Science.gov

Sample records for passive localization processing

  1. Passive Acoustic Vessel Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwal, Pasang Sherpa

    This thesis investigates the development of a low-cost passive acoustic system for localizing moving vessels to monitor areas where human activities such as fishing, snorkeling and poaching are restricted. The system uses several off-the-shelf sensors with unsynchronized clocks where the Time Difference of Arrival (TDOA) or time delay is extracted by cross-correlation of the signal between paired sensors. The cross-correlation function uses phase correlation or Phase Transform (PHAT) which whitens the cross-spectrum in order to de-emphasize dominant frequency components. Using the locations of pairs of sensors as foci, hyperbolic equations can be defined using the time delay between them. With three or more sensors, multiple hyperbolic functions can be calculated which intersect at a unique point: the boat's location. It is also found that increasing separation distances between sensors decreased the correlation between the signals. However larger separation distances have better localization capability than with small distances. Experimental results from the Columbia and Willamette Rivers are presented to demonstrate performance.

  2. Indoor localization using passive RFID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vastianos, George E.; Kyriazanos, Dimitris M.; Segou, Olga E.; Mitilineos, Stelios A.; Thomopoulos, Stelios C. A.

    2011-06-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) systems based on passive tags are used successfully in a wide range of object identification applications. However, the increasing needs to meet new demands on applications of localization and tracking create a new field for evolution of the RFID technology. This paper presents the design, implementation, and evaluation of a cost-effective localization system for in-building usage that is able to localize objects that carry passive RFID tags. The RFID reading is performed by a single Reader and an array of directional antennas through multiplexing. Evaluation and experimental results from three localization algorithms based on RSSI are presented.

  3. Strong local passivity in finite quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Frey, Michael; Funo, Ken; Hotta, Masahiro

    2014-07-01

    Passive states of quantum systems are states from which no system energy can be extracted by any cyclic (unitary) process. Gibbs states of all temperatures are passive. Strong local (SL) passive states are defined to allow any general quantum operation, but the operation is required to be local, being applied only to a specific subsystem. Any mixture of eigenstates in a system-dependent neighborhood of a nondegenerate entangled ground state is found to be SL passive. In particular, Gibbs states are SL passive with respect to a subsystem only at or below a critical system-dependent temperature. SL passivity is associated in many-body systems with the presence of ground state entanglement in a way suggestive of collective quantum phenomena such as quantum phase transitions, superconductivity, and the quantum Hall effect. The presence of SL passivity is detailed for some simple spin systems where it is found that SL passivity is neither confined to systems of only a few particles nor limited to the near vicinity of the ground state.

  4. Adaptive passive fathometer processing.

    PubMed

    Siderius, Martin; Song, Heechun; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S; Hursky, Paul; Harrison, Chris

    2010-04-01

    Recently, a technique has been developed to image seabed layers using the ocean ambient noise field as the sound source. This so called passive fathometer technique exploits the naturally occurring acoustic sounds generated on the sea-surface, primarily from breaking waves. The method is based on the cross-correlation of noise from the ocean surface with its echo from the seabed, which recovers travel times to significant seabed reflectors. To limit averaging time and make this practical, beamforming is used with a vertical array of hydrophones to reduce interference from horizontally propagating noise. The initial development used conventional beamforming, but significant improvements have been realized using adaptive techniques. In this paper, adaptive methods for this process are described and applied to several data sets to demonstrate improvements possible as compared to conventional processing.

  5. Locally contacted rear surface passivated solar cells by inkjet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phiwpha, N.; Fangsuwannarak, T.; Sopitpan, S.

    2014-06-01

    Inkjet printing of photoresist material may provide a new route for low-cost fabrication of patterned oxide passivation layer of solar cells that require fine patterning and simple process. However, printing by liquid-based, environmentally friendly ink and printing device required development efforts aimed at achieving a fine patterning and long used inkjet nozzles under corrosive influence. This work was demonstrated a concept for grooved silicon oxide patterning for rear localized contact of p-n junction solar cells by chemical etching after photoresist patterning obtained. This article reviews the silicon dioxide fabrication on p-Si substrate from sol-gel technique for oxide passivation layer of solar cells. The aluminium was deposited on the patterned oxide layer and then heated at its Al-Si eutectic temperature. Finally, an aluminium-induced solid-phase epitaxial growth of p+ forming into the openings of the oxide passivation layer was presented. The sheet resistance of n-emitter layer, carrier life-time and surface recombination velocity values are investigated. Photoconductive measurements were performed on the prepared samples after each thermal process to measure the effective lifetime of the minority carriers. Carrier lifetime up to 60 microseconds has been measured on c-Si wafer passivated by the opened SiO2 layer. It was shown that the patterned SiO2 passivation has obtained high passivation quality making by the proposed inkjet printing method.

  6. Model-based ocean acoustic passive localization

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Sullivan, E.J.

    1994-01-24

    The detection, localization and classification of acoustic sources (targets) in a hostile ocean environment is a difficult problem -- especially in light of the improved design of modern submarines and the continual improvement in quieting technology. Further the advent of more and more diesel-powered vessels makes the detection problem even more formidable than ever before. It has recently been recognized that the incorporation of a mathematical model that accurately represents the phenomenology under investigation can vastly improve the performance of any processor, assuming, of course, that the model is accurate. Therefore, it is necessary to incorporate more knowledge about the ocean environment into detection and localization algorithms in order to enhance the overall signal-to-noise ratios and improve performance. An alternative methodology to matched-field/matched-mode processing is the so-called model-based processor which is based on a state-space representation of the normal-mode propagation model. If state-space solutions can be accomplished, then many of the current ocean acoustic processing problems can be analyzed and solved using this framework to analyze performance results based on firm statistical and system theoretic grounds. The model-based approach, is (simply) ``incorporating mathematical models of both physical phenomenology and the measurement processes including noise into the processor to extract the desired information.`` In this application, we seek techniques to incorporate the: (1) ocean acoustic propagation model; (2) sensor array measurement model; and (3) noise models (ambient, shipping, surface and measurement) into a processor to solve the associated localization/detection problems.

  7. Passive versus active local microrheology in mammalian cells and amoebae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riviere, C.; Gazeau, F.; Marion, S.; Bacri, J.-C.; Wilhelm, C.

    2004-12-01

    We compare in this paper the rotational magnetic microrheology detailed by Marion et al [18] and Wilhelm et al [19] to the passive tracking microrheology. The rotational microrheology has been designed to explore, using magnetic rotating probes, the local intracellular microenvironment of living cells in terms of viscoelasticity. Passive microrheology techniques is based on the analysis of spontaneous diffusive motions of Brownian probes. The dependence of mean square displacement (MSD) with the time then directly reflects the type of movement (sub-, hyper- or diffusive motions). Using the same intracellular probes, we performed two types of measurements (active and passive). Based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, one should obtain the same information from the both techniques in a thermally equilibrium system. Interestingly, our measurements differ, and the discordances directly inform on active biological processes, which add to thermally activated fluctuations in our out-of equilibrium systems. In both cell models used, mammalian Hela cells and amoebae Entamoeba Histolytica, a hyper-diffusive regime at a short time is observed, which highlights the presence of an active non-thermal driving force, acting on the probe. However, the nature of this active force in mammalian cells and amoebae is different, according to their different phenotypes. In mammalian cells active processes are governed by the transport, via molecular motors, on the microtubule network. In amoebae, which are highly motile cells free of microtubule network, the active processes are dominated by strong fluxes of cytoplasm driven by extension of pseudopodia, in random directions, leading to an amplitude of motion one order of magnitude higher than for mammalian cells. Figs 7, Refs 32.

  8. Stable surface passivation process for compound semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.

    2001-01-01

    A passivation process for a previously sulfided, selenided or tellurated III-V compound semiconductor surface. The concentration of undesired mid-gap surface states on a compound semiconductor surface is reduced by the formation of a near-monolayer of metal-(sulfur and/or selenium and/or tellurium)-semiconductor that is effective for long term passivation of the underlying semiconductor surface. Starting with the III-V compound semiconductor surface, any oxidation present thereon is substantially removed and the surface is then treated with sulfur, selenium or tellurium to form a near-monolayer of chalcogen-semiconductor of the surface in an oxygen-free atmosphere. This chalcogenated surface is then contacted with a solution of a metal that will form a low solubility chalcogenide to form a near-monolayer of metal-chalcogen-semiconductor. The resulting passivating layer provides long term protection for the underlying surface at or above the level achieved by a freshly chalcogenated compound semiconductor surface in an oxygen free atmosphere.

  9. Time-Frequency Cardiac Passive Acoustic Localization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    by cardiohemic theory [1], [2]. The region Ω3 shows also a good clue for the closure of the mitral valve beneath the principal focus. This focus...signal processing methods for the diagnosis of the heart valve dysfunction and degeneration are strongly established in [1], [2]. However, conventional...pregnant women [6]. Using this system, different �images� corresponding to the various distinct phases of the heart beat; e.g., closure of the mitral and

  10. Human sperm rheotaxis: a passive physical process

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuoran; Liu, Jun; Meriano, Jim; Ru, Changhai; Xie, Shaorong; Luo, Jun; Sun, Yu

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing question in natural reproduction is how mammalian sperm navigate inside female reproductive tract and finally reach the egg cell, or oocyte. Recently, fluid flow was proposed as a long–range guidance cue for sperm navigation. Coitus induces fluid flow from oviduct to uterus, and sperm align themselves against the flow direction and swim upstream, a phenomenon termed rheotaxis. Whether sperm rheotaxis is a passive process dominated by fluid mechanics, or sperm actively sense and adapt to fluid flow remains controversial. Here we report the first quantitative study of sperm flagellar motion during human sperm rheotaxis and provide direct evidence indicating that sperm rheotaxis is a passive process. Experimental results show that there is no significant difference in flagellar beating amplitude and asymmetry between rheotaxis-turning sperm and those sperm swimming freely in the absence of fluid flow. Additionally, fluorescence image tracking shows no Ca2+ influx during sperm rheotaxis turning, further suggesting there is no active signal transduction during human sperm rheotaxis. PMID:27005727

  11. Human sperm rheotaxis: a passive physical process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhuoran; Liu, Jun; Meriano, Jim; Ru, Changhai; Xie, Shaorong; Luo, Jun; Sun, Yu

    2016-03-01

    A long-standing question in natural reproduction is how mammalian sperm navigate inside female reproductive tract and finally reach the egg cell, or oocyte. Recently, fluid flow was proposed as a long–range guidance cue for sperm navigation. Coitus induces fluid flow from oviduct to uterus, and sperm align themselves against the flow direction and swim upstream, a phenomenon termed rheotaxis. Whether sperm rheotaxis is a passive process dominated by fluid mechanics, or sperm actively sense and adapt to fluid flow remains controversial. Here we report the first quantitative study of sperm flagellar motion during human sperm rheotaxis and provide direct evidence indicating that sperm rheotaxis is a passive process. Experimental results show that there is no significant difference in flagellar beating amplitude and asymmetry between rheotaxis-turning sperm and those sperm swimming freely in the absence of fluid flow. Additionally, fluorescence image tracking shows no Ca2+ influx during sperm rheotaxis turning, further suggesting there is no active signal transduction during human sperm rheotaxis.

  12. Local and nonlocal advection of a passive scalar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, R. K.

    2006-11-01

    Passive and active scalar mixing is examined in a simple one-parameter family of two-dimensional flows based on quasi-geostrophic dynamics, in which the active scalar, the quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity, is confined to a single horizontal surface (so-called surface quasi-geostrophic dynamics) and in which a passive scalar field is also advected by the (horizontal, two-dimensional) velocity field at a finite distance from the surface. At large distances from the surface the flow is determined by the largest horizontal scales, the flow is spectrally nonlocal, and a chaotic advection-type regime dominates. At small distances, z, scaling arguments suggest a transition wavenumber kc˜1/2z, where the slope of the passive scalar spectrum changes from k-5/3, determined by local dynamics, to k-1, determined by nonlocal dynamics, analogous to the transition to a k-1 slope in the Batchelor regime in three-dimensional turbulence. Direct numerical simulations reproduce the qualitative aspects of this transition. Other characteristics of the simulated scalar fields, such as the relative dominance of coherent or filamentary structures, are also shown to depend strongly on the degree of locality.

  13. How lasing localized structures evolve out of passive mode locking.

    PubMed

    Marconi, M; Javaloyes, J; Balle, S; Giudici, M

    2014-06-06

    We investigate the relationship between passive mode locking and the formation of time-localized structures in the output intensity of a laser. We show how the mode-locked pulses transform into lasing localized structures, allowing for individual addressing and arbitrary low repetition rates. Our analysis reveals that this occurs when (i) the cavity round-trip is much larger than the slowest medium time scale, namely the gain recovery time, and (ii) the mode-locked solution coexists with the zero intensity (off) solution. These conditions enable the coexistence of a large quantity of stable solutions, each of them being characterized by a different number of pulses per round-trip and with different arrangements. Then, each mode-locked pulse becomes localized, i.e., individually addressable.

  14. Comparative evaluation of passive, active, and passive-active distraction techniques on pain perception during local anesthesia administration in children.

    PubMed

    Abdelmoniem, Soad A; Mahmoud, Sara A

    2016-05-01

    Local anesthesia forms the backbone of pain control techniques and is necessary for a painless dental procedure. Nevertheless, administering a local anesthetic injection is among the most anxiety-provoking procedures to children. This study was performed to compare the efficacy of different distraction techniques (passive, active, and passive-active) on children's pain perception during local anesthesia administration. A total of 90 children aged four to nine years, requiring inferior alveolar nerve block for primary molar extraction, were included in this study and randomly divided into three groups according to the distraction technique employed during local anesthesia administration. Passive distraction group: the children were instructed to listen to a song on headphones; Active distraction group: the children were instructed to move their legs up and down alternatively; and Passive-active distraction group: this was a combination between both techniques. Pain perception during local anesthesia administration was evaluated by the Sounds, Eyes, and Motor (SEM) scale and Wong Baker FACES® Pain Rating Scale. There was an insignificant difference between the three groups for SEM scale and Wong Baker FACES Pain Rating Scale at P = 0.743 and P = 0.112 respectively. The examined distraction techniques showed comparable results in reducing pain perception during local anesthesia administration.

  15. The experimental study on the contact process of passive walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Feng; Bi, Lai-Ye; Wang, Tian-Shu; Li, Jun-Feng

    2012-08-01

    The passive dynamic walking is a new concept of biped walking. Researchers have been working on this area with both theoretical analysis and experimental analysis ever since McGeer. This paper presents our compass-like passive walking model with a new set of testing system. Two gyroscopes are used for measuring the angles of two legs, and ten FlexiForce sensors are used for measuring the contact forces on the feet. We got the experimental data on the passive walking process with the validated testing system. A great emphasis was put on the contact process between the feet and the slope. The contact process of the stance leg was divided into four sections, and differences between the real testing contact process and the classic analytical contact process with no bouncing and slipping were summarized.

  16. Workshop on the Detection, Classification, Localization and Density Estimation of Marine Mammals Using Passive Acoustics - 2015

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    and Density Estimation of Marine Mammals Using Passive Acoustics - 2015 John A. Hildebrand Scripps Institution of Oceanography UCSD La Jolla...classification, localization and density estimation of marine mammals using passive acoustics, and by doing so advance the state of the art in this field...OBJECTIVES The Seventh International Workshop on Detection, Classification, Localization, and Density Estimation (DCLDE) of Marine Mammals Using

  17. Passive detection, characterization, and localization of multiple LFMCW LPI signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamschin, Brandon; Clancy, John; Grabbe, Mike; Fortier, Matthew; Novak, John

    2014-06-01

    A method for passive Detection, Characterization, and Localization (DCL) of multiple low power, Linear Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (LFMCW) (i.e., Low Probability of Intercept (LPI)) signals is proposed. In contrast to other detection and characterization approaches, such as those based on the Wigner-Ville Transform (WVT) 1or the Wigner-Ville Hough Transform (WVHT) ,2 our approach does not begin with a parametric model of the received signal that is specified directly in terms of its LFMCW constituents. Rather, we analyze the signal over time intervals that are short, non-overlapping, and contiguous by modeling it within these intervals as a sum of sinusoidal (i.e., harmonic) components with unknown frequencies, deterministic but unknown amplitudes, unknown order (i.e., number of harmonic components), and unknown noise autocorrelation function. Using this model of the signal, which we refer to as the Short-Time Harmonic Model (STHM), we implement a detection statistic based on Thompson's Method for harmonic analysis,3 which leads to a detection threshold that is a function of False Alarm Probability PFA and not a function of the noise properties. By doing so we reliably detect the presence of multiple LFMCW signals in colored noise without the need for prewhitening, efficiently estimate (i.e., characterize) their parameters, provide estimation error variances for a subset of these parameters, and produce Time-of-Arrival (TOA) estimates that can be used to estimate the geographical location of (i.e., localize) each LFMCW source. Finally, by using the entire time-series we refine these parameter estimates by using them as initial conditions to the Maximum Likelihood Estimator (MLE), which was originally given in1 and later found in2 to be too computationally expensive for multiple LFMCW signals if accurate initial conditions were not available to limit the search space. We demonstrate the performance of our approach via simulation.

  18. Cognitive Processes in Discourse Comprehension: Passive Processes, Reader-Initiated Processes, and Evolving Mental Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Broek, Paul; Helder, Anne

    2017-01-01

    As readers move through a text, they engage in various types of processes that, if all goes well, result in a mental representation that captures their interpretation of the text. With each new text segment the reader engages in passive and, at times, reader-initiated processes. These processes are strongly influenced by the readers'…

  19. Enhanced Passive and Active Processing of Syllables in Musician Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chobert, Julie; Marie, Celine; Francois, Clement; Schon, Daniele; Besson, Mireille

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the influence of musical expertise in 9-year-old children on passive (as reflected by MMN) and active (as reflected by discrimination accuracy) processing of speech sounds. Musician and nonmusician children were presented with a sequence of syllables that included standards and deviants in vowel frequency,…

  20. Enhanced Passive and Active Processing of Syllables in Musician Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chobert, Julie; Marie, Celine; Francois, Clement; Schon, Daniele; Besson, Mireille

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the influence of musical expertise in 9-year-old children on passive (as reflected by MMN) and active (as reflected by discrimination accuracy) processing of speech sounds. Musician and nonmusician children were presented with a sequence of syllables that included standards and deviants in vowel frequency,…

  1. Passive localization in the deep ocean based on cross-correlation function matching.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhixiong; Yang, Kunde; Ma, Yuanliang

    2016-06-01

    Passive localization of a sound source in the deep ocean is investigated in this study. The source can be localized by taking advantage of a cross-correlation function matching technique. When a two-sensor vertical array is used in the deep ocean, two types of side lobe curves appear in the ambiguity surface of the localization. The side lobe curves are analytically expressed and they are then used as indicators of the localization result instead of the scanning point with the maximum power. Simulation and experiment demonstrate the performance of the proposed passive localization method.

  2. Passive electrical monitoring and localization of fluid leakages from wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.; Mao, D.; Haas, A. K.; Karaoulis, M.; Frash, L.

    2015-02-01

    Electrokinetic phenomena are a class of cross-coupling phenomena involving the relative displacement between the pore water (together with the electrical diffuse layer) with respect to the solid phase of a porous material. We demonstrate that electrical fields of electrokinetic nature can be associated with fluid leakages from wells. These leakages can be remotely monitored and the resulting signals used to localize their causative source distribution both in the laboratory and in field conditions. The first laboratory experiment (Experiment #1) shows how these electrical fields can be recorded at the surface of a cement block during the leakage of a brine from a well. The measurements were performed with a research-grade medical electroencephalograph and were inverted using a genetic algorithm to localize the causative source of electrical current and therefore, localize the leak in the block. Two snapshots of electrical signals were used to show how the leak evolved over time. The second experiment (Experiment #2) was performed to see if we could localize a pulse water injection from a shallow well in field conditions in the case of a heterogeneous subsurface. We used the same equipment as in Experiment #1 and processed the data with a trend removal algorithm, picking the amplitude from 24 receiver channels just after the water injection. The amplitude of the electric signals changed from the background level indicating that a volume of water was indeed flowing inside the well into the surrounding soil and then along the well. We used a least-square inversion algorithm to invert a snapshot of the electrical potential data at the injection time to localize the source of the self-potential signals. The inversion results show positive potential anomalies in the vicinity of the well. For both experiments, forward numerical simulations of the problem using a finite element package were performed in order to assess the underlying physics of the causative source of the

  3. Localization of low-frequency coherent sound sources with compressive beamforming-based passive synthetic aperture.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhixiong; Yang, Kunde; Duan, Rui; Xiao, Peng

    2015-04-01

    The localization of low-frequency coherent sources requires a proper aperture to ensure a high spatial resolution. Attaining a large aperture is difficult in practice when the conditions involved are limited. This letter investigated a compressive beamforming-based passive synthetic aperture approach with a reference sensor in a fixed position. Localization findings on acoustic sources in a semi-anechoic chamber were compared with conventional beamforming, compressive beamforming, passive synthetic aperture, and compressive beamforming-based passive synthetic aperture. Results suggest that the proposed method can produce a higher spatial resolution and higher detection ability than the others.

  4. Local vibration enhanced the efficacy of passive exercise on mitigating bone loss in hindlimb unloading rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yunfei; Luan, Huiqin; Sun, Lianwen; Bi, Jingfang; Wang, Ying; Fan, Yubo

    2017-08-01

    Spaceflight induced bone loss is seriously affecting astronauts. Mechanical stimulation from exercise has been shown to restrain bone resorption as well as improve bone formation. Current exercise countermeasures in space cannot prevent it completely. Active exercise may convert to passive exercise in some ways because of the loss of gravity stimulus and inertia of exercise equipment. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of passive exercise or/and local vibration on counteracting the deterioration of the musculoskeletal system, including bone, muscle and tendons in tail-suspended rats. We hypothesized that local vibration could enhance the efficacy of passive exercise on countering bone loss. 40 Sprague Dawley rats were randomly distributed into five groups (n = 8, each): tail-suspension (TS), TS+35 Hz vibration (TSV), TS + passive exercise (TSP), TS + passive exercise coupled with 35 Hz vibration (TSPV) and control (CON). Passive exercise or/and local vibration was performed for 21 days. On day 0 and 21, bone mineral density (BMD) was observed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and trabecular microstructure was evaluated by microcomputer tomography (μCT) analysis in vivo. Mechanical properties of tibia and tendon were determined by a mechanical testing system. Soleus and bone ash weight was tested by an electronic balance. Results showed that the passive exercise could not prevent the decrease of trabecular BMD, microstructure and bone ash weight induced by TS, whereas vibration and passive exercise coupled with local vibration (PV) could. Biomechanical properties of the tibia and tendon in TSPV group significantly increased compared with TS group. In summary, PV in this study was the best method in preventing weightlessness-induced bone loss. Consistent with our hypothesis, local vibration partly enhanced the effect of passive exercise. Furthermore, this study will be useful in improving countermeasure for astronauts, but also for the

  5. Non-invasive Technology to Study Local Passivity Breakdown of Metal Alloys in Aqueous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Alan M. Shipley

    2005-03-09

    Little is known about the basic mechanisms of passive oxide breakdown, repair, and localized corrosion of metals. A non-invasive instrument and methods have been developed to study local events and mechanisms that initiate passivity breakdown and subsequent corrosion of metals in aqueous media. The ''difference viewer imaging technique'' (DVIT) is a rapid, real time, non-invasive assay to study metal surfaces in corrosive solutions. It has a spatial resolution of less than 10.0 ?m (1cm x 1cm sample, 1000 x 1000 pixel CCD) to observe initial corrosion processes of the order of seconds. DVIT is a software-controlled video microscopy system and methods to collect and analyze pixel changes in video images. These images are recorded from a digital CCD video camera and frame grabber package using visible light for illumination. The DVIT system detects changes in video images that represent initial corrosive events that lead to passivity breakdown and re-passivation on metal surfaces in situ. This visual technique is easy to use and apply. It compliments other metal surface measurement techniques and can be used simultaneously with them. DVIT has proven to be more sensitive in detecting changes than scanning microelectrode techniques. DVIT is also much easier than other methods to apply and operate. It has the further advantage of providing a real time image of the entire metal surface under study instead of waiting for a microelectrode to scan a number of data points over a sample then plot the results. This project has fulfilled all specifications as outlined in the Department of Energy solicitation responsible for this grant application and award and exceeded a number of the specifications. Applicable Electronics, Inc. now has a marketable instrument and software package available for sale now. Further development of the system will be ongoing as driven by customer needs and discoveries. This technology has immediate applications in corrosion labs to further study

  6. Image processing techniques for passive millimeter-wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettington, Alan H.; Gleed, David G.

    1998-08-01

    We present our results on the application of image processing techniques for passive millimeter-wave imaging and discuss possible future trends. Passive millimeter-wave imaging is useful in poor weather such as in fog and cloud. Its spatial resolution, however, can be restricted due to the diffraction limit of the front aperture. Its resolution may be increased using super-resolution techniques but often at the expense of processing time. Linear methods may be implemented in real time but non-linear methods which are required to restore missing spatial frequencies are usually more time consuming. In the present paper we describe fast super-resolution techniques which are potentially capable of being applied in real time. Associated issues such as reducing the influence of noise and improving recognition capability will be discussed. Various techniques have been used to enhance passive millimeter wave images giving excellent results and providing a significant quantifiable increase in spatial resolution. Examples of applying these techniques to imagery will be given.

  7. Solution-processed amorphous silicon surface passivation layers

    SciTech Connect

    Mews, Mathias Sontheimer, Tobias; Korte, Lars; Rech, Bernd; Mader, Christoph; Traut, Stephan; Wunnicke, Odo

    2014-09-22

    Amorphous silicon thin films, fabricated by thermal conversion of neopentasilane, were used to passivate crystalline silicon surfaces. The conversion is investigated using X-ray and constant-final-state-yield photoelectron spectroscopy, and minority charge carrier lifetime spectroscopy. Liquid processed amorphous silicon exhibits high Urbach energies from 90 to 120 meV and 200 meV lower optical band gaps than material prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Applying a hydrogen plasma treatment, a minority charge carrier lifetime of 1.37 ms at an injection level of 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 3} enabling an implied open circuit voltage of 724 mV was achieved, demonstrating excellent silicon surface passivation.

  8. Local-Level Prognostics Health Management Systems Framework for Passive AdvSMR Components. Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Roy, Surajit; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Pardini, Allan F.; Jones, Anthony M.; Deibler, John E.

    2014-09-12

    This report describes research results to date in support of the integration and demonstration of diagnostics technologies for prototypical AdvSMR passive components (to establish condition indices for monitoring) with model-based prognostics methods. The focus of the PHM methodology and algorithm development in this study is at the localized scale. Multiple localized measurements of material condition (using advanced nondestructive measurement methods), along with available measurements of the stressor environment, enhance the performance of localized diagnostics and prognostics of passive AdvSMR components and systems.

  9. Dual Electrolytic Plasma Processing for Steel Surface Cleaning and Passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L.; Zhang, P.; Shi, J.; Liang, J.; Tian, W. B.; Zhang, Y. M.; Sun, Z. M.

    2017-07-01

    To remove the rust on rebars and passivate the fresh surfaces, electrodes reversing electrolytic plasma processing (EPP) was proposed and conducted in a 10 wt.% Na2CO3 aqueous solution. The morphology and the composition of the surface were investigated by SEM and XPS. Experimental results show that the rust on the surface was removed effectively by cathode EPP, and a passive film containing Cr2O3 was achieved by the succeeding anode EPP treatment, by a simple operation of reversing the bias. The corrosion resistance was evaluated in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution using an electrochemical workstation. In comparison, the corrosion resistance was improved by the succeeding anode EPP treatment, which is evidenced by a positive shift of the open-circuit potential, an increase in the electrochemical impedance representing the inner layer by 76.8% and the decrease in the corrosion current density by 49.6%. This is an effective and environment-friendly technique to clean and passivate rebars and similar steel materials.

  10. Acoustic emission localization in plates with dispersion and reverberations using sparse PZT sensors in passive mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelli, Alessandro; De Marchi, Luca; Marzani, Alessandro; Speciale, Nicolò

    2012-02-01

    A strategy for the localization of acoustic emissions (AE) in plates with dispersion and reverberation is proposed. The procedure exploits signals received in passive mode by sparse conventional piezoelectric transducers and a three-step processing framework. The first step consists in a signal dispersion compensation procedure, which is achieved by means of the warped frequency transform. The second step concerns the estimation of the differences in arrival time (TDOA) of the acoustic emission at the sensors. Complexities related to reflections and plate resonances are overcome via a wavelet decomposition of cross-correlating signals where the mother function is designed by a synthetic warped cross-signal. The magnitude of the wavelet coefficients in the warped distance-frequency domain, in fact, precisely reveals the TDOA of an acoustic emission at two sensors. Finally, in the last step the TDOA data are exploited to locate the acoustic emission source through hyperbolic positioning. The proposed procedure is tested with a passive network of three/four piezo-sensors located symmetrically and asymmetrically with respect to the plate edges. The experimentally estimated AE locations are close to those theoretically predicted by the Cramèr-Rao lower bound.

  11. Delivery of video-on-demand services using local storages within passive optical networks.

    PubMed

    Abeywickrama, Sandu; Wong, Elaine

    2013-01-28

    At present, distributed storage systems have been widely studied to alleviate Internet traffic build-up caused by high-bandwidth, on-demand applications. Distributed storage arrays located locally within the passive optical network were previously proposed to deliver Video-on-Demand services. As an added feature, a popularity-aware caching algorithm was also proposed to dynamically maintain the most popular videos in the storage arrays of such local storages. In this paper, we present a new dynamic bandwidth allocation algorithm to improve Video-on-Demand services over passive optical networks using local storages. The algorithm exploits the use of standard control packets to reduce the time taken for the initial request communication between the customer and the central office, and to maintain the set of popular movies in the local storage. We conduct packet level simulations to perform a comparative analysis of the Quality-of-Service attributes between two passive optical networks, namely the conventional passive optical network and one that is equipped with a local storage. Results from our analysis highlight that strategic placement of a local storage inside the network enables the services to be delivered with improved Quality-of-Service to the customer. We further formulate power consumption models of both architectures to examine the trade-off between enhanced Quality-of-Service performance versus the increased power requirement from implementing a local storage within the network.

  12. 43 CFR 2806.43 - How does BLM calculate rent for passive reflectors and local exchange networks?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... reflectors and local exchange networks? 2806.43 Section 2806.43 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating...-Of-Way § 2806.43 How does BLM calculate rent for passive reflectors and local exchange networks? (a) BLM calculates rent for passive reflectors and local exchange networks by using the same rent...

  13. 43 CFR 2806.43 - How does BLM calculate rent for passive reflectors and local exchange networks?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... reflectors and local exchange networks? 2806.43 Section 2806.43 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating...-Of-Way § 2806.43 How does BLM calculate rent for passive reflectors and local exchange networks? (a) BLM calculates rent for passive reflectors and local exchange networks by using the same rent...

  14. 43 CFR 2806.43 - How does BLM calculate rent for passive reflectors and local exchange networks?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... reflectors and local exchange networks? 2806.43 Section 2806.43 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating...-Of-Way § 2806.43 How does BLM calculate rent for passive reflectors and local exchange networks? (a) BLM calculates rent for passive reflectors and local exchange networks by using the same rent...

  15. 43 CFR 2806.43 - How does BLM calculate rent for passive reflectors and local exchange networks?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... reflectors and local exchange networks? 2806.43 Section 2806.43 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating...-Of-Way § 2806.43 How does BLM calculate rent for passive reflectors and local exchange networks? (a) BLM calculates rent for passive reflectors and local exchange networks by using the same rent...

  16. A hybrid passive localization method under strong interference with a preliminary experimental demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Bo; Yang, Yixin; Yang, Kunde; Wang, Yong; Shi, Yang

    2016-12-01

    Strong interference exists in many passive localization problems and may lead to the inefficacy of traditional localization methods. In this study, a hybrid passive localization method is proposed to address strong interference. This method combines generalized cross-correlation and interference cancellation for time-difference-of-arrival (TDOA) measurement, followed by a time-delay-based iterative localization method. The proposed method is applied to a preliminary experiment using three hydrophones. The TDOAs estimated by the proposed method are compared with those obtained by the particle filtering method. Results show that the positions are in agreement when the TDOAs are accurately obtained. Furthermore, the proposed method is more capable of localization in the presence of a strong moving jamming source.

  17. Surface passivation process of compound semiconductor material using UV photosulfidation

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.

    1995-01-01

    A method for passivating compound semiconductor surfaces by photolytically disrupting molecular sulfur vapor with ultraviolet radiation to form reactive sulfur which then reacts with and passivates the surface of compound semiconductors.

  18. Passive acoustic source localization using sources of opportunity.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, Christopher M A; Sarkar, J; Hodgkiss, W S; Kuperman, W A; Sabra, K G

    2015-07-01

    The feasibility of using data derived replicas from ships of opportunity for implementing matched field processing is demonstrated. The Automatic Identification System (AIS) is used to provide the library coordinates for the replica library and a correlation based processing procedure is used to overcome the impediment that the replica library is constructed from sources with different spectra and will further be used to locate another source with its own unique spectral structure. The method is illustrated with simulation and then verified using acoustic data from a 2009 experiment for which AIS information was retrieved from the United States Coast Guard Navigation Center Nationwide AIS database.

  19. Apparatus and process for passivating an SRF cavity

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Wallace, John P

    2014-12-02

    An apparatus and process for the production of a niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided. The apparatus comprises a first chamber positioned within a second chamber, an RF generator and vacuum pumping systems. The process comprises placing the niobium cavity in a first chamber of the apparatus; thermally treating the cavity by high temperature in the first chamber while maintaining high vacuum in the first and second chambers; and applying a passivating thin film layer to a surface of the cavity in the presence of a gaseous mixture and an RF field. Further a niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients produced by the method of the invention is provided.

  20. New process of silicon carbide purification intended for silicon passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbouche, M.; Zaghouani, R. Benabderrahmane; Benammar, N. E.; Aglieri, V.; Mosca, M.; Macaluso, R.; Khirouni, K.; Ezzaouia, H.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we report on a new, efficient and low cost process of silicon carbide (SiC) powder purification intended to be used in photovoltaic applications. This process consists on the preparation of porous silicon carbide layers followed by a photo-thermal annealing under oxygen atmosphere and chemical treatment. The effect of etching time on impurities removal efficiency was studied. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) results showed that the best result was achieved for an etching time of 10 min followed by gettering at 900 °C during 1 h. SiC purity is improved from 3N (99.9771%) to 4N (99.9946%). Silicon carbide thin films were deposited onto silicon substrates by pulsed laser deposition technique (PLD) using purified SiC powder as target. Significant improvement of the minority carrier lifetime was obtained encouraging the use of SiC as a passivation layer for silicon.

  1. Passive millimeter-wave camera with interferometric processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nohmi, Hitoshi; Ohnishi, Seiki; Kujubu, Osamu

    2007-04-01

    A proto-type passive millimeter-wave (MMW) camera with interferometric processing has been developed and evaluated to confirm the feasibility of the interferometric MMW camera and to study the characteristics of MMW images. This proto-type camera is comprised of the minimum configuration as an interferometric imager which consists of two sets of a W-band receiver with a horn antenna, and a digital processing unit. The position of these two antennas with W-band front-end moves on the precision linear slider in horizontal and vertical axis. The coherently amplified two channel signals are digitized and processed in the hardware processor. The process is comprised of correlation of all combination of each axis data, and integration to improve the signal to noise ratio. The integrated data is processed to make an image by matched filter processing. The integration time is from 1mS to 10S depending on required integration gain. The maximum synthesized antenna aperture size is 1m for horizontal axis and 50cm for vertical axis. In this paper, the evaluation of the proto-type P-MMW camera is descried. After the evaluation, some improvement was scheduled and conducted. Also, future plan for a real-time camera using this technique is presented .

  2. Fabrication of multilayer passive electric components using inkjet printing and low temperature laser processing on polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Seung Hwan; Chung, Jaewon; Pan, Heng; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2006-02-01

    The low temperature fabrication of passive electrical components (conductor, capacitor) on the flexible polymer substrate is presented in this paper. A drop-on-demand (DOD) ink-jetting system was used to print gold nano-particles suspended in Alpha-Terpineol solvent and PVP in PGMEA solvent to fabricate passive electrical components on flexible polymer substrate. Short pulsed laser ablation enabled finer electrical components to overcome limitation of inkjet process. Continuous Argon ion laser was irradiated locally to evaporate carrier solvent as well as to sinter gold nano-particles. In addition, a self alignment technique for PVP layer was demonstrated taking advantage of the deliberate modification of surface wetting characteristics. Finally, a new selective ablation of multilayered gold nanoparticle film was demonstrated using the ablation threshold difference for sintered and non sintered gold nanoparticles.

  3. Systematic Satellite Observations of the Impact of Aerosols from Passive Volcanic Degassing on Local Cloud Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebmeier, S.K.; Sayer, Andrew M.; Grainger, R. G.; Mather, T. A.; Carboni, E.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of volcanic emissions, especially from passive degassing and minor explosions, is a source of uncertainty in estimations of aerosol indirect effects. Observations of the impact of volcanic aerosol on clouds contribute to our understanding of both present-day atmospheric properties and of the pre-industrial baseline necessary to assess aerosol radiative forcing. We present systematic measurements over several years at multiple active and inactive volcanic islands in regions of low present-day aerosol burden. The timeaveraged indirect aerosol effects within 200 kilometers downwind of island volcanoes are observed using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, 2002-2013) and Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR, 2002- 2008) data. Retrievals of aerosol and cloud properties at Kilauea (Hawaii), Yasur (Vanuatu) and Piton de la Fournaise (la Reunion) are rotated about the volcanic vent to be parallel to wind direction, so that upwind and downwind retrievals can be compared. The emissions from all three volcanoes - including those from passive degassing, Strombolian activity and minor explosions - lead to measurably increased aerosol optical depth downwind of the active vent. Average cloud droplet effective radius is lower downwind of the volcano in all cases, with the peak difference ranging from 2 - 8 micrometers at the different volcanoes in different seasons. Estimations of the difference in Top of Atmosphere upward Short Wave flux upwind and downwind of the active volcanoes from NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) suggest a downwind elevation of between 10 and 45 Watts per square meter at distances of 150 - 400 kilometers from the volcano, with much greater local (less than 80 kilometers) effects. Comparison of these observations with cloud properties at isolated islands without degassing or erupting volcanoes suggests that these patterns are not purely orographic in origin. Our observations of unpolluted

  4. Systematic satellite observations of the impact of aerosols from passive volcanic degassing on local cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebmeier, S. K.; Sayer, A. M.; Grainger, R. G.; Mather, T. A.; Carboni, E.

    2014-10-01

    The impact of volcanic emissions, especially from passive degassing and minor explosions, is a source of uncertainty in estimations of aerosol indirect effects. Observations of the impact of volcanic aerosol on clouds contribute to our understanding of both present-day atmospheric properties and of the pre-industrial baseline necessary to assess aerosol radiative forcing. We present systematic measurements over several years at multiple active and inactive volcanic islands in regions of low present-day aerosol burden. The time-averaged indirect aerosol effects within 200 km downwind of island volcanoes are observed using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, 2002-2013) and Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR, 2002-2008) data. Retrievals of aerosol and cloud properties at Kīlauea (Hawai'i), Yasur (Vanuatu) and Piton de la Fournaise (la Réunion) are rotated about the volcanic vent to be parallel to wind direction, so that upwind and downwind retrievals can be compared. The emissions from all three volcanoes - including those from passive degassing, Strombolian activity and minor explosions - lead to measurably increased aerosol optical depth downwind of the active vent. Average cloud droplet effective radius is lower downwind of the volcano in all cases, with the peak difference ranging from 2-8 μm at the different volcanoes in different seasons. Estimations of the difference in Top of Atmosphere upward Short Wave flux upwind and downwind of the active volcanoes from NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) suggest a downwind elevation of between 10 and 45 Wm-2 at distances of 150-400 km from the volcano, with much greater local (< 80 km) effects. Comparison of these observations with cloud properties at isolated islands without degassing or erupting volcanoes suggests that these patterns are not purely orographic in origin. Our observations of unpolluted, isolated marine settings may capture processes similar to

  5. Sound localization with communications headsets: comparison of passive and active systems.

    PubMed

    Abel, Sharon M; Tsang, Suzanne; Boyne, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that conventional hearing protectors interfere with sound localization. This research examines possible benefits from advanced communications devices. Horizontal plane sound localization was compared in normal-hearing males with the ears unoccluded and fitted with Peltor H10A passive attenuation earmuffs, Racal Slimgard II communications muffs in active noise reduction (ANR) and talk-through-circuitry (TTC) modes and Nacre QUIETPRO TM communications earplugs in off (passive attenuation) and push-to-talk (PTT) modes. Localization was assessed using an array of eight loudspeakers, two in each spatial quadrant. The stimulus was 75 dB SPL, 300-ms broadband noise. One block of 120 forced-choice loudspeaker identification trials was presented in each condition. Subjects responded using a laptop response box with a set of eight microswitches in the same configuration as the speaker array. A repeated measures ANOVA was applied to the dataset. The results reveal that the overall percent correct response was highest in the unoccluded condition (94%). A significant reduction of 24% was observed for the communications devices in TTC and PTT modes and a reduction of 49% for the passive muff and plug and muff with ANR. Disruption in performance was due to an increase in front-back reversal errors for mirror image spatial positions. The results support the conclusion that communications devices with advanced technologies are less detrimental to directional hearing than conventional, passive, limited amplification and ANR devices.

  6. Evolving uses of passive seismic arrays from continental to local scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmandt, B.

    2014-12-01

    Portable passive seismic surveys are generally used to sample scales and locations that are not practical with long-term observatories, but are fundamental to studying Earth systems. The breadth of uses and designs of portable passive surveys is expanding rapidly as result of advances in instrumentation and analysis. Examples from recent passive surveys will be used illustrate how they are bringing new constraint to systems spanning continental to local scales. At continental scale EarthScope's USArray is providing a view of the transition zone between the upper and lower mantle that facilitates integration of seismology, geodynamics, and mineral physics. Recently recognized correlations between mantle flow and abrupt velocity decreases in the top of the lower mantle are consistent with laboratory constraints on the consequences of volatile cycling in the deep Earth. Arrays with similar numbers of seismometers (~103) are also being used in a passive mode on much smaller scales. The Long Beach 3D survey conducted by NodalSeismic in 2011 covered only 7x10 km in southern California with about 5,000 seismometers. The instruments were optimized for recording high frequencies (>10 Hz), but they also successfully recorded local and teleseismic earthquakes. Delay time and amplitude maps for earthquake body-waves revealed coherent structural variations at scales as small as about 400 m. Such dense sampling of teleseismic earthquake wave fields yielded new constraint on localized deep crustal deformation underlying the tectonic boundary between mainland California and the rifted Inner Continental Borderland. The utility of passive data from the Long Beach 3D survey partly motivated a recent deployment of more than 900 exploration industry seismometers to record continuously for 2 weeks at Mt. St. Helens volcano in Washington in 2014. New observations of the >50 local earthquakes recorded within the Mt. St. Helens array will also be presented.

  7. Passive millimeter-wave camera with interferometric processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nohmi, Hitoshi; Ohnishi, Seiki; Kujubu, Osamu

    2006-05-01

    A proto-type passive millimeter-wave (MMW) camera with interferometric processing has been developed. The purpose is to confirm the feasibility of the interferometric MMW camera and to study the characteristics of MMW images. In this paper, the principle and the feature of the interferometric MMW camera is described. Also, the hardware configuration and the image processing algorithm are presented. This proto-type camera is comprised of the minimum configuration as an interferometric imager which consists of two sets of a W-band front end with a horn antenna, a receiver, and an A/D converter, a high-speed processing hardware, and a computer. The position of these two antennas with W-band front-end moves on the precision linear slider in horizontal and vertical axis. The coherently amplified two channel signals are digitized and processed in the hardware processor. The process is comprised of phase error compensation, correlation of all combination of each axis data, and integration to improve the signal to noise ratio. The computer input the integrated data to make an image by matched filter processing. The integration time is from 1mS to 10S depending on required integration gain. The maximum synthesized antenna aperture size is 1m for horizontal axis and 50cm for vertical axis. Because it takes certain time to receive by the moving antennas, only the targets without motion are imaged by this proto-type camera. The processed images will be shown. Also, future plan for a real-time camera using this technique is presented.

  8. Protection Switching and Local Area Network Emulation in Passive Optical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadarajah, Nishaanthan; Wong, Elaine; Attygalle, Manik; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai Thas

    2006-05-01

    This paper proposes and experimentally demonstrates an automatic-protection-switching (APS) mechanism against distribution fiber breaks in passive optical networks (PONs). The protection of optical-network units (ONUs) that are located at the customer premises is carried out by monitoring the distribution fiber using the traffic that is transported among the customers in the PON. This configuration emulates a local area network (LAN) over the existing PON while facilitating the switching of signal transmissions to a predetermined protection path in an event of a distribution fiber break. As failure detection and APS are performed independently by each ONU in a distributed manner, the processing complexities and delays are reduced at the central office (CO). The restoration of the traffic transported between the CO and an ONU in the event of the distribution fiber break is performed by interconnecting adjacent ONUs and carrying out signal transmissions via an independent but interconnected ONU. Such a protection mechanism enables multiple adjacent ONUs to be simultaneously protected by a single ONU utilizing its maximum available bandwidth. This paper experimentally verifies the feasibility of the proposed protection mechanism in conjunction with two different LAN-emulation schemes with a 1.25-Gb/s upstream baseband transmission to the CO and a 155-Mb/s LAN data transmission on a radio-frequency carrier. The experimental results obtained from both schemes are compared, and the power budgets are calculated to analyze the scalability of each scheme.

  9. Passive sound-localization ability of the big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus).

    PubMed

    Koay, G; Kearns, D; Heffner, H E; Heffner, R S

    1998-05-01

    The passive sound-localization ability (i.e. minimum audible angle) of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, was determined using a conditioned avoidance procedure in which the animals were trained to discriminate left sounds from right sounds. The mean threshold of three bats for a 100-ms broadband noise burst was 14 degrees, a value that is about average for mammals. A similar threshold of 15 degrees was obtained for one animal when it was retested with one of its own recorded echolocation calls as the stimulus. The two bats tested on pure-tone localization were able to localize high-frequency, but not low-frequency tones, even when a low-frequency tone was amplitude modulated, a result indicating that these bats are not able to use binaural time-difference cues for localization. Finally, given the width of the bat's field of best vision, as determined by a count of its ganglion-cell density, its sound-localization acuity is consistent with the hypothesis that the role of passive sound localization is to direct the eyes to the source of a sound.

  10. Electrical addressing and temporal tweezing of localized pulses in passively-mode-locked semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camelin, P.; Javaloyes, J.; Marconi, M.; Giudici, M.

    2016-12-01

    We show that the pumping current is a convenient parameter for manipulating the temporal localized structures (LSs), also called localized pulses, found in passively-mode-locked vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. While short electrical pulses can be used for writing and erasing individual LSs, we demonstrate that a current modulation introduces a temporally evolving parameter landscape allowing one to control the position and the dynamics of LSs. We show that the localized pulse drifting speed in this landscape depends almost exclusively on the local parameter value instead of depending on the landscape gradient, as shown in quasi-instantaneous media. This experimental observation is theoretically explained by the causal response time of the semiconductor carriers that occurs on a finite time scale and breaks the parity invariance along the cavity, thus leading to a different paradigm for temporal tweezing of localized pulses. Different modulation waveforms are applied for describing exhaustively this paradigm. Starting from a generic model of passive mode locking based upon delay differential equations, we deduce the effective equations of motion for these LSs in a time-dependent current landscape.

  11. Localized electrical fine tuning of passive microwave and radio frequency devices

    DOEpatents

    Findikoglu, Alp T.

    2001-04-10

    A method and apparatus for the localized electrical fine tuning of passive multiple element microwave or RF devices in which a nonlinear dielectric material is deposited onto predetermined areas of a substrate containing the device. An appropriate electrically conductive material is deposited over predetermined areas of the nonlinear dielectric and the signal line of the device for providing electrical contact with the nonlinear dielectric. Individual, adjustable bias voltages are applied to the electrically conductive material allowing localized electrical fine tuning of the devices. The method of the present invention can be applied to manufactured devices, or can be incorporated into the design of the devices so that it is applied at the time the devices are manufactured. The invention can be configured to provide localized fine tuning for devices including but not limited to coplanar waveguides, slotline devices, stripline devices, and microstrip devices.

  12. Effect of excimer laser annealing on a-InGaZnO thin-film transistors passivated by solution-processed hybrid passivation layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermundo, Juan Paolo; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Fujii, Mami N.; Nonaka, Toshiaki; Ishihara, Ryoichi; Ikenoue, Hiroshi; Uraoka, Yukiharu

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of excimer laser annealing (ELA) as a low temperature annealing alternative to anneal amorphous InGaZnO (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) passivated by a solution-processed hybrid passivation layer. Usually, a-IGZO is annealed using thermal annealing at high temperatures of up to 400 °C. As an alternative to high temperature thermal annealing, two types of ELA, XeCl (308 nm) and KrF (248 nm) ELA, are introduced. Both ELA types enhanced the electrical characteristics of a-IGZO TFTs leading to a mobility improvement of ~13 cm2 V-1 s-1 and small threshold voltage which varied from ~0-3 V. Furthermore, two-dimensional heat simulation using COMSOL Multiphysics was used to identify possible degradation sites, analyse laser heat localization, and confirm that the substrate temperature is below 50 °C. The two-dimensional heat simulation showed that the substrate temperature remained at very low temperatures, less than 30 °C, during ELA. This implies that any flexible material can be used as the substrate. These results demonstrate the large potential of ELA as a low temperature annealing alternative for already-passivated a-IGZO TFTs.

  13. SVD Approaches in Multisource, Multipath Passive Array Processing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Chien-Kuo

    Several system identification techniques have been proposed to treat high resolution directional finding problems in passive sonar, radar, and communication systems. In this dissertation, we present a new covariance approximation approach. The covariance matrices of source signals, in stationary environments often have a special form known as Toeplitz matrix. Our approach is based on what is known as the Toeplitz approximation method (TAM) via Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) in stochastic realization theory, which can deal with the color noise environment and the correlated sources. One of such practical situations is the multipath situation. To reduce the effect of rounding errors incurred in spectrum estimation algorithm, a SVD state space modeling is suggested. It offers the important advantage of low sensitivity to the perturbation of parameter estimation. Using the TAM approach we can first obtain source bearing information, and then cancel undesired signals. For cancellation, we introduce a Least-Square beamformer to form an adaptive spatial filter network. The weighting vector of our spatial filter is derived using a Gram-Schmidt partial orthogonalization procedure which leads to an adaptive scheme, allowing computational savings. This recursive algorithm enjoys another important feature in that it may be implemented in a compact VLSI array processor, such as wavefront/systolic array processors. This implementation aspect is critical for real-time processing applications. Another problem discussed in the dissertation is that of determining desired or undesired path directions from target source under the hypothesis of given correlation coefficients. For that we first formulate the path identification criterion. The decision criterion is based upon the probability density function for estimated path correlation coefficients. The performance of such criterion is also discussed. Extensive simulations have been conducted and the simulation results indicate

  14. Regularization of Localized Degradation Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-28

    order to assess the regularization properties of non-classical micropolar Cosserat continua which feature non-symmetric stress and strain tensors because...of the presence of couple-stresses and micro-curvatures. It was shown that micropolar media may only exhibit localized failure in the form of tensile

  15. Process Dependence of H Passivation and Doping in H-implanted ZnO

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-04

    Process dependence of H passivation and doping in H-implanted ZnO This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the...00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Process dependence of H passivation and doping in H-implanted ZnO 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...Appl. Phys. 46 (2013) 055107 (7pp) doi:10.1088/0022-3727/46/5/055107 Process dependence of H passivation and doping in H-implanted ZnO Z Zhang1, D C

  16. Improved passive optical network architectures to support local area network emulation and protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Elaine; Nadarajah, Nishaanthan; Chae, Chang-Joon; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai; Attygalle, Sanjeewa M.

    2006-01-01

    We describe two optical layer schemes which simultaneously facilitate local area network emulation and automatic protection switching against distribution fiber breaks in passive optical networks. One scheme employs a narrowband fiber Bragg grating placed close to the star coupler in the feeder fiber of the passive optical network, while the other uses an additional short length distribution fiber from the star coupler to each customer for the redirection of the customer traffic. Both schemes use RF subcarrier multiplexed transmission for intercommunication between customers in conjunction with upstream access to the central office at baseband. Failure detection and automatic protection switching are performed independently by each optical network unit that is located at the customer premises in a distributed manner. The restoration of traffic transported between the central office and an optical network unit in the event of the distribution fiber break is performed by interconnecting adjacent optical network units and carrying out signal transmissions via an independent but interconnected optical network unit. Such a protection mechanism enables multiple adjacent optical network units to be simultaneously protected by a single optical network unit utilizing its maximum available bandwidth. We experimentally verify the feasibility of both schemes with 1.25 Gb/s upstream baseband transmission to the central office and 155 Mb/s local area network data transmission on a RF subcarrier frequency. The experimental results obtained from both schemes are compared, and the power budgets are calculated to analyze the scalability of each scheme.

  17. Spatial Distribution of Lead Iodide and Local Passivation on Organo-Lead Halide Perovskite.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Wen, Xiaoming; Yun, Jae S; Huang, Shujuan; Green, Martin; Jeon, Nam Joong; Yang, Woon Seok; Noh, Jun Hong; Seo, Jangwon; Seok, Sang Il; Ho-Baillie, Anita

    2017-02-22

    We identify nanoscale spatial distribution of PbI2 on the (FAPbI3)0.85(MAPbBr3)0.15 perovskite thin film and investigate the local passivation effect using confocal based optical microscopy of steady state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL). Different from a typical scanning electron microscope (SEM) morphology study, confocal based PL spectroscopy and microscopy allow researchers to map the morphologies of both perovskite and PbI2 grains simultaneously, by selectively detecting their characteristic fluorescent bands using band-pass filters. In this work, we compare the perovskite samples without and with excess PbI2 incorporation and unambiguously reveal PbI2 distribution for the PbI2-rich sample. In addition, using the nanoscale time-resolved PL technique we show that the PbI2-rich regions exhibit longer lifetime due to suppressed defect trapping, compared to the PbI2-poor regions. The measurement on the PbI2-rich sample indicates that the passivation effect of PbI2 in perovskite film is effective, especially in localized regions. Hence, this finding is important for further improvement of the solar cells by considering the strategy of excess PbI2 incorporation.

  18. Local and global processing in savant artists with autism.

    PubMed

    Pring, Linda; Ryder, Nicola; Crane, Laura; Hermelin, Beate

    2010-01-01

    We explored the hypothesis that an enhanced local processing style is characteristic of both art and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by examining local and global processing in savant artists with ASD. Specifically, savant artists were compared against non-talented individuals with ASD or mild/moderate learning difficulties (MLD), as well as artistically talented or nontalented students, on the block-design task and meaningful and abstract versions of the embedded figures test (EFT). Results demonstrated that there were no significant differences between the meaningful and abstract versions of the EFT, in any of the groups. This suggests that the primary process governing performance on this task was perceptual (local), rather than conceptual (global). More interestingly, the savant artists performed above the level of the ASD and MLD groups on the block-design test, but not the EFT. Despite both the block-design task and the EFT measuring local processing abilities, we suggest that this result is due to the block-design task being an active construction task (requiring the conversion of a visual input into a motor output), whereas the EFT is a passive recognition task. Therefore, although an enhanced local processing style is an important aspect of savant artistic talent, motor control also appears to be a necessary skill.

  19. Passive acoustic mapping of magnetic microbubbles for cavitation enhancement and localization.

    PubMed

    Crake, Calum; Victor, Marie de Saint; Owen, Joshua; Coviello, Christian; Collin, Jamie; Coussios, Constantin-C; Stride, Eleanor

    2015-01-21

    Magnetic targeting of microbubbles functionalized with superparamagnetic nanoparticles has been demonstrated previously for diagnostic (B-mode) ultrasound imaging and shown to enhance gene delivery in vitro and in vivo. In the present work, passive acoustic mapping (PAM) was used to investigate the potential of magnetic microbubbles for localizing and enhancing cavitation activity under focused ultrasound. Suspensions of magnetic microbubbles consisting of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC), air and 10 nm diameter iron oxide nanoparticles were injected into a tissue mimicking phantom at different flow velocities (from 0 to 50 mm s(-1)) with or without an applied magnetic field. Microbubbles were excited using a 500 kHz single element focused transducer at peak negative focal pressures of 0.1-1.0 MPa, while a 64 channel imaging array passively recorded their acoustic emissions. Magnetic localization of microbubble-induced cavitation activity was successfully achieved and could be resolved using PAM as a shift in the spatial distribution and increases in the intensity and sustainability of cavitation activity under the influence of a magnetic field. Under flow conditions at shear rates of up to 100 s(-1) targeting efficacy was maintained. Application of a magnetic field was shown to consistently increase the energy of cavitation emissions by a factor of 2-5 times over the duration of exposures compared to the case without targeting, which was approximately equivalent to doubling the injected microbubble dose. These results suggest that magnetic targeting could be used to localize and increase the concentration of microbubbles and hence cavitation activity for a given systemic dose of microbubbles or ultrasound intensity.

  20. Passive acoustic mapping of magnetic microbubbles for cavitation enhancement and localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crake, Calum; de Saint Victor, Marie; Owen, Joshua; Coviello, Christian; Collin, Jamie; Coussios, Constantin-C.; Stride, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic targeting of microbubbles functionalized with superparamagnetic nanoparticles has been demonstrated previously for diagnostic (B-mode) ultrasound imaging and shown to enhance gene delivery in vitro and in vivo. In the present work, passive acoustic mapping (PAM) was used to investigate the potential of magnetic microbubbles for localizing and enhancing cavitation activity under focused ultrasound. Suspensions of magnetic microbubbles consisting of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC), air and 10 nm diameter iron oxide nanoparticles were injected into a tissue mimicking phantom at different flow velocities (from 0 to 50 mm s-1) with or without an applied magnetic field. Microbubbles were excited using a 500 kHz single element focused transducer at peak negative focal pressures of 0.1-1.0 MPa, while a 64 channel imaging array passively recorded their acoustic emissions. Magnetic localization of microbubble-induced cavitation activity was successfully achieved and could be resolved using PAM as a shift in the spatial distribution and increases in the intensity and sustainability of cavitation activity under the influence of a magnetic field. Under flow conditions at shear rates of up to 100 s-1 targeting efficacy was maintained. Application of a magnetic field was shown to consistently increase the energy of cavitation emissions by a factor of 2-5 times over the duration of exposures compared to the case without targeting, which was approximately equivalent to doubling the injected microbubble dose. These results suggest that magnetic targeting could be used to localize and increase the concentration of microbubbles and hence cavitation activity for a given systemic dose of microbubbles or ultrasound intensity.

  1. Automatic post processing algorithm for passive seismic monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepeina, K.

    2014-05-01

    The problem of monitoring of different types of seismic events - geoacoustic precursors of earthquakes, industrial and field explosions, places fragments fall of separating parts of rockets-carriers, etc. is one of the key in the modern ecology of the environment. The peculiarity of this kind of monitoring is that it is mobile seismic groups, which should be based in the proposed area of occurrence of events. One of the most important steps for solving the problems connected with the detection and identification of recorded data from passive sensors in mobile seismic array (MSA). The task of determining the nature of the source and its' coordinates lies in the basis of direction, referred to as the geoacoustic location. Using a new approach (not by location but by neural classification of waveform "portraits") usability of algorithm which based on quantitative parameters of signal will be demonstrated.

  2. Skin blood flow and local temperature independently modify sweat rate during passive heat stress in humans.

    PubMed

    Wingo, Jonathan E; Low, David A; Keller, David M; Brothers, R Matthew; Shibasaki, Manabu; Crandall, Craig G

    2010-11-01

    Sweat rate (SR) is reduced in locally cooled skin, which may result from decreased temperature and/or parallel reductions in skin blood flow. The purpose of this study was to test the hypotheses that decreased skin blood flow and decreased local temperature each independently attenuate sweating. In protocols I and II, eight subjects rested supine while wearing a water-perfused suit for the control of whole body skin and internal temperatures. While 34°C water perfused the suit, four microdialysis membranes were placed in posterior forearm skin not covered by the suit to manipulate skin blood flow using vasoactive agents. Each site was instrumented for control of local temperature and measurement of local SR (capacitance hygrometry) and skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry). In protocol I, two sites received norepinephrine to reduce skin blood flow, while two sites received Ringer solution (control). All sites were maintained at 34°C. In protocol II, all sites received 28 mM sodium nitroprusside to equalize skin blood flow between sites before local cooling to 20°C (2 sites) or maintenance at 34°C (2 sites). In both protocols, individuals were then passively heated to increase core temperature ~1°C. Both decreased skin blood flow and decreased local temperature attenuated the slope of the SR to mean body temperature relationship (2.0 ± 1.2 vs. 1.0 ± 0.7 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1)·°C(-1) for the effect of decreased skin blood flow, P = 0.01; 1.2 ± 0.9 vs. 0.07 ± 0.05 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1)·°C(-1) for the effect of decreased local temperature, P = 0.02). Furthermore, local cooling delayed the onset of sweating (mean body temperature of 37.5 ± 0.4 vs. 37.6 ± 0.4°C, P = 0.03). These data demonstrate that local cooling attenuates sweating by independent effects of decreased skin blood flow and decreased local skin temperature.

  3. Starting a local conservation and passive solar retrofit program: an energy planning sourcebook

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, V; Mathews, R

    1982-02-01

    A city planner or a neighborhood activist may wish to initiate a local conservation and passive solar retrofit program but may not have previous experience in doing so. This sourcebook is designed to assist interested individuals with their energy planning efforts, from determining retrofit potential, to financing and implementing the program. An approach or methodology is provided which can be applied to determine retrofit potential in single-family residences, mobile homes, multifamily residences, and nonresidential buildings. Case studies in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are given as examples. Guidelines are provided for evaluating the economic benefits of a retrofit program through benefit-cost analysis and economic base studies at the city and neighborhood levels. Also included are approaches to community outreach, detailing how to get started, how to gain local support, and examples of successful programs throughout the US. The need for financing, the development of a local strategy, public and private financing techniques, and community energy service organizations are examined. In addition to the Albuquerque case studies, a brief technology characterization, heat-loss calculations, economic tools, and a list of resources are appended.

  4. Passive Sensor Integration for Vehicle Self-Localization in Urban Traffic Environment.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yanlei; Hsu, Li-Ta; Kamijo, Shunsuke

    2015-12-03

    This research proposes an accurate vehicular positioning system which can achieve lane-level performance in urban canyons. Multiple passive sensors, which include Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers, onboard cameras and inertial sensors, are integrated in the proposed system. As the main source for the localization, the GNSS technique suffers from Non-Line-Of-Sight (NLOS) propagation and multipath effects in urban canyons. This paper proposes to employ a novel GNSS positioning technique in the integration. The employed GNSS technique reduces the multipath and NLOS effects by using the 3D building map. In addition, the inertial sensor can describe the vehicle motion, but has a drift problem as time increases. This paper develops vision-based lane detection, which is firstly used for controlling the drift of the inertial sensor. Moreover, the lane keeping and changing behaviors are extracted from the lane detection function, and further reduce the lateral positioning error in the proposed localization system. We evaluate the integrated localization system in the challenging city urban scenario. The experiments demonstrate the proposed method has sub-meter accuracy with respect to mean positioning error.

  5. Passive Sensor Integration for Vehicle Self-Localization in Urban Traffic Environment †

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yanlei; Hsu, Li-Ta; Kamijo, Shunsuke

    2015-01-01

    This research proposes an accurate vehicular positioning system which can achieve lane-level performance in urban canyons. Multiple passive sensors, which include Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers, onboard cameras and inertial sensors, are integrated in the proposed system. As the main source for the localization, the GNSS technique suffers from Non-Line-Of-Sight (NLOS) propagation and multipath effects in urban canyons. This paper proposes to employ a novel GNSS positioning technique in the integration. The employed GNSS technique reduces the multipath and NLOS effects by using the 3D building map. In addition, the inertial sensor can describe the vehicle motion, but has a drift problem as time increases. This paper develops vision-based lane detection, which is firstly used for controlling the drift of the inertial sensor. Moreover, the lane keeping and changing behaviors are extracted from the lane detection function, and further reduce the lateral positioning error in the proposed localization system. We evaluate the integrated localization system in the challenging city urban scenario. The experiments demonstrate the proposed method has sub-meter accuracy with respect to mean positioning error. PMID:26633420

  6. Passivation Behavior of Ultrafine-Grained Pure Copper Fabricated by Accumulative Roll Bonding (ARB) Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattah-alhosseini, Arash; Imantalab, Omid

    2016-01-01

    In this study, passivation behavior of ultrafine-grained (UFG) pure copper fabricated by ARB process in 0.01 M borax solution has been investigated. Before any electrochemical measurements, evaluation of microstructure was obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM observations revealed that with increasing the number of ARB passes, the grain size of specimens decrease. Also, TEM images showed that UFGs with average size of below 100 nm appeared after 7 passes of ARB. To investigate the passivation behavior of the specimens, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Mott-Schottky analysis was carried out. For this purpose, three potentials within the passive region were chosen for potentiostatic passive film growth. EIS results showed that both passive film and charge-transfer resistance increases with increasing the number of ARB passes. Moreover, Mott-Schottky analysis revealed that with increasing the number of ARB passes, the acceptor density of the passive films decreased. In conclusion, increasing the number of ARB passes offers better conditions for forming the passive films with higher protection behavior, due to the growth of a much thicker and less defective films.

