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Sample records for passive treatment analog

  1. Bedrock refractive-flow cells: A passive treatment analog to funnel-and-gate

    SciTech Connect

    Dick, V.; Edwards, D.

    1997-12-31

    Funnel-and-gate technology provides a mechanism to passively treat groundwater contaminant plumes, but depends on placement of a sufficient barrier ({open_quotes}funnel{close_quotes}) in the plume flow path to channel the plume to a pass-through treatment zone ({open_quotes}gate{close_quotes}). Conventional barrier technologies limit funnel-and-gate deployment to unconsolidated overburden applications. A method has been developed which allows similar passive treatment to be applied to bedrock plumes. Rather than use barriers as the funnel, the method uses engineered bedrock zones, installed via precision blasting or other means, to refract groundwater flow along a preferred path to treatment (gate). The method requires orienting the refractive cell based on the Tangent Law and extending refractive cell limbs down gradient of the gate to disperse head and control flow. A typical Refractive-Flow cell may be{open_quotes}Y{close_quotes}shaped, with each limb 3-10 ft [1-3 m] wide and several tens to a few hundred feet [10 - 100 m] in length. Treatment takes place at the center of the X. MODFLOW modeling has been used to successfully simulate desired flow. Engineered blasting has been used at full scale application to create bedrock rubble zones for active collection/flow control for several years. The method provides a previously unavailable method to passively treat contaminated groundwater in bedrock at low cost.

  2. Passive Endwall Treatments for Enhancing Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    These lecture notes were presented at the von Karman Institutes lecture series on Advances in Axial Compressor Aerodynamics, May 2006. They provide a fairly extensive overview of what's been learned from numerous investigations of various passive casing endwall technologies that have been proposed for alleviating the stall limiting physics associated with the compressor endwall flow field. The lecture notes are organized to give an appreciation for the inventiveness and understanding of the earliest compressor technologists and to provide a coherent thread of understanding that has arisen out of the early investigations. As such the lecture notes begin with a historical overview of casing treatments from their infancy through the earliest proposed concepts involving blowing, suction and flow recirculation. A summary of lessons learned from these early investigations is provided at the end of this section. The lecture notes then provide a somewhat more in-depth overview of recent advancements in the development of passive casing treatments from the late 1990's through 2006, including advancements in understanding the flow mechanism of circumferential groove casing treatments, and the development of discrete tip injection and self-recirculating casing treatments. At the conclusion of the lecture notes a final summary of lessons learned throughout the history of the development of passive casing treatments is provided. Finally, a list of future needs is given. It is hoped that these lecture notes will be a useful reference for future research endeavors to improve our understanding of the fluid physics of passive casing treatments and how they act to enhance compressor stability, and that they will perhaps provide a springboard for future research activities in this area of interest

  3. Somatostatin analog treatment of acromegaly: new aspects.

    PubMed

    Lamberts, S W; del Pozo, E

    1988-01-01

    Ten acromegalics received daily doses of 200-300 micrograms of a long-acting somatostatin analog, SMS 201-995 (Sandostatin, SMS), for an average of 64 weeks. Basal mean GH values of 44 +/- (SE) 7.8 ng/ml had fallen into the normal range at the end of the observation period (mean 64 weeks). This effect was accompanied by a substantial drop in somatomedin-C values. Reduction of pituitary tumor size could be documented in 3 of 6 patients. Whereas SMS did not affect high plasma PRL in 4 microprolactinoma patients, lactotrophs turned sensitive to this agent in mixed GH/PRL tumors. In a comparative study between SMS and bromocriptine, the former normalized circulating GH in 10 of 17 acromegalics in an acute trial, whereas bromocriptine was effective in only 5. A combination of both substances was effective in 2 of 3 patients who were insensitive to single drug administration. Cultures of GH-secreting tumor cells showed a statistically significant hormone decrease in the medium when exposed to SMS. However, in some instances, a diminution of the GH contents of the tumor cells was also observed, presumably as the basis for intracellular breakdown and clinical tumor shrinkage.

  4. Bupropion and bupropion analogs as treatments for CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Carroll, F Ivy; Blough, Bruce E; Mascarella, S Wayne; Navarro, Hernán A; Lukas, Ronald J; Damaj, M Imad

    2014-01-01

    Bupropion, introduced as an antidepressant in the 1980s, is also effective as a smoking cessation aid and is beneficial in the treatment of methamphetamine addiction, cocaine dependence, addictive behaviors such as pathological gambling, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. (2S,3S)-hydroxybupropion is an active metabolite of bupropion produced in humans that contributes to antidepressant and smoking cessation efficacy and perhaps benefits in other CNS disorders. Mechanisms underlying its antidepressant and smoking abstinence remain elusive. However, it seems likely that efficacy is due to a combination of the effects of bupropion and/or its active metabolite (2S,3S)-hydroxybupropion involving the inhibition of reuptake of dopamine (DA) and NE in reward centers of the brain and the noncompetitive antagonism of α4β2- and α3β4*-nAChRs. These combined effects of bupropion and its active metabolite may be responsible for its ability to decrease nicotine reward and withdrawal. Studies directed toward development of a bupropion analog for treatment of cocaine addiction led to compounds, typified by 2-(N-cyclopropylamino)-3'-chloropropiophenone (RTI-6037-39), thought to act as indirect DA agonists. In addition, (2S,3S)-hydroxybupropion analogs were developed, which had varying degrees of DA and NE uptake inhibition and antagonism of nAChRs. These compounds will be valuable tools for animal behavioral studies and as clinical candidates. Here, we review the (1) early studies leading to the development of bupropion, (2) bupropion metabolism and the identification of (2S,3R)-hydroxybupropion as an active metabolite, (3) mechanisms of bupropion and metabolite action, (4) effects in animal behavioral studies, (5) results of clinical studies, and (6) development of bupropion analogs as potential pharmacotherapies for treating nicotine and cocaine addiction.

  5. Passive treatment of wastewater and contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Phifer, Mark A.; Sappington, Frank C.; Millings, Margaret R.; Turick, Charles E.; McKinsey, Pamela C.

