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Sample records for passive matrix displays

  1. JTEC panel on display technologies in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannas, Lawrence E., Jr.; Glenn, William E.; Credelle, Thomas; Doane, J. William; Firester, Arthur H.; Thompson, Malcolm

    1992-01-01

    This report is one in a series of reports that describes research and development efforts in Japan in the area of display technologies. The following are included in this report: flat panel displays (technical findings, liquid crystal display development and production, large flat panel displays (FPD's), electroluminescent displays and plasma panels, infrastructure in Japan's FPD industry, market and projected sales, and new a-Si active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) factory); materials for flat panel displays (liquid crystal materials, and light-emissive display materials); manufacturing and infrastructure of active matrix liquid crystal displays (manufacturing logistics and equipment); passive matrix liquid crystal displays (LCD basics, twisted nematics LCD's, supertwisted nematic LCD's, ferroelectric LCD's, and a comparison of passive matrix LCD technology); active matrix technology (basic active matrix technology, investment environment, amorphous silicon, polysilicon, and commercial products and prototypes); and projection displays (comparison of Japanese and U.S. display research, and technical evaluation of work).

  2. Preparation of ordered mesoporous alumina-doped titania films with high thermal stability and their application to high-speed passive-matrix electrochromic displays.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiangfen; Bastakoti, Bishnu Prasad; Weng, Wu; Higuchi, Tetsuya; Oveisi, Hamid; Suzuki, Norihiro; Chen, Wei-Jung; Huang, Yu-Tzu; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2013-08-12

    Ordered mesoporous alumina-doped titania thin films with anatase crystalline structure were prepared by using triblock copolymer Pluronic P123 as structure-directing agent. Uniform Al doping was realized by using aluminum isopropoxide as a dopant source which can be hydrolyzed together with titanium tetraisopropoxide. Aluminum doping into the titania framework can prevent rapid crystallization to the anatase phase, thereby drastically increasing thermal stability. With increasing Al content, the crystallization temperatures tend to increase gradually. Even when the Al content doped into the framework was increased to 15 mol %, a well-ordered mesoporous structure was obtained, and the mesostructural ordering was still maintained after calcination at 550 °C. During the calcination process, large uniaxial shrinkage occurred along the direction perpendicular to the substrate with retention of the horizontal mesoscale periodicity, whereby vertically oriented nanopillars were formed in the film. The resulting vertical porosity was successfully exploited to fabricate a high-speed and high-quality passive-matrix electrochromic display by using a leuco dye. The vertical nanospace in the films can effectively prevent drifting of the leuco dye. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Interactive display system having a matrix optical detector

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.; DeSanto, Leonard

    2007-01-23

    A display system includes a waveguide optical panel having an inlet face and an opposite outlet face. An image beam is projected across the inlet face laterally and transversely for display on the outlet face. An optical detector including a matrix of detector elements is optically aligned with the inlet face for detecting a corresponding lateral and transverse position of an inbound light spot on the outlet face.

  4. A passive cooling system proposal for multifunction and high-power displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tari, Ilker

    2013-03-01

    Flat panel displays are conventionally cooled by internal natural convection, which constrains the possible rate of heat transfer from the panel. On one hand, during the last few years, the power consumption and the related cooling requirement for 1080p displays have decreased mostly due to energy savings by the switch to LED backlighting and more efficient electronics. However, on the other hand, the required cooling rate recently started to increase with new directions in the industry such as 3D displays, and ultra-high-resolution displays (recent 4K announcements and planned introduction of 8K). In addition to these trends in display technology itself, there is also a trend to integrate consumer entertainment products into displays with the ultimate goal of designing a multifunction device replacing the TV, the media player, the PC, the game console and the sound system. Considering the increasing power requirement for higher fidelity in video processing, these multifunction devices tend to generate very high heat fluxes, which are impossible to dissipate with internal natural convection. In order to overcome this obstacle, instead of active cooling with forced convection that comes with drawbacks of noise, additional power consumption, and reduced reliability, a passive cooling system relying on external natural convection and radiation is proposed here. The proposed cooling system consists of a heat spreader flat heat pipe and aluminum plate-finned heat sink with anodized surfaces. For this system, the possible maximum heat dissipation rates from the standard size panels (in 26-70 inch range) are estimated by using our recently obtained heat transfer correlations for the natural convection from aluminum plate-finned heat sinks together with the surface-to-surface radiation. With the use of the proposed passive cooling system, the possibility of dissipating very high heat rates is demonstrated, hinting a promising green alternative to active cooling.

  5. Amorphous silicon thin film transistor active-matrix organic light-emitting diode displays fabricated on flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Jonathan A.

    Organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays are of immense interest because they have several advantages over liquid crystal displays, the current dominant flat panel display technology. OLED displays are emissive and therefore are brighter, have a larger viewing angle, and do not require backlights and filters, allowing thinner, lighter, and more power efficient displays. The goal of this work was to advance the state-of-the-art in active-matrix OLED display technology. First, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistor (TFT) active-matrix OLED pixels and arrays were designed and fabricated on glass substrates. The devices operated at low voltages and demonstrated that lower performance TFTs could be utilized in active-matrix OLED displays, possibly allowing lower cost processing and the use of polymeric substrates. Attempts at designing more control into the display at the pixel level were also made. Bistable (one bit gray scale) active-matrix OLED pixels and arrays were designed and fabricated. Such pixels could be used in novel applications and eventually help reduce the bandwidth requirements in high-resolution and large-area displays. Finally, a-Si:H TFT active-matrix OLED pixels and arrays were fabricated on a polymeric substrate. Displays fabricated on a polymeric substrates would be lightweight; flexible, more rugged, and potentially less expensive to fabricate. Many of the difficulties associated with fabricating active-matrix backplanes on flexible substrates were studied and addressed.

  6. Miniaturized LEDs for flat-panel displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radauscher, Erich J.; Meitl, Matthew; Prevatte, Carl; Bonafede, Salvatore; Rotzoll, Robert; Gomez, David; Moore, Tanya; Raymond, Brook; Cok, Ronald; Fecioru, Alin; Trindade, António Jose; Fisher, Brent; Goodwin, Scott; Hines, Paul; Melnik, George; Barnhill, Sam; Bower, Christopher A.

    2017-02-01

    Inorganic light emitting diodes (LEDs) serve as bright pixel-level emitters in displays, from indoor/outdoor video walls with pixel sizes ranging from one to thirty millimeters to micro displays with more than one thousand pixels per inch. Pixel sizes that fall between those ranges, roughly 50 to 500 microns, are some of the most commercially significant ones, including flat panel displays used in smart phones, tablets, and televisions. Flat panel displays that use inorganic LEDs as pixel level emitters (μILED displays) can offer levels of brightness, transparency, and functionality that are difficult to achieve with other flat panel technologies. Cost-effective production of μILED displays requires techniques for precisely arranging sparse arrays of extremely miniaturized devices on a panel substrate, such as transfer printing with an elastomer stamp. Here we present lab-scale demonstrations of transfer printed μILED displays and the processes used to make them. Demonstrations include passive matrix μILED displays that use conventional off-the shelf drive ASICs and active matrix μILED displays that use miniaturized pixel-level control circuits from CMOS wafers. We present a discussion of key considerations in the design and fabrication of highly miniaturized emitters for μILED displays.

  7. Flexible active-matrix displays and shift registers based on solution-processed organic transistors.

    PubMed

    Gelinck, Gerwin H; Huitema, H Edzer A; van Veenendaal, Erik; Cantatore, Eugenio; Schrijnemakers, Laurens; van der Putten, Jan B P H; Geuns, Tom C T; Beenhakkers, Monique; Giesbers, Jacobus B; Huisman, Bart-Hendrik; Meijer, Eduard J; Benito, Estrella Mena; Touwslager, Fred J; Marsman, Albert W; van Rens, Bas J E; de Leeuw, Dago M

    2004-02-01

    At present, flexible displays are an important focus of research. Further development of large, flexible displays requires a cost-effective manufacturing process for the active-matrix backplane, which contains one transistor per pixel. One way to further reduce costs is to integrate (part of) the display drive circuitry, such as row shift registers, directly on the display substrate. Here, we demonstrate flexible active-matrix monochrome electrophoretic displays based on solution-processed organic transistors on 25-microm-thick polyimide substrates. The displays can be bent to a radius of 1 cm without significant loss in performance. Using the same process flow we prepared row shift registers. With 1,888 transistors, these are the largest organic integrated circuits reported to date. More importantly, the operating frequency of 5 kHz is sufficiently high to allow integration with the display operating at video speed. This work therefore represents a major step towards 'system-on-plastic'.

  8. Effect of passive polarizing three-dimensional displays on surgical performance for experienced laparoscopic surgeons.

    PubMed

    Smith, R; Schwab, K; Day, A; Rockall, T; Ballard, K; Bailey, M; Jourdan, I

    2014-10-01

    Although the potential benefits of stereoscopic laparoscopy have been recognized for years, the technology has not been adopted because of poor operator tolerance. Passive polarizing projection systems, which have revolutionized three-dimensional (3D) cinema, are now being trialled in surgery. This study was designed to see whether this technology resulted in significant performance benefits for skilled laparoscopists. Four validated laparoscopic skills tasks, each with ten repetitions, were performed by 20 experienced laparoscopic surgeons, in both two-dimensional (2D) and 3D conditions. The primary outcome measure was the performance error rate; secondary outcome measures were time for task completion, 3D motion tracking (path length, motion smoothness and grasping frequency) and workload dimension ratings of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Task Load Index. Surgeons demonstrated a 62 per cent reduction in the median number of errors and a 35 per cent reduction in median performance time when using the passive polarizing 3D display compared with the 2D display. There was a significant 15 per cent reduction in median instrument path length, an enhancement of median motion smoothness, and a 15 per cent decrease in grasper frequency with the 3D display. Participants reported significant reductions in subjective workload dimension ratings of the NASA Task Load Index following use of the 3D displays. Passive polarizing 3D displays improved both the performance of experienced surgeons in a simulated setting and surgeon perception of the operative field. Although it has been argued that the experience of skilled laparoscopic surgeons compensates fully for the loss of stereopsis, this study indicates that this is not the case. Surgical relevance The potential benefits of stereoscopic laparoscopy have been known for years, but the technology has not been adopted because of poor operator tolerance. The first laparoscopic operation was carried out

  9. Passive method of eliminating accommodation/convergence disparity in stereoscopic head-mounted displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichenlaub, Jesse B.

    2005-03-01

    The difference in accommodation and convergence distance experienced when viewing stereoscopic displays has long been recognized as a source of visual discomfort. It is especially problematic in head mounted virtual reality and enhanced reality displays, where images must often be displayed across a large depth range or superimposed on real objects. DTI has demonstrated a novel method of creating stereoscopic images in which the focus and fixation distances are closely matched for all parts of the scene from close distances to infinity. The method is passive in the sense that it does not rely on eye tracking, moving parts, variable focus optics, vibrating optics, or feedback loops. The method uses a rapidly changing illumination pattern in combination with a high speed microdisplay to create cones of light that converge at different distances to form the voxels of a high resolution space filling image. A bench model display was built and a series of visual tests were performed in order to demonstrate the concept and investigate both its capabilities and limitations. Results proved conclusively that real optical images were being formed and that observers had to change their focus to read text or see objects at different distances

  10. Evaluation of the availability of bound analyte for passive sampling in the presence of mobile binding matrix.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianqiao; Huang, Shuyao; Jiang, Ruifen; Cui, Shufen; Luan, Tiangang; Chen, Guosheng; Qiu, Junlang; Cao, Chenyang; Zhu, Fang; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2016-04-21

    Elucidating the availability of the bound analytes for the mass transfer through the diffusion boundary layers (DBLs) adjacent to passive samplers is important for understanding the passive sampling kinetics in complex samples, in which the lability factor of the bound analyte in the DBL is an important parameter. In this study, the mathematical expression of lability factor was deduced by assuming a pseudo-steady state during passive sampling, and the equation indicated that the lability factor was equal to the ratio of normalized concentration gradients between the bound and free analytes. Through the introduction of the mathematical expression of lability factor, the modified effective average diffusion coefficient was proven to be more suitable for describing the passive sampling kinetics in the presence of mobile binding matrixes. Thereafter, the lability factors of the bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) micelles as the binding matrixes were figured out according to the improved theory. The lability factors were observed to decrease with larger binding ratios and smaller micelle sizes, and were successfully used to predict the mass transfer efficiencies of PAHs through DBLs. This study would promote the understanding of the availability of bound analytes for passive sampling based on the theoretical improvements and experimental assessments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Amorphous silicon thin-film transistor active-matrix for reflective cholesteric liquid crystal displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahm, Jeong-Yeop

    Reflective cholesteric liquid crystal displays (Ch-LCDs) have advantages, such as, high brightness, low power consumption, and wide viewing angle, since they do not need any polarizer, color filter, and backlight. Furthermore, due to their bistability Ch-LCDs can retain their images virtually forever without additional power consumption. But conventional passive-matrix addressing of Ch-LCDs allows only a slow image updating speed. Active-matrix addressing should allow fast image updating or video-rate operation. However, because the threshold voltage of cholesteric, liquid crystal is high (>20V), the switching devices for active-matrix addressing should satisfy required characteristics even under high bias conditions. In order to investigate the applicability of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin film transistors (a-Si:H TFTs) for the switching devices of active-matrix (AM) Ch-LCDs, the characteristics of conventional and gate offset high voltage a-Si:H TTFs were examined under high bias conditions. And it was concluded that high OFF-current of conventional a-Si:H TFTs and low ON-current of gate offset high voltage a-Si:H TFTs were main problems for reflective AM Ch-LCD applications. In order to improve the TFT characteristics under high bias conditions, we propose two new a-Si:H TFT structures called gate planarized (GP) and buried field plate (BFP) high voltage a-Si:H TFTs. Firstly, in the GP a-Si:H TFTs, we used a thick spin-coated benzocyclobutene (BCB) layer beneath a thin hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H) layer for gate insulator. The GP a-Si:H TFT showed normal TFT characteristic up to VGS = VDS = ˜100 V without any device failure. But TFT ON-current of GP a-Si:H TFT was reduced due to the introduction of the thick low dielectric BCB layer. Secondly, in the BFP a-Si:H TFT, an offset region and a buried field plate were introduced between the drain/source and gate electrodes to reduce the electric field in the pinch-off region. For this BFP

  12. Visual Acuity Using Head-fixed Displays During Passive Self and Surround Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Scott J.; Black, F. Owen; Stallings, Valerie; Peters, Brian

    2007-01-01

    The ability to read head-fixed displays on various motion platforms requires the suppression of vestibulo-ocular reflexes. This study examined dynamic visual acuity while viewing a head-fixed display during different self and surround rotation conditions. Twelve healthy subjects were asked to report the orientation of Landolt C optotypes presented on a micro-display fixed to a rotating chair at 50 cm distance. Acuity thresholds were determined by the lowest size at which the subjects correctly identified 3 of 5 optotype orientations at peak velocity. Visual acuity was compared across four different conditions, each tested at 0.05 and 0.4 Hz (peak amplitude of 57 deg/s). The four conditions included: subject rotated in semi-darkness (i.e., limited to background illumination of the display), subject stationary while visual scene rotated, subject rotated around a stationary visual background, and both subject and visual scene rotated together. Visual acuity performance was greatest when the subject rotated around a stationary visual background; i.e., when both vestibular and visual inputs provided concordant information about the motion. Visual acuity performance was most reduced when the subject and visual scene rotated together; i.e., when the visual scene provided discordant information about the motion. Ranges of 4-5 logMAR step sizes across the conditions indicated the acuity task was sufficient to discriminate visual performance levels. The background visual scene can influence the ability to read head-fixed displays during passive motion disturbances. Dynamic visual acuity using head-fixed displays can provide an operationally relevant screening tool for visual performance during exposure to novel acceleration environments.

  13. Transparent active matrix organic light-emitting diode displays driven by nanowire transistor circuitry.

    PubMed

    Ju, Sanghyun; Li, Jianfeng; Liu, Jun; Chen, Po-Chiang; Ha, Young-Geun; Ishikawa, Fumiaki; Chang, Hsiaokang; Zhou, Chongwu; Facchetti, Antonio; Janes, David B; Marks, Tobin J

    2008-04-01

    Optically transparent, mechanically flexible displays are attractive for next-generation visual technologies and portable electronics. In principle, organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) satisfy key requirements for this application-transparency, lightweight, flexibility, and low-temperature fabrication. However, to realize transparent, flexible active-matrix OLED (AMOLED) displays requires suitable thin-film transistor (TFT) drive electronics. Nanowire transistors (NWTs) are ideal candidates for this role due to their outstanding electrical characteristics, potential for compact size, fast switching, low-temperature fabrication, and transparency. Here we report the first demonstration of AMOLED displays driven exclusively by NW electronics and show that such displays can be optically transparent. The displays use pixel dimensions suitable for hand-held applications, exhibit 300 cd/m2 brightness, and are fabricated at temperatures suitable for integration on plastic substrates.

  14. Fully Screen-Printed, Large-Area, and Flexible Active-Matrix Electrochromic Displays Using Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xuan; Lau, Christian; Liu, Yihang; Wu, Fanqi; Gui, Hui; Liu, Qingzhou; Ma, Yuqiang; Wan, Haochuan; Amer, Moh R; Zhou, Chongwu

    2016-11-22

    Semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes are ideal semiconductors for printed electronics due to their advantageous electrical and mechanical properties, intrinsic printability in solution, and desirable stability in air. However, fully printed, large-area, high-performance, and flexible carbon nanotube active-matrix backplanes are still difficult to realize for future displays and sensing applications. Here, we report fully screen-printed active-matrix electrochromic displays employing carbon nanotube thin-film transistors. Our fully printed backplane shows high electrical performance with mobility of 3.92 ± 1.08 cm 2 V -1 s -1 , on-off current ratio I on /I off ∼ 10 4 , and good uniformity. The printed backplane was then monolithically integrated with an array of printed electrochromic pixels, resulting in an entirely screen-printed active-matrix electrochromic display (AMECD) with good switching characteristics, facile manufacturing, and long-term stability. Overall, our fully screen-printed AMECD is promising for the mass production of large-area and low-cost flexible displays for applications such as disposable tags, medical electronics, and smart home appliances.

  15. Angiogenic Type I Collagen Extracellular Matrix Integrated with Recombinant Bacteriophages Displaying Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Junghyo; Korkmaz Zirpel, Nuriye; Park, Hyun-Ji; Han, Sewoon; Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Shin, Jisoo; Cho, Seung-Woo; Nam, Chang-Hoon; Chung, Seok

    2016-01-21

    Here, a growth-factor-integrated natural extracellular matrix of type I collagen is presented that induces angiogenesis. The developed matrix adapts type I collagen nanofibers integrated with synthetic colloidal particles of recombinant bacteriophages that display vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The integration is achieved during or after gelation of the type I collagen and the matrix enables spatial delivery of VEGF into a desired region. Endothelial cells that contact the VEGF are found to invade into the matrix to form tube-like structures both in vitro and in vivo, proving the angiogenic potential of the matrix. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Recent advances and product enhancements in reflective cholesteric displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Asad; Schneider, Tod; Miller, Nick; Marhefka, Duane; Ernst, Todd; Nicholson, Forrest; Doane, Joseph W.

    2005-04-01

    Bistable reflective cholesteric displays are a liquid crystal display technology developed to fill a market need for very low power displays on a low-cost, high resolution passive matrix. Their unique look, high reflectivity, bistability, and simple structure make them an ideal flat panel display choice for handheld or other portable devices where small lightweight batteries with long lifetimes are important. We discuss recent advances in cholesteric display technology at Kent Displays such as progress towards single layer black and white displays, standard products, lower cost display modules, and various interface options for cholesteric display applications. It will be shown that inclusion of radio frequency (rf) control options and serial peripheral interface (spi) can greatly enhance the cholesteric display module market penetration by enabling quick integration into end devices. Finally, some discussion will be on the progress of the development of flexible reflective cholesteric displays. These flexible displays can dramatically change industrial design methods by enabling curved surfaces with displays integrated in them. Additional discussion in the paper will include applications of various display modes including signs, hand held instrumentation, and the electronic book and reader.

  17. Active and passive distraction using a head-mounted display helmet: effects on cold pressor pain in children.

    PubMed

    Dahlquist, Lynnda M; McKenna, Kristine D; Jones, Katia K; Dillinger, Lindsay; Weiss, Karen E; Ackerman, Claire Sonntag

    2007-11-01

    The current study tested the effectiveness of interactive versus passive distraction that was delivered via a virtual reality type head-mounted display helmet for children experiencing cold pressor pain. Forty children, aged 5 to 13 years, underwent 1 or 2 baseline cold pressor trials followed by interactive distraction and passive distraction trials in counterbalanced order. Pain threshold and pain tolerance. Children who experienced either passive or interactive distraction demonstrated significant improvements in both pain tolerance and pain threshold relative to their baseline scores. In contrast, children who underwent a second cold pressor trial without distraction showed no significant improvements in pain tolerance or threshold. Although both distraction conditions were effective, the interactive distraction condition was significantly more effective. Implications for the treatment of children's distress during painful medical procedures are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Separated carbon nanotube macroelectronics for active matrix organic light-emitting diode displays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jialu; Fu, Yue; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Po-Chiang; Liu, Zhiwei; Wei, Wei; Wu, Chao; Thompson, Mark E; Zhou, Chongwu

    2011-11-09

    Active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) display holds great potential for the next generation visual technologies due to its high light efficiency, flexibility, lightweight, and low-temperature processing. However, suitable thin-film transistors (TFTs) are required to realize the advantages of AMOLED. Preseparated, semiconducting enriched carbon nanotubes are excellent candidates for this purpose because of their excellent mobility, high percentage of semiconducting nanotubes, and room-temperature processing compatibility. Here we report, for the first time, the demonstration of AMOLED displays driven by separated nanotube thin-film transistors (SN-TFTs) including key technology components, such as large-scale high-yield fabrication of devices with superior performance, carbon nanotube film density optimization, bilayer gate dielectric for improved substrate adhesion to the deposited nanotube film, and the demonstration of monolithically integrated AMOLED display elements with 500 pixels driven by 1000 SN-TFTs. Our approach can serve as the critical foundation for future nanotube-based thin-film display electronics.

  19. Separated Carbon Nanotube Macroelectronics for Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yue; Zhang, Jialu; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Pochiang; Zhou, Chongwu

    2012-02-01

    Active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) display holds great potential for the next generation visual technologies due to its high light efficiency, flexibility, lightweight, and low-temperature processing. However, suitable thin-film transistors (TFTs) are required to realize the advantages of AMOLED. Pre-separated, semiconducting enriched carbon nanotubes are excellent candidates for this purpose because of their excellent mobility, high percentage of semiconducting nanotubes, and room-temperature processing compatibility. Here we report, for the first time, the demonstration of AMOLED displays driven by separated nanotube thin-film transistors (SN-TFTs) including key technology components such as large-scale high-yield fabrication of devices with superior performance, carbon nanotube film density optimization, bilayer gate dielectric for improved substrate adhesion to the deposited nanotube film, and the demonstration of monolithically integrated AMOLED display elements with 500 pixels driven by 1000 SN-TFTs. Our approach can serve as the critical foundation for future nanotube-based thin-film display electronics.

  20. Ultrathin Quantum Dot Display Integrated with Wearable Electronics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaemin; Shim, Hyung Joon; Yang, Jiwoong; Choi, Moon Kee; Kim, Dong Chan; Kim, Junhee; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2017-10-01

    An ultrathin skin-attachable display is a critical component for an information output port in next-generation wearable electronics. In this regard, quantum dot (QD) light-emitting diodes (QLEDs) offer unique and attractive characteristics for future displays, including high color purity with narrow bandwidths, high electroluminescence (EL) brightness at low operating voltages, and easy processability. Here, ultrathin QLED displays that utilize a passive matrix to address individual pixels are reported. The ultrathin thickness (≈5.5 µm) of the QLED display enables its conformal contact with the wearer's skin and prevents its failure under vigorous mechanical deformation. QDs with relatively thick shells are employed to improve EL characteristics (brightness up to 44 719 cd m -2 at 9 V, which is the record highest among wearable LEDs reported to date) by suppressing the nonradiative recombination. Various patterns, including letters, numbers, and symbols can be successfully visualized on the skin-mounted QLED display. Furthermore, the combination of the ultrathin QLED display with flexible driving circuits and wearable sensors results in a fully integrated QLED display that can directly show sensor data. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Color matrix display simulation based upon luminance and chromatic contrast sensitivity of early vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Russel A.; Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Larimer, James O.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the design and operation of a new simulation model for color matrix display development. It models the physical structure, the signal processing, and the visual perception of static displays, to allow optimization of display design parameters through image quality measures. The model is simple, implemented in the Mathematica computer language, and highly modular. Signal processing modules operate on the original image. The hardware modules describe backlights and filters, the pixel shape, and the tiling of the pixels over the display. Small regions of the displayed image can be visualized on a CRT. Visual perception modules assume static foveal images. The image is converted into cone catches and then into luminance, red-green, and blue-yellow images. A Haar transform pyramid separates the three images into spatial frequency and direction-specific channels. The channels are scaled by weights taken from human contrast sensitivity measurements of chromatic and luminance mechanisms at similar frequencies and orientations. Each channel provides a detectability measure. These measures allow the comparison of images displayed on prospective devices and, by that, the optimization of display designs.

  2. Multiple-layered effective medium approximation approach to modeling environmental effects on alumina passivated highly porous silicon nanostructured thin films measured by in-situ Mueller matrix ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mock, Alyssa; Carlson, Timothy; VanDerslice, Jeremy; Mohrmann, Joel; Woollam, John A.; Schubert, Eva; Schubert, Mathias

    2017-11-01

    Optical changes in alumina passivated highly porous silicon slanted columnar thin films during controlled exposure to toluene vapor are reported. Electron-beam evaporation glancing angle deposition and subsequent atomic layer deposition are utilized to deposit alumina passivated nanostructured porous silicon thin films. In-situ Mueller matrix generalized spectroscopic ellipsometry in an environmental cell is then used to determine changes in optical properties of the nanostructured thin films by inspection of individual Mueller matrix elements, each of which exhibit sensitivity to adsorption. The use of a multiple-layered effective medium approximation model allows for accurate description of the inhomogeneous nature of toluene adsorption onto alumina passivated highly porous silicon slanted columnar thin films.

  3. Pentacene-based organic thin film transistors, integrated circuits, and active matrix displays on polymeric substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheraw, Christopher Duncan

    2003-10-01

    Organic thin film transistors are attractive candidates for a variety of low cost, large area commercial electronics including smart cards, RF identification tags, and flat panel displays. Of particular interest are high performance organic thin film transistors (TFTs) that can be fabricated on flexible polymeric substrates allowing low-cost, lightweight, rugged electronics such as flexible active matrix displays. This thesis reports pentacene organic thin film transistors fabricated on flexible polymeric substrates with record performance, the fastest photolithographically patterned organic TFT integrated circuits on polymeric substrates reported to date, and the fabrication of the organic TFT backplanes used to build the first organic TFT-driven active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD), also the first AMLCD on a flexible substrate, ever reported. In addition, the first investigation of functionalized pentacene derivatives used as the active layer in organic thin film transistors is reported. A low temperature (<110°C) process technology was developed allowing the fabrication of high performance organic TFTs, integrated circuits, and large TFT arrays on flexible polymeric substrates. This process includes the development of a novel water-based photolithographic active layer patterning process using polyvinyl alcohol that allows the patterning of organic semiconductor materials for elimination of active layer leakage current without causing device degradation. The small molecule aromatic hydrocarbon pentacene was used as the active layer material to fabricate organic TFTs on the polymeric material polyethylene naphthalate with field-effect mobility as large as 2.1 cm2/V-s and on/off current ratio of 108. These are the best values reported for organic TFTs on polymeric substrates and comparable to organic TFTs on rigid substrates. Analog and digital integrated circuits were also fabricated on polymeric substrates using pentacene TFTs with propagation delay as

  4. Regulation of extracellular matrix elements and sarcomerogenesis in response to different periods of passive stretching in the soleus muscle of rats.

    PubMed

    Peviani, Sabrina M; Guzzoni, Vinicius; Pinheiro-Dardis, Clara M; Silva, Yara P da; Fioravante, Alisson C R; Sagawa, Adriana H; Delfino, Gabriel B; Durigan, João L Q; Salvini, Tania F

    2018-06-13

    Stretching is a common method used to prevent muscle shortening and improve limited mobility. However, the effect of different time periods on stretching-induced adaptation of the extracellular matrix and its regulatory elements have yet to be investigated. We aimed to evaluate the expression of fibrillar collagens, sarcomerogenesis, metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and gene expression of the extracellular matrix (ECM) regulators in the soleus (SOL) muscle of rats submitted to different stretching periods. The soleus muscles were submitted to 10 sets of passive stretching over 10 (St 10d) or 15 days (St 15d) (1 min per set, with 30 seconds' rest between sets). Sarcomerogenesis, muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), and MMP activity and mRNA levels in collagen (type I, III and IV), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), growth factor-beta (TGF-β), and lysyl oxidase (LOX) were analyzed. Passive stretching over both time periods mitigated COL-I deposition in the SOL muscle of rats. Paradoxically, 10 days of passive stretching induced COL-I and COL-III synthesis, with concomitant upregulation of TGF-β1 and CTGF at a transcriptional level. These responses may be associated with lower LOX mRNA levels in SOL muscles submitted to 10 passive stretching sessions. Moreover, sarcomerogenesis was observed after 15 days of stretching, suggesting that stretching-induced muscle adaptations are time-dependent responses.

  5. Driving technology for improving motion quality of active-matrix organic light-emitting diode display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongbin; Kim, Minkoo; Kim, Jong-Man; Kim, Seung-Ryeol; Lee, Seung-Woo

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports transient response characteristics of active-matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) displays for mobile applications. This work reports that the rising responses look like saw-tooth waveform and are not always faster than those of liquid crystal displays. Thus, a driving technology is proposed to improve the rising transient responses of AMOLED based on the overdrive (OD) technology. We modified the OD technology by combining it with a dithering method because the conventional OD method cannot successfully enhance all the rising responses. Our method can improve all the transitions of AMOLED without modifying the conventional gamma architecture of drivers. A new artifact is found when OD is applied to certain transitions. We propose an optimum OD selection method to mitigate the artifact. The implementation results show the proposed technology can successfully improve motion quality of scrolling texts as well as moving pictures in AMOLED displays.

  6. Contribution of titin and extracellular matrix to passive pressure and measurement of sarcomere length in the mouse left ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Charles S; Granzier, Henk L

    2011-01-01

    It remains to be established to what degree titin and the extracellular matrix (ECM) contribute to passive pressure in the left ventricle (LV). Thus, we aimed to elucidate the contribution of major molecular determinants of passive pressure in the normal mouse LV. Furthermore, we determined the working sarcomere length (SL) range of the LV to bridge our findings to earlier work in skinned muscle fibers. We utilized Frank-Starling type protocols to obtain diastolic pressure-volume relationships (PVR) in Langendorff perfused isolated LVs. To quantify the molecular contribution of titin and ECM, we innovated on methods of fiber mechanics to chemically permeabilize intact LVs and measure a fully passive PVR. To differentially dissect the contributions of the ECM and titin, we utilized myofilament extraction techniques in permeabilized LVs, measuring passive PVRs at each stage in the protocol. Myofilament extraction suggests that titin contributes ~80% of passive pressures in the heart. Langendorff perfusion was also used to chemically fix passive and BaCl2 activated hearts at specific volumes to determine that the maximal working SL range of the midwall LV fibers is approximately 1.8-2.2 μm. A model of the passive SL-Volume relationship was then used to estimate the pressure-SL relationships, indicating that the ECM contribution does not exceed titin's contribution until large volumes with SLs>~2.2μm. In conclusion, within physiological volumes titin is the dominant contributor to LV passive pressure, and ECM-based pressures dominates at larger volumes. PMID:21255582

  7. Technology and design of an active-matrix OLED on crystalline silicon direct-view display for a wristwatch computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, James L.; Schlig, Eugene S.; Prache, Olivier; Dove, Derek B.; Ali, Tariq A.; Howard, Webster E.

    2002-02-01

    The IBM Research Division and eMagin Corp. jointly have developed a low-power VGA direct view active matrix OLED display, fabricated on a crystalline silicon CMOS chip. The display is incorporated in IBM prototype wristwatch computers running the Linus operating system. IBM designed the silicon chip and eMagin developed the organic stack and performed the back-end-of line processing and packaging. Each pixel is driven by a constant current source controlled by a CMOS RAM cell, and the display receives its data from the processor memory bus. This paper describes the OLED technology and packaging, and outlines the design of the pixel and display electronics and the processor interface. Experimental results are presented.

  8. Plastic substrates for active matrix liquid crystal display incapable of withstanding processing temperature of over 200 C and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Carey, P.G.; Smith, P.M.; Havens, J.H.; Jones, P.

    1999-01-05

    Bright-polarizer-free, active-matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCDs) are formed on plastic substrates. The primary components of the display are a pixel circuit fabricated on one plastic substrate, an intervening liquid-crystal material, and a counter electrode on a second plastic substrate. The-pixel circuit contains one or more thin-film transistors (TFTs) and either a transparent or reflective pixel electrode manufactured at sufficiently low temperatures to avoid damage to the plastic substrate. Fabrication of the TFTs can be carried out at temperatures less than 100 C. The liquid crystal material is a commercially made nematic curvilinear aligned phase (NCAP) film. The counter electrode is comprised of a plastic substrate coated with a transparent conductor, such as indium-doped tin oxide (ITO). By coupling the active matrix with NCAP, a high-information content can be provided in a bright, fully plastic package. Applications include any low cost portable electronics containing flat displays where ruggedization of the display is desired. 12 figs.

  9. Flexible active-matrix organic light-emitting diode display enabled by MoS2 thin-film transistor.

    PubMed

    Choi, Minwoo; Park, Yong Ju; Sharma, Bhupendra K; Bae, Sa-Rang; Kim, Soo Young; Ahn, Jong-Hyun

    2018-04-01

    Atomically thin molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) has been extensively investigated in semiconductor electronics but has not been applied in a backplane circuitry of organic light-emitting diode (OLED) display. Its applicability as an active drive element is hampered by the large contact resistance at the metal/MoS 2 interface, which hinders the transport of carriers at the dielectric surface, which in turn considerably deteriorates the mobility. Modified switching device architecture is proposed for efficiently exploiting the high- k dielectric Al 2 O 3 layer, which, when integrated in an active matrix, can drive the ultrathin OLED display even in dynamic folding states. The proposed architecture exhibits 28 times increase in mobility compared to a normal back-gated thin-film transistor, and its potential as a wearable display attached to a human wrist is demonstrated.

  10. Flexible active-matrix organic light-emitting diode display enabled by MoS2 thin-film transistor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong Ju

    2018-01-01

    Atomically thin molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has been extensively investigated in semiconductor electronics but has not been applied in a backplane circuitry of organic light-emitting diode (OLED) display. Its applicability as an active drive element is hampered by the large contact resistance at the metal/MoS2 interface, which hinders the transport of carriers at the dielectric surface, which in turn considerably deteriorates the mobility. Modified switching device architecture is proposed for efficiently exploiting the high-k dielectric Al2O3 layer, which, when integrated in an active matrix, can drive the ultrathin OLED display even in dynamic folding states. The proposed architecture exhibits 28 times increase in mobility compared to a normal back-gated thin-film transistor, and its potential as a wearable display attached to a human wrist is demonstrated. PMID:29713686

  11. Substrate and Passivation Techniques for Flexible Amorphous Silicon-Based X-ray Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Marrs, Michael A.; Raupp, Gregory B.

    2016-01-01

    Flexible active matrix display technology has been adapted to create new flexible photo-sensing electronic devices, including flexible X-ray detectors. Monolithic integration of amorphous silicon (a-Si) PIN photodiodes on a flexible substrate poses significant challenges associated with the intrinsic film stress of amorphous silicon. This paper examines how altering device structuring and diode passivation layers can greatly improve the electrical performance and the mechanical reliability of the device, thereby eliminating one of the major weaknesses of a-Si PIN diodes in comparison to alternative photodetector technology, such as organic bulk heterojunction photodiodes and amorphous selenium. A dark current of 0.5 pA/mm2 and photodiode quantum efficiency of 74% are possible with a pixelated diode structure with a silicon nitride/SU-8 bilayer passivation structure on a 20 µm-thick polyimide substrate. PMID:27472329

  12. Substrate and Passivation Techniques for Flexible Amorphous Silicon-Based X-ray Detectors.

    PubMed

    Marrs, Michael A; Raupp, Gregory B

    2016-07-26

    Flexible active matrix display technology has been adapted to create new flexible photo-sensing electronic devices, including flexible X-ray detectors. Monolithic integration of amorphous silicon (a-Si) PIN photodiodes on a flexible substrate poses significant challenges associated with the intrinsic film stress of amorphous silicon. This paper examines how altering device structuring and diode passivation layers can greatly improve the electrical performance and the mechanical reliability of the device, thereby eliminating one of the major weaknesses of a-Si PIN diodes in comparison to alternative photodetector technology, such as organic bulk heterojunction photodiodes and amorphous selenium. A dark current of 0.5 pA/mm² and photodiode quantum efficiency of 74% are possible with a pixelated diode structure with a silicon nitride/SU-8 bilayer passivation structure on a 20 µm-thick polyimide substrate.

  13. Plastic substrates for active matrix liquid crystal display incapable of withstanding processing temperature of over 200.degree. C and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Paul G.; Smith, Patrick M.; Havens, John; Jones, Phil

    1999-01-01

    Bright-polarizer-free, active-matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCDs) are formed on plastic substrates. The primary components of the display are a pixel circuit fabricated on one plastic substrate, an intervening liquid-crystal material, and a counter electrode on a second plastic substrate. The-pixel circuit contains one or more thin-film transistors (TFTs) and either a transparent or reflective pixel electrode manufactured at sufficiently low temperatures to avoid damage to the plastic substrate. Fabrication of the TFTs can be carried out at temperatures less than 100.degree. C. The liquid crystal material is a commercially made nematic curvilinear aligned phase (NCAP) film. The counter electrode is comprised of a plastic substrate coated with a transparent conductor, such as indium-doped tin oxide (ITO). By coupling the active matrix with NCAP, a high-information content can be provided in a bright, fully plastic package. Applications include any low cost portable electronics containing flat displays where ruggedization of the display is desired.

  14. Suppression of TFT leakage current effect on active matrix displays by employing a new circular switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Hoon; Park, Hyun-Sang; Jeon, Jae-Hong; Han, Min-Koo

    2008-03-01

    We have proposed a new poly-Si TFT pixel, which can suppress TFT leakage current effect on active matrix organic diode (AMOLED) displays, by employing a new circular switching TFT and additional signal line for compensating the leakage current. When the leakage current of switching TFT is increased, the VGS of the current driving TFT in the proposed pixel is not altered by the variable data voltages due to the circular switching TFT. Our simulation results show that OLED current variation of the proposed pixel can be suppressed less than 3%, while that of conventional pixel exceeds 30%. The proposed pixel may be suitable to suppress the leakage current effect on AMOLED display.

  15. Embedded Touch Sensing Circuit Using Mutual Capacitance for Active-Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young-Ju; Seok, Su-Jeong; Park, Sang-Ho; Kim, Ohyun

    2011-03-01

    We propose and simulate an embedded touch sensing circuit for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays. The circuit consists of three thin-film transistors (TFTs), one fixed capacitor, and one variable capacitor. AMOLED displays do not have a variable capacitance characteristic, so we realized a variable capacitor to detect touches in the sensing pixel by exploiting the change in the mutual capacitance between two electrodes that is caused by touch. When a dielectric substance approaches two electrodes, the electric field is shunted so that the mutual capacitance decreases. We use the existing TFT process to form the variable capacitor, so no additional process is needed. We use advanced solid-phase-crystallization TFTs because of their stability and uniformity. The proposed circuit detects multi-touch points by a scanning process.

  16. Passive mechanical properties of rat abdominal wall muscles suggest an important role of the extracellular connective tissue matrix.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephen H M; Carr, John Austin; Ward, Samuel R; Lieber, Richard L

    2012-08-01

    Abdominal wall muscles have a unique morphology suggesting a complex role in generating and transferring force to the spinal column. Studying passive mechanical properties of these muscles may provide insights into their ability to transfer force among structures. Biopsies from rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO), and transverse abdominis (TrA) were harvested from male Sprague-Dawley rats, and single muscle fibers and fiber bundles (4-8 fibers ensheathed in their connective tissue matrix) were isolated and mechanically stretched in a passive state. Slack sarcomere lengths were measured and elastic moduli were calculated from stress-strain data. Titin molecular mass was also measured from single muscle fibers. No significant differences were found among the four abdominal wall muscles in terms of slack sarcomere length or elastic modulus. Interestingly, across all four muscles, slack sarcomere lengths were quite long in individual muscle fibers (>2.4 µm), and demonstrated a significantly longer slack length in comparison to fiber bundles (p < 0.0001). Also, the extracellular connective tissue matrix provided a stiffening effect and enhanced the resistance to lengthening at long muscle lengths. Titin molecular mass was significantly less in TrA compared to each of the other three muscles (p < 0.0009), but this difference did not correspond to hypothesized differences in stiffness. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  17. European display scene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Christopher T.

    2000-08-01

    The manufacture of Flat Panel Displays (FPDs) is dominated by Far Eastern sources, particularly in Active Matrix Liquid Crystal Displays (AMLCD) and Plasma. The United States has a very powerful capability in micro-displays. It is not well known that Europe has a very active research capability which has lead to many innovations in display technology. In addition there is a capability in display manufacturing of organic technologies as well as the licensed build of Japanese or Korean designs. Finally, Europe has a display systems capability in military products which is world class.

  18. Direct Integration of Dynamic Emissive Displays into Knitted Fabric Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellingham, Alyssa

    electroluminescence that occur where the conductive fibers contact the EL fibers. A passive matrix addressing scheme was used to apply a voltage to each pixel individually, creating a display capable of dynamically communicating information. Optical measurements of the intensity and color of emitted light were used to quantify the performance of the display and compare it to state-of-the-art display technologies. The charge-voltage (Q-V) electrical characterization technique is used to gain information about the ACPEL fiber device operation, and mechanical tests were performed to determine the effect everyday wear and tear would have on the performance of the display. The presented textile display structure and method of producing fibers with individual sections of electroluminescence addresses the shortcomings in existing textile display technology and provides a route to directly integrated communicative textiles for applications ranging from biomedical research and monitoring to fashion. An extensive discussion of the materials and methods of production needed to scale this textile display technology and incorporate it into wearable applications is presented.

  19. Voltage Drop Compensation Method for Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sang-moo; Ryu, Do-hyung; Kim, Keum-nam; Choi, Jae-beom; Kim, Byung-hee; Berkeley, Brian

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, the conventional voltage drop compensation methods are reviewed and the novel design and driving scheme, the advanced power de-coupled (aPDC) driving method, is proposed to effectively compensate the voltage IR drop of active matrix light emitting diode (AMOLED) displays. The advanced PDC driving scheme can be applied to general AMOLED pixel circuits that have been developed with only minor modification or without requiring modification in pixel circuit. A 14-in. AMOLED panel with the aPDC driving scheme was fabricated. Long range uniformity (LRU) of the 14-in. AMOLED panel was improved from 43% without the aPDC driving scheme, to over 87% at the same brightness by using the scheme and the layout complexity of the panel with new design scheme is less than that of the panel with the conventional design scheme.

  20. Combat vehicle crew helmet-mounted display: next generation high-resolution head-mounted display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Scott A.

    1994-06-01

    The Combat Vehicle Crew Head-Mounted Display (CVC HMD) program is an ARPA-funded, US Army Natick Research, Development, and Engineering Center monitored effort to develop a high resolution, flat panel HMD for the M1 A2 Abrams main battle tank. CVC HMD is part of the ARPA High Definition Systems (HDS) thrust to develop and integrate small (24 micrometers square pels), high resolution (1280 X 1024 X 6-bit grey scale at 60 frame/sec) active matrix electroluminescent (AMEL) and active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCD) for head mounted and projection applications. The Honeywell designed CVC HMD is a next generation head-mounted display system that includes advanced flat panel image sources, advanced digital display driver electronics, high speed (> 1 Gbps) digital interconnect electronics, and light weight, high performance optical and mechanical designs. The resulting dramatic improvements in size, weight, power, and cost have already led to program spin offs for both military and commercial applications.

  1. A Laboratory-Based Course in Display Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarik, J.; Akinwande, A. I.; Kymissis, I.

    2011-01-01

    A laboratory-based class in flat-panel display technology is presented. The course introduces fundamental concepts of display systems and reinforces these concepts through the fabrication of three display devices--an inorganic electroluminescent seven-segment display, a dot-matrix organic light-emitting diode (OLED) display, and a dot-matrix…

  2. Image quality affected by diffraction of aperture structure arrangement in transparent active-matrix organic light-emitting diode displays.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Hsiang; Huang, Mao-Hsiu; Jeng, Wei-de; Huang, Ting-Wei; Lo, Kuo-Lung; Ou-Yang, Mang

    2015-10-01

    Transparent display is one of the main technologies in next-generation displays, especially for augmented reality applications. An aperture structure is attached on each display pixel to partition them into transparent and black regions. However, diffraction blurs caused by the aperture structure typically degrade the transparent image when the light from a background object passes through finite aperture window. In this paper, the diffraction effect of an active-matrix organic light-emitting diode display (AMOLED) is studied. Several aperture structures have been proposed and implemented. Based on theoretical analysis and simulation, the appropriate aperture structure will effectively reduce the blur. The analysis data are also consistent with the experimental results. Compared with the various transparent aperture structure on AMOLED, diffraction width (zero energy position of diffraction pattern) of the optimize aperture structure can be reduced 63% and 31% in the x and y directions in CASE 3. Associated with a lenticular lens on the aperture structure, the improvement could reach to 77% and 54% of diffraction width in the x and y directions. Modulation transfer function and practical images are provided to evaluate the improvement of image blurs.

  3. New Driving Scheme to Improve Hysteresis Characteristics of Organic Thin Film Transistor-Driven Active-Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Nakajima, Yoshiki; Takei, Tatsuya; Fujisaki, Yoshihide; Fukagawa, Hirohiko; Suzuki, Mitsunori; Motomura, Genichi; Sato, Hiroto; Tokito, Shizuo; Fujikake, Hideo

    2011-02-01

    A new driving scheme for an active-matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) display was developed to prevent the picture quality degradation caused by the hysteresis characteristics of organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). In this driving scheme, the gate electrode voltage of a driving-OTFT is directly controlled through the storage capacitor so that the operating point for the driving-OTFT is on the same hysteresis curve for every pixel after signal data are stored in the storage capacitor. Although the number of OTFTs in each pixel for the AMOLED display is restricted because OTFT size should be large enough to drive organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) due to their small carrier mobility, it can improve the picture quality for an OTFT-driven flexible OLED display with the basic two transistor-one capacitor circuitry.

  4. Matrix formalism of electromagnetic wave propagation through multiple layers in the near-field region: application to the flat panel display.

    PubMed

    Lee, C Y; Lee, D E; Hong, Y K; Shim, J H; Jeong, C K; Joo, J; Zang, D S; Shim, M G; Lee, J J; Cha, J K; Yang, H G

    2003-04-01

    We have developed an electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation theory through a single layer and multiple layers in the near-field and far-field regions, and have constructed a matrix formalism in terms of the boundary conditions of the EM waves. From the shielding efficiency (SE) against EM radiation in the near-field region calculated by using the matrix formalism, we propose that the effect of multiple layers yields enhanced shielding capability compared to a single layer with the same total thickness in conducting layers as the multiple layers. We compare the intensities of an EM wave propagating through glass coated with conducting indium tin oxide (ITO) on one side and on both sides, applying it to the electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding filter in a flat panel display such as a plasma display panel (PDP). From the measured intensities of EMI noise generated by a PDP loaded with ITO coated glass samples, the two-side coated glass shows a lower intensity of EMI noise compared to the one-side coated glass. The result confirms the enhancement of the SE due to the effect of multiple layers, as expected in the matrix formalism of EM wave propagation in the near-field region. In the far-field region, the two-side coated glass with ITO in multiple layers has a higher SE than the one-side coated glass with ITO, when the total thickness of ITO in both cases is the same.

  5. Program For A Pushbutton Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busquets, Anthony M.; Luck, William S., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Programmable Display Pushbutton (PDP) is pushbutton device available from Micro Switch having programmable 16X35 matrix of light-emitting diodes on pushbutton surface. Any desired legends display on PDP's, producing user-friendly applications reducing need for dedicated manual controls. Interacts with operator, calls for correct response before transmitting next message. Both simple manual control and sophisticated programmable link between operator and host system. Programmable Display Pushbutton Legend Editor (PDPE) computer program used to create light-emitting-diode (LED) displays for pushbuttons. Written in FORTRAN.

  6. Passive and Active Control of Space Structures (PACOSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morosow, G.; Harcrow, H.; Rogers, L.

    1985-04-01

    Passive and Active Control of Space Structures (PACOSS) is a five-year program designed to investigate highly damped structures in conjunction with active control systems, and in particular to develop technology that integrates passive damping and active control to achieve precise pointing control. Major areas of research include metal matrix composites; viscoelastic materials; damping devices; dynamic test article design, fabrication and testing; and active damping.

  7. A visual analysis of multi-attribute data using pixel matrix displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Ming C.; Dayal, Umeshwar; Keim, Daniel; Schreck, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    Charts and tables are commonly used to visually analyze data. These graphics are simple and easy to understand, but charts show only highly aggregated data and present only a limited number of data values while tables often show too many data values. As a consequence, these graphics may either lose or obscure important information, so different techniques are required to monitor complex datasets. Users need more powerful visualization techniques to digest and compare detailed multi-attribute data to analyze the health of their business. This paper proposes an innovative solution based on the use of pixel-matrix displays to represent transaction-level information. With pixelmatrices, users can visualize areas of importance at a glance, a capability not provided by common charting techniques. We present our solutions to use colored pixel-matrices in (1) charts for visualizing data patterns and discovering exceptions, (2) tables for visualizing correlations and finding root-causes, and (3) time series for visualizing the evolution of long-running transactions. The solutions have been applied with success to product sales, Internet network performance analysis, and service contract applications demonstrating the benefits of our method over conventional graphics. The method is especially useful when detailed information is a key part of the analysis.

  8. Novel Digital Driving Method Using Dual Scan for Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Myoung Hoon; Choi, Inho; Chung, Hoon-Ju; Kim, Ohyun

    2008-11-01

    A new digital driving method has been developed for low-temperature polycrystalline silicon, transistor-driven, active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AM-OLED) displays by time-ratio gray-scale expression. This driving method effectively increases the emission ratio and the number of subfields by inserting another subfield set into nondisplay periods in the conventional digital driving method. By employing the proposed modified gravity center coding, this method can be used to effectively compensate for dynamic false contour noise. The operation and performance were verified by current measurement and image simulation. The simulation results using eight test images show that the proposed approach improves the average peak signal-to-noise ratio by 2.61 dB, and the emission ratio by 20.5%, compared with the conventional digital driving method.

  9. Field emitter displays for future avionics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Susan K.; Jones, Gary W.; Zimmerman, Steven M.; Blazejewski, Edward R.

    1995-06-01

    Field emitter array-based display technology offers CRT-like characteristics in a thin flat-panel display with many potential applications for vehicle-mounted, crew workstation, and helmet-mounted displays, as well as many other military and commercial applications. In addition to thinness, high brightness, wide viewing angle, wide temperature range, and low weight, field emitter array displays also offer potential advantages such as row-at-a-time matrix addressability and the ability to be segmented.

  10. Passive MIMO Radar Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    investigated using recent results from random matrix theory. Equivalence is established between PMR networks without direct-path signals and passive...approach ignores a potentially useful source of information about the unknown transmit signals . This is particularly true in high-DNR scenarios, in...which the direct-path signal provides a high-quality reference that can be used for (noisy) matched filtering, as in the conventional approach. Thus

  11. The role of hydrodynamics, matrix and sampling duration in passive sampling of polar compounds with Empore SDB-RPS disks.

    PubMed

    Vermeirssen, Etiënne L M; Asmin, Josef; Escher, Beate I; Kwon, Jung-Hwan; Steimen, Irene; Hollender, Juliane

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing need to monitor concentrations of polar organic contaminants in the aquatic environment. Integrative passive samplers can be used to assess time weighted average aqueous concentrations, provided calibration data are available and sampling rates are known. The sampling rate depends on environmental factors, such as temperature and water flow rate. Here we introduce an apparatus to investigate the sampling properties of passive samplers using river-like flow conditions and ambient environmental matrices: river water and treated sewage effluent. As a model sampler we selected Empore SDB-RPS disks in a Chemcatcher housing. The disks were exposed for 1 to 8 days at flow rates between 0.03 and 0.4 m s(-1). Samples were analysed using a bioassay for estrogenic activity and by LC-MS-MS target analysis of the pharmaceuticals sulfamethoxazole, carbamazepine and clarithromycin. In order to assess sampling rates of SDB disks, we also measured aqueous concentrations of the pharmaceuticals. Sampling rates increased with increasing flow rate and this relationship was not affected by the environmental matrix. However, SDB disks were only sampling in the integrative mode at low flow rates <0.1 m s(-1) and/or for short sampling times. The duration of linear uptake was particularly short for sulfamethoxazole (1 day) and longer for clarithromycin (5 days). At 0.03 m s(-1) and 12-14 degrees C, the sampling rate of SDB disks was 0.09 L day(-1) for clarithromycin, 0.14 L day(-1) for sulfamethoxazole and 0.25 L day(-1) for carbamazepine. The results show that under controlled conditions, SDB disks can be effectively used as passive sampling devices.

  12. Aspects and Some Results on Passivity and Positivity of Dynamic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la Sen, M.

    2017-12-01

    This paper is devoted to discuss certain aspects of passivity results in dynamic systems and the characterization of the regenerative systems counterparts. In particular, the various concepts of passivity as standard passivity, strict input passivity, strict output passivity and very strict passivity (i.e. joint strict input and output passivity) are given and related to the existence of a storage function and a dissipation function. Later on, the obtained results are related to external positivity of systems and positivity or strict positivity of the transfer matrices and transfer functions in the time-invariant case. On the other hand, it is discussed how to achieve or how eventually to increase the passivity effects via linear feedback by the synthesis of the appropriate feed-forward or feedback controllers or, simply, by adding a positive parallel direct input-output matrix interconnection gain.

  13. Sunlight readable avionics displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visinski, Joseph R.

    1998-09-01

    The theme of the Cockpit Displays V Conference of 'Custom versus Consumer -- Grade Displays in Defense Applications' reflects the Raytheon Systems Company field emission display (FED) development effort. Raytheon chose to license commercial FED technology and subsequently participate in a commercial industry 'FED Alliance' to insert this technology into commercial and avionics defense applications. The unaffordability of custom military displays makes them an unfeasible choice to build a business upon. The major differences between consumer FEDs and those adapted for military/avionics installations are: (1) high brightness for sunlight visibility; (2) extended environmental range; (3) high resolution; (4) wider dimming range for sunlight to NVIS operation; (5) extended gray scales; (6) lifetime product support well beyond two year consumer market life. The transition to defense applications is further being accomplished via industry/government partnerships as the DARPA Technology Reinvestment Project (TRP) and BAA 97-31. FEDs combine cathode ray tube (CRT) and matrix addressed flat panel display technology, parts, manufacturing, and test equipment, plus open systems interfaces into a new display.

  14. Evaluation of inorganic and organic light-emitting diode displays for signage application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Pratibha; Kwok, Harry

    2006-08-01

    High-brightness, inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have been successfully utilized for edge-lighting of large displays for signage. Further interest in solid-state lighting technology has been fueled with the emergence of small molecule and polymer-based organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). In this paper, edgelit inorganic LED-based displays and state-of-the-art OLED-based displays are evaluated on the basis of electrical and photometric measurements. The reference size for a signage system is assumed to be 600 mm x 600mm based on the industrial usage. With the availability of high power light-emitting diodes, it is possible to develop edgelit signage systems of the standard size. These displays possess an efficacy of 18 lm/W. Although, these displays are environmentally friendly and efficient, they suffer from some inherent limitations. Homogeneity of displays, which is a prime requirement for illuminated signs, is not accomplished. A standard deviation of 3.12 lux is observed between the illuminance values on the surface of the display. In order to distribute light effectively, reflective gratings are employed. Reflective gratings aid in reducing the problem but fail to eliminate it. In addition, the overall cost of signage is increased by 50% with the use of these additional components. This problem can be overcome by the use of a distributed source of light. Hence, the organic-LEDs are considered as a possible contender. In this paper, we experimentally determine the feasibility of using OLEDs for signage applications and compare their performance with inorganic LEDs. Passive matrix, small-molecule based, commercially available OLEDs is used. Design techniques for implementation of displays using organic LEDs are also discussed. It is determined that tiled displays based on organic LEDs possess better uniformity than the inorganic LED-based displays. However, the currently available OLEDs have lower light-conversion efficiency and higher costs than the

  15. Application of Matrix Projection Exposure Using a Liquid Crystal Display Panel to Fabricate Thick Resist Molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukasawa, Hirotoshi; Horiuchi, Toshiyuki

    2009-08-01

    The patterning characteristics of matrix projection exposure using an analog liquid crystal display (LCD) panel in place of a reticle were investigated, in particular for oblique patterns. In addition, a new method for fabricating practical thick resist molds was developed. At first, an exposure system fabricated in past research was reconstructed. Changes in the illumination optics and the projection lens were the main improvements. Using fly's eye lenses, the illumination light intensity distribution was homogenized. The projection lens was changed from a common camera lens to a higher-grade telecentric lens. In addition, although the same metal halide lamp was used as an exposure light source, the central exposure wavelength was slightly shortened from 480 to 450 nm to obtain higher resist sensitivity while maintaining almost equivalent contrast between black and white. Circular and radial patterns with linewidths of approximately 6 µm were uniformly printed in all directions throughout the exposure field owing to these improvements. The patterns were smoothly printed without accompanying stepwise roughness caused by the cell matrix array. On the bases of these results, a new method of fabricating thick resist molds for electroplating was investigated. It is known that thick resist molds fabricated using the negative resist SU-8 (Micro Chem) are useful because very high aspect patterns are printable and the side walls are perpendicular to the substrate surfaces. However, the most suitable exposure wavelength of SU-8 is 365 nm, and SU-8 is insensitive to light of 450 nm wavelength, which is most appropriate for LCD matrix exposure. For this reason, a novel multilayer resist process was proposed, and micromolds of SU-8 of 50 µm thickness were successfully obtained. As a result, feasibility for fabricating complex resist molds including oblique patterns was demonstrated.

  16. Mice lacking the extracellular matrix protein MAGP1 display delayed thrombotic occlusion following vessel injury

    PubMed Central

    Werneck, Claudio C.; Vicente, Cristina P.; Weinberg, Justin S.; Shifren, Adrian; Pierce, Richard A.; Broekelmann, Thomas J.; Tollefsen, Douglas M.