  7. Industry-Grade Seismic Processing System for Controlled- (and Passive-) Source Research in Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubak, G.; Morozov, I.

    2004-05-01

    to be initiated and controlled from a single interface. Jobs may be executed either locally or on a single or multiple remote systems in a heterogeneous computing environment. The GUI includes tools for run-time control of both local and remote processes.. The GUI also includes provisions for cluster scheduling, allowing processes to be executed on Beowulf clusters. Depending on their design, individual tools or flows can be parallelized using either PVM or MPI (Message Passing Interface). With the decentralized processing concept implemented in SIA, grid computing and seamless data exchange could become a reality without any effort from the users. In passive-source work, which is quickly adopting reflection processing techniques, this industry-style processing could provide sophisticated, inexpensive, and high performance approaches to data retrieval and access to hundreds of signal enhancement tools developed in reflection seismics.

  8. Recombination processes in passivated boron-implanted black silicon emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Gastrow, Guillaume; Ortega, Pablo; Alcubilla, Ramon; Husein, Sebastian; Nietzold, Tara; Bertoni, Mariana; Savin, Hele

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we study the recombination mechanisms in ion-implanted black silicon (bSi) emitters and discuss their advantages over diffused emitters. In the case of diffusion, the large bSi surface area increases emitter doping and consequently Auger recombination compared to a planar surface. The total doping dose is on the contrary independent of the surface area in implanted emitters, and as a result, we show that ion implantation allows control of emitter doping without compromise in the surface aspect ratio. The possibility to control surface doping via implantation anneal becomes highly advantageous in bSi emitters, where surface passivation becomes critical due to the increased surface area. We extract fundamental surface recombination velocities Sn through numerical simulations and obtain the lowest values at the highest anneal temperatures. With these conditions, an excellent emitter saturation current (J0e) is obtained in implanted bSi emitters, reaching 20 fA/cm2 ± 5 fA/cm2 at a sheet resistance of 170 Ω/sq. Finally, we identify the different regimes of recombination in planar and bSi emitters as a function of implantation anneal temperature. Based on experimental data and numerical simulations, we show that surface recombination can be reduced to a negligible contribution in implanted bSi emitters, which explains the low J0e obtained.

  9. Advanced Methods for Passive Acoustic Detection, Classification, and Localization of Marine Mammals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    processing described by Mellinger et al. (2011). A second stage is also used which processes a frequency band from 1320 to 1450 Hz to detect the onset... processing . Then a third stage calculates the frequency with high spectral resolution (0.72 Hz per bin) of the DSC for each detected boing to help associate...humpback song units detected via Generalized Power Law processing cross-correlated between hydrophone pairs. Both model-based baleen whale localization

  10. Combining Radiography and Passive Measurements for Radiological Threat Localization in Cargo

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Erin A.; White, Timothy A.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Robinson, Sean M.; Wittman, Richard A.

    2015-10-01

    Detecting shielded special nuclear material (SNM) in a cargo container is a difficult problem, since shielding reduces the amount of radiation escaping the container. Radiography provides information that is complementary to that provided by passive gamma-ray detection systems: while not directly sensitive to radiological materials, radiography can reveal highly shielded regions that may mask a passive radiological signal. Combining these measurements has the potential to improve SNM detection, either through improved sensitivity or by providing a solution to the inverse problem to estimate source properties (strength and location). We present a data-fusion method that uses a radiograph to provide an estimate of the radiation-transport environment for gamma rays from potential sources. This approach makes quantitative use of radiographic images without relying on image interpretation, and results in a probabilistic description of likely source locations and strengths. We present results for this method for a modeled test case of a cargo container passing through a plastic-scintillator-based radiation portal monitor and a transmission-radiography system. We find that a radiograph-based inversion scheme allows for localization of a low-noise source placed randomly within the test container to within 40 cm, compared to 70 cm for triangulation alone, while strength estimation accuracy is improved by a factor of six. Improvements are seen in regions of both high and low shielding, but are most pronounced in highly shielded regions. The approach proposed here combines transmission and emission data in a manner that has not been explored in the cargo-screening literature, advancing the ability to accurately describe a hidden source based on currently-available instrumentation.

  11. Passive and active processes in visuo-spatial memory: double dissociation in developmental learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Cornoldi, C; Rigoni, F; Venneri, A; Vecchi, T

    2000-01-01

    The distinction between passive and active visuo-spatial memory has been useful to interpret various pattern of deficits reported in individual differences studies. However, this interpretation raises the issue of task difficulty, since active tasks could be failed simply because more complex and the corresponding deficit could reflect a reduced capacity of the system. We describe two children with Nonverbal Learning Disability whose performance provides evidence of a dissociation between passive and active memory processes. One of the children showed a selective impairment in passive tasks and performed flawlessly in active tasks, whereas the second child displayed the opposite pattern. These data suggest that a qualitative difference between passive and active processes does exist and that differences in performance do not reflect a lower/higher level of task difficulty. Further, these data underlie the importance of formulating theoretical models of visuo-spatial memory including both material-related (i.e., visual vs spatial) and process-related (i.e., passive vs active) distinctions.

  12. Systematic Satellite Observations of the Impact of Aerosols from Passive Volcanic Degassing on Local Cloud Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebmeier, S. K.; Sayer, A. M.; Grainger, R. G.; Mather, T. A.; Carboni, E.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of volcanic emissions is a significant source of uncertainty in estimations of aerosol indirect radiative forcing, especially with respect to emissions from passive de-gassing and minor explosions. Understanding the impact of volcanic emissions on indirect radiative forcing is important assessing present day atmospheric properties and also to define the pre-industrial baseline to assess anthropogenic perturbations. We present observations of the time-averaged indirect aerosol effect within 200 km downwind of isolated island volcanoes in regions of low present-day aerosol burden using MODIS and AATSR data. Retrievals of aerosol and cloud properties at Kilauea (Hawaii), Yasur (Vanuatu) and Piton de la Fournaise (Reunion) are rotated about the volcanic vent according to wind direction, so that retrievals downwind of the volcano can be averaged to improve signal to noise ratio. The emissions from all three volcanoes, including those from passive degassing, strombolian activity and minor explosions lead to measurably increased aerosol optical depth downwind of the active vent. Average cloud droplet effective radius is lower downwind of the volcano in all cases, with the peak difference in effective radius ranging from 48 microns at the different volcanoes. A comparison of these observations with cloud properties at isolated islands with no significant source of aerosol suggests that these patterns are not purely orographic in origin. This approach sets out a first step for the systematic measurement of the effects of present day low altitude volcanic emissions on cloud properties, and our observations of unpolluted, isolated marine settings may capture processes similar to those in the preindustrial marine atmosphere.

  13. Systematic satellite observations of the impact of aerosols from passive volcanic degassing on local cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebmeier, S. K.; Sayer, A. M.; Grainger, R. G.; Mather, T. A.; Carboni, E.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of volcanic emissions is a significant source of uncertainty in estimations of aerosol indirect radiative forcing, especially with respect to emissions from passive degassing and minor explosions. Understanding the impact of volcanic emissions on indirect radiative forcing is important for assessing present day atmospheric properties and also to define the pre-industrial baseline to assess anthropogenic perturbations. We present observations of the time-averaged indirect aerosol effect within 200 km downwind of isolated island volcanoes in regions of low present-day aerosol burden using MODIS and AATSR data. Retrievals of aerosol and cloud properties at Kīlauea (Hawai'i), Yasur (Vanuatu) and Piton de la Fournaise (Réunion) are rotated about the volcanic vent according to wind direction, so that retrievals downwind of the volcano can be averaged to improve signal to noise ratio. The emissions from all three volcanoes, including those from passive degassing, strombolian activity and minor explosions lead to measurably increased aerosol optical depth downwind of the active vent. Average cloud droplet effective radius is lower downwind of the volcano in all cases, with the peak difference in effective radius of 4-8 μm at the different volcanoes. A comparison of these observations with cloud properties at isolated islands with no significant source of aerosol suggests that these patterns are not purely orographic in origin. This approach sets out a first step for the systematic measurement of the effects of present day low altitude volcanic emissions on cloud properties. Our observations of unpolluted, isolated marine settings may also capture processes similar to those in the pre-industrial marine atmosphere.

  14. DEMONSTRATION OF AN INTEGRATED, PASSIVE BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT PROCESS FOR AMD

    EPA Science Inventory

    An innovative, cost-effective, biological treatment process has been designed by MSE Technology Applications, Inc. to treat acid mine drainage (AMD). A pilot-scale demonstration is being conducted under the Mine Waste Technology Program using water flowing from an abandoned mine ...

  15. DEMONSTRATION OF AN INTEGRATED, PASSIVE BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT PROCESS FOR AMD

    EPA Science Inventory

    An innovative, cost-effective, biological treatment process has been designed by MSE Technology Applications, Inc. to treat acid mine drainage (AMD). A pilot-scale demonstration is being conducted under the Mine Waste Technology Program using water flowing from an abandoned mine ...

  16. Three-dimensional velocity structure of the Galeras volcano (Colombia) from passive local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Carlos Alberto; Torres, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    A three-dimensional estimation of the Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio structure at Galeras volcano was conducted by means of passive local earthquake tomography. 14,150 volcano-tectonic events recorded by 58 stations in the seismological network established for monitoring the volcanic activity by the Colombian Geological Survey - Pasto Volcano Observatory between the years 1989 and 2015, were inverted by using the LOTOS code. The seismic events are associated with shear-stress fractures in solid rock as a response to pressure induced by magma flow. Tomography resolution tests suggest a depth of imaging that yield 10 km from the summit of the main crater, illuminating a large portion of the volcanic structure and the interaction of tectonic features like the Buesaco and Silvia-Pijao faults. Full catalog tomographic inversion, that represents the stacked image of the volcanic structure or the most permanent features underneath the volcano, shows vertical structures aligned with seismicity beneath the main crater. We hypothesize that these structures correspond to a system of ducts or fractures through which magma and fluid phases flow up from deeper levels toward the top and related with the intersection of the surface traces of the Silvia-Pijao and Buesaco faults.

  17. An analytic overview of long range passive detection and localization in an inhomogeneous ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, D

    1991-07-01

    An analytic summary or overview of the problem of long range passive source detection and localization is presented. The principal aims are to provide an analytic basis for developing effective weak-signal detection and estimation algorithms and performance measures in a model-based approach, when the desired source (or sources) are not surely known to be present p(H{sub 1})<1, in a general ambient noise field due primarily to surface or near-surface noise mechanisms. In addition to threshold detection and estimation (when (pH{sub 1})<1: signal not surely present) with correlated space and time noise samples, procedures for modeling the random acoustic noise and signal fields are outlined, from the viewpoint of the ocean as an inhomogeneous acoustic waveguide, {nabla}c{ne}0, with boundaries, and arbitrary (near) surface distributions of noise sources. The latter are required to specify these otherwise canonical results to the present class of problems. The Report concludes with a short list of next steps, and references to pertinent supporting material.

  18. Passive monitoring and localization of marine mammals in open ocean environments using widely spaced bottom mounted hydrophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, Susan; Moretti, David; Morrissey, Ronald; Dimarzio, Nancy

    2003-10-01

    The Marine Mammal Monitoring on Navy Ranges (M3R) project has developed a toolset for passive detection and localization of marine mammals using the existing infrastructure of Navy's undersea ranges. The Office of Naval Research funded the M3R project as part of the Navy's effort to determine the effects of acoustic and other emissions on marine mammals and threatened/endangered species. A necessary first step in this effort is the creation of a baseline of behavior, which requires long-term monitoring of marine mammals. Such monitoring, in turn, requires the ability to detect and localize the animals. This paper will present the passive acoustic monitoring and localization tools developed under M3R. It will also present results of the deployment of the M3R tools at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC), Andros Island, Bahamas from June through November 2003. Finally, it will discuss current work to improve automated species classification.

  19. Methodology for the passive control of orbital inclination and mean local time to meet sun-synchronous orbit requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Kraft, Lauri

    1992-01-01

    The mean local time (MLT) of equatorial crossing of a sun-synchronous Earth-observing spacecraft orbit drifts with inclination; therefore, in order to maintain the MLT, the inclination must be controlled. Inclination may be maintained actively by costly out-of-plane maneuvers or passively by using the perturbing forces due to the sun and moon. This paper examines the passive control approach using the Earth Observing System (EOS) as a basis for the discussion. Applications to Landsat and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) spacecraft are presented for comparison. This technique is especially beneficial to spacecraft lacking propulsion systems. The results indicate that passive inclination control appears to be the preferable maintenance method when spacecraft weight restrictions, operational considerations, and scientific requirements apply.

  20. Methodology for the passive control of orbital inclination and mean local time to meet sun-synchronous orbit requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Kraft, Lauri

    1992-01-01

    The mean local time (MLT) of equatorial crossing of a sun-synchronous Earth-observing spacecraft orbit drifts with inclination; therefore, in order to maintain the MLT, the inclination must be controlled. Inclination may be maintained actively by costly out-of-plane maneuvers or passively by using the perturbing forces due to the sun and moon. This paper examines the passive control approach using the Earth Observing System (EOS) as a basis for the discussion. Applications to Landsat and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) spacecraft are presented for comparison. This technique is especially beneficial to spacecraft lacking propulsion systems. The results indicate that passive inclination control appears to be the preferable maintenance method when spacecraft weight restrictions, operational considerations, and scientific requirements apply.

  1. The Effect of Processing Instruction and Dictogloss Tasks on Acquisition of the English Passive Voice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qin, Jingjing

    2008-01-01

    This study was intended to compare processing instruction (VanPatten, 1993, 1996, 2000), an input-based focus on form technique, to dictogloss tasks, an output-oriented focus-on-form type of instruction to assess their effects in helping beginning-EFL (English as a Foreign Language) learners acquire the simple English passive voice. Two intact…

  2. Semantic Processing Persists despite Anomalous Syntactic Category: ERP Evidence from Chinese Passive Sentences

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Wu, Fuyun; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    The syntax-first model and the parallel/interactive models make different predictions regarding whether syntactic category processing has a temporal and functional primacy over semantic processing. To further resolve this issue, an event-related potential experiment was conducted on 24 Chinese speakers reading Chinese passive sentences with the passive marker BEI (NP1 + BEI + NP2 + Verb). This construction was selected because it is the most-commonly used Chinese passive and very much resembles German passives, upon which the syntax-first hypothesis was primarily based. We manipulated semantic consistency (consistent vs. inconsistent) and syntactic category (noun vs. verb) of the critical verb, yielding four conditions: CORRECT (correct sentences), SEMANTIC (semantic anomaly), SYNTACTIC (syntactic category anomaly), and COMBINED (combined anomalies). Results showed both N400 and P600 effects for sentences with semantic anomaly, with syntactic category anomaly, or with combined anomalies. Converging with recent findings of Chinese ERP studies on various constructions, our study provides further evidence that syntactic category processing does not precede semantic processing in reading Chinese. PMID:26125621

  3. Adaptive behaviors in multi-agent source localization using passive sensing.

    PubMed

    Shaukat, Mansoor; Chitre, Mandar

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, the role of adaptive group cohesion in a cooperative multi-agent source localization problem is investigated. A distributed source localization algorithm is presented for a homogeneous team of simple agents. An agent uses a single sensor to sense the gradient and two sensors to sense its neighbors. The algorithm is a set of individualistic and social behaviors where the individualistic behavior is as simple as an agent keeping its previous heading and is not self-sufficient in localizing the source. Source localization is achieved as an emergent property through agent's adaptive interactions with the neighbors and the environment. Given a single agent is incapable of localizing the source, maintaining team connectivity at all times is crucial. Two simple temporal sampling behaviors, intensity-based-adaptation and connectivity-based-adaptation, ensure an efficient localization strategy with minimal agent breakaways. The agent behaviors are simultaneously optimized using a two phase evolutionary optimization process. The optimized behaviors are estimated with analytical models and the resulting collective behavior is validated against the agent's sensor and actuator noise, strong multi-path interference due to environment variability, initialization distance sensitivity and loss of source signal.

  4. Adaptive behaviors in multi-agent source localization using passive sensing

    PubMed Central

    Shaukat, Mansoor; Chitre, Mandar

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the role of adaptive group cohesion in a cooperative multi-agent source localization problem is investigated. A distributed source localization algorithm is presented for a homogeneous team of simple agents. An agent uses a single sensor to sense the gradient and two sensors to sense its neighbors. The algorithm is a set of individualistic and social behaviors where the individualistic behavior is as simple as an agent keeping its previous heading and is not self-sufficient in localizing the source. Source localization is achieved as an emergent property through agent’s adaptive interactions with the neighbors and the environment. Given a single agent is incapable of localizing the source, maintaining team connectivity at all times is crucial. Two simple temporal sampling behaviors, intensity-based-adaptation and connectivity-based-adaptation, ensure an efficient localization strategy with minimal agent breakaways. The agent behaviors are simultaneously optimized using a two phase evolutionary optimization process. The optimized behaviors are estimated with analytical models and the resulting collective behavior is validated against the agent’s sensor and actuator noise, strong multi-path interference due to environment variability, initialization distance sensitivity and loss of source signal. PMID:28018121

  5. Target detection using microwave irradiances from natural sources: A passive, local and global surveillance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Detection of metal objects on or near the Earth's surface was investigated using existing, passive, microwave sensors operating from Earth orbit. The range equations are derived from basic microwave principles and theories and the expressions are given explicitly to estimate the signal to noise ratio for detecting metal targets operating as bistatic scatterers. Actual measurements are made on a range of metal objects observed from orbit using existing passive microwave receiving systems. The details of the measurements and the results are tabulated and discussed. The advantages of a passive microwave sensor as it is applied to surveillance of metal objects as viewed from aerial platforms or from orbit, are examined.

  6. Improved traveling-wave efficiency in 7T human MRI using passive local loop and dipole arrays.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xinqiang; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Gore, John C; Grissom, William A

    2017-06-01

    Traveling-wave MRI, which uses relatively small and simple RF antennae, has robust matching performance and capability for large field-of-view (FOV) imaging. However, the power efficiency of traveling-wave MRI is much lower than conventional methods, which limits its application. One simple approach to improve the power efficiency is to place passive resonators around the subject being imaged. The feasibility of this approach has been demonstrated in previous works using a single small resonant loop. In this work, we aim to explore how much the improvements can be maintained in human imaging using an array design, and whether electric dipoles can be used as local elements. First, a series of electromagnetic (EM) simulations were performed on a human model. Then RF coils were constructed and the simulation results using the best setup for head imaging were validated in MR experiments. By using the passive local loop and transverse dipole arrays, respectively, the transmit efficiency (B1(+)) of traveling-wave MRI can be improved by 3-fold in the brain and 2-fold in the knee. The types of passive elements (loops or dipoles) should be carefully chosen for brain or knee imaging to maximize the improvement, and the enhancement depends on the local body configuration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Orientability of loop processes in relative locality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin-Qing

    2013-12-01

    Inspired by recent results of unusual properties of loop processes in relative locality, we introduce a way to classify loops in the case of κ-Poincaré momentum space. We show that the notion of orientability is deeply connected to a few essential properties of loop processes. Nonorientable loops have effective curvature, which explicitly breaks translation symmetry, and can lead to a breaking of causality and global momentum conservation. Orientable loops, on the other hand, are “flat.” Causality and global momentum conservation are all well preserved in these kinds of loops. We comment that the nontrivial classical loops in relative locality might be understood as dual effects from general relativity, and some physical implications are discussed.

  8. Recombination at laser-processed local base contacts by dynamic infrared lifetime mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Jens; Bothe, Karsten; Gatz, Sebastian; Haase, Felix; Mader, Christoph; Brendel, Rolf

    2010-12-01

    Laser-processed local metal contacts to Si solar cells are a promising approach, to combine high efficiency and low production cost. Understanding carrier transport and recombination in locally contacted solar cells requires numerical simulations with experimentally verified input parameters. One of these input parameters is the reverse saturation current density J0,cont at the local base contact. We determine J0,cont by means of area averaged charge carrier lifetime measurements and an analytical model, which distinguishes between recombination at the metal contacts and at the passivated interface in between the contacts. The calibration-free dynamic infrared lifetime mapping technique is used. We measure local reverse saturation current densities J0,cont=2×103 to 2×107 fA/cm2 at metal contacts to p-type float-zone material with resistivities ρ =0.5 to 200 Ω cm. Laser contact openings (LCOs) formed by laser ablation of an amorphous Si/SiNx passivation stack and subsequent physical vapor deposition of aluminum are used as contact formation technique. As well laser fired contacts (LFCs) are applied to the same passivation stack and metallization. We observe no difference in J0,cont between LCO and LFC. Our results indicate degradation of the passivation stack by the laser treatment in the vicinity of the LCO and LFC.

  9. Local seismologic observations of karst processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malovichko, D. A.; Kadebskaya, O. I.; Shulakov, D. Yu.; Butyrin, P. G.

    2010-01-01

    The paper addresses the methodic questions of arrangement and implementation of local temporal seismologic observations targeting research on karst. We describe an approach for the quantitative assessment of the feasibility for recording the seismic effect of dynamic phenomena accompanying the karst processes. The approach copes with the specific features of excitation, propagation, and recording of seismic waves for a given karsting massif. The adequacy of this approach is supported by the results of experiments on the imitation of collapses in the test object, namely in the Kungur ice cave (Perm region). We describe the experience in application of approaches developed in “big” seismology in the choice of the optimal configuration of the local seismic group (taking into account the properties of stationary microseismic noises) and methods for data processing (identification of the nature of signals) as applied to the conditions of the study of karst processes. Based on the observations performed in Kungur, Perm region, the efficiency of the use of the local seismic group for discriminating signals of an exogenous and endogenous nature is demonstrated.

  10. Local and Regional Processes in Community Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Juan C; Kolasa, Jurek

    2013-01-01

    Controversy on whether local (deterministic) or regional (stochastic) factors control the structure of communities persists after decades of research. The main reason for why it has not been resolved may lie in the nature of evidence which largely comes from realized natural communities. In such communities assembly history leaves a mark that may support either set of factors. To avoid the confounding effects of assembly history we controlled for these effects experimentally. We created a null community by mixing 17 rock pool communities. We then divided the null community into replicates and distributed among treatments representing a gradient of factors from local to regional. We hypothesized that if deterministic factors dominate the assembly of communities, community structures should show a corresponding gradient from being very similar and convergent to dissimilar and divergent. In contrast, if local processes are predominantly stochastic in nature, such a gradient of community configurations should emerge even in the homogeneous setting. Our results appear to partially support both hypotheses and thus suggest that both deterministic and stochastic processes contribute to the assembly of communities. Furthermore, we found that to satisfactorily explain patterns observed in natural communities environmental heterogeneity and regional processes must also be considered. In conclusion, although deterministic mechanisms seem to be important in the assembly of communities, in natural systems their signal may be diluted and masked whenever other factors exert meaningful influence. Such factors increase the number of possible paths to the point that the number of paths equals the number of communities in a metacommunity. PMID:23355879

  11. Children’s assignment of grammatical roles in the online processing of Mandarin passive sentences

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi Ting; Zheng, Xiaobei; Meng, Xiangzhi; Snedeker, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    Children’s difficulty understanding passives in English has been attributed to the syntactic complexity, overall frequency, cue reliability, and/or incremental processing of this construction. To understand the role of these factors, we used the visual-world paradigm to examine comprehension in Mandarin Chinese where passives are infrequent but signaled by a highly valid marker (BEI). Eye-movements during sentences indicated that these markers triggered incremental role assignments in adults and 5-year-olds. Actions after sentences indicated that passives were often misinterpreted as actives when markers appeared after the referential noun (“Seal BEI it eat” → The seal is eaten by it). However, they were more likely to be interpreted correctly when markers appeared before (“It BEI seal eat” → It is eaten by the seal). The actions and the eye-movements suggest that for both adults and children, interpretations of passive are easier when they do not require revision of an earlier role assignment. PMID:24376303

  12. Anisotropic Elastography for Local Passive Properties and Active Contractility of Myocardium from Dynamic Heart Imaging Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ge; Sun, L. Z.

    2006-01-01

    Major heart diseases such as ischemia and hypertrophic myocardiopathy are accompanied with significant changes in the passive mechanical properties and active contractility of myocardium. Identification of these changes helps diagnose heart diseases, monitor therapy, and design surgery. A dynamic cardiac elastography (DCE) framework is developed to assess the anisotropic viscoelastic passive properties and active contractility of myocardial tissues, based on the chamber pressure and dynamic displacement measured with cardiac imaging techniques. A dynamic adjoint method is derived to enhance the numerical efficiency and stability of DCE. Model-based simulations are conducted using a numerical left ventricle (LV) phantom with an ischemic region. The passive material parameters of normal and ischemic tissues are identified during LV rapid/reduced filling and artery contraction, and those of active contractility are quantified during isovolumetric contraction and rapid/reduced ejection. It is found that quasistatic simplification in the previous cardiac elastography studies may yield inaccurate material parameters. PMID:23165032

  13. Anisotropic elastography for local passive properties and active contractility of myocardium from dynamic heart imaging sequence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Ge; Sun, L Z

    2006-01-01

    Major heart diseases such as ischemia and hypertrophic myocardiopathy are accompanied with significant changes in the passive mechanical properties and active contractility of myocardium. Identification of these changes helps diagnose heart diseases, monitor therapy, and design surgery. A dynamic cardiac elastography (DCE) framework is developed to assess the anisotropic viscoelastic passive properties and active contractility of myocardial tissues, based on the chamber pressure and dynamic displacement measured with cardiac imaging techniques. A dynamic adjoint method is derived to enhance the numerical efficiency and stability of DCE. Model-based simulations are conducted using a numerical left ventricle (LV) phantom with an ischemic region. The passive material parameters of normal and ischemic tissues are identified during LV rapid/reduced filling and artery contraction, and those of active contractility are quantified during isovolumetric contraction and rapid/reduced ejection. It is found that quasistatic simplification in the previous cardiac elastography studies may yield inaccurate material parameters.

  14. THE RECOVERY OF TRANSMISSIVITY IN PASSIVE IRON WIRES AS A MODEL OF RECOVERY PROCESSES IN IRRITABLE LIVING SYSTEMS

    PubMed Central

    Lillie, Ralph S.

    1920-01-01

    is indicated by a sudden change in the electrical potential of the wire, from that of active to that of passive iron; this phase is succeeded by the second and more prolonged period during which the passivating layer undergoes the progressive alteration associated with the recovery of transmissivity. This alteration appears to consist in a progressive thinning of the passivating film until a minimal thickness of (probably 1 molecule) is attained. Further thinning is prevented by local electrochemical oxidation. 6. The phenomena of partial or limited transmission during the second phase of the recovery process show a close correspondence with the phenomena of conduction with decrement in irritable living tissues such as nerve. Other analogies with the behavior of irritable tissues (threshold phenomena, distinction between "local" and "propagated" effects, summation, effects resembling electrotonus) are described. PMID:19871851

  15. Deploying Monitoring Trails for Fault Localization in All- Optical Networks and Radio-over-Fiber Passive Optical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maamoun, Khaled Mohamed

    Fault localization is the process of realizing the true source of a failure from a set of collected failure notifications. Isolating failure recovery within the network optical domain is necessary to resolve alarm storm problems. The introduction of the monitoring trail (m-trail) has been proven to deliver better performance by employing monitoring resources in a form of optical trails - a monitoring framework that generalizes all the previously reported counterparts. In this dissertation, the m-trail design is explored and a focus is given to the analysis on using m-trails with established lightpaths to achieve fault localization. This process saves network resources by reducing the number of the m-trails required for fault localization and therefore the number of wavelengths used in the network. A novel approach based on Geographic Midpoint Technique, an adapted version of the Chinese Postman's Problem (CPP) solution and an adapted version of the Traveling Salesman's Problem (TSP) solution algorithms is introduced. The desirable features of network architectures and the enabling of innovative technologies for delivering future millimeter-waveband (mm-WB) Radio-over-Fiber (RoF) systems for wireless services integrated in a Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) is proposed in this dissertation. For the conceptual illustration, a DWDM RoF system with channel spacing of 12.5 GHz is considered. The mm-WB Radio Frequency (RF) signal is obtained at each Optical Network Unit (ONU) by simultaneously using optical heterodyning photo detection between two optical carriers. The generated RF modulated signal has a frequency of 12.5 GHz. This RoF system is easy, cost-effective, resistant to laser phase noise and also reduces maintenance needs, in principle. A revision of related RoF network proposals and experiments is also included. A number of models for Passive Optical Networks (PON)/ RoF-PON that combine both innovative and existing ideas along with a number of

  16. Lexically Specific Knowledge and Individual Differences in Adult Native Speakers' Processing of the English Passive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Street, James A.; Dabrowska, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    This article provides experimental evidence for the role of lexically specific representations in the processing of passive sentences and considerable education-related differences in comprehension of the passive construction. The experiment measured response time and decision accuracy of participants with high and low academic attainment using an…

  17. Fifth International Workshop on Detection, Classification, Localization and Density Estimation of Marine Mammals using Passive Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    spring 2011 in Seattle) • The Fourth International Conference on Detection and Classification of Marine Mammals using Passive Acoustics ( Pavia ...Italy, 2009) • The International BioAcoustic Congress ( Pavia , Italy, 2009) Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting

  18. Advanced information processing system: Local system services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhardt, Laura; Alger, Linda; Whittredge, Roy; Stasiowski, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) is a multi-computer architecture composed of hardware and software building blocks that can be configured to meet a broad range of application requirements. The hardware building blocks are fault-tolerant, general-purpose computers, fault-and damage-tolerant networks (both computer and input/output), and interfaces between the networks and the computers. The software building blocks are the major software functions: local system services, input/output, system services, inter-computer system services, and the system manager. The foundation of the local system services is an operating system with the functions required for a traditional real-time multi-tasking computer, such as task scheduling, inter-task communication, memory management, interrupt handling, and time maintenance. Resting on this foundation are the redundancy management functions necessary in a redundant computer and the status reporting functions required for an operator interface. The functional requirements, functional design and detailed specifications for all the local system services are documented.

  19. Amorphous silicon passivation for 23.3% laser processed back contact solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carstens, Kai; Dahlinger, Morris; Hoffmann, Erik; Zapf-Gottwick, Renate; Werner, Jürgen H.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents amorphous silicon deposited at temperatures below 200 °C, leading to an excellent passivation layer for boron doped emitter and phosphorus doped back surface field areas in interdigitated back contact solar cells. A higher deposition temperature degrades the passivation of the boron emitter by an increased hydrogen effusion due to lower silicon hydrogen bond energy, proved by hydrogen effusion measurements. The high boron surface doping in crystalline silicon causes a band bending in the amorphous silicon. Under these conditions, at the interface, the intentionally undoped amorphous silicon becomes p-type conducting, with the consequence of an increased dangling bond defect density. For bulk amorphous silicon this effect is described by the defect pool model. We demonstrate, that the defect pool model is also applicable to the interface between amorphous and crystalline silicon. Our simulation shows the shift of the Fermi energy towards the valence band edge to be more pronounced for high temperature deposited amorphous silicon having a small bandgap. Application of optimized amorphous silicon as passivation layer for the boron doped emitter and phosphorus doped back surface field on the rear side of laser processed back contact solar cells, fabricated using four laser processing steps, yields an efficiency of 23.3%.

  20. A new application of passive samplers as indicators of in-situ biodegradation processes.

    PubMed

    Belles, Angel; Alary, Claire; Criquet, Justine; Billon, Gabriel

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a method for evaluating the in-situ degradation of nitro polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitro-PAH) in sediments is presented. The methodology is adapted from the passive sampler technique, which commonly uses the dissipation rate of labeled compounds loaded in passive sampler devices to sense the environmental conditions of exposure. In the present study, polymeric passive samplers (made of polyethylene strips) loaded with a set of labeled polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and nitro-PAH were immersed in sediments (in field and laboratory conditions) to track the degradation processes. This approach is theoretically based on the fact that a degradation process induces a steeper concentration gradient of the labeled compounds in the surrounding sediment, thereby increasing their compound dissipation rates compared with their dissipation in abiotic conditions. Postulating that the degradation magnitude is the same for the labeled compounds loaded in polyethylene strips and for their native homologs that are potentially present in the sediment, the field degradation of 3 nitro-PAH (2-nitro-fluorene, 1-nitro-pyrene, 6-nitro-chrysene) was semi-quantitatively analyzed using the developed method.

  1. Fabrication process for polymer PLC platforms with V-grooves for passive alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Suntak; Lee, Jong-Moo; Ahn, Joon Tae; Baek, Yong-Soon

    2005-12-01

    A method for polymer planar lightwave circuit (PLC) devices fabricated on a substrate with V-grooves is developed for passive alignment of an optical fiber to a polymer waveguide. In order to minimize thickness nonuniformity of polymer layers caused by the V-grooves, dry film resist (DFR) is used. The V-grooves are covered with the DFR before the polymer layers are spin-coated on the substrate. The DFR prevents the polymer from being filled in the V-grooves as well as from being spin-coated nonuniformly on the substrate. This process provides a simple and cost-effective fabrication method of polymer PLCs or platforms for passive alignment.

  2. Application of a passive electrochemical noise technique to localized corrosion of candidate radioactive waste container materials

    SciTech Connect

    Korzan, M.A.

    1994-05-01

    One of the key engineered barriers in the design of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is the waste canister that encapsulates the spent fuel elements. Current candidate metals for the canisters to be emplaced at Yucca Mountain include cast iron, carbon steel, Incoloy 825 and titanium code-12. This project was designed to evaluate passive electrochemical noise techniques for measuring pitting and corrosion characteristics of candidate materials under prototypical repository conditions. Experimental techniques were also developed and optimized for measurements in a radiation environment. These techniques provide a new method for understanding material response to environmental effects (i.e., gamma radiation, temperature, solution chemistry) through the measurement of electrochemical noise generated during the corrosion of the metal surface. In addition, because of the passive nature of the measurement the technique could offer a means of in-situ monitoring of barrier performance.

  3. Sound Localization with Communications Headsets: Comparison of Passive and Active Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    communications muffs in active noise reduction (ANR) and talk-through-circuitry (TTC) modes and Nacre QUIETPRO communications earplugs in off (passive...UK) in active noise reduction (ANR) and talk-through circuitry (TTC) modes ofoperation and Nacre QU’IETPRO communications earplugs ( Nacre , Trondheim...externally mounted microphones [Figure 2a]. Sound level is limited to 85 dBA. The Nacre QUIETPRO device comprises two ear pieces (transducer housing

  4. Electrochemical and Passive Behaviors of Pure Copper Fabricated by Accumulative Roll-Bonding (ARB) Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imantalab, O.; Fattah-alhosseini, A.

    2015-07-01

    In the present work, electrochemical and passive behaviors of pure copper fabricated by accumulative roll-bonding (ARB) process in 0.01 M borax solution (pH = 9.1) have been studied. Before any electrochemical measurements, evaluation of microstructure was obtained by Vickers microhardness, x-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy. The results of microhardness tests revealed that microhardness values increased with the increasing number of ARB cycles. Also a sharp increase was seen in microhardness after the first ARB cycle, whereas mediocre additional increases were observed afterward up to the seven cycles. Moreover, XRD patterns showed that the mean crystallite size values decrease with the increasing number of ARB cycles. To investigate the electrochemical and passive behaviors of the samples, the potentiodynamic polarization, Mott-Schottky analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were carried out. Polarization plots revealed that as a result of ARB, the corrosion behavior of the specimens improves compared with the annealed pure copper. Also, the Mott-Schottky analysis and EIS measurements showed that the increasing number of ARB cycles offer better conditions for forming the passive films with higher protection behavior, due to the growth of less-defective films.

  5. Real-time image processing for passive mmW imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozacik, Stephen; Paolini, Aaron; Bonnett, James; Harrity, Charles; Mackrides, Daniel; Dillon, Thomas E.; Martin, Richard D.; Schuetz, Christopher A.; Kelmelis, Eric; Prather, Dennis W.

    2015-05-01

    The transmission characteristics of millimeter waves (mmWs) make them suitable for many applications in defense and security, from airport preflight scanning to penetrating degraded visual environments such as brownout or heavy fog. While the cold sky provides sufficient illumination for these images to be taken passively in outdoor scenarios, this utility comes at a cost; the diffraction limit of the longer wavelengths involved leads to lower resolution imagery compared to the visible or IR regimes, and the low power levels inherent to passive imagery allow the data to be more easily degraded by noise. Recent techniques leveraging optical upconversion have shown significant promise, but are still subject to fundamental limits in resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. To address these issues we have applied techniques developed for visible and IR imagery to decrease noise and increase resolution in mmW imagery. We have developed these techniques into fieldable software, making use of GPU platforms for real-time operation of computationally complex image processing algorithms. We present data from a passive, 77 GHz, distributed aperture, video-rate imaging platform captured during field tests at full video rate. These videos demonstrate the increase in situational awareness that can be gained through applying computational techniques in real-time without needing changes in detection hardware.

  6. The impact of number mismatch and passives on the real-time processing of relative clauses.

    PubMed

    Contemori, Carla; Marinis, Theodoros

    2014-05-01

    Language processing plays a crucial role in language development, providing the ability to assign structural representations to input strings (e.g., Fodor, 1998). In this paper we aim at contributing to the study of children's processing routines, examining the operations underlying the auditory processing of relative clauses in children compared to adults. English-speaking children (6;0-8;11) and adults participated in the study, which employed a self-paced listening task with a final comprehension question. The aim was to determine (i) the role of number agreement in object relative clauses in which the subject and object NPs differ in terms of number properties, and (ii) the role of verb morphology (active vs. passive) in subject relative clauses. Even though children's off-line accuracy was not always comparable to that of adults, analyses of reaction times results support the view that children have the same structural processing reflexes observed in adults.

  7. Passive acoustic localization of the Atlantic bottlenose dolphin using whistles and echolocation clicks.

    PubMed

    Freitag, L E; Tyack, P L

    1993-04-01

    A method for localization and tracking of calling marine mammals was tested under realistic field conditions that include noise, multipath, and arbitrarily located sensors. Experiments were performed in two locations using four and six hydrophones with captive Atlantic bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). Acoustic signals from the animals were collected in the field using a digital acoustic data acquisition system. The data were then processed off-line to determine relative hydrophone positions and the animal locations. Accurate hydrophone position estimates are achieved by pinging sequentially from each hydrophone to all the others. A two-step least-squares algorithm is then used to determine sensor locations from the calibration data. Animal locations are determined by estimating the time differences of arrival of the dolphin signals at the different sensors. The peak of a matched filter output or the first cycle of the observed waveform is used to determine arrival time of an echolocation click. Cross correlation between hydrophones is used to determine inter-sensor time delays of whistles. Calculation of source location using the time difference of arrival measurements is done using a least-squares solution to minimize error. These preliminary experimental results based on a small set of data show that realistic trajectories for moving animals may be generated from consecutive location estimates.

  8. In situ evolution of trivalent chromium process passive film on Al in a corrosive aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xuecheng; Argekar, Sandip; Wang, Peng; Schaefer, Dale W

    2011-11-01

    In situ neutron reflectivity (NR) is used to observe the structure and evolution of a Trivalent Chromium Process (TCP) passive film on Al in a NaCl-D(2)O solution. Using a split liquid reflectivity cell we mimicked the corrosion process on the anodic sites in alloy AA 2024-T3 in a pitting scenario. The split cell separates the anodic and cathodic reactions, allowing NR observation of the corroding anodic surface under potential control. We observed the evolution of the TCP film on the Al anode and compared the degradation of the Al with and without TCP protection. When held at 100 mV above the open-circuit potential (OCP), unprotected aluminum dissolves at a rate of 120 Å/h. By contrast, TCP-coated Al is stable up to the pitting potential (200 mV above OCP). In the passive state D(2)O molecules penetrate the bulk TCP film by partially replacing the hydrate water. In spite of exchange of hydration water, the TCP film is stable and the underlying aluminum is fully protected. The passive character of the TCP film is due to a dense layer at the metal-TCP interface and/or to suppression of ion transport in the bulk film. As the pitting potential is approached the film swells and NaCl-D(2)O solution penetrates the TCP film. At this point, 50 vol % of the TCP film is occupied by bulk NaCl-D(2)O solution. Failure occurs by aluminum dissolution under the swollen TCP film as the imbibed solution contacts the Al metal. Further increase in potential leads to complete stripping of the TCP film.

  9. Comparing passive source localization and tracking approaches with a towed horizontal receiver array in an ocean waveguide.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zheng; Tran, Duong D; Ratilal, Purnima

    2013-11-01

    Approaches for instantaneous passive source localization using a towed horizontal receiver array in a random range-dependent ocean waveguide are examined. They include: (1) Moving array triangulation, (2) array invariant, (3) bearings-only target motion analysis in modified polar coordinates via the extended Kalman filter, and (4) bearings-migration minimum mean-square error. These methods are applied to localize and track a vertical source array deployed in the far-field of a towed horizontal receiver array during the Gulf of Maine 2006 Experiment. The source transmitted intermittent broadband pulses in the 300 to 1200 Hz frequency range. A nonlinear matched-filter kernel designed to replicate the acoustic signal measured by the receiver array is applied to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio. The source localization accuracy is found to be highly dependent on source-receiver geometry and the localization approach. For a relatively stationary source drifting at speeds much slower than the receiver array tow-speed, the mean source position can be estimated by moving array triangulation with less than 3% error near broadside direction. For a moving source, the Kalman filter method gives the best performance with 5.5% error. The array invariant is the best approach for localizing sources within the endfire beam of the receiver array with 7% error.

  10. "Active" and "Passive" Lava Resurfacing Processes on Io: A Comparative Study of Loki Patera and Prometheus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, A. G.; Matson, D. L.; Leone, G.; Wilson, L.; Keszthelyi, L. P.

    2004-01-01

    Studies of Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) data and ground based data of volcanism at Prometheus and Loki Patera on Io reveal very different mechanisms of lava emplacement at these two volcanoes. Data analyses show that the periodic nature of Loki Patera s volcanism from 1990 to 2001 is strong evidence that Loki s resurfacing over this period resulted from the foundering of a crust on a lava lake. This process is designated passive , as there is no reliance on sub-surface processes: the foundering of the crust is inevitable. Prometheus, on the other hand, displays an episodicity in its activity which we designate active . Like Kilauea, a close analog, Prometheus s effusive volcanism is dominated by pulses of magma through the nearsurface plumbing system. Each system affords views of lava resurfacing processes through modelling.

  11. Array Signal Processing for Source Localization and Digital Communication.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bong-Gee

    Array antennas are used in several areas such as sonar and digital communication. Although array patterns may be different depending on applications, they are used with a view to collecting more data and obtaining better results. We first consider a passive sonar system in random environments where the index of refraction is random. While source localization problems for deterministic environments are well studied, they require accurate propagation models which are not available in random environments. We extend the localization problems to random environments. It has been shown that methods developed for deterministic environments fail in random environments because of the stochastic nature of acoustic propagation. Therefore, we model observations as random, and use a statistical signal processing technique combined with physics. The statistical signal model is provided by physics either empirically or theoretically. The performance technique relies on the accuracy of the statistical models. We have applied the maximum likelihood method to angle of arrival estimation and range estimation problems. The Cramer-Rao lower bounds have been also derived to predict the estimation performance. Next, we use the array antennas for diversity combining equalization in digital communications. Spatial diversity equalization is used in two ways; to improve bit error rate or to improve the transmission rate. This is feasible by using more antennas at the receiver end. We apply Helstrom's saddle point integration method to multi -input multi-output communication systems and show that a factor of 3-4 of channel reuse is possible. It is also shown that the advantage is because of the diversity itself not because of more taps. We further improve the equalization performance by joint pre- and postfilter design. Two different methods have been proposed according to the prefilter type. Although the mean square error is not easy to minimize, appropriate methods have been adopted and show

  12. Morphotectonic evolution of passive margins undergoing active surface processes: large-scale experiments using numerical models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beucher, Romain; Huismans, Ritske S.

    2016-04-01

    Extension of the continental lithosphere can lead to the formation of a wide range of rifted margins styles with contrasting tectonic and geomorphological characteristics. It is now understood that many of these characteristics depend on the manner extension is distributed depending on (among others factors) rheology, structural inheritance, thermal structure and surface processes. The relative importance and the possible interactions of these controlling factors is still largely unknown. Here we investigate the feedbacks between tectonics and the transfers of material at the surface resulting from erosion, transport, and sedimentation. We use large-scale (1200 x 600 km) and high-resolution (~1km) numerical experiments coupling a 2D upper-mantle-scale thermo-mechanical model with a plan-form 2D surface processes model (SPM). We test the sensitivity of the coupled models to varying crust-lithosphere rheology and erosional efficiency ranging from no-erosion to very efficient erosion. We discuss how fast, when and how the topography of the continents evolves and how it can be compared to actual passive margins escarpment morphologies. We show that although tectonics is the main factor controlling the rift geometry, transfers of masses at the surface affect the timing of faulting and the initiation of sea-floor spreading. We discuss how such models may help to understand the evolution of high-elevated passive margins around the world.

  13. The effects of magnetic field distortion on the accuracy of passive device localization frames in MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Cepek, Jeremy; Chronik, Blaine A; Fenster, Aaron

    2014-05-01

    The interventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging environment presents many challenges for the accurate localization of interventional devices. In particular, geometric distortion of the static magnetic field may be both appreciable and unpredictable. This paper aims to quantify the sensitivity of localization error of various passive device localization frames to static magnetic field distortion in MR. Three localization frames were considered based on having distinctly different methods of encoding position and orientation in MR images. For each frame, the effects of static field distortion were modeled, allowing rotational and translational errors to be computed as functions of the level of distortion, which was modeled using a first order approximation. Validation of the model was performed by imaging the localization frames in a 3T clinical MR scanner, and simulating the effects of static field distortion by varying the scanner's center frequency and gradient shim values. Plots of the rotational and translational components of error in localization frame position and orientation estimates are provided for ranges of uniform static field distortions of 1-100 μT and static field distortion gradients of 0.01-1 mT/m in all three directions. The theoretical estimates are in good agreement with the results obtained by imaging. The error in position and orientation estimation of passive localization frames in MR can be sensitive to static magnetic field distortions. The level of sensitivity, the type of error (i.e., rotational or translational), and the direction of error are dependent on the frame's design and the method used to image it. If 2D gradient echo imaging is employed, frames with position and orientation estimate sensitivity to slice-select error (such as the z-frame) should be avoided, since this source of error is not easily correctable. Accurate frame position and orientation estimates that are insensitive to static field distortion can be achieved

  14. Amorphous Silicon Carbide Passivating Layers to Enable Higher Processing Temperature in Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary

    2015-04-06

    "Very efficient crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells have been demonstrated when thin layers of intrinsic and doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) are used for passivation and carrier selectivity in a heterojunction device. One limitation of this device structure is the (parasitic) absorption in the front passivation/collection a-Si:H layers; another is the degradation of the a-Si:H-based passivation upon temperature, limiting the post-processes to approximately 200°C thus restricting the contacting possibilities and potential tandem device fabrication. To alleviate these two limitations, we explore the potential of amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H), a widely studied material in use in standard a-Si:H thin-film solar cells, which is known for its wider bandgap, increased hydrogen content and stronger hydrogen bonding compared to a-Si:H. We study the surface passivation of solar-grade textured n-type c-Si wafers for symmetrical stacks of 10-nm-thick intrinsic a-SiC:H with various carbon content followed by either p-doped or n-doped a-Si:H (referred to as i/p or i/n stacks). For both doping types, passivation (assessed through carrier lifetime measurements) is degraded by increasing the carbon content in the intrinsic a-SiC:H layer. Yet, this hierarchy is reversed after annealing at 350°C or more due to drastic passivation improvements upon annealing when an a-SiC:H layer is used. After annealing at 350°C, lifetimes of 0.4 ms and 2.0 ms are reported for i/p and i/n stacks, respectively, when using an intrinsic a-SiC:H layer with approximately 10% of carbon (initial lifetimes of 0.3 ms and 0.1 ms, respectively, corresponding to a 30% and 20-fold increase, respectively). For stacks of pure a-Si:H material the lifetimes degrade from 1.2 ms and 2.0 ms for i/p and i/n stacks, respectively, to less than 0.1 ms and 1.1 ms (12-fold and 2-fold decrease, respectively). For complete solar cells using pure a-Si:H i/p and i/n stacks, the open-circuit voltage (Voc

  15. An Adaptive Likelihood Distribution Algorithm for the Localization of Passive RFID Tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Yuuki; Hori, Toshihiro; Onishi, Taiki; Wada, Tomotaka; Mutsuura, Kouichi; Okada, Hiromi

    The RFID (Radio Frequency IDentification) tag technology is expected as a tool of localization. By the localization of RFID tags, a mobile robot which installs in RFID readers can recognize surrounding environments. In addition, RFID tags can be applied to a navigation system for walkers. In this paper, we propose an adaptive likelihood distribution scheme for the localization of RFID tags. This method adjusts the likelihood distribution depending on the signal intensity from RFID tags. We carry out the performance evaluation of estimated position error by both computer simulations and implemental experiments. We show that the proposed system is more effective than the conventional system.

  16. A Novel Communication Range Recognition (CRR) Scheme for Spatial Localization of Passive RFID Tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Tomotaka; Uchitomi, Norie; Ota, Yuuki; Hori, Toshihiro; Mutsuura, Kouichi; Okada, Hiromi

    RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) technology is expected to be used as a localization tool. By the localization of RFID tags, a mobile robot equipped with an RFID reader can recognize the surrounding environment. In this paper, we propose a novel effective scheme called the communication range recognition (CRR) scheme for localizing RFID tags. In this scheme, an RFID reader determines the boundaries of the communication range when it is appropriately positioned by the robot. We evaluate the estimated position accuracy through numerous experiments. We show that the moving distance of the RFID reader in the proposed scheme is lower than that in conventional schemes.

  17. Comprehensive analytical model for locally contacted rear surface passivated solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Andreas; Biro, Daniel; Nekarda, Jan; Stumpp, Stefan; Kimmerle, Achim; Mack, Sebastian; Preu, Ralf

    2010-12-01

    For optimum performance of solar cells featuring a locally contacted rear surface, the metallization fraction as well as the size and distribution of the local contacts are crucial, since Ohmic and recombination losses have to be balanced. In this work we present a set of equations which enable to calculate this trade off without the need of numerical simulations. Our model combines established analytical and empirical equations to predict the energy conversion efficiency of a locally contacted device. For experimental verification, we fabricate devices from float zone silicon wafers of different resistivity using the laser fired contact technology for forming the local rear contacts. The detailed characterization of test structures enables the determination of important physical parameters, such as the surface recombination velocity at the contacted area and the spreading resistance of the contacts. Our analytical model reproduces the experimental results very well and correctly predicts the optimum contact spacing without the use of free fitting parameters. We use our model to estimate the optimum bulk resistivity for locally contacted devices fabricated from conventional Czochralski-grown silicon material. These calculations use literature values for the stable minority carrier lifetime to account for the bulk recombination caused by the formation of boron-oxygen complexes under carrier injection.

  18. Application of XAD-resin based passive air samplers to assess local (roadside) and regional patterns of persistent organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Barthel, Paul; Thuens, Sabine; Shunthirasingham, Chubashini; Westgate, John N; Wania, Frank; Radke, Michael

    2012-07-01

    We used XAD-resin based passive air samplers (PAS) to measure atmospheric levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at five ombrotrophic bogs in Eastern Canada. The aims of our study were to investigate the influence of local roads on contaminant levels in the bogs, to derive the regional pattern of atmospheric concentrations, and to assess the uncertainties of the method. Expanded uncertainties based on the duplicate PAS deployed at 24 sites were good for the PAHs, while the deployment period of approx. 100 days was too short to yield acceptable uncertainties for PCBs. The regional PAH distribution was in good agreement with the calculated source proximity of the sampled bogs. We conclude that XAD-resin based PAS deployed for comparatively short periods are well suited for measuring atmospheric concentrations of volatile PAHs, while in remote regions longer deployment is necessary for less volatile PAHs and for PCBs.

  19. Revisiting the stability of 2D passive biped walking: Local behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, James A.; Marsh, Anthony P.; Granata, Kevin P.; Ross, Shane D.

    2008-12-01

    Models of biped walking have demonstrated that stable walking motions are possible without active control. Stability of these motions has typically been quantified by studying the stability of an associated Poincaré map (orbital stability). However, additional insight may be obtained by examining how perturbations evolve over the short-term (local stability). For example, there may be regions where small perturbations actually diverge from the unperturbed trajectory, even if over the entire cycle small (but perhaps not large) perturbations are dissipated. We present techniques to calculate local stability, and demonstrate the utility of these techniques by examining the local stability of the 2D compass biped. These techniques are relevant to the design of controllers to maintain stability in robots, and in understanding how the neuromuscular system maintains stability in humans.

  20. Assessment of Four Passive Hearing Protection Devices for Continuous Noise Attenuation, Impulsive Noise Insertion Loss, and Auditory Localization Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-17

    2 3. Etymotic EB-15 BlastPLG™ and ear tips...29 A-7. Attenuation – EB-15 – Passive, Flanged Ear Tip ................................................................. 30 A-8...Attenuation – EB-15 – Passive, Foam Ear Tip ..................................................................... 31 vii

  1. Passive Acoustic Source Localization at a Low Sampling Rate Based on a Five-Element Cross Microphone Array

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Yue; Wang, Pengfei; Zha, Fusheng; Li, Mantian; Gao, Wa; Song, Baoyu

    2015-01-01

    Accurate acoustic source localization at a low sampling rate (less than 10 kHz) is still a challenging problem for small portable systems, especially for a multitasking micro-embedded system. A modification of the generalized cross-correlation (GCC) method with the up-sampling (US) theory is proposed and defined as the US-GCC method, which can improve the accuracy of the time delay of arrival (TDOA) and source location at a low sampling rate. In this work, through the US operation, an input signal with a certain sampling rate can be converted into another signal with a higher frequency. Furthermore, the optimal interpolation factor for the US operation is derived according to localization computation time and the standard deviation (SD) of target location estimations. On the one hand, simulation results show that absolute errors of the source locations based on the US-GCC method with an interpolation factor of 15 are approximately from 1/15- to 1/12-times those based on the GCC method, when the initial same sampling rates of both methods are 8 kHz. On the other hand, a simple and small portable passive acoustic source localization platform composed of a five-element cross microphone array has been designed and set up in this paper. The experiments on the established platform, which accurately locates a three-dimensional (3D) near-field target at a low sampling rate demonstrate that the proposed method is workable. PMID:26057042

  2. Passive Acoustic Source Localization at a Low Sampling Rate Based on a Five-Element Cross Microphone Array.

    PubMed

    Kan, Yue; Wang, Pengfei; Zha, Fusheng; Li, Mantian; Gao, Wa; Song, Baoyu

    2015-06-05

    Accurate acoustic source localization at a low sampling rate (less than 10 kHz) is still a challenging problem for small portable systems, especially for a multitasking micro-embedded system. A modification of the generalized cross-correlation (GCC) method with the up-sampling (US) theory is proposed and defined as the US-GCC method, which can improve the accuracy of the time delay of arrival (TDOA) and source location at a low sampling rate. In this work, through the US operation, an input signal with a certain sampling rate can be converted into another signal with a higher frequency. Furthermore, the optimal interpolation factor for the US operation is derived according to localization computation time and the standard deviation (SD) of target location estimations. On the one hand, simulation results show that absolute errors of the source locations based on the US-GCC method with an interpolation factor of 15 are approximately from 1/15- to 1/12-times those based on the GCC method, when the initial same sampling rates of both methods are 8 kHz. On the other hand, a simple and small portable passive acoustic source localization platform composed of a five-element cross microphone array has been designed and set up in this paper. The experiments on the established platform, which accurately locates a three-dimensional (3D) near-field target at a low sampling rate demonstrate that the proposed method is workable.

  3. Achieving Passive Localization with Traffic Light Schedules in Urban Road Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Niu, Qiang; Yang, Xu; Gao, Shouwan; Chen, Pengpeng; Chan, Shibing

    2016-10-10

    Localization is crucial for the monitoring applications of cities, such as road monitoring, environment surveillance, vehicle tracking, etc. In urban road sensor networks, sensors are often sparely deployed due to the hardware cost. Under this sparse deployment, sensors cannot communicate with each other via ranging hardware or one-hop connectivity, rendering the existing localization solutions ineffective. To address this issue, this paper proposes a novel Traffic Lights Schedule-based localization algorithm (TLS), which is built on the fact that vehicles move through the intersection with a known traffic light schedule. We can first obtain the law by binary vehicle detection time stamps and describe the law as a matrix, called a detection matrix. At the same time, we can also use the known traffic light information to construct the matrices, which can be formed as a collection called a known matrix collection. The detection matrix is then matched in the known matrix collection for identifying where sensors are located on urban roads. We evaluate our algorithm by extensive simulation. The results show that the localization accuracy of intersection sensors can reach more than 90%. In addition, we compare it with a state-of-the-art algorithm and prove that it has a wider operational region.

  4. Achieving Passive Localization with Traffic Light Schedules in Urban Road Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Qiang; Yang, Xu; Gao, Shouwan; Chen, Pengpeng; Chan, Shibing

    2016-01-01

    Localization is crucial for the monitoring applications of cities, such as road monitoring, environment surveillance, vehicle tracking, etc. In urban road sensor networks, sensors are often sparely deployed due to the hardware cost. Under this sparse deployment, sensors cannot communicate with each other via ranging hardware or one-hop connectivity, rendering the existing localization solutions ineffective. To address this issue, this paper proposes a novel Traffic Lights Schedule-based localization algorithm (TLS), which is built on the fact that vehicles move through the intersection with a known traffic light schedule. We can first obtain the law by binary vehicle detection time stamps and describe the law as a matrix, called a detection matrix. At the same time, we can also use the known traffic light information to construct the matrices, which can be formed as a collection called a known matrix collection. The detection matrix is then matched in the known matrix collection for identifying where sensors are located on urban roads. We evaluate our algorithm by extensive simulation. The results show that the localization accuracy of intersection sensors can reach more than 90%. In addition, we compare it with a state-of-the-art algorithm and prove that it has a wider operational region. PMID:27735871

  5. Local Ownership of Education Policies at the Crossroads between the Active Participation and the Passive Compliance to International Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imaniriho, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Over the past three decades, perceptions about the role of local population in policy development process have deeply changed. This change is related to the idea promoted by international institutions that the development actions cannot succeed without a strong local ownership and a broad approach that guarantee active participation of local…

  6. Increasing the quality of image of a commercially available passive THz camera due to computer processing of image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav; Palka, Norbert; Kowalski, Marcin

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrate the improvement of the quality of the image captured by TS4 - the commercially available THz passive camera manufactured by ThruVision Systems Ltd. The measurements range of this device reaches 10 meters. Our approach is based on application of novel spatial filters and algorithms, developed by us for computer processing of passive THz images produced by the various THz cameras. In our opinion, the most important result of this paper consists in a demonstration of the possibility of using a passive THz camera to observe a difference in temperature on the human skin if this difference is caused by different temperatures in the inside of the body. Such possibility was proposed by Vyacheslav Trofimov on the Conference in Baltimore (April 2012) as well as and in [20]. We discuss two physical experiments, in which a person drinks hot and cold water. After computer processing of images captured by passive THz camera TS4 we may see the pronounced temperature trace on the human body. We illustrate this phenomenon by a series of images captured by passive THz camera in real time. As we believe, these experiments allow us wide applications of passive THz cameras for the detection of objects concealed in the inside of the human body because the difference in temperature that will be reflected on the human skin. Modern passive THz cameras have not enough resolution in temperature to see this difference. However, computer processing allows us to enhance it for this application. Using computer processing one may enhance the image quality and delete noise on the images. In some cases, it is possible to achieve full de-noising of the image.

  7. Local oscillator phase noise limitation on the resolution of acoustic delay line wireless passive sensor measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrétien, N.; Friedt, J.-M.; Martin, G.

    2014-06-01

    The role of the phase noise of a local oscillator driving a pulsed-mode RADAR used for probing surface acoustic wave sensors is investigated. The echo delay, representative of the acoustic velocity, and hence the physical quantity probed by the sensor, is finely measured as a phase. Considering that the intrinsic oscillator phase fluctuation defines the phase noise measurement resolution, we experimentally and theoretically assess the relation between phase noise, measurement range, and measurand resolution.

  8. Advanced Methods for Passive Acoustic Detection, Classification, and Localization of Marine Mammals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    Balaenoptera acutorostrata), blue (B. musculus), and humpback (Megaptera novaeangliae) whales . Odontocete click removal. The methods being developed here...Output of MHT – Kalman filtering algorithm tracking for 2 Blainville’s beaked whales ( blue and red solid lines) using bottom-mounted hydrophones at...AUTEC (cyan dots are raw localizations). Figure 8: Depth tracks ( blue and red solid lines) from the 2 Blaineville’s beaked whales in Figure 2

  9. Passive ranging errors due to multipath distortion of deterministic transient signals with application to the localization of small arms fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Brian G.; Lo, Kam W.

    2002-01-01

    A passive ranging technique based on wavefront curvature is used to estimate the ranges and bearings of impulsive sound sources represented by small arms fire. The discharge of a firearm results in the generation of a transient acoustic signal whose energy propagates radially outwards from the omnidirectional source. The radius of curvature of the spherical wavefront at any instant is equal to the instantaneous range from the source. The curvature of the acoustic wavefront is sensed with a three-microphone linear array by first estimating the differential time of arrival (or time delay) of the acoustic wavefront at each of the two adjacent sensor pairs and then processing the time-delay information to extract the range and bearing of the source. However, modeling the passive ranging performance of the wavefront curvature method for a deterministic transient signal source in a multipath environment shows that when the multipath and direct path arrivals are unresolvable, the time-delay estimates are biased which, in turn, biases the range estimates. The model explains the observed under-ranging of small arms firing positions during a field experiment.

  10. Passive ranging errors due to multipath distortion of deterministic transient signals with application to the localization of small arms fire.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Brian G; Lo, Kam W

    2002-01-01

    A passive ranging technique based on wavefront curvature is used to estimate the ranges and bearings of impulsive sound sources represented by small arms fire. The discharge of a firearm results in the generation of a transient acoustic signal whose energy propagates radially outwards from the omnidirectional source. The radius of curvature of the spherical wavefront at any instant is equal to the instantaneous range from the source. The curvature of the acoustic wavefront is sensed with a three-microphone linear array by first estimating the differential time of arrival (or time delay) of the acoustic wavefront at each of the two adjacent sensor pairs and then processing the time-delay information to extract the range and bearing of the source. However, modeling the passive ranging performance of the wavefront curvature method for a deterministic transient signal source in a multipath environment shows that when the multipath and direct path arrivals are unresolvable, the time-delay estimates are biased which, in turn, biases the range estimates. The model explains the observed under-ranging of small arms firing positions during a field experiment.

  11. Symbol processing in the left angular gyrus: evidence from passive perception of digits.

    PubMed

    Price, Gavin R; Ansari, Daniel

    2011-08-01

    Arabic digits are one of the most ubiquitous symbol sets in the world. While there have been many investigations into the neural processing of the semantic information digits represent (e.g. through numerical comparison tasks), little is known about the neural mechanisms which support the processing of digits as visual symbols. To characterise the component neurocognitive mechanisms which underlie numerical cognition, it is essential to understand the processing of digits as a visual category, independent of numerical magnitude processing. The 'Triple Code Model' (Dehaene, 1992; Dehaene and Cohen, 1995) posits an asemantic visual code for processing Arabic digits in the ventral visual stream, yet there is currently little empirical evidence in support of this code. This outstanding question was addressed in the current functional Magnetic Resonance (fMRI) study by contrasting brain responses during the passive viewing of digits versus letters and novel symbols at short (50 ms) and long (500 ms) presentation times. The results of this study reveal increased activation for familiar symbols (digits and letters) relative to unfamiliar symbols (scrambled digits and letters) at long presentation durations in the left dorsal Angular gyrus (dAG). Furthermore, increased activation for Arabic digits was observed in the left ventral Angular gyrus (vAG) in comparison to letters, scrambled digits and scrambled letters at long presentation durations, but no digit specific activation in any region at short presentation durations. These results suggest an absence of a digit specific 'Visual Number Form Area' (VNFA) in the ventral visual cortex, and provide evidence for the role of the left ventral AG during the processing of digits in the absence of any explicit processing demands. We conclude that Arabic digit processing depends specifically on the left AG rather than a ventral visual stream VNFA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Geometric Properties of Dynamic Nonlinear Networks: Transversality, Local-Solvability and Eventual Passivity,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-17

    the following map is an isomorphism: (L*t( d , o id- .d ((dt).) i.e.. r" is a local diffeomorphism at x. But this precisel\\ Al 1 A ( means that (q. 0...coordinate system for N. that g, is a global (’I diffeomorphism . Therefore , For proof we need a lemma. Recall (ir*G),(.. ) defined h,(tR,). where h...however. that g T1 into T"*X. It is clear that (66) implies that J, is an is a (’, global diffeomorphism . then the right-hand side of isomorphism and

  13. Underwater passive acoustic localization of Pacific walruses in the northeastern Chukchi Sea.

    PubMed

    Rideout, Brendan P; Dosso, Stan E; Hannay, David E

    2013-09-01

    This paper develops and applies a linearized Bayesian localization algorithm based on acoustic arrival times of marine mammal vocalizations at spatially-separated receivers which provides three-dimensional (3D) location estimates with rigorous uncertainty analysis. To properly account for uncertainty in receiver parameters (3D hydrophone locations and synchronization times) and environmental parameters (water depth and sound-speed correction), these quantities are treated as unknowns constrained by prior estimates and prior uncertainties. Unknown scaling factors on both the prior and arrival-time uncertainties are estimated by minimizing Akaike's Bayesian information criterion (a maximum entropy condition). Maximum a posteriori estimates for sound source locations and times, receiver parameters, and environmental parameters are calculated simultaneously using measurements of arrival times for direct and interface-reflected acoustic paths. Posterior uncertainties for all unknowns incorporate both arrival time and prior uncertainties. Monte Carlo simulation results demonstrate that, for the cases considered here, linearization errors are small and the lack of an accurate sound-speed profile does not cause significant biases in the estimated locations. A sequence of Pacific walrus vocalizations, recorded in the Chukchi Sea northwest of Alaska, is localized using this technique, yielding a track estimate and uncertainties with an estimated speed comparable to normal walrus swim speeds.

