    The stated goals of the Radon program were: (1) Theoretical investigation of the role of the Radon transform in signal processing, including enumeration of the operations achievable in Radon space. (2) Construction of a practical system for two dimensional spectral analysis and image filtering. (3) Proof-of-principle experiments for other processing operations, such as bandwidth compression and calculation of the Wigner distribution function. (4) Determination of the feasibility of Radon-space processing of three dimensional data, emphasizing not only system architecture but also storage media capable of saving rapidly retrieving the requisite data arrays. Several 2D signal-processing operations are discovered susceptible to solution in Radon space. These include the Hartley transform, certain joint coordinate-frequency representations (e.g., the Wigner distribution function and Woodward ambiguity functions), certain algorithms for spectrum estimation (e.g., the periodogram and the Yule Walker autoregressive model), and the cepstrum. Most of these Radon space operations have been demonstrated in computer simulations and some have been performed by means of analog hardware in the hybrid Radon space signal processing system. This system can perform a family of processing operations at about five frames per second, limited by the image-rotation rate. Processing is performed by surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters, and the 2D processed signal is displayed on a CRT.

  4. Intercomparison of radon and decay product measurements in an underground mine and EPA radon laboratory: A study organized by the IAEA International Radon Metrology Programme

    SciTech Connect

    Budd, G.; Hopper, R.; Braganza, E.; Ronca-Battista, M.; Steinhaeusler, F.; Stegner, P.

    1998-11-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna and the European Union (EU) in Bruxelles formed the International Radon Metrology Programme. The IRMP is designed to assess and foster the improvement of radon and decay product measurements that are made around the world. Within the framework of the IRMP, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory (EPA) in Las Vegas, Nevada, organized jointly with the U.S. Bureau of Mines an international intercomparison exercise at a former uranium mine (Twilight Mine, Colorado) and the EPA Radon Laboratory. The main objective of this exercise was to compare radon and radon decay product instruments under both well-controlled as well as widely fluctuating exposure conditions. The laboratory exposures occurred under relatively steady radon and decay product conditions, with a moderate equilibrium ratio, while the conditions in the mine fluctuated greatly and the equilibrium ratio was low. An additional purpose of the exercise was to provide a forum for manufacturers and measurement organizations worldwise to exchange information and plan improvements in their operations and calibration programs. Altogether 19 organizations from seven countries intercomparing 32 different radon and radon decay product instruments participated in this exercise. This paper summarizes the results from the analysis of the experimental data obtained in the Bureau of Mines Twilight Mine in July of 1994, as well as the results from the EPA Radon laboratory in August of 1994.

  5. Measurements of radon, thoron, isotopic uranium and thorium to determine occupational and environmental exposure and risk at Fernald Feed Materials Production Center. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.

    1998-06-01

    'The research objectives of this report are: (1) To develop an accurate personal radon/thoron monitor to quantitate exposure during remediation. This personal monitor is a miniaturization and modification of the area {sup 222}Rn monitor that has proven accuracy and precision. (2) To develop a personal aerosol particle size sampler, based on the principles of the novel sampler the author has developed. The sampler measures not only {sup 222}Rn decay product aerosol size but long lived nuclides. There are, as yet, no size distribution data on the aerosol particle size distribution of these nuclides during remediation, yet the aerosol particle size is the major determinant of lung dose. (3) To develop the sequential radiochemistry necessary to measure any environmental sample for {sup 228,230,232}Th, {sup 226,228}Ra, {sup 234,235,238}U and {sup 210}Pb. To utilize the radiochemistry to accurately trace and delineate these nuclides in the environment. To obtain historic and present radiochemical data to understand the need for supplemental soil/water etc. measurements.'

  6. Radon, CO2 and CH4 as environmental tracers in groundwater/surface water interaction studies - comparative theoretical evaluation of the gas specific water/air phase transfer kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, M.; Paschke, A.

    2015-05-01

    The applicability of radon as environmental tracer in groundwater/surface water interaction studies has been documented in a considerable number of publications. In some of these reports it has also been suggested to validate the radon based results by using CO2 and CH4 as supplementary tracers. The on-site measurement of the three gaseous parameters relies on their extraction from the water followed by the measurement of their concentration by means of mobile gas-in-air detectors. Since most related practical applications require the recording of time series, a continuous extraction of the gases from (e.g.) a permanently pumped water stream is necessary. A precondition for the sound combined interpretation of the resulting time series is that the individual temporal responses of the extracted gas-in-air concentrations to instantaneously changing gas-in-water concentrations are either identical or in reproducible relation to each other. The aim of our theoretical study was the comparison of the extraction behavior of the three gaseous solutes with focus on the individual temporal responses to changing gas-in-water concentrations considering in particular the gas specific water/air phase transfer kinetics. We could show that the overall mass transfer coefficients of radon, CO2 and CH4 result in a virtually similar temporal response to aqueous concentration changes, thus confirming the straightforward combined measurement/utilization of the dissolved gases as environmental tracers in groundwater/surface water interaction studies.

  7. Atmosphere purification of radon and radon daughter elements

    DOEpatents

    Stein, L.

    1974-01-01

    A method of removing radon and radon daughter elements from an atmosphere containing these elements by passing the atmosphere through a bed of fluorinating compound whereby the radon and radon daughters are oxidized to their respective fluorides is discussed. These fluorides adhere to the fluorinating compound and are thus removed from the atmosphere which may then be recirculated. A method for recovering radon and separating radon from its daughter elements is also described. (Official Gazette)

  8. Reporting on Radon: The Role of Local Newspapers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post, James F.; And Others

    Noting that past local media coverage of environmental topics, including those dealing with radiation topics, has often been superficial, a study assessed press coverage of the radon problem in the Lehigh Valley region of Pennsylvania during the first nine months of 1985. The study explored whether local media coverage of radon--a colorless,…

  9. [Radon and domestic exposure].

    PubMed

    Melloni, B; Vergnenègre, A; Lagrange, P; Bonnaud, F

    2000-12-01

    Radon is a noble gas derived from the decay of radium, which itself is a decay product of uranium. The decay products of radon can collect electrostatically on dust particles in the air and, if these particles are inhaled and attach to bronchial epithelium, produce a high local radiation dose. Alpha particles can induce DNA double-strand breaks and the development of cancer. A causal relation between lung cancer and radon exposure and its progeny has been demonstrated in epidemiological studies of miners. Radon exposure became a public health issue almost 15 years ago. Most radon exposure occurs indoors, predominantly in the home. There is however, a wide range of radon concentration values in different countries. The highest level occurs in areas with granite and permeable soils. The risk for smoking, the leading cause of lung cancer, is far greater than for radon, the second leading cause. The estimates obtained from case-control studies of indoor radon are very contradictory. Scientific knowledge of effects of low levels of exposure to radon and the role of cigarette smoking, as a combined factor, must be studied. Smoking and radon probably interact in a multiplicative fashion.

  10. Indoor Radon: The Deadliest Pollutant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the origin, occurrence, and effects of radon gas. Cites studies which attribute 5,000 to 20,000 deaths per year to radon exposure and the synergistic effect between radon and smoking. Explains ways to reduce risks. (RT)

  11. RADON REDUCTION IN A CRAWL SPACE HOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radon, a naturally occurring radioactive gas, is drawn from the soil into a house when low air pressure exists in the house. This is a commonplace environmental hazard in the United States, Canada, and northern Europe. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing ...

  12. Carcinogenic and Cocarcinogenic Effects of Radon and Radon Daughters in Rats.

    PubMed Central

    Monchaux, G; Morlier, JP; Morin, M; Chameaud, J; Lafuma, J; Masse, R

    1994-01-01

    It has been previously established that lung cancer could be induced in rats by exposure to radon and radon daughters. Although the oat-cell carcinomas that are common in humans were not found in rats, other histological types of lung carcinomas, especially squamous cell carcinomas and primitive lung adenocarcinomas, were similar to those observed in humans. A dose-effect relationship was established for cumulative doses varying from 25 to 3000 working-level-months (WLM), which was similar for medium and high cumulative doses to that observed in uranium miners. This experimental protocol was also used to study the potential cocarcinogenic effects of other environmental or industrial airborne pollutants such as tobacco smoke, mineral fibers, diesel exhausts, or minerals from metallic mine ores that may act synergistically with radon exposure. In rats exposed to radon and tobacco smoke combined, the incidence of lung cancers was higher by a factor of 2-4 according to the cumulative radon exposure and the duration of tobacco smoke exposure. When mineral fibers were injected intrapleurally, an increased incidence of malignant thoracic tumors was observed in rats exposed to radon and fibers combined, but synergistic effects resulted in additivity. With diesel exhausts or minerals from metallic ores, a slight, nonsignificant increase in the incidence of lung carcinomas was observed compared with rats exposed to radon alone. These results demonstrated that it is possible to establish the potential cocarcinogenic action, showing either multiplicative, additive, or no effect of various environmental or industrial airborne pollutants combined with radon exposure. This radon model is valid for investigating possible interactions between two occupational exposures. Images p64-a Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. PMID:9719670

  13. A summary of EPA radon chamber tests and results for rounds 3 and 4 of the National Radon Measurement Proficiency Program

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.M.; Sensintaffar, E.L.

    1993-02-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency`s Office of Radiation and Indoor Air (ORIA) established the National Radon Measurement Proficiency (RMP) Program in 1986. Through this voluntary program, participants can demonstrate their ability to measure radon and/or radon decay products by submitting their detection devices to a blind test in a designated radon chamber. In this report, two EPA radon and radon decay products test chambers (chambers A and C) located at the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory in Montgomery, Alabama are described. These chambers were used to expose detectors submitted for testing in Round 4 of the National Radon Measurement Proficiency Program and are used routinely for calibration purposes. Also described are the measurement and calibration procedures which were used to establish the official target values for radon and radon decay products concentrations during RMP Round 4 testing. The results for RMP Round 3 (conducted at the US DOE Environmental Measurements Laboratory radon chamber in New York) and RMP Round 4 (conducted in the two NAREL chambers) are discussed and compared. Following Round 4, the NAREL staff analyzed the collective performance for each measurement method tested in these rounds and found that all methods agreed with the target values within expected limits except for RPISU`s and charcoal adsorbers. After analyzing the RMP4 results, NAREL staff spent several months evaluating the difference in charcoal adsorber response between Round 3 and 4 by performing radon chamber tests using EPA 4-inch, open-faced charcoal adsorbers.

  14. Steady-state response of a charcoal bed to radon in flowing air with water vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, T.E.; Jarzemba, M.S.; Fentiman, A.W.

    1995-06-01

    Previously we have developed a mathematical model of radon adsorption in active air with water vapor on small U.S. Environmental Protection Agency charcoal canisters that are used for environmental measurements of radon. The purpose of this paper is to extend this mathematical model to describe the adsorption of radon by large charcoal beds with radon-laden air flowing through them. The resulting model equations are solved analytically to predict the steady-state adsorption of radon by such beds. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Radon assay and purification techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Simgen, Hardy

    2013-08-08

    Radon is a source of background in many astroparticle physics experiments searching for rare low energy events. In this paper an overview about radon in the field is given including radon detection techniques, radon sources and material screening with respect to radon emanation. Finally, also the problem of long-lived radioactive {sup 222}Rn-daughters and the question of gas purification from radon is addressed.

  16. Personal radon dosimetry from eyeglass lenses.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, R L; Meyer, N R; Hadley, S A; MacDonald, J; Cavallo, A

    2001-01-01

    Eyeglass lenses are commonly composed of allyl-diglycol carbonate (CR-39), an alpha-particle detecting plastic, thus making such lenses personal radon dosemeters. Samples of such lenses have been obtained, etched to reveal that radon and radon progeny alpha tracks can be seen in abundance, and sensitivities have been calibrated in radon chambers as a primary calibration, and with a uranium-based source of alpha particles as a convenient secondary standard. With one exception natural, environmental (fossil) track densities ranged from less than 3,000 to nearly 70,000 per cm2 for eyeglasses that had been worn for various times from one to nearly five years. Average radon concentrations to which those wearers were exposed are inferred to be in the range 14 to 130 Bq x m(-3) (0.4 to 3.5 pCi x l(-1)). A protocol for consistent, meaningful readout is derived and used. In the exceptional case the fossil track density was 1,780,000 cm(-2) and the inferred (24 h) average radon concentration was 6500 Bq x m(-3) (175 pCi x l(-1)) for a worker at an inactive uranium mine that is used for therapy.

  17. Assessment of Karst Spring Features in a typical Mediterranean fluvial landscape with an Interdisciplinary Investigation nased on Radon-222 as an Environmental Indicator. The case study of the Bussento River basin (Campania region, Southern Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuomo, A.; Guadagnuolo, D.; Guida, D.; Guida, M.; Knoeller, K.; Schubert, M.; Siervo, V.

    2012-04-01

    Karst aquifers provide 25% of the overall drinking water resources to the world's population and sustain aquatic life in most fluvial systems, providing several ecological services to human beings, although, because of their complex links between surface and groundwater, turn out to be very vulnerable to contamination and pollution. Hydrological assessment of karst systems reveals to be extremely complex and difficult and requires a stepwise multi-tracers approach. This work describes some of the most relevant findings obtained from the implementation of an interdisciplinary approach based on the use of Environmental Tracers, consisting of Naturally Occurring Radionuclides like Radon-222 (referred to as Radon), for the investigation of Groundwater/Surface water Interaction (GSI) processes in fluvial water bodies. In particular, Radon activity concentration measurement data having been collected from streamflow and instream springs during monthly field campaigns performed in a typical Mediterranean karst river basin: the Bussento river system (Campania region, Southern Italy). The general task has been to investigate the complex interactions and exchanges between streamflow and groundwater in a fluvial water body, at scales that are imperceptible to standard hydrological and hydraulic analyses. The Bussento River basin has been chosen as a study case for the following features of extreme relevance: Its location inside the Cilento and Vallo di Diano National Park, its inclusion of a WWF Nature Reserve, it represents a remarkable Drinking Water resource for the territory and last but not least its system includes Submarine Groundwater Discharges (SGD) to the Policastro Gulf. All these issues causes, therefore, that the management of its relevant water resources requires not only groundwater protection for domestic drinking use, but also riverine wildlife preservation and coastal water quality maintenance. As a support for hydro-geomorphological and hydrological

  18. Preliminary results on variations of radon concentration associated with rock deformation in a uranium mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdoya, Massimo; Bochiolo, Massimo; Chiozzi, Paolo; Pasquale, Vincenzo; Armadillo, Egidio; Rizzello, Daniele; Chiaberto, Enrico

    2013-04-01

    Time-series of radon concentration and environmental parameters were recently recorded in a uranium mine gallery, located in the Maritime Alps (NW Italy). The mine was bored in metarhyolites and porphyric schists mainly composed by quartz, feldspar, sericite and fluorite. U-bearing minerals are generally concentrated in veins heterogeneously spaced and made of crystals of metaautunite and metatorbernite. Radon air concentration monitoring was performed with an ionization chamber which was placed at the bottom of the gallery. Hourly mean values of temperature, pressure, and relative humidity were also measured. External data of atmospheric temperature, pressure and rainfall were also available from a meteorological station located nearby, at a similar altitude of the mine. The analysis of the time series recorded showed variation of radon concentration, of large amplitude, exhibiting daily and half-daily periods, which do not seem correlated with meteorological records. Searching for the origin of radon concentration changes and monitoring their amplitude as a function of time can provide important clues on the complex emanation process. During this process, radon reaches the air- and water-filled interstices by recoil and diffusion, where its migration is directed towards lower concentration regions, following the local gradient. The radon emanation from the rock matrix could also be controlled by stress changes acting on the rate of migration of radon into fissures, and fractures. This may yield emanation boosts due to rock extension and the consequent crack broadening, and emanation decrease when joints between cracks close. Thus, besides interaction and mass transfer with the external atmospheric environment, one possible explanation for the periodic changes in radon concentrations in the investigated mine, could be the variation of rock deformation related to lunar-solar tides. The large variation of concentration could be also due to the fact that the mine is

  19. Radon as a naturally occurring tracer for the assessment of residual NAPL contamination of aquifers.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Michael; Paschke, Albrecht; Lau, Steffen; Geyer, Wolfgang; Knöller, Kay

    2007-02-01

    The noble gas radon has a strong affinity to non-aqueous phase-liquids (NAPLs). That property makes it applicable as naturally occurring partitioning tracer for assessing residual NAPL contamination of aquifers. In a NAPL contaminated aquifer, radon dissolved in the groundwater partitions preferably into the NAPL. The magnitude of the resulting radon deficit in the groundwater depends on the NAPL-specific radon partition coefficient and on the NAPL saturation of the pore space. Hence, if the partition coefficient is known, the NAPL saturation is attainable by determination of the radon deficit. After a concise discussion of theoretical aspects regarding radon partitioning into NAPL, related experimental data and results of a field investigation are presented. Aim of the laboratory experiments was the determination of radon partition coefficients of multi-component NAPLs of environmental concern. The on-site activities were carried out in order to confirm the applicability of the "radon method" under field conditions.

  20. EPA`s approach to assessment of radon risk

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, A.; Puskin, J.S.; Nelson, N.; Nelson, C.B.

    1992-12-31

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has assessed the potential lung-cancer risk to the general population due to radon based on the Agency`s general principles of risk assessment. This same approach has been used to assess the impact on public health of other carcinogenic environmental pollutants. This paper briefly describes the application of EPA`s approach to radon and includes a description of the method used by the Agency to estimate that approximately 22,000 lung-cancer deaths per year may be related to radon exposure. Also presented are the weight of evidence for classifying radon as a known human carcinogen and the uncertainties associated with estimating risks from radon exposure. These combined factors reflect the extent of the underlying support and the context for EPA`s estimates of lung-cancer deaths.

  1. Detection of radon decay products in rainwater.

    PubMed

    Baker, S I

    1999-11-01

    The Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) Environmental Radiation Monitoring System measures and records ambient radiation levels and provides detection capability for radon decay products in rain clouds. These decay products in rainwater tracked into a facility on the shoes of workers can cause false alarms from hand and shoe monitors. The monitors at ANL-E can easily detect the radon decay products, and the 19.6 and 26.8 min half-lives of the beta-particle emitters are long enough in many cases for sufficient activity to still be present to initiate a contamination alarm when the shoes are checked for radioactivity. The Environmental Radiation Monitoring System provides a warning when precipitation contains elevated levels of radon decay products. It is based on a prototype developed at the Super Collider Laboratory. During its first year of operation there were nine alarms from radon decay products with an alarm trigger point set at 30% greater than background. The alarms occurred at both monitoring stations, which are approximately 1,000 m apart, indicating large diameter radon clouds. The increases in background were associated with low atmospheric pressure. There was no correlation with radon released from the coal-burning steam plant on the site. Alarms also occurred when short-lived accelerator-produced radioactivity in the exhaust stack plume passed over the NaI(Tl) detector in one of the stations. The 450 MeV proton accelerator near the station produced 12C, 13N, and 15O by spallation of air nuclei. The gamma-ray spectrum from the plume from the accelerator exhaust stack was dominated by the 511 keV annihilation gamma rays from decay of these radionuclides. These gamma rays were easily distinguished from the 609 keV, 1,120 keV, and 1,764 keV gamma rays emitted by the radon decay products.

  2. RADON REDUCTION AND RADON RESISTANT CONSTRUCTION DEMONSTRATIONS IN NEW YORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report covers three tasks related to indoor radon: (1) the demonstration of radon reduction techniques in 8 houses in each of two uniquely different radon prone areas of the State of New York; (2) the evaluation and repair of 14 radon mitigation systems in houses mitigated 4 ...

  3. Atmosphere purification of radon and radon daughter elements

    DOEpatents

    Stein, L.

    1973-12-11

    A method for purifying an atmosphere of radon and radon daughter elements which may be contained therein by contacting the atmosphere with a fluorinating solution, whereby the radon and radon daughters are oxidized to their respective fluorides is discussed. The fluorides dissolve in the fluorinating solutlon and are removed from the atmosphere, which may then be recirculated. (Official Gazette)

  4. Factors affecting indoor radon concentration in Norwegian homes

    SciTech Connect

    Strand, T.

    1995-12-31

    The indoor radon concentration may vary by more than an order of magnitude over a few days period, and often there is a significant difference in the radon level between summer and winter. The variation pattern gives important information about the source characteristics which is often needed when remedial measures are introduced. Short-term and long-term variations of the radon concentration in twenty typical Norwegian single family houses were studied in detail by continuous measurements and monthly passive measurements by nuclear track detectors. The radon measurements were correlated with meteorological data, building characteristics and information from the householders about ventilation habits. The main results of these studies will be presented in this paper.

  5. Indoor radon variations in central Iran and its geostatistical map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadad, Kamal; Mokhtari, Javad

    2015-02-01

    We present the results of 2 year indoor radon survey in 10 cities of Yazd province in Central Iran (covering an area of 80,000 km2). We used passive diffusive samplers with LATEX polycarbonate films as Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTD). This study carried out in central Iran where there are major minerals and uranium mines. Our results indicate that despite few extraordinary high concentrations, average annual concentrations of indoor radon are within ICRP guidelines. When geostatistical spatial distribution of radon mapped onto geographical features of the province it was observed that risk of high radon concentration increases near the Saqand, Bafq, Harat and Abarkooh cities, this depended on the elevation and vicinity of the ores and mines.

  6. Radon and radon daughter levels in energy efficient housing.

    PubMed

    McGregor, R G; Walker, W B; Létourneau, E G

    1985-10-01

    Radon and radon daughter concentrations have been measured in 33 "energy-efficient" homes in a small subdivision in Kanata, Ontario. Integrated radon measurements were determined over three month periods for a year using solid state nuclear track detectors. Radon and radon daughter grab sample determinations were made during corresponding periods and confirm the distributions of the integrated radon measurements. Annual average individual home radon concentrations show an 8 fold concentration range between homes. This variability in radon concentrations is not reflected in the range of air exchange rates for the homes. A distinct seasonal variation is noted for the median values of the radon and radon daughter concentrations and the equilibrium factor F in the dwellings.

  7. LARGE BUILDING RADON MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes information on how bilding systems -- especially the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system -- inclurence radon entry into large buildings and can be used to mitigate radon problems. It addresses the fundamentals of large building HVAC syst...

  8. Radon: The Silent Danger.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoffel, Jennifer

    1989-01-01

    This article discusses the public health dangers associated with radon exposure in homes and schools. In addition, testing and corrective efforts by federal and state agencies are discussed. A map indicating areas in the U.S. with potentially high radon levels is included. (IAH)

  9. Radon-Induced Health Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muirhead, C. R.

    The following sections are included: * Lung Cancer * Studies of miners * Estimates of lifetime risk associated with indoor radon exposure * Factors that may affect risk estimates * Sex and age at exposure * Joint effect of radon and smoking * Exposure rate * Epidemiological studies of lung cancer and indoor radon exposure * Cancers Other Than Lung * Dosimetry * Epidemiological studies * Studies of miners * Indoor radon exposure * Concluding Remarks * References

  10. The most recent international intercomparisons of radon and thoron monitors with the NIRS radon and thoron chambers.

    PubMed

    Janik, M; Yonehara, H

    2015-06-01

    The fifth international intercomparison for radon and fourth for thoron monitors were conducted at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (Japan) with the radon and thoron chambers. The tests were made under two different exposures to radon and two exposures (in two rounds due to limited space in the thoron chamber) to thoron. In these most recent intercomparisons, two new graphical methods recommended by the ISO standard, Mandel's h statistic and the Youden plot, were implemented to evaluate the consistency between laboratories and within laboratories.The presented data indicated that the performance quality of laboratories for radon measurement as expressed by the percentage difference parameter has been stable since the first international intercomparison for passive monitors carried out in 2007, and it amounted to around 50 for 10 % of the difference from the reference value. The thoron exercise showed that further development and additional studies to improve its measuring methods and reliability are needed.

  11. Chemical properties of radon

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, L.

    1986-01-01

    Radon is frequently regarded as a totally inert element. It is, however, a ''metalloid'' - an element which lies on the diagonal of the Periodic Table between the true metals and nonmetals and which exhibits some of the characteristics of both. It reacts with fluorine, halogen fluorides, dioxygenyl salts, fluoro-nitrogen salts, and halogen fluoride-metal fluoride complexes to form ionic compounds. Several of the solid reagents can be used to collect radon from air but must be protected from moisture, since they hydrolyze readily. Recently, solutions of nonvolatile, cationic radon have been produced in nonaqueous solvents. Ion-exchange studies have shown that the radon can be quantitatively collected on columns packed with either Nafion resins or complex salts. In its ionic state, radon is able to displace H/sup +/, Na/sup +/, K/sup +/, Cs/sup +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, and Ba/sup 2 +/ ions from a number of solid materials. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Invited article: radon and thoron intercomparison experiments for integrated monitors at NIRS, Japan.

    PubMed

    Janik, M; Ishikawa, T; Omori, Y; Kavasi, N

    2014-02-01

    Inhalation of radon ((222)Rn) and its short-lived decay products and of products of the thoron ((220)Rn) series accounts for more than half of the effective dose from natural radiation sources. At this time, many countries have begun large-scale radon and thoron surveys and many different measurement methods and instruments are used in these studies. Consequently, it is necessary to improve and standardize technical methods of measurements and to verify quality assurance by intercomparisons between laboratories. Four international intercomparisons for passive integrating radon and thoron monitors were conducted at the NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan). Radon exercises were carried out in the 24.4 m(3) inner volume walk-in radon chamber that has systems to control radon concentration, temperature, and humidity. Moreover, the NIRS thoron chamber with a 150 dm(3) inner volume was utilized to provide three thoron intercomparisons. At present, the NIRS is the only laboratory world-wide that has carried out periodic thoron intercomparison of passive monitors. Fifty laboratories from 26 countries participated in the radon intercomparison, using six types of detectors (charcoal, CR-39, LR 115, polycarbonate film, electret plate, and silicon photodiode). Eighteen laboratories from 12 countries participated in the thoron intercomparisons, using two etch-track types (CR-39 and polycarbonate) detectors. The tests were made under one to three different exposures to radon and thoron. The data presented in this paper indicated that the performance quality of laboratories for radon measurement has been gradually increasing. Results of thoron exercises showed that the quality for thoron measurements still needs further development and additional studies are needed to improve its measuring methods. The present paper provides a summary of all radon and thoron international intercomparisons done at NIRS from 2007 to date and it describes the present status on

  13. Invited Article: Radon and thoron intercomparison experiments for integrated monitors at NIRS, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Omori, Y.; Kavasi, N.

    2014-02-01

    Inhalation of radon (222Rn) and its short-lived decay products and of products of the thoron (220Rn) series accounts for more than half of the effective dose from natural radiation sources. At this time, many countries have begun large-scale radon and thoron surveys and many different measurement methods and instruments are used in these studies. Consequently, it is necessary to improve and standardize technical methods of measurements and to verify quality assurance by intercomparisons between laboratories. Four international intercomparisons for passive integrating radon and thoron monitors were conducted at the NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan). Radon exercises were carried out in the 24.4 m3 inner volume walk-in radon chamber that has systems to control radon concentration, temperature, and humidity. Moreover, the NIRS thoron chamber with a 150 dm3 inner volume was utilized to provide three thoron intercomparisons. At present, the NIRS is the only laboratory world-wide that has carried out periodic thoron intercomparison of passive monitors. Fifty laboratories from 26 countries participated in the radon intercomparison, using six types of detectors (charcoal, CR-39, LR 115, polycarbonate film, electret plate, and silicon photodiode). Eighteen laboratories from 12 countries participated in the thoron intercomparisons, using two etch-track types (CR-39 and polycarbonate) detectors. The tests were made under one to three different exposures to radon and thoron. The data presented in this paper indicated that the performance quality of laboratories for radon measurement has been gradually increasing. Results of thoron exercises showed that the quality for thoron measurements still needs further development and additional studies are needed to improve its measuring methods. The present paper provides a summary of all radon and thoron international intercomparisons done at NIRS from 2007 to date and it describes the present status on radon and

  14. Invited Article: Radon and thoron intercomparison experiments for integrated monitors at NIRS, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Janik, M. Ishikawa, T.; Omori, Y.; Kavasi, N.

    2014-02-15

    Inhalation of radon ({sup 222}Rn) and its short-lived decay products and of products of the thoron ({sup 220}Rn) series accounts for more than half of the effective dose from natural radiation sources. At this time, many countries have begun large-scale radon and thoron surveys and many different measurement methods and instruments are used in these studies. Consequently, it is necessary to improve and standardize technical methods of measurements and to verify quality assurance by intercomparisons between laboratories. Four international intercomparisons for passive integrating radon and thoron monitors were conducted at the NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan). Radon exercises were carried out in the 24.4 m{sup 3} inner volume walk-in radon chamber that has systems to control radon concentration, temperature, and humidity. Moreover, the NIRS thoron chamber with a 150 dm{sup 3} inner volume was utilized to provide three thoron intercomparisons. At present, the NIRS is the only laboratory world-wide that has carried out periodic thoron intercomparison of passive monitors. Fifty laboratories from 26 countries participated in the radon intercomparison, using six types of detectors (charcoal, CR-39, LR 115, polycarbonate film, electret plate, and silicon photodiode). Eighteen laboratories from 12 countries participated in the thoron intercomparisons, using two etch-track types (CR-39 and polycarbonate) detectors. The tests were made under one to three different exposures to radon and thoron. The data presented in this paper indicated that the performance quality of laboratories for radon measurement has been gradually increasing. Results of thoron exercises showed that the quality for thoron measurements still needs further development and additional studies are needed to improve its measuring methods. The present paper provides a summary of all radon and thoron international intercomparisons done at NIRS from 2007 to date and it describes the

  15. Mutagenicity of radon and radon daughters

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, H.H.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of our research is to investigate the dose-response relationship of the lethal and mutagenic effects of exposure of cells to radon and its decay products. Dose rate dependence and the nature of the DNA lesion will be studied, using the thymidine kinase and HPRT loci to measure mutation frequency. A deficiency in DNA repair is shown to lead to a greater proportion of mutants with intergenic lesions. The cytotoxic effects of radon and its daughters are similar in human TK6 lymphoblasts and mouse L5178Y lymphoblasts, the cell line used in previous experiments. The results of molecular analysis of four spontaneous and 25 X-radiation induced HPRT{sup {minus}} mutants. Eleven radon-induced HPRT{sup {minus}} mutants have been isolated, and will be analyzed in a similar fashion. 9 figs.

  16. Application of activated charcoal radon collectors in high humidity environments.

    PubMed

    Iimoto, Takeshi; Tokonami, Shinji; Morishita, Yasuaki; Kosako, Toshiso

    2005-01-01

    Most commercially based activated charcoal radon collectors were designed for use in indoor environments. However, at present, they are often used for research in radon surveys in unique environments, such as in the bathrooms, underground areas, mines, caves and tunnels. In these environments, the relative humidity would be around 100%, and a change in the sensitivity of cpm(Bq m(-3))(-1)(radon) would occur. For this study, the reduction in the sensitivity of activated charcoal radon collector due to environmental humidity was investigated, and the data correction was discussed. Here, ST-100 (Pico-Rad) was selected as an example of a familiar activated charcoal radon collector. According to our performance test, the humidity of 90% (20 degrees C) resulted in a 15% reduction of the sensitivity for 24 h collection. The ST-100 user should discuss the necessity of data correction by comparing the change of sensitivity with other levels of estimation errors.

  17. The radon problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crameri, Reto; Burkart, Werner

    The importance of the radon problem is illustrated by the fact that the indoor exposure to radon and radon daughters amounts to about 40% of the total effective dose equivalent to which the population is exposed to both, from natural and man made sources. This exposure may increase even further due to new building technologies optimized for energy conservation. Although radon and its decay products are well known to cause lung cancer at high exposure levels, considerable controversy remains about the magnitude of risk due to low-level exposure. Linear extrapolation from the dose-response values of uranium miners who were heavily exposed to these nuclides would suggest that a relevant fraction (10-40%) of lung cancers in the general population are caused by the inhalation of radon daughters. Moreover, the results of monitoring programs in several countries during the past years have revealed that for a small, but not negligible fraction of the population, the lifetime exposure from indoor radon daughters is comparable to, or even exceeds the occupational radon exposure of moderately exposed underground miners still showing a significant excess lung cancer frequency.

  18. Assessment of the multimedia mitigation of radon in New York.

    PubMed

    Kitto, Michael E

    2007-05-01

    Although not yet implemented, the 1996 amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act instructed the states (or local water suppliers) to address radon concentrations in community water systems (CWS). As an alternative to reducing waterborne radon concentrations in the CWS to the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 11 Bq L(-1), states (or individual CWS) would be permitted to develop a multimedia mitigation (MMM) program, which allowed a greater concentration (148 Bq L(-1)) of waterborne radon in the CWS, if it could be shown that an equivalent health risk reduction could be achieved by reducing indoor radon concentrations. For a MMM program to be acceptable, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency required the health-risk reduction attained through mitigations and radon-resistant new construction (RRNC) to offset the increased health risk due to radon in community water systems above the MCL of 11 Bq L(-1). A quantitative assessment indicates that the reduction in health risk currently achieved in New York State through radon mitigations and RRNC exceeded the increase in risk associated with an alternative MCL of 148 Bq L(-1). The implementation of a MMM program in New York would result in an overall reduction in the health risk associated with exposure to radon. PMID:17429303

  19. A computer model of human thermoregulation for a wide range of environmental conditions: the passive system.

    PubMed

    Fiala, D; Lomas, K J; Stohrer, M

    1999-11-01

    A dynamic model predicting human thermal responses in cold, cool, neutral, warm, and hot environments is presented in a two-part study. This, the first paper, is concerned with aspects of the passive system: 1) modeling the human body, 2) modeling heat-transport mechanisms within the body and at its periphery, and 3) the numerical procedure. A paper in preparation will describe the active system and compare the model predictions with experimental data and the predictions by other models. Here, emphasis is given to a detailed modeling of the heat exchange with the environment: local variations of surface convection, directional radiation exchange, evaporation and moisture collection at the skin, and the nonuniformity of clothing ensembles. Other thermal effects are also modeled: the impact of activity level on work efficacy and the change of the effective radiant body area with posture. A stable and accurate hybrid numerical scheme was used to solve the set of differential equations. Predictions of the passive system model are compared with available analytic solutions for cylinders and spheres and show good agreement and stable numerical behavior even for large time steps.

  20. Geographical distribution of indoor radon and related geological characteristics in Bonghwa County, a provisional radon-prone area in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, E R; Chang, B U; Kim, H J; Song, M H; Kim, Y J

    2015-12-01

    The detailed indoor radon survey was conducted during a year (from September 2012 to August 2013) quarterly in Bonghwa county, one of the provisional radon-prone areas in Korea. The surveyed area was selected on the basis of previously conducted nationwide radon survey results. In order to minimise statistical and environmental uncertainties, ∼3 % of the entire dwellings were carefully selected based on the statistical annual report of Bonghwa county. The measurement is carried out by using solid-state nuclear track detector. The range of indoor radon concentration in each dwelling was 4.36-858 Bq m(-3) and that of annual effective dose due to inhaled radon of the resident in each dwelling was 0.19-23.5 mSv y(-1). Each dwelling was determined for geology criterion using one-way Analysis of Variance for the purpose of comparing indoor radon distribution with geology. Geographical distribution of indoor radon is closely related to the geological characteristics of basement rocks. In addition, the comparison between geographical distribution of indoor radon and terrestrial gamma radiation was done.

  1. Radon reduction and radon monitoring in the NEMO experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Nachab, A.

    2007-03-28

    The first data of the NEMO 3 neutrinoless double beta decay experiment have shown that the radon can be a non negligible component of the background. In order to reduce the radon level in the gas mixture, it has been necessary first to cover the NEMO 3 detector with an airtight tent and then to install a radon-free air factory. With the use of sensitive radon detectors, the level of radon at the exit of the factory and inside the tent is continuously controlled. These radon levels are discussed within the NEMO 3 context.

  2. Radon Dosimetry and Monitoring in Mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineau, J. F.

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * The Atmosphere in Underground Mines * Origin of the radioactivity of the atmosphere in underground mines * Main characteristics of the atmosphere of mines * Temperature * Relative humidity * Particle size distribution of the aerosols * Volume concentration of radon * Age of the ventilation air * Volume concentration of radon decay products * Volume concentration of long-lived aerosols (LLA) * Order of magnitude of the volume concentrations to be measured * Dosimetry: Application to Miners * Dosimetry of miners in France * Integrated dosimetry system * Measuring head * Unit for the detection and measurement of exposure to potential alpha energy * Treatment and reading of the detector films * Expression of the results * Other examples of operational dosimetry * Use of closed passive dosimeters for the dosimetry of miners * Monitoring of Physical Parameters of the Atmospheres * Qualification of non-uranium mines * Monitoring of the environment of mining sites * Optimisation of radiation protection using the dosimetric data * Concluding Remarks * References

  3. Mineral dusts and radon in uranium mines

    SciTech Connect

    Abelson, P.H.

    1991-11-08

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) continues to assert that radon is a major cause of lung cancer in this country. EPA is fostering a radon program that could entail huge financial and emotional costs while yielding negligible benefits to public health. Justification for the program was the occurrence of lung cancer in men exposed to huge amounts of radon, mineral dusts, and other lung irritants in uranium mines on the Colorado Plateau. Lung cancer has been reported in about 356 cigarette smokers and in about 25 nonsmokers. During the era of high radon levels, monitoring was sporadic. Conditions in only a small fraction of the mines were measured, and that on a few separate occasions. Later, cumulative exposure to radon was calculated on the basis of measurements involving only a tiny fraction of the miners. Some were exposed to more than 15,000 pCi/liter of radon and its products. The level in the average home is about 1.5 pCi/liter. In making extrapolations from mine to home, the assumption is made that residents are in their dwellings most of the time and that miners spend only 170 hours a month in the mine. Two major questionable assumptions are involved in extrapolations from high doses of radon in the mines to low doses in homes. One is that no threshold is involved; that is, that humans have no remediation mechanism for {alpha} particle damages. There is evidence to the contrary. The most unrealistic assumption is that heavy exposure to silica has no effect on inducing lung cancer. Many studies have shown that silica dust causes lung cancer in animals. Exposure of human culture cells to silica has resulted in formation of neoplastic tissue. EPA has no solid evidence that exposures to 4 pCi/liter of radon causes lung cancer in either smokers or nonsmokers. Indeed, there is abundant evidence to the contrary in the fact that in states with high levels of radon, inhabitants have less lung cancer than those in states with low levels.

  4. Time-dependent response of a charcoal bed to radon and water vapor in flowing air

    SciTech Connect

    Henkel, J.A.; Fentiman, A.W.; Blue, T.E.

    1995-12-31

    Extremely high airborne concentrations of radon gas may be encountered during the remediation of uranium mill tailings storage facilities. Radon is also a constituent of the off-gas of mill-tailing vitrification. An effective way to remove radon from either gas is to pass the gas through a packed bed containing activated charcoal. Measurements of radon concentrations in the environment using charcoal canisters were first described by George. Canisters similar to those used by George in his first experiments have become the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) standard for measuring environmental radon and were described in the EPA protocol for environmental radon measurement. The dynamic behavior of EPA charcoal canisters has been previously described with a mathematical model for the kinetics of radon gas adsorption in air in the presence of water vapor. This model for charcoal canisters has been extended to large charcoal beds with flowing air containing radon and water vapor. The mathematical model for large charcoal beds can be used to evaluate proposed bed designs or to model existing beds. Parameters that affect the radon distribution within a charcoal bed that can be studied using the mathematical model include carrier gas relative humidity and flow velocity, and input radon concentration. In addition, the relative performances of several different charcoals can be studied, provided sufficient information about their adsorption, desorption, and diffusion constants is known.