    2008-01-01

    Mice lacking the extracellular matrix protein microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1 (MAGP1) display delayed thrombotic occlusion of the carotid artery following injury as well as prolonged bleeding from a tail vein incision. Normal occlusion times were restored when recombinant MAGP1 was infused into deficient animals prior to vessel wounding. Blood coagulation was normal in these animals as assessed by activated partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time. Platelet number was lower in MAGP1-deficient mice, but the platelets showed normal aggregation properties in response to various agonists. MAGP1 was not found in normal platelets or in the plasma of wild-type mice. In ligand blot assays, MAGP1 bound to fibronectin, fibrinogen, and von Willebrand factor, but von Willebrand factor was the only protein of the 3 that bound to MAGP1 in surface plasmon resonance studies. These findings show that MAGP1, a component of microfibrils and vascular elastic fibers, plays a role in hemostasis and thrombosis. PMID:18281502

  17. Novel Driving Method for Two-Dimensional and Three-Dimensional Switchable Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays for Emission and Programming Time Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In, Hai-Jung; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2012-03-01

    A novel driving method for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) switchable active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays is proposed to extend emission time and data programming time during 3D display operation. The proposed pixel consists of six thin-film transistors (TFTs) and two capacitors, and the aperture ratio of the pixel is 45.8% under 40-in. full-high-definition television condition. By increasing emission time and programming time, the flicker problem can be reduced and the lifetime of AMOLED displays can be extended owing to the decrease in emission current density. Simulation results show that the emission current error range from -0.4 to 1.6% is achieved when the threshold voltage variation of driving TFTs is in the range from -1.0 to 1.0 V, and the emission current error is 1.0% when the power line IR-drop is 2.0 V.

  18. Designing low cost LED display for the billboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yi-Jian; Uang, Chii-Maw; Wang, Ping-Chieh; Ho, Zu-Sheng

    2011-10-01

    With quickly advance of the computer, microelectronics and photonics technologies, LED display panel becomes a new electronic advertising media. It can be used to show any information whatever characters or graphics. Most LED display panels are built of many Light-Emitting Diodes arranged in a matrix form. The display has many advantages such as low power, low cost, long life and high definition. Because the display panel is asked to show rich color, the LED display panel's driving system becomes very complex. The design methodology of LED display panel's driver becomes more and more important to meet the market requirements. Cost is always the most important issue in public market domain. In this paper, we report a design methodology of LED display panel's driver based on the microprocessor control unit (MCU) system and LED display controller IC, HT1632C, to control three colors, RGB, color LED display panel and the modular panel size is 24*16 in matrix form. The HT1632C is a memory mapping LED display controller, it can be used on many applications, such as digital clock, thermometer, counter, voltmeter or other instrumentation readouts. Three pieces of HT1632C are used to drive a 24*16 RGB LED display panel, in our design case. Each HT163C chip is used to control one of the R, G and B color. As the drive mode is driven in DC mode, the RGB display panel can create and totally of seven colors under the control of MCU. The MCU generates the control signal to drive HT1632C. In this study, the software design methodology is adopted with dynamic display principle. When the scan frequency is 60Hz, LED display panel will get the clear picture and be able to display seven colors.

  19. High-performance low-cost back-channel-etch amorphous gallium-indium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors by curing and passivation of the damaged back channel.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Chul; Ahn, Seung-Eon; Lee, Ho-Nyeon

    2013-12-11

    High-performance, low-cost amorphous gallium-indium-zinc oxide (a-GIZO) thin-film-transistor (TFT) technology is required for the next generation of active-matrix organic light-emitting diodes. A back-channel-etch structure is the most appropriate device structure for high-performance, low-cost a-GIZO TFT technology. However, channel damage due to source/drain etching and passivation-layer deposition has been a critical issue. To solve this problem, the present work focuses on overall back-channel processes, such as back-channel N2O plasma treatment, SiOx passivation deposition, and final thermal annealing. This work has revealed the dependence of a-GIZO TFT characteristics on the N2O plasma radio-frequency (RF) power and frequency, the SiH4 flow rate in the SiOx deposition process, and the final annealing temperature. On the basis of these results, a high-performance a-GIZO TFT with a field-effect mobility of 35.7 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), a subthreshold swing of 185 mV dec(-1), a switching ratio exceeding 10(7), and a satisfactory reliability was successfully fabricated. The technology developed in this work can be realized using the existing facilities of active-matrix liquid-crystal display industries.

  20. Human operator tracking performance with a vibrotactile display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inbar, Gideon F.

    1991-01-01

    Vibrotactile displays have been designed and used as a sensory aid for the blind. In the present work the same 6 x 24 'Optacon' type vibrotactile display (VTD) was used to characterize human operator (HO) tracking performance in pursuit and compensatory tasks. The VTD was connected via a microprocessor to a one-dimensional joy stick manipulator. Various display schemes were tested on the VDT, and were also compared to visual tracking performance using a specially constructed photo diode matrix display comparable to the VTD.

  1. High Resolution Displays Using NCAP Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macknick, A. Brian; Jones, Phil; White, Larry

    1989-07-01

    Nematic curvilinear aligned phase (NCAP) liquid crystals have been found useful for high information content video displays. NCAP materials are liquid crystals which have been encapsulated in a polymer matrix and which have a light transmission which is variable with applied electric fields. Because NCAP materials do not require polarizers, their on-state transmission is substantially better than twisted nematic cells. All dimensional tolerances are locked in during the encapsulation process and hence there are no critical sealing or spacing issues. By controlling the polymer/liquid crystal morphology, switching speeds of NCAP materials have been significantly improved over twisted nematic systems. Recent work has combined active matrix addressing with NCAP materials. Active matrices, such as thin film transistors, have given displays of high resolution. The paper will discuss the advantages of NCAP materials specifically designed for operation at video rates on transistor arrays; applications for both backlit and projection displays will be discussed.

  2. AMLCD head-down displays for avionic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Alan J.

    1997-02-01

    Smiths Industries has been involved in the design, manufacture and supply of products used for the presentation of information, in one form or another, from its early pioneering years through to the present day. In the mid 1980s Smiths Industries began to invest in the then emerging active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) technology which the company believed would eventually take over from the cathode ray tube. To date Smiths Industries has made a significant investment in acquiring the enabling technology needed to produce active matrix liquid crystal color head- down displays for fast jet, helicopter and civil aircraft applications. The significant improvement in AMLCD product quality and manufacturing capability over recent years has enabled market penetration of AMLCD technology products to be achieved in military and civil avionic markets. Virtually all new contracts for head-down displays are now demanding the use of AMLCD technology rather than the cathode ray tube. A significant decision to move to AMLCD technology was made by McDonnell Douglas Helicopters in 1995, when a contract to supply over 4000 head-down display products for the Apache Helicopter was let. This has paved the way for the future of AMLCD technology.

  3. Ten inch Planar Optic Display

    SciTech Connect

    Beiser, L.; Veligdan, J.

    A Planar Optic Display (POD) is being built and tested for suitability as a high brightness replacement for the cathode ray tube, (CRT). The POD display technology utilizes a laminated optical waveguide structure which allows a projection type of display to be constructed in a thin (I to 2 inch) housing. Inherent in the optical waveguide is a black cladding matrix which gives the display a black appearance leading to very high contrast. A Digital Micromirror Device, (DMD) from Texas Instruments is used to create video images in conjunction with a 100 milliwatt green solid state laser. An anamorphic opticalmore » system is used to inject light into the POD to form a stigmatic image. In addition to the design of the POD screen, we discuss: image formation, image projection, and optical design constraints.« less

  4. In vitro model to study the effects of matrix stiffening on Ca2+ handling and myofilament function in isolated adult rat cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Aref; Fontoura, Dulce; Valent, Erik; Goebel, Max; Kardux, Kim; Falcão‐Pires, Inês; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2017-01-01

    Key points This paper describes a novel model that allows exploration of matrix‐induced cardiomyocyte adaptations independent of the passive effect of matrix rigidity on cardiomyocyte function.Detachment of adult cardiomyocytes from the matrix enables the study of matrix effects on cell shortening, Ca2+ handling and myofilament function.Cell shortening and Ca2+ handling are altered in cardiomyocytes cultured for 24 h on a stiff matrix.Matrix stiffness‐impaired cardiomyocyte contractility is reversed upon normalization of extracellular stiffness.Matrix stiffness‐induced reduction in unloaded shortening is more pronounced in cardiomyocytes isolated from obese ZSF1 rats with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction compared to lean ZSF1 rats. Abstract Extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffening is a key element of cardiac disease. Increased rigidity of the ECM passively inhibits cardiac contraction, but if and how matrix stiffening also actively alters cardiomyocyte contractility is incompletely understood. In vitro models designed to study cardiomyocyte–matrix interaction lack the possibility to separate passive inhibition by a stiff matrix from active matrix‐induced alterations of cardiomyocyte properties. Here we introduce a novel experimental model that allows exploration of cardiomyocyte functional alterations in response to matrix stiffening. Adult rat cardiomyocytes were cultured for 24 h on matrices of tuneable stiffness representing the healthy and the diseased heart and detached from their matrix before functional measurements. We demonstrate that matrix stiffening, independent of passive inhibition, reduces cell shortening and Ca2+ handling but does not alter myofilament‐generated force. Additionally, detachment of adult cultured cardiomyocytes allowed the transfer of cells from one matrix to another. This revealed that stiffness‐induced cardiomyocyte changes are reversed when matrix stiffness is normalized. These matrix stiffness

  5. A new surface-potential-based compact model for the MoS2 field effect transistors in active matrix display applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jingchen; Peng, Songang; Liu, Wei; Wu, Quantan; Li, Ling; Geng, Di; Yang, Guanhua; Ji, Zhouyu; Lu, Nianduan; Liu, Ming

    2018-02-01

    We present a continuous surface-potential-based compact model for molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) field effect transistors based on the multiple trapping release theory and the variable-range hopping theory. We also built contact resistance and velocity saturation models based on the analytical surface potential. This model is verified with experimental data and is able to accurately predict the temperature dependent behavior of the MoS2 field effect transistor. Our compact model is coded in Verilog-A, which can be implemented in a computer-aided design environment. Finally, we carried out an active matrix display simulation, which suggested that the proposed model can be successfully applied to circuit design.

  6. Boeing Displays Process Action team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, R. Nick; Jacobsen, Alan R.

    2000-08-01

    Boeing uses Active Matrix Liquid Crystal Display (AMLCD) technology in a wide variety of its aerospace products, including military, commercial, and space applications. With the demise of Optical Imaging Systems (OIS) in September 1998, the source of on-shore custom AMLCD products has become very tenuous. Reliance on off-shore sources of AMLCD glass for aerospace products is also difficult when the average life of a display product is often less than one-tenth the 30 or more years expected from aerospace platforms. Boeing is addressing this problem through the development of a Displays Process Action Team that gathers input from all display users across the spectrum of our aircraft products. By consolidating requirements, developing common interface standards, working with our suppliers and constantly monitoring custom sources as well as commercially available products, Boeing is minimizing the impact (current and future) of the uncertain AMLCD avionics supply picture.

  7. New ultraportable display technology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvelda, Phillip; Lewis, Nancy D.

    1998-08-01

    MicroDisplay devices are based on a combination of technologies rooted in the extreme integration capability of conventionally fabricated CMOS active-matrix liquid crystal display substrates. Customized diffraction grating and optical distortion correction technology for lens-system compensation allow the elimination of many lenses and systems-level components. The MicroDisplay Corporation's miniature integrated information display technology is rapidly leading to many new defense and commercial applications. There are no moving parts in MicroDisplay substrates, and the fabrication of the color generating gratings, already part of the CMOS circuit fabrication process, is effectively cost and manufacturing process-free. The entire suite of the MicroDisplay Corporation's technologies was devised to create a line of application- specific integrated circuit single-chip display systems with integrated computing, memory, and communication circuitry. Next-generation portable communication, computer, and consumer electronic devices such as truly portable monitor and TV projectors, eyeglass and head mounted displays, pagers and Personal Communication Services hand-sets, and wristwatch-mounted video phones are among the may target commercial markets for MicroDisplay technology. Defense applications range from Maintenance and Repair support, to night-vision systems, to portable projectors for mobile command and control centers.

  8. High-performance large-area AMLCD avionic display module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syroid, Daniel D.; Hansen, Glenn A.

    1995-06-01

    There is a need for a reliable source of high performance large area sunlight readable active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCDs) for avionic and military land vehicle applications. Image Quest has developed an avionic display module (ADM) to demonstrate the capability to produce high performance avionic displays to satisfy this need. The ADM is a large area (6.24 X 8.32 inch) display with VGA compatible interface, 640 X 480 color pixels and 64 gray shades per primary color. The display features excellent color discrimination in full sunlight due to a saturated color gamut, very low specular reflectance (< 1%) and high output white luminance (200 fL). The ADM is designed from the glass up to fully meet the avionic and military application and environment. Control over all the display performance parameters including contrast, transmission, chroma, resolution, active size and packaging configuration is ensured because Image Quest produces all of the critical elements of the display. These elements include the a-Si TFT AMLCD glass, RGB color filter matrix, bonding of folded back driver TABs, anti-reflective cover glass, LC heater and integration of high luminance hot cathode backlight with thermal controls. The display features rugged compact packaging, 2000:1 luminance dimming range and wide operating temperature range (-40 to +71 $DRGC). In the immediate future Image Quest plans to expand the development efforts to other similar custom high resolution and high performance avionic display module configurations including 4 X 4 inch delta triad, 6.7 X 6.7 inch delta triad and 16.5 inch diagonal with 1280 X 1024 pixels. Image Quest can deliver up to 10,000 displays per year on a timely basis at a reasonable cost.

  9. Method of fabrication of display pixels driven by silicon thin film transistors

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Paul G.; Smith, Patrick M.

    1999-01-01

    Display pixels driven by silicon thin film transistors are fabricated on plastic substrates for use in active matrix displays, such as flat panel displays. The process for forming the pixels involves a prior method for forming individual silicon thin film transistors on low-temperature plastic substrates. Low-temperature substrates are generally considered as being incapable of withstanding sustained processing temperatures greater than about 200.degree. C. The pixel formation process results in a complete pixel and active matrix pixel array. A pixel (or picture element) in an active matrix display consists of a silicon thin film transistor (TFT) and a large electrode, which may control a liquid crystal light valve, an emissive material (such as a light emitting diode or LED), or some other light emitting or attenuating material. The pixels can be connected in arrays wherein rows of pixels contain common gate electrodes and columns of pixels contain common drain electrodes. The source electrode of each pixel TFT is connected to its pixel electrode, and is electrically isolated from every other circuit element in the pixel array.

  10. In vitro model to study the effects of matrix stiffening on Ca2+ handling and myofilament function in isolated adult rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    van Deel, Elza D; Najafi, Aref; Fontoura, Dulce; Valent, Erik; Goebel, Max; Kardux, Kim; Falcão-Pires, Inês; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2017-07-15

    This paper describes a novel model that allows exploration of matrix-induced cardiomyocyte adaptations independent of the passive effect of matrix rigidity on cardiomyocyte function. Detachment of adult cardiomyocytes from the matrix enables the study of matrix effects on cell shortening, Ca 2+ handling and myofilament function. Cell shortening and Ca 2+ handling are altered in cardiomyocytes cultured for 24 h on a stiff matrix. Matrix stiffness-impaired cardiomyocyte contractility is reversed upon normalization of extracellular stiffness. Matrix stiffness-induced reduction in unloaded shortening is more pronounced in cardiomyocytes isolated from obese ZSF1 rats with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction compared to lean ZSF1 rats. Extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffening is a key element of cardiac disease. Increased rigidity of the ECM passively inhibits cardiac contraction, but if and how matrix stiffening also actively alters cardiomyocyte contractility is incompletely understood. In vitro models designed to study cardiomyocyte-matrix interaction lack the possibility to separate passive inhibition by a stiff matrix from active matrix-induced alterations of cardiomyocyte properties. Here we introduce a novel experimental model that allows exploration of cardiomyocyte functional alterations in response to matrix stiffening. Adult rat cardiomyocytes were cultured for 24 h on matrices of tuneable stiffness representing the healthy and the diseased heart and detached from their matrix before functional measurements. We demonstrate that matrix stiffening, independent of passive inhibition, reduces cell shortening and Ca 2+ handling but does not alter myofilament-generated force. Additionally, detachment of adult cultured cardiomyocytes allowed the transfer of cells from one matrix to another. This revealed that stiffness-induced cardiomyocyte changes are reversed when matrix stiffness is normalized. These matrix stiffness-induced changes in cardiomyocyte

  11. Passivity-based sliding mode control for a polytopic stochastic differential inclusion system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Leipo; Fu, Zhumu; Song, Xiaona

    2013-11-01

    Passivity-based sliding mode control for a polytopic stochastic differential inclusion (PSDI) system is considered. A control law is designed such that the reachability of sliding motion is guaranteed. Moreover, sufficient conditions for mean square asymptotic stability and passivity of sliding mode dynamics are obtained by linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Finally, two examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. © 2013 ISA. Published by ISA. All rights reserved.

  12. Vibratory tactile display for textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikei, Yasushi; Ikeno, Akihisa; Fukuda, Shuichi

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a tactile display that produces vibratory stimulus to a fingertip in contact with a vibrating tactor matrix. The display depicts tactile surface textures while the user is exploring a virtual object surface. A piezoelectric actuator drives the individual tactor in accordance with both the finger movement and the surface texture being traced. Spatiotemporal display control schemes were examined for presenting the fundamental surface texture elements. The temporal duration of vibratory stimulus was experimentally optimized to simulate the adaptation process of cutaneous sensation. The selected duration time for presenting a single line edge agreed with the time threshold of tactile sensation. Then spatial stimulus disposition schemes were discussed for representation of other edge shapes. As an alternative means not relying on amplitude control, a method of augmented duration at the edge was investigated. Spatial resolution of the display was measured for the lines presented both in perpendicular and parallel to a finger axis. Discrimination of texture density was also measured on random dot textures.

  13. Display technologies; Proceedings of the Meeting, National Chiao Tung Univ., Hsinchu, Taiwan, Dec. 17, 18, 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shu-Hsia; Wu, Shin-Tson

    1992-10-01

    A broad range of interdisciplinary subjects related to display technologies is addressed, with emphasis on high-definition displays, CRTs, projection displays, materials for display application, flat-panel displays, display modeling, and polymer-dispersed liquid crystals. Particular attention is given to a CRT approach to high-definition television display, a superhigh-resolution electron gun for color display CRT, a review of active-matrix liquid-crystal displays, color design for LCD parameters in projection and direct-view applications, annealing effects on ZnS:TbF3 electroluminescent devices prepared by RF sputtering, polycrystalline silicon thin film transistors with low-temperature gate dielectrics, refractive index dispersions of liquid crystals, a new rapid-response polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal material, and improved liquid crystals for active-matrix displays using high-tilt-orientation layers. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  14. Multimedia Matrix: A Cognitive Strategy for Designers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherry, Annette C.

    This instructional development project evaluates the effect of a matrix-based strategy to assist multimedia authors in acquiring and applying principles for effective multimedia design. The Multimedia Matrix, based on the Park and Hannafin "Twenty Principles and Implications for Interactive Multimedia" design, displays a condensed…

  15. Passivity of memristive BAM neural networks with leakage and additive time-varying delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiping; Wang, Meiqi; Luo, Xiong; Li, Lixiang; Zhao, Wenbing; Liu, Linlin; Ping, Yuan

    2018-02-01

    This paper investigates the passivity of memristive bidirectional associate memory neural networks (MBAMNNs) with leakage and additive time-varying delays. Based on some useful inequalities and appropriate Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals (LKFs), several delay-dependent conditions for passivity performance are obtained in linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Moreover, the leakage delays as well as additive delays are considered separately. Finally, numerical simulations are provided to demonstrate the feasibility of the theoretical results.

  16. Magnetic switching of optical reflectivity in nanomagnet/micromirror suspensions: colloid displays as a potential alternative to liquid crystal displays.

    PubMed

    Bubenhofer, S B; Athanassiou, E K; Grass, R N; Koehler, F M; Rossier, M; Stark, W J

    2009-12-02

    Two-particle colloids containing nanomagnets and microscale mirrors can be prepared from iron oxide nanoparticles, microscale metal flakes and high-density liquids stabilizing the mirror suspension against sedimentation by matching the constituent's density. The free Brownian rotation of the micromirrors can be magnetically controlled through an anisotropic change in impulse transport arising from impacts of the magnetic nanoparticles onto the anisotropic flakes. The resulting rapid mirror orientation allows large changes in light transmission and switchable optical reflectivity. The preparation of a passive display was conceptually demonstrated through colloid confinement in a planar cavity over an array of individually addressable solenoids and resulted in 4 x 4 digit displays with a reaction time of less than 100 ms.

  17. Amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O Thin Film Transistor Current-Scaling Pixel Electrode Circuit for Active-Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Charlene; Abe, Katsumi; Fung, Tze-Ching; Kumomi, Hideya; Kanicki, Jerzy

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we analyze application of amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin film transistors (a-InGaZnO TFTs) to current-scaling pixel electrode circuit that could be used for 3-in. quarter video graphics array (QVGA) full color active-matrix organic light-emitting displays (AM-OLEDs). Simulation results, based on a-InGaZnO TFT and OLED experimental data, show that both device sizes and operational voltages can be reduced when compare to the same circuit using hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) TFTs. Moreover, the a-InGaZnO TFT pixel circuit can compensate for the drive TFT threshold voltage variation (ΔVT) within acceptable operating error range.

  18. 3.4-Inch Quarter High Definition Flexible Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Display with Oxide Thin Film Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatano, Kaoru; Chida, Akihiro; Okano, Tatsuya; Sugisawa, Nozomu; Inoue, Tatsunori; Seo, Satoshi; Suzuki, Kunihiko; Oikawa, Yoshiaki; Miyake, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Jun; Yamazaki, Shunpei; Eguchi, Shingo; Katayama, Masahiro; Sakakura, Masayuki

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we report a 3.4-in. flexible active matrix organic light emitting display (AMOLED) display with remarkably high definition (quarter high definition: QHD) in which oxide thin film transistors (TFTs) are used. We have developed a transfer technology in which a TFT array formed on a glass substrate is separated from the substrate by physical force and then attached to a flexible plastic substrate. Unlike a normal process in which a TFT array is directly fabricated on a thin plastic substrate, our transfer technology permits a high integration of high performance TFTs, such as low-temperature polycrystalline silicon TFTs (LTPS TFTs) and oxide TFTs, on a plastic substrate, because a flat, rigid, and thermally-stable glass substrate can be used in the TFT fabrication process in our transfer technology. As a result, this technology realized an oxide TFT array for an AMOLED on a plastic substrate. Furthermore, in order to achieve a high-definition AMOLED, color filters were incorporated in the TFT array and a white organic light-emitting diode (OLED) was combined. One of the features of this device is that the whole body of the device can be bent freely because a source driver and a gate driver can be integrated on the substrate due to the high mobility of an oxide TFT. This feature means “true” flexibility.

  19. New Passivity Criteria for Fuzzy Bam Neural Networks with Markovian Jumping Parameters and Time-Varying Delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadivel, P.; Sakthivel, R.; Mathiyalagan, K.; Thangaraj, P.

    2013-02-01

    This paper addresses the problem of passivity analysis issue for a class of fuzzy bidirectional associative memory (BAM) neural networks with Markovian jumping parameters and time varying delays. A set of sufficient conditions for the passiveness of the considered fuzzy BAM neural network model is derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities by using the delay fractioning technique together with the Lyapunov function approach. In addition, the uncertainties are inevitable in neural networks because of the existence of modeling errors and external disturbance. Further, this result is extended to study the robust passivity criteria for uncertain fuzzy BAM neural networks with time varying delays and uncertainties. These criteria are expressed in the form of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), which can be efficiently solved via standard numerical software. Two numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  20. Manufacturing Methods and Engineering for TFT Addressed Display.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-20

    type required for the Army’s DMD (Digital Message Device), based on an active-matrix addressed electroluminescent display previously developed by...electroluminescent phosphor as the light emitter, and finally packaging or encapsulation. Because of size limitations of the pilot manufacturing facility, the DMD ...display was designed as two identical halves, which were then to be made individually in the auto- mated machine and later assembled into a single DMD

  1. Threshold-Voltage-Shift Compensation and Suppression Method Using Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Thin-Film Transistors for Large Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Kyonghwan; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2012-03-01

    A threshold-voltage-shift compensation and suppression method for active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays fabricated using a hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin-film transistor (TFT) backplane is proposed. The proposed method compensates for the threshold voltage variation of TFTs due to different threshold voltage shifts during emission time and extends the lifetime of the AMOLED panel. Measurement results show that the error range of emission current is from -1.1 to +1.7% when the threshold voltage of TFTs varies from 1.2 to 3.0 V.

  2. Military display market: third comprehensive edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    2002-08-01

    Defense displays comprise a niche market whose continually high performance requirements drive technology. The military displays market is being characterized to ascertain opportunities for synergy across platforms, and needs for new technology. All weapons systems are included. Some 382,585 displays are either now in use or planned in DoD weapon systems over the next 15 years, comprising displays designed into direct-view, projection-view, and virtual- image-view applications. This defense niche market is further fractured into 1163 micro-niche markets by the some 403 program offices who make decisions independently of one another. By comparison, a consumer electronics product has volumes of tens-of-millions of units for a single fixed design. Some 81% of defense displays are ruggedized versions of consumer-market driven designs. Some 19% of defense displays, especially in avionics cockpits and combat crewstations, are custom designs to gain the additional performance available in the technology base but not available in consumer-market-driven designs. Defense display sizes range from 13.6 to 4543 mm. More than half of defense displays are now based on some form of flat panel display technology, especially thin-film-transistor active matrix liquid crystal display (TFT AMLCD); the cathode ray tube (CRT) is still widely used but continuing to drop rapidly in defense market share.

  3. Identification of chondrocyte-binding peptides by phage display.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Crystal S F; Lui, Julian C; Baron, Jeffrey

    2013-07-01

    As an initial step toward targeting cartilage tissue for potential therapeutic applications, we sought cartilage-binding peptides using phage display, a powerful technology for selection of peptides that bind to molecules of interest. A library of phage displaying random 12-amino acid peptides was iteratively incubated with cultured chondrocytes to select phage that bind cartilage. The resulting phage clones demonstrated increased affinity to chondrocytes by ELISA, when compared to a wild-type, insertless phage. Furthermore, the selected phage showed little preferential binding to other cell types, including primary skin fibroblast, myocyte and hepatocyte cultures, suggesting a tissue-specific interaction. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the selected phage bound chondrocytes themselves and the surrounding extracellular matrix. FITC-tagged peptides were synthesized based on the sequence of cartilage-binding phage clones. These peptides, but not a random peptide, bound cultured chondrocytes, and extracelluar matrix. In conclusion, using phage display, we identified peptide sequences that specifically target chondrocytes. We anticipate that such peptides may be coupled to therapeutic molecules to provide targeted treatment for cartilage disorders. Copyright © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  4. Passive beam forming and spatial diversity in meteor scatter communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akram, Ammad; Cannon, Paul S.

    1996-03-01

    The method of passive beam formation using a four-element Butler matrix to improve the signal availability of meteor scatter communication systems is investigated. Signal availability, defined as the integrated time that the signal-to-noise ratio (snr) exceeds some snr threshold, serves as an important indicator of system performance. Butler matrix signal availability is compared with the performance of a single four-element Yagi reference system using ˜6.5 hours of data from a 720 km north-south temperate latitude link. The signal availability improvement factor of the Butler matrix is found to range between 1.6-1.8 over the snr threshold range of 20-30 dB in a 300-Hz bandwidth. Experimental values of the Butler matrix signal availability improvement factor are compared with analytical predictions. The experimental values show an expected snr threshold dependency with a dramatic increase at high snr. A theoretical analysis is developed to describe this increase. The signal availability can be further improved by ˜10-20% in a system employing two four-element Butler matrices with squinted beams so as to illuminate the sky with eight high-gain beams. Space diversity is found to increase the signal availability of a single antenna system by ˜10-15%, but the technique has very little advantage in a system already employing passive beam formation.

  5. The provisional matrix: setting the stage for tissue repair outcomes.

    PubMed

    Barker, Thomas H; Engler, Adam J

    2017-07-01

    Since its conceptualization in the 1980s, the provisional matrix has often been characterized as a simple fibrin-containing scaffold for wound healing that supports the nascent blood clot and is functionally distinct from the basement membrane. However subsequent advances have shown that this matrix is far from passive, with distinct compositional differences as the wound matures, and providing an active role for wound remodeling. Here we review the stages of this matrix, provide an update on the state of our understanding of provisional matrix, and present some of the outstanding issues related to the provisional matrix, its components, and their assembly and use in vivo. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Operating room managerial decision-making on the day of surgery with and without computer recommendations and status displays.

    PubMed

    Dexter, Franklin; Willemsen-Dunlap, Ann; Lee, John D

    2007-08-01

    There are three basic types of decision aids to facilitate operating room (OR) management decision-making on the day of surgery. Decision makers can rely on passive status displays (e.g., big screens or whiteboards), active status displays (e.g., text pager notification), and/or command displays (e.g., text recommendations about what to do). Anesthesiologists, OR nurses, and housekeepers were given nine simulated scenarios (vignettes) involving multiple ORs to study their decision-making. Participants were randomized to one of four groups, all with an updated paper OR schedule: with/without command display and with/without passive status display. Participants making decisions without command displays performed no better than random chance in terms of increasing the predictability of work hours, reducing over-utilized OR time, and increasing OR efficiency. Status displays had no effect on these end-points, whereas command displays improved the quality of decisions. In the scenarios for which the command displays provided recommendations that adversely affected safety, participants appropriately ignored advice. Anesthesia providers and nursing staff made decisions that increased clinical work per unit time in each OR, even when doing so resulted in an increase in over-utilized OR time, higher staffing costs, unpredictable work hours, and/or mandatory overtime. Organizational culture and socialization during clinical training may be a cause. Command displays showed promise in mitigating this tendency. Additional investigations are in our companion paper.

  7. Passivity analysis for uncertain BAM neural networks with time delays and reaction-diffusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianping; Xu, Shengyuan; Shen, Hao; Zhang, Baoyong

    2013-08-01

    This article deals with the problem of passivity analysis for delayed reaction-diffusion bidirectional associative memory (BAM) neural networks with weight uncertainties. By using a new integral inequality, we first present a passivity condition for the nominal networks, and then extend the result to the case with linear fractional weight uncertainties. The proposed conditions are expressed in terms of linear matrix inequalities, and thus can be checked easily. Examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed results.

  8. Damping Characteristics of Metal Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-25

    DAMPING OF METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES - -.......... 7-1 7.1 EPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE .............................................................. 7-1 7.2 M...space structures (LSS). A critical design concern for LSS is suppression of vibrations, caused by onboard and hostile threat-related disturbances during...acquisi- tion pointing and tracing (APT) phases of maneuvering. Various active and passive control mea- sures can be incorporated in the designs of

  9. Visual characteristics of LED display pushbuttons for avionic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanni, Paolo; Isoldi, Felice

    1991-08-01

    Programmable LED matrix display push buttons may greatly increase the performances of the computer-based avionic systems. The number of switches in a control panel can be reduced by a factor of 10 or more. This leads to a reduction in weight and size of the control instrumentations and in shorter response time of pilots. This work deals with the study and the optimization of visual performances of these displays in a configuration requiring a low- power consumption and Night Vision Goggles (NVG) compatibility. In considering displays for avionic applications, it is important to take into account sunlight readability. Visibility problems may arise in high ambient illumination. Up to now the only contributions usually considered for reduction of visibility are the diffused and specular reflected luminances that predominate with the sun behind the pilot. But there is another critical condition--the sun in front of the pilot. In this case the equivalent veiling glare predominates. Display performances and contrast enhancement filter characteristics must be optimized to find a compromise between these two extreme ambient conditions. Considering a keyboard with 10 push buttons, with two lines of four characters each and a power consumption less than 14 W with 40 of LEDs on, the authors have obtained good sunlight readability, choosing an optimized combination of NVG and contrast enhancement filter and LED matrix display.

  10. Passivation of black phosphorus saturable absorbers for reliable pulse formation of fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Dongsoo; Park, Kichul; Park, Ki-Hwan; Song, Yong-Won

    2017-11-01

    Black phosphorus (BP) has attracted increasing attention due to its unique electrical properties. In addition, the outstanding optical nonlinearity of BP has been demonstrated in various ways. Its functionality as a saturable absorber, in particular, has been validated in demonstrations of passive mode-locked lasers. However, normally, the performance of BP is degraded eventually by both thermal and chemical damage in ambient conditions. The passivation of BP is the critical issue to guarantee a stable performance of the optical devices. We quantitatively characterized the mode-locked lasers operated by BP saturable absorbers with diversified passivation materials such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) or Al2O3, considering the atomic structure of the materials, and therefore the hydro-permeability of the passivation layers. Unlike the BP layers without passivation, we demonstrated that the Al2O3-passivated BP layer was protected from the surface oxidation reaction in the long-term, and the PDMS-passivated one had a short-term blocking effect. The quantitative analysis showed that the time-dependent characteristics of the pulsed laser without passivation were changed with respect to the pulse duration, spectral width, and time-bandwidth product displaying 550 fs, 2.8 nm, and 0.406, respectively. With passivation, the changes were limited to <43 fs, <0.3 nm, and <0.012, respectively.

  11. Passivation of black phosphorus saturable absorbers for reliable pulse formation of fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Na, Dongsoo; Park, Kichul; Park, Ki-Hwan; Song, Yong-Won

    2017-11-24

    Black phosphorus (BP) has attracted increasing attention due to its unique electrical properties. In addition, the outstanding optical nonlinearity of BP has been demonstrated in various ways. Its functionality as a saturable absorber, in particular, has been validated in demonstrations of passive mode-locked lasers. However, normally, the performance of BP is degraded eventually by both thermal and chemical damage in ambient conditions. The passivation of BP is the critical issue to guarantee a stable performance of the optical devices. We quantitatively characterized the mode-locked lasers operated by BP saturable absorbers with diversified passivation materials such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) or Al 2 O 3 , considering the atomic structure of the materials, and therefore the hydro-permeability of the passivation layers. Unlike the BP layers without passivation, we demonstrated that the Al 2 O 3 -passivated BP layer was protected from the surface oxidation reaction in the long-term, and the PDMS-passivated one had a short-term blocking effect. The quantitative analysis showed that the time-dependent characteristics of the pulsed laser without passivation were changed with respect to the pulse duration, spectral width, and time-bandwidth product displaying 550 fs, 2.8 nm, and 0.406, respectively. With passivation, the changes were limited to <43 fs, <0.3 nm, and <0.012, respectively.

  12. Mobile display technologies: Past developments, present technologies, and future opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    It has been thirty years since the first active matrix (AM) flat panel display (FPD) was industrialized for portable televisions (TVs) in 1984. The AM FPD has become a dominant electronic display technology widely used from mobile displays to large TVs. The development of AM FPDs for mobile displays has significantly changed our lives by enabling new applications, such as notebook personal computers (PCs), smartphones and tablet PCs. In the future, the role of mobile displays will become even more important, since mobile displays are the live interface for the world of mobile communications in the era of ubiquitous networks. Various developments are being conducted to improve visual performance, reduce power consumption and add new functionality. At the same time, innovative display concepts and novel manufacturing technologies are being investigated to create new values.

  13. Design for active and passive flutter suppression and gust alleviation. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpel, M.

    1981-01-01

    Analytical design techniques for active and passive control of aeroelastic systems are based on a rational approximation of the unsteady aerodynamic loads in the entire Laplace domain, which yields matrix equations of motion with constant coefficients. Some existing schemes are reviewed, the matrix Pade approximant is modified, and a technique which yields a minimal number of augmented states for a desired accuracy is presented. The state-space aeroelastic model is used to design an active control system for simultaneous flutter suppression and gust alleviation. The design target is for a continuous controller which transfers some measurements taken on the vehicle to a control command applied to a control surface. Structural modifications are formulated in a way which enables the treatment of passive flutter suppression system with the same procedures by which active control systems are designed.

  14. Decoupling the effects of confinement and passivation on semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Roya; Hall, Colin; Murphy, Peter J; Reece, Peter J; Charrault, Eric; Evans, Drew

    2016-07-20

    Semiconductor (SC) quantum dots (QDs) have recently been fabricated by both chemical and plasma techniques for specific absorption and emission of light. Their optical properties are governed by the size of the QD and the chemistry of any passivation at their surface. Here, we decouple the effects of confinement and passivation by utilising DC magnetron sputtering to fabricate SC QDs in a perfluorinated polyether oil. Very high band gaps are observed for fluorinated QDs with increasing levels of quantum confinement (from 4.2 to 4.6 eV for Si, and 2.5 to 3 eV for Ge), with a shift down to 3.4 eV for Si when oxygen is introduced to the passivation layer. In contrast, the fluorinated Si QDs display a constant UV photoluminescence (3.8 eV) irrespective of size. This ability to tune the size and passivation independently opens a new opportunity to extending the use of simple semiconductor QDs.

  15. Optimized thin film coatings for passive radiative cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghshine, Babak B.; Saboonchi, Ahmad

    2018-03-01

    Passive radiative cooling is a very interesting method, which lays on low atmospheric downward radiation within 8-13 μm waveband at dry climates. Various thin film multilayer structures have been investigated in numerous experimental studies, in order to find better coatings to exploit the full potential of this method. However, theoretical works are handful and limited. In this paper, the Simulated Annealing and Genetic Algorithm are used to optimize a thin film multilayer structure for passive radiative cooling applications. Spectral radiative properties are calculated through the matrix formulation. Considering a wide range of materials, 30 high-potential convective shields are suggested. According to the calculations, cooling can be possible even under direct sunlight, using the introduced shields. Moreover, a few water-soluble materials are studied for the first time and the results show that, a KBr substrate coated by a thin CaF2 or polyethylene film can is very close to an ideal coating for passive radiative cooling at night.

  16. MAGP1, the extracellular matrix, and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Craft, Clarissa S

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue and the extracellular matrix were once considered passive players in regulating physiological processes. Now, both entities are acknowledged for their capacity to engage signal transduction pathways, and for their involvement in maintaining normal tissue homeostasis. We recently published a series of studies that identified a novel mechanism whereby an extracellular matrix molecule, MAGP1 (microfibril associated glycoprotein 1), can regulate energy metabolism in adipose tissue. MAGP1 is a component of extracellular microfibrils and plays a supportive role in maintaining thermoregulation by indirectly regulating expression of the thermogenic uncoupling proteins (UCPs). The focus of this commentary is to draw attention to the role of the extracellular matrix in regulating the bioavailability of signaling molecules, like transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), and exemplify that a better understanding of the extracellular matrix's biological properties could unveil a new source of therapeutic targets for metabolic diseases. PMID:26167404

  17. MAGP1, the extracellular matrix, and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Craft, Clarissa S

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue and the extracellular matrix were once considered passive players in regulating physiological processes. Now, both entities are acknowledged for their capacity to engage signal transduction pathways, and for their involvement in maintaining normal tissue homeostasis. We recently published a series of studies that identified a novel mechanism whereby an extracellular matrix molecule, MAGP1 (microfibril associated glycoprotein 1), can regulate energy metabolism in adipose tissue. MAGP1 is a component of extracellular microfibrils and plays a supportive role in maintaining thermoregulation by indirectly regulating expression of the thermogenic uncoupling proteins (UCPs). The focus of this commentary is to draw attention to the role of the extracellular matrix in regulating the bioavailability of signaling molecules, like transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), and exemplify that a better understanding of the extracellular matrix's biological properties could unveil a new source of therapeutic targets for metabolic diseases.

  18. Drug solubility in lipid nanocarriers: Influence of lipid matrix and available interfacial area.

    PubMed

    Göke, Katrin; Bunjes, Heike

    2017-08-30

    Amongst other strategies for the formulation of poorly water-soluble drugs, solubilization of these drugs in lipid-based formulations is a promising option. Most screening methods for the identification of a suitable lipid-based formulation fail to elucidate the role interfacial effects play for drug solubility in disperse systems. In a novel screening approach called passive drug loading, different preformed lipid nanocarrier dispersions are incubated with drug powder. Afterwards, undissolved drug is filtered off and the amount of solubilized drug is determined. The aim of this study was to identify parameters for drug solubility in pure lipids as well as for drug loading to the lipid-water interface of lipid nanoparticles. Using passive loading, the solubility of eight poorly water-soluble drugs in seven lipid nanocarriers varying in particle size or lipid matrix was investigated. Drug solubility in the nanocarriers did not follow any apparent trend and different drugs dissolved best in different carriers. Drugs with a melting point below approximately 150°C displayed distinctly better solubility than higher melting drugs. Additionally, relating the specific lipid nanocarrier surface area to the drug solubility allowed drawing conclusions on the drug localization. Fenofibrate, dibucaine and, less distinctly also clotrimazole, which all melt below 150°C, were predominantly located in the lipid droplet core of the nanoparticles. In contrast, the five remaining drugs (betamethasone valerate, flufenamic acid, itraconazole, ketoconazole, mefenamic acid) were also located at the lipid-water interface to different, but substantial degrees. The ability to account for drug loading to the lipid-water interface is thus a major advantage of passive loading. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The tongue display unit (TDU) for electrotactile spatiotemporal pattern presentation.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarek, K A

    2011-12-01

    The Tongue Display Unit (TDU) is a 144-channel programmable pulse generator that delivers dc-balanced voltage pulses suitable for electrotactile (electrocutaneous) stimulation of the anterior-dorsal tongue, through a matrix of surface electrodes. This article reviews the theory of operation and a design overview of the TDU, as well as selected applications. These include sensory substitution, tactile information display and neurorehabilitation via induced neuroplasticity.

  20. Biocular vehicle display optical designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, H.; Carter, Tom

    2012-06-01

    Biocular vehicle display optics is a fast collimating lens (f / # < 0.9) that presents the image of the display at infinity to both eyes of the viewer. Each eye captures the scene independently and the brain merges the two images into one through the overlapping portions of the images. With the recent conversion from analog CRT based displays to lighter, more compact active-matrix organic light-emitting diodes (AMOLED) digital image sources, display optical designs have evolved to take advantage of the higher resolution AMOLED image sources. To maximize the field of view of the display optics and fully resolve the smaller pixels, the digital image source is pre-magnified by relay optics or a coherent taper fiber optics plate. Coherent taper fiber optics plates are used extensively to: 1. Convert plano focal planes to spherical focal planes in order to eliminate Petzval field curvature. This elimination enables faster lens speed and/or larger field of view of eye pieces, display optics. 2. Provide pre-magnification to lighten the work load of the optics to further increase the numerical aperture and/or field of view. 3. Improve light flux collection efficiency and field of view by collecting all the light emitted by the image source and guiding imaging light bundles toward the lens aperture stop. 4. Reduce complexity of the optical design and overall packaging volume by replacing pre-magnification optics with a compact taper fiber optics plate. This paper will review and compare the performance of biocular vehicle display designs without and with taper fiber optics plate.

  1. Camera calibration: active versus passive targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalz, Christoph; Forster, Frank; Angelopoulou, Elli

    2011-11-01

    Traditionally, most camera calibrations rely on a planar target with well-known marks. However, the localization error of the marks in the image is a source of inaccuracy. We propose the use of high-resolution digital displays as active calibration targets to obtain more accurate calibration results for all types of cameras. The display shows a series of coded patterns to generate correspondences between world points and image points. This has several advantages. No special calibration hardware is necessary because suitable displays are practically ubiquitious. The method is fully automatic, and no identification of marks is necessary. For a coding scheme based on phase shifting, the localization accuracy is approximately independent of the camera's focus settings. Most importantly, higher accuracy can be achieved compared to passive targets, such as printed checkerboards. A rigorous evaluation is performed to substantiate this claim. Our active target method is compared to standard calibrations using a checkerboard target. We perform camera, calibrations with different combinations of displays, cameras, and lenses, as well as with simulated images and find markedly lower reprojection errors when using active targets. For example, in a stereo reconstruction task, the accuracy of a system calibrated with an active target is five times better.

  2. Status review of field emission displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghrayeb, Joseph; Daniels, Reginald

    2001-09-01

    Cathode ray tube (CRT) technology dominates the direct view display market. Mature CRT technology for many designs is still the preferred choice. CRT manufacturers have greatly improved the size and weight of the CRT displays. High performance CRTs continue to be in great demand, however, supply have to contend with the vanishing CRT vendor syndrome. Therefore, the vanishing CRT vendor syndrome fuels the search for an alternate display technology source. Within the past 10 years, field emission display (FED) technology had gained momentum and, at one time, was considered the most viable electronic display technology candidate [to replace the CRT]. The FED community had advocated and promised many advantages over active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCD), electro luminescent (EL) or Plasma displays. Some observers, including potential FED manufacturers and the Department of Defense, (especially the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA)), consider the FED entry as having leapfrog potential. Despite major investments by US manufacturers as well as Asian manufacturers, reliability and manufacturing difficulties greatly slowed down the advancement of the technology. The FED manufacturing difficulties have caused many would-be FED manufacturing participants to abandon FED research. This paper will examine the trends, which are leading this nascent technology to its downfall. FED technology was once considered to have the potential to leapfrog over AMLCD's dominance in the display industry. At present the FED has suffered severe setbacks and there are very few [FED] manufacturers still pursuing research in the area. These companies have yet to deliver a display beyond the prototype stage.

  3. Passivity analysis of memristor-based impulsive inertial neural networks with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Wan, Peng; Jian, Jigui

    2018-03-01

    This paper focuses on delay-dependent passivity analysis for a class of memristive impulsive inertial neural networks with time-varying delays. By choosing proper variable transformation, the memristive inertial neural networks can be rewritten as first-order differential equations. The memristive model presented here is regarded as a switching system rather than employing the theory of differential inclusion and set-value map. Based on matrix inequality and Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional method, several delay-dependent passivity conditions are obtained to ascertain the passivity of the addressed networks. In addition, the results obtained here contain those on the passivity for the addressed networks without impulse effects as special cases and can also be generalized to other neural networks with more complex pulse interference. Finally, one numerical example is presented to show the validity of the obtained results. Copyright © 2018 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Amorphous Silicon: Flexible Backplane and Display Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Kalluri R.

    Advances in the science and technology of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H, also referred to as a-Si) and the associated devices including thin-film transistors (TFT) during the past three decades have had a profound impact on the development and commercialization of major applications such as thin-film solar cells, digital image scanners and X-ray imagers and active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCDs). Particularly, during approximately the past 15 years, a-Si TFT-based flat panel AMLCDs have been a huge commercial success. a-Si TFT-LCD has enabled the note book PCs, and is now rapidly replacing the venerable CRT in the desktop monitor and home TV applications. a-Si TFT-LCD is now the dominant technology in use for applications ranging from small displays such as in mobile phones to large displays such as in home TV, as well-specialized applications such as industrial and avionics displays.

  5. Three-Dimensional Tactical Display and Method for Visualizing Data with a Probability of Uncertainty

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-03

    replacing the more complex and less intuitive displays presently provided in such contexts as commercial aircraft , marine vehicles, and air traffic...free space-virtual reality, 3-D image display system which is enabled by using a unique form of Aerogel as the primary display media. A preferred...generates and displays a real 3-D image in the Aerogel matrix. [0014] U.S. Patent No. 6,285,317, issued September 4, 2001, to Ong, discloses a

  6. Three-Dimensional Tactical Display and Method for Visualizing Data with a Probability of Uncertainty

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-03

    replacing the more complex and less intuitive displays presently provided in such contexts as commercial aircraft , marine vehicles, and air traffic...space-virtual reality, 3-D image display system which is enabled by using a unique form of Aerogel as the primary display media. A preferred...and displays a real 3-D image in the Aerogel matrix. [0014] U.S. Patent No. 6,285,317, issued September 4, 2001, to Ong, discloses a navigation

  7. Subtilisin QK-2: secretory expression in Lactococcus lactis and surface display onto gram-positive enhancer matrix (GEM) particles.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ruifeng; Zhou, Kangping; Han, Zhenwei; Wang, Yefu

    2016-05-12

    Purified from the supernatant of Bacillus subtilis QK02 culture broth, Subtilisin QK-2 is a type of effective thrombolytic reagent that has great exploitable potential. However, the unbearable flavor that occurs with fermentation and the complicated methods that are required to obtain pure products limit the application of this enzyme. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB)-based delivery vehicles are promising as cheap and safe options for medicinal compounds. The secretory expression and surface display using LAB may popularize Subtilisin QK-2 more easily and conveniently with minimal adverse effects. Subtilisin QK-2 was expressed successfully in two forms using lactic acid bacteria. For the secretory expression in Lactococcus lactis, Subtilisin QK-2 was efficiently secreted into the culture using the promoter P nisA and signal peptide SPUsp. The expression levels were not different in L. lactis NZ9000 and NZ3900 without the effect of different selection markers. However, leaky expression was only detected in L. lactis NZ3900. The biological activity of this secreted Subtilisin QK-2 was enhanced by modulating the pH of medium to slightly alkaline during induction and by codon optimization of either the entire gene sequence (qk') or only the propeptide gene sequence (qkpro'). For surface display onto gram-positive enhancer matrix (GEM) particles, n LysM repeats from the C-terminal region of the major autolysin AcmA of L. lactis were fused to either the C-terminus (n = 1, 3, 5) or the N-terminus (n = 1) of the Subtilisin QK-2. These fusion proteins were secreted into the culture medium, and the QK-3LysM was able to bind to the surface of various LAB GEM particles without a loss of fibrinolytic activity. Furthermore, the binding capacity significantly increased with a higher concentration of QK-3LysM. Compared to the free-form Subtilisin QK-2, the QK-3LysM displayed on the surface of GEM particles was more stable in the simulated gastric juice. Combined with the safety and

  8. Consideration of technologies for head-down displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Christopher T.

    1998-09-01

    The market for military avionics head down displays for which Active Matrix Liquid Crystal Displays (AMLCD) has been specified is both well established and substantial. Typical major programs such as F-22, V-22 and Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) amount to over 15,000 displays. Nevertheless there is an insecurity about the situation because of the dependency upon Japanese and Korean manufacturers and the vagaries of the commercial market. The U.S. has only 7% of the world's manufacturing capability in AMLCD and is seeking alternative technologies to regain a hold in this lucrative business. The U.S. military manufacturers of AMLCD are capable, but can never achieve the benefits of scale that Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) equipment can offer. In addition to the commercial and political concerns, there are still performance issues related to AMLCD and there is a view that emissive displays in particular can offer advantages over AMLCD. However, it is beneficial to be able to tailor display sizes and there are doubts about the ability of current flat panel technologies to achieve custom, or indeed large area panels either economically, or reliably. It is in this arena that projection displays may be the optimum solution.

  9. Polyfluorene light-emitting devices and amorphous silicon:hydrogen TFT pixel circuits for active-matrix organic light-emitting displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yi

    2000-10-01

    Organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) made of single-layer and double-layer polymer thin films have been fabricated and studied. The hole transporting (polymer A) and emissive (polymer B) polymers were poly(9,9' -dioctyl fluorene-2,7-diyl)-co-poly(diphenyl-p-tolyl-amine-4,4 '-diyl) and poly(9,9'-dioctyl fluorene-2,7-diyl)-co-poly(benzothiadiazole 2,5-diyl), respectively. The optical bandgaps of polymer A and B were 2.72 and 2.82 eV, respectively. The photoluminescence (PL) peaks for polymer A and B were 502 and 546 nm, respectively. The electroluminescence (EL) peak for polymer B was 547 nm. No EL has been observed from polymer A single layer OLEDs. To obtain the spectral distribution of the emission properties of the light-emitting devices, a new light-output measurement technique was developed. Using this technique, the spectral distribution of the luminance, radiance, photon density emission can be obtained. Moreover, the device external quantum efficiency calculated using this technique is accurate and insensitive to the light emission spectrum shape. Organic light-emitting devices have been fabricated and studied on both glass and flexible plastic substrates. The OLEDs showed a near-linear relationship between the luminance and the applied current density over four orders of magnitude. For the OLEDs fabricated on the glass substrate, luminance ˜9,300 cd/m2, emission efficiency ˜14.5 cd/A, luminescence power efficiency ˜2.26 lm/W, and external quantum efficiency ˜3.85% have been achieved. For the OLEDs fabricated on the flexible plastic substrates, both aluminum and calcium were used as cathode materials. The achieved maximum OLED luminance, emission efficiency, luminescence power efficiency, and external quantum efficiency were ˜13,000 cd/m2, ˜66.1 cd/A, ˜17.2 lm/W, and 16.7%, respectively. To make an active-matrix organic light-emitting display (AM-OLED), a two-TFT pixel electrode circuit was designed and fabricated based on amorphous silicon TFT

  10. Matrix of educational and training materials in remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindenlaub, J. C.; Lube, B. M.

    1976-01-01

    Remote sensing educational and training materials developed by LARS have been organized in a matrix format. Each row in the matrix represents a subject area in remote sensing and the columns represent different types of instructional materials. This format has proved to be useful for displaying in a concise manner the subject matter content, prerequisite requirements and technical depth of each instructional module in the matrix. A general description of the matrix is followed by three examples designed to illustrate how the matrix can be used to synthesize training programs tailored to meet the needs of individual students. A detailed description of each of the modules in the matrix is contained in a catalog section.

  11. Influence of La addition on the semi-conductive properties of passive films formed on Cu-Ni alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Xiang; Zhang, Yadong; Zhou, Qiongyu; Zhang, Yinghui; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Hang; Yang, Bin

    2018-05-01

    The semi-conductive properties of passive films formed on Cu-Ni alloy and Cu-Ni-La alloy were investigated in 0.1 M NaOH solution, by employing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), Mott–Schottky analysis and point defect model (PDM). Results indicate that both the passive films formed on Cu-Ni alloy and Cu-Ni-La alloy display p-type semi-conductive characteristics with cation vacancies in order of magnitude of 1020 cm3. Compared with Cu-Ni alloy, La addition could significantly improve the corrosion resistance, due to a superior barrier passive film formed Cu-Ni-La alloy with a bigger film resistance (R f), increased passive film thickness (L ss) in conjunction with decreased diffusion coefficient (D 0).

  12. PROGRAMMABLE DISPLAY PUSHBUTTON LEGEND EDITOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busquets, A. M.

    1994-01-01

    The Programmable Display Pushbutton (PDP) is a pushbutton device available from Micro Switch which has a programmable 16 x 35 matrix of LEDs on the pushbutton surface. Any desired legends can be displayed on the PDPs, producing user-friendly applications which greatly reduce the need for dedicated manual controls. Because the PDP can interact with the operator, it can call for the correct response before transmitting its next message. It is both a simple manual control and a sophisticated programmable link between the operator and the host system. The Programmable Display Pushbutton Legend Editor, PDPE, is used to create the LED displays for the pushbuttons. PDPE encodes PDP control commands and legend data into message byte strings sent to a Logic Refresh and Control Unit (LRCU). The LRCU serves as the driver for a set of four PDPs. The legend editor (PDPE) transmits to the LRCU user specified commands that control what is displayed on the LED face of the individual pushbuttons. Upon receiving a command, the LRCU transmits an acknowledgement that the message was received and executed successfully. The user then observes the effect of the command on the PDP displays and decides whether or not to send the byte code of the message to a data file so that it may be called by an applications program. The PDPE program is written in FORTRAN for interactive execution. It was developed on a DEC VAX 11/780 under VMS. It has a central memory requirement of approximately 12800 bytes. It requires four Micro Switch PDPs and two RS-232 VAX 11/780 terminal ports. The PDPE program was developed in 1985.

  13. Elastography Study of Hamstring Behaviors during Passive Stretching

    PubMed Central

    Le Sant, Guillaume; Ates, Filiz; Brasseur, Jean-Louis; Nordez, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The mechanical properties of hamstring muscles are usually inferred from global passive torque/angle relationships, in combination with adjoining tissues crossing the joint investigated. Shear modulus measurement provides an estimate of changes in muscle-tendon stiffness and passive tension. This study aimed to assess the passive individual behavior of each hamstring muscle in different stretching positions using shear wave elastography. Methods/Results The muscle shear modulus of each hamstring muscle was measured during a standardized slow passive knee extension (PKE, 80% of maximal range of motion) on eighteen healthy male volunteers. Firstly, we assessed the reliability of the measurements. Results were good for semitendinosus (ST, CV: 8.9%-13.4%), semimembranosus (SM, CV: 10.3%-11.2%) and biceps femoris long-head (BF-lh, CV: 8.6%-13.3%), but not for biceps femoris short-head (BF-sh, CV: 20.3%-44.9%). Secondly, we investigated each reliable muscle in three stretch positions: 70°, 90° and 110° of hip flexion. The results showed different values of shear modulus for the same amount of perceived stretch, with the highest measurements in the high-flexed hip situation. Moreover, individual muscles displayed different values, with values increasing or BF-lh, SM and ST, respectively. The inter-subject variability was 35.3% for ST, 27.4% for SM and 30.2% for BF-lh. Conclusion This study showed that the hip needs to be high-flexed to efficiently tension the hamstrings, and reports a higher muscle-tendon stress tolerance at 110° of hip angle. In addition muscles have different passive behaviors, and future works will clarify if it can be linked with rate of injury. PMID:26418862

  14. Area laser crystallized LTPS TFTs with implanted contacts for active matrix OLED displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persidis, Efstathios; Baur, Holger; Pieralisi, Fabio; Schalberger, Patrick; Fruehauf, Norbert

    2008-03-01

    We have developed a four mask low temperature poly-Si (LTPS) TFT process for p- and n-channel devices. Our PECVD deposited amorphous silicon is recrystallized to polycrystalline silicon with single area excimer laser crystallization while formation of drain and source is carried out with self aligned ion beam implantation. We have investigated implantation parameters, suitability of various metallizations as well as laser activation and annealing procedures. To prove the potential capability of our devices, which are suitable for conventional and inverted OLEDs alike, we have produced several functional active matrix backplanes implementing different pixel circuits. Our active matrix backplane process has been customized to drive small molecules as well as polymers, regardless if top or bottom emitting.

  15. Corrosion of Titanium Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, B.S., Jr.; Alman, D.E.

    2002-09-22

    The corrosion behavior of unalloyed Ti and titanium matrix composites containing up to 20 vol% of TiC or TiB{sub 2} was determined in deaerated 2 wt% HCl at 50, 70, and 90 degrees C. Corrosion rates were calculated from corrosion currents determined by extrapolation of the tafel slopes. All curves exhibited active-passive behavior but no transpassive region. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiC composites were similar to those for unalloyed Ti except at 90 degrees C where the composites were slightly higher. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiB{sub 2} composites were generally higher than those for unalloyed Ti and increasedmore » with higher concentrations of TiB{sub 2}. XRD and SEM-EDS analyses showed that the TiC reinforcement did not react with the Ti matrix during fabrication while the TiB{sub 2} reacted to form a TiB phase.« less

  16. Passive stiffness of coupled wrist and forearm rotations.

    PubMed

    Drake, Will B; Charles, Steven K

    2014-09-01

    Coordinated movement requires that the neuromuscular system account and compensate for movement dynamics. One particularly complex aspect of movement dynamics is the interaction that occurs between degrees of freedom (DOF), which may be caused by inertia, damping, and/or stiffness. During wrist rotations, the two DOF of the wrist (flexion-extension and radial-ulnar deviation, FE and RUD) are coupled through interaction torques arising from passive joint stiffness. One important unanswered question is whether the DOF of the forearm (pronation-supination, PS) is coupled to the two DOF of the wrist. Answering this question, and understanding the dynamics of wrist and forearm rotations in general, requires knowledge of the stiffness encountered during rotations involving all three DOF (PS, FE, and RUD). Here we present the first-ever measurement of the passive stiffness encountered during simultaneous wrist and forearm rotations. Using a wrist and forearm robot, we measured coupled wrist and forearm stiffness in 10 subjects and present it as a 3-by-3 stiffness matrix. This measurement of passive wrist and forearm stiffness will enable future studies investigating the dynamics of wrist and forearm rotations, exposing the dynamics for which the neuromuscular system must plan and compensate during movements involving the wrist and forearm.