  14. The route of passive chloride movement across amphibian skin: localization and regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Wolfram; Somieski, Petra; Katz, Uri

    2002-11-13

    Transepithelial Cl(-) conductance (G(Cl)) in amphibian skin can be activated in several species by serosa positive potentials. Mitochondria-rich cells (MRC) or tight junctions (TJ) between the epithelial cells are possible sites for this pathway. The properties and the techniques used to investigate this pathway are reviewed in the present paper. In situ techniques are preferable, since specific properties of the MRC are apparently not maintained in isolated cells. Volume measurements and electronprobe microanalysis of intracellular ions suggest the localization of voltage-activated G(Cl) to MRC. G(Cl) correlates poorly with the density of MRC. The vibrating voltage probe allows quantitative correlation of the local Cl(-) current through morphologically identified structures and the transepithelial Cl(-) current. Our analysis shows that 80% of the voltage-activated Cl(-) current is accounted for by current through MRC or their immediate vicinity. The activation patterns of this current and the inhibition by the alpha(1)-adrenergic agonist, epinephrine, conform to those of the transepithelial current. However, less than 20% of the MRC are active at a certain moment and the activity is spontaneously variable with time. The molecular nature of this pathway, physiological control mechanisms and their relation to the temporal activity of MRC remain to be studied.

  15. High Accuracy Passive Magnetic Field-Based Localization for Feedback Control Using Principal Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Foong, Shaohui; Sun, Zhenglong

    2016-08-12

    In this paper, a novel magnetic field-based sensing system employing statistically optimized concurrent multiple sensor outputs for precise field-position association and localization is presented. This method capitalizes on the independence between simultaneous spatial field measurements at multiple locations to induce unique correspondences between field and position. This single-source-multi-sensor configuration is able to achieve accurate and precise localization and tracking of translational motion without contact over large travel distances for feedback control. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used as a pseudo-linear filter to optimally reduce the dimensions of the multi-sensor output space for computationally efficient field-position mapping with artificial neural networks (ANNs). Numerical simulations are employed to investigate the effects of geometric parameters and Gaussian noise corruption on PCA assisted ANN mapping performance. Using a 9-sensor network, the sensing accuracy and closed-loop tracking performance of the proposed optimal field-based sensing system is experimentally evaluated on a linear actuator with a significantly more expensive optical encoder as a comparison.

  16. High Accuracy Passive Magnetic Field-Based Localization for Feedback Control Using Principal Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Foong, Shaohui; Sun, Zhenglong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel magnetic field-based sensing system employing statistically optimized concurrent multiple sensor outputs for precise field-position association and localization is presented. This method capitalizes on the independence between simultaneous spatial field measurements at multiple locations to induce unique correspondences between field and position. This single-source-multi-sensor configuration is able to achieve accurate and precise localization and tracking of translational motion without contact over large travel distances for feedback control. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used as a pseudo-linear filter to optimally reduce the dimensions of the multi-sensor output space for computationally efficient field-position mapping with artificial neural networks (ANNs). Numerical simulations are employed to investigate the effects of geometric parameters and Gaussian noise corruption on PCA assisted ANN mapping performance. Using a 9-sensor network, the sensing accuracy and closed-loop tracking performance of the proposed optimal field-based sensing system is experimentally evaluated on a linear actuator with a significantly more expensive optical encoder as a comparison. PMID:27529253

  17. Effects of Active and Passive Hearing Protection Devices on Sound Source Localization, Speech Recognition, and Tone Detection

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Andrew D.; Beemer, Brianne T.; Greene, Nathaniel T.; Argo, Theodore; Meegan, G. Douglas; Tollin, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Hearing protection devices (HPDs) such as earplugs offer to mitigate noise exposure and reduce the incidence of hearing loss among persons frequently exposed to intense sound. However, distortions of spatial acoustic information and reduced audibility of low-intensity sounds caused by many existing HPDs can make their use untenable in high-risk (e.g., military or law enforcement) environments where auditory situational awareness is imperative. Here we assessed (1) sound source localization accuracy using a head-turning paradigm, (2) speech-in-noise recognition using a modified version of the QuickSIN test, and (3) tone detection thresholds using a two-alternative forced-choice task. Subjects were 10 young normal-hearing males. Four different HPDs were tested (two active, two passive), including two new and previously untested devices. Relative to unoccluded (control) performance, all tested HPDs significantly degraded performance across tasks, although one active HPD slightly improved high-frequency tone detection thresholds and did not degrade speech recognition. Behavioral data were examined with respect to head-related transfer functions measured using a binaural manikin with and without tested HPDs in place. Data reinforce previous reports that HPDs significantly compromise a variety of auditory perceptual facilities, particularly sound localization due to distortions of high-frequency spectral cues that are important for the avoidance of front-back confusions. PMID:26313145

  18. Passive acoustic detection and localization of whales: effects of shipping noise in Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park.

    PubMed

    Simard, Yvan; Roy, Nathalie; Gervaise, Cédric

    2008-06-01

    The performance of large-aperture hydrophone arrays to detect and localize blue and fin whales' 15-85 Hz signature vocalizations under ocean noise conditions was assessed through simulations from a normal mode propagation model combined to noise statistics from 15 960 h of recordings in Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park. The probability density functions of 2482 summer noise level estimates in the call bands were used to attach a probability of detection/masking to the simulated call levels as a function of whale depth and range for typical environmental conditions. Results indicate that call detection was modulated by the calling depth relative to the sound channel axis and by modal constructive and destructive interferences with range. Masking of loud infrasounds could reach 40% at 30 km for a receiver at the optimal depth. The 30 dB weaker blue whale D-call were subject to severe masking. Mapping the percentages of detection and localization allowed assessing the performance of a six-hydrophone array under mean- and low-noise conditions. This approach is helpful for optimizing hydrophone configuration in implementing passive acoustic monitoring arrays and building their detection function for whale density assessment, as an alternative to or in combination with the traditional undersampling visual methods.

  19. The Cold Land Process Experiment's (CLPX) Local Scale Observation Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, J. P.; Cline, D.; Elder, K.; Davis, R. E.; Pomeroy, J.; Koh, Y.; Armstrong, R.; Koike, T.; McDonald, K.

    2002-12-01

    The Local Scale Observation Site (LSOS) is the smallest study site of the Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX) and is located within the Fraser Meso-cell Study Area (MSA), near the Fraser Experimental Forest Headquarters Facility, in Fraser, Colorado USA. The 100- x 100-m site consists of a small, open field, a managed dense canopy, and an open, mixed age canopy. Unlike the other components of the experiment, which focus on spatial distributions at relatively brief "snapshots" in time, measurements at the local-scale site focused on the temporal domain. Measurements made at the LSOS were designed to produce a comprehensive assessment of the snow, soil, and vegetation characteristics viewed by the ground-based remote sensing instruments. The objective of ground-based microwave remote sensing was to collect time series of active and passive microwave spectral signatures over snow, soil, and forest, coincident with intensive physical characterization of these features. Ground-based remote sensing instruments included Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) radars operating over multiple microwave bandwidths, the Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer (GBMR-7) (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) Simulator; channels 18.7, 23.8, 36.5, and 89.0-GHz), and in 2003, an L/C/X/Ku-band scatterometer radar system. Snow and soil measurements included standard snow physical properties, snow surface roughness, snow depth transects, and soil moisture. The stem and canopy temperature, and xylem flux of several trees within the area, were monitored continuously. Two micrometeorological towers, one located in the open snow area and the other in the forested area, monitored ambient conditions and provided forcing data sets for 1-D snow/soil models. Arrays of radiometers (0.3-3 μm) and a scanning thermal radiometer (8-12 μm) characterized the variability of radiative receipt in the forests. These measurements, together with the ground-based remote sensing, provide the

  20. Nearly Monodispersion CoSm Alloy Nanoparticles Formed by an In-situ Rapid Cooling and Passivating Microfluidic Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yujun; Henry, Laurence L.

    2009-10-01

    An in situ rapid cooling and passivating microfluidic process has been developed for the synthesis of nearly monodispersed cobalt samarium nanoparticles (NPs) with tunable crystal structures and surface properties. This process involves promoting the nucleation and growth of NPs at an elevated temperature and rapidly quenching the NP colloids in a solution containing a passivating reagent at a reduced temperature. We have shown that Cobalt samarium NPs having amorphous crystal structures and a thin passivating layer can be synthesized with uniform nonspherical shapes and size of about 4.8 nm. The amorphous CoSm NPs in our study have blocking temperature near 40 K and average coercivity of 225 Oe at 10 K. The NPs also exhibit high anisotropic magnetic properties with a wasp-waist hysteresis loop and a bias shift of coercivity due to the shape anisotropy and the exchange coupling between the core and the thin oxidized surface layer.

  1. Efficient and stable solution-processed planar perovskite solar cells via contact passivation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hairen; Jain, Ankit; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Lan, Xinzheng; García de Arquer, F Pelayo; Fan, James Z; Quintero-Bermudez, Rafael; Yuan, Mingjian; Zhang, Bo; Zhao, Yicheng; Fan, Fengjia; Li, Peicheng; Quan, Li Na; Zhao, Yongbiao; Lu, Zheng-Hong; Yang, Zhenyu; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sargent, Edward H

    2017-02-17

    Planar perovskite solar cells (PSCs) made entirely via solution processing at low temperatures (<150°C) offer promise for simple manufacturing, compatibility with flexible substrates, and perovskite-based tandem devices. However, these PSCs require an electron-selective layer that performs well with similar processing. We report a contact-passivation strategy using chlorine-capped TiO2 colloidal nanocrystal film that mitigates interfacial recombination and improves interface binding in low-temperature planar solar cells. We fabricated solar cells with certified efficiencies of 20.1 and 19.5% for active areas of 0.049 and 1.1 square centimeters, respectively, achieved via low-temperature solution processing. Solar cells with efficiency greater than 20% retained 90% (97% after dark recovery) of their initial performance after 500 hours of continuous room-temperature operation at their maximum power point under 1-sun illumination (where 1 sun is defined as the standard illumination at AM1.5, or 1 kilowatt/square meter).

  2. Efficient and stable solution-processed planar perovskite solar cells via contact passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Hairen; Jain, Ankit; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Lan, Xinzheng; García de Arquer, F. Pelayo; Fan, James Z.; Quintero-Bermudez, Rafael; Yuan, Mingjian; Zhang, Bo; Zhao, Yicheng; Fan, Fengjia; Li, Peicheng; Quan, Li Na; Zhao, Yongbiao; Lu, Zheng-Hong; Yang, Zhenyu; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sargent, Edward H.

    2017-02-01

    Planar perovskite solar cells (PSCs) made entirely via solution processing at low temperatures (<150°C) offer promise for simple manufacturing, compatibility with flexible substrates, and perovskite-based tandem devices. However, these PSCs require an electron-selective layer that performs well with similar processing. We report a contact-passivation strategy using chlorine-capped TiO2 colloidal nanocrystal film that mitigates interfacial recombination and improves interface binding in low-temperature planar solar cells. We fabricated solar cells with certified efficiencies of 20.1 and 19.5% for active areas of 0.049 and 1.1 square centimeters, respectively, achieved via low-temperature solution processing. Solar cells with efficiency greater than 20% retained 90% (97% after dark recovery) of their initial performance after 500 hours of continuous room-temperature operation at their maximum power point under 1-sun illumination (where 1 sun is defined as the standard illumination at AM1.5, or 1 kilowatt/square meter).

  3. Passive solar technology

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D

    1981-04-01

    The present status of passive solar technology is summarized, including passive solar heating, cooling and daylighting. The key roles of the passive solar system designer and of innovation in the building industry are described. After definitions of passive design and a summary of passive design principles are given, performance and costs of passive solar technology are discussed. Passive energy design concepts or methods are then considered in the context of the overall process by which building decisions are made to achieve the integration of new techniques into conventional design. (LEW).

  4. Fluid transport processes in the passive margins of the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoni, Claudia; Foschi, Martino; Cartwright, Joe; Levell, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    We analyse and produce a synoptic model of the different styles of fluid transport occurring in the various passive margin settings in the Eastern Mediterranean. The common tectonic-stratigraphic setting is dominated, from the Mesozoic, by the interaction of the Tethyan platforms with Cenozoic to recent, mainly clastic, deposits interacting with the ubiquitous thick late Miocene (Messinian) evaporitic sediments. This created different specific modes of fluid-lithology coupling behaviours, and generated an extraordinary suite of seismically resolvable fluid flow phenomena, including mud volcanoes, pockmarks, dissolution/collapse structures, chimneys and pipes. We integrate this evidence with the analysis of the regional pressure/temperature gradient, and with published hydrocarbon generation models, to propose a regional synthesis of all fluid transport processes in a specific basinal context. We place the fluid flow evidence observed in the Eastern Mediterranean in the framework of the three main fluid flow settings, which are typically defined in sedimentary basins, in terms of depth: 1) A thermobaric fluid regime, where fluid transport is limited and convection can be the dominant transport mechanism, 2) A thermogenic regime, where fluids supplied by hydrocarbon generation can migrate by hydraulic fracturing and advection (along open faults/conduits), by matrix flow and in the longer term, by diffusion processes, 3) A shallow compactional regime, where the fluids are generated by sediment dewatering and shallow diagenesis, and the main transport mechanism is characterised by vertical fluid flow, either through advection and hydrofracturing along faults, or matrix flow. In the Eastern Mediterranean passive margins, this depth-related subdivision needs to be modified in order to accommodate the influence of the laterally and vertically extensive evaporitic series, which acts as a regional aquitard/aquiclude to water or a seal to hydrocarbon flow. The presence of

  5. Solution-processed gadolinium doped indium-oxide thin-film transistors with oxide passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Hun; Kim, Taehun; Lee, Jihun; Avis, Christophe; Jang, Jin

    2017-03-01

    We studied the effect of Gd doping on the structural properties of solution processed, crystalline In2O3 for thin-film transistor (TFT) application. With increasing Gd in In2O3 up to 20%, the material structure changes into amorphous phase, and the oxygen vacancy concentration decreases from 15.4 to 8.4%, and M-OH bonds from 33.5 to 23.7%. The field-effect mobility for the Gd doped In2O3 TFTs decreases and threshold voltage shifts to the positive voltage with increasing Gd concentration. In addition, the stability of the solution processed TFTs can also be improved by increasing Gd concentration. As a result, the optimum Gd concentration is found to be ˜5% in In2O3 and the 5% Gd doped In2O3 TFTs with the Y2O3 passivation layer exhibit the linear mobility of 9.74 cm2/V s, the threshold voltage of -0.27 V, the subthreshold swing of 79 mV/dec., and excellent bias stability.

  6. Physical processes controlling passive larval transport at the Patagonian Shelf Break Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Bárbara C.; Palma, Elbio D.; Combes, Vincent; Lasta, Mario L.

    2017-06-01

    The largest beds of the Patagonian scallop (Zygochlamys patagonica) have been associated with high chlorophyll-a concentration observed along the Patagonian Shelf Break Front but there is no supported hypothesis about how this benthic-pelagic connection is maintained. In this work we address the main physical processes driving the benthic-pelagic linkages through oriented numerical experiments derived from a realistic, high-resolution numerical model, and Lagrangian stochastic simulations. The results support the hypothesis of an important dynamical control of the slope current on the fate of surface released passive particles and their subsequent bottom settlement. A high percentage of the particles released at the surface settled over the scallop beds. The particles remaining at the surface layer followed a prevailing NE flow direction with low cross-shelf dispersion. Additional experiments show that the secondary cross-shelf circulation forced by the slope current promotes downwelling and hence the settlement of particles on the westward side (onshore) of the shelf break. The percent of particles settling over the scallop beds exceeded 80% by the addition of vertical stochastic turbulence and tidal forcing. These results highlight the importance of including the vertical diffusivity in particle tracking experiments to better estimate benthic-pelagic interaction processes.

  7. Public Participation in the Process of Local Public Health Policy, Using Policy Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yukyung; Kim, Chang-yup; You, Myoung Soon; Lee, Kun Sei; Park, Eunyoung

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the current public participation in-local health policy and its implications through the analysis of policy networks in health center programs. Methods: We examined the decision-making process in sub-health center installations and the implementation process in metabolic syndrome management program cases in two districts (‘gu’s) of Seoul. Participants of the policy network were selected by the snowballing method and completed self-administered questionnaires. Actors, the interactions among actors, and the characteristics of the network were analyzed by Netminer. Results: The results showed that the public is not yet actively participating in the local public health policy processes of decision-making and implementation. In the decision-making process, most of the network actors were in the public sector, while the private sector was a minor actor and participated in only a limited number of issues after the major decisions were made. In the implementation process, the program was led by the health center, while other actors participated passively. Conclusions: Public participation in Korean public health policy is not yet well activated. Preliminary discussions with various stakeholders, including civil society, are needed before making important local public health policy decisions. In addition, efforts to include local institutions and residents in the implementation process with the public officials are necessary to improve the situation. PMID:25475197

  8. Public participation in the process of local public health policy, using policy network analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Yukyung; Kim, Chang-Yup; You, Myoung Soon; Lee, Kun Sei; Park, Eunyoung

    2014-11-01

    To assess the current public participation in-local health policy and its implications through the analysis of policy networks in health center programs. We examined the decision-making process in sub-health center installations and the implementation process in metabolic syndrome management program cases in two districts ('gu's) of Seoul. Participants of the policy network were selected by the snowballing method and completed self-administered questionnaires. Actors, the interactions among actors, and the characteristics of the network were analyzed by Netminer. The results showed that the public is not yet actively participating in the local public health policy processes of decision-making and implementation. In the decision-making process, most of the network actors were in the public sector, while the private sector was a minor actor and participated in only a limited number of issues after the major decisions were made. In the implementation process, the program was led by the health center, while other actors participated passively. Public participation in Korean public health policy is not yet well activated. Preliminary discussions with various stakeholders, including civil society, are needed before making important local public health policy decisions. In addition, efforts to include local institutions and residents in the implementation process with the public officials are necessary to improve the situation.

  9. The Comparative Effects of Processing Instruction and Dictogloss on the Acquisition of the English Passive by Speakers of Turkish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uludag, Onur; Vanpatten, Bill

    2012-01-01

    The current study presents the results of an experiment investigating the effects of processing instruction (PI) and dictogloss (DG) on the acquisition of the English passive voice. Sixty speakers of Turkish studying English at university level were assigned to three groups: one receiving PI, the other receiving DG and the third serving as a…

  10. Is Broca's Area Involved in the Processing of Passive Sentences? An Event-Related fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yokoyama, Satoru; Watanabe, Jobu; Iwata, Kazuki; Ikuta, Naho; Haji, Tomoki; Usui, Nobuo; Taira, Masato; Miyamoto, Tadao; Nakamura, Wataru; Sato, Shigeru; Horie, Kaoru; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2007-01-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate whether activation in Broca's area is greater during the processing of passive versus active sentences in the brains of healthy subjects. Twenty Japanese native speakers performed a visual sentence comprehension task in which they were asked to read a visually presented sentence…

  11. A PROPOSED METHOD FOR ESTIMATING FAILURE RATES OF DEGRADED PASSIVE COMPONENTS IN THE NRC SIGNIFICANCE DETERMINATION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Ivans, William J.; Lowry, Peter P.

    2013-11-01

    This paper outlines a methodology for estimation of the incremental core damage frequency associated with the degradation of passive components with a view to its application in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's significance determination process. The method involves use of simplified physics-based models of materials degradation and the probabilistic comparison of transient loads with deteriorating system capacities.

  12. Is Broca's Area Involved in the Processing of Passive Sentences? An Event-Related fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yokoyama, Satoru; Watanabe, Jobu; Iwata, Kazuki; Ikuta, Naho; Haji, Tomoki; Usui, Nobuo; Taira, Masato; Miyamoto, Tadao; Nakamura, Wataru; Sato, Shigeru; Horie, Kaoru; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2007-01-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate whether activation in Broca's area is greater during the processing of passive versus active sentences in the brains of healthy subjects. Twenty Japanese native speakers performed a visual sentence comprehension task in which they were asked to read a visually presented sentence…

  13. Localized rapid heating process for precision chalcogenide glass molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; He, Peng; Yu, Jianfeng; Lee, L. James; Yi, Allen Y.

    2015-10-01

    Precision glass molding is an important process for high volume optical fabrication. However, conventional glass molding is a bulk heating process that usually requires a long thermal cycle, where molding assembly and other mechanical parts are heated and cooled together. This often causes low efficiency and other heating and cooling related problems, such as large thermal expansion in both the molds and molded optics. To cope with this issue, we developed a localized rapid heating process to effectively heat only very small part of the glass. This localized rapid heating study utilized a fused silica wafer coated with a thin graphene layer to heat only the surface of the glass. The graphene coating functions as an electrical resistant heater when a power source was applied across the thin film coating, generating heat on and near the coating. The feasibility of this process was validated by both experiments and numerical simulation. To demonstrate the advantages of the localized rapid heating, both localized rapid heating process and bulk heating process were performed and carefully compared. The uniformity and quality of the molded sample by localized rapid heating process was also demonstrated. In summary, localized rapid heating process by using graphene coated fused silica wafer was characterized and can be readily implemented in replication of micro scale chalcogenide glasses. A fused silica wafer coated with a thin graphene layer was utilized for localized rapid heating only the surface of the glass. The graphene coating functions as an electrical resistant heater when a power source was applied across the thin film coating, generating high temperature on and near the coating. This process is fast and efficient since only interested areas are heated without affecting the entire glass substrate or the mold assembly. The uniformity and quality of the molded sample by localized rapid heating process was demonstrated by comparing both localized rapid heating

  14. Quality of Life and Toxicity From Passively Scattered and Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, Thomas J.; Munsell, Mark F.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quyhn Nhu; Mathai, Benson; Zhu, X. Ron; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Amos, Richard A.; Dong, Lei; Mahmood, Usama; Kuban, Deborah A.; Frank, Steven J.; Hoffman, Karen E.; McGuire, Sean E.; Lee, Andrew K.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL)/toxicity in men treated with proton beam therapy for localized prostate cancer and to compare outcomes between passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT). Methods and Materials: Men with localized prostate cancer enrolled on a prospective QOL protocol with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up were reviewed. Comparative groups were defined by technique (PSPT vs SSPT). Patients completed Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaires at baseline and every 3-6 months after proton beam therapy. Clinically meaningful differences in QOL were defined as ≥0.5 × baseline standard deviation. The cumulative incidence of modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade ≥2 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity and argon plasma coagulation were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 226 men received PSPT, and 65 received SSPT. Both PSPT and SSPT resulted in statistically significant changes in sexual, urinary, and bowel Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite summary scores. Only bowel summary, function, and bother resulted in clinically meaningful decrements beyond treatment completion. The decrement in bowel QOL persisted through 24-month follow-up. Cumulative grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity at 24 months were 13.4% and 9.6%, respectively. There was 1 grade 3 GI toxicity (PSPT group) and no other grade ≥3 GI or GU toxicity. Argon plasma coagulation application was infrequent (PSPT 4.4% vs SSPT 1.5%; P=.21). No statistically significant differences were appreciated between PSPT and SSPT regarding toxicity or QOL. Conclusion: Both PSPT and SSPT confer low rates of grade ≥2 GI or GU toxicity, with preservation of meaningful sexual and urinary QOL at 24 months. A modest, yet clinically meaningful, decrement in bowel QOL was seen throughout follow-up. No toxicity or QOL differences between PSPT and SSPT were identified. Long-term comparative results in a

  15. Surface Passivation for 3-5 Semiconductor Processing: Stable Gallium Sulphide Films by MOCVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macinnes, Andrew N.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Power, Michael B.; Kang, Soon; Barron, Andrew R.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Tabib-Azar, Massood

    1994-01-01

    Gallium sulphide (GaS) has been deposited on GaAs to form stable, insulating, passivating layers. Spectrally resolved photoluminescence and surface recombination velocity measurements indicate that the GaS itself can contribute a significant fraction of the photoluminescence in GaS/GaAs structures. Determination of surface recombination velocity by photoluminescence is therefore difficult. By using C-V analysis of metal-insulator-semiconductor structures, passivation of the GaAs with GaS films is quantified.

  16. Effects of obesity and mild hypohydration on local sweating and cutaneous vascular responses during passive heat stress in females.

    PubMed

    Moyen, Nicole E; Burchfield, Jenna M; Butts, Cory L; Glenn, Jordan M; Tucker, Matthew A; Treece, Keeley; Smith, Amber J; McDermott, Brendon P; Ganio, Matthew S

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of obesity and mild hypohydration on local sweating (LSR) and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) responses during passive heat stress in females. Thirteen obese (age, 24 ± 4 years; 45.4% ± 5.2% body fat) and 12 nonobese (age, 22 ± 2 years; 25.1% ± 3.9% body fat) females were passively heated (1.0 °C rectal temperature increase) while either euhydrated (EUHY) or mildly hypohydrated (HYPO; via fluid restriction). Chest and forearm LSR (ventilated capsule) and CVC (Laser Doppler flowmetry) onset, sensitivity, and plateau/steady state were recorded as mean body temperature increased (ΔTb). Participants began trials EUHY (urine specific gravity, Usg = 1.009 ± 0.006) or HYPO (Usg = 1.025 ± 0.004; p < 0.05), and remained EUHY or HYPO. Independent of obesity, HYPO decreased sweat sensitivity at the chest (HYPO = 0.79 ± 0.35, EUHY = 0.95 ± 0.39 Δmg·min(-1)·cm(-2)/°C ΔTb) and forearm (HYPO = 0.82 ± 0.39, EUHY = 1.06 ± 0.34 Δmg·min(-1)·cm(-2)/°C ΔTb); forearm LSR plateau was also decreased (HYPO = 0.66 ± 0.19, EUHY = 0.78 ± 0.23 mg·min(-1)·cm(-2); all p < 0.05). Overall, obese females had lower chest-sweat sensitivity (0.72 ± 0.35 vs. 1.01 ± 0.33 Δmg·min(-1)·cm(-2)/°C ΔTb) and plateau (0.55 ± 0.27 vs. 0.80 ± 0.25 mg·min(-1)·cm(-2); p < 0.05). While hypohydrated, obese females had a lower chest LSR (p < 0.05) versus nonobese females midway (0.45 ± 0.26 vs. 0.73 ± 0.23 mg·min(-1)·cm(-2)) and at the end (0.53 ± 0.27 vs. 0.81 ± 0.24 mg·min(-1)·cm(-2)) of heating. Furthermore, HYPO (relative to the EUHY trials) led to a greater decrease in CVC sensitivity in obese (-28 ± 27 Δ% maximal CVC/°C ΔTb) versus nonobese females (+9.2 ± 33 Δ% maximal CVC/°C ΔTb; p < 0.05). In conclusion, mild hypohydration impairs females' sweating responses during passive heat stress, and this effect is exacerbated when obese.

  17. Finite-size effects on electronic structure and local properties in passivated AA-stacked bilayer armchair-edge graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiongwen; Shi, Zhengang; Xiang, Shaohua; Song, Kehui; Zhou, Guanghui

    2017-03-01

    Based on the tight-binding model and dual-probe scanning tunneling microscopy technology, we theoretically investigate the electronic structure and local property in the passivated AA-stacked bilayer armchair-edge graphene nanoribbons (AABLAGNRs). We show that they are highly sensitive to the size of the ribbons, which is evidently different from the single-layer armchair-edge graphene nanoribbons. The ‘3p’ rule only applies to the narrow AABLGNRs. Namely, in the passivated 3p- and (3p  +  1)-AABLGNRs, the narrow ribbons are semiconducting while the medium and wide ribbons are metallic. Although the passivated (3p  +  2)-AABLGNRs are metallic, the ‘3j’ rule only applies to the narrow and medium ribbons. Namely, electrons are in the semiconducting states at sites of line 3j while they are in the metallic states at other sites. This induces a series of parallel and discrete metallic channels, consisting of lines 3j  -  1 and 3j  -  2, for the low-energy electronic transports. In the passivated wide (3p  +  2)-AABLGNRs, all electrons are in the metallic states. Additionally, the ‘3p’ and ‘3j’ rules are controllable to disappear and reappear by applying an external perpendicular electric field. Resultantly, an electric filed-driven current switch can be realized in the passivated narrow and medium (3p  +  2)-AABLGNRs.

  18. Finite-size effects on electronic structure and local properties in passivated AA-stacked bilayer armchair-edge graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiongwen; Shi, Zhengang; Xiang, Shaohua; Song, Kehui; Zhou, Guanghui

    2017-03-01

    Based on the tight-binding model and dual-probe scanning tunneling microscopy technology, we theoretically investigate the electronic structure and local property in the passivated AA-stacked bilayer armchair-edge graphene nanoribbons (AABLAGNRs). We show that they are highly sensitive to the size of the ribbons, which is evidently different from the single-layer armchair-edge graphene nanoribbons. The '3p' rule only applies to the narrow AABLGNRs. Namely, in the passivated 3p- and (3p  +  1)-AABLGNRs, the narrow ribbons are semiconducting while the medium and wide ribbons are metallic. Although the passivated (3p  +  2)-AABLGNRs are metallic, the '3j' rule only applies to the narrow and medium ribbons. Namely, electrons are in the semiconducting states at sites of line 3j while they are in the metallic states at other sites. This induces a series of parallel and discrete metallic channels, consisting of lines 3j  -  1 and 3j  -  2, for the low-energy electronic transports. In the passivated wide (3p  +  2)-AABLGNRs, all electrons are in the metallic states. Additionally, the '3p' and '3j' rules are controllable to disappear and reappear by applying an external perpendicular electric field. Resultantly, an electric filed-driven current switch can be realized in the passivated narrow and medium (3p  +  2)-AABLGNRs.

  19. Passivation process and the mechanism of packing particles in the Fe0/GAC system during the treatment of ABS resin wastewater.

    PubMed

    Lai, Bo; Zhou, Yuexi; Wang, Juling; Zhang, Yunhong; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    This study provides mechanistic insights into the passivation of the packing particles during the treatment of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) resin wastewater by the Fe0/GAC system. The granular-activated carbon (GAC) and iron chippings (Fe0) were mixed together with a volumetric ratio of 1:1. GAC has a mean particle size of approximately 3-5 mm, a specific surface of 748 m2 g(-1), a total pore volume of 0.48 mL g(-1) and a bulk density of 0.49 g cm(-3). The iron chippings have a compact and non-porous surface morphology. The results show that the packing particles in the Fe0/GAC system would lose their activity because the removal of TOC and PO4(3-) for ABS resin wastewater could not carried out by the Fe0/GAC system after 40 days continuous running. Meanwhile, the availability of O2 and intrinsic reactivity of Fe0 play a key role on the form of passive film with different iron oxidation states. The passive film on the surface of iron chippings was formed by two phases: (a) local corrosion phase (0-20 d) and (b) co-precipitation phase (20-40 d), while that of GAC was mainly formed by the co-precipitation of corrosion products with SO4(2-) and PO4(3-) because SO4(2-) and PO4(3-) would not easily reach the Fe0 surface. Therefore, in order to avoid the occurrence of filler passivation, high concentrations of SO4(2-) and PO4(3-) in wastewater should be removed before the treatment process of the Fe/GAC system.

  20. Fundamental studies on passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.

    1993-06-01

    Using photoelectrochemical impedance and admittance spectroscopies, a fundamental and quantitative understanding of the mechanisms for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal and alloy surfaces in contact with aqueous environments is being developed. A point defect model has been extended to explain the breakdown of passive films, leading to pitting and crack growth and thus development of damage due to localized corrosion.

  1. Deciphering the influence of the thermal processes on the early passive margins formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousquet, Romain; Nalpas, Thierry; Ballard, Jean-François; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude; Chelalou, Roman; Clerc, Camille

    2015-04-01

    Many large-scale dynamic processes, from continental rifting to plate subduction, are intimately linked to metamorphic reactions. This close relation between geodynamic processes and metamorphic reactions is, in spite of appearances, yet poorly understood. For example, during extension processes, rocks will be exposed to important temperature, pressures and stress changes. Meanwhile less attention has been paid to other important aspects of the metamorphic processes. When reacting rocks expand and contract, density and volume changes will set up in the surrounding material. While several tectonic models are proposed to explain the formation of extensive basins and passive margins ( simple shear detachment mantle exhumation .... ) a single thermal model (McKenzie , 1978), as a dogma, is used to understanding and modeling the formation and evolution of sedimentary basins . This model is based on the assumption that the extension is only by pure shear and it is instantaneous. Under this approach, the sedimentary deposits occur in two stages. i) A short step , 1 to 10 Ma , controlled by tectonics. ii) A longer step , at least 50 Ma as a result of the thermal evolution of the lithosphere.
However, most stratigraphic data indicate that less thermal model can account for documented vertical movements. The study of the thermal evolution , coupled with other tectonic models , and its consequences have never been studied in detail , although the differences may be significant and it is clear that the petrological changes associated with changes in temperature conditions , influence changes reliefs.
In addition, it seems that the relationship between basin formation and thermal evolution is not always the same:
- Sometimes the temperature rise above 50 to 100 Ma tectonic extension. In the Alps, a significant rise in geothermal gradient Permo -Triassic followed by a "cold" extension , leading to the opening of the Ligurian- Piedmont ocean, from the Middle Jurassic .

  2. Local infiltration of rabies immunoglobulins without systemic intramuscular administration: An alternative cost effective approach for passive immunization against rabies

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Omesh Kumar; Madhusudana, Shampur Narayan; Gaunta, Pyare Lal; Belludi, Ashwin Yajaman

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Presently the dose of rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) which is an integral part of rabies post exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is calculated based on body weight though the recommendation is to infiltrate the wound(s). This practice demands large quantities of RIG which may be unaffordable to many patients. In this background, we conducted this study to know if the quantity and cost of RIG can be reduced by restricting passive immunization to local infiltration alone and avoiding systemic intramuscular administration based on the available scientific evidence. Two hundred and sixty nine category III patients bitten by suspect or confirmed rabid dogs/animals were infiltrated with equine rabies immunoglobulin (ERIGs) in and around the wound. The quantity of ERIG used was proportionate to the size and number of wounds irrespective of their body weight. They were followed with a regular course of rabies vaccination by intra-dermal route. As against 363 vials of RIGs required for all these cases as per current recommendation based on body weight, they required only 42 vials of 5ml RIG. Minimum dose of RIGs given was 0.25 ml and maximum dose given was 8 ml. On an average 1.26 ml of RIGs was required per patient that costs Rs. 150 ($3). All the patients were followed for 9 months and they were healthy and normal at the end of observation period. With local infiltration, that required small quantities of RIG, the RIGs could be made available to all patients in times of short supply in the market. A total of 30 (11%) serum samples of patients were tested for rabies virus neutralizing antibodies by the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT) and all showed antibody titers >0.5 IU/mL by day 14. In no case the dose was higher than that required based on body weight and no immunosuppression resulted. To conclude, this pilot study shows that local infiltration of RIG need to be considered in times of non-availability in the market or unaffordability by poor patients

  3. Geothermal policy development program: expediting the local geothermal permitting process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    For a number of years, concerns have been raised about the length of time and the complexity involved in obtaining required permits in order to develop the geothermal resource at the Geysers. Perhaps the most important factor is jurisdiction. At the Geysers, all three levels of government - local, state, and federal - exercise significant authority over various aspects of geothermal development. In addition, several agencies within each governmental level play an active role in the permitting process. The present study is concerned primarily with the local permitting process, and the ways in which this process could be expedited. This report begins by looking at the local role in the overall permitting process, and then reviews the findings and conclusions that have been reached in other studies of the problem. This is followed by a case study evaluation of recent permitting experience in the four Geysers-Calistoga KGRA counties, and the report concludes by outlining several approaches to expediting the local permitting process.

  4. The use of passive, secure cells for processing of highly active nuclear wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Ch.; Cavanah, P.; Richardson, J.

    2007-07-01

    Passive, secure cells (PSCs) have been used for over 50 years at the Sellafield nuclear site in the UK for radioactive processing plants. PSCs are designed and constructed with the expectation that there will be no need to enter them throughout the life of the plant. EnergySolutions has full and exclusive rights in North America to use the intellectual property and know-how generated at the Sellafield site and this includes all the design and operational data for PSCs. These data are thus available for use in the new build of nuclear plant currently being envisaged under the GNEP initiative. There are three types of PSC. Type 1 PSCs contain plant items with no maintainable moving parts, and pipework is all welded and radiographed to nuclear standards. Type 2 PSCs contain plant items with slowly rotating or intermittently moveable parts, but all maintainable items such as motors and gearboxes are located outside the cell, with sealed through-cell-wall drives. Type 3 PSCs are a newer design, dating from the 1980's, in which all maintainable in-cell items are designed as removable modules. The housings for the equipment are permanently welded into the in-cell pipework, and the modules can be withdrawn from these housings, through removable hatches in the PSC roof, into shielded steel 'flasks'. The flasks are moved to a maintenance cell where the modules are repaired or prepared for disposal. The process is reversed to re-install the modules back into service in the PSC. All three types of PSC have been shown to have operability, maintainability, reliability, space utilization, contamination control and worker radiation dose uptake advantages over canyon-based plants. The increased capital cost of PSCs over canyons is offset by decreased operating costs. Although PSCs have lower flexibility for process change than do canyons, this can be mitigated by the provision of spare cells and pipework at the design stage. Entry to PSCs is possible but has been required only

  5. Evidence for equivalence of diffusion processes of passive scalar and magnetic fields in anisotropic Navier-Stokes turbulence.

    PubMed

    Jurčišinová, E; Jurčišin, M

    2017-05-01

    The influence of the uniaxial small-scale anisotropy on the kinematic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is investigated by using the field theoretic renormalization group technique in the one-loop approximation of a perturbation theory. The infrared stable fixed point of the renormalization group equations, which drives the scaling properties of the model in the inertial range, is investigated as the function of the anisotropy parameters and it is shown that, at least at the one-loop level of approximation, the diffusion processes of the weak passive magnetic field in the anisotropically driven kinematic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence are completely equivalent to the corresponding diffusion processes of passively advected scalar fields in the anisotropic Navier-Stokes turbulent environments.

  6. Evidence for equivalence of diffusion processes of passive scalar and magnetic fields in anisotropic Navier-Stokes turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurčišinová, E.; Jurčišin, M.

    2017-05-01

    The influence of the uniaxial small-scale anisotropy on the kinematic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is investigated by using the field theoretic renormalization group technique in the one-loop approximation of a perturbation theory. The infrared stable fixed point of the renormalization group equations, which drives the scaling properties of the model in the inertial range, is investigated as the function of the anisotropy parameters and it is shown that, at least at the one-loop level of approximation, the diffusion processes of the weak passive magnetic field in the anisotropically driven kinematic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence are completely equivalent to the corresponding diffusion processes of passively advected scalar fields in the anisotropic Navier-Stokes turbulent environments.

  7. Cortical activation in the processing of passive sentences in L1 and L2: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Satoru; Okamoto, Hideyuki; Miyamoto, Tadao; Yoshimoto, Kei; Kim, Jungho; Iwata, Kazuki; Jeong, Hyeonjeong; Uchida, Shinya; Ikuta, Naho; Sassa, Yuko; Nakamura, Wataru; Horie, Kaoru; Sato, Shigeru; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2006-04-01

    The question of whether the bilingual brain processes a first and second language (L1 and L2, respectively) differently is a central issue in many psycholinguistic and neurolinguistic studies. This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate whether late bilinguals process structurally complex sentences in L1 and L2 in different cortical networks. For this purpose, we directly compared brain activity during the processing of active and passive sentences in both L1 and L2. We asked 36 healthy subjects to judge whether or not a presented sentence was semantically plausible. Both L1 and L2 activated the left hemispheric language-related regions such as the left inferior frontal, superior/middle temporal, and parietal cortices. However, we found different activation patterns between L1 and L2 in the processing of passive sentences. Passive sentences elicited greater activation than their active counterparts in the left pars triangularis, the premotor area, and the superior parietal lobule in Japanese, but not in English. Furthermore, there was a significant interaction between sentence type (active versus passive) and language (Japanese versus English) in the left pars orbitalis. The results of this study indicate that late bilinguals use similar cortical regions to comprehend both L1 and L2. However, when late bilinguals are presented with structurally complex sentences, the involvement of these regions differs between L1 and L2. These results suggest that, in addition to age of L2 acquisition and L2 proficiency, differences in grammatical construction affect cortical representation during the comprehension of L1 and L2.

  8. Passive stimulation and behavioral training differentially transform temporal processing in the inferior colliculus and primary auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Maike; Beitel, Ralph E; Schreiner, Christoph E; Leake, Patricia A

    2017-01-01

    In profoundly deaf cats, behavioral training with intracochlear electric stimulation (ICES) can improve temporal processing in the primary auditory cortex (AI). To investigate whether similar effects are manifest in the auditory midbrain, ICES was initiated in neonatally deafened cats either during development after short durations of deafness (8 wk of age) or in adulthood after long durations of deafness (≥3.5 yr). All of these animals received behaviorally meaningless, "passive" ICES. Some animals also received behavioral training with ICES. Two long-deaf cats received no ICES prior to acute electrophysiological recording. After several months of passive ICES and behavioral training, animals were anesthetized, and neuronal responses to pulse trains of increasing rates were recorded in the central (ICC) and external (ICX) nuclei of the inferior colliculus. Neuronal temporal response patterns (repetition rate coding, minimum latencies, response precision) were compared with results from recordings made in the AI of the same animals (Beitel RE, Vollmer M, Raggio MW, Schreiner CE. J Neurophysiol 106: 944-959, 2011; Vollmer M, Beitel RE. J Neurophysiol 106: 2423-2436, 2011). Passive ICES in long-deaf cats remediated severely degraded temporal processing in the ICC and had no effects in the ICX. In contrast to observations in the AI, behaviorally relevant ICES had no effects on temporal processing in the ICC or ICX, with the single exception of shorter latencies in the ICC in short-deaf cats. The results suggest that independent of deafness duration passive stimulation and behavioral training differentially transform temporal processing in auditory midbrain and cortex, and primary auditory cortex emerges as a pivotal site for behaviorally driven neuronal temporal plasticity in the deaf cat.

  9. Is water uptake by reptilian eggs regulated by physiological processes of embryos or a passive hydraulic response to developmental environments?

    PubMed

    Warner, Daniel A; Moody, Melissa A; Telemeco, Rory S

    2011-11-01

    Moisture availability is critical for successful embryonic development in many organisms. In most oviparous reptiles, for example, water exchange between eggs and the surrounding environment can have substantial fitness consequences, but regulation of this process is unclear. Here, we evaluate whether water uptake by eggs of the lizard Anolis sagrei is regulated by the presence of a live embryo or is a passive hydraulic response to substrate moisture conditions. Many eggs laid in our captive colony were infertile or contained embryos that died during early stages of development, yet these 'dead' eggs continued to gain mass similar to that of 'live' eggs at least during the first half of incubation. Our results suggest that water uptake by eggs is largely a passive hydraulic process during the first half of incubation, but active regulation by embryos may be necessary during latter stages. Maternal effects (e.g., deposition of salts into yolk) could influence this passive process during early incubation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of the Effects of Local Cryotherapy and Passive Cross-Body Stretch on Extensibility in Subjects with Posterior Shoulder Tightness

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyue-nam; Kwon, Oh-yun; Weon, Jong-hyuck; Choung, Sung-dae; Kim, Si-hyun

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to compare the immediate effects of local cryotherapy (LC) and passive cross-body stretch on the extensibility of the posterior shoulder muscle in individuals with posterior shoulder tightness. Eighty-seven healthy subjects with a between-shoulder difference in internal rotation (IR) range of motion (ROM) greater than 10° were randomly divided into three groups: LC group, stretching group, and control group (n = 29 in each group). Subjects in the LC group received LC on infraspinatus and posterior deltoid muscles and subjects in the stretching group performed passive cross-body stretch. Stretch sensation was measured at the end range of passive IR and horizontal adduction (HA) using numerical rating scale, and the pressure pain threshold (PPT) at the infraspinatus and posterior deltoid muscles was measured using pressure algometry. Passive and active ROM of IR and HA of the glenohumeral joint were measured using an inclinometer. All measurements were performed at pre-intervention, post- intervention, and 10-min follow-up. Stretch sensation was significantly decreased and PPT was significantly increased in the LC and stretching groups at post-intervention, and these effects were maintained at 10-min follow-up, compared to the control group. Both the LC group and stretching group had a significantly greater increase in passive and active ROM of IR and HA, compared to the control group at post-intervention and 10-min follow-up. However, there were no significant differences in stretch sensation, PPT, or ROM of IR and HA between the LC group and stretching group. LC can be used to decrease the stretch sensation and increase PPT and ROM of IR and HA as much as a stretching exercise. LC could be an alternative method for increasing the restricted ROM of glenohumeral IR and HA for individuals with posterior shoulder tightness, especially for patients and sports players who have severe stretching discomfort. Key Points Local cryotherapy (LC) decreased

  11. Effects of face/head and whole body cooling during passive heat stress on human somatosensory processing.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hiroki; Namba, Mari; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Shibasaki, Manabu

    2017-06-01

    We herein investigated the effects of face/head and whole body cooling during passive heat stress on human somatosensory processing recorded by somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) at C4' and Fz electrodes. Fourteen healthy subjects received a median nerve stimulation at the left wrist. SEPs were recorded at normothermic baseline (Rest), when esophageal temperature had increased by ~1.2°C (heat stress: HS) during passive heating, face/head cooling during passive heating (face/head cooling: FHC), and after HS (whole body cooling: WBC). The latencies and amplitudes of P14, N20, P25, N35, P45, and N60 at C4' and P14, N18, P22, and N30 at Fz were evaluated. Latency indicated speed of the subcortical and cortical somatosensory processing, while amplitude reflected the strength of neural activity. Blood flow in the internal and common carotid arteries (ICA and CCA, respectively) and psychological comfort were recorded in each session. Increases in esophageal temperature due to HS significantly decreased the amplitude of N60, psychological comfort, and ICA blood flow in the HS session, and also shortened the latencies of SEPs (all, P < 0.05). While esophageal temperature remained elevated, FHC recovered the peak amplitude of N60, psychological comfort, and ICA blood flow toward preheat baseline levels as well as WBC. However, the latencies of SEPs did not recover in the FHC and WBC sessions. These results suggest that impaired neural activity in cortical somatosensory processing during passive HS was recovered by FHC, whereas conduction velocity in the ascending somatosensory input was accelerated by increases in body temperature. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Local Conjecturing Process in the Solving of Pattern Generalization Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutarto; Nusantara, Toto; Subanji; Sisworo

    2016-01-01

    This aim of this study is to describe the process of local conjecturing in generalizing patterns based on Action, Process, Object, Schema (APOS) theory. The subjects were 16 grade 8 students from a junior high school. Data collection used Pattern Generalization Problem (PGP) and interviews. In the first stage, students completed PGP; in the second…

  13. Cultural Variations in Global versus Local Processing: A Developmental Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oishi, Shigehiro; Jaswal, Vikram K.; Lillard, Angeline S.; Mizokawa, Ai; Hitokoto, Hidefumi; Tsutsui, Yoshiro

    2014-01-01

    We conducted 3 studies to explore cultural differences in global versus local processing and their developmental trajectories. In Study 1 ("N" = 363), we found that Japanese college students were less globally oriented in their processing than American or Argentine participants. We replicated this effect in Study 2 ("N" =…

  14. Ensuring Effective Curriculum Approval Processes: A Guide for Local Senates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Curriculum is the heart of the mission of every college. College curriculum approval processes have been established to ensure that rigorous, high quality curriculum is offered that meets the needs of students. While some concerns may exist regarding the effectiveness and efficiency of local curriculum processes, all participants in the process…

  15. Cultural Variations in Global versus Local Processing: A Developmental Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oishi, Shigehiro; Jaswal, Vikram K.; Lillard, Angeline S.; Mizokawa, Ai; Hitokoto, Hidefumi; Tsutsui, Yoshiro

    2014-01-01

    We conducted 3 studies to explore cultural differences in global versus local processing and their developmental trajectories. In Study 1 ("N" = 363), we found that Japanese college students were less globally oriented in their processing than American or Argentine participants. We replicated this effect in Study 2 ("N" =…

  16. Wetland-based passive treatment systems for gold ore processing effluents containing residual cyanide, metals and nitrogen species.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, R; Ordóñez, A; Loredo, J; Younger, P L

    2013-10-01

    Gold extraction operations generate a variety of wastes requiring responsible disposal in compliance with current environmental regulations. During recent decades, increased emphasis has been placed on effluent control and treatment, in order to avoid the threat to the environment posed by toxic constituents. In many modern gold mining and ore processing operations, cyanide species are of most immediate concern. Given that natural degradation processes are known to reduce the toxicity of cyanide over time, trials have been made at laboratory and field scales into the feasibility of using wetland-based passive systems as low-cost and environmentally friendly methods for long-term treatment of leachates from closed gold mine tailing disposal facilities. Laboratory experiments on discrete aerobic and anaerobic treatment units supported the development of design parameters for the construction of a field-scale passive system at a gold mine site in northern Spain. An in situ pilot-scale wetland treatment system was designed, constructed and monitored over a nine-month period. Overall, the results suggest that compost-based constructed wetlands are capable of detoxifying cyanidation effluents, removing about 21.6% of dissolved cyanide and 98% of Cu, as well as nitrite and nitrate. Wetland-based passive systems can therefore be considered as a viable technology for removal of residual concentrations of cyanide from leachates emanating from closed gold mine tailing disposal facilities.

  17. Passive membrane properties and electrotonic signal processing in retinal rod bipolar cells.

    PubMed

    Oltedal, Leif; Veruki, Margaret Lin; Hartveit, Espen

    2009-02-15

    Rod bipolar cells transmit visual signals from their dendrites, where they receive input from rod photoreceptors, to their axon terminals, where they synapse onto amacrine cells. Little is known, however, about the transmission and possible transformation of these signals. We have combined axon terminal recording in retinal slices, quantitative, light-microscopic morphological reconstruction and computer modelling to obtain detailed compartmental models of rat rod bipolar cells. Passive cable properties were estimated by directly fitting the current responses of the models evoked by voltage pulses to the physiologically recorded responses. At a holding potential of -60 mV, the average best-fit parameters were 1.1 microF cm(-2) for specific membrane capacitance (C(m)), 130 Omega cm for cytoplasmic resistivity (R(i)), and 24 kOmega cm(2) for specific membrane resistance (R(m)). The passive integration of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs was examined by computer modelling with physiologically realistic synaptic conductance waveforms. For both transient and steady-state synaptic inhibition, the inhibitory effect was relatively insensitive to the location of the inhibition. For transient synaptic inhibition, the time window of effective inhibition depended critically on the relative timing of inhibition and excitation. The passive signal transmission between soma and axon terminal was examined by the electrotonic transform and quantified as the frequency-dependent voltage attenuation of sinusoidal voltage waveforms. For the range of parameters explored (axon diameter and length, R(i)), the lowest cutoff frequency observed was approximately 300 Hz, suggesting that realistic scotopic visual signals will be faithfully transmitted from soma to axon terminal, with minimal passive attenuation along the axon.

  18. Digital Processing of Passive Ka-Band Microwave Images for Sea-Ice Classification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    Development Activity »’ NSTL, Mississippi 39529 Foreword Field trials of an airborne passive-microwave imaging system (MICRAD) in April 1976 demonstrated...Ross Williams). Engineering field tests of the KRMS were completed in December 1982. First use of the KRMS in support of an Arctic research...brightness temperature 6 Numerical approach to image classification 11 Field data 13 Histograms 14 Training regions 14 Open water 14 Old ice 15 First

  19. Snap Your Fingers! An ERP/sLORETA Study Investigating Implicit Processing of Self- vs. Other-Related Movement Sounds Using the Passive Oddball Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Justen, Christoph; Herbert, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    So far, neurophysiological studies have investigated implicit and explicit self-related processing particularly for self-related stimuli such as the own face or name. The present study extends previous research to the implicit processing of self-related movement sounds and explores their spatio-temporal dynamics. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were assessed while participants (N = 12 healthy subjects) listened passively to previously recorded self- and other-related finger snapping sounds, presented either as deviants or standards during an oddball paradigm. Passive listening to low (500 Hz) and high (1000 Hz) pure tones served as additional control. For self- vs. other-related finger snapping sounds, analysis of ERPs revealed significant differences in the time windows of the N2a/MMN and P3. An subsequent source localization analysis with standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) revealed increased cortical activation in distinct motor areas such as the supplementary motor area (SMA) in the N2a/mismatch negativity (MMN) as well as the P3 time window during processing of self- and other-related finger snapping sounds. In contrast, brain regions associated with self-related processing [e.g., right anterior/posterior cingulate cortex (ACC/PPC)] as well as the right inferior parietal lobule (IPL) showed increased activation particularly during processing of self- vs. other-related finger snapping sounds in the time windows of the N2a/MMN (ACC/PCC) or the P3 (IPL). None of these brain regions showed enhanced activation while listening passively to low (500 Hz) and high (1000 Hz) pure tones. Taken together, the current results indicate (1) a specific role of motor regions such as SMA during auditory processing of movement-related information, regardless of whether this information is self- or other-related, (2) activation of neural sources such as the ACC/PCC and the IPL during implicit processing of self-related movement stimuli, and (3

  20. Snap Your Fingers! An ERP/sLORETA Study Investigating Implicit Processing of Self- vs. Other-Related Movement Sounds Using the Passive Oddball Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Justen, Christoph; Herbert, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    So far, neurophysiological studies have investigated implicit and explicit self-related processing particularly for self-related stimuli such as the own face or name. The present study extends previous research to the implicit processing of self-related movement sounds and explores their spatio-temporal dynamics. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were assessed while participants (N = 12 healthy subjects) listened passively to previously recorded self- and other-related finger snapping sounds, presented either as deviants or standards during an oddball paradigm. Passive listening to low (500 Hz) and high (1000 Hz) pure tones served as additional control. For self- vs. other-related finger snapping sounds, analysis of ERPs revealed significant differences in the time windows of the N2a/MMN and P3. An subsequent source localization analysis with standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) revealed increased cortical activation in distinct motor areas such as the supplementary motor area (SMA) in the N2a/mismatch negativity (MMN) as well as the P3 time window during processing of self- and other-related finger snapping sounds. In contrast, brain regions associated with self-related processing [e.g., right anterior/posterior cingulate cortex (ACC/PPC)] as well as the right inferior parietal lobule (IPL) showed increased activation particularly during processing of self- vs. other-related finger snapping sounds in the time windows of the N2a/MMN (ACC/PCC) or the P3 (IPL). None of these brain regions showed enhanced activation while listening passively to low (500 Hz) and high (1000 Hz) pure tones. Taken together, the current results indicate (1) a specific role of motor regions such as SMA during auditory processing of movement-related information, regardless of whether this information is self- or other-related, (2) activation of neural sources such as the ACC/PCC and the IPL during implicit processing of self-related movement stimuli, and (3

  1. Synergistic Use of Passive and Active Data for Cloud Process Studies: Examples from the A-Train Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Z. J.

    2013-05-01

    Clouds play a critical role in regulating the energy budget and water cycle of our planet. Developing a global observation and understanding of clouds requires space-borne remote sensing systems. Through internationally coordinated efforts, various observation systems and cloud products have been developed over the past 30 years. An especially fruitful area involves the synergy between passive and active sensing. Since a number of textbooks and review articles have been published on the remote sensing techniques of these systems, we do not intend to repeat them. Rather, the focus of this paper is on the application side, that is, we illustrate how synergistic use of passive and active observations can be employed to study cloud microphysical and dynamical processes using examples from recent studies that utilized the A-Train data, including a short study of warm cloud droplet growth mechanisms using CloudSat, MODIS and AMSR-E, and a series of studies of tropical convective dynamics using CloudSat and MODIS. Compared to cloud retrieval algorithm development, synergistic use of passive and active data for cloud process studies is a relatively new area. Strictly speaking, it may not be proper to classify it as an "area" because there is no clear roadmap to guide its development, nor any well defined envelop to contain it. Most such studies appear ad hoc in nature and almost always have a certain innovative touch that defies any rigid a priori framework. Yet, it is through these novel studies that cloud processes are systematically investigated from a global perspective. Conclusions drawn from them can thus be generalized that will help evaluate and improve cloud parameterizations in global climate models. It is our hope that more of this kind of studies will blossom out in the future. Finally, from a satellite mission development perspective, these applications will feed back to the design of the observation systems so that guidance can be provided to help define the

  2. Processing and fusion for human body terahertz dual-band passive image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Li; Shen, Yanchun; Jin, Weiqi; Zhao, Guozhong; Cai, Yi

    2016-11-01

    Compared with microwave, THz has higher resolution, and compared with infrared, THz has better penetrability. Human body radiate THz also, its photon energy is low, it is harmless to human body. So THz has great potential applications in the body searching system. Dual-band images may contain different information for the same scene, so THz dual-band imaging have been a significant research subject of THz technology. Base on the dual-band THz passive imaging system which is composed of a 94GHz and a 250GHz cell detector, this paper researched the preprocessing and fusion algorithm for THz dual-band images. Firstly, THz images have such problems: large noise, low SNR, low contrast, low details. Secondly, the stability problem of the optical mechanical scanning system makes the images less repetitive, obvious stripes and low definition. Aiming at these situations, this paper used the BM3D de-noising algorithm to filter noise and correct the scanning problem. Furthermore, translation, rotation and scaling exist between the two images, after registered by the intensity-base registration algorithm, and enhanced by the adaptive histogram equalization algorithm, the images are fused by image fusion algorithm based on wavelet. This effectively reduced the image noise, scan distortion and matching error, improved the details, enhanced the contrast. It is helpful to improve the detection efficiency of hidden objects too. Method in this paper has a substantial effect for improving the dual-band THz passive imaging system's performance and promoting technology practical.

  3. A Model Using Local Weather Data to Determine the Effective Sampling Volume for PCB Congeners Collected on Passive Air Samplers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We have developed and evaluated a mathematical model to determine the effective sampling volumes (Veff) of PCBs and similar compounds captured using polyurethane foam passive air samplers (PUF–PAS). We account for the variability in wind speed, air temperature, and equilibrium partitioning over the course of the deployment of the samplers. The model, provided as an annotated Matlab script, predicts the Veff as a function of physical-chemical properties of each compound and meteorology from the closest Integrated Surface Database (ISD) data set obtained through NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). The model was developed to be user-friendly, only requiring basic Matlab knowledge. To illustrate the effectiveness of the model, we evaluated three independent data sets of airborne PCBs simultaneously collected using passive and active samplers: at sites in Chicago, Lancaster, UK, and Toronto, Canada. The model provides Veff values comparable to those using depuration compounds and calibration against active samplers, yielding an average congener specific concentration method ratio (active/passive) of 1.1 ± 1.2. We applied the model to PUF–PAS samples collected in Chicago and show that previous methods can underestimate concentrations of PCBs by up to 40%, especially for long deployments, deployments conducted under warming conditions, and compounds with log Koa values less than 8. PMID:26963482

  4. A Model Using Local Weather Data to Determine the Effective Sampling Volume for PCB Congeners Collected on Passive Air Samplers.

    PubMed

    Herkert, Nicholas J; Martinez, Andres; Hornbuckle, Keri C

    2016-07-05

    We have developed and evaluated a mathematical model to determine the effective sampling volumes (Veff) of PCBs and similar compounds captured using polyurethane foam passive air samplers (PUF-PAS). We account for the variability in wind speed, air temperature, and equilibrium partitioning over the course of the deployment of the samplers. The model, provided as an annotated Matlab script, predicts the Veff as a function of physical-chemical properties of each compound and meteorology from the closest Integrated Surface Database (ISD) data set obtained through NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). The model was developed to be user-friendly, only requiring basic Matlab knowledge. To illustrate the effectiveness of the model, we evaluated three independent data sets of airborne PCBs simultaneously collected using passive and active samplers: at sites in Chicago, Lancaster, UK, and Toronto, Canada. The model provides Veff values comparable to those using depuration compounds and calibration against active samplers, yielding an average congener specific concentration method ratio (active/passive) of 1.1 ± 1.2. We applied the model to PUF-PAS samples collected in Chicago and show that previous methods can underestimate concentrations of PCBs by up to 40%, especially for long deployments, deployments conducted under warming conditions, and compounds with log Koa values less than 8.

  5. Digital image processing for the early localization of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelmar, Cheryl M.

    1991-06-01

    The prognosis for cancer patients becomes much better if a tumor is diagnosed, localized and treated early, in a precancerous stage. The difficulty lies in the localization of cancerous tumors. Carcinoma in situ (CIS) refers to a tumor which is approximately 100 microns thick and one which has not penetrated through the epithelium wall or become invasive (2). A tumor of this size cannot be detected by existing techniques such as x-ray, computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine or conventional endoscopy under white-light illumination. However, these tumors can be localized and destroyed by photodynamic diagnosis and therapy. This research shows that digital image processing and the technique of digital image ratioing contribute to photodynamic diagnosis and the early localization of cancer. A software package has been developed as a result of this research. The software package quantifies the usefulness of digital image processing for tumor localization and detectability. System parameters such as the endoscope distance and angle variations, tumor size and tumor concentration, sensitivity and specificity of the system have been tested and quantified.

  6. Morphology in autism spectrum disorders: local processing bias and language.

    PubMed

    Vulchanova, Mila; Talcott, Joel B; Vulchanov, Valentin; Stankova, Margarita; Eshuis, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a detailed study of a case of linguistic talent in the context of autism spectrum disorder, specifically Asperger syndrome. I.A. displays language strengths at the level of morphology and syntax. Yet, despite this grammar advantage, processing of figurative language and inferencing based on context presents a problem for him. The morphology advantage for I.A. is consistent with the weak central coherence (WCC) account of autism. From this account, the presence of a local processing bias is evident in the ways in which autistic individuals solve common problems, such as assessing similarities between objects and finding common patterns, and may therefore provide an advantage in some cognitive tasks compared to typical individuals. We extend the WCC account to language and provide evidence for a connection between the local processing bias and the acquisition of morphology and grammar.

  7. The challenge of localizing vehicle backup alarms: effects of passive and electronic hearing protectors, ambient noise level, and backup alarm spectral content.

    PubMed

    Alali, Khaled A; Casali, John G

    2011-01-01

    A human factors experiment employed a hemi-anechoic sound field in which listeners were required to localize a vehicular backup alarm warning signal (both a standard and a frequency-augmented alarm) in 360-degrees azimuth in pink noise of 60 dBA and 90 dBA. Measures of localization performance included: (1) percentage correct localization, (2) percentage of right--left localization errors, (3) percentage of front-rear localization errors, and (4) localization absolute deviation in degrees from the alarm's actual location. In summary, the data demonstrated that, with some exceptions, normal hearing listeners' ability to localize the backup alarm in 360-degrees azimuth did not improve when wearing augmented hearing protectors (including dichotic sound transmission earmuffs, flat attenuation earplugs, and level-dependent earplugs) as compared to when wearing conventional passive earmuffs or earplugs of the foam or flanged types. Exceptions were that in the 90 dBA pink noise, the flat attenuation earplug yielded significantly better accuracy than the polyurethane foam earplug and both the dichotic and the custom-made diotic electronic sound transmission earmuffs. However, the flat attenuation earplug showed no benefit over the standard pre-molded earplug, the arc earplug, and the passive earmuff. Confusions of front-rear alarm directions were most significant in the 90 dBA noise condition, wherein two types of triple-flanged earplugs exhibited significantly fewer front-rear confusions than either of the electronic muffs. On all measures, the diotic sound transmission earmuff resulted in the poorest localization of any of the protectors due to the fact that its single-microphone design did not enable interaural cues to be heard. Localization was consistently more degraded in the 90 dBA pink noise as compared with the relatively quiet condition of the 60 dBA pink noise. A frequency-augmented backup alarm, which incorporated 400 Hz and 4000 Hz components to exploit the

  8. Design of an HF-Band RFID System with Multiple Readers and Passive Tags for Indoor Mobile Robot Self-Localization.

    PubMed

    Mi, Jian; Takahashi, Yasutake

    2016-07-29

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology has already been explored for efficient self-localization of indoor mobile robots. A mobile robot equipped with RFID readers detects passive RFID tags installed on the floor in order to locate itself. The Monte-Carlo localization (MCL) method enables the localization of a mobile robot equipped with an RFID system with reasonable accuracy, sufficient robustness and low computational cost. The arrangements of RFID readers and tags and the size of antennas are important design parameters for realizing accurate and robust self-localization using a low-cost RFID system. The design of a likelihood model of RFID tag detection is also crucial for the accurate self-localization. This paper presents a novel design and arrangement of RFID readers and tags for indoor mobile robot self-localization. First, by considering small-sized and large-sized antennas of an RFID reader, we show how the design of the likelihood model affects the accuracy of self-localization. We also design a novel likelihood model by taking into consideration the characteristics of the communication range of an RFID system with a large antenna. Second, we propose a novel arrangement of RFID tags with eight RFID readers, which results in the RFID system configuration requiring much fewer readers and tags while retaining reasonable accuracy of self-localization. We verify the performances of MCL-based self-localization realized using the high-frequency (HF)-band RFID system with eight RFID readers and a lower density of RFID tags installed on the floor based on MCL in simulated and real environments. The results of simulations and real environment experiments demonstrate that our proposed low-cost HF-band RFID system realizes accurate and robust self-localization of an indoor mobile robot.