    2007-11-06

    A bioremediation system using inorganic oxide-reducing microbial consortia for the treatment of, inter alia coal mine and coal yard runoff uses a containment vessel for contaminated water and a second, floating phase for nutrients. Biodegradable oils are preferred nutrients.

  6. Passive treatment of wastewater and contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Phifer, Mark A.; Sappington, Frank C.; Millings, Margaret R.; Turick, Charles E.; McKinsey, Pamela C.

    2006-12-12

    A bioremediation system using inorganic oxide-reducing microbial consortia for the treatment of, inter alia coal mine and coal yard runoff uses a containment vessel for contaminated water and a second, floating phase for nutrients. Biodegradable oils are preferred nutrients.

  7. Treatment of articular fractures with continuous passive motion.

    PubMed

    Onderko, Laura Lynn; Rehman, Saqib

    2013-07-01

    This article presents a review of the basic science and current research on the use of continuous passive motion therapy after surgery for an intra-articular fracture. This information is useful for surgeons in the postoperative management of intra-articular fractures in determining the best course of treatment to reduce complications and facilitate quicker recovery. PMID:23827837

  8. Mine Waste Technology Program. Passive Treatment for Reducing Metal Loading

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 48, Passive Treatment Technology Evaluation for Reducing Metal Loading, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S. Departmen...

  9. Passive Porous Treatment for Reducing Flap Side-Edge Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan M.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2008-01-01

    A passive porous treatment has been proposed as a means of suppressing noise generated by the airflow around the side edges of partial-span flaps on airplane wings when the flaps are extended in a high-lift configuration. The treatment proposed here does not incur any aerodynamic penalties and could easily be retrofit to existing airplanes. The treatment could also be applied to reduce noise generated by turbomachinery, including wind turbines. Innovative aspects of the proposed treatment include a minimum treatment area and physics-based procedure for treatment design. The efficacy of the treatment was confirmed during wind-tunnel experiments at NASA Ames, wherein the porous treatment was applied to a minute surface area in the vicinity of a flap edge on a 26-percent model of Boeing 777-200 wing.

  10. Passive Electroreception in Fish: AN Analog Model of the Spike Generation Zone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, James Robert

    Sensory transduction begins in receptor cells specialized to the sensory modality involved and proceeds to the more generalized stage of the first afferent fiber, converting the initial sensory information into neural spikes for transmittal to the central nervous system. We have developed a unique analog electronic model of the generalized step (also known as the spike generation zone (SGZ)) using a tunnel diode, an operational amplifier, resistors, and capacitors. With no externally applied simulated postsynaptic input current, our model represents a 10^{-3}cm^2 patch (100 times the typical in vivo area) of tonically active, nonadaptive, postsynaptic neural membrane that behaves as a pacemaker cell. Similar to the FitzHugh-Nagumo equations, our model is shown to be a simplification of the Hodgkin-Huxley parallel conductance model and can be analyzed by the methods of van der Pol. Measurements using the model yield results which compare favorably to physiological stimulus-response data gathered by Murray for elasmobranch electroreceptors. We then use the model to show that the main contribution to variance in the rate of neural spike output is provided by coincident inputs to the SGZ oscillator (i.e., by synaptic input noise) and not by inherent instability of the SGZ oscillator. Configured for maximum sensitivity, our model is capable of detecting stimulus changes as low as 50 fA in less than a second and this corresponds to a fractional frequency change of Delta f/f ~ 2 times 10^{-3}. Much data exists implying that in vivo detection of Delta f/f is limited to the range of one to ten percent (Weber-Fechner criterion). We propose the variance induced by the synaptic input noise provides a plausible physiological basis for the Weber-Fechner criterion.

  11. Miniaturized passive hydrogel check valve for hydrocephalus treatment.

    PubMed

    Schwerdt, Helen N; Bristol, Ruth E; Junseok Chae

    2014-03-01

    Improvements in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) draining techniques for treatment of hydrocephalus are urgently sought after to substitute for current CSF shunts that are plagued by high failure rates. The passive check valve aims to restore near natural CSF draining operations while mitigating possible failure mechanisms caused by finite leakage or low resilience that frequently constrain practical implementation of miniaturized valves. A simple hydrogel diaphragm structures core passive valve operations and enforce valve sealing properties to substantially lower reverse flow leakage. Experimental measurements demonstrate realization of targeted cracking pressures (PT ≈ 20-110 mmH2O) and operation at -800 <; ΔP <; 600 mmH2O without observable degradation or leakage.

  12. Application of Passive Porous Treatment to Slat Trailing Edge Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2003-01-01

    Porous trailing-edge treatment is investigated as a passive means for slat noise reduction by using time-accurate simulations based on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. For the model scale high-lift configuration used during previous experiments in the Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center, application of the proposed treatment over a minute fraction of the slat surface area is shown to mitigate the noise impact of the trailing edge, with no measurable aerodynamic penalty. Assessment of the pressure fluctuations in the vicinity of the treated edge indicates a potential noise reduction in excess of 20 dB. The primary mechanism underlying this reduction is related to the reduced strength of Strouhal shedding from the finite thickness trailing edge. A secondary effect of the treatment involves an upward shift in the Strouhal-shedding frequency to a frequency band of reduced auditory sensitivity in a full-scale application.

  13. A passive acoustic monitor of treatment effectiveness during extracorporeal lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, F.; Thomas, K.; Leighton, T. G.; Ryves, S.; Phillips, D.; Coleman, A. J.

    2011-02-01

    Although extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has now been in the clinic for at least three decades, there has been little advance in efforts (i) to estimate the efficacy of the treatment whilst it is in progress, or (ii) to determine the end-point of a treatment session in terms of the degree of stone fragmentation achieved. Previous in vitro experimentation and clinical trials have shown that a passive acoustic monitor has the potential to provide evidence of the effectiveness and end-point of lithotripsy. The system exploits secondary emissions generated during shock-tissue interaction, whose features depend on the quality of tissue at the beam focus. This prototype was developed into the first commercially available clinical ESWL treatment monitor (Precision Acoustic Ltd, Dorchester, UK), and a unit has been acquired and tested in the clinical routine by urologists at Guy's and St Thomas NHS Trust in March 2009. This paper critically assesses the performance of the new system for the first 25 treatments monitored. The ESWL monitor correctly predicted the treatment outcome of 15 of the 18 treatments that were followed-up clinically. In addition, it was noted that the measure of treatment effectiveness provided by the monitor after 500 shocks was predictive of the final treatment outcome (p < 0.001). This suggests that the system could be used in pre-assessment; indicating if the stone is susceptible to ESWL or if the patient should be sent for surgery.