  17. Interactive display of molecular models using a microcomputer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, J. T.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    A simple, microcomputer-based, interactive graphics display system has been developed for the presentation of perspective views of wire frame molecular models. The display system is based on a TERAK 8510a graphics computer system with a display unit consisting of microprocessor, television display and keyboard subsystems. The operating system includes a screen editor, file manager, PASCAL and BASIC compilers and command options for linking and executing programs. The graphics program, written in USCD PASCAL, involves the centering of the coordinate system, the transformation of centered model coordinates into homogeneous coordinates, the construction of a viewing transformation matrix to operate on the coordinates, clipping invisible points, perspective transformation and scaling to screen coordinates; commands available include ZOOM, ROTATE, RESET, and CHANGEVIEW. Data file structure was chosen to minimize the amount of disk storage space. Despite the inherent slowness of the system, its low cost and flexibility suggests general applicability.

  18. Modeling Passive Propagation of Malwares on the WWW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunbo, Liu; Chunfu, Jia

    Web-based malwares host in websites fixedly and download onto user's computers automatically while users browse. This passive propagation pattern is different from that of traditional viruses and worms. A propagation model based on reverse web graph is proposed. In this model, propagation of malwares is analyzed by means of random jump matrix which combines orderness and randomness of user browsing behaviors. Explanatory experiments, which has single or multiple propagation sources respectively, prove the validity of the model. Using this model, people can evaluate the hazardness of specified websites and take corresponding countermeasures.

  19. Interactive wire-frame ship hullform generation and display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calkins, D. E.; Garbini, J. L.; Ishimaru, J.

    1984-01-01

    An interactive automated procedure to generate a wire frame graphic image of a ship hullform, which uses a digitizing tablet in conjunction with the hullform lines drawing, was developed. The geometric image created is displayed on an Evans & Sutherland PS-300 graphics terminal for real time interactive viewing or is output as hard copy on an inexpensive dot matrix printer.

  20. AMPS data management requirements study, appendix 1. [user manuals (computer programs)/display devices - computerized simulation/experimentation/ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Flow charts and display formats for the simulation of five experiments are given. The experiments are: (1) electromagnetic wave transmission; (2) passive observations of ambient plasma; (3) ionospheric measurements with subsatellite; (4) electron accelerator beam measurements; and (5) measurement of acoustical gravity waves in the sodium layer using lasers. A detailed explanation of the simulation procedure, definition of variables, and an explanation of how the experimenter makes display choices is also presented. A functional description is included on each flow chart and the assumptions and definitions of terms and scope of the flow charts and displays are presented.

  1. Effect of passive concentration as instructional set for training enhancement of EEG alpha.

    PubMed

    Knox, S S

    1980-12-01

    The technique of passive concentration, employed by autogenic training and Transcendental Meditation for achieving relaxation, was tested here as a technique for enhancing EEG alpha. Of 30 subjects displaying between 15% and 74% alpha in their resting EEGs recruited, 10 had to be eliminated. The remaining 20 constituted two groups. One was instructed only to attempt to maintain a tone indicating alpha but given no information about technique (control group). The other was given additional instructions in passive concentration (experimental group). Both were given four 5-min. trials a day for 4 consecutive days. Heart rate and skin conductance were measured to monitor autonomic arousal. The group receiving instructions in passive concentration had significantly less alpha than the control group, which did not increase amount of alpha above baseline. The reduction of alpha in the experimental group was interpreted as resulting from beginning long training periods (20 min. per day), a practice advocated by Transcendental Meditation but discouraged by autogenic training. It was concluded that the relevance of passive concentration for alpha enhancement is doubtful.

  2. Low energy switching driver for printed electrochromic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, Ciprian; Dobre, Robert Alexandru

    2016-12-01

    This paper continues our investigations in relatively new developed printed electrochromic displays (ECDs). There are some advantages of ECDs that recommend them for specific low end and short time disposable display applications, for instance the ECD devices present low power consumption (they are non-emissive, reflective, i.e. passive) and have a good viewing angle, looking like ink on paper. It is to note that these displays are still in research, and partly present on the market. There are a lot of papers regarding the chemistry and electro-chemistry of the device, but very few about concrete schematics for driving these displays. Due to their low penetration in applications, and due to lack of standardization, there are not yet realized custom drivers in form of integrated circuits. The driving of these circuits is not at all so simple. These are very sensitive devices in what it concerns exceeding the drive pulse duration and voltage level. In order to take full advantage of the low power consumption of this device, a good driver circuitry needs to be realized also in the "low power" class. We propose in this paper an original driving circuit, that has very low consumption and that can be even supplied by a supercapacitor or by a printed battery. The whole structure can be further integrated as a system on foil.

  3. Distance correction system for localization based on linear regression and smoothing in ambient intelligence display.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Hee; Choi, Jae-Hun; Lim, Myung-Eun; Park, Soo-Jun

    2008-01-01

    This paper suggests the method of correcting distance between an ambient intelligence display and a user based on linear regression and smoothing method, by which distance information of a user who approaches to the display can he accurately output even in an unanticipated condition using a passive infrared VIR) sensor and an ultrasonic device. The developed system consists of an ambient intelligence display and an ultrasonic transmitter, and a sensor gateway. Each module communicates with each other through RF (Radio frequency) communication. The ambient intelligence display includes an ultrasonic receiver and a PIR sensor for motion detection. In particular, this system selects and processes algorithms such as smoothing or linear regression for current input data processing dynamically through judgment process that is determined using the previous reliable data stored in a queue. In addition, we implemented GUI software with JAVA for real time location tracking and an ambient intelligence display.

  4. The Lehmer Matrix and Its Recursive Analogue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    LU factorization of matrix A by considering det A = det U = ∏n i=1 2i−1 i2 . The nth Catalan number is given in terms of binomial coefficients by Cn...for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number . 1. REPORT DATE 2010 2. REPORT...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Lehmer matrix and its recursive analogue 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  5. Autostereoscopic image creation by hyperview matrix controlled single pixel rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasnick, Armin

    2017-06-01

    technology just with a simple equation. This formula can be utilized to create a specific hyperview matrix for a certain 3D display - independent of the technology used. A hyperview matrix may contain the references to loads of images and act as an instruction for a subsequent rendering process of particular pixels. Naturally, a single pixel will deliver an image with no resolution and does not provide any idea of the rendered scene. However, by implementing the method of pixel recycling, a 3D image can be perceived, even if all source images are different. It will be proven that several millions of perspectives can be rendered with the support of GPU rendering and benefit from the hyperview matrix. In result, a conventional autostereoscopic display, which is designed to represent only a few perspectives can be used to show a hyperview image by using a suitable hyperview matrix. It will be shown that a millions-of-views-hyperview-image can be presented on a conventional autostereoscopic display. For such an hyperview image it is required that all pixels of the displays are allocated by different source images. Controlled by the hyperview matrix, an adapted renderer can render a full hyperview image in real-time.

  6. Virtual surface characteristics of a tactile display using magneto-rheological fluids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul-Hee; Jang, Min-Gyu

    2011-01-01

    Virtual surface characteristics of tactile displays are investigated to characterize the feeling of human touch for a haptic interface application. In order to represent the tactile feeling, a prototype tactile display incorporating Magneto-Rheological (MR) fluid has been developed. Tactile display devices simulate the finger's skin to feel the sensations of contact such as compliance, friction, and topography of the surface. Thus, the tactile display can provide information on the surface of an organic tissue to the surgeon in virtual reality. In order to investigate the compliance feeling of a human finger's touch, normal force responses of a tactile display under various magnetic fields have been assessed. Also, shearing friction force responses of the tactile display are investigated to simulate the action of finger dragging on the surface. Moreover, different matrix arrays of magnetic poles are applied to form the virtual surface topography. From the results, different tactile feelings are observed according to the applied magnetic field strength as well as the arrays of magnetic poles combinations. This research presents a smart tactile display technology for virtual surfaces.

  7. Electromagnetic energy coupling mechanism with matrix architecture control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Eli (Inventor); Knowles, Gareth (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to reconfigurable, solid-state matrix arrays comprising multiple rows and columns of reconfigurable secondary mechanisms that are independently tuned. Specifically, the invention relates to reconfigurable devices comprising multiple, solid-state mechanisms characterized by at least one voltage-varied parameter disposed within a flexible, multi-laminate film, which are suitable for use as magnetic conductors, ground surfaces, antennas, varactors, ferrotunable substrates, or other active or passive electronic mechanisms.

  8. Dye foils with increased durability for passive Q-switching in a 1064 nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierczyk, Z.; Kwasny, M.; Czeszko, J.

    The results of spectral gel permeation chromatography and differential thermal analysis investigations of structures of dye foils consisting of bis-(4-dimethyl-amino-dithio-benzil)-nickel dye suspended in polymethylmethacrylate matrix, to be used for passive Q-switching in a 1064 nm laser, are reported. Results of experimental measurements and of numerical calculations of thermal and generating properties, and of the endurance of passive foil type Q-switches in the resonator of YAG:Nd(3+) laser are also presented. Optimization of polymerization conditions has enabled the production of dye foils with high thermal and photochemical resistance, which give stable operation of a giant pulsed laser.

  9. Dye Foils With Increased Durability For Passive Q-Switching In A 1064 Nm Laser.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierczyk, Z.; Kwasny, M.; Czeszko, J.

    1987-10-01

    The results of spectral (IR, UV-VIS, H NMR) , gel permeation chromatography and differential thermal analysis investigations of structures of dye foils consisting of bis-(4-dimethyl-amino-dithio-benzil)-nickel dye suspended in polymethylmethacrylate matrix, to be used for passive Q-switching in a 1064 nm laser, are reported. Results of experimental measurements and of numerical calculations of thermal and generating properties, and of the endurance of passive foil type Q-switches in the resona-tor of YAG:Nd3+ laser are also presented. Optimization of polymerization conditions has enabled the production of dye foils with high thermal and photochemical resistance, which give stable operation of a giant pulsed laser.

  10. Collagen in the spicule organic matrix of the gorgonian Leptogorgia virgulata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsley, R. J.; Tsuzaki, M.; Watabe, N.; Mechanic, G. L.

    1990-01-01

    Decalcification of the calcareous spicules from the gorgonian Leptogorgia virgulata reveals an organic matrix that may be divided into water insoluble and soluble fractions. The insoluble fraction displays characteristics typical of collagen, which is an unusual component of an invertebrate calcium carbonate structure. This matrix fraction exhibits a collagenous amino acid profile and behavior upon SDS-PAGE. Furthermore, the reducible crosslink, dihydroxylysinonorleucine (DHLNL), is detected in this fraction. The composition of the matrix varies seasonally; i.e., the collagenous composition is most prevalent in the summer. These results indicate that the insoluble matrix is a dynamic structure. Potential roles of this matrix in spicule calcification are discussed.

  11. Automated Analysis, Classification, and Display of Waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwan, Chiman; Xu, Roger; Mayhew, David; Zhang, Frank; Zide, Alan; Bonggren, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    A computer program partly automates the analysis, classification, and display of waveforms represented by digital samples. In the original application for which the program was developed, the raw waveform data to be analyzed by the program are acquired from space-shuttle auxiliary power units (APUs) at a sampling rate of 100 Hz. The program could also be modified for application to other waveforms -- for example, electrocardiograms. The program begins by performing principal-component analysis (PCA) of 50 normal-mode APU waveforms. Each waveform is segmented. A covariance matrix is formed by use of the segmented waveforms. Three eigenvectors corresponding to three principal components are calculated. To generate features, each waveform is then projected onto the eigenvectors. These features are displayed on a three-dimensional diagram, facilitating the visualization of the trend of APU operations.

  12. Color flat panel display for the Bradley Fighting Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, J. Colin; Martin, A. J.

    1996-05-01

    The modernization program for the Bradley Fighting Vehicle, M2 A3, represents the first deployment of an active matrix liquid crystal display, AMLCD, in a military ground vehicle. In many respects the selection of AMLCD was determined according to the familiar metrics which have resulted in AMLCD being broadly selected for modern air vehicle installations. In fact, there is considerable similarities between the Bradley AMLCD and its recent forbearers in the avionic industry. In the Bradley, the AMLCD unit is referred to as a color flat panel display, CFPD and the features of this unit, as well as its environment and utilization are described in this paper.

  13. High-performance single-crystalline arsenic-doped indium oxide nanowires for transparent thin-film transistors and active matrix organic light-emitting diode displays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Chiang; Shen, Guozhen; Chen, Haitian; Ha, Young-geun; Wu, Chao; Sukcharoenchoke, Saowalak; Fu, Yue; Liu, Jun; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J; Thompson, Mark E; Zhou, Chongwu

    2009-11-24

    We report high-performance arsenic (As)-doped indium oxide (In(2)O(3)) nanowires for transparent electronics, including their implementation in transparent thin-film transistors (TTFTs) and transparent active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays. The As-doped In(2)O(3) nanowires were synthesized using a laser ablation process and then fabricated into TTFTs with indium-tin oxide (ITO) as the source, drain, and gate electrodes. The nanowire TTFTs on glass substrates exhibit very high device mobilities (approximately 1490 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)), current on/off ratios (5.7 x 10(6)), steep subthreshold slopes (88 mV/dec), and a saturation current of 60 microA for a single nanowire. By using a self-assembled nanodielectric (SAND) as the gate dielectric, the device mobilities and saturation current can be further improved up to 2560 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and 160 microA, respectively. All devices exhibit good optical transparency (approximately 81% on average) in the visible spectral range. In addition, the nanowire TTFTs were utilized to control green OLEDs with varied intensities. Furthermore, a fully integrated seven-segment AMOLED display was fabricated with a good transparency of 40% and with each pixel controlled by two nanowire transistors. This work demonstrates that the performance enhancement possible by combining nanowire doping and self-assembled nanodielectrics enables silicon-free electronic circuitry for low power consumption, optically transparent, high-frequency devices assembled near room temperature.

  14. Pixel structures to compensate nonuniform threshold voltage and mobility of polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors using subthreshold current for large-size active matrix organic light-emitting diode displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Jun-Seok; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2014-01-01

    We propose pixel structures for large-size and high-resolution active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays using a polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) thin-film transistor (TFT) backplane. The proposed pixel structures compensate the variations of the threshold voltage and mobility of the driving TFT using the subthreshold current. The simulated results show that the emission current error of the proposed pixel structure B ranges from -2.25 to 2.02 least significant bit (LSB) when the variations of the threshold voltage and mobility of the driving TFT are ±0.5 V and ±10%, respectively.

  15. Cockpit display of hazardous wind shear information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanke, Craig; Hansman, R. John, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Information on cockpit display of wind shear information is given in viewgraph form. Based on the current status of windshear sensors and candidate data dissemination systems, the near-term capabilities for windshear avoidance will most likely include: (1) Ground-based detection: TDWR (Terminal Doppler Weather Radar), LLWAS (Low-Level Windshear Alert System), Automated PIREPS; (2) Ground-Air datalinks: Air traffic control voice channels, Mode-S digital datalink, ACARS alphanumeric datalink. The possible datapaths for integration of these systems are illustrated in a diagram. In the future, airborne windshear detection systems such as lidars, passive IR detectors, or airborne Doppler radars may also become available. Possible future datalinks include satellite downlink and specialized en route weather channels.

  16. Bone matrix to growth factors: location, location, location

    PubMed Central

    Todorovic, Vesna

    2010-01-01

    The demonstration that fibrillin-1 mutations perturb transforming growth factor (TGF)–β bioavailability/signaling in Marfan syndrome (MFS) changed the view of the extracellular matrix as a passive structural support to a dynamic modulator of cell behavior. In this issue, Nistala et al. (2010. J. Cell Biol. doi: 10.1083/jcb.201003089) advance this concept by demonstrating how fibrillin-1 and -2 regulate TGF-β and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) action during osteoblast maturation. PMID:20855500

  17. Research on Visual Display Integration for Advanced Fighter Aircraft.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-01

    V— V . — I 22 February 1979 ERRATA: AMBL-TR-78-97, RESEARC H ON...speculated , the matrix format technologies (plasnias , LC’s, and LED’S) have made significant inroads to the display market for alpha— • numerics and...applications in the consumer/industrial market . Countering the trend a recent article (Reference (61)) indicates some current interest in using a laser

  18. Driving Method for Compensating Reliability Problem of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Thin Film Transistors and Image Sticking Phenomenon in Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Min-Seok; Jo, Yun-Rae; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a driving method for compensating the electrical instability of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistors (TFTs) and the luminance degradation of organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices for large active matrix OLED (AMOLED) displays. The proposed driving method senses the electrical characteristics of a-Si:H TFTs and OLEDs using current integrators and compensates them by an external compensation method. Threshold voltage shift is controlled a using negative bias voltage. After applying the proposed driving method, the measured error of the maximum emission current ranges from -1.23 to +1.59 least significant bit (LSB) of a 10-bit gray scale under the threshold voltage shift ranging from -0.16 to 0.17 V.

  19. Robust passivity analysis for discrete-time recurrent neural networks with mixed delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chuan-Kuei; Shu, Yu-Jeng; Chang, Koan-Yuh; Shou, Ho-Nien; Lu, Chien-Yu

    2015-02-01

    This article considers the robust passivity analysis for a class of discrete-time recurrent neural networks (DRNNs) with mixed time-delays and uncertain parameters. The mixed time-delays that consist of both the discrete time-varying and distributed time-delays in a given range are presented, and the uncertain parameters are norm-bounded. The activation functions are assumed to be globally Lipschitz continuous. Based on new bounding technique and appropriate type of Lyapunov functional, a sufficient condition is investigated to guarantee the existence of the desired robust passivity condition for the DRNNs, which can be derived in terms of a family of linear matrix inequality (LMI). Some free-weighting matrices are introduced to reduce the conservatism of the criterion by using the bounding technique. A numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness and applicability.

  20. Multi-Length Scale-Enriched Continuum-Level Material Model for Kevlar-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-03

    is unlimited. Multi-Length Scale-Enriched Continuum-Level Material Model for Kevlar ®-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composites The views, opinions...12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 ballistics, composites, Kevlar , material models, microstructural defects REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11... Kevlar ®-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composites Report Title Fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composite materials display quite complex deformation

  1. Decolorization of textile dye RB19 using volcanic rock matrix immobilized Bacillus thuringiensis cells with surface displayed laccase.

    PubMed

    Wan, Juan; Sun, Xiaowen; Liu, Cheng; Tang, Mengjun; Li, Lin; Ni, Hong

    2017-06-01

    A triplicate volcanic rock matrix-Bacillus thuringiensis-laccase WlacD (VRMs-Bt-WlacD) dye decolorization system was developed. WlacD was displayed on the B. thuringiensis MB174 cell surface to prepare a whole-cell laccase biocatalyst by using two repeat N-terminal domains of autolysin Mbg (Mbgn) 2 as the anchoring motif. Immunofluorescence microscopic assays confirmed that the fusion protein (Mbgn) 2 -WlacD was anchored on the surface of the recombinant B. thuringiensis MB174. After optimization by a single factor test, L 9 (3 4 )-orthogonal test, Plackett-Burman test, steepest ascent method, and Box-Behnken response surface methodology, the whole-cell specific laccase activity of B. thuringiensis MB174 was improved to 555.2 U L -1 , which was 2.25 times than that of the primary culture condition. Optimized B. thuringiensis MB174 cells were further adsorbed by VRMs to prepare VRMs-Bt-WlacD, an immobilized whole-cell laccase biocatalyst. Decolorization capacity of as-prepared VRMs-Bt-WlacD toward an initial concentration of 500 mg L -1 of an textile dye reactive blue 19 (RB19) aqueous solution reached 72.36% at a solid-to-liquid ratio of 10 g-100 mL. Repeated decolorization-activation operations showed the high decolorization capacity of VRMs-Bt-WlacD and have the potential for large-scale or continuous operations.

  2. Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Based Reflex Color Reflective Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Asad

    2012-02-01

    Bistable color cholesteric liquid crystal displays are unique LCDs that exhibit high reflectivity, good contrast, extremely low power operation, and are amenable to versatile roll-to-roll manufacturing. The display technology, now branded as Reflex has been in commercialized products since 1996. It has been the subject of extensive research and development globally by a variety of parties in both academic and industrial settings. Today, the display technology is in volume production for applications such as dedicated eWriters (Boogie Board), full color electronic skins (eSkin), and displays for smart cards. The flexibility comes from polymerization induced phase separation using unique materials unparalleled in any other display technology. The blend of monomers, polymers, cross linkers, and other components along with nematic liquid crystals and chiral dopants is created and processed in such ways so as to enable highly efficient manufactrable displays using ultra thin plastic substrates -- often as thin as 50μm. Other significant aspects include full color by stacking or spatial separation, night vision capability, ultra high resolution, as well as active matrix capabilities. Of particular note is the stacking approach of Reflex based displays to show full color. This approach for reflective color displays is unique to this technology. Owing to high transparency in wavelength bands outside the selective reflection band, three primarily color layers can be stacked on top of each other and reflect without interfering with other layers. This highly surprising architecture enables the highest reflectivity of any other reflective electronic color display technology. The optics, architecture, electro-topics, and process techniques will be discussed. This presentation will focus on the physics of the core technology and color, it's evolution from rigid glass based displays to flexible displays, development of products from the paradigm shifting concepts to consumer

  3. Optical character recognition with feature extraction and associative memory matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Osami; Shibahara, Akihito; Suzuki, Takamasa

    1998-06-01

    A method is proposed in which handwritten characters are recognized using feature extraction and an associative memory matrix. In feature extraction, simple processes such as shifting and superimposing patterns are executed. A memory matrix is generated with singular value decomposition and by modifying small singular values. The method is optically implemented with two liquid crystal displays. Experimental results for the recognition of 25 handwritten alphabet characters clearly shows the effectiveness of the method.

  4. Mechanically and optically reliable folding structure with a hyperelastic material for seamless foldable displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyuk-Jun; Shim, HongShik; Kim, Sunkook; Choi, Woong; Chun, Youngtea; Kee, InSeo; Lee, SangYoon

    2011-04-01

    We report a mechanically and optically robust folding structure to realize a foldable active matrix organic-light-emitting-diode (AMOLED) display without a visible crease at the junction. A nonlinear stress analysis, based on a finite element method, provided an optimized design. The folding-unfolding test on the structure exhibited negligible deterioration of the relative brightness at the junction of the individual panels up to 105 cycles at a folding radius of 1 mm, indicating highly reliable mechanical and optical tolerances. These results demonstrate the feasibility of seamless foldable AMOLED displays, with potentially important technical implications on fabricating large size flexible displays.

  5. Active-matrix OLED using 150°C a-Si TFT backplane built on flexible plastic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Kalluri R.; Chanley, Charles; Dodd, Sonia R.; Roush, Jared; Schmidt, John; Srdanov, Gordana; Stevenson, Matthew; Wessel, Ralf; Innocenzo, Jeffrey; Yu, Gang; O'Regan, Marie B.; MacDonald, W. A.; Eveson, R.; Long, Ke; Gleskova, Helena; Wagner, Sigurd; Sturm, James C.

    2003-09-01

    Flexible displays fabricated using plastic substrates have a potential for being very thin, light weight, highly rugged with greatly minimized propensity for breakage, roll-to-roll manufacturing and lower cost. The emerging OLED display media offers the advantage of being a solid state and rugged structure for flexible displays in addition to the many potential advantages of an AM OLED over the currently dominant AM LCD. The current high level of interest in flexible displays is facilitating the development of the required enabling technologies which include development of plastic substrates, low temperature active matrix device and backplane fabrication, and display packaging. In the following we will first discuss our development efforts in the PEN based plastic substrates, active matrix backplane technology, low temperature (150°C) a-Si TFT devices and an AM OLED test chip used for evaluating various candidate designs. We will then describe the design, fabrication and successful evaluation and demonstration of a 64x64 pixel AM OLED test display using a-Si TFT backplane fabricated at 150°C on the flexible plastic substrate.

  6. Terrain Portrayal for Head-Down Displays Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Monica F.; Takallu, M. A.

    2002-01-01

    The General Aviation Element of the Aviation Safety Program's Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) Project is developing technology to eliminate low visibility induced General Aviation (GA) accidents. SVS displays present computer generated 3-dimensional imagery of the surrounding terrain on the Primary Flight Display (PFD) to greatly enhance pilot's situation awareness (SA), reducing or eliminating Controlled Flight into Terrain, as well as Low-Visibility Loss of Control accidents. SVS-conducted research is facilitating development of display concepts that provide the pilot with an unobstructed view of the outside terrain, regardless of weather conditions and time of day. A critical component of SVS displays is the appropriate presentation of terrain to the pilot. An experimental study has been conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to explore and quantify the relationship between the realism of the terrain presentation and resulting enhancements of pilot SA and pilot performance. Composed of complementary simulation and flight test efforts, Terrain Portrayal for Head-Down Displays (TP-HDD) experiments will help researchers evaluate critical terrain portrayal concepts. The experimental effort is to provide data to enable design trades that optimize SVS applications, as well as develop requirements and recommendations to facilitate the certification process. This paper focuses on the experimental set-up and preliminary qualitative results of the TP-HDD simulation experiment. In this experiment a fixed based flight simulator was equipped with various types of Head Down flight displays, ranging from conventional round dials (typical of most GA aircraft) to glass cockpit style PFD's. The variations of the PFD included an assortment of texturing and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) resolution combinations. A test matrix of 10 terrain display configurations (in addition to the baseline displays) were evaluated by 27 pilots of various backgrounds and experience levels

  7. Emissive flat panel displays: A challenge to the AMLCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walko, R. J.

    According to some sources, flat panel displays (FPD's) for computers will represent a 20-40 billion dollar industry by the end of the decade and could leverage up to 100-200 billion dollars in computer sales. Control of the flat panel display industry could be a significant factor in the global economy if FPD's manage to tap into the enormous audio/visual consumer market. Japan presently leads the world in active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) manufacturing, the current leading FPD technology. The AMLCD is basically a light shutter which does not emit light on its own, but modulates the intensity of a separate backlight. However, other technologies, based on light emitting phosphors, could eventually challenge the AMLCD's lead position. These light-emissive technologies do not have the size, temperature and viewing angle limitations of AMLCD's. In addition, they could also be less expensive to manufacture, and require a smaller capital outlay for a manufacturing plant. An overview of these alternative technologies is presented.

  8. Interlanguage Passive Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simargool, Nirada

    2008-01-01

    Because the appearance of the passive construction varies cross linguistically, differences exist in the interlanguage (IL) passives attempted by learners of English. One such difference is the widely studied IL pseudo passive, as in "*new cars must keep inside" produced by Chinese speakers. The belief that this is a reflection of L1 language…

  9. Mechanical Stability of Flexible Graphene-Based Displays.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulos, George; Pappas, Panagiotis-Nektarios; Li, Zheling; Kinloch, Ian A; Young, Robert J; Novoselov, Kostya S; Lu, Ching Yu; Pugno, Nicola; Parthenios, John; Galiotis, Costas; Papagelis, Konstantinos

    2016-08-31

    The mechanical behavior of a prototype touch panel display, which consists of two layers of CVD graphene embedded into PET films, is investigated in tension and under contact-stress dynamic loading. In both cases, laser Raman spectroscopy was employed to assess the stress transfer efficiency of the embedded graphene layers. The tensile behavior was found to be governed by the "island-like" microstructure of the CVD graphene, and the stress transfer efficiency was dependent on the size of graphene "islands" but also on the yielding behavior of PET at relatively high strains. Finally, the fatigue tests, which simulate real operation conditions, showed that the maximum temperature gradient developed at the point of "finger" contact after 80 000 cycles does not exceed the glass transition temperature of the PET matrix. The effect of these results on future product development and the design of new graphene-based displays are discussed.

  10. Enhanced robust finite-time passivity for Markovian jumping discrete-time BAM neural networks with leakage delay.

    PubMed

    Sowmiya, C; Raja, R; Cao, Jinde; Rajchakit, G; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of enhanced results on robust finite-time passivity for uncertain discrete-time Markovian jumping BAM delayed neural networks with leakage delay. By implementing a proper Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional candidate, the reciprocally convex combination method together with linear matrix inequality technique, several sufficient conditions are derived for varying the passivity of discrete-time BAM neural networks. An important feature presented in our paper is that we utilize the reciprocally convex combination lemma in the main section and the relevance of that lemma arises from the derivation of stability by using Jensen's inequality. Further, the zero inequalities help to propose the sufficient conditions for finite-time boundedness and passivity for uncertainties. Finally, the enhancement of the feasible region of the proposed criteria is shown via numerical examples with simulation to illustrate the applicability and usefulness of the proposed method.

  11. Hewlett-Packard's Approaches to Full Color Reflective Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Gary

    2012-02-01

    Reflective displays are desirable in applications requiring low power or daylight readability. However, commercial reflective displays are currently either monochrome or capable of only dim color gamuts. Low cost, high-quality color technology would be rapidly adopted in existing reflective display markets and would enable new solutions in areas such as retail pricing and outdoor digital signage. Technical breakthroughs are required to enable bright color gamuts at reasonable cost. Pixel architectures that rely on pure reflection from a single layer of side-by-side primary-color sub-pixels use only a fraction of the display area to reflect incident light of a given color and are, therefore, unacceptably dark. Reflective devices employing stacked color primaries offer the possibility of a somewhat brighter color gamut but can be more complex to manufacture. In this talk, we describe HP's successes in addressing these fundamental challenges and creating both high performance stacked-primary reflective color displays as well as inexpensive single layer prototypes that provide good color. Our stacked displays utilize a combination of careful light management techniques, proprietary high-contrast electro-optic shutters, and highly transparent active-matrix TFT arrays based on transparent metal oxides. They also offer the possibility of relatively low cost manufacturing through roll-to-roll processing on plastic webs. To create even lower cost color displays with acceptable brightness, we have developed means for utilizing photoluminescence to make more efficient use of ambient light in a single layer device. Existing reflective displays create a desired color by reflecting a portion of the incident spectrum while absorbing undesired wavelengths. We have developed methods for converting the otherwise-wasted absorbed light to desired wavelengths via tailored photoluminescent composites. Here we describe a single active layer prototype display that utilizes these materials

  12. Reflective and transflective liquid crystal displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fushan

    Recently transflective liquid crystal displays (LCD) received a lot of attention. A transflective display has a transmissive mode and a reflective mode. It combines the high contrast, high brightness of the transmissive mode with energy-saving of reflective mode and has good performance in various illumination conditions. However, state-of-the-art transflective displays have problems such as different electro-optical properties, difficulty in compatibility and optimization of both modes, low efficiency of light utilization, and complexity in structure. This dissertation focuses on finding new designs of transflective displays that address those problems. One way to do this is to study film compensation of LCD. We first studied film compensation of bistable twisted nematic (BTN) LCD. Starting form the reduced (3x3) Mueller matrices, we derived and simplified the conditions that film compensated BTN can be optimized. Based on these relations, electro-optical properties of some particular configurations, and designs of transflective BTN with high brightness and contrast were given. To confirm and get a better understanding of the results, we use the Poincare sphere to analyze film compensated BTN. The key to this approach is the existence of "fixed points". Compared with the matrix approach, this approach is more simple, elegant, and efficient. We then generalized the Poincare sphere approach to a universal approach of LCD. We applied the universal approach to film compensation of ECB and IPS, and the design of achromatic birefringent filters. We also give two more new designs of transflective displays. In the first design, a dichroic mirror is used to split the visible spectrum into two parts used in transmissive and reflective modes, respectively. Both modes can be optimized. It has a simple structure and good light utilization. A design for a full-color transflective display with good performance is also given. In the second design, each pixel is divided into two

  13. Flat-panel video resolution LED display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wareberg, P. G.; Kennedy, D. I.

    The system consists of a 128 x 128 element X-Y addressable LED array fabricated from green-emitting gallium phosphide. The LED array is interfaced with a 128 x 128 matrix TV camera. Associated electronics provides for seven levels of grey scale above zero with a grey scale ratio of square root of 2. Picture elements are on 0.008 inch centers resulting in a resolution of 125 lines-per-inch and a display area of approximately 1 sq. in. The LED array concept lends itself to modular construction, permitting assembly of a flat panel screen of any desired size from 1 x 1 inch building blocks without loss of resolution. A wide range of prospective aerospace applications exist extending from helmet-mounted systems involving small dedicated arrays to multimode cockpit displays constructed as modular screens. High-resolution LED arrays are already used as CRT replacements in military film-marking reconnaissance applications.

  14. Mechanical Stability of Flexible Graphene-Based Displays

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of a prototype touch panel display, which consists of two layers of CVD graphene embedded into PET films, is investigated in tension and under contact-stress dynamic loading. In both cases, laser Raman spectroscopy was employed to assess the stress transfer efficiency of the embedded graphene layers. The tensile behavior was found to be governed by the “island-like” microstructure of the CVD graphene, and the stress transfer efficiency was dependent on the size of graphene “islands” but also on the yielding behavior of PET at relatively high strains. Finally, the fatigue tests, which simulate real operation conditions, showed that the maximum temperature gradient developed at the point of “finger” contact after 80 000 cycles does not exceed the glass transition temperature of the PET matrix. The effect of these results on future product development and the design of new graphene-based displays are discussed. PMID:27494211

  15. Finite-time robust passive control for a class of switched reaction-diffusion stochastic complex dynamical networks with coupling delays and impulsive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed Ali, M.; Yogambigai, J.; Kwon, O. M.

    2018-03-01

    Finite-time boundedness and finite-time passivity for a class of switched stochastic complex dynamical networks (CDNs) with coupling delays, parameter uncertainties, reaction-diffusion term and impulsive control are studied. Novel finite-time synchronisation criteria are derived based on passivity theory. This paper proposes a CDN consisting of N linearly and diffusively coupled identical reaction- diffusion neural networks. By constructing of a suitable Lyapunov-Krasovskii's functional and utilisation of Jensen's inequality and Wirtinger's inequality, new finite-time passivity criteria for the networks are established in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), which can be checked numerically using the effective LMI toolbox in MATLAB. Finally, two interesting numerical examples are given to show the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  16. Robust passive control for a class of uncertain neutral systems based on sliding mode observer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Zhao, Lin; Kao, Yonggui; Gao, Cunchen

    2017-01-01

    The passivity-based sliding mode control (SMC) problem for a class of uncertain neutral systems with unmeasured states is investigated. Firstly, a particular non-fragile state observer is designed to generate the estimations of the system states, based upon which a novel integral-type sliding surface function is established for the control process. Secondly, a new sufficient condition for robust asymptotic stability and passivity of the resultant sliding mode dynamics (SMDs) is obtained in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Thirdly, the finite-time reachability of the predesigned sliding surface is ensured by resorting to a novel adaptive SMC law. Finally, the validity and superiority of the scheme are justified via several examples. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W.

    1990-01-01

    A method of passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  18. Change Blindness Phenomena for Virtual Reality Display Systems.

    PubMed

    Steinicke, Frank; Bruder, Gerd; Hinrichs, Klaus; Willemsen, Pete

    2011-09-01

    In visual perception, change blindness describes the phenomenon that persons viewing a visual scene may apparently fail to detect significant changes in that scene. These phenomena have been observed in both computer-generated imagery and real-world scenes. Several studies have demonstrated that change blindness effects occur primarily during visual disruptions such as blinks or saccadic eye movements. However, until now the influence of stereoscopic vision on change blindness has not been studied thoroughly in the context of visual perception research. In this paper, we introduce change blindness techniques for stereoscopic virtual reality (VR) systems, providing the ability to substantially modify a virtual scene in a manner that is difficult for observers to perceive. We evaluate techniques for semiimmersive VR systems, i.e., a passive and active stereoscopic projection system as well as an immersive VR system, i.e., a head-mounted display, and compare the results to those of monoscopic viewing conditions. For stereoscopic viewing conditions, we found that change blindness phenomena occur with the same magnitude as in monoscopic viewing conditions. Furthermore, we have evaluated the potential of the presented techniques for allowing abrupt, and yet significant, changes of a stereoscopically displayed virtual reality environment.

  19. A real-time LPC-based vocal tract area display for voice development.

    PubMed

    Rossiter, D; Howard, D M; Downes, M

    1994-12-01

    This article reports the design and implementation of a graphical display that presents an approximation to vocal tract area in real time for voiced vowel articulation. The acoustic signal is digitally sampled by the system. From these data a set of reflection coefficients is derived using linear predictive coding. A matrix of area coefficients is then determined that approximates the vocal tract area of the user. From this information a graphical display is then generated. The complete cycle of analysis and display is repeated at approximately 20 times/s. Synchronised audio and visual sequences can be recorded and used as dynamic targets for articulatory development. Use of the system is illustrated by diagrams of system output for spoken cardinal vowels and for vowels sung in a trained and untrained style.

  20. Surface display of roGFP for monitoring redox status of extracellular microenvironments in Shewanella oneidensis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Mukherjee, Manisha; Cheng, Hsin-I; Zhang, Yingdan; Ji, Lianghui; Cao, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Biofilms are the most ubiquitous and resilient form of microbial life on earth. One most important feature of a biofilm is the presence of a self-produced matrix, which creates highly heterogeneous and dynamic microenvironments within biofilms. Redox status in biofilm microenvironments plays a critical role in biofilm development and function. However, there is a lack of non-intrusive tools to quantify extracellular redox status of microenvironments within a biofilm matrix. In this study, using Shewanella oneidensis as a model organism, we demonstrated a novel approach to monitor extracellular redox status in biofilm microenvironments. Specifically, we displayed a redox sensitive fluorescence protein roGFP onto the cell surface of S. oneidensis by fusing it to the C-terminus of BpfA, a large surface protein, and used the surface displayed roGFP as a sensor to quantify the extracellular redox status in the matrix of S. oneidensis biofilms. The fusion of roGFP into BpfA has no negative impacts on cell growth and biofilm formation. Upon exposure to oxidizing agents such as H2 O2 , Ag(+) , and SeO3 (2-) , S. oneidensis BpfA-roGFP cells exhibited a characteristic fluorescence of roGFP. Proteinase treatment assay and super-resolution structured illumination microscopy confirmed the surface localization of BpfA-roGFP. We further used the surface displayed roGFP monitored the extracellular redox status in the matrix at different depths of a biofilm exposed to H2 O2 . This study provides a novel approach to non-invasively monitor extracellular redox status in microenvironments within biofilms, which can be used to understand redox responses of biofilms to environmental perturbations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Mixed H∞ and passive control for linear switched systems via hybrid control approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qunxian; Ling, Youzhu; Wei, Lisheng; Zhang, Hongbin

    2018-03-01

    This paper investigates the mixed H∞ and passive control problem for linear switched systems based on a hybrid control strategy. To solve this problem, first, a new performance index is proposed. This performance index can be viewed as the mixed weighted H∞ and passivity performance. Then, the hybrid controllers are used to stabilise the switched systems. The hybrid controllers consist of dynamic output-feedback controllers for every subsystem and state updating controllers at the switching instant. The design of state updating controllers not only depends on the pre-switching subsystem and the post-switching subsystem, but also depends on the measurable output signal. The hybrid controllers proposed in this paper can include some existing ones as special cases. Combine the multiple Lyapunov functions approach with the average dwell time technique, new sufficient conditions are obtained. Under the new conditions, the closed-loop linear switched systems are globally uniformly asymptotically stable with a mixed H∞ and passivity performance index. Moreover, the desired hybrid controllers can be constructed by solving a set of linear matrix inequalities. Finally, a numerical example and a practical example are given.

  2. Weak-microcavity organic light-emitting diodes with improved light out-coupling.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sang-Hwan; Song, Young-Woo; Lee, Joon-gu; Kim, Yoon-Chang; Lee, Jong Hyuk; Ha, Jaeheung; Oh, Jong-Suk; Lee, So Young; Lee, Sun Young; Hwang, Kyu Hwan; Zang, Dong-Sik; Lee, Yong-Hee

    2008-08-18

    We propose and demonstrate weak-microcavity organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays with improved light-extraction and viewing-angle characteristics. A single pair of low- and high-index layers is inserted between indium tin oxide (ITO) and a glass substrate. The electroluminescent (EL) efficiencies of discrete red, green, and blue weak-microcavity OLEDs are enhanced by 56%, 107%, and 26%, respectively, with improved color purity. Moreover, full-color passive-matrix bottom-emitting OLED displays are fabricated by employing low-index layers of two thicknesses. As a display, the EL efficiency of white color was 27% higher than that of a conventional OLED display.

  3. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1990-06-19

    A method is described for passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  4. Passive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bojesen, Emile

    2018-01-01

    This paper does not present an advocacy of a passive education as opposed to an active education nor does it propose that passive education is in any way 'better' or more important than active education. Through readings of Maurice Blanchot, Jacques Derrida and B.S. Johnson, and gentle critiques of Jacques Rancière and John Dewey, passive…

  5. Direct Fabrication of a-Si:H Thin Film Transistor Arrays on Plastic and Metal Foils for Flexible Displays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    TFTs ) arrays for high information content active matrix flexible displays for Army applications. For all flexible substrates a manufacturable...impermeable flexible substrate systems “display-ready” materials and handling protocols, (ii) high performance TFT devices and circuits fabricated...processes for integration with the flexible TFT arrays. Approaches and solution to address each of these major challenges are described in the

  6. Liquid crystal light valve technologies for display applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Takizawa, Kuniharu

    2001-11-01

    The liquid crystal (LC) light valve, which is a spatial light modulator that uses LC material, is a very important device in the area of display development, image processing, optical computing, holograms, etc. In particular, there have been dramatic developments in the past few years in the application of the LC light valve to projectors and other display technologies. Various LC operating modes have been developed, including thin film transistors, MOS-FETs and other active matrix drive techniques to meet the requirements for higher resolution, and substantial improvements have been achieved in the performance of optical systems, resulting in brighter display images. Given this background, the number of applications for the LC light valve has greatly increased. The resolution has increased from QVGA (320 x 240) to QXGA (2048 x 1536) or even super- high resolution of eight million pixels. In the area of optical output, projectors of 600 to 13,000 lm are now available, and they are used for presentations, home theatres, electronic cinema and other diverse applications. Projectors using the LC light valve can display high- resolution images on large screens. They are now expected to be developed further as part of hyper-reality visual systems. This paper provides an overview of the needs for large-screen displays, human factors related to visual effects, the way in which LC light valves are applied to projectors, improvements in moving picture quality, and the results of the latest studies that have been made to increase the quality of images and moving images or pictures.

  7. Hydrogenation of passivated contacts

    DOEpatents

    Nemeth, William; Yuan, Hao-Chih; LaSalvia, Vincenzo; Stradins, Pauls; Page, Matthew R.

    2018-03-06

    Methods of hydrogenation of passivated contacts using materials having hydrogen impurities are provided. An example method includes applying, to a passivated contact, a layer of a material, the material containing hydrogen impurities. The method further includes subsequently annealing the material and subsequently removing the material from the passivated contact.

  8. Improved passive treatment of high Zn and Mn concentrations using caustic magnesia (MgO): particle size effects.

    PubMed

    Rötting, Tobias S; Ayora, Carlos; Carrera, Jesus

    2008-12-15

    High concentrations of divalent metals such as Zn, Mn, Cu, Pb, Ni, Cd, Co, etc. are not removed satisfactorily in conventional (calcite- or organic matter-based) passive treatment systems. Caustic magnesia ("MgO") has been used successfully as an alternative alkaline material to remove these metals almost completely from water, but columns with coarse-grained MgO lost reactivity or permeability due to the accumulation of precipitates when only a small portion of the reagent had been spent. In the present study, MgO was mixed with wood chips to overcome these problems. Two columns with different MgO grain sizes were used to treat Zn- and Mn-rich water during one year. Performance was compared by measuring depth profiles of chemical parameters and hydraulic conductivity. The column containing 25% (v/v) of MgO with median particle size of about 3 mm displayed low reactivity and poor metal retention. In contrast, the column containing only 12.5% (v/v) of MgO with median particle size of 0.15 mm depleted Zn and Mn below detection limit throughout the study and had a good hydraulic performance. 95% of the applied MgO was consumed in the zone where Zn and Mn accumulated. The fine alkaline grains can dissolve almost completely before the growing layer of precipitates passivates them, whereas clogging is prevented by the large pores of the coarse inert matrix (wood chips). A reactive transport model corroborated the hypotheses that Zn(II) was removed due to its low solubility at pH near 10 achieved by MgO dissolution, whereas Mn(II) was removed due to rapid oxidation to Mn(III) at this pH and subsequent precipitation. The model also confirmed that the small size and large specific surface area of the MgO particles are the key factor to achieve a sufficiently fast dissolution.

  9. Loop Mirror Laser Neural Network with a Fast Liquid-Crystal Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mos, Evert C.; Schleipen, Jean J. H. B.; de Waardt, Huug; Khoe, Djan G. D.

    1999-07-01

    In our laser neural network (LNN) all-optical threshold action is obtained by application of controlled optical feedback to a laser diode. Here an extended experimental LNN is presented with as many as 32 neurons and 12 inputs. In the setup we use a fast liquid-crystal display to implement an optical matrix vector multiplier. This display, based on ferroelectric liquid-crystal material, enables us to present 125 training examples s to the LNN. To maximize the optical feedback efficiency of the setup, a loop mirror is introduced. We use a -rule learning algorithm to train the network to perform a number of functions toward the application area of telecommunication data switching.

  10. Active Matrix OLED Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, George

    2013-01-01

    This report focuses on the limited environmental testing of the AMOLED display performed as an engineering evaluation by The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC)-specifically. EMI. Thermal Vac, and radiation tests. The AMOLED display is an active-matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) technology. The testing provided an initial understanding of the technology and its suitability for space applications. Relative to light emitting diode (LED) displays or liquid crystal displays (LCDs), AMOLED displays provide a superior viewing experience even though they are much lighter and smaller, produce higher contrast ratio and richer colors, and require less power to operate than LCDs. However, AMOLED technology has not been demonstrated in a space environment. Therefore, some risks with the technology must be addressed before they can be seriously considered for human spaceflight. The environmental tests provided preliminary performance data on the ability of the display technology to handle some of the simulated induced space/spacecraft environments that an AMOLED display will see during a spacecraft certification test program. This engineering evaluation is part of a Space Act Agreement (SM) between The NASA/JSC and Honeywell International (HI) as a collaborative effort to evaluate the potential use of AMOLED technology for future human spaceflight missions- both government-led and commercial. Under this SM, HI is responsible for doing optical performance evaluation, as well as temperature and touch screen studies. The NASA/JSC is responsible for performing environmental testing comprised of EMI, Thermal Vac, and radiation tests. Additionally, as part of the testing, limited optical data was acquired to assess performance as the display was subjected to the induced environments. The NASA will benefit from this engineering evaluation by understanding AMOLED suitability for future use in space as well as becoming a smarter buyer (or developer) of the technology. HI benefits

  11. Environmental qualification of the MH-53J color multifunction display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malia, Timothy E.

    1996-05-01

    In early 1994, Loral Federal Systems Owego (LFS-O) was awarded the MH-53J Interactive Defensive Avionics System/Multi-Mission Advanced Tactical Terminal (IDAS/MATT) upgrade program as prime contractor. The MH-53J is a USAF special operations helicopter providing infiltration and exfiltration mission capability in a low-slow manner. One element the upgrade was a new digital map system (DMS), which consists of a 2 GB digital memory unit (DMU), a digital map computer (DMC) and a 6' by 8' color multi-function display (CMFD). Although the original specification was written for a CRT, Loral determined that an active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) based solution would better achieve the mission goals. The display upgrade was not intended to be a development program, but LFS-O found that there were very few solutions available near term, and chose to develop the display in Owego, making it their first military AMLCD production program. The CMFD is based on a commercial liquid crystal display manufactured by Display Technologies Incorporated (DTI), a joint venture of IBM and Toshiba. In March of 1995, just nine months after the design started, LFS-O delivered the first CMFD for systems integration. In December 1995, LFS-O successfully completed the environmental qualification of the CMFD. The extensive testing unearthed several initial deficiencies in the thermal, vibration, humidity salt fog and EMI design. This paper discusses these challenges and how they were overcome to achieve compliance with the USAF requirements.

  12. Design of a projection display screen with vanishing color shift for rear-projection HDTV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiu; Zhu, Jin-lin

    1996-09-01

    Using bi-convex cylinder lens with matrix structure, the transmissive projection display screen with high contrast and wider viewing angle has been widely used in large rear projection TV and video projectors, it obtained a inhere color shift and puzzled the designer of display screen for RGB projection tube in-line adjustment. Based on the method of light beam racing, the general software of designing projection display screen has been developed and the computer model of vanishing color shift for rear projection HDTV has bee completed. This paper discussed the practical designing method to vanish the defect of color shift and mentioned the relations between the primary optical parameters of display screen and relative geometry sizes of lens' surface. The distributions of optical gain to viewing angle and the influences on engineering design are briefly analyzed.

  13. Effectiveness of Matrix Organizations at the TACOM LCMC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-05

    Scott Baumgartner UNCLASSIFIED 14 responsibility and involvement in decision making, and offers a greater opportunity to display capabilities and...According to Knight, “Matrix structures are said to facilitate high quality and innovative solutions to complex technical problems” (Knight, 1976...discipline expertise to remain innovative (Davis & Lawrence, 1977). Communications The project teams must have a clear understanding of the vision, goals

  14. Circular displays: control/display arrangements and stereotype strength with eight different display locations.

    PubMed

    Chan, Alan H S; Hoffmann, Errol R

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments are reported that were designed to investigate control/display arrangements having high stereotype strengths when using circular displays. Eight display locations relative to the operator and control were tested with rotational and translational controls situated on different planes according to the Frame of Reference Transformation Tool (FORT) model of Wickens et al. (2010). (Left. No, Right! Development of the Frame of Reference Transformation Tool (FORT), Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 54th Annual Meeting, 54: 1022-1026). In many cases, there was little effect of display locations, indicating the importance of the Worringham and Beringer (1998. Directional stimulus-response compatibility: a test of three alternative principles. Ergonomics, 41(6), 864-880) Visual Field principle and an extension of this principle for rotary controls (Hoffmann and Chan (2013). The Worringham and Beringer 'visual field' principle for rotary controls. Ergonomics, 56(10), 1620-1624). The initial indicator position (12, 3, 6 and 9 o'clock) had a major effect on control/display stereotype strength for many of the six controls tested. Best display/control arrangements are listed for each of the different control types (rotational and translational) and for the planes on which they are mounted. Data have application where a circular display is used due to limited display panel space and applies to space-craft, robotics operators, hospital equipment and home appliances. Practitioner Summary: Circular displays are often used when there is limited space available on a control panel. Display/control arrangements having high stereotype strength are listed for four initial indicator positions. These arrangements are best for design purposes.

  15. Passive synchronization for Markov jump genetic oscillator networks with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li; He, Bing; Man, Chuntao; Wang, Shun

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the synchronization problem of coupled Markov jump genetic oscillator networks with time-varying delays and external disturbances is investigated. By introducing the drive-response concept, a novel mode-dependent control scheme is proposed, which guarantees that the synchronization can be achieved. By applying the Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional method and stochastic analysis, sufficient conditions are established based on passivity theory in terms of linear matrix inequalities. A numerical example is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of our theoretical results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A Low-Cost PC-Based Image Workstation for Dynamic Interactive Display of Three-Dimensional Anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, William A.; Raya, Sai P.; Udupa, Jayaram K.

    1989-05-01

    A system for interactive definition, automated extraction, and dynamic interactive display of three-dimensional anatomy has been developed and implemented on a low-cost PC-based image workstation. An iconic display is used for staging predefined image sequences through specified increments of tilt and rotation over a solid viewing angle. Use of a fast processor facilitates rapid extraction and rendering of the anatomy into predefined image views. These views are formatted into a display matrix in a large image memory for rapid interactive selection and display of arbitrary spatially adjacent images within the viewing angle, thereby providing motion parallax depth cueing for efficient and accurate perception of true three-dimensional shape, size, structure, and spatial interrelationships of the imaged anatomy. The visual effect is that of holding and rotating the anatomy in the hand.

  17. Osteoblast Differentiation and Bone Matrix Formation In Vivo and In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Blair, Harry C; Larrouture, Quitterie C; Li, Yanan; Lin, Hang; Beer-Stoltz, Donna; Liu, Li; Tuan, Rocky S; Robinson, Lisa J; Schlesinger, Paul H; Nelson, Deborah J

    2017-06-01

    We review the characteristics of osteoblast differentiation and bone matrix synthesis. Bone in air breathing vertebrates is a specialized tissue that developmentally replaces simpler solid tissues, usually cartilage. Bone is a living organ bounded by a layer of osteoblasts that, because of transport and compartmentalization requirements, produce bone matrix exclusively as an organized tight epithelium. With matrix growth, osteoblasts are reorganized and incorporated into the matrix as living cells, osteocytes, which communicate with each other and surface epithelium by cell processes within canaliculi in the matrix. The osteoblasts secrete the organic matrix, which are dense collagen layers that alternate parallel and orthogonal to the axis of stress loading. Into this matrix is deposited extremely dense hydroxyapatite-based mineral driven by both active and passive transport and pH control. As the matrix matures, hydroxyapatite microcrystals are organized into a sophisticated composite in the collagen layer by nucleation in the protein lattice. Recent studies on differentiating osteoblast precursors revealed a sophisticated proton export network driving mineralization, a gene expression program organized with the compartmentalization of the osteoblast epithelium that produces the mature bone matrix composite, despite varying serum calcium and phosphate. Key issues not well defined include how new osteoblasts are incorporated in the epithelial layer, replacing those incorporated in the accumulating matrix. Development of bone in vitro is the subject of numerous projects using various matrices and mesenchymal stem cell-derived preparations in bioreactors. These preparations reflect the structure of bone to variable extents, and include cells at many different stages of differentiation. Major challenges are production of bone matrix approaching the in vivo density and support for trabecular bone formation. In vitro differentiation is limited by the organization and

  18. Osteoblast Differentiation and Bone Matrix Formation In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Larrouture, Quitterie C.; Li, Yanan; Lin, Hang; Beer-Stoltz, Donna; Liu, Li; Tuan, Rocky S.; Robinson, Lisa J.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Nelson, Deborah J.

    2017-01-01

    We review the characteristics of osteoblast differentiation and bone matrix synthesis. Bone in air breathing vertebrates is a specialized tissue that developmentally replaces simpler solid tissues, usually cartilage. Bone is a living organ bounded by a layer of osteoblasts that, because of transport and compartmentalization requirements, produce bone matrix exclusively as an organized tight epithelium. With matrix growth, osteoblasts are reorganized and incorporated into the matrix as living cells, osteocytes, which communicate with each other and surface epithelium by cell processes within canaliculi in the matrix. The osteoblasts secrete the organic matrix, which are dense collagen layers that alternate parallel and orthogonal to the axis of stress loading. Into this matrix is deposited extremely dense hydroxyapatite-based mineral driven by both active and passive transport and pH control. As the matrix matures, hydroxyapatite microcrystals are organized into a sophisticated composite in the collagen layer by nucleation in the protein lattice. Recent studies on differentiating osteoblast precursors revealed a sophisticated proton export network driving mineralization, a gene expression program organized with the compartmentalization of the osteoblast epithelium that produces the mature bone matrix composite, despite varying serum calcium and phosphate. Key issues not well defined include how new osteoblasts are incorporated in the epithelial layer, replacing those incorporated in the accumulating matrix. Development of bone in vitro is the subject of numerous projects using various matrices and mesenchymal stem cell-derived preparations in bioreactors. These preparations reflect the structure of bone to variable extents, and include cells at many different stages of differentiation. Major challenges are production of bone matrix approaching the in vivo density and support for trabecular bone formation. In vitro differentiation is limited by the organization and

  19. Higher anterior knee laxity influences the landing biomechanics displayed by pubescent girls.

    PubMed

    Wild, Catherine Y; Munro, Bridget J; Steele, Julie R

    2017-01-01

    Despite an increase in anterior knee laxity (AKL) during the adolescent growth spurt in girls, it is unknown whether landing biomechanics are affected by this change. This study investigated whether pubescent girls with higher AKL displayed differences in their lower limb strength or landing biomechanics when performing a horizontal leap movement compared to girls with lower AKL. Forty-six pubescent girls (10-13 years) were tested at the time of their peak height velocity (PHV). Passive AKL was quantified and used to classify participants into higher (HAKL; peak displacement > 4 mm) and lower (LAKL; peak displacement < 3 mm) AKL groups (n = 15/group). Three-dimensional kinematics, ground reaction forces (GRF) and muscle activation patterns were assessed during a horizontal leap landing. HAKL participants displayed significantly (P < 0.05) reduced hip abduction, increased hip abduction moments, as well as earlier hamstring muscle and later tibialis anterior activation compared to LAKL participants. Girls with HAKL displayed compensatory landing biomechanics, which are suggested to assist the functional stability of their knees during this dynamic task. Further research is warranted, however, to confirm or refute this notion.

  20. Commentary on "Capturing the Evasive Passive"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillo-Martin, Diane; Snyder, William

    2009-01-01

    Passives has been the focus of much research in language acquisition since the 1970s. It has been clear from this research that young children seldom produce passives spontaneously, particularly "long" or "full" passives with a by-phrase; and they usually perform poorly on experimental tests of the comprehension of passives, especially passives of…

  1. Carbon Nanotube Driver Circuit for 6 × 6 Organic Light Emitting Diode Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jianping; Zhang, Kang; Li, Jingqi; Zhao, Yongbiao; Wang, Yilei; Pillai, Suresh Kumar Raman; Volkan Demir, Hilmi; Sun, Xiaowei; Chan-Park, Mary B.; Zhang, Qing

    2015-06-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) is expected to be a very promising material for flexible and transparent driver circuits for active matrix organic light emitting diode (AM OLED) displays due to its high field-effect mobility, excellent current carrying capacity, optical transparency and mechanical flexibility. Although there have been several publications about SWNT driver circuits, none of them have shown static and dynamic images with the AM OLED displays. Here we report on the first successful chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown SWNT network thin film transistor (TFT) driver circuits for static and dynamic AM OLED displays with 6 × 6 pixels. The high device mobility of ~45 cm2V-1s-1 and the high channel current on/off ratio of ~105 of the SWNT-TFTs fully guarantee the control capability to the OLED pixels. Our results suggest that SWNT-TFTs are promising backplane building blocks for future OLED displays.

  2. Carbon Nanotube Driver Circuit for 6 × 6 Organic Light Emitting Diode Display

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jianping; Zhang, Kang; Li, Jingqi; Zhao, Yongbiao; Wang, Yilei; Pillai, Suresh Kumar Raman; Volkan Demir, Hilmi; Sun, Xiaowei; Chan-Park, Mary B.; Zhang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) is expected to be a very promising material for flexible and transparent driver circuits for active matrix organic light emitting diode (AM OLED) displays due to its high field-effect mobility, excellent current carrying capacity, optical transparency and mechanical flexibility. Although there have been several publications about SWNT driver circuits, none of them have shown static and dynamic images with the AM OLED displays. Here we report on the first successful chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown SWNT network thin film transistor (TFT) driver circuits for static and dynamic AM OLED displays with 6 × 6 pixels. The high device mobility of ~45 cm2V−1s−1 and the high channel current on/off ratio of ~105 of the SWNT-TFTs fully guarantee the control capability to the OLED pixels. Our results suggest that SWNT-TFTs are promising backplane building blocks for future OLED displays. PMID:26119218

  3. Carbon Nanotube Driver Circuit for 6 × 6 Organic Light Emitting Diode Display.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jianping; Zhang, Kang; Li, Jingqi; Zhao, Yongbiao; Wang, Yilei; Pillai, Suresh Kumar Raman; Volkan Demir, Hilmi; Sun, Xiaowei; Chan-Park, Mary B; Zhang, Qing

    2015-06-29

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) is expected to be a very promising material for flexible and transparent driver circuits for active matrix organic light emitting diode (AM OLED) displays due to its high field-effect mobility, excellent current carrying capacity, optical transparency and mechanical flexibility. Although there have been several publications about SWNT driver circuits, none of them have shown static and dynamic images with the AM OLED displays. Here we report on the first successful chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown SWNT network thin film transistor (TFT) driver circuits for static and dynamic AM OLED displays with 6 × 6 pixels. The high device mobility of ~45 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1) and the high channel current on/off ratio of ~10(5) of the SWNT-TFTs fully guarantee the control capability to the OLED pixels. Our results suggest that SWNT-TFTs are promising backplane building blocks for future OLED displays.