  9. Design of an HF-Band RFID System with Multiple Readers and Passive Tags for Indoor Mobile Robot Self-Localization

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Jian; Takahashi, Yasutake

    2016-01-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology has already been explored for efficient self-localization of indoor mobile robots. A mobile robot equipped with RFID readers detects passive RFID tags installed on the floor in order to locate itself. The Monte-Carlo localization (MCL) method enables the localization of a mobile robot equipped with an RFID system with reasonable accuracy, sufficient robustness and low computational cost. The arrangements of RFID readers and tags and the size of antennas are important design parameters for realizing accurate and robust self-localization using a low-cost RFID system. The design of a likelihood model of RFID tag detection is also crucial for the accurate self-localization. This paper presents a novel design and arrangement of RFID readers and tags for indoor mobile robot self-localization. First, by considering small-sized and large-sized antennas of an RFID reader, we show how the design of the likelihood model affects the accuracy of self-localization. We also design a novel likelihood model by taking into consideration the characteristics of the communication range of an RFID system with a large antenna. Second, we propose a novel arrangement of RFID tags with eight RFID readers, which results in the RFID system configuration requiring much fewer readers and tags while retaining reasonable accuracy of self-localization. We verify the performances of MCL-based self-localization realized using the high-frequency (HF)-band RFID system with eight RFID readers and a lower density of RFID tags installed on the floor based on MCL in simulated and real environments. The results of simulations and real environment experiments demonstrate that our proposed low-cost HF-band RFID system realizes accurate and robust self-localization of an indoor mobile robot. PMID:27483279

  10. Rapid method for design and fabrication of passive micromixers in microfluidic devices using a direct-printing process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ai-Lin; He, Feng-yun; Wang, Kang; Zhou, Ting; Lu, Yu; Xia, Xing-hua

    2005-09-01

    We developed a facile and rapid one-step technique for design and fabrication of passive micromixers in microfluidic devices using a direct-printing process. A laser printing mechanism was dexterously adopted to pattern the microchannels with different gray levels using vector graphic software. With the present method, periodically ordered specific bas-relief microstructures can be easily fabricated on transparencies by a simple printing process. The size and shape of the resultant microstructures are determined by the gray level of the graphic software and the resolution of the laser printer. Patterns of specific bas-relief microstructures on the floor of a channel act as obstacles in the flow path for advection mixing, which can be used as efficient mixing elements. The mixing effect of the resultant micromixer in microfluidic devices was evaluated using CCD fluorescence spectroscopy. We found that the mixing performance depends strongly on the gray level values. Under optimal conditions, fast passive mixing with our periodic ordered patterns in microfluidic devices has been achieved at the very early stages of the laminar flow. In addition, fabrication of micromixers using the present versatile technique requires less than an hour. The present method is promising for fabrication of micromixers in microfluidic devices at low cost and without complicated devices and environment, providing a simple solution to mixing problems in the micro-total-analysis-systems field.

  11. Method for localizing and isolating an errant process step

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth W.; Karnowski, Thomas P.; Ferrell, Regina K.

    2003-01-01

    A method for localizing and isolating an errant process includes the steps of retrieving from a defect image database a selection of images each image having image content similar to image content extracted from a query image depicting a defect, each image in the selection having corresponding defect characterization data. A conditional probability distribution of the defect having occurred in a particular process step is derived from the defect characterization data. A process step as a highest probable source of the defect according to the derived conditional probability distribution is then identified. A method for process step defect identification includes the steps of characterizing anomalies in a product, the anomalies detected by an imaging system. A query image of a product defect is then acquired. A particular characterized anomaly is then correlated with the query image. An errant process step is then associated with the correlated image.

  12. The Effect of Active versus Passive Recovery Periods during High Intensity Intermittent Exercise on Local Tissue Oxygenation in 18 – 30 Year Old Sedentary Men

    PubMed Central

    Kerhervé, Hugo A.; Askew, Christopher D.; Solomon, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose High intensity interval training (HIIT) has been proposed as a time-efficient format of exercise to reduce the chronic disease burden associated with sedentary behaviour. Changes in oxygen utilisation at the local tissue level during an acute session of HIIT could be the primary stimulus for the health benefits associated with this format of exercise. The recovery periods of HIIT effect the physiological responses that occur during the session. It was hypothesised that in sedentary individuals, local and systemic oxygen utilisation would be higher during HIIT interspersed with active recovery periods, when compared to passive recovery periods. Methods Twelve sedentary males (mean ± SD; age 23 ± 3 yr) completed three conditions on a cycle ergometer: 1) HIIT with passive recovery periods between four bouts (HIITPASS) 2) HIIT with active recovery periods between four bouts (HIITACT) 3) HIITACT with four HIIT bouts replaced with passive periods (REC). Deoxygenated haemoglobin (HHb) in the vastus lateralis (VL) and gastrocnemius (GN) muscles and the pre-frontal cortex (FH), oxygen consumption (VO2), power output and heart rate (HR) were measured continuously during the three conditions. Results There was a significant increase in HHb at VL during bouts 2 (p = 0.017), 3 (p = 0.035) and 4 (p = 0.035) in HIITACT, compared to HIITPASS. Mean power output was significantly lower in HIITACT, compared to HIITPASS (p < 0.001). There was a significant main effect for site in both HIITPASS (p = 0.029) and HIITACT (p = 0.005). There were no significant differences in VO2 and HR between HIITPASS and HIITACT. Conclusions The increase in HHb at VL and the lower mean power output during HIITACT could indicate that a higher level of deoxygenation contributes to decreased mechanical power in sedentary participants. The significant differences in HHb between sites indicates the specificity of oxygen utilisation. PMID:27677081

  13. Local Composite Quantile Regression Smoothing for Harris Recurrent Markov Processes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Degui; Li, Runze

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the local polynomial composite quantile regression (CQR) smoothing method for the nonlinear and nonparametric models under the Harris recurrent Markov chain framework. The local polynomial CQR regression method is a robust alternative to the widely-used local polynomial method, and has been well studied in stationary time series. In this paper, we relax the stationarity restriction on the model, and allow that the regressors are generated by a general Harris recurrent Markov process which includes both the stationary (positive recurrent) and nonstationary (null recurrent) cases. Under some mild conditions, we establish the asymptotic theory for the proposed local polynomial CQR estimator of the mean regression function, and show that the convergence rate for the estimator in nonstationary case is slower than that in stationary case. Furthermore, a weighted type local polynomial CQR estimator is provided to improve the estimation efficiency, and a data-driven bandwidth selection is introduced to choose the optimal bandwidth involved in the nonparametric estimators. Finally, we give some numerical studies to examine the finite sample performance of the developed methodology and theory. PMID:27667894

  14. Tall FIN formation for FINFET devices of 20nm and beyond using multi-cycles of passivation and etch processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Dae-han; Yang, Dae Geun; Khanna, Puneet; Maeng, Chang; Hu, Owen; Shen, Hongliang; Wei, Andy; Kim, Sung

    2013-03-01

    In the past a few years, there has been a trend that non-planar field effect transistors (FETs) replace planar counterparts in semiconductor industry. One of critical and challenging processes to fabricate this non-planar device in bulk Si wafers is forming the array of tall Si fins with tight pitch that is used for gate channel as well as source and drain. Fin formation process typically involves deep Si etch using hard mask formed by double patterning technique (DPT). Traditional Si etch tends to results in intra-cell depth loading due to pitch walking and necking profile at the top portion of fins due to deep Si etch at small space. In addition, tall fins tend to stick to each other after post etch wet clean due to surface tension and hydrophilic fin sidewall. In this publication, 200nm tall fins with straight profile at the significant top portion of fins are demonstrated by using multi cycles of passivation and etch process. Physical and chemical parameters of each cycle were tuned respectively to generate straight top profile for gate channel control and smooth bottom profile to make it friendly for the following oxide gap fill process. Intra-cell and iso-dense depth loading is less than 3% of total depth. In addition, fin sticking is no longer observed after this multi cycle process. The exact mechanism is still under investigation but it is postulated that the fin sidewall surface condition has changed to be less hydrophilic due to multi cycle passivation.

  15. Exciton localization in solution-processed organolead trihalide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Haiping; Yu, Qianqian; Li, Hui; Li, Jing; Si, Junjie; Jin, Yizheng; Wang, Nana; Wang, Jianpu; He, Jingwen; Wang, Xinke; Zhang, Yan; Ye, Zhizhen

    2016-03-01

    Organolead trihalide perovskites have attracted great attention due to the stunning advances in both photovoltaic and light-emitting devices. However, the photophysical properties, especially the recombination dynamics of photogenerated carriers, of this class of materials are controversial. Here we report that under an excitation level close to the working regime of solar cells, the recombination of photogenerated carriers in solution-processed methylammonium-lead-halide films is dominated by excitons weakly localized in band tail states. This scenario is evidenced by experiments of spectral-dependent luminescence decay, excitation density-dependent luminescence and frequency-dependent terahertz photoconductivity. The exciton localization effect is found to be general for several solution-processed hybrid perovskite films prepared by different methods. Our results provide insights into the charge transport and recombination mechanism in perovskite films and help to unravel their potential for high-performance optoelectronic devices.

  16. Exciton localization in solution-processed organolead trihalide perovskites

    PubMed Central

    He, Haiping; Yu, Qianqian; Li, Hui; Li, Jing; Si, Junjie; Jin, Yizheng; Wang, Nana; Wang, Jianpu; He, Jingwen; Wang, Xinke; Zhang, Yan; Ye, Zhizhen

    2016-01-01

    Organolead trihalide perovskites have attracted great attention due to the stunning advances in both photovoltaic and light-emitting devices. However, the photophysical properties, especially the recombination dynamics of photogenerated carriers, of this class of materials are controversial. Here we report that under an excitation level close to the working regime of solar cells, the recombination of photogenerated carriers in solution-processed methylammonium–lead–halide films is dominated by excitons weakly localized in band tail states. This scenario is evidenced by experiments of spectral-dependent luminescence decay, excitation density-dependent luminescence and frequency-dependent terahertz photoconductivity. The exciton localization effect is found to be general for several solution-processed hybrid perovskite films prepared by different methods. Our results provide insights into the charge transport and recombination mechanism in perovskite films and help to unravel their potential for high-performance optoelectronic devices. PMID:26996605

  17. Applicability of radio astronomy techniques to the processing and interpretation of aperture synthesis passive millimetre-wave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Christopher T.; Wilkinson, Peter N.; Salmon, Neil A.; Cameron, Colin D.

    2012-06-01

    This PhD programme is contributing to the development of Passive Millimetre-Wave Imagers (PMMWI) using the principles of interferometric aperture synthesis and digital signal processing. The principal applications are security screening, all-weather flight aids and earth observation. To enhance the cost-effectiveness of PMMWI systems the number of collecting elements must be minimised whilst maintaining adequate image fidelity. A wide range of techniques have been developed by the radio astronomy community for improving the fidelity of sparse interferometric array imagery. This paper brings to the attention of readers these techniques and discusses how they may be applied to imaging using software packages publicly available from the radio astronomy community. The intention of future work is to adapt these algorithms to process experimental data from a range of realistic simulations and real-world targets.

  18. Modeling Structural and Mechanical Responses to Localized Erosional Processes on a Bivergent Orogenic Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzen, R.; Morgan, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    Critical Coulomb wedge theory established that orogenic and accretionary wedges should develop self-similarly and maintain a critical taper that reflects the balance of strength of the wedge material and a basal décollement. However, a variety of geological processes can perturb that balance, forcing readjustment of the wedge. For example, glacial erosion and landsliding can concentrate erosion on a localized portion of the wedge slope, leaving that portion of the wedge with an out-of-equilibrium slope that would need to re-develop for the wedge to resume self-similar growth. We use the discrete element method to analyze how growing bivergent wedges with different cohesive strengths respond structurally and mechanically to erosional events localized along upper, middle, and lower segments of the pro-wedge. Mechanically, pro-wedge erosion results in a sudden decrease followed by a quick recovery of the mean stress and maximum shear stress throughout the pro-wedge. However, when erosion is localized in the mid- to lower portions of the pro-wedge, a zone of increased mean stress develops where the wedge is concentrating deformation to recover its taper. In contrast, when erosion is localized in the upper axial zone, there is almost no recovery of the wedge taper, reflecting the fact that the material at the top of the wedge is being carried passively in a transition zone between the pro-wedge and retro-wedge. Structurally, wedges composed of lower cohesion material recover their critical taper almost immediately through distributed deformation, while wedges of higher-cohesion material recover more slowly, and incompletely, by concentrating deformation along existing fault surfaces. As a result, localized erosional episodes can have a lasting effect on the wedge morphology when the wedge is composed of higher cohesion material.

  19. Breakdown of local information processing may underlie isoflurane anesthesia effects

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, Kristin K.; Priesemann, Viola; Hutt, Axel

    2017-01-01

    The disruption of coupling between brain areas has been suggested as the mechanism underlying loss of consciousness in anesthesia. This hypothesis has been tested previously by measuring the information transfer between brain areas, and by taking reduced information transfer as a proxy for decoupling. Yet, information transfer is a function of the amount of information available in the information source—such that transfer decreases even for unchanged coupling when less source information is available. Therefore, we reconsidered past interpretations of reduced information transfer as a sign of decoupling, and asked whether impaired local information processing leads to a loss of information transfer. An important prediction of this alternative hypothesis is that changes in locally available information (signal entropy) should be at least as pronounced as changes in information transfer. We tested this prediction by recording local field potentials in two ferrets after administration of isoflurane in concentrations of 0.0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. We found strong decreases in the source entropy under isoflurane in area V1 and the prefrontal cortex (PFC)—as predicted by our alternative hypothesis. The decrease in source entropy was stronger in PFC compared to V1. Information transfer between V1 and PFC was reduced bidirectionally, but with a stronger decrease from PFC to V1. This links the stronger decrease in information transfer to the stronger decrease in source entropy—suggesting reduced source entropy reduces information transfer. This conclusion fits the observation that the synaptic targets of isoflurane are located in local cortical circuits rather than on the synapses formed by interareal axonal projections. Thus, changes in information transfer under isoflurane seem to be a consequence of changes in local processing more than of decoupling between brain areas. We suggest that source entropy changes must be considered whenever interpreting changes in

  20. Breakdown of local information processing may underlie isoflurane anesthesia effects.

    PubMed

    Wollstadt, Patricia; Sellers, Kristin K; Rudelt, Lucas; Priesemann, Viola; Hutt, Axel; Fröhlich, Flavio; Wibral, Michael

    2017-06-01

    The disruption of coupling between brain areas has been suggested as the mechanism underlying loss of consciousness in anesthesia. This hypothesis has been tested previously by measuring the information transfer between brain areas, and by taking reduced information transfer as a proxy for decoupling. Yet, information transfer is a function of the amount of information available in the information source-such that transfer decreases even for unchanged coupling when less source information is available. Therefore, we reconsidered past interpretations of reduced information transfer as a sign of decoupling, and asked whether impaired local information processing leads to a loss of information transfer. An important prediction of this alternative hypothesis is that changes in locally available information (signal entropy) should be at least as pronounced as changes in information transfer. We tested this prediction by recording local field potentials in two ferrets after administration of isoflurane in concentrations of 0.0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. We found strong decreases in the source entropy under isoflurane in area V1 and the prefrontal cortex (PFC)-as predicted by our alternative hypothesis. The decrease in source entropy was stronger in PFC compared to V1. Information transfer between V1 and PFC was reduced bidirectionally, but with a stronger decrease from PFC to V1. This links the stronger decrease in information transfer to the stronger decrease in source entropy-suggesting reduced source entropy reduces information transfer. This conclusion fits the observation that the synaptic targets of isoflurane are located in local cortical circuits rather than on the synapses formed by interareal axonal projections. Thus, changes in information transfer under isoflurane seem to be a consequence of changes in local processing more than of decoupling between brain areas. We suggest that source entropy changes must be considered whenever interpreting changes in information

  1. RANS Simulation of Passive Scalar Residence Times and Exchange Processes in Idealized and Natural Stream Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drost, Kevin; Jackson, Tracie; Haggerty, Roy; Apte, Sourabh

    2011-11-01

    Natural stream systems contain a variety of dead zones characterized by flow separation, a mixing layer, and a recirculation zone. These dead zones play an important role in stream solute transport studies. Previous published work has focused on idealized storage zone geometries studied in laboratory flumes. Using RANS simulations, this study first examines these idealized geometries to determine the appropriate scaling relationships between idealized dead zone geometries and the residence times of a passive scalar. These scaling relationships are then applied to measurements from natural systems. The field-measured geometries are located in Oak and Soap creeks near Corvallis, Oregon. Field measurements for the natural systems included: (a) survey measurements to delineate storage zone morphologies; (b) Marsh-McBirney and acoustic Doppler velocimetry measurements for model boundary conditions and computation of turbulence parameters; and (c) continuous salt injections within storage zones and electrical conductivity measurements at point locations in the main channel and storage zones to quantify exchange rates and residence times. This work is sponsored by NSF-EAR project #0943570.

  2. Processing and fusion of passively acquired, millimeter and terahertz images of the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Li; Shen, Yanchun; Jin, Weiqi; Zhao, Guozhong; Cai, Yi

    2017-04-01

    A passive, millimeter wave (MMW) and terahertz (THz) dual-band imaging system composed of 94 and 250 GHz single-element detectors was used to investigate preprocessing and fusion algorithms for dual-band images. Subsequently, an MMW and THz image preprocessing and fusion integrated algorithm (MMW-THz IPFIA) was developed. In the algorithm, a block-matching and three-dimensional filtering denoising algorithm is employed to filter noise, an adaptive histogram equalization algorithm to enhance images, an intensity-based registration algorithm to register images, and a wavelet-based image fusion algorithm to fuse the preprocessed images. The performance of the algorithm was analyzed by calculating the SNR and information entropy of the actual images. This algorithm effectively reduces the image noise and improves the level of detail in the images. Since the algorithm improves the performance of the investigated imaging system, it should support practical technological applications. Because the system responds to blackbody radiation, its improvement is quantified herein using the static performance parameter commonly employed for thermal imaging systems, namely, the minimum detectable temperature difference (MDTD). An experiment was conducted in which the system's MDTD was measured before and after applying the MMW-THz IPFIA, verifying the improved performance that can be realized through its application.

  3. The role of local feature processing in object perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Hyejean

    One of the outstanding questions in the study of human visual perception of objects is how local feature processing affects object perception. In this thesis, we addressed this fundamental question by examining human perceptual performance on images containing whole objects or partial images of objects (containing one, two or three features) for two perceptual tasks: detection ("something" vs. random dot noise) and classification (perception of the object category, e.g., car vs. other objects). Images were embedded in visual noise and we measured human subjects' performance in a range of noise levels close to subjects' perceptual threshold. First, we found that human detection performance increases when more object area (A) is revealed and when the noise variance (N) decreases. The contribution of these factors can be characterized as a function of Ln(A/N), which we will refer to as the Area-to-Noise ratio (ANR). When the ANR was equated in the subsequent experiments, comparison of detection performance on partial vs. whole images of objects revealed the dynamic role of local feature processing in object detection: (i) detection based on a single useful feature was better than detection based on a whole object suggesting the effectiveness of local feature processing, (ii) however, detection of a whole object did not require detection of its features and (iii) detection performance varied across features; useful features (such as eyes for faces and wheels for cars) yielded better performance than suboptimal features (such as nose and mouth for faces). This pattern of results did not significantly vary across two methods we used to select features (features based on semantic judgments and a computer algorithm), and two object categories (faces and cars). For classification, results were largely similar, except that in low ANR levels (below the level sufficient for successful detection of a whole object) classification performance was better on a single useful feature

  4. Contribution of active and passive acoustics to study oceanographic processes feeding whales in a critical habitat of the St. Lawrence Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, Yvan; Roy, Nathalie; Simard, Yvan; Cotté, Cédric

    2001-05-01

    The head of the main channel of the continent in eastern Canada is the site of particular oceanographic processes that are responsible for the creation of a persistent feeding ground regularly visited by baleen whales from the Atlantic for centuries. Multifrequency acoustics coupled with ADCP and hydrographic measurements has been used to map the krill and capelin aggregations in 3D and visualize their local concentration process under tidal forcing and upwelling at the channel head. The krill scattering layers, pumped into the area by the strong two-layer estuarine circulation, appear to be concentrated during flood by tidal currents forced against the slopes and upwelling, to which depth-keeping krill is reacting by swimming down. Capelin also tends to concentrate on slopes and neighboring shallows. This highly recurrent process generates rich patches that are contributing with the mean circulation to make this area the richest krill aggregation in Northwest Atlantic. This critical habitat is located in a major continental seaway. Passive acoustics techniques are explored to locate whale calls and map the use of this area in continuing months, especially by blue and fin whales, with the aim of understanding their movements to improve their protection.

  5. Contribution of active and passive acoustics to study oceanographic processes feeding whales in a critical habitat of the St. Lawrence Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, Yvan; Roy, Nathalie; Simard, Yvan; Cotté, Cédric

    2004-05-01

    The head of the main channel of the continent in eastern Canada is the site of particular oceanographic processes that are responsible for the creation of a persistent feeding ground regularly visited by baleen whales from the Atlantic for centuries. Multifrequency acoustics coupled with ADCP and hydrographic measurements has been used to map the krill and capelin aggregations in 3D and visualize their local concentration process under tidal forcing and upwelling at the channel head. The krill scattering layers, pumped into the area by the strong two-layer estuarine circulation, appear to be concentrated during flood by tidal currents forced against the slopes and upwelling, to which depth-keeping krill is reacting by swimming down. Capelin also tends to concentrate on slopes and neighboring shallows. This highly recurrent process generates rich patches that are contributing with the mean circulation to make this area the richest krill aggregation in Northwest Atlantic. This critical habitat is located in a major continental seaway. Passive acoustics techniques are explored to locate whale calls and map the use of this area in continuing months, especially by blue and fin whales, with the aim of understanding their movements to improve their protection.

  6. Face Context Influences Local Part Processing: An ERP Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Sun, Yaoru; Zhao, Lun

    2017-01-01

    Perception of face parts on the basis of features is thought to be different from perception of whole faces, which is more based on configural information. Face context is also suggested to play an important role in face processing. To investigate how face context influences the early-stage perception of facial local parts, we used an oddball paradigm that tested perceptual stages of face processing rather than recognition. We recorded the event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by whole faces and face parts presented in four conditions (upright-normal, upright-thatcherised, inverted-normal and inverted-thatcherised), as well as the ERPs elicited by non-face objects (whole houses and house parts) with corresponding conditions. The results showed that face context significantly affected the N170 with increased amplitudes and earlier peak latency for upright normal faces. Removing face context delayed the P1 latency but did not affect the P1 amplitude prominently for both upright and inverted normal faces. Across all conditions, neither the N170 nor the P1 was modulated by house context. The significant changes on the N170 and P1 components revealed that face context influences local part processing at the early stage of face processing and this context effect might be specific for face perception. We further suggested that perceptions of whole faces and face parts are functionally distinguished.

  7. The interplay between referential processing and local syntactic/semantic processing: ERPs to written Chinese discourse.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Zhang, Yaxu; Boland, Julie E; Cai, Lin

    2015-02-09

    Two event-related brain potential experiments were conducted to investigate the functional interplay between discourse-level referential processing and local syntactic/semantic processing of phrases. We manipulated both the syntactic/semantic coherence of a noun phrase (NP) and the referential ambiguity of the same NP. Incoherence of the NP elicited a P600 effect in both experiments. Referential ambiguities elicited a sustained negativity (Nref) in a subset of the participants in both experiments. Crucially, among participants showing robust Nref effects to referential ambiguity in the coherent condition, Nref effects were absent when the NP was incoherent. These results provide evidence against theories in which referential processing is functionally independent of local syntactic/semantic processing of phrases. Instead, a local phrase anomaly can block aspects of referential processing concerning ambiguity.

  8. The Impact of Number Mismatch and Passives on the Real-Time Processing of Relative Clauses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Contemori, Carla; Marinis, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    Language processing plays a crucial role in language development, providing the ability to assign structural representations to input strings (e.g., Fodor, 1998). In this paper we aim at contributing to the study of children's processing routines, examining the operations underlying the auditory processing of relative clauses in children…

  9. The Impact of Number Mismatch and Passives on the Real-Time Processing of Relative Clauses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Contemori, Carla; Marinis, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    Language processing plays a crucial role in language development, providing the ability to assign structural representations to input strings (e.g., Fodor, 1998). In this paper we aim at contributing to the study of children's processing routines, examining the operations underlying the auditory processing of relative clauses in children…

  10. Global-local processing relates to spatial and verbal processing: implications for sex differences in cognition.

    PubMed

    Pletzer, Belinda; Scheuringer, Andrea; Scherndl, Thomas

    2017-09-05

    Sex differences have been reported for a variety of cognitive tasks and related to the use of different cognitive processing styles in men and women. It was recently argued that these processing styles share some characteristics across tasks, i.e. male approaches are oriented towards holistic stimulus aspects and female approaches are oriented towards stimulus details. In that respect, sex-dependent cognitive processing styles share similarities with attentional global-local processing. A direct relationship between cognitive processing and global-local processing has however not been previously established. In the present study, 49 men and 44 women completed a Navon paradigm and a Kimchi Palmer task as well as a navigation task and a verbal fluency task with the goal to relate the global advantage (GA) effect as a measure of global processing to holistic processing styles in both tasks. Indeed participants with larger GA effects displayed more holistic processing during spatial navigation and phonemic fluency. However, the relationship to cognitive processing styles was modulated by the specific condition of the Navon paradigm, as well as the sex of participants. Thus, different types of global-local processing play different roles for cognitive processing in men and women.

  11. Passive air sampling of polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides at the Korean Arctic and Antarctic research stations: implications for long-range transport and local pollution.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung-Deuk; Baek, Song-Yee; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Wania, Frank; Ikonomou, Michael G; Yoon, Young-Jun; Park, Byong-Kwon; Hong, Sungmin

    2008-10-01

    To assess levels and patterns of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in polar regions, XAD-resin based passive air samplers were deployed for one year at the Korean polar research stations at Ny-Alesund, Norway (2005-2006) and King George Island, Antarctica (2004-2005). Backward trajectories suggest that these stations are affected by long-range transport from source regions in Northern Europe and Russia and the southern tip of South America, respectively. Relatively high levels of PCB-11, averaging 60 pg x m(-3), were observed in Antarctica, suggesting an unusual source of PCB-11 to the Southern Hemisphere. Reflecting the hemispheric distribution of global PCB emissions, the average level of sigma205PCB (excluding three mono-CBs and PCB-11) was five times higher in the Arctic (95 pg x m(-3)) than in the Antarctic (19 pg x m(-3)). Levels of sigma9PCB at Ny-Alesund were similarto those reported for other Arctic sites, while levels at King George Island were lower than at other sites on the Antarctic Peninsula but 1 order of magnitude higher than background levels measured at a more remote Antarctic site. Light homologues were predominant in all samples (except for one Arctic sample), consistent with the hypothesis of global fractionation and predictions of long-range transport potential. Dominance of heavy PCBs on the roof of the main building at Ny-Alesund and a concentration gradient with distance from the main building at King George Island strongly indicated the influence of local sources. OCP levels were also influenced by long-range transport but not by local sources. This study highlights the feasibility of using passive air sampling to assess both long-range transport and local pollution in remote regions.

  12. Anaerobic-ion exchange (AN-IX) process for local-scale nitrogen recovery from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel P; Smith, Nathaniel T

    2015-11-01

    An anaerobic-ion exchange (AN-IX) process was developed for point-of-origin recovery of nitrogen from household wastewater. The process features upflow solids-blanket anaerobic treatment (ammonification) followed by ammonium ion exchange onto natural zeolite. The AN-IX system is configured as a series of linked upflow chambers that operate passively without energy input, and is amenable to intermittent and seasonal operation. A 57L prototype was operated for over 1.8 years treating actual wastewater under field conditions. Total nitrogen removal exceeded 96% through the first 160 days of operation and effluent ammonium nitrogen remained below detection for 300 days. Ion exchange chambers exhibited sequential NH4(+)-N breakthrough over extended operation and complete media exhaustion was approached at Day 355. The ammonium capacity of zeolite was estimated as 13.5mg NH4(+)-N per gram dry weight. AN-IX is a resilient and cost effective process for local-scale nitrogen recovery and reuse, suitable for small scale and larger systems.

  13. Array processing for RFID tag localization exploiting multi-frequency signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yimin; Li, Xin; Amin, Moeness G.

    2009-05-01

    RFID is an increasingly valuable business and technology tool for electronically identifying, locating, and tracking products, assets, and personnel. As a result, precise positioning and tracking of RFID tags and readers have received considerable attention from both academic and industrial communities. Finding the position of RFID tags is considered an important task in various real-time locating systems (RTLS). As such, numerous RFID localization products have been developed for various applications. The majority of RFID positioning systems is based on the fusion of pieces of relevant information, such as the range and the direction-of-arrival (DOA). For example, trilateration can determine the tag position by using the range information of the tag estimated from three or more spatially separated reader antennas. Triangulation is another method to locate RFID tags that use the direction-of-arrival (DOA) information estimated at multiple spatially separated locations. The RFID tag positions can also be determined through hybrid techniques that combine the range and DOA information. The focus of this paper to study the design and performance of the localization of passive RFID tags using array processing techniques in a multipath environment, and exploiting multi-frequency CW signals. The latter are used to decorrelate the coherent multipath signals for effective DOA estimation and for the purpose of accurate range estimation. Accordingly, the spatial and frequency dimensionalities are fully utilized for robust and accurate positioning of RFID tags.

  14. Modelling of double air-bridged structured inductor implemented by a GaAs integrated passive device manufacturing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Yao, Zhao; Zhang, Chun-Wei; Fu, Xiao-Qian; Li, Zhi-Ming; Li, Nian-Qiang; Wang, Cong

    2017-05-01

    In order to provide excellent performance and show the development of a complicated structure in a module and system, this paper presents a double air-bridge-structured symmetrical differential inductor based on integrated passive device technology. Corresponding to the proposed complicated structure, a new manufacturing process fabricated on a high-resistivity GaAs substrate is described in detail. Frequency-independent physical models are presented with lump elements and the results of skin effect-based measurements. Finally, some key features of the inductor are compared; good agreement between the measurements and modeled circuit fully verifies the validity of the proposed modeling approach. Meanwhile, we also present a comparison of different coil turns for inductor performance. The proposed work can provide a good solution for the design, fabrication, modeling, and practical application of radio-frequency modules and systems.

  15. Scalable Indoor Localization via Mobile Crowdsourcing and Gaussian Process.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qiang; Li, Qun; Shi, Zesen; Chen, Wei; Wang, Weiping

    2016-03-16

    Indoor localization using Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI) fingerprinting has been extensively studied for decades. The positioning accuracy is highly dependent on the density of the signal database. In areas without calibration data, however, this algorithm breaks down. Building and updating a dense signal database is labor intensive, expensive, and even impossible in some areas. Researchers are continually searching for better algorithms to create and update dense databases more efficiently. In this paper, we propose a scalable indoor positioning algorithm that works both in surveyed and unsurveyed areas. We first propose Minimum Inverse Distance (MID) algorithm to build a virtual database with uniformly distributed virtual Reference Points (RP). The area covered by the virtual RPs can be larger than the surveyed area. A Local Gaussian Process (LGP) is then applied to estimate the virtual RPs' RSSI values based on the crowdsourced training data. Finally, we improve the Bayesian algorithm to estimate the user's location using the virtual database. All the parameters are optimized by simulations, and the new algorithm is tested on real-case scenarios. The results show that the new algorithm improves the accuracy by 25.5% in the surveyed area, with an average positioning error below 2.2 m for 80% of the cases. Moreover, the proposed algorithm can localize the users in the neighboring unsurveyed area.

  16. Scalable Indoor Localization via Mobile Crowdsourcing and Gaussian Process

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Qiang; Li, Qun; Shi, Zesen; Chen, Wei; Wang, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Indoor localization using Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI) fingerprinting has been extensively studied for decades. The positioning accuracy is highly dependent on the density of the signal database. In areas without calibration data, however, this algorithm breaks down. Building and updating a dense signal database is labor intensive, expensive, and even impossible in some areas. Researchers are continually searching for better algorithms to create and update dense databases more efficiently. In this paper, we propose a scalable indoor positioning algorithm that works both in surveyed and unsurveyed areas. We first propose Minimum Inverse Distance (MID) algorithm to build a virtual database with uniformly distributed virtual Reference Points (RP). The area covered by the virtual RPs can be larger than the surveyed area. A Local Gaussian Process (LGP) is then applied to estimate the virtual RPs’ RSSI values based on the crowdsourced training data. Finally, we improve the Bayesian algorithm to estimate the user’s location using the virtual database. All the parameters are optimized by simulations, and the new algorithm is tested on real-case scenarios. The results show that the new algorithm improves the accuracy by 25.5% in the surveyed area, with an average positioning error below 2.2 m for 80% of the cases. Moreover, the proposed algorithm can localize the users in the neighboring unsurveyed area. PMID:26999139

  17. Gaussian process regression for sensor networks under localization uncertainty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jadaliha, M.; Xu, Yunfei; Choi, Jongeun; Johnson, N.S.; Li, Weiming

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we formulate Gaussian process regression with observations under the localization uncertainty due to the resource-constrained sensor networks. In our formulation, effects of observations, measurement noise, localization uncertainty, and prior distributions are all correctly incorporated in the posterior predictive statistics. The analytically intractable posterior predictive statistics are proposed to be approximated by two techniques, viz., Monte Carlo sampling and Laplace's method. Such approximation techniques have been carefully tailored to our problems and their approximation error and complexity are analyzed. Simulation study demonstrates that the proposed approaches perform much better than approaches without considering the localization uncertainty properly. Finally, we have applied the proposed approaches on the experimentally collected real data from a dye concentration field over a section of a river and a temperature field of an outdoor swimming pool to provide proof of concept tests and evaluate the proposed schemes in real situations. In both simulation and experimental results, the proposed methods outperform the quick-and-dirty solutions often used in practice.

  18. Local-global processing bias is not a unitary individual difference in visual processing.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Rebecca; Van der Hallen, Ruth; Huygelier, Hanne; Van de Cruys, Sander; Wagemans, Johan

    2017-05-04

    A large body of research reports individual differences in local and global visual processing in relation to expertise, culture and psychopathology. However, recent research has suggested that various different measures of local-global processing are not strongly associated with one another, calling its construct validity into question. The current study sought to further explore the validity of local-global processing biases in perception by developing three tasks based on two existing paradigms: the Embedded Figures Test (EFT) and the Navon hierarchical letters task. The newly developed tasks aimed to control for stimulus and response factors that may have impacted upon the reliability of previous research. They were administered to a large sample of undergraduate students (N>100). The results of two new versions of the EFT indicated that disembedding performance is influenced by the structure of the embedding context. In addition, global precedence and interference in the Navon task remained present even when local attentional approaches to global hierarchical stimuli were restricted. Inter-task correlations within the EFT were high but low between the EFT and the Navon task, lending support to the notion that local-global processing is not a monolithic construct, but representative of a number of distinct perceptual abilities and biases. Future research may use these task distinctions to pinpoint more precisely which aspects of perceptual processing characterise specific (clinical) participant populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Local and Global Limits on Visual Processing in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Tibber, Marc S.; Anderson, Elaine J.; Bobin, Tracy; Carlin, Patricia; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.; Dakin, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia has been linked to impaired performance on a range of visual processing tasks (e.g. detection of coherent motion and contour detection). It has been proposed that this is due to a general inability to integrate visual information at a global level. To test this theory, we assessed the performance of people with schizophrenia on a battery of tasks designed to probe voluntary averaging in different visual domains. Twenty-three outpatients with schizophrenia (mean age: 40±8 years; 3 female) and 20 age-matched control participants (mean age 39±9 years; 3 female) performed a motion coherence task and three equivalent noise (averaging) tasks, the latter allowing independent quantification of local and global limits on visual processing of motion, orientation and size. All performance measures were indistinguishable between the two groups (ps>0.05, one-way ANCOVAs), with one exception: participants with schizophrenia pooled fewer estimates of local orientation than controls when estimating average orientation (p = 0.01, one-way ANCOVA). These data do not support the notion of a generalised visual integration deficit in schizophrenia. Instead, they suggest that distinct visual dimensions are differentially affected in schizophrenia, with a specific impairment in the integration of visual orientation information. PMID:25689281

  20. Local and global limits on visual processing in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tibber, Marc S; Anderson, Elaine J; Bobin, Tracy; Carlin, Patricia; Shergill, Sukhwinder S; Dakin, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia has been linked to impaired performance on a range of visual processing tasks (e.g. detection of coherent motion and contour detection). It has been proposed that this is due to a general inability to integrate visual information at a global level. To test this theory, we assessed the performance of people with schizophrenia on a battery of tasks designed to probe voluntary averaging in different visual domains. Twenty-three outpatients with schizophrenia (mean age: 40±8 years; 3 female) and 20 age-matched control participants (mean age 39±9 years; 3 female) performed a motion coherence task and three equivalent noise (averaging) tasks, the latter allowing independent quantification of local and global limits on visual processing of motion, orientation and size. All performance measures were indistinguishable between the two groups (ps>0.05, one-way ANCOVAs), with one exception: participants with schizophrenia pooled fewer estimates of local orientation than controls when estimating average orientation (p = 0.01, one-way ANCOVA). These data do not support the notion of a generalised visual integration deficit in schizophrenia. Instead, they suggest that distinct visual dimensions are differentially affected in schizophrenia, with a specific impairment in the integration of visual orientation information.

  1. Three-dimensional line interpretation via local processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentland, Alexander P.; Kuo, Jeff

    1990-10-01

    The interpretation of line drawings is known to be very difficult, and has a long history in vision research. However for certain restricted but important types of drawings we have been able to produce good 3-D interpretations quite efficiently using only local image-plane computations. The types of drawings we can handle are line drawings of 3-D space curves, for instance, a drawing of the 3-D path followed by a butterfly or a line drawing of a potato chip. Such line drawings are, of course, intrinsically ambiguous - there is simply not enough information in the 2-D image to arrive at a unique 3-D interpretation. Despite this difficulty, there remains the fact that for any given image all people see pretty much exactly the same 3-D interpretation (or sometimes a small number of interpretations). People, therefore, must be bringing additional knowledge or assumptions to the problem. In this paper we show that by picking the smoothest 3-D space curve that is consistent with the image data we can obtain a 3-D interpretation which is very similar to the people's interpretation. The teleological motivation for selecting the smoothest 3-D space curve is that it is the most stable 3-D interpretation, and thus in one sense the most likely 3-D interpretation. The process of computing the smoothest 3-D space curve is carried out by simple, local processing that can be implemented by a neural network.

  2. Dough, tough, cough, rough: A "fast" fMRI localizer of component processes in reading.

    PubMed

    Malins, Jeffrey G; Gumkowski, Nina; Buis, Bonnie; Molfese, Peter; Rueckl, Jay G; Frost, Stephen J; Pugh, Kenneth R; Morris, Robin; Mencl, W Einar

    2016-10-01

    In the current study, we present a novel fMRI protocol in which words, pseudowords, and other word-like stimuli are passively presented in a rapid, sequential fashion. In this "fast" localizer paradigm, items are presented in groups of four; within sets, words are related in orthographic, phonological, and/or semantic properties. We tested this protocol with a group of skilled adult readers (N=18). Analyses uncovered key regions of the reading network that were sensitive to different component processes at the group level; namely, left fusiform gyrus as well as the pars opercularis subregion of inferior frontal gyrus were sensitive to lexicality; several regions including left precentral gyrus and left supramarginal gyrus were sensitive to spelling-sound consistency; the pars triangularis subregion of inferior frontal gyrus was sensitive to semantic similarity. Additionally, in a number of key brain regions, activation in response to semantically similar words was related to individual differences in reading comprehension outside the scanner. Importantly, these findings are in line with previous investigations of the reading network, yet data were obtained using much less imaging time than comparable paradigms currently available, especially relative to the number of indices of component processes obtained. This feature, combined with the relatively simple nature of the task, renders it appropriate for groups of subjects with a wide range of reading abilities, including children with impairments.

  3. On the single sweep processing of auditory brainstem responses: click vs. chirp stimulations and active vs. passive electrodes.

    PubMed

    Corona-Strauss, Farah I; Delb, Wolfgang; Bloching, Marc; Strauss, Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    We have recently shown that click evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) single sweeps can efficiently be processed by a hybrid novelty detection system. This approach allowed for the objective detection of hearing thresholds in a fraction of time of conventional schemes, making it appropriate for the efficient implementation of newborn hearing screening procedures. It is the objective of this study to evaluate whether this approach might further be improved by different stimulation paradigms and electrode settings. In particular, we evaluate chirp stimulations which compensate the basilar-membrane dispersion and active electrodes which are less sensitive to movements. This is the first study which is directed to a single sweep processing of chirp evoked ABRs. By concentrating on transparent features and a minimum number of adjustable parameters, we present an objective comparison of click vs.chirp stimulations and active vs. passive electrodes in the ultrafast ABR detection. We show that chirp evoked brainstem responses and active electrodes might improve the single sweeps analysis of ABRs.Consequently, we conclude that a single sweep processing of ABRs for the objective determination of hearing thresholds can further be improved by the use of optimized chirp stimulations and active electrodes.

  4. Novel Surface Passivation Technique for Low-Temperature Solution-Processed Perovskite PV Cells.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Neeti; Shirai, Yasuhiro; Yanagida, Masatoshi; Karen, Akiya; Miyano, Kenjiro

    2016-02-01

    Low-temperature solution-processed perovskite solar cells are attracting immense interest due to their ease of fabrication and potential for mass production on flexible substrates. However, the unfavorable surface properties of planar substrates often lead to large variations in perovskite crystal size and weak charge extractions at interfaces, resulting in inferior performance. Here, we report the improved performance, reproducibility, and high stability of "p-i-n" planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells. The key fabrication process is the addition of the amine-polymer poly[(9,9-bis(3'-(N,N-dimethylamino)propyl)-2,7-fluorene)-alt-2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)] (PFN-P1) to a simple spin-coating process. The PFN-P1 works as a surfactant and helps promote uniform crystallization. As a result, perovskite films with PFN-P1 have a uniform distribution of grain sizes and improved open circuit voltage. Devices with PFN-P1 showed the best efficiency (13.2%), with a small standard deviation (0.40), out of 60 cells. Moreover, ∼90% of the initial efficiency was retained over more than 6 months. Additionally, devices fabricated from PFN-P1 mixed perovskite films showed higher stability under continuous operation at maximum power point over 150 h. Our results show that this approach is simple and effective for improving device performance, reproducibility, and stability by modifying perovskite properties with PFN-P1. Because of the simplicity of the fabrication process and reliable performance increase, this approach marks important progress in low-temperature solution-processed perovskite solar cells.

  5. Passive Localization of Mixed Far-Field and Near-Field Sources without Estimating the Number of Sources

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jian; Tao, Haihong; Rao, Xuan; Su, Jia

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for the localization of mixed far-field sources (FFSs) and near-field sources (NFSs) without estimating the source number. Firstly, the algorithm decouples the direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation from the range estimation by exploiting fourth-order spatial-temporal cumulants of the observed data. Based on the joint diagonalization structure of multiple spatial-temporal cumulant matrices, a new one-dimensional (1-D) spatial spectrum function is derived to generate the DOA estimates of both FFSs and NFSs. Then, the FFSs and NFSs are identified and the range parameters of NFSs are determined via beamforming technique. Compared with traditional mixed sources localization algorithms, the proposed algorithm avoids the performance deterioration induced by erroneous source number estimation. Furthermore, it has a higher resolution capability and improves the estimation accuracy. Computer simulations are implemented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:25668212

  6. Method of drying passivated micromachines by dewetting from a liquid-based process

    DOEpatents

    Houston, Michael R.; Howe, Roger T.; Maboudian, Roya; Srinivasan, Uthara

    2000-01-01

    A method of fabricating a micromachine includes the step of constructing a low surface energy film on the micromachine. The micromachine is then rinsed with a rinse liquid that has a high surface energy, relative to the low surface energy film, to produce a contact angle of greater than 90.degree. between the low surface energy film and the rinse liquid. This relatively large contact angle causes any rinse liquid on the micromachine to be displaced from the micromachine when the micromachine is removed from the rinse liquid. In other words, the micromachine is dried by dewetting from a liquid-based process. Thus, a separate evaporative drying step is not required, as the micromachine is removed from the liquid-based process in a dry state. The relatively large contact angle also operates to prevent attractive capillary forces between micromachine components, thereby preventing contact and adhesion between adjacent microstructure surfaces. The low surface energy film may be constructed with a fluorinated self-assembled monolayer film. The processing of the invention avoids the use of environmentally harmful, health-hazardous chemicals.

  7. Entropy of continuous Markov processes in local thermal equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyuelos, Miguel

    2009-05-01

    The Boltzmann’s entropy of a continuous Markov process, in local thermal equilibrium, in contact with a reservoir at temperature T , is analyzed. Assuming that the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation has constant coefficients and satisfies detailed balance, an equation for the entropy density is derived, from which it is possible to obtain expressions for the transport coefficients as functions of the diffusion matrix. Expressions for the entropy production terms of the system and of the combination of system plus reservoir are obtained. Known relations among transport coefficients are derived. The multicomponent case is also analyzed and the Prigogine theorem of minimum entropy production is derived in the context of reaction diffusion systems. The derivations presented in this paper are proposed as a framework for a deeper understanding of concepts used in nonequilibrium diffusion systems.

  8. Rise of dinosaurs reveals major body-size transitions are driven by passive processes of trait evolution

    PubMed Central

    Sookias, Roland B.; Butler, Richard J.; Benson, Roger B. J.

    2012-01-01

    A major macroevolutionary question concerns how long-term patterns of body-size evolution are underpinned by smaller scale processes along lineages. One outstanding long-term transition is the replacement of basal therapsids (stem-group mammals) by archosauromorphs, including dinosaurs, as the dominant large-bodied terrestrial fauna during the Triassic (approx. 252–201 million years ago). This landmark event preceded more than 150 million years of archosauromorph dominance. We analyse a new body-size dataset of more than 400 therapsid and archosauromorph species spanning the Late Permian–Middle Jurassic. Maximum-likelihood analyses indicate that Cope's rule (an active within-lineage trend of body-size increase) is extremely rare, despite conspicuous patterns of body-size turnover, and contrary to proposals that Cope's rule is central to vertebrate evolution. Instead, passive processes predominate in taxonomically and ecomorphologically more inclusive clades, with stasis common in less inclusive clades. Body-size limits are clade-dependent, suggesting intrinsic, biological factors are more important than the external environment. This clade-dependence is exemplified by maximum size of Middle–early Late Triassic archosauromorph predators exceeding that of contemporary herbivores, breaking a widely-accepted ‘rule’ that herbivore maximum size greatly exceeds carnivore maximum size. Archosauromorph and dinosaur dominance occurred via opportunistic replacement of therapsids following extinction, but were facilitated by higher archosauromorph growth rates. PMID:22298850

  9. Rise of dinosaurs reveals major body-size transitions are driven by passive processes of trait evolution.

    PubMed

    Sookias, Roland B; Butler, Richard J; Benson, Roger B J

    2012-06-07

    A major macroevolutionary question concerns how long-term patterns of body-size evolution are underpinned by smaller scale processes along lineages. One outstanding long-term transition is the replacement of basal therapsids (stem-group mammals) by archosauromorphs, including dinosaurs, as the dominant large-bodied terrestrial fauna during the Triassic (approx. 252-201 million years ago). This landmark event preceded more than 150 million years of archosauromorph dominance. We analyse a new body-size dataset of more than 400 therapsid and archosauromorph species spanning the Late Permian-Middle Jurassic. Maximum-likelihood analyses indicate that Cope's rule (an active within-lineage trend of body-size increase) is extremely rare, despite conspicuous patterns of body-size turnover, and contrary to proposals that Cope's rule is central to vertebrate evolution. Instead, passive processes predominate in taxonomically and ecomorphologically more inclusive clades, with stasis common in less inclusive clades. Body-size limits are clade-dependent, suggesting intrinsic, biological factors are more important than the external environment. This clade-dependence is exemplified by maximum size of Middle-early Late Triassic archosauromorph predators exceeding that of contemporary herbivores, breaking a widely-accepted 'rule' that herbivore maximum size greatly exceeds carnivore maximum size. Archosauromorph and dinosaur dominance occurred via opportunistic replacement of therapsids following extinction, but were facilitated by higher archosauromorph growth rates.

  10. Influence of Second Language Proficiency and Syntactic Structure Similarities on the Sensitivity and Processing of English Passive Sentence in Late Chinese-English Bilinguists: An ERP Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Xin; Wang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the influence of L2 proficiency and syntactic similarity on English passive sentence processing, the present ERP study asked 40 late Chinese-English bilinguals (27 females and 13 males, mean age = 23.88) with high or intermediate L2 proficiency to read the sentences carefully and to indicate for each sentence whether or not it was…

  11. Influence of Second Language Proficiency and Syntactic Structure Similarities on the Sensitivity and Processing of English Passive Sentence in Late Chinese-English Bilinguists: An ERP Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Xin; Wang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the influence of L2 proficiency and syntactic similarity on English passive sentence processing, the present ERP study asked 40 late Chinese-English bilinguals (27 females and 13 males, mean age = 23.88) with high or intermediate L2 proficiency to read the sentences carefully and to indicate for each sentence whether or not it was…

  12. Behavioral detection of passive whisker stimuli requires somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Toshio; Feldman, Daniel E

    2013-07-01

    Rodent whisker sensation occurs both actively, as whiskers move rhythmically across objects, and in a passive mode in which externally applied deflections are sensed by static, non-moving whiskers. Passive whisker stimuli are robustly encoded in the somatosensory (S1) cortex, and provide a potentially powerful means of studying cortical processing. However, whether S1 contributes to passive sensation is debated. We developed 2 new behavioral tasks to assay passive whisker sensation in freely moving rats: Detection of unilateral whisker deflections and discrimination of right versus left whisker deflections. Stimuli were simple, simultaneous multi-whisker deflections. Local muscimol inactivation of S1 reversibly and robustly abolished sensory performance on these tasks. Thus, S1 is required for the detection and discrimination of simple stimuli by passive whiskers, in addition to its known role in active whisker sensation.

  13. Behavioral Detection of Passive Whisker Stimuli Requires Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Miyashita, Toshio; Feldman, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Rodent whisker sensation occurs both actively, as whiskers move rhythmically across objects, and in a passive mode in which externally applied deflections are sensed by static, non-moving whiskers. Passive whisker stimuli are robustly encoded in the somatosensory (S1) cortex, and provide a potentially powerful means of studying cortical processing. However, whether S1 contributes to passive sensation is debated. We developed 2 new behavioral tasks to assay passive whisker sensation in freely moving rats: Detection of unilateral whisker deflections and discrimination of right versus left whisker deflections. Stimuli were simple, simultaneous multi-whisker deflections. Local muscimol inactivation of S1 reversibly and robustly abolished sensory performance on these tasks. Thus, S1 is required for the detection and discrimination of simple stimuli by passive whiskers, in addition to its known role in active whisker sensation. PMID:22661403

  14. Investigation of radio astronomy image processing techniques for use in the passive millimetre-wave security screening environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Christopher T.; Hutchinson, Simon; Salmon, Neil A.; Wilkinson, Peter N.; Cameron, Colin D.

    2014-06-01

    Image processing techniques can be used to improve the cost-effectiveness of future interferometric Passive MilliMetre Wave (PMMW) imagers. The implementation of such techniques will allow for a reduction in the number of collecting elements whilst ensuring adequate image fidelity is maintained. Various techniques have been developed by the radio astronomy community to enhance the imaging capability of sparse interferometric arrays. The most prominent are Multi- Frequency Synthesis (MFS) and non-linear deconvolution algorithms, such as the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) and variations of the CLEAN algorithm. This investigation focuses on the implementation of these methods in the defacto standard for radio astronomy image processing, the Common Astronomy Software Applications (CASA) package, building upon the discussion presented in Taylor et al., SPIE 8362-0F. We describe the image conversion process into a CASA suitable format, followed by a series of simulations that exploit the highlighted deconvolution and MFS algorithms assuming far-field imagery. The primary target application used for this investigation is an outdoor security scanner for soft-sided Heavy Goods Vehicles. A quantitative analysis of the effectiveness of the aforementioned image processing techniques is presented, with thoughts on the potential cost-savings such an approach could yield. Consideration is also given to how the implementation of these techniques in CASA might be adapted to operate in a near-field target environment. This may enable a much wider usability by the imaging community outside of radio astronomy and thus would be directly relevant to portal screening security systems in the microwave and millimetre wave bands.

  15. Effect of passivation layer grown by atomic layer deposition and sputtering processes on Si quantum dot superlattice to generate high photocurrent for high-efficiency solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksudur Rahman, Mohammad; Higo, Akio; Sekhar, Halubai; Erman Syazwan, Mohd; Hoshi, Yusuke; Usami, Noritaka; Samukawa, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    The effect of passivation films on a Si quantum dot superlattice (QDSL) was investigated to generate high photocurrent in solar-cell applications. Three types of passivation films, sputter-grown amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC), hydrogenated a-SiC (a-SiC:H), and atomic-layer-deposited aluminum oxide (ALD-Al2O3), were used to passivate the Si QDSLs containing a stack of four 4 nm Si nanodisks (NDs) and 2 nm silicon carbide (SiC) films fabricated by neutral beam etching (NBE). Because of the high surface-to-volume ratio typically present in quantum Si-NDs formed in the top-down NBE process, there is a tendency to form larger surface dangling bonds on untreated Si-ND surfaces as well as to have short distance (<10 nm) between high-aspect-ratio nanopillars of stacked 4 nm Si-NDs/2 nm SiC films, which conventionally sputter SiC films cannot uniformly cover. Therefore, we optimized the passivation techniques with an ALD-Al2O3 film. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis helped to explain the surface morphology before and after the passivation of the QDSLs. After the completion of the passivation process, the quality of the top surface films of the QDSLs was analyzed from the surface roughness by atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis, which revealed that ALD-Al2O3 passivated films had the smallest roughness (RMS) of 1.09 nm with respect to sputter-grown a-SiC (RMS: 1.75 nm) and a-SiC:H (RMS: 1.54 nm) films. Conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) revealed that ALD-Al2O3 passivation decreased the surface-leakage current as a result of proper passivation of side-wall surface defects in the QDSLs. The carrier transport characteristics were extracted from the QDSLs using the photovoltaic (PV) properties of p++/i/n+ solar cells, where the QDSLs consisted of different passivation layers acting as intermediate layers (i-layers) between the high-doping-density p++ Si (1 × 1020 cm-3) and n+ Si (1 × 1019 cm-3) substrates. High-doping-density p++ Si acted as a hole

  16. Fluvial processes and passive rehabilitation of the Lisbon Bottom side-channel chute, Lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Robert B.; Laustrup, Mark S.; Chapman, Michael D.

    2001-01-01

    Multiple large floods in 1993-1997 on the Lower Missouri River carved a side-channel chute through the river bottom at Lisbon, Missouri. Although similar in some respects to engineered side-channel chutes designed for habitat rehabilitation projects, the Lisbon Bottom chute has been unique in that it was allowed to evolve for more than four years with minimal stabilization. During the wet years, 1996-1999, the chute was subjected to abnormally high discharges and passed as much as 20% of the total discharge of the Missouri River. Relatively unrestrained fluvial processes during this time created a wide channel with highly diverse habitats. The upper one-half of the chute established a shallow, braided channel morphology similar to the pre-managed Missouri River. The lower half established a dynamically migrating, single-thread channel, and an incipient flood plain. Compared to the adjacent navigation channel, the chute established substantial areas of shallow, slow-velocity aquatic habitat that is considered to be in short supply in the present-day Lower Missouri River. The shortterm biological benefits have been mixed: the chute has fewer waterbird and benthic macroinvertebrate taxa than adjacent riverine habitats, but greater numbers of fish species compared to the navigation channel.

  17. Local permeability changes, passive degassing and related gas hazard at the Baia di Levante area (Vulcano island, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diliberto, Iole Serena; Cangemi, Marianna; Gagliano, Antonina Lisa; Inguaggiato, Salvatore; Madonia, Paolo; Pedone, Maria; Fabio Pisciotta, Antonino

    2016-04-01

    Vulcano, the southernmost island of the Aeolian archipelago (Italy), is presently characterized by active fumarolic fields located along the rim of La Fossa cone and the shoreline of the Baia di Levante beach, in the northern portion of the island.The Baia di Levante fumarolic vents are fed by a shallow hydrothermal aquifer heated by magmatic gases rising from the deep down, with a spatial distribution strongly affected by the local fracture network. These fractures are the expression of a deformation field, dominated by a northward motion to Lipari, abruptly decaying to the Vulcanello peninsula, immediately northward of the Baia di Levante beach. Variable rates of fluid transfer to the surface, following permeability changes affecting the fracture network are among the results of stress field variations over time which induce fluctuations in the pressure state of the hydrothermal system. Under these conditions, increments in hydrothermal gas flow, able to cause an increase of gas hazard, could be determined by a rearrangement of the shallow permeability distribution induced by changes in the deformation field. In this case not associated to any variation in the volcanic activity state. Since 2009 an huge gas flow increment has been noticed in some undersea vents of the Baia di Levante area, leading to increase of gas hazard in their immediate surroundings. On the contrary, the acquired data from the INGV volcanic surveillance program didn't suggest any correlated increase of the magmatic fluid component in the degassing activity.In July 2015, we carried out multi-parametric geochemical surveys in this area, based on direct (thermocouple) and indirect (thermal infrared camera and pyrometer) soil temperature, soil CO2 flux, atmospheric concentration of CO2 and H2S measurements at low elevation (one meter a.s.l.). The chemical and isotopic composition of low temperature fumarole gases was determined too.The comparison of the new data with previous surveys carried out

  18. Threshold Region Performance Prediction for Adaptive Matched Field Processing Localization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    significant non-local estimation errors at low signal-to-noise ratios ( SNRs )-errors not modeled by traditional localization measures such as the Cramer...as a function of SNR , for apertures and environments of interest. Particular attention will be given to the "threshold SNR " (below which localization...performance degrades rapidly due to global estimation errors) and to the minimum SNR required to achieve acceptable range/depth localization. Initial

  19. Toxicological evaluation of some Malaysian locally processed raw food products.

    PubMed

    Sharif, R; Ghazali, A R; Rajab, N F; Haron, H; Osman, F

    2008-01-01

    Malaysian locally processed raw food products are widely used as main ingredients in local cooking. Previous studies showed that these food products have a positive correlation with the incidence of cancer. The cytotoxicity effect was evaluated using MTT assay (3-(4,5-dimetil-2-thiazolil)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) against Chang liver cells at 2000 microg/ml following 72 h incubation. Findings showed all methanol extracts caused a tremendous drop in the percentage of cell viability at 2000 microg/ml (shrimp paste - 41.69+/-3.36%, salted fish - 37.2+/-1.06%, dried shrimp - 40.32+/-1.8%, p<0.05). To detect DNA damage in a single cell, alkaline Comet Assay was used. None of the extracts caused DNA damage to the Chang liver cells at 62.5 microg/ml following 24 h incubation, as compared to the positive control, hydrogen peroxide (tail moment - 9.50+/-1.50; tail intensity - 30.50+/-2.50). Proximate analysis which was used for the evaluation of macronutrients in food showed that shrimp paste did not comply with the protein requirement (<25%) as in Food Act 1983. Salt was found in every sample with the highest percentage being detected in shrimp paste which exceeded 20%. Following heavy metal analysis (arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury), arsenic was found in every sample with dried shrimps showing the highest value as compared to the other samples (6.16 mg/kg). In conclusion, several food extracts showed cytotoxic effect but did not cause DNA damage against Chang liver cells. Salt was found as the main additive and arsenic was present in every sample, which could be the probable cause of the toxicity effects observed.

  20. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown. Final report, [September 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.

    1994-02-21

    Purpose is to understand the mechanisms for growth and breakdown of passive films on metal and alloy surfaces in aqueous medium; a secondary goal is to devise methods for predicting localized corrosion damage in industrial systems. Tasks currently being studied are: formation of bilayer structures in passive films on metals and alloys; passivity breakdown on solid vs. liquid gallium; roles of alloying elements in passivity breakdown; electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of passive films; electronic structure of passive oxide films; photoelectrochemical impedance spectroscopy of passive films; and kinetics of localized attack.

  1. Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE) of High Aspect Ratio SiC Microstructures using a Time-Multiplexed Etch-Passivate Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Laura J.; Beheim, Glenn M.

    2006-01-01

    High aspect ratio silicon carbide (SiC) microstructures are needed for microengines and other harsh environment micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). Previously, deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) of low aspect ratio (AR less than or = 1) deep (greater than 100 micron) trenches in SiC has been reported. However, existing DRIE processes for SiC are not well-suited for definition of high aspect ratio features because such simple etch-only processes provide insufficient control over sidewall roughness and slope. Therefore, we have investigated the use of a time-multiplexed etch-passivate (TMEP) process, which alternates etching with polymer passivation of the etch sidewalls. An optimized TMEP process was used to etch high aspect ratio (AR greater than 5) deep (less than 100 micron) trenches in 6H-SiC. Power MEMS structures (micro turbine blades) in 6H-SiC were also fabricated.

  2. A novel local anti-colorectal cancer drug delivery system: negative lipidoid nanoparticles with a passive target via a size-dependent pattern.

    PubMed

    Ding, Weifeng; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Jianfeng; Guo, Yibing; Ju, Shaoqing; Wang, Huimin

    2013-09-20

    The nontoxic, targeted and effective delivery of nucleic acid drugs remains an important challenge for clinical development. Here, we describe a novel negative lipidoid nanoparticle delivery system, providing entrapment-based transfection agents for local delivery of siRNA to the colorectal cancer focus. The delivery system was synthesized with lipidoid material 98N12-5(1), mPEG2000-C12/C14 glyceride and cholesterol at a desired molar ratio to realize the anionic surface charge of particles, which could alleviate to a larger degree the inflammatory response and immune stimulation of the organism, embodying dramatic biocompatibility. In particular, mPEG2000-C12/C14 glyceride was selected to ameliorate the stability of the delivery system and protection of nucleic acids by extending the tail length of the carbons, crucial also to neutralize the positive charge of 98N12-5(1) to form a resultant anionic particle. In vivo experiments revealed that a particle size of 90 nm perfectly realized a passive target in a size-dependent manner and did not affect the function of the liver and kidneys by a local delivery method, enema. We clarified that the uptake of negative lipidoid nanoparticles internalized through a lipid raft endocytotic pathway with low cytotoxicity, strong biocompatibility and high efficacy. This study suggests that negative lipidoid nanoparticles with enema delivery constitute, uniquely and appropriately, a local anti-colorectal cancer nucleic acid drug delivery platform, and the application of similar modes may be feasible in other therapeutic settings.

  3. A novel local anti-colorectal cancer drug delivery system: negative lipidoid nanoparticles with a passive target via a size-dependent pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Weifeng; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Jianfeng; Guo, Yibing; Ju, Shaoqing; Wang, Huimin

    2013-09-01

    The nontoxic, targeted and effective delivery of nucleic acid drugs remains an important challenge for clinical development. Here, we describe a novel negative lipidoid nanoparticle delivery system, providing entrapment-based transfection agents for local delivery of siRNA to the colorectal cancer focus. The delivery system was synthesized with lipidoid material 98N12-5(1), mPEG2000-C12/C14 glyceride and cholesterol at a desired molar ratio to realize the anionic surface charge of particles, which could alleviate to a larger degree the inflammatory response and immune stimulation of the organism, embodying dramatic biocompatibility. In particular, mPEG2000-C12/C14 glyceride was selected to ameliorate the stability of the delivery system and protection of nucleic acids by extending the tail length of the carbons, crucial also to neutralize the positive charge of 98N12-5(1) to form a resultant anionic particle. In vivo experiments revealed that a particle size of 90 nm perfectly realized a passive target in a size-dependent manner and did not affect the function of the liver and kidneys by a local delivery method, enema. We clarified that the uptake of negative lipidoid nanoparticles internalized through a lipid raft endocytotic pathway with low cytotoxicity, strong biocompatibility and high efficacy. This study suggests that negative lipidoid nanoparticles with enema delivery costitute, uniquely and appropriately, a local anti-colorectal cancer nucleic acid drug delivery platform, and the application of similar modes may be feasible in other therapeutic settings.

  4. General second-order covariance of Gaussian maximum likelihood estimates applied to passive source localization in fluctuating waveguides.