  5. Results Of The National Survey On Radon Indoors In Albania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bode, Kozeta; Bylyku, Elida; Cfarku, Florinda; Mucollari, Irena; Shyti, Manjola

    2010-01-01

    Radon in indoor air originates from trace concentrations of radium in substrate soil and the walls, floor and ceilings which are constructed of building materials [1]. According to the assessments made by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), radon in the natural environment constitutes about 50% of the human exposure to natural radiation or 1, 2 mSv/year [3]. In this paper are given the results of the indoor radon concentration measurement of about 173 dwellings which involving 10 Albanian Regions performed by the Centre of Applied Nuclear Physics. For these measurements were used passive radon detector Radtrack, which provide the average values of indoor radon concentration for 90 days (3 months). Regional averages range from about 23 Bq m-3 to about 278 Bq m-3. However, the uncertainty of regional values can be relevant in case of small Regions, where a low number of small dwellings, although such uncertainties do not affect significantly national values. Based at the results of the measurements, the indoor radon concentrations in the majority of the dwellings were under reference levels (200-400 Bqm-3) [2].

  6. Environmental assessment and management of metal-rich wastes generated in acid mine drainage passive remediation systems.

    PubMed

    Macías, Francisco; Caraballo, Manuel A; Nieto, José Miguel

    2012-08-30

    As acid mine drainage (AMD) remediation is increasingly faced by governments and mining industries worldwide, the generation of metal-rich solid residues from the treatments plants is concomitantly raising. A proper environmental management of these metal-rich wastes requires a detailed characterization of the metal mobility as well as an assessment of this new residues stability. The European standard leaching test EN 12457-2, the US EPA TCLP test and the BCR sequential extraction procedure were selected to address the environmental assessment of dispersed alkaline substrate (DAS) residues generated in AMD passive treatment systems. Significant discrepancies were observed in the hazardousness classification of the residues according to the TCLP or EN 12457-2 test. Furthermore, the absence of some important metals (like Fe or Al) in the regulatory limits employed in both leaching tests severely restricts their applicability for metal-rich wastes. The results obtained in the BCR sequential extraction suggest an important influence of the landfill environmental conditions on the metals released from the wastes. To ensure a complete stability of the pollutants in the studied DAS-wastes the contact with water or any other leaching solutions must be avoided and a dry environment needs to be provided in the landfill disposal selected. PMID:22717063

  7. Development of calibration facility for radon and its progenies at NIM (China).

    PubMed

    Liang, J C; Zheng, P H; Yang, Z J; Liu, H R; Zhang, M; Li, Z S; Zhang, L; Guo, Q J

    2015-11-01

    Accurate measurement of radon and its progenies is the basis to control the radon dose and reduce the risk of lung cancer caused. The precise calibration of measuring instrument is an important part of the quality control of measurements of the concentration of radon and radon progenies. To establish Chinese national standards and realise reliable calibrations of measuring instrument for radon and its progenies, a radon chamber with regulation capability of environmental parameters, aerosol and radon concentrations was designed and constructed at National Institute of Metrology (NIM). The chamber has a total volume of ∼20 m(3) including an exposure volume of 12.44 m(3). The radon concentration can be controlled from 12 Bq m(-3) to the maximum of 232 kBq m(-3). The regulation range of temperature, relative humidity and aerosol are 0.66 -44.39°C, 16.4 -95 %RH and 10(2) -10(6) cm(-3), respectively. The main advantages of the NIM radon chamber with respect to maintaining a stable concentration and equilibrium factor of radon progenies in a wide range through automatic regulation and control of radon and aerosol are described. PMID:25948838

  8. Dose assessment of population groups exposed to elevated radon levels in radioactive Italian spas

    SciTech Connect

    Sciocchetti, G.; Tosti, S.; Baldassini, P.G.; Sarao, R.; Soldano, E.

    1992-12-31

    The natural spring waters on the Isle of Ischia are among the most radioactive in the world. Therapeutic application of these waters, which contain very high radon concentrations, increases the radon exposure of people treated with them. People who live and work at radioactive spas may be good subjects for testing to evaluate detectable biological effects, especially because their exposures will be less influenced by synergistic factors than those of underground miners. The aim of our investigation was to characterize radon exposure for population groups exposed to high radon levels. Our approach takes into account some peculiar requirements of our epidemiological investigations. To obtain representative dose values, workers were classified into groups to obtain significant results suitable for epidemiological pilot studies. Investigations were carried out on the geological aspects of radon sources, environmental parameters, physical and dosimetric factors which influence radon levels, and related exposures in therapeutic facilities in order to model patterns of radon exposures for the various population groups. We inventoried hyper-radioactive springs on the island. We identified workers in radon spas who were exposed to radiation from inhaled radon daughters and retrospectively assessed their radon exposures. Results showed that, under some conditions, spa employees may have been exposed to much higher than usual levels of radon, which produced up to about 60 mSv y{sup -1} effective dose equivalent.

  9. Development of calibration facility for radon and its progenies at NIM (China).

    PubMed

    Liang, J C; Zheng, P H; Yang, Z J; Liu, H R; Zhang, M; Li, Z S; Zhang, L; Guo, Q J

    2015-11-01

    Accurate measurement of radon and its progenies is the basis to control the radon dose and reduce the risk of lung cancer caused. The precise calibration of measuring instrument is an important part of the quality control of measurements of the concentration of radon and radon progenies. To establish Chinese national standards and realise reliable calibrations of measuring instrument for radon and its progenies, a radon chamber with regulation capability of environmental parameters, aerosol and radon concentrations was designed and constructed at National Institute of Metrology (NIM). The chamber has a total volume of ∼20 m(3) including an exposure volume of 12.44 m(3). The radon concentration can be controlled from 12 Bq m(-3) to the maximum of 232 kBq m(-3). The regulation range of temperature, relative humidity and aerosol are 0.66 -44.39°C, 16.4 -95 %RH and 10(2) -10(6) cm(-3), respectively. The main advantages of the NIM radon chamber with respect to maintaining a stable concentration and equilibrium factor of radon progenies in a wide range through automatic regulation and control of radon and aerosol are described.

  10. The influence of thoron on instruments measuring radon activity concentration.

    PubMed

    Michielsen, N; Bondiguel, S

    2015-11-01

    Thoron, the isotope 220 of radon, is a radionuclide whose concentration may influence the measurement of the activity concentration of (222)Rn in the air. If in the case of continuous and active sampling measuring instruments, using a pump for example, the influence of thoron on radon measurement is obvious and is taken into account in the apparatus, it is often assumed that in the case of a passive sampling, by diffusion through a filter for example, this thoron influence is negligible. This is due to the very short radioactive half-life of thoron, 55.6 s (3.82 d for (222)Rn), and the assumption that the diffusion time of thoron in the detection chamber is long enough beside that of the thoron half-life. The objective of this study is to check whether this assumption is true or not for different kinds of commercial electronic apparatus used to measure radon activity concentration from soil to dwellings. First of all, the devices were calibrated in activity concentration of radon, and then they were exposed to a controlled thoron atmosphere. The experiments concerning the thoron aimed to investigate the sensitivity to thoron in the radon measuring mode of the apparatus. Results of these experiments show that all devices have a very quick answer to thoron atmosphere, even though the sensitivities vary from one instrument to another. Results clearly show that this influence on radon measurement due to the thoron is observed also after the exposition because of the decay of (212)Pb and its progenies. In conclusion, the sensitivity to thoron in the radon measuring mode depends strongly on the type of instruments. The results of the present investigation show that for some apparatus, the influence of thoron cannot be disregarded especially when measuring radon in soil.

  11. Improvement in understanding the deposition of ambient dust particles on ECAM (environmental continuous air monitor) filters, reduction of the alpha-particle interference of radon progeny and other radioactive aerosols in different particle size ranges on filters, and development of ECAMs with increased sensitivity under dusty outdoor conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Schery, Stephen D., Wasiolek, Piotr; Rodgers, John

    1999-06-01

    Improvement in understanding the deposition of ambient dust particles on ECAM (environmental continuous air monitor) filters, reduction of the alpha-particle interference of radon progeny and other radioactive aerosols in different particle size ranges on filters, and development of ECAMs with increased sensitivity under dusty outdoor conditions.

  12. Radon: Is it a problem

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, B.L.; Mettler, F.A.; Harley, N.H. )

    1989-09-01

    Radon gas is a major source of radiation exposure to the general public. Radon-222 is a product of uranium-238, present in varying concentrations in all soils. Radon enters buildings from soil, water, natural gas, and building materials. Its short-lived breakdown products, termed radon daughters, include alpha-emitting solids that can deposit in the lungs. Firm evidence links lung cancer risk in miners with high exposure to radon daughters. The amount of risk associated with the much lower but chronic doses received in buildings is difficult to establish. By some extrapolations, radon daughters may be responsible for a significant number of lung cancer deaths. The existence or extent of synergism with smoking is unresolved. Local conditions can cause high levels of radon in some buildings, and measures that reduce indoor radon are of potential value. 39 references.

  13. An investigation of factors affecting the entry of radon into structures on the Island of Guam

    SciTech Connect

    Kladder, D.L.; Burkhart, J.F.; Thorburn, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    Factors affecting the entry of radon-222 gas into structures on the Island of Guam were investigated during the summer of 1993. Research findings indicated that radon transport into buildings on Guam, and perhaps in other tropical areas, is driven by sub-grade soil pressure (positive with respect to atmospheric pressure) rather than interior buildings vacuums. Immediate and substantive increases in indoor radon concentrations were associated with environmental effects of wind and rain. Radon entry, and hence indoor radon concentrations, is significantly greater during the rainy season as opposed to the dry season. In the absence of mechanically induced interior vacuums in buildings, external environmental forces creating sub-slab pressures are the predominant factor in affecting radon entry in Guam. Indoor radon potentials can be correlated to the locations where the underlying geology is limestone. Furthermore, the radon source appears to be within the first few feet of the surface of these limestones rather than uniformly distributed throughout the limestone. The effects of seismic activity on radon entry are short-lived unless significant damage occurs to a structure. Radon entry during calm weather conditions may also be a function of the rising and falling of ocean tides.

  14. Variations of well water radon in Virginia and Maryland.

    PubMed

    Mose, D G; Mushrush, G W; Simoni, F V

    2001-01-01

    In north-central Virginia and south-central Maryland, municipal water supplies obtained from reservoirs provide radon-free potable water. However, about 10 percent of the population consumes well water. Radon in drinking water from some wells exceeds 4,000 pCi/L. Only about 30% of the radon is lost between the well storage tanks and the homes. The average radon concentration is about 2,000 pCi/L, which greatly exceeds the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's recommended Maximum Contamination Level of 300 pCi/L. In this study of a geologically diverse area, the well water comes from granite (radon averages about 3,000 pCi,/L), schist and phyllite (about 2,000 pCi/L), sandstone (about 1,500 pCi/L), and quartzite (about 1,100 pCi/L). Aeration experiments on well water in storage tanks indicated that about 60-70% can be removed using a splash box with an exhaust fan on the storage tank, and about 60-70% can be removed using bubble aeration. About 90% of the radon can be removed by the simultaneous use of bubble aeration, splash box, and an exhaust fan. However, this combination does not become less efficient through time. Passing the water through tanks of activated charcoal can remove about 90% of the radon, though the charcoal becomes less efficient over an interval of a few months.

  15. American Lung Association`s radon public information program

    SciTech Connect

    McCurdy, L.E.

    1992-12-31

    The American Lung Association (ALA), the nation`s oldest voluntary health organization, is dedicated to the conquest of lung disease and the promotion of lung health. The objective of the ALA Radon Public Information Program is to reduce public exposure to elevated indoor radon levels through implementing grassroots-based radon public awareness campaigns by 22 local ALA groups. The program, which is funded by a grant from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), was initiated in December 1989; the first phase will continue until May, 1991. Activities of local Lung Associations include distribution of free or reduced-cost radon kits; presenting programs in elementary and secondary schools; presenting information on TV news series and talk shows, and on radio Public Service Announcements and talk shows; presenting articles and feature stories in the print media; holding conferences, workshops, and displays at fairs and other exhibitions; distributing radon fact sheets through libraries and utility company mailings; and distributing videos through video chains and libraries. The local Lung Associations also serve as promoters for the EPA/Advertising Council Radon Public Service Announcement Campaign. We will highlight the activities of the groups in communicating radon health risks to the public; we will describe the results obtained and will attempt to evaluate the merits of the various approaches on the basis of the initial results.

  16. Preliminary assessment of radon potential of the Pacific coast states

    SciTech Connect

    Otton, J.K. )

    1993-04-01

    The US Geological Survey has recently released preliminary assessments of the radon potential in Washington, Oregon, and California. These assessments, funded by the Environmental Protection Agency, are based on geology, soils, aeroradiometric data, indoor radon data, and housing characteristics. Coastal mountain areas with low-uranium basaltic rocks and high soil moisture, and drier inland areas of low-uranium basaltic rocks in the northern part of the three-stage area have low round potential (<10 percent of homes with >4 pCi/L). Areas with highly permeable, uraniferous glacial outwash deposits in central and northeastern Washington; local areas with uraniferous marine shales in southern and south-central California; areas of granites, acidic volcanic rocks and alluvium derived from then in southeastern Oregon and central California; and steep soils developed on volcanic rocks in the Columbia River Gorge all have moderate (10-25 percent of homes with >4 pCi/L) radon potential. Extreme levels of indoor radon are possible in the northern Spokane, Wash. suburbs where homes may be sited on uranium occurrences. the radon potential of Mojave-Desert areas with high-uranium soils and rocks seems to be lowered by low radon entry rates, probably caused by slab-on-grade construction, use of evaporative coolers, and lifestyle factors. With the uranium-rich soils and rocks present, however, high indoor radon levels are possible where unusual housing conditions are present.

  17. National radon measurement proficiency (RMP) program: Individual proficiency report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    In February 1986, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the Radon Measurement Proficiency (RMP) Program to assist the public in identifying organizations capable of providing reliable radon measurement services. Until recently, the RMP Program measured the proficiency of organizations only and listed them according to their measurement service capabilities. Organizations listed in the report are called Listed RMP Program Participants. In December 1991, EPA announced the new individual proficiency listing category in the RMP Program. Individuals applying for the new listing status must demonstrate knowledge of radon measurement fundamentals by passing a written proficiency examination, maintain affiliation with an RMP listed organization, and meet other program requirements. The Measurement Exam adds to the RMP Program by evaluating the knowledge of individual radon measurement service providers. The addition of the component is appropriate since the quality and reliability of radon measurement services depend on the ability of individual measurement contractors. The RMP Program is managed by the EPA Office of Radiation Programs' Radon Division. Under the voluntary program, radon measurement contractors demonstrate their proficiency by meeting specific Program requirements. Individual contractors who meet these requirements are then listed in the Report.

  18. Comparative dosimetry for radon and thoron in high background radiation areas in China.

    PubMed

    Kudo, H; Tokonami, S; Omori, Y; Ishikawa, T; Iwaoka, K; Sahoo, S K; Akata, N; Hosoda, M; Wanabongse, P; Pornnumpa, C; Sun, Q; Li, X; Akiba, S

    2015-11-01

    The present study focuses on internal exposure caused by the inhalation of radon and thoron progenies because the internal exposures have not yet been clarified. For their dose assessment, radon, thoron and thoron progeny concentrations were measured by passive monitors over a long period (for 6 months). Consequently, radon, thoron and equilibrium equivalent thoron concentrations were given as 124 ± 78, 1247 ± 1189 and 7.8 ± 9.1 Bq m(-3), respectively. Annual effective doses are estimated to be 3.1 ± 2.0 mSv for radon and 2.2 ± 2.5 mSv for thoron. Total dose are estimated to be 5.3 ± 3.5 mSv a(-1). The present study has revealed that the radon dose was comparable with the thoron dose, and the total dose was ∼2 times higher than the worldwide average.

  19. International comparison of cave radon concentrations identifying the potential alpha radiation risks to British cave users

    SciTech Connect

    Hyland, R.; Gunn, J.

    1994-08-01

    Elevated concentrations of {sup 222}Rn have been recorded in many limestone caves throughout the world. As prolonged exposure to high radon concentrations has been linked to cancer and tumors, particularly of the lung, a national survey of radon in British caves was undertaken. Passive radon detectors were exposed at 250 sites in 47 caves over four 7-d sampling periods. Mean concentrations ranging from 454-8,868 Bq m{sup {minus}3} were recorded. In one system, in the Peak District, radon concentrations of 155,000 Bq m{sup {minus}3} were recorded. The results indicate that the potential radiation dose from a single 4-h trip could exceed the national average annual background radiation dose (for the UK) from radon of 1.25 mSv. 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. Determination of the minimum measurement time for estimating long-term mean radon concentration.

    PubMed

    Janik, M; Łoskiewicz, J; Tokonami, S; Kozak, K; Mazur, J; Ishikawa, T

    2012-11-01

    Radon measurements, as do any measurements, include errors in their readings. The relative values of such errors depend principally on the measurement methods used, the radon concentration to be measured and the duration of the measurements. Typical exposure times for radon surveys using passive detectors [nuclear track detectors, activated charcoal, electrostatic (E-perm), etc.)] may extend from a few days to months, whereas, in the case of screening methods utilising active radon monitors (AlphaGUARD, RAD7, EQF, etc.), the measurements may be completed quickly within a few hours to a few days. Thus, the latter may have relatively large error values, which affect the measurement accuracy significantly compared with the former measurements made over long time periods. The method presented in this paper examines the uncertainty of a short-term radon measurement as an estimate of the long-term mean and suggests a minimum measurement time to achieve a given margin of uncertainty of that estimate. PMID:22923240

  1. The measurements of thoron, radon and their decay products thanks to Pinocchio, Tengu and Trolls.

    PubMed

    Tommasino, L; Tokonami, S; Tommasino, P M

    2010-10-01

    In the present paper, the long noses of Pinocchio, Tengu and Trolls are used to measure, respectively, radon, thoron, and their decay products both by track-etch detectors and by Geiger-Müller (G-M) counters. Just recently, four new passive samplers (termed quatrefoil) have been developed which greatly simplify the detection of all airborne radionuclides by using either passive or real-time detectors. In particular, surface-deposited radon (thoron) decay products are sampled by films with large area and small surface density (0.1-1 mg cm(-2)). Once exposed, these films are stacked together for their detection by a pancake G-M counter. For the measurements of radon and thoron in soil, 25-cm-long tubes with sampling films along their internal surfaces can be successfully used. Once exposed, these films can be counted by a pancake G-M for the selective measurement of radon and thoron.

  2. Measurements of indoor radon and radon progeny in Mexico City

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Y.S.; Rodriguez, G.P.

    1996-06-01

    Indoor radon has been a public concern associated with increased lung cancer risks. Radon decay products interact with indoor aerosols to form progeny with different size distributions, which may influence the lung dosimetry when the progeny are inhaled. Air pollution in Mexico City is a serious problems with high particulate concentrations, but there are few reports of indoor radon measurement. The purposes of this study were to measure the aerosol concentration, radon concentration, and radon activity size distribution in the living area of three houses in Mexico City. The radon concentration was monitored by a RGM-3 radon gas monitor (Eberline, Inc., Santa Fe, NM). A graded diffusion battery was used to determine the progeny concentration and activity size distribution. The concentration and size distribution of the indoor aerosols were monitored by a quartz, crystal microbalance cascade impactor. Our measurements showed high concentrations of indoor aerosols (20-180 gg m{sup -3}). However, the radon concentrations-were low (<1 pCi L{sup -1}), but showed a clear diurnal pattern with peak concentrations from 2-10 AM. The activity size distributions of radon progeny were trimodal, with peaks of 0.6 nm, 4-5 nm, and 100 rim. Most activities were associated with large particle sizes. Our results indicated that indoor radon concentration was not high, due in part to a relatively high air exchange with outdoor air. The high aerosol concentration may also play an important part in the activity size distribution of radon progeny.

  3. Radon exposure assessment in a former uranium production facility

    SciTech Connect

    Akbar-Khanzadch, F.; Merrill, E.A.

    1996-06-01

    Storage of radon-producing materials in three silos and six waste pits is one of the major environmental and occupational issues at a former uranium production facility, now a Superfund Site. The concentrations of radium up to 190,000 pCi g{sup -1} for silos and up to 1,200 pCi g{sup -1} for waste pits have been reported. This study was conducted to identify conditions and climatic factors that contribute to higher radon levels and to assess workers` exposure at the site. Data covering a 12-mo period were compiled from monitoring radon levels by hourly real-time indoor (within 3 buildings) and outdoor (at 14 on-site and 2 off-site stations) and from hourly site specific meteorological information. The ranges of radon levels were 0.05-98.8 pCi L{sup -1} outdoor on-site, 0.1-8.9 pCi L{sup -1} outdoor off-side, and 0.05-3.0 pCi L{sup -1} indoor on-site. Only radon levels in the vicinity of the storage silos, which is an exclusion zone, were significantly higher than levels off-site. Significantly higher levels of radon were detected in the production areas vs. those at the perimeter areas, suggesting that there were significant sources of on-site radon contamination other than the silos. Radon concentrations showed diurnal variations, maximum levels occurring at early morning and minimum levels in the afternoon. A seasonal variation was also observed, with radon levels highest during mid summer while lowest during winter. Wind direction, wind speed, relative humidity, and ambient temperature appeared to be the most significant predictors of radon concentration. The dose, calculated by using exposure models and annual average levels of radon in the work area, was below recommended exposure limits. These results suggest that the emission control methods at this site have been effective in maintaining environmental radon contamination and workers` exposure at acceptable levels.

  4. Towards a Brazilian radon map: consortium radon Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, N C; Bossew, P; Ferreira Filho, A L; Campos, T F C; Pereira, A J S C; Yoshimura, E M; Veiga, L H S; Campos, M P; Rocha, Z; Paschuk, S A; Bonotto, D M

    2014-07-01

    Recently, the idea of generating radon map of Brazil has emerged. First attempts of coordinating radon surveys--carried out by different groups across the country--and initial discussions on how to proceed on a larger scale were made at the First Brazilian Radon Seminary, Natal, September 2012. Conventionally, it is believed that indoor radon is no major problem in Brazil, because the overall benign climate usually allows high ventilation rates. Nevertheless, scattered measurements have shown that moderately high indoor radon concentrations (up to a few hundred Bq m⁻³) do occur regionally. Brazilian geology is very diverse and there are regions where an elevated geogenic radon potential exists or is expected to exist. Therefore, a Brazilian Radon Survey is expected to be a challenge, although it appears an important issue, given the rising concern of the public about the quality of its environment.

  5. Bayesian Prediction of Mean Indoor Radon Concentrations for Minnesota Counties

    SciTech Connect

    Price, P.N.; Nero, A.V.; Gelman, A.

    1995-08-01

    Past efforts to identify areas having higher than average indoor radon concentrations by examining the statistical relationship between local mean concentrations and physical parameters such as the soil radium concentration have been hampered by the noise in local means caused by the small number of homes monitored in some or most areas, In the present paper, indoor radon data from a survey in Minnesota are analyzed in such a way as to minimize the effect of finite sample size within counties, in order to determine the true county-to-county variation of indoor radon concentrations in the state and the extent to which this variation is explained by the variation in surficial radium concentration among counties, The analysis uses hierarchical modeling, in which some parameters of interest (such as county geometric mean (GM) radon concentrations) are assumed to be drawn from a single population, for which the distributional parameters are estimated from the data. Extensions of this technique, known as a random effects regression and mixed effects regression, are used to determine the relationship between predictive variables and indoor radon concentrations; the results are used to refine the predictions of each county's radon levels, resulting in a great decrease in uncertainty. The true county-to-county variation of GM radon levels is found to be substantially less than the county-to-county variation of the observed GMs, much of which is due to the small sample size in each county. The variation in the logarithm of surficial radium content is shown to explain approximately 80% of the variation of the logarithm of GM radon concentration among counties. The influences of housing and measurement factors, such as whether the monitored home has a basement and whether the measurement was made in a basement, are also discussed. This approach offers a self-consistent statistical method for predicting the mean values of indoor radon concentrations or other geographically

  6. Bayesian Prediction of Mean Indoor Radon Concentrations for Minnesota Counties

    SciTech Connect

    Price, P.N.; Nero, A.V.; Gelman, A.

    1996-02-01

    Past efforts to identify areas with higher than average indoor radon concentrations by examining the statistical relationship between local mean concentrations and physical parameters such as the soil radium concentration have been hampered by the variation in local means caused by the small number of homes monitored in most areas. In this paper, indoor radon data from a survey in Minnesota are analyzed to minimize the effect of finite sample size within counties, to determine the true county-to-county variation of indoor radon concentrations in the state, and to find the extent to which this variation is explained by the variation in surficial radium concentration among counties. The analysis uses hierarchical modeling, in which some parameters of interest (such as county geometric mean (GM) radon concentrations) are assumed to be drawn from a single population, for which the distributional parameters are estimated from the data. Extensions of this technique, known as a random effects regression and mixed effects regression, are used to determine the relationship between predictive variables and indoor radon concentrations; the results are used to refine the predictions of each county's radon levels, resulting in a great decrease in uncertainty. The true county-to-county variation of GM radon levels is found to be substantially less than the county-to-county variation of the observed GMs, much of which is due to the small sample size in each county. The variation in the logarithm of surficial radium content is shown to explain approximately 80% of the variation of the logarithm of GM radon concentration among counties. The influences of housing and measurement factors, such as whether the monitored home has a basement and whether the measurement was made in a basement, are also discussed. The statistical method can be used to predict mean radon concentrations, or applied to other geographically distributed environmental parameters.

  7. Field Investigation of the Surface-deposited Radon Progeny as a Possible Predictor of the Airborne Radon Progeny Dose Rate

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kainan; Steck, Daniel J.; Field, R. William

    2009-01-01

    The quantitative relationships between radon gas concentration, the surface-deposited activities of various radon progeny, the airborne radon progeny dose rate, and various residential environmental factors were investigated through actual field measurements in 38 selected Iowa houses occupied by either smokers or nonsmokers. Airborne dose rate was calculated from unattached and attached potential alpha energy concentrations (PAECs) using two dosimetric models with different activity-size weighting factors. These models are labeled Pdose and Jdose, respectively. Surface-deposited 218Po and 214Po were found significantly correlated to radon, unattached PAEC, and both airborne dose rates (p < 0.0001) in nonsmoking environments. However, deposited 218Po was not significantly correlated to the above parameters in smoking environments. In multiple linear regression analysis, natural logarithm transformation was performed for airborne dose rate as the dependent variable, as well as for radon and deposited 218Po and 214Po as predictors. An interaction effect was found between deposited 214Po and an obstacle in front of the Retrospective Reconstruction Detector (RRD) in predicting dose rate (p = 0.049 and 0.058 for Pdose and Jdose, respectively) for nonsmoking environments. After adjusting for radon and deposited radon progeny effects, the presence of either cooking, usage of a fireplace, or usage of a ceiling fan significantly, or marginal significantly, reduced the Pdose to 0.65 (90% CI 0.42–0.996), 0.54 (90% CI 0.28–1.02) and 0.66 (90% CI 0.45–0.96), respectively. For Jdose, only the usage of a ceiling fan significantly reduced the dose rate to 0.57 (90% CI 0.39–0.85). In smoking environments, deposited 218Po was a significant negative predictor for Pdose (RR 0.68, 90% CI 0.55–0.84) after adjusting for long-term 222Rn and environmental factors. A significant decrease of 0.72 (90% CI 0.64–0.83) in the mean Pdose was noted, after adjusting for the radon and

  8. Radon: a bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Lepman, S.R.; Boegel, M.L.; Hollowell, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, with the support of the Department of Energy, has developed a computerized database to manage research information in the area of building ventilation and indoor air quality. This literature survey contains references pertaining to the physical properties of radon and its daughters, instrumentation for their measurement, health effects, surveys and measurements, and regulatory information. The references in the bibliography are sequenced in alphabetical order and abstracts are included when supplied by the author. The objective of this report is to disseminate the bibliographic references compiled at the laboratory relating to radon research portion of the program. Interested database users are encouraged to contact the laboratory to receive instructions for direct database acess. A flyer describing the database is supplied at the end of the bibliography and a brief overview of the Radon Research porgram is given.

  9. Radon Research Program, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The scientific information being sought in this program encompasses research designed to determine radon availability and transport outdoors, modeling transport into and within buildings, physics and chemistry of radon and radon progeny, dose response relationships, lung cancer risk, and mechanisms of radon carcinogenesis. The main goal of the DOE/OHER Radon Research Program is to develop information to reduce these uncertainties and thereby provide an improved health risk estimate of exposure to radon and its progeny as well as to provide information useful in radon control strategies. Results generated under the Program were highlighted in a National Research Council report on radon dosimetry. The study concluded that the risk of radon exposure is 30% less in homes than in mines. This program summary of book describes the OHER FY-1991 Radon Research Program. It is the fifth in an annual series of program books designed to provide scientific and research information to the public and to other government agencies on the DOE Radon Research Program.

  10. Radon level and radon effective dose rate determination using SSNTDs in Sannur cave, Eastern desert of Egypt.

    PubMed

    Amin, Rafat M; Eissa, M F

    2008-08-01

    For the assessment of inhalation doses due to radon and its progeny to cavern workers and visitors, it is necessary to have information on the time integrated gas concentrations and equilibrium factors. Passive single cup dosimeters using solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) is the best suited for this purpose in wadi Sannur cave, Beni Suef, Egypt. The average radon concentration measurements for the cave are 836 +/- 150 Bq m(-3) by CR-39 detectors and for equilibrium factor an overall average of all measured values was used 0.687. The effective dose for cave workers is 3.65 mSv/year while for visitors is 23 muSv/year. Comparing these values to the Ionizing Radiation Regulations (IRR) values which indicate that the estimated effective doses for workers and visitors in this cave are less than the average overall radon dose.

  11. The effectiveness of mitigation for reducing radon risk in single-family Minnesota homes.

    PubMed

    Steck, Daniel J

    2012-09-01

    Increased lung cancer incidence has been linked with long-term exposure to elevated residential radon. Experimental studies have shown that soil ventilation can be effective in reducing radon concentrations in single-family homes. Most radon mitigation systems in the U.S. are installed by private contractors. The long-term effectiveness of these systems is not well known, since few state radon programs regulate or independently confirm post-mitigation radon concentrations. The effectiveness of soil ventilation systems in Minnesota was measured for 140 randomly selected clients of six professional mitigators. Homeowners reported pre-mitigation radon screening concentrations that averaged 380 Bq m (10.3 pCi L). Long term post-mitigation radon measurements on the two lowest floors show that, even years after mitigation, 97% of these homes have concentrations below the 150 Bq m U.S. Environmental Protection Agency action level. The average post-mitigation radon in the houses was 30 Bq m, an average observed reduction of >90%. If that reduction was maintained over the lifetime of the 1.2 million Minnesotans who currently reside in single-family homes with living space radon above the EPA action level, approximately 50,000 lives could be extended for nearly two decades by preventing radon-related lung cancers.

  12. Measurements of radon concentrations in waters and soil gas of Zonguldak, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Koray, Abdullah; Akkaya, Gizem; Kahraman, Ayşegül; Kaynak, Gökay

    2014-12-01

    The radon concentrations in soil-gas and water samples (in the form of springs, catchment, tap, thermal) used as drinking water or thermal were measured using a professional radon monitor AlphaGUARD PQ 2000PRO. The measured radon concentrations in water samples ranged from 0.32 to 88.22 Bq l(-1). Most of radon levels in potable water samples are below the maximum contaminant level of 11 Bq l(-1) recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The calculated annual effective doses due to radon intake through water consumption varied from 0.07 to 18.53 µSv y(-1). The radon concentrations in soil gas varied from 295.67 to 70 852.92 Bq m(-3). The radon level in soil gas was found to be higher in the area close to the formation boundary thrust and faults. No correlation was observed between radon concentrations in groundwater and soil gas. Also, no significant correlation was observed between soil-gas radon and temperature, pressure and humidity. The emanation of radon from groundwater and soil gas is controlled by the geological formation and by the tectonic structure of the area. PMID:24287600

  13. Radon programmes and health marketing.

    PubMed

    Fojtikova, Ivana; Rovenska, Katerina

    2011-05-01

    Being aware of negative health effects of radon exposure, many countries aim for the reduction of the radon exposure of their population. The Czech radon programme was commenced >20 y ago. Since then experts have gathered a lot of knowledge, necessary legislation has been enacted, tens of thousands of inhabitants have been offered free measurement and subsidy for the mitigation. Despite the effort, the effectiveness of the radon programme seems to be poor. Newly built houses still exhibit elevated radon concentrations and the number of houses mitigated is very low. Is it possible to enhance the effectivity of radon programme while keeping it on a voluntary basis? One possible way is to employ health marketing that draws together traditional marketing theories and science-based strategies to prevention. The potential of using marketing principles in communication and delivery of radon information will be discussed. PMID:21498864

  14. Radon assay for SNO+

    SciTech Connect

    Rumleskie, Janet

    2015-12-31

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  15. Radon assay for SNO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumleskie, Janet

    2015-12-01

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  16. National radon measurement-proficiency program: Individual proficiency report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    In February 1986, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the Radon Measurement Proficiency (RMP) Program to assist the public in identifying organizations capable of providing reliable radon measurement services. In December 1991, EPA announced the new individual proficiency listing category in the RMP Program. Individuals applying for this new listing status must demonstrate knowledge of radon measurement fundamentals by passing a written proficiency examination, maintain affiliation with an RMP listed organization, and meet other program requirements. This report lists those individuals who have met the requirements of the RMP Program as of April 30, 1992. These requirements are designed to provide minimum proficiency criteria for individuals who provide radon measurement services on-site in a residential environment.

  17. What Teachers Should Know about Radon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bettis, Clifford; Throckmorton, Carl

    1991-01-01

    Attempts to clear up misunderstandings about radon and outlines information teachers can convey to their students. Includes a brief history of radon, health threats posed by radon, methods to measure radon quantities, homeowner risks and preventative actions, and a glossary of radon terms. (MDH)

  18. The cauliflower-like black crusts on sandstones: A natural passive sampler to evaluate the surrounding environmental pollution.

    PubMed

    Morillas, Héctor; Maguregui, Maite; García-Florentino, Cristina; Carrero, Jose Antonio; Salcedo, Isabel; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Black crust in buildings can be formed as a result of different kind of chemical and physical reactions between the stone surface and environmental factors (e.g. acid aerosols emitted to the atmosphere, airborne particulate matter, etc.). Moreover, biological colonizations can also be present on them. This kind of pathology is widely present in limestones, but fewer are the case study dealing with the characterization of black crusts on sandstones. In this work we present an innovative methodology based on the use of cauliflower-like black crusts formed on sandstone material as natural passive sampler to evaluate the environmental pollution related with the emission of natural (crustal particles and marine aerosol particles) and metallic elements in the airborne particulate matter from the surrounding atmosphere. To illustrate its usefulness, different cauliflower-like black crusts growing in areas protected from the rain growing in an historical construction, La Galea Fortress, made up of sandstone and placed in the Abra Bay (Getxo, Basque Country, Spain) were characterized. This area suffers the anthropogenic emissions coming from the surrounding industry, traffic, sea port, and the natural ones coming from the surrounding marine atmosphere. The applied analytical methodology began with a previous elemental in situ screening in order to evaluate and compare the presence of the metals trapped in black crusts from different orientations using a hand-held energy dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence spectrometer. After this preliminary study, samples of black crusts were taken in order to characterize them in the laboratory using molecular techniques (Raman spectroscopy and XRD) and elemental techniques (ICP-MS, SEM-EDS and micro energy dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence). With the last two elemental techniques, imaging analyses were performed at different lateral resolutions in order to observe the distribution of the metals and other kind of particles trapped in the black

  19. The cauliflower-like black crusts on sandstones: A natural passive sampler to evaluate the surrounding environmental pollution.

    PubMed

    Morillas, Héctor; Maguregui, Maite; García-Florentino, Cristina; Carrero, Jose Antonio; Salcedo, Isabel; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Black crust in buildings can be formed as a result of different kind of chemical and physical reactions between the stone surface and environmental factors (e.g. acid aerosols emitted to the atmosphere, airborne particulate matter, etc.). Moreover, biological colonizations can also be present on them. This kind of pathology is widely present in limestones, but fewer are the case study dealing with the characterization of black crusts on sandstones. In this work we present an innovative methodology based on the use of cauliflower-like black crusts formed on sandstone material as natural passive sampler to evaluate the environmental pollution related with the emission of natural (crustal particles and marine aerosol particles) and metallic elements in the airborne particulate matter from the surrounding atmosphere. To illustrate its usefulness, different cauliflower-like black crusts growing in areas protected from the rain growing in an historical construction, La Galea Fortress, made up of sandstone and placed in the Abra Bay (Getxo, Basque Country, Spain) were characterized. This area suffers the anthropogenic emissions coming from the surrounding industry, traffic, sea port, and the natural ones coming from the surrounding marine atmosphere. The applied analytical methodology began with a previous elemental in situ screening in order to evaluate and compare the presence of the metals trapped in black crusts from different orientations using a hand-held energy dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence spectrometer. After this preliminary study, samples of black crusts were taken in order to characterize them in the laboratory using molecular techniques (Raman spectroscopy and XRD) and elemental techniques (ICP-MS, SEM-EDS and micro energy dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence). With the last two elemental techniques, imaging analyses were performed at different lateral resolutions in order to observe the distribution of the metals and other kind of particles trapped in the black

  20. Residential radon and lung cancer in never smokers. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Torres-Durán, María; Barros-Dios, Juan Miguel; Fernández-Villar, Alberto; Ruano-Ravina, Alberto

    2014-04-01

    Radon exposure is considered the second cause of lung cancer and the first in never smokers. We aim to assess the effect of residential radon exposure on the risk of lung cancer in never smokers through a systematic review applying predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. 14 Studies were included. Some of them point to a relationship between residential radon and lung cancer while others show no association. Further studies are necessary to test this association and to assess if other risk factors such as environmental tobacco smoke could modify the effect of residential radon exposure on lung cancer.

  1. Analysis of volatile phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1992-12-31

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The .experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at three depths in the shallow soil column; barometric pressure, rainfall and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis of the data sets has shown that the gas phase radon activities under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been demonstrated.

  2. Analysis of volatile phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The .experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at three depths in the shallow soil column; barometric pressure, rainfall and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis of the data sets has shown that the gas phase radon activities under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been demonstrated.

  3. Radon in the Workplace: the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Ionizing Radiation Standard.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Robert K

    2016-10-01

    On 29 December 1970, the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 established the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). This article on OSHA, Title 29, Part 1910.1096 Ionizing Radiation standard was written to increase awareness of the employer, the workforce, state and federal governments, and those in the radon industry who perform radon testing and radon mitigation of the existence of these regulations, particularly the radon relevant aspect of the regulations. This review paper was also written to try to explain what can sometimes be complicated regulations. As the author works within the Radon Division of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Radiation Protection, the exclusive focus of the article is on radon. The 1910.1096 standard obviously covers many other aspects of radiation and radiation safety in the work place. PMID:27575350

  4. Radon in the Workplace: the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Ionizing Radiation Standard.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Robert K

    2016-10-01

    On 29 December 1970, the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 established the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). This article on OSHA, Title 29, Part 1910.1096 Ionizing Radiation standard was written to increase awareness of the employer, the workforce, state and federal governments, and those in the radon industry who perform radon testing and radon mitigation of the existence of these regulations, particularly the radon relevant aspect of the regulations. This review paper was also written to try to explain what can sometimes be complicated regulations. As the author works within the Radon Division of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Radiation Protection, the exclusive focus of the article is on radon. The 1910.1096 standard obviously covers many other aspects of radiation and radiation safety in the work place.

  5. Contribution of radon and radon daughters to respiratory cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.; Samet, J.M.; Cross, F.T.; Hess, T.; Muller, J.; Thomas, D.