  4. Use of modified lip repositioning technique associated with esthetic crown lengthening for treatment of excessive gingival display: A case report of multiple etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Mantovani, Matheus Bortoluzzi; Souza, Eduardo Clemente; Marson, Fabiano Carlos; Corrêa, Giovani Oliveira; Progiante, Patrícia Saram; Silva, Cléverson Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Excessive gingival display during smile can result in compromised esthetics. This study aims to report a case of excessive gingival display with multiple etiologies treated by means of modified lip repositioning technique associated with esthetic crown lengthening. A 23-year-old female patient, with 5-mm gingival display during smile caused by altered passive eruption and hypermobility of the upper lip, underwent the modified lip repositioning technique associated with gingivectomy followed by flap elevation and ostectomy/osteoplasty. Seven months after the second procedure, the patient had her esthetic complaint solved appearing stable in the observation period. The modified lip repositioning technique is an effective procedure employed to reduce gingival display and when associated with esthetic clinical crown lengthening, can appropriately treat cases of gummy smile. PMID:27041845

  5. Pixel electronic noise as a function of position in an active matrix flat panel imaging array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdandoost, Mohammad Y.; Wu, Dali; Karim, Karim S.

    2010-04-01

    We present an analysis of output referred pixel electronic noise as a function of position in the active matrix array for both active and passive pixel architectures. Three different noise sources for Active Pixel Sensor (APS) arrays are considered: readout period noise, reset period noise and leakage current noise of the reset TFT during readout. For the state-of-the-art Passive Pixel Sensor (PPS) array, the readout noise of the TFT switch is considered. Measured noise results are obtained by modeling the array connections with RC ladders on a small in-house fabricated prototype. The results indicate that the pixels in the rows located in the middle part of the array have less random electronic noise at the output of the off-panel charge amplifier compared to the ones in rows at the two edges of the array. These results can help optimize for clearer images as well as help define the region-of-interest with the best signal-to-noise ratio in an active matrix digital flat panel imaging array.

  6. Surface Passivation in Empirical Tight Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yu; Tan, Yaohua; Jiang, Zhengping; Povolotskyi, Michael; Klimeck, Gerhard; Kubis, Tillmann

    2016-03-01

    Empirical Tight Binding (TB) methods are widely used in atomistic device simulations. Existing TB methods to passivate dangling bonds fall into two categories: 1) Method that explicitly includes passivation atoms is limited to passivation with atoms and small molecules only. 2) Method that implicitly incorporates passivation does not distinguish passivation atom types. This work introduces an implicit passivation method that is applicable to any passivation scenario with appropriate parameters. This method is applied to a Si quantum well and a Si ultra-thin body transistor oxidized with SiO2 in several oxidation configurations. Comparison with ab-initio results and experiments verifies the presented method. Oxidation configurations that severely hamper the transistor performance are identified. It is also shown that the commonly used implicit H atom passivation overestimates the transistor performance.

  7. Multiple-Flat-Panel System Displays Multidimensional Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundo, Daniel; Levit, Creon; Henze, Christopher; Sandstrom, Timothy; Ellsworth, David; Green, Bryan; Joly, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Ames hyperwall is a display system designed to facilitate the visualization of sets of multivariate and multidimensional data like those generated in complex engineering and scientific computations. The hyperwall includes a 77 matrix of computer-driven flat-panel video display units, each presenting an image of 1,280 1,024 pixels. The term hyperwall reflects the fact that this system is a more capable successor to prior computer-driven multiple-flat-panel display systems known by names that include the generic term powerwall and the trade names PowerWall and Powerwall. Each of the 49 flat-panel displays is driven by a rack-mounted, dual-central-processing- unit, workstation-class personal computer equipped with a hig-hperformance graphical-display circuit card and with a hard-disk drive having a storage capacity of 100 GB. Each such computer is a slave node in a master/ slave computing/data-communication system (see Figure 1). The computer that acts as the master node is similar to the slave-node computers, except that it runs the master portion of the system software and is equipped with a keyboard and mouse for control by a human operator. The system utilizes commercially available master/slave software along with custom software that enables the human controller to interact simultaneously with any number of selected slave nodes. In a powerwall, a single rendering task is spread across multiple processors and then the multiple outputs are tiled into one seamless super-display. It must be noted that the hyperwall concept subsumes the powerwall concept in that a single scene could be rendered as a mosaic image on the hyperwall. However, the hyperwall offers a wider set of capabilities to serve a different purpose: The hyperwall concept is one of (1) simultaneously displaying multiple different but related images, and (2) providing means for composing and controlling such sets of images. In place of elaborate software or hardware crossbar switches, the

  8. The effect of display movement angle, indicator type and display location on control/display stereotype strength.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Errol R; Chan, Alan H S

    2017-08-01

    Much research on stereotype strength relating display and control movements for displays moving in the vertical or horizontal directions has been reported. Here we report effects of display movement angle, where the display moves at angles (relative to the vertical) of between 0° and 180°. The experiment used six different controls, four display locations relative to the operator and three types of indicator. Indicator types were included because of the strong effects of the 'scale-side principle' that are variable with display angle. A directional indicator had higher stereotype strength than a neutral indicator, and showed an apparent reversal in control/display stereotype direction beyond an angle of 90°. However, with a neutral indicator this control reversal was not present. Practitioner Summary: The effects of display moving at angles other than the four cardinal directions, types of control, location of display and types of indicator are investigated. Indicator types (directional and neutral) have an effect on stereotype strength and may cause an apparent control reversal with change of display movement angle.

  9. A Novel Matrix Protein Hic31 from the Prismatic Layer of Hyriopsis Cumingii Displays a Collagen-Like Structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojun; Zeng, Shimei; Dong, Shaojian; Jin, Can; Li, Jiale

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we clone and characterize a novel matrix protein, hic31, from the mantle of Hyriopsis cumingii. The amino acid composition of hic31 consists of a high proportion of Glycine residues (26.67%). Tissue expression detection by RT-PCR indicates that hic31 is expressed specifically at the mantle edge. In situ hybridization results reveals strong signals from the dorsal epithelial cells of the outer fold at the mantle edge, and weak signals from inner epithelial cells of the same fold, indicating that hic31 is a prismatic-layer matrix protein. Although BLASTP results identify no shared homology with other shell-matrix proteins or any other known proteins, the hic31 tertiary structure is similar to that of collagen I, alpha 1 and alpha 2. It has been well proved that collagen forms the basic organic frameworks in way of collagen fibrils and minerals present within or outside of these fibrils. Therefore, hic31 might be a framework-matrix protein involved in the prismatic-layer biomineralization. Besides, the gene expression of hic31 increase in the early stages of pearl sac development, indicating that hic31 may play important roles in biomineralization of the pearl prismatic layer.

  10. Surface Passivation of CdSe Quantum Dots in All Inorganic Amorphous Solid by Forming Cd1-xZnxSe Shell.

    PubMed

    Xia, Mengling; Liu, Chao; Zhao, Zhiyong; Wang, Jing; Lin, Changgui; Xu, Yinsheng; Heo, Jong; Dai, Shixun; Han, Jianjun; Zhao, Xiujian

    2017-02-07

    CdSe quantum dots (QDs) doped glasses have been widely investigated for optical filters, LED color converter and other optical emitters. Unlike CdSe QDs in solution, it is difficult to passivate the surface defects of CdSe QDs in glass matrix, which strongly suppress its intrinsic emission. In this study, surface passivation of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) by Cd 1-x Zn x Se shell in silicate glass was reported. An increase in the Se/Cd ratio can lead to the partial passivation of the surface states and appearance of the intrinsic emission of CdSe QDs. Optimizing the heat-treatment condition promotes the incorporation of Zn into CdSe QDs and results in the quenching of the defect emission. Formation of CdSe/Cd 1-x Zn x Se core/graded shell QDs is evidenced by the experimental results of TEM and Raman spectroscopy. Realization of the surface passivation and intrinsic emission of II-VI QDs may facilitate the wide applications of QDs doped all inorganic amorphous materials.

  11. Passivation Of High-Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    Surfaces of high-temperature superconductors passivated with native iodides, sulfides, or sulfates formed by chemical treatments after superconductors grown. Passivating compounds nearly insoluble in and unreactive with water and protect underlying superconductors from effects of moisture. Layers of cuprous iodide and of barium sulfate grown. Other candidate passivating surface films: iodides and sulfides of bismuth, strontium, and thallium. Other proposed techniques for formation of passivating layers include deposition and gas-phase reaction.

  12. BioSAVE: display of scored annotation within a sequence context.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Richard F; Adryan, Boris

    2008-03-20

    Visualization of sequence annotation is a common feature in many bioinformatics tools. For many applications it is desirable to restrict the display of such annotation according to a score cutoff, as biological interpretation can be difficult in the presence of the entire data. Unfortunately, many visualisation solutions are somewhat static in the way they handle such score cutoffs. We present BioSAVE, a sequence annotation viewer with on-the-fly selection of visualisation thresholds for each feature. BioSAVE is a versatile OS X program for visual display of scored features (annotation) within a sequence context. The program reads sequence and additional supplementary annotation data (e.g., position weight matrix matches, conservation scores, structural domains) from a variety of commonly used file formats and displays them graphically. Onscreen controls then allow for live customisation of these graphics, including on-the-fly selection of visualisation thresholds for each feature. Possible applications of the program include display of transcription factor binding sites in a genomic context or the visualisation of structural domain assignments in protein sequences and many more. The dynamic visualisation of these annotations is useful, e.g., for the determination of cutoff values of predicted features to match experimental data. Program, source code and exemplary files are freely available at the BioSAVE homepage.

  13. The passive control of air pollution exposure in Dublin, Ireland: a combined measurement and modelling case study.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, J; Gill, L W; McNabola, A

    2013-08-01

    This study investigates the potential real world application of passive control systems to reduce personal pollutant exposure in an urban street canyon in Dublin, Ireland. The implementation of parked cars and/or low boundary walls as a passive control system has been shown to minimise personal exposure to pollutants on footpaths in previous investigations. However, previous research has been limited to generic numerical modelling studies. This study combines real-time traffic data, meteorological conditions and pollution concentrations, in a real world urban street canyon before and after the implementation of a passive control system. Using a combination of field measurements and numerical modelling this study assessed the potential impact of passive controls on personal exposure to nitric oxide (NO) concentrations in the street canyon in winter conditions. A calibrated numerical model of the urban street canyon was developed, taking into account the variability in traffic and meteorological conditions. The modelling system combined the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations and a semi-empirical equation, and demonstrated a good agreement with measured field data collected in the street canyon. The results indicated that lane distribution, fleet composition and vehicular turbulence all affected pollutant dispersion, in addition to the canyon geometry and local meteorological conditions. The introduction of passive controls displayed mixed results for improvements in air quality on the footpaths for different wind and traffic conditions. Parked cars demonstrated the most comprehensive passive control system with average improvements in air quality of up to 15% on the footpaths. This study highlights the potential of passive controls in a real street canyon to increase dispersion and improve air quality at street level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Measure Guideline: Passive Vents

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, David; Neri, Robin

    2016-02-05

    This document addresses the use of passive vents as a source of outdoor air in multifamily buildings. The challenges associated with implementing passive vents and the factors affecting performance are outlined. A comprehensive design methodology and quantified performance metrics are provided. Two hypothetical design examples are provided to illustrate the process. This document is intended to be useful to designers, decision-makers, and contractors implementing passive ventilation strategies. It is also intended to be a resource for those responsible for setting high-performance building program requirements, especially pertaining to ventilation and outdoor air. To ensure good indoor air quality, a dedicated sourcemore » of outdoor air is an integral part of high-performance buildings. Presently, there is a lack of guidance pertaining to the design and installation of passive vents, resulting in poor system performance. This report details the criteria necessary for designing, constructing, and testing passive vent systems to enable them to provide consistent and reliable levels of ventilation air from outdoors.« less

  15. Techniques for active passivation

    DOEpatents

    Roscioli, Joseph R.; Herndon, Scott C.; Nelson, Jr., David D.

    2016-12-20

    In one embodiment, active (continuous or intermittent) passivation may be employed to prevent interaction of sticky molecules with interfaces inside of an instrument (e.g., an infrared absorption spectrometer) and thereby improve response time. A passivation species may be continuously or intermittently applied to an inlet of the instrument while a sample gas stream is being applied. The passivation species may have a highly polar functional group that strongly binds to either water or polar groups of the interfaces, and once bound presents a non-polar group to the gas phase in order to prevent further binding of polar molecules. The instrument may be actively used to detect the sticky molecules while the passivation species is being applied.

  16. Numerical study of comparison of vorticity and passive vectors in turbulence and inviscid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkitani, Koji

    2002-04-01

    The nonlinear vortex stretching in incompressible Navier-Stokes turbulence is compared with a linear stretching process of passive vectors (PVs). In particular, we pay special attention to the difference of these processes under long and short time evolutions. For finite time evolution, we confirm our previous finding that the stretching effect of vorticity is weaker than that of general passive vectors for a majority of the initial conditions with the same energy spectra. The above difference can be explained qualitatively by examining the Biot-Savart formula. In order to see to what extent infinitesimal time development explains the above difference, we examine the probability density functions (PDFs) of the stretching rates of the passive vectors in the vicinity of a solution of Navier-Stokes equations. It is found that the PDFs are found to have a Gaussian distribution, suggesting that there are equally many PVs that stretched less and more than the vorticity. This suggests the importance of the vorticity-strain correlation built up over finite time in turbulence. We also discuss the case of Euler equations, where the dynamics of the Jacobian matrix relating the physical and material coordinates is examined numerically. A kind of alignment problem associated with the Cauchy-Green tensor is proposed and studied using the results of numerical simulations. It is found that vorticity tends to align itself with the most compressing eigenvector of the Cauchy-Green tensor. A two-dimensional counterpart of active-passive comparison is briefly studied. There is no essential difference between stretching of vorticity gradients and that of passive scalar gradients and a physical interpretation is given to it.

  17. Rapid P300 brain-computer interface communication with a head-mounted display

    PubMed Central

    Käthner, Ivo; Kübler, Andrea; Halder, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Visual ERP (P300) based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) allow for fast and reliable spelling and are intended as a muscle-independent communication channel for people with severe paralysis. However, they require the presentation of visual stimuli in the field of view of the user. A head-mounted display could allow convenient presentation of visual stimuli in situations, where mounting a conventional monitor might be difficult or not feasible (e.g., at a patient's bedside). To explore if similar accuracies can be achieved with a virtual reality (VR) headset compared to a conventional flat screen monitor, we conducted an experiment with 18 healthy participants. We also evaluated it with a person in the locked-in state (LIS) to verify that usage of the headset is possible for a severely paralyzed person. Healthy participants performed online spelling with three different display methods. In one condition a 5 × 5 letter matrix was presented on a conventional 22 inch TFT monitor. Two configurations of the VR headset were tested. In the first (glasses A), the same 5 × 5 matrix filled the field of view of the user. In the second (glasses B), single letters of the matrix filled the field of view of the user. The participant in the LIS tested the VR headset on three different occasions (glasses A condition only). For healthy participants, average online spelling accuracies were 94% (15.5 bits/min) using three flash sequences for spelling with the monitor and glasses A and 96% (16.2 bits/min) with glasses B. In one session, the participant in the LIS reached an online spelling accuracy of 100% (10 bits/min) using the glasses A condition. We also demonstrated that spelling with one flash sequence is possible with the VR headset for healthy users (mean: 32.1 bits/min, maximum reached by one user: 71.89 bits/min at 100% accuracy). We conclude that the VR headset allows for rapid P300 BCI communication in healthy users and may be a suitable display option for severely

  18. IMDISP - INTERACTIVE IMAGE DISPLAY PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    The Interactive Image Display Program (IMDISP) is an interactive image display utility for the IBM Personal Computer (PC, XT and AT) and compatibles. Until recently, efforts to utilize small computer systems for display and analysis of scientific data have been hampered by the lack of sufficient data storage capacity to accomodate large image arrays. Most planetary images, for example, require nearly a megabyte of storage. The recent development of the "CDROM" (Compact Disk Read-Only Memory) storage technology makes possible the storage of up to 680 megabytes of data on a single 4.72-inch disk. IMDISP was developed for use with the CDROM storage system which is currently being evaluated by the Planetary Data System. The latest disks to be produced by the Planetary Data System are a set of three disks containing all of the images of Uranus acquired by the Voyager spacecraft. The images are in both compressed and uncompressed format. IMDISP can read the uncompressed images directly, but special software is provided to decompress the compressed images, which can not be processed directly. IMDISP can also display images stored on floppy or hard disks. A digital image is a picture converted to numerical form so that it can be stored and used in a computer. The image is divided into a matrix of small regions called picture elements, or pixels. The rows and columns of pixels are called "lines" and "samples", respectively. Each pixel has a numerical value, or DN (data number) value, quantifying the darkness or brightness of the image at that spot. In total, each pixel has an address (line number, sample number) and a DN value, which is all that the computer needs for processing. DISPLAY commands allow the IMDISP user to display all or part of an image at various positions on the display screen. The user may also zoom in and out from a point on the image defined by the cursor, and may pan around the image. To enable more or all of the original image to be displayed on the

  19. AMPS data management requirements study. [user manuals (computer programs)/display devices - computerized simulation/experimentation/ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A data simulation is presented for instruments and associated control and display functions required to perform controlled active experiments of the atmosphere. A comprehensive user's guide is given for the data requirements and software developed for the following experiments: (1) electromagnetic wave transmission; (2) passive observation of ambient plasmas; (3) ionospheric measurements with a subsatellite; (4) electron accelerator beam measurements; and (5) measurement of acoustic gravity waves in the sodium layer using lasers. A complete description of each experiment is given.

  20. Low Voltage, Low Power Organic Light Emitting Transistors for AMOLED Displays

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, M. A.; Liu, B.; Donoghue, E. P.

    2011-01-01

    Low voltage, low power dissipation, high aperture ratio organic light emitting transistors are demonstrated. The high level of performance is enabled by a carbon nanotube source electrode that permits integration of the drive transistor and the organic light emitting diode into an efficient single stacked device. Given the demonstrated performance, this technology could break the technical logjam holding back widespread deployment of active matrix organic light emitting displays at flat panel screen sizes.

  1. Remarkably High Mobility Thin-Film Transistor on Flexible Substrate by Novel Passivation Material.

    PubMed

    Shih, Cheng Wei; Chin, Albert

    2017-04-25

    High mobility thin-film transistor (TFT) is crucial for future high resolution and fast response flexible display. Remarkably high performance TFT, made at room temperature on flexible substrate, is achieved with record high field-effect mobility (μ FE ) of 345 cm 2 /Vs, small sub-threshold slope (SS) of 103 mV/dec, high on-current/off-current (I ON /I OFF ) of 7 × 10 6 , and a low drain-voltage (V D ) of 2 V for low power operation. The achieved mobility is the best reported data among flexible electronic devices, which is reached by novel HfLaO passivation material on nano-crystalline zinc-oxide (ZnO) TFT to improve both I ON and I OFF . From X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, the non-passivated device has high OH-bonding intensity in nano-crystalline ZnO, which damage the crystallinity, create charged scattering centers, and form potential barriers to degrade mobility.

  2. Passive cavitation imaging with ultrasound arrays

    PubMed Central

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Datta, Saurabh; Holland, Christy K.; Mast, T. Douglas

    2009-01-01

    A method is presented for passive imaging of cavitational acoustic emissions using an ultrasound array, with potential application in real-time monitoring of ultrasound ablation. To create such images, microbubble emissions were passively sensed by an imaging array and dynamically focused at multiple depths. In this paper, an analytic expression for a passive image is obtained by solving the Rayleigh–Sommerfield integral, under the Fresnel approximation, and passive images were simulated. A 192-element array was used to create passive images, in real time, from 520-kHz ultrasound scattered by a 1-mm steel wire. Azimuthal positions of this target were accurately estimated from the passive images. Next, stable and inertial cavitation was passively imaged in saline solution sonicated at 520 kHz. Bubble clusters formed in the saline samples were consistently located on both passive images and B-scans. Passive images were also created using broadband emissions from bovine liver sonicated at 2.2 MHz. Agreement was found between the images and source beam shape, indicating an ability to map therapeutic ultrasound beams in situ. The relation between these broadband emissions, sonication amplitude, and exposure conditions are discussed. PMID:20000921

  3. Passive cavitation imaging with ultrasound arrays.

    PubMed

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A; Datta, Saurabh; Holland, Christy K; Mast, T Douglas

    2009-12-01

    A method is presented for passive imaging of cavitational acoustic emissions using an ultrasound array, with potential application in real-time monitoring of ultrasound ablation. To create such images, microbubble emissions were passively sensed by an imaging array and dynamically focused at multiple depths. In this paper, an analytic expression for a passive image is obtained by solving the Rayleigh-Sommerfield integral, under the Fresnel approximation, and passive images were simulated. A 192-element array was used to create passive images, in real time, from 520-kHz ultrasound scattered by a 1-mm steel wire. Azimuthal positions of this target were accurately estimated from the passive images. Next, stable and inertial cavitation was passively imaged in saline solution sonicated at 520 kHz. Bubble clusters formed in the saline samples were consistently located on both passive images and B-scans. Passive images were also created using broadband emissions from bovine liver sonicated at 2.2 MHz. Agreement was found between the images and source beam shape, indicating an ability to map therapeutic ultrasound beams in situ. The relation between these broadband emissions, sonication amplitude, and exposure conditions are discussed.

  4. Effect of Ultrasonic Nano-Crystal Surface Modification (UNSM) on the Passivation Behavior of Aged 316L Stainless Steel

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Tae; Lee, Jung-Hee; Kim, Young-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Stainless steels have good corrosion resistance in many environments but welding or aging can decrease their resistance. This work focused on the effect of aging time and ultrasonic nano-crystal surface modification on the passivation behavior of 316L stainless steel. In the case of slightly sensitized 316L stainless steel, increasing the aging time drastically decreased the pitting potential, increased the passive current density, and decreased the resistance of the passive film, even though aging did not form chromium carbide and a chromium depletion zone. This behavior is due to the micro-galvanic corrosion between the matrix and carbon segregated area, and this shows the importance of carbon segregation in grain boundaries to the pitting corrosion resistance of stainless steel, in addition to the formation of the chromium depletion zone. UNSM (Ultrasonic Nano Crystal Surface Modification)-treatment to the slightly sensitized 316L stainless steel increased the pitting potential, decreased the passive current density, and increased the resistance of the passive film. However, in the case of heavily sensitized 316L stainless steel, UNSM-treatment decreased the pitting potential, increased the passive current density, and decreased the resistance of the passive film. This behavior is due to the dual effects of the UNSM-treatment. That is, the UNSM-treatment reduced the carbon segregation, regardless of whether the stainless steel 316L was slightly or heavily sensitized. However, since this treatment made mechanical flaws in the outer surface in the case of the heavily sensitized stainless steel, UNSM-treatment may eliminate chromium carbide, and this flaw can be a pitting initiation site, and therefore decrease the pitting corrosion resistance. PMID:28773067

  5. Effect of Ultrasonic Nano-Crystal Surface Modification (UNSM) on the Passivation Behavior of Aged 316L Stainless Steel.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Tae; Lee, Jung-Hee; Kim, Young-Sik

    2017-06-27

    Stainless steels have good corrosion resistance in many environments but welding or aging can decrease their resistance. This work focused on the effect of aging time and ultrasonic nano-crystal surface modification on the passivation behavior of 316L stainless steel. In the case of slightly sensitized 316L stainless steel, increasing the aging time drastically decreased the pitting potential, increased the passive current density, and decreased the resistance of the passive film, even though aging did not form chromium carbide and a chromium depletion zone. This behavior is due to the micro-galvanic corrosion between the matrix and carbon segregated area, and this shows the importance of carbon segregation in grain boundaries to the pitting corrosion resistance of stainless steel, in addition to the formation of the chromium depletion zone. UNSM (Ultrasonic Nano Crystal Surface Modification)-treatment to the slightly sensitized 316L stainless steel increased the pitting potential, decreased the passive current density, and increased the resistance of the passive film. However, in the case of heavily sensitized 316L stainless steel, UNSM-treatment decreased the pitting potential, increased the passive current density, and decreased the resistance of the passive film. This behavior is due to the dual effects of the UNSM-treatment. That is, the UNSM-treatment reduced the carbon segregation, regardless of whether the stainless steel 316L was slightly or heavily sensitized. However, since this treatment made mechanical flaws in the outer surface in the case of the heavily sensitized stainless steel, UNSM-treatment may eliminate chromium carbide, and this flaw can be a pitting initiation site, and therefore decrease the pitting corrosion resistance.

  6. High-Resolution Large-Field-of-View Three-Dimensional Hologram Display System and Method Thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Mintz, Frederick W. (Inventor); Tsou, Peter (Inventor); Bryant, Nevin A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A real-time, dynamic, free space-virtual reality, 3-D image display system is enabled by using a unique form of Aerogel as the primary display media. A preferred embodiment of this system comprises a 3-D mosaic topographic map which is displayed by fusing four projected hologram images. In this embodiment, four holographic images are projected from four separate holograms. Each holographic image subtends a quadrant of the 4(pi) solid angle. By fusing these four holographic images, a static 3-D image such as a featured terrain map would be visible for 360 deg in the horizontal plane and 180 deg in the vertical plane. An input, either acquired by 3-D image sensor or generated by computer animation, is first converted into a 2-D computer generated hologram (CGH). This CGH is then downloaded into large liquid crystal (LC) panel. A laser projector illuminates the CGH-filled LC panel and generates and displays a real 3-D image in the Aerogel matrix.

  7. Speed in Information Processing with a Computer Driven Visual Display in a Real-time Digital Simulation. M.S. Thesis - Virginia Polytechnic Inst.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyle, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    Information transfer between the operator and computer-generated display systems is an area where the human factors engineer discovers little useful design data relating human performance to system effectiveness. This study utilized a computer-driven, cathode-ray-tube graphic display to quantify human response speed in a sequential information processing task. The performance criteria was response time to sixteen cell elements of a square matrix display. A stimulus signal instruction specified selected cell locations by both row and column identification. An equal probable number code, from one to four, was assigned at random to the sixteen cells of the matrix and correspondingly required one of four, matched keyed-response alternatives. The display format corresponded to a sequence of diagnostic system maintenance events, that enable the operator to verify prime system status, engage backup redundancy for failed subsystem components, and exercise alternate decision-making judgements. The experimental task bypassed the skilled decision-making element and computer processing time, in order to determine a lower bound on the basic response speed for given stimulus/response hardware arrangement.

  8. Tropospheric Passive Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keafer, L. S., Jr. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The long term role of airborne/spaceborne passive remote sensing systems for tropospheric air quality research and the identification of technology advances required to improve the performance of passive remote sensing systems were discussed.

  9. TFT-Directed Electroplating of RGB Luminescent Films without a Vacuum or Mask toward a Full-Color AMOLED Pixel Matrix.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Zhang, Donglian; Xiong, You; Zhou, Xuehong; Liu, Cao; Chen, Weifeng; Wu, Weijing; Zhou, Lei; Xu, Miao; Wang, Lei; Liu, Linlin; Peng, Junbiao; Ma, Yuguang; Cao, Yong

    2018-05-30

    The thin-film transistor (TFT) driving circuit is a separate electronic component embedded within the panel itself to switch the current for each pixel in active-matrix organic light-emitting diode displays. We reported a TFT-directed dye electroplating method to fabricate pixels; this would be a new method to deposit films on prepatterned electrode for organic full-color display, where TFT driving circuit provide a switching current signal to drive and direct dye depositing on selected RGB pixels. A prototype patterned color pixel matrix was achieved, as high-quality light-emitting films with uniform morphology, pure RGB chromaticity, and stable output.

  10. Solution-Processed Organic Thin-Film Transistor Array for Active-Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Chihiro; Hata, Takuya; Chuman, Takashi; Ishizuka, Shinichi; Yoshizawa, Atsushi

    2013-05-01

    We developed a 3-in. organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) array with an ink-jetted organic semiconductor. All layers except electrodes were fabricated by solution processes. The OTFT performed well without hysteresis, and the field-effect mobility in the saturation region was 0.45 cm2 V-1 s-1, the threshold voltage was 3.3 V, and the on/off current ratio was more than 106. We demonstrated a 3-in. active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) display driven by the OTFT array. The display could provide clear moving images. The peak luminance of the display was 170 cd/m2.

  11. Evaluating the Relationship between Equilibrium Passive ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This review evaluates passive sampler uptake of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) as it relates to organism bioaccumulation in the water column and interstitial water. Fifty-five studies were found where both passive samplers and organism bioaccumulation were used to measured water quality. Of these investigations, 19 provided direct comparisons relating passive sampler concentrations and organism bioaccumulation. Passive sampling polymers included in the review were: low density polyethylene (LDPE); polyoxymethylene (POM); and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and organisms ranged from polychaetes and oligochaetes to bivalves, aquatic insects, and gastropods. Log-linear regressions correlating bioaccumulation (CL) and passive sampler concentration (CPS) were used to assess the strength of observed relationships. In general, the passive sampler concentrations resulted in statistically-significant, logarithmic, predictive relationships, most of which were within one to two orders of magnitude of measured bioaccumulation. Overall, bioaccumulation values were greater than passive sampler concentrations. A mean ratio of CL to CPS was 10.8 ± 18.4 (n = 609) for available data. Given that all studies presented resulted in a strong CL versus CPS relationship suggests that using passive sampling as a surrogate for organism bioaccumulation is viable when biomonitoring organisms are not available. Passive sampling based measurements can provide useful information for ma

  12. Modified Lip Repositioning with Esthetic Crown Lengthening: A Combined Approach to Treating Excessive Gingival Display.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Isis M; Gaud-Quintana, Sadja; Stern, Jacob K

    Lip repositioning surgery to address excessive gingival display induced by different etiologies has received major attention recently. Several techniques and variations have been reported, including myotomy or repositioning of the levator labii superioris muscle, Le Fort impaction, maxillary gingivectomies, botulinum toxin injections, and lip stabilization. This study reports a case of excessive gingival display treated by a modified combined approach. A 25-year-old woman with a 4- to 8-mm gingival display when smiling caused by a combination of short clinical crowns induced by an altered passive eruption and hypermobility of the upper lip underwent a staged esthetic crown-lengthening procedure followed by a modified lip repositioning technique. A description of the technique and a comparison with other modes of therapy is discussed. This modified approach for treating the hypermobile lip included a bilateral removal of a partial-thickness strip of mucosa from the maxillary buccal vestibule without severing the muscle, leaving the midline frenum intact and suturing the lip mucosa to the mucogingival line. The narrower vestibule and increased tooth length resulted in a symmetric and pleasing gingival display when smiling that remained stable over time. With proper diagnosis and sequence of therapy, modified lip repositioning surgery combined with esthetic crown lengthening can be used predictably to treat excessive gingival display and enhance smile esthetics.

  13. Investigations of Some Liquid Matrixes for Analyte Quantification by MALDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Jeong Hee; Park, Kyung Man; Ahn, Sung Hee; Lee, Seong Hoon; Kim, Myung Soo

    2015-06-01

    Sample inhomogeneity is one of the obstacles preventing the generation of reproducible mass spectra by MALDI and to their use for the purpose of analyte quantification. As a potential solution to this problem, we investigated MALDI with some liquid matrixes prepared by nonstoichiometric mixing of acids and bases. Out of 27 combinations of acids and bases, liquid matrixes could be produced from seven. When the overall spectral features were considered, two liquid matrixes using α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid as the acid and 3-aminoquinoline and N,N-diethylaniline as bases were the best choices. In our previous study of MALDI with solid matrixes, we found that three requirements had to be met for the generation of reproducible spectra and for analyte quantification: (1) controlling the temperature by fixing the total ion count, (2) plotting the analyte-to-matrix ion ratio versus the analyte concentration as the calibration curve, and (3) keeping the matrix suppression below a critical value. We found that the same requirements had to be met in MALDI with liquid matrixes as well. In particular, although the liquid matrixes tested here were homogeneous, they failed to display spot-to-spot spectral reproducibility unless the first requirement above was met. We also found that analyte-derived ions could not be produced efficiently by MALDI with the above liquid matrixes unless the analyte was sufficiently basic. In this sense, MALDI processes with solid and liquid matrixes should be regarded as complementary techniques rather than as competing ones.

  14. Investigations of Some Liquid Matrixes for Analyte Quantification by MALDI.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jeong Hee; Park, Kyung Man; Ahn, Sung Hee; Lee, Seong Hoon; Kim, Myung Soo

    2015-10-01

    Sample inhomogeneity is one of the obstacles preventing the generation of reproducible mass spectra by MALDI and to their use for the purpose of analyte quantification. As a potential solution to this problem, we investigated MALDI with some liquid matrixes prepared by nonstoichiometric mixing of acids and bases. Out of 27 combinations of acids and bases, liquid matrixes could be produced from seven. When the overall spectral features were considered, two liquid matrixes using α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid as the acid and 3-aminoquinoline and N,N-diethylaniline as bases were the best choices. In our previous study of MALDI with solid matrixes, we found that three requirements had to be met for the generation of reproducible spectra and for analyte quantification: (1) controlling the temperature by fixing the total ion count, (2) plotting the analyte-to-matrix ion ratio versus the analyte concentration as the calibration curve, and (3) keeping the matrix suppression below a critical value. We found that the same requirements had to be met in MALDI with liquid matrixes as well. In particular, although the liquid matrixes tested here were homogeneous, they failed to display spot-to-spot spectral reproducibility unless the first requirement above was met. We also found that analyte-derived ions could not be produced efficiently by MALDI with the above liquid matrixes unless the analyte was sufficiently basic. In this sense, MALDI processes with solid and liquid matrixes should be regarded as complementary techniques rather than as competing ones.

  15. Impact of pregnancy and vaginal delivery on the passive and active mechanics of the rat vagina.

    PubMed

    Feola, Andrew; Moalli, Pamela; Alperin, Marianna; Duerr, Robbie; Gandley, Robin E; Abramowitch, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Remodeling of vaginal extracellular matrix and smooth muscle likely plays a critical role in reducing the risk of maternal injury during vaginal delivery by altering the mechanical properties to increase distension and reduce stress. Long-Evans rats were divided into five groups to examine the passive mechanical and active contractile properties throughout pregnancy and postpartum: virgin (n=17), mid-pregnant (Day 14-16, n=12), late-pregnant (Day 20-22, n=14), immediate postpartum (0-2 h after delivery, n=14), and 4 week postpartum (n=15). Longitudinal sections of vaginal tissue were loaded to failure uniaxially for passive mechanical or active contractile properties were examined. For passive mechanics, the tangent modulus decreased 45% by mid-pregnancy and immediately postpartum (p<0.001). The ultimate strain continuously increased up to 43% higher than virgin animals (p=0.007) in the immediate postpartum group. For active mechanics, the maximal contractile force was 36-56% lower through immediate postpartum animals, and was significantly more sensitive to K+ throughout pregnancy and postpartum (p=0.003). The changes observed in the passive and active properties of the rat vagina are consistent with what would be expected from a tissue that is remodeling to maximize its ability to distend at the time of vaginal delivery to facilitate passage of the fetus with minimal injury.

  16. [A cross sectional study of passive smoking of non-smoking women and analysis of influence factors on women passive smoking].

    PubMed

    Han, Jing-Xiu; Ma, Ling; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Liu, Xi; Zheng, Su-hua; Gan, De-kun; Fang, Jun

    2006-09-01

    To fund out the state of passive smoking of non-smoking women and search for measures of controlling women passive smoking. 3500 non-smoking women in Beijing, Shanghai, Chengdu city were interviewed. Analyses were performed by chi2 test Fisher test and ANOVA test. 92.7% passive smoking women exposure to ETS at home, 40.8% at workplace. 38.9% exposed to ETS from birthday, and 42.3% from 18 - 30 age. The average exposure time of passive smoking is (1.17 +/- 1.10) hours per day. The proportion of passive-smoking time over 2 hours at home is higher than work place. In passive-smoking group, the proportion of 30 - 50 age group, secondary education, married, merchant/service, principal of units, and manufacture/transport workers were higher than non-smoking group. 97.5% think that passive smoking is harmful to health, and the proportion of thinking passive smoking has severe harm to health in non-passive-smoking group is higher than passive-smoking group. 70.0% open windows when someone smokes around her, but only 16.9% ask the smokers do not smoke around her forwardly. Suppose that someone were smoking around yourself, the consciousness of avoiding passive smoking forwardly in non-passive-smoking group is stronger than passive-smoking group. 95.1% believe the content of smoking-harm propagandized by medium. The main places of controlling passive smoking are the home and the department, commerce, service, and manufacture/ transport workplace. The rate of passive smoking was influenced by the consciousness of the serious level of harms by passive smoking. Propagandizing the serious harm of passive smoking by medium and strengthening the consciousness of avoiding passive smoking were one of feasible measures to lower the rate of smoking and passive smoking.

  17. Multiple mechanisms quench passive spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser-McKelvie, Amelia; Brown, Michael J. I.; Pimbblet, Kevin; Dolley, Tim; Bonne, Nicolas J.

    2018-02-01

    We examine the properties of a sample of 35 nearby passive spiral galaxies in order to determine their dominant quenching mechanism(s). All five low-mass (M⋆ < 1 × 1010 M⊙) passive spiral galaxies are located in the rich Virgo cluster. This is in contrast to low-mass spiral galaxies with star formation, which inhabit a range of environments. We postulate that cluster-scale gas stripping and heating mechanisms operating only in rich clusters are required to quench low-mass passive spirals, and ram-pressure stripping and strangulation are obvious candidates. For higher mass passive spirals, while trends are present, the story is less clear. The passive spiral bar fraction is high: 74 ± 15 per cent, compared with 36 ± 5 per cent for a mass, redshift and T-type matched comparison sample of star-forming spiral galaxies. The high mass passive spirals occur mostly, but not exclusively, in groups, and can be central or satellite galaxies. The passive spiral group fraction of 74 ± 15 per cent is similar to that of the comparison sample of star-forming galaxies at 61 ± 7 per cent. We find evidence for both quenching via internal structure and environment in our passive spiral sample, though some galaxies have evidence of neither. From this, we conclude no one mechanism is responsible for quenching star formation in passive spiral galaxies - rather, a mixture of mechanisms is required to produce the passive spiral distribution we see today.

  18. Effect of an Mg-rich matrix on the corrosion behavior of As-cast magnesium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choong Do; Kang, Choon Sik; Shin, Kwang Seon

    2000-10-01

    In the present study, the corrosion behavior of as-cast Mg-Al and Mg-Al-Zn alloys was studied as a function of the Al content in the matrix. Corrosion properties such as the corrosion rate, corrosion potential, and repassivation tendency were estimated through immersion and electrochemical tests. The corrosion potential and corrosion rate of a solutionized alloy depend mainly on the Al content of the as-cast alloy. The variation of Al content in the Mg-rich matrix influences the stability of the passive film and the repassivation tendency, i.e., as the Al content of the matrix increases, the repassivation tendency of the surface protective film after its breakage deteriorates. Also, it was proven that the enhancement of corrosion resistance by heat treatment, as in T6, is due to the decrease of solute concentration in the matrix, in addition to the effect of the precipitate, which plays the role of a barrier against corrosion.

  19. Chinese Passives: Transformational or Lexical?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jiuwu; Wen, Xiaohong

    Analysis of Chinese passive constructions indicates two types. The first is a verbal or syntactic passive because it is derived through a transformational rule. The second is a lexical passive that has certain properties in common with the predicate adjectives in both Chinese and English and is derived through the semantic function and in lexical…

  20. Flat panel displays in the helmet-mounted display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Christopher T.; Freeman, Jonathan P.

    2002-08-01

    The Helmet Mounted Display has been in development for over 25 years and with few exceptions those systems in service have incorporated a miniature Cathode Ray Tube as the display source. The exceptions have been the use of Light Emitting Diodes in Helmet Sighting displays. The argument for Flat Panel Displays has been well rehearsed and this paper provides a summary of the available technologies but with a rationale for a decision to use Reflective Liquid Crystal devices. The Paper then describes sources of illumination and derives the luminance required from that source.

  1. Thick-Filament Strain and Interfilament Spacing in Passive Muscle: Effect of Titin-Based Passive Tension

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Thomas; Wu, Yiming; Bekyarova, Tanya; Farman, Gerrie P.; Fukuda, Norio; Granzier, Henk

    2011-01-01

    We studied the effect of titin-based passive tension on sarcomere structure by simultaneously measuring passive tension and low-angle x-ray diffraction patterns on passive fiber bundles from rabbit skinned psoas muscle. We used a stretch-hold-release protocol with measurement of x-ray diffraction patterns at various passive tension levels during the hold phase before and after passive stress relaxation. Measurements were performed in relaxing solution without and with dextran T-500 to compress the lattice toward physiological levels. The myofilament lattice spacing was measured in the A-band (d1,0) and Z-disk (dZ) regions of the sarcomere. The axial spacing of the thick-filament backbone was determined from the sixth myosin meridional reflection (M6) and the equilibrium positions of myosin heads from the fourth myosin layer line peak position and the I1,1/I1,0 intensity ratio. Total passive tension was measured during the x-ray experiments, and a differential extraction technique was used to determine the relations between collagen- and titin-based passive tension and sarcomere length. Within the employed range of sarcomere lengths (∼2.2–3.4 μm), titin accounted for >80% of passive tension. X-ray results indicate that titin compresses both the A-band and Z-disk lattice spacing with viscoelastic behavior when fibers are swollen after skinning, and elastic behavior when the lattice is reduced with dextran. Titin also increases the axial thick-filament spacing, M6, in an elastic manner in both the presence and absence of dextran. No changes were detected in either I1,1/I1,0 or the position of peaks on the fourth myosin layer line during passive stress relaxation. Passive tension and M6 measurements were converted to thick-filament compliance, yielding a value of ∼85 m/N, which is several-fold larger than the thick-filament compliance determined by others during the tetanic tension plateau of activated intact muscle. This difference can be explained by the fact

  2. Real-Time Seismic Displays in Museums Appeal to the Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Meagan; Taber, John; Hubenthal, Michael

    2006-02-01

    Technology provides people with constant access to the latest news, weather, and entertainment. Not surprisingly, the public increasingly demands that the most current information be available for immediate consumption. For museums striving to educate the public and to maintain and expand visitor interest, gone are the days of passively conveying scientific concepts through static displays. Instead, science museums must find creative ways to capture the public's interest-successful advocacy for research funding, solutions to environmental problems, even future generations' scientific innovation depend on this. To this end, the continuous collection and dissemination of real-time science information by the scientific community offers museums an opportunity to capitalize on visitors' data addiction and increase the public's interest in, and understanding of, the Earth system.

  3. 26 CFR 1.1398-1 - Treatment of passive activity losses and passive activity credits in individuals' title 11 cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Treatment of passive activity losses and passive... to Individuals' Title 11 Cases § 1.1398-1 Treatment of passive activity losses and passive activity... and rules of general application. For purposes of this section— (1) Passive activity and former...

  4. A Novel Passive Wireless Sensing Method for Concrete Chloride Ion Concentration Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuangxi; Sheng, Wei; Deng, Fangming; Wu, Xiang; Fu, Zhihui

    2017-12-11

    In this paper, a novel approach for concrete chloride ion concentration measuring based on passive and wireless sensor tag is proposed. The chloride ion sensor based on RFID communication protocol is consisting of an energy harvesting and management circuit, a low dropout voltage regulator, a MCU, a RFID tag chip and a pair of electrodes. The proposed sensor harvests energy radiated by the RFID reader to power its circuitry. To improve the stability of power supply, a three-stage boost rectifier is customized to rectify the harvested power into dc power and step-up the voltage. Since the measured data is wirelessly transmitted, it contains miscellaneous noises which would decrease the accuracy of measuring. Thus, in this paper, the wavelet denoising method is adopted to denoise the raw data. Besides, a monitoring software is developed to display the measurement results in real-time. The measurement results indicate that the proposed passive sensor tag can achieve a reliable communication distance of 16.3 m and can reliably measure the chloride ion concentration in concrete.

  5. BioSAVE: Display of scored annotation within a sequence context

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Richard F; Adryan, Boris

    2008-01-01

    Background Visualization of sequence annotation is a common feature in many bioinformatics tools. For many applications it is desirable to restrict the display of such annotation according to a score cutoff, as biological interpretation can be difficult in the presence of the entire data. Unfortunately, many visualisation solutions are somewhat static in the way they handle such score cutoffs. Results We present BioSAVE, a sequence annotation viewer with on-the-fly selection of visualisation thresholds for each feature. BioSAVE is a versatile OS X program for visual display of scored features (annotation) within a sequence context. The program reads sequence and additional supplementary annotation data (e.g., position weight matrix matches, conservation scores, structural domains) from a variety of commonly used file formats and displays them graphically. Onscreen controls then allow for live customisation of these graphics, including on-the-fly selection of visualisation thresholds for each feature. Conclusion Possible applications of the program include display of transcription factor binding sites in a genomic context or the visualisation of structural domain assignments in protein sequences and many more. The dynamic visualisation of these annotations is useful, e.g., for the determination of cutoff values of predicted features to match experimental data. Program, source code and exemplary files are freely available at the BioSAVE homepage. PMID:18366701

  6. Neural cell adhesion molecule-deficient beta-cell tumorigenesis results in diminished extracellular matrix molecule expression and tumour cell-matrix adhesion.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, Joakim; Xian, Xiaojie; He, Liqun; Ståhlberg, Anders; Nelander, Sven; Samuelsson, Tore; Kubista, Mikael; Semb, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    To understand by which mechanism neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) limits beta tumour cell disaggregation and dissemination, we searched for potential downstream genes of N-CAM during beta tumour cell progression by gene expression profiling. Here, we show that N-CAM-deficient beta-cell tumorigenesis is associated with changes in the expression of genes involved in cell-matrix adhesion and cytoskeletal dynamics, biological processes known to affect the invasive and metastatic behaviour of tumour cells. The extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules emerged as the primary target, i.e. N-CAM deficiency resulted in down-regulated mRNA expression of a broad range of ECM molecules. Consistent with this result, deficient deposition of major ECM stromal components, such as fibronectin, laminin 1 and collagen IV, was observed. Moreover, N-CAM-deficient tumour cells displayed defective matrix adhesion. These results offer a potential mechanism for tumour cell disaggregation during N-CAM-deficient beta tumour cell progression. Prospective consequences of these findings for the role of N-CAM in beta tumour cell dissemination are discussed.

  7. Common display performance requirements for military and commercial aircraft product lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoener, Steven J.; Behrens, Arthur J.; Flint, John R.; Jacobsen, Alan R.

    2001-09-01

    Obtaining high quality Active Matrix Liquid Crystal (AMLCD) glass to meet the needs of the commercial and military aerospace business is a major challenge, at best. With the demise of all domestic sources of AMLCD substrate glass, the industry is now focused on overseas sources, which are primarily producing glass for consumer electronics. Previous experience with ruggedizing commercial glass leads to the expectation that the aerospace industry can leverage off the commercial market. The problem remains, while the commercial industry is continually changing and improving its products, the commercial and military aerospace industries require stable and affordable supplies of AMLCD glass for upwards of 20 years to support production and maintenance operations. The Boeing Engineering and Supplier Management Process Councils have chartered a group of displays experts from multiple aircraft product divisions within the Boeing Company, the Displays Process Action Team (DPAT), to address this situation from an overall corporate perspective. The DPAT has formulated a set of Common Displays Performance Requirements for use across the corporate line of commercial and military aircraft products. Though focused on the AMLCD problem, the proposed common requirements are largely independent of display technology. This paper describes the strategy being pursued within the Boeing Company to address the AMLCD supply problem and details the proposed implementation process, centered on common requirements for both commercial and military aircraft displays. Highlighted in this paper are proposed common, or standard, display sizes and the other major requirements established by the DPAT, along with the rationale for these requirements.

  8. [Investigation on remote measurement of air pollution by a method of infrared passive scanning imaging].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yang; Xu, Liang; Gao, Min-Guang; Feng, Ming-Chun; Jin, Ling; Tong, Jing-Jing; Li, Sheng

    2012-07-01

    Passive remote sensing by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry allows detection of air pollution. However, for the localization of a leak and a complete assessment of the situation in the case of the release of a hazardous cloud, information about the position and the distribution of a cloud is essential. Therefore, an imaging passive remote sensing system comprising an interferometer, a data acquisition and processing software, scan system, a video system, and a personal computer has been developed. The remote sensing of SF6 was done. The column densities of all directions in which a target compound has been identified may be retrieved by a nonlinear least squares fitting algorithm and algorithm of radiation transfer, and a false color image is displayed. The results were visualized by a video image, overlaid by false color concentration distribution image. The system has a high selectivity, and allows visualization and quantification of pollutant clouds.

  9. Implementation of biological tissue Mueller matrix for polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography based on LabVIEW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yongping; Zhang, Xiyang; He, Youwu; Cai, Jianyong; Li, Hui

    2018-02-01

    The Jones matrix and the Mueller matrix are main tools to study polarization devices. The Mueller matrix can also be used for biological tissue research to get complete tissue properties, while the commercial optical coherence tomography system does not give relevant analysis function. Based on the LabVIEW, a near real time display method of Mueller matrix image of biological tissue is developed and it gives the corresponding phase retardant image simultaneously. A quarter-wave plate was placed at 45 in the sample arm. Experimental results of the two orthogonal channels show that the phase retardance based on incident light vector fixed mode and the Mueller matrix based on incident light vector dynamic mode can provide an effective analysis method of the existing system.

  10. Display formats manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runnels, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The standards and procedures for the generation of operational display formats to be used in the Mission Control Center (MCC) display control system are presented. The required effort, forms, and fundamentals for the design, specifications, and production of display formats are identified. The principles of display design and system constraints controlling the creation of optimum operational displays for mission control are explained. The basic two types of MCC display systems for presenting information are described.

  11. Antireflection/Passivation Step For Silicon Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crotty, Gerald T.; Kachare, Akaram H.; Daud, Taher

    1988-01-01

    New process excludes usual silicon oxide passivation. Changes in principal electrical parameters during two kinds of processing suggest antireflection treatment almost as effective as oxide treatment in passivating cells. Does so without disadvantages of SiOx passivation.

  12. Evaluating the Relationship between Equilibrium Passive ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Critcal Review evaluates passive sampler uptake of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) in water column and interstitial water exposures as a surrogate for organism bioaccumulation. Fifty-seven studies were found where both passive sampler uptake and organism bioaccumulation were measured and 19 of these investigations provided direct comparisons relating passive sampler uptake and organism bioaccumulation. Polymers compared included low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polyoxymethylene (POM), and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and organisms ranged from polychaetes and oligochaetes to bivalves, aquatic insects, and gastropods. Regression equations correlating bioaccumulation (CL) and passive sampler uptake (CPS) were used to assess the strength of observed relationships. Passive sampling based concentrations resulted in log–log predictive relationships, most of which were within one to 2 orders of magnitude of measured bioaccumulation. Mean coefficients of determination (r2) for LDPE, PDMS, and POM were 0.68, 0.76, and 0.58, respectively. For the available raw, untransformed data, the mean ratio of CL and CPS was 10.8 ± 18.4 (n = 609). Using passive sampling as a surrogate for organism bioaccumulation is viable when biomonitoring organisms are not available. Passive sampling based estimates of bioaccumulation provide useful information for making informed decisions about the bioavailability of HOCs. This review evaluates passive sampler uptake of hydrophobi

  13. The theoretical study of passive and active optical devices via planewave based transfer (scattering) matrix method and other approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuo, Ye

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we theoretically study the electromagnetic wave propagation in several passive and active optical components and devices including 2-D photonic crystals, straight and curved waveguides, organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), and etc. Several optical designs are also presented like organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells and solar concentrators. The first part of the thesis focuses on theoretical investigation. First, the plane-wave-based transfer (scattering) matrix method (TMM) is briefly described with a short review of photonic crystals and other numerical methods to study them (Chapter 1 and 2). Next TMM, the numerical method itself is investigated in details and developed inmore » advance to deal with more complex optical systems. In chapter 3, TMM is extended in curvilinear coordinates to study curved nanoribbon waveguides. The problem of a curved structure is transformed into an equivalent one of a straight structure with spatially dependent tensors of dielectric constant and magnetic permeability. In chapter 4, a new set of localized basis orbitals are introduced to locally represent electromagnetic field in photonic crystals as alternative to planewave basis. The second part of the thesis focuses on the design of optical devices. First, two examples of TMM applications are given. The first example is the design of metal grating structures as replacements of ITO to enhance the optical absorption in OPV cells (chapter 6). The second one is the design of the same structure as above to enhance the light extraction of OLEDs (chapter 7). Next, two design examples by ray tracing method are given, including applying a microlens array to enhance the light extraction of OLEDs (chapter 5) and an all-angle wide-wavelength design of solar concentrator (chapter 8). In summary, this dissertation has extended TMM which makes it capable of treating complex optical systems. Several optical designs by TMM and ray tracing method are also given as a full complement

  14. Interior design for passive solar homes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breen, J. C.

    1981-07-01

    The increasing emphasis on refinement of passive solar systems brought recognition to interior design as an integral part of passive solar architecture. Interior design can be used as a finetuning tool minimizing many of the problems associated with passive solar energy use in residential buildings. In addition, treatment of interior space in solar model homes may be a prime factor in determining sales success. A new style of interior design is evolving in response to changes in building from incorporating passive solar design features. The psychology behind passive solar architecture is reflected in interiors, and selection of interior components increasingly depends on the functional suitably of various interior elements.

  15. Photoinduced Field-Effect Passivation from Negative Carrier Accumulation for High-Efficiency Silicon/Organic Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaolang; Yang, Zhenhai; Wu, Sudong; Zhu, Juye; Guo, Wei; Sheng, Jiang; Ye, Jichun; Cui, Yi

    2017-12-26

    Carrier recombination and light management of the dopant-free silicon/organic heterojunction solar cells (HSCs) based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) are the critical factors in developing high-efficiency photovoltaic devices. However, the traditional passivation technologies can hardly provide efficient surface passivation on the front surface of Si. In this study, a photoinduced electric field was induced in a bilayer antireflective coating (ARC) of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and titanium oxide (TiO 2 ) films, due to formation of an accumulation layer of negative carriers (O 2 - species) under UV (sunlight) illumination. This photoinduced field not only suppressed the silicon surface recombination but also enhanced the built-in potential of HSCs with 84 mV increment. In addition, this photoactive ARC also displayed the outstanding light-trapping capability. The front PEDOT:PSS/Si HSC with the saturated O 2 - received a champion PCE of 15.51% under AM 1.5 simulated sunlight illumination. It was clearly demonstrated that the photoinduced electric field was a simple, efficient, and low-cost method for the surface passivation and contributed to achieve a high efficiency when applied in the Si/PEDOT:PSS HSCs.

  16. Results of a Demonstration Assessment of Passive System Reliability Utilizing the Reliability Method for Passive Systems (RMPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Bucknor, Matthew; Grabaskas, David; Brunett, Acacia

    2015-04-26

    Advanced small modular reactor designs include many advantageous design features such as passively driven safety systems that are arguably more reliable and cost effective relative to conventional active systems. Despite their attractiveness, a reliability assessment of passive systems can be difficult using conventional reliability methods due to the nature of passive systems. Simple deviations in boundary conditions can induce functional failures in a passive system, and intermediate or unexpected operating modes can also occur. As part of an ongoing project, Argonne National Laboratory is investigating various methodologies to address passive system reliability. The Reliability Method for Passive Systems (RMPS), amore » systematic approach for examining reliability, is one technique chosen for this analysis. This methodology is combined with the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) approach to assess the reliability of a passive system and the impact of its associated uncertainties. For this demonstration problem, an integrated plant model of an advanced small modular pool-type sodium fast reactor with a passive reactor cavity cooling system is subjected to a station blackout using RELAP5-3D. This paper discusses important aspects of the reliability assessment, including deployment of the methodology, the uncertainty identification and quantification process, and identification of key risk metrics.« less

  17. Assessing cellulolysis in passive treatment systems for mine drainage: a modified enzyme assay.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Corina M; Gould, W Douglas; Lindsay, Matthew B J; Blowes, David W; Ptacek, Carol J; Condon, Peter D

    2013-01-01

    A modified cellulase enzyme assay was developed to monitor organic matter degradation in passive treatment systems for mine drainage. This fluorogenic substrate method facilitates assessment of exo-(1,4)-β-D-glucanase, endo-(1,4)-β-D-glucanase, and β-glucosidase, which compose an important cellulase enzyme system. The modified method was developed and refined using samples of organic carbon-amended mine tailings from field experiments where sulfate reduction was induced as a strategy for managing water quality. Sample masses (3 g) and the number of replicates ( ≥ 3) were optimized. Matrix interferences within these metal-rich samples were found to be insignificant. Application of this modified cellulase assay method provided insight into the availability and degradation of organic carbon within the amended tailings. Results of this study indicate that cellulase enzyme assays can be applied to passive treatment systems for mine drainage, which commonly contain elevated concentrations of metals. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  18. Flat-panel electronic displays: a triumph of physics, chemistry and engineering

    PubMed Central

    Hilsum, Cyril

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the history and science behind the development of modern flat-panel displays, and assesses future trends. Electronic displays are an important feature of modern life. For many years the cathode ray tube, an engineering marvel, was universal, but its shape was cumbersome and its operating voltage too high. The need for a flat-panel display, working at a low voltage, became imperative, and much research has been applied to this need. Any versatile flat-panel display will exploit an electro-optical effect, a transparent conductor and an addressing system to deliver data locally. The first need is to convert an electrical signal into a visible change. Two methods are available, the first giving emission of light, the second modulating ambient illumination. The most useful light-emitting media are semiconductors, historically exploiting III–V or II–VI compounds, but more recently organic or polymer semiconductors. Another possible effect uses gas plasma discharges. The modulating, or subtractive, effects that have been studied include liquid crystals, electrophoresis, electrowetting and electrochromism. A transparent conductor makes it possible to apply a voltage to an extended area while observing the results. The design is a compromise, since the free electrons that carry current also absorb light. The first materials used were metals, but some semiconductors, when heavily doped, give a better balance, with high transmission for a low resistance. Delivering data unambiguously to a million or so picture elements across the display area is no easy task. The preferred solution is an amorphous silicon thin-film transistor deposited at each cross-point in an X–Y matrix. Success in these endeavours has led to many applications for flat-panel displays, including television, flexible displays, electronic paper, electronic books and advertising signs. PMID:20123746

  19. Flat-panel electronic displays: a triumph of physics, chemistry and engineering.

    PubMed

    Hilsum, Cyril

    2010-03-13

    This paper describes the history and science behind the development of modern flat-panel displays, and assesses future trends. Electronic displays are an important feature of modern life. For many years the cathode ray tube, an engineering marvel, was universal, but its shape was cumbersome and its operating voltage too high. The need for a flat-panel display, working at a low voltage, became imperative, and much research has been applied to this need. Any versatile flat-panel display will exploit an electro-optical effect, a transparent conductor and an addressing system to deliver data locally. The first need is to convert an electrical signal into a visible change. Two methods are available, the first giving emission of light, the second modulating ambient illumination. The most useful light-emitting media are semiconductors, historically exploiting III-V or II-VI compounds, but more recently organic or polymer semiconductors. Another possible effect uses gas plasma discharges. The modulating, or subtractive, effects that have been studied include liquid crystals, electrophoresis, electrowetting and electrochromism. A transparent conductor makes it possible to apply a voltage to an extended area while observing the results. The design is a compromise, since the free electrons that carry current also absorb light. The first materials used were metals, but some semiconductors, when heavily doped, give a better balance, with high transmission for a low resistance. Delivering data unambiguously to a million or so picture elements across the display area is no easy task. The preferred solution is an amorphous silicon thin-film transistor deposited at each cross-point in an X-Y matrix. Success in these endeavours has led to many applications for flat-panel displays, including television, flexible displays, electronic paper, electronic books and advertising signs.