    PubMed

    Bertsatos, Ioannis; Zanolin, Michele; Ratilal, Purnima; Chen, Tianrun; Makris, Nicholas C

    2010-11-01

    A method is provided for determining necessary conditions on sample size or signal to noise ratio (SNR) to obtain accurate parameter estimates from remote sensing measurements in fluctuating environments. These conditions are derived by expanding the bias and covariance of maximum likelihood estimates (MLEs) in inverse orders of sample size or SNR, where the first-order covariance term is the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB). Necessary sample sizes or SNRs are determined by requiring that (i) the first-order bias and the second-order covariance are much smaller than the true parameter value and the CRLB, respectively, and (ii) the CRLB falls within desired error thresholds. An analytical expression is provided for the second-order covariance of MLEs obtained from general complex Gaussian data vectors, which can be used in many practical problems since (i) data distributions can often be assumed to be Gaussian by virtue of the central limit theorem, and (ii) it allows for both the mean and variance of the measurement to be functions of the estimation parameters. Here, conditions are derived to obtain accurate source localization estimates in a fluctuating ocean waveguide containing random internal waves, and the consequences of the loss of coherence on their accuracy are quantified.

  5. County Scale Distribution of Amblyomma americanum (Ixodida: Ixodidae) in Oklahoma: Addressing Local Deficits in Tick Maps Based on Passive Reporting.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Anne W; Noden, Bruce H; Gruntmeir, Jeff M; Holland, Taylor; Mitcham, Jessica R; Martin, Jaclyn E; Johnson, Eileen M; Little, Susan E

    2015-03-01

    Geographic distribution records for the lone star tick [Amblyomma americanum (L.)] in the peer-reviewed literature are incomplete for Oklahoma, preventing accurate disease risk assessments. To address this issue and document the presence of A. americanum in available habitats throughout the state, county-scale tick records published in U.S. Department of Agriculture-Cooperative Economic Insect Reports and specimens maintained at the K.C. Emerson Entomology Museum, Oklahoma State University, were reviewed. In addition, dry ice traps and tick drags were used to collect adult and nymphal A. americanum from throughout the state. Review of published USDA reports and the local museum collection documented A. americanum in 49 total counties (35 and 35, respectively). Active surveillance efforts confirmed the presence of this tick in 50 counties from which this species had not been previously reported to be established, documenting A. americanum is established in 68 of the 77 (88.3%) counties in Oklahoma. Taken together, these data verify that A. americanum ticks are much more widespread in Oklahoma than reflected in the literature, a phenomenon likely repeated throughout the geographic range of this tick in the eastern half of North America. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. The factor of local cultural specificity and process of globalization.

    PubMed

    Rudnev, Viacheslav

    2012-12-01

    is important today. Actually, Glocalization can assist in adaptation process of harmonizing local and global needs to a way of Sustainability. Glocalization puts globalization problems down to the human scale. The age of Globalization has made the problem of cultural dialog extra actual, otherwise the Mankind has no chance to survive. The Glocalization is the process of creation of a harmony in Nature, Society and Humans system in the context of Sustainability.

  7. Amplification of local changes along the timescale processing hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Yeshurun, Yaara; Nguyen, Mai; Hasson, Uri

    2017-08-29

    Small changes in word choice can lead to dramatically different interpretations of narratives. How does the brain accumulate and integrate such local changes to construct unique neural representations for different stories? In this study, we created two distinct narratives by changing only a few words in each sentence (e.g., "he" to "she" or "sobbing" to "laughing") while preserving the grammatical structure across stories. We then measured changes in neural responses between the two stories. We found that differences in neural responses between the two stories gradually increased along the hierarchy of processing timescales. For areas with short integration windows, such as early auditory cortex, the differences in neural responses between the two stories were relatively small. In contrast, in areas with the longest integration windows at the top of the hierarchy, such as the precuneus, temporal parietal junction, and medial frontal cortices, there were large differences in neural responses between stories. Furthermore, this gradual increase in neural differences between the stories was highly correlated with an area's ability to integrate information over time. Amplification of neural differences did not occur when changes in words did not alter the interpretation of the story (e.g., sobbing to "crying"). Our results demonstrate how subtle differences in words are gradually accumulated and amplified along the cortical hierarchy as the brain constructs a narrative over time.

  8. Process synchronization and data communication between processes in real time local area networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeger, R.

    1985-12-01

    This thesis extends the multi-computer real-time executive, MCORTEX. The multiple cluster system RTC (Real Time Cluster Star), consisting of clusters of single board computers (INTEL iSBC 86/12A), which are connected via an Ethernet Local Area Network, serves as a hardware basis for the implementation of extended MCORTEX. The extension upgrades MCORTEX to system-wide synchronization and general data communication between any processes in the system. An intercluster shared memory model is developed, that partially replicates intracluster shared memory, such that shared data replication is minimized and the system's processing speed is maximized. This implementation, by transmitting produced shared data to all consuming clusters as soon as possible after production, guarantees that only cluster local hits occur in the system. Shared memory space is used efficiently by transmitting shared data to consuming clusters only, and by the ability to store shared data contiguously in intracluster shared memory.

  9. Assessment of a virtual functional prototyping process for the rapid manufacture of passive-dynamic ankle-foot orthoses.

    PubMed

    Schrank, Elisa S; Hitch, Lester; Wallace, Kevin; Moore, Richard; Stanhope, Steven J

    2013-10-01

    Passive-dynamic ankle-foot orthosis (PD-AFO) bending stiffness is a key functional characteristic for achieving enhanced gait function. However, current orthosis customization methods inhibit objective premanufacture tuning of the PD-AFO bending stiffness, making optimization of orthosis function challenging. We have developed a novel virtual functional prototyping (VFP) process, which harnesses the strengths of computer aided design (CAD) model parameterization and finite element analysis, to quantitatively tune and predict the functional characteristics of a PD-AFO, which is rapidly manufactured via fused deposition modeling (FDM). The purpose of this study was to assess the VFP process for PD-AFO bending stiffness. A PD-AFO CAD model was customized for a healthy subject and tuned to four bending stiffness values via VFP. Two sets of each tuned model were fabricated via FDM using medical-grade polycarbonate (PC-ISO). Dimensional accuracy of the fabricated orthoses was excellent (average 0.51 ± 0.39 mm). Manufacturing precision ranged from 0.0 to 0.74 Nm/deg (average 0.30 ± 0.36 Nm/deg). Bending stiffness prediction accuracy was within 1 Nm/deg using the manufacturer provided PC-ISO elastic modulus (average 0.48 ± 0.35 Nm/deg). Using an experimentally derived PC-ISO elastic modulus improved the optimized bending stiffness prediction accuracy (average 0.29 ± 0.57 Nm/deg). Robustness of the derived modulus was tested by carrying out the VFP process for a disparate subject, tuning the PD-AFO model to five bending stiffness values. For this disparate subject, bending stiffness prediction accuracy was strong (average 0.20 ± 0.14 Nm/deg). Overall, the VFP process had excellent dimensional accuracy, good manufacturing precision, and strong prediction accuracy with the derived modulus. Implementing VFP as part of our PD-AFO customization and manufacturing framework, which also includes fit customization, provides a novel and powerful method to

  10. Passive euthanasia

    PubMed Central

    Garrard, E; Wilkinson, S

    2005-01-01

    The idea of passive euthanasia has recently been attacked in a particularly clear and explicit way by an "Ethics Task Force" established by the European Association of Palliative Care (EAPC) in February 2001. It claims that the expression "passive euthanasia" is a contradiction in terms and hence that there can be no such thing. This paper critically assesses the main arguments for the Task Force's view. Three arguments are considered. Firstly, an argument based on the (supposed) wrongness of euthanasia and the (supposed) permissibility of what is often called passive euthanasia. Secondly, the claim that passive euthanasia (so-called) cannot really be euthanasia because it does not cause death. And finally, a consequence based argument which appeals to the (alleged) bad consequences of accepting the category of passive euthanasia. We conclude that although healthcare professionals' nervousness about the concept of passive euthanasia is understandable, there is really no reason to abandon the category provided that it is properly and narrowly understand and provided that "euthanasia reasons" for withdrawing or withholding life-prolonging treatment are carefully distinguished from other reasons. PMID:15681666

  11. Local Risk-Minimization for Defaultable Claims with Recovery Process

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, Francesca; Cretarola, Alessandra

    2012-06-15

    We study the local risk-minimization approach for defaultable claims with random recovery at default time, seen as payment streams on the random interval [0,{tau} Logical-And T], where T denotes the fixed time-horizon. We find the pseudo-locally risk-minimizing strategy in the case when the agent information takes into account the possibility of a default event (local risk-minimization with G-strategies) and we provide an application in the case of a corporate bond. We also discuss the problem of finding a pseudo-locally risk-minimizing strategy if we suppose the agent obtains her information only by observing the non-defaultable assets.

  12. Data Locality via Coordinated Caching for Distributed Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, M.; Kuehn, E.; Giffels, M.; Jung, C.

    2016-10-01

    To enable data locality, we have developed an approach of adding coordinated caches to existing compute clusters. Since the data stored locally is volatile and selected dynamically, only a fraction of local storage space is required. Our approach allows to freely select the degree at which data locality is provided. It may be used to work in conjunction with large network bandwidths, providing only highly used data to reduce peak loads. Alternatively, local storage may be scaled up to perform data analysis even with low network bandwidth. To prove the applicability of our approach, we have developed a prototype implementing all required functionality. It integrates seamlessly into batch systems, requiring practically no adjustments by users. We have now been actively using this prototype on a test cluster for HEP analyses. Specifically, it has been integral to our jet energy calibration analyses for CMS during run 2. The system has proven to be easily usable, while providing substantial performance improvements. Since confirming the applicability for our use case, we have investigated the design in a more general way. Simulations show that many infrastructure setups can benefit from our approach. For example, it may enable us to dynamically provide data locality in opportunistic cloud resources. The experience we have gained from our prototype enables us to realistically assess the feasibility for general production use.

  13. Development and Testing of an Ultra Low Power System-On-Chip (SOC) Platform for Marine Mammal Tags and Passive Acoustic Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    tag, called Nano -power Electronics MOdule (NEMO). The NEMO tag has the specific application goal of determining the response of deep diving whales to...flowchart. IMPACT/ APPLICATIONS The goal of this project is to develop a marine mammal tag to last for several weeks. This tag will allow data...Development and Testing of an Ultra Low Power System-On-Chip (SOC) Platform for Marine Mammal Tags and Passive Acoustic Signal Processing Benton H

  14. REALISTIC MODELING OF LOCAL DYNAMO PROCESSES ON THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Kitiashvili, I. N.; Mansour, N. N.; Wray, A. A.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2015-08-10

    Magnetic fields are usually observed in the quiet Sun as small-scale elements that cover the entire solar surface (the “salt-and-pepper” patterns in line-of-sight magnetograms). By using 3D radiative MHD numerical simulations, we find that these fields result from a local dynamo action in the top layers of the convection zone, where extremely weak “seed” magnetic fields (e.g., from a 10{sup −6} G) can locally grow above the mean equipartition field to a stronger than 2000 G field localized in magnetic structures. Our results reveal that the magnetic flux is predominantly generated in regions of small-scale helical downflows. We find that the local dynamo action takes place mostly in a shallow, about 500 km deep, subsurface layer, from which the generated field is transported into the deeper layers by convective downdrafts. We demonstrate that the observed dominance of vertical magnetic fields at the photosphere and horizontal fields above the photosphere can be explained by small-scale magnetic loops produced by the dynamo. Such small-scale loops play an important role in the structure and dynamics of the solar atmosphere and their detection in observations is critical for understanding the local dynamo action on the Sun.

  15. Challenges of Engaging Local Stakeholders for Statewide Program Development Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Michael J.; Leuci, Mary; Stewart, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The University of Missouri Extension needed to develop an annual program review process that collaboratively engaged county-level stakeholders. The results from the first 2 years highlight the results, challenges, and implications of the design process. The annual review process needs to be adaptive, responsive, and reflective from year to year…

  16. Local and Global Processing: Observations from a Remote Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidoff, Jules; Fonteneau, Elisabeth; Fagot, Joel

    2008-01-01

    In Experiment 1, a normal adult population drawn from a remote culture (Himba) in northern Namibia made similarity matches to [Navon, D. (1977). Forest before trees: The precedence of global features in visual perception. "Cognitive Psychology", 9, 353-383] hierarchical figures. The Himba showed a local bias stronger than that has been…

  17. Applying Psychology in Local Authority Emergency Planning Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posada, Susan E.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the work of two EPs involved in a multi-agency project to produce Local Authority (LA) guidelines on psycho/social support following critical incidents and disasters. EPs were involved as participant observers during a simulation of setting up and running a LA reception centre for evacuees. A questionnaire was then…

  18. Local and Global Processing: Observations from a Remote Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidoff, Jules; Fonteneau, Elisabeth; Fagot, Joel

    2008-01-01

    In Experiment 1, a normal adult population drawn from a remote culture (Himba) in northern Namibia made similarity matches to [Navon, D. (1977). Forest before trees: The precedence of global features in visual perception. "Cognitive Psychology", 9, 353-383] hierarchical figures. The Himba showed a local bias stronger than that has been…

  19. Investigation of the surface passivation mechanism through an Ag-doped Al-rich film using a solution process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Firoz; Baek, Seong-Ho; Kim, Jae Hyun

    2015-12-01

    Electronic recombination loss is an important issue for photovoltaic (PV) devices. While it can be reduced by using a passivating layer, most of the techniques used to prepare passivating layers are either not cost effective or not applicable for device applications. Previously, it was reported that a low cost sol-gel derived Al-rich zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) film serves as an effective passivating layer for p-type silicon but is not effective for n-type silicon. Herein, we studied the elemental composition of the film and the interfacial structure of ZnO:Al:Ag/n-Si using TEM, XPS, FTIR, and SIMS analyses. The XPS analysis revealed that Ag-rich zones randomly formed in the film near the ZnO:Al:Ag//n-Si interface, which induced a positive charge at the interface. The maximal value of the effective minority carrier lifetime (τeff ~ 1581 μs) is obtained for a wafer using the ZnO:Al:Ag passivating layer with RAg/Zn = 2%. The corresponding limiting surface recombination velocity is ~16 cm s-1. The FTIR absorption area of Si-H bonds is used to calculate the hydrogen content in the film. The hydrogen content is increased with increasing Ag content up to RAg/Zn = 2% to a maximal value of 3.89 × 1022 atoms per cm3 from 3.03 × 1022 atoms per cm3 for RAg/Zn = 0%. The positive charge induced at the interface may cause band bending, which would produce an electric field that repels the minority charge carriers from the interface to the bulk of n-Si. Two basic phenomena, chemical passivation due to Si-H bonding and field effect passivation due to the charge induced at the interface, have been observed for effective passivation of the n-Si surface. An implied Voc of 688.1 mV is obtained at an illumination intensity of 1 sun.Electronic recombination loss is an important issue for photovoltaic (PV) devices. While it can be reduced by using a passivating layer, most of the techniques used to prepare passivating layers are either not cost effective or not applicable for device

  20. The effects of local and global coherence on the processing and recall of history and science texts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everson, Michelle Gaddy

    2002-09-01

    Using the Material-Appropriate Processing Theory (e.g., Einstein, McDaniel, Owen, & Cote, 1990; McDaniel & Einstein, 1989; McDaniel, Einstein, Dunay, & Cobb, 1986) as a framework, the present study examined the effects of local and global text revisions on the processing and recall of texts from the content areas of history and science. One hundred college participants talked out loud as they read a history and a science passage that varied in terms of local and global coherence relations. Participants then engaged in a free-recall task. Analysis of the think-aloud data revealed no significant main effects of content area or type of revision on readers' attempts to establish local and global coherence. Processing differences that were observed suggest readers of history and science passages may access background knowledge to a different degree while reading, or may adopt different kinds of passive reading strategies. When reading history as opposed to science passages, participants were more likely to make comment such as "Nothing comes to mind here" or "I can't think of what to say here"; when reading science as opposed to history passages, participants were more likely to make comments such as "Okay", "I see", and "That makes sense". Although overall amount recalled from the passages did not vary as a function of content area or type or revision, amount recalled from science passages was significantly related to amount of local-level processing and number of college-level science courses taken; amount recalled from history passages was significantly related to amount of local- and global-level processing. This suggests a difference in the way history and science readers rely on background knowledge and text structure in order to retrieve textual information. Overall, results of this study indicate that similar types of text revisions can have the same effect on the processing and recall of history and science texts. However, differences in the way in which

  1. The rhetoric and realities of integrating air quality into the local transport planning process in English local authorities.

    PubMed

    Olowoporoku, Dotun; Hayes, Enda; Longhurst, James; Parkhurst, Graham

    2012-06-30

    Regardless of its intent and purposes, the first decade of the Local Air Quality Management (LAQM) framework had little or no effect in reducing traffic-related air pollution in the UK. Apart from the impact of increased traffic volumes, the major factor attributed to this failure is that of policy disconnect between the process of diagnosing air pollution and its management, thereby limiting the capability of local authorities to control traffic-related sources of air pollution. Integrating air quality management into the Local Transport Plan (LTP) process therefore presents opportunities for enabling political will, funding and joined-up policy approach to reduce this limitation. However, despite the increased access to resources for air quality measures within the LTP process, there are local institutional, political and funding constraints which reduce the impact of these policy interventions on air quality management. This paper illustrate the policy implementation gaps between central government policy intentions and the local government process by providing evidence of the deprioritisation of air quality management compared to the other shared priorities in the LTP process. We draw conclusions on the policy and practice of integrating air quality management into transport planning. The evidence thereby indicate the need for a policy shift from a solely localised hotspot management approach, in which the LAQM framework operates, to a more holistic management of vehicular emissions within wider spatial administrative areas. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Fast contactless vibrating structure characterization using real time field programmable gate array-based digital signal processing: Demonstrations with a passive wireless acoustic delay line probe and vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goavec-Mérou, G.; Chrétien, N.; Friedt, J.-M.; Sandoz, P.; Martin, G.; Lenczner, M.; Ballandras, S.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrating mechanical structure characterization is demonstrated using contactless techniques best suited for mobile and rotating equipments. Fast measurement rates are achieved using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices as real-time digital signal processors. Two kinds of algorithms are implemented on FPGA and experimentally validated in the case of the vibrating tuning fork. A first application concerns in-plane displacement detection by vision with sampling rates above 10 kHz, thus reaching frequency ranges above the audio range. A second demonstration concerns pulsed-RADAR cooperative target phase detection and is applied to radiofrequency acoustic transducers used as passive wireless strain gauges. In this case, the 250 ksamples/s refresh rate achieved is only limited by the acoustic sensor design but not by the detection bandwidth. These realizations illustrate the efficiency, interest, and potentialities of FPGA-based real-time digital signal processing for the contactless interrogation of passive embedded probes with high refresh rates.

  3. Fast contactless vibrating structure characterization using real time field programmable gate array-based digital signal processing: demonstrations with a passive wireless acoustic delay line probe and vision.

    PubMed

    Goavec-Mérou, G; Chrétien, N; Friedt, J-M; Sandoz, P; Martin, G; Lenczner, M; Ballandras, S

    2014-01-01

    Vibrating mechanical structure characterization is demonstrated using contactless techniques best suited for mobile and rotating equipments. Fast measurement rates are achieved using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices as real-time digital signal processors. Two kinds of algorithms are implemented on FPGA and experimentally validated in the case of the vibrating tuning fork. A first application concerns in-plane displacement detection by vision with sampling rates above 10 kHz, thus reaching frequency ranges above the audio range. A second demonstration concerns pulsed-RADAR cooperative target phase detection and is applied to radiofrequency acoustic transducers used as passive wireless strain gauges. In this case, the 250 ksamples/s refresh rate achieved is only limited by the acoustic sensor design but not by the detection bandwidth. These realizations illustrate the efficiency, interest, and potentialities of FPGA-based real-time digital signal processing for the contactless interrogation of passive embedded probes with high refresh rates.

  4. Local Pattern Classification Differentiates Processes of Economic Valuation

    PubMed Central

    Clithero, John A.; Carter, R. McKell; Huettel, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    For effective decision making, individuals must be able to form subjective values from many types of information. Yet, the neural mechanisms that underlie potential differences in value computation across different decision scenarios are incompletely understood. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in conjunction with the machine learning technique of support vector machines (SVM), to identify brain regions that contain unique local information associated with different types of valuation. We used a combinatoric approach that evaluated the unique contributions of different brain regions to model generalization strength. Local voxel patterns in left posterior parietal cortex contained unique information differentiating probabilistic and intertemporal valuation, a result that was not accessible using standard fMRI analyses. We conclude that the early valuation phases for these reward types differ on a fine spatial scale, suggesting the existence of computational topographies along the value construction pathway. PMID:19349244

  5. Remote trap passivation in colloidal quantum dot bulk nano-heterojunctions and its effect in solution-processed solar cells.

    PubMed

    Rath, Arup K; Pelayo Garcia de Arquer, F; Stavrinadis, Alexandros; Lasanta, Tania; Bernechea, Maria; Diedenhofen, Silke L; Konstantatos, Gerasimos

    2014-07-16

    More-efficient charge collection and suppressed trap recombination in colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells is achieved by means of a bulk nano-heterojunction (BNH) structure, in which p-type and n-type materials are blended on the nanometer scale. The improved performance of the BNH devices, compared with that of bilayer devices, is displayed in higher photocurrents and higher open-circuit voltages (resulting from a trap passivation mechanism).

  6. The Community Development Process: The Rediscovery of Local Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddle, William W.; Biddle, Loureide J.

    The development process in two communities, a mining county in rural Appalachia and a deteriorating neighborhood in a northern industrial city, is presented in case-study form. Concepts and commonly used terms are defined; a process of development is identified that can be used in groups small enough to permit attention to the growth of persons.…

  7. Tunneling Processes into Localized Subgap States in Superconductors.

    PubMed

    Ruby, Michael; Pientka, Falko; Peng, Yang; von Oppen, Felix; Heinrich, Benjamin W; Franke, Katharina J

    2015-08-21

    We combine scanning-tunneling-spectroscopy experiments probing magnetic impurities on a superconducting surface with a theoretical analysis of the tunneling processes between (superconducting) tip and substrate. We show that the current through impurity-induced Shiba bound states is carried by single-electron tunneling at large tip-substrate distances and Andreev reflections at smaller distances. The single-electron current requires relaxation processes, allowing us to extract information on quasiparticle transitions and lifetimes.

  8. Curvelet processing of MRI for local image enhancement.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Kunyu; Ma, Jianwei; Ye, Datian; Wu, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging provides very good contrast between different soft tissues; however, in some cases, this technique is not so suitable to image calcified structures like bones. The quality of images is often degraded by blur edges or noises, which makes it difficult to accurately identify bone structures. In this paper, we proposed a new curvelet preprocessing method for local image enhancement to especially improve the quality of spinal MRI. Our objective is to both sharpen boundaries and smoothen the intensity variation of the vertebra. In the first phase, we extract features through curvelet coefficients and the gradient of the original image, then we utilize fuzzy cluster method to classify the whole image scope into the 'edge' region and the 'nonedge' region. In the second phase, we locally sharpen or smoothen the image by adaptive adjustment of curvelet coefficients and Gaussian smoothing method in different subregions. To evaluate the effect of the preprocessing method, we examine the gradient of the image and its segmentation results as the assessments. The experiment results show that the feature extraction method is effective for classification and the vertebra performs higher contrast on boundaries and less noises after the enhancement, which indeed helps increase the accuracy of further segmentation. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Visibility to discern local from nonlocal dynamic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brú, A.; Gómez-Castro, D.; Nuño, J. C.

    2017-04-01

    We compare using visibility the usual Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) universality class and a fractional Edward-Wilkinson (EWf) equation with correlated noise, which share the same kinetic roughening exponents. The KPZ universality class is described by an equation in terms of the usual derivatives, uncorrelated noise and therefore is intrinsically local. The second model includes fractional powers of the Laplace operator and correlated noise, both of which are nonlocal. From their scaling properties, one could be tempted to conclude that both dynamics belong to the same universality class, specifically, to the KPZ universality class. However, this is a wrong conclusion that calls the attention against the indiscriminate application of this approach in real systems without taking into consideration basic physical assumptions (e.g. locality). These examples reveal the necessity of finding new algorithms for detecting characteristics that remain unnoticed to classical scaling analysis, where only the two first moments of the interface distribution (mean and variance) are used to classify the dynamics. We show that visibility and, in particular, the kinetic roughening exponents of the visibility interface, are able to distinguish between these two dynamics which are confused by standard techniques.

  10. Surface passivation of MgAl2O4 spinel powder by chemisorbing H3PO4 for easy aqueous processing.

    PubMed

    Olhero, Susana M; Ganesh, Ibram; Torres, Paula M C; Ferreira, José M F

    2008-09-02

    A stoichiometric MgAl 2O 4 spinel (MAS) powder was synthesized by heat treating at 1400 degrees C for 2 h a compacted mixture of alpha-Al 2O 3 and calcined caustic MgO, followed by crushing and milling. The surface of this powder was then passivated against hydrolysis with H 3PO 4 and Al(H 2PO 4) 3 in an ethanol solution. The as-passivated powder could then be dispersed in water using tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) and an ammonium salt of poly(acrylic acid) (Duramax D-3005) as dispersing agents and gelcast to form green consolidates with relatively high strength (>15 MPa). The good dispersing behavior of the passivated powder in water was confirmed by the low viscosity of its suspension containing 41-45 vol % solids, demonstrating the viability of replacing organic solvents by water in colloidal processing of MAS-based ceramics. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX) studies revealed that only negligible amounts of phosphate ions at the surface are required to effectively protect the powder from reacting with water.

  11. Local Restaurant Smoking Regulations and the Adolescent Smoking Initiation Process

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Michael; Albers, Alison B.; Cheng, Debbie M.; Hamilton, William L.; Biener, Lois

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess whether smoke-free restaurant laws influence the progression from (1) never smoking to early experimentation and (2) early experimentation to established smoking. Design A longitudinal, 4-year, 3-wave study of a representative sample of Massachusetts youth. Setting A total of 301 Massachusetts communities. Participants Study participants were 3834 Massachusetts youths aged 12 to 17 years at baseline, from January 2, 2001, to June 18, 2002, of whom 2791 (72.8%) were reinterviewed after 2 years (from January 30, 2003, to July 31, 2004) and 2217 (57.8%) were reinterviewed after 4 years (from February 16, 2005, to March 26, 2006). Wave 3 respondents were recruited from both those who responded at wave 2 and those who did not. Main Exposure The primary predictor of interest is the strength of the local restaurant smoking regulation in the respondents’ town of residence at the baseline of each transition period. Main Outcome Measures (1) Overall progression to established smoking (having smoked ≥100 cigarettes in one’s lifetime), (2) transition from nonsmoking (never having puffed a cigarette) to experimentation, and (3) transition from experimentation to established smoking. Results Youths living in towns with a strong restaurant smoking regulation at baseline had significantly lower odds of progressing to established smoking (odds ratio, 0.60; 95% confidence interval, 0.42–0.85) compared with those living in towns with weak regulations. The observed association between strong restaurant smoking regulations and impeded progression to established smoking was entirely due to an effect on the transition from experimentation to established smoking (odds ratio, 0.53; 95% confidence interval, 0.33–0.86). Conclusion Local smoke-free restaurant laws may significantly lower youth smoking initiation by impeding the progression from cigarette experimentation to established smoking. PMID:18458195

  12. Global Impacts of the Bologna Process: International Perspectives, Local Particularities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zmas, Aristotelis

    2015-01-01

    The paper examines the transfer of the Bologna Process (BP) outside Europe, focusing on its "external dimension" and dynamics in global settings. It argues that the BP impacts on the internationalisation activities of universities, especially with regard to cross-border transparency of qualifications, transnational improvement of quality…

  13. Characterization and Genomic Localization of a SMAD4 Processed Pseudogene.

    PubMed

    Watson, Christopher M; Camm, Nick; Crinnion, Laura A; Antanaviciute, Agne; Adlard, Julian; Markham, Alexander F; Carr, Ian M; Charlton, Ruth; Bonthron, David T

    2017-09-01

    Like many clinical diagnostic laboratories, the Yorkshire Regional Genetics Service undertakes routine investigation of cancer-predisposed individuals by high-throughput sequencing of patient DNA that has been target-enriched for genes associated with hereditary cancer. Accurate diagnosis using such reagents requires alertness regarding rare nonpathogenic variants that may interfere with variant calling. In a cohort of 2042 such cases, we identified 5 that initially appeared to be carriers of a 95-bp deletion of SMAD4 intron 6. More detailed analysis indicated that these individuals all carried one copy of a SMAD4 processed gene. Because of its interference with diagnostic analysis, we characterized this processed gene in detail. Whole-genome sequencing and confirmatory Sanger sequencing of junction PCR products were used to show that in each of the 5 cases, the SMAD4 processed gene was integrated at the same position on chromosome 9, located within the last intron of the SCAI gene. This rare polymorphic processed gene therefore reflects the occurrence of a single ancestral retrotransposition event. Compared to the reference SMAD4 mRNA sequence NM_005359.5 (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nucleotide), the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the processed gene are both truncated, but its open reading frame is unaltered. Our experience leads us to advocate the use of an RNA-seq aligner as part of diagnostic assay quality assurance, since this allows their recognition in a comparatively facile automated fashion. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Measure Guideline: Passive Vents

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, David; Neri, Robin

    2016-02-05

    This document addresses the use of passive vents as a source of outdoor air in multifamily buildings. The challenges associated with implementing passive vents and the factors affecting performance are outlined. A comprehensive design methodology and quantified performance metrics are provided. Two hypothetical design examples are provided to illustrate the process. This document is intended to be useful to designers, decision-makers, and contractors implementing passive ventilation strategies. It is also intended to be a resource for those responsible for setting high-performance building program requirements, especially pertaining to ventilation and outdoor air. To ensure good indoor air quality, a dedicated source of outdoor air is an integral part of high-performance buildings. Presently, there is a lack of guidance pertaining to the design and installation of passive vents, resulting in poor system performance. This report details the criteria necessary for designing, constructing, and testing passive vent systems to enable them to provide consistent and reliable levels of ventilation air from outdoors.

  15. On the Roles of Corrosion Products in Local Cell Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    34" . " ", -. .: • -" " - ". " .. " " " ~ " " "’ I Vw-- L0 THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY College of Earth and Mineral Sciences UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS OF STUDY Ceramic...Science and Engineering, Earth Sciences, Fuel Science, Geography, Geosciences, Metallurgy, Meteorology, Mineral Economics, Mining Engineering, Petro...Mineralogy, Geography, Geology, Geophysics, Metallurgy, Meteorology, Mineral Economics, Mineral Processing, Mining Engineering, Petroleum and Natural Gas

  16. Information Processing to Maintain Localization in ASW Surveillance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-07-29

    different targets. The approach is to combine, using Bayesian methods, contact do + a scenario- based parametric model for target motion. Statistical...method that makes accurate use of the observational data. ACCESSION for NTIS White Section DOC Buff Section 0 UNANNOUNCED 1 JUSTIFICATION Dist. AV’iL...97 Comparison of Processing Algorithms Using ASWIPS 103 REFERENCES 129 APPENDIX A AUXILIARY FORMULAS FOR EVALUATING GAUSSIAN A-1 INTEGRALS APPENDIX B

  17. Absolute and relative pitch: Global versus local processing of chords

    PubMed Central

    Ziv, Naomi; Radin, Shulamit

    2014-01-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is the ability to identify or produce notes without any reference note. An ongoing debate exists regarding the benefits or disadvantages of AP in processing music. One of the main issues in this context is whether the categorical perception of pitch in AP possessors may interfere in processing tasks requiring relative pitch (RP). Previous studies, focusing mainly on melodic and interval perception, have obtained inconsistent results. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of AP and RP separately, using isolated chords. Seventy-three musicians were categorized into four groups of high and low AP and RP, and were tested on two tasks: identifying chord types (Task 1), and identifying a single note within a chord (Task 2). A main effect of RP on Task 1 and an interaction between AP and RP in reaction times were found. On Task 2 main effects of AP and RP, and an interaction were found, with highest performance in participants with both high AP and RP. Results suggest that AP and RP should be regarded as two different abilities, and that AP may slow down reaction times for tasks requiring global processing. PMID:24855499

  18. Absolute and relative pitch: Global versus local processing of chords.

    PubMed

    Ziv, Naomi; Radin, Shulamit

    2014-01-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is the ability to identify or produce notes without any reference note. An ongoing debate exists regarding the benefits or disadvantages of AP in processing music. One of the main issues in this context is whether the categorical perception of pitch in AP possessors may interfere in processing tasks requiring relative pitch (RP). Previous studies, focusing mainly on melodic and interval perception, have obtained inconsistent results. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of AP and RP separately, using isolated chords. Seventy-three musicians were categorized into four groups of high and low AP and RP, and were tested on two tasks: identifying chord types (Task 1), and identifying a single note within a chord (Task 2). A main effect of RP on Task 1 and an interaction between AP and RP in reaction times were found. On Task 2 main effects of AP and RP, and an interaction were found, with highest performance in participants with both high AP and RP. Results suggest that AP and RP should be regarded as two different abilities, and that AP may slow down reaction times for tasks requiring global processing.

  19. The Influence of Local Geometric Effects on Mars Polar Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, M. H.

    2005-01-01

    Using simple, qualitative heat balance models, this paper addresses textures and structures that will result from the evolution of volatile layers by accretion and by ablation. Such phenomena may have global implications that are not apparent when only flat or sloped surfaces are modeled. In general, structures such as mounds or depressions formed out of volatile materials will evolve in shape such that the growth or retreat of any particular surface will be maximized. It can be shown that the local radius of curvature is proportional to the growth or retreat rate. For example, icy surfaces will tend to form facets that face the dominant sun direction. Two such cases are evaluated: a) Features associated with condensation of volatiles, include cold-trapping and redistribution, such as the concentration of frost around the Viking 2 lander [1]. Here I will focus on textures that likely result from the formation of seasonal CO2 deposits. b) Features associated with sublimation of volatiles, such as those described by Ingersoll et. al. [2] result in textured surfaces that affect both the apparent emissivity and albedo. Similar calculations have been performed with respect to the "Swiss cheese" features on the South Polar Cap [3]. Here, I evaluate the likely sublimation rates from optimal ice scarp structures and their implications for the long-term evolution of the polar caps and formation of layered terrain.

  20. Local adaptation in Trinidadian guppies alters ecosystem processes

    PubMed Central

    Bassar, Ronald D.; Marshall, Michael C.; López-Sepulcre, Andrés; Zandonà, Eugenia; Auer, Sonya K.; Travis, Joseph; Pringle, Catherine M.; Flecker, Alexander S.; Thomas, Steven A.; Fraser, Douglas F.; Reznick, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Theory suggests evolutionary change can significantly influence and act in tandem with ecological forces via ecological-evolutionary feedbacks. This theory assumes that significant evolutionary change occurs over ecologically relevant timescales and that phenotypes have differential effects on the environment. Here we test the hypothesis that local adaptation causes ecosystem structure and function to diverge. We demonstrate that populations of Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata), characterized by differences in phenotypic and population-level traits, differ in their impact on ecosystem properties. We report results from a replicated, common garden mesocosm experiment and show that differences between guppy phenotypes result in the divergence of ecosystem structure (algal, invertebrate, and detrital standing stocks) and function (gross primary productivity, leaf decomposition rates, and nutrient flux). These phenotypic effects are further modified by effects of guppy density. We evaluated the generality of these effects by replicating the experiment using guppies derived from two independent origins of the phenotype. Finally, we tested the ability of multiple guppy traits to explain observed differences in the mesocosms. Our findings demonstrate that evolution can significantly affect both ecosystem structure and function. The ecosystem differences reported here are consistent with patterns observed across natural streams and argue that guppies play a significant role in shaping these ecosystems. PMID:20133670

  1. Enhanced Local Processing of Dynamic Visual Information in Autism: Evidence from Speed Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Y.; Norton, D. J.; McBain, R.; Gold, J.; Frazier, J. A.; Coyle, J. T.

    2012-01-01

    An important issue for understanding visual perception in autism concerns whether individuals with this neurodevelopmental disorder possess an advantage in processing local visual information, and if so, what is the nature of this advantage. Perception of movement speed is a visual process that relies on computation of local spatiotemporal signals…

  2. Enhanced Local Processing of Dynamic Visual Information in Autism: Evidence from Speed Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Y.; Norton, D. J.; McBain, R.; Gold, J.; Frazier, J. A.; Coyle, J. T.

    2012-01-01

    An important issue for understanding visual perception in autism concerns whether individuals with this neurodevelopmental disorder possess an advantage in processing local visual information, and if so, what is the nature of this advantage. Perception of movement speed is a visual process that relies on computation of local spatiotemporal signals…

  3. Behavioral and Physiological Findings of Gender Differences in Global-Local Visual Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roalf, David; Lowery, Natasha; Turetsky, Bruce I.

    2006-01-01

    Hemispheric asymmetries in global-local visual processing are well-established, as are gender differences in cognition. Although hemispheric asymmetry presumably underlies gender differences in cognition, the literature on gender differences in global-local processing is sparse. We employed event related brain potential (ERP) recordings during…

  4. Passivation process in quasi-continuous laser derusting with intermediate pulse width and line-scanning method.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Du, Peng; Zhang, Jun; Shi, Shudong; Liu, Shujing; Chen, Nianjiang; Zhao, Hong; Song, Feng

    2014-02-20

    Floating rust composed of particles and aggregates is the primary product of iron or steel corrosion. Because the floating rust has a porous structure and small thickness, part of the irradiating laser energy can be transmitted through the rust layer and be absorbed by the iron substrate. The adherent force between the floating rust and the metal substrate is weak. In this paper we carried out a series of experiments on this specific rust type to achieve laser derusting and passivating simultaneously. We used a line-scanning method (50% overlapping ratio between adjacent laser spots) to get the nearly average uniform distribution of laser fluence in a large cleaning area. The laser irradiation can directly heat a metal surface to cause thermo-elastic vibration to shake off the rust layer and to cause oxidization to form a protective layer. The most important factor of laser passivating is that the iron surface must be heated to the melting point of iron but not much higher. During this short melting period, on the one hand the iron surface could be oxidized completely; on the other hand the melting of the iron surface could make uniform the oxygen concentration and temperature in the molten iron bath.

  5. Physically secured orthogonal frequency division multiplexing-passive optical network employing noise-based encryption and signal recovery process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wei; Zhang, Chongfu; Yuan, Weicheng

    2016-02-01

    We propose a physically enhanced secure scheme for direct detection-orthogonal frequency division multiplexing-passive optical network (DD-OFDM-PON) and long reach coherent detection-orthogonal frequency division multiplexing-passive optical network (LRCO-OFDM-PON), by employing noise-based encryption and channel/phase estimation. The noise data generated by chaos mapping are used to substitute training sequences in preamble to realize channel estimation and frame synchronization, and also to be embedded on variable number of key-selected randomly spaced pilot subcarriers to implement phase estimation. Consequently, the information used for signal recovery is totally hidden as unpredictable noise information in OFDM frames to mask useful information and to prevent illegal users from correctly realizing OFDM demodulation, and thereby enhancing resistance to attackers. The levels of illegal-decryption complexity and implementation complexity are theoretically discussed. Through extensive simulations, the performances of the proposed channel/phase estimation and the security introduced by encrypted pilot carriers have been investigated in both DD-OFDM and LRCO-OFDM systems. In addition, in the proposed secure DD-OFDM/LRCO-OFDM PON models, both legal and illegal receiving scenarios have been considered. These results show that, by utilizing the proposed scheme, the resistance to attackers can be significantly enhanced in DD-OFDM-PON and LRCO-OFDM-PON systems without performance degradations.

  6. Localization of Impaired Kinesthetic Processing Post-stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kenzie, Jeffrey M.; Semrau, Jennifer A.; Findlater, Sonja E.; Yu, Amy Y.; Desai, Jamsheed A.; Herter, Troy M.; Hill, Michael D.; Scott, Stephen H.; Dukelow, Sean P.

    2016-01-01

    Kinesthesia is our sense of limb motion, and allows us to gauge the speed, direction, and amplitude of our movements. Over half of stroke survivors have significant impairments in kinesthesia, which leads to greatly reduced recovery and function in everyday activities. Despite the high reported incidence of kinesthetic deficits after stroke, very little is known about how damage beyond just primary somatosensory areas affects kinesthesia. Stroke provides an ideal model to examine structure-function relationships specific to kinesthetic processing, by comparing lesion location with behavioral impairment. To examine this relationship, we performed voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping and statistical region of interest analyses on a large sample of sub-acute stroke subjects (N = 142) and compared kinesthetic performance with stroke lesion location. Subjects with first unilateral, ischemic stroke underwent neuroimaging and a comprehensive robotic kinesthetic assessment (~9 days post-stroke). The robotic exoskeleton measured subjects' ability to perform a kinesthetic mirror-matching task of the upper limbs without vision. The robot moved the stroke-affected arm and subjects' mirror-matched the movement with the unaffected arm. We found that lesions both within and outside primary somatosensory cortex were associated with significant kinesthetic impairments. Further, sub-components of kinesthesia were associated with different lesion locations. Impairments in speed perception were primarily associated with lesions to the right post-central and supramarginal gyri whereas impairments in amplitude of movement perception were primarily associated with lesions in the right pre-central gyrus, anterior insula, and superior temporal gyrus. Impairments in perception of movement direction were associated with lesions to bilateral post-central and supramarginal gyri, right superior temporal gyrus and parietal operculum. All measures of impairment shared a common association with

  7. Local muscular fatigue and attentional processes in a fencing task.

    PubMed

    Devienne, M F; Audiffren, M; Ripoll, H; Stein, J F

    2000-02-01

    Study of the effects of brief exercise on mental processes by Tomporowski and Ellis (1986) has shown that moderate muscular tension improves cognitive performance while low or high tension does not. Improvements in performance induced by exercise are commonly associated with increase in arousal, while impairments are generally attributed to the effects of muscular or central fatigue. To test two hypotheses, that (1) submaximal muscular exercise would decrease premotor time and increase would increase the attentional and preparatory effects observed in premotor time 9 men, aged 20 to 30 years, performed an isometric test at 50% of their maximum voluntary contraction between blocks of a 3-choice reaction-time fencing task. Analysis showed (1) physical exercise did not improve postexercise premotor time, (2) muscular fatigue induced by isometric contractions did not increase motor time, (3) there was no effect of exercise on attentional and preparatory processes involved in the postexercise choice-RT task. The invalidation of hypotheses was mainly explained by disparity in directional effects across subjects and by use of an exercise that was not really fatiguing.

  8. Health-related Quality of Life and Mental Health in the Process of Active and Passive Ageing.

    PubMed

    Dajak, Lidija; Mastilica, Miroslav; Orešković, Stjepan; Vuletić, Gorka

    2016-12-01

    To analyse the differences in the self-estimate of life quality depending on the ageing type - passive, active. Life-quality linked to health was measured with an SF-36 survey, which gives multi-dimensional criteria of health and life-quality. SF-36 survey represents a theoretically based and empirically proven operationalization of two overal health concepts, which are body and mental health, and its two general manifestations, functioning, and welfare. 200 examinees in total, aged from 55 to 92, were included in the research. Divided by sex, in the research participated 148 women and 52 men. Depending on the ageing way, the examinees were divided into 2 categories: passive ageing (n=100), active ageing (n=100), and for these groups a detailed result analysis was done. Statistical analysis includes descriptive statistics, Hi-square test, Spearman's correlation coefficient, and Mann-Whitney U test. In all dimensions of health, examinees from the category Active ageing achieve higher scores, which indicates better health and better functioning. Between the groups, a statistically significant difference was determined, on the following dimensions: Overall health, Pains, Energy and vitality, Social operations, and Limits due to emotional difficulties. With the Hi-square test, it was determined that there are differences between the groups. The biggest difference can be seen in the reply categories related to health deterioration (χ(2)=10.391; df=4; p=0.034). Examinees from the Active ageing group mention significantly less that their health has gotten worse compared to the previous year (26% of the active ones state that their health is somewhat worse, and only 2% that their health is significantly worse, compared to the passive ones where 36% state that their health is worse, and 9% that it's much worse compared to the year before). Tested was the difference between arithmetic middles on the issue of mental health based on the ageing type (p>0.05), and the results

  9. Effect of flexible vegetation on localized erosion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Termini, Donatella

    2013-04-01

    The knowledge of the hydraulic characteristics of flow over vegetation is very important to support the management of fluvial processes. The effects of vegetation on flow velocity are significant and of crucial importance for stabilizing sediments and reducing erosion along the channel. But, because of the temporal changing of roughness due to natural vegetative growth, the response of vegetation to the flow can change in time. Thus, vegetation has a complex effect on walls roughness and the study of the hydrodynamic conditions of flow is difficult. Many theoretical and experimental investigations have been performed in order to analyze both the mean flow and turbulence structure of open-channel flow (Nezu and Rodi 1986; Ghisalberti and Nepf, 2002). Recent experimental runs carried out in laboratory channels with flexible vegetation, realized by using artificial filaments (Kutija and Hong 1996; Ikeda and Kanazawa 1996), investigated some peculiar characteristics of flow turbulence structure and revealed the generation of periodic organized vortices whose center is located slightly above the top of the vegetation layer. Ghisalberti and Nepf (2002) confirmed the formation of such vortices, highlighting that, in the case of flexible vegetation, the vortex-driven oscillation of velocity drives coherent vegetation waving, producing a spatially and temporally variable drag force. In this paper, attention is paid to the influence of vegetation on the erosion processes both on the bed and on the channel banks. Experiments were carried out both in a straight channel and in a meandering channel, both constructed at the Department of Civil, Environmental, Aerospatial and of Materials (DICAM) - University of Palermo (Italy). The formation of turbulence structures inside the vegetated layer is verified, providing some insight into the mechanisms of sediment transport. Nezu, I. & Rodi, W. 1986. Open-channel flow measurements with a Laser Doppler Anemometer. Journal of Hydraulic

  10. The effect of global versus local processing styles on assimilation versus contrast in social judgment.

    PubMed

    Förster, Jens; Liberman, Nira; Kuschel, Stefanie

    2008-04-01

    The authors propose a global/local processing style model (GLOMO) for assimilation and contrast effects in social judgment. GLOMO is based on Schwarz and Bless' (1992, 2007) inclusion-exclusion model, which suggests that when information is included into a category, assimilation occurs, whereas when information is excluded from a category, contrast occurs. According to GLOMO, inclusion versus exclusion should be influenced by whether people process information globally or locally. In 5 experiments, using both disambiguation and social comparison, the authors induced local versus global processing through perceptual tasks and time perspective and showed that global processing produced assimilation, whereas local processing produced contrast. The experiments showed that processing styles elicited in one task can carry over to other tasks and influence social judgments. Furthermore, they found that hemisphere activation and accessibility of judgment-consistent knowledge partially mediated these effects. Implications for current and classic models of social judgment are discussed. (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Gaussian Process Regression Plus Method for Localization Reliability Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kehan; Meng, Zhaopeng; Own, Chung-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Location data are among the most widely used context data in context-aware and ubiquitous computing applications. Many systems with distinct deployment costs and positioning accuracies have been developed over the past decade for indoor positioning. The most useful method is focused on the received signal strength and provides a set of signal transmission access points. However, compiling a manual measuring Received Signal Strength (RSS) fingerprint database involves high costs and thus is impractical in an online prediction environment. The system used in this study relied on the Gaussian process method, which is a nonparametric model that can be characterized completely by using the mean function and the covariance matrix. In addition, the Naive Bayes method was used to verify and simplify the computation of precise predictions. The authors conducted several experiments on simulated and real environments at Tianjin University. The experiments examined distinct data size, different kernels, and accuracy. The results showed that the proposed method not only can retain positioning accuracy but also can save computation time in location predictions. PMID:27483276

  12. Gaussian Process Regression Plus Method for Localization Reliability Improvement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kehan; Meng, Zhaopeng; Own, Chung-Ming

    2016-07-29

    Location data are among the most widely used context data in context-aware and ubiquitous computing applications. Many systems with distinct deployment costs and positioning accuracies have been developed over the past decade for indoor positioning. The most useful method is focused on the received signal strength and provides a set of signal transmission access points. However, compiling a manual measuring Received Signal Strength (RSS) fingerprint database involves high costs and thus is impractical in an online prediction environment. The system used in this study relied on the Gaussian process method, which is a nonparametric model that can be characterized completely by using the mean function and the covariance matrix. In addition, the Naive Bayes method was used to verify and simplify the computation of precise predictions. The authors conducted several experiments on simulated and real environments at Tianjin University. The experiments examined distinct data size, different kernels, and accuracy. The results showed that the proposed method not only can retain positioning accuracy but also can save computation time in location predictions.

  13. Dynamic processes and their influence on the transformation of the passive admixture in the sea of Azov

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. A.; Cherkesov, L. V.; Shul'ga, T. Ya.

    2014-07-01

    In this model, we apply a nonlinear three-dimensional sigma-coordinate model to study the waves and currents in the Sea of Azov generated by different fields of wind forcing: a constant wind, a quickly varying real wind obtained using the data of reanalysis applying the SKIRON model, and the wind resulting from their combined forcing. This mathematical model was also applied to study the transformation of the passive admixture appearing under the influence of wind fields in the Sea of Azov considered here. We compared the results of numerical calculations with the field data obtained under the wind forcing at a number of hydrological stations. We found the regularities of the water transport driven by onshore and offshore winds, the velocities of the currents, and the characteristics of the evolution of polluted regions at different depths as functions of the nonstationary wind intensity and the velocities of the stationary currents.

  14. Priming global and local processing of composite faces: revisiting the processing-bias effect on face perception.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zaifeng; Flevaris, Anastasia V; Robertson, Lynn C; Bentin, Shlomo

    2011-07-01

    We used the composite-face illusion and Navon stimuli to determine the consequences of priming local or global processing on subsequent face recognition. The composite-face illusion reflects the difficulty of ignoring the task-irrelevant half-face while attending the task-relevant half if the half-faces in the composite are aligned. On each trial, participants first matched two Navon stimuli, attending to either the global or the local level, and then matched the upper halves of two composite faces presented sequentially. Global processing of Navon stimuli increased the sensitivity to incongruence between the upper and the lower halves of the composite face, relative to a baseline in which the composite faces were not primed. Local processing of Navon stimuli did not influence the sensitivity to incongruence. Although incongruence induced a bias toward different responses, this bias was not modulated by priming. We conclude that global processing of Navon stimuli augments holistic processing of the face.

  15. 21. national passive solar conference: Proceedings. Volume 21

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell-Howe, R.; Wilkins-Crowder, B.

    1996-10-01

    The 70 papers of this conference are arranged under the following topical sections: Passive case studies (7 papers); Daylighting (6); Passive solar cooling (6); School buildings (4); Passive charrettes (4); Emerging architecture (3); Community planning (5); Passive components and materials (9); Passive computer simulation (5); Passive metrics (7); Education and curriculum (9); and Public programs (6). All papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  16. The Development of Global and Local Processing: A Comparison of Children to Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Eric; Peterson, Robin L.

    2014-01-01

    In light of the adult model of a hemispheric asymmetry of global and local processing, we compared children (M [subscript age] = 8.4 years) to adults in a global-local reaction time (RT) paradigm. Hierarchical designs (large shapes made of small shapes) were presented randomly to each visual field, and participants were instructed to identify…

  17. Managed Moves: School and Local Authority Staff Perceptions of Processes, Success and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagley, Christopher; Hallam, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The current research aimed to increase understanding of the processes of managed moves for children at risk of exclusion from school, particularly exploring what contributed to success and the nature of the challenges experienced. The study was conducted in one English local authority where 11 school staff and 5 local authority staff were…

  18. The Development of Global and Local Processing: A Comparison of Children to Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Eric; Peterson, Robin L.

    2014-01-01

    In light of the adult model of a hemispheric asymmetry of global and local processing, we compared children (M [subscript age] = 8.4 years) to adults in a global-local reaction time (RT) paradigm. Hierarchical designs (large shapes made of small shapes) were presented randomly to each visual field, and participants were instructed to identify…

  19. Adaptation to Leftward-shifting Prisms Enhances Local Processing in Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Scott A.; Dassonville, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In healthy individuals, adaptation to left-shifting prisms has been shown to simulate the symptoms of hemispatial neglect, including a reduction in global processing that approximates the local bias observed in neglect patients. The current study tested whether leftward prism adaptation can more specifically enhance local processing abilities. In three experiments, the impact of local and global processing was assessed through tasks that measure susceptibility to illusions that are known to be driven by local or global contextual effects. Susceptibility to the rod-and-frame illusion – an illusion disproportionately driven by both local and global effects depending on frame size – was measured before and after adaptation to left- and right-shifting prisms. A significant increase in rod-and-frame susceptibility was found for the left-shifting prism group, suggesting that adaptation caused an increase in local processing effects. The results of a second experiment confirmed that leftward prism adaptation enhances local processing, as assessed with susceptibility to the simultaneous-tilt illusion. A final experiment employed a more specific measure of the global effect typically associated with the rod-andframe illusion, and found that although the global effect was somewhat diminished after leftward prism adaptation, the trend failed to reach significance (p = .078). Rightward prism adaptation had no significant effects on performance in any of the experiments. Combined, these findings indicate that leftward prism adaptation in healthy individuals can simulate the local processing bias of neglect patients primarily through an increased sensitivity to local visual cues, and confirm that prism adaptation not only modulates lateral shifts of attention, but also prompts shifts from one level of processing to another. PMID:24560913

  20. Adaptation to leftward-shifting prisms enhances local processing in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Reed, Scott A; Dassonville, Paul

    2014-04-01

    In healthy individuals, adaptation to left-shifting prisms has been shown to simulate the symptoms of hemispatial neglect, including a reduction in global processing that approximates the local bias observed in neglect patients. The current study tested whether leftward prism adaptation can more specifically enhance local processing abilities. In three experiments, the impact of local and global processing was assessed through tasks that measure susceptibility to illusions that are known to be driven by local or global contextual effects. Susceptibility to the rod-and-frame illusion - an illusion disproportionately driven by both local and global effects depending on frame size - was measured before and after adaptation to left- and right-shifting prisms. A significant increase in rod-and-frame susceptibility was found for the left-shifting prism group, suggesting that adaptation caused an increase in local processing effects. The results of a second experiment confirmed that leftward prism adaptation enhances local processing, as assessed with susceptibility to the simultaneous-tilt illusion. A final experiment employed a more specific measure of the global effect typically associated with the rod-and-frame illusion, and found that although the global effect was somewhat diminished after leftward prism adaptation, the trend failed to reach significance (p=.078). Rightward prism adaptation had no significant effects on performance in any of the experiments. Combined, these findings indicate that leftward prism adaptation in healthy individuals can simulate the local processing bias of neglect patients primarily through an increased sensitivity to local visual cues, and confirm that prism adaptation not only modulates lateral shifts of attention, but also prompts shifts from one level of processing to another. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Key role of the sorption process in alteration of metal and metalloid quantification by fouling development on DGT passive samplers.

    PubMed

    Devillers, Delphine; Buzier, Rémy; Grybos, Malgorzata; Charriau, Adeline; Guibaud, Gilles

    2017-11-01

    The DGT technique (diffusive gradients in thin films) is widely used for passive sampling of labile trace metals and metalloids in natural waters. Although development of fouling on the protective membranes is frequently observed, its effect on DGT sampling has been barely investigated. This study evaluates the influence of fouling on sampling of trace cationic metals Cd(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Pb(II) and oxyanions As(V), Cr(VI), Sb(V) and Se(VI). Fouling was developed in situ on polycarbonate membranes in four diverse natural freshwater environments and sampling alteration was assessed in controlled laboratory experiments. Accumulation of oxyanions and Ni was unaltered in the presence of fouling whereas significant alteration occurred in sampling of Cd, Cu and Pb (at pH ∼5.4). Characterization of the fouled membranes highlighted the intervention of sorption phenomenon as sampling alteration was systematically observed alongside element sorption onto fouled membrane. A preliminary flowchart for identifying potentially biased quantifications linked to fouling development during in situ DGT deployment in natural waters is proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Surprisal and Locality on Danish Sentence Processing: An Eye-Tracking Investigation.

    PubMed

    Balling, Laura Winther; Kizach, Johannes

    2017-03-22

    An eye-tracking experiment in Danish investigates two dominant accounts of sentence processing: locality-based theories that predict a processing advantage for sentences where the distance between the major syntactic heads is minimized, and the surprisal theory which predicts that processing time increases with big changes in the relative entropy of possible parses, sometimes leading to anti-locality effects. We consider both lexicalised surprisal, expressed in conditional trigram probabilities, and syntactic surprisal expressed in the manipulation of the expectedness of the second NP in Danish constructions with two postverbal NP-objects. An eye-tracking experiment showed a clear advantage for local syntactic relations, with only a marginal effect of lexicalised surprisal and no effect of syntactic surprisal. We conclude that surprisal has a relatively marginal effect, which may be clearest for verbs in verb-final languages, while locality is a robust predictor of sentence processing.

  3. Optimization of charge transfer and transport processes at the CdSe quantum dots/TiO2 nanorod interface by TiO2 interlayer passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo-Quintero, O. A.; Triana, M. A.; Rincon, M. E.

    2017-06-01

    Surface trap states hinder charge transfer and transport properties in TiO2 nanorods (NRs), limiting its application on optoelectronic devices. Here, we study the interfacial processes between rutile TiO2 NR and CdSe quantum dots (QDs) using TiO2 interlayer passivation treatments. Anatase or rutile TiO2 thin layers were deposited on an NR surface by two wet-chemical deposition treatments. Reduced interfacial charge recombination between NRs and CdSe QDs was observed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy with the introduction of TiO2 thin film interlayers compared to bare TiO2 NRs. These results can be ascribed to in-gap trap state passivation of the TiO2 NR surface, which led to an increase in open circuit voltage. Moreover, the rutile thin layer was more efficient than anatase to promote a higher photo-excited electron transfer from CdSe QDs to TiO2 NRs due to a large driving force for charge injection, as confirmed by surface photovoltage spectroscopy.

  4. The transmembrane transporter domain of glutamate transporters is a process tip localizer

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Mariko Kato; Yasui, Masato

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate transporters in the central nervous system remove glutamate released from neurons to terminate the signal. These transporters localize to astrocyte process tips approaching neuronal synapses. The mechanisms underlying the localization of glutamate transporters to these processes, however, are not known. In this study, we demonstrate that the trimeric transmembrane transporter domain fragment of glutamate transporters, lacking both N- and C-terminal cytoplasmic regions, localized to filopodia tips. This is a common property of trimeric transporters including a neutral amino acid transporter ASCT1. Astrocyte specific proteins are not required for the filopodia tip localization. An extracellular loop at the centre of the 4th transmembrane helices, unique for metazoans, is required for the localization. Moreover, a C186S mutation at the 4th transmembrane region of EAAT1, found in episodic ataxia patients, significantly decreased its process tip localization. The transmembrane transporter domain fragments of glutamate transporters also localized to astrocyte process tips in cultured hippocampal slice. These results indicate that the transmembrane transporter domain of glutamate transporters have an additional function as a sorting signal to process tips. PMID:25761899

  5. Passivated niobium cavities

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao [Yorktown, VA; Hjorvarsson, Bjorgvin [Lagga Arby, SE; Ciovati, Gianluigi [Newport News, VA

    2006-12-19

    A niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided by treating a niobium cavity through a process comprising: 1) removing surface oxides by plasma etching or a similar process; 2) removing hydrogen or other gases absorbed in the bulk niobium by high temperature treatment of the cavity under ultra high vacuum to achieve hydrogen outgassing; and 3) assuring the long term chemical stability of the niobium cavity by applying a passivating layer of a superconducting material having a superconducting transition temperature higher than niobium thereby reducing losses from electron (cooper pair) scattering in the near surface region of the interior of the niobium cavity. According to a preferred embodiment, the passivating layer comprises niobium nitride (NbN) applied by reactive sputtering.

  6. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Hall, Earl T. (Inventor); Baker, Donald A. (Inventor); Bryant, Timothy D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  7. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Hall, Earl T.; Baker, Donald A.; Bryant, Timothy D.

    1992-08-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  8. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-07-01

    The invention is an ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system. The invention incorporates piezoelectric polymer film combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted from a fetus inside an expectant mother and to provide means for filtering out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  9. Treating landfill leachate using passive aeration trickling filters; effects of leachate characteristics and temperature on rates and process dynamics.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Richard; Winson, Michael; Scullion, John

    2009-04-01

    Biological ammoniacal-nitrogen (NH(4)(+)-N) and organic carbon (TOC) treatment was investigated in replicated mesoscale attached microbial film trickling filters, treating strong and weak strength landfill leachates in batch mode at temperatures of 3, 10, 15 and 30 degrees C. Comparing leachates, rates of NH(4)(+)-N reduction (0.126-0.159 g m(-2) d(-1)) were predominantly unaffected by leachate characteristics; there were significant differences in TOC rates (0.072-0.194 g m(-2) d(-1)) but no trend relating to leachate strength. Rates of total oxidised nitrogen (TON) accumulation (0.012-0.144 g m(-2) d(-1)) were slower for strong leachates. Comparing temperatures, treatment rates varied between 0.029-0.319 g NH(4)(+)-N m(-2) d(-1) and 0.033-0.251 g C m(-2) d(-1) generally increasing with rising temperatures; rates at 3 degrees C were 9 and 13% of those at 30 degrees C for NH(4)(+)-N and TOC respectively. For the weak leachates (NH(4)(+)-N<140 mg l(-1)) complete oxidation of NH(4)(+)-N was achieved. For the strong leachates (NH(4)(+)-N 883-1150 mg l(-1)) a biphasic treatment response resulted in NH(4)(+)-N removal efficiencies of between 68 and 88% and for one leachate no direct transformation of NH(4)(+)-N to TON in bulk leachate. The temporal decoupling of NH(4)(+)-N oxidation and TON accumulation in this leachate could not be fully explained by denitrification, volatilisation or anammox, suggesting temporary storage of N within the treatment system. This study demonstrates that passive aeration trickling filters can treat well-buffered high NH(4)(+)-N strength landfill leachates under a range of temperatures and that leachate strength has no effect on initial NH(4)(+)-N treatment rates. Whether this approach is a practicable option depends on a range of site specific factors.

  10. Radiobrightness Forward Modelling vs Observations from Local to Satellite Scales during the 2003 NASA Cold Land Processes Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward J.; Tedesco, Marco

    2004-01-01

    A key issue for passive microwave Earth sensing applications is subpixel heterogeneity and its role in the connection between local-scale conditions vs. what is observed at the satellite footprint scale. The recently-completed NASA Cold Land Processes Field Experiment (CLPX-1) was designed to provide microwave remote sensing observations and ground truth for studies of snow and from ground remote sensing, particularly issues related to scaling. CLPX-1 was conducted in the spring of 2003 in Colorado, USA. Measurements of radiobrightness were made with nested footprint sizes ranging from scales of meters at a single site to 25 x 25 km across the entire CLPX-1 domain. Corresponding measurements of snowpack conditions (snow depth and temperature. density, and grain size profiles) as well as weather analyses were used to provide input data for forward radiative transfer model investigations. This paper will focus on the ability of forward modelling, based primarily on Dense Medium Radiative Transfer (DMRT) theory, combined with snowpack measurements and weather data to reproduce the radiobrightness signatures observed at multiple scales during both the third and fourth Intensive Observing Periods (February and March, 2003). The conditions include both wet and dry periods as well as a variety of forest cover conditions, providing a valuable test of model performance. These analyses will help guide the choice of future snow retrieval algorithm and the design of future Cold Lands observing systems.

  11. Management of local economic and ecological system of coal processing company

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiseleva, T. V.; Mikhailov, V. G.; Karasev, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    The management issues of local ecological and economic system of coal processing company - coal processing plant - are considered in the article. The objectives of the research are the identification and the analysis of local ecological and economic system (coal processing company) performance and the proposals for improving the mechanism to support the management decision aimed at improving its environmental safety. The data on the structure of run-of-mine coal processing products are shown. The analysis of main ecological and economic indicators of coal processing enterprises, characterizing the state of its environmental safety, is done. The main result of the study is the development of proposals to improve the efficiency of local enterprise ecological and economic system management, including technical, technological and business measures. The results of the study can be recommended to industrial enterprises to improve their ecological and economic efficiency.

  12. Passive sonic detection and ranging for locating sound sources.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F; Zhu, Na

    2013-06-01

    A passive sonic detection and ranging (SODAR) technology is developed to locate sound sources that emit arbitrarily time-dependent signals in a typical environment encountered in practice in real time. This passive SODAR is built on a comprehensive approach including the pre-processing of input data to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio, acoustic modeling of sound radiation from a point source, iterative triangulations, and post-processing of output data to ensure the accuracy in source localization. Moreover, it employs an optimization process to extend the source detection range and improve the source localization accuracy in a highly non-ideal environment that involves a large number of unspecified reflected and diffracted sound waves. This is accomplished through computations based on the source locations predicted by the individual units of four microphones that are not lying on the same plane. Experimental results confirm that passive SODAR works for arbitrarily time-dependent signals that include continuous, transient, impulsive, random, narrow-, and broadband sounds with frequencies above 20 Hz. The minimum number of microphones that are required in passive SODAR is six. These microphones can be mounted anywhere as long as they are not on the same plane and the lines of sight from sound sources remain unblocked.