    1986-12-01

    This article reviews studies on the contribution of radon and radon daughters to respiratory cancer and proposes recommendations for further research, particularly a national radon survey. The steady-state outdoor radon concentration averages 200 pCi/m3, and indoor levels are about 4 times higher. The primary source of radon in homes is the underlying soil; entry depends on multiple variables and reduced ventilation for energy conservation increases indoor radon levels. Occupational exposures are expressed in units of radon daughter potential energy concentration or working level (WL). Cumulative exposure is the product of the working level and the time exposed. The unit for cumulative exposure is the working level month (WLM). The occupational standard for radon exposure is 4 WLM/year, and 2 WLM/year has been suggested as a guideline for remedial action in homes. Epidemiologic studies show that miners with cumulative radon daughter exposures somewhat below 100 WLM have excess lung cancer mortality. Some 3% to 8% of miners studied have developed lung cancer attributable to radon daughters. All of the underground mining studies show an increased risk of lung cancer with radon daughter exposure. All cell types of lung cancer increased with radon exposure. If radon and smoking act in a multiplicative manner, then the risk for smokers could be 10 times that for nonsmokers. The potential risk of lung cancer appears to be between 1 and 2 per 10,000/WLM, which yields a significant number of lung cancers as some 220 million persons in the United States are exposed on average to 10 to 20 WLM/lifetime.

  6. Contribution of radon and radon daughters to respiratory cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Harley, N; Samet, J M; Cross, F T; Hess, T; Muller, J; Thomas, D

    1986-01-01

    This article reviews studies on the contribution of radon and radon daughters to respiratory cancer and proposes recommendations for further research, particularly a national radon survey. The steady-state outdoor radon concentration averages 200 pCi/m3, and indoor levels are about 4 times higher. The primary source of radon in homes is the underlying soil; entry depends on multiple variables and reduced ventilation for energy conservation increases indoor radon levels. Occupational exposures are expressed in units of radon daughter potential energy concentration or working level (WL). Cumulative exposure is the product of the working level and the time exposed. The unit for cumulative exposure is the working level month (WLM). The occupational standard for radon exposure is 4 WLM/year, and 2 WLM/year has been suggested as a guideline for remedial action in homes. Epidemiologic studies show that miners with cumulative radon daughter exposures somewhat below 100 WLM have excess lung cancer mortality. Some 3% to 8% of miners studied have developed lung cancer attributable to radon daughters. All of the underground mining studies show an increased risk of lung cancer with radon daughter exposure. All cell types of lung cancer increased with radon exposure. If radon and smoking act in a multiplicative manner, then the risk for smokers could be 10 times that for nonsmokers. The potential risk of lung cancer appears to be between 1 and 2 per 10,000/WLM, which yields a significant number of lung cancers as some 220 million persons in the United States are exposed on average to 10 to 20 WLM/lifetime. PMID:3830103

  7. Radon exposure at a radioactive waste storage facility.

    PubMed

    Manocchi, F H; Campos, M P; Dellamano, J C; Silva, G M

    2014-06-01

    The Waste Management Department of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN) is responsible for the safety management of the waste generated at all internal research centers and that of other waste producers such as industry, medical facilities, and universities in Brazil. These waste materials, after treatment, are placed in an interim storage facility. Among them are (226)Ra needles used in radiotherapy, siliceous cake arising from conversion processes, and several other classes of waste from the nuclear fuel cycle, which contain Ra-226 producing (222)Rn gas daughter.In order to estimate the effective dose for workers due to radon inhalation, the radon concentration at the storage facility has been assessed within this study. Radon measurements have been carried out through the passive method with solid-state nuclear track detectors (CR-39) over a period of nine months, changing detectors every month in order to determine the long-term average levels of indoor radon concentrations. The radon concentration results, covering the period from June 2012 to March 2013, varied from 0.55 ± 0.05 to 5.19 ± 0.45 kBq m(-3). The effective dose due to (222)Rn inhalation was further assessed following ICRP Publication 65.

  8. Radon exposure at a radioactive waste storage facility.

    PubMed

    Manocchi, F H; Campos, M P; Dellamano, J C; Silva, G M

    2014-06-01

    The Waste Management Department of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN) is responsible for the safety management of the waste generated at all internal research centers and that of other waste producers such as industry, medical facilities, and universities in Brazil. These waste materials, after treatment, are placed in an interim storage facility. Among them are (226)Ra needles used in radiotherapy, siliceous cake arising from conversion processes, and several other classes of waste from the nuclear fuel cycle, which contain Ra-226 producing (222)Rn gas daughter.In order to estimate the effective dose for workers due to radon inhalation, the radon concentration at the storage facility has been assessed within this study. Radon measurements have been carried out through the passive method with solid-state nuclear track detectors (CR-39) over a period of nine months, changing detectors every month in order to determine the long-term average levels of indoor radon concentrations. The radon concentration results, covering the period from June 2012 to March 2013, varied from 0.55 ± 0.05 to 5.19 ± 0.45 kBq m(-3). The effective dose due to (222)Rn inhalation was further assessed following ICRP Publication 65. PMID:24705248

  9. Mapping geogenic radon potential by regression kriging.

    PubMed

    Pásztor, László; Szabó, Katalin Zsuzsanna; Szatmári, Gábor; Laborczi, Annamária; Horváth, Ákos

    2016-02-15

    Radon ((222)Rn) gas is produced in the radioactive decay chain of uranium ((238)U) which is an element that is naturally present in soils. Radon is transported mainly by diffusion and convection mechanisms through the soil depending mainly on the physical and meteorological parameters of the soil and can enter and accumulate in buildings. Health risks originating from indoor radon concentration can be attributed to natural factors and is characterized by geogenic radon potential (GRP). Identification of areas with high health risks require spatial modeling, that is, mapping of radon risk. In addition to geology and meteorology, physical soil properties play a significant role in the determination of GRP. In order to compile a reliable GRP map for a model area in Central-Hungary, spatial auxiliary information representing GRP forming environmental factors were taken into account to support the spatial inference of the locally measured GRP values. Since the number of measured sites was limited, efficient spatial prediction methodologies were searched for to construct a reliable map for a larger area. Regression kriging (RK) was applied for the interpolation using spatially exhaustive auxiliary data on soil, geology, topography, land use and climate. RK divides the spatial inference into two parts. Firstly, the deterministic component of the target variable is determined by a regression model. The residuals of the multiple linear regression analysis represent the spatially varying but dependent stochastic component, which are interpolated by kriging. The final map is the sum of the two component predictions. Overall accuracy of the map was tested by Leave-One-Out Cross-Validation. Furthermore the spatial reliability of the resultant map is also estimated by the calculation of the 90% prediction interval of the local prediction values. The applicability of the applied method as well as that of the map is discussed briefly. PMID:26706761

  10. Mapping geogenic radon potential by regression kriging.

    PubMed

    Pásztor, László; Szabó, Katalin Zsuzsanna; Szatmári, Gábor; Laborczi, Annamária; Horváth, Ákos

    2016-02-15

    Radon ((222)Rn) gas is produced in the radioactive decay chain of uranium ((238)U) which is an element that is naturally present in soils. Radon is transported mainly by diffusion and convection mechanisms through the soil depending mainly on the physical and meteorological parameters of the soil and can enter and accumulate in buildings. Health risks originating from indoor radon concentration can be attributed to natural factors and is characterized by geogenic radon potential (GRP). Identification of areas with high health risks require spatial modeling, that is, mapping of radon risk. In addition to geology and meteorology, physical soil properties play a significant role in the determination of GRP. In order to compile a reliable GRP map for a model area in Central-Hungary, spatial auxiliary information representing GRP forming environmental factors were taken into account to support the spatial inference of the locally measured GRP values. Since the number of measured sites was limited, efficient spatial prediction methodologies were searched for to construct a reliable map for a larger area. Regression kriging (RK) was applied for the interpolation using spatially exhaustive auxiliary data on soil, geology, topography, land use and climate. RK divides the spatial inference into two parts. Firstly, the deterministic component of the target variable is determined by a regression model. The residuals of the multiple linear regression analysis represent the spatially varying but dependent stochastic component, which are interpolated by kriging. The final map is the sum of the two component predictions. Overall accuracy of the map was tested by Leave-One-Out Cross-Validation. Furthermore the spatial reliability of the resultant map is also estimated by the calculation of the 90% prediction interval of the local prediction values. The applicability of the applied method as well as that of the map is discussed briefly.

  11. Predictors of Indoor Radon Concentrations in Pennsylvania, 1989–2013

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Joan A.; Ogburn, Elizabeth L.; Rasmussen, Sara G.; Irving, Jennifer K.; Pollak, Jonathan; Locke, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Radon is the second-leading cause of lung cancer worldwide. Most indoor exposure occurs by diffusion of soil gas. Radon is also found in well water, natural gas, and ambient air. Pennsylvania has high indoor radon concentrations; buildings are often tested during real estate transactions, with results reported to the Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP). Objectives We evaluated predictors of indoor radon concentrations. Methods Using first-floor and basement indoor radon results reported to the PADEP between 1987 and 2013, we evaluated associations of radon concentrations (natural log transformed) with geology, water source, building characteristics, season, weather, community socioeconomic status, community type, and unconventional natural gas development measures based on drilled and producing wells. Results Primary analysis included 866,735 first measurements by building, with the large majority from homes. The geologic rock layer on which the building sat was strongly associated with radon concentration (e.g., Axemann Formation, median = 365 Bq/m3, IQR = 167–679 vs. Stockton Formation, median = 93 Bq/m3, IQR = 52–178). In adjusted analysis, buildings using well water had 21% higher concentrations (β = 0.191, 95% CI: 0.184, 0.198). Buildings in cities (vs. townships) had lower concentrations (β = –0.323, 95% CI: –0.333, –0.314). When we included multiple tests per building, concentrations declined with repeated measurements over time. Between 2005 and 2013, 7,469 unconventional wells were drilled in Pennsylvania. Basement radon concentrations fluctuated between 1987 and 2003, but began an upward trend from 2004 to 2012 in all county categories (p < 0.001), with higher levels in counties having ≥ 100 drilled wells versus counties with none, and with highest levels in the Reading Prong. Conclusions Geologic unit, well water, community, weather, and unconventional natural gas development were associated with indoor radon

  12. A REVIEW OF RADON MITIGATION IN LARGE BUILDINGS IN THE US

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Protection Agency of the US carried out its initial research on radon mitigation in houses, both existing and new. A review of this work is presented in another paper at this workshop. Four years ago, this work was expanded to include the study of radon in schoo...

  13. A Citizen's Guide to Radon. What It Is and What To Do about It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) are concerned about the increased risk of developing lung cancer faced by persons exposed to above-average levels of radon in their homes. The purpose of this pamphlet is to help readers to understand the radon problem and decide if they need to take…

  14. Environmental Health Topics from A to Z

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Lead Mercury Mold Nanomaterials Ozone Perfluorinated Chemicals Pesticides Radon Soy Infant Formula Styrene Water Pollution Environmental ... Occupational Health Ozone Parkinson's Disease Perfluorinated Chemicals (PFCs) Pesticides Radon Reproductive Health Soy Infant Formula Styrene Toxicology ...

  15. Predicting indoor radon-222 concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, M.H.

    1994-12-31

    Radon, a cause of lung cancer among miners, is being investigated as a source of lung cancer in the general population due to long-term low-level exposures in residences. Assessment of cumulative residential radon exposure entails measurements in past residences, some of which no longer exist or are not accessible. Estimates of radon concentrations in these missing homes are necessary for analysis of the radon-lung cancer association. Various approaches have been used by researchers attempting to predict the distribution of radon measurements in homes from specified geological and building characteristics. This study has modelled the set of basement radon measurements of 3788 Connecticut homes with several of these approaches, in addition to a descriptive tree method not previously utilized, and compared their validity on a random subset of homes not used in model construction. Each geographical and geological variable was more predictive of radon concentration than any of the housing characteristics. The single variable which explained the largest fraction of the variability in radon readings was the mean radon concentration for the zipcode area in which the house was located (R{sup 2} = .157). Soil characteristics at individual housing sites were not available for these analyses. They would be expected to increase the predictive power of the models. Multiple regression models, both additive and multiplicative, were not able to explain more than 22% of the variation in radon readings. Variables found to be significant in these models were zipcode mean, residential radon mean of bedrock unit, building age, type of foundation walls, type of water supply, aeroradioactivity reading, and lithology of the bedrock. A site potential index, based upon a classification of the bedrock underlying the house, was a better predictor of indoor radon level than other single geological variables, yet only explained 8% of the radon variability.

  16. RESIDENTIAL RADON RESISTANT CONSTRUCTION FEATURE SELECTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a proposed residential radon resistant construction feature selection system. The features consist of engineered barriers to reduce radon entry and accumulation indoors. The proposed Florida standards require radon resistant features in proportion to regional...

  17. RADON AND PROGENY SOURCED DOSE ASSESSMENT OF SPA EMPLOYEES IN BALNEOLOGICAL SITES.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Sefa Kemal; Demiröz, Işık

    2016-09-01

    This study was conducted in the scope of IAEA project with the name 'Establishing a Systematic Radioactivity Survey and Total Effective Dose Assessment in Natural Balneological Sites' (TUR/9/018), at the Health Physics department of Sarayköy Nuclear Research and Training Center (SANAEM). The aim of this study is estimation of radon and progeny sourced effective dose for the people who are working at the spa facilities by measuring radon activity concentration (RAC) at the ambient air of indoor spa pools and dressing rooms. As it is known, the source of the radon gas is the radium content of the earth crust. Therefore, thermal waters coming from ground may contain dissolved radon and the radon can diffuse water to air. So the ambient air of spa pools can contain serious RAC that depends on a lot of parameters. In this regard, RAC measurements were executed at the 70 spa facilities in Turkey. The measurements were done with both active and passive methods at ambient air of spa pools and dressing rooms. Thus, active measurements were carried out by using the Alphaguard(®) with diffusion mode during half an hour, and passive measurements were carried out by using the humidity resistive CR-39 radon detectors during 2 months. Results show that RAC values at ambient air of spa pools varies between 13 Bq m(-3) and 10 kBq m(-3) Because long-term measurements are more reliable, if it is available, for dose calculations passive radon measurements (with CR-39 detectors) at ambient air of spa pools and dressing rooms were used, otherwise active measurement results were used. With the measurement by the conversion coefficients of ICRP 65 and occupational data of the employees has got from questionary forms, effective dose values were calculated. According to the calculations, spa employees are exposed to annual average dose between 0.05 and 29 mSv because of radon and progeny.

  18. RADON AND PROGENY SOURCED DOSE ASSESSMENT OF SPA EMPLOYEES IN BALNEOLOGICAL SITES.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Sefa Kemal; Demiröz, Işık

    2016-09-01

    This study was conducted in the scope of IAEA project with the name 'Establishing a Systematic Radioactivity Survey and Total Effective Dose Assessment in Natural Balneological Sites' (TUR/9/018), at the Health Physics department of Sarayköy Nuclear Research and Training Center (SANAEM). The aim of this study is estimation of radon and progeny sourced effective dose for the people who are working at the spa facilities by measuring radon activity concentration (RAC) at the ambient air of indoor spa pools and dressing rooms. As it is known, the source of the radon gas is the radium content of the earth crust. Therefore, thermal waters coming from ground may contain dissolved radon and the radon can diffuse water to air. So the ambient air of spa pools can contain serious RAC that depends on a lot of parameters. In this regard, RAC measurements were executed at the 70 spa facilities in Turkey. The measurements were done with both active and passive methods at ambient air of spa pools and dressing rooms. Thus, active measurements were carried out by using the Alphaguard(®) with diffusion mode during half an hour, and passive measurements were carried out by using the humidity resistive CR-39 radon detectors during 2 months. Results show that RAC values at ambient air of spa pools varies between 13 Bq m(-3) and 10 kBq m(-3) Because long-term measurements are more reliable, if it is available, for dose calculations passive radon measurements (with CR-39 detectors) at ambient air of spa pools and dressing rooms were used, otherwise active measurement results were used. With the measurement by the conversion coefficients of ICRP 65 and occupational data of the employees has got from questionary forms, effective dose values were calculated. According to the calculations, spa employees are exposed to annual average dose between 0.05 and 29 mSv because of radon and progeny. PMID:26424134

  19. Radon mapping - Santa Barbara and Ventura counties

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, R.

    1997-11-01

    Since 1990, the Department of Conservation`s Division of Mines and Geology (DMG) has provided geologic information and conducted several research projects on geology and radon for the California Department of Health Services (DHS) Radon Program. This article provides a brief overview of radon`s occurrence and impact on human health, and summarizes a recent DMG project for DHS that used geologic, geochemical, and indoor radon measurement data to produce detailed radon potential zone maps for Santa Barbara and Ventura counties.

  20. Indoor Radon Concentration Levels in Najran Region, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyami, S. H.; Al-Ghamdi, S. S.; Baig, M. R.; Al-Garawi, M. S.

    2010-07-01

    Measurement of indoor radon concentration was performed in Najran region in the south west of Saudi Arabia, using CR-39 dosimeter. Despite many previous studies on indoor radon concentrations in Saudi Arabia, the data available are still limited. The objective of this study, which is the first of its kind in the region, is to have preliminary data of radon in this region. Such measurement will contribute towards further studies in this region of Saudi Arabia. The indoor radon concentration was measured in the villages of Fara Al-Jabal and Badr Al-Janoob (about 2000 m above sea level), Hadadah and Al-Khanig (about 1700 m above sea level). It was found that radon distribution in these villages is normal skewed to the right, with a range of 9±5 to 163±32 Bqm-3 and an average of 49±2 Bqm-3. It was also found that the average radon concentration is independent of altitude. Our findings show that the values are below the safe limit of 150 Bqm-3 set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of the USA

  1. NRC committee provides new risk estimates for exposure to radon

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    A new set of age-specific estimates describing the increased risk of lung cancer following exposure to radon was released in January by a National Research Council committee. The revised estimates result from new statistical techniques used to analyze previously collected data. In a study jointly sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the committee concluded that lifetime exposure to one working level month (WLM) of radon per year, a standard measure used by radiation experts, increases an individual's chances of dying from lung cancer by 1.5 times compared with someone exposed only to background levels of radon. The committee estimated that, for every 1 million people exposed over a lifetime to one WLM of radon, about 350 additional deaths would occur due to lung cancer. The committee found that lung cancer risks associated with radon increased with increasing length of exposure. Moreover, it said that 15 years after exposure to radon has ended, the risk of lung cancer from the exposure declines to half the original risk.

  2. Indoor Radon Concentration Levels in Najran Region, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Alyami, S. H.; Al-Ghamdi, S. S.; Baig, M. R.; Al-Garawi, M.S.

    2010-07-07

    Measurement of indoor radon concentration was performed in Najran region in the south west of Saudi Arabia, using CR-39 dosimeter. Despite many previous studies on indoor radon concentrations in Saudi Arabia, the data available are still limited. The objective of this study, which is the first of its kind in the region, is to have preliminary data of radon in this region. Such measurement will contribute towards further studies in this region of Saudi Arabia. The indoor radon concentration was measured in the villages of Fara Al-Jabal and Badr Al-Janoob (about 2000 m above sea level), Hadadah and Al-Khanig (about 1700 m above sea level). It was found that radon distribution in these villages is normal skewed to the right, with a range of 9{+-}5 to 163{+-}32 Bqm{sup -3} and an average of 49{+-}2 Bqm{sup -3}. It was also found that the average radon concentration is independent of altitude. Our findings show that the values are below the safe limit of 150 Bqm{sup -3} set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of the USA

  3. Compact anti-radon facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fajt, L.; Kouba, P.; Mamedov, F.; Smolek, K.; Štekl, I.

    2015-08-17

    Suppression of radon background is one of main tasks in ultra-low background experiments. The most promising technique for suppression of radon is its adsorption on charcoal. Within the frame of the NEMO-3 experiment, radon trapping facility (RTF) was installed in Modane underground laboratory in 2004. Based on long-term experience with this facility a new compact transportable anti-radon facility was constructed in cooperation among IEAP CTU, SÚRO and ATEKO company. The device provides 20m{sup 3}/h of purified air (air radon activity at the output ∼10mBq/m{sup 3}). The basic features and preliminary results of anti-radon device testing are presented.

  4. Radon mapping strategies in Austria.

    PubMed

    Gruber, V; Ringer, W; Wurm, G; Friedmann, H

    2015-11-01

    According to current European and international recommendations (e.g. by IAEA, WHO and European Union), countries shall identify high radon areas. In Austria, this task was initiated already in the early 1990s, which yielded the first Austrian Radon Potential Map. This map is still in use, updated with recent indoor radon data in 2012. The map is based on radon gas measurements in randomly selected dwellings, normalised to a standard situation. To meet the current (legal) requirements, uncertainties in the existing Austrian radon map should be reduced. A new indoor radon survey with a different sampling strategy was started, and possible mapping methods are studied and tested. In this paper, the methodology for the existing map as well as the planned strategies to improve this map is discussed.

  5. Lung cancer in never-smokers: a case-control study in a radon-prone area (Galicia, Spain).

    PubMed

    Torres-Durán, María; Ruano-Ravina, Alberto; Parente-Lamelas, Isaura; Leiro-Fernández, Virginia; Abal-Arca, José; Montero-Martínez, Carmen; Pena-Álvarez, Carolina; González-Barcala, Francisco Javier; Castro-Añón, Olalla; Golpe-Gómez, Antonio; Martínez, Cristina; Mejuto-Martí, María José; Fernández-Villar, Alberto; Barros-Dios, Juan Miguel

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effect of residential radon exposure on the risk of lung cancer in never-smokers and to ascertain if environmental tobacco smoke modifies the effect of residential radon. We designed a multicentre hospital-based case-control study in a radon-prone area (Galicia, Spain). All participants were never-smokers. Cases had an anatomopathologically confirmed primary lung cancer and controls were recruited from individuals undergoing minor, non-oncological surgery. Residential radon was measured using alpha track detectors. We included 521 individuals, 192 cases and 329 controls, 21% were males. We observed an odds ratio of 2.42 (95% CI 1.45-4.06) for individuals exposed to ≥200 Bq·m(-3) compared with those exposed to <100 Bq·m(-3). Environmental tobacco smoke exposure at home increased lung cancer risk in individuals with radon exposure>200 Bq·m(-3). Individuals exposed to environmental tobacco smoke and to radon concentrations>200 Bq·m(-3) had higher lung cancer risk than those exposed to lower radon concentrations and exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Residential radon increases lung cancer risk in never-smokers. An association between residential radon exposure and environmental tobacco smoke on the risk of lung cancer might exist.

  6. Residential radon and lung cancer incidence in a Danish cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Braeuner, Elvira V.; Andersen, Claus E.; Sorensen, Mette; Jovanovic Andersen, Zorana; Gravesen, Peter; Ulbak, Kaare; Hertel, Ole; Pedersen, Camilla; Overvad, Kim; Tjonneland, Anne; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2012-10-15

    High-level occupational radon exposure is an established risk factor for lung cancer. We assessed the long-term association between residential radon and lung cancer risk using a prospective Danish cohort using 57,053 persons recruited during 1993-1997. We followed each cohort member for cancer occurrence until 27 June 2006, identifying 589 lung cancer cases. We traced residential addresses from 1 January 1971 until 27 June 2006 and calculated radon at each of these addresses using information from central databases regarding geology and house construction. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for lung cancer risk associated with residential radon exposure with and without adjustment for sex, smoking variables, education, socio-economic status, occupation, body mass index, air pollution and consumption of fruit and alcohol. Potential effect modification by sex, traffic-related air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke was assessed. Median estimated radon was 35.8 Bq/m{sup 3}. The adjusted IRR for lung cancer was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.69-1.56) in association with a 100 Bq/m{sup 3} higher radon concentration and 1.67 (95% CI: 0.69-4.04) among non-smokers. We found no evidence of effect modification. We find a positive association between radon and lung cancer risk consistent with previous studies but the role of chance cannot be excluded as these associations were not statistically significant. Our results provide valuable information at the low-level radon dose range.

  7. Residential radon and lung cancer incidence in a Danish cohort.

    PubMed

    Bräuner, Elvira V; Andersen, Claus E; Sørensen, Mette; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Gravesen, Peter; Ulbak, Kaare; Hertel, Ole; Pedersen, Camilla; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2012-10-01

    High-level occupational radon exposure is an established risk factor for lung cancer. We assessed the long-term association between residential radon and lung cancer risk using a prospective Danish cohort using 57,053 persons recruited during 1993-1997. We followed each cohort member for cancer occurrence until 27 June 2006, identifying 589 lung cancer cases. We traced residential addresses from 1 January 1971 until 27 June 2006 and calculated radon at each of these addresses using information from central databases regarding geology and house construction. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for lung cancer risk associated with residential radon exposure with and without adjustment for sex, smoking variables, education, socio-economic status, occupation, body mass index, air pollution and consumption of fruit and alcohol. Potential effect modification by sex, traffic-related air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke was assessed. Median estimated radon was 35.8 Bq/m(3). The adjusted IRR for lung cancer was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.69-1.56) in association with a 100 Bq/m(3) higher radon concentration and 1.67 (95% CI: 0.69-4.04) among non-smokers. We found no evidence of effect modification. We find a positive association between radon and lung cancer risk consistent with previous studies but the role of chance cannot be excluded as these associations were not statistically significant. Our results provide valuable information at the low-level radon dose range.

  8. (Mutagenicity of radon and radon daughters)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The current objective of our research is to investigate the dose-response relationship of the lethal and mutagenic effects of exposure of cells to radon and its decay products. Dose-rate dependence will be studied, as well as the nature of the DNA lesions. The effect of DNA repair on the lethal and mutagenic effects of exposure and on the character of the DNA lesions will be investigated by comparing the response of L5178Y strains which differ in their ability to rejoin X radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. This report discusses progress incurred from 4/1/1988--10/1/1990. 5 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Domestic and personal determinants of the contamination of individuals by household radon daughters

    SciTech Connect

    Stebbings, J.H.; Kardatzke, D.R.; Toohey, R.E.; Essling, M.E.; Pagnamenta, A.

    1986-01-01

    Radon daughters were counted by gamma spectroscopy from 180 adult residents of eastern Pennsylvania during the winter of 1983-84. Body radon daughter contamination is an index of relative individual respiratory exposures to radon daughters. These can be related to household radon levels, and to personal risk factors such as sex and tobacco smoking. Over 75% of this Pennsylvania population appeared to have environmentally enhanced radon daughter contamination; 59% had counting rates greater than 2 s.d. above background. House radon levels were the major determinants of radon daughters contamination in the 112 subjects for which both sets of measurements were available (p<.001). Both sex (<.02) and cigarette smoking (p<.005) were found to significantly modify that relationship, after nonlinear adjustment for travel times. Using a logarithmic model, for a given radon level body contamination by radon daughters in females was 2-3.5x higher than in males. Nonsmokers had 2-4x higher levels of contamination than smokers. For female nonsmokers relative to male smokers (which in general corresponds to the population of major concern relative to the population from which risk estimates have been derived), the excesses multiply. These results are for total contamination, both internal and external.

  10. Fractal and Chaos Analysis for Dynamics of Radon Exhalation from Uranium Mill Tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongmei; Tan, Wanyu; Tan, Kaixuan; Liu, Zehua; Xie, Yanshi

    2016-08-01

    Tailings from mining and milling of uranium ores potentially are large volumes of low-level radioactive materials. A typical environmental problem associated with uranium tailings is radon exhalation, which can significantly pose risks to environment and human health. In order to reduce these risks, it is essential to study the dynamical nature and underlying mechanism of radon exhalation from uranium mill tailings. This motivates the conduction of this study, which is based on the fractal and chaotic methods (e.g. calculating the Hurst exponent, Lyapunov exponent and correlation dimension) and laboratory experiments of the radon exhalation rates. The experimental results show that the radon exhalation rate from uranium mill tailings is highly oscillated. In addition, the nonlinear analyses of the time series of radon exhalation rate demonstrate the following points: (1) the value of Hurst exponent much larger than 0.5 indicates non-random behavior of the radon time series; (2) the positive Lyapunov exponent and non-integer correlation dimension of the time series imply that the radon exhalation from uranium tailings is a chaotic dynamical process; (3) the required minimum number of variables should be five to describe the time evolution of radon exhalation. Therefore, it can be concluded that the internal factors, including heterogeneous distribution of radium, and randomness of radium decay, as well as the fractal characteristics of the tailings, can result in the chaotic evolution of radon exhalation from the tailings.

  11. 2014 ICHLNRRA intercomparison of radon/thoron gas and radon short-lived decay products measuring instruments in the NRPI Prague.

    PubMed

    Jílek, K; Timková, J

    2015-06-01

    During the Eighth International Conference on High Levels of Natural Radiation and Radon Areas held in autumn 2014 at Prague, the third intercomparison of radon/thoron gas and radon short-lived decay products measurement instruments was organised by and held at the Natural Radiation Division of the National Radiation Protection Institute (NRPI; SÚRO v.v.i.) in Prague. The intercomparison was newly focussed also on continuous monitors with active sampling adapters capable to distinguish radon/thoron gas in their mix field.The results of radon gas measurements carried out in the big NRPI radon chamber indicated very well an average deviation of up to 5 % from the reference NRPI value for 80 % of all the exposed instruments. The results of equilibrium equivalent concentration continuous monitors indicated an average deviation of up to 5 % from the reference NRPI value for 40 % of all the exposed instruments and their ~8-10 % shift compared with the NRPI. The results of investigated ambient conditions upon response of exposed continuous monitors indicated influence of aerosol changes upon response of radon monitors with an active air sampling adapters through the filter, only. The exposures of both radon/thoron gas discriminative continuous monitors and passive detectors have been indicated inconsistent results: on one hand, their excellent agreement up to several per cent for both the gases, and on the other hand, systematic unsatisfactory differences up to 40 %. Additional radon/thoron exercises are recommended to improve both the instruments themselves and quality of their operators.

  12. Radon Treatment Controversy

    PubMed Central

    Zdrojewicz, Zygmunt; Strzelczyk, Jadwiga (Jodi)

    2006-01-01

    In spite of long traditions, treatments utilizing radon-rich air or water have not been unequivocally embraced by modern medicine. The objective of this work is to examine factors that contribute to this continuing controversy. While the exact mechanism of radon's effect on human body is not completely understood, recent advances in radiobiology offer new insights into biochemical processes occurring at low-level exposures to ionizing radiation. Medical evidence and patients' testimonials regarding effectiveness of radon spa treatments of various ailments, most notably rheumatoid arthritis are accumulating worldwide. They challenge the premise of the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) theory that the dose-effect response is the same per unit dose regardless of the total dose. Historically, such inference overshadowed scientific inquiries into the low-dose region and lead to a popular belief that no amount of radiation can be good. Fortunately, the LNT theory, which lacks any scientific basis, did not remain unchallenged. As the reviewed literature suggests, a paradigm shift, reflected in the consideration of hormetic effects at low-doses, is gaining momentum in the scientific community worldwide. The impetus comes from significant evidence of adaptive and stimulatory effects of low-levels of radiation on human immune system. PMID:18648641

  13. Anti-radon coating for mitigating indoor radon concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Grace W. W.; Tang, Y. H.; Tam, C. M.; Gao, X. F.

    Sufficient data has proven that radon and its decay products are the principal noso-genesis to lung and other related cancers. To reduce and control the effects of radon pollution, standards to limit indoor radon concentration have been issued in China and other countries or regions. To echo this, an anti-radon coating has been studied and developed with partial funding support from the Innovation and Technology Fund of the Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. The coating had been experimented in a newly constructed building where the recorded maximum and average hourly background radon concentrations were recorded at 130,000 Bq m -3 and 100,000 Bq m -3 respectively under a concealed condition. The experimental results from application of the coating have shown an anti-radon efficiency of up to 99.85%, which decreases the indoor radon background concentration down to a safe level in a 72-h measurement. The coating still remains in a good condition currently and effective in anti-radon three years after the application.

  14. Radon in indoor concentrations and indoor concentrations of metal dust particles in museums and other public buildings.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, G L; Braz, D; de Jesus, E F; Santos, S M; Cardoso, K; Hecht, A A; Dias da Cunha, Moore K

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the public and occupational exposure to radon and metal-bearing particles in museums and public buildings located in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. For this study, four buildings were selected: two historic buildings, which currently house an art gallery and an art museum; and two modern buildings, a chapel and a club. Integrated radon concentration measurements were performed using passive radon detectors with solid state nuclear track detector-type Lexan used as nuclear track detector. Air samplers with a cyclone were used to collect the airborne particle samples that were analyzed by the particle-induced X-ray emission technique. The average unattached-radon concentrations in indoor air in the buildings were above 40 Bq/m(3), with the exception of Building D as measured in 2009. The average radon concentrations in indoor air in the four buildings in 2009 were below the recommended reference level by World Health Organization (100 Bq/m(3)); however, in 2011, the average concentrations of radon in Buildings A and C were above this level, though lower than 300 Bq/m(3). The average concentrations of unattached radon were lower than 148 Bq/m(3) (4pCi/L), the USEPA level recommended to take action to reduce the concentrations of radon in indoor air. The unattached-radon average concentrations were also lower than the value recommended by the European Union for new houses. As the unattached-radon concentrations were below the international level recommended to take action to reduce the radon concentration in air, it was concluded that during the period of sampling, there was low risk to human health due to the inhalation of unattached radon in these four buildings.

  15. Long- and short-term indoor radon survey in the Ardea municipality, south Rome.

    PubMed

    Franci, Daniele; Aureli, Tommaso

    2014-12-01

    The indoor radon concentration was measured in 16 schools and 6 public departments in the Ardea municipality, using both active and passive detectors. The annual concentration of radon has been determined as the mean of two consecutive 6-month periods of sampling from January 2012 to January 2013. The indoor radon level measured in the monitored buildings ranged from 17 to 918 Bq·m(-3), with a mean value of 154 Bq·m(-3). In addition, the correlation between short-term and long-term measurements was studied. Experimental data demonstrate that the deviation of short-term measurements with respect to polyallyl diglycol carbonate data does not exceed ±40 % in a very extended range of radon concentrations.

  16. Lung cancer mortality and radon concentration in a chronically exposed neighborhood in Chihuahua, Mexico: a geospatial analysis.

    PubMed

    Hinojosa de la Garza, Octavio R; Sanín, Luz H; Montero Cabrera, María Elena; Serrano Ramirez, Korina Ivette; Martínez Meyer, Enrique; Reyes Cortés, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This study correlated lung cancer (LC) mortality with statistical data obtained from government public databases. In order to asses a relationship between LC deaths and radon accumulation in dwellings, indoor radon concentrations were measured with passive detectors randomly distributed in Chihuahua City. Kriging (K) and Inverse-Distance Weighting (IDW) spatial interpolations were carried out. Deaths were georeferenced and Moran's I correlation coefficients were calculated. The mean values (over n = 171) of the interpolation of radon concentrations of deceased's dwellings were 247.8 and 217.1 Bq/m(3), for K and IDW, respectively. Through the Moran's I values obtained, correspondingly equal to 0.56 and 0.61, it was evident that LC mortality was directly associated with locations with high levels of radon, considering a stable population for more than 25 years, suggesting spatial clustering of LC deaths due to indoor radon concentrations.

  17. Lung Cancer Mortality and Radon Concentration in a Chronically Exposed Neighborhood in Chihuahua, Mexico: A Geospatial Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hinojosa de la Garza, Octavio R.; Sanín, Luz H.; Montero Cabrera, María Elena; Serrano Ramirez, Korina Ivette; Martínez Meyer, Enrique; Reyes Cortés, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This study correlated lung cancer (LC) mortality with statistical data obtained from government public databases. In order to asses a relationship between LC deaths and radon accumulation in dwellings, indoor radon concentrations were measured with passive detectors randomly distributed in Chihuahua City. Kriging (K) and Inverse-Distance Weighting (IDW) spatial interpolations were carried out. Deaths were georeferenced and Moran's I correlation coefficients were calculated. The mean values (over n = 171) of the interpolation of radon concentrations of deceased's dwellings were 247.8 and 217.1 Bq/m3, for K and IDW, respectively. Through the Moran's I values obtained, correspondingly equal to 0.56 and 0.61, it was evident that LC mortality was directly associated with locations with high levels of radon, considering a stable population for more than 25 years, suggesting spatial clustering of LC deaths due to indoor radon concentrations. PMID:25165752

  18. Map showing radon potential of rocks and soils in Montgomery County, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gundersen, L.C.; Reimer, G.M.; Wiggs, C.R.; Rice, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes the radon potential of Montgomery County in the context of its geology. Radon is a naturally occurring gas produced by the radioactive decay of uranium. Radon produced by uraniferous rocks and soils may enter a house through porous building materials and through openings in walls and floors. Radon gases has a tendency to move from the higher pressure commonly existing in the soil to the lower pressure commonly existing in the house. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA, 1986a) estimates that elevated levels of indoor radon may be associated with 5,000 to 20,000 of the 130,000 lung cancer deaths per year. They also estimate that 8 to 12 percent of the homes in the United States will have annual average indoor radon levels exceeding 4 picoCuries per liter of air (pCi/L). Above this level, the U.S. EPA recommends homeowners take remedial action. May factors control the amount of radon which may enter a home from the geologic environment. Soil drainage, permeability, and moisture content effect the amount of radon that can be released from rocks and soils (known as the emmanation) and may limit or increase how far it can migrate. Well drained, highly permeable soils facilitate the movement of radon. Soils with water content in the 8 to 15 percent range enhance the emmanation of radon (Lindmark, 1985). Daily and seasonal variations in soil and indoor radon can be caused by meteorologic factors such as barometric pressure, temperature, and wind (Clements and Wilkening, 1974; Schery and other, 1984). Construction practices also inhibit or promote entry of radon into the home (U.S. EPA, 1986b). In general, however, geology controls the source and distribution of radon (Akerblom and Wilson, 1982; Gundersen and others, 1987, 1988; Sextro and others, 1987; U.S. EPA, 1983; Peake, 1988; Peake and Hess, 1988). The following sections describe: 1) the methods used to measure radon and equivalent uranium (eU) in soil; 2) the radon potential

  19. RADON MITIGATION STUDIES: NASHVILLE DEMONSTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an EPA radon mitigation demonstration project involving 14 houses in the Nashville, TN, area with indoor radon levels of 5.6-47.6 pCi/L, using a variety of techniques, designed to be the most cost effective methods possible to implement, and yet adequa...

  20. APPLICATION OF RADON REDUCTION METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document is intended to aid homeowners and contractors in diagnosing and solving indoor radon problems. It will also be useful to State and Federal regulatory officials and many other persons who provide advice on the selection, design and operation of radon reduction methods...

  1. National Radon Database. Volume 4. The EPA/state residential radon surveys: CA, HI, ID, LA, NE, NV, NC, OK, SC, the Navajo Nation, and the Billings, MT IHS Area 1989-1990 (5 1/4 inch, 1. 2mb) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The National Radon Database (NRDB) was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to distribute information in two recent radon surveys: the EPA/State Residential Radon Surveys and the National Residential Radon Survey. The National Residential Radon Surveys collected annual average radon measurements on all levels of approximately 5,700 homes nationwide. Information collected during survey includes a detailed questionnaire on house characteristics, as well as radon measurements. The radon survey data for Volume 6 is contained on two diskettes. The data diskettes are accompanied by comprehensive documentation on the design and implementation of the survey, the development and use of sampling weights, a summary of survey results, and information concerning the household questionnaire.

  2. National Radon Database. Volume 4. The EPA/state residential radon survey: CA, HI, ID, LA, NE, NV, NC, OK, SC, the Navajo Nation, and the Billings, MT IHS Area 1989-1990 (3 1/2 inch, 1. 44mb) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The National Radon Database (NRDB) was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to distribute information in two recent radon surveys: the EPA/State Residential Radon Surveys and the National Residential Radon Survey. The National Residential Radon Surveys collected annual average radon measurements on all levels of approximately 5,700 homes nationwide. Information collected during survey includes a detailed questionnaire on house characteristics, as well as radon measurements. The radon survey data for Volume 6 is contained on two diskettes. The data diskettes are accompanied by comprehensive documentation on the design and implementation of the survey, the development and use of sampling weights, a summary of survey results, and information concerning the household questionnaire.

  3. Application of decision trees to the analysis of soil radon data for earthquake prediction.

    PubMed

    Zmazek, B; Todorovski, L; Dzeroski, S; Vaupotic, J; Kobal, I

    2003-06-01

    Different regression methods have been used to predict radon concentration in soil gas on the basis of environmental data, i.e. barometric pressure, soil temperature, air temperature and rainfall. Analyses of the radon data from three stations in the Krsko basin, Slovenia, have shown that model trees outperform other regression methods. A model has been built which predicts radon concentration with a correlation of 0.8, provided it is influenced only by the environmental parameters. In periods with seismic activity this correlation is much lower. This decrease in predictive accuracy appears 1-7 days before earthquakes with local magnitude 0.8-3.3.