  20. Effect of display location on control-display stereotype strength for translational and rotational controls with linear displays.

    PubMed

    Chan, Alan H S; Hoffmann, Errol R

    2015-01-01

    Experiments were designed to investigate the effects of control type and display location, relative to the operator, on the strength of control/display stereotypes. The Worringham and Beringer Visual Field principle and an extension of this principle for rotary controls (Hoffmann E.R., and Chan A.H.S. 2013). "The Worringham and Beringer 'Visual Field' Principle for Rotary Controls. Ergonomics." 56 (10): 1620-1624) indicated that, for a number of different control types (rotary and lever) on different planes, there should be no significant effect of the display location relative to the seated operator. Past data were surveyed and stereotype strengths listed. Experiments filled gaps where data are not available. Six different control types and seven display locations were used, as in the Frame of Reference Transformation Tool (FORT) model of Wickens et al. (Wickens, C.D., Keller, J.W., and Small, R.L. (2010). "Left. No, Right! Development of the Frame of Reference Transformation Tool (FORT)." Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 54th Annual Meeting September 2010, 54: 1022-1026). Control/display arrangements with high stereotype strengths were evaluated yielding data for designers of complex control/display arrangements where the control and display are in different planes and for where the operator is moving. It was found possible to predict display/control arrangements with high stereotype strength, based on past data. Practitioner Summary: Controls and displays in complex arrangements need to have high compatibility. These experiments provide arrangements for six different controls (rotary and translational) and seven different display locations relative to the operator.

  1. Passive and active floating torque during swimming.

    PubMed

    Kjendlie, Per-Ludvik; Stallman, Robert Keig; Stray-Gundersen, James

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of passive underwater torque on active body angle with the horizontal during front crawl swimming and to assess the effect of body size on passive torque and active body angle. Additionally, the effects of passive torque, body angle and hydrostatic lift on maximal sprinting performance were addressed. Ten boys [aged 11.7 (0.8) years] and 12 male adult [aged 21.4 (3.7) years] swimmers volunteered to participate. Their body angle with the horizontal was measured at maximal velocity, and at two submaximal velocities using an underwater video camera system. Passive torque and hydrostatic lift were measured during an underwater weighing procedure, and the center of mass and center of volume were determined. The results showed that passive torque correlated significantly with the body angle at a velocity 63% of v(max) ( alpha(63) r=-0.57), and that size-normalized passive torque correlated significantly with the alpha(63) and alpha(77) (77% of v(max)) with r=-0.59 and r=-0.54 respectively. Hydrostatic lift correlated with alpha(63) with r=-0.45. The negative correlation coefficients are suggested to be due to the adults having learned to overcome passive torque when swimming at submaximal velocities by correcting their body angle. It is concluded that at higher velocities the passive torque and hydrostatic lift do not influence body angle during swimming. At a velocity of 63% of v(max), hydrostatic lift and passive torque influences body angle. Passive torque and size-normalized passive torque increases with body size. When corrected for body size, hydrostatic lift and passive torque did not influence the maximal sprinting velocity.

  2. Low-power SXGA active matrix OLED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacyk, Ihor; Prache, Olivier; Ghosh, Amal

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents the design and first evaluation of a full-color 1280×3×1024 pixel, active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) microdisplay that operates at a low power of 200mW under typical operating conditions of 35fL, and offers a precision 30-bit RGB digital interface in a compact size (0.78-inch diagonal active area). The new system architecture developed by eMagin for the SXGA microdisplay, based on a separate FPGA driver and AMOLED display chip, offers several benefits, including better power efficiency, cost-effectiveness, more features for improved performance, and increased system flexibility.

  3. The link between exercise and titin passive stiffness.

    PubMed

    Lalande, Sophie; Mueller, Patrick J; Chung, Charles S

    2017-09-01

    What is the topic of this review? This review focuses on how in vivo and molecular measurements of cardiac passive stiffness can predict exercise tolerance and how exercise training can reduce cardiac passive stiffness. What advances does it highlight? This review highlights advances in understanding the relationship between molecular (titin-based) and in vivo (left ventricular) passive stiffness, how passive stiffness modifies exercise tolerance, and how exercise training may be therapeutic for cardiac diseases with increased passive stiffness. Exercise can help alleviate the negative effects of cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular co-morbidities associated with sedentary behaviour; this may be especially true in diseases that are associated with increased left ventricular passive stiffness. In this review, we discuss the inverse relationship between exercise tolerance and cardiac passive stiffness. Passive stiffness is the physical property of cardiac muscle to produce a resistive force when stretched, which, in vivo, is measured using the left ventricular end diastolic pressure-volume relationship or is estimated using echocardiography. The giant elastic protein titin is the major contributor to passive stiffness at physiological muscle (sarcomere) lengths. Passive stiffness can be modified by altering titin isoform size or by post-translational modifications. In both human and animal models, increased left ventricular passive stiffness is associated with reduced exercise tolerance due to impaired diastolic filling, suggesting that increased passive stiffness predicts reduced exercise tolerance. At the same time, exercise training itself may induce both short- and long-term changes in titin-based passive stiffness, suggesting that exercise may be a treatment for diseases associated with increased passive stiffness. Direct modification of passive stiffness to improve exercise tolerance is a potential therapeutic approach. Titin passive stiffness itself may

  4. Special Technology Area Review on Displays. Report of Department of Defense Advisory Group on Electron Devices Working Group C (Electro-Optics)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    mirror device ( DMD ) for C4ISR applications, the IBM 9.2 megapixel 22-in. diagonal active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) monitor for data...FED, VFD, OLED and a variety of microdisplays (uD, comprising uLCD, uOLED, DMD and other MEMs) (see glossary). 3 CDT = cathode display tubes (used in...than SVGA, greater battery life and brightness, decreased weight and thickness, electromagnetic interference (EMI), and development of video

  5. Most energetic passive states.

    PubMed

    Perarnau-Llobet, Martí; Hovhannisyan, Karen V; Huber, Marcus; Skrzypczyk, Paul; Tura, Jordi; Acín, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Passive states are defined as those states that do not allow for work extraction in a cyclic (unitary) process. Within the set of passive states, thermal states are the most stable ones: they maximize the entropy for a given energy, and similarly they minimize the energy for a given entropy. Here we find the passive states lying in the other extreme, i.e., those that maximize the energy for a given entropy, which we show also minimize the entropy when the energy is fixed. These extremal properties make these states useful to obtain fundamental bounds for the thermodynamics of finite-dimensional quantum systems, which we show in several scenarios.

  6. Effective Surface Passivation of InP Nanowires by Atomic-Layer-Deposited Al2O3 with POx Interlayer.

    PubMed

    Black, L E; Cavalli, A; Verheijen, M A; Haverkort, J E M; Bakkers, E P A M; Kessels, W M M

    2017-10-11

    III/V semiconductor nanostructures have significant potential in device applications, but effective surface passivation is critical due to their large surface-to-volume ratio. For InP such passivation has proven particularly difficult, with substantial depassivation generally observed following dielectric deposition on InP surfaces. We present a novel approach based on passivation with a phosphorus-rich interfacial oxide deposited using a low-temperature process, which is critical to avoid P-desorption. For this purpose we have chosen a PO x layer deposited in a plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) system at room temperature. Since PO x is known to be hygroscopic and therefore unstable in atmosphere, we encapsulate this layer with a thin ALD Al 2 O 3 capping layer to form a PO x /Al 2 O 3 stack. This passivation scheme is capable of improving the photoluminescence (PL) efficiency of our state-of-the-art wurtzite (WZ) InP nanowires by a factor of ∼20 at low excitation. If we apply the rate equation analysis advocated by some authors, we derive a PL internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of 75% for our passivated wires at high excitation. Our results indicate that it is more reliable to calculate the IQE as the ratio of the integrated PL intensity at room temperature to that at 10 K. By this means we derive an IQE of 27% for the passivated wires at high excitation (>10 kW cm -2 ), which constitutes an unprecedented level of performance for undoped InP nanowires. This conclusion is supported by time-resolved PL decay lifetimes, which are also shown to be significantly higher than previously reported for similar wires. The passivation scheme displays excellent long-term stability (>7 months) and is additionally shown to substantially improve the thermal stability of InP surfaces (>300 °C), significantly expanding the temperature window for device processing. Such effective surface passivation is a key enabling technology for InP nanowire devices such as

  7. Effective Surface Passivation of InP Nanowires by Atomic-Layer-Deposited Al2O3 with POx Interlayer

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    III/V semiconductor nanostructures have significant potential in device applications, but effective surface passivation is critical due to their large surface-to-volume ratio. For InP such passivation has proven particularly difficult, with substantial depassivation generally observed following dielectric deposition on InP surfaces. We present a novel approach based on passivation with a phosphorus-rich interfacial oxide deposited using a low-temperature process, which is critical to avoid P-desorption. For this purpose we have chosen a POx layer deposited in a plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) system at room temperature. Since POx is known to be hygroscopic and therefore unstable in atmosphere, we encapsulate this layer with a thin ALD Al2O3 capping layer to form a POx/Al2O3 stack. This passivation scheme is capable of improving the photoluminescence (PL) efficiency of our state-of-the-art wurtzite (WZ) InP nanowires by a factor of ∼20 at low excitation. If we apply the rate equation analysis advocated by some authors, we derive a PL internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of 75% for our passivated wires at high excitation. Our results indicate that it is more reliable to calculate the IQE as the ratio of the integrated PL intensity at room temperature to that at 10 K. By this means we derive an IQE of 27% for the passivated wires at high excitation (>10 kW cm–2), which constitutes an unprecedented level of performance for undoped InP nanowires. This conclusion is supported by time-resolved PL decay lifetimes, which are also shown to be significantly higher than previously reported for similar wires. The passivation scheme displays excellent long-term stability (>7 months) and is additionally shown to substantially improve the thermal stability of InP surfaces (>300 °C), significantly expanding the temperature window for device processing. Such effective surface passivation is a key enabling technology for InP nanowire devices such as nanolasers and

  8. Monocular display unit for 3D display with correct depth perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Kunio; Hosomi, Takashi

    2009-11-01

    A study of virtual-reality system has been popular and its technology has been applied to medical engineering, educational engineering, a CAD/CAM system and so on. The 3D imaging display system has two types in the presentation method; one is a 3-D display system using a special glasses and the other is the monitor system requiring no special glasses. A liquid crystal display (LCD) recently comes into common use. It is possible for this display unit to provide the same size of displaying area as the image screen on the panel. A display system requiring no special glasses is useful for a 3D TV monitor, but this system has demerit such that the size of a monitor restricts the visual field for displaying images. Thus the conventional display can show only one screen, but it is impossible to enlarge the size of a screen, for example twice. To enlarge the display area, the authors have developed an enlarging method of display area using a mirror. Our extension method enables the observers to show the virtual image plane and to enlarge a screen area twice. In the developed display unit, we made use of an image separating technique using polarized glasses, a parallax barrier or a lenticular lens screen for 3D imaging. The mirror can generate the virtual image plane and it enlarges a screen area twice. Meanwhile the 3D display system using special glasses can also display virtual images over a wide area. In this paper, we present a monocular 3D vision system with accommodation mechanism, which is useful function for perceiving depth.

  9. Passivity-based Robust Control of Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, Atul G.; Joshi, Suresh M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report provides a brief summary of the research work performed over the duration of the cooperative research agreement between NASA Langley Research Center and Kansas State University. The cooperative agreement which was originally for the duration the three years was extended by another year through no-cost extension in order to accomplish the goals of the project. The main objective of the research was to develop passivity-based robust control methodology for passive and non-passive aerospace systems. The focus of the first-year's research was limited to the investigation of passivity-based methods for the robust control of Linear Time-Invariant (LTI) single-input single-output (SISO), open-loop stable, minimum-phase non-passive systems. The second year's focus was mainly on extending the passivity-based methodology to a larger class of non-passive LTI systems which includes unstable and nonminimum phase SISO systems. For LTI non-passive systems, five different passification. methods were developed. The primary effort during the years three and four was on the development of passification methodology for MIMO systems, development of methods for checking robustness of passification, and developing synthesis techniques for passifying compensators. For passive LTI systems optimal synthesis procedure was also developed for the design of constant-gain positive real controllers. For nonlinear passive systems, numerical optimization-based technique was developed for the synthesis of constant as well as time-varying gain positive-real controllers. The passivity-based control design methodology developed during the duration of this project was demonstrated by its application to various benchmark examples. These example systems included longitudinal model of an F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) for pitch axis control, NASA's supersonic transport wind tunnel model, ACC benchmark model, 1-D acoustic duct model, piezo-actuated flexible link model, and NASA

  10. Rich structure in the correlation matrix spectra in non-equilibrium steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Soham; Leyvraz, Francois; Monroy Castillero, Paulino; Seligman, Thomas H.

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that, if a model displays long-range (power-law) spatial correlations, its equal-time correlation matrix will also have a power law tail in the distribution of its high-lying eigenvalues. The purpose of this paper is to show that the converse is generally incorrect: a power-law tail in the high-lying eigenvalues of the correlation matrix may exist even in the absence of equal-time power law correlations in the initial model. We may therefore view the study of the eigenvalue distribution of the correlation matrix as a more powerful tool than the study of spatial Correlations, one which may in fact uncover structure, that would otherwise not be apparent. Specifically, we show that in the Totally Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process, whereas there are no clearly visible correlations in the steady state, the eigenvalues of its correlation matrix exhibit a rich structure which we describe in detail.

  11. Rich structure in the correlation matrix spectra in non-equilibrium steady states.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Soham; Leyvraz, Francois; Monroy Castillero, Paulino; Seligman, Thomas H

    2017-01-17

    It has been shown that, if a model displays long-range (power-law) spatial correlations, its equal-time correlation matrix will also have a power law tail in the distribution of its high-lying eigenvalues. The purpose of this paper is to show that the converse is generally incorrect: a power-law tail in the high-lying eigenvalues of the correlation matrix may exist even in the absence of equal-time power law correlations in the initial model. We may therefore view the study of the eigenvalue distribution of the correlation matrix as a more powerful tool than the study of spatial Correlations, one which may in fact uncover structure, that would otherwise not be apparent. Specifically, we show that in the Totally Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process, whereas there are no clearly visible correlations in the steady state, the eigenvalues of its correlation matrix exhibit a rich structure which we describe in detail.

  12. Adenoviral transduction supports matrix expression of alginate cultured articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pohle, D; Kasch, R; Herlyn, P; Bader, R; Mittlmeier, T; Pützer, B M; Müller-Hilke, B

    2012-09-01

    The present study examines the effects of adenoviral (Ad) transduction of human primary chondrocyte on transgene expression and matrix production. Primary chondrocytes were isolated from healthy articular cartilage and from cartilage with mild osteoarthritis (OA), transduced with an Ad vector and either immediately cultured in alginate or expanded in monolayer before alginate culture. Proteoglycan production was measured using dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assay and matrix gene expression was quantified by real-time PCR. Viral infection of primary chondrocytes results in a stable long time transgene expression for up to 13 weeks. Ad transduction does not significantly alter gene expression and matrix production if chondrocytes are immediately embedded in alginate. However, if expanded prior to three dimension (3D) culture in alginate, chondrocytes produce not only more proteoglycans compared to non-transduced controls, but also display an increased anabolic and decreased catabolic activity compared to non-transduced controls. We therefore suggest that successful autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) should combine adenoviral transduction of primary chondrocytes with expansion in monolayer followed by 3D culture. Future studies will be needed to investigate whether the subsequent matrix production can be further improved by using Ad vectors bearing genes encoding matrix proteins. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Constant Switching Frequency DTC for Matrix Converter Fed Speed Sensorless Induction Motor Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mir, Tabish Nazir; Singh, Bhim; Bhat, Abdul Hamid

    2018-05-01

    The paper presents a constant switching frequency scheme for speed sensorless Direct Torque Control (DTC) of Matrix Converter fed Induction Motor Drive. The use of matrix converter facilitates improved power quality on input as well as motor side, along with Input Power Factor control, besides eliminating the need for heavy passive elements. Moreover, DTC through Space Vector Modulation helps in achieving a fast control over the torque and flux of the motor, with added benefit of constant switching frequency. A constant switching frequency aids in maintaining desired power quality of AC mains current even at low motor speeds, and simplifies input filter design of the matrix converter, as compared to conventional hysteresis based DTC. Further, stator voltage estimation from sensed input voltage, and subsequent stator (and rotor) flux estimation is done. For speed sensorless operation, a Model Reference Adaptive System is used, which emulates the speed dependent rotor flux equations of the induction motor. The error between conventionally estimated rotor flux (reference model) and the rotor flux estimated through the adaptive observer is processed through PI controller to generate the rotor speed estimate.

  14. Passive-solar homes for Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, M. L.

    1982-06-01

    Acceptance of passive solar technologies has been slow within the conventional building trades in Texas because it is a common misconception that solar is expensive, and data on local applications is severely limited or nonexistent. It is the purpose of this solar development to move passive solar design into the mainstream of public acceptance by helping to overcome and eliminate these barriers. Specifically, the goal is to develop a set of regional climatic building standards to help guide the conventional building trade toward the utilization of soft energy systems which will reduce overall consumption at a price and convenience most Texans can afford. To meet this objective, eight sample passive design structures are presented. These designs represent state of the art regional applications of passive solar space conditioning. The methodology used in the passive solar design process included: analysis of regional climatic data; analysis of historical regional building prototypes; determination of regional climatic design priorities and assets; prototypical design models for the discretionary housing market; quantitative thermal analysis of prototypical designs; and construction drawings of building prototypes.

  15. Improvement in Brightness Uniformity by Compensating for the Threshold Voltages of Both the Driving Thin-Film Transistor and the Organic Light-Emitting Diode for Active-Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching-Lin Fan,; Hui-Lung Lai,; Jyu-Yu Chang,

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel pixel design and driving method for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AM-OLED) displays using low-temperature polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors (LTPS-TFTs). The proposed threshold voltage compensation circuit, which comprised five transistors and two capacitors, has been verified to supply uniform output current by simulation work using the automatic integrated circuit modeling simulation program with integrated circuit emphasis (AIM-SPICE) simulator. The driving scheme of this voltage programming method includes four periods: precharging, compensation, data input, and emission. The simulated results demonstrate excellent properties such as low error rate of OLED anode voltage variation (<1%) and high output current. The proposed pixel circuit shows high immunity to the threshold voltage deviation characteristics of both the driving poly-Si TFT and the OLED.

  16. Fabrication of Electrophoretic Display Driven by Membrane Switch Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senda, Kazuo; Usui, Hiroaki

    2010-04-01

    Electrophoretic devices (EPDs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have potential application in a large-area flexible displays, such as digital signage. For this purpose, a new backplane is capable of driving a large unit is required instead of thin-film transistors. In this paper we describe the fabrication of a membrane switch array suitable for driving large-scale flat-panel displays. An array of membrane switches was prepared using flexible printed circuit (FPC) technology of polyimide films, by combining low-temperature processes of lamination and copper electroplating methods. An array of 256 matrix switches with a pixel size of 7 mm2 was prepared to drive the EPD front panel. The switches were driven at a voltage of about 40 V and a frequency of 10 Hz. The operation characteristics agreed well with the result of the theoretical calculation. The calculation also suggested that driving voltage can be lowered by increasing pixel size. The contact resistance of the membrane switch was as low as 0.2 Ω, which implies the wide applicability of this device for driving a variety of elements.

  17. Evaluating the Relationship between Equilibrium Passive ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Objectives. This review evaluates passive sampler uptake of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) in water column and interstitial water exposures as a surrogate for organism bioaccumulation. Approach/Activities. Fifty-five studies were found where both passive sampler uptake and organism bioaccumulation were measured and 19 of these investigations provided direct comparisons relating passive sampler uptake and organism bioaccumulation. Polymers compared included low density polyethylene (LDPE), polyoxymethylene (POM), and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and organisms ranged from polychaetes and oligochaetes to bivalves, aquatic insects, and gastropods. Regression equations correlating bioaccumulation (CL) and passive sampler uptake (CPS) were used to assess the strength of observed relationships. Results/Lessons Learned. Passive sampling based concentrations resulted in strong logarithmic regression relationships, most of which were within one to two orders of magnitude of measured bioaccumulation. Mean coefficients of determination (r2) for LDPE, PDMS and POM were 0.68, 0.76 and 0.58, respectively. For the available raw data, the mean ratio of CL and CPS was 10.8 ± 18.4 (n = 609). Passive sampler uptake and bioaccumulation were not found to be identical (i.e., CPS ≠ CL) but the logarithmic-based relationships between these values were consistently linear and predictive. This review concludes that in many applications passive sampling may serve as a

  18. Evaluating the Relationship between Equilibrium Passive ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This review evaluates passive sampler uptake of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) in water column and interstitial water exposures as a surrogate for organism bioaccumulation. Fifty-four studies were found where both passive sampler uptake and organism bioaccumulation were measured and 19 of these investigations provided direct comparisons relating passive sampler uptake and organism bioaccumulation. Polymers compared included low density polyethylene (LDPE), polyoxymethylene (POM), and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and organisms ranged from polychaetes and oligochaetes to bivalves, aquatic insects, and gastropods. Regression equations correlating bioaccumulation (CL) and passive sampler uptake (CPS) were used to assess the strength of observed relationships. Passive sampling based concentrations resulted in logarithmic predictive relationships, most of which were within one to two orders of magnitude of measured bioaccumulation. Mean coefficients of determination (r2) for LDPE, PDMS and POM were 0.68, 0.76 and 0.58, respectively. For the available raw data, the mean ratio of CL and CPS was 10.8 ± 18.4 (n = 609). This review concludes that in many applications passive sampling may serve as a reliable surrogate for biomonitoring organisms when biomonitoring organisms are not available. When applied properly, passive sampling based estimates of bioaccumulation provide useful information for making informed decisions about the bioavailability of HOCs

  19. Silver nanoparticles-incorporated Nb2O5 surface passivation layer for efficiency enhancement in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Suresh, S; Unni, Gautam E; Satyanarayana, M; Sreekumaran Nair, A; Mahadevan Pillai, V P

    2018-08-15

    Guiding and capturing photons at the nanoscale by means of metal nanoparticles and interfacial engineering for preventing back-electron transfer are well documented techniques for performance enhancement in excitonic solar cells. Drifting from the conventional route, we propose a simple one-step process to integrate both metal nanoparticles and surface passivation layer in the porous photoanode matrix of a dye-sensitized solar cell. Silver nanoparticles and Nb 2 O 5 surface passivation layer are simultaneously deposited on the surface of a highly porous nanocrystalline TiO 2 photoanode, facilitating an absorption enhancement in the 465 nm and 570 nm wavelength region and a reduction in back-electron transfer in the fabricated dye-sensitized solar cells together. The TiO 2 photoanodes were prepared by spray pyrolysis deposition method from a colloidal solution of TiO 2 nanoparticles. An impressive 43% enhancement in device performance was accomplished in photoanodes having an Ag-incorporated Nb 2 O 5 passivation layer as against a cell without Ag nanoparticles. By introducing this idea, we were able to record two benefits - the metal nanoparticles function as the absorption enhancement agent, and the Nb 2 O 5 layer as surface passivation for TiO 2 nanoparticles and as an energy barrier layer for preventing back-electron transfer - in a single step. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Three-dimensional holographic display of ultrasound computed tomograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, Michael P.; Janee, Helmar S.; Ysrael, Mariana Z.; Hodler, Jeurg; Olson, Linda K.; Leopold, George R.; Schulz, Raymond

    1997-05-01

    Breast ultrasound is a valuable adjunct to mammography but is limited by a very small field of view, particularly with high-resolution transducers necessary for breast diagnosis. We have been developing an ultrasound system based on a diffraction tomography method that provides slices through the breast on a large 20-cm diameter circular field of view. Eight to fifteen images are typically produced in sequential coronal planes from the nipple to the chest wall with either 0.25 or 0.5 mm pixels. As a means to simplify the interpretation of this large set of images, we report experience with 3D life-sized displays of the entire breast of human volunteers using a digital holographic technique. The compound 3D holographic images are produced from the digital image matrix, recorded on 14 X 17 inch transparency and projected on a special white-light viewbox. Holographic visualization of the entire breast has proved to be the preferred method for 3D display of ultrasound computed tomography images. It provides a unique perspective on breast anatomy and may prove useful for biopsy guidance and surgical planning.

  1. Spectrum of walk matrix for Koch network and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Pinchen; Lin, Yuan; Zhang, Zhongzhi

    2015-06-01

    Various structural and dynamical properties of a network are encoded in the eigenvalues of walk matrix describing random walks on the network. In this paper, we study the spectra of walk matrix of the Koch network, which displays the prominent scale-free and small-world features. Utilizing the particular architecture of the network, we obtain all the eigenvalues and their corresponding multiplicities. Based on the link between the eigenvalues of walk matrix and random target access time defined as the expected time for a walker going from an arbitrary node to another one selected randomly according to the steady-state distribution, we then derive an explicit solution to the random target access time for random walks on the Koch network. Finally, we corroborate our computation for the eigenvalues by enumerating spanning trees in the Koch network, using the connection governing eigenvalues and spanning trees, where a spanning tree of a network is a subgraph of the network, that is, a tree containing all the nodes.

  2. High-throughput countercurrent microextraction in passive mode.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tingliang; Xu, Cong

    2018-05-15

    Although microextraction is much more efficient than conventional macroextraction, its practical application has been limited by low throughputs and difficulties in constructing robust countercurrent microextraction (CCME) systems. In this work, a robust CCME process was established based on a novel passive microextractor with four units without any moving parts. The passive microextractor has internal recirculation and can efficiently mix two immiscible liquids. The hydraulic characteristics as well as the extraction and back-extraction performance of the passive CCME were investigated experimentally. The recovery efficiencies of the passive CCME were 1.43-1.68 times larger than the best values achieved using cocurrent extraction. Furthermore, the total throughput of the passive CCME developed in this work was about one to three orders of magnitude higher than that of other passive CCME systems reported in the literature. Therefore, a robust CCME process with high throughputs has been successfully constructed, which may promote the application of passive CCME in a wide variety of fields.

  3. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-03-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  4. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-01-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  5. Mimicking the extracellular matrix with functionalized, metal-assembled collagen peptide scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Gordillo, Victor; Chmielewski, Jean

    2014-08-01

    Natural and synthetic three-dimensional (3-D) scaffolds that mimic the microenvironment of the extracellular matrix (ECM), with growth factor storage/release and the display of cell adhesion signals, offer numerous advantages for regenerative medicine and in vitro morphogenesis and oncogenesis modeling. Here we report the design of collagen mimetic peptides (CMPs) that assemble into a highly crosslinked 3-D matrix in response to metal ion stimuli, that may be functionalized with His-tagged cargoes, such as green fluorescent protein (GFP-His8) and human epidermal growth factor (hEGF-His6). The bound hEGF-His6 was found to gradually release from the matrix in vitro and induce cell proliferation in the EGF-dependent cell line MCF10A. The additional incorporation of a cell adhesion sequence (RGDS) at the N-terminus of the CMP creates an environment that facilitated the organization of matrix-encapsulated MCF10A cells into spheroid structures, thus mimicking the ECM environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Bacterial whole-cell biocatalysts by surface display of enzymes: toward industrial application.

    PubMed

    Schüürmann, Jan; Quehl, Paul; Festel, Gunter; Jose, Joachim

    2014-10-01

    Despite the first report on the bacterial display of a recombinant peptide appeared almost 30 years ago, industrial application of cells with surface-displayed enzymes is still limited. To display an enzyme on the surface of a living cell bears several advantages. First of all, neither the substrate nor the product of the enzymatic reaction needs to cross a membrane barrier. Second, the enzyme being linked to the cell can be separated from the reaction mixture and hence the product by simple centrifugation. Transfer to a new substrate preparation results in multiple cycles of enzymatic conversion. Finally, the anchoring in a matrix, in this case, the cell envelope stabilizes the enzyme and makes it less accessible to proteolytic degradation and material adsorption resulting in continuous higher activities. These advantages in common need to balance some disadvantages before this application can be taken into account for industrial processes, e.g., the exclusion of the enzyme from the cellular metabolome and hence from redox factors or other co-factors that need to be supplied. Therefore, this digest describes the different systems in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that have been used for the surface display of enzymes so far and focuses on examples among these which are suitable for industrial purposes or for the production of valuable resources, not least in order to encourage a broader application of whole-cell biocatalysts with surface-displayed enzymes.

  7. Passive Sensor Materials Based on Liquid Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-12

    REPORT Passive Sensor Materials based on Liquid Crystals 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Research supported by this grant entitled “Passive...Sensor Materials Based on Liquid Crystals” revolved around an investigation of liquid crystalline materials for use in passive sensors for chemical... based on Liquid Crystals Report Title ABSTRACT Research supported by this grant entitled “Passive Sensor Materials Based on Liquid Crystals” revolved

  8. Mixed H ∞ and Passive Projective Synchronization for Fractional Order Memristor-Based Neural Networks with Time-Delay and Parameter Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiao-Na; Song, Shuai; Tejado Balsera, Inés; Liu, Lei-Po

    2017-10-01

    This paper investigates the mixed H ∞ and passive projective synchronization problem for fractional-order (FO) memristor-based neural networks. Our aim is to design a controller such that, though the unavoidable phenomena of time-delay and parameter uncertainty are fully considered, the resulting closed-loop system is asymptotically stable with a mixed H ∞ and passive performance level. By combining active and adaptive control methods, a novel hybrid control strategy is designed, which can guarantee the robust stability of the closed-loop system and also ensure a mixed H ∞ and passive performance level. Via the application of FO Lyapunov stability theory, the projective synchronization conditions are addressed in terms of linear matrix inequality techniques. Finally, two simulation examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. U1604146, U1404610, 61473115, 61203047, Science and Technology Research Project in Henan Province under Grant Nos. 152102210273, 162102410024, and Foundation for the University Technological Innovative Talents of Henan Province under Grant No. 18HASTIT019

  9. Display Techniques for Advanced Crew Stations (DTACS). Phase 1. Display Techniques Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    26 3.1.3 Off Screen Displays .. ................... 27 3.1.4 Flat Panel Displays. .. ................. 27 3.2 FORMAT REQUIREMENTS...Head-Up Display ....... .................... ... 96 4.5.2 Display Panel .... ................. 98 4.5.3 RGB Calligraphic Display ................ 99...117 3.4 VOICE WARNING/RESPONSE TECHNOLOGY .............. . i.117 5.5 TOUCH PANEL TECHNOLOGY ..... ................ ... 118 5.6

  10. Visuomotor learning by passive motor experience

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Takashi; Kondo, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Humans can adapt to unfamiliar dynamic and/or kinematic transformations through the active motor experience. Recent studies of neurorehabilitation using robots or brain-computer interface (BCI) technology suggest that passive motor experience would play a measurable role in motor recovery, however our knowledge of passive motor learning is limited. To clarify the effects of passive motor experience on human motor learning, we performed arm reaching experiments guided by a robotic manipulandum. The results showed that the passive motor experience had an anterograde transfer effect on the subsequent motor execution, whereas no retrograde interference was confirmed in the ABA paradigm experiment. This suggests that the passive experience of the error between visual and proprioceptive sensations leads to the limited but actual compensation of behavior, although it is fragile and cannot be consolidated as a persistent motor memory. PMID:26029091

  11. Tribological Properties of NiAl Matrix Composites Filled with Serpentine Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Bing; Jing, Peixing; Ma, Weidong

    2017-12-01

    The unexplored tribological properties of NiAl matrix composites filled with serpentine powders are investigated using a reciprocating ball-on-disk configuration. Tribological test results reveal that increasing the serpentine concentration to some extent reduces the friction coefficients and wear rates of the composites. The best anti-friction and anti-wear performance is displayed by the NiAl matrix composite filled with 8 wt.% serpentine and 2 wt.% TiC (NAST). Microstructural analyses demonstrate that after adding serpentine, the self-lubricating films with different percentages of coverage form on the worn surfaces of the composites. A self-lubricating film with the highest percentage of coverage smears on the worn surface of NAST. This clearly suggests that serpentine can act as a new type of filler for NiAl matrix composites, whereas a combination of serpentine and TiC can enable serpentine to provide a full play to its excellent lubricating performance.

  12. Corrosion Behavior of Plasma-Passivated Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Barbour, J.C.; Braithwaite, J.W.; Son, K.A.

    1999-07-09

    A new approach is being pursued to study corrosion in Cu alloy systems by using combinatorial analysis combined with microscopic experimentation (the Combinatorial Microlab) to determine mechanisms for copper corrosion in air. Corrosion studies are inherently difficult because of complex interactions between materials and environment, forming a multidimensional phase space of corrosion variables. The Combinatorial Microlab was specifically developed to address the mechanism of Cu sulfidation, which is an important reliability issue for electronic components. This approach differs from convention by focusing on microscopic length scales, the relevant scale for corrosion. During accelerated aging, copper is exposed to a varietymore » of corrosive environments containing sulfidizing species that cause corrosion. A matrix experiment was done to determine independent and synergistic effects of initial Cu oxide thickness and point defect density. The CuO{sub x} was controlled by oxidizing Cu in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) O{sub 2} plasma, and the point defect density was modified by Cu ion irradiation. The matrix was exposed to 600 ppb H{sub 2}S in 65% relative humidity air atmosphere. This combination revealed the importance of oxide quality in passivating Cu and prevention of the sulfidizing reaction. A native oxide and a defect-laden ECR oxide both react at 20 C to form a thick Cu{sub 2}S layer after exposure to H{sub 2}S, while different thicknesses of as-grown ECR oxide stop the formation of Cu{sub 2}S. The species present in the ECR oxide will be compared to that of an air oxide, and the sulfide layer growth rate will be presented.« less

  13. Climate-Specific Passive Building Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Graham S.; Klingenberg, Katrin

    2015-07-29

    In 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recognized the value of performance-based passive building standards when it joined with Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) to promote DOE’s Challenge Home program in tandem with the PHIUS+ Certification program. Since then, the number of passive building projects that have been certified under the partnership has grown exponentially because of some synergy. Passive building represents a well-developed approach to arrive at the envelope basis for zero energy and energy-positive projects by employing performance-based criteria and maximizing cost-effective savings from conservation before implementing renewable energy technologies. The Challenge Home program evolved into themore » Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program in a move toward 1) attaining zero energy and 2) including active renewable energy generation such as photovoltaics (PV)—toward the zero energy goal.« less

  14. Atomic Scale Understanding of Poly-Si/SiO2/c-Si Passivated Contacts: Passivation Degradation Due to Metallization

    SciTech Connect

    Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Young, David; Lee, Benjamin

    2016-11-21

    The key attributes for achieving high efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells include class leading developments in the ability to approach the theoretical limits of silicon solar technology (29.4% efficiency). The push for high efficiency devices is further compounded with the clear need for passivation to reduce recombination at the metal contacts. At the same time there is stringent requirement to retain the same material device quality, surface passivation, and performance characteristics following subsequent processing. The development of passivated silicon cell structures that retain active front and rear surface passivation and overall material cell quality is therefore a relevant and activemore » area of development. To address the potential outcomes of metallization on passivated silicon stack, we report on some common microstructural features of degradation due to metallization for a series of silicon device stacks. A fundamental materials understanding of the metallization process on retaining high-efficiency passivated Si devices is therefore gained over these series of results.« less

  15. Passive ultra-brief video training improves performance of compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Justin L; Vogele, Jennifer; Hart, Kimberly W; Lindsell, Christopher J; McMullan, Jason T

    2017-06-01

    Bystander compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. To broaden CPR training, 1-2min ultra-brief videos have been disseminated via the Internet and television. Our objective was to determine whether participants passively exposed to a televised ultra-brief video perform CPR better than unexposed controls. This before-and-after study was conducted with non-patients in an urban Emergency Department waiting room. The intervention was an ultra-brief CPR training video displayed via closed-circuit television 3-6 times/hour. Participants were unaware of the study and not told to watch the video. Pre-intervention, no video was displayed. Participants were asked to demonstrate compression-only CPR on a manikin. Performance was scored based on critical actions: check for responsiveness, call for help, begin compressions immediately, and correct hand placement, compression rate and depth. The primary outcome was the proportion of participants who performed all actions correctly. There were 50 control and 50 exposed participants. Mean age was 37, 51% were African-American, 52% were female, and 10% self-reported current CPR certification. There were no statistically significant differences in baseline characteristics between groups. The number of participants who performed all actions correctly was 0 (0%) control vs. 10 (20%) exposed (difference 20%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 8.9-31.1%, p<0.001). Correct compression rate and depth were 11 (22%) control vs. 22 (44%) exposed (22%, 95% CI 4.1-39.9%, p=0.019), and 5 (10%) control vs. 15 (30%) exposed (20%, 95% CI 4.8-35.2%, p=0.012), respectively. Passive ultra-brief video training is associated with improved performance of compression-only CPR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Breast carcinoma with a predominant duct-replacing component and chondroid matrix production.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Shogo; Koda, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    Breast carcinomas that produce chondroid matrix are extremely rare. If the carcinoma is invasive, it is classified as a matrix-producing carcinoma (MPC). Herein, we present a case of a breast carcinoma, which showed duct-replacing growth with chondroid matrix production. A 63-year-old woman underwent fine needle aspiration cytology for suspected malignancy, based on radiological findings. Cellular components showed sufficient atypia to allow a diagnosis of malignancy. A partial mastectomy was performed, and no mass-forming lesion was apparent in the surgically resected specimen. Histopathological examination showed that the carcinoma produced chondroid matrix and grew replacing ducts, which were associated with a small amount of an obvious invasive component without matrix production. Some parts of the duct-replacing component might take the form of expansile invasion due to the absence of residual duct-lining myoepithelial cells; it is difficult to decide whether the duct-replacing component is invasive or not. However, regarding a few tumor nests, they would be recognized as MPC-like intraductal components because of the focal presence of myoepithelial cells around them. Hence, this carcinoma could not be definitely diagnosed as a MPC, even though we believe they are closely related. This is the first reported case of a breast carcinoma displaying duct-replacing growth with chondroid matrix production.

  17. Active matrix OLED for rugged HMD and viewfinder applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Kia; Jones, Susan K.; Prache, Olivier; Fellowes, David A.

    2004-09-01

    We present characterization of a full-color 852x3x600-pixel, active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) color microdisplay (eMagin Corporation's SVGA+ display) for environmentally demanding applications. The results show that the AMOLED microdisplay can provide cold-start turn-on and operate at extreme temperature conditions, far in excess of non-emissive displays. Correction factors for gamma response of the AMOLED microdisplay as a function of temperature have been determined to permit consistent luminance and contrast from -40°C to over +80°C. Gamma adjustments are made by a simple temperature compensation adjustment of the reference voltages of the AMOLED. The typical room temperature full-on luminance half-life of the SVGA+ full color display organic light emitting diode (OLED) display at over 3,000 hr at a starting luminance at approx. 100 cd/m2, translates to more than 15,000 hr of continuous full-motion video usage, based on a 25% duty cycle at a typical 50-60 cd/m2 commercial luminance level, or over 60,000 hr half-life in monochrome white usage, or over 100,000 hr luminance half-life in monochrome yellow usage at similar operating conditions. Half life at typical night vision luminance levels would be much longer.

  18. Composition-controlled active-passive transition and corrosion behavior of Fe-Cr(Mo)-Zr-B bulk amorphous steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Jiajia; Wu, Yidong; Wang, Tan; Liu, Yanhui; Hui, Xidong

    2018-07-01

    Various corrosive environments in daily life and industry have put forward high requirement on corrosion resistance of metals, especially steels. Unlike the strict demand in Cr content of crystalline stainless steels, amorphous steels (ASs) with lower Cr content can be endowed with outstanding corrosion resistance, while the intrinsic mechanism is not fully understood. Herein, we present a novel Fe92-x-y-zCrxMoyZr8Bz (6 ≤ x ≤ 40, 0 ≤ y ≤ 22, and 12 ≤ z ≤ 18) bulk amorphous steel (BAS) forming system and reveal the synergistic effect of Cr and Mo in determining the chemical stability of oxide films. It has been found the Fe92-x-zCrxZr8Bz BASs with 1 mm in diameter display a Cr-controlling active-passive transition at the Cr threshold of ∼25% in 1 M hydrochloric acid. When adding minor Mo into the BASs, the Cr threshold can be remarkably reduced by forming favorable hexavalent Mo oxides. The generation of Mo6+ is facilitated by atomic selective dissolution at the interface and can promote the passivation. In contrast, when the Cr content of the Mo-doped glasses exceeds 25%, few Mo6+ oxides would produce as the prior formation of protective passive films inhibits the further oxidation of Mo. Therefore, manipulating the active-passive transition properly is crucial to designing ASs with high stainlessness.

  19. Nuclear Matrix Association: Switching to the Invasive Cytotrophoblast

    PubMed Central

    Drennan, Kathryn J.; Linnemann, Amelia K.; Platts, Adrian E.; Heng, Henry H.; Armant, D. Randall; Krawetz, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal trophoblast invasion is associated with the most common and most severe complications of human pregnancy. The biology of invasion, as well as the etiology of abnormal invasion remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to characterize the transcriptome of the HTR-8/SVneo human cytotrophoblast cell line which displays well characterized invasive and non-invasive behavior, and to correlate the activity of the transcriptome with nuclear matrix attachment and cell phenotype. Comparison of the invasive to non-invasive HTR transcriptomes was unremarkable. In contrast, comparison of the MARs on chromosomes 14–18 revealed an increased number of MARs associated with the invasive phenotype. These attachment areas were more likely to be associated with silent rather than actively transcribed genes. This study supports that view that that nuclear matrix attachment may play an important role in cytotrophoblast invasion by ensuring specific silencing that facilitates invasion. PMID:20346505

  20. Tactile Feedback Display with Spatial and Temporal Resolutions

    PubMed Central

    Vishniakou, Siarhei; Lewis, Brian W.; Niu, Xiaofan; Kargar, Alireza; Sun, Ke; Kalajian, Michael; Park, Namseok; Yang, Muchuan; Jing, Yi; Brochu, Paul; Sun, Zhelin; Li, Chun; Nguyen, Truong; Pei, Qibing; Wang, Deli

    2013-01-01

    We report the electronic recording of the touch contact and pressure using an active matrix pressure sensor array made of transparent zinc oxide thin-film transistors and tactile feedback display using an array of diaphragm actuators made of an interpenetrating polymer elastomer network. Digital replay, editing and manipulation of the recorded touch events were demonstrated with both spatial and temporal resolutions. Analog reproduction of the force is also shown possible using the polymer actuators, despite of the high driving voltage. The ability to record, store, edit, and replay touch information adds an additional dimension to digital technologies and extends the capabilities of modern information exchange with the potential to revolutionize physical learning, social networking, e-commerce, robotics, gaming, medical and military applications. PMID:23982053

  1. Tactile feedback display with spatial and temporal resolutions.

    PubMed

    Vishniakou, Siarhei; Lewis, Brian W; Niu, Xiaofan; Kargar, Alireza; Sun, Ke; Kalajian, Michael; Park, Namseok; Yang, Muchuan; Jing, Yi; Brochu, Paul; Sun, Zhelin; Li, Chun; Nguyen, Truong; Pei, Qibing; Wang, Deli

    2013-01-01

    We report the electronic recording of the touch contact and pressure using an active matrix pressure sensor array made of transparent zinc oxide thin-film transistors and tactile feedback display using an array of diaphragm actuators made of an interpenetrating polymer elastomer network. Digital replay, editing and manipulation of the recorded touch events were demonstrated with both spatial and temporal resolutions. Analog reproduction of the force is also shown possible using the polymer actuators, despite of the high driving voltage. The ability to record, store, edit, and replay touch information adds an additional dimension to digital technologies and extends the capabilities of modern information exchange with the potential to revolutionize physical learning, social networking, e-commerce, robotics, gaming, medical and military applications.

  2. Tactile Feedback Display with Spatial and Temporal Resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishniakou, Siarhei; Lewis, Brian W.; Niu, Xiaofan; Kargar, Alireza; Sun, Ke; Kalajian, Michael; Park, Namseok; Yang, Muchuan; Jing, Yi; Brochu, Paul; Sun, Zhelin; Li, Chun; Nguyen, Truong; Pei, Qibing; Wang, Deli

    2013-08-01

    We report the electronic recording of the touch contact and pressure using an active matrix pressure sensor array made of transparent zinc oxide thin-film transistors and tactile feedback display using an array of diaphragm actuators made of an interpenetrating polymer elastomer network. Digital replay, editing and manipulation of the recorded touch events were demonstrated with both spatial and temporal resolutions. Analog reproduction of the force is also shown possible using the polymer actuators, despite of the high driving voltage. The ability to record, store, edit, and replay touch information adds an additional dimension to digital technologies and extends the capabilities of modern information exchange with the potential to revolutionize physical learning, social networking, e-commerce, robotics, gaming, medical and military applications.

  3. Thin optical display panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James Thomas

    1997-01-01

    An optical display includes a plurality of optical waveguides each including a cladding bound core for guiding internal display light between first and second opposite ends by total internal reflection. The waveguides are stacked together to define a collective display thickness. Each of the cores includes a heterogeneous portion defining a light scattering site disposed longitudinally between the first and second ends. Adjacent ones of the sites are longitudinally offset from each other for forming a longitudinal internal image display over the display thickness upon scattering of internal display light thereagainst for generating a display image. In a preferred embodiment, the waveguides and scattering sites are transparent for transmitting therethrough an external image in superposition with the display image formed by scattering the internal light off the scattering sites for defining a heads up display.

  4. Polyplanar optical display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veligdan, James T.; Beiser, Leo; Biscardi, Cyrus; Brewster, Calvin; DeSanto, Leonard

    1997-07-01

    The polyplanar optical display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be use with any projection source. This display screen is 2 inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. The new display uses a 100 milliwatt green solid state laser as its optical source. In order to produce real- time video, the laser light is being modulated by a digital light processing (DLP) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments, Inc. A variable astigmatic focusing system is used to produce a stigmatic image on the viewing face of the POD. In addition to the optical design, we discuss the electronic interfacing to the DLP chip, the opto-mechanical design and viewing angle characteristics.

  5. Passive magnetic bearing configurations

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F [Walnut Creek, CA

    2011-01-25

    A journal bearing provides vertical and radial stability to a rotor of a passive magnetic bearing system when the rotor is not rotating and when it is rotating. In the passive magnetic bearing system, the rotor has a vertical axis of rotation. Without the journal bearing, the rotor is vertically and radially unstable when stationary, and is vertically stable and radially unstable when rotating.

  6. Lipid-Based Passivation in Nanofluidics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Stretching DNA in nanochannels is a useful tool for direct, visual studies of genomic DNA at the single molecule level. To facilitate the study of the interaction of linear DNA with proteins in nanochannels, we have implemented a highly effective passivation scheme based on lipid bilayers. We demonstrate virtually complete long-term passivation of nanochannel surfaces to a range of relevant reagents, including streptavidin-coated quantum dots, RecA proteins, and RecA–DNA complexes. We show that the performance of the lipid bilayer is significantly better than that of standard bovine serum albumin-based passivation. Finally, we show how the passivated devices allow us to monitor single DNA cleavage events during enzymatic degradation by DNase I. We expect that our approach will open up for detailed, systematic studies of a wide range of protein–DNA interactions with high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:22432814

  7. Citric Acid Passivation of Stainless Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasensky, David; Reali, John; Larson, Chris; Carl, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Passivation is a process for cleaning and providing corrosion protection for stainless steel. Currently, on Kennedy Space Center (KSC), only parts passivated with nitric acid are acceptable for use. KSC disposes of approximately 125gal of concentrated nitric acid per year, and receives many parts from vendors who must also dispose of used nitric acid. Unfortunately, nitric acid presents health and environmental hazards. As a result, several recent industry studies have examined citric acid as an alternative. Implementing a citric acid-based passivation procedure would improve the health and environmental safety aspects of passivation process. However although there is a lack of published studies that conclusively prove citric acid is a technically sound passivation agent. In 2007, NASA's KSC Materials Advisory Working Group requested the evaluation of citric acid in place of nitric acid for passivation of parts at KSC. United Space Alliance Materials & Processes engineers have developed a three-phase test plan to evaluate citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid on three stainless steels commonly used at KSC: UNS S30400, S41000, and S17400. Phases 1 and 2 will produce an optimized citric acid treatment based on results from atmospheric exposure at NASA's Beach Corrosion Facility. Phase 3 will compare the optimized solution(s) with nitric acid treatments. If the results indicate that citric acid passivates as well or better than nitric acid, NASA intends to approve this method for parts used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  8. Matrix completion by deep matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jicong; Cheng, Jieyu

    2018-02-01

    Conventional methods of matrix completion are linear methods that are not effective in handling data of nonlinear structures. Recently a few researchers attempted to incorporate nonlinear techniques into matrix completion but there still exists considerable limitations. In this paper, a novel method called deep matrix factorization (DMF) is proposed for nonlinear matrix completion. Different from conventional matrix completion methods that are based on linear latent variable models, DMF is on the basis of a nonlinear latent variable model. DMF is formulated as a deep-structure neural network, in which the inputs are the low-dimensional unknown latent variables and the outputs are the partially observed variables. In DMF, the inputs and the parameters of the multilayer neural network are simultaneously optimized to minimize the reconstruction errors for the observed entries. Then the missing entries can be readily recovered by propagating the latent variables to the output layer. DMF is compared with state-of-the-art methods of linear and nonlinear matrix completion in the tasks of toy matrix completion, image inpainting and collaborative filtering. The experimental results verify that DMF is able to provide higher matrix completion accuracy than existing methods do and DMF is applicable to large matrices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Image quality evaluation of color displays using a Fovean color camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehrig, Hans; Dallas, William J.; Fan, Jiahua; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Redford, Gary R.; Yoneda, Takahiro

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents preliminary data on the use of a color camera for the evaluation of Quality Control (QC) and Quality Analysis (QA) of a color LCD in comparison with that of a monochrome LCD. The color camera is a C-MOS camera with a pixel size of 9 µm and a pixel matrix of 2268 × 1512 × 3. The camera uses a sensor that has co-located pixels for all three primary colors. The imaging geometry used mostly was 12 × 12 camera pixels per display pixel even though it appears that an imaging geometry of 17.6 might provide results which are more accurate. The color camera is used as an imaging colorimeter, where each camera pixel is calibrated to serve as a colorimeter. This capability permits the camera to determine chromaticity of the color LCD at different sections of the display. After the color calibration with a CS-200 colorimeter the color coordinates of the display's primaries determined from the camera's luminance response are very close to those found from the CS-200. Only the color coordinates of the display's white point were in error. Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) as well as Noise in terms of the Noise Power Spectrum (NPS) of both LCDs were evaluated. The horizontal MTFs of both displays have a larger negative slope than the vertical MTFs, indicating that the horizontal MTFs are poorer than the vertical MTFs. However the modulations at the Nyquist frequency seem lower for the color LCD than for the monochrome LCD. These results contradict simulations regarding MTFs in the vertical direction. The spatial noise of the color display in both directions are larger than that of the monochrome display. Attempts were also made to analyze the total noise in terms of spatial and temporal noise by applying subtractions of images taken at exactly the same exposure. Temporal noise seems to be significantly lower than spatial noise.

  10. Schematic displays for the Space Shuttle Orbiter multifunction cathode-ray-tube display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, W.

    1979-01-01

    A standardized procedure for developing cathode ray tube displayed schematic diagrams. The displaying of Spacelab information on the space shuttle orbiter multifunction cathode ray tube display system is used to illustrate this procedure. Schematic displays with the equivalent tabular displays are compared.

  11. Technical - Economic Research for Passive Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniotaite, Ruta

    2017-10-01

    A newly constructed passive house must save 80 % of heat resources; otherwise it is not a passive house. The heating energy demand of a passive building is less than 15 kWh/m2 per year. However, a passive house is something more than just an energy-saving house. This concept involves sustainable, high-quality, valuable, healthy and durable construction. Features of a passive house: high insulation of envelope components, high-quality windows, good tightness of the building, regenerative ventilation system and elimination of thermal bridges. The Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD) 61 requires all new public buildings to become near-zero energy buildings by 2019 and will be extended to all new buildings by 2021. This concept involves sustainable, high-quality, valuable, healthy and durable construction. Foundation, walls and roofs are the most essential elements of a house. The type of foundation for a private house is selected considering many factors. The article examines technological and structural solutions for passive buildings foundation, walls and roofs. The technical-economic comparison of the main structures of a passive house revealed that it is cheaper to install an adequately designed concrete slab foundation than to build strip or pile foundation and the floor separately. Timber stud walls are the cheapest wall option for a passive house and 45-51% cheaper compared to other options. The comparison of roofs and ceilings showed that insulation of the ceiling is 25% more efficient than insulation of the roof. The comparison of the main envelope elements efficiency by multiple-criteria evaluation methods showed that it is economically feasible to install concrete slab on ground foundation, stud walls with sheet cladding and a pitched roof with insulated ceiling.

  12. Integrated passive flux measurement in groundwater: design and performance of iFLUX samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verreydt, Goedele; Razaei, Meisam; Meire, Patrick; Van Keer, Ilse; Bronders, Jan; Seuntjens, Piet

    2017-04-01

    The monitoring and management of soil and groundwater is a challenge. Current methods for the determination of movement or flux of pollution in groundwater use no direct measurements but only simulations based on concentration measurements and Darcy velocity estimations. This entails large uncertainties which cause remediation failures and higher costs for contaminated site owners. On top of that, the lack of useful data makes it difficult to get approval for a risk-based management approach which completely avoids costly remedial actions. The iFLUX technology is a key development of Dr. Goedele Verreydt at the University of Antwerp and VITO. It is supported by the passive flux measurement technology as invented by Prof. Mike Annable and his team at the University of Florida. The iFLUX technology includes an in situ measurement device for capturing dynamic groundwater quality and quantity, the iFLUX sampler, and an associated interpretation and visualization method. The iFLUX sampler is a modular passive sampler that provides simultaneous in situ point determinations of a time-averaged target compound mass flux and water flux. The sampler is typically installed in a monitoring well where it intercepts the groundwater flow and captures the compounds of interest. The sampler consists of permeable cartridges which are each packed with a specific sorbent matrix. The sorbent matrix of the water flux cartridge is impregnated with known amounts of water soluble resident tracers. These tracers are leached from the matrix at rates proportional to the groundwater flux. The measurements of the contaminants and the remaining resident tracer are used to determine groundwater and target compound fluxes. Exposure times range from 1 week to 6 months, depending on the expected concentration and groundwater flow velocity. The iFLUX sampler technology has been validated and tested at several field projects. Currently, 4 cartridges are tested and available: 1 waterflux cartridge to

  13. Extracellular matrix regenerative graft attenuates the negative impact of polypropylene prolapse mesh on vagina in rhesus macaque

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Rui; Knight, Katrina; Barone, William; Powers, Robert W.; Nolfi, Alexis; Palcsey, Stacy; Abramowitch, Steven; Moalli, Pamela A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The use of wide pore lightweight polypropylene mesh to improve anatomical outcomes in the surgical repair of prolapse has been hampered by mesh complications. One of the prototype prolapse meshes has been found to negatively impact the vagina by inducing a decrease in smooth muscle volume and contractility and the degradation of key structural proteins (collagen and elastin), resulting in vaginal degeneration. Recently, bioscaffolds derived from extracellular matrix have been used to mediate tissue regeneration and have been widely adopted in tissue engineering applications. OBJECTIVE Here we aimed to: (1) define whether augmentation of a polypropylene prolapse mesh with an extracellular matrix regenerative graft in a primate sacrocolpopexy model could mitigate the degenerative changes; and (2) determine the impact of the extracellular matrix graft on vagina when implanted alone. STUDY DESIGN A polypropylene-extracellular matrix composite graft (n = 9) and a 6-layered extracellular matrix graft alone (n = 8) were implanted in 17 middle-aged parous rhesus macaques via sacrocolpopexy and compared to historical data obtained from sham (n = 12) and the polypropylene mesh (n = 12) implanted by the same method. Vaginal function was measured in passive (ball-burst test) and active (smooth muscle contractility) mechanical tests. Vaginal histomorphologic/ biochemical assessments included hematoxylin-eosin and trichrome staining, immunofluorescent labeling of α-smooth muscle actin and apoptotic cells, measurement of total collagen, collagen subtypes (ratio III/ I), mature elastin, and sulfated glycosaminoglycans. Statistical analyses included 1-way analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis, and appropriate posthoc tests. RESULTS The host inflammatory response in the composite mesh-implanted vagina was reduced compared to that following implantation with the polypropylene mesh alone. The increase in apoptotic cells observed with the polypropylene mesh was blunted in

  14. End-of-Mission Passivation: Successes and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas; Matney, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The passivation of spacecraft and launch vehicle orbital stages at end-of-mission has been a principal space debris mitigation measure world-wide since the 1980 s. Space vehicle passivation includes the removal of stored energies, especially those associated with propulsion and electrical power systems. Prior to 2007 the breakup of non-functioning, non-passivated space vehicles was the major source of hazardous debris in Earth orbit. The United Nations and the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee have both included passivation in their formal space debris mitigation guidelines. This often simple countermeasure has been adopted by many spacefaring countries and organizations and has undoubtedly prevented numerous major satellite breakups. For some existing space vehicle designs, passivation requires changes in hardware, software, and/or operational procedures. Questions about the permissible degree of passivation for both current and future space vehicles have arisen and are addressed herein. An important element to be considered is the potentially long period in which the space vehicle will remain in orbit, i.e., up to 25 years after mission termination in LEO and for centuries in orbits above LEO. Finally, the issue of passivation of space vehicles which have failed prematurely is addressed.

  15. Flat-panel display solutions for ground-environment military displays (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, J., II; Roach, R.

    2005-05-01

    Displays for military vehicles have very distinct operational and cost requirements that differ from other military applications. These requirements demand that display suppliers to Army and Marine ground-environments provide low cost equipment that is capable of operation across environmental extremes. Inevitably, COTS components form the foundation of these "affordable" display solutions. This paper will outline the major display requirements and review the options that satisfy conflicting and difficult operational demands, using newly developed equipment as an example. Recently, a new supplier was selected for the Drivers Vision Enhancer (DVE) equipment, including the Display Control Module (DCM). The paper will outline the DVE and describe development of a new DCM solution. The DVE programme, with several thousand units presently in service and operational in conflicts such as "Operation Iraqi Freedom", represents a critical balance between cost and performance. We shall describe design considerations that include selection of COTS sources, the need to minimise display modification; video interfaces, power interfaces, operator interfaces and new provisions to optimise displayed video content.

  16. Sharp Estimates in Ruelle Theorems for Matrix Transfer Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J.; Latushkin, Y.

    A matrix coefficient transfer operator , on the space of -sections of an m-dimensional vector bundle over n-dimensional compact manifold is considered. The spectral radius of is estimated bya; and the essential spectral radius byDISPLAY" DISC="MATH"> Here is the set of ergodic f-invariant measures, and for is the measure-theoretic entropy of f, is the largest Lyapunov exponent of the cocycle over f generated by , and is the smallest Lyapunov exponent of the differential of f.