  13. Decoupling absorption and emission processes in super-resolution localization of emitters in a plasmonic hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, David L.; Cortés, Emiliano; Giannini, Vincenzo; Török, Peter; Roschuk, Tyler; Maier, Stefan A.

    2017-02-01

    The absorption process of an emitter close to a plasmonic antenna is enhanced due to strong local electromagnetic (EM) fields. The emission, if resonant with the plasmonic system, re-radiates to the far-field by coupling with the antenna via plasmonic states, whose presence increases the local density of states. Far-field collection of the emission of single molecules close to plasmonic antennas, therefore, provides mixed information of both the local EM field strength and the local density of states. Moreover, super-resolution localizations from these emission-coupled events do not report the real position of the molecules. Here we propose using a fluorescent molecule with a large Stokes shift in order to spectrally decouple the emission from the plasmonic system, leaving the absorption strongly resonant with the antenna's enhanced EM fields. We demonstrate that this technique provides an effective way of mapping the EM field or the local density of states with nanometre spatial resolution.

  14. Decoupling absorption and emission processes in super-resolution localization of emitters in a plasmonic hotspot

    PubMed Central

    Mack, David L.; Cortés, Emiliano; Giannini, Vincenzo; Török, Peter; Roschuk, Tyler; Maier, Stefan A.

    2017-01-01

    The absorption process of an emitter close to a plasmonic antenna is enhanced due to strong local electromagnetic (EM) fields. The emission, if resonant with the plasmonic system, re-radiates to the far-field by coupling with the antenna via plasmonic states, whose presence increases the local density of states. Far-field collection of the emission of single molecules close to plasmonic antennas, therefore, provides mixed information of both the local EM field strength and the local density of states. Moreover, super-resolution localizations from these emission-coupled events do not report the real position of the molecules. Here we propose using a fluorescent molecule with a large Stokes shift in order to spectrally decouple the emission from the plasmonic system, leaving the absorption strongly resonant with the antenna's enhanced EM fields. We demonstrate that this technique provides an effective way of mapping the EM field or the local density of states with nanometre spatial resolution. PMID:28211479

  15. Global/local processing style: Explaining the relationship between trait anxiety and binge eating.

    PubMed

    Becker, Kendra R; Plessow, Franziska; Coniglio, Kathryn A; Tabri, Nassim; Franko, Debra L; Zayas, Lazaro V; Germine, Laura; Thomas, Jennifer J; Eddy, Kamryn T

    2017-09-30

    Anxiety is a risk factor for disordered eating, but the mechanisms by which anxiety promotes disordered eating are poorly understood. One possibility is local versus global cognitive processing style, defined as a relative tendency to attend to details at the expense of the "big picture." Anxiety may narrow attention, in turn, enhancing local and/or compromising global processing. We examined relationships between global/local processing style, anxiety, and disordered eating behaviors in a transdiagnostic outpatient clinical sample. We hypothesized that local (vs. global) processing bias would mediate the relationship between anxiety and disordered eating behaviors. Ninety-three participants completed the eating disorder examination-questionnaire (EDE-Q), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI)-trait subscale, and the Navon task (a test of processing style in which large letters are composed of smaller letters both congruent and incongruent with the large letter). The sample was predominantly female (95%) with a mean age of 27.4 years (SD = 12.1 years). Binge eating, but not fasting, purging, or excessive exercise, was correlated with lower levels of global processing style. There was a significant indirect effect between anxiety and binge eating via reduced global level global/local processing. In individuals with disordered eating, being more generally anxious may encourage a detailed-oriented bias, preventing individuals from maintaining the bigger picture and making them more likely to engage in maladaptive behaviors (e.g., binge eating). © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Blasting and Passivation Treatments for ASTM F139 Stainless Steel for Biomedical Applications: Effects on Surface Roughness, Hardening, and Localized Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza, Adriana L. Lemos; Kang, Kyung Won; Bonetto, Rita D.; Llorente, Carlos L.; Bilmes, Pablo D.; Gervasi, Claudio A.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the combination of good biofunctionality and biocompatibility at low cost, AISI 316 low carbon vacuum melting (LVM) stainless steel, as considered in ASTM F139 standard, is often the first choice for medical implants, particularly for use in orthopedic surgery. Proper surface finish must be provided to ensure adequate interactions of the alloy with human body tissues that in turn allows the material to deliver the desired performance. Preliminary studies performed in our laboratory on AISI 316LVM stainless steel surfaces modified by glass bead blasting (from industrial supplier) followed by different nitric acid passivation conditions disclosed the necessity to extend parameters of the surface treatments and to further consider roughness, pitting corrosion resistance, and surface and subsurface hardening measurements, all in one, as the most effective characterization strategy. This was the approach adopted in the present work. Roughness assessment was performed by means of amplitude parameters, functional parameters, and an estimator of the fractal dimension that characterizes surface topography. We clearly demonstrate that the blasting treatment should be carried out under controlled conditions in order to obtain similar surface and subsurface properties. Otherwise, a variation in one of the parameters could modify the surface properties, exerting a profound impact on its application as biomaterial. A passivation step is necessary to offset the detrimental effect of blasting on pitting corrosion resistance.

  17. Influence of focal point properties on energy transfer and plasma evolution during laser ignition process with a passively q-switched laser.

    PubMed

    Bärwinkel, Mark; Lorenz, Sebastian; Stäglich, Robert; Brüggemann, Dieter

    2016-07-11

    Miniaturized passively q-switched laser ignition systems are a promising alternative to conventional ignition sources to ensure a reliable ignition under difficult conditions. In this study the influences of focal point properties on energy transfer from laser to plasma as well as plasma formation and propagation are investigated as the first steps of the laser induced ignition process. Maximum fluence and fluence volume are introduced to characterize focal point properties for varying laser pulse energies and focusing configurations. The results show that the transferred laser energy increases with increasing maximum fluence. During laser emission plasma propagates along the beam path of the focused laser beam. Rising maximum fluence results in increased plasma volume, but expansion saturates when fluence volume reaches its maximum.

  18. [Passive euthanasia].

    PubMed

    Trube-Becker, E

    1977-01-01

    After having been acquainted with the historical development of euthanasia, the following steps for assitance in dying, called passive euthanasia are being discussed. a) Assistance during dying without speeding up death is the self-evident duty of a doctor. b) Assistance during death and speeding up the same as an unavoidable result of therapeutical treatment, more or less desired or more or less unavoidable. c) Assistance through letting the patient die by abandoning all therapeutical means, when these would only lead to a short extension of life time. No doctor is compelled to take measures to extend life if it is against the will of the patient. He is not even entitled to do so. A special problem is the abandoning of extended operative treatment, this borders on the so called active enthanasia. The dying patient always has the same right of treatment by a docter as well as nursing like all other suffering human beings. The decision to let a patient die should not result in leaving him by himself and to abandon all nursing as well. Such steps would include letting him lie in dirty linen, not sucking off the mucous secretion from the trachea, refusal to assist during mealtimes, non-assistance during cathetering, and the removal of the dying person to the bathroom, or any other remote orner of the hospital. No dying person should stay without help Loneliness especially is the greatest pain of a dying patient.

  19. Near-surface void characterization and sensitivity analysis using enhanced processing procedures on passive Multi-Channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Jeffery Jordan

    Enhanced processing procedures on passive multichannel analysis of surface-waves (MASW) data were utilized to identify velocity anomalies above known salt solution voids in Hutchinson, Kansas, likely caused by the changing stress field due to the migration and/or expansion of the void. Previous geophysical studies within the study area provided information about the origin of the dominant passive surface-wave energy, allowing for an optimal spread orientation consisting of both 1D survey lines and a 2D grid. Occasional passing trains throughout the night generated surface-wave energy ranging from 4 Hz to 20 Hz for most recorded events. The use of the 2D grid allowed for identification of the orientation of wave propagation to correct the high apparent velocities caused by the oblique source orientation. Following acquisition, enhanced processing procedures such as time window stacking, percent keep, and source stacking, generated an overtone image with a higher signal-to-noise ratio and more pronounced fundamental mode energy. This visual improvement facilitated the extraction of fundamental mode energy, ultimately increasing the accuracy of the final shear-wave velocity profile. Velocity anomalies within the velocity profiles could likely be attributed to the changing of the stress field during the movement of the void. As the void expands laterally, the roof span increases. The increasing roof span likely increases the stress and shear velocity in the overburden load causing high-velocity haloes in the velocity profile. When the roof span becomes too large to support the overburden load, the roof rock will collapse, causing the migration of the void. Upon collapse, the non-collapsed overburden should accumulate stress due to the lack of underlying support, while the collapsed rock (rubble) should decrease in shear-wave velocity.

  20. Modeling the uptake of semivolatile organic compounds by passive air samplers: importance of mass transfer processes within the porous sampling media.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianming; Wania, Frank

    2012-09-04

    Air sampling based on diffusion of target molecules from the atmospheric gas phase to passive sampling media (PSMs) is currently modeled using the two-film approach. Originally developed to describe chemical exchange between air and water, it assumes a uniform chemical distribution in the bulk phases on either side of the interfacial films. Although such an assumption may be satisfied when modeling uptake in PSMs in which chemicals have high mobility, its validity is questionable for PSMs such as polyurethane foam disks and XAD-resin packed mesh cylinders. Mass transfer of chemicals through the PSMs may be subject to a large resistance because of the low mass fraction of gas-phase chemicals in the pores, where diffusion occurs. Here we present a model that does not assume that chemicals distribute uniformly in the PSMs. It describes the sequential diffusion of vapors through a stagnant air-side boundary layer and the PSM pores, and the reversible sorption onto the PSM. Sensitivity analyses reveal the potential influence of the latter two processes on passive sampling rates (PSRs) unless the air-side boundary layer is assumed to be extremely thick (i.e., representative of negligible wind speeds). The model also reveals that the temperature dependence of PSRs, differences in PSRs between different compounds, and a two-stage uptake, all observed in field calibrations, can be attributed to those mass transfer processes within the PSM. The kinetics of chemical sorption to the PSM from the gas phase in the macro-pores is a knowledge gap that needs to be addressed before the model can be applied to specific compounds.

  1. Local and global processing of music in high-functioning persons with autism: beyond central coherence?

    PubMed

    Mottron, L; Peretz, I; Ménard, E

    2000-11-01

    A multi-modal abnormality in the integration of parts and whole has been proposed to account for a bias toward local stimuli in individuals with autism (Frith, 1989; Mottron & Belleville, 1993). In the current experiment, we examined the utility of hierarchical models in characterising musical information processing in autistic individuals. Participants were 13 high-functioning individuals with autism and 13 individuals of normal intelligence matched on chronological age, nonverbal IQ, and laterality, and without musical experience. The task consisted of same-different judgements of pairs of melodies. Differential local and global processing was assessed by manipulating the level, local or global, at which modifications occurred. No deficit was found in the two measures of global processing. In contrast, the clinical group performed better than the comparison group in the detection of change in nontransposed, contour-preserved melodies that tap local processing. These findings confirm the existence of a "local bias" in music perception in individuals with autism, but challenge the notion that it is accounted for by a deficit in global music processing. The present study suggests that enhanced processing of elementary physical properties of incoming stimuli, as found previously in the visual modality, may also exist in the auditory modality.

  2. Perception of Shapes Targeting Local and Global Processes in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinter, Emma J.; Maybery, Murray T.; Pellicano, Elizabeth; Badcock, Johanna C.; Badcock, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Several researchers have found evidence for impaired global processing in the dorsal visual stream in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). However, support for a similar pattern of visual processing in the ventral visual stream is less consistent. Critical to resolving the inconsistency is the assessment of local and…

  3. Local Discriminability Determines the Strength of Holistic Processing for Faces in the Fusiform Face Area

    PubMed Central

    Goffaux, Valerie; Schiltz, Christine; Mur, Marieke; Goebel, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the Fusiform Face Area (FFA) is not exclusively dedicated to the interactive processing of face features, but also contains neurons sensitive to local features. This suggests the existence of both interactive and local processing modes, consistent with recent behavioral findings that the strength of interactive feature processing (IFP) engages most strongly when similar features need to be disambiguated. Here we address whether the engagement of the FFA into interactive versus featural representational modes is governed by local feature discriminability. We scanned human participants while they matched target features within face pairs, independently of the context of distracter features. IFP was operationalized as the failure to match the target without being distracted by distracter features. Picture-plane inversion was used to disrupt IFP while preserving input properties. We found that FFA activation was comparably strong, irrespective of whether similar target features were embedded in dissimilar contexts(i.e., inducing robust IFP) or dissimilar target features were embedded in the same context (i.e., engaging local processing). Second, inversion decreased FFA activation to faces most robustly when similar target features were embedded in dissimilar contexts, indicating that FFA engages into IFP mainly when features cannot be disambiguated at a local level. Third, by means of Spearman rank correlation tests, we show that the local processing of feature differences in the FFA is supported to a large extent by the Occipital Face Area, the Lateral Occipital Complex, and early visual cortex, suggesting that these regions encode the local aspects of face information. The present findings confirm the co-existence of holistic and featural representations in the FFA. Furthermore, they establish FFA as the main contributor to the featural/holistic representational mode switches determined by local discriminability. PMID:23316180

  4. Auditory global-local processing: effects of attention and musical experience.

    PubMed

    Ouimet, Tia; Foster, Nicholas E V; Hyde, Krista L

    2012-10-01

    In vision, global (whole) features are typically processed before local (detail) features ("global precedence effect"). However, the distinction between global and local processing is less clear in the auditory domain. The aims of the present study were to investigate: (i) the effects of directed versus divided attention, and (ii) the effect musical training on auditory global-local processing in 16 adult musicians and 16 non-musicians. Participants were presented with short nine-tone melodies, each comprised of three triplet sequences (three-tone units). In a "directed attention" task, participants were asked to focus on either the global or local pitch pattern and had to determine if the pitch pattern went up or down. In a "divided attention" task, participants judged whether the target pattern (up or down) was present or absent. Overall, global structure was perceived faster and more accurately than local structure. The global precedence effect was observed regardless of whether attention was directed to a specific level or divided between levels. Musicians performed more accurately than non-musicians overall, but non-musicians showed a more pronounced global advantage. This study provides evidence for an auditory global precedence effect across attention tasks, and for differences in auditory global-local processing associated with musical experience.

  5. Systems Factorial Technology provides new insights on global–local information processing in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Shannon A.; Blaha, Leslie M.; Houpt, Joseph W.; Townsend, James T.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies of global–local processing in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have indicated mixed findings, with some evidence of a local processing bias, or preference for detail-level information, and other results suggesting typical global advantage, or preference for the whole or gestalt. Findings resulting from this paradigm have been used to argue for or against a detail focused processing bias in ASDs, and thus have important theoretical implications. We applied Systems Factorial Technology, and the associated Double Factorial Paradigm (both defined in the text), to examine information processing characteristics during a divided attention global–local task in high-functioning individuals with an ASD and typically developing controls. Group data revealed global advantage for both groups, contrary to some current theories of ASDs. Information processing models applied to each participant revealed that task performance, although showing no differences at the group level, was supported by different cognitive mechanisms in ASD participants compared to controls. All control participants demonstrated inhibitory parallel processing and the majority demonstrated a minimum-time stopping rule. In contrast, ASD participants showed exhaustive parallel processing with mild facilitatory interactions between global and local information. Thus our results indicate fundamental differences in the stopping rules and channel dependencies in individuals with an ASD. PMID:23750050

  6. Localization in covariance matrices of coupled heterogenous Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barucca, Paolo

    2014-12-01

    We define a random-matrix ensemble given by the infinite-time covariance matrices of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes at different temperatures coupled by a Gaussian symmetric matrix. The spectral properties of this ensemble are shown to be in qualitative agreement with some stylized facts of financial markets. Through the presented model formulas are given for the analysis of heterogeneous time series. Furthermore evidence for a localization transition in eigenvectors related to small and large eigenvalues in cross-correlations analysis of this model is found, and a simple explanation of localization phenomena in financial time series is provided. Finally we identify both in our model and in real financial data an inverted-bell effect in correlation between localized components and their local temperature: high- and low-temperature components are the most localized ones.

  7. Base Closures: Long and Costly Process of Reducing the Local National Work Force in Germany.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    from 4 months salary to 7 months.’ U.S. liability may also be affected by German labor law . For example, the German Termination Law could require...Agreement and German labor law can affect termination Complicated Process costs of local national employees. The Collective Tariff Agreement defines...Liability Agreement states that German labor laws are generally applicable to employment of local national civilians by the United States. The German Law on

  8. Electrical conductivity images across the Namibian passive margin: Implications for tectonic processes along the Kaoko Belt, the western Kongo Craton and the Walvis Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weckmann, Ute; Meqbel, Naser; Kapinos, Gerhard; Jegen-Kulcsar, Marion; Ritter, Oliver

    2014-05-01

    The Special Priority Programme SAMPLE of the German Science Foundation DFG is focussed on investigating processes related to the breakup of supercontinent Gondwana and the post breakup evolution of the passive continental margins of Africa and South America. Within this framework an amphibian magnetotelluric (MT) experiment was conducted at the Southern African passive continental margin, starting at the Walvis Ridge in the Atlantic Ocean and crossing onshore the entire Kaoko Belt and the western boundary of the Kongo Craton in Northern Namibia. High-quality MT data at 167 onshore and xx offshore sites show a strong variability within short distances and indicate complex subsurface structures in parts of the Kaoko Belt and along some of the major thrust and fault zones. To identify the main conductivity features and resolve their properties in more spatial detail we started our modelling procedure with 2D inversion for a sub-set of the data where the 3D effects are less dominant along the amphibian profile. However, to account for 3D effects in the MT data and to assess robustness of conductivity anomalies revealed in the 2D model we used the entire data set for the 3D inversion using ModEM. 2D and 3D inversion models show zones of high electrical conductivity that correlate with surface expressions of prominent faults such as the Purros Mylonite Zone and the Three Palm Mylonite Zone of the Kaoko Belt. Outcropping Etendeka flood basalts in the Western Kaoko Zones are imaged by 10-15km deep reaching zones of high resistivity. Additionally, the inversion models reveal a spatial correlation of resistive zones with the cratonic Northern Platform; however, the geologically defined onset of the Kongo Craton appears as an area of high conductivity. Compared with other craton boundaries in Southern Africa this is very untypical.

  9. Feature binding and the processing of global-local shapes in bilingual and monolingual children.

    PubMed

    Cottini, Milvia; Pieroni, Laura; Spataro, Pietro; Devescovi, Antonella; Longobardi, Emiddia; Rossi-Arnaud, Clelia

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, we examined the effects of bilingualism and age on a color-shape binding task (assessing visual working memory) and a global-local task (assessing inhibitory processes) in a sample of 55 bilingual and 49 monolingual children 8 and 10 years old. In the color-shape binding task, corrected recognition scores increased in older children; bilingual children performed better than monolinguals in the shape-only condition, but the two groups were equally accurate in the color-only and combination conditions. In the global-local task, accuracy was higher in bilingual than in monolingual children, particularly on incongruent trials; monolingual children showed a strong global precedence effect (higher accuracy in the global than in the local conditions and greater global-to-local interference), whereas bilingual children exhibited a small, but significant, local precedence effect (higher accuracy in the local than in the global conditions and greater local-to-global interference). These findings confirm and extend previous evidence indicating that the bilingualism advantage is more pronounced in working memory tasks involving inhibitory processes.

  10. Percept-switch nucleation in binocular rivalry reveals local adaptation characteristics of early visual processing.

    PubMed

    van Ee, Raymond

    2011-02-22

    When the two eyes view incompatible images that subtend the entire visual field, perception alternates between the two images unpredictably: at seemingly random times and locations, observers experience sudden changes in the awareness of the unchanging visual stimulation. Here we focus on the very first spontaneous breakout from the very first suppression phase after onset of the two eyes' competing whole-field stimuli. We call such spontaneous local breakout an "initial percept-switch nucleation." We employed homogeneous visual input to examine where, and how, spontaneous local initial percept-switch nucleations originate, demonstrating that their spatial distribution contains locally random inhomogeneities, which are eye- and observer-dependent. We were able to predict the occurrence probability of the percept nucleations by adaptation buildup of the neurons associated with the representation of one eye's image. Intriguingly, the neuronal processes related to both cross-inhibition and local eye dominance could not predict nucleation probability; this is because nucleation inhomogeneity appeared to be different from another previously reported local inhomogeneity known as "onset bias" signifying the local first dominance-choice inhomogeneity upon stimulus onset. Collectively, we reveal a governing role of local adaptation in the neurons associated with early visual processing of one eye's image, in the origination of new phases in awareness.

  11. Local active information storage as a tool to understand distributed neural information processing.

    PubMed

    Wibral, Michael; Lizier, Joseph T; Vögler, Sebastian; Priesemann, Viola; Galuske, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Every act of information processing can in principle be decomposed into the component operations of information storage, transfer, and modification. Yet, while this is easily done for today's digital computers, the application of these concepts to neural information processing was hampered by the lack of proper mathematical definitions of these operations on information. Recently, definitions were given for the dynamics of these information processing operations on a local scale in space and time in a distributed system, and the specific concept of local active information storage was successfully applied to the analysis and optimization of artificial neural systems. However, no attempt to measure the space-time dynamics of local active information storage in neural data has been made to date. Here we measure local active information storage on a local scale in time and space in voltage sensitive dye imaging data from area 18 of the cat. We show that storage reflects neural properties such as stimulus preferences and surprise upon unexpected stimulus change, and in area 18 reflects the abstract concept of an ongoing stimulus despite the locally random nature of this stimulus. We suggest that LAIS will be a useful quantity to test theories of cortical function, such as predictive coding.

  12. The role of local and global processing in the recognition of living and nonliving things.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Richard; Forde, Emer

    2006-01-01

    We report a study on a patient (DW) with integrative visual agnosia and a category-specific recognition impairment for living things. We assessed DW's local and global processing and tested if his integrative agnosia could have led directly to his category-specific impairment. The main findings were: (i) DW was faster at identifying local compared to global letters. (ii) DW showed no local-to-global (or global-to-local) interference effects in selective attention tasks. (iii) DW showed a congruency effect in a divided attention task, suggesting that, when his attention was cued to both levels, he could process information simultaneously and integrate local and global information. (iv) Controls were poorer at naming nonliving compared to living things when presented with silhouettes. These data suggest that local and global information are differentially weighted in the visual recognition of living and nonliving things, and that an impairment in processing the overall shape of an object can lead to a category-specific deficit for living things. Crucially, this implies that category-specific impairments do not necessarily reflect damage to the semantic system, and models of semantic memory based on this assumption need to be revised.

  13. Global and local visual processing in autism: An objective assessment approach.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Kritika; Voyles, Angela C; Kiorpes, Lynne; Di Martino, Adriana

    2017-08-01

    We examined global and local visual processing in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) via a match-to-sample task using Kanizsa illusory contours (KIC). School-aged children with ASD (n = 28) and age-matched typically developing controls (n = 22; 7-13 years) performed a sequential match-to-sample between a solid shape (sample) and two illusory alternatives. We tracked eye gaze and behavioral performance in two task conditions: one with and one without local interference from background noise elements. While analyses revealed lower accuracy and longer reaction time in ASD in the condition with local interference only, eye tracking robustly captured ASD-related global atypicalities across both conditions. Specifically, relative to controls, children with ASD showed decreased fixations to KIC centers, indicating reduced global perception. Notably, they did not differ from controls in regard to fixations to local elements or touch response location. These results indicate impaired global perception in the absence of heightened local processing in ASD. They also underscore the utility of eye-tracking measures as objective indices of global/local visual processing strategies in ASD. Autism Res 2017, 10: 1392-1404. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The effects of local and global processing orientation on eyewitness identification performance.

    PubMed

    Perfect, Timothy J; Dennis, Ian; Snell, Amelia

    2007-10-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that performance on a simultaneous target-present photographic line-up can be enhanced by prior global processing orientation, and hindered by prior local processing orientation induced by processing Navon letter stimuli. A series of studies explore the generality of this processing bias effect using either videotaped scenarios or live interactions. Five experiments demonstrate that these effects are seen across a range of test stimuli, test formats, and test instructions. These data inform the processes engaged in by witnesses when making line-up identifications and indicate that it may be possible to improve the accuracy of witnesses making such judgements.

  15. Evaluation of Alternate Surface Passivation Methods (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E

    2005-05-31

    Stainless steel containers were assembled from parts passivated by four commercial vendors using three passivation methods. The performance of these containers in storing hydrogen isotope mixtures was evaluated by monitoring the composition of initially 50% H{sub 2} 50% D{sub 2} gas with time using mass spectroscopy. Commercial passivation by electropolishing appears to result in surfaces that do not catalyze hydrogen isotope exchange. This method of surface passivation shows promise for tritium service, and should be studied further and considered for use. On the other hand, nitric acid passivation and citric acid passivation may not result in surfaces that do not catalyze the isotope exchange reaction H{sub 2} + D{sub 2} {yields} 2HD. These methods should not be considered to replace the proprietary passivation processes of the two current vendors used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facility.

  16. ERP evidence of a meaningfulness impact on visual global/local processing: when meaning captures attention.

    PubMed

    Beaucousin, Virginie; Cassotti, Mathieu; Simon, Grégory; Pineau, Arlette; Kostova, Milena; Houdé, Olivier; Poirel, Nicolas

    2011-04-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded to investigate whether the meaningfulness of experimental stimuli impacted performances during global/local visual tasks. Participants were presented with compound stimuli, based on either meaningful letters, meaningful objects, or meaningless non-objects. The ERP recordings displayed typical early components, P1 and N1, evoked by task-related processes that affected global and local processes differently according to the meaningfulness of the stimuli. The effect of meaningfulness of the stimuli during global processing showed that P1 amplitudes were larger in response to objects and non-objects compared to letters, while letters and objects elicited larger N1 amplitudes than non-objects. Second, during local processing, the mean amplitudes of the ERPs recorded for object and letter stimuli were systematically smaller than the amplitudes recorded for non-object stimuli for both P1 and N1 components. In addition, object and letter stimuli elicited comparable mean ERP responses during local processing. These results are discussed in terms of the influences of both attentional and top-down identification processes. Taken together, these findings suggested that looking for meaning is crucial in the perception of visual scenes and that the meaningfulness nature of the stimuli should be taken into account in future studies.

  17. Structural and functional characterization of human telomerase RNA processing and cajal body localization signals.

    PubMed

    Theimer, Carla A; Jády, Beáta E; Chim, Nicholas; Richard, Patricia; Breece, Katherine E; Kiss, Tamás; Feigon, Juli

    2007-09-21

    The RNA component of human telomerase (hTR) includes H/ACA and CR7 domains required for 3' end processing, localization, and accumulation. The terminal loop of the CR7 domain contains the CAB box (ugAG) required for targeting of scaRNAs to Cajal bodies (CB) and an uncharacterized sequence required for accumulation and processing. To dissect out the contributions of the CR7 stem loop to hTR processing and localization, we solved the solution structures of the 3' terminal stem loops of hTR CR7 and U64 H/ACA snoRNA, and the 5' terminal stem loop of U85 C/D-H/ACA scaRNA. These structures, together with analysis of localization, processing, and accumulation of hTRs containing nucleotide substitutions in the CR7 domain, identified the sequence and structural requirements of the hTR processing and CB localization signals and showed that these signals are functionally independent. Further, 3' end processing was found to be a prerequisite for translocation of hTR to CBs.

  18. Impairment in local and global processing and set-shifting in body dysmorphic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kerwin, Lauren; Hovav, Sarit; Helleman, Gerhard; Feusner, Jamie D.

    2014-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterized by distressing and often debilitating preoccupations with misperceived defects in appearance. Research suggests that aberrant visual processing may contribute to these misperceptions. This study used two tasks to probe global and local visual processing as well as set shifting in individuals with BDD. Eighteen unmedicated individuals with BDD and 17 non-clinical controls completed two global-local tasks. The embedded figures task requires participants to determine which of three complex figures contained a simpler figure embedded within it. The Navon task utilizes incongruent stimuli comprised of a large letter (global level) made up of smaller letters (local level). The outcome measures were response time and accuracy rate. On the embedded figures task, BDD individuals were slower and less accurate than controls. On the Navon task, BDD individuals processed both global and local stimuli slower and less accurately than controls, and there was a further decrement in performance when shifting attention between the different levels of stimuli. Worse insight correlated with poorer performance on both tasks. Taken together, these results suggest abnormal global and local processing for non-appearance related stimuli among BDD individuals, in addition to evidence of poor set-shifting abilities. Moreover, these abnormalities appear to relate to the important clinical variable of poor insight. Further research is needed to explore these abnormalities and elucidate their possible role in the development and/or persistence of BDD symptoms. PMID:24972487

  19. Impairment in local and global processing and set-shifting in body dysmorphic disorder.

    PubMed

    Kerwin, Lauren; Hovav, Sarit; Hellemann, Gerhard; Feusner, Jamie D

    2014-10-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterized by distressing and often debilitating preoccupations with misperceived defects in appearance. Research suggests that aberrant visual processing may contribute to these misperceptions. This study used two tasks to probe global and local visual processing as well as set-shifting in individuals with BDD. Eighteen unmedicated individuals with BDD and 17 non-clinical controls completed two global-local tasks. The embedded figures task requires participants to determine which of three complex figures contains a simpler figure embedded within it. The Navon task utilizes incongruent stimuli comprised of a large letter (global level) made up of smaller letters (local level). The outcome measures were response time and accuracy rate. On the embedded figures task, BDD individuals were slower and less accurate than controls. On the Navon task, BDD individuals processed both global and local stimuli slower and less accurately than controls, and there was a further decrement in performance when shifting attention between the different levels of stimuli. Worse insight correlated with poorer performance on both tasks. Taken together, these results suggest abnormal global and local processing for non-appearance related stimuli among BDD individuals, in addition to evidence of poor set-shifting abilities. Moreover, these abnormalities appear to relate to the important clinical variable of poor insight. Further research is needed to explore these abnormalities and elucidate their possible role in the development and/or persistence of BDD symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Gestalt perception and local-global processing in high-functioning autism.

    PubMed

    Bölte, Sven; Holtmann, Martin; Poustka, Fritz; Scheurich, Armin; Schmidt, Lutz

    2007-09-01

    This study examined gestalt perception in high-functioning autism (HFA) and its relation to tasks indicative of local visual processing. Data on of gestalt perception, visual illusions (VI), hierarchical letters (HL), Block Design (BD) and the Embedded Figures Test (EFT) were collected in adult males with HFA, schizophrenia, depression and normative controls. Individuals with HFA processed gestalt stimuli less in accord with gestalt laws, particularly regarding the principle of similarity. Gestalt processing correlated positively with global processing of the HL. EFT and BD performance correlated negatively with VI susceptibility in HFA. All clinical groups succumbed less to VI than the normative sample. Results suggest decreased gestalt perception in HFA, being associated with a more general local visual processing bias.

  1. Prism adaptation reverses the local processing bias in patients with right temporo-parietal junction lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rafal, Robert D.; List, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    Lesions to the right temporo-parietal cortex commonly result in hemispatial neglect. Lesions to the same area are also associated with hyperattention to local details of a scene and difficulty perceiving the global structure. This local processing bias is an important factor contributing to neglect and may contribute to the higher prevalence of the disorder following right compared with left hemisphere strokes. In recent years, visuomotor adaptation to rightward-shifting prisms has been introduced as a promising treatment for hemispatial neglect. Explanations for these improvements have generally described a leftward realignment of attention, however, the present investigation provides evidence that prism adaptation reduces the local processing bias. Five patients with right temporal-parietal junction lesions were asked to identify the global or local levels of hierarchical figures before and after visuomotor adaptation to rightward-shifting prisms. Prior to prism adaptation the patients had difficulty ignoring the local elements when identifying the global component. Following prism adaptation, however, this pattern was reversed, with greater global interference during local level identification. The results suggest that prism adaptation may improve non-spatially lateralized deficits that contribute to the neglect syndrome. PMID:19416951

  2. Mapping Flow Localization Processes in Deformation of Irradiated Reactor Structural Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, K.

    2002-07-18

    Metals that can sustain plastic deformation homogeneously throughout their bulk tend to be tough and malleable. Often, however, if a metal has been hardened it will no longer deform uniformly. Instead, the deformation occurs in narrow bands on a microscopic scale wherein stresses and strains become concentrated in localized zones. This strain localization degrades the mechanical properties of the metal by causing premature plastic instability failure or by inducing the formation of cracks. Irradiation with neutrons hardens a metal and makes it more prone to deformation by strain localization. Although this has been known since the earliest days of radiation damage studies, a full measure of the connection between neutron irradiation hardening and strain localization is wanting, particularly in commercial alloys used in the construction of nuclear reactors. Therefore, the goal of this project is to systematically map the extent of involvement of strain localization processes in plastic deformation of three reactor alloys that have been neutron irradiated. The deformation processes are to be identified and related to changes in the tensile properties of the alloys as functions of neutron fluence (dose) and degree of plastic strain. The intent is to define the role of strain localization in radiation embrittlement phenomena. The three test materials are a tempered bainitic A533B steel, representing reactor pressure vessel steel, an annealed 316 stainless steel and annealed Zircaloy-4 representing reactor internal components.

  3. EMu: probabilistic inference of mutational processes and their localization in the cancer genome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The spectrum of mutations discovered in cancer genomes can be explained by the activity of a few elementary mutational processes. We present a novel probabilistic method, EMu, to infer the mutational signatures of these processes from a collection of sequenced tumors. EMu naturally incorporates the tumor-specific opportunity for different mutation types according to sequence composition. Applying EMu to breast cancer data, we derive detailed maps of the activity of each process, both genome-wide and within specific local regions of the genome. Our work provides new opportunities to study the mutational processes underlying cancer development. EMu is available at http://www.sanger.ac.uk/resources/software/emu/. PMID:23628380

  4. Enhanced Photocurrents with ZnS Passivated Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 Photocathodes Synthesized Using a Nonvacuum Process for Solar Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Chae, Sang Youn; Park, Se Jin; Han, Sung Gyu; Jung, Hyejin; Kim, Chae-Woong; Jeong, Chaehwan; Joo, Oh-Shim; Min, Byoung Koun; Hwang, Yun Jeong

    2016-12-07

    Chalcopyrite Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 (CIGS) semiconductors are potential candidates for use in photoelectrochemical (PEC) hydrogen generation due to their excellent optical absorption properties and high conduction band edge position. In the present research, CIGS thin film was successfully prepared on a transparent substrate (F:SnO2 glass) using a solution-based process and applied for a photocathode in solar water splitting, which shows control of the surface state associated with sulfurization/selenization process significantly influences on the PEC activity. A ZnS passivation surface layer was introduced, which effectively suppresses charge recombination by surface states of CIGS. The CIGS/ZnS/Pt photocathode exhibited highly enhanced PEC activity (∼24 mA·cm(-2) at -0.3 V vs RHE). The performances of our CIGS photocathode on the transparent substrate were also characterized under front/back light illumination, and the incident photon to current conversion efficiency (IPCE) drastically changed depending on the illumination directions showing decreased IPCE especially under UV region with back illumination. The slow minority carrier (electron) transportation is suggested as a limiting factor for the PEC activity of the CIGS photocathode.

  5. Influence of Second Language Proficiency and Syntactic Structure Similarities on the Sensitivity and Processing of English Passive Sentence in Late Chinese-English Bilinguists: An ERP Study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xin; Wang, Pei

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the influence of L2 proficiency and syntactic similarity on English passive sentence processing, the present ERP study asked 40 late Chinese-English bilinguals (27 females and 13 males, mean age = 23.88) with high or intermediate L2 proficiency to read the sentences carefully and to indicate for each sentence whether or not it was correct. Sentences were classified into literal translation sentences with the similar structure between the two languages and free translation sentences with the different structure. Behavioral data showed: shorter reaction times and higher accuracy rates occurred in the high-proficient group than those in the intermediate-proficient group; shorter reaction times and higher accuracy rates were observed in literal translation sentences than those in free translation sentences. ERP results showed literal translation sentences elicited an enhanced P200 and P600 while free translation sentences elicited a larger N400. The high-proficient group showed a larger P600 in syntactic violations and double violations while the intermediate-proficient group evoked an enhanced N400 in semantic violations and double violations. Literal translation sentences caused a larger P200 while free translation sentences elicited more negative-going N400. Behavioral and ERP data revealed the influence of L2 proficiency and syntactic similarity on L2 sentence processing, and L2 proficiency played a predominate role.

  6. Local expression of expansin induces the entire process of leaf development and modifies leaf shape

    PubMed Central

    Pien, Stéphane; Wyrzykowska, Joanna; McQueen-Mason, Simon; Smart, Cheryl; Fleming, Andrew

    2001-01-01

    Expansins are a family of extracellular proteins proposed to play a key role in wall stress relaxation and, thus, in cell and tissue growth. To test the possible function of expansins in morphogenesis, we have developed a technique that allows transient local microinduction of gene expression in transgenic plants. We have used this system to manipulate expansin gene expression in various tissues. Our results indicate that local expansin expression within the meristem induces a developmental program that recapitulates the entire process of leaf formation. Moreover, local transient induction of expansin expression on the flank of developing primordia leads to the induction of ectopic lamina tissue and thus modulation of leaf shape. These data describe an approach for the local manipulation of gene expression and indicate a role for expansin in the control of both leaf initiation and shape. These results are consistent with the action of cell division-independent mechanisms in plant morphogenesis. PMID:11562463

  7. A theory of local and global processes which affect solar wind electrons. II - Experimental support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Olbert, S.

    1979-01-01

    Strong observational support from data obtained on three different satellites and reported by three independent experimental groups is presented for all of the theoretically predicted correlations of a previous paper concerning local and global processes that affect solar-wind electrons. Specifically, it is shown that: (1) subthermal electrons behave most nearly as a classical gas; (2) the solar-wind extrathermal fraction of the electron density is anticorrelated within steady-state stream patterns with the local bulk speed; (3) the extrathermal electrons form a spectrally distinguishable subpopulation whose differential 'temperature' is anticorrelated with the local bulk speed; (4) the heat flux carried by electrons is anticorrelated with the bulk speed; and (5) the extrathermal 'temperature' is nearly independent of radius in the inner heliosphere. It is concluded that the previously discussed global and local Coulomb collisional effects are essential aspects of the solar-wind plasma as it is observed.

  8. From local to global processing: the development of illusory contour perception.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Kritika; Franchak, John; Adolph, Karen; Kiorpes, Lynne

    2015-03-01

    Global visual processing is important for segmenting scenes, extracting form from background, and recognizing objects. Local processing involves attention to the local elements, contrast, and boundaries of an image at the expense of extracting a global percept. Previous work is inconclusive regarding the relative development of local and global processing. Some studies suggest that global perception is already present by 8 months of age, whereas others suggest that the ability arises during childhood and continues to develop during adolescence. We used a novel method to assess the development of global processing in 3- to 10-year-old children and an adult comparison group. We used Kanizsa illusory contours as an assay of global perception and measured responses on a touch-sensitive screen while monitoring eye position with a head-mounted eye tracker. Participants were tested using a similarity match-to-sample paradigm. Using converging measures, we found a clear developmental progression with age such that the youngest children performed near chance on the illusory contour discrimination, whereas 7- and 8-year-olds performed nearly perfectly, as did adults. There was clear evidence of a gradual shift from a local processing strategy to a global one; young children looked predominantly at and touched the "pacman" inducers of the illusory form, whereas older children and adults looked predominantly at and touched the middle of the form. These data show a prolonged developmental trajectory in appreciation of global form, with a transition from local to global visual processing between 4 and 7 years of age.

  9. Kinect Posture Reconstruction Based on a Local Mixture of Gaussian Process Models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiguang; Zhou, Liuyang; Leung, Howard; Shum, Hubert P H

    2016-11-01

    Depth sensor based 3D human motion estimation hardware such as Kinect has made interactive applications more popular recently. However, it is still challenging to accurately recognize postures from a single depth camera due to the inherently noisy data derived from depth images and self-occluding action performed by the user. In this paper, we propose a new real-time probabilistic framework to enhance the accuracy of live captured postures that belong to one of the action classes in the database. We adopt the Gaussian Process model as a prior to leverage the position data obtained from Kinect and marker-based motion capture system. We also incorporate a temporal consistency term into the optimization framework to constrain the velocity variations between successive frames. To ensure that the reconstructed posture resembles the accurate parts of the observed posture, we embed a set of joint reliability measurements into the optimization framework. A major drawback of Gaussian Process is its cubic learning complexity when dealing with a large database due to the inverse of a covariance matrix. To solve the problem, we propose a new method based on a local mixture of Gaussian Processes, in which Gaussian Processes are defined in local regions of the state space. Due to the significantly decreased sample size in each local Gaussian Process, the learning time is greatly reduced. At the same time, the prediction speed is enhanced as the weighted mean prediction for a given sample is determined by the nearby local models only. Our system also allows incrementally updating a specific local Gaussian Process in real time, which enhances the likelihood of adapting to run-time postures that are different from those in the database. Experimental results demonstrate that our system can generate high quality postures even under severe self-occlusion situations, which is beneficial for real-time applications such as motion-based gaming and sport training.

  10. Gibbs free energy assisted passivation layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salihoglu, Omer; Tansel, T.; Hostut, M.; Ergun, Y.; Aydinli, A.

    2016-05-01

    Reduction of surface leakage is a major challenge in most photodetectors that requires the elimination of surface oxides on etched mesas during passivation. Engineering the passivation requires close attention to chemical reactions that take place at the interface during the process. In particular, removal of surface oxides may be controlled via Gibbs reactivity. We have compared electrical performance of type-II superlattice photodetectors, designed for MWIR operation, passivated by different passivation techniques. We have used ALD deposited Al2O3, HfO2, TiO2, ZnO, PECVD deposited SiO2, Si3N4 and sulphur containing octadecanethiol (ODT) selfassembled monolayers (SAM) passivation layers on InAs/GaSb p-i-n superlattice photodetectors with cutoff wavelength at 5.1 μm. In this work, we have compared the result of different passivation techniques which are done under same conditions, same epitaxial structure and same fabrication processes. We have found that ALD deposited passivation is directly related to the Gibbs free energy of the passivation material. Gibbs free energies of the passivation layer can directly be compared with native surface oxides to check the effectiveness of the passivation layer before the experimental study.

  11. Low-cost Landsat digital processing system for state and local information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooper, N. J.; Spann, G. W.; Faust, N. L.; Paludan, C. T. N.

    1979-01-01

    The paper details a minicomputer-based system which is well within the budget of many state, regional, and local agencies that previously could not afford digital processing capability. In order to achieve this goal a workable small-scale Landsat system is examined to provide low-cost automated processing. It is anticipated that the alternative systems will be based on a single minicomputer, but that the peripherals will vary depending on the capability emphasized in a particular system.

  12. Material Processing Handbook. The Wisconsin Guide to Local Curriculum Improvement in Industrial Education K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison. Div. of Instructional Services.

    This handbook is intended to aid industrial educators in developing material processing activities for their programs; it is especially designed to aid educators in implementing "The Wisconsin Guide to Local Curriculum Improvement in Industrial Education, K-12." The guide provides suggested outlines and models that could be used to…

  13. Effects of Local and Global Context on Processing Sentences with Subject and Object Relative Clauses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Fang; Mo, Lun; Louwerse, Max M.

    2013-01-01

    An eye tracking study investigated the effects of local and global discourse context on the processing of subject and object relative clauses, whereby the contexts favored either a subject relative clause interpretation or an object relative clause interpretation. The fixation data replicated previous studies showing that object relative clause…

  14. Visual Search in ASD: Instructed versus Spontaneous Local and Global Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Hallen, Ruth; Evers, Kris; Boets, Bart; Steyaert, Jean; Noens, Ilse; Wagemans, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Visual search has been used extensively to investigate differences in mid-level visual processing between individuals with ASD and TD individuals. The current study employed two visual search paradigms with Gaborized stimuli to assess the impact of task distractors (Experiment 1) and task instruction (Experiment 2) on local-global visual…

  15. Gestalt Perception and Local-Global Processing in High-Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolte, Sven; Holtmann, Martin; Poustka, Fritz; Scheurich, Armin; Schmidt, Lutz

    2007-01-01

    This study examined gestalt perception in high-functioning autism (HFA) and its relation to tasks indicative of local visual processing. Data on of gestalt perception, visual illusions (VI), hierarchical letters (HL), Block Design (BD) and the Embedded Figures Test (EFT) were collected in adult males with HFA, schizophrenia, depression and…

  16. Gestalt Perception and Local-Global Processing in High-Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolte, Sven; Holtmann, Martin; Poustka, Fritz; Scheurich, Armin; Schmidt, Lutz

    2007-01-01

    This study examined gestalt perception in high-functioning autism (HFA) and its relation to tasks indicative of local visual processing. Data on of gestalt perception, visual illusions (VI), hierarchical letters (HL), Block Design (BD) and the Embedded Figures Test (EFT) were collected in adult males with HFA, schizophrenia, depression and…

  17. Are the Autism and Positive Schizotypy Spectra Diametrically Opposed in Local versus Global Processing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell-Smith, Suzanna N.; Maybery, Murray T.; Bayliss, Donna M.

    2010-01-01

    Crespi and Badcock (2008) proposed that autism and psychosis represent two extremes on a cognitive spectrum with normality at its center. Their specific claim that autistic and positive schizophrenia traits contrastingly affect preference for local versus global processing was investigated by examining Embedded Figures Test performance in two…

  18. Visual Search in ASD: Instructed versus Spontaneous Local and Global Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Hallen, Ruth; Evers, Kris; Boets, Bart; Steyaert, Jean; Noens, Ilse; Wagemans, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Visual search has been used extensively to investigate differences in mid-level visual processing between individuals with ASD and TD individuals. The current study employed two visual search paradigms with Gaborized stimuli to assess the impact of task distractors (Experiment 1) and task instruction (Experiment 2) on local-global visual…

  19. Are the Autism and Positive Schizotypy Spectra Diametrically Opposed in Local versus Global Processing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell-Smith, Suzanna N.; Maybery, Murray T.; Bayliss, Donna M.

    2010-01-01

    Crespi and Badcock (2008) proposed that autism and psychosis represent two extremes on a cognitive spectrum with normality at its center. Their specific claim that autistic and positive schizophrenia traits contrastingly affect preference for local versus global processing was investigated by examining Embedded Figures Test performance in two…

  20. Quantifying the limitations to the performance of passive correlation processing methods applied to the extraction of tomographic information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. C.; Gerstoft, P.

    2011-12-01

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that correlation of signals measured over spatially separated sensors in a diffuse, random wave field yields information about coherent (deterministic) wave propagation between the sensors. The measured coherence can be used to tomographically extract parameters related to the propagation environment. Being a stochastic measurement process, the coherent information of the sample correlation function is obscured by random (incoherent) fluctuations that average down as the sample observation duration increases. As the measurement stochastically converges with increasing sample duration to reveal the underlying coherent temporal structure associated with the spatial correlations, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) between the measured coherent power and the power of the random fluctuations likewise increases. While it is known that the SNR decreases with sensor separation, Cramer-Rao (CR) analysis indicates that the stochastic convergence rate for the extraction of tomographic information from measured wave coherence increases with sensor separation. Thus, while the SNR itself may be maximal for closely spaced sensors, in terms of performance in the tomographic context, it is preferable to use large sensor separation. In cases involving attenuation, there is an optimal distance of maximal tomographic performance. The CR prediction is verified through simulation.

  1. Spatiotemporal dynamics of processing nonsymbolic number: an event-related potential source localization study.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Daniel C; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2012-09-01

    Coordinated studies with adults, infants, and nonhuman animals provide evidence for two distinct systems of nonverbal number representation. The "parallel individuation" (PI) system selects and retains information about one to three individual entities and the "numerical magnitude" system establishes representations of the approximate cardinal value of a group. Recent event-related potential (ERP) work has demonstrated that these systems reliably evoke functionally and temporally distinct patterns of brain response that correspond to established behavioral signatures. However, relatively little is known about the neural generators of these ERP signatures. To address this question, we targeted known ERP signatures of these systems, by contrasting processing of small versus large nonsymbolic numbers, and used a source localization algorithm (LORETA) to identify their cortical origins. Early processing of small numbers, showing the signature effects of PI on the N1 (∼150 ms), was localized primarily to extrastriate visual regions. In contrast, qualitatively and temporally distinct processing of large numbers, showing the signatures of approximate number representation on the mid-latency P2p (∼200-250 ms), was localized primarily to right intraparietal regions. In comparison, mid-latency small number processing was localized to the right temporal-parietal junction and left-lateralized intraparietal regions. These results add spatial information to the emerging ERP literature documenting the process by which we represent number. Furthermore, these results substantiate recent claims that early attentional processes determine whether a collection of objects will be represented through PI or as an approximate numerical magnitude by providing evidence that downstream processing diverges to distinct cortical regions. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Impaired Global, and Compensatory Local, Biological Motion Processing in People with High Levels of Autistic Traits

    PubMed Central

    van Boxtel, Jeroen J. A.; Lu, Hongjing

    2013-01-01

    People with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are hypothesized to have poor high-level processing but superior low-level processing, causing impaired social recognition, and a focus on non-social stimulus contingencies. Biological motion perception provides an ideal domain to investigate exactly how ASD modulates the interaction between low and high-level processing, because it involves multiple processing stages, and carries many important social cues. We investigated individual differences among typically developing observers in biological motion processing, and whether such individual differences associate with the number of autistic traits. In Experiment 1, we found that individuals with fewer autistic traits were automatically and involuntarily attracted to global biological motion information, whereas individuals with more autistic traits did not show this pre-attentional distraction. We employed an action adaptation paradigm in the second study to show that individuals with more autistic traits were able to compensate for deficits in global processing with an increased involvement in local processing. Our findings can be interpreted within a predictive coding framework, which characterizes the functional relationship between local and global processing stages, and explains how these stages contribute to the perceptual difficulties associated with ASD. PMID:23630514

  3. Understanding the local socio-political processes affecting conservation management outcomes in Corbett Tiger Reserve, India.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Archi; Hickey, Gordon M; Badola, Ruchi; Hussain, Syed Ainul

    2014-05-01

    Several measures have been recommended to guarantee a sustainable population of tigers: sufficient inviolate spaces for a viable population, sufficient prey populations, trained and skilled manpower to guard against poaching and intrusion, banning trade in tiger products to reduce poaching, and importantly, the political will to precipitate these recommendations into implementation. Of these, the creation of sufficient inviolate spaces (generally in the form of protected areas) has created the most issues with local resource-dependent communities, often resulting in significant challenges for tiger conservation policy and management. Very little empirical research has, however, been done to understand and contextualize the local-level socio-political interactions that may influence the efficacy of tiger conservation in India. In this paper, we present the results of exploratory research into the ways in which local-stakeholder groups affect the management of Corbett Tiger Reserve (CTR). Using a combined grounded theory-case study research design, and the Institutional Analysis and Development framework for analysis, we identify the socio-political processes through which local-stakeholder groups are able to articulate their issues and elicit desirable actions from the management of CTR. Increasing our awareness of these processes can help inform the design and implementation of more effective tiger conservation management and policy strategies that have the potential to create more supportive coalitions of tiger conservation stakeholders at the local level.

  4. Understanding the Local Socio-political Processes Affecting Conservation Management Outcomes in Corbett Tiger Reserve, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Archi; Hickey, Gordon M.; Badola, Ruchi; Hussain, Syed Ainul

    2014-05-01

    Several measures have been recommended to guarantee a sustainable population of tigers: sufficient inviolate spaces for a viable population, sufficient prey populations, trained and skilled manpower to guard against poaching and intrusion, banning trade in tiger products to reduce poaching, and importantly, the political will to precipitate these recommendations into implementation. Of these, the creation of sufficient inviolate spaces (generally in the form of protected areas) has created the most issues with local resource-dependent communities, often resulting in significant challenges for tiger conservation policy and management. Very little empirical research has, however, been done to understand and contextualize the local-level socio-political interactions that may influence the efficacy of tiger conservation in India. In this paper, we present the results of exploratory research into the ways in which local-stakeholder groups affect the management of Corbett Tiger Reserve (CTR). Using a combined grounded theory-case study research design, and the Institutional Analysis and Development framework for analysis, we identify the socio-political processes through which local-stakeholder groups are able to articulate their issues and elicit desirable actions from the management of CTR. Increasing our awareness of these processes can help inform the design and implementation of more effective tiger conservation management and policy strategies that have the potential to create more supportive coalitions of tiger conservation stakeholders at the local level.

  5. The Measurement Process in Local Quantum Physics and the EPR Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doplicher, Sergio

    2017-07-01

    We describe in a qualitative way a possible picture of the Measurement Process in Quantum Mechanics, which takes into account the finite and non zero time duration T of the interaction between the observed system and the microscopic part of the measurement apparatus; the finite space size R of that apparatus; and the fact that the macroscopic part of the measurement apparatus, having the role of amplifying the effect of that interaction to a macroscopic scale, is composed by a very large but finite number N of particles. The Schrödinger evolution of the composed system can be expected to deform into the conventional picture of the measurement, as an instantaneous action turning a pure state into a mixture, only in the limit N → ∞, T → 0, R → ∞ . Our main point is to discuss this picture for the measurement of local observables in Quantum Field Theory, where the dynamics of the theory and the measurement itself are described by the same time evolution complying with the Principle of Locality. We comment on the Einstein Podolski Rosen thought experiment, reformulated here only in terms of local observables (rather than global ones, as one particle or polarization observables).The local picture of the measurement process helps to make it clear that there is no conflict with the Principle of Locality.

  6. Effects of Local and Non-Local Processes on the Aging of the Tropopause Layer and the Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittman, J. V.; Wofsy, S. C.; Daube, B. C.; Smith, J. B.; Anderson, J. G.; Gao, R. S.; Rollins, A. W.; Thornberry, T. D.; Watts, L. A.; Hintsa, E. J.; Moore, F. L.; Elkins, J. W.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Andrews, A. E.; Atlas, E. L.; Navarro, M. A.; Schauffler, S.; Bui, T. V.; Pfister, L.; Liang, Q.; Wang, T.

    2015-12-01

    As concentrations of greenhouse gases continue to increase in the troposphere, general circulation models predict an acceleration in the Brewer-Dobson circulation (BDC). A common diagnostic used to evaluate this change in circulation is age of air, which is defined as the time elapsed since stratospheric air was last in contact with the troposphere. An acceleration in the BDC can lead to shorter residence times and hence younger age of air. This change would affect the chemical distribution of pollutants and ozone-depleting substances in the stratosphere and potentially impact the recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer. In this study, we use in-situ measurements and model outputs to derive and compare vertical profiles of age of air and to assess the impact of various dynamical processes on age of air over the tropics and Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes. We focus on measurements of winds and several tracers with varying atmospheric lifetimes recently obtained in the tropopause region and lower stratosphere during the NASA ATTREX and NASA SEAC4RS campaigns between Jan 2013 and Mar 2014. We derive age of air using CO2 measurements at the surface and at altitude. This tracer is nearly chemically inert in the atmosphere and has well-known sources at the surface: an increasing trend over time resulting from anthropogenic activity and a superimposed seasonal cycle resulting from photosynthesis and respiration by the biosphere. During the field deployments, we encountered episodes of contrasting transport and mixing processes compared to background conditions, namely local and non-local convection as identified by trajectories and distinct chemical signatures, nearby typhoons, wave activity, and shifts in large-scale circulation. In addition to aircraft measurements, we also examine data from earlier high-altitude balloon flights, which allowed us to sample deeper into the stratosphere. We complement the observations with model outputs from the NASA GEOS-5 atmospheric

  7. An improved solution of local window parameters setting for local singularity analysis based on Excel VBA batch processing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daojun; Cheng, Qiuming; Agterberg, Frits; Chen, Zhijun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper Excel VBA is used for batch calculation in Local Singularity Analysis (LSA), which is for the information extracting from different kinds of geoscience data. Capabilities and advantages of a new module called Batch Tool for Local Singularity Index Mapping (BTLSIM) are: (1) batch production of series of local singularity maps with different settings of local window size, shape and orientation parameters; (2) local parameter optimization based on statistical tests; and (3) provision of extra output layers describing how spatial changes induced by parameter optimization are related to spatial structure of the original input layers.

  8. Subcellular localization of cytoplasmic lattice-associated proteins is dependent upon fixation and processing procedures.

    PubMed

    Morency, Eric; Anguish, Lynne; Coonrod, Scott

    2011-02-16

    We and others have recently demonstrated by immuno-EM and mutation analysis that two oocyte-restricted maternal effect genes, PADI6 and MATER, localize, in part, to the oocyte cytoplasmic lattices (CPLs). During these ongoing studies, however, we found that the localization of these factors by confocal immunofluorescence (IF) analysis can vary dramatically depending upon how the oocytes and embryos are processed, with the localization pattern sometimes appearing more uniformly cytoplasmic while at other times appearing to be primarily cortical. We set out to better understand this differential staining pattern by testing a range of IF protocol parameters, changing mainly time and temperature conditions of the primary antibody solution incubation, as well as fixation methods. We found by confocal IF whole mount analysis that PADI6 and MATER localization in germinal vesicle stage oocytes is mainly cytoplasmic when the oocytes are fixed and then incubated with primary antibodies at room temperature for 1 hour, while the localization of these factors is largely limited to the cortex when the oocytes are fixed and incubated in primary antibody at 4 °C overnight. We then probed sections of fixed/embedded ovaries and isolated two-cell embryos with specific antibodies and found that, under these conditions, PADI6 and MATER were again primarily cytoplasmically localized, although the staining for these factors is slightly more cortical at the two-cell stage. Taken together, our results suggest that the localization of CPL-associated proteins by confocal IF is particularly affected by processing conditions. Further, based on our current observations, it appears that PADI6 and MATER are primarily distributed throughout the cytoplasm as opposed to the oocyte subcortex.

  9. Effects of local and global context on processing sentences with subject and object relative clauses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fang; Mo, Lun; Louwerse, Max M

    2013-06-01

    An eye tracking study investigated the effects of local and global discourse context on the processing of subject and object relative clauses, whereby the contexts favored either a subject relative clause interpretation or an object relative clause interpretation. The fixation data replicated previous studies showing that object relative clause sentences were more difficult to process than subject relative sentences. Crucially, however, the reading difficulty asymmetry between subject and object relative clause sentences disappeared when the sentences were presented with a local or a global discourse context that favored the objects in the object relative clauses. These findings demonstrate that the evidence for a syntax-based account of sentence processing is found when sentences are presented in isolation. However, if sentences are placed more naturally, in context, discourse factors outweigh the initial structural assignment.

  10. Spread spectrum fiber-optic local area network using optical processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prucnal, P. R.; Santoro, M. A.; Fan, T. R.

    1986-01-01

    Spread spectrum code division multiple access (CDMA) allows asynchronous multiple access to a local area network (LAN) with no waiting. The additional bandwidth required by spread spectrum can be accommodated by using a fiber-optic channel and incoherent optical signal processing. New CDMA sequences are designed specifically for optical processing. It is shown that increasing the number of chips per bit, by using optical processing, allows an increase in capacity of a CDMA LAN. An experiment is performed demonstrating the performance of an optical CDMA LAN, operating at 100 Mbd with three users.

  11. Atypical Local Interference Affects Global Processing in Children with Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    PubMed

    Payne, Jonathan M; Porter, Melanie A; Bzishvili, Samantha; North, Kathryn N

    2017-05-01

    To examine hierarchical visuospatial processing in children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a single gene disorder associated with visuospatial impairments, attention deficits, and executive dysfunction. We used a modified Navon paradigm consisting of a large "global" shape composed of smaller "local" shapes that were either congruent (same) or incongruent (different) to the global shape. Participants were instructed to name either the global or local shape within a block. Reaction times, interference ratios, and error rates of children with NF1 (n=30) and typically developing controls (n=24) were compared. Typically developing participants demonstrated the expected global processing bias evidenced by a vulnerability to global interference when naming local stimuli without a cost of congruence when naming global stimuli. NF1 participants, however, experienced significant interference from the unattended level when naming both local and global levels of the stimuli. Findings suggest that children with NF1 do not demonstrate the typical human bias of processing visual information from a global perspective. (JINS, 2017, 23, 446-450).

  12. Development of the reverse passive latex agglutination method for the detection and quantification of the genus Nitrospira in the wastewater treatment process.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Takekazu; Nagai, Fumiko; Yamamoto, Shuta; Hashimoto, Toshikazu; Ito, Masahiko; Sawada, Haruji

    2008-02-01

    This report describes a new immunological method for the detection and quantification of Nitrospira populations using the reverse passive latex agglutination (RPLA). The numbers of the genus Nitrospira have been quantified only by molecular biological techniques such as FISH and quantitative PCR to date. Using high-density latex particles and a specific polyclonal antibody, Nitrospira populations in the wastewater treatment process were quantified in the shortest 4 h of incubation. The minimum detectable number of Nitrospira cells was 7.0x10(5) (log(10) 5.85) cells/ml. It is thought that the RPLA method can quantify Nitrospira populations more simply, economically, and speedily than molecular biological techniques or the culture method, because this procedure has a simple protocol and does not require the use of specialized equipment, expensive reagents, or technical skill. Therefore it is applicable for use in the everyday control and maintenance of water quality in wastewater treatment facilities where equipment is not sufficient or in the field.

  13. Wavelength tuning of planar photonic crystals by local processing of individual holes.

    PubMed

    Kicken, H H J E; Alkemade, P F A; van der Heijden, R W; Karouta, F; Nötzel, R; van der Drift, E; Salemink, H W M

    2009-11-23

    Tuning of the resonant wavelength of a single hole defect cavity in planar photonic crystals was demonstrated using transmission spectroscopy. Local post-production processing of single holes in a planar photonic crystal is carried out after selectively opening a masking layer by focused ion beam milling. The resonance was blue-shifted by enlargement of selected holes using local wet chemical etching and red-shifted by infiltration with liquid crystals. This method can be applied to precisely control the resonant frequency, and can also be used for mode selective tuning.

  14. Global-local visual processing impacts risk taking behaviors, but only at first

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Stephen Wee Hun; Yuen, Alexander Y. L.; Tong, Eddie M. W.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the impact of early visual processing on decision-making during unpredictable, risky situations. Participants undertook Navon’s (1977) task and attended to either global letters or local letters only, following which they completed the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART). It was observed that global-focused individuals made more balloon pumps during the BART (i.e., took more risk), whereas local-focused individuals took less risk, albeit only initially. The theory of predictive and reactive control systems (PARCS) provides an excellent account of the data. Implications and future directions are discussed. PMID:26379586

  15. The cold land processes experiment (CLPX) local scale observatin site (LSOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, K. C.; Hardy, J. P.; Cline, D.; Elder, K.; Davis, R.; Pomeroy, J.; Koh, G.; Armstrong, R.; Koike, T.

    2002-01-01

    The Local Scale Observation Site (LSOS) is the smallest study site of the Cold LandProcesses Experiment (CLPX) and is located within the Fraser Meso-cell Study Area (MSA), near the Fraser Experimental Forest Headquarters Facility, in Fraser, CO USA.The 100-m x 100-m site consists of a small open field, a managed dense canopy and an open, mixed age canopy. Unlike the other components of the experiment, which focus on spatial distributions at relatively brief snapshots in time, measurements at the local scale site focused on the temporal domain.

  16. The cold land processes experiment (CLPX) local scale observatin site (LSOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, K. C.; Hardy, J. P.; Cline, D.; Elder, K.; Davis, R.; Pomeroy, J.; Koh, G.; Armstrong, R.; Koike, T.

    2002-01-01

    The Local Scale Observation Site (LSOS) is the smallest study site of the Cold LandProcesses Experiment (CLPX) and is located within the Fraser Meso-cell Study Area (MSA), near the Fraser Experimental Forest Headquarters Facility, in Fraser, CO USA.The 100-m x 100-m site consists of a small open field, a managed dense canopy and an open, mixed age canopy. Unlike the other components of the experiment, which focus on spatial distributions at relatively brief snapshots in time, measurements at the local scale site focused on the temporal domain.

  17. Low-Temperature Process for Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposition of an Al2O3 Passivation Layer for Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoonbae; Lee, Jihye; Sohn, Sunyoung; Jung, Donggeun

    2016-05-01

    Flexible organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells have drawn extensive attention due to their light weight, cost efficiency, portability, and so on. However, OPV cells degrade quickly due to organic damage by water vapor or oxygen penetration when the devices are driven in the atmosphere without a passivation layer. In order to prevent damage due to water vapor or oxygen permeation into the devices, passivation layers have been introduced through methods such as sputtering, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD). In this work, the structural and chemical properties of Al2O3 films, deposited via ALCVD at relatively low temperatures of 109 degrees C, 200 degrees C, and 300 degrees C, are analyzed. In our experiment, trimethylaluminum (TMA) and H2O were used as precursors for Al2O3 film deposition via ALCVD. All of the Al2O3 films showed very smooth, featureless surfaces without notable defects. However, we found that the plastic flexible substrate of an OPV device passivated with 300 degrees C deposition temperature was partially bended and melted, indicating that passivation layers for OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates need to be formed at temperatures lower than 300 degrees C. The OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates were passivated by the Al2O3 film deposited at the temperature of 109 degrees C. Thereafter, the photovoltaic properties of passivated OPV cells were investigated as a function of exposure time under the atmosphere.