  4. Radon reduction systems in the construction of new houses in Gainesville, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Najafi, F.T.

    1998-11-01

    High radon level exposures increase human risk of lung cancer. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the effectiveness of applying the Enkavent mat method and the suction pit method; as tested by a University of Florida research team; to reduce radon entry in new houses built in the city of Gainesville and the surrounding Alachua County area in Florida. Both of these passive techniques include placement of a barrier under the concrete floor slab right on top of the soil at the new building sites. Passive and active techniques applied in the construction of new houses reduced radon levels to below the minimum requirements of 148 Bq m{sup {minus}3} (4 pCi L{sup {minus}1}). The mitigation systems investigated in this research were adopted by the Florida Legislature to become part of the new building construction code in Florida.

  5. Environmental monitoring of selected pesticides and organic chemicals in urban stormwater recycling systems using passive sampling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Declan; Miotliński, Konrad; Gonzalez, Dennis; Barry, Karen; Dillon, Peter; Gallen, Christie

    2014-03-01

    Water recycling via aquifers has become a valuable tool to augment urban water supplies in many countries. This study reports the first use of passive samplers for monitoring of organic micropollutants in Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR). Five different configurations of passive samplers were deployed in a stormwater treatment wetland, groundwater monitoring wells and a recovery tank to capture a range of polar and non-polar micropollutants present in the system. The passive samplers were analysed for a suite of pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other chemicals. As a result, 17 pesticides and pesticide degradation products, 5 PAHs and 8 other organic chemicals including flame retardants and fragrances were detected in urban stormwater recharging Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) and an Aquifer Storage Transfer and Recovery (ASTR) system. Of the pesticides detected, diuron, metolachlor and chlorpyrifos were generally detected at the highest concentrations in one or more passive samplers, whereas chlorpyrifos, diuron, metolachlor, simazine, galaxolide and triallate were detected in multiple samplers. Fluorene was the PAH detected at the highest concentration and the flame retardant Tris(1-chloro-2-propyl)phosphate was the chemical detected in the greatest abundance at all sites. The passive samplers showed different efficiencies for capture of micropollutants with the Empore disc samplers giving the most reliable results. The results indicate generally low levels of organic micropollutants in the stormwater, as the contaminants detected were present at very low ng/L levels, generally two to four orders of magnitude below the drinking water guidelines (NHMRC, 2011). The efficiency of attenuation of these organic micropollutants during MAR was difficult to determine due to variations in the source water concentrations. Comparisons were made between different samplers, to give a field-based calibration where existing lab-based calibrations were

  6. Environmental monitoring of selected pesticides and organic chemicals in urban stormwater recycling systems using passive sampling techniques.

    PubMed

    Page, Declan; Miotliński, Konrad; Gonzalez, Dennis; Barry, Karen; Dillon, Peter; Gallen, Christie

    2014-03-01

    Water recycling via aquifers has become a valuable tool to augment urban water supplies in many countries. This study reports the first use of passive samplers for monitoring of organic micropollutants in Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR). Five different configurations of passive samplers were deployed in a stormwater treatment wetland, groundwater monitoring wells and a recovery tank to capture a range of polar and non-polar micropollutants present in the system. The passive samplers were analysed for a suite of pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other chemicals. As a result, 17 pesticides and pesticide degradation products, 5 PAHs and 8 other organic chemicals including flame retardants and fragrances were detected in urban stormwater recharging Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) and an Aquifer Storage Transfer and Recovery (ASTR) system. Of the pesticides detected, diuron, metolachlor and chlorpyrifos were generally detected at the highest concentrations in one or more passive samplers, whereas chlorpyrifos, diuron, metolachlor, simazine, galaxolide and triallate were detected in multiple samplers. Fluorene was the PAH detected at the highest concentration and the flame retardant Tris(1-chloro-2-propyl)phosphate was the chemical detected in the greatest abundance at all sites. The passive samplers showed different efficiencies for capture of micropollutants with the Empore disc samplers giving the most reliable results. The results indicate generally low levels of organic micropollutants in the stormwater, as the contaminants detected were present at very low ng/L levels, generally two to four orders of magnitude below the drinking water guidelines (NHMRC, 2011). The efficiency of attenuation of these organic micropollutants during MAR was difficult to determine due to variations in the source water concentrations. Comparisons were made between different samplers, to give a field-based calibration where existing lab-based calibrations were

  7. Threshold for Radon-Induced Lung Cancer From Inhaled Plutonium Data.

    PubMed

    Cuttler, Jerry M; Sanders, Charles L

    2015-01-01

    Cohen's lung cancer mortality data, from his test of the LNT theory, do not extend to the no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL) above which inhaled radon decay products begin to induce excess lung cancer mortality. Since there is concern about the level of radon in homes, it is important to set the radon limit near the NOAEL to avoid the risk of losing a health benefit. Assuming that dogs model humans, data from a study on inhaled plutonium dioxide particulates in dogs were assessed, and the NOAEL for radon-induced lung tumors was estimated to be about 2100 Bq/m(3). The US Environmental Protection Agency should consider raising its radon action level from 150 to at least 1000 Bq/m(3).

  8. Threshold for Radon-Induced Lung Cancer From Inhaled Plutonium Data

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Cohen’s lung cancer mortality data, from his test of the LNT theory, do not extend to the no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL) above which inhaled radon decay products begin to induce excess lung cancer mortality. Since there is concern about the level of radon in homes, it is important to set the radon limit near the NOAEL to avoid the risk of losing a health benefit. Assuming that dogs model humans, data from a study on inhaled plutonium dioxide particulates in dogs were assessed, and the NOAEL for radon-induced lung tumors was estimated to be about 2100 Bq/m3. The US Environmental Protection Agency should consider raising its radon action level from 150 to at least 1000 Bq/m3. PMID:26740812

  9. Identification of tidal and climatic influences within domestic radon time-series from Northamptonshire, UK.

    PubMed

    Groves-Kirkby, C J; Denman, A R; Crockett, R G M; Phillips, P S; Gillmore, G K

    2006-08-15

    Analysis of data from extended radon concentration time-series obtained from domestic and public-sector premises in the vicinity of Northampton, UK, and elsewhere, confirms that, in addition to the generally recognised climatic influences, 'Earth Tides' and 'Ocean Tidal Loading' drive periodic radon liberation via geophysically driven groundwater level variations. Regression and cross-correlation with environmental parameters showed some degree of association between radon concentration and mean temperature and rainfall. Fourier analysis of radon time-series identified periodicities of the order of 23.9 h (luni-solar diurnal, K(1)), 24.0 h (solar day, S(1)), 168 h (1 week) and 661.3 h (lunar month, M(m)), while cross-correlation with tidal strength demonstrated periodicity of the order of 14 days (lunar-solar fortnight, M(f)). These results suggest that astronomical influences, including tides, play a part in controlling radon release from the soil. PMID:16406058

  10. 40 CFR 700.41 - Radon user fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Radon user fees. 700.41 Section 700.41 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT GENERAL... Toxic Substances Control Act appear at 40 CFR part 195....

  11. RADON REMOVAL TECHNIQUES FOR SMALL COMMUNITY PUBLIC WATER SUPPLIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents the results of an evaluation, performed by the University of New Hampshire--Environmental Research Group (ERG), of radon removal in small community water supplies using full-scale granular activated carbon adsorption, diffused bubble aeration and packed tower ...

  12. Lung cancer and exposure to radon in women - New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenberg, J.B.; Klotz, J.B.; Wilcox, H.B.; Gel-del-Real, M.; Stemhagen, A. ); Nicholls, G.P. )

    1989-11-17

    In 1985, the New Jersey State Department of Health (NJDOH) initiated an epidemiologic study of lung cancer and exposure to radon in New Jersey women. In collaboration with the New Jersey State Department of Environmental Protection and the National Cancer Institute, NJDOH examined whether exposure to radon in homes is associated with increased lung cancer risk. This study was based on a previous statewide case-control study of risk for lung cancer. The data indicated that year-round exposures in living areas were two to five times lower than basement measurements taken during heating season. The difference increased with higher concentrations.

  13. Standardization of radon measurements. 2. Accuracy and proficiency testing

    SciTech Connect

    Matuszek, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    The accuracy of in situ environmental radon measurement techniques is reviewed and new data for charcoal canister, alpha-track (track-etch) and electret detectors are presented. Deficiencies reported at the 1987 meeting in Wurenlingen, Federal Republic of Germany, for measurements using charcoal detectors are confirmed by the new results. Accuracy and precision of the alpha-track measurements laboratory were better than in 1987. Electret detectors appear to provide a convenient, accurate, and precise system for the measurement of radon concentration. The need for a comprehensive, blind proficiency-testing programs is discussed.

  14. H. R. 5138: This Act may be cited as the Radon Measurement Proficiency Act. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session, June 21, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    A bill was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives to direct the Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to conduct radon measurement proficiency research and to establish a mandatory radon measurement proficiency program. The purpose of the research will be to assess the ability of measuring methods and protocols to accurately assess exposure to radon progeny.

  15. Wind-induced contaminant transport in near-surface soils with application to radon entry into buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, W J

    1996-05-01

    Indoor air exposures to gaseous contaminants originating in soil can cause large human health risks. To predict and control these exposures, the mechanisms that affect vapor transport in near-surface soils need to be understood. In particular, radon exposure is a concern since average indoor radon concentrations lead to much higher risks than are generally accepted for exposure to other environmental contaminants. This dissertation examines an important component of the indoor radon problem: the impacts of wind on soil-gas and radon transport and entry into buildings. The research includes experimental and modeling studies of wind`s interactions with a building`s superstructure and the resulting soil-gas and radon flows in the surrounding soil. In addition to exploring the effects of steady winds, a novel modeling technique is developed to examine the impacts of fluctuating winds on soil-gas and radon transport.

  16. Trkalian fields and Radon transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saygili, K.

    2010-03-01

    We write the spherical curl transformation for Trkalian fields using differential forms. Then we consider Radon transform of these fields. The Radon transform of a Trkalian field satisfies a corresponding eigenvalue equation on a sphere in transform space. The field can be reconstructed using knowledge of the Radon transform on a canonical hemisphere. We consider relation of the Radon transformation with Biot-Savart integral operator and discuss its transform introducing Radon-Biot-Savart operator. The Radon transform of a Trkalian field is an eigenvector of this operator. We also present an Ampere-law type relation for these fields. We apply these to Lundquist solution. We present a Chandrasekhar-Kendall-type solution of the corresponding equation in the transform space. Lastly, we focus on the Euclidean topologically massive Abelian gauge theory. The Radon transform of an anti-self-dual field is related by antipodal map on this sphere to the transform of the self-dual field obtained by inverting space coordinates. The Lundquist solution provides an example of quantization of topological mass in this context.

  17. Open charcoal chamber method for mass measurements of radon exhalation rate from soil surface.

    PubMed

    Tsapalov, Andrey; Kovler, Konstantin; Miklyaev, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Radon exhalation rate from the soil surface can serve as an important criterion in the evaluation of radon hazard of the land. Recently published international standard ISO 11665-7 (2012) is based on the accumulation of radon gas in a closed container. At the same time since 1998 in Russia, as a part of engineering and environmental studies for the construction, radon flux measurements are made using an open charcoal chamber for a sampling duration of 3-5 h. This method has a well-defined metrological justification and was tested in both favorable and unfavorable conditions. The article describes the characteristics of the method, as well as the means of sampling and measurement of the activity of radon absorbed. The results of the metrological study suggest that regardless of the sampling conditions (weather, the mechanism and rate of radon transport in the soil, soil properties and conditions), uncertainty of method does not exceed 20%, while the combined standard uncertainty of radon exhalation rate measured from the soil surface does not exceed 30%. The results of the daily measurements of radon exhalation rate from the soil surface at the experimental site during one year are reported. PMID:27132250

  18. Measurements of indoor radon concentrations in Chaiya and Tha Chana districts, Surat Thani province, Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titipornpun, K.; Titipornpun, A.; Sola, P.; Bhongsuwan, T.

    2015-05-01

    Chaiya and Tha Chana districts of Surat Thani province are located in the areas with high levels of equivalent uranium at the ground surface, which have been identified as sources of radon. A survey measurement of indoor radon concentrations was carried out in 248 houses, using CR-39 detectors in closed cups. The geometric mean of indoor radon concentrations in Chaiya and Tha Chana districts were 26 ± 2 Bq·m-3 and 30 ± 2 Bq·m-3, respectively. Although the minimum radon concentration was 4 Bq·m-3 in both locations, the maximum radon concentration was found to be 159 Bq·m-3 in Tha Chana district, while it was 88 Bq·m-3 in Chaiya district. The level of radon concentrations above the action level (148 Bq·m-3) recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency was only found in two houses, which accounted for 1% of the total buildings surveyed in this present study. The majority of houses, which accounted for 94% of the total buildings surveyed, showed the radon concentration below the action level. As these houses had access to air flow during the daytime through open doors and windows, it is likely that such ventilation was sufficient to keep radon at a low concentration.

  19. Soil-gas and indoor radon distribution related to geology in Frederick County, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Szarzi, S.L.; Reimer, G.M.; Been, J.M.

    1992-12-31

    Soil-gas radon concentrations vary in response to geologic controls in Frederick County, Maryland, and the variation leads to different radon availabilities for potential indoor accumulations. Quartzites, which form from the core of ridges and mountains of the southern and western part of the county, have a mean soil-gas radon concentration of 26 kBq m{sup -3} (700 pCi L{sup -1}). Phyllites, found in the Piedmont province in the eastern part of the county, have a mean soil-gas radon concentration of 59 kBq m{sup -3} (1600 pCi L{sup -1}). Many indoor radon measurements for homes in the southeast portion of the county, made by means of charcoal canisters, exceeded 1850 Bq m{sup -3} (50 pCi L{sup -1}). Homes built in areas where the soil-gas radon concentrations were greater than 75 kBq m{sup -3} (2000 pCi L{sup -1}) may have indoor radon concentrations that exceed 150 Bq m{sup -3} (4 pCi L{sup -1}), the current action level recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Data obtained in studies like ours throughout the United States are essential to identify {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes} which may produce elevated indoor radon levels of significant risk.

  20. Using radon risk to motivate smoking reduction: evaluation of written materials and brief telephone counselling

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, E.; Andrews, J.; Lee, M.; Glasgow, R.; Hampson, S.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Radon and cigarette smoking have synergistic effects on lung cancer, even when radon concentrations are relatively low. Working through an electric utility company, we sought to reach smoking households with low radon concentrations and motivate smoking cessation or prohibiting smoking in the home.
DESIGN—Eligible homes (n = 714) were randomised to receive: (1) the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) "A citizen's guide to radon"; (2) a specially developed pamphlet; or (3) that pamphlet plus brief telephone counselling.
PROCEDURE—Utility company "bill stuffers" offered free radon test kits to smoking households. All households received radon test results with an explanatory cover letter. Both the specially developed pamphlet and the telephone counselling emphasised that smoking cessation or prohibiting smoking in the home were the optimal risk reduction strategies. Households were followed up at 3 and 12 months after receiving materials.
RESULTS—The specially developed pamphlet and the EPA guide yielded similar outcomes. There was a non-significant trend for telephone counselling to produce greater sustained quitting than the specially developed pamphlet, and phone counselling led to significantly more new household smoking bans.
CONCLUSIONS—Working through a public utility company is an efficient way to reach smoking households, and brief telephone counselling is a promising method for promoting household smoking bans and cessation in homes alerted to the risk posed by the combination of radon and smoking.


Keywords: radon risk; smoking cessation; smoking bans; telephone counselling PMID:10982577

  1. The new social marketing challenge to promote radon testing.

    PubMed

    DiPofi, J A; LaTour, M S; Henthorne, T L

    2001-01-01

    As part of a project funded by the Environmental Protection Agency, exploratory qualitative analysis was conducted to gain insight into perceptions of the threat of radon in the Karst geological region (i.e., Northern Alabama, Central Tennessee, Central Kentucky). Based on health practitioner input, it was clear that the tenets of Protection Motivation Theory (PMT) and the probing afforded by focus group research would provide greatly needed theory-based insight into the public reactions (or lack thereof) to the threat posed by radon. Qualitative research findings of this project are discussed as well as preliminary recommendations are provided to advance the protection motivation theory research agenda for promoting awareness of the threat of radon and to influence appropriate response to that threat.

  2. [Radon exposition preliminary research in a Sicilian territory].

    PubMed

    Gioia, A; Signorello, M L; Allegri, D; Lombino, R L; Riballo, P G; Marrone, G; Allegri, F

    2007-01-01

    Radon toxicity on human body is well known from along (in 1988 radon has been classified as first type carcinogen, after only to tobacco's smoke, as cause of lung's cancer). Based on known scientific data, preliminary study has been conducted by the AA. It concerns radon exposition on inhabitants living in a Sicilian territory featured by previous seismic events: the territory and the town of Montevago. The project has been sponsored by ARPA Palermo. The territory of Montevago has been divided in several areas in order to assign detectors homogeneously, to begin the environmental sampling. In the period between May and October 2006, instruments has been calibrated and standardization of the procedure has been completed, in collaboration with Centro Studi Nucleare Enrico Fermi del Dipartimento di Ingegneria Nucleare del Politecnico di Milano. The values obtained result in European range.

  3. The history, development and the present status of the radon measurement programme in the United States of America.

    PubMed

    George, A C

    2015-11-01

    The US radon measurement programme began in the late 1950s by the US Public Health Service in Colorado, New Mexico and Utah during the uranium frenzy. After the 1967 Congressional Hearings on the working conditions in uranium mines, the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was asked to conduct studies in active uranium mines to assess the exposure of the miners on the Colorado Plateau and in New Mexico. From 1967 to 1972, the Health and Safety Laboratory of the US AEC in New York investigated more than 20 uranium mines for radon and radon decay product concentrations and particle size in 4 large uranium mines in New Mexico. In 1970, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was established and took over some of the AEC radon measurement activities. Between 1975 and 1978, the Environmental Measurements Laboratory of the US Department of Energy conducted the first detailed indoor radon survey in the USA. Later in 1984, the very high concentrations of radon found in Pennsylvania homes set the wheels in motion and gave birth to the US Radon Industry. The US EPA expanded its involvement in radon issues and assumed an active role by establishing the National Radon Proficiency Program to evaluate the effectiveness of radon measurement and mitigation methods. In 1998, due to limited resources EPA privatised the radon programme. This paper presents a personal perspective of past events and current status of the US radon programme. It will present an update on radon health effects, the incidence rate of lung cancer in the USA and the number of radon measurements made from 1988 to 2013 using short-term test methods. More than 23 million measurements were made in the last 25 y and as a result more than 1.24 million homes were mitigated successfully. It is estimated that <2 % of the radon measurements performed in the USA are made using long-term testing devices. The number of homes above the US action level of 148 Bq m(-3) (4 pCi l(-1)) may be ∼8.5 million because ∼50

  4. Passive Acoustic Monitoring of the Environmental Impact of Oil Exploration on Marine Mammals in the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sidorovskaia, Natalia A; Ackleh, Azmy S; Tiemann, Christopher O; Ma, Baoling; Ioup, Juliette W; Ioup, George E

    2016-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is a region densely populated by marine mammals that must adapt to living in a highly active industrial environment. This paper presents a new approach to quantifying the anthropogenic impact on the marine mammal population. The results for sperm and beaked whales of a case study of regional population dynamics trends after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, derived from passive acoustic-monitoring data gathered before and after the spill in the vicinity of the accident, are presented.

  5. Emanation of radon from household granite.

    PubMed

    Kitto, Michael E; Haines, Douglas K; Arauzo, Hernando Diaz

    2009-04-01

    Emanation of radon (222Rn) from granite used for countertops and mantels was measured with continuous and integrating radon monitors. Each of the 24 granite samples emitted a measurable amount of radon. Of the two analytical methods that utilized electret-based detectors, one measured the flux of radon from the granite surfaces, and the other one measured radon levels in a glass jar containing granite cores. Additional methods that were applied utilized alpha-scintillation cells and a continuous radon monitor. Measured radon flux from the granites ranged from 2 to 310 mBq m-2 s-1, with most granites emitting <20 mBq m-2 s-1. Emanation of radon from granites encapsulated in airtight containers produced equilibrium concentrations ranging from <0.01 to 11 Bq kg-1 when alpha-scintillation cells were used, and from <0.01 to 4.0 Bq kg-1 when the continuous radon monitor was used.

  6. Radon Policy in Finland, Achievements and Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Arvela, Hannu; Maekelaeinen, Ilona; Reisbacka, Heikki

    2008-08-07

    Finland is a country of high indoor radon concentrations. Since 1980 the authority regulations, guidance, radon mapping and research work supporting decision making have been developed continuously. Clear regulations directed to citizens and authorities form the basis for radon policy. Active mapping work and measurement ordered by private home owners has resulted in 100.000 houses measured. National indoor radon data base forms a good basis for decision making, communication and research. The number of new houses provided with radon preventive constructions has increased remarkably. New radon campaigns has increased measurement and mitigation activity. Furher increasing of public awareness is the key challenge.

  7. A comparative study of indoor radon concentrations between dwellings and schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapdan, E.; Altinsoy, N.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the relationship of radon concentrations between dwellings and the schools located in the same regions and to obtain related indoor average radon concentration dwelling-school correction factor for similar locations. The research has been carried out by determining indoor radon concentrations at schools and dwellings located at the same districts in the selected two separate research fields called The Former Adapazari region and The New Adapazari region in the city of Adapazari using a total of 81 Cr-39 passive radon detectors for 75 days. The average radon concentrations have been determined for the dwellings and the schools in 15 districts of the Former Adapazari region as 59.9 Bq m-3 and 57.1 Bq m-3, respectively. The results in 4 districts of the New Adapazari region were 63.5 Bq m-3 for the dwellings and 61.0 Bq m-3 for the schools. Moreover, the annual effective doses were calculated as 1.33 mSv/y and 1.41 mSv/y for the dwellings of Former Adapazari and New Adapazari, respectively. It was seen that the doses received in the dwellings are about four times the doses received in the schools. The indoor radon concentration dwelling-school correction factor was found to be 1.04±0.01 for the research area.

  8. 'Radon Concentration Survey in Inner Rooms from Deputy Chamber and National Congress-Brasilia/DF'

    SciTech Connect

    Nicoli, Ieda Gomes; Cardozo, Katia Maria; Azevedo Gouvea, Vandir de

    2008-08-07

    Radon gas has been monitored in many environments such as rural and urban houses, high natural radioactivity areas and underground mining regions. Nevertheless few data are reported in literature about studies in state buildings. So we get in touch with these buildings managers, where work the Deputy Chamber and the National Congress in Brasilia--DF, in order to obtain radon data in these state buildings, so representative for brazilian people. In order to make a preliminary scanning of radon concentration in these buildings, it was put in selected points, radon nuclear track passive detectors type SSNTD, specifically polycarbonate Lexan, which were exposed for periods from two to five months. Afterwards they were sent to Nuclear Engineering Institute in Rio de Janeiro for analysis of {sup 222}Rn contents. Derived values, whose average value was about 73 Bq/m{sup 3}, were all under maximum permissible limits for radon 200 Bq/m{sup 3}, established by International Comission on Radiological Protection--ICRP 65, for inner environments of houses and state buildings. This work has been coordinated by CNEN Office in Braselia with effective participation of Nuclear Engineering Institute from CNEN--RJ, that has worked since beginning of april 2004, supplying and analysing radon detectors.

  9. Measurement of radon potential from soil using a special method of sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosma, Constantin; Papp, Botond; Moldovan, Mircea; Cosma, Victor; Cindea, Ciprian; Suciu, Liviu; Apostu, Adelina

    2010-10-01

    Soil radon gas and/or its exhalation rate are used as indicators for some applications, such as uranium exploration, indoor radon concentration, seismic activity, location of subsurface faults, etc., and also in the studies where the main interest is the field verification of radon transport models. This work proposes a versatile method for the soil radon sampling using a special manner of pumping. The soil gas is passed through a column of charcoal by using passive pumping. A plastic bottle filled with water is coupled to an activated charcoal column and the flow of water through an adjustable hole made at the bottom of bottle assures a controlled gas flow from the soil. The results obtained for the activity of activated charcoal are in the range of 20-40 kBq/m3, for a depth of approximately 0.8 m. The results obtained by this method were confirmed by simultaneous measurements using LUK 3C device for soil radon measurements. Possible applications for the estimation of radon soil potential are discussed.

  10. Thoron detection with an active Radon exposure meter—First results

    SciTech Connect

    Irlinger, J. Wielunski, M.; Rühm, W.

    2014-02-15

    For state-of-the-art discrimination of Radon and Thoron several measurement techniques can be used, such as active sampling, electrostatic collection, delayed coincidence method, and alpha-particle-spectroscopy. However, most of the devices available are bulky and show high power consumption, rendering them unfeasible for personal exposition monitoring. Based on a Radon exposure meter previously realized at the Helmholtz Center Munich (HMGU), a new electronic prototype for Radon/Thoron monitoring is currently being developed, which features small size and weight. Operating with pin-diode detectors, the low-power passive-sampling device can be used for continuous concentration measurements, employing alpha-particle-spectroscopy and coincidence event registration to distinguish decays originating either from Radon or Thoron isotopes and their decay products. In open geometry, preliminary calibration measurements suggest that one count per hour is produced by a 11 Bq m{sup −3} Radon atmosphere or by a 15 Bq m{sup −3} Thoron atmosphere. Future efforts will concentrate on measurements in mixed Radon/Thoron atmospheres.

  11. Thoron detection with an active Radon exposure meter--first results.

    PubMed

    Irlinger, J; Wielunski, M; Rühm, W

    2014-02-01

    For state-of-the-art discrimination of Radon and Thoron several measurement techniques can be used, such as active sampling, electrostatic collection, delayed coincidence method, and alpha-particle-spectroscopy. However, most of the devices available are bulky and show high power consumption, rendering them unfeasible for personal exposition monitoring. Based on a Radon exposure meter previously realized at the Helmholtz Center Munich (HMGU), a new electronic prototype for Radon/Thoron monitoring is currently being developed, which features small size and weight. Operating with pin-diode detectors, the low-power passive-sampling device can be used for continuous concentration measurements, employing alpha-particle-spectroscopy and coincidence event registration to distinguish decays originating either from Radon or Thoron isotopes and their decay products. In open geometry, preliminary calibration measurements suggest that one count per hour is produced by a 11 Bq m(-3) Radon atmosphere or by a 15 Bq m(-3) Thoron atmosphere. Future efforts will concentrate on measurements in mixed Radon/Thoron atmospheres. PMID:24593342

  12. Map showing radon potential of rocks and soils in Fairfax County, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otton, James K.; Schumann, R. Randall; Owen, Douglass E.; Thurman, Nelson; Duval, Joseph S.

    1988-01-01

    Since 1984, indoor radon has gained national attention as a significant health hazard in the United States. Radon is a colorless, odorless, radioactive gas derived from uranium by radioactive decay. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) now projects that 5,000 to 20,000 lung-cancer deaths per year may be attributed to the long-term exposure to indoor radon and its radioactive decay products. Indoor radon has been previously recognized as a health hazard associated with uranium-bearing mill tailings or building materials, but it was not until December 1984 that some natural soils and rocks were found to be sources of indoor radon at levels comparable to those in uranium mines. It is now suspected that elevated indoor radon levels are far more widespread than initially though. The EPA considers 4 picoCuries of radon per liter of air (pCi/L) as the level (in a year-round measurement) at which actions ought to be taken to lower the concentration of indoor radon. All soils and rocks contain measurable amounts of uranium, which generate measurable amounts of radon. Certain soils and rocks, however, have a greater potential to cause indoor radon problems than others because (1) they have a higher uranium content and thus can generate higher levels of radon in soil gas (gas that occupies the pores of the soil), and (2) the permeability of the sol or rack is sufficiently high that radon-bearing soil gas can flow freely and move indoors through the foundation of the structure. This study was designed to demonstrate the correlation between the geologic environment and indoor radon levels and to demonstrate a method of assessment that could be used by other informed workers in areas of their interest. A parallel study by Gundersen and others (1988) of the radon potential of rocks and soils in Montgomery County, Md., used somewhat different methods of assessment because the data available for and assessment of Montgomery County differed.

  13. Passive Acoustic Monitoring of the Environmental Impact of Oil Exploration on Marine Mammals in the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sidorovskaia, Natalia A; Ackleh, Azmy S; Tiemann, Christopher O; Ma, Baoling; Ioup, Juliette W; Ioup, George E

    2016-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is a region densely populated by marine mammals that must adapt to living in a highly active industrial environment. This paper presents a new approach to quantifying the anthropogenic impact on the marine mammal population. The results for sperm and beaked whales of a case study of regional population dynamics trends after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, derived from passive acoustic-monitoring data gathered before and after the spill in the vicinity of the accident, are presented. PMID:26611062

  14. Analysis of volatile-phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at depth; barometric pressure, rainfall, and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature, and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been observed. 25 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Radon testing behavior in a sample of individuals with high home radon screening measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.W.; Kross, B.C.; Vust, L.J. )

    1993-08-01

    Although radon exposure has been identified as the second leading cause of lung cancer, fewer than 6% of US homeowners test their homes for radon. This report examines participants' follow-up radon testing behavior subsequent to receiving an initial screening radon level greater than 20 pCi/L. Sixty-two participants in the Iowa State-Wide Rural Radon Screening Survey who had radon screening measurements over 20 pCi/L were questioned by phone survey 3 months after receipt of their radon screening result to assess: whether participants were aware of radon's health risk; if participants recalled the radon screening results; how participants perceived the relative health risk of radon and whether participants planned follow-up radon testing. Only 19% of the respondents specifically identified lung cancer as the possible adverse health outcome of high radon exposure, and the majority of participants underestimated the health risks high radon levels pose when compared to cigarettes and x-rays. In addition, less than one third (29%) of the participants actually remembered their radon screening level within 10 pCi/L 3 months after receiving their screening results. Only 53% of the individuals correctly interpreted their screening radon level as being in the high range, and only 39% of the participants planned follow-up radon measurements. Receipt of radon screening test results indicating high radon levels was not an adequate motivational factor in itself to stimulate further radon assessment or mitigation. The findings suggest that free radon screening will not result in a dramatic increase in subsequent homeowner initiated remediation or further recommended radon testing. 13 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  16. RADON REDUCTION AND RADON-RESISTANT CONSTRUCTION DEMONSTRATIONS IN NEW YORK - VOLUME 1: TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of radon reduction and radon-resistant construction demonstrations in New York. The existing house evaluation demonstrated radon mitigation techniques where indoor radon concentrations exceeded 4 pCi/L. Results demonstrated that sealing all accessible fou...

  17. A study of the influence of a gravel subslab layer on radon entry rate using two basement structures

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, A.L.; Sextro, R.G.; Fisk, W.J.; Garbesi, K.; Wooley, J.; Wollenberg, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    In buildings with elevated radon concentrations, the dominant transport mechanism of radon is advective flow of soil gas into the building substructure. However, the building-soil system is often complex, making detailed studies of the radon source term difficult. In order to examine radon entry into buildings, the authors have constructed two room-size, precisely-fabricated basement structures at a site with relatively homogeneous, moderately permeable soil. The basements are identical except that one lies directly on native soil whereas the other lies on a high permeability aggregate layer. The soil pressure field and radon entry rate have been measured for different basement pressures and environmental conditions. The subslab gravel layer greatly enhances the advective entry of radon into the structure; when the structures are depressurized, the radon entry rate into the structure with the subslab gravel layer is more than a factor of 3 times the radon entry rate into the other structure for the same depressurization. The gravel subslab layer also spreads the pressure field around the structure, extending the field of influence of the structure and the region from which it draws radon.

  18. Developing geologic tools for finding very high indoor radon, examples from the midwestern and eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Gundersen, L.C.S.; Schumann, R.R.

    1995-12-31

    A three-year study of the Geologic Radon Potential of the United States was recently released by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These geologic radon potential assessments were made using 5 types of data: 1. building architecture; 2. aerial radiometric surveys; 3. soil characteristics, 4. indoor radon; and 5. geology. These estimates predict the land`s potential to produce radon. Building upon the knowledge gained in this national study of geologic radon potential, the USGS is cooperating with the Department of Energy, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and the EPA to develop a quantitative methodology for assessing the percentage of hmes (as a function of area) that exceed > 20 pCi/L in the current housing stock of the United States. In this paper, we present and contrast the geologic radon potential of two areas of the United States where indoor radon occurrences greater than 20 pCi/L are not uncommon. The Central and Southern Appalachian Highlands are south of the limit of glaciation and bedrock geologic parameters statistically account for a significant amount of the variation seen in indoor radon. Geology, soil radon, and surface gamma radiation have been compared with indoor radon and regression analyses indicate high positive correlations (R<0.5 to 0.9). In glaciated areas such as the northern Appalachian Highlands and the Central Lowlands area of the midwestern United States, the correlation of bedrock geology to indoor radon is obscured. Our most recent investigations indicate that glacial deposit morphology and radionuclide residence in the source rock can be used successfully to predict the magnitude and variation of indoor radon.

  19. Epistemic assessment of radon level of offices in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, L. T.; Mui, K. W.; Law, K. Y.; Hui, P. S.

    People spend most of their life working indoors. Human exposure to various air pollutants changed its importance in nature from outdoor to indoor. As some of the pollutant sources basically originate from the building envelope that could not be removed or is costly to mitigate, the remaining questions are: how the indoor air quality (IAQ) is monitored and how the information could be used for the environmental control system to achieve the best air quality delivery. Indoor radon level could be measured with a number of sampling approaches and used to determine the acceptance of an IAQ with respect to certain exposure limits. In determining the acceptable IAQ of a space, this study proposes that the measured indoor radon level must be accompanied with the confidence levels of the assessment. Radon levels in Hong Kong offices were studied by a cross-sectional measurement in 216 typical offices and a year-round longitudinal measurement in one office. The results showed that 96.5% (94.0-99.0% at 95% confidence interval) and 98.6% (97.0% to >99.9% at 95% confidence interval) of the sampled offices would satisfy action radon levels of 150 and 200 Bq m -3, respectively. The same results were then used to quantify the prior knowledge on radon level distributions of an office and the probable errors of the adopted sampling schemes. This study proposes an epistemic approach, with the prior knowledge and a sample test result, to assess the acceptance against an action radon level of an office in Hong Kong. With the certainty of the test results determined for judgmental purposes, it is possible to apply the method to an office for follow-up tests of acceptance.

  20. Effects of Listening to Music versus Environmental Sounds in Passive and Active Situations on Levels of Pain and Fatigue in Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Mercadíe, Lolita; Mick, Gérard; Guétin, Stéphane; Bigand, Emmanuel

    2015-10-01

    In fibromyalgia, pain symptoms such as hyperalgesia and allodynia are associated with fatigue. Mechanisms underlying such symptoms can be modulated by listening to pleasant music. We expected that listening to music, because of its emotional impact, would have a greater modulating effect on the perception of pain and fatigue in patients with fibromyalgia than listening to nonmusical sounds. To investigate this hypothesis, we carried out a 4-week study in which patients with fibromyalgia listened to either preselected musical pieces or environmental sounds when they experienced pain in active (while carrying out a physical activity) or passive (at rest) situations. Concomitant changes of pain and fatigue levels were evaluated. When patients listened to music or environmental sounds at rest, pain and fatigue levels were significantly reduced after 20 minutes of listening, with no difference of effect magnitude between the two stimuli. This improvement persisted 10 minutes after the end of the listening session. In active situations, pain did not increase in presence of the two stimuli. Contrary to our expectations, music and environmental sounds produced a similar relieving effect on pain and fatigue, with no benefit gained by listening to pleasant music over environmental sounds.

  1. Effects of Listening to Music versus Environmental Sounds in Passive and Active Situations on Levels of Pain and Fatigue in Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Mercadíe, Lolita; Mick, Gérard; Guétin, Stéphane; Bigand, Emmanuel

    2015-10-01

    In fibromyalgia, pain symptoms such as hyperalgesia and allodynia are associated with fatigue. Mechanisms underlying such symptoms can be modulated by listening to pleasant music. We expected that listening to music, because of its emotional impact, would have a greater modulating effect on the perception of pain and fatigue in patients with fibromyalgia than listening to nonmusical sounds. To investigate this hypothesis, we carried out a 4-week study in which patients with fibromyalgia listened to either preselected musical pieces or environmental sounds when they experienced pain in active (while carrying out a physical activity) or passive (at rest) situations. Concomitant changes of pain and fatigue levels were evaluated. When patients listened to music or environmental sounds at rest, pain and fatigue levels were significantly reduced after 20 minutes of listening, with no difference of effect magnitude between the two stimuli. This improvement persisted 10 minutes after the end of the listening session. In active situations, pain did not increase in presence of the two stimuli. Contrary to our expectations, music and environmental sounds produced a similar relieving effect on pain and fatigue, with no benefit gained by listening to pleasant music over environmental sounds. PMID:26163741

  2. The Austrian radon activities on the way to the national radon action plan.

    PubMed

    Gruber, V; Ringer, W; Wurm, G; Haider, W

    2014-07-01

    Based on the new Euratom Basic Safety Standards (BSS), all EU member states will be obliged to design a strategy to address long-term risks from radon exposure, which is laid down in the 'national radon action plan'. In Austria, the National Radon Centre is responsible for the development of the action plan. This paper presents the current and planned radon protection activities on the way to establish the radon action plan--like the national radon database, the definition of radon risk areas by improving the existing radon map, as well as strategies and activities to increase the radon awareness of the public and decision-makers and to involve the building sector. The impact of and the need for actions caused by the BSS requirements on the Austrian radon legislation, strategy and programme are discussed.

  3. Metakaolin as a radon retardant from concrete.

    PubMed

    Lau, B M F; Balendran, R V; Yu, K N

    2003-01-01

    Granite aggregates are known to be the radon source in concrete. Recently, metakaolin has been introduced as a partial substitution of Portland cement to produce high strength concrete. It can effectively reduce the porosity of both the matrix and the aggregate/paste transition zone, which suggests its ability to retard radon emission from concrete aggregates. In the present work, radon exhalation rates from concrete cubes substituted with metakaolin were measured using charcoal canisters and gamma spectroscopy, and were considerably lower than those from normal concrete, by about 30%. The indoor radon concentration reduction is estimated as approximately 9 Bq m(-3) calculated using a room model, causing a 30% reduction in the indoor radon concentration and the corresponding radon dose. Therefore, metakaolin is a simple material to reduce the indoor radon concentration and the radon dose.

  4. Thermo-diffusional radon waves in soils.

    PubMed

    Minkin, Leonid; Shapovalov, Alexander S

    2016-09-15

    A new theoretical framework for diurnal and seasonal oscillations of the concentration of radon in soil and open air is proposed. The theory is based on the existing temperature waves in soils and thermo-diffusional gas flux in porous media. As soil is a non-isothermal porous medium, usually possessing a large fraction of microscopic pores belonging to Knudsen's free molecular field, a thermo-diffusional gas flow in soil has to arise. The radon mass transfer equation in soil for sinusoidal temperature oscillations at the soil-atmosphere boundary is solved, which reveals that radon concentration behaves as a damped harmonic wave. The amplitude of radon concentration oscillations and phase shift between radon concentration oscillations and soil temperature depend on the radon diffusion coefficient in soil, rate of radon production, soil thermal conductivity, average soil temperature, decay constant, and heat of radon transfer. Primarily numerical calculations are presented and comparisons with experimental data are shown. PMID:27155259

  5. Soil radon and electromagnetic anomalies before the Ileia(Greece) M6.8 earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolopoulos, D.; Vogiannis, E.; Louizi, A.; Zisos, A.