  17. Screens and Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edstrom, Malin

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the characteristics of different computer screen technologies including the possible harmful effects on health of cathode ray tube (CRT) terminals. CRT's are compared to other technologies including liquid crystal displays, plasma displays, electroluminiscence displays, and light emitting diodes. A chart comparing the different…

  18. Seamless tiled display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubin, Matthew B. (Inventor); Larson, Brent D. (Inventor); Kolosowsky, Aleksandra (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A modular and scalable seamless tiled display apparatus includes multiple display devices, a screen, and multiple lens assemblies. Each display device is subdivided into multiple sections, and each section is configured to display a sectional image. One of the lens assemblies is optically coupled to each of the sections of each of the display devices to project the sectional image displayed on that section onto the screen. The multiple lens assemblies are configured to merge the projected sectional images to form a single tiled image. The projected sectional images may be merged on the screen by magnifying and shifting the images in an appropriate manner. The magnification and shifting of these images eliminates any visual effect on the tiled display that may result from dead-band regions defined between each pair of adjacent sections on each display device, and due to gaps between multiple display devices.

  19. An Event-Structural Account of Passive Acquisition in Korean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kwee-Ock; Lee, Youngjoo

    2008-01-01

    Some peculiar properties of children's passives have long been observed in various languages such as an asymmetry between actional passives and nonactional passives. These peculiarities have been accounted for under the hypothesis that children's early passives are adjectival, and as such exhibit properties of adjectival passives in adult grammar.…

  20. Microlaser-based displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergstedt, Robert; Fink, Charles G.; Flint, Graham W.; Hargis, David E.; Peppler, Philipp W.

    1997-07-01

    Laser Power Corporation has developed a new type of projection display, based upon microlaser technology and a novel scan architecture, which provides the foundation for bright, extremely high resolution images. A review of projection technologies is presented along with the limitations of each and the difficulties they experience in trying to generate high resolution imagery. The design of the microlaser based projector is discussed along with the advantage of this technology. High power red, green, and blue microlasers have been designed and developed specifically for use in projection displays. These sources, in combination with high resolution, high contrast modulator, produce a 24 bit color gamut, capable of supporting the full range of real world colors. The new scan architecture, which reduces the modulation rate and scan speeds required, is described. This scan architecture, along with the inherent brightness of the laser provides the fundamentals necessary to produce a 5120 by 4096 resolution display. The brightness and color uniformity of the display is excellent, allowing for tiling of the displays with far fewer artifacts than those in a traditionally tiled display. Applications for the display include simulators, command and control centers, and electronic cinema.

  1. Maintenance Procedure Display: Head Mounted Display (HMD) Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Milrian; Litaker, Harry L., Jr.; Solem, Jody A.; Holden, Kritina L.; Hoffman, Ronald R.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing maintenance procedures for head mounted displays is shown. The topics include: 1) Study Goals; 2) Near Eye Displays (HMDs); 3) Design; 4) Phase I-Evaluation Methods; 5) Phase 1 Results; 6) Improved HMD Mounting; 7) Phase 2 -Evaluation Methods; 8) Phase 2 Preliminary Results; and 9) Next Steps.

  2. Advances in three-dimensional integral imaging: sensing, display, and applications [Invited].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiao; Javidi, Bahram; Martinez-Corral, Manuel; Stern, Adrian

    2013-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sensing and imaging technologies have been extensively researched for many applications in the fields of entertainment, medicine, robotics, manufacturing, industrial inspection, security, surveillance, and defense due to their diverse and significant benefits. Integral imaging is a passive multiperspective imaging technique, which records multiple two-dimensional images of a scene from different perspectives. Unlike holography, it can capture a scene such as outdoor events with incoherent or ambient light. Integral imaging can display a true 3D color image with full parallax and continuous viewing angles by incoherent light; thus it does not suffer from speckle degradation. Because of its unique properties, integral imaging has been revived over the past decade or so as a promising approach for massive 3D commercialization. A series of key articles on this topic have appeared in the OSA journals, including Applied Optics. Thus, it is fitting that this Commemorative Review presents an overview of literature on physical principles and applications of integral imaging. Several data capture configurations, reconstruction, and display methods are overviewed. In addition, applications including 3D underwater imaging, 3D imaging in photon-starved environments, 3D tracking of occluded objects, 3D optical microscopy, and 3D polarimetric imaging are reviewed.

  3. Enlightened Use of Passive Voice in Technical Writing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trammell, M. K.

    1981-01-01

    The passive voice as a normal, acceptable, and established syntactic form in technical writing is defended. Passive/active verb ratios, taken from sources including 'antipassivist' text books, are considered. The suitability of the passive voice in technical writing which involves unknown or irrelevant agents is explored. Three 'myths' that the passive (1) utilizes an abnormal and artificial word order, (2) is lifeless, and (3) is indirect are considered. Awkward and abnormal sounding examples encountered in text books are addressed in terms of original context. Unattractive or incoherent passive sentences are explained in terms of inappropriate conversion from active sentences having (1) short nominal or pronominal subjects or (2) verbs with restrictions on their passive use.

  4. Asymptotic Stability of Interconnected Passive Non-Linear Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isidori, A.; Joshi, S. M.; Kelkar, A. G.

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of stabilization of a class of internally passive non-linear time-invariant dynamic systems. A class of non-linear marginally strictly passive (MSP) systems is defined, which is less restrictive than input-strictly passive systems. It is shown that the interconnection of a non-linear passive system and a non-linear MSP system is globally asymptotically stable. The result generalizes and weakens the conditions of the passivity theorem, which requires one of the systems to be input-strictly passive. In the case of linear time-invariant systems, it is shown that the MSP property is equivalent to the marginally strictly positive real (MSPR) property, which is much simpler to check.

  5. Polyplanar optic display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.; Biscardi, C.; Brewster, C.

    1997-07-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. This display screen is 2 inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. The new display uses a 100 milliwatt green solid state laser (532 nm) as its optical source. In order to produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP{trademark}) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments, Inc.more » A variable astigmatic focusing system is used to produce a stigmatic image on the viewing face of the POD. In addition to the optical design, the authors discuss the electronic interfacing to the DLP{trademark} chip, the opto-mechanical design and viewing angle characteristics.« less

  6. ORFeome Phage Display.

    PubMed

    Zantow, Jonas; Moreira, Gustavo Marçal Schmidt Garcia; Dübel, Stefan; Hust, Michael

    2018-01-01

    ORFeome phage display allows the efficient functional screening of entire proteomes or even metaproteomes to identify immunogenic proteins. For this purpose, randomly fragmented, whole genomes or metagenomes are cloned into a phage-display vector allowing positive selection for open reading frames (ORF) to improve the library quality. These libraries display all possible proteins encoded by a pathogen or a microbiome on the phage surface. Consequently, immunogenic proteins can be selected from these libraries using disease-related immunoglobulins from patient serum. ORFeome phage display in particular allows the identification of immunogenic proteins that are only expressed in the host-pathogen interaction but not in cultivation, as well as the detection of very low expressed and very small immunogens and immunogenic proteins of non-cultivable organisms. The identified immunogenic proteins are potential biomarkers for the development of diagnostic assays or vaccines. These articles will give an introduction to ORFeome phage-display technology and give detailed protocols to identify immunogenic proteins by phage display.

  7. A display module implemented by the fast high-temperatue response of carbon nanotube thin yarns.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yang; Liu, Peng; Jiang, Kaili; Fan, Shoushan

    2012-05-09

    Suspending superaligned multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films were processed into CNT thin yarns, about 1 μm in diameter, by laser cutting and an ethanol atomization bath treatment. The fast high-temperature response under a vacuum was revealed by monitoring the incandescent light with a photo diode. The thin yarns can be electrically heated up to 2170 K in 0.79 mS, and the succeeding cool-down time is 0.36 mS. The fast response is attributed to the ultrasmall mass of the independent single yarn, large radiation coefficient, and improved thermal conductance through the two cool ends. The millisecond response time makes it possible to use the visible hot thin yarns as light-emitting elements of an incandescent display. A fully sealed display with 16 × 16 matrix was successfully fabricated using screen-printed thick electrodes and CNT thin yarns. It can display rolling characters with a low power consumption. More applications can be further developed based on the addressable CNT thermal arrays.

  8. Past matrix stiffness primes epithelial cells and regulates their future collective migration through a mechanical memory.

    PubMed

    Nasrollahi, Samila; Walter, Christopher; Loza, Andrew J; Schimizzi, Gregory V; Longmore, Gregory D; Pathak, Amit

    2017-11-01

    During morphogenesis and cancer metastasis, grouped cells migrate through tissues of dissimilar stiffness. Although the influence of matrix stiffness on cellular mechanosensitivity and motility are well-recognized, it remains unknown whether these matrix-dependent cellular features persist after cells move to a new microenvironment. Here, we interrogate whether priming of epithelial cells by a given matrix stiffness influences their future collective migration on a different matrix - a property we refer to as the 'mechanical memory' of migratory cells. To prime cells on a defined matrix and track their collective migration onto an adjoining secondary matrix of dissimilar stiffness, we develop a modular polyacrylamide substrate through step-by-step polymerization of different PA compositions. We report that epithelial cells primed on a stiff matrix migrate faster, display higher actomyosin expression, form larger focal adhesions, and retain nuclear YAP even after arriving onto a soft secondary matrix, as compared to their control behavior on a homogeneously soft matrix. Priming on a soft ECM causes a reverse effect. The depletion of YAP dramatically reduces this memory-dependent migration. Our results present a previously unidentified regulation of mechanosensitive collective cell migration by past matrix stiffness, in which mechanical memory depends on YAP activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An ultra-compact and low loss passive beam-forming network integrated on chip with off chip linear array

    SciTech Connect

    Lepkowski, Stefan Mark

    2015-05-01

    The work here presents a review of beam forming architectures. As an example, the author presents an 8x8 Butler Matrix passive beam forming network including the schematic, design/modeling, operation, and simulated results. The limiting factor in traditional beam formers has been the large size dictated by transmission line based couplers. By replacing these couplers with transformer-based couplers, the matrix size is reduced substantially allowing for on chip compact integration. In the example presented, the core area, including the antenna crossover, measures 0.82mm×0.39mm (0.48% the size of a branch line coupler at the same frequency). The simulated beam forming achieves amore » peak PNR of 17.1 dB and 15dB from 57 to 63GHz. At the 60GHz center frequency the average insertion loss is simulated to be 3.26dB. The 8x8 Butler Matrix feeds into an 8-element antenna array to show the array patterns with single beam and adjacent beam isolation.« less

  10. 26 CFR 1.469-2 - Passive activity loss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Passive activity loss. 1.469-2 Section 1.469-2...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxable Year for Which Deductions Taken § 1.469-2 Passive activity loss. (a)-(c... passive activity unless the interest in property was used in a passive activity for either— (1) 20 percent...

  11. [Construction of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG particles surface display system].

    PubMed

    Su, Runyu; Nie, Boyao; Yuan, Shengling; Tao, Haoxia; Liu, Chunjie; Yang, Bailiang; Wang, Yanchun

    2017-01-25

    To describe a novel particles surface display system which is consisted of gram-positive enhancer matrix (GEM) particles and anchor proteins for bacteria-like particles vaccines, we treated Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG bacteria with 10% heated-TCA for preparing GEM particles, and then identified the harvested GEM particles by electron microscopy, RT-PCR and SDS-PAGE. Meanwhile, Escherichia coli was induced to express hybrid proteins PA3-EGFP and P60-EGFP, and GEM particles were incubated with them. Then binding of anchor proteins were determined by Western blotting, transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and spectrofluorometry. GEM particles preserved original size and shape, and proteins and DNA contents of GEM particles were released substantially. The two anchor proteins both had efficiently immobilized on the surface of GEM. GEM particles that were bounded by anchor proteins were brushy. The fluorescence of GEM particles anchoring PA3 was slightly brighter than P60, but the difference was not significant (P>0.05). GEM particles prepared from L. rhamnosus GG have a good binding efficiency with anchor proteins PA3-EGFP and P60-EGFP. Therefore, this novel foreign protein surface display system could be used for bacteria-like particle vaccines.

  12. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Passive tendon prosthesis. 888.3025 Section 888...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3025 Passive tendon prosthesis. (a) Identification. A passive tendon prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of silicon elastomer or a...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Passive tendon prosthesis. 888.3025 Section 888...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3025 Passive tendon prosthesis. (a) Identification. A passive tendon prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of silicon elastomer or a...

  14. Sub-pixel localisation of passive micro-coil fiducial markers in interventional MRI.

    PubMed

    Rea, Marc; McRobbie, Donald; Elhawary, Haytham; Tse, Zion T H; Lamperth, Michael; Young, Ian

    2009-04-01

    Electromechanical devices enable increased accuracy in surgical procedures, and the recent development of MRI-compatible mechatronics permits the use of MRI for real-time image guidance. Integrated imaging of resonant micro-coil fiducials provides an accurate method of tracking devices in a scanner with increased flexibility compared to gradient tracking. Here we report on the ability of ten different image-processing algorithms to track micro-coil fiducials with sub-pixel accuracy. Five algorithms: maximum pixel, barycentric weighting, linear interpolation, quadratic fitting and Gaussian fitting were applied both directly to the pixel intensity matrix and to the cross-correlation matrix obtained by 2D convolution with a reference image. Using images of a 3 mm fiducial marker and a pixel size of 1.1 mm, intensity linear interpolation, which calculates the position of the fiducial centre by interpolating the pixel data to find the fiducial edges, was found to give the best performance for minimal computing power; a maximum error of 0.22 mm was observed in fiducial localisation for displacements up to 40 mm. The inherent standard deviation of fiducial localisation was 0.04 mm. This work enables greater accuracy to be achieved in passive fiducial tracking.

  15. Performance and Safety Tests of Lithium-Ion Cells Arranged in a Matrix Design Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith; Tracinski, Walt

    2010-01-01

    Matrix Packs display large variations in cell bank voltages at the charge and discharge current (C/2) used in this test program. The voltage difference is larger at the end of discharge than at the end of charge under the conditions studied. Disconnection of a cell from the pack leads to a larger voltage difference during discharge (greater than 2.0 V) between the bank that has one less cell and the other banks. Thermal profile does not show any significant changes or increase in temperature after one cell was disconnected from the bank in spite of falling to very low voltages at the end of discharge. All tests on the matrix pack with the HAM displayed lower max in general due to the placement of thermocouple on the outside of the HAM rather than on the cells. Disconnection of cells has almost no influence on the performance of the packs and does not show any abnormal thermal changes for the 100 cycles obtained in this test program. Longer cycle life may influence the performance especially if the low voltage cell goes into reversal. Overcharge leads to CID activation of cells. If the matrix configuration has a larger number of cells in series, (more than 5 S configuration), the limitations of protective devices may manifest itself irrespective of it being in a matrix configuration. External short circuit causes a fire with expulsion of content from some cells. The fire does not propagate itself laterally, but if there was cell module stacking, then the fire would cause the cells above it to also go into flames/thermal runaway. Limitations of protective devices are observed in this case as the PTCs in the cells did not protect under this abusive condition. Matrix configurations seem to provide protection against lateral propagation of fire and flame. Matrix pack configuration seems to provide good performance in spite of losing cell connections; at least for the configuration tested under this program.

  16. Handbook on passive thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mookherji, T. K.; Hayes, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    A handbook of passive thermal control surfaces data pertaining to the heat transfer requirements of spacecraft is presented. Passive temperature control techniques and the selection of control surfaces are analyzed. The space environmental damage mechanisms in passive thermal control surfaces are examined. Data on the coatings for which technical information is available are presented in tabular form. Emphasis was placed on consulting only those references where the experimental simulation of the space environment appeared to be more appropriate.

  17. Display technology - Human factors concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Alan; Wickens, Christopher; Kite, Kirsten

    1990-03-01

    Recent advances in the design of aircraft cockpit displays are reviewed, with an emphasis on their applicability to automobiles. The fundamental principles of display technology are introduced, and individual chapters are devoted to selective visual attention, command and status displays, foveal and peripheral displays, navigational displays, auditory displays, color and pictorial displays, head-up displays, automated systems, and dual-task performance and pilot workload. Diagrams, drawings, and photographs of typical displays are provided.

  18. Passive immunization reduces behavioral and neuropathological deficits in an alpha-synuclein transgenic model of Lewy body disease.

    PubMed

    Masliah, Eliezer; Rockenstein, Edward; Mante, Michael; Crews, Leslie; Spencer, Brian; Adame, Anthony; Patrick, Christina; Trejo, Margarita; Ubhi, Kiren; Rohn, Troy T; Mueller-Steiner, Sarah; Seubert, Peter; Barbour, Robin; McConlogue, Lisa; Buttini, Manuel; Games, Dora; Schenk, Dale

    2011-04-29

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Parkinson's Disease (PD) are common causes of motor and cognitive deficits and are associated with the abnormal accumulation of alpha-synuclein (α-syn). This study investigated whether passive immunization with a novel monoclonal α-syn antibody (9E4) against the C-terminus (CT) of α-syn was able to cross into the CNS and ameliorate the deficits associated with α-syn accumulation. In this study we demonstrate that 9E4 was effective at reducing behavioral deficits in the water maze, moreover, immunization with 9E4 reduced the accumulation of calpain-cleaved α-syn in axons and synapses and the associated neurodegenerative deficits. In vivo studies demonstrated that 9E4 traffics into the CNS, binds to cells that display α-syn accumulation and promotes α-syn clearance via the lysosomal pathway. These results suggest that passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies against the CT of α-syn may be of therapeutic relevance in patients with PD and DLB.

  19. Further considerations on the thermal stabilization of the nuclear matrix in mouse erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Martelli, A M; Falcieri, E; Gobbi, P; Manzoli, L; Cataldi, A; Rana, R A; Cocco, L

    1992-04-01

    The morphology and the polypeptide composition of the nuclear matrix obtained from 37 degrees C incubated nuclei has been studied in mouse erythroleukemia cells. From a structural point of view, in the absence of heat treatment, the matrix lacked identifiable nucleolar remnants and the internal fibrogranular meshwork whereas a peripheral lamina was seen. On the contrary, the matrix obtained from heat exposed nuclei displayed very electrondense nucleolar remnants and an abundant inner network. These results were obtained irrespective of the type of extracting agent (2M NaCl or 0.2 M (NH4)2SO4) used to remove histones and other soluble proteins. The heat stabilization of the matrix could not be prevented by sulfhydryl blocking chemicals such as iodoacetamide and n-ethylmaleimide, thus suggesting that heat does not stabilize the matrix by inducing the formation of disulfide bonds. Only limited differences in the polypeptide pattern of matrix isolated under different conditions were seen using one-dimensional pore gradient polyacrylamide gels stained with both Coomassie Brilliant Blue and silver despite the fact that the matrix fraction from heat treated nuclei retained about three fold more protein in comparison with controls. The same results were obtained also by means of two-dimensional non-equilibrium gel electrophoresis.

  20. Determining minimal display element requirements for surface map displays

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-04-14

    There is a great deal of interest in developing electronic surface map displays to enhance safety and reduce incidents and incursions on or near the airport surface. There is a lack of research, however, detailing the minimal display elements require...

  1. Simulation of passive thermal management system for lithium-ion battery packs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Andrew; Al-Hallaj, Said

    A passive thermal management system that uses a phase change material (PCM) is designed and simulated for a lithium-ion (Li-ion) laptop battery pack. The problem of low thermal conductivity of the PCM was significantly improved by impregnating an expanded graphite (EG) matrix with the PCM. The heat generation rate for a commercial 186502.2 Ah Li-ion battery was experimentally measured for various constant power discharges. Simulation of the battery pack, composed of six Li-ion batteries, shows that safe operation of the battery pack during the most extreme case requires the volume of the battery pack be almost doubled to fit sufficient PCM in the pack. Improving the properties of the PCM composite have the potential to significantly reduce the volume increase in comparison to the original battery pack volume.

  2. Adapter-directed display: a modular design for shuttling display on phage surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kevin Caili; Wang, Xinwei; Zhong, Pingyu; Luo, Peter Peizhi

    2010-02-05

    A novel adapter-directed phage display system was developed with modular features. In this system, the target protein is expressed as a fusion protein consisting of adapter GR1 from the phagemid vector, while the recombinant phage coat protein is expressed as a fusion protein consisting of adapter GR2 in the helper phage vector. Surface display of the target protein is accomplished through specific heterodimerization of GR1 and GR2 adapters, followed by incorporation of the heterodimers into phage particles. A series of engineered helper phages were constructed to facilitate both display valency and formats, based on various phage coat proteins. As the target protein is independent of a specific phage coat protein, this modular system allows the target protein to be displayed on any given phage coat protein and allows various display formats from the same vector without the need for reengineering. Here, we demonstrate the shuttling display of a single-chain Fv antibody on phage surfaces between multivalent and monovalent formats, as well as the shuttling display of an antigen-binding fragment molecule on phage coat proteins pIII, pVII, and pVIII using the same phagemid vectors combined with different helper phage vectors. This adapter-directed display concept has been applied to eukaryotic yeast surface display and to a novel cross-species display that can shuttle between prokaryotic phage and eukaryotic yeast systems. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Image quality evaluation for smart-phone displays at lighting levels of indoor and outdoor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Rui; Xu, Haisong; Wang, Binyu; Luo, Ming Ronnier

    2012-08-01

    The image quality of two active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) smart-phone displays and two in-plane switching (IPS) ones was visually assessed at two levels of ambient lighting conditions corresponding to indoor and outdoor applications, respectively. Naturalness, colorfulness, brightness, contrast, sharpness, and overall image quality were evaluated via psychophysical experiment by categorical judgment method using test images selected from different application categories. The experimental results show that the AMOLED displays perform better on colorfulness because of their wide color gamut, while the high pixel resolution and high peak luminance of the IPS panels help the perception of brightness, contrast, and sharpness. Further statistical analysis of ANOVA indicates that ambient lighting levels have significant influences on the attributes of brightness and contrast.

  4. Development of Verbal Passive in Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perovic, Alexandra; Wexler, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To experimentally investigate knowledge of passives of actional ("hold") and psychological ("love") verbs in children with Williams syndrome (WS). Passives are usually reported to be in line with mental age in WS. However, studies usually focus on passives of actional verbs only. Method: Twenty-six children with WS, ages 6-16, and 3…

  5. Demonstration of Passive Fuel Cell Thermal Management Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth A.; Jakupca, Ian; Colozza, Anthony; Wynne, Robert; Miller, Michael; Meyer, Al; Smith, William

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing advanced passive thermal management technology to reduce the mass and improve the reliability of space fuel cell systems for the NASA Exploration program. The passive thermal management system relies on heat conduction within highly thermally conductive cooling plates to move the heat from the central portion of the cell stack out to the edges of the fuel cell stack. Using the passive approach eliminates the need for a coolant pump and other cooling loop components within the fuel cell system which reduces mass and improves overall system reliability. Previous development demonstrated the performance of suitable highly thermally conductive cooling plates and integrated heat exchanger technology to collect the heat from the cooling plates (Ref. 1). The next step in the development of this passive thermal approach was the demonstration of the control of the heat removal process and the demonstration of the passive thermal control technology in actual fuel cell stacks. Tests were run with a simulated fuel cell stack passive thermal management system outfitted with passive cooling plates, an integrated heat exchanger and two types of cooling flow control valves. The tests were run to demonstrate the controllability of the passive thermal control approach. Finally, successful demonstrations of passive thermal control technology were conducted with fuel cell stacks from two fuel cell stack vendors.

  6. A parallel algorithm for the eigenvalues and eigenvectors for a general complex matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shroff, Gautam

    1989-01-01

    A new parallel Jacobi-like algorithm is developed for computing the eigenvalues of a general complex matrix. Most parallel methods for this parallel typically display only linear convergence. Sequential norm-reducing algorithms also exit and they display quadratic convergence in most cases. The new algorithm is a parallel form of the norm-reducing algorithm due to Eberlein. It is proven that the asymptotic convergence rate of this algorithm is quadratic. Numerical experiments are presented which demonstrate the quadratic convergence of the algorithm and certain situations where the convergence is slow are also identified. The algorithm promises to be very competitive on a variety of parallel architectures.

  7. Color Gamut of a Nematic Liquid Crystal Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Teruo; Mada, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Shunsuke

    1980-05-01

    The theoretical color gamut of a nematic liquid crystal display is described. The color gamut of a tunable birefringence mode and a guest host mode are revealed with the CIE chromaticity diagram and color solid. In order to account for the quantitative color gamut, color matching between the given chromaticity coordinates and those calculated is investigated. Color matching is performed by a combination of three liquid crystal subcells (A, B, C), where each subcell receives the voltage VA, VB, VC or contains the dye amount a, b, c. Calculation of the value of voltage or dye amount was executed by the matrix representation method. The calculated data are in good agreement with the given data within 0.50 CIE-UNIT color difference in the 1964 CIE (U*, V*, W*) color scale.

  8. 26 CFR 1.1398-1 - Treatment of passive activity losses and passive activity credits in individuals' title 11 cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Treatment of passive activity losses and passive activity credits in individuals' title 11 cases. 1.1398-1 Section 1.1398-1 Internal Revenue... (CONTINUED) Rules Relating to Individuals' Title 11 Cases § 1.1398-1 Treatment of passive activity losses and...

  9. Lithification of vitric- and clastic-matrix breccias - SEM petrography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, W. C.; Mckay, D. S.; Warner, J. L.; Simonds, C. H.

    1976-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope was used in a petrographic investigation of the matrix textures of 41 lunar breccias ranging from very friable soil clods through coherent microbreccias and tough vitric breccias to tough, fine-grained crystalline breccias. It was found that as their coherence increases, the matrices display a gradual increase in the content of glass from 1 or 2% as filaments less than 1 micron across through 5-50% as irregularly shaped patches up to 200 microns across to over 50% as continuous networks.

  10. Construction of genetically engineered M13K07 helper phage for simultaneous phage display of gold binding peptide 1 and nuclear matrix protein 22 ScFv antibody.

    PubMed

    Fatemi, Farnaz; Amini, Seyed Mohammad; Kharrazi, Sharmin; Rasaee, Mohammad Javad; Mazlomi, Mohammad Ali; Asadi-Ghalehni, Majid; Rajabibazl, Masoumeh; Sadroddiny, Esmaeil

    2017-11-01

    The most common techniques of antibody phage display are based on the use of M13 filamentous bacteriophages. This study introduces a new genetically engineered M13K07 helper phage displaying multiple copies of a known gold binding peptide on p8 coat proteins. The recombinant helper phages were used to rescue a phagemid vector encoding the p3 coat protein fused to the nuclear matrix protein 22 (NMP22) ScFv antibody. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy, and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis revealed that the expression of gold binding peptide 1 (GBP1) on major coat protein p8 significantly enhances the gold-binding affinity of M13 phages. The recombinant bacteriophages at concentrations above 5×10 4 pfu/ml red-shifted the UV-vis absorbance spectra of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs); however, the surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles was not changed by the wild type bacteriophages at concentrations up to 10 12 pfu/ml. The phage ELISA assay demonstrated the high affinity binding of bifunctional bacteriophages to NMP22 antigen at concentrations of 10 5 and 10 6 pfu/ml. Thus, the p3 end of the bifunctional bacteriophages would be able to bind to specific target antigen, while the AuNPs were assembled along the coat of virus for signal generation. Our results indicated that the complex of antigen-bacteriophages lead to UV-vis spectral changes of AuNPs and NMP22 antigen in concentration range of 10-80μg/ml can be detected by bifunctional bacteriophages at concentration of 10 4 pfu/ml. The ability of bifunctional bacteriophages to bind to antigen and generate signal at the same time, makes this approach applicable for identifying different antigens in immunoassay techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. System status display information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, L. G.; Erickson, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    The system Status Display is an electronic display system which provides the flight crew with enhanced capabilities for monitoring and managing aircraft systems. Guidelines for the design of the electronic system displays were established. The technical approach involved the application of a system engineering approach to the design of candidate displays and the evaluation of a Hernative concepts by part-task simulation. The system engineering and selection of candidate displays are covered.

  12. Energy extraction from a semi-passive flapping-foil turbine with active heave and passive pitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreau, Matthieu; Dumas, Guy; Gunther, Kevin; CFD Laboratory LMFN Team

    2017-11-01

    Due to the inherent complexity of the mechanisms needed to prescribe the heaving and the pitching motions of optimal flapping-foil turbines, several research groups are now investigating the potential of using unconstrained passive motions. The amplitude, the phase and the frequency of such free motions are thus the result of the interaction of the blade with the flow and its elastic supports, namely springs and dampers. In parallel with our current study on fully-passive flapping-foil turbines, we investigate in this work the possibility of using a semi-passive turbine. Unlike previous semi-passive turbines studied in the literature, we propose a turbine with a passive pitching motion and an active heaving motion constrained to be a sine wave with desired amplitude and frequency. As most of the energy extracted by flapping-foil turbines comes from the heaving motion, it is natural to connect an electric generator to this degree of freedom, thereby allowing one to constrain this motion. It is found that large-amplitude pitching motions leading to a considerable energy extraction can arise under different circumstances and mechanisms, either forced by the heaving motion or driven by an instability of the pitching motion itself. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), the Tyler Lewis Clean Energy Research Foundation, Calcul Québec and Compute Canada.

  13. Silicon surface passivation by silicon nitride deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon nitride deposition was studied as a method of passivation for silicon solar cell surfaces. The following three objectives were the thrust of the research: (1) the use of pecvd silicon nitride for passivation of silicon surfaces; (2) measurement techniques for surface recombination velocity; and (3) the importance of surface passivation to high efficiency solar cells.

  14. False-color display of special sensor microwave/imager (SSM/I) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negri, Andrew J.; Adler, Robert F.; Kummerow, Christian D.

    1989-01-01

    Displays of multifrequency passive microwave data from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) flying on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft are presented. Observed brightness temperatures at 85.5 GHz (vertical and horizontal polarizations) and 37 GHz (vertical polarization) are respectively used to 'drive' the red, green, and blue 'guns' of a color monitor. The resultant false-color images can be used to distinguish land from water, highlight precipitation processes and structure over both land and water, and detail variations in other surfaces such as deserts, snow cover, and sea ice. The observations at 85.5 GHz also add a previously unavailable frequency to the problem of rainfall estimation from space. Examples of mesoscale squall lines, tropical and extra-tropical storms, and larger-scale land and atmospheric features as 'viewed' by the SSM/I are shown.

  15. False-color display of special sensor microwave/imager (SSM/I) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negri, Andrew J.; Adler, Robert F.; Kummerow, Christian D.

    1989-02-01

    Displays of multifrequency passive microwave data from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) flying on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft are presented. Observed brightness temperatures at 85.5 GHz (vertical and horizontal polarizations) and 37 GHz (vertical polarization) are respectively used to 'drive' the red, green, and blue 'guns' of a color monitor. The resultant false-color images can be used to distinguish land from water, highlight precipitation processes and structure over both land and water, and detail variations in other surfaces such as deserts, snow cover, and sea ice. The observations at 85.5 GHz also add a previously unavailable frequency to the problem of rainfall estimation from space. Examples of mesoscale squall lines, tropical and extra-tropical storms, and larger-scale land and atmospheric features as 'viewed' by the SSM/I are shown.

  16. Matrix Approach of Seismic Wave Imaging: Application to Erebus Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blondel, T.; Chaput, J.; Derode, A.; Campillo, M.; Aubry, A.

    2017-12-01

    This work aims at extending to seismic imaging a matrix approach of wave propagation in heterogeneous media, previously developed in acoustics and optics. More specifically, we will apply this approach to the imaging of the Erebus volcano in Antarctica. Volcanoes are actually among the most challenging media to explore seismically in light of highly localized and abrupt variations in density and wave velocity, extreme topography, extensive fractures, and the presence of magma. In this strongly scattering regime, conventional imaging methods suffer from the multiple scattering of waves. Our approach experimentally relies on the measurement of a reflection matrix associated with an array of geophones located at the surface of the volcano. Although these sensors are purely passive, a set of Green's functions can be measured between all pairs of geophones from ice-quake coda cross-correlations (1-10 Hz) and forms the reflection matrix. A set of matrix operations can then be applied for imaging purposes. First, the reflection matrix is projected, at each time of flight, in the ballistic focal plane by applying adaptive focusing at emission and reception. It yields a response matrix associated with an array of virtual geophones located at the ballistic depth. This basis allows us to get rid of most of the multiple scattering contribution by applying a confocal filter to seismic data. Iterative time reversal is then applied to detect and image the strongest scatterers. Mathematically, it consists in performing a singular value decomposition of the reflection matrix. The presence of a potential target is assessed from a statistical analysis of the singular values, while the corresponding eigenvectors yield the corresponding target images. When stacked, the results obtained at each depth give a three-dimensional image of the volcano. While conventional imaging methods lead to a speckle image with no connection to the actual medium's reflectivity, our method enables to

  17. A real-space stochastic density matrix approach for density functional electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Beck, Thomas L

    2015-12-21

    The recent development of real-space grid methods has led to more efficient, accurate, and adaptable approaches for large-scale electrostatics and density functional electronic structure modeling. With the incorporation of multiscale techniques, linear-scaling real-space solvers are possible for density functional problems if localized orbitals are used to represent the Kohn-Sham energy functional. These methods still suffer from high computational and storage overheads, however, due to extensive matrix operations related to the underlying wave function grid representation. In this paper, an alternative stochastic method is outlined that aims to solve directly for the one-electron density matrix in real space. In order to illustrate aspects of the method, model calculations are performed for simple one-dimensional problems that display some features of the more general problem, such as spatial nodes in the density matrix. This orbital-free approach may prove helpful considering a future involving increasingly parallel computing architectures. Its primary advantage is the near-locality of the random walks, allowing for simultaneous updates of the density matrix in different regions of space partitioned across the processors. In addition, it allows for testing and enforcement of the particle number and idempotency constraints through stabilization of a Feynman-Kac functional integral as opposed to the extensive matrix operations in traditional approaches.

  18. Discreet passive explosive detection through 2-sided waveguided fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Harper, Ross James [Stillwater, OK; la Grone, Marcus [Cushing, OK; Fisher, Mark [Stillwater, OK

    2011-10-18

    The current invention provides a passive sampling device suitable for collecting and detecting the presence of target analytes. In particular, the passive sampling device is suitable for detecting nitro-aromatic compounds. The current invention further provides a passive sampling device reader suitable for determining the collection of target analytes. Additionally, the current invention provides methods for detecting target analytes using the passive sampling device and the passive sampling device reader.

  19. K-Shell Photoionization of Nickel Ions Using R-Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witthoeft, M. C.; Bautista, M. A.; Garcia, J.; Kallman, T. R.; Mendoza, C.; Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.

    2011-01-01

    We present R-matrix calculations of photoabsorption and photoionization cross sections across the K edge of the Li-like to Ca-like ions stages of Ni. Level-resolved, Breit-Pauli calculations were performed for the Li-like to Na-like stages. Term-resolved calculations, which include the mass-velocity and Darwin relativistic corrections, were performed for the Mg-like to Ca-like ion stages. This data set is extended up to Fe-like Ni using the distorted wave approximation as implemented by AUTOSTRUCTURE. The R-matrix calculations include the effects of radiative and Auger dampings by means of an optical potential. The damping processes affect the absorption resonances converging to the K thresholds causing them to display symmetric profiles of constant width that smear the otherwise sharp edge at the K-shell photoionization threshold. These data are important for the modeling of features found in photoionized plasmas.

  20. Liquid Crystal Airborne Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    Cum.nings, J. P., et al., Properties and Limitations oe Liquid Crystals for Aircraft Displays, Honeywell Corporate Researc ."I Center, Final Report HR-72...basic module could be used to build displays for both the commercial and military! 157- marhecs, and so would establi sh a broad and sizable market ... market for the display becomes a reality; therein lies, f TABLE 16 THE COURSE OF FUTURE DISPLAY DEVELOPMENT Today 1976-77 1980 1985 Display Size 2" 1 3.2

  1. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Rosenberg, A.H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest. 1 fig.

  2. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Rosenberg, Alan H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest.

  3. Modeling of Passive Forces of Machine Tool Covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolar, Petr; Hudec, Jan; Sulitka, Matej

    The passive forces acting against the drive force are phenomena that influence dynamical properties and precision of linear axes equipped with feed drives. Covers are one of important sources of passive forces in machine tools. The paper describes virtual evaluation of cover passive forces using the cover complex model. The model is able to compute interaction between flexible cover segments and sealing wiper. The result is deformation of cover segments and wipers which is used together with measured friction coefficient for computation of cover total passive force. This resulting passive force is dependent on cover position. Comparison of computational results and measurement on the real cover is presented in the paper.

  4. Using paired visual and passive acoustic surveys to estimate passive acoustic detection parameters for harbor porpoise abundance estimates.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Eiren K; Forney, Karin A; Barlow, Jay

    2017-01-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring is a promising approach for monitoring long-term trends in harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) abundance. Before passive acoustic monitoring can be implemented to estimate harbor porpoise abundance, information about the detectability of harbor porpoise is needed to convert recorded numbers of echolocation clicks to harbor porpoise densities. In the present study, paired data from a grid of nine passive acoustic click detectors (C-PODs, Chelonia Ltd., United Kingdom) and three days of simultaneous aerial line-transect visual surveys were collected over a 370 km 2 study area. The focus of the study was estimating the effective detection area of the passive acoustic sensors, which was defined as the product of the sound production rate of individual animals and the area within which those sounds are detected by the passive acoustic sensors. Visually estimated porpoise densities were used as informative priors in a Bayesian model to solve for the effective detection area for individual harbor porpoises. This model-based approach resulted in a posterior distribution of the effective detection area of individual harbor porpoises consistent with previously published values. This technique is a viable alternative for estimating the effective detection area of passive acoustic sensors when other experimental approaches are not feasible.

  5. JAVA Stereo Display Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Karina

    2008-01-01

    This toolkit provides a common interface for displaying graphical user interface (GUI) components in stereo using either specialized stereo display hardware (e.g., liquid crystal shutter or polarized glasses) or anaglyph display (red/blue glasses) on standard workstation displays. An application using this toolkit will work without modification in either environment, allowing stereo software to reach a wider audience without sacrificing high-quality display on dedicated hardware. The toolkit is written in Java for use with the Swing GUI Toolkit and has cross-platform compatibility. It hooks into the graphics system, allowing any standard Swing component to be displayed in stereo. It uses the OpenGL graphics library to control the stereo hardware and to perform the rendering. It also supports anaglyph and special stereo hardware using the same API (application-program interface), and has the ability to simulate color stereo in anaglyph mode by combining the red band of the left image with the green/blue bands of the right image. This is a low-level toolkit that accomplishes simply the display of components (including the JadeDisplay image display component). It does not include higher-level functions such as disparity adjustment, 3D cursor, or overlays all of which can be built using this toolkit.

  6. 76 FR 72875 - Passive Activity Losses and Credits Limited

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... Passive Activity Losses and Credits Limited AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION... losses from passive activities. Section 469(b) permits passive losses disallowed in one year to be carried over to the next year. Section 469(c)(1) provides that a passive activity means any activity which...

  7. Active matrix organic light emitting diode (OLED)-XL life test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellowes, David A.; Wood, Michael V.; Hastings, Arthur R., Jr.; Ghosh, Amalkumar P.; Prache, Olivier

    2008-04-01

    OLED displays have been known to exhibit high levels of performance with regards to contrast, response time, uniformity, and viewing angle, but a lifetime improvement has been perceived to be essential for broadening the applications of OLED's in the military and in the commercial market. As a result of this need, the US Army and eMagin Corporation established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to improve the lifetime of OLED displays. In 2006, eMagin Corporation developed long-life OLED-XL devices for use in their AMOLED microdisplays for head-worn applications, and RDECOM CERDEC NVESD ran life tests on these displays, finding over 200% lifetime improvement for the XL devices over the standard displays. Early results were published at the 2007 SPIE Defense and Security Symposium. Further life testing of XL and standard devices at ambient conditions and at high temperatures will be presented this year along with a recap of previous data. This should result in a better understanding of the applicability of AMOLEDs in military and commercial head mounted systems: where good fits are made, and where further development might be needed. This is a continuation of the paper "Life test results of OLED-XL long-life devices for use in active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) displays for head mounted applications" presented at SPIE DSS in 2007.

  8. Interferometric inversion for passive imaging and navigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2017-0096 Interferometric inversion for passive imaging and navigation Laurent Demanet MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Final...COVERED (From - To) Feb 2015-Jan 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Interferometric inversion for passive imaging and navigation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...Grant title: Interferometric inversion for passive imaging and navigation • Grant number: FA9550-15-1-0078 • Period: Feburary 2015 - January 2017

  9. Assessment of Eye Fatigue Caused by 3D Displays Based on Multimodal Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Jae Won; Heo, Hwan; Choi, Jong-Suk; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2014-01-01

    With the development of 3D displays, user's eye fatigue has been an important issue when viewing these displays. There have been previous studies conducted on eye fatigue related to 3D display use, however, most of these have employed a limited number of modalities for measurements, such as electroencephalograms (EEGs), biomedical signals, and eye responses. In this paper, we propose a new assessment of eye fatigue related to 3D display use based on multimodal measurements. compared to previous works Our research is novel in the following four ways: first, to enhance the accuracy of assessment of eye fatigue, we measure EEG signals, eye blinking rate (BR), facial temperature (FT), and a subjective evaluation (SE) score before and after a user watches a 3D display; second, in order to accurately measure BR in a manner that is convenient for the user, we implement a remote gaze-tracking system using a high speed (mega-pixel) camera that measures eye blinks of both eyes; thirdly, changes in the FT are measured using a remote thermal camera, which can enhance the measurement of eye fatigue, and fourth, we perform various statistical analyses to evaluate the correlation between the EEG signal, eye BR, FT, and the SE score based on the T-test, correlation matrix, and effect size. Results show that the correlation of the SE with other data (FT, BR, and EEG) is the highest, while those of the FT, BR, and EEG with other data are second, third, and fourth highest, respectively. PMID:25192315

  10. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

  11. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1994-01-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

  12. Anomalous scaling of passive scalars in rotating flows.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Imazio, P; Mininni, P D

    2011-06-01

    We present results of direct numerical simulations of passive scalar advection and diffusion in turbulent rotating flows. Scaling laws and the development of anisotropy are studied in spectral space, and in real space using an axisymmetric decomposition of velocity and passive scalar structure functions. The passive scalar is more anisotropic than the velocity field, and its power spectrum follows a spectral law consistent with ~ k[Please see text](-3/2). This scaling is explained with phenomenological arguments that consider the effect of rotation. Intermittency is characterized using scaling exponents and probability density functions of velocity and passive scalar increments. In the presence of rotation, intermittency in the velocity field decreases more noticeably than in the passive scalar. The scaling exponents show good agreement with Kraichnan's prediction for passive scalar intermittency in two dimensions, after correcting for the observed scaling of the second-order exponent.

  13. Display Tactics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetlow, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Display took a wide variety of forms ranging from students presenting their initial planning and thought processes, to displays of their finished work, and their suggestions for extending the task should they, or others, have time to return to it in the future. A variety of different media were used from traditional posters in many shapes and…

  14. Wireless passive radiation sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G

    2013-12-03

    A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

  15. Effective surface passivation of multi-shelled InP quantum dots through a simple complexing with titanium species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Jung-Ho; Kim, Min-Seok; Han, Chang-Yeol; Jang, Eun-Pyo; Do, Young Rag; Yang, Heesun

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescent efficiency of various visible quantum dots (QDs) has been incessantly improved to meet industrially high standard mainly through the advance in core/shell heterostructural design, however, their stability against degradable environments appears still lacking. The most viable strategy to cope with this issue was to exploit chemically inert oxide phases to passivate QD surface in the form of either individual overcoating or matrix embedding. Herein, we report a simple but effective means to passivate QD surface by complexing its organic ligands with a metal alkoxide of titanium isopropoxide (Ti(i-PrO)4). For this, highly efficient red-emitting InP QDs with a multi-shell structure of ZnSeS intermediate plus ZnS outer shell are first synthesized and then the surface of resulting InP/ZnSeS/ZnS QDs is in-situ decorated with Ti(i-PrO)4. The presence of Tisbnd O species from Ti(i-PrO)4 on QD surface is verified by x-ray photoelectron and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analyses. Two comparative dispersions of pristine versus Ti(i-PrO)4-complexed QDs are exposed for certain periods of time to UV photon and heat and their temporal changes in photoluminescence are monitored, resulting in a huge improvement in QD stability from the latter ones through Ti(i-PrO)4-mediated better surface passivation.

  16. Displays and simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohon, N.

    A 'simulator' is defined as a machine which imitates the behavior of a real system in a very precise manner. The major components of a simulator and their interaction are outlined in brief form, taking into account the major components of an aircraft flight simulator. Particular attention is given to the visual display portion of the simulator, the basic components of the display, their interactions, and their characteristics. Real image displays are considered along with virtual image displays, and image generators. Attention is given to an advanced simulator for pilot training, a holographic pancake window, a scan laser image generator, the construction of an infrared target simulator, and the Apollo Command Module Simulator.

  17. A direct passive method for measuring water and contaminant fluxes in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatfield, Kirk; Annable, Michael; Cho, Jaehyun; Rao, P. S. C.; Klammler, Harald

    2004-12-01

    This paper introduces a new direct method for measuring water and contaminant fluxes in porous media. The method uses a passive flux meter (PFM), which is essentially a self-contained permeable unit properly sized to fit tightly in a screened well or boring. The meter is designed to accommodate a mixed medium of hydrophobic and/or hydrophilic permeable sorbents, which retain dissolved organic/inorganic contaminants present in the groundwater flowing passively through the meter. The contaminant mass intercepted and retained on the sorbent is used to quantify cumulative contaminant mass flux. The sorptive matrix is also impregnated with known amounts of one or more water soluble 'resident tracers'. These tracers are displaced from the sorbent at rates proportional to the groundwater flux; hence, in the current meter design, the resident tracers are used to quantify cumulative groundwater flux. Theory is presented and quantitative tools are developed to interpret the water flux from tracers possessing linear and nonlinear elution profiles. The same theory is extended to derive functional relationships useful for quantifying cumulative contaminant mass flux. To validate theory and demonstrate the passive flux meter, results of multiple box-aquifer experiments are presented and discussed. From these experiments, it is seen that accurate water flux measurements are obtained when the tracer used in calculations resides in the meter at levels representing 20 to 70 percent of the initial condition. 2,4-Dimethyl-3-pentanol (DMP) is used as a surrogate groundwater contaminant in the box aquifer experiments. Cumulative DMP fluxes are measured within 5% of known fluxes. The accuracy of these estimates generally increases with the total volume of water intercepted.

  18. Passive OCT probe head for 3D duct inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Helen D.; Tatam, Ralph P.

    2013-09-01

    A passive, endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) probe has been demonstrated, incorporating an imaging fibre bundle and 45° conical mirror, and with no electromechanical components at the probe tip. Circular scanning, of the beam projected onto the proximal face of the imaging bundle, produces a corresponding circular scan at the distal end of the bundle. The beam is turned through 90° by the conical mirror and converted into a radially-scanned sample beam, permitting circumferential OCT scanning in quasi-cylindrical ducts. OCT images, displayed as polar plots and as 3D reconstructions, are presented, showing the internal profile of a metallic test sample containing a 660 µm step in the internal wall. Results have been acquired using two methods: one that makes use of multiple beam-circle diameters, and a mechanical ‘pull-back’ technique. The effects of the convex surface of the conical mirror on spatial resolution are discussed, with suggested working distances given for different application regimes.

  19. Effect of protein properties on display efficiency using the M13 phage display system.

    PubMed

    Imai, S; Mukai, Y; Takeda, T; Abe, Y; Nagano, K; Kamada, H; Nakagawa, S; Tsunoda, S; Tsutsumi, Y

    2008-10-01

    The M13 phage display system is a powerful technology for engineering proteins such as functional mutant proteins and peptides. In this system, it is necessary that the protein is displayed on the phage surface. Therefore, its application is often limited when a protein is poorly displayed. In this study, we attempted to understand the relationship between a protein's properties and its display efficiency using the well-known pIII and pVIII type phage display system. The display of positively charged SV40 NLS and HIV-1 Tat peptides on pill was less efficient than that of the neutrally charged RGDS peptide. When different molecular weight proteins (1.5-58 kDa) were displayed on pIII and pVIII, their display efficiencies were directly influenced by their molecular weights. These results indicate the usefulness in predicting a desired protein's compatibility with protein and peptide engineering using the phage display system.

  20. Displays enabling mobile multimedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Jyrki

    2007-02-01

    With the rapid advances in telecommunications networks, mobile multimedia delivery to handsets is now a reality. While a truly immersive multimedia experience is still far ahead in the mobile world, significant advances have been made in the constituent audio-visual technologies to make this become possible. One of the critical components in multimedia delivery is the mobile handset display. While such alternatives as headset-style near-to-eye displays, autostereoscopic displays, mini-projectors, and roll-out flexible displays can deliver either a larger virtual screen size than the pocketable dimensions of the mobile device can offer, or an added degree of immersion by adding the illusion of the third dimension in the viewing experience, there are still challenges in the full deployment of such displays in real-life mobile communication terminals. Meanwhile, direct-view display technologies have developed steadily, and can provide a development platform for an even better viewing experience for multimedia in the near future. The paper presents an overview of the mobile display technology space with an emphasis on the advances and potential in developing direct-view displays further to meet the goal of enabling multimedia in the mobile domain.

  1. An Uncertainty Structure Matrix for Models and Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence L.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Hemsch, Michael J.; Luckring, James M.; Tripathi, Ram K.

    2008-01-01

    Software that is used for aerospace flight control and to display information to pilots and crew is expected to be correct and credible at all times. This type of software is typically developed under strict management processes, which are intended to reduce defects in the software product. However, modeling and simulation (M&S) software may exhibit varying degrees of correctness and credibility, depending on a large and complex set of factors. These factors include its intended use, the known physics and numerical approximations within the M&S, and the referent data set against which the M&S correctness is compared. The correctness and credibility of an M&S effort is closely correlated to the uncertainty management (UM) practices that are applied to the M&S effort. This paper describes an uncertainty structure matrix for M&S, which provides a set of objective descriptions for the possible states of UM practices within a given M&S effort. The columns in the uncertainty structure matrix contain UM elements or practices that are common across most M&S efforts, and the rows describe the potential levels of achievement in each of the elements. A practitioner can quickly look at the matrix to determine where an M&S effort falls based on a common set of UM practices that are described in absolute terms that can be applied to virtually any M&S effort. The matrix can also be used to plan those steps and resources that would be needed to improve the UM practices for a given M&S effort.

  2. A study of the diffusional behavior of a two-phase metal matrix composite exposed to a high temperature environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    The progress of diffusion-controlled filament-matrix interaction in a metal matrix composite where the filaments and matrix comprise a two-phase binary alloy system was studied by mathematically modeling compositional changes resulting from prolonged elevated temperature exposure. The analysis treats a finite, diffusion-controlled, two-phase moving-interface problem by means of a variable-grid finite-difference technique. The Ni-W system was selected as an example system. Modeling was carried out for the 1000 to 1200 C temperature range for unidirectional composites containing from 6 to 40 volume percent tungsten filaments in a Ni matrix. The results are displayed to show both the change in filament diameter and matrix composition as a function of exposure time. Compositional profiles produced between first and second nearest neighbor filaments were calculated by superposition of finite-difference solutions of the diffusion equations.

  3. Development of a novel rDNA based plasmid for enhanced cell surface display on Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Bulani, Siyavuya Ishmael; Moleleki, Lucy; Albertyn, Jacobus; Moleleki, Ntsane

    2012-05-20

    In this study, a novel rDNA based plasmid was developed for display of heterologous proteins on the cell surface of Yarrowia lipolytica using the C-terminal end of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored Y. lipolytica cell wall protein 1 (YlCWP1). mCherry was used as a model protein to assess the efficiency of the constructed plasmid. Y. lipolytica transformants harbouring the expression cassettes showed a purple colour phenotype on selective YNB-casamino plates as compared to control cells indicating that mCherry was displayed on the cells. Expression of mCherry on cells of Y. lipolytica was confirmed by both fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. Furthermore, SDS-PAGE analysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-time-of (TOF)-mass spectrometry (MS) peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) confirmed that the protein cleaved from the yeast cells using enterokinase was mCherry. Efficient cleavage of mCherry reported in this work offers an alternative purification method for displayed heterologous proteins on Y. lipolytica cells using the plasmid constructed in this study. The developed displaying system offers great potential for industrial production and purification of heterologous proteins at low cost.

  4. Vertical Diffusivities of Active and Passive Tracers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Cheng, Y.; Howard, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    The climate models that include a carbon-cycle need the vertical diffusivity of a passive tracer. Since an expression for the latter is not available, it has been common practice to identify it with that of salt. The identification is questionable since T, S are active, not passive tracers. We present the first derivation of the diffusivity of a passive tracer in terms of Ri (Richardson number) and Rq (density ratio, ratio of salinity over temperature z-gradients). The following results have emerged: (a) The passive tracer diffusivity is an algebraic function of Ri, Rq. (b) In doubly stable regimes (DS, partial derivative of T with respect to z > 0, partial derivative of S with respect to z < 0), the passive scalar diffusivity is nearly the same as that of salt/heat for any values of Rq < 0 and Ri > 0. (c) In DC regimes (diffusive convection, partial derivative of T with respect to z < 0, partial derivative of S with respect to z < 0, Rq > 1), the passive scalar diffusivity is larger than that of salt. At Ri = O(1), it can be more than twice as large. (d) In SF regimes (salt fingers, partial derivative of T with respect to z > 0, partial derivative of S with respect to z > 0, Rq < 1), the passive scalar diffusivity is smaller than that of salt. At Ri = O(1), it can be less than half of it. (e) The passive tracer diffusivity predicted at the location of NATRE (North Atlantic Tracer Release Experiment) is discussed. (f) Perhaps the most relevant conclusion is that the common identification of the tracer diffusivity with that of salt is valid only in DS regimes. In the Southern Ocean, where there is the largest CO2 absorption, the dominant regime is diffusive convection discussed in (c) above.

  5. Evaluation of the swelling behaviour of iota-carrageenan in monolithic matrix tablets.

    PubMed

    Kelemen, András; Buchholcz, Gyula; Sovány, Tamás; Pintye-Hódi, Klára

    2015-08-10

    The swelling properties of monolithic matrix tablets containing iota-carrageenan were studied at different pH values, with measurements of the swelling force and characterization of the profile of the swelling curve. The swelling force meter was linked to a PC by an RS232 cable and the measured data were evaluated with self-developed software. The monitor displayed the swelling force vs. time curve with the important parameters, which could be fitted with an Analysis menu. In the case of iota-carrageenan matrix tablets, it was concluded that the pH and the pressure did not influence the swelling process, and the first section of the swelling curve could be fitted by the Korsmeyer-Peppas equation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. EMU helmet mounted display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marmolejo, Jose (Inventor); Smith, Stephen (Inventor); Plough, Alan (Inventor); Clarke, Robert (Inventor); Mclean, William (Inventor); Fournier, Joseph (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A helmet mounted display device is disclosed for projecting a display on a flat combiner surface located above the line of sight where the display is produced by two independent optical channels with independent LCD image generators. The display has a fully overlapped field of view on the combiner surface and the focus can be adjusted from a near field of four feet to infinity.

  7. Antenna for passive RFID tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiopu, Paul; Manea, Adrian; Cristea, Ionica; Grosu, Neculai; Vladescu, Marian; Craciun, Anca-Ileana; Craciun, Alexandru

    2015-02-01

    Minuscule devices, called RFID tags are attached to objects and persons and emit information which positioned readers may capture wirelessly. Many methods of identification have been used, but that of most common is to use a unique serial number for identification of person or object. RFID tags can be characterized as either active or passive [1,2]. Traditional passive tags are typically in "sleep" state until awakened by the reader's emitted field. In passive tags, the reader's field acts to charge the capacitor that powers the badge and this can be a combination of antenna and barcodes obtained with SAW( Surface Acoustic Wave) devices [1,2,3] . The antenna in an RFID tag is a conductive element that permits the tag to exchange data with the reader. The paper contribution are targeted to antenna for passive RFID tags. The electromagnetic field generated by the reader is somehow oriented by the reader antenna and power is induced in the tag only if the orientation of the tag antenna is appropriate. A tag placed orthogonal to the reader yield field will not be read. This is the reason that guided manufacturers to build circular polarized antenna capable of propagating a field that is alternatively polarized on all planes passing on the diffusion axis. Passive RFID tags are operated at the UHF frequencies of 868MHz (Europe) and 915MHz (USA) and at the microwave frequencies of 2,45 GHz and 5,8 GHz . Because the tags are small dimensions, in paper, we present the possibility to use circular polarization microstrip antenna with fractal edge [2].

  8. Passive cooling during transport of asphyxiated term newborns

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Deirdre; Labrecque, Michelle; O’Melia, Michael; Bacic, Janine; Hansen, Anne; Soul, Janet S

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of passive cooling during transport of asphyxiated newborns. Study Design Retrospective medical record review of newborns with perinatal asphyxia transported for hypothermia between July 2007 and June 2010. Results Forty-three newborns were transported, 27 of whom were passively cooled. Twenty (74%) passively cooled newborns arrived with axillary temperature between 32.5 and 34.5 °C. One newborn (4%) arrived with a subtherapeutic temperature, and 6 (22%) had temperatures >34.5 °C. Time from birth to hypothermia was significantly shorter among passively cooled newborns compared with newborns not cooled (215 vs. 327 minutes, p<0.01), even though time from birth to arrival was similar (252 vs. 259 minutes, p=0.77). There were no significant adverse events related to passive cooling. Conclusions Exclusive passive cooling for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy results in significantly earlier achievement of effective therapeutic hypothermia without significant adverse events. PMID:23154670

  9. Enabling high grayscale resolution displays and accurate response time measurements on conventional computers.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangrui; Lu, Zhong-Lin

    2012-02-29

    Display systems based on conventional computer graphics cards are capable of generating images with 8-bit gray level resolution. However, most experiments in vision research require displays with more than 12 bits of luminance resolution. Several solutions are available. Bit++ (1) and DataPixx (2) use the Digital Visual Interface (DVI) output from graphics cards and high resolution (14 or 16-bit) digital-to-analog converters to drive analog display devices. The VideoSwitcher (3) described here combines analog video signals from the red and blue channels of graphics cards with different weights using a passive resister network (4) and an active circuit to deliver identical video signals to the three channels of color monitors. The method provides an inexpensive way to enable high-resolution monochromatic displays using conventional graphics cards and analog monitors. It can also provide trigger signals that can be used to mark stimulus onsets, making it easy to synchronize visual displays with physiological recordings or response time measurements. Although computer keyboards and mice are frequently used in measuring response times (RT), the accuracy of these measurements is quite low. The RTbox is a specialized hardware and software solution for accurate RT measurements. Connected to the host computer through a USB connection, the driver of the RTbox is compatible with all conventional operating systems. It uses a microprocessor and high-resolution clock to record the identities and timing of button events, which are buffered until the host computer retrieves them. The recorded button events are not affected by potential timing uncertainties or biases associated with data transmission and processing in the host computer. The asynchronous storage greatly simplifies the design of user programs. Several methods are available to synchronize the clocks of the RTbox and the host computer. The RTbox can also receive external triggers and be used to measure RT with respect

  10. Active subjects of passive monitoring: responses to a passive monitoring system in low-income independent living

    PubMed Central

    BERRIDGE, CLARA

    2016-01-01

    Passive monitoring technology is beginning to be reimbursed by third-party payers in the United States of America. Given the low voluntary uptake of these technologies on the market, it is important to understand the concerns and perspectives of users, former users and non-users. In this paper, the range of ways older adults relate to passive monitoring in low-income independent-living residences is presented. This includes experiences of adoption, non-adoption, discontinuation and creative ‘misuse’. The analysis of interviews reveals three key insights. First, assumptions built into the technology about how older adults live present a problem for many users who experience unwanted disruptions and threats to their behavioural autonomy. Second, resident response is varied and challenges the dominant image of residents as passive subjects of a passive monitoring system. Third, the priorities of older adults (e.g. safety, autonomy, privacy, control, contact) are more diverse and multi-faceted than those of the housing organisation staff and family members (e.g. safety, efficiency) who drive the passive monitoring intervention. The tension between needs, desires and the daily lives of older adults and the technological solutions offered to them is made visible by their active responses, including resistance to them. This exposes the active and meaningful qualities of older adults’ decisions and practices. PMID:28239211

  11. Low cost passive solar adobe house

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-12-21

    A brief description, photographs, and cost breakdown of a hybrid direct-gain passive solar adobe house constructed in the City of El Paso, Texas. The 3-panel active solar domestic hot water system acts as a back-up to the direct gain passive system.