  14. Passive mine drainage treatment: an effective low-cost alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, J.D.

    1985-12-01

    Two prototype Passive Mine Drainage Treatment Systems have been designed and constructed in Colorado. These projects have addressed acid mine drainage from inactive coal mines. Metal removal for both systems is accomplished using simulated peat bogs composed of sphagnum moss and hypnum moss retained by loose rock check dams. Acid neutralization is accomplished using crushed limestone filled channels. Neutralization and aeration are enhanced with drop structures and waterfalls placed in the drainage channel. Preliminary water quality results show dramatic treatment effects with the PMDT system. This investigation presents cost data for design and construction of the two PMDT systems. Cost projections for periodic maintenance requirements are provided along with a suggested method for financing maintenance costs. Performance data for the first system installed are presented. 14 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  15. Passive flow regulators for drug delivery and hydrocephalus treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappel, E.; Dumont-Fillon, D.; Mefti, S.

    2014-03-01

    Passive flow regulators are usually intended to deliver or drain a fluid at a constant rate independently from pressure variations. New designs of passive flow regulators made of a stack of a silicon membrane anodically bonded to a Pyrex substrate are proposed. A first design has been built for the derivation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) towards peritoneum for hydrocephalus treatment. The device allows draining CSF at the patient production rate independently from postural changes. The flow rate is regulated at 20 ml/h in the range 10 to 40 mbar. Specific features to adjust in vivo the nominal flow rate are shown. A second design including high pressure shut-off feature has been made. The intended use is drug delivery with pressurized reservoir of typically 100 to 300 mbar. In both cases, the membrane comprises several holes facing pillars in the Pyrex substrate. These pillars are machined in a cavity which ensures a gap between the membrane and the pillars at rest. The fluid in the pressurized reservoir is directly in contact with the top surface of the membrane, inducing its deflection towards Pyrex substrate and closing progressively the fluidic pathway through each hole of the membrane. Since the membrane deflection is highly non-linear, FEM simulations have been performed to determine both radial position and diameter of the membrane holes that ensure a constant flow rate for a given range of pressure.

  16. 26 CFR 1.1398-1 - Treatment of passive activity losses and passive activity credits in individuals' title 11 cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Treatment of passive activity losses and..., 1992. This section applies to cases commencing on or after November 9, 1992. (2) Cases commencing before November 9, 1992—(i) Election required. This section applies to a case commencing before...

  17. 26 CFR 1.1398-1 - Treatment of passive activity losses and passive activity credits in individuals' title 11 cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Treatment of passive activity losses and..., 1992. This section applies to cases commencing on or after November 9, 1992. (2) Cases commencing before November 9, 1992—(i) Election required. This section applies to a case commencing before...

  18. [Diagnosis and treatment strategy of diseases due to passive smoking].

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Michiyuki

    2013-03-01

    Passive smoking causes a wide range of diseases from membrane irritation such as sore throat or nasal symptom, to fatal diseases such as lung cancer or heart attack. Extensive epidemiological studies have revealed that passive smoking at home or at workplaces raises the all cause mortality of nonsmoking family members by 14-75%. Moreover, many people in Japan are suffered from chemical hypersensitivity due to chronic persistent passive smoking at workplaces. Most critical diagnostic clue of passive smoking caused disease is the temporal relationship of tobacco smoke exposure and disease onset. One hundred percent smoke free workplace or environment is the only effective measure for curing and preventing illnesses caused by passive smoke exposure. PMID:23631237

  19. Integrated Passive Biological Treatment System/ Mine Waste Technology Program Report #16

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of the Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 16, Integrated, Passive Biological Treatment System, funded by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the United States Depar...

  20. Correlation Between Analog Noise Measurements and the Expected Bit Error Rate of a Digital Signal Propagating Through Passive Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Joseph D.; Theofylaktos, Onoufrios

    2012-01-01

    A method of determining the bit error rate (BER) of a digital circuit from the measurement of the analog S-parameters of the circuit has been developed. The method is based on the measurement of the noise and the standard deviation of the noise in the S-parameters. Once the standard deviation and the mean of the S-parameters are known, the BER of the circuit can be calculated using the normal Gaussian function.

  1. 77 FR 62270 - Proposed Revision Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... COMMISSION Proposed Revision Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors AGENCY... Treatment of Non-Safety Systems (RTNSS) for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors.'' The current SRP does not contain guidance on the proposed RTNSS for Passive Advance Light Water Reactors. DATES:...

  2. Crown lengthening to facilitate restorative treatment in the presence of incomplete passive eruption.

    PubMed

    Hempton, T J; Esrason, F

    2000-04-01

    Crown-lengthening surgery can be utilized to expose subgingival caries. In this clinical case, a patient presented with incomplete passive eruption in the maxillary anterior sextant. This case illustrates that when incomplete passive eruption is present and restorative treatment is necessary in the maxillary anterior sextant, crown-lengthening surgery not only provides exposure of subgingival caries but can also result in a more esthetic therapeutic outcome.