    2009-04-01

    -Thoron) with the aid of a mechanical pump working continuously at a rate of 1 L/min. Radon is continuously measured every ten minutes. Additionally, calibrated passive radon dosimeters based on CR-39 Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTD's) are periodically (every two weeks) installed in 50 cm holes dug near the 1-m probe and exposed (passively) to soil radon. After the end of each exposure period, the dosimeters are collected and the SSNTD's are measured via standard methods (optical microscopy track counting). Both methods (active with AG and passive with SSNTD's) provide similar estimates of mean soil radon concentration. Active techniques are much more precise and quick, however, they indicated the necessity of periodical checks for the pumping and measurement status, especially after strong rainfalls. The mean soil radon concentration was found fairly constant (to within +/- 10%) and approximately equal to 25-27 kBq m-3. Numerous soil radon concentration anomalies (sudden statistically significant (p

  6. [Information and involvement in health risks exemplified by a radon survey program].

    PubMed

    Hazard, B P

    1993-01-01

    As part of a large-scale radon testing program in homes for the region of the Southern Districts of the former German Democratic Republic (GDR) planned by the then West German Federal Ministry of the Environment, Natural Conservation and Reactor Safety and carried out by the Institute of Water, Soil and Air Hygiene (WaBoLu) of the West German Federal Health Office (BGA) in cooperation with the West German Federal Office for Environmental Protection (BfS) and the East German State Office for Atomic Safety (SAAS), the author (then employed at WaBoLu) was responsible for conducting the radon testing in the town of Schlema near the Czechoslovakian border in Southern Saxony. During preparatory work in this town in the fall of 1990, the author noted that the local population was very concerned about their potential radon problem. In the months previously, reports in newspapers and television had frequently pointed out the dangers to health of living in this region, often citing examples of particularly high radon levels from the area. Before the "opening" of the GDR to a free press in the fall of 1989, the local population had heard virtually nothing from the authorities about radon--neither of the possible health risk in general, nor of their own personal radon levels at home. This, together with the lack of experience of East Germans generally to evaluate critically and objectively information from the free press, had led to particularly high levels of anxiety and worry among the local population, even before radon concentrations in homes were known. In the light of these circumstances, the author decided to carry out the radon program with the help of the local school children. These children, aged 13 to 17, were entrusted with the task of carrying out the radon testing using a simple method developed by WaBoLu in all homes of the town. In class, they were informed not only about this testing method, but also about radon generally. It was hoped that, while testing in

  7. [The radon risk in Lombardy].

    PubMed

    Facchini, U; Sesana, L; Agostoni, G; Testa, V

    1997-10-01

    We investigated the geographical distribution of lung cancer mortality rates in some Italian regions, Lombardy and Emilia-Romagna in particular, where the investigation was mainly focused on the risk related to the presence of radon inside dwelling-houses. We referred to the death certificates provided by the Central Institute of Statistics (ISTAT) relative to the years 1980-1988 to calculate the relevant mortality rates. Mortality rates appear higher in some northern than in southern regions and in the islands and also (> a factor of 10) in the male than in the female population; the mortality rates in the male population exhibit a linear correlation with past cigarette smoking. The death rates in the male population (age range: 35-64 years) in northern Italy average 100 events/100,000 inhabitants, but several local health centers in Lombardy at the foot of the Alpine range, north of the Po River, have mortality rates over 50% higher than estimated rates. We considered radon exposure in Lombardy dwelling-houses. The Alps are rich in granite rocks, with 50-150 Bq/kg uranium concentrations, which produce the sediments, sands and gravels making the ground of the Lombardy plain. A recent survey of indoor radon exposure levels showed average values around 100 Bq/m3. The National Academy of Sciences (Washington, DC) has presented a formula to calculate the relative risk of lung cancer related to radon exposure during a lifetime. When this model was applied to excess events in Lombardy, acceptable agreement was found with the assumption that excess deaths are ascribable to higher radon exposure levels. We also compared Lombardy with Emilia-Romagna where the sediments and soil in the plain come from the Apennine range where calcareous rocks have low uranium content. Radon exposure levels in Emilia-Romagna were around 50 Bq/m3 and the radon risk factor in this region is therefore not particularly significant.

  8. Comparative survey of outdoor, residential and workplace radon concentrations.

    PubMed

    Barros, Nirmalla; Field, Dan W; Steck, Daniel J; Field, R William

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated radon concentrations in above-ground (i.e. first floor) workplace in Missouri and compared them with above-ground radon concentrations in nearby homes and outdoor locations. This study also examined the potential utility of using home and outdoor radon concentrations to predict the radon concentration at a nearby workplace (e.g. county agencies and schools). Even though workplace radon concentrations were not statistically different from home radon concentrations, the radon concentration at a particular home, or outdoor location, was a poor predictor of the radon concentration at a nearby workplace. Overall, 9.6 and 9.9 % of homes and workplace, respectively, exhibited radon concentrations of ≥148 Bq m(-3). Because of the percentage of workplace with elevated radon concentrations, the results suggest that additional surveys of workplace radon concentrations are needed, especially in areas of high radon potential, to assess the contribution of workplace radon exposure to an individual's overall radon exposure.

  9. Environmental variation of PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs in two tropical Andean Colombian cities using passive samplers.

    PubMed

    Cortés, J; Cobo, M; González, C M; Gómez, C D; Abalos, M; Aristizábal, B H

    2016-10-15

    Passive air-sampling data of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs) taken in Manizales (a medium-sized city) and Bogotá (a megacity), Colombia, were analyzed in order to identify potential sources of pollution and the possible influence of meteorological variables like temperature and precipitation. The results indicate important differences in levels of PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs between Bogotá and Manizales, attributed to differences in site characteristics and potential local/regional sources. Higher PCDD/Fs concentrations were observed in Bogotá (373fg/m(3)) compared to those observed in Manizales, with mean levels ranging from 64fg/m(3) in a residential zone to 151fg/m(3) around a vehicular-influenced area. Higher dl-PCBs concentrations were observed in the industrial area of Manizales compared to those observed in Bogotá, with mean levels of 6668fg/m(3) and 4388fg/m(3) respectively. In terms of PCDD/Fs congener distribution, there was a predominance of octachlorodibenzodioxin (OCDD) followed by 1,2,3,4,6,7.8-heptachlorodibenzofuran (HpCDF) congeners, with both cities showing higher levels in zones of high vehicular activity. Industrial influence was most evident in dl-PCB levels. In comparison to the mean levels of dl-PCB congeners obtained in the vehicular zones of Bogotá and Manizales, the industrially influenced sampling stations showed higher concentrations of dl-PCB congeners. Passive sampling results suggested that congener concentration profiles are characteristic of their different emission sources, and can be used to distinguish between their industrial or vehicular origins.

  10. Environmental variation of PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs in two tropical Andean Colombian cities using passive samplers.

    PubMed

    Cortés, J; Cobo, M; González, C M; Gómez, C D; Abalos, M; Aristizábal, B H

    2016-10-15

    Passive air-sampling data of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs) taken in Manizales (a medium-sized city) and Bogotá (a megacity), Colombia, were analyzed in order to identify potential sources of pollution and the possible influence of meteorological variables like temperature and precipitation. The results indicate important differences in levels of PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs between Bogotá and Manizales, attributed to differences in site characteristics and potential local/regional sources. Higher PCDD/Fs concentrations were observed in Bogotá (373fg/m(3)) compared to those observed in Manizales, with mean levels ranging from 64fg/m(3) in a residential zone to 151fg/m(3) around a vehicular-influenced area. Higher dl-PCBs concentrations were observed in the industrial area of Manizales compared to those observed in Bogotá, with mean levels of 6668fg/m(3) and 4388fg/m(3) respectively. In terms of PCDD/Fs congener distribution, there was a predominance of octachlorodibenzodioxin (OCDD) followed by 1,2,3,4,6,7.8-heptachlorodibenzofuran (HpCDF) congeners, with both cities showing higher levels in zones of high vehicular activity. Industrial influence was most evident in dl-PCB levels. In comparison to the mean levels of dl-PCB congeners obtained in the vehicular zones of Bogotá and Manizales, the industrially influenced sampling stations showed higher concentrations of dl-PCB congeners. Passive sampling results suggested that congener concentration profiles are characteristic of their different emission sources, and can be used to distinguish between their industrial or vehicular origins. PMID:26953138

  11. Soil radon as a possible earthquake precursor: Preliminary results from Ileia (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petraki, Ermioni; Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios; Louizi, Anna; Zisos, Athanasios

    2010-05-01

    into AG at a rate of 1 L/min. Pumping is performed via a 1-m soil probe to minimize meteorological influences and a 25-m radon proof 25-mm tube to avoid simultaneous measurement of soil 220Rn. Proper dust and moisture filters are employed. Radon is monitored every 10 minutes. This interval can be reduced to 1 minute, however with lower accuracy and data storage capacity. For comparison purposes, calibrated passive radon dosimeters based on CR-39 Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTD's) were periodically installed and exposed to soil radon in 50 cm holes were dug near the 1-m probe. The exposures lasted 1-2 weeks. Afterwards, the SSNTD's were removed, etched and measured via standard methods (optical microscopy track counting). The period of comparison measurements was 6 months. Continuous monitoring and passive measurements were cross-calibrated and found to provide similar estimates of mean soil radon concentration. Active techniques are much more precise and quick, however, they indicated the necessity of periodical checks for the pumping and measurement status, especially after strong rainfalls.The mean soil radon concentration was found fairly constant (~ 25-30 kBq m-3). Numerous soil radon concentration anomalies were detected. These were arbitrarily corresponded in terms of magnitude and duration to seismic events of the near area. All detected anomalies were sudden, significantly (p

  12. RADON GENERATION AND TRANSPORT THROUGH CONCRETE FOUNDATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an examination of radon generation and transport through Florida residential concretes for their contribution to indoor radon concentrations. Radium concentrations in the 11 concretes tested were all <2.5 pCi/g and radon emanation coefficients were all...

  13. Radon-hazard potential of Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Black, B.D.; Solomon, B.J. )

    1993-04-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas formed by decay of uranium, and occurs in nearly all geologic materials. Although radon has been shown to be a significant cause of lung cancer in miners, the health hazard from accumulation of radon gas in buildings has only recently been recognized. Indoor-radon hazards depend on both geologic and non-geologic factors. Although non-geologic factors such as construction type, weather, and lifestyles are difficult to measure, geologic factors such as uranium concentration, soil permeability, and depth to ground water can be quantified. Uranium-enriched geologic materials, such as black shales, marine sandstones, and certain granitic, metamorphic, and volcanic rocks, are generally associated with a high radon-hazard potential. Impermeable soil or shallow ground water impedes radon movement and is generally associated with a low radon-hazard potential. A numerical rating system based on these geologic factors has been developed to map radon-hazard potential in Utah. A statewide map shows that the radon-hazard potential of Utah is generally moderate. Assessments of hazard potential from detailed field investigations correlate well with areas of this map. Central Utah has the highest radon-hazard potential, primarily due to uranium-enriched Tertiary volcanic rocks. The radon-hazard potential of eastern Utah is moderate to high, but is generally restricted by low uranium levels. Western Utah, where valley basins with impermeable soils and shallow ground water are common, has the lowest radon-hazard potential.

  14. An overview of radon research in Canada.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Whyte, Jeff; Ford, Ken

    2015-11-01

    Based on new scientific information and broad public consultation, the Government of Canada updated the guideline for exposure to indoor radon and launched a multi-year radon programme in 2007. Major achievements in radon research accomplished in the past 7 y are highlighted here.

  15. Is Your School Safe from Radon?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Radon is a natural, chemically inert, radioactive gas that can seep to the surface from underground rocks. As many as 20,000 lung cancer deaths in the U.S. each year may be radon-caused. Screening a school for radon is not difficult and may be done on weekends. It's safer for students and staff to test and be sure. (MLH)

  16. Reducing Radon in Schools: A Team Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ligman, Bryan K.; Fisher, Eugene J.

    This document presents the process of radon diagnostics and mitigation in schools to help educators determine the best way to reduce elevated radon levels found in a school. The guidebook is designed to guide school leaders through the process of measuring radon levels, selecting the best mitigation strategy, and directing the efforts of a…

  17. Radon Risk Perception and Testing: Sociodemographic Correlates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Michael T.; Warner, Kenneth E.

    1994-01-01

    Using information from the 1990 National Health Interview Survey, examined beliefs regarding radon and radon-testing activities among different sociodemographic groups. Results suggest relatively superficial knowledge regarding radon, and little testing, within the survey population. Significantly less knowledge was observed among female and…

  18. A study of Monitoring and Mapping for Radon-Concentration Distribution in Gyeongju - 12201

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chan Hee; Lee, Jung Min; Jang, So Young; Kim, Shin Jae; Moon, Joo Hyun

    2012-07-01

    Radon is one of the most important contributors to the radiation exposure in humans. This study measured the indoor radon concentrations at the 17 elementary school auditoriums that were sampled from those in the city of Gyeongju, Korea. The reason that an elementary school was selected as a measurement object is that many students and teachers stay for a long time in a day and it's easy to identify the characteristics of the auditorium building such as the essential building. The measurement shows that most of the indoor radon concentrations at the 17 elementary school auditoriums did not exceed 148 Bq/m{sup 3} that is the action level recommended by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This study measured the indoor radon concentrations at the elementary school auditoriums in Gyeongju. The measurements were analyzed according to the bedrock type and the time intervals per day. In this study, it was found that the indoor radon concentrations over off-duty hours were generally higher that those over on-duty hours, and the indoor radon concentration in the area whose bedrock is volcanic rock was higher than those in the area of the other types of bedrock. As mentioned above, attention has to be paid to an elementary school since many young students and teachers stay for more 6 hours a day at it. Hence, it is necessary to continuously monitor and properly manage the indoor radon concentrations in the elementary schools. (authors)

  19. International standardisation work on the measurement of radon in air and water.

    PubMed

    Calmet, D; Ameon, R; Beck, T; Bombard, A; Bourquin, M N; Brun, S; De Jong, P; Forte, M; Fournier, M; Herranz, M; Jerome, S; Klett, A; Kwakman, P; Llaurado, M; Loyen, J; Michel, R; Nardoux, P; Richards, T; Schuler, C; Tokonami, S; Woods, M

    2011-05-01

    Radon is considered to be the main source of human exposure to natural radiation. As stated by the World Health Organization, the exposure due to the inhalation of indoor radon is much greater than the one via the ingestion of water as radon degasses from water during handling. In response to these concerns about the universal presence of radon, environmental assessment studies are regularly commissioned to assess the radon exposure of public and workers. The credibility of such studies relies on the quality and reliability of radon analysis as well as on the sample representativeness of the radiological situation. The standard-setting approach, based on consensus, seemed to lend itself to a settlement of technical aspects of potential comparison. At present, two Working Groups of the International Standardization Organization are focussing on drafting standards on radon and its decay products measurement in air and water. These standards, which aim for a set of rigorous metrology practices, will be useful for persons in charge of the initial characterisation of a site with respect to natural radioactivity as well as to those performing the routine surveillance of specific sites. PMID:21498866

  20. Effects of residential mobility on individual versus population risk of radon-related lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, K.E.; Courant, P.N.; Mendez, D.

    1995-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) does not consider the effects of normal patterns of residential mobility in estimating individual radon-related lung cancer risks. As a consequence, the EPA`s population risk estimates may have little hearing on individual risks, and remediation of high-radon homes may have only small health benefits for the individuals who remediate their homes. Through a simulation analysis, we examine the effects of residential mobility on radon exposure and lung cancer risk. Given normal mobility, only 7% of eventual radon-related mortality among current 30 year olds will occur in the 5% currently living in homes above 4 pCi/l (the EPA`s action level for remediation), in contrast with an estimate of 31% of deaths when mobility is ignored. Above 10 pCi/l, the no-mobility assumption implies 10.3% of deaths, compared to only 0.4% when mobility is taken into account. We conclude that knowledge of one`s current radon exposure is not necessarily a useful guide to one`s risk, especially for residents of the high-radon homes targeted for remediation by the EPA. The risk of such individuals is likely to be substantially lower than that implied in the EPA`S risk charts. If people currently living in high-radon homes remediate their houses, the majority of the resulting health benefits will accrue to future occupants of their homes. 25 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  1. Determination of radon concentration levels in well water in Konya, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, M; Eren, N; Demirel, S; Zedef, V

    2013-10-01

    Radon ((222)Rn) measurements were undertaken in 16 samples of well water representing different depths and different types of aquifers found at the city centre of Konya, Central Turkey. The radon activity concentrations of the well water samples collected in the spring and summer seasons of 2012 were measured by using the radon gas analyser (AlphaGUARD PQ 2000PRO). The radon concentrations for spring and summer seasons are 2.29 ± 0.17 to 27.25 ± 1.07 and 1.44 ± 0.18 to 27.45 ± 1.25 Bq l(-1), respectively. The results at hand revealed that the radon concentration levels of the waters strictly depend on the seasons and are slightly variable with depth. Eleven of the 16 well water samples had radon concentration levels below the safe limit of 11.11 Bq l(-1) recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. However, all measured radon concentration levels are well below the 100 Bq l(-1) safe limit declared by the World Health Organisation. The doses resulting from the consumption of these waters were calculated. The calculated minimum and maximum effective doses are 0.29 and 5.49 µSv a(-1), respectively. PMID:23595410

  2. Radon in indoor air of primary schools: determinant factors, their variability and effective dose.

    PubMed

    Madureira, Joana; Paciência, Inês; Rufo, João; Moreira, André; de Oliveira Fernandes, Eduardo; Pereira, Alcides

    2016-04-01

    Radon is a radioactive gas, abundant in granitic areas, such as in the city of Porto at the north-east of Portugal. This gas is a recognized carcinogenic agent, being appointed by the World Health Organization as the leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The aim of this preliminary survey was to determine indoor radon concentrations in public primary schools, to analyse the main factors influencing their indoor concentration levels and to estimate the effective dose in students and teachers in primary schools. Radon concentrations were measured in 45 classrooms from 13 public primary schools located in Porto, using CR-39 passive radon detectors for about 2-month period. In all schools, radon concentrations ranged from 56 to 889 Bq/m(3) (mean = 197 Bq/m(3)). The results showed that the limit of 100 Bq/m(3) established by WHO IAQ guidelines was exceeded in 92 % of the measurements, as well as 8 % of the measurements exceeded the limit of 400 Bq/m(3) established by the national legislation. Moreover, the mean annual effective dose was calculated as 1.25 mSv/y (ranging between 0.58 and 3.07 mSv/y), which is below the action level (3-10 mSv). The considerable variability of radon concentration observed between and within floors indicates a need to monitor concentrations in several rooms for each floor. A single radon detector for each room can be used, provided that the measurement error is considerably lower than variability of radon concentration between rooms. The results of the present survey will provide useful baseline data for adopting safety measures and dealing effectively with radiation emergencies. In particular, radon remediation techniques should be used in buildings located in the highest radon risk areas of Portugal. The results obtained in the current study concerning radon levels and their variations will be useful to optimize the design of future research surveys.

  3. Radon in indoor air of primary schools: determinant factors, their variability and effective dose.

    PubMed

    Madureira, Joana; Paciência, Inês; Rufo, João; Moreira, André; de Oliveira Fernandes, Eduardo; Pereira, Alcides

    2016-04-01

    Radon is a radioactive gas, abundant in granitic areas, such as in the city of Porto at the north-east of Portugal. This gas is a recognized carcinogenic agent, being appointed by the World Health Organization as the leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The aim of this preliminary survey was to determine indoor radon concentrations in public primary schools, to analyse the main factors influencing their indoor concentration levels and to estimate the effective dose in students and teachers in primary schools. Radon concentrations were measured in 45 classrooms from 13 public primary schools located in Porto, using CR-39 passive radon detectors for about 2-month period. In all schools, radon concentrations ranged from 56 to 889 Bq/m(3) (mean = 197 Bq/m(3)). The results showed that the limit of 100 Bq/m(3) established by WHO IAQ guidelines was exceeded in 92 % of the measurements, as well as 8 % of the measurements exceeded the limit of 400 Bq/m(3) established by the national legislation. Moreover, the mean annual effective dose was calculated as 1.25 mSv/y (ranging between 0.58 and 3.07 mSv/y), which is below the action level (3-10 mSv). The considerable variability of radon concentration observed between and within floors indicates a need to monitor concentrations in several rooms for each floor. A single radon detector for each room can be used, provided that the measurement error is considerably lower than variability of radon concentration between rooms. The results of the present survey will provide useful baseline data for adopting safety measures and dealing effectively with radiation emergencies. In particular, radon remediation techniques should be used in buildings located in the highest radon risk areas of Portugal. The results obtained in the current study concerning radon levels and their variations will be useful to optimize the design of future research surveys. PMID:26100326

  4. Impacts of a Sub-Slab Aggregate Layer and a Sub-Aggregate Membrane on Radon Entry Rate: A Numerical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnefous, Y.C.; Gadgil, A.J.; Revzan, K.L.; Fisk, W.J.; Riley, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    A subslab aggregate layer can increase the radon entry rate into a building by up to a factor of 5. We use a previously tested numerical technique to investigate and confirm this phenomenon. Then we demonstrate that a sub-aggregate membrane has the potential to significantly reduce the increase in radon entry rate due to the aggregate layer, even when a gap exists between the perimeter of the membrane and the footer. Such membranes greatly reduce diffusion of radon from the soil into the aggregate and are impermeable to flow. Radon entry through the basement floor slab is limited to radon entry through the holes in the membrane. In addition, a sub-aggregate membrane is predicted to improve the performance of active sub-slab ventilation systems and makes passive systems more promising.

  5. Mutagenicity of radon and radon daughters. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, H.H.

    1991-12-01

    The objective of our research is to investigate the dose-response relationship of the lethal and mutagenic effects of exposure of cells to radon and its decay products. Dose rate dependence and the nature of the DNA lesion will be studied, using the thymidine kinase and HPRT loci to measure mutation frequency. A deficiency in DNA repair is shown to lead to a greater proportion of mutants with intergenic lesions. The cytotoxic effects of radon and its daughters are similar in human TK6 lymphoblasts and mouse L5178Y lymphoblasts, the cell line used in previous experiments. The results of molecular analysis of four spontaneous and 25 X-radiation induced HPRT{sup {minus}} mutants. Eleven radon-induced HPRT{sup {minus}} mutants have been isolated, and will be analyzed in a similar fashion. 9 figs.

  6. Unusually high indoor radon concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennemoser, O.; Ambach, W.; Brunner, P.; Schneider, P.; Oberaigner, W.; Purtscheller, F.; Stingl, V.

    Measurements of indoor radon concentrations in the village Umhausen (2600 inhabitants, Ötztal valley, Tyrol, Austria) revealed unusually high indoor radon concentrations up to 274,000 Bq m -3. The medians measured on the basements were 3750 Bq m -3 in winter and 361 Bq m -3 in summer, those on the ground floors were 1180 Bq m -3 and 210 Bq m -3, respectively. Seventy-one per cent of the houses showed basement radon concentrations above the Austrian action level of 400 Bq m -3 in winter, 33% in summer. There are indications that the high radon concentrations are due to a giant rock slide about 8700 years ago. The unusually high radon concentrations in Umhausen coincide with a statistically significant increase in lung cancer mortality. For the period 1970-1991 the age and sex standardized mortality rate is 3.85 (95% confidence interval: 2.9 to 5.1). The control population is the total population of Tyrol (630,000 inhabitants).

  7. Measurement and distribution of radon and radon progeny: An overview of indoor-radon risk reduction in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.; Harrison, J.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of indoor radon risk reduction in the U.S. EPA currently estimates that 15,000-20,000 Americans die each year from radon-induced lung cancer. The estimate is based on epidemiological data which establish the link between radon and lung cancer, and surveys which provide estimates of radon exposure to the American public. EPA and state cosponsored radon surveys conducted in 34 states have indicated that houses with elevated radon levels exist in all parts of the U.S. These surveys have also indicated that radon levels in individual houses cannot be predicted with any degree of accuracy with existing methods. Individual houses must be tested. Based on these surveys, the EPA estimates that up to 8 million houses have annual average radon levels in the living area which exceed EPA's action guideline of 150 Bq/cu m. Responding to the great health risk posed by indoor radon, EPA, through its comprehensive Radon Action Program, has focused on many activities designed to reduce risk to the public from indoor radon. Key activities in the effort include the research and development of risk-reduction technology and the transfer of the technology to state and local governments, private sector industry, and the public.

  8. Review of low-energy construction, air tightness, ventilation strategies and indoor radon: results from Finnish houses and apartments.

    PubMed

    Arvela, H; Holmgren, O; Reisbacka, H; Vinha, J

    2014-12-01

    Low-energy and passive house construction practices are characterised by increased insulation, high air tightness of the building shell and controlled mechanical ventilation with heat recovery. As a result of the interaction of mechanical ventilation and high air tightness, the pressure difference in a building can be markedly enhanced. This may lead to elevated indoor radon levels. Minor leakages in the foundation can affect the radon concentration, even in the case where such leaks do not markedly reduce the total air tightness. The potential for high pressures to affect indoor radon concentrations markedly increases when the air tightness ACH50, i.e. the air change per hour induced by a pressure difference of 50 Pa, is <1.0 h(-1). Pressure differences in Finnish low-rise residential houses having mechanical supply and exhaust ventilation with heat recovery (MSEV) are typically 2-3 Pa, clearly lower than the values of 5-9 Pa in houses with only mechanical exhaust ventilation (MEV). In MSEV houses, radon concentrations are typically 30% lower than in MEV houses. In new MSEV houses with an ACH50 of 0.6 h(-1), the limit for passive construction, the analytical estimates predict an increase of 100% in the radon concentration compared with older houses with an ACH50 of 4.0 h(-1). This poses a challenge for efficient radon prevention in new construction. Radon concentrations are typically 30% lower in houses with two storeys compared with only one storey. The introduction of an MSEV ventilation strategy in typically very airtight apartments has markedly reduced pressure differences and radon concentrations.

  9. Radon Exposure Assessment and Relative Effective Dose Estimation to Inhabitants of Puglia Region, South Italy

    PubMed Central

    Quarto, Maria; Pugliese, Mariagabriella; La Verde, Giuseppe; Loffredo, Filomena; Roca, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Indoor radon concentrations were measured in dwellings of the Puglia region in Southern Italy using LR-115 passive detectors. The results show that the radon concentrations varied from 15 ± 2 to 2166 ± 133 Bq/m3 with a geometric mean of 114 Bq/m3 and a geometric standard deviation of 2.3. An analysis on the factors affecting radon concentration such as age of the dwellings, floors, and stories, was performed. The mean effective dose to inhabitants has been calculated and found to be 8.2 mSv/y. Finally, for estimation of cancer risks, the lifetime risk and lung cancer cases per years per million have been calculated. PMID:26610543

  10. Radon Exposure Assessment and Relative Effective Dose Estimation to Inhabitants of Puglia Region, South Italy.

    PubMed

    Quarto, Maria; Pugliese, Mariagabriella; La Verde, Giuseppe; Loffredo, Filomena; Roca, Vincenzo

    2015-11-23

    Indoor radon concentrations were measured in dwellings of the Puglia region in Southern Italy using LR-115 passive detectors. The results show that the radon concentrations varied from 15 ± 2 to 2166 ± 133 Bq/m³ with a geometric mean of 114 Bq/m³ and a geometric standard deviation of 2.3. An analysis on the factors affecting radon concentration such as age of the dwellings, floors, and stories, was performed. The mean effective dose to inhabitants has been calculated and found to be 8.2 mSv/y. Finally, for estimation of cancer risks, the lifetime risk and lung cancer cases per years per million have been calculated.

  11. Radon Exposure Assessment and Relative Effective Dose Estimation to Inhabitants of Puglia Region, South Italy.

    PubMed

    Quarto, Maria; Pugliese, Mariagabriella; La Verde, Giuseppe; Loffredo, Filomena; Roca, Vincenzo

    2015-11-01

    Indoor radon concentrations were measured in dwellings of the Puglia region in Southern Italy using LR-115 passive detectors. The results show that the radon concentrations varied from 15 ± 2 to 2166 ± 133 Bq/m³ with a geometric mean of 114 Bq/m³ and a geometric standard deviation of 2.3. An analysis on the factors affecting radon concentration such as age of the dwellings, floors, and stories, was performed. The mean effective dose to inhabitants has been calculated and found to be 8.2 mSv/y. Finally, for estimation of cancer risks, the lifetime risk and lung cancer cases per years per million have been calculated. PMID:26610543

  12. Indoor radon survey in Visegrad countries.

    PubMed

    Műllerová, Monika; Kozak, Krzysztof; Kovács, Tibor; Smetanová, Iveta; Csordás, Anita; Grzadziel, Dominik; Holý, Karol; Mazur, Jadwiga; Moravcsík, Attila; Neznal, Martin; Neznal, Matej

    2016-04-01

    The indoor radon measurements were carried out in 123 residential buildings and 33 schools in Visegrad countries (Slovakia, Hungary and Poland). In 13.2% of rooms radon concentration exceeded 300Bqm(-3), the reference value recommended in the Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM. Indoor radon in houses shows the typical radon behavior, with a minimum in the summer and a maximum in the winter season, whereas in 32% of schools the maximum indoor radon was reached in the summer months. PMID:26774389

  13. Simulation of Radon Transport in Geothermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Semprini, Lewis; Kruger, Paul

    1983-12-15

    Numerical simulation of radon transport is a useful adjunct in the study of radon as an in situ tracer of hydrodynamic and thermodynamic numerical model has been developed to assist in the interpretation of field experiments. The model simulates transient response of radon concentration in wellhead geofluid as a function of prevailing reservoir conditions. The radon simulation model has been used to simulate radon concentration response during production drawdown and two flowrate transient tests in vapor-dominated systems. Comparison of model simulation with experimental data from field tests provides insight in the analysis of reservoir phenomena such as propagation of boiling fronts, and estimates of reservoir properties of porosity and permeability thickness.

  14. The indoor radon problem: Studies in the Albuquerque, New Mexico area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookins, Douglas G.

    1988-12-01

    Radon buildup in homes is now recognized throughout the world as a potentially major health hazard. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimate 8,000 30,000 fatalities per year in the United States due to indoor radon. The Albuquerque, New Mexico area was chosen for study because it is representative of metropolitan areas in the southwestern United States where slightly uraniferous source rocks (Sandia granite) have provided the very immature soil for much of the area. The granite contains 4.7 ppm U, and limestone capping the granite 5.7 ppm U. Soils in the area average 4.24 ppm U, and Th/U ratios average 3.2. These data suggest some removal of U from the source rocks, but fixation of the U in the soils (that is, as opposed to widespread removal of the U by solution), thus providing a ready source for soil radon. A pilot study of soil radon in the area in winter of 1983 1984 shows high values, 180 pCi/l, relative to the U.S. average (about 100 pCi/l). In the winter of 1986 1987, 180 dwellings were surveyed for their indoor radon levels, including 20 that had been surveyed in summer of 1986. Twenty-eight percent of those in the winter study yielded indoor radon above the EPA suggested maximum permissible level of 4 pCi/l air, well above the EPA estimate of 10 15 dwellings for the U.S. The indoor radon levels show positive correlation with closeness to the Sandia Mountains, to soil radon, to excess insulation, to homes with solar capacities, and other factors. Building materials may provide a very minor source of some indoor radon. Summer readings are lower than winter readings except when the houses possess refrigerated air conditioning.

  15. A critical analysis of climatic influences on indoor radon concentrations: Implications for seasonal correction.

    PubMed

    Groves-Kirkby, Christopher J; Crockett, Robin G M; Denman, Antony R; Phillips, Paul S

    2015-10-01

    Although statistically-derived national Seasonal Correction Factors (SCFs) are conventionally used to convert sub-year radon concentration measurements to an annual mean, it has recently been suggested that external temperature could be used to derive local SCFs for short-term domestic measurements. To validate this approach, hitherto unanalysed radon and temperature data from an environmentally-stable location were analysed. Radon concentration and internal temperature were measured over periods totalling 1025 days during an overall period of 1762 days, the greatest continuous sampling period being 334 days, with corresponding meteorological data collected at a weather station 10 km distant. Mean daily, monthly and annual radon concentrations and internal temperatures were calculated. SCFs derived using monthly mean radon concentration, external temperature and internal-external temperature-difference were cross-correlated with each other and with published UK domestic SCF sets. Relatively good correlation exists between SCFs derived from radon concentration and internal-external temperature difference but correlation with external temperature, was markedly poorer. SCFs derived from external temperature correlate very well with published SCF tabulations, confirming that the complexity of deriving SCFs from temperature data may be outweighed by the convenience of using either of the existing domestic SCF tabulations. Mean monthly radon data fitted to a 12-month sinusoid showed reasonable correlation with many of the annual climatic parameter profiles, exceptions being atmospheric pressure, rainfall and internal temperature. Introducing an additional 6-month sinusoid enhanced correlation with these three parameters, the other correlations remaining essentially unchanged. Radon latency of the order of months in moisture-related parameters suggests that the principal driver for radon is total atmospheric moisture content rather than relative humidity. PMID:26093853

  16. A critical analysis of climatic influences on indoor radon concentrations: Implications for seasonal correction.

    PubMed

    Groves-Kirkby, Christopher J; Crockett, Robin G M; Denman, Antony R; Phillips, Paul S

    2015-10-01

    Although statistically-derived national Seasonal Correction Factors (SCFs) are conventionally used to convert sub-year radon concentration measurements to an annual mean, it has recently been suggested that external temperature could be used to derive local SCFs for short-term domestic measurements. To validate this approach, hitherto unanalysed radon and temperature data from an environmentally-stable location were analysed. Radon concentration and internal temperature were measured over periods totalling 1025 days during an overall period of 1762 days, the greatest continuous sampling period being 334 days, with corresponding meteorological data collected at a weather station 10 km distant. Mean daily, monthly and annual radon concentrations and internal temperatures were calculated. SCFs derived using monthly mean radon concentration, external temperature and internal-external temperature-difference were cross-correlated with each other and with published UK domestic SCF sets. Relatively good correlation exists between SCFs derived from radon concentration and internal-external temperature difference but correlation with external temperature, was markedly poorer. SCFs derived from external temperature correlate very well with published SCF tabulations, confirming that the complexity of deriving SCFs from temperature data may be outweighed by the convenience of using either of the existing domestic SCF tabulations. Mean monthly radon data fitted to a 12-month sinusoid showed reasonable correlation with many of the annual climatic parameter profiles, exceptions being atmospheric pressure, rainfall and internal temperature. Introducing an additional 6-month sinusoid enhanced correlation with these three parameters, the other correlations remaining essentially unchanged. Radon latency of the order of months in moisture-related parameters suggests that the principal driver for radon is total atmospheric moisture content rather than relative humidity.

  17. Radon removal from flowing air by a water scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, T.E.; Jarzemba, M.S.; Fentiman, A.W.; Denison, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    As part of a process that is being developed to vitrify tailings from Belgian Congo ore that is stored in large silos at a former U.S. Department of Energy uranium-processing facility in southwestern Ohio, process off-gas is produced that contains large concentrations of radon gas (on the order of hundreds of thousands of picocuries per litre). To meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency restrictions, the process off-gas must be stripped of its radon content before it is vented to the atmosphere. It is appropriate to consider a charcoal bed as part of an off-gas treatment system for the removal of radon at the vitrification facility. However, a difficulty arises in incorporating a charcoal bed into an off-gas treatment system at a vitrification facility. That difficulty is that the capability of the charcoal bed to capture and retain radon gas decreases with increasing bed temperature. Thus, it may be necessary to include a water scrubber in the off-gas treatment system to cool the process off-gas before it is passed through the charcoal bed.

  18. Moisture content and unsaturated conditions in UMTRA project radon barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    A typical Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal facility consists of uranium tailings and other contaminated materials covered by a three to six foot thick radon barrier and six inches of filter sand, overlain by one foot of erosion-protection riprap. To comply with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency groundwater protection standards applicable to the UMTRA Project, groundwater concentration limits of hazardous constitutents cannot be exceeded at the point of compliance, which is the downgradient limit of the waste management area. The typical radon barrier has a saturated hydraulic conductivity of approximately 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} centimeters per second (cm/s). Long-term seepage rates from a disposal facility with an unsaturated radon barrier may permit the concentration limits to be met at the point of compliance. Field studies were undertaken to measure the percent saturation and the relation of percent saturation to soil tension, and to predict the hydraulic conductivity as a function of percent saturation in radon barriers at three UMTRA Project disposal facilities that have been completed for up to two years. Presently typical covers have been completed at the Shiprock, Clive, and Burrell sites, and they are planned or under construction at the Ambrosia Lake, Green River, Lakeview, Mexican Hat, Slick Rock, and Tuba City sites. 2 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Variation of the unattached fraction of radon progeny and its contribution to radon exposure.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lu; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Qiuju

    2016-06-01

    The unattached fraction of radon progeny is one of the most important factors for radon exposure evaluation through the dosimetric approach. To better understand its level and variation in the real environment, a series of field measurements were carried out indoors and outdoors, and radon equilibrium equivalent concentration was also measured. The dose contribution of unattached radon progeny was evaluated in addition. The results show that no clear variation trend of the unattached fraction of radon progeny is observed in an indoor or outdoor environment. The average unattached fraction of radon progeny for the indoors and outdoors are (8.7  ±  1.6)% and (9.7  ±  2.1)%, respectively. The dose contribution of unattached radon progeny to total radon exposure is some 38.8% in an indoor environment, suggesting the importance of the evaluation on unattached radon progeny. PMID:27171653

  20. Correlation of soil radon and permeability with indoor radon potential in Ottawa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Falcomer, Renato; Bergman, Lauren; Wierdsma, Jessica; Ly, Jim

    2009-08-01

    Soil gas radon and soil gas permeability measurements were conducted at 32 sites across the five most populated communities in the city of Ottawa where indoor radon measurements were available for 167 houses. A soil radon index (SRI) determined from the soil radon concentration and the soil gas permeability was used to characterise radon availability from soil to air. This study demonstrated that the average SRI in a community area correlates with the indoor radon potential (the percentage of homes above 200 Bq m(-3)) in that community. Soil gas radon concentrations together with soil gas permeability measurements can be a useful tool for the prediction of the indoor radon potential in the development of a Canadian radon risk map.

  1. Radon exchange dynamics in a karst system investigated by radon continuous measurements in water: first results.

    PubMed

    Peano, G; Vigna, B; Villavecchia, E; Agnesod, G

    2011-05-01

    In 2008 the underground Karst Laboratory of Bossea Cave started research on radon exchange dynamics between bedrock, cave waters (main collector and percolations) and indoor underground atmosphere. Radon air concentrations, normally high, increase more and more during the collector's floods. An explanation of this is a radon-water solubilisation process more effective in flood events, because of a greater rock-water contact surface. Radon is then carried by water into the cave and released into the air. To verify this, continuous measurements of radon concentration are needed not only in the air, but also in the waters of the cave. So a new device for continuous radon monitoring in water was tested, connected to the AlphaGuard radon monitor. For the first 6 months of 2010, for different sections of the cave, the correlations between radon in the air, radon in the waters and the collector's stream flow fluctuations were presented and discussed. PMID:21586541

  2. Environmental Radioactivity, Temperature, and Precipitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riland, Carson A.