  12. Passive Solar Heating Residences.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    concerned, as long as the basic system falls within one of the passive concepts, then it is a passive system. If a fan can increase the system~s...wood walls and roof is R-22, in the block walls (urea-formaldahyde foam sprayed in wall cavity) is R-30, and a 4" styro- foam board at the slab edge (R...is based cn 1,000 BTU/sq. ft./day, which is a clear day value. The south windows have reflectors which will increase the energy gained (30% by Steve

  13. A small mammal community in a forest fragment, vegetation corridor and coffee matrix system in the Brazilian Atlantic forest.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Mariana Ferreira; Passamani, Marcelo; Louzada, Júlio

    2011-01-01

    The objective of our work was to verify the value of the vegetation corridor in the conservation of small mammals in fragmented tropical landscapes, using a model system in the southeastern Minas Gerais. We evaluated and compared the composition and structure of small mammals in a vegetation corridor, forest fragments and a coffee matrix. A total of 15 species were recorded, and the highest species richness was observed in the vegetation corridor (13 species), followed by the forest fragments (10) and the coffee matrix (6). The absolute abundance was similar between the vegetation corridor and fragments (F = 22.94; p = 0.064), and the greatest differences occurred between the vegetation corridor and the matrix (F = 22.94; p = 0.001) and the forest fragments and the matrix (F = 22.94; p = 0.007). Six species showed significant habitat preference possibly related to the sensitivity of the species to the forest disturbance. Marmosops incanus was the species most sensitive to disturbance; Akodon montensis, Cerradomys subflavus, Gracilinanus microtarsus and Rhipidomys sp. displayed little sensitivity to disturbance, with a high relative abundance in the vegetation corridor. Calomys sp. was the species least affected by habitat disturbance, displaying a high relative abundance in the coffee matrix. Although the vegetation corridors are narrow (4 m width), our results support the hypothesis in which they work as a forest extension, share most species with the forest fragment and support species richness and abundance closer to forest fragments than to the coffee matrix. Our work highlights the importance and cost-effectiveness of these corridors to biodiversity management in the fragmented Atlantic Forest landscapes and at the regional level.

  14. A Small Mammal Community in a Forest Fragment, Vegetation Corridor and Coffee Matrix System in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Mariana Ferreira; Passamani, Marcelo; Louzada, Júlio

    2011-01-01

    The objective of our work was to verify the value of the vegetation corridor in the conservation of small mammals in fragmented tropical landscapes, using a model system in the southeastern Minas Gerais. We evaluated and compared the composition and structure of small mammals in a vegetation corridor, forest fragments and a coffee matrix. A total of 15 species were recorded, and the highest species richness was observed in the vegetation corridor (13 species), followed by the forest fragments (10) and the coffee matrix (6). The absolute abundance was similar between the vegetation corridor and fragments (F = 22.94; p = 0.064), and the greatest differences occurred between the vegetation corridor and the matrix (F = 22.94; p = 0.001) and the forest fragments and the matrix (F = 22.94; p = 0.007). Six species showed significant habitat preference possibly related to the sensitivity of the species to the forest disturbance. Marmosops incanus was the species most sensitive to disturbance; Akodon montensis, Cerradomys subflavus, Gracilinanus microtarsus and Rhipidomys sp. displayed little sensitivity to disturbance, with a high relative abundance in the vegetation corridor. Calomys sp. was the species least affected by habitat disturbance, displaying a high relative abundance in the coffee matrix. Although the vegetation corridors are narrow (4 m width), our results support the hypothesis in which they work as a forest extension, share most species with the forest fragment and support species richness and abundance closer to forest fragments than to the coffee matrix. Our work highlights the importance and cost-effectiveness of these corridors to biodiversity management in the fragmented Atlantic Forest landscapes and at the regional level. PMID:21912591

  15. Passive Superconducting Shielding: Experimental Results and Computer Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, B. A.; Kamiya, K.

    2003-01-01

    Passive superconducting shielding for magnetic refrigerators has advantages over active shielding and passive ferromagnetic shielding in that it is lightweight and easy to construct. However, it is not as easy to model and does not fail gracefully. Failure of a passive superconducting shield may lead to persistent flux and persistent currents. Unfortunately, modeling software for superconducting materials is not as easily available as is software for simple coils or for ferromagnetic materials. This paper will discuss ways of using available software to model passive superconducting shielding.

  16. Configurations and calibration methods for passive sampling techniques.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Gangfeng; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2007-10-19

    Passive sampling technology has developed very quickly in the past 15 years, and is widely used for the monitoring of pollutants in different environments. The design and quantification of passive sampling devices require an appropriate calibration method. Current calibration methods that exist for passive sampling, including equilibrium extraction, linear uptake, and kinetic calibration, are presented in this review. A number of state-of-the-art passive sampling devices that can be used for aqueous and air monitoring are introduced according to their calibration methods.

  17. A photophoretic-trap volumetric display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalley, D. E.; Nygaard, E.; Squire, K.; van Wagoner, J.; Rasmussen, J.; Gneiting, S.; Qaderi, K.; Goodsell, J.; Rogers, W.; Lindsey, M.; Costner, K.; Monk, A.; Pearson, M.; Haymore, B.; Peatross, J.

    2018-01-01

    Free-space volumetric displays, or displays that create luminous image points in space, are the technology that most closely resembles the three-dimensional displays of popular fiction. Such displays are capable of producing images in ‘thin air’ that are visible from almost any direction and are not subject to clipping. Clipping restricts the utility of all three-dimensional displays that modulate light at a two-dimensional surface with an edge boundary; these include holographic displays, nanophotonic arrays, plasmonic displays, lenticular or lenslet displays and all technologies in which the light scattering surface and the image point are physically separate. Here we present a free-space volumetric display based on photophoretic optical trapping that produces full-colour graphics in free space with ten-micrometre image points using persistence of vision. This display works by first isolating a cellulose particle in a photophoretic trap created by spherical and astigmatic aberrations. The trap and particle are then scanned through a display volume while being illuminated with red, green and blue light. The result is a three-dimensional image in free space with a large colour gamut, fine detail and low apparent speckle. This platform, named the Optical Trap Display, is capable of producing image geometries that are currently unobtainable with holographic and light-field technologies, such as long-throw projections, tall sandtables and ‘wrap-around’ displays.

  18. Map display design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aretz, Anthony J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a cognitive model of a pilot's navigation task and describes an experiment comparing a visual momentum map display to the traditional track-up and north-up approaches. The data show the advantage to a track-up map is its congruence with the ego-centered forward view; however, the development of survey knowledge is hindered by the inconsistency of the rotating display. The stable alignment of a north-up map aids the acquisition of survey knowledge, but there is a cost associated with the mental rotation of the display to a track-up alignment for ego-centered tasks. The results also show that visual momentum can be used to reduce the mental rotation costs of a north-up display.

  19. Print media coverage of research on passive smoking

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, G.; Bero, L.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the extent and content of newspaper and magazine coverage of research on passive smoking.
DESIGN—Content analysis of newspaper and magazine articles.
SUBJECTS—Articles reporting on passive smoking research published in newspapers (n = 180) or magazines (n = 92) between January 1981 and December 1994.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Numbers of articles, conclusions of articles, sources quoted, numbers and characteristics of research studies cited, presence of tobacco advertising.
RESULTS—The number of newspaper and magazine articles reporting on passive smoking research increased from four in 1981 to 57 in 1992 and 32 in 1994. Sixty-two per cent (168/272) of articles concluded that the research on passive smoking is controversial. Tobacco industry representatives were quoted significantly more often in newspaper articles (52%, 94/180) than magazine articles (12%, 11/92) (p<0.0001). Of 121 different research studies cited in the lay press articles, only 15 were from tobacco-industry sponsored projects or publications. In magazines, acceptance of tobacco industry advertising was associated with the conclusion that research on passive smoking is controversial (p<0.0001).
CONCLUSIONS—Although research on the harmful effects of passive smoking accumulated between 1981 and 1994, lay press coverage of the research maintained that the science was controversial. Few research studies were cited to support the industry's claim that passive smoking is not harmful to health. However, tobacco industry representatives who were critical of the research methods used to study the health effects of passive smoking were frequently quoted.


Keywords: environmental tobacco smoke; media; passive smoking PMID:10599568

  20. Passive hand movements disrupt adults' counting strategies.

    PubMed

    Imbo, Ineke; Vandierendonck, André; Fias, Wim

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we experimentally tested the role of hand motor circuits in simple-arithmetic strategies. Educated adults solved simple additions (e.g., 8 + 3) or simple subtractions (e.g., 11 - 3) while they were required to retrieve the answer from long-term memory (e.g., knowing that 8 + 3 = 11), to transform the problem by making an intermediate step (e.g., 8 + 3 = 8 + 2 + 1 = 10 + 1 = 11) or to count one-by-one (e.g., 8 + 3 = 8…9…10…11). During the process of solving the arithmetic problems, the experimenter did or did not move the participants' hand on a four-point matrix. The results show that passive hand movements disrupted the counting strategy while leaving the other strategies unaffected. This pattern of results is in agreement with a procedural account, showing that the involvement of hand motor circuits in adults' mathematical abilities is reminiscent of finger counting during childhood.

  1. Cellular automaton formulation of passive scalar dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Hudong; Matthaeus, William H.

    1987-01-01

    Cellular automata modeling of the advection of a passive scalar in a two-dimensional flow is examined in the context of discrete lattice kinetic theory. It is shown that if the passive scalar is represented by tagging or 'coloring' automation particles a passive advection-diffusion equation emerges without use of perturbation expansions. For the specific case of the hydrodynamic lattice gas model of Frisch et al. (1986), the diffusion coefficient is calculated by perturbation.

  2. Columbia County Habitat for Humanity Passive Townhomes

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2016-03-01

    Columbia County Habitat for Humanity (CCHH) (New York, Climate Zone 5A) built a pair of townhomes to Passive House Institute U.S. (PHIUS+ 2015) criteria to explore approaches for achieving Passive House performance (specifically with respect to exterior wall, space-conditioning, and ventilation strategies) within the labor and budget context inherent in a Habitat for Humanity project. CCHH’s goal is to eventually develop a cost-justified Passive House prototype design for future projects.

  3. Children's Control/Display Stereotypes.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Errol R; Chan, Alan H S; Tai, Judy P C

    2018-06-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine control/display stereotypes for children of a range of ages and development of these stereotypes with age. Background Little is known about control/display stereotypes for children of different ages and the way in which these stereotypes develop with age. This study is part of a program to determine the need to design differentially for these age groups. Method We tested four groups of children with various tasks (age groups 5 to 7, 8 to 10, 11 to 13, 14 to 16), with about 30 in each group. Examples of common tasks were opening a bottle, turning on taps, and allocating numbers to keypads. More complex tasks involved rotating a control to move a display in a requested direction. Results Tasks with which different age groups were familiar showed no effect of age group. Different control/display arrangements generally showed an increase in stereotype strength with age, with dependence on the form of the control/display arrangement. Two-dimensional arrangements, with the control on the same plane as the display, had higher stereotype strength than three-dimensional arrangements for all age groups, suggesting an effect of familiarity with controls and displays with increasing age. Conclusion Children's control/display stereotypes do not differ greatly from those of adults, and hence, design for children older than 5 years of age, for control/display stereotypes, can be the same as that for adult populations. Application When designing devices for children, the relationship between controls and displays can be as for adult populations, for which there are considerable experimental data.

  4. Passive Thermal Management of Foil Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods for passive thermal management of foil bearing systems are disclosed herein. The flow of the hydrodynamic film across the surface of bearing compliant foils may be disrupted to provide passive cooling and to improve the performance and reliability of the foil bearing system.

  5. Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Gorski, Anthony J.; Schertz, William W.

    1982-01-01

    A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

  6. Panoramic projection avionics displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmanash, Michael H.

    2003-09-01

    Avionics projection displays are entering production in advanced tactical aircraft. Early adopters of this technology in the avionics community used projection displays to replace or upgrade earlier units incorporating direct-view CRT or AMLCD devices. Typical motivation for these upgrades were the alleviation of performance, cost and display device availability concerns. In these systems, the upgraded (projection) displays were one-for-one form / fit replacements for the earlier units. As projection technology has matured, this situation has begun to evolve. The Lockheed-Martin F-35 is the first program in which the cockpit has been specifically designed to take advantage of one of the more unique capabilities of rear projection display technology, namely the ability to replace multiple small screens with a single large conformal viewing surface in the form of a panoramic display. Other programs are expected to follow, since the panoramic formats enable increased mission effectiveness, reduced cost and greater information transfer to the pilot. Some of the advantages and technical challenges associated with panoramic projection displays for avionics applications are described below.

  7. Can Passive Touch Be Better than Active Touch? A Comparison of Active and Passive Tactile Maze Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Barry L.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    In a comparison of the performance of active and passive mechanically yoked subjects who learned their way through a tactile maze, it was shown that active subjects made more errors and took a greater number of trials to reach criterion than did passive subjects. (Author)

  8. Proteome Profiles of Outer Membrane Vesicles and Extracellular Matrix of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Couto, Narciso; Schooling, Sarah R; Dutcher, John R; Barber, Jill

    2015-10-02

    In the present work, two different proteomic platforms, gel-based and gel-free, were used to map the matrix and outer membrane vesicle exoproteomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms. These two proteomic strategies allowed us a confident identification of 207 and 327 proteins from enriched outer membrane vesicles and whole matrix isolated from biofilms. Because of the physicochemical characteristics of these subproteomes, the two strategies showed complementarity, and thus, the most comprehensive analysis of P. aeruginosa exoproteome to date was achieved. Under our conditions, outer membrane vesicles contribute approximately 20% of the whole matrix proteome, demonstrating that membrane vesicles are an important component of the matrix. The proteomic profiles were analyzed in terms of their biological context, namely, a biofilm. Accordingly relevant metabolic processes involved in cellular adaptation to the biofilm lifestyle as well as those related to P. aeruginosa virulence capabilities were a key feature of the analyses. The diversity of the matrix proteome corroborates the idea of high heterogeneity within the biofilm; cells can display different levels of metabolism and can adapt to local microenvironments making this proteomic analysis challenging. In addition to analyzing our own primary data, we extend the analysis to published data by other groups in order to deepen our understanding of the complexity inherent within biofilm populations.

  9. Force-Balance Dynamic Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, Alice T.; White, William C.

    1988-01-01

    Balance dynamic display unit (BDDU) is compact system conditioning six dynamic analog signals so they are monitored simultaneously in real time on single-trace oscilloscope. Typical BDDU oscilloscope display in scan mode shows each channel occupying one-sixth of total trace. System features two display modes usable with conventional, single-channel oscilloscope: multiplexed six-channel "bar-graph" format and single-channel display. Two-stage visual and audible limit alarm provided for each channel.

  10. Passivated niobium cavities

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao [Yorktown, VA; Hjorvarsson, Bjorgvin [Lagga Arby, SE; Ciovati, Gianluigi [Newport News, VA

    2006-12-19

    A niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided by treating a niobium cavity through a process comprising: 1) removing surface oxides by plasma etching or a similar process; 2) removing hydrogen or other gases absorbed in the bulk niobium by high temperature treatment of the cavity under ultra high vacuum to achieve hydrogen outgassing; and 3) assuring the long term chemical stability of the niobium cavity by applying a passivating layer of a superconducting material having a superconducting transition temperature higher than niobium thereby reducing losses from electron (cooper pair) scattering in the near surface region of the interior of the niobium cavity. According to a preferred embodiment, the passivating layer comprises niobium nitride (NbN) applied by reactive sputtering.

  11. Augmenting digital displays with computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing

    As we inevitably step deeper and deeper into a world connected via the Internet, more and more information will be exchanged digitally. Displays are the interface between digital information and each individual. Naturally, one fundamental goal of displays is to reproduce information as realistically as possible since humans still care a lot about what happens in the real world. Human eyes are the receiving end of such information exchange; therefore it is impossible to study displays without studying the human visual system. In fact, the design of displays is rather closely coupled with what human eyes are capable of perceiving. For example, we are less interested in building displays that emit light in the invisible spectrum. This dissertation explores how we can augment displays with computation, which takes both display hardware and the human visual system into consideration. Four novel projects on display technologies are included in this dissertation: First, we propose a software-based approach to driving multiview autostereoscopic displays. Our display algorithm can dynamically assign views to hardware display zones based on multiple observers' current head positions, substantially reducing crosstalk and stereo inversion. Second, we present a dense projector array that creates a seamless 3D viewing experience for multiple viewers. We smoothly interpolate the set of viewer heights and distances on a per-vertex basis across the arrays field of view, reducing image distortion, crosstalk, and artifacts from tracking errors. Third, we propose a method for high dynamic range display calibration that takes into account the variation of the chrominance error over luminance. We propose a data structure for enabling efficient representation and querying of the calibration function, which also allows user-guided balancing between memory consumption and the amount of computation. Fourth, we present user studies that demonstrate that the ˜ 60 Hz critical flicker fusion

  12. Extracellular matrix regenerative graft attenuates the negative impact of polypropylene prolapse mesh on vagina in rhesus macaque.

    PubMed

    Liang, Rui; Knight, Katrina; Barone, William; Powers, Robert W; Nolfi, Alexis; Palcsey, Stacy; Abramowitch, Steven; Moalli, Pamela A

    2017-02-01

    The use of wide pore lightweight polypropylene mesh to improve anatomical outcomes in the surgical repair of prolapse has been hampered by mesh complications. One of the prototype prolapse meshes has been found to negatively impact the vagina by inducing a decrease in smooth muscle volume and contractility and the degradation of key structural proteins (collagen and elastin), resulting in vaginal degeneration. Recently, bioscaffolds derived from extracellular matrix have been used to mediate tissue regeneration and have been widely adopted in tissue engineering applications. Here we aimed to: (1) define whether augmentation of a polypropylene prolapse mesh with an extracellular matrix regenerative graft in a primate sacrocolpopexy model could mitigate the degenerative changes; and (2) determine the impact of the extracellular matrix graft on vagina when implanted alone. A polypropylene-extracellular matrix composite graft (n = 9) and a 6-layered extracellular matrix graft alone (n = 8) were implanted in 17 middle-aged parous rhesus macaques via sacrocolpopexy and compared to historical data obtained from sham (n = 12) and the polypropylene mesh (n = 12) implanted by the same method. Vaginal function was measured in passive (ball-burst test) and active (smooth muscle contractility) mechanical tests. Vaginal histomorphologic/biochemical assessments included hematoxylin-eosin and trichrome staining, immunofluorescent labeling of α-smooth muscle actin and apoptotic cells, measurement of total collagen, collagen subtypes (ratio III/I), mature elastin, and sulfated glycosaminoglycans. Statistical analyses included 1-way analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis, and appropriate post-hoc tests. The host inflammatory response in the composite mesh-implanted vagina was reduced compared to that following implantation with the polypropylene mesh alone. The increase in apoptotic cells observed with the polypropylene mesh was blunted in the composite (overall P < .001). Passive

  13. Hydrodynamic interactions between a self-rotation rotator and passive particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Zhenyu; Lin, Jian-Zhong; Ku, Xiaoke

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we numerically investigate the hydrodynamic interaction between a self-rotation rotator and passive particles in a two-dimensional confined cavity at two typical Reynolds numbers according to the different flow features. Both the fluid-particle interaction and particle-particle interaction through fluid media are taken into consideration. The results show that from the case of a rotator and one passive particle to the case of a rotator and two passive particles, the system becomes much more complex because the relative displacement between the rotator and the passive particles and the velocity of passive particles are strongly dependent on the Reynolds number and the initial position of passive particles. For the system of two particles, the passive particle gradually departs from the rotator although its relative displacement to the rotator exhibits a periodic oscillation at the lower Reynolds number. Furthermore, the relative distance between the two particles and the rotator's rotational frequency are responsible for the oscillation amplitude and frequency of the passive particle's velocity. For the system of three particles, the passive particle's velocities exhibit a superposition of a large amplitude oscillation and a small amplitude oscillation at the lower Reynolds number, and the large amplitude oscillation will disappear at the higher Reynolds number. The change of the included angle of the two passive particles is dependent on the initial positions of the passive particles at the lower Reynolds number, whereas the included angle of the two passive particles finally approaches a fixed value at the higher Reynolds number. It is interesting that the two passive particles periodically approach and depart from each other when the included angle is not equal to π, while all the three particles (including the rotator) keep the positions in a straight line when the included angle is equal to π because the interference between two passive

  14. Evaluation of the performance of a passive-active vibration isolation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L. L.; Hansen, C. H.; Doolan, C.

    2015-01-01

    The behavior of a feedforward active isolation system subjected to actuator output constraints is investigated. Distributed parameter models are developed to analyze the system response, and to produce a transfer matrix for the design of an integrated passive-active isolation system. Cost functions considered here comprise a combination of the vibration transmission energy and the sum of the squared control forces. The example system considered is a rigid body connected to a simply supported plate via two isolation mounts. The overall isolation performance is evaluated by numerical simulation. The results show that the control strategies which rely on unconstrained actuator outputs may give substantial power transmission reductions over a wide frequency range, but also require large control force amplitudes to control excited vibration modes of the system. Expected power transmission reductions for modified control strategies that incorporate constrained actuator outputs are considerably less than typical reductions with unconstrained actuator outputs. The active system with constrained control force outputs is shown to be more effective at the resonance frequencies of the supporting plate. However, in the frequency range in which rigid body modes are present, the control strategies employed using constrained actuator outputs can only achieve 5-10 dB power transmission reduction, while at off-resonance frequencies, little or no power transmission reduction can be obtained with realistic control forces. Analysis of the wave effects in the passive mounts is also presented.

  15. AMOLED (active matrix OLED) functionality and usable lifetime at temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellowes, David A.; Wood, Michael V.; Prache, Olivier; Jones, Susan

    2005-05-01

    Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode (AMOLED) displays are known to exhibit high levels of performance, and these levels of performance have continually been improved over time with new materials and electronics design. eMagin Corporation developed a manually adjustable temperature compensation circuit with brightness control to allow for excellent performance over a wide temperature range. Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (US Army) tested the performance and survivability of a number of AMOLED displays in a temperature chamber over a range from -55°C to +85°C. Although device performance of AMOLEDs has always been its strong suit, the issue of usable display lifetimes for military applications continues to be an area of discussion and research. eMagin has made improvements in OLED materials and worked towards the development of a better understanding of usable lifetime for operation in a military system. NVESD ran luminance degradation tests of AMOLED panels at 50°C and at ambient to characterize the lifetime of AMOLED devices. The result is a better understanding of the applicability of AMOLEDs in military systems: where good fits are made, and where further development is needed.

  16. The Passive in 3- and 4-Year-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Barros Pereira Rubin, Maraci Coelho

    2009-01-01

    This paper argues that analyzing the patterns of individual subject performance in tests of comprehension of passives might give insight into how little children interpret passives: 3 and 4 year-olds seem to go through a range of passive interpretation, that varies from actual comprehension to total non-comprehension. The fact that some small…

  17. Polarimetric passive remote sensing of periodic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veysoglu, Murat E.; Yueh, H. A.; Shin, R. T.; Kong, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of polarimetry in active remote sensing is extended to passive remote sensing. The potential use of the third and fourth Stokes parameters U and V, which play an important role in polarimetric active remote sensing, is demonstrated for passive remote sensing. It is shown that, by the use of the reciprocity principle, the polarimetric parameters of passive remote sensing can be obtained through the solution of the associated direct scattering problem. These ideas are applied to study polarimetric passive remote sensing of periodic surfaces. The solution of the direct scattering problem is obtained by an integral equation formulation which involves evaluation of periodic Green's functions and normal derivative of those on the surface. Rapid evaluation of the slowly convergent series associated with these functions is observed to be critical for the feasibility of the method. New formulas, which are rapidly convergent, are derived for the calculation of these series. The study has shown that the brightness temperature of the Stokes parameter U can be significant in passive remote sensing. Values as high as 50 K are observed for certain configurations.

  18. Passive exposure to nicotine from e-cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Gallart-Mateu, D; Elbal, L; Armenta, S; de la Guardia, M

    2016-05-15

    A procedure based on the use of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), after liquid-liquid microextraction (LLME), has been successfully employed for the determination of passive exposure to nicotine from cigarette and e-cigarette smoking. Nicotine has been determined in exhaled breath and oral fluids of both, active and passive smokers. The aforementioned studies, made in closed environments, evidenced that the exhaled breath after conventional blend cigarette smoke provides nicotine levels of the order of 220 ng per puff, in the case of experienced smokers, being exhaled only 32 ng in the case of e-cigarettes. On the other hand, the nicotine amount in oral fluids of passive vapers was between 8 and 14 µg L(-1) lower than the average value of 38±14 µg L(-1) found for passive smokers of rolling tobacco and clearly lower than the 79±36 µg L(-1) obtained from passive smokers of classical yellow blend. This study was also placed in the frame of the verification of the e-cigarettes composition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Matrix directed adipogenesis and neurogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue and bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A; Tang, Xin; Saif, Taher A; Kilian, Kristopher A

    2016-09-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate into multiple lineages through guidance from the biophysical and biochemical properties of the extracellular matrix. In this work we conduct a combinatorial study of matrix properties that influence adipogenesis and neurogenesis including: adhesion proteins, stiffness, and cell geometry, for mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue (AT-MSCs) and bone marrow (BM-MSCs). We uncover distinct differences in integrin expression, the magnitude of traction stress, and lineage specification to adipocytes and neuron-like cells between cell sources. In the absence of media supplements, adipogenesis in AT-MSCs is not significantly influenced by matrix properties, while the converse is true in BM-MSCs. Both cell types show changes in the expression of neurogenesis markers as matrix cues are varied. When cultured on laminin conjugated microislands of the same adhesive area, BM-MSCs display elevated adipogenesis markers, while AT-MSCs display elevated neurogenesis markers; integrin analysis suggests neurogenesis in AT-MSCs is guided by adhesion through integrin αvβ3. Overall, the properties of the extracellular matrix guides MSC adhesion and lineage specification to different degrees and outcomes, in spite of their similarities in general characteristics. This work will help guide the selection of MSCs and matrix components for applications where high fidelity of differentiation outcome is desired. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive cell type for stem cell therapies; however, in order for these cells to be useful in medicine, we need to understand how they respond to the physical and chemical environments of tissue. Here, we explore how two promising sources of MSCs-those derived from bone marrow and from adipose tissue-respond to the compliance and composition of tissue using model extracellular matrices. Our results demonstrate a source-specific propensity to undergo adipogenesis and neurogenesis, and

  20. Polyplanar optical display electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSanto, Leonard; Biscardi, Cyrus

    1997-07-01

    The polyplanar optical display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. The prototype ten inch display is two inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. In order to achieve a long lifetime, the new display uses a 100 milliwatt green solid- state laser at 532 nm as its light source. To produce real- time video, the laser light is being modulated by a digital light processing (DLP) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments. In order to use the solid-state laser as the light source and also fit within the constraints of the B-52 display, the digital micromirror device (DMD) circuit board is removed from the Texas Instruments DLP light engine assembly. Due to the compact architecture of the projection system within the display chassis, the DMD chip is operated remotely from the Texas Instruments circuit board. We discuss the operation of the DMD divorced from the light engine and the interfacing of the DMD board with various video formats including the format specific to the B-52 aircraft. A brief discussion of the electronics required to drive the laser is also presented.

  1. Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode (AMOLED) Environmental Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, George A.

    2013-01-01

    This report focuses on the limited environmental testing of the AMOLED display performed as an engineering evaluation by The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC)-specifically. EMI. Thermal Vac, and radiation tests. The AMOLED display is an active-matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) technology. The testing provided an initial understanding of the technology and its suitability for space applications. Relative to light emitting diode (LED) displays or liquid crystal displays (LCDs), AMOLED displays provide a superior viewing experience even though they are much lighter and smaller, produce higher contrast ratio and richer colors, and require less power to operate than LCDs. However, AMOLED technology has not been demonstrated in a space environment. Therefore, some risks with the technology must be addressed before they can be seriously considered for human spaceflight. The environmental tests provided preliminary performance data on the ability of the display technology to handle some of the simulated induced space/spacecraft environments that an AMOLED display will see during a spacecraft certification test program. This engineering evaluation is part of a Space Act Agreement (SM) between The NASA/JSC and Honeywell International (HI) as a collaborative effort to evaluate the potential use of AMOLED technology for future human spaceflight missions- both government-led and commercial. Under this SM, HI is responsible for doing optical performance evaluation, as well as temperature and touch screen studies. The NASA/JSC is responsible for performing environmental testing comprised of EMI, Thermal Vac, and radiation tests. Additionally, as part of the testing, limited optical data was acquired to assess performance as the display was subjected to the induced environments. The NASA will benefit from this engineering evaluation by understanding AMOLED suitability for future use in space as well as becoming a smarter buyer (or developer) of the technology. HI benefits

  2. Display of adenoregulin with a novel Pichia pastoris cell surface display system.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ren; Jiang, Zhengbing; Liu, Meiyun; Tao, Xinyi; Ma, Yushu; Wei, Dongzhi

    2007-02-01

    Two Pichia pastoris cell surface display vectors were constructed. The vectors consisted of the flocculation functional domain of Flo1p with its own secretion signal sequence or the alpha-factor secretion signal sequence, a polyhistidine (6xHis) tag for detection, an enterokinase recognition site, and the insertion sites for target proteins. Adenoregulin (ADR) is a 33-amino-acid antimicrobial peptide isolated from Phyllomedusa bicolor skin. The ADR was expressed and displayed on the Pichia pastoris KM71 cell surface with the system reported. The displayed recombinant ADR fusion protein was detected by fluorescence microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The antimicrobial activity of the recombinant adenoregulin was detected after proteolytic cleavage of the fusion protein on cell surface. The validity of the Pichia pastoris cell surface display vectors was proved by the displayed ADR.

  3. Climate-Specific Passive Building Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Graham S.; Klingenberg, Katrin

    2015-07-01

    Passive design principles (super insulation, airtight envelopes, elimination of thermal bridges, etc.) - pioneered in North America in the 70s and 80s and refined in Europe in the 90s have proven to be universally effective to significantly reduce heating and cooling loads. However, a single, rigid performance metric developed in Germany has led to limited uptake of passive building principles in many regions of the United States. It has also, in many cases, promoted some design decisions that had negative effects on economic feasibility and thermal comfort. This study's main objective is to validate (in a theoretical sense) verifiable, climate-specificmore » passive standards and space conditioning criteria that retain ambitious, environmentally-necessary energy reduction targets and are economically feasible, such standards provide designers an ambitious but achievable performance target on the path to zero.« less

  4. Discreet passive explosive detection through 2-sided wave guided fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Harper, Ross James; la Grone, Marcus; Fisher, Mark

    2012-10-16

    The current invention provides a passive sampling device suitable for collecting and detecting the presence of target analytes. In particular, the passive sampling device is suitable for detecting nitro-aromatic compounds. The current invention further provides a passive sampling device reader suitable for determining the collection of target analytes. Additionally, the current invention provides methods for detecting target analytes using the passive sampling device and the passive sampling device reader.

  5. Passive Immunization Reduces Behavioral and Neuropathological Deficits in an Alpha-Synuclein Transgenic Model of Lewy Body Disease

    PubMed Central

    Masliah, Eliezer; Rockenstein, Edward; Mante, Michael; Crews, Leslie; Spencer, Brian; Adame, Anthony; Patrick, Christina; Trejo, Margarita; Ubhi, Kiren; Rohn, Troy T.; Mueller-Steiner, Sarah; Seubert, Peter; Barbour, Robin; McConlogue, Lisa; Buttini, Manuel; Games, Dora; Schenk, Dale

    2011-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Parkinson's Disease (PD) are common causes of motor and cognitive deficits and are associated with the abnormal accumulation of alpha-synuclein (α-syn). This study investigated whether passive immunization with a novel monoclonal α-syn antibody (9E4) against the C-terminus (CT) of α-syn was able to cross into the CNS and ameliorate the deficits associated with α-syn accumulation. In this study we demonstrate that 9E4 was effective at reducing behavioral deficits in the water maze, moreover, immunization with 9E4 reduced the accumulation of calpain-cleaved α-syn in axons and synapses and the associated neurodegenerative deficits. In vivo studies demonstrated that 9E4 traffics into the CNS, binds to cells that display α-syn accumulation and promotes α-syn clearance via the lysosomal pathway. These results suggest that passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies against the CT of α-syn may be of therapeutic relevance in patients with PD and DLB. PMID:21559417

  6. Experiment and simulation of a LiFePO4 battery pack with a passive thermal management system using composite phase change material and graphite sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chunjing; Xu, Sichuan; Chang, Guofeng; Liu, Jinling

    2015-02-01

    A passive thermal management system (TMS) for LiFePO4 battery modules using phase change material (PCM) as the heat dissipation source to control battery temperature rise is developed. Expanded graphite matrix and graphite sheets are applied to compensate low thermal conductivity of PCM and improve temperature uniformity of the batteries. Constant current discharge and mixed charge-discharge duties were applied on battery modules with and without PCM on a battery thermal characteristics test platform. Experimental results show that PCM cooling significantly reduces the battery temperature rise during short-time intense use. It is also found that temperature uniformity across the module deteriorates with the increasing of both discharge time and current rates. The maximum temperature differences at the end of 1C and 2C-rate discharges are both less than 5 °C, indicating a good performance in battery thermal uniformity of the passive TMS. Experiments on warm-keeping performance show that the passive TMS can effectively keep the battery within its optimum operating temperature for a long time during cold weather uses. A three dimensional numerical model of the battery pack with the passive TMS was conducted using ANSYS Fluent. Temperature profiles with respect to discharging time reveal that simulation shows good agreement with experiment at 1C-discharge rate.

  7. Matrix product operators, matrix product states, and ab initio density matrix renormalization group algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Keselman, Anna; Nakatani, Naoki; Li, Zhendong; White, Steven R.

    2016-07-01

    Current descriptions of the ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm use two superficially different languages: an older language of the renormalization group and renormalized operators, and a more recent language of matrix product states and matrix product operators. The same algorithm can appear dramatically different when written in the two different vocabularies. In this work, we carefully describe the translation between the two languages in several contexts. First, we describe how to efficiently implement the ab initio DMRG sweep using a matrix product operator based code, and the equivalence to the original renormalized operator implementation. Next we describe how to implement the general matrix product operator/matrix product state algebra within a pure renormalized operator-based DMRG code. Finally, we discuss two improvements of the ab initio DMRG sweep algorithm motivated by matrix product operator language: Hamiltonian compression, and a sum over operators representation that allows for perfect computational parallelism. The connections and correspondences described here serve to link the future developments with the past and are important in the efficient implementation of continuing advances in ab initio DMRG and related algorithms.

  8. Matrix product operators, matrix product states, and ab initio density matrix renormalization group algorithms.

    PubMed

    Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Keselman, Anna; Nakatani, Naoki; Li, Zhendong; White, Steven R

    2016-07-07

    Current descriptions of the ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm use two superficially different languages: an older language of the renormalization group and renormalized operators, and a more recent language of matrix product states and matrix product operators. The same algorithm can appear dramatically different when written in the two different vocabularies. In this work, we carefully describe the translation between the two languages in several contexts. First, we describe how to efficiently implement the ab initio DMRG sweep using a matrix product operator based code, and the equivalence to the original renormalized operator implementation. Next we describe how to implement the general matrix product operator/matrix product state algebra within a pure renormalized operator-based DMRG code. Finally, we discuss two improvements of the ab initio DMRG sweep algorithm motivated by matrix product operator language: Hamiltonian compression, and a sum over operators representation that allows for perfect computational parallelism. The connections and correspondences described here serve to link the future developments with the past and are important in the efficient implementation of continuing advances in ab initio DMRG and related algorithms.

  9. XVD Image Display Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Andres, Paul M.; Mortensen, Helen B.; Parizher, Vadim; McAuley, Myche; Bartholomew, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The XVD [X-Windows VICAR (video image communication and retrieval) Display] computer program offers an interactive display of VICAR and PDS (planetary data systems) images. It is designed to efficiently display multiple-GB images and runs on Solaris, Linux, or Mac OS X systems using X-Windows.

  10. Multimission helicopter cockpit displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, William S.; Terry, Jody K.; Lovelace, Nancy D.

    1996-05-01

    A new operator display subsystem is being incorporated as part of the next generation United States Navy (USN) helicopter avionics system to be integrated into the multi-mission helicopter (MMH) that replaces both the SH-60B and the SH-60F in 2001. This subsystem exploits state-of-the-art technology for the display hardware, the display driver hardware, information presentation methodologies, and software architecture. Both of the existing SH-60 helicopter display systems are based on monochrome CRT technology; a key feature of the MMH cockpit is the integration of color AMLCD multifunction displays. The MMH program is one of the first military programs to use modified commercial AMLCD elements in a tactical aircraft. This paper presents the general configuration of the MMH cockpit and multifunction display subsystem and discusses the approach taken for presenting helicopter flight information to the pilots as well as presentation of mission sensor data for use by the copilot.

  11. Raster graphics display library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsrud, Anders; Stephenson, Michael B.

    1987-01-01

    The Raster Graphics Display Library (RGDL) is a high level subroutine package that give the advanced raster graphics display capabilities needed. The RGDL uses FORTRAN source code routines to build subroutines modular enough to use as stand-alone routines in a black box type of environment. Six examples are presented which will teach the use of RGDL in the fastest, most complete way possible. Routines within the display library that are used to produce raster graphics are presented in alphabetical order, each on a separate page. Each user-callable routine is described by function and calling parameters. All common blocks that are used in the display library are listed and the use of each variable within each common block is discussed. A reference on the include files that are necessary to compile the display library is contained. Each include file and its purpose are listed. The link map for MOVIE.BYU version 6, a general purpose computer graphics display system that uses RGDL software, is also contained.

  12. Development of Plastic Substrate Technology for Active Matrix Liquid Crystal Displays Final Report CRADA No. TC-761-93

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, P.; Kamath, H.

    Raychem Corporation (RYC) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) conducted a development program with the goal to make rugged, low-cost., high-resolution flat panel displays based on RYC's proprietary Nematic Curvilinear Aligned Phase (NCAP) liquid crystal and LLNL's patented processes for the formation and doping of polycrystalline silicon on low-temperature, flexible, plastic substrates.

  13. Full resolution hologram-like autostereoscopic display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenlaub, Jesse B.; Hutchins, Jamie

    1995-01-01

    Under this program, Dimension Technologies Inc. (DTI) developed a prototype display that uses a proprietary illumination technique to create autostereoscopic hologram-like full resolution images on an LCD operating at 180 fps. The resulting 3D image possesses a resolution equal to that of the LCD along with properties normally associated with holograms, including change of perspective with observer position and lack of viewing position restrictions. Furthermore, this autostereoscopic technique eliminates the need to wear special glasses to achieve the parallax effect. Under the program a prototype display was developed which demonstrates the hologram-like full resolution concept. To implement such a system, DTI explored various concept designs and enabling technologies required to support those designs. Specifically required were: a parallax illumination system with sufficient brightness and control; an LCD with rapid address and pixel response; and an interface to an image generation system for creation of computer graphics. Of the possible parallax illumination system designs, we chose a design which utilizes an array of fluorescent lamps. This system creates six sets of illumination areas to be imaged behind an LCD. This controlled illumination array is interfaced to a lenticular lens assembly which images the light segments into thin vertical light lines to achieve the parallax effect. This light line formation is the foundation of DTI's autostereoscopic technique. The David Sarnoff Research Center (Sarnoff) was subcontracted to develop an LCD that would operate with a fast scan rate and pixel response. Sarnoff chose a surface mode cell technique and produced the world's first large area pi-cell active matrix TFT LCD. The device provided adequate performance to evaluate five different perspective stereo viewing zones. A Silicon Graphics' Iris Indigo system was used for image generation which allowed for static and dynamic multiple perspective image rendering

  14. Can Effective Synthetic Vision System Displays be Implemented on Limited Size Display Spaces?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, J. Raymond, Jr.; Glaab, Lou J.; Prinzel, Lance J.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2004-01-01

    The Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) element of the NASA Aviation Safety Program is striving to eliminate poor visibility as a causal factor in aircraft accidents, and to enhance operational capabilities of all types or aircraft. To accomplish these safety and situation awareness improvements, the SVS concepts are designed to provide a clear view of the world ahead through the display of computer generated imagery derived from an onboard database of terrain, obstacle and airport information. An important issue for the SVS concept is whether useful and effective Synthetic Vision System (SVS) displays can be implemented on limited size display spaces as would be required to implement this technology on older aircraft with physically smaller instrument spaces. In this study, prototype SVS displays were put on the following display sizes: (a) size "A' (e.g. 757 EADI), (b) form factor "D" (e.g. 777 PFD), and (c) new size "X" (Rectangular flat-panel, approximately 20 x 25 cm). Testing was conducted in a high-resolution graphics simulation facility at NASA Langley Research Center. Specific issues under test included the display size as noted above, the field-of-view (FOV) to be shown on the display and directly related to FOV is the degree of minification of the displayed image or picture. Using simulated approaches with display size and FOV conditions held constant no significant differences by these factors were found. Preferred FOV based on performance was determined by using approaches during which pilots could select FOV. Mean preference ratings for FOV were in the following order: (1) 30 deg., (2) Unity, (3) 60 deg., and (4) 90 deg., and held true for all display sizes tested. Limitations of the present study and future research directions are discussed.

  15. Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystal Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doane, J. William

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION AND HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT * PDLC MATERIALS PREPARATION * Polymerization induced phase separation (PIPS) * Thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) * Solvent induced phase separation (SIPS) * Encapsulation (NCAP) * RESPONSE VOLTAGE * Dielectric and resistive effects * Radial configuration * Bipolar configuration * Other director configurations * RESPONSE TIME * DISPLAY CONTRAST * Light scattering and index matching * Incorporation of dyes * Contrast measurements * PDLC DISPLAY DEVICES AND INNOVATIONS * Reflective direct view displays * Large-scale, flexible displays * Switchable windows * Projection displays * High definition spatial light modulator * Haze-free PDLC shutters: wide angle view displays * ENVIRONMENTAL STABILITY * ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS * REFERENCES

  16. Solid-state turn coordinator display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meredith, B. D.; Crouch, R. K.; Kelly, W. L., IV

    1975-01-01

    A solid state turn coordinator display which employs light emitting diodes (LED's) as the display medium was developed to demonstrate the feasibility of such displays for aircraft applications. The input to the display is supplied by a fluidic inertial rate sensor used in an aircraft wing leveler system. The display is composed of the LED radial display face and the electronics necessary to address and drive the individual lines of LED's. Three levels of brightness are provided to compensate for the different amounts of ambient light present in the cockpit.

  17. System status display evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, Leland G.

    1988-01-01

    The System Status Display is an electronic display system which provides the crew with an enhanced capability for monitoring and managing the aircraft systems. A flight simulation in a fixed base cockpit simulator was used to evaluate alternative design concepts for this display system. The alternative concepts included pictorial versus alphanumeric text formats, multifunction versus dedicated controls, and integration of the procedures with the system status information versus paper checklists. Twelve pilots manually flew approach patterns with the different concepts. System malfunctions occurred which required the pilots to respond to the alert by reconfiguring the system. The pictorial display, the multifunction control interfaces collocated with the system display, and the procedures integrated with the status information all had shorter event processing times and lower subjective workloads.

  18. Mid-infrared Fe2+:ZnSe semiconductor saturable absorber mirror for passively Q-switched Er3+-doped ZBLAN fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Shougui; Feng, Guoying; Dai, Shenyu; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Lijuan; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2018-02-01

    A mid-infrared (mid-IR) semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) based on Fe2+:ZnSe for passively Q-switched Er3+-doped ZBLAN fiber laser has been demonstrated. Fe2+:ZnSe SESAM was fabricated by electron beam evaporation method. Fe2+ was innovatively doped into the reflective Bragg stack, in which ZnSe layer served as both doped matrix and high refractive layer during the fabricating process. By using the Fe2+:ZnSe SESAM, stable passively Q-switched pulses with the minimum pulse width of 0.43 μs under a repetition rate of 160.82 kHz were obtained. The recorded maximum average output power of 873 mW with a peak power of 12.59 W and pulse energy of 5.43 μJ were achieved. The results demonstrated a new method for fabricating Fe2+:ZnSe SESAM, which can be used in compact mid-IR Q-switched fiber laser.

  19. Passive sampler for PM10-2.5 aerosol.

    PubMed

    Leith, David; Sommerlatt, Darrell; Boundy, Maryanne G

    2007-03-01

    This study investigates the use of a small passive sampler for aerosol particles to determine particulate matter (PM)10-2.5 concentrations in outdoor air. The passive sampler collects particles by gravity, diffusion, and convective diffusion onto a glass coverslip that is then examined with an optical microscope; digital images are processed with free software and the resultant PM10-2.5 concentrations determined. Both the samplers and the analyses are relatively inexpensive. Passive samplers were collocated with Federal Reference Method (FRM) samplers in Chapel Hill, NC; Phoenix, AZ; and Birmingham, AL; for periods from 5 to 15 days. Particles consisted primarily of inorganic dusts at some sites and a mix of industrial and inorganic materials at other sites. Measured concentrations ranged from < 10 microg/m3 to approximately 40 microg/m3. Overall, PM10-2.5 concentrations measured with the passive samplers were within approximately 1 standard deviation of concentrations measured with the FRM samplers. Concentrations determined with passive samplers depend on assumptions about particle density and shape factors and may also depend somewhat on local wind speed and turbulence; accurate values for these parameters may not be known. The degree of agreement between passive and FRM concentrations measured here suggests that passive measurements may not be overly dependent on accurate knowledge of these parameters.

  20. Polyplanar optical display electronics

    SciTech Connect

    DeSanto, L.; Biscardi, C.

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. The prototype ten inch display is two inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. In order to achieve a long lifetime, the new display uses a 100 milliwatt green solid-state laser (10,000 hr. life) at 532 nm as its light source. To produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by amore » Digital Light Processing (DLP{trademark}) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments. In order to use the solid-state laser as the light source and also fit within the constraints of the B-52 display, the Digital Micromirror Device (DMD{trademark}) circuit board is removed from the Texas Instruments DLP light engine assembly. Due to the compact architecture of the projection system within the display chassis, the DMD{trademark} chip is operated remotely from the Texas Instruments circuit board. The authors discuss the operation of the DMD{trademark} divorced from the light engine and the interfacing of the DMD{trademark} board with various video formats (CVBS, Y/C or S-video and RGB) including the format specific to the B-52 aircraft. A brief discussion of the electronics required to drive the laser is also presented.« less

  1. Passive radiative cooling design with broadband optical thin-film filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kecebas, Muhammed Ali; Menguc, M. Pinar; Kosar, Ali; Sendur, Kursat

    2017-09-01

    The operation of most electronic semiconductor devices suffers from the self-generated heat. In the case of photovoltaic or thermos-photovoltaic cells, their exposure to sun or high temperature sources make them get warm beyond the desired operating conditions. In both incidences, the solution strategy requires effective radiative cooling process, i.e., by selective absorption and emission in predetermined spectral windows. In this study, we outline two approaches for alternative 2D thin film coatings, which can enhance the passive thermal management for application to electronic equipment. Most traditional techniques use a metallic (silver) layer because of their high reflectivity, although they display strong absorption in the visible and near-infrared spectrums. We show that strong absorption in the visible and near-infrared spectrums due to a metallic layer can be avoided by repetitive high index-low index periodic layers and broadband reflection in visible and near-infrared spectrums can still be achieved. These modifications increase the average reflectance in the visible and near-infrared spectrums by 3-4%, which increases the cooling power by at least 35 W/m2. We also show that the performance of radiative cooling can be enhanced by inserting an Al2O3 film (which has strong absorption in the 8-13 μm spectrum, and does not absorb in the visible and near-infrared) within conventional coating structures. These two approaches enhance the cooling power of passive radiative cooling systems from the typical reported values of 40 W/m2-100 W/m2 and 65 W/m2 levels respectively.

  2. Fully Passive Wireless Acquisition of Neuropotentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwerdt, Helen N.

    The ability to monitor electrophysiological signals from the sentient brain is requisite to decipher its enormously complex workings and initiate remedial solutions for the vast amount of neurologically-based disorders. Despite immense advancements in creating a variety of instruments to record signals from the brain, the translation of such neurorecording instrumentation to real clinical domains places heavy demands on their safety and reliability, both of which are not entirely portrayed by presently existing implantable recording solutions. In an attempt to lower these barriers, alternative wireless radar backscattering techniques are proposed to render the technical burdens of the implant chip to entirely passive neurorecording processes that transpire in the absence of formal integrated power sources or powering schemes along with any active circuitry. These radar-like wireless backscattering mechanisms are used to conceive of fully passive neurorecording operations of an implantable microsystem. The fully passive device potentially manifests inherent advantages over current wireless implantable and wired recording systems: negligible heat dissipation to reduce risks of brain tissue damage and minimal circuitry for long term reliability as a chronic implant. Fully passive neurorecording operations are realized via intrinsic nonlinear mixing properties of the varactor diode. These mixing and recording operations are directly activated by wirelessly interrogating the fully passive device with a microwave carrier signal. This fundamental carrier signal, acquired by the implant antenna, mixes through the varactor diode along with the internal targeted neuropotential brain signals to produce higher frequency harmonics containing the targeted neuropotential signals. These harmonics are backscattered wirelessly to the external interrogator that retrieves and recovers the original neuropotential brain signal. The passive approach removes the need for internal power

  3. 26 CFR 1.469-3T - Passive activity credit (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Passive activity credit (temporary). 1.469-3T... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Taxable Year for Which Deductions Taken § 1.469-3T Passive activity credit (temporary). (a) Computation of passive activity credit. The taxpayer's passive activity credit...

  4. 26 CFR 1.469-3T - Passive activity credit (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Passive activity credit (temporary). 1.469-3T... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxable Year for Which Deductions Taken § 1.469-3T Passive activity credit (temporary). (a) Computation of passive activity credit. The taxpayer's passive activity...

  5. Increased electrocatalyzed performance through high content potassium doped graphene matrix and aptamer tri infinite amplification labels strategy: Highly sensitive for matrix metalloproteinases-2 detection.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiang; Zhang, Tong; Wu, Dan; Yan, Tao; Pang, Xuehui; Du, Bin; Lou, Wanruo; Wei, Qin

    2017-08-15

    Herein, a super-labeled immunoassay was fabricated for matrix metalloproteinases-2 detection. A self-corrosion ITO micro circuit board was designed in this sensing platform to reduce the random error in the same testing condition, and the self-constructed sensing platform is portable with a cheap price. The K-modified graphene (K-GS) was utilized as the matrix material, which was synthesized well by phenylate and phenanthrene through the polar bond of nonpolar molecule phenylate and the π-π interaction for the first time. An aptamer-based labels based on Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), thionine (Th) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were applied as the signal source for tri infinite amplification. This fabricated super-labeled immunoassay exhibit excellent performance for MMPs-2 detection. It displayed a broad linear range of 10 -4 -10ng/mL with a low detection limit of 35 fg/mL, which may have a potential application in the clinical diagnose. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Passive cooling system for a vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Terry Joseph; Thoensen, Thomas

    2005-11-15

    A passive cooling system for a vehicle (114) transfers heat from an overheated internal component, for example, an instrument panel (100), to an external portion (116) of the vehicle (114), for example, a side body panel (126). The passive cooling system includes one or more heat pipes (112) having an evaporator section (118) embedded in the overheated internal component and a condenser section (120) at the external portion (116) of the vehicle (114). The evaporator (118) and condenser (120) sections are in fluid communication. The passive cooling system may also include a thermally conductive film (140) for thermally connecting the evaporator sections (118) of the heat pipes (112) to each other and to the instrument panel (100).

  7. Passive Cooling System for a Vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, T. J.; Thoensen, T.

    2005-11-15

    A passive cooling system for a vehicle (114) transfers heat from an overheated internal component, for example, an instrument panel (100), to an external portion (116) of the vehicle (114), for example, a side body panel (126). The passive cooling system includes one or more heat pipes (112) having an evaporator section (118) embedded in the overheated internal component and a condenser section (120) at the external portion (116) of the vehicle (114). The evaporator (118) and condenser (120) sections are in fluid communication. The passive cooling system may also include a thermally conductive film (140) for thermally connecting the evaporator sections (118) of the heat pipes (112) to each other and to the instrument panel (100).

  8. Passive inhalation of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Cone, E J; Yousefnejad, D; Hillsgrove, M J; Holicky, B; Darwin, W D

    1995-10-01

    Six healthy male volunteers were exposed to the vapor of 100 and 200 mg freebase cocaine heated to a temperature of 200 degrees C in an unventilated room (12,600-L volume) for a period of 1 h. No pharmacological effects were detected as a result of the exposure. Blood specimens collected immediately following exposure were negative for cocaine and metabolites. Urine specimens analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry contained peak concentrations of benzoylecgonine that ranged from 22 to 123 ng/mL. The peak excretion time for benzoylecgonine following passive exposure was approximately 5 h. The amount of cocaine inhaled by the subjects during passive exposure was estimated from room air measurements of cocaine to be approximately 0.25 mg. The total amount of cocaine (cocaine plus metabolites) excreted in urine by the six subjects ranged from 0.04 to 0.21 mg. For comparison, the six subjects also received an intravenous injection of 1 mg cocaine hydrochloride. Four of six subjects screened positive (300-ng/mL cutoff concentration) following the injection, indicating that the minimum amount of cocaine in these subjects necessary to produce positive results was approximately 1 mg. A second passive inhalation study was undertaken in which specimens were collected from research staff who assisted in a series of experimental studies with "crack" (freebase cocaine) smokers. The research staff remained in close vicinity while the crack smokers smoked three doses of freebase cocaine (12.5, 25, and 50 mg) over a period of 4 h. As a result, staff members were passively exposed to sidestream smoke from crack pipes and to breath exhalation from the crack smokers. Urine specimens from the staff members contained a maximum of 6 ng/mL benzoylecgonine. Only traces (less than 1 ng/mL) of cocaine were detected in any specimen. Overall, these studies demonstrated that individuals exposed to cocaine smoke under naturalistic or artificial conditions absorbed small amounts of

  9. Advanced Aerodynamic Design of Passive Porosity Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Craig A.; Viken, Sally A.; Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes aerodynamic design work aimed at developing a passive porosity control effector system for a generic tailless fighter aircraft. As part of this work, a computational design tool was developed and used to layout passive porosity effector systems for longitudinal and lateral-directional control at a low-speed, high angle of attack condition. Aerodynamic analysis was conducted using the NASA Langley computational fluid dynamics code USM3D, in conjunction with a newly formulated surface boundary condition for passive porosity. Results indicate that passive porosity effectors can provide maneuver control increments that equal and exceed those of conventional aerodynamic effectors for low-speed, high-alpha flight, with control levels that are a linear function of porous area. This work demonstrates the tremendous potential of passive porosity to yield simple control effector systems that have no external moving parts and will preserve an aircraft's fixed outer mold line.

  10. Folding in and out: passive morphing in flapping wings.

    PubMed

    Stowers, Amanda K; Lentink, David

    2015-03-25

    We present a new mechanism for passive wing morphing of flapping wings inspired by bat and bird wing morphology. The mechanism consists of an unactuated hand wing connected to the arm wing with a wrist joint. Flapping motion generates centrifugal accelerations in the hand wing, forcing it to unfold passively. Using a robotic model in hover, we made kinematic measurements of unfolding kinematics as functions of the non-dimensional wingspan fold ratio (2-2.5) and flapping frequency (5-17 Hz) using stereo high-speed cameras. We find that the wings unfold passively within one to two flaps and remain unfolded with only small amplitude oscillations. To better understand the passive dynamics, we constructed a computer model of the unfolding process based on rigid body dynamics, contact models, and aerodynamic correlations. This model predicts the measured passive unfolding within about one flap and shows that unfolding is driven by centrifugal acceleration induced by flapping. The simulations also predict that relative unfolding time only weakly depends on flapping frequency and can be reduced to less than half a wingbeat by increasing flapping amplitude. Subsequent dimensional analysis shows that the time required to unfold passively is of the same order of magnitude as the flapping period. This suggests that centrifugal acceleration can drive passive unfolding within approximately one wingbeat in small and large wings. Finally, we show experimentally that passive unfolding wings can withstand impact with a branch, by first folding and then unfolding passively. This mechanism enables flapping robots to squeeze through clutter without sophisticated control. Passive unfolding also provides a new avenue in morphing wing design that makes future flapping morphing wings possibly more energy efficient and light-weight. Simultaneously these results point to possible inertia driven, and therefore metabolically efficient, control strategies in bats and birds to morph or recover

  11. Extraction of near-surface properties for a lossy layered medium using the propagator matrix

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehta, K.; Snieder, R.; Graizer, V.

    2007-01-01

    Near-surface properties play an important role in advancing earthquake hazard assessment. Other areas where near-surface properties are crucial include civil engineering and detection and delineation of potable groundwater. From an exploration point of view, near-surface properties are needed for wavefield separation and correcting for the local near-receiver structure. It has been shown that these properties can be estimated for a lossless homogeneous medium using the propagator matrix. To estimate the near-surface properties, we apply deconvolution to passive borehole recordings of waves excited by an earthquake. Deconvolution of these incoherent waveforms recorded by the sensors at different depths in the borehole with the recording at the surface results in waves that propagate upwards and downwards along the array. These waves, obtained by deconvolution, can be used to estimate the P- and S-wave velocities near the surface. As opposed to waves obtained by cross-correlation that represent filtered version of the sum of causal and acausal Green's function between the two receivers, the waves obtained by deconvolution represent the elements of the propagator matrix. Finally, we show analytically the extension of the propagator matrix analysis to a lossy layered medium for a special case of normal incidence. ?? 2007 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2007 RAS.

  12. Global Passivity in Microscopic Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdin, Raam; Rahav, Saar

    2018-04-01

    The main thread that links classical thermodynamics and the thermodynamics of small quantum systems is the celebrated Clausius inequality form of the second law. However, its application to small quantum systems suffers from two cardinal problems. (i) The Clausius inequality does not hold when the system and environment are initially correlated—a commonly encountered scenario in microscopic setups. (ii) In some other cases, the Clausius inequality does not provide any useful information (e.g., in dephasing scenarios). We address these deficiencies by developing the notion of global passivity and employing it as a tool for deriving thermodynamic inequalities on observables. For initially uncorrelated thermal environments the global passivity framework recovers the Clausius inequality. More generally, global passivity provides an extension of the Clausius inequality that holds even in the presences of strong initial system-environment correlations. Crucially, the present framework provides additional thermodynamic bounds on expectation values. To illustrate the role of the additional bounds, we use them to detect unaccounted heat leaks and weak feedback operations ("Maxwell demons") that the Clausius inequality cannot detect. In addition, it is shown that global passivity can put practical upper and lower bounds on the buildup of system-environment correlations for dephasing interactions. Our findings are highly relevant for experiments in various systems such as ion traps, superconducting circuits, atoms in optical cavities, and more.