  3. Benefits of nucleos(t)ide analog treatments for hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Honda, Koichi; Seike, Masataka; Murakami, Kazunari

    2015-10-01

    Chronic hepatitis B infection induces progressive liver disease. Before nucleos(t)ide analogs (NUCs) became established as a safe and effective treatment for hepatitis B, it was difficult to suppress the activity of the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Currently, many patients with hepatitis or cirrhosis associated with HBV are treated with NUCs for an extended period of time, and the effects, benefits, and limitations of these treatments have been apparent. This article reviews HBV-related cirrhosis, its natural course and survival, histological improvement after NUC treatments, treatment effects for decompensated cirrhosis, the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after NUC treatments, and the efficacy of NUC treatments before and after the treatment of patients for HBV-related HCC. Of particular interest are the histological improvements, including regression of fibrosis, that have been achieved with NUC treatments. Liver function of patients with decompensated cirrhosis has significantly improved regardless of the type of NUC applied, and treatment with NUCs has reduced the incidence of HCC in cirrhotic patients. However, cirrhosis remains the strongest risk factor for HCC occurrence following NUC treatments, and the long-term cumulative incidence of HCC after NUC treatments remains high. When recurrence does occur, it is important to reconsider the treatment modality according to the degree of improved liver function that was achieved.

  4. Treatment with Insulin Analog X10 and IGF-1 Increases Growth of Colon Cancer Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Hvid, Henning; Blouin, Marie-José; Birman, Elena; Damgaard, Jesper; Poulsen, Fritz; Fels, Johannes Josef; Fledelius, Christian; Hansen, Bo Falck; Pollak, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with an increased risk for development of certain forms of cancer, including colon cancer. The publication of highly controversial epidemiological studies in 2009 raised the possibility that use of the insulin analog glargine increases this risk further. However, it is not clear how mitogenic effects of insulin and insulin analogs measured in vitro correlate with tumor growth-promoting effects in vivo. The aim of this study was to examine possible growth-promoting effects of native human insulin, insulin X10 and IGF-1, which are considered positive controls in vitro, in a short-term animal model of an obesity- and diabetes-relevant cancer. We characterized insulin and IGF-1 receptor expression and the response to treatment with insulin, X10 and IGF-1 in the murine colon cancer cell line (MC38 cells) in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we examined pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and monitored growth of MC38 cell allografts in mice with diet-induced obesity treated with human insulin, X10 and IGF-1. Treatment with X10 and IGF-1 significantly increased growth of MC38 cell allografts in mice with diet-induced obesity and we can therefore conclude that supra-pharmacological doses of the insulin analog X10, which is super-mitogenic in vitro and increased the incidence of mammary tumors in female rats in a 12-month toxicity study, also increase growth of tumor allografts in a short-term animal model. PMID:24260289

  5. Vitamin D analogs combined with 5-fluorouracil in human HT-29 colon cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    MILCZAREK, MAGDALENA; FILIP-PSURSKA, BEATA; ŚWIĘTNICKI, WIESŁAW; KUTNER, ANDRZEJ; WIETRZYK, JOANNA

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the antitumor effect of two synthetic analogs of vitamin D, namely PRI-2191 [(24R)-1,24-dihydroxyvitamin D3] and PRI-2205 (5,6-trans calcipotriol), in combined human colon HT-29 cancer treatment with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Mice bearing HT-29 tumors transplanted subcutaneously or orthotopically were injected with vitamin D analogs and 5-FU in various schedules. A statistically significant inhibition of subcutaneous or orthotopic tumor growth was observed as a result of combined therapy. In HT-29 tumors and in cells from in vitro culture, we observed increased vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression after treatment with either PRI-2205 or 5-FU alone, or in combination. Moreover, PRI-2205 decreased the percentage of cells from intestinal tumors in G2/M and S stages and increased sub-G1. Increased VDR expression was also observed after combined treatment of mice with 5-FU and PRI-2191. Moreover, our docking studies showed that PRI-2205 has stronger affinity for VDR, DBP and CAR/RXR ligand binding domains than PRI-2191. PRI-2191 analog, used with 5-FU, increased the percentage of subcutaneous tumor cells in G0/G1 and decreased the percentage in G2/M, S and sub-G1 populations as compared to 5-FU alone. In in vitro studies, we observed increased expression of p21 and p-ERK1/2 diminution via use of both analogs as compared to use of 5-FU alone. Simultaneously, PRI-2191 antagonizes some pro-apoptotic activities of 5-FU in vitro. However, in spite of these disadvantageous effects in terms of apoptosis, the therapeutic effect expressed as tumor growth retardation by PRI-2191 is significant. Our results suggest that the mechanism of potentiation of 5-FU antitumor action by both analogs is realized via increased p21 expression and decreased p-ERK1/2 level which may lead to diminution of thymidylate synthase expression. Higher binding affinity for VDR, DBP, but also for CAR\\RXR ligand binding domain of PRI-2205 may, in part, explain its very low

  6. DEMONSTRATION OF AN INTEGRATED, PASSIVE BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT PROCESS FOR AMD

    EPA Science Inventory

    An innovative, cost-effective, biological treatment process has been designed by MSE Technology Applications, Inc. to treat acid mine drainage (AMD). A pilot-scale demonstration is being conducted under the Mine Waste Technology Program using water flowing from an abandoned mine ...

  7. EVALUATION OF A TWO-STAGE PASSIVE TREATMENT APPROACH FOR MINING INFLUENCE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A two-stage passive treatment approach was assessed at bench-scale using two Colorado Mining Influenced Waters (MIWs). The first-stage was a limestone drain with the purpose of removing iron and aluminum and mitigating the potential effects of mineral acidity. The second stage w...

  8. 9 CFR 113.499 - Products for treatment of failure of passive transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.499 Products for treatment of failure of passive transfer. A... antibody origin. A product for oral administration shall not be recommended for use in animals more than 24...) Antibody functionality. Prior to licensure, the prospective licensee shall perform a neutralization...

  9. 9 CFR 113.499 - Products for treatment of failure of passive transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.499 Products for treatment of failure of passive transfer. A... antibody origin. A product for oral administration shall not be recommended for use in animals more than 24...) Antibody functionality. Prior to licensure, the prospective licensee shall perform a neutralization...

  10. 9 CFR 113.499 - Products for treatment of failure of passive transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.499 Products for treatment of failure of passive transfer. A... antibody origin. A product for oral administration shall not be recommended for use in animals more than 24...) Antibody functionality. Prior to licensure, the prospective licensee shall perform a neutralization...