    1996-01-01

    Reports that environmental radioactivity levels vary with temperature and precipitation and these effects are due to radon. Discusses the measurement of this environmental radioactivity and the theory behind it. (JRH)

  3. Monte Carlo simulation experiments on box-type radon dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Khalid; Kamran, Muhammad; Illahi, Ahsan; Manzoor, Shahid

    2014-11-01

    Epidemiological studies show that inhalation of radon gas (222Rn) may be carcinogenic especially to mine workers, people living in closed indoor energy conserved environments and underground dwellers. It is, therefore, of paramount importance to measure the 222Rn concentrations (Bq/m3) in indoors environments. For this purpose, box-type passive radon dosimeters employing ion track detector like CR-39 are widely used. Fraction of the number of radon alphas emitted in the volume of the box type dosimeter resulting in latent track formation on CR-39 is the latent track registration efficiency. Latent track registration efficiency is ultimately required to evaluate the radon concentration which consequently determines the effective dose and the radiological hazards. In this research, Monte Carlo simulation experiments were carried out to study the alpha latent track registration efficiency for box type radon dosimeter as a function of dosimeter's dimensions and range of alpha particles in air. Two different self developed Monte Carlo simulation techniques were employed namely: (a) Surface ratio (SURA) method and (b) Ray hitting (RAHI) method. Monte Carlo simulation experiments revealed that there are two types of efficiencies i.e. intrinsic efficiency (ηint) and alpha hit efficiency (ηhit). The ηint depends upon only on the dimensions of the dosimeter and ηhit depends both upon dimensions of the dosimeter and range of the alpha particles. The total latent track registration efficiency is the product of both intrinsic and hit efficiencies. It has been concluded that if diagonal length of box type dosimeter is kept smaller than the range of alpha particle then hit efficiency is achieved as 100%. Nevertheless the intrinsic efficiency keeps playing its role. The Monte Carlo simulation experimental results have been found helpful to understand the intricate track registration mechanisms in the box type dosimeter. This paper explains that how radon concentration from the

  4. Residential radon exposure and lung cancer: risk in nonsmokers.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, John S; Gesell, Thomas F

    2002-07-01

    Lung cancer is a disease that is almost entirely caused by smoking; hence, it is almost totally preventable. Yet there are a small percentage of cases, perhaps as many as 5 to 15%, where there are other causes. Risk factors identified for this other group include passive smoking, occupational exposure to certain chemicals and ionizing radiation, diet, and family history of cancer. In the United States cigarette smoking is on the decline among adults, occupational exposures are being reduced, and people are being made more aware of appropriate diets. These changes are gradually resulting in a reduced risk for this disease. Lung cancer in the U.S. may, therefore, eventually become largely a disease of the past. It remains important, however, to continue to study the cause(s) of lung cancer in non-smokers, particularly never smokers. Because of our interest in the effects of residential radon exposure on the development of lung cancer in non-smokers, we conducted a critical review of the scientific literature to evaluate this issue in detail. Strict criteria were utilized in selecting studies, which included being published in a peer reviewed journal, including non-smokers in the studied populations, having at least 100 cases, and being of case-control design. A total of 12 individual studies were found that met the criteria, with 10 providing some information on non-smokers. Most of these studies did not find any significant association between radon and lung cancer in non-smokers. Furthermore, data were not presented in sufficient detail for non-smokers in a number of studies. Based on the most recent findings, there is some evidence that radon may contribute to lung cancer risk in current smokers in high residential radon environments. The situation regarding the risk of lung cancer from radon in non-smokers (ex and never) is unclear, possibly because of both the relatively limited sample size of non-smokers and methodological limitations in most of the individual

  5. Modeling radon transport in dry, cracked soil

    SciTech Connect

    Holford, D.J. ); Schery, S.D.; Wilson, J.L.; Phillips, F.M. )

    1993-01-10

    A two-dimensional finite element code was used to investigate the effect of changes in surface air pressure on radon flux from soil with parallel, partially penetrating cracks. A sensitivity analysis investigates the effects of various crack dimensions, soil characteristics, and surface air pressure on radon flux from the soil surface to the atmosphere. Simulation results indicate that radon flux is most sensitive to soil properties; the diffusion coefficient is most important, followed by permeability and porosity. Radon flux is also sensitive to changes in barometric pressure, which cause variations in radon flux above and below the average diffusive flux. Sinusoidal variations in barometric pressure cause a net increase in the average radon flux from the soil, because increases in flux during periods of decreasing pressure are greater than the decreases in flux during periods of decreasing pressure of equal magnitude. Cracks were found to significantly increase radon flux from soils of low permeability. 33 refs. 19 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Novel approaches in radon and thoron dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressyanov, D.; Dimitrov, D.; Dimitrova, I.; Georgiev, S.; Mitev, K.

    2014-07-01

    This report presents some novel approaches for radon/radon progeny and thoron measurements that can help to resolve some long-lasting problems in dosimetry, but which are not yet part of the common practice. The focus is in two directions: The use of CDs/DVDs as radon and thoron detectors and the employment of grab-sampling and/or integrated radon progeny measurements for diagnostic of the air conditions related to mitigation and indoor ventilation. The potential of these approaches is illustrated by several successful applications: (1) Study of the 222Rn distribution in large buildings and identification of places with radon problem; (2) Radon and thoron monitoring in underground mines; (3) Radon measurements in natural waters, including directly in the water source; (4) Grab sampling 222Rn progeny measurements for the purposes of pre- and post-mitigation diagnostic; (5) Integrated measurements of individual 222Rn short-lived decay products for diagnostic of indoor ventilation conditions.

  7. Transport of radon from soil into residences

    SciTech Connect

    Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.

    1984-02-01

    To develop effective monitoring and control programs for indoor radon it is important to understand the causes of the broad range of concentrations that has been observed. Measurements of indoor radon concentration and air-exchange rate in dwellings in several countries indicate that this variability arises largely from differences among structures in the rate of radon entry. Recent evidence further suggests that the major source of indoor radon in many circumstances is the soil adjacent to the building foundation and that pressure-driven flow, rather than molecular diffusion, is the dominant transport process by which radon enters the buildings. Key factors affecting radon transport from soil are radon production in soil, flow-inducing mechanisms, soil permeability, and building substructure type. 24 references, 1 figure.

  8. Factors Affecting Radon Concentration in Houses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sharif, Abdel-Latif; Abdelrahman, Y. S.

    2001-03-01

    The dangers to the human health upon exposure to radon and its daughter products is the main motivation behind the vast number of studies performed to find the concentration of radon in our living environment, including our houses. The presence of radon and its daughter products in houses are due to various sources including building materials and the soil under the houses. Many factors affect radon concentration in our houses, the elevation above ground level,ventilation, building materials and room usage being among these factors. In our paper, we discuss the effect of elevation above ground level, room usage and ventilation on the Radon concentration in houses. The faculty residences of the Mu'tah University (Jordan) were chosen in our study. Our results showed that the concentration of radon decreases with elevation. Ventilation rate was also found to affect radon concentration, where low concentrations observed for areas with good ventilation.

  9. Automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor

    DOEpatents

    Langner, Jr., G. Harold

    1993-01-01

    An automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor is provided which includes a housing having an aperture allowing radon entry, and a filter that excludes the entry of radon daughters into the housing. A flexible track registration material is located within the housing that records alpha-particle emissions from the decay of radon and radon daughters inside the housing. The flexible track registration material is capable of being spliced such that the registration material from a plurality of monitors can be spliced into a single strip to facilitate automatic processing of the registration material from the plurality of monitors. A process for the automatic counting of radon registered by a radon monitor is also provided.

  10. Automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor

    DOEpatents

    Langner, G.H. Jr.

    1993-01-12

    An automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor is provided which includes a housing having an aperture allowing radon entry, and a filter that excludes the entry of radon daughters into the housing. A flexible track registration material is located within the housing that records alpha-particle emissions from the decay of radon and radon daughters inside the housing. The flexible track registration material is capable of being spliced such that the registration material from a plurality of monitors can be spliced into a single strip to facilitate automatic processing of the registration material from the plurality of monitors. A process for the automatic counting of radon registered by a radon monitor is also provided.

  11. Characterizing the source of radon indoors

    SciTech Connect

    Nero, A.V.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    1983-09-01

    Average indoor radon concentrations range over more than two orders of magnitude, largely because of variability in the rate at which radon enters from building materials, soil, and water supplies. Determining the indoor source magnitude requires knowledge of the generation of radon in source materials, its movement within materials by diffusion and convection, and the means of its entry into buildings. This paper reviews the state of understanding of indoor radon sources and transport. Our understanding of generation rates in and movement through building materials is relatively complete and indicates that, except for materials with unusually high radionuclide contents, these sources can account for observed indoor radon concentrations only at the low end of the range observed. Our understanding of how radon enters buildings from surrounding soil is poorer, however recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest that soil may be the predominant source in many cases where the indoor radon concentration is high. 73 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  12. 30 CFR 57.5046 - Protection against radon gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Protection against radon gas. 57.5046 Section... Protection against radon gas. Where radon daughter concentrations exceed 10 WL, respirator protection against radon gas shall be provided in addition to protection against radon daughters. Protection against...

  13. 30 CFR 57.5046 - Protection against radon gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Protection against radon gas. 57.5046 Section... Protection against radon gas. Where radon daughter concentrations exceed 10 WL, respirator protection against radon gas shall be provided in addition to protection against radon daughters. Protection against...

  14. Bioaccumulation Using Surrogate Samplers (Bass): Evaluation Of A Passive Sampler As An Alternative Monitoring Tool For Environmental Contaminants At The Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Paller, M.; Knox, A.; Kuhne, W.; Blas, S.

    2015-10-15

    DOE sites conduct traditional environmental monitoring programs that require collecting, processing, and analyzing water, sediment, and fish samples. However, recently developed passive sampling technologies, such as Diffusive Gradient in Thin films (DGT), may measure the chemical phases that are available and toxic to organisms (the bioavailable fraction), thereby producing more accurate and economical results than traditional methods.  Our laboratory study showed that dissolved copper concentrations measured by DGT probes were strongly correlated with the uptake of copper by Lumbriculus variegatus, an aquatic worm, and with concentrations of copper measured by conventional methods.  Dissolved copper concentrations in DGT probes increased with time of exposure, paralleling the increase in copper with time that ocurred in Lumbriculus.  Additional studies with a combination of seven dissolved metals showed similar results.  These findings support the use of DGT as a biomimetic monitoring tool and provide a basis for refinement of these methods for cost-effective environmental monitoring at DOE sites.

  15. Predicted indoor radon concentrations from a Monte Carlo simulation of 1,000,000 granite countertop purchases.

    PubMed

    Allen, J G; Zwack, L M; MacIntosh, D L; Minegishi, T; Stewart, J H; McCarthy, J F

    2013-03-01

    Previous research examining radon exposure from granite countertops relied on using a limited number of exposure scenarios. We expanded upon this analysis and determined the probability that installing a granite countertop in a residential home would lead to a meaningful radon exposure by performing a Monte Carlo simulation to obtain a distribution of potential indoor radon concentrations attributable to granite. The Monte Carlo analysis included estimates of the probability that a particular type of granite would be purchased, the radon flux associated with that type, the size of the countertop purchased, the volume of the home where it would be installed and the air exchange rate of that home. One million countertop purchases were simulated and 99.99% of the resulting radon concentrations were lower than the average outdoor radon concentrations in the US (14.8 Bq m(-3); 0.4  pCi l(-1)). The median predicted indoor concentration from granite countertops was 0.06 Bq m(-3) (1.59 × 10(-3) pCi l(-1)), which is over 2000 times lower than the US Environmental Protection Agency's action level for indoor radon (148 Bq m(-3); 4 pCi l(-1)). The results show that there is a low probability of a granite countertop causing elevated levels of radon in a home. PMID:23295242

  16. Predicted indoor radon concentrations from a Monte Carlo simulation of 1,000,000 granite countertop purchases.

    PubMed

    Allen, J G; Zwack, L M; MacIntosh, D L; Minegishi, T; Stewart, J H; McCarthy, J F

    2013-03-01

    Previous research examining radon exposure from granite countertops relied on using a limited number of exposure scenarios. We expanded upon this analysis and determined the probability that installing a granite countertop in a residential home would lead to a meaningful radon exposure by performing a Monte Carlo simulation to obtain a distribution of potential indoor radon concentrations attributable to granite. The Monte Carlo analysis included estimates of the probability that a particular type of granite would be purchased, the radon flux associated with that type, the size of the countertop purchased, the volume of the home where it would be installed and the air exchange rate of that home. One million countertop purchases were simulated and 99.99% of the resulting radon concentrations were lower than the average outdoor radon concentrations in the US (14.8 Bq m(-3); 0.4  pCi l(-1)). The median predicted indoor concentration from granite countertops was 0.06 Bq m(-3) (1.59 × 10(-3) pCi l(-1)), which is over 2000 times lower than the US Environmental Protection Agency's action level for indoor radon (148 Bq m(-3); 4 pCi l(-1)). The results show that there is a low probability of a granite countertop causing elevated levels of radon in a home.

  17. Radon in ground water of the Lower Susqehanna and Potomac River basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, Bruce D.; Ator, Scott W.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water samples collected from 267 wells were analyzed for radon as part of a water-quality reconnaissance of subunits of the Lower Susquehanna and Potomac River Basins conducted by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program. Radon is a product of the radioactive decay of uranium. Airborne radon has been cited by the Surgeon General of the United States as the second-leading cause of lung cancer and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has identified ground-water supplies as possible contributing sources of indoor radon. Eighty percent of ground-water samples collected for this study were found to contain radon at activities greater than 300 pCi/L (picocuries per liter), the USEPA's proposed Maximum Contaminant Level for radon in drinking water, and 31 percent of samples contained radon at activities greater than 1,000 pCi/L. The 10 subunits where samples were collected were grouped into three classes - median ground-water radon activity less than 300 pCi/L, between 300 pCi/L and 1,000 pCi/L, and greater than 1,000 pCi/L. Subunits underlain by igneous and metamorphic rocks of the Piedmont Physiographic Province typically have the highest median ground-water radon activities (greater than 1,000 pCi/L); although there is a large variation in radon activities within most of the subunits. Lower median radon activities (between 300 pCi/L and 1,000 pCi/L) were found in ground water in subunits underlain by limestone and dolomite. Of three subunits underlain by sandstone and shale, one fell into each of the three radon-activity classes. The large variability within these subunits may be attributed to the fact that the uranium content of sandstone and shale is related to the uranium content of the sediments from which they formed.

  18. Dose estimation derived from the exposure to radon, thoron and their progeny in the indoor environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramola, R. C.; Prasad, Mukesh; Kandari, Tushar; Pant, Preeti; Bossew, Peter; Mishra, Rosaline; Tokonami, S.

    2016-08-01

    The annual exposure to indoor radon, thoron and their progeny imparts a major contribution to inhalation doses received by the public. In this study, we report results of time integrated passive measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations that were carried out in Garhwal Himalaya with the aim of investigating significant health risk to the dwellers in the region. The measurements were performed using recently developed LR-115 detector based techniques. The experimentally determined values of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations were used to estimate total annual inhalation dose and annual effective doses. The equilibrium factors for radon and thoron were also determined from the observed data. The estimated value of total annual inhalation dose was found to be 1.8 ± 0.7 mSv/y. The estimated values of the annual effective dose were found to be 1.2 ± 0.5 mSv/y and 0.5 ± 0.3 mSv/y, respectively. The estimated values of radiation doses suggest no important health risk due to exposure of radon, thoron and progeny in the study area. The contribution of indoor thoron and its progeny to total inhalation dose ranges between 13–52% with mean value of 30%. Thus thoron cannot be neglected when assessing radiation doses.

  19. Dose estimation derived from the exposure to radon, thoron and their progeny in the indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Ramola, R C; Prasad, Mukesh; Kandari, Tushar; Pant, Preeti; Bossew, Peter; Mishra, Rosaline; Tokonami, S

    2016-01-01

    The annual exposure to indoor radon, thoron and their progeny imparts a major contribution to inhalation doses received by the public. In this study, we report results of time integrated passive measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations that were carried out in Garhwal Himalaya with the aim of investigating significant health risk to the dwellers in the region. The measurements were performed using recently developed LR-115 detector based techniques. The experimentally determined values of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations were used to estimate total annual inhalation dose and annual effective doses. The equilibrium factors for radon and thoron were also determined from the observed data. The estimated value of total annual inhalation dose was found to be 1.8 ± 0.7 mSv/y. The estimated values of the annual effective dose were found to be 1.2 ± 0.5 mSv/y and 0.5 ± 0.3 mSv/y, respectively. The estimated values of radiation doses suggest no important health risk due to exposure of radon, thoron and progeny in the study area. The contribution of indoor thoron and its progeny to total inhalation dose ranges between 13-52% with mean value of 30%. Thus thoron cannot be neglected when assessing radiation doses. PMID:27499492

  20. Residential radon exposure and lung cancer: an overview of published studies

    SciTech Connect

    Neuberger, J.S. )

    1991-01-01

    A possible link between presumed or measured household radon exposure and lung cancer is reviewed on the basis of published epidemiologic studies. Evidence of a link is reported as a result of studies in Sweden; findings are inconsistent elsewhere. A number of methodological problems were found. Many of the studies are ecological in design and are, therefore, primarily hypothesis generating. A number of studies lack any data on the number of lung cancers and are, therefore, difficult to evaluate. Some other studies provide results that are internally inconsistent. Of the case/control studies, there are many with minimal or no information on active and passive smoking, occupation, family history of cancer, and diet. The case/control studies are generally small in size and of low statistical power. Exposure classifications are nonstandardized, inconsistent in their findings, and often gross in their characterization of radon concentrations. Relatively few of the studies actually measured radon exposure. Some of the studies showed significant positive associations either with geological characteristics, water supply contamination, or house type. No significant associations were found with residence near uranium or radium processing waste. Where radon levels were measured, a relatively small percentage of studies found a statistically significant positive association with lung cancer. Overall, the evidence for an association between residential radon exposure and lung cancer is weak. There is a need for a more decisive case/control epidemiologic study of this problem.55 references.

  1. Dose estimation derived from the exposure to radon, thoron and their progeny in the indoor environment

    PubMed Central

    Ramola, R. C.; Prasad, Mukesh; Kandari, Tushar; Pant, Preeti; Bossew, Peter; Mishra, Rosaline; Tokonami, S.

    2016-01-01

    The annual exposure to indoor radon, thoron and their progeny imparts a major contribution to inhalation doses received by the public. In this study, we report results of time integrated passive measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations that were carried out in Garhwal Himalaya with the aim of investigating significant health risk to the dwellers in the region. The measurements were performed using recently developed LR-115 detector based techniques. The experimentally determined values of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations were used to estimate total annual inhalation dose and annual effective doses. The equilibrium factors for radon and thoron were also determined from the observed data. The estimated value of total annual inhalation dose was found to be 1.8 ± 0.7 mSv/y. The estimated values of the annual effective dose were found to be 1.2 ± 0.5 mSv/y and 0.5 ± 0.3 mSv/y, respectively. The estimated values of radiation doses suggest no important health risk due to exposure of radon, thoron and progeny in the study area. The contribution of indoor thoron and its progeny to total inhalation dose ranges between 13–52% with mean value of 30%. Thus thoron cannot be neglected when assessing radiation doses. PMID:27499492

  2. The effect of radon-resistant construction techniques in a crawlspace house

    SciTech Connect

    Dudney, C S; Wilson, D L; Dyess, T M

    1992-09-01

    An extensive battery of radon-diagnostic tests were performed on two different houses built on the SAME foundation. A house was studied as part of a multi-year evaluation of radon mitigation measures in the Tennessee Valley. The original house was destroyed in a fire caused by a faulty space heater. The second house was built on the same foundation using passive techniques to reduce radon transport via the crawlspace to the living area. The rebuilt house achieved a 60% reduction in the volumetric transport of air from crawlspace to living area when the heating and cooling system was not operating. An even greater reduction was found when the HAC system was operating, reflecting the benefits of new, well-sealed ductwork. In spite of these enhancements, the passive measures failed to reduce radon concentrations to below 4 pCi/L. The primary reason is believed to be the enclosure of the open carport to form a garage at the time of reconstruction.

  3. Radon mitigation survey among New York State residents living in high radon homes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Ju, C.; Stark, A.D.; Teresi, N.

    1999-10-01

    In order to evaluate the effectiveness of New York State Department of Health's efforts to increase public awareness about radon risk and to promote radon testing and mitigation in compliance with EPA's guideline, a statewide radon mitigation survey was conducted between September 1995 and January 1996 among New York State residents whose homes had radon levels equal to or greater than 148 Bq m{sup {minus}3} on the first floor (or above) living areas. The survey found that about 60% of 1,113 participants had taken actions for radon mitigation. The percentage of respondents who took actions to reduce radon levels in their homes increased with increasing education level as well as household income level. The method of installing a powered system to provide more ventilation was a more effective mitigation method than opening windows/doors or sealing cracks/openings in the basement. Mitigation performed by contractors was more effective in reducing radon levels than mitigation performed by residents. The reasons for performing radon mitigation given by the majority of respondents were those strongly related to radon health risk. High home radon level was an important motivational factor to stimulate radon mitigation. On the other hand, the cost of radon mitigation was a major barrier in decision making for performing radon mitigation and for selecting mitigation measures.

  4. Potential lung cancer risk from indoor radon exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.; Harley, J.H. )

    1990-09-01

    The contribution of radon daughter exposure to excess lung cancer in underground miners is universally accepted. These miners received exposures from tens to thousands of WLM in a relatively few years. Although the miners were also exposed to other noxious agents in mines, the appearance of the excess lung cancer mortality in several types of mines and the increase with increasing exposure provide convincing evidence of the role of radon as the carcinogen. It is conceivable that exposures to radon at an average concentration of one to two pCi/liter, the levels for a majority of homes, might not produce excess lung cancers. This would require that a lifetime exposure at low concentrations produce a different response from that of a few years at higher levels for the miners. This is unlikely but not impossible. The current environmental epidemiology is of varying quality. The better studies may give some answers in a few years. These studies are more likely to establish an upper limit of risk than to provide an exposure-response model. Present risk estimates cannot be used accurately in estimating the overall lung cancer risk to the US population, since there are no good data on average exposure and exposure distribution. For example, the number of homes above the EPA guideline of four pCi/liter may range from two million to 10 million. An estimate of the actual radon exposure in the US may be forthcoming from a planned EPA survey, but these data will not be available for a few years. In the conservative tradition of radiation protection, indoor radon exposures in homes are estimated to produce a number of excess lung cancers in the population.22 references.

  5. Radon Reduction Experience at a Former Uranium Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Eger, K. J.; Rutherford, L.; Rickett, K.; Fellman, R.; Hungate, S.

    2004-02-29

    Approximately 6,200 cubic meters of waste containing about 2.0E8 MBq of radium-226 are stored in two large silos at the Fernald Site in southwest Ohio. The material is scheduled for retrieval, packaging, off site shipment and disposal by burial. Air in the silos above the stored material contained radon-222 at a concentration of 7.4 E5 Bq/L. Short-lived daughters formed by decay in these headspaces generated dose rates at contact with the top of the silos up to 1.05 mSv/hr and there complicate the process of retrieval. A Radon Control System (RCS) employing carbon adsorption beds has been designed under contract with the Fluor Fernald to remove most of the radon in the headspaces and maintain lower concentrations during periods when work on or above the domes is needed. Removing the radon also removes the short-lived daughters and reduces the dose rate near the domes to 20 to 30 {mu}Sv/hr. Failing to remove the radon would be costly, in the exposure of personnel needed to work extended periods at these moderate dose rates, or in dollars for the application of remote retrieval techniques. In addition, the RCS minimizes the potential for environmental releases. This paper describes the RCS, its mode of operation, and early experiences. The results of the test described herein and the experience gained from operation of the RCS during its first phase of continuous operation, will be used to determine the best air flow, and air flow distribution, the most desirable number and sequence number and sequence of adsorption beds to be used and the optimum application of air recycle within the RCS.

  6. Radon as a tracer of daily, seasonal and spatial air movements in the Underground Tourist Route "Coal Mine" (SW Poland).

    PubMed

    Tchorz-Trzeciakiewicz, Dagmara Eulalia; Parkitny, Tomasz

    2015-11-01

    The surveys of radon concentrations in the Underground Tourist Route "Coal Mine" were carried out using passive and active measurement techniques. Passive methods with application of Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors LR115 were used at 4 points in years 2004-2007 and at 21 points in year 2011. These detectors were exchanged at the beginning of every season in order to get information about seasonal and spatial changes of radon concentrations. The average radon concentration noted in this facility was 799 Bq m(-3) and is consistent with radon concentrations noted in Polish coal mines. Seasonal variations, observed in this underground tourist route, were as follows: the highest radon concentrations were noted during summers, the lowest during winters, during springs and autumns intermediate but higher in spring than in autumn. The main external factor that affected seasonal changes of radon concentrations was the seasonal variation of outside temperature. No correlation between seasonal variations of radon concentrations and seasonal average atmospheric pressures was found. Spatial variations of radon concentrations corresponded with air movements inside the Underground Tourist Route "Coal Mine". The most vivid air movements were noted along the main tunnel in adit and at the place located near no blinded (in the upper part) shaft. Daily variations of radon concentrations were recorded in May 2012 using RadStar RS-230 as the active measurement technique. Typical daily variations of radon concentrations followed the pattern that the highest radon concentrations were recorded from 8-9 a.m. to 7-8 p.m. and the lowest during nights. The main factor responsible for hourly variations of radon concentrations was the daily variation of outside temperatures. No correlations were found between radon concentration and other meteorological parameters such as atmospheric pressure, wind velocity or precipitation. Additionally, the influence of human factor on radon

  7. Radium and radon tracers in aquatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, S. B.

    2012-10-01

    Fourth International Ra-Rn Workshop;Narragansett, Rhode Island, 3-8 June 2012 Radium (Ra) and radon (Rn) are widely recognized as important geochemical tracers in the estimation of dispersion in aquatic environments, submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) to the coastal ocean, water mass residence times, and air-sea and water- sediment exchange. More than 50 scientists, including graduate students and early- career scientists from 10 countries, recently participated in a workshop on Ra and Rn in Narragansett, R. I. The workshop was hosted by the University of Rhode Island and sponsored by the U.S. National Science Foundation Chemical Oceanography Program, ORTEC, Eichrom, and Durridge Company. The workshop provided a forum for presentations and open discussions regarding the latest developments and new directions in the application and measurement of isotopes 223Ra, 224Ra, 226Ra, 228Ra, and 222Rn, as well as models used in the application of these tracers to a range of environmental problems.

  8. Instrumentation for a radon research house

    SciTech Connect

    Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.; Robb, A.W.

    1981-07-01

    A highly automated monitoring and control system for studying radon and radon-daughter behavior in residences has been designed and built. The system has been installed in a research house, a test space contained in a two-story wood-framed building, which allows us to conduct controlled studies of (1) pollutant transport within and between rooms, (2) the dynamics of radon daughter behavior, and (3) techniques for controlling radon and radon daughters. The system's instrumentation is capable of measuring air-exchange rate, four-point radon concentration, individual radon daughter concentrations, indoor temerature and humidity, and outdoor weather parameters (temperature, humidity, modules, wind speed, and wind direction). It is also equipped with modules that control the injection of radon and tracer gas into the test space, the operation of the forced-air furnace, the mechanical ventilation system, and the mixing fans located in each room. A microcomputer controls the experiments and records the data on magnetic tape and on a printing terminal. The data on tape is transferred to a larger computer system for reduction and analysis. In this paper we describe the essential design and function of the instrumentation system, as a whole, singling out those components that measure ventilation rate, radon concentration, and radon daughter concentrations.

  9. Collaborative investigations on thoron and radon in some rural communities of Balkans.

    PubMed

    Zunić, Z S; Celiković, I; Tokonami, S; Ishikawa, T; Ujić, P; Onischenko, A; Zhukovsky, M; Milić, G; Jakupi, B; Cuknić, O; Veselinović, N; Fujimoto, K; Sahoo, S K; Yarmoshenko, I

    2010-10-01

    This paper deals with the results of the first-field use in the Balkans, i.e. Serbia and Republic of Srpska (Bosnia and Hercegovina), of a passive polycarbonate Mark II type and poliallyldiglycol carbonate (Cr-39) alpha track detectors sensitive to thoron as well as to radon. Both types of solid state nuclear track detectors were designed and supplied by National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. The commercial names for these detectors which all have been field tested in Balkan rural communities are known as: UFO and RADUET passive discriminative radon/thoron detectors. No database of thoron and thoron progeny concentrations in dwellings in Serbia or Balkans region exist, and as a result, the level of exposure of the Serbian population to thoron and its progeny is unknown so far. PMID:20966203

  10. Low Radon Cleanroom at the University of Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Darren; Hallin, Aksel; Hanchurak, Stephen; Krauss, Carsten; Liu, Shengli; Soluk, Richard

    2011-04-01

    A cleanroom laboratory designed to create and maintain a low concentration of radon in the air has been designed and is now under construction. We describe the clean room, the radon stripping system, and various radon monitoring tools.

  11. Evaluation of the uniformity of concentration of radon in a radon chamber.

    PubMed

    Xiongjie, Zhang; Ye, Zhang; Yang, Liu; Bin, Tang

    2016-04-01

    In order to solve the problem that the evaluation results of the uniformity of concentration of radon in a radon chamber via various methods were difficult to compare, according to its statistical properties, a mathematical model was built to analyze the uniformity of concentration of radon; an evaluation method for the overall uniformity of concentration of radon was proposed on the basis of single-factor multi-group ANOVA, and a detection method for nonuniform points in a radon chamber was proposed on the basis of single-factor two-group t-test; an evaluation process of the uniformity of concentration of radon in a radon chamber was established. The proposed method was applied to evaluate the HD-6 small and medium-sized radon chambers and achieved good results. PMID:26821207

  12. Passive Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J.; Baugher, Charles; Alexander, Iwan

    1992-01-01

    Motion of ball in liquid indicates acceleration. Passive accelerometer measures small accelerations along cylindrical axis. Principle of operation based on Stokes' law. Provides accurate measurements of small quasi-steady accelerations. Additional advantage, automatically integrates out unwanted higher-frequency components of acceleration.

  13. Study of temporal variation of radon concentrations in public drinking water supplies

    SciTech Connect

    York, E.L.

    1995-12-31

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for radon-222 in public drinking water supplies of 300 pCi/L. Proposed monitoring requirements include collecting quarterly grab samples for the first year, then annual samples for the remainder of the compliance cycle provided first year quarterly samples average below the MCL. The focus of this research was to study the temporal variation of groundwater radon concentrations to investigate how reliably one can predict an annual average radon concentration based on the results of grab samples. Using a {open_quotes}slow-flow{close_quotes} collection method and liquid scintillation analysis, biweekly water samples were taken from ten public water supply wells in North Carolina (6 month - 11 month sampling periods). Based on study results, temporal variations exist in groundwater radon concentrations. Statistical analysis performed on the data indicates that grab samples taken from each of the ten wells during the study period would exhibit groundwater radon concentrations within 30% of their average radon concentration.

  14. "Radon Concentration Survey in Inner Rooms from Deputy Chamber and National Congress—Brasília/DF"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nícoli, Ieda Gomes; Cardozo, Kátia Maria; de Azevedo Gouvea, Vandir

    2008-08-01

    Radon gas has been monitored in many environments such as rural and urban houses, high natural radioactivity areas and underground mining regions. Nevertheless few data are reported in literature about studies in state buildings. So we get in touch with these buildings managers, where work the Deputy Chamber and the National Congress in Brasília—DF, in order to obtain radon data in these state buildings, so representative for brazilian people. In order to make a preliminary scanning of radon concentration in these buildings, it was put in selected points, radon nuclear track passive detectors type SSNTD, specifically polycarbonate Lexan, which were exposed for periods from two to five months. Afterwards they were sent to Nuclear Engineering Institute in Rio de Janeiro for analysis of 222Rn contents. Derived values, whose average value was about 73 Bq/m3, were all under maximum permissible limits for radon 200 Bq/m3, established by International Comission on Radiological Protection—ICRP 65, for inner environments of houses and state buildings. This work has been coordinated by CNEN Office in Brasélia with effective participation of Nuclear Engineering Institute from CNEN—RJ, that has worked since beginning of april 2004, supplying and analysing radon detectors.

  15. Indoor radon concentration data: Its geographic and geologic distribution, an example from the Capital District, NY

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.J.; Overeynder, H.M.; Thomas, B.R.

    1995-09-01

    Most studies of the geographic distribution of indoor radon levels are plotted by county or ZIP code. This method is used for the radon potential maps produced by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH). The basis for the mapping is the mean or median indoor radon count for all the data provided by NYSDOH within each geographic area. While testing the indoor radon analyses provided to the authors by CMT Independent Laboratories, we discovered data that deviated markedly from the EPA and NYSDOH means for the Capital District of New York (Albany and surrounding counties). Their screening indoor radon average concentrations in pCi/L, indicate low potential for Schenectady (3.0), Saratoga (3.2), and Albany (3.7) counties; and moderate potential for Rensselaer (6.4) and Columbia (7.0) counties. Our database of over 3,000 analyses contains over 800 records of indoor radon counts above 4 pCi/L (14-47% of each county`s analyses), many high enough to be rated as a serious health hazard. In order to obtain greater precision of information, the authors plotted their indoor radon data by street address using MapInfo, a geographic Information System (GIS), and StreetInfo, MapInfo`s TIGER address database. We compared the geographic distribution of our data to both the Bedrock Geology and Surficial Geology Maps of New York State. The results show a striking relationship of radon concentrations to bedrock, faults and permeability of surficial material. Data being compiled and mapped by street address by the NYSDOH in Erie County in western New York, confirm our results.

  16. Successes and Challenges in Implementation of Radon Control Activities in Iowa, 2010–2015

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Anne L.; Miller, Laura L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Radon gas has recently become more prominent in discussions of lung cancer prevention nationally and in Iowa. A review in 2013 of cancer plans in the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program found that 42% of cancer plans, including Iowa’s, had terminology on radon. Plans included awareness activities, home testing, remediation, policy, and policy evaluation. Community Context Iowa has the highest average radon concentrations in the United States; 70% of homes have radon concentrations above the Environmental Protection Agency’s action levels. Radon control activities in Iowa are led by the Iowa Cancer Consortium, the Iowa Department of Public Health, and the Iowa Radon Coalition. Methods A collaborative approach was used to increase levels of awareness, testing, and (if necessary) mitigation, and to introduce a comprehensive radon control policy in Iowa by engaging partners and stakeholders across the state. Outcome The multipronged approach and collaborative work in Iowa appears to have been successful in increasing awareness: the number of radon tests completed in Iowa increased by 20% from 19,600 in 2009 to 23,500 in 2014, and the number of mitigations completed by certified mitigators increased by 108% from 2,600 to more than 5,400. Interpretation Through collaboration, Iowa communities are engaged in activities that led to increases in awareness, testing, mitigation, and policy. States interested in establishing a similar program should consider a multipronged approach involving multiple entities and stakeholders with different interests and abilities. Improvements in data collection and analysis are necessary to assess impact. PMID:27079648

  17. National radon contractor proficiency program. Proficiency report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    The report lists those individual contractors who have met the requirements of the Radon Contractor Proficiency (PCP) Program as of December 15, 1990. These requirements are designed to provide minimum proficiency criteria for individuals who design and supervise the installation of radon mitigation systems in buildings. The RCP Program measures the proficiency of an individual contractor, not their company. The report provides the program requirements, RCP mitigation guidelines, State Radon contacts, and information on how to use the RCP tables.

  18. Arsenic, asbestos and radon: emerging players in lung tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The cause of lung cancer is generally attributed to tobacco smoking. However lung cancer in never smokers accounts for 10 to 25% of all lung cancer cases. Arsenic, asbestos and radon are three prominent non-tobacco carcinogens strongly associated with lung cancer. Exposure to these agents can lead to genetic and epigenetic alterations in tumor genomes, impacting genes and pathways involved in lung cancer development. Moreover, these agents not only exhibit unique mechanisms in causing genomic alterations, but also exert deleterious effects through common mechanisms, such as oxidative stress, commonly associated with carcinogenesis. This article provides a comprehensive review of arsenic, asbestos, and radon induced molecular mechanisms responsible for the generation of genetic and epigenetic alterations in lung cancer. A better understanding of the mode of action of these carcinogens will facilitate the prevention and management of lung cancer related to such environmental hazards. PMID:23173984

  19. Radon survey in Greece--risk assesment.

    PubMed

    Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios; Louizi, Anna; Koukouliou, Virginia; Serefoglou, Athina; Georgiou, Evangelos; Ntalles, Konstantinos; Proukakis, Charalambos

    2002-01-01

    A large scale radon survey using track etch detectors has been carried out from 1995 to 1998 in Greece in order to estimate the radon concentrations in Greek dwellings and the exposure of the Greek population to radon. The total data set consisted of 1,277 samples. Residential potential alpha energy concentration values ranged between (0.024 +/- 0.009) and (8 +/- 1) WLM per year (P < 0.05) and effective doses between (0.09 +/- 0.04) and (28 +/- 4) mSv (P < 0.05). The mean lifetime risk for the Greek population due to radon was found to be 0.4%.

  20. Radon in outdoor air in Nevada.

    PubMed

    Price, J G; Rigby, J G; Christensen, L; Hess, R; LaPointe, D D; Ramelli, A R; Desilets, M; Hopper, R D; Kluesner, T; Marshall, S

    1994-04-01

    Measurements of radon at 50 sites with varying geology indicate that outdoor air in Nevada is comparable to that measured nationwide by Hopper et al. (1991). The statewide median of 15 Bq m-3 (0.4 pCi L-1) is essentially the same as the nationwide median. The range is considerable: from 2.6-52 Bq m-3 (0.07-1.40 pCi L-1). Variations in these measurements can generally be correlated with different concentrations of radon in soils and uranium and its progeny in rocks. Silica-rich igneous rocks (rhyolites and granites) appear to be the main sources of high levels of radon in outdoor air in Nevada. Concentrations of radon in outdoor air generally correlate with levels of radon in soil gas. Measurements taken from heights of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 m above the ground suggest that radon in outdoor air reflects the local geology throughout this range of heights. Towns for which > 20% of the homes have indoor-air radon concentrations > 48 Bq m-3 (4 pCi L-1) generally have relatively high soil-gas radon, relatively high outdoor-air radon, or both.

  1. Low-Cost Radon Reduction Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, William B.; Francisco, Paul W.; Merrin, Zachary

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the research was to conduct a primary scoping study on the impact of air sealing between the foundation and the living space on radon transport reduction across the foundation-living space floor assembly. Fifteen homes in the Champaign, Illinois area participated in the study. These homes were instrumented for hourly continuous radon measurements and simultaneous temperature and humidity the foundation was improved. However, this improved isolation did not lead to significant reductions in radon concentration in the living space. Other factors such as outdoor temperature were shown to have an impact on radon concentration.

  2. Potential health effects of indoor radon exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Radford, E P

    1985-01-01

    Radon-222 is a ubiquitous noble gas arising from decay of radium-226 normally present in the earth's crust. Alpha radiation from inhaled short-lived daughters of radon readily irradiates human bronchial epithelium, and there is now good evidence of excess risk of lung cancer in underground miners exposed to higher concentrations. In homes, radon levels are highly variable, showing approximately log-normal distributions and often a small fraction of homes with high concentrations of radon and radon daughters. Factors affecting indoor concentrations include type of bedrock under dwellings, house foundation characteristics, radon dissolved in artesian water, and ventilation and degree of air movement in living spaces. Despite much recent work, exposures to radon daughters by the general public are not well defined. From application of risk assessments in miners to home conditions, it appears that about 25% or more of lung cancers among nonsmokers over the age of 60, and about 5% in smokers, may be attributable to exposure to radon daughters at home. It may be necessary to take remedial action to reduce this hazard in those dwellings with elevated levels of radon, and new construction should take account of this problem. PMID:4085431

  3. Radon emanation on the San Andreas Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, C. Y.

    1978-01-01

    Radon is a radioactive gas with a half-life of 3.8 days. (Half-life is the time required for the substance to lose half of its radioactivity by decay.) It is itself produced by the decay of uranium. Radon is constantly emanated from the Earth into the atmosphere. Many cases are known where anomalously large amounts of radon have been given off along active faults. THe radon emanation has shown variations with time that are related to changing atmospheric conidtions and possibly to nearby seismic activity. 