  13. Display technologies for augmented reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byoungho; Lee, Seungjae; Jang, Changwon; Hong, Jong-Young; Li, Gang

    2018-02-01

    With the virtue of rapid progress in optics, sensors, and computer science, we are witnessing that commercial products or prototypes for augmented reality (AR) are penetrating into the consumer markets. AR is spotlighted as expected to provide much more immersive and realistic experience than ordinary displays. However, there are several barriers to be overcome for successful commercialization of AR. Here, we explore challenging and important topics for AR such as image combiners, enhancement of display performance, and focus cue reproduction. Image combiners are essential to integrate virtual images with real-world. Display performance (e.g. field of view and resolution) is important for more immersive experience and focus cue reproduction may mitigate visual fatigue caused by vergence-accommodation conflict. We also demonstrate emerging technologies to overcome these issues: index-matched anisotropic crystal lens (IMACL), retinal projection displays, and 3D display with focus cues. For image combiners, a novel optical element called IMACL provides relatively wide field of view. Retinal projection displays may enhance field of view and resolution of AR displays. Focus cues could be reconstructed via multi-layer displays and holographic displays. Experimental results of our prototypes are explained.

  14. Passive detection of subpixel obstacles for flight safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Matthew D.; Loveland, Rohan C.

    2001-12-01

    Military aircraft fly below 100 ft. above ground level in support of their missions. These aircraft include fixed and rotary wing and may be manned or unmanned. Flying at these low altitudes presents a safety hazard to the aircrew and aircraft, due to the occurrences of obstacles within the aircraft's flight path. The pilot must rely on eyesight and in some cases, infrared sensors to see obstacles. Many conditions can exacerbate visibility creating a situation in which obstacles are essentially invisible, creating a safety hazard, even to an alerted aircrew. Numerous catastrophic accidents have occurred in which aircraft have collided with undetected obstacles. Accidents of this type continue to be a problem for low flying military and commercial aircraft. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have the same problem, whether operating autonomously or under control of a ground operator. Boeing-SVS has designed a passive, small, low- cost (under $100k) gimbaled, infrared imaging based system with advanced obstacle detection algorithms. Obstacles are detected in the infrared band, and linear features are analyzed by innovative cellular automata based software. These algorithms perform detection and location of sub-pixel linear features. The detection of the obstacles is performed on a frame by frame basis, in real time. Processed images are presented to the aircrew on their display as color enhanced features. The system has been designed such that the detected obstacles are displayed to the aircrew in sufficient time to react and maneuver the aircraft to safety. A patent for this system is on file with the US patent office, and all material herein should be treated accordingly.

  15. Next generation smart window display using transparent organic display and light blocking screen.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gyeong Woo; Lampande, Raju; Choe, Dong Cheol; Ko, Ik Jang; Park, Jin Hwan; Pode, Ramchandra; Kwon, Jang Hyuk

    2018-04-02

    Transparent organic light emitting diodes (TOLED) have widespread applications in the next-generation display devices particularly in the large size transparent window and interactive displays. Herein, we report high performance and stable attractive smart window displays using facile process. Advanced smart window display is realized by integrating the high performance light blocking screen and highly transparent white OLED panel. The full smart window display reveals a maximum transmittance as high as 64.2% at the wavelength of 600 nm and extremely good along with tunable ambient contrast ratio (171.94:1) compared to that of normal TOLED (4.54:1). Furthermore, the performance decisive light blocking screen has demonstrated an excellent optical and electrical characteristics such as i) high transmittance (85.56% at 562nm) at light-penetrating state, ii) superior absorbance (2.30 at 562nm) in light interrupting mode, iii) high optical contrast (85.50 at 562 nm), iv) high optical stability for more than 25,000 cycle of driving, v) fast switching time of 1.9 sec, and vi) low driving voltage of 1.7 V. The experimental results of smart window display are also validated using optical simulation. The proposed smart window display technology allows us to adjust the intensity of daylight entering the system quickly and conveniently.

  16. Modernizing engine displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, E. T.; Enevoldson, E. K.

    1984-01-01

    The introduction of electronic fuel control to modern turbine engines has a number of advantages, which are related to an increase in engine performance and to a reduction or elimination of the problems associated with high angle of attack engine operation from the surface to 50,000 feet. If the appropriate engine display devices are available to the pilot, the fuel control system can provide a great amount of information. Some of the wealth of information available from modern fuel controls are discussed in this paper. The considered electronic engine control systems in their most recent forms are known as the Full Authority Digital Engine Control (FADEC) and the Digital Electronic Engine Control (DEEC). Attention is given to some details regarding the control systems, typical engine problems, the solution of problems with the aid of displays, engine displays in normal operation, an example display format, a multipage format, flight strategies, and hardware considerations.

  17. Gaze-contingent displays: a review.

    PubMed

    Duchowski, Andrew T; Cournia, Nathan; Murphy, Hunter

    2004-12-01

    Gaze-contingent displays (GCDs) attempt to balance the amount of information displayed against the visual information processing capacity of the observer through real-time eye movement sensing. Based on the assumed knowledge of the instantaneous location of the observer's focus of attention, GCD content can be "tuned" through several display processing means. Screen-based displays alter pixel level information generally matching the resolvability of the human retina in an effort to maximize bandwidth. Model-based displays alter geometric-level primitives along similar goals. Attentive user interfaces (AUIs) manage object- level entities (e.g., windows, applications) depending on the assumed attentive state of the observer. Such real-time display manipulation is generally achieved through non-contact, unobtrusive tracking of the observer's eye movements. This paper briefly reviews past and present display techniques as well as emerging graphics and eye tracking technology for GCD development.

  18. Post-exercise cortical depression following repetitive passive finger movement.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Ryohei; Sasaki, Ryoki; Tsuiki, Shota; Kojima, Sho; Onishi, Hideaki

    2017-08-24

    This study aimed to clarify the influence of range of repetitive passive finger movement on corticospinal excitability. Thirteen healthy subjects participated in this study. Passive index finger adduction-abduction movements were performed from 15° abduction to 15° adduction, 15° abduction to 0°, 0° to 15° adduction, and 15° adduction to 30° adduction, each at 15°/s for 10min on separate days. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation and M- and F-waves were measured before and after each repetitive passive index finger movement protocol to evaluate changes in corticospinal excitability. MEP amplitude significantly decreased after all passive movements, while F-wave amplitude, F-wave persistence, and M-wave amplitude remained stable. These results suggest that cortical excitability decreases after repetitive passive movement. However, the range of repetitive passive movement does not markedly influence the magnitude of cortical depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Closed-form solutions for linear regulator design of mechanical systems including optimal weighting matrix selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, Brantley R.; Skelton, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    Vibration in modern structural and mechanical systems can be reduced in amplitude by increasing stiffness, redistributing stiffness and mass, and/or adding damping if design techniques are available to do so. Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) theory in modern multivariable control design, attacks the general dissipative elastic system design problem in a global formulation. The optimal design, however, allows electronic connections and phase relations which are not physically practical or possible in passive structural-mechanical devices. The restriction of LQR solutions (to the Algebraic Riccati Equation) to design spaces which can be implemented as passive structural members and/or dampers is addressed. A general closed-form solution to the optimal free-decay control problem is presented which is tailored for structural-mechanical system. The solution includes, as subsets, special cases such as the Rayleigh Dissipation Function and total energy. Weighting matrix selection is a constrained choice among several parameters to obtain desired physical relationships. The closed-form solution is also applicable to active control design for systems where perfect, collocated actuator-sensor pairs exist.

  20. Emergence of solid state helmet-mounted displays in military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Curtis J.

    2002-08-01

    technologies and their applications to HMDs that this paper will address: ¸ Active Matrix Liquid Crystal Displays; improved response times, compensation films ¸ Sub-micron electronics ¸ Backlight Technology to address brightness issues across the spectrum of operations ¸ Distortion Correction to compensate for optical aberrations in near-real time.

  1. Skylab indicators (event timer) (secondary display) (four-digit metabolic display)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiberg, W.

    1971-01-01

    The effort expended in developing the following indicators is summarized: (1) event timer; (2) secondary display; and (3) 4 digit display (metabolic). The mechanical design, vibration analysis, and thermal analysis of all these units are identical, and descriptions pertain to all three units. All problems incurred during the program are discussed along with the recommendations, conclusions, and actions taken to rectify the situations.

  2. Anti-collision radio-frequency identification system using passive SAW tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, A. V.; Shepeta, A. P.

    2017-06-01

    Modern multi sensor systems should have high operating speed and resistance to climate impacts. Radiofrequency systems use passive SAW tags for identification items and vehicles. These tags find application in industry, traffic remote control systems, and railway remote traffic control systems for identification and speed measuring. However, collision of the passive SAW RFID tags hinders development passive RFID SAW technology in Industry. The collision problem for passive SAW tags leads for incorrect identification and encoding each tag. In our researching, we suggest approach for identification of several passive SAW tags in collision case.

  3. Electroless Plated Nanodiamond Coating for Stainless Steel Passivation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Korinko, P.; Spencer, W.

    Tritium gas sample bottles and manifold components require passivation surface treatments to minimize the interaction of the hydrogen isotopes with surface contamination on the stainless steel containment materials. This document summarizes the effort to evaluate electroless plated nanodiamond coatings as a passivation layer for stainless steel. In this work, we developed an electroless nanodiamond (ND)-copper (Cu) coating process to deposit ND on stainless steel parts with the diamond loadings of 0%, 25% and 50% v/v in a Cu matrix. The coated Conflat Flanged Vessel Assemblies (CFVAs) were evaluated on surface morphology, composition, ND distribution, residual hydrogen release, and surface reactivitymore » with deuterium. For as-received Cu and ND-Cu coated CFVAs, hydrogen off-gassing is rapid, and the off-gas rates of H 2 was one to two orders of magnitude higher than that for both untreated and electropolished stainless steel CFVAs, and hydrogen and deuterium reacted to form HD as well. These results indicated that residual H 2 was entrapped in the Cu and ND-Cu coated CFVAs during the coating process, and moisture was adsorbed on the surface, and ND and/or Cu might facilitate catalytic isotope exchange reaction for HD formation. However, hydrocarbons (i.e., CH 3) did not form, and did not appear to be an issue for the Cu and ND-Cu coated CFVAs. After vacuum heating, residual H 2 and adsorbed H 2O in the Cu and ND-Cu coated CFVAs were dramatically reduced. The H 2 off-gassing rate after the vacuum treatment of Cu and 50% ND-Cu coated CFVAs was on the level of 10 -14 l mbar/s cm 2, while H 2O off-gas rate was on the level of 10 -15 l mbar/s cm 2, consistent with the untreated or electropolished stainless steel CFVA, but the HD formation remained. The Restek EP bottle was used as a reference for this work. The Restek Electro-Polished (EP) bottle and their SilTek coated bottles tested under a different research project exhibited very little hydrogen off-gassing and

  4. Microrobot with passive diamagnetic levitation for microparticle manipulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lin; Zhang, Shengyuan; Jiang, Yonggang; Zhang, Deyuan; Arai, Fumihito

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, an innovative microrobot with passive diamagnetic levitation is presented. Based on theoretical analysis, finite element method simulation, and experiments, the shape of pyrolytic graphite is redesigned, which improves the stability of passive diamagnetic levitation significantly. Therefore, passive diamagnetic levitation is able to be applied for 3-D control of the microrobot. Compared with the traditional microrobots driven by permanent magnets in a microfluidic chip, the microrobot made of pyrolytic graphite and driven by magnetic force has two advantages, no friction and 3-D control, which is able to expand the scope of the microrobot applications. Finally, the microrobot with passive diamagnetic levitation was demonstrated by being encapsulated in a microfluidic chip for microparticle manipulations.

  5. LED instrument approach instruction display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meredith, B. D.; Kelly, W. L., IV; Crouch, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    A display employing light emitting diodes (LED's) was developed to demonstrate the feasibility of such displays for presenting landing and navigation information to reduce the workload of general aviation pilots during IFR flight. The display consists of a paper tape reader, digital memory, control electronics, digital latches, and LED alphanumeric displays. A presentable digital countdown clock-timer is included as part of the system to provide a convenient means of monitoring time intervals for precise flight navigation. The system is a limited capability prototype assembled to test pilot reaction to such a device under simulated IFR operation. Pilot opinion indicates that the display is helpful in reducing the IFR pilots workload when used with a runway approach plate. However, the development of a compact, low power second generation display was recommended which could present several instructions simultaneously and provide information update capability. A microprocessor-based display could fulfill these requirements.

  6. Displays in space.

    PubMed

    Colford, Nicholas

    2002-04-01

    This chapter describes the human and environmental factors that dictate the way that displays must be designed for, and used in space. A brief history of the evolution of such display systems covers developments from the Mercury rockets to the International Space Station. c2002 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  7. Does pointing facilitate the recall of serial positions in visuospatial working memory?

    PubMed

    Spataro, Pietro; Marques, Valeria R S; Longobardi, Emiddia; Rossi-Arnaud, Clelia

    2015-09-01

    The present study examined the question of whether pointing enhances the serial recall of visuospatial positions. Thirty-six participants were presented with 40 target arrays varying in length from five to eight items, with each position appearing sequentially in red for 1 s. The task was to reproduce the order of presentation of the positions on a blank matrix. Results showed that, for five-, six-, and seven-item arrays, order memory was significantly better in the passive view than in the pointing condition, and the serial position curves displayed both recency and priority effects. Interestingly, the advantage of the passive-view condition was more pronounced in the early than in the late positions. For eight-item arrays, no significant differences were found between the passive view and the pointing conditions. Overall, the present data provide no evidence in support of the view that pointing facilitates the recall of serial positions.

  8. Displaying Data As Movies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Judith G.

    1992-01-01

    NMSB Movie computer program displays large sets of data (more than million individual values). Presentation dynamic, rapidly displaying sequential image "frames" in main "movie" window. Any sequence of two-dimensional sets of data scaled between 0 and 255 (1-byte resolution) displayed as movie. Time- or slice-wise progression of data illustrated. Originally written to present data from three-dimensional ultrasonic scans of damaged aerospace composite materials, illustrates data acquired by thermal-analysis systems measuring rates of heating and cooling of various materials. Developed on Macintosh IIx computer with 8-bit color display adapter and 8 megabytes of memory using Symantec Corporation's Think C, version 4.0.

  9. Extracellular Matrix Remodeling: The Common Denominator in Connective Tissue DiseasesPossibilities for Evaluation and Current Understanding of the Matrix as More Than a Passive Architecture, but a Key Player in Tissue Failure

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Mette J.; Sand, Jannie M.; Henriksen, Kim; Genovese, Federica; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Smith, Victoria; Adamkewicz, Joanne I.; Christiansen, Claus; Leeming, Diana J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Increased attention is paid to the structural components of tissues. These components are mostly collagens and various proteoglycans. Emerging evidence suggests that altered components and noncoded modifications of the matrix may be both initiators and drivers of disease, exemplified by excessive tissue remodeling leading to tissue stiffness, as well as by changes in the signaling potential of both intact matrix and fragments thereof. Although tissue structure until recently was viewed as a simple architecture anchoring cells and proteins, this complex grid may contain essential information enabling the maintenance of the structure and normal functioning of tissue. The aims of this review are to (1) discuss the structural components of the matrix and the relevance of their mutations to the pathology of diseases such as fibrosis and cancer, (2) introduce the possibility that post-translational modifications (PTMs), such as protease cleavage, citrullination, cross-linking, nitrosylation, glycosylation, and isomerization, generated during pathology, may be unique, disease-specific biochemical markers, (3) list and review the range of simple enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) that have been developed for assessing the extracellular matrix (ECM) and detecting abnormal ECM remodeling, and (4) discuss whether some PTMs are the cause or consequence of disease. New evidence clearly suggests that the ECM at some point in the pathogenesis becomes a driver of disease. These pathological modified ECM proteins may allow insights into complicated pathologies in which the end stage is excessive tissue remodeling, and provide unique and more pathology-specific biochemical markers. PMID:23046407

  10. Displaying uncertainty: investigating the effects of display format and specificity.

    PubMed

    Bisantz, Ann M; Marsiglio, Stephanie Schinzing; Munch, Jessica

    2005-01-01

    We conducted four studies regarding the representation of probabilistic information. Experiments 1 through 3 compared performance on a simulated stock purchase task, in which information regarding stock profitability was probabilistic. Two variables were manipulated: display format for probabilistic information (blurred and colored icons, linguistic phrases, numeric expressions, and combinations) and specificity level (in which the number and size of discrete steps into which the probabilistic information was mapped differed). Results indicated few performance differences attributable to display format; however, performance did improve with greater specificity. Experiment 4, in which participants generated membership functions corresponding to three display formats, found a high degree of similarity in functions across formats and participants and a strong relationship between the shape of the membership function and the intended meaning of the representation. These results indicate that participants can successfully interpret nonnumeric representations of uncertainty and can use such representations in a manner similar to the way numeric expressions are used in a decision-making task. Actual or potential applications of this research include the use of graphical representations of uncertainty in systems such as command and control and situation displays.

  11. Passive damping in EDS maglev systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Rote, D. M.

    2002-05-03

    There continues to be strong interest in the subjects of damping and drag forces associated with electrodynamic suspension (EDS) systems. While electromagnetic drag forces resist the forward motion of a vehicle and therefore consume energy, damping forces control, at least in part, the response of the vehicle to disturbances. Ideally, one would like to reduce the drag forces as much as possible while retaining adequate damping forces to insure dynamic stability and satisfactory ride quality. These two goals turn out to be difficult to achieve in practice. It is well known that maglev systems tend to be intrinsically under damped.more » Consequently it is often necessary in a practical system design to enhance the damping passively or actively. For reasons of cost and simplicity, it is desirable to rely as much as possible on passive damping mechanisms. In this paper, rough estimates are made of the passive damping and drag forces caused by various mechanisms in EDS systems. No attention will be given to active control systems or secondary suspension systems which are obvious ways to augment passive damping mechanisms if the latter prove to be inadequate.« less

  12. Probabilistic Micromechanics and Macromechanics for Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Mital, Subodh K.; Shah, Ashwin R.

    1997-01-01

    The properties of ceramic matrix composites (CMC's) are known to display a considerable amount of scatter due to variations in fiber/matrix properties, interphase properties, interphase bonding, amount of matrix voids, and many geometry- or fabrication-related parameters, such as ply thickness and ply orientation. This paper summarizes preliminary studies in which formal probabilistic descriptions of the material-behavior- and fabrication-related parameters were incorporated into micromechanics and macromechanics for CMC'S. In this process two existing methodologies, namely CMC micromechanics and macromechanics analysis and a fast probability integration (FPI) technique are synergistically coupled to obtain the probabilistic composite behavior or response. Preliminary results in the form of cumulative probability distributions and information on the probability sensitivities of the response to primitive variables for a unidirectional silicon carbide/reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SiC/RBSN) CMC are presented. The cumulative distribution functions are computed for composite moduli, thermal expansion coefficients, thermal conductivities, and longitudinal tensile strength at room temperature. The variations in the constituent properties that directly affect these composite properties are accounted for via assumed probabilistic distributions. Collectively, the results show that the present technique provides valuable information about the composite properties and sensitivity factors, which is useful to design or test engineers. Furthermore, the present methodology is computationally more efficient than a standard Monte-Carlo simulation technique; and the agreement between the two solutions is excellent, as shown via select examples.

  13. Optimization of the polyplanar optical display electronics for a monochrome B-52 display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSanto, Leonard

    1998-09-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. The prototype ten-inch display is two inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. In order to achieve a long lifetime, the new display uses a new 200 mW green solid-state laser (10,000 hr. life) at 532 nm as its light source. To produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLPTM) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments (TI). In order to use the solid-state laser as the light source and also fit within the constraints of the B-52 display, the Digital Micromirror Device (DMDTM) chip is operated remotely from the Texas Instruments circuit board. In order to achieve increased brightness a monochrome digitizing interface was investigated. The operation of the DMDTM divorced from the light engine and the interfacing of the DMDTM board with the RS-170 video format specific to the B-52 aircraft will be discussed, including the increased brightness of the monochrome digitizing interface. A brief description of the electronics required to drive the new 200 mW laser is also presented.

  14. Ribosome display: next-generation display technologies for production of antibodies in vitro.

    PubMed

    He, Mingyue; Khan, Farid

    2005-06-01

    Antibodies represent an important and growing class of biologic research reagents and biopharmaceutical products. They can be used as therapeutics in a variety of diseases. With the rapid expansion of proteomic studies and biomarker discovery, there is a need for the generation of highly specific binding reagents to study the vast number of proteins encoded by the genome. Display technologies provide powerful tools for obtaining antibodies. Aside from the preservation of natural antibody repertoires, they are capable of exploiting diversity by DNA recombination to create very large libraries for selection of novel molecules. In contrast to in vivo immunization processes, display technologies allow selection of antibodies under in vitro-defined selection condition(s), resulting in enrichment of antibodies with desired properties from large populations. In addition, in vitro selection enables the isolation of antibodies against difficult antigens including self-antigens, and this can be applied to the generation of human antibodies against human targets. Display technologies can also be combined with DNA mutagenesis for antibody evolution in vitro. Some methods are amenable to automation, permitting high-throughput generation of antibodies. Ribosome display is considered as representative of the next generation of display technologies since it overcomes the limitations of cell-based display methods by using a cell-free system, offering advantages of screening larger libraries and continuously expanding new diversity during selection. Production of display-derived antibodies can be achieved by choosing one of a variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell-based expression systems. In the near future, cell-free protein synthesis may be developed as an alternative for large-scale generation of antibodies.

  15. Aging of the skeletal muscle extracellular matrix drives a stem cell fibrogenic conversion.

    PubMed

    Stearns-Reider, Kristen M; D'Amore, Antonio; Beezhold, Kevin; Rothrauff, Benjamin; Cavalli, Loredana; Wagner, William R; Vorp, David A; Tsamis, Alkiviadis; Shinde, Sunita; Zhang, Changqing; Barchowsky, Aaron; Rando, Thomas A; Tuan, Rocky S; Ambrosio, Fabrisia

    2017-06-01

    Age-related declines in skeletal muscle regeneration have been attributed to muscle stem cell (MuSC) dysfunction. Aged MuSCs display a fibrogenic conversion, leading to fibrosis and impaired recovery after injury. Although studies have demonstrated the influence of in vitro substrate characteristics on stem cell fate, whether and how aging of the extracellular matrix (ECM) affects stem cell behavior has not been investigated. Here, we investigated the direct effect of the aged muscle ECM on MuSC lineage specification. Quantification of ECM topology and muscle mechanical properties reveals decreased collagen tortuosity and muscle stiffening with increasing age. Age-related ECM alterations directly disrupt MuSC responses, and MuSCs seeded ex vivo onto decellularized ECM constructs derived from aged muscle display increased expression of fibrogenic markers and decreased myogenicity, compared to MuSCs seeded onto young ECM. This fibrogenic conversion is recapitulated in vitro when MuSCs are seeded directly onto matrices elaborated by aged fibroblasts. When compared to young fibroblasts, fibroblasts isolated from aged muscle display increased nuclear levels of the mechanosensors, Yes-associated protein (YAP)/transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ), consistent with exposure to a stiff microenvironment in vivo. Accordingly, preconditioning of young fibroblasts by seeding them onto a substrate engineered to mimic the stiffness of aged muscle increases YAP/TAZ nuclear translocation and promotes secretion of a matrix that favors MuSC fibrogenesis. The findings here suggest that an age-related increase in muscle stiffness drives YAP/TAZ-mediated pathogenic expression of matricellular proteins by fibroblasts, ultimately disrupting MuSC fate. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Integrated passive/active vibration absorber for multi-story buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Glauser, Gina J.; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Horta, Lucas G.

    1995-01-01

    Passive isolator, active vibration absorber, and an integrated passive/active (hybrid) control are studied for their effectiveness in reducing structural vibration under seismic excitations. For the passive isolator, a laminated rubber bearing base isolator which has been studied and used extensively by researchers and seismic designers is considered. An active vibration absorber concept, which can provide guaranteed closed-loop stability with minimum knowledge of the controlled system, is used to reduce the passive isolator displacement and to suppress the top floor vibration. A three-story building model is used for the numerical simulation. The performance of an active vibration absorber and a hybrid vibration controller in reducing peak structural responses is compared with the passively isolated structural response and with absence of vibration control systems under the N00W component of El Centro 1940 and N90W component of the Mexico City earthquake excitation records. The results show that the integrated passive/active vibration control system is most effective in suppressing the peak structural acceleration for the El Centro 1940 earthquake when compared with the passive or active vibration absorber alone. The active vibration absorber, however, is the only system that suppresses the peak acceleration of the structure for the Mexico City 1985 earthquake.

  17. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    DOEpatents

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  18. Large-screen display industry: market and technology trends for direct view and projection displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Joseph A.; Mentley, David E.

    1996-03-01

    Large screen information displays are defined as dynamic electronic displays that can be viewed by more than one person and are at least 2-feet wide. These large area displays for public viewing provide convenience, entertainment, security, and efficiency to the viewers. There are numerous uses for large screen information displays including those in advertising, transportation, traffic control, conference room presentations, computer aided design, banking, and military command/control. A noticeable characteristic of the large screen display market is the interchangeability of display types. For any given application, the user can usually choose from at least three alternative technologies, and sometimes from many more. Some display types have features that make them suitable for specific applications due to temperature, brightness, power consumption, or other such characteristic. The overall worldwide unit consumption of large screen information displays of all types and for all applications (excluding consumer TV) will increase from 401,109 units in 1995 to 655,797 units in 2002. On a unit consumption basis, applications in business and education represent the largest share of unit consumption over this time period; in 1995, this application represented 69.7% of the total. The market (value of shipments) will grow from DOL3.1 billion in 1995 to DOL3.9 billion in 2002. The market will be dominated by front LCD projectors and LCD overhead projector plates.

  19. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Passive tendon prosthesis. 888.3025 Section 888.3025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3025 Passive tendon prosthesis. (a...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Passive tendon prosthesis. 888.3025 Section 888.3025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3025 Passive tendon prosthesis. (a...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Passive tendon prosthesis. 888.3025 Section 888.3025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3025 Passive tendon prosthesis. (a...

  2. Three-dimensional display technologies

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Jason

    2014-01-01

    The physical world around us is three-dimensional (3D), yet traditional display devices can show only two-dimensional (2D) flat images that lack depth (i.e., the third dimension) information. This fundamental restriction greatly limits our ability to perceive and to understand the complexity of real-world objects. Nearly 50% of the capability of the human brain is devoted to processing visual information [Human Anatomy & Physiology (Pearson, 2012)]. Flat images and 2D displays do not harness the brain’s power effectively. With rapid advances in the electronics, optics, laser, and photonics fields, true 3D display technologies are making their way into the marketplace. 3D movies, 3D TV, 3D mobile devices, and 3D games have increasingly demanded true 3D display with no eyeglasses (autostereoscopic). Therefore, it would be very beneficial to readers of this journal to have a systematic review of state-of-the-art 3D display technologies. PMID:25530827

  3. Multimission helicopter information display technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, William S.

    1995-06-01

    A new Operator display subsystem is being incorporated as part of the next generation United States Navy (USN) helicopter avionics system to be integrated into the Multi-Mission Helicopter (MMH) which will replace both the SH-60B and the SH- 60F in 2001. This subsystem exploits state-of-the-art technology for the display hardware, the display driver hardware, information presentation methodologies, and software architecture. The technologies to be base technologies have evolved during the development period and the solution has been modified to include current elements including high resolution AMLCD color displays that are sunlight readable, highly reliable, and significantly lighter that CRT technology, as well as Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) based high-performance display generators that have only recently become feasible to implement in a military aircraft. This paper describes the overall subsystem architecture, some detail on the individual elements along with supporting rationale, the manner in which the display subsystem provides the necessary tools to significantly enhance the performance of the weapon system through the vital Operator-System Interface. Also addressed is a summary of the evolution of design leading to the current approach to MMH Operator displays and display processing as well as the growth path that the MMH display subsystem will most likely follow as additional technology evolution occurs.

  4. Passive chevron replicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeffinger, Thomas R. (Inventor); Tocci, Leonard R. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    There is described a passive replicator device to be used in magnetic bubble domain systems. The replicator is passive, i.e., does not require an active element such as a current source or the like, and both propagates and replicates bubble domains. In a preferred embodiment, the replicator uses chevron type elements arranged in an appropriate pattern so as to interact with a pair of propagation paths wherein bubble domains are propagated. A bubble in one propagation path is routinely transferred therealong and, concurrently, replicated by the instant device into another propagation path. A plurality of elements arranged in juxtaposition to the chevrons assists in controlling the propagation of the bubbles through the respective propagation paths and, at the appropriate time, provides a cutting action wherein a bubble which is elongated between the chevrons of the two propagation paths is split into two separate bubbles.

  5. Energetic Passivity of the Human Ankle Joint.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunglae; Hogan, Neville

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the passive or nonpassive behavior of the neuromuscular system is important to design and control robots that physically interact with humans, since it provides quantitative information to secure coupled stability while maximizing performance. This has become more important than ever apace with the increasing demand for robotic technologies in neurorehabilitation. This paper presents a quantitative characterization of passive and nonpassive behavior of the ankle of young healthy subjects, which provides a baseline for future studies in persons with neurological impairments and information for future developments of rehabilitation robots, such as exoskeletal devices and powered prostheses. Measurements using a wearable ankle robot actuating 2 degrees-of-freedom of the ankle combined with curl analysis and passivity analysis enabled characterization of both quasi-static and steady-state dynamic behavior of the ankle, unavailable from single DOF studies. Despite active neuromuscular control over a wide range of muscle activation, in young healthy subjects passive or dissipative ankle behavior predominated.

  6. Self-healing of damage in fibre-reinforced polymer-matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Hayes, S A; Zhang, W; Branthwaite, M; Jones, F R

    2007-04-22

    Self-healing resin systems have been discussed for over a decade and four different technologies had been proposed. However, little work on their application as composite matrices has been published although this was one of the stated aims of the earliest work in the field. This paper reports on the optimization of a solid-state self-healing resin system and its subsequent use as a matrix for high volume fraction glass fibre-reinforced composites. The resin system was optimized using Charpy impact testing and repeated healing, while the efficiency of healing in composites was determined by analysing the growth of delaminations following repeated impacts with or without a healing cycle. To act as a reference, a non-healing resin system was subjected to the same treatments and the results are compared with the healable system. The optimized resin system displays a healing efficiency of 65% after the first healing cycle, dropping to 35 and 30% after the second and third healing cycles, respectively. Correction for any healability due to further curing showed that approximately 50% healing efficiency could be achieved with the bisphenol A-based epoxy resin containing 7.5% of polybisphenol-A-co-epichlorohydrin. The composite, on the other hand, displays a healing efficiency of approximately 30%. It is therefore clear that the solid-state self-healing system is capable of healing transverse cracks and delaminations in a composite, but that more work is needed to optimize matrix healing within a composite and to develop a methodology for assessing recovery in performance.

  7. Passivation of high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The surface of high temperature superconductors such as YBa2Cu3O(7-x) are passivated by reacting the native Y, Ba and Cu metal ions with an anion such as sulfate or oxalate to form a surface film that is impervious to water and has a solubility in water of no more than 10(exp -3) M. The passivating treatment is preferably conducted by immersing the surface in dilute aqueous acid solution since more soluble species dissolve into the solution. The treatment does not degrade the superconducting properties of the bulk material.

  8. Modelling and analysis of the wetting characteristics of ink for display applications with the surface evolution technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dong-Youn; Brakke, Kenneth A.

    2009-06-01

    Piezo drop-on-demand inkjet printing technology has attracted the attention of display industries for the production of colour filters for thin film transistor liquid crystal displays (TFT LCD) because of the opportunity of reducing manufacturing cost. Colourant ink droplets ejected from inkjet nozzles selectively fill subpixels surrounded with black matrix (BM). Surface energy differences between the glass substrate and the BM generally guide this ink filling process. This colourant ink filling process, however, results from the complex hydrodynamic interaction of ink with the substrate and the BM. Neither computationally expensive numerical methods nor time and cost expensive experiments are suitable for the derivation of optimum surface conditions at the early development stage. In this study, a more concise surface evolution technique is proposed and ways to find the optimum surface conditions for the fabrication of TFT LCD colour filters and polymer light emitting devices are discussed, which might be useful for chemists and developers of ink and BM material, as well as for process engineers in display industries.

  9. Matrix management in hospitals: testing theories of matrix structure and development.

    PubMed

    Burns, L R

    1989-09-01

    A study of 315 hospitals with matrix management programs was used to test several hypotheses concerning matrix management advanced by earlier theorists. The study verifies that matrix management involves several distinctive elements that can be scaled to form increasingly complex types of lateral coordinative devices. The scalability of these elements is evident only cross-sectionally. The results show that matrix complexity is not an outcome of program age, nor does matrix complexity at the time of implementation appear to influence program survival. Matrix complexity, finally, is not determined by the organization's task diversity and uncertainty. The results suggest several modifications in prevailing theories of matrix organization.

  10. Mobile visual communications and displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valliath, George T.

    2004-09-01

    The different types of mobile visual communication modes and the types of displays needed in cellular handsets are explored. The well-known 2-way video conferencing is only one of the possible modes. Some modes are already supported on current handsets while others need the arrival of advanced network capabilities to be supported. Displays for devices that support these visual communication modes need to deliver the required visual experience. Over the last 20 years the display has grown in size while the rest of the handset has shrunk. However, the display is still not large enough - the processor performance and network capabilities continue to outstrip the display ability. This makes the display a bottleneck. This paper will explore potential solutions to a small large image on a small handset.

  11. Optimization of the polyplanar optical display electronics for a monochrome B-52 display

    SciTech Connect

    DeSanto, L.

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. The prototype ten-inch display is two inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. In order to achieve a long lifetime, the new display uses a new 200 mW green solid-state laser (10,000 hr. life) at 532 nm as its light source. To produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by amore » Digital Light Processing (DLP{trademark}) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments (TI). In order to use the solid-state laser as the light source and also fit within the constraints of the B-52 display, the Digital Micromirror Device (DMD{trademark}) chip is operated remotely from the Texas Instruments circuit board. In order to achieve increased brightness a monochrome digitizing interface was investigated. The operation of the DMD{trademark} divorced from the light engine and the interfacing of the DMD{trademark} board with the RS-170 video format specific to the B-52 aircraft will be discussed, including the increased brightness of the monochrome digitizing interface. A brief description of the electronics required to drive the new 200 mW laser is also presented.« less

  12. A flexible layout design method for passive micromixers.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yongbo; Liu, Zhenyu; Zhang, Ping; Liu, Yongshun; Gao, Qingyong; Wu, Yihui

    2012-10-01

    This paper discusses a flexible layout design method of passive micromixers based on the topology optimization of fluidic flows. Being different from the trial and error method, this method obtains the detailed layout of a passive micromixer according to the desired mixing performance by solving a topology optimization problem. Therefore, the dependence on the experience of the designer is weaken, when this method is used to design a passive micromixer with acceptable mixing performance. Several design disciplines for the passive micromixers are considered to demonstrate the flexibility of the layout design method for passive micromixers. These design disciplines include the approximation of the real 3D micromixer, the manufacturing feasibility, the spacial periodic design, and effects of the Péclet number and Reynolds number on the designs obtained by this layout design method. The capability of this design method is validated by several comparisons performed between the obtained layouts and the optimized designs in the recently published literatures, where the values of the mixing measurement is improved up to 40.4% for one cycle of the micromixer.

  13. In situ passivation of GaAsP nanowires.

    PubMed

    Himwas, C; Collin, S; Rale, P; Chauvin, N; Patriarche, G; Oehler, F; Julien, F H; Travers, L; Harmand, J-C; Tchernycheva, M

    2017-12-08

    We report on the structural and optical properties of GaAsP nanowires (NWs) grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. By adjusting the alloy composition in the NWs, the transition energy was tuned to the optimal value required for tandem III-V/silicon solar cells. We discovered that an unintentional shell was also formed during the GaAsP NW growth. The NW surface was passivated by an in situ deposition of a radial Ga(As)P shell. Different shell compositions and thicknesses were investigated. We demonstrate that the optimal passivation conditions for GaAsP NWs (with a gap of 1.78 eV) are obtained with a 5 nm thick GaP shell. This passivation enhances the luminescence intensity of the NWs by 2 orders of magnitude and yields a longer luminescence decay. The luminescence dynamics changes from single exponential decay with a 4 ps characteristic time in non-passivated NWs to a bi-exponential decay with characteristic times of 85 and 540 ps in NWs with GaP shell passivation.

  14. Color calibration and color-managed medical displays: does the calibration method matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehrig, Hans; Rehm, Kelly; Silverstein, Louis D.; Dallas, William J.; Fan, Jiahua; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.

    2010-02-01

    Our laboratory has investigated the efficacy of a suite of color calibration and monitor profiling packages which employ a variety of color measurement sensors. Each of the methods computes gamma correction tables for the red, green and blue color channels of a monitor that attempt to: a) match a desired luminance range and tone reproduction curve; and b) maintain a target neutral point across the range of grey values. All of the methods examined here produce International Color Consortium (ICC) profiles that describe the color rendering capabilities of the monitor after calibration. Color profiles incorporate a transfer matrix that establishes the relationship between RGB driving levels and the International Commission on Illumination (CIE) XYZ (tristimulus) values of the resulting on-screen color; the matrix is developed by displaying color patches of known RGB values on the monitor and measuring the tristimulus values with a sensor. The number and chromatic distribution of color patches varies across methods and is usually not under user control. In this work we examine the effect of employing differing calibration and profiling methods on rendition of color images. A series of color patches encoded in sRGB color space were presented on the monitor using color-management software that utilized the ICC profile produced by each method. The patches were displayed on the calibrated monitor and measured with a Minolta CS200 colorimeter. Differences in intended and achieved luminance and chromaticity were computed using the CIE DE2000 color-difference metric, in which a value of ▵E = 1 is generally considered to be approximately one just noticeable difference (JND) in color. We observed between one and 17 JND's for individual colors, depending on calibration method and target.

  15. Factors that influence muscle shear modulus during passive stretch.

    PubMed

    Koo, Terry K; Hug, François

    2015-09-18

    Although elastography has been increasingly used for evaluating muscle shear modulus associated with age, sex, musculoskeletal, and neurological conditions, its physiological meaning is largely unknown. This knowledge gap may hinder data interpretation, limiting the potential of using elastography to gain insights into muscle biomechanics in health and disease. We derived a mathematical model from a widely-accepted Hill-type passive force-length relationship to gain insight about the physiological meaning of resting shear modulus of skeletal muscles under passive stretching, and validated the model by comparing against the ex-vivo animal data reported in our recent work (Koo et al. 2013). The model suggested that resting shear modulus of a slack muscle is a function of specific tension and parameters that govern the normalized passive muscle force-length relationship as well as the degree of muscle anisotropy. The model also suggested that although the slope of the linear shear modulus-passive force relationship is primarily related to muscle anatomical cross-sectional area (i.e. the smaller the muscle cross-sectional area, the more the increase in shear modulus to result in the same passive muscle force), it is also governed by the normalized passive muscle force-length relationship and the degree of muscle anisotropy. Taken together, although muscle shear modulus under passive stretching has a strong linear relationship with passive muscle force, its actual value appears to be affected by muscle's mechanical, material, and architectural properties. This should be taken into consideration when interpreting the muscle shear modulus values. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tumorigenic Potential of Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, Stanley; Hymowitz, Michelle; Rollo, Ellen E.; Mann, Richard; Conner, Cathleen E.; Cao, Jian; Foda, Hussein D.; Tompkins, David C.; Toole, Bryan P.

    2001-01-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), a glycoprotein present on the cancer cell plasma membrane, enhances fibroblast synthesis of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The demonstration that peritumoral fibroblasts synthesize most of the MMPs in human tumors rather than the cancer cells themselves has ignited interest in the role of EMMPRIN in tumor dissemination. In this report we have demonstrated a role for EMMPRIN in cancer progression. Human MDA-MB-436 breast cancer cells, which are tumorigenic but slow growing in vivo, were transfected with EMMPRIN cDNA and injected orthotopically into mammary tissue of female NCr nu/nu mice. Green fluorescent protein was used to visualize metastases. In three experiments, breast cancer cell clones transfected with EMMPRIN cDNA were considerably more tumorigenic and invasive than plasmid-transfected cancer cells. Increased gelatinase A and gelatinase B expression (demonstrated by in situ hybridization and gelatin substrate zymography) was demonstrated in EMMPRIN-enhanced tumors. In contrast to de novo breast cancers in humans, human tumors transplanted into mice elicited minimal stromal or inflammatory cell reactions. Based on these experimental studies and our previous demonstration that EMMPRIN is prominently displayed in human cancer tissue, we propose that EMMPRIN plays an important role in cancer progression by increasing synthesis of MMPs. PMID:11395366

  17. Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Displays a Particular Time Response to Acute Stress: Variation in Its Levels and Activity Distribution in Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Aguayo, Felipe I; Pacheco, Aníbal A; García-Rojo, Gonzalo J; Pizarro-Bauerle, Javier A; Doberti, Ana V; Tejos, Macarena; García-Pérez, María A; Rojas, Paulina S; Fiedler, Jenny L

    2018-05-16

    A single stress exposure facilitates memory formation through neuroplastic processes that reshape excitatory synapses in the hippocampus, probably requiring changes in extracellular matrix components. We tested the hypothesis that matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), an enzyme that degrades components of extracellular matrix and synaptic proteins such as β-dystroglycan (β-DG 43 ), changes their activity and distribution in rat hippocampus during the acute stress response. After 2.5 h of restraint stress, we found (i) increased MMP-9 levels and potential activity in whole hippocampal extracts, accompanied by β-DG 43 cleavage, and (ii) a significant enhancement of MMP-9 immunoreactivity in dendritic fields such as stratum radiatum and the molecular layer of hippocampus. After 24 h of stress, we found that (i) MMP-9 net activity rises at somatic field, i.e., stratum pyramidale and granule cell layers, and also at synaptic field, mainly stratum radiatum and the molecular layer of hippocampus, and (ii) hippocampal synaptoneurosome fractions are enriched with MMP-9, without variation of its potential enzymatic activity, in accordance with the constant level of cleaved β-DG 43 . These findings indicate that stress triggers a peculiar timing response in the MMP-9 levels, net activity, and subcellular distribution in the hippocampus, suggesting its involvement in the processing of substrates during the stress response.

  18. X-Windows Widget for Image Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    XvicImage is a high-performance XWindows (Motif-compliant) user interface widget for displaying images. It handles all aspects of low-level image display. The fully Motif-compliant image display widget handles the following tasks: (1) Image display, including dithering as needed (2) Zoom (3) Pan (4) Stretch (contrast enhancement, via lookup table) (5) Display of single-band or color data (6) Display of non-byte data (ints, floats) (7) Pseudocolor display (8) Full overlay support (drawing graphics on image) (9) Mouse-based panning (10) Cursor handling, shaping, and planting (disconnecting cursor from mouse) (11) Support for all user interaction events (passed to application) (12) Background loading and display of images (doesn't freeze the GUI) (13) Tiling of images.

  19. Incremental passivity and output regulation for switched nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Hongbo; Zhao, Jun

    2017-10-01

    This paper studies incremental passivity and global output regulation for switched nonlinear systems, whose subsystems are not required to be incrementally passive. A concept of incremental passivity for switched systems is put forward. First, a switched system is rendered incrementally passive by the design of a state-dependent switching law. Second, the feedback incremental passification is achieved by the design of a state-dependent switching law and a set of state feedback controllers. Finally, we show that once the incremental passivity for switched nonlinear systems is assured, the output regulation problem is solved by the design of global nonlinear regulator controllers comprising two components: the steady-state control and the linear output feedback stabilising controllers, even though the problem for none of subsystems is solvable. Two examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  20. Active and Passive Sport Interests of Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stensaasen, Svein

    1980-01-01

    A study dealing with the sport interests of adolescents reveals significant relationships between different passive sport interests, and a relationship of active and passive sport interests which decreases with age and depends to some degree on social background. The study upholds previously determined relationships between sex and sport activity.…

  1. The German Passive: Analysis and Teaching Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffen, T. D.

    1981-01-01

    Proposes an analysis of German passive based upon internal structure rather than translation conventions from Latin and Greek. Claims that this approach leads to a description of the perfect participle as an adjectival complement, which eliminates the classification of a passive voice for German and simplifies the learning task. (MES)

  2. Active and Passive Remote Sensing of Ice.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    This is a report on the progress that has been made in the study of active and passive remote sensing of ice during the period of February 1, 1984...the emissivities as functions of viewing angles and polarizations. They are used to interpret the passive microwave remote sensing data from

  3. Active and Passive Remote Sensing of Ice.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    This is a report on the progress that has been made in the study of active and passive remote sensing of ice during the period of August 1, 1984...active and passive microwave remote sensing , (2) used the strong fluctuation theory and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to calculate the brightness

  4. Laser-driven polyplanar optic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veligdan, James T.; Beiser, Leo; Biscardi, Cyrus; Brewster, Calvin; DeSanto, Leonard

    1998-05-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. This display screen is 2 inches thick and has a matte-black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. The new display uses a 200 milliwatt green solid- state laser (532 nm) as its optical source. In order to produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLPTM) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments, Inc. A variable astigmatic focusing system is used to produce a stigmatic image on the viewing face of the POD. In addition to the optical design, we discuss the DLPTM chip, the opto-mechanical design and viewing angle characteristics.

  5. Collimated autostereoscopic displays for cockpit applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichenlaub, Jesse B.

    1995-06-01

    The use of an autostereoscopic display (a display that produces stereoscopic images that the user can see without wearing special glasses) for cockpit applications is now under investigation at Wright Patterson Air Force Base. DTI reported on this display, built for testing in a simulator, at last year's conference. It is believed, based on testing performed at NASA's Langley Research Center, that collimating this type of display will accrue benefits to the user including a grater useful imaging volume and more accurate stereo perception. DTI has therefore investigated the feasibility of collimating an autostereoscopic display, and has experimentally demonstrated a proof of concept model of such a display. As in the case of conventional displays, a collimated autostereoscopic display utilizes an optical element located one focal length from the surface of the image forming device. The presence of this element must be taken into account when designing the optics used to create the autostereoscopic images. The major design issues associated with collimated 2D displays are also associated with collimated autostereoscopic displays.

  6. Conceptual design of industrial process displays.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, C R; Lind, M

    1999-11-01

    Today, process displays used in industry are often designed on the basis of piping and instrumentation diagrams without any method of ensuring that the needs of the operators are fulfilled. Therefore, a method for a systematic approach to the design of process displays is needed. This paper discusses aspects of process display design taking into account both the designer's and the operator's points of view. Three aspects are emphasized: the operator tasks, the display content and the display form. The distinction between these three aspects is the basis for proposing an outline for a display design method that matches the industrial practice of modular plant design and satisfies the needs of reusability of display design solutions. The main considerations in display design in the industry are to specify the operator's activities in detail, to extract the information the operators need from the plant design specification and documentation, and finally to present this information. The form of the display is selected from existing standardized display elements such as trend curves, mimic diagrams, ecological interfaces, etc. Further knowledge is required to invent new display elements. That is, knowledge about basic visual means of presenting information and how humans perceive and interpret these means and combinations. This knowledge is required in the systematic selection of graphical items for a given display content. The industrial part of the method is first illustrated in the paper by a simple example from a plant with batch processes. Later the method is applied to develop a supervisory display for a condenser system in a nuclear power plant. The differences between the continuous plant domain of power production and the batch processes from the example are analysed and broad categories of display types are proposed. The problems involved in specification and invention of a supervisory display are analysed and conclusions from these problems are made. It is

  7. BASIC Matrix Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digital Equipment Corp., Maynard, MA.

    The curriculum materials and computer programs in this booklet introduce the idea of a matrix. They go on to discuss matrix operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication by a scalar, and matrix multiplication. The last section covers several contemporary applications of matrix multiplication, including problems of communication…

  8. Developing Intepretive Soil Education Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansmeyer, T. L.; Cooper, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    Describes several soil educational displays developed for park and nature center trails. Displays include full-scale soil monoliths displayed along the trails with explanations on why and how the soils are different, and micro-monoliths exhibiting the different soil types. (MDH)

  9. Quantitative Frequency-Domain Passive Cavitation Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Kevin J.; Bader, Kenneth B.; Rich, Kyle T.; Holland, Christy K.; Mast, T. Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Passive cavitation detection has been an instrumental technique for measuring cavitation dynamics, elucidating concomitant bioeffects, and guiding ultrasound therapies. Recently, techniques have been developed to create images of cavitation activity to provide investigators with a more complete set of information. These techniques use arrays to record and subsequently beamform received cavitation emissions, rather than processing emissions received on a single-element transducer. In this paper, the methods for performing frequency-domain delay, sum, and integrate passive imaging are outlined. The method can be applied to any passively acquired acoustic scattering or emissions, including cavitation emissions. In order to compare data across different systems, techniques for normalizing Fourier transformed data and converting the data to the acoustic energy received by the array are described. A discussion of hardware requirements and alternative imaging approaches are additionally outlined. Examples are provided in MATLAB. PMID:27992331

  10. Finite Element Modeling of Passive Material Influence on the Deformation and Force Output of Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, John A.; Chi, Sheng-Wei; Yang, Judy P.; Chen, Jiun-Shyan; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Sinha, Shantanu

    2014-01-01

    The pattern of deformation of the different structural components of a muscle-tendon complex when it is activated provides important information about the internal mechanics of the muscle. Recent experimental observations of deformations in contracting muscle have presented inconsistencies with current widely held assumption about muscle behavior. These include negative strain in aponeuroses, non-uniform strain changes in sarcomeres, even of individual muscle fibers and evidence that muscle fiber cross sectional deformations are asymmetrical suggesting a need to readjust current models of contracting muscle. We report here our use of finite element modeling techniques to simulate a simple muscle-tendon complex and investigate the influence of passive intramuscular material properties upon the deformation patterns under isometric and shortening conditions. While phenomenological force-displacement relationships described the muscle fiber properties, the material properties of the passive matrix were varied to simulate a hydrostatic model, compliant and stiff isotropically hyperelastic models and an anisotropic elastic model. The numerical results demonstrate that passive elastic material properties significantly influence the magnitude, heterogeneity and distribution pattern of many measures of deformation in a contracting muscle. Measures included aponeurosis strain, aponeurosis separation, muscle fiber strain and fiber cross-sectional deformation. The force output of our simulations was strongly influenced by passive material properties, changing by as much as ~80% under some conditions. Maximum output was accomplished by introducing anisotropy along axes which were not strained significantly during a muscle length change, suggesting that correct costamere orientation may be a critical factor in optimal muscle function. Such a model not only fits known physiological data, but also maintains the relatively constant aponeurosis separation observed during in vivo

  11. Finite element modeling of passive material influence on the deformation and force output of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, John A; Chi, Sheng-Wei; Yang, Judy P; Chen, Jiun-Shyan; Edgerton, Victor R; Sinha, Shantanu

    2012-05-01

    The pattern of deformation of different structural components of a muscle-tendon complex when it is activated provides important information about the internal mechanics of the muscle. Recent experimental observations of deformations in contracting muscle have presented inconsistencies with current widely held assumption about muscle behavior. These include negative strain in aponeuroses, non-uniform strain changes in sarcomeres, even of individual muscle fibers and evidence that muscle fiber cross sectional deformations are asymmetrical suggesting a need to readjust current models of contracting muscle. We report here our use of finite element modeling techniques to simulate a simple muscle-tendon complex and investigate the influence of passive intramuscular material properties upon the deformation patterns under isometric and shortening conditions. While phenomenological force-displacement relationships described the muscle fiber properties, the material properties of the passive matrix were varied to simulate a hydrostatic model, compliant and stiff isotropically hyperelastic models and an anisotropic elastic model. The numerical results demonstrate that passive elastic material properties significantly influence the magnitude, heterogeneity and distribution pattern of many measures of deformation in a contracting muscle. Measures included aponeurosis strain, aponeurosis separation, muscle fiber strain and fiber cross-sectional deformation. The force output of our simulations was strongly influenced by passive material properties, changing by as much as ~80% under some conditions. The maximum output was accomplished by introducing anisotropy along axes which were not strained significantly during a muscle length change, suggesting that correct costamere orientation may be a critical factor in the optimal muscle function. Such a model not only fits known physiological data, but also maintains the relatively constant aponeurosis separation observed during in vivo

  12. Is Children's Acquisition of the Passive a Staged Process? Evidence from Six- and Nine-Year-Olds' Production of Passives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messenger, Katherine; Branigan, Holly P.; McLean, Janet F.

    2012-01-01

    We report a syntactic priming experiment that examined whether children's acquisition of the passive is a staged process, with acquisition of constituent structure preceding acquisition of thematic role mappings. Six-year-olds and nine-year-olds described transitive actions after hearing active and passive prime descriptions involving the same or…

  13. Dichroic Liquid Crystal Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadur, Birendra

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * DICHROIC DYES * Chemical Structure * Chemical and Photochemical Stability * THEORETICAL MODELLING * DEFECTS CAUSED BY PROLONGED LIGHT IRRADIATION * CHEMICAL STRUCTURE AND PHOTOSTABILITY * OTHER PARAMETERS AFFECTING PHOTOSTABILITY * CELL PREPARATION * DICHROIC PARAMETERS AND THEIR MEASUREMENTS * Order Parameter and Dichroic Ratio Of Dyes * Absorbance, Order Parameter and Dichroic Ratio Measurements * IMPACT OF DYE STRUCTURE AND LIQUID CRYSTAL HOST ON PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF A DICHROIC MIXTURE * Order Parameter and Dichroic Ratio * EFFECT OF LENGTH OF DICHROIC DYES ON THE ORDER PARAMETER * EFFECT OF THE BREADTH OF DYE ON THE ORDER PARAMETER * EFFECT OF THE HOST ON THE ORDER PARAMETER * TEMPERATURE VARIATION OF THE ORDER PARAMETER OF DYES IN A LIQUID CRYSTAL HOST * IMPACT OF DYE CONCENTRATION ON THE ORDER PARAMETER * Temperature Range * Viscosity * Dielectric Constant and Anisotropy * Refractive Indices and Birefringence * solubility43,153-156 * Absorption Wavelength and Auxochromic Groups * Molecular Engineering of Dichroic Dyes * OPTICAL, ELECTRO-OPTICAL AND LIFE PARAMETERS * Colour And CIE Colour space120,160-166 * CIE 1931 COLOUR SPACE * CIE 1976 CHROMATICITY DIAGRAM * CIE UNIFORM COLOUR SPACES & COLOUR DIFFERENCE FORMULAE120,160-166 * Electro-Optical Parameters120 * LUMINANCE * CONTRAST AND CONTRAST RATIO * SWITCHING SPEED * Life Parameters and Failure Modes * DICHROIC MIXTURE FORMULATION * Monochrome Mixture * Black Mixture * ACHROMATIC BLACK MIXTURE FOR HEILMEIER DISPLAYS * Effect of Illuminant on Display Colour * Colour of the Field-On State * Effect of Dye Linewidth * Optimum Centroid Wavelengths * Effect of Dye Concentration * Mixture Formulation Using More Than Three Dyes * ACHROMATIC MIXTURE FOR WHITE-TAYLOR TYPE DISPLAYS * HEILMEIER DISPLAYS * Theoretical Modelling * Threshold Characteristic * Effects of Dye Concentration on Electro-optical Parameters * Effect of Cholesteric Doping * Effect of Alignment

  14. Signed-negabinary-arithmetic-based optical computing by use of a single liquid-crystal-display panel.

    PubMed

    Datta, Asit K; Munshi, Soumika

    2002-03-10

    Based on the negabinary number representation, parallel one-step arithmetic operations (that is, addition and subtraction), logical operations, and matrix-vector multiplication on data have been optically implemented, by use of a two-dimensional spatial-encoding technique. For addition and subtraction, one of the operands in decimal form is converted into the unsigned negabinary form, whereas the other decimal number is represented in the signed negabinary form. The result of operation is obtained in the mixed negabinary form and is converted back into decimal. Matrix-vector multiplication for unsigned negabinary numbers is achieved through the convolution technique. Both of the operands for logical operation are converted to their signed negabinary forms. All operations are implemented by use of a unique optical architecture. The use of a single liquid-crystal-display panel to spatially encode the input data, operational kernels, and decoding masks have simplified the architecture as well as reduced the cost and complexity.

  15. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites: A comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  16. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites - A comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  17. Laser-driven polyplanar optic display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.; Biscardi, C.; Brewster, C.

    1998-01-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. This display screen is 2 inches thick and has a matte-black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. The new display uses a 200 milliwatt green solid-state laser (532 nm) as its optical source. In order to produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments, Inc. A variablemore » astigmatic focusing system is used to produce a stigmatic image on the viewing face of the POD. In addition to the optical design, the authors discuss the DLP chip, the optomechanical design and viewing angle characteristics.« less

  18. Matrix of Key Federal Statutes and Federal and State Court Decisions Reflecting the Core Concepts of Disability Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, H. Rutherford, III; Stowe, Matt; Klein, Samara; Riffel, Brandon

    2012-01-01

    This matrix displays the decisions of the United States Supreme Court and the federal statutes most relevant to individuals with disabilities and their families. It is organized according to the core concepts of disability policy as identified by Rud Turnbull and his colleagues at the Beach Center on Disability, the University of Kansas, Lawrence,…

  19. New insights into the passive force enhancement in skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Jeong; Joumaa, Venus; Herzog, Walter

    2007-01-01

    The steady-state isometric force following active stretching of a muscle is always greater than the steady-state isometric force obtained in a purely isometric contraction at the same length. This phenomenon has been termed "residual force enhancement" and it is associated with an active and a passive component. The origin of these components remains a matter of scientific debate. The purpose of this work was to test the hypothesis that the passive component of the residual force enhancement is caused by a passive structural element. In order to achieve this purpose, single fibers (n=6) from the lumbrical muscles of frog (Rana pipiens) were isolated and attached to a force transducer and a motor that could produce computer-controlled length changes. The passive force enhancement was assessed for three experimental conditions: in a normal Ringer's solution, and after the addition of 5 and 15mM 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM) which inhibits force production in a dose-dependent manner. If our hypothesis was correct, one would expect the passive force enhancement to be unaffected following BDM application. However, we found that increasing concentrations of BDM decreased the isometric forces, increased the normalized residual force enhancement, and most importantly for this study, increased the passive force enhancement. Furthermore, BDM decreased the rate of force relaxation after deactivation following active stretching of fibers, passive stretching in the Ringer's and BDM conditions produced the same passive force-sarcomere length relationship, and passive force enhancement required activation and force production. These results led to the conclusion that the passive force enhancement cannot be caused by a structural component exclusively as had been assumed up to date, but must be associated, directly or indirectly, with cross-bridge attachments upon activation and the associated active force.

  20. Passive appendages improve the maneuverability of fish-like robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Beau; Tallapragada, Phanindra

    2017-11-01

    It is known that the passive mechanics of fish appendages play a role in the high efficiency of their swimming. A well known example of this is the experimental demonstration that a dead fish could swim upstream. However little is known about the role if any of passive deformations of a fish-like body that could aid in its maneuverability. Part of the difficulty investigating this lies in clearly separating the role of actuated body deformations and passive deformations in response to the fluid structure interaction. In this paper we compare the maneuverability of several fish shaped robotic models that possess varying numbers of passive appendages with a fish shaped robot that has no appendages. All the robots are propelled by the oscillations of an internal momentum wheel thereby eliminating any active deformations of the body. Our experiments clearly reveal the significant improvement in maneuverability of robots with passive appendages. In the broader context of swimming robots our experiments show that passive mechanisms could be useful to provide mechanical feedback that can help maneuverability and obstacle avoidance along with propulsive efficiency. This work was partly supported by a Grant from the NSF CMMI 1563315.