  11. 9 CFR 113.499 - Products for treatment of failure of passive transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.499 Products for treatment of failure of passive transfer. A... antibody origin. A product for oral administration shall not be recommended for use in animals more than 24...) Antibody functionality. Prior to licensure, the prospective licensee shall perform a neutralization...

  12. Geochemistry of rare earth elements in a passive treatment system built for acid mine drainage remediation.

    PubMed

    Prudêncio, Maria Isabel; Valente, Teresa; Marques, Rosa; Sequeira Braga, Maria Amália; Pamplona, Jorge

    2015-11-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) were used to assess attenuation processes in a passive system for acid mine drainage treatment (Jales, Portugal). Hydrochemical parameters and REE contents in water, soils and sediments were obtained along the treatment system, after summer and winter. A decrease of REE contents in the water resulting from the interaction with limestone after summer occurs; in the wetlands REE are significantly released by the soil particles to the water. After winter, a higher water dynamics favors the AMD treatment effectiveness and performance since REE contents decrease along the system; La and Ce are preferentially sequestered by ochre sludge but released to the water in the wetlands, influencing the REE pattern of the creek water. Thus, REE fractionation occurs in the passive treatment systems and can be used as tracer to follow up and understand the geochemical processes that promote the remediation of AMD.

  13. Geochemistry of rare earth elements in a passive treatment system built for acid mine drainage remediation.

    PubMed

    Prudêncio, Maria Isabel; Valente, Teresa; Marques, Rosa; Sequeira Braga, Maria Amália; Pamplona, Jorge

    2015-11-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) were used to assess attenuation processes in a passive system for acid mine drainage treatment (Jales, Portugal). Hydrochemical parameters and REE contents in water, soils and sediments were obtained along the treatment system, after summer and winter. A decrease of REE contents in the water resulting from the interaction with limestone after summer occurs; in the wetlands REE are significantly released by the soil particles to the water. After winter, a higher water dynamics favors the AMD treatment effectiveness and performance since REE contents decrease along the system; La and Ce are preferentially sequestered by ochre sludge but released to the water in the wetlands, influencing the REE pattern of the creek water. Thus, REE fractionation occurs in the passive treatment systems and can be used as tracer to follow up and understand the geochemical processes that promote the remediation of AMD. PMID:26247412

  14. Rationale for active vitamin D and analogs in the treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Yasuho

    2003-02-01

    In 1981, Chugai Pharmaceutical succeeded in marketing alfacalcidol, a prodrug of calcitriol, as a therapeutic agent for renal osteodystrophy. In 1983, Chugai succeeded in extending the application of alfacalcidol to the treatment of osteoporosis as well. Clinicians in Japan have accepted alfacalcidol as a remedy for osteoporosis. However, the use of calcitriol and its analogs for the treatment of osteoporosis is still controversial. Some misunderstandings exist internationally about the efficacy of the active form of vitamin D for the treatment of osteoporosis. It is important to emphasize that patients with osteoporosis have intestinal calcium malabsorption and dysfunction in renal activation of vitamin D. When massive doses of parent vitamin D were administered to OVX rats, bone mass increased, but surprisingly, many porotic area were observed in the cortical bone. On the other hand, administration of alfacalcidol increased physiological bone without porotic observation. It is necessary to give the active form of vitamin D, D-hormone, with an RDA-equivalent supply of calcium. Alfacalcidol forms physiological strong bones that are hardly fractured by regulating calcium and bone metabolism. We proposed a new vitamin D analog, 2beta (3-hydroxypropoxy)calcitriol [ED-71] as a therapeutic drug for osteoporosis, which is more potent than calcitriol. ED-71 is now being investigated in phase 2 clinical studies in Japan. ED-71 will appear as more improved drugs for osteoporosis until 2010. PMID:12520540

  15. Passive treatment of acid mine drainage with high metal concentrations using dispersed alkaline substrate.

    PubMed

    Rötting, Tobias S; Thomas, Robert C; Ayora, Carlos; Carrera, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    Passive treatment systems based on the dissolution of coarse calcite grains are widely used to remediate acid mine drainage (AMD). Unfortunately, they tolerate only low metal concentrations or acidity loads, because they are prone to passivation (loss of reactivity due to coating) and/or clogging (loss of permeability) by precipitates. To overcome these problems, a dispersed alkaline substrate (DAS) composed of a fine-grained alkaline reagent (calcite sand) mixed with a coarse inert matrix (wood chips) was developed. The small grains provide a large reactive surface and dissolve almost completely before the growing layer of precipitates passivates the substrate, whereas the dispersion of nuclei for precipitation on the inert surfaces retards clogging. Chemical and hydraulic performance of DAS was investigated in two laboratory columns fed at different flow rates with natural AMD of pH 2.3 to 3.5 and inflow net acidity 1350 to 2300 mg/L as CaCO(3). The DAS columns removed 900 to 1600 mg/L net acidity, 3 to 4.5 times more than conventional passive treatment systems. Regardless of the flow rate employed, Al, Fe(III), Cu, and Pb were virtually eliminated. Minor Zn, Ni, and Cd were removed at low flow rates. High acidity removal is possible because these metals accumulate intentionally in DAS, and their precipitation promotes further calcite dissolution. During 15 mo, DAS operated without clogging at 120 g acidity/m(2).d, four times the loading rate recommended for conventional passive systems; DAS may therefore be capable of treating AMD at sites where influent chemistry precludes the use of other passive systems.

  16. [Somatostatin analogs in the treatment of pancreatic cancer: utopia or feasible alternative?].

    PubMed

    Zalatnai, A; Pogány, V

    2000-10-22

    The authors give an overview on the clinical treatment results of pancreatic carcinoma with somatostatin analogs including octreotide, lanreotide and vapreotide. Numerous preclinical studies provided solid evidence that the growth of ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma can successfully be inhibited using such synthetic analogs via direct (apoptosis-inducing) and various indirect mechanisms. In the clinical practice their role still remains contradictory. Monotherapy did not result in a prolongation of the survival, however, in 15-20% of patients the progression of the process has been halted for several months accompanied by a significant improvement of the clinical condition without notable side effects. Combination of octreotide with tamoxifen yielded a survival benefit in addition to the stabilization of the general condition, although reduction of the tumor mass has not been documented. Despite the modest results these finding reinforce the responsiveness of the pancreatic ductal cancer to the hormonal manipulations and further studies on optimization of the effects are of worth. While in the majority of cases the somatostatin receptors have been lost, hormonal control of the pancreatic cancer could be achieved by combination treatment modalities.