  4. Radon emanation of rock and soil samples: A tool for stratigraphy, geology, geophysical modelling and radon health hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girault, Frédéric; Koirala, Bharat P.; Bhattarai, Mukunda; Rajaure, Sudhir; Richon, Patrick; Perrier, Frédéric

    2010-05-01

    Radium-226, the mother of radon-222, with a half-life of 1600 years, is intrinsically present in all the rocks and soils in variable amount. However, a small part only of the radium atoms is able to produce radon atoms in the porous media of the rock allowing this radon to escape the rock media through the pore space. This fraction of radium is referred to as the radon source term in rocks or soils, and is usually called the effective radium concentration (ECRa). This parameter is expressed in Bq kg-1, where CRa is the radium-226 concentration and E the emanation coefficient. Considering a sample, it is not possible to estimate its ECRa value a priori. Therefore, this parameter has to be measured in the laboratory. The method in the laboratory to obtain ECRa values is based on the measurement of the concentration of radon in the inner air of a hermetically sealed container in which one rock or one soil sample was previously placed. In order to measure this radon concentration, Lucas scintillation flasks were used, and their radon content counted by a photomultiplier (Stoulos et al., Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 2003). This method was compared in detail with another method using SSNTD (Solid-State Nuclear Track Detector). Detailed investigations have been carried out, including systematic effects such as the shape or volume of container, mass and preparation method of the sample, using a large number of rock, soil and building material samples (more than 800) collected in France and Nepal. Preliminary results will be given based on this data set. With such a large sample, some effects of intrinsic and external factors on the measurement technique and on the obtained results could also be accurately studied: the effect of atmospheric pressure, of the ambient temperature, or of the water content of the sample. ECRa measurements appear to be particularly useful for human health hazards study on a considered natural site, as well as for other applications

  5. [Passive smoking].

    PubMed

    Grandjean, E; Weber, A; Fischer, T

    1979-03-01

    Passive smoking is the involuntary inspiration of smoky indoor air. Based on the information available today, it may be assumed that passive smoking normally is no health hazard as far as the classical smoker's diseases (lung cancer, myocardial infarct, etc.) are concerned. Nevertheless, it is probable that irritations caused by tobacco smoke have an unfavorable influence on the health of small children and that of already sick persons. The main problem of passive smoking is annoyance due to odor and irritations of eyes and respiratory organs. Our investigations in a climatic chamber with healthy subjects show that air pollution caused by tobacco smoke as indicated by 5 ppm CO leads to marked eye irritations--objectively as well as subjectively--in 15 to 20% of the subjects. This corresponds to smoking 10 cigarettes per hour in a small room with an air ventilation rate of four times per hour. If air pollution caused by tobacco smoke lies below the level of 2 ppm CO, irritations and annoyance for healthy persons are regarded as low and tolerable. This corresponds to about four cigarettes per hour under the same circumstances.

  6. Preliminary risk assessment of radon in groundwater: a case study from Eskisehir, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yuce, Galip; Gasparon, Massimo

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the radon concentrations in the water supplies of a residential area of central west Anatolia, Turkey. This research provides a preliminary risk assessment for inhabitants in the study area which can be applied for other regions. In 14 out of the 19 water supplies analysed, radon concentrations exceeded the maximum contaminant level (11.1 Bq l(-1)). The total annual effective doses of 10 for the wet season and 14 for the dry season out of the 19 water supplies are greater than the values recommended by EPA [Cancer Risk Coefficients for Environmental Exposure to Radionuclides, Federal Guidance Report No. 13 (US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, 1999) < http://www.epa.gov/rpdweb00/docs/federal/402-r-99-001.pdf >] (0.1 mSv a(-1)). The elevated radon concentrations in water resources are most probably linked with geological origin which contains significant amounts of radioactive minerals.

  7. Alerting the apathetic and reassuring the alarmed: communicating about radon risk in three communities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chess, C.; Hance, B.J.

    1988-08-01

    Public reaction to the risk from radon varied widely in three communities chosen for qualitative analysis. In Boyertown, PA, some residents were very alarmed, but most were apathetic toward this newly identified environmental risk. In Clinton, NJ, residents were concerned and worked with the mayor and the state to determine whether they were at risk and to disseminate information about mitigation of high indoor radon levels. Residents in Vernon, New Jersey were very alarmed and actively opposed the state's decision to site low-level radium wastes there. The qualitative study examines why reactions differed among the three communities, and extracts lessons for communicating about the risk from radon. These lessons should apply to communicating about other environmental hazards to individuals and communities.

  8. Radon as an Anthropogenic Indoor Air Pollutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Crockett, Robin

    2016-04-01

    Radon is generally regarded as a naturally occurring radiological hazard but we report here measurements of significant, hazardous radon concentrations that arise from man-made sources, including granite ornaments/artefacts, uranium glass and glazed objects as well radium dial watches. This presentation concerns an examination and assessment of health risks from radium and uranium found in historical artefacts, many of which were once viewed as everyday items, and the radon that emanates from them. Such objects were very popular in industrialised countries such as the USA, UK and European countries) particularly between and including the two World Wars but are still readily available. A watch collection examined gave rise to a hazardous radon concentration of 13.24 kBq•m-3 approximately 67 times the Domestic Action Level of 200 Bq•m-3.The results for an aircraft altimeter are comparable to those of the watches, indicating radon activity equivalent to several watches, and also indicate an equilibrium concentration in the 16.3 m3 room ca. 33 times the UK domestic Action Level. Results from a granite block indicate a radon emanation of 19.7 Bq•kg-1, but the indicated equilibrium concentration in the 16.3 m3 room is only ca. 1.7% of the UK domestic Action Level. Uranium-glazed crockery and green uranium glass were scoped for radon activity. The former yielded a radon concentration of ca. 44 Bq•m-3 in a small (7 L) sealed container. The latter yielded a lower radon concentration in a larger (125 L) sealed container of ca. 6 Bq•m-3. This is barely above the background radon concentration in the laboratory, which was typically ca. 1-2 Bq•m-3. Individual items then are capable of giving rise to radon concentrations in excess of the UK Domestic Action Level in rooms in houses, particularly if poorly ventilated. We highlight the gap in the remediation protocols, which are focused on preventing radon entering buildings from outside, with regard to internally

  9. Using soil gas radon and geology to estimate regional radon potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimer, G.M.

    1992-01-01

    Two important parameters have been identified in order to estimate the radon potential of a region. They are the soil gas radon concentration and the geological rock type from which soils are derived. A simple soil gas collection and analytical technique has been developed to provide information on soil gas radon concentrations. The application of these techniques has demonstrated a clear relationship between the estimate of the radon potential and indoor radon measurements. This information is particularly important when evaluating the radon potential of areas that will be subject to population expansion in the future. Other factors, such as gamma radiation measurements and soil permeability can be included to improve the estimate of radon potential, but geology and soil gas measurements are the most important factors. Although this approach is useful for regional estimates, it can also be used for site-specific evaluations.

  10. High radon levels in subterranean environments: monitoring and technical criteria to ensure human safety (case of Castañar cave, Spain).

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Gallego, Miriam; Garcia-Anton, Elena; Fernandez-Cortes, Angel; Cuezva, Soledad; Sanchez-Moral, Sergio

    2015-07-01

    Castañar cave contains the highest radon gas ((222)Rn) concentration in Spain with an annual average of 31.9 kBq m(-)(3). Seasonal variations with summer minimums and maximum values in fall were recorded. The reduction of air-filled porosity of soil and rock by condensation or rainfalls hides the radon exchange by gas diffusion, determining this seasonal stair-step pattern of the radon activity concentration in underground air. The effective total dose and the maximum hours permitted have been evaluated for the guides and public safety with a highly detailed radon measurement along 2011 and 2012. A network of 12 passive detectors (kodalphas) has been installed, as well as, two radon continuous monitoring in the most interesting geological sites of the subterranean environment. A follow up of the recommended time (max. 50 min) inside the underground environment has been analysed since the reopen to public visitors for not surpassing the legal maximum effective dose for tourists and guides. Results shown that public visitors would receive in fall a 12.1% of the total effective dose permitted per visit, whereas in summer it is reduced to 8.6%, while the cave guide received a total effective dose of 6.41 mSv in four months. The spatial radon maps allow defining the most suitable touristic paths according to the radon concentration distribution and therefore, appropriate fall and summer touristic paths are recommended.

  11. High radon levels in subterranean environments: monitoring and technical criteria to ensure human safety (case of Castañar cave, Spain).

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Gallego, Miriam; Garcia-Anton, Elena; Fernandez-Cortes, Angel; Cuezva, Soledad; Sanchez-Moral, Sergio

    2015-07-01

    Castañar cave contains the highest radon gas ((222)Rn) concentration in Spain with an annual average of 31.9 kBq m(-)(3). Seasonal variations with summer minimums and maximum values in fall were recorded. The reduction of air-filled porosity of soil and rock by condensation or rainfalls hides the radon exchange by gas diffusion, determining this seasonal stair-step pattern of the radon activity concentration in underground air. The effective total dose and the maximum hours permitted have been evaluated for the guides and public safety with a highly detailed radon measurement along 2011 and 2012. A network of 12 passive detectors (kodalphas) has been installed, as well as, two radon continuous monitoring in the most interesting geological sites of the subterranean environment. A follow up of the recommended time (max. 50 min) inside the underground environment has been analysed since the reopen to public visitors for not surpassing the legal maximum effective dose for tourists and guides. Results shown that public visitors would receive in fall a 12.1% of the total effective dose permitted per visit, whereas in summer it is reduced to 8.6%, while the cave guide received a total effective dose of 6.41 mSv in four months. The spatial radon maps allow defining the most suitable touristic paths according to the radon concentration distribution and therefore, appropriate fall and summer touristic paths are recommended. PMID:25863322

  12. A statistical evaluation of the influence of housing characteristics and geogenic radon potential on indoor radon concentrations in France.

    PubMed

    Demoury, C; Ielsch, G; Hemon, D; Laurent, O; Laurier, D; Clavel, J; Guillevic, J

    2013-12-01

    Radon-222 is a radioactive natural gas produced by the decay of radium-226, known to be the main contributor to natural background radiation exposure. Effective risk management needs to determine the areas in which the density of buildings with high radon levels is likely to be highest. Predicting radon exposure from the location and characteristics of a dwelling could also contribute to epidemiological studies. Beginning in the nineteen-eighties, a national radon survey consisting in more than 10,000 measurements of indoor radon concentrations was conducted in French dwellings by the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN). Housing characteristics, which may influence radon accumulation in dwellings, were also collected. More recently, the IRSN generated a French geogenic radon potential map based on the interpretation of geological features. The present study analyzed the two datasets to investigate the factors influencing indoor radon concentrations using statistical modeling and to determine the optimum use of the information on geogenic radon potential that showed the best statistical association with indoor radon concentration. The results showed that the variables associated with indoor radon concentrations were geogenic radon potential, building material, year of construction, foundation type, building type and floor level. The model, which included the surrounding geogenic radon potential (i.e. the average geogenic radon potential within a disc of radius 20 km centered on the indoor radon measurement point) and variables describing house-specific factors and lifestyle explained about 20% of the overall variability of the logarithm of radon concentration. The surrounding geogenic radon potential was fairly closely associated with the local average indoor radon concentration. The prevalence of exposure to radon above specific thresholds and the average exposures to radon clearly increased with increasing classes of geogenic radon

  13. Monitoring of atmospheric gamma radiation and radon observations of rainfall events in southeast of Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, I. M.; Alves, M. A.; Gomes, M. P.

    2013-05-01

    It is well known that we live in an environment that is under the influence of radioactivity. Radioactive elements in Earth's crust, cosmic rays, and anthropogenic sources contribute to the radiation of different types (alpha, beta, gamma and X-rays) that can be measured. An interesting phenomenon associated with environmental radioactivity is radon washout wherein the radon gas that is produced by the decay of natural radioactive elements and released into the atmosphere is concentrated near ground by falling rain. Rain drops trap radon in their interior and transport this radioactive gas to the surface. In this study, we describe the monitoring of the localized and temporary increase in the natural radioactivity caused by radon washout using a 3"x 3" NaI(Tl) scintillator. Variations in the radioactivity were correlated with changes in meteorological conditions. We observed that even though rainfall is a main factor in the increase of natural radioactivity near ground, other factors such as the presence of fog and winds play an important role in the concentration and dispersion of radon. Because of the low cost of our experimental set up, we believe that this is an experiment that could easily be conducted in most universities and could also be used to monitor environmental radioactivity levels.

  14. Comparison of Ambient Radon Concentrations in Air in the Northern Mojave Desert from Continuous and Integrating Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    David S. Shafer; David McGraw; Lynn H. Karr; Greg McCurdy; Tammy L. Kluesner; Karen J. Gray; Jeffrey Tappen

    2010-05-18

    As part of a program to characterize and baseline environmental parameters, ambient radon-222 (Rn) monitoring was conducted in the rural community of Amargosa Valley, NV, the closest community to Yucca Mountain. Passive integrating and continuous Rn monitoring instruments were deployed adjacent to the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) station in Amargosa Valley. The CEMP station provided real-time ambient gamma exposure and meteorological data used to correct the integrated Rn measurements, verified the meteorological data collected by the continuous Rn monitoring instrument, and for provided instrumentation for evaluating the relationships between meteorological conditions and Rn concentrations. Hourly Rn concentrations in air measured by the continuous Rn monitoring instrument (AlphaGUARD®) were compared to the average hourly values for the integrating Rn measurements (E-PERM®) by dividing the total Rn measurements by the number of hours the instruments were deployed. The results of the comparison indicated that average hourly ambient Rn concentrations as measured by both methods ranged from 0.2 to 0.4 pico-curies per liter of air. Ambient Rn values for the AlphaGUARD exhibited diurnal variations. When Rn concentrations were compared with measurements of temperature (T), barometric pressure, and relative humidity, the correlation (inversely) was highest with T, albeit weakly.

  15. TEST CELL STUDIES OF RADON ENTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to contrast the effectiveness of slab-in-stem wall (SSW) with floating slab (FS) construction practices, to measure radon transport and entry for model testing, to develop protocols relevant to depressurized radon measurements, and to determine...

  16. Exposure to unusually high indoor radon levels

    SciTech Connect

    Rasheed, F.N. )

    1993-03-27

    Unusually high indoor radon concentrations were reported in a small village in western Tyrol, Austria. The authors have measured the seasonal course of indoor radon concentrations in 390 houses of this village. 71% of houses in winter and 33% in summer, showed radon values on the ground floor above the Austrian action level of 400 Bq/cm[sup 3]. This proportion results in an unusually high indoor radon exposure of the population. The radon source was an 8,700-year-old rock slide of granite gneiss, the largest of the alpine crystalline rocks. It has a strong emanating power because its rocks are heavily fractured and show a slightly increased uranium content. Previous reports show increased lung cancer mortality, myeloid leukemia, kidney cancer, melanoma, and prostate cancer resulting from indoor radon exposure. However, many studies fail to provide accurate information on indoor radon concentrations, classifying them merely as low, intermediate, and high, or they record only minor increases in indoor radon concentrations. Mortality data for 1970-91 were used to calculate age and sex standardized mortality rates (SMR) for 51 sites of carcinoma. The total population of Tyrol were controls. A significantly higher risk was recorded for lung cancer. The high SMR for lung cancer in female subjects is especially striking. Because the numbers were low for the other cancer sites, these were combined in one group to calculate the SMR. No significant increase in SMR was found for this group.

  17. Modeling of radon transport in unsaturated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.; Green, R.

    1995-08-10

    This study applies a recently developed model, LEACHV, to simulate transport of radon through unsaturated soil and compares calculated soil radon activities against field-measured values. For volatile and gas phase transport, LEACHV is modified from LEACHP, a pesticide version of LEACHM, as well-documented one-dimensional model for water and chemical movement through unsaturated soil. LEACHV adds consideration of air temperature changes and air flow driven by barometric pressure change to the other soil variables currently used in LEACHP. It applies diurnal barometric pressure and air temperature changes to reflect more accurately the typical field conditions, Sensitivity analysis and simulated results have clearly demonstrated the relative importance of barometric pressure change, rainfall events, changes in water content, gas advection, and radon source term in radon transport process. Comparisons among simulated results illustrated that the importance of barometric pressure change and its pumping phenomenon produces both fluctuation in soil gas radon activities and an elevation of the long-term average radon activity in shallow soils of an equal magnitude to the disturbed source parameter. Comparisons between measured and simulated soil radon activities showed that LEACHV can provide realistic estimates of radon activity concentration in the soil profile. 41 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Wavelet analysis of radon time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Susana; Pereira, Alcides; Neves, Luis

    2013-04-01

    Radon is a radioactive noble gas with a half-life of 3.8 days ubiquitous in both natural and indoor environments. Being produced in uranium-bearing materials by decay from radium, radon can be easily and accurately measured by nuclear methods, making it an ideal proxy for time-varying geophysical processes. Radon time series exhibit a complex temporal structure and large variability on multiple scales. Wavelets are therefore particularly suitable for the analysis on a scale-by-scale basis of time series of radon concentrations. In this study continuous and discrete wavelet analysis is applied to describe the variability structure of hourly radon time series acquired both indoors and on a granite site in central Portugal. A multi-resolution decomposition is performed for extraction of sub-series associated to specific scales. The high-frequency components are modeled in terms of stationary autoregressive / moving average (ARMA) processes. The amplitude and phase of the periodic components are estimated and tidal features of the signals are assessed. Residual radon concentrations (after removal of periodic components) are further examined and the wavelet spectrum is used for estimation of the corresponding Hurst exponent. The results for the several radon time series considered in the present study are very heterogeneous in terms of both high-frequency and long-term temporal structure indicating that radon concentrations are very site-specific and heavily influenced by local factors.

  19. Radon Risk Communication Strategies: A Regional Story.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Winnie

    2016-01-01

    Risk communication on the health effects of radon encounters many challenges and requires a variety of risk communication strategies and approaches. The concern over radon exposure and its health effects may vary according to people's level of knowledge and receptivity. Homeowners in radon-prone areas are usually more informed and have greater concern over those not living in radon-prone areas. The latter group is often found to be resistant to testing. In British Columbia as well as many other parts of the country, some homes have been lying outside of the radon-prone areas have radon levels above the Canadian guideline, which is the reason Health Canada recommends that all homes should be tested. Over the last five years, the Environment Health Program (EHP) of Health Canada in the British Columbia region has been using a variety of different approaches in their radon risk communications through social media, workshops, webinars, public forums, poster contests, radon distribution maps, public inquiries, tradeshows and conference events, and partnership with different jurisdictions and nongovernmental organizations. The valuable lessons learned from these approaches are discussed in this special report. PMID:26867298

  20. Radon Risk Communication Strategies: A Regional Story.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Winnie

    2016-01-01

    Risk communication on the health effects of radon encounters many challenges and requires a variety of risk communication strategies and approaches. The concern over radon exposure and its health effects may vary according to people's level of knowledge and receptivity. Homeowners in radon-prone areas are usually more informed and have greater concern over those not living in radon-prone areas. The latter group is often found to be resistant to testing. In British Columbia as well as many other parts of the country, some homes have been lying outside of the radon-prone areas have radon levels above the Canadian guideline, which is the reason Health Canada recommends that all homes should be tested. Over the last five years, the Environment Health Program (EHP) of Health Canada in the British Columbia region has been using a variety of different approaches in their radon risk communications through social media, workshops, webinars, public forums, poster contests, radon distribution maps, public inquiries, tradeshows and conference events, and partnership with different jurisdictions and nongovernmental organizations. The valuable lessons learned from these approaches are discussed in this special report.

  1. SITE-SPECIFIC MEASUREMENTS OF RESIDENTIAL RADON PROTECTION CATEGORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a series of benchmark measurements of soil radon potential at seven Florida sites and compares the measurements with regional estimates of radon potential from the Florida radon protection map. The measurements and map were developed under the Florida Radon R...

  2. Hidden Hazards of Radon: Scanning the Country for Problem Locations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gundersen, Linda C. S.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the geology of the radon problem in the United States and suggests how homeowners can cope with the radio active gas. Vignettes illustrate how and where radon is produced beneath the earth's surface, testing sites and procedures for radon in houses, and locations for potential radon problems across the United States. (MCO)

  3. Air cleaning and radon decay product mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K. ); Li, C.S. . John B. Pierce Foundation Lab.); Ramamurthi, M. )

    1990-01-01

    We evaluated air cleaning as a means to mitigate risks arising from exposure to indoor radon progeny in several single-family houses in the northeastern United States, using a new, automated, semi-continuous activity-weighted size distribution measurement system. Measurements included radon concentration, condensation nuclei count, and activity-weighted size distribution of radon decay products. Measurements were made with and without the air cleaning system operating. The influence of particles generated by various sources common to normal indoor activities on radon progeny behavior was evaluated. Aerosols were generated by running water in a shower, burning candles, smoking cigarettes, vacuuming, opening doors, and cooking. Both a filtration unit and an electrostatic precipitator were evaluated. Using a room model, the changes in attachment rates, average attachment diameters, and deposition rates of the unattached'' fraction with and without the air cleaning systems were calculated. The air cleaner typically reduced the radon progeny concentrations by 50 to 60%.

  4. Air cleaning and radon decay product mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.; Li, C.S.; Ramamurthi, M.

    1990-12-31

    We evaluated air cleaning as a means to mitigate risks arising from exposure to indoor radon progeny in several single-family houses in the northeastern United States, using a new, automated, semi-continuous activity-weighted size distribution measurement system. Measurements included radon concentration, condensation nuclei count, and activity-weighted size distribution of radon decay products. Measurements were made with and without the air cleaning system operating. The influence of particles generated by various sources common to normal indoor activities on radon progeny behavior was evaluated. Aerosols were generated by running water in a shower, burning candles, smoking cigarettes, vacuuming, opening doors, and cooking. Both a filtration unit and an electrostatic precipitator were evaluated. Using a room model, the changes in attachment rates, average attachment diameters, and deposition rates of the ``unattached`` fraction with and without the air cleaning systems were calculated. The air cleaner typically reduced the radon progeny concentrations by 50 to 60%.

  5. Radon risk perception and testing: Sociodemographic correlates

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.T.; Warner, K.E. . Technology Assessment and Policy Research Center)

    1994-03-01

    While numerous health education campaigns have been carried out to alert the public to radon's potential dangers and to encourage testing and mitigation, there has been little follow-up to determine which segments of the public are now most aware of the possible hazards of radon. Using information from the 1990 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), the authors have examined beliefs regarding radon and radon-testing activities among different sociodemographic groups. They used logistic regression to determine the relationship between these beliefs and actions and age, gender, education, income, minority status, and smoking status. The results suggest relatively superficial knowledge regarding radon, and very little testing, within the survey population. In particular, significantly less knowledge was observed among female and minority respondents, while less testing behavior was seen among older respondents. Lower educational levels and lower family income were associated with both decreased knowledge and testing. Recommendations for future education campaigns are discussed.

  6. Indoor radon risk potential of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimer, G.M.; Szarzi, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive evaluation of radon risk potential in the State of Hawaii indicates that the potential for Hawaii is low. Using a combination of factors including geology, soils, source-rock type, soil-gas radon concentrations, and indoor measurements throughout the state, a general model was developed that permits prediction for various regions in Hawaii. For the nearly 3,100 counties in the coterminous U.S., National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) aerorad data was the primary input factor. However, NURE aerorad data was not collected in Hawaii, therefore, this study used geology and soil type as the primary and secondary components of potential prediction. Although the radon potential of some Hawaiian soils suggests moderate risk, most houses are built above ground level and the radon soil potential is effectively decoupled from the house. Only underground facilities or those with closed or recirculating ventilation systems might have elevated radon potential. ?? 2005 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  7. Radon exposure and oropharyngeal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Espinosa, Tania; Barros-Dios, Juan Miguel; Ruano-Ravina, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer is a multifactorial disease. Alcohol and tobacco are the main risk factors. Radon is a human carcinogen linked to lung cancer risk, but its influence in other cancers is not well known. We aim to assess the effect of radon exposure on the risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer through a systematic review of the scientific literature. This review performs a qualitative analysis of the available studies. 13 cohort studies were included, most of them mortality studies, which analysed the relationship between occupational or residential radon exposure with oropharyngeal cancer mortality or incidence. Most of the included studies found no association between radon exposure and oral and pharyngeal cancer. This lack of effect was observed in miners studies and in general population studies. Further research is necessary to quantify if this association really exists and its magnitude, specially performing studies in general population, preferably living in areas with high radon levels.

  8. The role of passive sampling in monitoring the environmental impacts of produced water discharges from the Norwegian oil and gas industry.

    PubMed

    Hale, Sarah E; Oen, Amy M P; Cornelissen, Gerard; Jonker, Michiel T O; Waarum, Ivar-Kristian; Eek, Espen

    2016-10-15

    Stringent and periodic iteration of regulations related to the monitoring of chemical releases from the offshore oil and gas industry requires the use of ever changing, rapidly developing and technologically advancing techniques. Passive samplers play an important role in water column monitoring of produced water (PW) discharge to seawater under Norwegian regulation, where they are used to; i) measure aqueous concentrations of pollutants, ii) quantify the exposure of caged organisms and investigate PW dispersal, and iii) validate dispersal models. This article summarises current Norwegian water column monitoring practice and identifies research and methodological gaps for the use of passive samplers in monitoring. The main gaps are; i) the range of passive samplers used should be extended, ii) differences observed in absolute concentrations accumulated by passive samplers and organisms should be understood, and iii) the link between PW discharge concentrations and observed acute and sub-lethal ecotoxicological end points in organisms should be investigated.

  9. Radon Monitoring Results BPA Residential Weatherization Program, Report Number 1.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-01-01

    In October 1984, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began offering free radon monitoring to participants of its regionwide Residential Weatherization Program. The purpose of the radon monitoring is to provide information to participating homeowners or consumers on the average radon concentrations within their residences. This radon concentration information and other information on indoor air quality (IAQ) is provided to assist homeowners on their decision to install ''house-tightening'' weatherization measures. This radon report will present background information on why BPA decided to offer radon monitoring, the procedures used for monitoring, the extent of BPA radon monitoring in the region, and results of this monitoring. Subsequent BPA radon monitoring reports will be produced on a quarterly basis which will include a brief narrative on the radon monitoring and provide a summary of the radon data received to date.

  10. Indoor radon and lung cancer in China

    SciTech Connect

    Blot, W.J.; Xu, Z.Y.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Zhao, D.Z.; Stone, B.J.; Sun, J.; Jing, L.B.; Fraumeni, J.F. Jr. )

    1990-06-20

    Radon has long been known to contribute to risk of lung cancer, especially in undergound miners who are exposed to large amounts of the carcinogen. Recently, however, lower amounts of radon present in living areas have been suggested as an important cause of lung cancer. In an effort to clarify the relationship of low amounts of radon with lung cancer risk, we placed alpha-track radon detectors in the homes of 308 women with newly diagnosed lung cancer and 356 randomly selected female control subjects of similar age. Measurements were taken after 1 year. All study participants were part of the general population of Shenyang, People's Republic of China, an industrial city in the northeast part of the country that has one of the world's highest rates of lung cancer in women. The median time of residence in the homes was 24 years. The median household radon level was 2.3 pCi/L of air; 20% of the levels were greater than 4 pCi/L. Radon levels tended to be higher in single-story houses or on the first floor of multiple-story dwellings, and they were also higher in houses with increased levels of indoor air pollution from coal-burning stoves. However, the levels were not higher in homes of women who developed lung cancer than in homes of controls, nor did lung cancer risk increase with increasing radon level. No association between radon and lung cancer was observed regardless of cigarette-smoking status, except for a nonsignificant trend among heavy smokers. No positive associations of lung cancer cell type with radon were observed, except for a nonsignificant excess risk of small cell cancers among the more heavily exposed residents. Our data suggest that projections from surveys of miners exposed to high radon levels may have overestimated the overall risks of lung cancer associated with levels typically seen in homes in this Chinese city.

  11. Radon and the system of radiological protection.

    PubMed

    Lecomte, J F

    2012-01-01

    At its meeting in Porto, Portugal, in November 2009, the Main Commission of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) approved the formation of a new Task Group, reporting to Committee 4, to develop guidance on radiological protection against radon exposure. This article describes the Task Group's draft report entitled "Radiological Protection against Radon Exposure" which has been posted on the ICRP website for public consultation between January and June 2012. In this report, the Commission provides updated guidance on radiological protection against radon exposure. The report was developed considering the recently consolidated ICRP general recommendations, the new scientific knowledge about radon risk, and the experience gained by many organisations and countries in the control of radon exposure. The report describes the characteristics of radon exposure, covering sources and transfer mechanisms, nature of the risk, exposure conditions, similarities with other existing exposure situations, and challenges to manage radon exposure. In order to control radon exposure, the Commission recommends an integrated approach that is focused as much as possible on the management of the building or location in which radon exposure occurs, regardless of the purpose of the building and the category of the occupants. This approach is based on the optimisation principle, and a graded approach according to the degree of responsibilities at stake, notably in workplaces, and the level of ambition of the national authorities. The report emphasises the importance of preventive actions, and provides recommendations on how to control radon exposure in workplaces when workers' exposure can reasonably be regarded as being the responsibility of the operating management. In such a case, workers' exposures are considered to be occupational, and are controlled using the corresponding requirements on the basis of the optimisation principle, and application, as appropriate

  12. The Influence of Meteorological Parameters and Other Factors on Soil Radon Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovleva, V. S.; Nagorsky, P. M.; Kondratyeva, A. G.; Mishina, N. V.

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents the results of the research in the degree of the effect of space weather meteorological parameters and factors on the dynamics of soil radon levels and α- and β-radiation flux densities in a seismically passive region. The cross-correlation analysis showed a significant correlation of β-radiation flux density with temperature in summer, and no correlation in winter. A significant relation between α- and β-radiation flux densities and pressure within the intra-annual range was not observed. The investigation of the high-intensity precipitation effect on radon volumetric activity and α- and β-radiation flux densities showed their abnormal increase. The dependence of the anomaly duration on the depth was revealed. The abnormal jumps in α- and β-radiation flux densities data series occur in the snow-melting periods as well. Low-intensity precipitations significantly violate the standard "diurnal variations" of α- and β-radiation soil fluxes and radon volumetric activity. Fourier analysis showed the diurnal (24 hours) and semidiurnal (12 hours) harmonics for the observed radiation values at a depth of 0.5 m. The obtained results can be used for interpretation of the data on the soil radon monitoring in order to predict earthquakes, etc.

  13. Design and Fabrication of A Modern Radon-Tight Chamber for Radon Concentration Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhalemi, Ahmed; Jaafar, M. S.

    2010-07-01

    A modern radon-tight chamber (RTC) has been designed and fabricated to meet the request and requirements for both the Professional Continuous Radon Monitor (PCRM), and the RAD7 radon detector. The chamber is cubic shaped, made of Perspex with a volume of about 0.125 m3. The RTC was also equipped with a thermometer and a humidity sensor. A pair of gloves was attached on one side of the chamber's lateral opening for operating the PCRM. In addition, a fan was installed to circulate the air, and to distribute the radon gas to ensure homogeneity after the air inside the chamber is evacuated with nitrogen gas. At the end of the monitoring period, the results of the concentration of the radon emanated from a sample placed inside the chamber will then be available in any of three forms: numerical display on the control panel of the radon detector, printed report on the accessory printer, or transferred into a file on a personal computer via the RS-232 Serial port without disturbing the radon concentration inside the chamber. Computer software is provided by the manufacturer for this purpose. The result of analysis was presented in a one-way ANOVA that indicated that the radon concentration means are not difference for the three different positions of the PCRM (P > 0.05). Thus, this RTC can be used to measure the radon concentration and its progeny; in addition, it can be used for research and useful studies on radon exhalation from building materials.

  14. Experimental assessment of indoor radon and soil gas variability: the RADON project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, S. M.; Pereira, A. J. S. C.; Neves, L. J. P. F.; Steinitz, G.; Zafrir, H.; Donner, R.; Woith, H.

    2012-04-01

    Radon is a radioactive noble gas naturally present in the environment, particularly in soils derived from rocks with high uranium content. Radon is formed by alpha decay from radium within solid mineral grains, but can migrate via diffusion and/or advection into the air space of soils, as well as into groundwater and the atmosphere. The exhalation of radon from the pore space of porous materials into the atmosphere of indoor environments is well known to cause adverse health effects due to the inhalation of radon's short-lived decay products. The danger to human health is particularly acute in the case of poorly ventilated dwellings located in geographical areas of high radon potential. The RADON project, funded by the Portuguese Science Foundation (FCT), aims to evaluate the temporal variability of radon in the soil and atmosphere and to examine the influence of meteorological effects in radon concentration. For that purpose an experimental monitoring station is being installed in an undisturbed dwelling located in a region of high radon potential near the old uranium mine of Urgeiriça (central Portugal). The rationale of the project, the set-up of the experimental radon monitoring station, and preliminary monitoring results will be presented.

  15. Measurement of short-lived radon progenies by simultaneous αγ-spectrometry at the German radon reference chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.; Röttger, S.; Honig, A.; Sulima, T.; Buchholz, A.; Keyser, Uwe

    1999-02-01

    In the German radon reference chamber, the short-lived radon progenies are separated by a sample tube according to the attached or unattached fraction, while their activity concentration is afterwards measured by simultaneous α- and γ-spectrometry. The results are expressed by the equilibrium factor F and the unattached fraction fp (International Commission on Radiological Protection, ICRP Publication 50, Ann. ICRP 17 (1987) 1). Both F and fp, can be therefore studied with respect to the full set of environmental parameters, e.g. temperature, humidity, air pressure and aerosol concentration (Honig et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 416 (1998) 525). Up to now, well-defined and stable equilibrium factors in the interval from 0.1 to 1.0 have been established. In correlation with this, the unattached fraction can be varied from 0.01 to 0.9. The sample and measuring technique for the short-lived radon progenies described in this work is the basis for fundamental studies with regard to the equilibrium factor and the unattached fraction as well as for application as a calibration facility.

  16. Home energy efficiency and radon related risk of lung cancer: modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Milner, James; Shrubsole, Clive; Das, Payel; Jones, Benjamin; Ridley, Ian; Chalabi, Zaid; Hamilton, Ian; Armstrong, Ben; Davies, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of reducing home ventilation as part of household energy efficiency measures on deaths from radon related lung cancer. Design Modelling study. Setting England. Intervention Home energy efficiency interventions, motivated in part by targets for reducing greenhouse gases, which entail reduction in uncontrolled ventilation in keeping with good practice guidance. Main outcome measures Modelled current and future distributions of indoor radon levels for the English housing stock and associated changes in life years due to lung cancer mortality, estimated using life tables. Results Increasing the air tightness of dwellings (without compensatory purpose-provided ventilation) increased mean indoor radon concentrations by an estimated 56.6%, from 21.2 becquerels per cubic metre (Bq/m3) to 33.2 Bq/m3. After the lag in lung cancer onset, this would result in an additional annual burden of 4700 life years lost and (at peak) 278 deaths. The increases in radon levels for the millions of homes that would contribute most of the additional burden are below the threshold at which radon remediation measures are cost effective. Fitting extraction fans and trickle ventilators to restore ventilation will help offset the additional burden but only if the ventilation related energy efficiency gains are lost. Mechanical ventilation systems with heat recovery may lower radon levels and the risk of cancer while maintaining the advantage of energy efficiency for the most airtight dwellings but there is potential for a major adverse impact on health if such systems fail. Conclusion Unless specific remediation is used, reducing the ventilation of dwellings will improve energy efficiency only at the expense of population wide adverse impact on indoor exposure to radon and risk of lung cancer. The implications of this and other consequences of changes to ventilation need to be carefully evaluated to ensure that the desirable health and environmental benefits of

  17. Exposure assessment of radon in the drinking water supplies: a descriptive study in Palestine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Radon gas is considered as a main risk factor for lung cancer and found naturally in rock, soil, and water. The objective of this study was to determine the radon level in the drinking water sources in Nablus city in order to set up a sound policy on water management in Palestine. Methods This was a descriptive study carried out in two phases with a random sampling technique in the second phase. Primarily, samples were taken from 4 wells and 5 springs that supplied Nablus city residents. For each source, 3 samples were taken and each was analyzed in 4 cycles by RAD 7 device manufactured by Durridge Company. Secondly, from the seven regions of the Nablus city, three samples were taken from the residential tap water of each region. Regarding the old city, ten samples were taken. Finally, the mean radon concentration value for each source was calculated. Results The mean (range) concentration of radon in the main sources were 6.9 (1.5-23.4) Becquerel/liter (Bq/L). Separately, springs and wells' means were 4.6 Bq/L and 9.5 Bq/L; respectively. For the residential tap water in the 7 regions, the results of the mean (range) concentration values were found to be 1.0 (0.9-1.3) Bq/L. For the old city, the mean (range) concentration values were 2.3 (0.9-3.9) Bq/L. Conclusions Except for Al-Badan well, radon concentrations in the wells and springs were below the United State Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminated level (U.S EPA MCL). The level was much lower for tap water. Although the concentration of radon in the tap water of old city were below the MCL, it was higher than other regions in the city. Preventive measures and population awareness on radon's exposure are recommended. PMID:22243625

  18. [Passive smoking. Effects on health].

    PubMed

    Trédaniel, J; Zalcman, G; Boffetta, P; Hirsch, A

    1993-05-15

    Passive smoking--also called involuntary or environmental smoking--is the exposure of non-smokers to the tobacco smoke released by smokers. The physico-chemical composition of tobacco smoke, and notably its contents in toxic and carcinogenic substances, is the same in the secondary stream between puffs as in the primary stream released by the smoker. The pathogenic effects of passive smoking are increasingly well known and accepted. A high incidence of respiratory tract infections and of chronic respiratory and asthmatic symptoms is observed in children. In adults, passive smoking seems to be one of the main risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Its repercussions on the respiratory tracts is difficult to evaluate, but there are marked by an increase of respiratory symptoms and perhaps of chronic obstructive lung diseases. Finally, it is now recognized that passive smoking is a major risk factor for primary lung cancer in non-smokers exposed to tobacco smoke. PMID:8235360

  19. Report to the United States Congress on radionuclides in drinking water: Multimedia risk and cost assessment of radon in drinking water. Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-15

    EPA prepared the report in response to the Congressional mandate in Public Law 102-389 (the Chafee-Lautenberg Amendment to EPA's Appropriation Bill, enacted October 6, 1992) which directs the Administrator of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to report to Congress on EPA's findings regarding the risks of human exposure to radon, the costs for controlling or mitigating that exposure, and the risks posed by treating water to remove radon. The Chafee-Lautenberg Amendment called for an explicit multimedia comparison of the risks from radon in indoor air and drinking water. Congress placed the requirement on the Agency because of the concern voiced in the United States over the costs to be incurred by public water systems in the control of radon in drinking water while a larger threat from indoor air was not being addressed except through voluntary measures. Amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act in 1986 called for the regulation of radon in drinking water.

  20. Use of linear regression models to determine influence factors on the concentration levels of radon in occupied houses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buermeyer, Jonas; Gundlach, Matthias; Grund, Anna-Lisa; Grimm, Volker; Spizyn, Alexander; Breckow, Joachim

    2016-09-01

    This work is part of the analysis of the effects of constructional energy-saving measures to radon concentration levels in dwellings performed on behalf of the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection. In parallel to radon measurements for five buildings, both meteorological data outside the buildings and the indoor climate factors were recorded. In order to access effects of inhabited buildings, the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) was measured. For a statistical linear regression model, the data of one object was chosen as an example. Three dummy variables were extracted from the process of the CO2 concentration to provide information on the usage and ventilation of the room. The analysis revealed a highly autoregressive model for the radon concentration with additional influence by the natural environmental factors. The autoregression implies a strong dependency on a radon source since it reflects a backward dependency in time. At this point of the investigation, it cannot be determined whether the influence by outside factors affects the source of radon or the habitant’s ventilation behavior resulting in variation of the occurring concentration levels. In any case, the regression analysis might provide further information that would help to distinguish these effects. In the next step, the influence factors will be weighted according to their impact on the concentration levels. This might lead to a model that enables the prediction of radon concentration levels based on the measurement of CO2 in combination with environmental parameters, as well as the development of advices for ventilation.