  18. The Role of Musical Experience in Hemispheric Lateralization of Global and Local Auditory Processing.

    PubMed

    Black, Emily; Stevenson, Jennifer L; Bish, Joel P

    2017-01-01

    The global precedence effect is a phenomenon in which global aspects of visual and auditory stimuli are processed before local aspects. Individuals with musical experience perform better on all aspects of auditory tasks compared with individuals with less musical experience. The hemispheric lateralization of this auditory processing is less well-defined. The present study aimed to replicate the global precedence effect with auditory stimuli and to explore the lateralization of global and local auditory processing in individuals with differing levels of musical experience. A total of 38 college students completed an auditory-directed attention task while electroencephalography was recorded. Individuals with low musical experience responded significantly faster and more accurately in global trials than in local trials regardless of condition, and significantly faster and more accurately when pitches traveled in the same direction (compatible condition) than when pitches traveled in two different directions (incompatible condition) consistent with a global precedence effect. In contrast, individuals with high musical experience showed less of a global precedence effect with regards to accuracy, but not in terms of reaction time, suggesting an increased ability to overcome global bias. Further, a difference in P300 latency between hemispheres was observed. These findings provide a preliminary neurological framework for auditory processing of individuals with differing degrees of musical experience.

  19. Enhanced local processing of dynamic visual information in autism: evidence from speed discrimination.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Norton, D J; McBain, R; Gold, J; Frazier, J A; Coyle, J T

    2012-04-01

    An important issue for understanding visual perception in autism concerns whether individuals with this neurodevelopmental disorder possess an advantage in processing local visual information, and if so, what is the nature of this advantage. Perception of movement speed is a visual process that relies on computation of local spatiotemporal signals but requires the comparison of information from more than a single spatial location or temporal point. This study examined speed discrimination in adolescents (ages 13-18 years old) with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Compared to healthy controls (n=17), individuals with ASD (n=19) showed similarly precise speed discrimination when two comparison motion stimuli (random dot patterns) were presented closely in time (0.5s). With a longer temporal interval (3s) between the motion stimuli, individuals with ASD outperformed healthy controls on speed discrimination. On a second task--global motion perception--in which individuals were asked to detect coherent motion, individuals with ASD exhibited slightly degraded performance levels. The observed temporally selective enhancement in speed discrimination indicates that a local processing advantage in autism develops over a longer temporal range and is not limited to the spatial domain. These results suggest a dynamic perceptual mechanism for understanding, and therapeutically addressing, atypical visual processing in this neurodevelopmental disorder.

  20. Local and global processing in block design tasks in children with dyslexia or nonverbal learning disability.

    PubMed

    Cardillo, Ramona; Mammarella, Irene C; Garcia, Ricardo Basso; Cornoldi, Cesare

    2017-04-02

    Visuo-constructive and perceptual abilities have been poorly investigated in children with learning disabilities. The present study focused on local or global visuospatial processing in children with nonverbal learning disability (NLD) and dyslexia compared with typically-developing (TD) controls. Participants were presented with a modified block design task (BDT), in both a typical visuo-constructive version that involves reconstructing figures from blocks, and a perceptual version in which respondents must rapidly match unfragmented figures with a corresponding fragmented target figure. The figures used in the tasks were devised by manipulating two variables: the perceptual cohesiveness and the task uncertainty, stimulating global or local processes. Our results confirmed that children with NLD had more problems with the visuo-constructive version of the task, whereas those with dyslexia showed only a slight difficulty with the visuo-constructive version, but were in greater difficulty with the perceptual version, especially in terms of response times. These findings are interpreted in relation to the slower visual processing speed of children with dyslexia, and to the visuo-constructive problems and difficulty in using flexibly-experienced global vs local processes of children with NLD. The clinical and educational implications of these findings are discussed.

  1. Passive storage technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, P.

    1984-01-01

    Advances in storage technology and how passive techniques could be applied to the storage of propellants at the space station are described. The devices considered are passive orbital disconnect struts, cooled shield optimization, liftweight shields and catalytic converters.

  2. Tropospheric Passive Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keafer, L. S., Jr. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The long term role of airborne/spaceborne passive remote sensing systems for tropospheric air quality research and the identification of technology advances required to improve the performance of passive remote sensing systems were discussed.

  3. Passive Acoustic Detection and Localization of Mesoplodon Densirostris (Blainville’s Beaked Whale) Vocalization Using Distributed Bottom-Mounted Hydrophones in Conjunction With a Digital Tag (DTAG) Recording

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    éventail de référence situé dans la Langue de l’océan, Bahamas. Deux détecteurs, une transformation rapide de Fourier (FFT) basée détecteur et filtre ... filtre adapté est la plus performante, ce qui permet à 92% des animaux marqués de clics pour être détectés sur au moins un des hydrophones. Time...to time-synchronized 3D localizations by adjusting the swim speed to a least-squares match (Figure 11). Figure 10: Original DTag Kalman -filtered

  4. Local and Global Visual Processing in Autism Spectrum Disorders: Influence of Task and Sample Characteristics and Relation to Symptom Severity.

    PubMed

    Van Eylen, Lien; Boets, Bart; Steyaert, Jean; Wagemans, Johan; Noens, Ilse

    2015-08-02

    Local and global visual processing abilities and processing style were investigated in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) versus typically developing individuals, children versus adolescents and boys versus girls. Individuals with ASD displayed more attention to detail in daily life, while laboratory tasks showed slightly reduced global processing abilities, intact local processing abilities, and a more locally oriented processing style. However, the presence of these group differences depended on particular task and sample (i.e., age and gender) characteristics. Most measures of local and global processing did not correlate with each other and were not associated with processing style. Significant associations between local-global processing and ASD symptom severity were observed, but the causality of these associations remains unclear.

  5. Human motion tracking by temporal-spatial local gaussian process experts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu; Fu, Yun; Liu, Yuncai

    2011-04-01

    Human pose estimation via motion tracking systems can be considered as a regression problem within a discriminative framework. It is always a challenging task to model the mapping from observation space to state space because of the high-dimensional characteristic in the multimodal conditional distribution. In order to build the mapping, existing techniques usually involve a large set of training samples in the learning process which are limited in their capability to deal with multimodality. We propose, in this work, a novel online sparse Gaussian Process (GP) regression model to recover 3-D human motion in monocular videos. Particularly, we investigate the fact that for a given test input, its output is mainly determined by the training samples potentially residing in its local neighborhood and defined in the unified input-output space. This leads to a local mixture GP experts system composed of different local GP experts, each of which dominates a mapping behavior with the specific covariance function adapting to a local region. To handle the multimodality, we combine both temporal and spatial information therefore to obtain two categories of local experts. The temporal and spatial experts are integrated into a seamless hybrid system, which is automatically self-initialized and robust for visual tracking of nonlinear human motion. Learning and inference are extremely efficient as all the local experts are defined online within very small neighborhoods. Extensive experiments on two real-world databases, HumanEva and PEAR, demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed model, which significantly improve the performance of existing models.

  6. SU-E-T-61: A Practical Process for Fabricating Passive Scatter Proton Beam Modulation Compensation Filters Using 3D Printing

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, T; Drzymala, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this project was to devise a practical fabrication process for passive scatter proton beam compensation filters (CF) that is competitive in time, cost and effort using 3D printing. Methods: DICOM compensator filter files for a proton beam were generated by our Eclipse (Varian, Inc.) treatment planning system. The compensator thickness specifications were extracted with in-house software written in Matlab (MathWorks, Inc.) code and written to a text file which could be read by the Rhinoceros 5, computer-aided design (CAD) package (Robert McNeel and Associates), which subsequently generated a smoothed model in a STereoLithographic also known as a Standard Tesselation Language file (STL). The model in the STL file was subsequently refined using Netfabb software and then converted to printing instructions using Cura. version 15.02.1. for our 3D printer. The Airwolf3D, model HD2x, fused filament fabrication (FFF) 3D printer (Airwolf3D.com) was used for our fabrication system with a print speed of 150mm per second. It can print in over 22 different plastic filament materials in a build volume of 11” x 8” x 12”. We choose ABS plastic to print the 3D model of the imprint for our CFs. Results: Prints of the CF could be performed at a print speed of 70mm per second. The time to print the 3D topology for the CF for the 14 cm diameter snout of our Mevion 250 proton accelerator was less than 3 hours. The printed model is intended to subsequently be used as a mold to imprint a molten wax cylindrical to form the compensation after cooling. The whole process should be performed for a typical 3 beam treatment plan within a day. Conclusion: Use of 3D printing is practical and can be used to print a 3D model of a CF within a few hours.

  7. The effect of science learning integrated with local potential to improve science process skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahardini, Riris Riezqia Budy; Suryadarma, I. Gusti Putu; Wilujeng, Insih

    2017-08-01

    This research was aimed to know the effectiveness of science learning that integrated with local potential to improve student`s science process skill. The research was quasi experiment using non-equivalent control group design. The research involved all student of Muhammadiyah Imogiri Junior High School on grade VII as a population. The sample in this research was selected through cluster random sampling, namely VII B (experiment group) and VII C (control group). Instrument that used in this research is a nontest instrument (science process skill observation's form) adapted Desak Megawati's research (2016). The aspect of science process skills were making observation and communication. The data were using univariat (ANOVA) analyzed at 0,05 significance level and normalized gain score for science process skill increase's category. The result is science learning that integrated with local potential was effective to improve science process skills of student (Sig. 0,00). This learning can increase science process skill, shown by a normalized gain score value at 0,63 (medium category) in experiment group and 0,29 (low category) in control group.

  8. Place as a social space: fields of encounter relating to the local sustainability process.

    PubMed

    Dumreicher, Heidi; Kolb, Bettina

    2008-04-01

    The paper shows how sustainability questions relate to the local space. The local place is not a static entity, but a dynamic one, undergoing constant changes, and it is the rapid social and material processes within the given local situation that is a challenge for the Chinese villages and their integrity. The following article considers the cohesion between the dwellers' emotional co-ownership of their local space and the sustainability process as a driving force in social, economic and ecological development. We bring together the classification of the seven fields of encounter, which were developed out of the empirical data of the Chinese case study villages, and sustainability oriented management considerations for all levels of this concept. We do not pretend to know the solutions, but describe a set of interrelated fields that can be anchor points for placing the solutions and show in which fields action and intervention is possible. In our concept of sustainability, every spatial field has its special meaning, needs special measures and policies and has different connotations to concepts like responsibility, family values or communication systems. We see the social sustainability process as a support for the empowerment of the local dwellers, and the SUCCESS research has encouraged the villages to find suitable sustainability oriented solutions for their natural and societal situation. Before entering the discussion about the chances and potential of a sustainability approach for the Chinese villages, it is first necessary to accept the fact that rural villages play a primordial role in Chinese society and that their potential can strengthen future pathways for China.

  9. Angioedema attacks in patients with hereditary angioedema: Local manifestations of a systemic activation process.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Zonne L M; Relan, Anurag; Zeerleder, Sacha; Drouet, Christian; Zuraw, Bruce; Hack, C Erik

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) caused by a deficiency of functional C1-inhibitor (C1INH) becomes clinically manifest as attacks of angioedema. C1INH is the main inhibitor of the contact system. Poor control of a local activation process of this system at the site of the attack is believed to lead to the formation of bradykinin (BK), which increases local vasopermeability and mediates angioedema on interaction with BK receptor 2 on the endothelium. However, several observations in patients with HAE are difficult to explain from a pathogenic model claiming a local activation process at the site of the angioedema attack. Therefore we postulate an alternative model for angioedema attacks in patients with HAE, which assumes a systemic, fluid-phase activation of the contact system to generate BK and its breakdown products. Interaction of these peptides with endothelial receptors that are locally expressed in the affected tissues rather than with receptors constitutively expressed by the endothelium throughout the whole body explains that such a systemic activation process results in local manifestations of an attack. In particular, BK receptor 1, which is induced on the endothelium by inflammatory stimuli, such as kinins and cytokines, meets the specifications of the involved receptor. The pathogenic model discussed here also provides an explanation for why angioedema can occur at multiple sites during an attack and why HAE attacks respond well to modest increases of circulating C1INH activity levels because inhibition of fluid-phase Factor XIIa and kallikrein requires lower C1INH levels than inhibition of activator-bound factors.

  10. Local Versus Global Effects of Isoflurane Anesthesia on Visual Processing in the Fly Brain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract What characteristics of neural activity distinguish the awake and anesthetized brain? Drugs such as isoflurane abolish behavioral responsiveness in all animals, implying evolutionarily conserved mechanisms. However, it is unclear whether this conservation is reflected at the level of neural activity. Studies in humans have shown that anesthesia is characterized by spatially distinct spectral and coherence signatures that have also been implicated in the global impairment of cortical communication. We questioned whether anesthesia has similar effects on global and local neural processing in one of the smallest brains, that of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster). Using a recently developed multielectrode technique, we recorded local field potentials from different areas of the fly brain simultaneously, while manipulating the concentration of isoflurane. Flickering visual stimuli (‘frequency tags’) allowed us to track evoked responses in the frequency domain and measure the effects of isoflurane throughout the brain. We found that isoflurane reduced power and coherence at the tagging frequency (13 or 17 Hz) in central brain regions. Unexpectedly, isoflurane increased power and coherence at twice the tag frequency (26 or 34 Hz) in the optic lobes of the fly, but only for specific stimulus configurations. By modeling the periodic responses, we show that the increase in power in peripheral areas can be attributed to local neuroanatomy. We further show that the effects on coherence can be explained by impacted signal-to-noise ratios. Together, our results show that general anesthesia has distinct local and global effects on neuronal processing in the fruit fly brain. PMID:27517084

  11. Structural damage localization by outlier analysis of signal-processed mode shapes - Analytical and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulriksen, M. D.; Damkilde, L.

    2016-02-01

    Contrary to global modal parameters such as eigenfrequencies, mode shapes inherently provide structural information on a local level. Therefore, this particular modal parameter and its derivatives are utilized extensively for damage identification. Typically, more or less advanced mathematical methods are employed to identify damage-induced discontinuities in the spatial mode shape signals, hereby, potentially, facilitating damage detection and/or localization. However, by being based on distinguishing damage-induced discontinuities from other signal irregularities, an intrinsic deficiency in these methods is the high sensitivity towards measurement noise. In the present paper, a damage localization method which, compared to the conventional mode shape-based methods, has greatly enhanced robustness towards measurement noise is proposed. The method is based on signal processing of a spatial mode shape by means of continuous wavelet transformation (CWT) and subsequent application of a generalized discrete Teager-Kaiser energy operator (GDTKEO) to identify damage-induced mode shape discontinuities. In order to evaluate whether the identified discontinuities are in fact damage-induced, outlier analysis is conducted by applying the Mahalanobis metric to major principal scores of the sensor-located bands of the signal-processed mode shape. The method is tested analytically and benchmarked with other mode shape-based damage localization approaches on the basis of a free-vibrating beam and validated experimentally in the context of a residential-sized wind turbine blade subjected to an impulse load.

  12. BicD-dependent localization processes: from Drosophilia development to human cell biology.

    PubMed

    Claussen, Maike; Suter, Beat

    2005-11-01

    Many eukaryotic cells depend on proper cell polarization for their development and physiological function. The establishment of these polarities often involve the subcellular localization of a specific subset of proteins, RNAs and organelles. In Drosophila, the microtubule-dependent BicD (BicaudalD) localization machinery is involved in the proper localization of mRNA during oogenesis and embryogenesis and the proper positioning of the oocyte and photoreceptor nuclei. BicD acts together with the minus-end directed motor dynein as well as Egl and Lis-1. The finding that the mammalian homologs of BicD function in retrograde Golgi-to-ER transport has supported the view that BicD may be part of a repeatedly used and evolutionary conserved localization machinery. In this review we focus on the various processes in which BicD is involved during Drosophilian development and in mammals. In addition, we evaluate the interactions between BicD, the dynein localization machinery and associated factors.

  13. GWM-2005 - A Groundwater-Management Process for MODFLOW-2005 with Local Grid Refinement (LGR) Capability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahlfeld, David P.; Baker, Kristine M.; Barlow, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the Groundwater-Management (GWM) Process for MODFLOW-2005, the 2005 version of the U.S. Geological Survey modular three-dimensional groundwater model. GWM can solve a broad range of groundwater-management problems by combined use of simulation- and optimization-modeling techniques. These problems include limiting groundwater-level declines or streamflow depletions, managing groundwater withdrawals, and conjunctively using groundwater and surface-water resources. GWM was initially released for the 2000 version of MODFLOW. Several modifications and enhancements have been made to GWM since its initial release to increase the scope of the program's capabilities and to improve its operation and reporting of results. The new code, which is called GWM-2005, also was designed to support the local grid refinement capability of MODFLOW-2005. Local grid refinement allows for the simulation of one or more higher resolution local grids (referred to as child models) within a coarser grid parent model. Local grid refinement is often needed to improve simulation accuracy in regions where hydraulic gradients change substantially over short distances or in areas requiring detailed representation of aquifer heterogeneity. GWM-2005 can be used to formulate and solve groundwater-management problems that include components in both parent and child models. Although local grid refinement increases simulation accuracy, it can also substantially increase simulation run times.

  14. NASA Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX 2002/03): Local scale observation site

    Treesearch

    Janet Hardy; Robert Davis; Yeohoon Koh; Don Cline; Kelly Elder; Richard Armstrong; Hans-Peter Marshall; Thomas Painter; Gilles Castres Saint-Martin; Roger DeRoo; Kamal Sarabandi; Tobias Graf; Toshio Koike; Kyle McDonald

    2008-01-01

    The local scale observation site (LSOS) is the smallest study site (0.8 ha) of the 2002/03 Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX) and is located within the Fraser mesocell study area. It was the most intensively measured site of the CLPX, and measurements here had the greatest temporal component of all CLPX sites. Measurements made at the LSOS were designed to produce a...

  15. Method of Relaxation Moments for Studying Nonlinear Locally Nonequilibrium Processes of Transfer of Polymeric Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, V. I.

    2015-01-01

    A method for simulating the processes of transfer of thermodynamic systems with polymeric microstructure is considered. The method is based on the classical locally equilibrium medium-state entropy concept expanded by the introduction of a structural tensor parameter whose evolution characterizes the nonlinear anisotropic relaxation properties of a thermodynamic system and the associated transfer phenomena. The dynamic, thermal, and mass transfer characteristics of macrotransfer are determined by corresponding integrals of relaxation moments.

  16. Fabrication Process of Fine Electrodes Using Shadow Mask Evaporation and Tip-Induced Local Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akai, Tomonori; Abe, Takumi; Ishibashi, Masayoshi; Kato, Midori; Heike, Seiji; Shimomura, Takeshi; Okai, Makoto; Hashizume, Tomihiro; Ito, Kohzo

    2002-07-01

    We report on a simple process for fabricating fine electrodes by using shadow mask evaporation and tip-induced local oxidation. A set of electrodes for four-term resistance measurement has been fabricated. The gap width between the fine electrode was 150 nm and the roughness of the electrode surface was less than 0.5 nm. We were able to use the electrodes to measure the conductivity of a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT).

  17. Alterations to global but not local motion processing in long-term ecstasy (MDMA) users.

    PubMed

    White, Claire; Brown, John; Edwards, Mark

    2014-07-01

    Growing evidence indicates that the main psychoactive ingredient in the illegal drug "ecstasy" (methylendioxymethamphetamine) causes reduced activity in the serotonin and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) systems in humans. On the basis of substantial serotonin input to the occipital lobe, recent research investigated visual processing in long-term users and found a larger magnitude of the tilt aftereffect, interpreted to reflect broadened orientation tuning bandwidths. Further research found higher orientation discrimination thresholds and reduced long-range interactions in the primary visual area of ecstasy users. The aim of the present research was to investigate whether serotonin-mediated V1 visual processing deficits in ecstasy users extend to motion processing mechanisms. Forty-five participants (21 controls, 24 drug users) completed two psychophysical studies: A direction discrimination study directly measured local motion processing in V1, while a motion coherence task tested global motion processing in area V5/MT. "Primary" ecstasy users (n = 18), those without substantial polydrug use, had significantly lower global motion thresholds than controls [p = 0.027, Cohen's d = 0.78 (large)], indicating increased sensitivity to global motion stimuli, but no difference in local motion processing (p = 0.365). These results extend on previous research investigating the long-term effects of illicit drugs on visual processing. Two possible explanations are explored: defuse attentional processes may be facilitating spatial pooling of motion signals in users. Alternatively, it may be that a GABA-mediated disruption to V5/MT processing is reducing spatial suppression and therefore improving global motion perception in ecstasy users.

  18. A model of motion transparency processing with local center-surround interactions and feedback.

    PubMed

    Raudies, Florian; Mingolla, Ennio; Neumann, Heiko

    2011-11-01

    Motion transparency occurs when multiple coherent motions are perceived in one spatial location. Imagine, for instance, looking out of the window of a bus on a bright day, where the world outside the window is passing by and movements of passengers inside the bus are reflected in the window. The overlay of both motions at the window leads to motion transparency, which is challenging to process. Noisy and ambiguous motion signals can be reduced using a competition mechanism for all encoded motions in one spatial location. Such a competition, however, leads to the suppression of multiple peak responses that encode different motions, as only the strongest response tends to survive. As a solution, we suggest a local center-surround competition for population-encoded motion directions and speeds. Similar motions are supported, and dissimilar ones are separated, by representing them as multiple activations, which occurs in the case of motion transparency. Psychophysical findings, such as motion attraction and repulsion for motion transparency displays, can be explained by this local competition. Besides this local competition mechanism, we show that feedback signals improve the processing of motion transparency. A discrimination task for transparent versus opaque motion is simulated, where motion transparency is generated by superimposing large field motion patterns of either varying size or varying coherence of motion. The model's perceptual thresholds with and without feedback are calculated. We demonstrate that initially weak peak responses can be enhanced and stabilized through modulatory feedback signals from higher stages of processing.

  19. Data Processing Approach for Localizing Bio-magnetic Sources in the Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Hung-I.; Tseng, Chih-Yuan; Lee, H. C.

    2007-07-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) provides dynamic spatial-temporal insight for neural activities in the cortex. Because the possible number of sources is far greater than the number of MEG detectors, the proposition to localize sources directly from MEG data is ill-posed. Here we develop a novel approach based on a sequence of data processing procedures that includes a clustering process, an intersection analysis, and an application of the maximum entropy method. We examine the performance of our method and compare it with the minimum-norm least-square inverse method using an artificial noisy MEG data.

  20. Tracking marine mammals using passive acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosal, Eva-Marie

    2007-12-01

    It is difficult to study the behavior and physiology of marine mammals or to understand and mitigate human impact on them because much of their lives are spent underwater. Since sound propagates for long distances in the ocean and since many cetaceans are vocal, passive acoustics is a valuable tool for studying and monitoring their behavior. After a brief introduction to and review of passive acoustic tracking methods, this dissertation develops and applies two new methods. Both methods use widely-spaced (tens of kilometers) bottom-mounted hydrophone arrays, as well as propagation models that account for depth-dependent sound speed profiles. The first passive acoustic tracking method relies on arrival times of direct and surface-reflected paths. It is used to track a sperm whale using 5 at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) and gives position estimates that are accurate to within 10 meters. With such accuracy, the whale's pitch and yaw are estimated by assuming that its main axis (which points from the tail to the rostrum) is parallel to its velocity. Roll is found by fitting the details of the pulses within each sperm whale click to the so-called bent horn model of sperm whale sound production. Finally, given the position and orientation of the whale, its beam pattern is reconstructed and found to be highly directional with an intense forward directed component. Pair-wise spectrogram (PWS) processing is the second passive acoustic tracking method developed in this dissertation. Although it is computationally more intensive, PWS has several advantages over arrival-time tracking methods, especially in shallow water environments, for long duration calls, and for multiple-animal datasets, as is the case for humpback whales on Hawaiian breeding grounds. Results of simulations with realistic noise conditions and environmental mismatch are given and compared to other passive localization techniques. When applied to the AUTEC sperm whale dataset, PWS

  1. Health and equity in all policies in local government: processes and outcomes in two Norwegian municipalities.

    PubMed

    Von Heimburg, Dina; Hakkebo, Berit

    2017-08-01

    To identify key factors in implementing Health and Equity in All Policies (HEiAP) at the local level in two Norwegian municipalities in order to accelerate the progress of promoting health, well-being and equity in other local governments. This case study is presented as a narrative from policy-making processes in two Norwegian municipalities. The story is told from an insider perspective, with a focus on HEiAP policy makers in these two municipalities. The narrative identified key learning from implementing HEiAP at the local level, i.e. the importance of strengthening system and human capacities. System capacity is strengthened by governing HEiAP according to national legislation and a holistic governance system at the local level. Municipal plans are based on theory, evidence and local data. A 'main story' is developed to support the vision, defining joint societal goals and co-creation strategies. Policies are anchored by measuring and monitoring outcomes, sharing accountability and continuous dialogue to ensure political commitment. Human capacity is strengthened through participatory leadership, soft skills and health promotion competences across sectors. Health promotion competence at a strategic level in the organization, participation in professional networks, crowd sourcing toward common goals, and commitment through winning hearts and minds of politicians and other stakeholders are vital aspects. Our experience pinpoints the importance of strengthening system and human capacity in local governments. Further, we found it important to focus on the two strategic objectives in the European strategy 'Health 2020': (1) Improving health for all and reducing health inequalities; (2) improving leadership and participatory governance for health.

  2. Early vestibular processing does not discriminate active from passive self-motion if there is a discrepancy between predicted and actual proprioceptive feedback.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Jessica X; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2014-06-15

    Most of our sensory experiences are gained by active exploration of the world. While the ability to distinguish sensory inputs resulting of our own actions (termed reafference) from those produced externally (termed exafference) is well established, the neural mechanisms underlying this distinction are not fully understood. We have previously proposed that vestibular signals arising from self-generated movements are inhibited by a mechanism that compares the internal prediction of the proprioceptive consequences of self-motion to the actual feedback. Here we directly tested this proposal by recording from single neurons in monkey during vestibular stimulation that was externally produced and/or self-generated. We show for the first time that vestibular reafference is equivalently canceled for self-generated sensory stimulation produced by activation of the neck musculature (head-on-body motion), or axial musculature (combined head and body motion), when there is no discrepancy between the predicted and actual proprioceptive consequences of self-motion. However, if a discrepancy does exist, central vestibular neurons no longer preferentially encode vestibular exafference. Specifically, when simultaneous active and passive motion resulted in activation of the same muscle proprioceptors, neurons robustly encoded the total vestibular input (i.e., responses to vestibular reafference and exafference were equally strong), rather than exafference alone. Taken together, our results show that the cancellation of vestibular reafference in early vestibular processing requires an explicit match between expected and actual proprioceptive feedback. We propose that this vital neuronal computation, necessary for both accurate sensory perception and motor control, has important implications for a variety of sensory systems that suppress self-generated signals. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Knowledge in process? Exploring barriers between epidemiological research and local health policy development

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the Netherlands municipalities are legally required to draw up a Local Health Policy Memorandum every four years. This policy memorandum should be based on (local) epidemiological research as performed by the Regional Health Services. However, it is largely unknown if and in what way epidemiological research is used during local policy development. As part of a larger study on knowledge utilization at the local level in The Netherlands, an analytical framework on the use of epidemiological research in local health policy development in the Netherlands is presented here. Method Based on a literature search and a short inventory on experiences from Regional Health Services, we made a description of existing research utilization models and concepts about research utilization. Subsequently we mapped different barriers in research transmission. Results The interaction model is regarded as the main explanatory model. It acknowledges the interactive and incremental nature of policy development, which takes place in a context and includes diversity within the groups of researchers and policymakers. This fits well in the dynamic and complex setting of local Dutch health policy. For the conceptual framework we propose a network approach, in which we "extend" the interaction model. We not only focus on the one-to-one relation between an individual researcher and policymaker but include interactions between several actors participating in the research and policy process. In this model interaction between actors in the research and the policy network is expected to improve research utilization. Interaction can obstruct or promote four clusters of barriers between research and policy: expectations, transfer issues, acceptance, and interpretation. These elements of interactions and barriers provide an actual explanation of research utilization. Research utilization itself can be measured on the individual level of actors and on a policy process level. Conclusion The

  4. Effect of high-pressure processing of bovine colostrum on immunoglobulin G concentration, pathogens, viscosity, and transfer of passive immunity to calves.

    PubMed

    Foster, Derek M; Poulsen, Keith P; Sylvester, Hannah J; Jacob, Megan E; Casulli, Kaitlyn E; Farkas, Brian E

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of high-pressure processing on the immunoglobulin concentration, microbial load, viscosity, and transfer of passive immunity to calves when applied to bovine colostrum as an alternative to thermal pasteurization. A pilot study using Staphylococcus aureus was conducted to determine which pressure-time treatments are most appropriate for use with bovine colostrum, with the goals of maximizing bacterial inactivation while minimizing IgG content and viscosity changes. Following the pilot study, an inoculation study was conducted in which first-milking colostrum samples from Holstein-Friesian cows were inoculated with known concentrations of various bacteria or viruses and pressure processed at either 300 MPa for up to 60min or at 400MPa for up to 30min. The recovery of total native aerobic bacteria, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica serovar Dublin, Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis, bovine herpesvirus type 1, and feline calicivirus were determined after processing. Colostrum IgG content was measured before and after pressure processing. Shear stress and viscosity for each treatment was determined over shear rates encompassing those found during calf feeding and at normal bovine body temperature (37.8°C). Following a calf trial, serum IgG concentration was measured in 14 calves fed 4 L of colostrum pressure processed at 400MPa for 15min. In the pilot study, S. aureus was effectively reduced with pressure treatment at 300 and 400MPa (0, 5, 10, 15, 30, and 45min), with 2 treatments at 400MPa (30, 45min) determined to be inappropriate for use with bovine colostrum due to viscosity and IgG changes. High-pressure processing at 300MPa (30, 45, and 60min) and 400MPa (10, 15, and 20min) was shown to effectively reduce total native aerobic bacteria, E. coli, Salmonella Dublin, bovine herpesvirus type 1, and feline calicivirus populations in bovine colostrum, but no decrease occurred in Mycobacterium avium ssp

  5. Techniques for Processing Eyes Implanted With a Retinal Prosthesis for Localized Histopathological Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nayagam, David A. X.; McGowan, Ceara; Villalobos, Joel; Williams, Richard A.; Salinas-LaRosa, Cesar; McKelvie, Penny; Lo, Irene; Basa, Meri; Tan, Justin; Williams, Chris E.

    2013-01-01

    With the recent development of retinal prostheses, it is important to develop reliable techniques for assessing the safety of these devices in preclinical studies. However, the standard fixation, preparation, and automated histology procedures are not ideal. Here we describe new procedures for evaluating the health of the retina directly adjacent to an implant. Retinal prostheses feature electrode arrays in contact with eye tissue. Previous methods have not been able to spatially localize the ocular tissue adjacent to individual electrodes within the array. In addition, standard histological processing often results in gross artifactual detachment of the retinal layers when assessing implanted eyes. Consequently, it has been difficult to assess localized damage, if present, caused by implantation and stimulation of an implanted electrode array. Therefore, we developed a method for identifying and localizing the ocular tissue adjacent to implanted electrodes using a (color-coded) dye marking scheme, and we modified an eye fixation technique to minimize artifactual retinal detachment. This method also rendered the sclera translucent, enabling localization of individual electrodes and specific parts of an implant. Finally, we used a matched control to increase the power of the histopathological assessments. In summary, this method enables reliable and efficient discrimination and assessment of the retinal cytoarchitecture in an implanted eye. PMID:23963336

  6. Techniques for processing eyes implanted with a retinal prosthesis for localized histopathological analysis.

    PubMed

    Nayagam, David A X; McGowan, Ceara; Villalobos, Joel; Williams, Richard A; Salinas-LaRosa, Cesar; McKelvie, Penny; Lo, Irene; Basa, Meri; Tan, Justin; Williams, Chris E

    2013-08-02

    With the recent development of retinal prostheses, it is important to develop reliable techniques for assessing the safety of these devices in preclinical studies. However, the standard fixation, preparation, and automated histology procedures are not ideal. Here we describe new procedures for evaluating the health of the retina directly adjacent to an implant. Retinal prostheses feature electrode arrays in contact with eye tissue. Previous methods have not been able to spatially localize the ocular tissue adjacent to individual electrodes within the array. In addition, standard histological processing often results in gross artifactual detachment of the retinal layers when assessing implanted eyes. Consequently, it has been difficult to assess localized damage, if present, caused by implantation and stimulation of an implanted electrode array. Therefore, we developed a method for identifying and localizing the ocular tissue adjacent to implanted electrodes using a (color-coded) dye marking scheme, and we modified an eye fixation technique to minimize artifactual retinal detachment. This method also rendered the sclera translucent, enabling localization of individual electrodes and specific parts of an implant. Finally, we used a matched control to increase the power of the histopathological assessments. In summary, this method enables reliable and efficient discrimination and assessment of the retinal cytoarchitecture in an implanted eye.

  7. Gaussian Process Regression-Based Video Anomaly Detection and Localization With Hierarchical Feature Representation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kai-Wen; Chen, Yie-Tarng; Fang, Wen-Hsien

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a hierarchical framework for detecting local and global anomalies via hierarchical feature representation and Gaussian process regression (GPR) which is fully non-parametric and robust to the noisy training data, and supports sparse features. While most research on anomaly detection has focused more on detecting local anomalies, we are more interested in global anomalies that involve multiple normal events interacting in an unusual manner, such as car accidents. To simultaneously detect local and global anomalies, we cast the extraction of normal interactions from the training videos as a problem of finding the frequent geometric relations of the nearby sparse spatio-temporal interest points (STIPs). A codebook of interaction templates is then constructed and modeled using the GPR, based on which a novel inference method for computing the likelihood of an observed interaction is also developed. Thereafter, these local likelihood scores are integrated into globally consistent anomaly masks, from which anomalies can be succinctly identified. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time GPR is employed to model the relationship of the nearby STIPs for anomaly detection. Simulations based on four widespread datasets show that the new method outperforms the main state-of-the-art methods with lower computational burden.

  8. Self-Orientation Modulates the Neural Correlates of Global and Local Processing

    PubMed Central

    Liddell, Belinda J.; Das, Pritha; Battaglini, Eva; Malhi, Gin S.; Felmingham, Kim L.; Whitford, Thomas J.; Bryant, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Differences in self-orientation (or “self-construal”) may affect how the visual environment is attended, but the neural and cultural mechanisms that drive this remain unclear. Behavioral studies have demonstrated that people from Western backgrounds with predominant individualistic values are perceptually biased towards local-level information; whereas people from non-Western backgrounds that support collectivist values are preferentially focused on contextual and global-level information. In this study, we compared two groups differing in predominant individualistic (N = 15) vs collectivistic (N = 15) self-orientation. Participants completed a global/local perceptual conflict task whilst undergoing functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scanning. When participants high in individualistic values attended to the global level (ignoring the local level), greater activity was observed in the frontoparietal and cingulo-opercular networks that underpin attentional control, compared to the match (congruent) baseline. Participants high in collectivistic values activated similar attentional control networks o only when directly compared with global processing. This suggests that global interference was stronger than local interference in the conflict task in the collectivistic group. Both groups showed increased activity in dorsolateral prefrontal regions involved in resolving perceptual conflict during heightened distractor interference. The findings suggest that self-orientation may play an important role in driving attention networks to facilitate interaction with the visual environment. PMID:26270820

  9. Impacts of tropical deforestation. Part I: Process analysis of local climatic change

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Henderson-Sellers, A.; McGuffie, K.

    1996-07-01

    The potential impacts of deforestation in the humid Tropics are examined using a version of the National Center for Atmospheric Research`s CCM1 coupled with the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme package. Tropical deforestation in South America, Africa, and Southeast Asia is studied using the results from an 11-yr deforestation experiment and a 25-yr control integration. It is found that the local-scale impact (here defined as within the area deforested) varies greatly between the three deforested regions due to the differing controls on the local atmospheric circulation: the Southeast Asian monsoon is much less sensitive to deforestation than the low-level flow over South America. The analysis of the changes in cloud radiative forcing suggests that reduction in cloud amount can significantly mitigate the imposed increases in surface albedo. The importance of water recycling by the forest canopy is stressed in the simulation of local precipitation changes. Correlation analysis of the changes resulting from the deforestation has been used to determine the nature of the processes that follow from the removal of the forest canopy and to suggest the important processes. The role of large-scale dynamics is explored in a companion paper. 44 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Local media monitoring in process evaluation. Experiences from the Stockholm Diabetes Prevention Programme.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Camilla Maria; Bjärås, Gunilla; Tillgren, Per; Ostenson, Claes-Göran

    2007-01-01

    We present a rationale and approach for longitudinal analyses of media coverage and content, and illustrate how media monitoring can be used in process evaluations. Within a community-based diabetes prevention project, the Stockholm Diabetes Prevention Program, we analyzed the frequency, prominence, and framing of physical activity in local newspapers of three intervention and two control municipalities. In total, 2,128 stories and advertisements related to physical activity were identified between the years 1997 and 2002. Although stories about physical activity were relatively few (n = 224), they were prominently located in all five local newspapers. Physical activity was framed rather similarly in the municipalities. Health aspects, however, were expressed to a greater extent in stories in two of the intervention municipalities. A limited portion (14%) of the articles could be linked directly to the program. It is not possible to assess to what extent the program has had a disseminating effect on the newspapers' health-related content in general, due to weaknesses of the process tracking system and limitations of the study design. Implications for the design is that an evaluative framework should be preplanned and include data collection about media relationships, media's interest in public health, media coverage prior to the program and coverage in other media for comparisons of general trends in the reporting. The material and the current database, however, provide a good basis for quantitative content analysis and qualitative discourse analysis to yield information on the type, frequency, and content of health reporting in local newspapers.

  11. Insights to caving processes from localization of microseismic swarms induced by salt solution mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennart Kinscher, Jannes; Bernard, Pascal; Contrucci, Isabelle; Mangeney, Anne; Piguet, Jack Pierre; Bigarre, Pascal

    2014-05-01

    In order to improve our understanding of hazardous ground failures, caving processes, and collapses of large natural or man-made underground cavities, we studied microseismicity induced by the development and collapse of a salt solution mining cavity with a diameter of ~ 200 m at Cerville-Buissoncourt in Lorraine, France. Microseismicity was recorded as part of a large geophysical, multi-parameter monitoring research project (GISOS) by a local, high resolution, triggered 40 Hz geophone monitoring system consisting of five one-component and four three-component borehole stations located around and in the center of the cavity. The recorded microseismic events are very numerous (~ 50.000 recorded event files) where the major portion (~ 80 %) appear in unusual swarming sequences constituted by complex clusters of superimposed microseismic events. Body wave phase based routine tools for microseismic event detection and localization face strong limitations in the treatment of these signals. To overcome these shortcomings, we developed two probabilistic methods being able to assess the spatio-temporal characteristics in a semi-automatic manner. The first localization approach uses simple signal amplitude estimates on different frequency bands, and an attenuation model to constrain hypocenter source location. The second approach was designed to identify significantly polarized P wave energies and the associated polarization angles. Both approaches and its probabilistic conjunction were applied to the data of a two months lasting microseismic crisis occurring one year before the final collapse that was related to caving processes leading to a maximal growth of ~ 50 m of the cavity roof. The obtained epicenter locations show systematic spatio-temporal migration trends observed for different time scales. During three phases of major swarming activity, epicenter migration trends appear in the order of several seconds to minutes, are spatially constrained, and show partially a

  12. Local competition and metapopulation processes drive long-term seagrass-epiphyte population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lobelle, Delphine; Kenyon, Emma J; Cook, Kevan J; Bull, James C

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that ecological processes such as population regulation and natural enemy interactions potentially occur over a range of spatial scales, and there is a substantial body of literature developing theoretical understanding of the interplay between these processes. However, there are comparatively few studies quantifying the long-term effects of spatial scaling in natural ecosystems. A key challenge is that trophic complexity in real-world biological communities quickly obscures the signal from a focal process. Seagrass meadows provide an excellent opportunity in this respect: in many instances, seagrasses effectively form extensive natural monocultures, in which hypotheses about endogenous dynamics can be formulated and tested. We present amongst the longest unbroken, spatially explict time series of seagrass abundance published to date. Data include annual measures of shoot density, total above-ground abundance, and associated epiphyte cover from five Zostera marina meadows distributed around the Isles of Scilly, UK, from 1996 to 2011. We explore empirical patterns at the local and metapopulation scale using standard time series analysis and develop a simple population dynamic model, testing the hypothesis that both local and metapopulation scale feedback processes are important. We find little evidence of an interaction between scales in seagrass dynamics but that both scales contribute approximately equally to observed local epiphyte abundance. By quantifying the long-term dynamics of seagrass-epiphyte interactions we show how measures of density and extent are both important in establishing baseline information relevant to predicting responses to environmental change and developing management plans. We hope that this study complements existing mechanistic studies of physiology, genetics and productivity in seagrass, whilst highlighting the potential of seagrass as a model ecosystem. More generally, this study provides a rare opportunity to test

  13. A compact and versatile microfluidic probe for local processing of tissue sections and biological specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cors, J. F.; Lovchik, R. D.; Delamarche, E.; Kaigala, G. V.

    2014-03-01

    The microfluidic probe (MFP) is a non-contact, scanning microfluidic technology for local (bio)chemical processing of surfaces based on hydrodynamically confining nanoliter volumes of liquids over tens of micrometers. We present here a compact MFP (cMFP) that can be used on a standard inverted microscope and assist in the local processing of tissue sections and biological specimens. The cMFP has a footprint of 175 × 100 × 140 mm3 and can scan an area of 45 × 45 mm2 on a surface with an accuracy of ±15 μm. The cMFP is compatible with standard surfaces used in life science laboratories such as microscope slides and Petri dishes. For ease of use, we developed self-aligned mounted MFP heads with standardized "chip-to-world" and "chip-to-platform" interfaces. Switching the processing liquid in the flow confinement is performed within 90 s using a selector valve with a dead-volume of approximately 5 μl. We further implemented height-compensation that allows a cMFP head to follow non-planar surfaces common in tissue and cellular ensembles. This was shown by patterning different macroscopic copper-coated topographies with height differences up to 750 μm. To illustrate the applicability to tissue processing, 5 μm thick M000921 BRAF V600E+ melanoma cell blocks were stained with hematoxylin to create contours, lines, spots, gradients of the chemicals, and multiple spots over larger areas. The local staining was performed in an interactive manner using a joystick and a scripting module. The compactness, user-friendliness, and functionality of the cMFP will enable it to be adapted as a standard tool in research, development and diagnostic laboratories, particularly for the interaction with tissues and cells.

  14. Local Model Networks for the Optimization of a Tablet Production Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Benjamin; Nelles, Oliver; Belič, Aleš; Zupančič-Božič, Damjana

    The calibration of a tablet press machine requires comprehensive experiments and is therefore expensive and time-consuming. In order to optimize the process parameters of a tablet press machine on the basis of measured data this paper presents a new approach that works with the application of local model networks. Goal of the model-based optimization was the improvement of the quality of produced tablets, i.e. the reduction of capping occurence and the variation of the tablet mass as well as the variation of the crushing strength. Modeling and optimization of the tablet process parameters show that it is possible to find process settings for the tabletting of non-preprocessed powder such that a sufficient quality of the tablets can be achieved.

  15. Evaluating the implementation of environmental review mitigation in local planning and development processes

    SciTech Connect

    Slotterback, Carissa Schively

    2008-11-15

    The implementation of mitigation strategies and outcomes of environmental review remains a challenge for planners and regulators. While the process and content of environmental review is clearly defined, there is often little attention to what happens after the review is completed. This paper presents the results of an evaluation of the implementation of the outcomes of environmental review, specifically mitigation measures designed to respond to environmental impacts identified in the environmental impact analysis. Drawing on previous evaluations of environmental review outcomes and plan implementation, the research provides a methodology for evaluating the implementation of mitigation efforts, points to the challenges associated with implementing the mitigation outcomes of local environmental review in planning and development processes, and identifies opportunities to integrate planning and environmental review processes.

  16. Chlorination processing of local planetary ores for oxygen and metallurgically important metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, D. C.

    1989-01-01

    The use of chlorine to extract, reclaim, and purify metals has attractive possibilities for extraterrestrial processing of local planetary resources. While a complete cyclic process has been proposed for the recovery of metallurgically significant metals and oxygen, herein the chlorination step of the cycle is examined. An experimental apparatus for reacting refractory materials, such as ilmenite, in a microwave induced plasma is being built. Complex equilibria calculations reveal that stable refractory materials can, under the influence of a plasma, undergo chlorination and yield oxygen as a by-product. These issues and the potential advantages for plasma processing in space are reviewed. Also presented is a discussion of the complex equilibria program used in the analysis.

  17. [Intracellular localization of the processes of biosynthesis and degradation of NADP in skeletal muscle].

    PubMed

    Telepneva, V I; Kariavkina, O E

    1977-01-01

    In studies on intracellular NADP localization the process of NADP biosynthesis was observed in mitochondria and hyaloplasm of rabbit sceletal muscle cells. This synthesis was not found in microsomal and nuclear fractions. The seasonal alterations in the NAD-kinase activity were established: in autumn and winter months NADP synthesis proceeded at the maximal rate in hyaloplasm; in sping months the higher specific activity was observed in mitochondrial fraction. The rate of NADP synthesis was 2-5 times lower in initial and reconstructed (hyaloplasm+cell organelles) homogenate then in hyaloplasm, among the enzymes, degrading the NADP molecule in sceletal muscle, the highest activity was exhibitel by nucleosidase, which was localized mainly in mitochondria and microsomes. Mechanisms for regulation of the rate of NADP synthesis and degradation in cytostructures of rabbit sceletal muscles are discussed.

  18. A Sagnac-Michelson fibre optic interferometer: Signal processing for disturbance localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrat, M.; Szustakowski, M.; Pałka, N.; Ciurapiński, W.; Życzkowski, M.

    2007-09-01

    We present numerical and experimental results on a new generation fibre optic perimeter sensor based on a Sagnac and Michelson interferometers configuration. In particular, an original signal processing scheme is presented. The sensor can detect a potential intruder and determine its position along a protected zone. We propose a localization method that offers the inherent properties of both interferometers. After demodulation of the signals from both interferometers, the obtained amplitude characteristic of the Sagnac interferometer depends on a position of a disturbance along the interferometer, while amplitude characteristic of the Michelson interferometer does not depend on this position. So, quotient of both demodulated characteristics makes it possible to localize the disturbance. During investigations of a laboratory model of the sensor, it was possible to detect the position of the disturbance with a resolution of about 40 m along the 6-km-long sensor.

  19. Relations between Perceptual and Conceptual Scope: How Global versus Local Processing Fits a Focus on Similarity versus Dissimilarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Nine studies showed a bidirectional link (a) between a global processing style and generation of similarities and (b) between a local processing style and generation of dissimilarities. In Experiments 1-4, participants were primed with global versus local perception styles and then asked to work on an allegedly unrelated generation task. Across…

  20. Relations between Perceptual and Conceptual Scope: How Global versus Local Processing Fits a Focus on Similarity versus Dissimilarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Nine studies showed a bidirectional link (a) between a global processing style and generation of similarities and (b) between a local processing style and generation of dissimilarities. In Experiments 1-4, participants were primed with global versus local perception styles and then asked to work on an allegedly unrelated generation task. Across…

  1. Synchronized passive imaging of single cavitation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gateau, Jérôme; Aubry, Jean-François; Pernot, Mathieu; Chauvet, Daurian; Boch, Anne-Laure; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickaël

    2011-09-01

    Passive cavitation detection techniques are usually of relatively low sensitivity to single cavitation events. Moreover, a single-element transducer is generally used, so that the spatial localization of these cavitation events is not possible, or is limited to the probing volume. To both detect and localize single cavitation events over an extended volume, the following experimental set-up has been used and validated: cavitation is induced with a focused single-element transducer (mean frequency 660 kHz, f♯ = 1) driven by a high power (up to 5 kW) electric burst of a few cycles, and the acoustic emission of the bubbles is recorded on a standard linear array (4-7 MHz), mounted on the side of the single element to probe its focal spot. Both the frequencies and the geometry used are appropriate to in vivo implementation. The recording of ultrasonic radio-frequency (RF) data was performed simultaneously on 64 channels of the array and was synchronized with the pulsed excitation. A single cavitation event results in a high frequency and coherent wave front on the RF data. Thanks to synchronization, these RF data are beam-formed to localize the event with a axial resolution of 0.3 mm. A small number of discrete events could also be separated with this method. Besides, B-mode images obtained with the linear array prior to passive detection allowed the positioning of the events within the tissue structure. This technique has been used first ex vivo on freshly harve pig and sheep thigh muscle: with a two cycle excitation, a 9 MPa cavitation threshold was found. Cavitation detection was also achieved in vivo with a five cycle burst excitation in sheep thigh muscle for a peak acoustic pressure of 11MPa. This technique could provide useful information in order to better understand, control and monitor the initiation phase of the histotripsy process.

  2. Localization of the transverse processes in ultrasound for spinal curvature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamali, Shahrokh; Ungi, Tamas; Lasso, Andras; Yan, Christina; Lougheed, Matthew; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2017-03-01

    PURPOSE: In scoliosis monitoring, tracked ultrasound has been explored as a safer imaging alternative to traditional radiography. The use of ultrasound in spinal curvature measurement requires identification of vertebral landmarks such as transverse processes, but as bones have reduced visibility in ultrasound imaging, skeletal landmarks are typically segmented manually, which is an exceedingly laborious and long process. We propose an automatic algorithm to segment and localize the surface of bony areas in the transverse process for scoliosis in ultrasound. METHODS: The algorithm uses cascade of filters to remove low intensity pixels, smooth the image and detect bony edges. By applying first differentiation, candidate bony areas are classified. The average intensity under each area has a correlation with the possibility of a shadow, and areas with strong shadow are kept for bone segmentation. The segmented images are used to reconstruct a 3-D volume to represent the whole spinal structure around the transverse processes. RESULTS: A comparison between the manual ground truth segmentation and the automatic algorithm in 50 images showed 0.17 mm average difference. The time to process all 1,938 images was about 37 Sec. (0.0191 Sec. / Image), including reading the original sequence file. CONCLUSION: Initial experiments showed the algorithm to be sufficiently accurate and fast for segmentation transverse processes in ultrasound for spinal curvature measurement. An extensive evaluation of the method is currently underway on images from a larger patient cohort and using multiple observers in producing ground truth segmentation.

  3. Generation of spatiotemporally correlated spike trains and local field potentials using a multivariate autoregressive process.

    PubMed

    Gutnisky, Diego A; Josić, Kresimir

    2010-05-01

    Experimental advances allowing for the simultaneous recording of activity at multiple sites have significantly increased our understanding of the spatiotemporal patterns in neural activity. The impact of such patterns on neural coding is a fundamental question in neuroscience. The simulation of spike trains with predetermined activity patterns is therefore an important ingredient in the study of potential neural codes. Such artificially generated spike trains could also be used to manipulate cortical neurons in vitro and in vivo. Here, we propose a method to generate spike trains with given mean firing rates and cross-correlations. To capture this statistical structure we generate a point process by thresholding a stochastic process that is continuous in space and discrete in time. This stochastic process is obtained by filtering Gaussian noise through a multivariate autoregressive (AR) model. The parameters of the AR model are obtained by a nonlinear transformation of the point-process correlations to the continuous-process correlations. The proposed method is very efficient and allows for the simulation of large neural populations. It can be optimized to the structure of spatiotemporal correlations and generalized to nonstationary processes and spatiotemporal patterns of local field potentials and spike trains.

  4. Improvement of bias-stability in amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors by using solution-processed Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivation

    SciTech Connect

    An, Sungjin; Mativenga, Mallory; Kim, Youngoo; Jang, Jin

    2014-08-04

    We demonstrate back channel improvement of back-channel-etch amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors by using solution-processed yttrium oxide (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) passivation. Two different solvents, which are acetonitrile (35%) + ethylene glycol (65%), solvent A and deionized water, solvent B are investigated for the spin-on process of the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivation—performed after patterning source/drain (S/D) Mo electrodes by a conventional HNO{sub 3}-based wet-etch process. Both solvents yield devices with good performance but those passivated by using solvent B exhibit better light and bias stability. Presence of yttrium at the a-IGZO back interface, where it occupies metal vacancy sites, is confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The passivation effect of yttrium is more significant when solvent A is used because of the existence of more metal vacancies, given that the alcohol (65% ethylene glycol) in solvent A may dissolve the metal oxide (a-IGZO) through the formation of alkoxides and water.

  5. Macroscopic fluxes and local reciprocal relation in second-order stochastic processes far from equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Hao

    2015-01-01

    A stochastic process is an essential tool for the investigation of the physical and life sciences at nanoscale. In the first-order stochastic processes widely used in chemistry and biology, only the flux of mass rather than that of heat can be well defined. Here we investigate the two macroscopic fluxes in second-order stochastic processes driven by position-dependent forces and temperature gradient. We prove that the thermodynamic equilibrium defined through the vanishing of macroscopic fluxes is equivalent to that defined via time reversibility at mesoscopic scale. In the small noise limit, we find that the entropy production rate, which has previously been defined by the mesoscopic irreversible fluxes on the phase space, matches the classic macroscopic expression as the sum of the products of macroscopic fluxes and their associated thermodynamic forces. Further we show that the two pairs of forces and fluxes in such a limit follow a linear phenomenonical relation and the associated scalar coefficients always satisfy the reciprocal relation for both transient and steady states. The scalar coefficient is proportional to the square of local temperature divided by the local frictional coefficient and originated from the second moment of velocity distribution along each dimension. This result suggests the very close connection between the Soret effect (thermal diffusion) and Dufour effect at nanoscale even far from equilibrium.

  6. The contribution of local and transport processes to phytoplankton biomass variability over different timescales in the Upper James River, Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Qubin; Shen, Jian

    2017-09-01

    Although both local processes (photosynthesis, respiration, grazing, and settling), and transport processes (advective transport and diffusive transport) significantly affect local phytoplankton dynamics, it is difficult to separate their contributions and to investigate the relative importance of each process to the local variability of phytoplankton biomass over different timescales. A method of using the transport rate is introduced to quantify the contribution of transport processes. By combining the time-varying transport rate and high-frequency observed chlorophyll a data, we can explicitly examine the impact of local and transport processes on phytoplankton biomass over a range of timescales from hourly to annually. For the Upper James River, results show that the relative importance of local and transport processes differs on different timescales. Local processes dominate phytoplankton variability on daily to weekly timescales, whereas the contribution of transport processes increases on seasonal to annual timescales and reaches equilibrium with local processes. With the use of the transport rate and high-frequency chlorophyll a data, a method similar to the open water oxygen method for metabolism is also presented to estimate phytoplankton primary production.

  7. Local contextual processing of abstract and meaningful real-life images in professional athletes.

    PubMed

    Fogelson, Noa; Fernandez-Del-Olmo, Miguel; Acero, Rafael Martín

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the effect of abstract versus real-life meaningful images from sports on local contextual processing in two groups of professional athletes. Local context was defined as the occurrence of a short predictive series of stimuli occurring before delivery of a target event. EEG was recorded in 10 professional basketball players and 9 professional athletes of individual sports during three sessions. In each session, a different set of visual stimuli were presented: triangles facing left, up, right, or down; four images of a basketball player throwing a ball; four images of a baseball player pitching a baseball. Stimuli consisted of 15 % targets and 85 % of equal numbers of three types of standards. Recording blocks consisted of targets preceded by randomized sequences of standards and by sequences including a predictive sequence signaling the occurrence of a subsequent target event. Subjects pressed a button in response to targets. In all three sessions, reaction times and peak P3b latencies were shorter for predicted targets compared with random targets, the last most informative stimulus of the predictive sequence induced a robust P3b, and N2 amplitude was larger for random targets compared with predicted targets. P3b and N2 peak amplitudes were larger in the professional basketball group in comparison with professional athletes of individual sports, across the three sessions. The findings of this study suggest that local contextual information is processed similarly for abstract and for meaningful images and that professional basketball players seem to allocate more attentional resources in the processing of these visual stimuli.

  8. Global/local processing of hierarchical visual stimuli in a conflict-choice task by capuchin monkeys (Sapajus spp.).

    PubMed

    Truppa, Valentina; Carducci, Paola; De Simone, Diego Antonio; Bisazza, Angelo; De Lillo, Carlo

    2017-03-01

    In the last two decades, comparative research has addressed the issue of how the global and local levels of structure of visual stimuli are processed by different species, using Navon-type hierarchical figures, i.e. smaller local elements that form larger global configurations. Determining whether or not the variety of procedures adopted to test different species with hierarchical figures are equivalent is of crucial importance to ensure comparability of results. Among non-human species, global/local processing has been extensively studied in tufted capuchin monkeys using matching-to-sample tasks with hierarchical patterns. Local dominance has emerged consistently in these New World primates. In the present study, we assessed capuchins' processing of hierarchical stimuli with a method frequently adopted in studies of global/local processing in non-primate species: the conflict-choice task. Different from the matching-to-sample procedure, this task involved processing local and global information retained in long-term memory. Capuchins were trained to discriminate between consistent hierarchical stimuli (similar global and local shape) and then tested with inconsistent hierarchical stimuli (different global and local shapes). We found that capuchins preferred the hierarchical stimuli featuring the correct local elements rather than those with the correct global configuration. This finding confirms that capuchins' local dominance, typically observed using matching-to-sample procedures, is also expressed as a local preference in the conflict-choice task. Our study adds to the growing body of comparative studies on visual grouping functions by demonstrating that the methods most frequently used in the literature on global/local processing produce analogous results irrespective of extent of the involvement of memory processes.

  9. Subcellular localization of glycosidases and glycosyltransferases involved in the processing of N-linked oligosaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, A.; Johnson, K.D.; Szumilo, T.; Elbein, A.D.; Chrispeels, M.J.

    1987-11-01

    Using isopycnic sucrose gradients, we have ascertained the subcellular location of several enzymes involved in the processing of the N-linked oligosaccharides of glycoproteins in developing cotyledons of the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris. All are localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or Golgi complex as determined by co-sedimentation with the ER marker, NADH-cytochrome c reductase, or the Golgi marker, glucan synthase I. Glucosidase activity, which removes glucose residues from Glc/sub 3/Man/sub 9/(GlcNAc)/sub 2/, was found exclusively in the ER. All other processing enzymes, which act subsequent to the glucose trimming steps, are associates with Golgi. These include mannosidase I (removes 1-2 mannose residues from Man/sub 6-9/(GlcNAc)/sub 2/), mannosidase II (removes mannose residues from GlcNAcMan/sub 5/(GlcNAc)/sub 2/), and fucosyltransferase (transfers a fucose residue to the Asn-linked GlcNAc of appropriate glycans). The authors have previously reported the localization of two other glycan modifying enzymes (GlcNAc-transferase and xylosyltranferase activities) in the Golgi complex. Attempts at subfractionation of the Golgi fraction on shallow sucrose gradients yielded similar patterns of distribution for all the Golgi processing enzymes. Subfractionation on Percoll gradients resulted in two peaks of the Golgi marker enzyme inosine diphosphatase, whereas the glycan processing enzymes were all enriched in the peak of lower density. These results do not lend support to the hypothesis that N-linked oligosaccharide processing enzymes are associated with Golgi cisternae of different densities.

  10. Are the autism and positive schizotypy spectra diametrically opposed in local versus global processing?

    PubMed

    Russell-Smith, Suzanna N; Maybery, Murray T; Bayliss, Donna M

    2010-08-01

    Crespi and Badcock (2008) proposed that autism and psychosis represent two extremes on a cognitive spectrum with normality at its center. Their specific claim that autistic and positive schizophrenia traits contrastingly affect preference for local versus global processing was investigated by examining Embedded Figures Test performance in two groups of students separated on autistic-like traits but matched on positive schizotypy traits, and two groups separated on positive schizotypy traits but matched on autistic-like traits (n = 20 per group). Consistent with their theory, higher levels of autistic-like traits were associated with faster identification of hidden figures, whereas higher levels of positive schizotypy traits were associated with slower identification.

  11. Springtime cloud properties in the Taiwan Strait: synoptic controls and local processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueh, Mien-Tze; Lin, Pay-Liam

    2014-05-01

    This paper examines the springtime cloud properties in the Taiwan Strait (TS), with emphases on their dependence on synoptic controls and local processes, using a suite of in situ and remote sensing observations. Cloud properties in the TS are inferred from a combination of MODIS and in situ observations and further classified into two synoptic conditions: continental cold air surge and frontal system. The study reveals a predominance of synoptic-scale controls in regulating the cloud properties in the TS. The sensitivity of clouds to the local thermodynamic mechanisms as well as the underlying surface conditions is fundamentally dependent on synoptic-scale flow patterns. The springtime clouds over the TS are commonly a mixture of stratocumulus and alto clouds. More precisely, there is a preponderance of stratocumulus over the strait. A preferential occupancy of stratiform alto clouds is recognized during cold air surge, whereas vertical development of cloud layers (mostly the stratocumulus) is commonly observed with frontal passage. The most distinct difference between the local clouds formation associated with the two synoptic conditions is the suppression of very low cloud and fog along with cold air surge. Stratus clouds and fog are present within the northward prefrontal airflow from warmer to colder water sites, along with an increase in stability relating to lower altitudes of boundary layer clouds. Although the rainfall occurrences are about the same for both synoptic conditions, the frontal rain amounts are larger on average.

  12. Tracking Passive Sentence Comprehension in Agrammatic Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Aaron M.; Mack, Jennifer E.; Thompson, Cynthia K.

    2011-01-01

    People with agrammatic aphasia often experience greater difficulty comprehending passive compared to active sentences. The Trace Deletion Hypothesis (TDH; Grodzinsky, 2000) proposes that aphasic individuals cannot generate accurate syntactic representations of passive sentences and, hence, use an agent-first processing strategy which leads to at-chance performance. We tested this claim using the eyetracking-while-listening paradigm in order to reveal online processing routines. Ten agrammatic aphasic participants and 10 age-matched controls listened to passive and active sentences and performed a sentence-picture matching task (i.e., selecting between two pictures with reversed thematic roles), while their eye movements were monitored. Control participants’ performance was at ceiling, whereas accuracy for the aphasic participants was above chance for active sentences and at chance for passive sentences. Further, for the control participants, the eye movement data showed an initial agent-first processing bias, followed by fixation on the correct picture in the vicinity of the verb in both active and passive sentences. However, the aphasic participants showed no evidence of agent-first processing, counter the predictions of the TDH. In addition, in active sentences, they reliably fixated the correct picture only at sentence offset, reflecting slowed processing. During passive sentence processing, fixations were at chance throughout the sentence, but different patterns were noted for correct and incorrect trials. These results are consistent with the proposal that agrammatic sentence comprehension failure involves lexical processing and/or lexical integration deficits. PMID:22043134

  13. [Anti-doping policy development process in the sports world (1968~1999): focusing on IOC activities and passive response from Korea].

    PubMed

    Hwang, Eui-Ryong; Kim, Tae-Young

    2014-08-01

    athletes experienced doping test directly, yet education about doping was limited. However, some national team level athletes tested positive on the doping test and underwent disciplinary action. In addition, athletic federation or leaders acquiesced athletes doping made secretly; this indicated that South Korea was also not free from doping. It was found that Korea world of sports showed very passive countermeasures and development process.

  14. Prediction Of Formability In Sheet Metal Forming Processes Using A Local Damage Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, P.; Santos, Abel; César Sá, J.; Andrade Pires, F.; Barata da Rocha, A.

    2007-05-01

    The formability in sheet metal forming processes is mainly conditioned by ductile fracture resulting from geometric instabilities due to necking and strain localization. The macroscopic collapse associated with ductile failure is a result of internal degradation described throughout metallographic observations by the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids and micro-cracks. Damage influences and is influenced by plastic deformation and therefore these two dissipative phenomena should be coupled at the constitutive level. In this contribution, Lemaitre's ductile damage model is coupled with Hill's orthotropic plasticity criterion. The coupling between damaging and material behavior is accounted for within the framework of Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM). The resulting constitutive equations are implemented in the Abaqus/Explicit code, for the prediction of fracture onset in sheet metal forming processes. The damage evolution law takes into account the important effect of micro-crack closure, which dramatically decreases the rate of damage growth under compressive paths.