  17. Autoinducer-2 analogs and electric fields - an antibiotic-free bacterial biofilm combination treatment.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Sowmya; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Guo, Min; Sintim, Herman O; Bentley, William E; Ghodssi, Reza

    2016-10-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a common cause of chronic medical implant infections. Treatment and eradication of biofilms by conventional antibiotic therapy has major drawbacks including toxicity and side effects associated with high-dosage antibiotics. Additionally, administration of high doses of antibiotics may facilitate the emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Thus, there is an urgent need for the development of treatments that are not based on conventional antibiotic therapies. Presented herein is a novel bacterial biofilm combination treatment independent of traditional antibiotics, by using low electric fields in combination with small molecule inhibitors of bacterial quorum sensing - autoinducer-2 analogs. We investigate the effect of this treatment on mature Escherichia coli biofilms by application of an alternating and offset electric potential in combination with the small molecule inhibitor for 24 h using both macro and micro-scale devices. Crystal violet staining of the macro-scale biofilms shows a 46 % decrease in biomass compared to the untreated control. We demonstrate enhanced treatment efficacy of the combination therapy using a high-throughput polydimethylsiloxane-based microfluidic biofilm analysis platform. This microfluidic flow cell is designed to reduce the growth variance of in vitro biofilms while providing an integrated control, and thus allows for a more reliable comparison and evaluation of new biofilm treatments on a single device. We utilize linear array charge-coupled devices to perform real-time tracking of biomass by monitoring changes in optical density. End-point confocal microscopy measurements of biofilms treated with the autoinducer analog and electric fields in the microfluidic device show a 78 % decrease in average biofilm thickness in comparison to the negative controls and demonstrate good correlation with real-time optical density measurements. Additionally, the combination treatment showed 76 % better treatment

  18. Autoinducer-2 analogs and electric fields - an antibiotic-free bacterial biofilm combination treatment.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Sowmya; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Guo, Min; Sintim, Herman O; Bentley, William E; Ghodssi, Reza

    2016-10-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a common cause of chronic medical implant infections. Treatment and eradication of biofilms by conventional antibiotic therapy has major drawbacks including toxicity and side effects associated with high-dosage antibiotics. Additionally, administration of high doses of antibiotics may facilitate the emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Thus, there is an urgent need for the development of treatments that are not based on conventional antibiotic therapies. Presented herein is a novel bacterial biofilm combination treatment independent of traditional antibiotics, by using low electric fields in combination with small molecule inhibitors of bacterial quorum sensing - autoinducer-2 analogs. We investigate the effect of this treatment on mature Escherichia coli biofilms by application of an alternating and offset electric potential in combination with the small molecule inhibitor for 24 h using both macro and micro-scale devices. Crystal violet staining of the macro-scale biofilms shows a 46 % decrease in biomass compared to the untreated control. We demonstrate enhanced treatment efficacy of the combination therapy using a high-throughput polydimethylsiloxane-based microfluidic biofilm analysis platform. This microfluidic flow cell is designed to reduce the growth variance of in vitro biofilms while providing an integrated control, and thus allows for a more reliable comparison and evaluation of new biofilm treatments on a single device. We utilize linear array charge-coupled devices to perform real-time tracking of biomass by monitoring changes in optical density. End-point confocal microscopy measurements of biofilms treated with the autoinducer analog and electric fields in the microfluidic device show a 78 % decrease in average biofilm thickness in comparison to the negative controls and demonstrate good correlation with real-time optical density measurements. Additionally, the combination treatment showed 76 % better treatment

  19. Plant chlorophyll fluorescence: active and passive measurements at canopy and leaf scales with different nitrogen treatments

    PubMed Central

    Cendrero-Mateo, M. Pilar; Moran, M. Susan; Papuga, Shirley A.; Thorp, K.R.; Alonso, L.; Moreno, J.; Ponce-Campos, G.; Rascher, U.; Wang, G.

    2016-01-01

    Most studies assessing chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) have examined leaf responses to environmental stress conditions using active techniques. Alternatively, passive techniques are able to measure ChlF at both leaf and canopy scales. However, the measurement principles of both techniques are different, and only a few datasets concerning the relationships between them are reported in the literature. In this study, we investigated the potential for interchanging ChlF measurements using active techniques with passive measurements at different temporal and spatial scales. The ultimate objective was to determine the limits within which active and passive techniques are comparable. The results presented in this study showed that active and passive measurements were highly correlated over the growing season across nitrogen treatments at both canopy and leaf-average scale. At the single-leaf scale, the seasonal relation between techniques was weaker, but still significant. The variability within single-leaf measurements was largely related to leaf heterogeneity associated with variations in CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance, and less so to variations in leaf chlorophyll content, leaf size or measurement inputs (e.g. light reflected and emitted by the leaf and illumination conditions and leaf spectrum). This uncertainty was exacerbated when single-leaf analysis was limited to a particular day rather than the entire season. We concluded that daily measurements of active and passive ChlF at the single-leaf scale are not comparable. However, canopy and leaf-average active measurements can be used to better understand the daily and seasonal behaviour of passive ChlF measurements. In turn, this can be used to better estimate plant photosynthetic capacity and therefore to provide improved information for crop management. PMID:26482242

  20. Plant chlorophyll fluorescence: active and passive measurements at canopy and leaf scales with different nitrogen treatments.