  1. Contribution of waterborne radon to home air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Deb, A.K.

    1994-12-31

    Radon-222 is a member of the uranium decay chain and is formed from the decay of radium-226. Radon and its decay products emit alpha particles during the decay process. If radon is inhaled, alpha particles emitted from inhaled radon and its daughters increase the risk of lung cancer. Radon is soluble in water; thus when radon comes in contact with groundwater it dissolves. The radon concentration in groundwater may range from 100 pCi/L to 1,000,000 pCi/L. When water with a high radon level is used in the home, radon is released from the water to the air and thus can increase indoor air radon concentration. Considering the estimated health risk from radon in public water supply systems, EPA has proposed a maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 300 pCi/L for radon in public drinking water supplies. To address the health risks of radon in water and the proposed regulations, the American Water Works Association Research Foundation (AWWARF) initiated a study to determine the contribution of waterborne radon to radon levels in indoor household air.

  2. Dose-dependent in vivo cell-cycle changes following radon progeny exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.F.; Carpenter, T.R.; Hickman, A.W.; Jaramillo, R.J.; Gurule, D.M.

    1994-11-01

    Exposures to low concentrations of alpha-emitting radon progeny are reported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to be the second leading cause of lung cancer. Current risk estimates for lung cancer from the inhalation of radon progeny are based on data from underground uranium miners. To produce such risk estimates, calculations are based on several assumptions concerning exposure-response relationships rather than dose-response relationships. A better understanding of the mechanisms of interactions between alpha particles, the cells of the respiratory tract, and the progression toward cancer may validate the mathematical models used to derive risk estimates.

  3. Radon, smoking, and lung cancer: the need to refocus radon control policy.

    PubMed

    Lantz, Paula M; Mendez, David; Philbert, Martin A

    2013-03-01

    Exposure to radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer, and the risk is significantly higher for smokers than for nonsmokers. More than 85% of radon-induced lung cancer deaths are among smokers. The most powerful approach for reducing the public health burden of radon is shaped by 2 overarching principles: public communication efforts that promote residential radon testing and remediation will be the most cost effective if they are primarily directed at current and former smokers; and focusing on smoking prevention and cessation is the optimal strategy for reducing radon-induced lung cancer in terms of both public health gains and economic efficiency. Tobacco control policy is the most promising route to the public health goals of radon control policy.

  4. Orphan radon daughters at Denver Radium site

    SciTech Connect

    Holub, R.F.; Droullard, R.F.; Davis, T.H.

    1992-12-31

    During 18 mo of sampling airborne radioactively at a National Priority List ({open_quotes}Superfund{close_quotes}) site in metroPOlitan Denver, Bureau of mines personnel discovered radon daughters that are not supported by the parent radon gas. We refer to them as {open_quotes}orphan{close_quotes} daughters because the parent, radon, is not present in sufficient concentration to support the measured daughter products. Measurements of the {open_quotes}orphan{close_quotes} daughters were made continuously, using the Bureau-developed radon and working-level (radon-daughter) monitors. The data showed high equilibrium ratios, ranging from 0.7 to 3.5, for long periods of time. Repeated, high-volume, 15-min grab samples were made, using the modified Tsivoglou method, to measure radon daughters, to which thoron daughters contributed 26 {+-} 12%. On average 28 {+-} 6% of the particulate activity was contributed by thoron daughters. Most samples were mixtures in which the {sup 218}Po concentration was lower than that of {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi, in agreement with the high-equilibrium factors obtained from the continuous sampling data. In view of the short half-life of radon progeny, we conclude that the source of the orphan daughters is not far from the Superfund sites. The mechanism of this phenomenon is not understood at this time, but we will discuss its possible significance in evaluating population doses.

  5. S. 791: This Act may be cited as the Radon Information Act of 1991, introduced in the US Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, April 9, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the US Senate on April 9, 1991 to amend Title III of the Toxic Substances Control Act (15 USC. 2661 et seq.). This legislation will require certain information relating to radon to be made available in connection with certain real estate transactions. In addition, radon testing devices offered for sale will be required to be tested in the radon measurement proficiency program of the Environmental Protection Agency. Buyers of homes have the right to know about radon risks, radon testing, and radon abatement techniques before they purchase a home. The purposes of this bill are: to establish a procedure by which home buyers receive information about radon; and to provide radon-related information to prospective home buyers at the time of all home sale transactions involving mortgage loans that are secured by a first lien on residential real property and are federally insured, guaranteed, made, or assisted or are purchased by a federally chartered secondary mortgage market institution.

  6. Radon in Soil Gas Above Bedrock Fracture Sets at the Shepley’s Hill Superfund Site

    SciTech Connect

    J.R. Giles; T.L. McLing; M.V. Carpenter; C.J. Smith; W. Brandon

    2012-12-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) recently provided technical support for ongoing environmental remediation activities at the Shepley’s Hill remediation site near Devens, MA (Figure 1). The technical support was requested as follow-on work to an initial screening level radiation survey conducted in 2008. The purpose of the original study was to assess the efficacy of the INL-developed Backpack Sodium Iodide System (BaSIS) for detecting elevated areas of natural radioactivity due to the decay of radon-222 gases emanating from the underlying fracture sets. Although the results from the initial study were mixed, the BaSIS radiation surveys did confirm that exposed bedrock outcrops have higher natural radioactivity than the surficial soils, thus a high potential for detecting elevated levels of radon and/or radon daughter products. (INL 2009) The short count times associated with the BaSIS measurements limited the ability of the system to respond to elevated levels of radioactivity from a subsurface source, in this instance radon gas emanating from fracture sets. Thus, it was postulated that a different methodology be employed to directly detect the radon in the soil gases. The CR-39 particle track detectors were investigated through an extensive literature and technology search. The relatively long deployment or “detection” time of several days, as well as the sensitivity of the measurement and robustness of the detectors made the CR-39 technology promising for deployment at the Shepley’s Hill site.

  7. Investigation of radon entry and effectiveness of mitigation measures in seven houses in New Jersey: Midproject report

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, T.G.; Dudney, C.S.; Monar, K.P.; Landguth, D.C.; Wilson, D.L.; Hawthorne, A.R.; Hubbard, L.M.; Gadsby, K.J.; Bohac, D.L.; Decker, C.A.

    1987-12-01

    A detailed radon mitigation study is in progress in 14 homes in the New Jersey Piedmont area. The principal goals are the refinement of diagnostic measurements for selection and implementation of mitigation systems, and the reduction of radon concentrations to acceptable levels inside the study houses. Monitoring stations were installed in each home in October, 1986. Instrumented measurements included: basement and upstairs radon; differential pressures across the basement/subslag, basement/upstairs and basement/outdoor interfaces; temperatures at basement, upstairs and outdoor locations; and central air handler usage. A weather station was located at one house, monitoring wind speed and direction; barometric pressure; precipitation; soil temperature; and outdoor temperature and relative humidity. A time-averaged value of all of the above parameters was recorded every 30 min. Several additional parameters were monitored on an intermittent basis in all or selected homes. These include multizone air infiltration rates which have been measured in all homes using passive perfluorocarbon tracers (PFT) and in two homes using a constant concentration tracer gas system (CCTG). Total radon progeny, soil gas radon concentration and permeability characteristics, and gamma radiation levels were also monitored periodically in all study homes. 10 refs., 53 figs.

  8. Indoor radon periodicities and their physical constraints: a study in the Coimbra region (Central Portugal).

    PubMed

    Neves, L J P F; Barbosa, S M; Pereira, A J S C

    2009-10-01

    Indoor radon activities were measured during a period of 6 months, as well as several physical environmental variables (temperature, pressure, humidity and rainfall). The location was a small room at an administrative building of the University of Coimbra, usually undisturbed by human activities and situated over bedrock of low-uranium Triassic red sandstones. A low average activity of radon was observed (36 Bq m(-3)), however showing a very well marked daily periodicity (10+/-5 Bq m(-3)), with maximum values occurring more frequently between 9 and 10 a.m. Daily variations are shown to have no relation with earth tides, and their amplitudes exhibit a significant correlation with outdoor temperature; no dependence on barometric pressure was found. Rainfall disturbs the observed daily radon cycles through a strong reduction of their amplitude, but has no effect on the long-term variability of the gas concentration. PMID:19632749

  9. Indoor radon periodicities and their physical constraints: a study in the Coimbra region (Central Portugal).

    PubMed

    Neves, L J P F; Barbosa, S M; Pereira, A J S C

    2009-10-01

    Indoor radon activities were measured during a period of 6 months, as well as several physical environmental variables (temperature, pressure, humidity and rainfall). The location was a small room at an administrative building of the University of Coimbra, usually undisturbed by human activities and situated over bedrock of low-uranium Triassic red sandstones. A low average activity of radon was observed (36 Bq m(-3)), however showing a very well marked daily periodicity (10+/-5 Bq m(-3)), with maximum values occurring more frequently between 9 and 10 a.m. Daily variations are shown to have no relation with earth tides, and their amplitudes exhibit a significant correlation with outdoor temperature; no dependence on barometric pressure was found. Rainfall disturbs the observed daily radon cycles through a strong reduction of their amplitude, but has no effect on the long-term variability of the gas concentration.

  10. Radon and thoron progeny concentration variability in relation to meteorological conditions at Bucharest (Romania).

    PubMed

    Baciu, Adriana Celestina

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents results of natural radioactivity levels in the atmosphere obtained for a 5 years period (1994-1999) at the Bucharest Environmental Radioactivity Surveillance Station (BERSS). The variability of radon and thoron progeny activity concentrations is analysed in relation to the local dynamics of the meteorological parameters (wind speed, air temperature, air pressure, cloud cover, relative humidity). The radon and thoron progeny concentrations display a daily and seasonal variation, with the highest values in the early morning and the lowest values in the afternoon. The outdoor radon progeny concentrations show maximum values in autumn and minimum values in spring-summer. The outdoor thoron progeny concentrations display maximum values in autumn and minimum values in winter. Significant statistical correlations with the meteorological parameters were obtained. The study on the temporal variability of natural atmospheric radioactivity near Bucharest is a starting point for further assessment of the radiological consequences resulting from human activities.

  11. Nanomaterial Containing Wall Paints Can Increase Radon Concentration in Houses Located in Radon Prone Areas

    PubMed Central

    Haghani, M.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Faghihi, R.; Mehdizadeh, S.; Moradgholi, J.; Darvish, L.; Fathi-Pour, E.; Ansari, L.; Ghanbar-pour, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, extensive technological advancements have made it possible to use nanopaints which show exciting properties. In IR Iran excessive radon levels (up to 3700 Bq m–3) have been reported in homes located in radon prone areas. Over the past decades, concerns have been raised about the risk posed by residential radon exposure. Objective: This study aims at investigating the effect of using nanomaterial containing wall paints on radon concentration in homes. Methods: Two wooden model houses were used in this study. Soil samples from Ramsar high background radiation areas were used for simulating the situation of a typical house in radon-prone areas. Conventional water-soluble wall paint was used for painting the walls of the 1st house model; while the 2nd house model was painted with the same wall paint with montmorillonitenanoclay. Results: Three days after sealing the house models, radon level was measured by using a portable radon survey meter. The mean radon level inside the 1st house model (conventional paint) was 515.3 ± 17.8 Bq/m3 while the mean radon concentration in the 2nd house model (nano-painted house model) was 570.8 ± 18.5 Bq/m3. The difference between these means was statistically significant (P<0.001). Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first investigation on the effect of nano-material containing wall paints on indoor radon concentrations.  It can be concluded that nano-material-containing wall paints should not be used in houses with wooden walls located in radon prone areas. Although the mechanism of this effect is not clearly known, decreased porosity in nano-paints might be a key factor in increasing the radon concentration in homes. PMID:25505754

  12. Thorough investigations on indoor radon in Băiţa radon-prone area (Romania).

    PubMed

    Cucoş Dinu, Alexandra; Cosma, Constantin; Dicu, Tiberius; Begy, Robert; Moldovan, Mircea; Papp, Botond; Niţă, Dan; Burghele, Bety; Sainz, Carlos

    2012-08-01

    A comprehensive radon survey has been carried out in Băiţa radon-prone area, Transylvania, Romania, in 4 localities (Băiţa, Nucet, Fînaţe, and Cîmpani) situated in the vicinity of former Romanian uranium mines. Indoor radon concentrations have been measured in 1128 ground floor rooms and cellars of 303 family houses by using CR-39 diffusion type radon detectors. The annual average of indoor radon concentration for Băiţa area was found to be 241±178 Bq m(-3), which is about two times higher than the average value of 126 Bq m(-3), computed for Romania. About 28% of investigated houses exceed the reference level of radon gas in dwellings of 300 Bq m(-3). The indoor radon measurements on each house have been carried out in several rooms simultaneously with the aim of obtaining a more detailed picture on the exposure to radon in the studied area. An analysis on the variability of radon levels among floors (floor-to-floor variation) and rooms (room-to-room variation) and also the influence of factors like the presence of cellar or the age of the building is presented. The coefficient of variation (CV) within ground floor rooms of the same house (room-to-room variation) ranged between 0.9 and 120.8%, with an arithmetic mean of 46.2%, a large variability among rooms within surveyed dwellings being clearly identified. The mean radon concentration in bedrooms without cellar was higher than in bedrooms above the cellar, the difference being statistically significant (t test, one tail, p<0.001, n=82). For houses built during 1960-1970 an increasing trend for radon levels was observed, but overall there was no significant difference in indoor radon concentrations by age of dwelling (one-way ANOVA test, p>0.05).

  13. NOy from Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding on Environmental Satellite during the Southern Hemisphere polar vortex split in September/October 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengistu Tsidu, G.; Stiller, G. P.; von Clarmann, T.; Funke, B.; HöPfner, M.; Fischer, H.; Glatthor, N.; Grabowski, U.; Kellmann, S.; Kiefer, M.; Linden, A.; López-Puertas, M.; Milz, M.; Steck, T.; Wang, D. Y.

    2005-06-01

    Reactive nitrogen species HNO3, ClONO2, NO, NO2, and N2O5 were retrieved from high resolution atmospheric limb emission spectra measured by the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) on board the European Environmental Satellite (ENVISAT) during the split of the southern polar vortex in September/October 2002. The chemical and transport processes determining the NOy deficit and partitioning are investigated here. Most of the available NOy in the polar vortex was in the form of HNO3 and NOx in the lower stratosphere except for the period 22-27 September when NOy was mostly in the form of HNO3 and ClONO2 between the 400 K and 475 K levels. The dominant process throughout the lower stratosphere was enhanced photolysis of HNO3 resulting in a steady increase of NOx during the split of vortex. The enhanced photolysis was initiated following the displacement of the vortex to low and midlatitudes. This observation was confirmed by the buildup of HNO3 after this period in mid-October following the vortex repositioning on the pole. N2O5 inside the vortex increased above the 625 K level during the 22-27 September period following the enhancement of NOx from HNO3 photolysis. On the 475 K level, the NOy volume mixing ratio (VMR) inside the vortex is lower than the reference value derived from its proxy early winter exvortex relation by about 12.5 ppbv during the whole period. The artificial reference linear tracer method suggests that the contribution to the NOy deficit due to quasi-horizontal mixing and denitrification before the split of vortex is approximately 25% and 75%, respectively. After the vortex split the contribution due to mixing increased to 40-45%, while that due to denitrification decreased to 55-60%. The quasi-isentropic mixing line approach uses [CH4]:[N2O] vortex scatterplots to estimate the mixing induced NOy deficit to be 55-60% before, and 62% after, the vortex split.

  14. The August 1986 through February 1988 radon intercomparisons at EML

    SciTech Connect

    Fisenne, I.M.; George, A.C.; Keller, H.W.

    1988-10-01

    In this report, we summarize the results of the eleventh through fourteenth (August 1986, February 1987, July 1987, February 1988) radon intercomparison exercises sponsored by the Environmental Measurements Laboratory. Thirty-six groups including US federal facilities, and national and state laboratories participated in these exercises. The results indicate that the majority of the participants' results were within +-25% of the nominal value at /sup 222/Rn concentrations ranging from 12 to 65 pCi L/sup -1/. Two common difficulties, calculation errors and scintillation cell leakage, are discussed in terms of good practice. 5 refs.

  15. Additional contamination when radon is in excess.

    PubMed

    Martín Sánchez, A; de la Torre Pérez, J; Ruano Sánchez, A B; Naranjo Correa, F L

    2013-11-01

    A study of the behavior of the (222)Rn progeny on clothes, skin and hair has been performed in a place with very high radon concentration. In the past, radon concentration was established to be about 32 kBq/m(3) in a very high humidity environment inside a tourist cave in Extremadura (Spain). The results show that (222)Rn daughters are adhered on clothes, skin and hair, adding some radioactive concentration to that due to radon and its progeny existing in the breathable air. PMID:23548693

  16. Normal and seasonally amplified indoor radon levels

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.; Wilson, D.L.; King, D.

    1995-01-01

    Winter and summer indoor radon measurements are reported for 121 houses in Freehold, New Jersey. When presented as winter:summer ratios of indoor radon, the data closely approximate a lognormal distribution. The geometric mean is 1.49. Freehold is located on the fairly flat coastal plain. The winter:summer ratios are believed to represent the norm for regions of the U.S. with cold winters and hot summers. The Freehold data set can be compared to corresponding data sets from other locations to suggest seasonal perturbations of indoor radon arising from unusual causes.

  17. Indoor radon concentration forecasting in South Tyrol.

    PubMed

    Verdi, L; Weber, A; Stoppa, G

    2004-01-01

    In this paper a modern statistical technique of multivariate analysis is applied to an indoor radon concentration data base. Several parameters are more or less significant in determining the radon concentration inside a building. The elaboration of the information available on South Tyrol makes it possible both to identify the statistically significant variables and to build up a statistical model that allows us to forecast the radon concentration in dwellings, when the values of the same variables involved are given. The results confirm the complexity of the phenomenon.

  18. Radon program of the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Petrová, K; Pravdová, E

    2014-07-01

    The Radon Program of the Czech Republic 2010-2019--Action Plan is based on Governmental Decision No. 594/2009 (Radon Program of the Czech Republic 2010-2019--Action Plan, Government of the Czech Republic, Decision No. 594/2009, May 4 2009) and is coordinated by the State Office for Nuclear Safety. It covers both prevention in new house construction and intervention in existing houses with high indoor radon concentration. The Program is aimed at developing an effective public information system. It takes advantage of long-term experience and good scientific and technological background-staff, methods, standards and technologies.

  19. Soil gas radon assessment and development of a radon risk map in Bolsena, Central Italy.

    PubMed

    Cinelli, G; Tositti, L; Capaccioni, B; Brattich, E; Mostacci, D

    2015-04-01

    Vulsini Volcanic district in Northern Latium (Central Italy) is characterized by high natural radiation background resulting from the high concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium in the volcanic products. In order to estimate the radon radiation risk, a series of soil gas radon measurements were carried out in Bolsena, the principal urban settlement in this area NE of Rome. Soil gas radon concentration ranges between 7 and 176 kBq/m(3) indicating a large degree of variability in the NORM content and behavior of the parent soil material related in particular to the occurrence of two different lithologies. Soil gas radon mapping confirmed the existence of two different areas: one along the shoreline of the Bolsena lake, characterized by low soil radon level, due to a prevailing alluvial lithology; another close to the Bolsena village with high soil radon level due to the presence of the high radioactive volcanic rocks of the Vulsini volcanic district. Radon risk assessment, based on soil gas radon and permeability data, results in a map where the alluvial area is characterized by a probability to be an area with high Radon Index lower than 20 %, while probabilities higher than 30 % and also above 50 % are found close to the Bolsena village.

  20. Radon potential, geologic formations, and lung cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Ellen J.; Gokun, Yevgeniya; Andrews, William M.; Overfield, Bethany L.; Robertson, Heather; Wiggins, Amanda; Rayens, Mary Kay

    2015-01-01

    Objective Exposure to radon is associated with approximately 10% of U.S. lung cancer cases. Geologic rock units have varying concentrations of uranium, producing fluctuating amounts of radon. This exploratory study examined the spatial and statistical associations between radon values and geological formations to illustrate potential population-level lung cancer risk from radon exposure. Method This was a secondary data analysis of observed radon values collected in 1987 from homes (N = 309) in Kentucky and geologic rock formation data from the Kentucky Geological Survey. Radon value locations were plotted on digital geologic maps using ArcGIS and linked to specific geologic map units. Each map unit represented a package of different types of rock (e.g., limestone and/or shale). Log-transformed radon values and geologic formation categories were compared using one-way analysis of variance. Results Observed radon levels varied significantly by geologic formation category. Of the 14 geologic formation categories in north central Kentucky, four were associated with median radon levels, ranging from 8.10 to 2.75 pCi/L. Conclusion Radon potential maps that account for geologic factors and observed radon values may be superior to using observed radon values only. Knowing radon-prone areas could help target population-based lung cancer prevention interventions given the inequities that exist related to radon. PMID:26844090

  1. Health Effects of High Radon Environments in Central Europe: Another Test for the LNT Hypothesis?

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    , including some historical references, recent results primarily in three areas, namely the possible effects of the inhalation of very high radon concentrations on miners; the effect of increased residential radon concentrations on the population; and the therapeutic use of radon. With many of the results still evolving and/or under intense discussion among the experts, more evidence is emerging that radon, which has been inhaled at extremely high concentrations in the multimillion Bq/m3 range by many of older miners (however, with substantial confounders, and large uncertainties in retrospective dosimetry), was perhaps an important but not the dominating factor for an increase in lung cancer rates. Other factors such as smoking, inhalation of quartz and mineral dust, arsenic, nitrous gases, etc. are likely to be more serious contributors to increased miner lung cancer rates. An extrapolation of miner data to indoor radon situations is not feasible. Concerning indoor radon studies, the by far dominating effect of smoking on the lung cancer incidence makes the results of some studies, apparently showing a positive dose-response relationship, questionable. According to recent studies in several countries, there are no, or beneficial, residential radon effects below about 600 to 1000 Bq/m3 (the extensive studies in the U.S., in particular by B. Cohen, and the discussions about these data, will not be part of this review, because they have already been discussed in detail in the U.S. literature). As a cause of lung cancer, radon seems to rank — behind active and passive smoking, and probably also air pollution in densely populated and/or industrial areas (diesel exhaust soot, etc.) — as a minor contributor in cases of extremely high residential radon levels, combined with heavy smoking of the residents. As demonstrated in an increasing number of randomized double-blind clinical studies for various painful inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatism, arthritic problems, and

  2. Optical detection of radon decay in air

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Johan; Ihantola, Sakari; Peräjärvi, Kari; Toivonen, Harri; Toivonen, Juha

    2016-01-01

    An optical radon detection method is presented. Radon decay is directly measured by observing the secondary radiolumines cence light that alpha particles excite in air, and the selectivity of coincident photon detection is further enhanced with online pulse-shape analysis. The sensitivity of a demonstration device was 6.5 cps/Bq/l and the minimum detectable concentration was 12 Bq/m3 with a 1 h integration time. The presented technique paves the way for optical approaches in rapid radon detec tion, and it can be applied beyond radon to the analysis of any alpha-active sample which can be placed in the measurement chamber. PMID:26867800

  3. Dependency of radon entry on pressure difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokotti, H.; Kalliokoski, P.; Jantunen, M.

    Radon levels, ventilation rate and pressure differences were monitored continuously in four apartment houses with different ventilation systems. Two of them were ventilated by mechanical exhaust, one by mechanical supply and exhaust, and one by natural ventilation. The two-storey houses were constructed from concrete elements on a slab and located on a gravel esker. It was surprising to find that increasing the ventilation rate increased levels of radon in the apartments. Increased ventilation caused increased outdoor-indoor pressure difference, which in turn increased the entry rate of radon and counteracted the diluting effect of ventilation. The increase was significant when the outdoor-indoor pressure difference exceeded 5 Pa. Especially in the houses with mechanical exhaust ventilation the pressure difference was the most important factor of radon entry rate, and contributed up to several hundred Bq m -3 h -1.

  4. Measuring radon source magnitude in residential buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Nazaroff, W.W.; Boegel, M.L.; Nero, A.V.

    1981-08-01

    A description is given of procedures used in residences for rapid grab-sample and time-dependent measurements of the air-exchange rate and radon concentration. The radon source magnitude is calculated from the results of simultaneous measurements of these parameters. Grab-sample measurements in three survey groups comprising 101 US houses showed the radon source magnitude to vary approximately log-normally with a geometric mean of 0.37 and a range of 0.01 to 6.0 pCi 1/sup -1/ h/sup -1/. Successive measurements in six houses in the northeastern United States showed considerable variability in source magnitude within a given house. In two of these houses the source magnitude showed a strong correlation with the air-exchange rate, suggesting that soil gas influx can be an important transport process for indoor radon.

  5. Optical detection of radon decay in air.

    PubMed

    Sand, Johan; Ihantola, Sakari; Peräjärvi, Kari; Toivonen, Harri; Toivonen, Juha

    2016-02-12

    An optical radon detection method is presented. Radon decay is directly measured by observing the secondary radiolumines cence light that alpha particles excite in air, and the selectivity of coincident photon detection is further enhanced with online pulse-shape analysis. The sensitivity of a demonstration device was 6.5 cps/Bq/l and the minimum detectable concentration was 12 Bq/m(3) with a 1 h integration time. The presented technique paves the way for optical approaches in rapid radon detec tion, and it can be applied beyond radon to the analysis of any alpha-active sample which can be placed in the measurement chamber.

  6. Long term performance of radon mitigation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Prill, R.; Fisk, W.J.

    2002-03-01

    Researchers installed radon mitigation systems in 12 houses in Spokane, Washington and Coeur d'Alene, Idaho during the heating season 1985--1986 and continued to monitor indoor radon quarterly and annually for ten years. The mitigation systems included active sub-slab ventilation, basement over-pressurization, and crawlspace isolation and ventilation. The occupants reported various operational problems with these early mitigation systems. The long-term radon measurements were essential to track the effectiveness of the mitigation systems over time. All 12 homes were visited during the second year of the study, while a second set 5 homes was visited during the fifth year to determine the cause(s) of increased radon in the homes. During these visits, the mitigation systems were inspected and measurements of system performance were made. Maintenance and modifications were performed to improve system performance in these homes.

  7. Measurement of Radon in Indoor Air.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey, Daniel M.; Simolunas, Glenn

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment to teach the principles of air sampling, gamma ray spectroscopy, nuclear decay, and radioactive equilibrium. Analyzes radon by carbon adsorption and gamma ray counting. Provides methodology and rate of decay equations. (MVL)

  8. Radon in private drinking water wells.

    PubMed

    Otahal, P; Merta, J; Burian, I

    2014-07-01

    At least 10% of inhabitants in the Czech Republic are supplied with water from private sources (private wells, boreholes). With the increasing cost of water, the number of people using their own sources of drinking water will be likely to increase. According to the Decree of the State Office for Nuclear Safety about the Radiation Protection 307/2002 as amended by Decree 499/2005, the guideline limit for the supplied drinking water ('drinking water for public supply') for radon concentration is 50 Bq·l(-1). This guideline does not apply to private sources of drinking water. Radon in water influences human health by ingestion and also by inhalation when radon is released from water during showering and cooking. This paper presents results of measurements of radon concentrations in water from private wells in more than 300 cases. The gross concentration of alpha-emitting radionuclides and the concentrations of radium and uranium were also determined. PMID:24714110

  9. Indoor radon in the region of Brussels

    SciTech Connect

    Tondeur, F.; Gerardy, I.; Christiaens, D.; Hallez, S.; Flemal, J.M.

    1999-12-01

    The indoor radon ({sup 222}Rn) concentration has been measured by charcoal detectors in 278 buildings in the region of Brussels, Belgium. The correlation with the nature of the subsoil can be studied in detail thanks to the available geotechnical map. With a geometrical mean indoor radon concentration of 19 Bq m{sup {minus}3}, Brussels can be considered as generally unaffected by the radon problem. No value higher than 400 Bq m{sup {minus}3} (the EU reference level for existing houses) was measured in an occupied room. However, two factors that may enhance the risk are identified: the absence of a basement or a ventilated crawl space, and the presence of loess, under the house. About one third of the houses without basements or ventilated crawl spaces built on loess show an indoor radon concentration above 200 Bq m{sup {minus}3} (the EU reference level for new houses).

  10. Radon Transform and Light-Cone Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teryaev, O. V.

    2016-08-01

    The relevance of Radon transform for generalized and transverse momentum dependent parton distributions is discussed. The new application for conditional (fracture) parton distributions and dihadron fragmentation functions is suggested.

  11. Comparison of retrospective and contemporary indoor radon measurements in a high-radon area of Serbia.

    PubMed

    Zunić, Z S; Yarmoshenko, I V; Kelleher, K; Paridaens, J; Mc Laughlin, J P; Celiković, I; Ujić, P; Onischenko, A D; Jovanović, S; Demajo, A; Birovljev, A; Bochicchio, F

    2007-11-15

    In Niska Banja, Serbia, which is a high-radon area, a comparison was made between two retrospective radon measuring methods and contemporary radon measurements. The two retrospective methods derive the radon concentrations that occurred in dwellings over longer periods in the past, based on the amount of trapped (210)Po on the surface of glass objects (surface traps, ST) or in the bulk of porous materials (volume traps, VT). Both surface implanted (210)Po in glass objects and contemporary radon in air were measured in 46 rooms, distributed in 32 houses of this radon spa-town, using a dual alpha track detector configuration (CR-39 and LR115) and CR-39 track etched detectors, respectively. In addition to the use of surface trap measurements, in 18 rooms (distributed in 15 houses) VT samples of suitable material were also collected, allowing to compare ST and VT retrospective radon concentration estimates. For each room, contemporary annual radon concentrations (CONT) were measured or estimated using seasonal correction factors. The distribution of the radon concentration in all data sets was found to be close to lognormal (Chi-square test>0.05). Geometric means (GM) are similar, ranging from 1040 to 1380 Bq m(-3), whereas geometric standard deviations (GSD) for both the retrospective methods are greater than for the CONT method, showing reasonable agreement between VT, ST and CONT measurements. A regression analysis, with respect to the lognormal distribution of each data set, shows that for VT-ST the correlation coefficient r is 0.85, for VT-CONT r is 0.82 and for ST-CONT r is 0.73. Comparison of retrospective and contemporary radon concentrations with regard to supposed long-term indoor radon changes further supports the principal agreement between the retrospective and conventional methods.

  12. Radon in surface water on Jersey.

    PubMed

    Grainger, C R

    1996-08-01

    A survey of surface water was undertaken, in Jersey, in 1994, to measure the concentration of radon. Over most of the island the levels were found to be low. The highest levels correlated with the areas where granite was intruded into older rocks. The levels found could lead to elevated concentrations in some dwellings but it was felt that radon was not a major risk to the health of the public.

  13. Indoor radon levels in Cumberland County, PA

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.L.; Nason, R.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements were made of radon levels in 165 randomly selected homes in Cumberland County, PA during Winter 1984-1985. The average and mean levels were found to be 9.1 +/- 0.7 pCi/L and 6.3 +/- 0.5 pCi/L, respectively, many times normally encountered levels. Average and mean radon levels are reported vs. various house characteristics. 4 references, 1 figure, 6 tables.

  14. Radon, cigarette smoke, and lung cancer: A re-analysis of the Colorado Plateau uranium miners' data [see comments

    SciTech Connect

    Moolgavkar, S.H.; Luebeck, E.G.; Krewski, D.; Zielinski, J.M. )

    1993-05-01

    Much of our knowledge regarding the interaction of radon and tobacco smoke in the etiology of human lung cancer derives from studies of uranium miners. In this article, we present a re-analysis of lung cancer mortality in the Colorado Plateau miners' cohort within the framework of the two-mutation clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis. This analysis takes into account the patterns of exposure to radon and cigarette smoke experienced by individuals in the cohort. A simultaneous re-analysis of the British doctors' cohort indicated that those model parameters relating to the effects of tobacco were comparable in the two data sets. We found no evidence of interaction between radon and tobacco smoke with respect to their joint effect on the first or second stage mutation rates or on the rate of proliferation of initiated cells. The age-specific relative risks associated with joint exposure to radon and cigarette smoke, however, were supra-additive but submultiplicative. The analysis also confirmed that fractionation of radon exposures leads to higher lung cancer risks. Finally, we present some estimates of lung cancer risk from environmental radon exposure for non-smokers and smokers.

  15. Real-time measurement of individual occupational radon exposures in tombs of the Valley of the Kings, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Gruber, E; Salama, E; Rühm, W

    2011-03-01

    The active radon exposure meter developed recently at the German Research Center for Environmental Health (Helmholtz Zentrum München) was used to measure radon concentrations in 12 tombs located in the Valley of the Kings, Egypt. Radon concentrations in air between 50 ± 7 and 12 100 ± 600 Bq m(-3) were obtained. The device was also used to measure individual radon exposures of those persons working as safeguards inside the tombs. For a measurement time of 2-3 d, typical individual radon exposures ranged from 1800 ± 400 to 240 000 ± 13 000 Bq h m(-3), depending on the duration of measurement and radon concentration in the different tombs. Based on current ICRP dose conversion conventions for workers and on equilibrium factors published in the literature for these tombs, individual effective dose rates that range from 1.5 ± 0.3 to 860 ± 50 µSv d(-1) were estimated. If it is assumed that the climatic conditions present at the measurement campaign persist for about half a year, in this area, then effective doses up to ∼ 66 mSv could be estimated for half a year, for some of the safeguards of tombs where F-values were known. To reduce the exposure of the safeguards, some recommendations are proposed. PMID:21183552

  16. Passive Measurements of Thoron and its Progeny in some Dwellings in Ireland

    SciTech Connect

    Choncubhair, Orlaith Ni; Laughlin, James Mc; Tokonami, Shinji

    2008-08-07

    In this paper, an account is given of the development, calibration and field use of a passive alpha track detector sensitive to thoron as well as to radon. No database of thoron and thoron progeny concentrations in dwellings in Ireland exists and, as a result, the level of exposure of the Irish population to thoron and its progeny is unknown. As an initial or pilot stage in establishing such a data base measurements of thoron and thoron progeny concentrations (the latter expressed in Equilibrium Equivalent Thoron Concentration (EETC)) were made in 40 randomly chosen Irish dwellings. The EETC measurements were made using a passive thoron progeny deposition rate monitor designed and supplied by NIRS (Japan). In addition standard unmodified SSI passive radon detectors were used to measure radon in these dwellings. The measured thoron concentrations ranged from below the level of detection to 154 Bq/m{sup 3} while the radon gas ranged from 15 to 179 Bq/m{sup 3}. The thoron progeny EETC values for these dwellings ranged from 0.03 to 7.7 Bq/m{sup 3}. An account is also given of the dosimetric implications of these measurements.

  17. Influence of a component of solar irradiance on radon signals at 1 km depth, Gran Sasso, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinitz, G.; Piatibratova, O.; Charit-Yaari, N.

    2012-12-01

    Exploratory monitoring of radon is conducted at one location at the deep underground Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS). Measurements (15-min resolution) are performed over a time span of ca. 600 days in the air of the surrounding calcareous country rock. Utilizing both alpha and gamma-ray detectors systematic and recurring radon signals are recorded. Two primary signal types are determined: (a) non-periodic Multi-Day (MD) signals lasting 2-10 days, and (b) Daily Radon (DR) signals - which are of a periodic nature exhibiting a primary 24-h cycle. The local ancillary environmental conditions (P, T) seem not to affect radon in air monitored at the site. Long term patterns of day-time measurements are different from the pattern of night-time measurements indicating a day-night modulation of gamma radiation from radon in air. The phenomenology of the MD and DR signals is similar to situations encountered at other locations where radon is monitored with a high time resolution in geogas at upper crustal levels. In accordance with recent field and experimental results it is suggested that a components of solar irradiance is affecting the radiation from radon in air, and this influence is further modulated by the diurnal rotation of Earth. The occurrence of these radon signals in the 1 km deep low radiation underground geological environment of LNGS provides new information on the time variation of the local radiation environment. The observations and results place the LNGS facility as a high priority location for performing advanced investigations of these geophysical phenomena, due to its location and its infrastructure.

  18. An assessment of ecological and case-control methods for estimating lung cancer risk due to indoor radon

    SciTech Connect

    Stidley, C.A.; Samet, J.M.

    1992-12-31

    Studies of underground miners indicate that indoor radon is an important cause of lung cancer. This finding has raised concern that exposure to radon also causes lung cancer in the general population. Epidemiological studies, including both case-control and ecological approaches, have directly addressed the risks of indoor residential radon; many more case-control studies are in progress. Ecological studies that associate lung-cancer rates with typical indoor radon levels in various geographic areas have not consistently shown positive associations. The results of purportedly negative ecological studies have been used as a basis for questioning the hazards of indoor radon exposure. Because of potentially serious methodologic flaws for testing hypotheses, we examined the ecological method as a tool for assessing lung-cancer risk from indoor radon exposure. We developed a simulation approach that utilizes the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radon survey data to assign exposures to individuals within counties. Using the computer-generated data, we compared risk estimates obtained by ecological regression methods with those obtained from other regression methods and with the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} risks used to generate the data. For many of these simulations, the ecological models, while fitting the summary data well, gave risk estimates that differed considerably from the true risks. For some models, the risk estimates were negatively correlated with exposure, although the assumed relationship was positive. Attempts to improve the ecological models by adding smoking variables, including interaction terms, did not always improve the estimates of risk, which are easily affected by model misspecification. Because exposure situations used in the simulations are realistic, our results show that ecological methods may not accurately estimate the lung-cancer risk associated with indoor radon exposure.

  19. Radon monitoring in groundwater samples from some areas of northern Rajasthan, India, using a RAD7 detector.

    PubMed

    Rani, Asha; Mehra, Rohit; Duggal, Vikas

    2013-01-01

    Radon monitoring has been increasingly conducted worldwide because of the hazardous effects of radon on the health of human beings. In the present research, groundwater samples were taken from hand pumps at different areas of the districts of SriGanganagar, Hanumangarh, Sikar and Churu in northern Rajasthan. RAD7, an electronic radon detector (Durridge co., USA), was used to estimate the radon concentration in groundwater used for drinking. Radon concentration in the groundwater ranged from 0.5 ± 0.3 Bq l(-1) (Chimanpura) to 85.7±4.9 Bq l(-1)(Khandela) with an average value of 9.03±1.03 Bq l(-1). In 89 % of the samples, radon concentration is well below the allowed maximum contamination level (MCL) of radon concentration in water of 11 Bq l(-1), proposed by US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Only in 11 % of the samples, the recorded values were found to be higher than MCL proposed by USEPA and only in 5 % of the samples, the recorded values were found to be higher than the values between 4 and 40 Bq l(-1) suggested for radon concentration in water for human consumption by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the effect of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). The annual effective dose in stomach and lungs per person was also evaluated in this research. The estimated total annual effective dose of adults ranged from 1.34 to 229.68 µSv y(-1). The total annual effective dose from three locations of the studied area was found to be greater than the safe limit (0.1 mSv y(-1)) recommended by World Health Organization and EU Council.

  20. Influence of a component of solar irradiance on radon signals at 1 km depth, Gran Sasso, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Steinitz, G.; Piatibratova, O.; Gazit-Yaari, N.

    2013-01-01

    Exploratory monitoring of radon is conducted at one location in the deep underground Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS). Measurements (15-min resolution) are performed over a time span of ca 600 days in the air of the surrounding calcareous country rock. Using both α- and γ-ray detectors, systematic and recurring radon signals are recorded. Two primary signal types are determined: (i) non-periodic multi-day (MD) signals lasting 2–10 days and (ii) daily radon (DR) signals—which are of a periodic nature exhibiting a primary 24-h cycle (θ=0.48). The local ancillary environmental conditions (pressure, temperature) seem not to affect radon in air monitored at the site. Long-term patterns of daytime measurements are different from the pattern of night-time measurements indicating a day–night modulation of γ-radiation from radon in air. The phenomenology of the MD and DR signals is similar to situations encountered at other locations where radon is monitored with a high time resolution in geogas at upper crustal levels. In accordance with recent field and experimental results, it is suggested that a component of solar irradiance is affecting the radiation from radon in air, and this influence is further modulated by the diurnal rotation of the Earth. The occurrence of these radon signals in the 1 km deep low-radiation underground geological environment of LNGS provides new information on the time variation of the local radiation environment. The observations and results place the LNGS facility as a high-priority location for performing advanced investigations of these geophysical phenomena. PMID:24204189