  15. Localized stem chilling alters carbon processes in the adjacent stem and in source leaves.

    PubMed

    De Schepper, Veerle; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Steppe, Kathy

    2011-11-01

    Transport phloem is no longer associated with impermeable pipes, but is instead considered as a leaky system in which loss and retrieval mechanisms occur. Local stem chilling is often used to study these phenomena. In this study, 5-cm- lengths of stems of 3-year-old oak trees (Quercus robur L.) were locally chilled for 1 week to investigate whether observations at stem and leaf level can be explained by the leakage-retrieval mechanism. The chilling experiment was repeated three times across the growing season. Measurements were made of leaf photosynthesis, carbohydrate concentrations in leaves and bark, stem growth and maximum daily stem shrinkage. Across the growing season, a feedback inhibition in leaf photosynthesis was observed, causing increased dark respiration and starch concentration. This inhibition was attributed to the total phloem resistance which locally increased due to the cold temperatures. It is hypothesized that this higher phloem resistance increased the phloem pressure above the cold block up to the source leaves, inducing feedback inhibition. In addition, an increase in radial stem growth and carbohydrate concentration was observed above the cold block, while the opposite occurred below the block. These observations indicate that net lateral leakage of carbohydrates from the phloem was enhanced above the cold block and that translocation towards regions below the block decreased. This behaviour is probably also attributable to the higher phloem resistance. The chilling effects on radial stem growth and carbohydrate concentration were significant in the middle of the growing season, while they were not at the beginning and near the end of the growing season. Furthermore, maximum daily shrinkages were larger above the cold block during all chilling experiments, indicating an increased resistance in the xylem vessels, also generated by low temperatures. In conclusion, localized stem chilling altered multiple carbon processes in the source leaves

  16. Neural Processes in the Human Temporoparietal Cortex Separated by Localized Independent Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Igelström, Kajsa M; Webb, Taylor W; Graziano, Michael S A

    2015-06-24

    The human temporoparietal junction (TPJ) is a topic of intense research. Imaging studies have identified TPJ activation in association with many higher-order functions such as theory-of-mind, episodic memory, and attention, causing debate about the distribution of different processes. One major challenge is the lack of consensus about the anatomical location and extent of the TPJ. Here, we address this problem using data-driven analysis to test the hypothesis that the bilateral TPJ can be parcellated into subregions. We applied independent component analysis (ICA) to task-free fMRI data within a local region around the bilateral TPJ, iterating the ICA at multiple model orders and in several datasets. The localized analysis allowed finer separation of processes and the use of multiple dimensionalities provided qualitative information about lateralization. We identified four subdivisions that were bilaterally symmetrical and one that was right biased. To test whether the independent components (ICs) reflected true subdivisions, we performed functional connectivity analysis using the IC coordinates as seeds. This confirmed that the subdivisions belonged to distinct networks. The right-biased IC was connected with a network often associated with attentional processing. One bilateral subdivision was connected to sensorimotor regions and another was connected to auditory regions. One subdivision that presented as distinct left- and right-biased ICs was connected to frontoparietal regions. Another subdivision that also had left- and right-biased ICs was connected to social or default mode networks. Our results show that the TPJ in both hemispheres hosts multiple neural processes with connectivity patterns consistent with well developed specialization and lateralization.

  17. Revisiting Gaussian Process Regression Modeling for Localization in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Philipp; Toledano-Ayala, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Signal strength-based positioning in wireless sensor networks is a key technology for seamless, ubiquitous localization, especially in areas where Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals propagate poorly. To enable wireless local area network (WLAN) location fingerprinting in larger areas while maintaining accuracy, methods to reduce the effort of radio map creation must be consolidated and automatized. Gaussian process regression has been applied to overcome this issue, also with auspicious results, but the fit of the model was never thoroughly assessed. Instead, most studies trained a readily available model, relying on the zero mean and squared exponential covariance function, without further scrutinization. This paper studies the Gaussian process regression model selection for WLAN fingerprinting in indoor and outdoor environments. We train several models for indoor/outdoor- and combined areas; we evaluate them quantitatively and compare them by means of adequate model measures, hence assessing the fit of these models directly. To illuminate the quality of the model fit, the residuals of the proposed model are investigated, as well. Comparative experiments on the positioning performance verify and conclude the model selection. In this way, we show that the standard model is not the most appropriate, discuss alternatives and present our best candidate. PMID:26370996

  18. Revisiting Gaussian Process Regression Modeling for Localization in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Richter, Philipp; Toledano-Ayala, Manuel

    2015-09-08

    Signal strength-based positioning in wireless sensor networks is a key technology for seamless, ubiquitous localization, especially in areas where Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals propagate poorly. To enable wireless local area network (WLAN) location fingerprinting in larger areas while maintaining accuracy, methods to reduce the effort of radio map creation must be consolidated and automatized. Gaussian process regression has been applied to overcome this issue, also with auspicious results, but the fit of the model was never thoroughly assessed. Instead, most studies trained a readily available model, relying on the zero mean and squared exponential covariance function, without further scrutinization. This paper studies the Gaussian process regression model selection for WLAN fingerprinting in indoor and outdoor environments. We train several models for indoor/outdoor- and combined areas; we evaluate them quantitatively and compare them by means of adequate model measures, hence assessing the fit of these models directly. To illuminate the quality of the model fit, the residuals of the proposed model are investigated, as well. Comparative experiments on the positioning performance verify and conclude the model selection. In this way, we show that the standard model is not the most appropriate, discuss alternatives and present our best candidate.

  19. A Multi-Objective Compounded Local Mobile Cloud Architecture Using Priority Queues to Process Multiple Jobs.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaohui; Sun, Bingyi; Cui, Jiaxu; Xu, Gaochao

    2016-01-01

    As a result of the greatly increased use of mobile devices, the disadvantages of portable devices have gradually begun to emerge. To solve these problems, the use of mobile cloud computing assisted by cloud data centers has been proposed. However, cloud data centers are always very far from the mobile requesters. In this paper, we propose an improved multi-objective local mobile cloud model: Compounded Local Mobile Cloud Architecture with Dynamic Priority Queues (LMCpri). This new architecture could briefly store jobs that arrive simultaneously at the cloudlet in different priority positions according to the result of auction processing, and then execute partitioning tasks on capable helpers. In the Scheduling Module, NSGA-II is employed as the scheduling algorithm to shorten processing time and decrease requester cost relative to PSO and sequential scheduling. The simulation results show that the number of iteration times that is defined to 30 is the best choice of the system. In addition, comparing with LMCque, LMCpri is able to effectively accommodate a requester who would like his job to be executed in advance and shorten execution time. Finally, we make a comparing experiment between LMCpri and cloud assisting architecture, and the results reveal that LMCpri presents a better performance advantage than cloud assisting architecture.

  20. A Multi-Objective Compounded Local Mobile Cloud Architecture Using Priority Queues to Process Multiple Jobs

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaohui; Sun, Bingyi; Cui, Jiaxu; Xu, Gaochao

    2016-01-01

    As a result of the greatly increased use of mobile devices, the disadvantages of portable devices have gradually begun to emerge. To solve these problems, the use of mobile cloud computing assisted by cloud data centers has been proposed. However, cloud data centers are always very far from the mobile requesters. In this paper, we propose an improved multi-objective local mobile cloud model: Compounded Local Mobile Cloud Architecture with Dynamic Priority Queues (LMCpri). This new architecture could briefly store jobs that arrive simultaneously at the cloudlet in different priority positions according to the result of auction processing, and then execute partitioning tasks on capable helpers. In the Scheduling Module, NSGA-II is employed as the scheduling algorithm to shorten processing time and decrease requester cost relative to PSO and sequential scheduling. The simulation results show that the number of iteration times that is defined to 30 is the best choice of the system. In addition, comparing with LMCque, LMCpri is able to effectively accommodate a requester who would like his job to be executed in advance and shorten execution time. Finally, we make a comparing experiment between LMCpri and cloud assisting architecture, and the results reveal that LMCpri presents a better performance advantage than cloud assisting architecture. PMID:27419854

  1. Effects of local electric surface potential on holes charging process in uncapped germanium nanocrystal

    SciTech Connect

    Marchand, Aude; El Hdiy, Abdelillah

    2015-04-21

    The charging kinetics of holes are investigated in an uncapped Ge nanocrystal by the use of the nano-electron beam induced current technique. The charging process is studied under zero volt or under an appropriate electric field. The investigation is repeated many times on the same nanocrystal and on others in the same sample to attest of the reproducibility of the results. At 0 V, the cycles of charging kinetics are superimposed and are in a steady state, but an instantaneous local and negative surface potential, established in the nanocrystal at the beginning of the kinetics, slows down the holes charging process. Under an external field, the energy band bending accentuation affects the holes charging time constants. As a result, the holes charging cycles weakly affect the electrical performance of the thin oxide as is indicated by the value of the measured local resistivity of 6 × 10{sup 10}–10{sup 11} Ω cm, which is relatively lower than that of the thick thermal oxide.

  2. Localized Ni deposition improved by saccharin sodium in the intermittent MAGE process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J. H.; Lin, J. C.; Chang, T. K.; You, X. B.; Jiang, S. B.

    2009-02-01

    Localized Ni deposition improved by saccharin sodium (SS) in the intermittent microanode guided electroplating (intermittent MAGE) process has been investigated. This effect is more complicated than conventional planar electroplating. If there was an insignificant amount of SS in the bath (i.e. less than 1.0 mM), then the radius of the fabricated nodular columns would range from 37.5 to 42.5 µm cyclically along the axis and the surface would be covered with a homogeneous layer of 3-8 µm Ni particles. In the presence of an optimal amount of SS (i.e. around 1.0-3.0 mM), columns with uniform radius (around 42.5 µm) were fabricated and the surface was covered by a homogeneous layer of fine Ni particles (i.e. diameter 1 µm). With higher SS (4.0-6.0 mM in the bath), columns were constructed with uniform radius but the surface was covered by alternating zones of coarse and fine Ni particles. For SS beyond critical concentrations (8.0 mM at 4.0 V and 10.0 mM at 4.5 and 5.0 V), no microcolumn could be constructed and a universal planar Ni deposition on the substrate was formed instead. SS is an absorbent and it leads to cathodic polarization in the electroplating process. The influence of SS on the asymmetrical electric field distributed in the local area and formed by localized electrochemical deposition (LECD) has been studied by the use of the proposed model in this work and commercial finite element software.

  3. The bud break process and its variation among local populations of boreal black spruce

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Sergio; Bousquet, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Phenology of local populations can exhibit adaptations to the current environmental conditions resulting from a close interaction between climate and genotype. The bud break process and its variations among populations were analyzed in greenhouse by monitoring the growth resumption in black spruce [Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP] seedlings originating from seeds of five stands across the closed boreal forest in Quebec, Canada. Bud break lasted 15 days and occurred earlier and quicker in northern provenances. Provenance explained between 10.2 and 32.3% of the variance in bud break, while the families accounted for a smaller but still significant part of the variance. The late occurrence of one phenological phase corresponded to a delayed occurrence of the others according to linear relationships. A causal model was proposed in the form of a chain of events with each phase of bud break being related to the previous and successive one, while no link was observed between non-adjacent phases. The adaptation of black spruce populations along the latitudinal gradient points toward a strategy based on rapid physiological processes triggered by temperature increase inducing high metabolic activity. The variation observed in bud break reflects an evolutionary trade-off between maximization of security and taking advantage of the short growing season. This work provides evidence of the phenological adaptations of black spruce to its local environmental conditions while retaining sizeable genetic diversity within populations. Because of the multigenic nature of phenology, this diversity should provide some raw material for adaptation to changing local environmental conditions. PMID:25389430

  4. Design and simulation of a microwave powered microplasma system for local area materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narendra, Jeffri Julliarsa

    A microwave powered microplasma source is developed and tested for materials processing on spatially localized areas. A small diameter stream of plasma (less than 2 mm in diameter) is created by focusing microwave energy inside a discharge tube. The discharge then flows out the end of the tube onto the surface being processed delivering ions and reactive radicals. The diameter of the plasma stream from the tube to the material being processed can be controlled by an aperture mounted at the end of the tube. The spot size of the localized plasma stream ranges from 2 mm down to 10's micrometers depending on the aperture size. The discharge is created by using 2.45 GHz microwave energy that is coupled into the discharge using a small foreshortened cylindrical cavity that has a hollow inner conductor and a small capacitive gap at the end of the cavity. A processing gas mixture is fed through a 2 mm inner diameter quartz tube which is located inside the hollow inner conductor of the cavity. This tube is exposed to a high electric field at the small gap end of the cavity thus generating a surface wave plasma. The length of the surface wave discharge in the tube can be extended by increasing the microwave power to the discharge so that the plasma reaches the aperture. The operating pressures range from 0.5 Torr to 100 Torr and the microwave power utilized ranges from a few Watts to 10's Watts. Several properties of the discharge including plasma power density, electron density and electron temperature are measured. The power densities of argon and Ar/O2 plasma discharges vary from 10's to over 450 W/cm 3. The plasma density and electron temperature of argon discharges are measured using a double Langmuir probe placed in the materials processing area. The plasma densities are in the range of 1011 -- 1013 cm-3. Computational modeling of the plasma discharge and the microwave excitation of the discharge is performed using a finite element analysis. The goal of the modeling

  5. Citric Acid Passivation of Stainless Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasensky, David; Reali, John; Larson, Chris; Carl, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Passivation is a process for cleaning and providing corrosion protection for stainless steel. Currently, on Kennedy Space Center (KSC), only parts passivated with nitric acid are acceptable for use. KSC disposes of approximately 125gal of concentrated nitric acid per year, and receives many parts from vendors who must also dispose of used nitric acid. Unfortunately, nitric acid presents health and environmental hazards. As a result, several recent industry studies have examined citric acid as an alternative. Implementing a citric acid-based passivation procedure would improve the health and environmental safety aspects of passivation process. However although there is a lack of published studies that conclusively prove citric acid is a technically sound passivation agent. In 2007, NASA's KSC Materials Advisory Working Group requested the evaluation of citric acid in place of nitric acid for passivation of parts at KSC. United Space Alliance Materials & Processes engineers have developed a three-phase test plan to evaluate citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid on three stainless steels commonly used at KSC: UNS S30400, S41000, and S17400. Phases 1 and 2 will produce an optimized citric acid treatment based on results from atmospheric exposure at NASA's Beach Corrosion Facility. Phase 3 will compare the optimized solution(s) with nitric acid treatments. If the results indicate that citric acid passivates as well or better than nitric acid, NASA intends to approve this method for parts used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  6. Locality-Aware Parallel Process Mapping for Multi-Core HPC Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hursey, Joshua J; Squyres, Jeffrey M.; Dontje, Terry

    2011-01-01

    High Performance Computing (HPC) systems are composed of servers containing an ever-increasing number of cores. With such high processor core counts, non-uniform memory access (NUMA) architectures are almost universally used to reduce inter-processor and memory communication bottlenecks by distributing processors and memory throughout a server-internal networking topology. Application studies have shown that the tuning of processes placement in a server s NUMA networking topology to the application can have a dramatic impact on performance. The performance implications are magnified when running a parallel job across multiple server nodes, especially with large scale HPC applications. This paper presents the Locality-Aware Mapping Algorithm (LAMA) for distributing the individual processes of a parallel application across processing resources in an HPC system, paying particular attention to the internal server NUMA topologies. The algorithm is able to support both homogeneous and heterogeneous hardware systems, and dynamically adapts to the available hardware and user-specified process layout at run-time. As implemented in Open MPI, the LAMA provides 362,880 mapping permutations and is able to naturally scale out to additional hardware resources as they become available in future architectures.

  7. The forest or the trees: preference for global over local image processing is reversed by prior experience in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Avarguès-Weber, Aurore; Dyer, Adrian G; Ferrah, Noha; Giurfa, Martin

    2015-01-22

    Traditional models of insect vision have assumed that insects are only capable of low-level analysis of local cues and are incapable of global, holistic perception. However, recent studies on honeybee (Apis mellifera) vision have refuted this view by showing that this insect also processes complex visual information by using spatial configurations or relational rules. In the light of these findings, we asked whether bees prioritize global configurations or local cues by setting these two levels of image analysis in competition. We trained individual free-flying honeybees to discriminate hierarchical visual stimuli within a Y-maze and tested bees with novel stimuli in which local and/or global cues were manipulated. We demonstrate that even when local information is accessible, bees prefer global information, thus relying mainly on the object's spatial configuration rather than on elemental, local information. This preference can be reversed if bees are pre-trained to discriminate isolated local cues. In this case, bees prefer the hierarchical stimuli with the local elements previously primed even if they build an incorrect global configuration. Pre-training with local cues induces a generic attentional bias towards any local elements as local information is prioritized in the test, even if the local cues used in the test are different from the pre-trained ones. Our results thus underline the plasticity of visual processing in insects and provide new insights for the comparative analysis of visual recognition in humans and animals.

  8. The forest or the trees: preference for global over local image processing is reversed by prior experience in honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Avarguès-Weber, Aurore; Dyer, Adrian G.; Ferrah, Noha; Giurfa, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Traditional models of insect vision have assumed that insects are only capable of low-level analysis of local cues and are incapable of global, holistic perception. However, recent studies on honeybee (Apis mellifera) vision have refuted this view by showing that this insect also processes complex visual information by using spatial configurations or relational rules. In the light of these findings, we asked whether bees prioritize global configurations or local cues by setting these two levels of image analysis in competition. We trained individual free-flying honeybees to discriminate hierarchical visual stimuli within a Y-maze and tested bees with novel stimuli in which local and/or global cues were manipulated. We demonstrate that even when local information is accessible, bees prefer global information, thus relying mainly on the object's spatial configuration rather than on elemental, local information. This preference can be reversed if bees are pre-trained to discriminate isolated local cues. In this case, bees prefer the hierarchical stimuli with the local elements previously primed even if they build an incorrect global configuration. Pre-training with local cues induces a generic attentional bias towards any local elements as local information is prioritized in the test, even if the local cues used in the test are different from the pre-trained ones. Our results thus underline the plasticity of visual processing in insects and provide new insights for the comparative analysis of visual recognition in humans and animals. PMID:25473017

  9. Passive thermosiphon solar collector

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    A passive thermosiphon solar collector was designed, built, installed and tested under this grant. The basic premise was to design a simple system that was economical to build and easy to install as a retrofit to many similar homes in the local community. The module is comprised of a 2X4 frame with a sandwiched insert consisting of a flat black painted aluminum absorber panel and a fiberglass reinforced plastic glazing. This insert is completely sealed from the environment with neoprene seals and rubber silicone sealant. The modules are enclosed in an overall framework of 2X8 material bolted to a concrete reinforced footing and attached to the residence at the top. This framework results in an air chamber behind the absorber panel where the air from the basement enters the chamber at the bottom and exits at the top of the chamber into the house. The air chamber is completely insulated with 5/8 inch polyisocyanurate foil covered foam board. Fabrication is detailed in the Design and Construction section and supplemented with the photo series submitted with the Second Quarter report. The test results indicate this modular concept is a viable solution to conserving our national resources and reducing heating expenses. In this specific experiment, the use of solar energy provided a thirty-five percent reduction in natural gas consumption for this home.

  10. Local modification of ceramic surfaces by a laser induced cladding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Sabine; Rohde, Magnus

    2009-02-01

    In order to develop a multifunctional material, a laser induced process was applied to change the properties of a glass-ceramic by introducing a second phase into the surface. Localized melting of the ceramic and/or a melting of a preplaced powder layer was achieved by the application of laser energy. After solidification a composite with new properties was developed. The characteristic feature of the process is the option of a local modification, which is restricted to the substrate surface and can be controlled by adjustment of the laser parameters. Accordingly modified areas with different geometries and with a complex multiphase microstructure could be fabricated, while the ceramic bulk remains in its original state. Sintered LTCC-substrates (Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramic) were modified with powders metal-oxides (WO3, CuO) with nanosized particles. Powders of metals (Cu, Ni) were used too. Cladding layers located at the top of the substrate or layers with a thickness up to several hundred microns, which were embedded into the substrate surface, could be fabricated. The properties of the laser modified regions differ significantly from that of the LTCC-substrate. The obtained structures offer modified mechanical, thermophysical and electrical properties. In particular an enhanced thermal conductivity could be detected. The electrical resistivity of the laser modified tracks widely varied depending on the process parameters and the powder. Tracks made with CuO- and WO3-powders show a negative temperature coefficient for electrical resistance, i.e. it decreases with increasing temperature, which is typical for semiconductors.

  11. Passive Localization of Underwater Acoustic Beacons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    maxtime) TickCounto; aborto ; FSRead(gASerRefln,&numCharln,&addressBuf); TalkSail(’O); iistart the PTR’s data collecticn DrawString(w\\p: H) I display a...34); aborto ; EventLoopO; II main execution loop RAMSDClose(sPortA); HI must close the RAM Drivers before shutdown 193 free(gw); //must release the...kNumExp+l),sizeof(double)); if(wtrue ==NULL) DrawString("\\pCan’t allocate memory for data collection!!! ); aborto ; Nvmeas = calloc(3L*(kStep~kNumExp+l

  12. Passive magnetic bearing configurations

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F [Walnut Creek, CA

    2011-01-25

    A journal bearing provides vertical and radial stability to a rotor of a passive magnetic bearing system when the rotor is not rotating and when it is rotating. In the passive magnetic bearing system, the rotor has a vertical axis of rotation. Without the journal bearing, the rotor is vertically and radially unstable when stationary, and is vertically stable and radially unstable when rotating.

  13. LASL passive program

    SciTech Connect

    Neeper, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    Recent accomplishments are outlined on the following tasks: (1) solar load ratio for sunspaces; (2) thermal performance of components and buildings; (3) convective loop test; (4) similarity study of interzone convection; (5) evaluation of phase-change thermal storage; (6) off-peak electrical auxiliary heating; (7) passive solar design handbook; (8) program support to DOE; and (9) passive cooling for residences. (WHK)

  14. Going beyond exposure to local news media: an information-processing examination of public perceptions of food safety.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Kenneth; Thorson, Esther; Zhang, Yuyan

    2006-12-01

    The relationship between local news media and public perceptions of food safety was examined in a statewide telephone survey (n = 524). The theoretical framework of the study was based on a review of the social and psychological factors that affect public concerns about food safety, the relationship between mass communication and risk perception, and the thesis of information-processing strategies and its impact on learning from the news. The results show that information-processing strategies substantially mediated the relationship between local news media and public perceptions of food safety, with elaborative processing being more influential than active reflection in people's learning from the news media. Attention to local television had an independent effect, after demographics, awareness of food safety problems, and perceived safety of local food supply were statistically controlled. Other important predictors included gender, education, ethnicity, and perceived safety of local food supply.

  15. Passive solar construction handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, E.; Evans, D.; Gardstein, C.

    1981-08-01

    Many of the basic elements of passive solar design are reviewed. The unique design constraints presented in passive homes are introduced and many of the salient issues influencing design decisions are described briefly. Passive solar construction is described for each passive system type: direct gain, thermal storage wall, attached sunspace, thermal storage roof, and convective loop. For each system type, important design and construction issues are discussed and case studies illustrating designed and built examples of the system type are presented. Construction details are given and construction and thermal performance information is given for the materials used in collector components, storage components, and control components. Included are glazing materials, framing systems, caulking and sealants, concrete masonry, concrete, brick, shading, reflectors, and insulators. The Load Collector Ratio method for estimating passive system performance is appended, and other analysis methods are briefly summarized. (LEW)

  16. Point process models for localization and interdependence of punctate cellular structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Majarian, Timothy D; Naik, Armaghan W; Johnson, Gregory R; Murphy, Robert F

    2016-07-01

    Accurate representations of cellular organization for multiple eukaryotic cell types are required for creating predictive models of dynamic cellular function. To this end, we have previously developed the CellOrganizer platform, an open source system for generative modeling of cellular components from microscopy images. CellOrganizer models capture the inherent heterogeneity in the spatial distribution, size, and quantity of different components among a cell population. Furthermore, CellOrganizer can generate quantitatively realistic synthetic images that reflect the underlying cell population. A current focus of the project is to model the complex, interdependent nature of organelle localization. We built upon previous work on developing multiple non-parametric models of organelles or structures that show punctate patterns. The previous models described the relationships between the subcellular localization of puncta and the positions of cell and nuclear membranes and microtubules. We extend these models to consider the relationship to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and to consider the relationship between the positions of different puncta of the same type. Our results do not suggest that the punctate patterns we examined are dependent on ER position or inter- and intra-class proximity. With these results, we built classifiers to update previous assignments of proteins to one of 11 patterns in three distinct cell lines. Our generative models demonstrate the ability to construct statistically accurate representations of puncta localization from simple cellular markers in distinct cell types, capturing the complex phenomena of cellular structure interaction with little human input. This protocol represents a novel approach to vesicular protein annotation, a field that is often neglected in high-throughput microscopy. These results suggest that spatial point process models provide useful insight with respect to the spatial dependence between cellular structures.

  17. Localized electro-thermal processing: a new route to the patterning of magnetic recording media.

    PubMed

    Aziz, M M; Newman, D M; Sidwell, A; Wears, M L; Wright, C D

    2010-12-17

    Previous reports have detailed the fabrication of media able to support high density magnetic recording in both longitudinal and perpendicular formats by the global rapid thermal processing of sputtered non-magnetic precursor films. During processing in this manner a magnetic element is released from its nitride and agglomerates to form a random near mono-dispersion of magnetic nano-particles. Here we explore, primarily through modelling and simulation, the feasibility of processing similarly formulated precursor media not globally but locally. We investigate the potential of using conducting nano-probe tips to produce, via electro-thermal (Joule) heating, a nano-patterned recording medium in the form of regular arrays of magnetic islands in a non-magnetic host. In the first instance we concentrate on the simplest cobalt based precursor medium for which both initial simulation and experimental studies indicate the formation of magnetic islands with dimensions of the order of the tip diameter; this is relatively straightforward. The results signify that if practical production scenarios can be devised to produce technologically significant areas of recording media by the rapid multi-probe repetition of this technique, then processing in this manner offers a promising route to areal recording densities of perhaps 5 Terabit/in(2) even with the simplest cobalt media. We also note that the electro-thermal processing method is potentially extendable to the production of a wide variety of magnetic materials (e.g. PtCo, FeCo, NiFe alloys) and, applied via electrical nano-imprinting type techniques, to the production of a wide variety of patterned structures.

  18. Regulation of the processivity and intracellular localization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae dynein by dynactin

    PubMed Central

    Kardon, Julia R.; Reck-Peterson, Samara L.; Vale, Ronald D.

    2009-01-01

    Dynactin, a large multisubunit complex, is required for intracellular transport by dynein; however, its cellular functions and mechanism of action are not clear. Prior studies suggested that dynactin increases dynein processivity by tethering the motor to the microtubule through its own microtubule binding domains. However, this hypothesis could not be tested without a recombinant source of dynactin. Here, we have produced recombinant dynactin and dynein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and examined the effect of dynactin on dynein in single-molecule motility assays. We show that dynactin increases the run length of single dynein motors, but does not alter the directionality of dynein movement. Enhancement of dynein processivity by dynactin does not require the microtubule (MT) binding domains of Nip100 (the yeast p150Glued homolog). Dynactin lacking these MT binding domains also supports the proper localization and function of dynein during nuclear segregation in vivo. Instead, a segment of the coiled-coil of Nip100 is required for these activities. Our results directly demonstrate that dynactin increases the processivity of dynein through a mechanism independent of microtubule tethering. PMID:19293377

  19. Hi-fidelity multi-scale local processing for visually optimized far-infrared Herschel images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li Causi, G.; Schisano, E.; Liu, S. J.; Molinari, S.; Di Giorgio, A.

    2016-07-01

    In the context of the "Hi-Gal" multi-band full-plane mapping program for the Galactic Plane, as imaged by the Herschel far-infrared satellite, we have developed a semi-automatic tool which produces high definition, high quality color maps optimized for visual perception of extended features, like bubbles and filaments, against the high background variations. We project the map tiles of three selected bands onto a 3-channel panorama, which spans the central 130 degrees of galactic longitude times 2.8 degrees of galactic latitude, at the pixel scale of 3.2", in cartesian galactic coordinates. Then we process this image piecewise, applying a custom multi-scale local stretching algorithm, enforced by a local multi-scale color balance. Finally, we apply an edge-preserving contrast enhancement to perform an artifact-free details sharpening. Thanks to this tool, we have thus produced a stunning giga-pixel color image of the far-infrared Galactic Plane that we made publicly available with the recent release of the Hi-Gal mosaics and compact source catalog.

  20. Local generalised method of moments: an application to point process-based rainfall models.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarska, Jo M; Isham, Valerie S; Northrop, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Long series of simulated rainfall are required at point locations for a range of applications, including hydrological studies. Clustered point process-based rainfall models have been used for generating such simulations for many decades. These models suffer from a major limitation, however: their stationarity. Although seasonality can be allowed by fitting separate models for each calendar month or season, the models are unsuitable in their basic form for climate impact studies. In this paper, we develop new methodology to address this limitation. We extend the current fitting approach by allowing the discrete covariate, calendar month, to be replaced or supplemented with continuous covariates that are more directly related to the incidence and nature of rainfall. The covariate-dependent model parameters are estimated for each time interval using a kernel-based nonparametric approach within a generalised method-of-moments framework. An empirical study demonstrates the new methodology using a time series of 5-min rainfall data. The study considers both local mean and local linear approaches. While asymptotic results are included, the focus is on developing useable methodology for a complex model that can only be solved numerically. Issues including the choice of weighting matrix, estimation of parameter uncertainty and bandwidth and model selection are considered from this perspective. © 2015 The Authors. Environmetrics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Aided infrared target classifier pre-processing by adaptive local contrast enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Ming Kai; Szu, Harold; Lee, Ting N.

    2009-04-01

    AiTR is well developed field of R/D. Nonetheless. a relatively poor under-sampled infrared video may achieve a sharper imagery by smart pre-processing, similar to super-resolution attempts; the difference is in the details. We took a local adaptive contrast enhancement to exploit the pixel intensity correlation, such as smoothness, contrast, and continuity, among neighborhood pixels of variable region sizes, so-called adaptive local contrast enhancement. The final success or failure rate of AiTR will depend on the choice of cost function, such as LMS, etc. In that, we found that a sparse samples do not satisfy the usual underlying Gaussian assumption, of which the Maximum Likelihood, the Bayesian, the Fisher Rao criteria, etc. are usually depending on a priori assumption of dense sampling approaching the Gaussian statistics. Thus, in this paper, we have developed a sparse sampling classifier, called the min-Max classifier for Aided Target Recognition (AiTR), to minimize the intra-class dispersion and at the same to maximize the inter-class separation to select the optimum features vectors. As a standard test case, we choose Petland eigen-faces to benchmark our performance. We apply Szu's lossless divide and conquer theorem solving the NP Complete TSP solution to treat the multiple classes AiTR, in order to achieve min-Max classifier more efficiently than pair-wise SVM classifier.

  2. Judging sound rotation when listeners and sounds rotate: Sound source localization is a multisystem process.

    PubMed

    Yost, William A; Zhong, Xuan; Najam, Anbar

    2015-11-01

    In four experiments listeners were rotated or were stationary. Sounds came from a stationary loudspeaker or rotated from loudspeaker to loudspeaker around an azimuth array. When either sounds or listeners rotate the auditory cues used for sound source localization change, but in the everyday world listeners perceive sound rotation only when sounds rotate not when listeners rotate. In the everyday world sound source locations are referenced to positions in the environment (a world-centric reference system). The auditory cues for sound source location indicate locations relative to the head (a head-centric reference system), not locations relative to the world. This paper deals with a general hypothesis that the world-centric location of sound sources requires the auditory system to have information about auditory cues used for sound source location and cues about head position. The use of visual and vestibular information in determining rotating head position in sound rotation perception was investigated. The experiments show that sound rotation perception when sources and listeners rotate was based on acoustic, visual, and, perhaps, vestibular information. The findings are consistent with the general hypotheses and suggest that sound source localization is not based just on acoustics. It is a multisystem process.

  3. Influence of etch process on contact hole local critical dimension uniformity in extreme-ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorusso, Gian F.; Mao, Ming; Reijnen, Liesbeth; Viatkina, Katja; Knops, Roel; Rispens, Gijsbert; Fliervoet, Timon

    2015-03-01

    Contact Hole (CH) Local Critical Dimension Uniformity (LCDU) has a direct impact on device performance. As a consequence, being able to understand and quantifying the different LCDU contributors and the way they evolve during the various process steps is critical. In this work the impact of etch process on LCDU for different resists and stacks is investigated on ASML NXE:3100 and NXE:3300. LCDU is decomposed into shot noise, mask, and metrology components. The design of the experiment is optimized to minimize the decomposition error. CD and LCDU are monitored and found to be stable. We observed that the net effect of the etch process is to improve LCDU, although the final LCDU is both stack- and resist-dependent. Different resists demonstrate the same LCDU improvement, so that the LCDU after etch will depend on the initial resist performance. Using a stack different from the one used to set up the etch process can undermine the LCDU improvement. The impact of the various etch steps is investigated in order to identify the physical mechanisms responsible for the LCDU improvement through etch. Both top-down and cross section Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) are used. The step-by-step analysis of the etch process showed that the main LCDU improvement is achieved during oxide etch, while the other process steps are either ineffective or detrimental in terms of LCDU. The main cause of the LCDU improvement is then attributed to the polymerization of the CH surface happening during the oxide etch. Finally, the LCDU improvement caused by the etch process is investigated as a function of the initial LCDU after litho in a relatively broad range (2-15nm). The ratio between LCDU after litho over LCDU after etch is investigated as a function of the initial LCDU after litho for two different resists. The results indicate that the impact of etch on LCDU is characterized by a single curve, specific to the etch process in use and independent of the resist type. In addition, we

  4. Geothermal energy development in Washington State. A guide to the federal, state and local regulatory process

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomquist, R.G.; Simpson, S.J.

    1986-03-01

    Washington State's geothermal potential is wide spread. Hot springs and five strato volcanoes existing throughout the Cascade Range, limited hot spring activity on the Olympic Peninsula, and broad reaching, low temperature geothermal resources found in the Columbia Basin comprise the extent of Washington's known geothermal resources. Determination of resource ownership is the first step in proceeding with geothermal exploration and development activities. The federal and state processes are examined from pre-lease activity through leasing and post-lease development concerns. Plans, permits, licenses, and other requirements are addressed for the federal, state, and local level. Lease, permit, and other forms for a number of geothermal exploration and development activities are included. A map of public lands and another displaying the measured geothermal resources throughout the state are provided.

  5. Regulation of mammalian microRNA processing and function by cellular signaling and subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Smalheiser, Neil R.

    2008-01-01

    For many microRNAs, in many normal tissues and in cancer cells, the cellular levels of mature microRNAs are not simply determined by transcription of microRNA genes. This mini-review will discuss how microRNA biogenesis and function can be regulated by various nuclear and cytoplasmic processing events, including emerging evidence that microRNA pathway components can be selectively regulated by control of their subcellular localization and by modifications that occur during dynamic cellular signaling. Finally, I will briefly summarize studies of microRNAs in synaptic fractions of adult mouse forebrain, which may serve as a model for other cell types as well. PMID:18433727

  6. DBSproc: An open source process for DBS electrode localization and tractographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Lauro, Peter M; Vanegas-Arroyave, Nora; Huang, Ling; Taylor, Paul A; Zaghloul, Kareem A; Lungu, Codrin; Saad, Ziad S; Horovitz, Silvina G

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective surgical treatment for movement disorders. Although stimulation sites for movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease are established, the therapeutic mechanisms of DBS remain controversial. Recent research suggests that specific white-matter tract and circuit activation mediates symptom relief. To investigate these questions, we have developed a patient-specific open-source software pipeline called 'DBSproc' for (1) localizing DBS electrodes and contacts from postoperative CT images, (2) processing structural and diffusion MRI data, (3) registering all images to a common space, (4) estimating DBS activation volume from patient-specific voltage and impedance, and (5) understanding the DBS contact-brain connectivity through probabilistic tractography. In this paper, we explain our methodology and provide validation with anatomical and tractographic data. This method can be used to help investigate mechanisms of action of DBS, inform surgical and clinical assessments, and define new therapeutic targets.

  7. Non-Local Means Inpainting of MS Lesions in Longitudinal Image Processing.

    PubMed

    Guizard, Nicolas; Nakamura, Kunio; Coupé, Pierrick; Fonov, Vladimir S; Arnold, Douglas L; Collins, D Louis

    2015-01-01

    In medical imaging, multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions can lead to confounding effects in automatic morphometric processing tools such as registration, segmentation and cortical extraction, and subsequently alter individual longitudinal measurements. Multiple magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inpainting techniques have been proposed to decrease the impact of MS lesions in medical image processing, however, most of these methods make the assumption that lesions only affect white matter. Here, we propose a method to fill lesion regions using the patch-based non-local mean (NLM) strategy. The method consists of a hierarchical concentric filling strategy after identification of the lesion region. The lesion is filled iteratively, based on the surrounding tissue intensity, using an onion peel strategy. This concentric technique presents the advantage of preserving the local information and therefore the continuity of the anatomy and does not require identification of any a priori normal brain tissues. The method is first evaluated on 20 healthy subjects with simulated artificial MS lesions where we assessed our technique by measuring the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) of the images with inpainted lesion and the original healthy images. Second, in order to assess the impact of lesion filling on longitudinal image analyses, we performed a power analysis with sample size estimation to evaluate brain atrophy and ventricular growth in patients with MS. The method was compared to two different publicly available methods (FSL lesion fill and Lesion LEAP) and a more classic method, which fills the region with intensities similar to that of the surrounding healthy white matter tissue or mask the lesions. The proposed method was shown to exceed the other methods in reproducing the fidelity of healthy subject images where the lesions were inpainted. The method also improved the power to detect brain atrophy or ventricular growth by decreasing the sample size by 25% in the presence

  8. Non-Local Means Inpainting of MS Lesions in Longitudinal Image Processing

    PubMed Central

    Guizard, Nicolas; Nakamura, Kunio; Coupé, Pierrick; Fonov, Vladimir S.; Arnold, Douglas L.; Collins, D. Louis

    2015-01-01

    In medical imaging, multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions can lead to confounding effects in automatic morphometric processing tools such as registration, segmentation and cortical extraction, and subsequently alter individual longitudinal measurements. Multiple magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inpainting techniques have been proposed to decrease the impact of MS lesions in medical image processing, however, most of these methods make the assumption that lesions only affect white matter. Here, we propose a method to fill lesion regions using the patch-based non-local mean (NLM) strategy. The method consists of a hierarchical concentric filling strategy after identification of the lesion region. The lesion is filled iteratively, based on the surrounding tissue intensity, using an onion peel strategy. This concentric technique presents the advantage of preserving the local information and therefore the continuity of the anatomy and does not require identification of any a priori normal brain tissues. The method is first evaluated on 20 healthy subjects with simulated artificial MS lesions where we assessed our technique by measuring the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) of the images with inpainted lesion and the original healthy images. Second, in order to assess the impact of lesion filling on longitudinal image analyses, we performed a power analysis with sample size estimation to evaluate brain atrophy and ventricular growth in patients with MS. The method was compared to two different publicly available methods (FSL lesion fill and Lesion LEAP) and a more classic method, which fills the region with intensities similar to that of the surrounding healthy white matter tissue or mask the lesions. The proposed method was shown to exceed the other methods in reproducing the fidelity of healthy subject images where the lesions were inpainted. The method also improved the power to detect brain atrophy or ventricular growth by decreasing the sample size by 25% in the presence

  9. Identification and chromosomal localization of a processed pseudogene of human GRK6.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, A W; Benovic, J L

    1997-01-03

    G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate agonist-occupied G-protein-coupled receptors, resulting in desensitization of receptor signaling. To date, 6 mammalian GRKs have been identified by molecular cloning. Several lines of evidence indicate that a homologue of GRK6, the most recently described GRK, is present in the human genome. Northern analysis identifies two transcripts which hybridize to GRK6, and genomic Southern analysis indicates that GRK6 is localized to chromosome 5, with a second GRK6-like locus on chromosome 13. To identify the GRK6 homologue on chromsome 13, several sets of closely-spaced primers were designed based on the GRK6 cDNA sequence and then used to amplify human genomic DNA by PCR. Two products were identified, the larger of which is a fragment of the GRK6 gene which contains introns, while the smaller fragment is 94% homologous to GRK6 and contains no introns. In order to further characterize this GRK6 homologue, primers from the 5' and 3' coding regions of GRK6 were used to amplify a product of 1458 base pairs from human genomic DNA. This 1458 base pair PCR fragment displays 94% homology to GRK6 and contains multiple nucleotide insertions and deletions compared to GRK6, including a C to T mutation at base pair 202 which creates a predicted in-frame stop codon. In an effort to determine whether this gene is transcriptionally active, primers designed to preferentially amplify either GRK6 or the homologue were used in reverse transcription PCR. In contrast to the GRK6-specific primers, primers which selectively amplify the GRK6 homologue fail to produce a PCR product in any RNA tested, indicating that this gene is most likely transcriptionally inactive. PCR amplification of rodent/human hybrid cell lines using these same primers confirms the previously established chromosome 5 localization of GRK6, and localizes this homologue to chromosome 13. Northern analysis indicates that the two GRK6-hybridizing species seen in RNA

  10. The road to the red sequence via secular and environmental processes: insights from the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolandi, Guido

    2017-04-01

    The evolution of galaxies can be thought as the result of the cumulative effects of two broad classes of processes: (i) secular (internal) processes determined by the very nature of the galaxy, and (ii) external processes that are determined by the environment in which the object is embedded. In this thesis I face both aspects of galaxy evolution. Among secular processes, I investigated the effects of stellar bars on the gaseous components of galaxies and their consequences on their evolution. In particular I show how bars affect both the ionized and cold gas in two different samples: the sample of the Halpha3 survey, an Halpha imaging survey of galaxies selected from ALFALFA in the Local and Coma superclusters; the Herschel Reference Sample, a representative sample of 323 local galaxies observed with the space-based Herschel observatory sensitive to the far-infrared emission of dust, a good tracer of cold gas. Owing to the Halpha3 data I demonstrate that main sequence barred galaxies have specific star formation rate suppressed with respect to pure disks. Here I propose a simple model in which bars drive the evolution of disk galaxies. Hydrodynamical simulations indeed show that a barred potential funnels the gas inside the corotation radius toward the center of the galaxy where it reaches high densities, cools and can be consumed by a burst of star formation. At the same time the dynamical torque of the bar keeps the gas outside the corotation radius in place, cutting the gas supply to the central region that consequently stops its star formation activity. Taking advantage of the images of the HRS sample, we show the evidences of such quenching. The aforementioned model is further tested by studying the stellar population properties of galaxies belonging to a sample of 6000 galaxies extracted from SDSS. To this aim, I designed in-house IDL codes that automatically perform aperture photometry and isophotal fitting recovering reliable magnitudes, colors

  11. A program for passively tracking a target using an array of sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Buhl, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    The problem of passively tracking a moving signal source has importance in a variety of applications such as radar, sonar, seismology, and radio astronomy. In many applications, only limited information is available about the signal source. It will be assumed here that only the signals which are detected by the sensors and the velocity of the source signal are known. The objective of this document is to present a program which passively tracks a target using an array of sensors. This program is available in MATLAB, version 3.5. The algorithm which is implemented consists of three main parts: time delay estimation, passive localization, and data post processing. Each of these parts are discussed, and the mathematical foundation for their solution given. Following, this the organization of the program is presented, and an example of its usage is given.

  12. Disruption of lamin B1 and lamin B2 processing and localization by farnesyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Adam, Stephen A; Butin-Israeli, Veronika; Cleland, Megan M; Shimi, Takeshi; Goldman, Robert D

    2013-01-01

    Lamin A and the B-type lamins, lamin B1 and lamin B2, are translated as pre-proteins that are modified at a carboxyl terminal CAAX motif by farnesylation, proteolysis and carboxymethylation. Lamin A is further processed by proteolysis to remove the farnesyl, but B-type lamins remain permanently farnesylated. Two childhood diseases, Hutchinson Gilford Progeria Syndrome and restrictive dermopathy are caused by defects in the processing of lamin A, resulting in permanent farnesylation of the protein. Farnesyltransferase inhibitors, originally developed to target oncogenic Ras, have recently been used in clinical trials to treat children with Hutchinson Gilford Progeria Syndrome. Lamin B1 and lamin B2 play important roles in cell proliferation and organ development, but little is known about the role of farnesylation in their functions. Treating normal human fibroblasts with farnesyltransferase inhibitors causes the accumulation of unprocessed lamin B2 and lamin A and a decrease in mature lamin B1. Normally, lamins are concentrated at the nuclear envelope/lamina, but when farnesylation is inhibited, the peripheral localization of lamin B2 decreases as its nucleoplasmic levels increase. Unprocessed prelamin A distributes into both the nuclear envelope/lamina and nucleoplasm. Farnesyltransferase inhibitors also cause a rapid cell cycle arrest leading to cellular senescence. This study suggests that the long-term inhibition of protein farnesylation could have unforeseen consequences on nuclear functions.

  13. Process development of injection molded parts with wound fiber structures for local reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzle, V.; Huber, T.; Henning, F.; Elsner, P.

    2014-05-01

    Glass and carbon fiber reinforcements in injection molded parts have been used for many decades in combination with thermoplastics. Where short- or long-fiber pellets are used, all areas of the part are nearly equally reinforced by fibers. With local continuous-fiber reinforcements it is possible to reduce fiber usage to the most highly loaded areas of the components along the lines of flux. This method, which draws on principles applied in nature, strengthens the parts with only a slight weight increase compared to non-reinforced parts. The combination of injection molding as a process for large-scale production with the high mechanical properties of continuous-fiber-reinforcements enables the production of high-strength components at reasonable costs. The paper presents the investigation of a process development with injection molded components in combination with wound fiber structures. Fundamental experiments with tensile loaded wound fiber structures regarding to their design influences are presented. On this basis a reinforcement structure for a demonstrator was developed and examined.

  14. Working memory processes are mediated by local and long-range synchronization of alpha oscillations.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Garcia, Maite; Pinal, Diego; Cantero, Jose L; Díaz, Fernando; Zurrón, Montserrat; Atienza, Mercedes

    2013-08-01

    Different cortical dynamics of alpha oscillations (8-13 Hz) have been associated with increased working memory load, which have been mostly interpreted as a neural correlate of functional inhibition. This study aims at determining whether different manifestations of load-dependent amplitude and phase dynamics in the alpha band can coexist over different cortical regions. To address this question, we increased information load by manipulating the number and spatial configuration of domino spots. Time-frequency analysis of EEG source activity revealed (i) load-independent increases of both alpha power and interregional alpha-phase synchrony within task-irrelevant, posterior cortical regions and (ii) load-dependent decreases of alpha power over areas of the left pFC and bilateral posterior parietal cortex (PPC) preceded in time by load-dependent decreases of alpha-phase synchrony between the left pFC and the left PPC. The former results support the role of alpha oscillations in inhibiting irrelevant sensorimotor processing, whereas the latter likely reflect release of parietal task-relevant areas from top-down inhibition with load increase. This interpretation found further support in a significant latency shift of 15 msec from pFC to the PPC. Together, these results suggest that amplitude and phase alpha dynamics in both local and long-range cortical networks reflect different neural mechanisms of top-down control that might be crucial in mediating the different working memory processes.

  15. Can the combination of localized "proliferative therapy" with "minor ozonated autohemotherapy" restore the natural healing process?

    PubMed

    Gracer, R I; Bocci, V

    2005-01-01

    Regenerative injection therapy (RIT), also known as proliferative therapy, has been used for over 30 years in the USA in patients with spinal and peripheral joint and ligamentous pathologies. It involves the injection of mildly irritating medications onto ligaments and tendons, most commonly at origins and insertions. These injections cause a mild inflammatory response which "turns on" the normal healing process and results in the regeneration of these structures. At the same time they strengthen and become less sensitive to pain through a combination of neurolysis of small nerve fibers (C-fibers) and increased stability of the underlying structures. Oxygen/ozone therapy is a well established complementary therapy practiced in many European countries. The ozone dissolves in body fluids and immediately reacts with biomolecules generating messengers responsible for biological and therapeutic activities. This results in an anti inflammatory response, which also results in a similar trophic reaction to that of RIT. It is logical to expect that combining these two modalities would result in enhanced healing and therefore improved clinical outcomes. Oxygen/ozone therapy, accomplished by autohemotherapy (AHT), is performed by either administering ozonated blood intravenously (Major AHT) or via intramuscular route (Minor AHT). These procedures result in stimulation of the immune and healing systems. Our concept is that the local injection of this activated blood injected directly to the ligamentous areas that are also being treated with RIT will act as a direct stimulation to the healing process. In addition, combining this with intravenous major AHT should stimulate the immune system to augment and support this process. RIT and oxygen/ozone therapy have been extensively studied separately. We propose a study of lumbosacral ligamentous pain to explore this therapeutic combination. We hope that this paper will stimulate general interest in this area of medicine and result

  16. Executive functioning and local-global visual processing: candidate endophenotypes for autism spectrum disorder?

    PubMed

    Van Eylen, Lien; Boets, Bart; Cosemans, Nele; Peeters, Hilde; Steyaert, Jean; Wagemans, Johan; Noens, Ilse

    2017-03-01

    Heterogeneity within autism spectrum disorder (ASD) hampers insight in the etiology and stimulates the search for endophenotypes. Endophenotypes should meet several criteria, the most important being the association with ASD and the higher occurrence rate in unaffected ASD relatives than in the general population. We evaluated these criteria for executive functioning (EF) and local-global (L-G) visual processing. By administering an extensive cognitive battery which increases the validity of the measures, we examined which of the cognitive anomalies shown by ASD probands also occur in their unaffected relatives (n = 113) compared to typically developing (TD) controls (n = 100). Microarrays were performed, so we could exclude relatives from probands with a de novo mutation in a known ASD susceptibility copy number variant, thus increasing the probability that genetic risk variants are shared by the ASD relatives. An overview of studies investigating EF and L-G processing in ASD relatives was also provided. For EF, ASD relatives - like ASD probands - showed impairments in response inhibition, cognitive flexibility and generativity (specifically, ideational fluency), and EF impairments in daily life. For L-G visual processing, the ASD relatives showed no anomalies on the tasks, but they reported more attention to detail in daily life. Group differences were similar for siblings and for parents of ASD probands, and yielded larger effect sizes in a multiplex subsample. The group effect sizes for the comparison between ASD probands and TD individuals were generally larger than those of the ASD relatives compared to TD individuals. Impaired cognitive flexibility, ideational fluency and response inhibition are strong candidate endophenotypes for ASD. They could help to delineate etiologically more homogeneous subgroups, which is clinically important to allow assigning ASD probands to different, more targeted, interventions. © 2016 Association for Child and Adolescent

  17. Rational defect passivation of Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 photovoltaics with solution-processed Cu2ZnSnS4:Na nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huanping; Song, Tze-Bin; Hsu, Wan-Ching; Luo, Song; Ye, Shenglin; Duan, Hsin-Sheng; Hsu, Chia-Jung; Yang, Wenbing; Yang, Yang

    2013-10-30

    An effective defect passivation route has been demonstrated in the rapidly growing Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe) solar cell device system by using Cu2ZnSnS4:Na (CZTS:Na) nanocrystals precursors. CZTS:Na nanocrystals are obtained by sequentially preparing CZTS nanocrystals and surface decorating of Na species, while retaining the kesterite CZTS phase. The exclusive surface presence of amorphous Na species is proved by X-ray photoluminescence spectrum and transmission electron microscopy. With Na-free glasses as the substrate, CZTS:Na nanocrystal-based solar cell device shows 50% enhancement of device performance (∼6%) than that of unpassivated CZTS nanocrystal-based device (∼4%). The enhanced electrical performance is closely related to the increased carrier concentration and elongated minority carrier lifetime, induced by defect passivation. Solution incorporation of extrinsic additives into the nanocrystals and the corresponding film enables a facile, quantitative, and versatile approach to tune the defect property of materials for future optoelectronic applications.

  18. Techniques for active passivation

    SciTech Connect

    Roscioli, Joseph R.; Herndon, Scott C.; Nelson, Jr., David D.

    2016-12-20

    In one embodiment, active (continuous or intermittent) passivation may be employed to prevent interaction of sticky molecules with interfaces inside of an instrument (e.g., an infrared absorption spectrometer) and thereby improve response time. A passivation species may be continuously or intermittently applied to an inlet of the instrument while a sample gas stream is being applied. The passivation species may have a highly polar functional group that strongly binds to either water or polar groups of the interfaces, and once bound presents a non-polar group to the gas phase in order to prevent further binding of polar molecules. The instrument may be actively used to detect the sticky molecules while the passivation species is being applied.

  19. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2013-03-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  20. Molecular dynamics study of solid-liquid heat transfer and passive liquid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesudasan Daisy, Sumith

    High heat flux removal is a challenging problem in boilers, electronics cooling, concentrated photovoltaic and other power conversion devices. Heat transfer by phase change is one of the most efficient mechanisms for removing heat from a solid surface. Futuristic electronic devices are expected to generate more than 1000 W/cm2 of heat. Despite the advancements in microscale and nanoscale manufacturing, the maximum passive heat flux removal has been 300 W/cm2 in pool boiling. Such limitations can be overcome by developing nanoscale thin-film evaporation based devices, which however require a better understanding of surface interactions and liquid vapor phase change process. Evaporation based passive flow is an inspiration from the transpiration process that happens in trees. If we can mimic this process and develop heat removal devices, then we can develop efficient cooling devices. The existing passive flow based cooling devices still needs improvement to meet the future demands. To improve the efficiency and capacity of these devices, we need to explore and quantify the passive flow happening at nanoscales. Experimental techniques have not advanced enough to study these fundamental phenomena at the nanoscale, an alternative method is to perform theoretical study at nanoscales. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a widely accepted powerful tool for studying a range of fundamental and engineering problems. MD simulations can be utilized to study the passive flow mechanism and heat transfer due to it. To study passive flow using MD, apart from the conventional methods available in MD, we need to have methods to simulate the heat transfer between solid and liquid, local pressure, surface tension, density, temperature calculation methods, realistic boundary conditions, etc. Heat transfer between solid and fluids has been a challenging area in MD simulations, and has only been minimally explored (especially for a practical fluid like water). Conventionally, an

  1. Benthic processes and coastal aquaculture: merging models and field data at a local scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigolin, Daniele; Rabouille, Christophe; Bombled, Bruno; Colla, Silvia; Pastres, Roberto; Pranovi, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    Shellfish farming is regarded as an organic extractive aquaculture activity. However, the production of faeces and pseudofaeces, in fact, leads to a net transfer of organic matter from the water column to the surface sediment. This process, which is expected to locally affect the sediment biogeochemistry, may also cause relevant changes in coastal areas characterized by a high density of farms. In this paper, we present the result of a study recently carried out in the Gulf of Venice (northern Adriatic sea), combining mathematical modelling and field sampling efforts. The work aimed at using a longline mussel farm as an in-situ test-case for modelling the differences in soft sediments biogeochemical processes along a gradient of organic deposition. We used an existing integrated model, allowing to describe biogeochemical fluxes towards the mussel farm and to predict the extent of the deposition area underneath it. The model framework includes an individual-based population dynamic model of the Mediterranean mussel coupled with a Lagrangian deposition model and a 1D benthic model of early diagenesis. The work was articulated in 3 steps: 1) the integrated model allowed to simulate the downward fluxes of organic matter originated by the farm, and the extent of its deposition area; 2) based on the first model application, two stations were localized, at which sediment cores were collected during a field campaign, carried out in June 2015. Measurements included O2 and pH microprofiling, porosity and micro-porosity, Total Organic Carbon, and pore waters NH4, PO4, SO4, Alkalinity, and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon; 3) two distinct early diagenesis models were set-up, reproducing observed field data in the sampled cores. Observed oxygen microprofiles showed a different behavior underneath the farm with respect to the outside reference station. In particular, a remarkable decrease in the oxygen penetration depth, and an increase in the O2 influx calculated from the

  2. Noise source localization using Matched Field Processing: wind turbines, mofettes and geysirs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umlauft, Josefine; Flores Estrella, Hortencia; Christin Obermann, Anne; Korn, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The Matched Field Processing (MFP) is a beamforming method, derived from ocean acoustics, that serves as a noise source localization and exploration tool in applied geophysics. Here, we present three case studies to explore the applicability of MFP in the presence of different source types, and using sensor arrays with different aperture and density. First, we show the localization of a single wind turbine (Saxony, Eastern Germany), which acts as a point source at the surface generating continuous vibrations due to the rotation of their blades. Using 30 vertical sensors (Reftek Texans) randomly distributed within an area of approximately 50 x 50 m2 around the wind turbine, we identified the turbine as the dominant noise source within the array. Therefore we verified that the MFP procedure gives useful results. The second test was performed in Hartouŝov (NW Bohemia, Czech Republic). This area is characterized by several natural degassing areas of mantle-originating fluids and CO2 (mofettes). Mofettes either appear as little sinks filled with bubbling groundwater or more extensive as vegetation anomalies. We located these mofettes, using the collapsing water bubbles as seismic noise source, and compared our results with CO2 flux values of the same field measured by Nickschick et al. (2015). The array consisted of 130 stations in total (30 Reftek Texans, 50 Omnirecs Data-Cubes3 and 50 Summit X-One channels) and covered an area of about 500 x 1000 m2. Additionally to MFP, we perfomed a polarization analysis of surface waves to characterize the wave field generated by the the degassing process. The last example is a geysering system in NE Java (Indonesia) which is called LUSI (Lumpur Sidoarjo). The geysir was surrounded by 5 stations (Trillium Compacts) arranged in a circle with about 1.5 km diameter. Here, we could successfully locate the surface position of the geysir as well as image its feeding channel to a depth of 100 m. This example shows the suitability of MFP

  3. Passive CO2 concentration in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Sage, Rowan F; Khoshravesh, Roxana

    2016-06-01

    Photorespiratory limitations on C3 photosynthesis are substantial in warm, low CO2 conditions. To compensate, certain plants evolved mechanisms to actively concentrate CO2 around Rubisco using ATP-supported CO2 pumps such as C4 photosynthesis. Plants can also passively accumulate CO2 without additional ATP expenditure by localizing the release of photorespired and respired CO2 around Rubisco that is diffusively isolated from peripheral air spaces. Passive accumulation of photorespired CO2 occurs when glycine decarboxylase is localized to vascular sheath cells in what is termed C2 photosynthesis, and through forming sheaths of chloroplasts around the periphery of mesophyll cells. The peripheral sheaths require photorespired CO2 to re-enter chloroplasts where it can be refixed. Passive accumulation of respiratory CO2 is common in organs such as stems, fruits and flowers, due to abundant heterotrophic tissues and high diffusive resistance along the organ periphery. Chloroplasts within these organs are able to exploit this high CO2 to reduce photorespiration. CO2 concentration can also be enhanced passively by channeling respired CO2 from roots and rhizomes into photosynthetic cells of stems and leaves via lacunae, aerenchyma and the xylem stream. Through passive CO2 concentration, C3 species likely improved their carbon economy and maintained fitness during episodes of low atmospheric CO2. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Hemispheric specialization for global and local processing: A direct comparison of linguistic and non-linguistic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Brederoo, Sanne G; Nieuwenstein, Mark R; Lorist, Monicque M; Cornelissen, Frans W

    2017-09-15

    It is often assumed that the human brain processes the global and local properties of visual stimuli in a lateralized fashion, with a left hemisphere (LH) specialization for local detail, and a right hemisphere (RH) specialization for global form. However, the evidence for such global-local lateralization stems predominantly from studies using linguistic stimuli, the processing of which has shown to be LH lateralized in itself. In addition, some studies have reported a reversal of global-local lateralization when using non-linguistic stimuli. Accordingly, it remains unclear whether global-local lateralization may in fact be stimulus-specific. To address this issue, we asked participants to respond to linguistic and non-linguistic stimuli that were presented in the right and left visual fields, allowing for first access by the LH and RH, respectively. The results showed global-RH and local-LH advantages for both stimulus types, but the global lateralization effect was larger for linguistic stimuli. Furthermore, this pattern of results was found to be robust, as it was observed regardless of two other task manipulations. We conclude that the instantiation and direction of global and local lateralization is not stimulus-specific. However, the magnitude of global,-but not local-, lateralization is dependent on stimulus type. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Functional Hemispheric Asymmetries of Global/Local Processing Mirrored by the Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martens, Ulla; Hubner, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    While hemispheric differences in global/local processing have been reported by various studies, it is still under dispute at which processing stage they occur. Primarily, it was assumed that these asymmetries originate from an early perceptual stage. Instead, the content-level binding theory (Hubner & Volberg, 2005) suggests that the hemispheres…

  6. Local Control of Forest Floor Organic Layer (F and H Layers) Drying Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, D. M.; Johnson, E. A.

    2008-12-01

    The forest floor in many ecosystems consists of a partially decomposed organic layer (duff). The duff, along with the litter layer, is the boundary between the atmosphere and the mineral soil, and for this reason it plays a crucial role in forest hydrology. The water budget of the duff is locally controlled throughout much of the snow free season, i.e. vertical fluxes dominate the water budget. During these dry periods the moisture content of the top layer of the duff, known as the F layer, cycles diurnally. Our objective is to better understand the processes controlling the duff water budget during dry periods using both modeling and field experiments. The model couples heat and mass transfer with meteorological fluxes to quantify the duff water budget during dry periods; since the fluxes are vertical during these dry periods the model is one dimensional. Field experiments determined which processes control the duff water budget during dry periods. The results indicate that the diurnal cycling of the moisture content in the F layer during dry periods is controlled by diurnal meteorological fluxes which drive coupled liquid and vapour fluxes through the duff layer. Additionally, there is minimal moisture movement between the mineral soil and the duff layer during these dry periods. This suggests that the duff water budget during dry periods is disconnected from the underlying mineral soil. The simulations incorporated the coupled meteorological fluxes and the disconnection between the duff and the mineral soil. These simulations reproduced the drying pattern in the duff with Nash-Sutcliffe efficiencies greater than 0.910 and coefficients of determination greater than 0.970 during the two longest precipitation free periods in the summer of 2007.

  7. Evaluation of Alternate Stainless Steel Surface Passivation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Elliot A.

    2005-05-31

    Stainless steel containers were assembled from parts passivated by four commercial vendors using three passivation methods. The performance of these containers in storing hydrogen isotope mixtures was evaluated by monitoring the composition of initially 50% H{sub 2} 50% D{sub 2} gas with time using mass spectroscopy. Commercial passivation by electropolishing appears to result in surfaces that do not catalyze hydrogen isotope exchange. This method of surface passivation shows promise for tritium service, and should be studied further and considered for use. On the other hand, nitric acid passivation and citric acid passivation may not result in surfaces that do not catalyze the isotope exchange reaction H{sub 2} + D{sub 2} {yields} 2HD. These methods should not be considered to replace the proprietary passivation processes of the two current vendors used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facility.

  8. Fungal isolates and metabolites in locally processed rice from five agro-ecological zones of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Abdus-Salaam, Rofiat; Atanda, Olusegun; Fanelli, Francesca; Sulyok, Micheal; Cozzi, Giuseppe; Bavaro, Simona; Krska, Rudolf; Logrieco, Antonio F; Ezekiel, Chibundu N; Salami, Waheed A

    2016-12-01

    This study reports the distribution of fungal isolates and fungal metabolites that naturally contaminate locally processed rice from five agro-ecological zones of Nigeria. The fungal species were isolated by the dilution plate technique and identified by appropriate diagnostics, while metabolites were determined by a liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometric method. Aspergillus and Penicillium species were the predominant isolates found in the rice samples while Fusarium spp. were not isolated. The mean fungal count differed significantly (p < 0.05) across the zones and ranged from 9.98 × 10(2) cfu g(-1) in the Southern Guinea Savannah to 96.97 × 10(2) cfu g(-1) in the Derived Savannah. For 16 fungal metabolites, selected from 63 positively identified fungal metabolites based on their concentration and spread across the zones, an occurrence map was constructed. The Northern Guinea Savannah recorded the highest contamination of fungal metabolites while the Sudan Savannah zone recorded the least.

  9. Packaged water: optimizing local processes for sustainable water delivery in developing nations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    With so much global attention and commitment towards making the Water and Sanitation targets of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) a reality, available figures seem to speak on the contrary as they reveal a large disparity between the expected and what currently obtains especially in developing countries. As studies have shown that the standard industrialized world model for delivery of safe drinking water technology may not be affordable in much of the developing world, packaged water is suggested as a low cost, readily available alternative water provision that could help bridge the gap. Despite the established roles that this drinking water source plays in developing nations, its importance is however significantly underestimated, and the source considered unimproved going by 'international standards'. Rather than simply disqualifying water from this source, focus should be on identifying means of improvement. The need for intervening global communities and developmental organizations to learn from and build on the local processes that already operate in the developing world is also emphasized. Identifying packaged water case studies of some developing nations, the implication of a tenacious focus on imported policies, standards and regulatory approaches on drinking water access for residents of the developing world is also discussed. PMID:21801391

  10. Local recharge processes in glacial and alluvial deposits of a temperate catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragalà, Federico A.; Parkin, Geoff

    2010-07-01

    SummaryThis study demonstrates that the composition and structure of Quaternary deposits and topography significantly influence rates of recharge and distribution of diffuse agricultural pollution at the hillslope scale. Analyses were made of vertical profiles of naturally-occurring chloride and nitrate, and artificially introduced bromide, in unsaturated and saturated sections of borehole cores of glacial till and alluvium under different land uses in the Upper Eden valley (UK). Estimates of local potential recharge were made based on chloride mass balance and nitrate peak methods. Persistent chloride bulges below the root zone were observed, and are interpreted to result from filtration processes at lithological boundaries. Changes in the shape of chloride profiles downslope, corroborated by nitrate profiles, indicate the roles of surface or near-surface runoff and runon, and the existence of lateral subsurface flows at depth. These findings have implications for estimation of recharge rates through unsaturated zones in Quaternary deposits, and the interpretation of potential 'hot-spots' of diffuse agrochemicals, particularly nitrates, moving through Quaternary deposits into groundwater.

  11. Local structure of cobalt nanoparticles synthesized by high heat flux plasma process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orpe, P. B.; Paris, E.; Balasubramanian, C.; Joseph, B.; Mukherjee, S.; Di Gioacchino, D.; Marcelli, A.; Saini, N. L.

    2017-08-01

    We have used high heat flux plasma synthesis process to grow Co those for the morphology, stoichiometry and the local structure as a function of plasma current. We find that the nanoparticles produced by the thermal plasma method have different shapes and size distribution with the plasma current being a key parameter in controlling the formation of composition, morphology and crystalline structure. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements at Co K-edge have revealed formation of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles with the composition mainly depending on the arc current. While low plasma current appears to produce nanoparticles solely of CoO with a small amount of Co metal, the high plasma current tends to produce nanoparticles of CoO and Co3O4 oxides with increased amount of Co metal. The results are consistent with the morphological and st