    PubMed

    Cendrero-Mateo, M Pilar; Moran, M Susan; Papuga, Shirley A; Thorp, K R; Alonso, L; Moreno, J; Ponce-Campos, G; Rascher, U; Wang, G

    2016-01-01

    Most studies assessing chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) have examined leaf responses to environmental stress conditions using active techniques. Alternatively, passive techniques are able to measure ChlF at both leaf and canopy scales. However, the measurement principles of both techniques are different, and only a few datasets concerning the relationships between them are reported in the literature. In this study, we investigated the potential for interchanging ChlF measurements using active techniques with passive measurements at different temporal and spatial scales. The ultimate objective was to determine the limits within which active and passive techniques are comparable. The results presented in this study showed that active and passive measurements were highly correlated over the growing season across nitrogen treatments at both canopy and leaf-average scale. At the single-leaf scale, the seasonal relation between techniques was weaker, but still significant. The variability within single-leaf measurements was largely related to leaf heterogeneity associated with variations in CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance, and less so to variations in leaf chlorophyll content, leaf size or measurement inputs (e.g. light reflected and emitted by the leaf and illumination conditions and leaf spectrum). This uncertainty was exacerbated when single-leaf analysis was limited to a particular day rather than the entire season. We concluded that daily measurements of active and passive ChlF at the single-leaf scale are not comparable. However, canopy and leaf-average active measurements can be used to better understand the daily and seasonal behaviour of passive ChlF measurements. In turn, this can be used to better estimate plant photosynthetic capacity and therefore to provide improved information for crop management.

  1. Enhanced Conversion Efficiency of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Solar Cells via Electrochemical Passivation Treatment.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hung-Wei; Thomas, Stuart R; Chen, Chia-Wei; Wang, Yi-Chung; Tsai, Hsu-Sheng; Yen, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Cheng-Hung; Tsai, Wen-Chi; Wang, Zhiming M; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2016-03-01

    Defect control in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) materials, no matter what the defect type or density, is a significant issue, correlating directly to PV performance. These defects act as recombination centers and can be briefly categorized into interface recombination and Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination, both of which can lead to reduced PV performance. Here, we introduce an electrochemical passivation treatment for CIGS films that can lower the oxygen concentration at the CIGS surface as observed by X-ray photoelectron spectrometer analysis. Temperature-dependent J-V characteristics of CIGS solar cells reveal that interface recombination is suppressed and an improved rollover condition can be achieved following our electrochemical treatment. As a result, the surface defects are passivated, and the power conversion efficiency performance of the solar cell devices can be enhanced from 4.73 to 7.75%.

  2. A glucagon analog chemically stabilized for immediate treatment of life-threatening hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Chabenne, Joseph; Chabenne, Maria Dimarchi; Zhao, Yan; Levy, Jay; Smiley, David; Gelfanov, Vasily; Dimarchi, Richard

    2014-06-01

    For more than half a century glucagon has been used as a critical care medicine in the treatment of life-threatening hypoglycemia. It is commercially supplied as a lyophilized powder intended to be solubilized in dilute aqueous hydrochloric acid immediately prior to administration. We have envisioned a "ready-to-use" glucagon as a drug of more immediate and likely use. Through a series of iterative changes in the native sequence we have identified glucagon analogs of appreciably enhanced aqueous solubility at physiological pH, and of chemical stability suitable for routine medicinal use. The superior biophysical properties were achieved in part through adjustment of the isoelectric point by use of a C-terminal Asp-Glu dipeptide. The native glutamines at positions 3, 20 and 24 as well as the methionine at 27 were substituted with amino acids of enhanced chemical stability, as directed by a full alanine scan of the native hormone. Of utmost additional importance was the dramatically enhanced stability of the peptide when Ser16 was substituted with alpha,aminoisobutyric acid (Aib), a substitution that stabilizes peptide secondary structure. The collective set of changes yield glucagon analogs of comparable in vitro and in vivo biological character to native hormone but with biophysical properties much more suitable for clinical use. PMID:24749059

  3. A glucagon analog chemically stabilized for immediate treatment of life-threatening hypoglycemia☆

    PubMed Central

    Chabenne, Joseph; Chabenne, Maria DiMarchi; Zhao, Yan; Levy, Jay; Smiley, David; Gelfanov, Vasily; DiMarchi, Richard

    2014-01-01

    For more than half a century glucagon has been used as a critical care medicine in the treatment of life-threatening hypoglycemia. It is commercially supplied as a lyophilized powder intended to be solubilized in dilute aqueous hydrochloric acid immediately prior to administration. We have envisioned a “ready-to-use” glucagon as a drug of more immediate and likely use. Through a series of iterative changes in the native sequence we have identified glucagon analogs of appreciably enhanced aqueous solubility at physiological pH, and of chemical stability suitable for routine medicinal use. The superior biophysical properties were achieved in part through adjustment of the isoelectric point by use of a C-terminal Asp-Glu dipeptide. The native glutamines at positions 3, 20 and 24 as well as the methionine at 27 were substituted with amino acids of enhanced chemical stability, as directed by a full alanine scan of the native hormone. Of utmost additional importance was the dramatically enhanced stability of the peptide when Ser16 was substituted with alpha,aminoisobutyric acid (Aib), a substitution that stabilizes peptide secondary structure. The collective set of changes yield glucagon analogs of comparable in vitro and in vivo biological character to native hormone but with biophysical properties much more suitable for clinical use. PMID:24749059

  4. 26 CFR 1.1291-0 - Treatment of shareholders of certain passive foreign investment companies; table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... passive foreign investment companies; table of contents. This section contains a listing of the headings...) Passive foreign investment company (PFIC). (2) Types of PFICs. (i) Qualified electing fund (QEF). (ii... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Treatment of shareholders of certain...

  5. 26 CFR 1.1291-0 - Treatment of shareholders of certain passive foreign investment companies; table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... passive foreign investment companies; table of contents. This section contains a listing of the headings...) Passive foreign investment company (PFIC). (2) Types of PFICs. (i) Qualified electing fund (QEF). (ii... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Treatment of shareholders of certain...

  6. 26 CFR 1.1291-0 - Treatment of shareholders of certain passive foreign investment companies; table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... passive foreign investment companies; table of contents. This section contains a listing of the headings...) Passive foreign investment company (PFIC). (2) Types of PFICs. (i) Qualified electing fund (QEF). (ii... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Treatment of shareholders of certain...

  7. 26 CFR 1.1291-0 - Treatment of shareholders of certain passive foreign investment companies; table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... passive foreign investment companies; table of contents. This section contains a listing of the headings...) Passive foreign investment company (PFIC). (2) Types of PFICs. (i) Qualified electing fund (QEF). (ii... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Treatment of shareholders of certain...

  8. Sizing criteria for a low footprint passive mine water treatment system.

    PubMed

    Sapsford, D J; Williams, K P

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to present data from a novel vertical flow mine water treatment system, demonstrate how these data can be used to generate sizing formulae for this technology, and present a comparison between the size of system based on these formulae and those of conventionally designed passive systems. The paper focuses on passive treatment of circum-neutral ferruginous mine waters bearing up to 50 mgl(-1) of iron in either ferrous or ferric form. The Vertical Flow Reactor (VFR) operates by passing mine water down through an accreting bed of ochre, the ochre bed being responsible for the intensification of iron removal by self-filtration and/or autocatalytic iron oxidation and precipitation. Key to the design and operation of the VFR system is the decrease in permeability in this ochre bed over time. The paper demonstrates that the VFR system can remove iron at many times the 10 g/m2/day removal rate - an often employed figure for the sizing of aerobic settling ponds and wetlands. The paper demonstrates that VFRs are viable and novel passive treatment system for mine waters with a smaller footprint than conventional systems.

  9. Passivation of bimetallic catalysts used in water treatment: prevention and reactivation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianming; Gillham, Robert W; Gui, Lai

    2013-01-01

    With respect to degradation rates and the range in contaminants treated, bimetals such as Ni-Fe or Pd-Fe generally outperform unamended granular iron. However, the catalytic enhancement is generally short-lived, lasting from a few days to months. To take advantage of the significant benefits of bimetals, this study aims at developing an effective method for the rejuvenation of passivated bimetals and alternatively, the prevention of rapid reactivity loss of bimetals. Because the most likely cause of Ni-Fe and Pd-Fe passivation is the deposition of iron oxide films over the catalyst sites, it is hypothesized that removal of the iron oxide films will restore the lost reactivity or avoiding the deposition of iron oxide films will prevent passivation. Two organic ligands (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and [s,s]-ethylenediaminedisuccinate acid ([s,s]-EDDS)) and two acids (citric acid and sulphuric acid) were tested as possible chemical reagents for both passivation rejuvenation and prevention. Trichloroethene (TCE) and Ni-Fe were chosen as probes for chlorinated solvents and bimetals respectively. The test was carried out using small glass columns packed with Ni-Fe. TCE solution containing a single reagent at various concentrations was pumped through the Ni-Fe columns with a residence time in the Ni-Fe of about 6.6 min. TCE concentrations in the influent and effluent were measured to evaluate the performance of each chemical reagent. The results show that (i) for passivated Ni-Fe, flushing with a low concentration of acid or ligand solution without mechanical mixing can fully restore the lost reactivity; and (ii) for passivation prevention, adding a small amount of a ligand or an acid to the feed solution can successfully prevent or at least substantially reduce Ni-Fe passivation. All four chemicals tested are effective in both rejuvenation and prevention, but sulphuric acid and citric acid are considered to be the most practical reagents due to their

  10. Evaluation of Reactive Mixtures for Passive Treatment of Mine Drainage from a Waste Rock Storage Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeen, S. W.; Mattson, B.

    2014-12-01

    Laboratory column tests for a passive treatment system for mine drainage from a waste rock storage area was conducted to evaluate suitable reactive mixture, system configuration, flow rate, and residence time. Five columns containing straw, chicken manure, mushroom compost, and limestone, either in layered or mixed, were set up and operated for a total of 74 days to simulate the treatment system. The key variables determined from the tests include pH and redox adjustment of the treatment system, treatment efficiency for acidity and metals, sulfate removal rates, and precipitation of secondary minerals as sinks for metals. The results showed that all of the five columns removed metals of concern (i.e., Al, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, Zn) with residence time of 15 hours and greater. The organic materials used in the test provided sufficient sulfate reduction that is available for metal removal in the mine drainage. The sulfate removal rates ranged between 200 and 600 mg/L/day. Reaction mechanisms responsible for the removal of metals may include sulfate reduction and subsequent sulfide precipitation, precipitation of secondary carbonates and hydroxides, co-precipitation, and sorption on organic materials and secondary precipitates. The results from the columns tests provide a basis for design of a pilot-scale field passive treatment system, such as permeable reactive barrier (PRB) or reducing and alkalinity producing system (RAPS).

  11. Performance evaluation of a hybrid-passive landfill leachate treatment system using multivariate statistical techniques.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Jack; Champagne, Pascale; Monnier, Anne-Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    A pilot-scale hybrid-passive treatment system operated at the Merrick Landfill in North Bay, Ontario, Canada, treats municipal landfill leachate and provides for subsequent natural attenuation. Collected leachate is directed to a hybrid-passive treatment system, followed by controlled release to a natural attenuation zone before entering the nearby Little Sturgeon River. The study presents a comprehensive evaluation of the performance of the system using multivariate statistical techniques to determine the interactions between parameters, major pollutants in the leachate, and the biological and chemical processes occurring in the system. Five parameters (ammonia, alkalinity, chemical oxygen demand (COD), "heavy" metals of interest, with atomic weights above calcium, and iron) were set as criteria for the evaluation of system performance based on their toxicity to aquatic ecosystems and importance in treatment with respect to discharge regulations. System data for a full range of water quality parameters over a 21-month period were analyzed using principal components analysis (PCA), as well as principal components (PC) and partial least squares (PLS) regressions. PCA indicated a high degree of association for most parameters with the first PC, which explained a high percentage (>40%) of the variation in the data, suggesting strong statistical relationships among most of the parameters in the system. Regression analyses identified 8 parameters (set as independent variables) that were most frequently retained for modeling the five criteria parameters (set as dependent variables), on a statistically significant level: conductivity, dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrite (NO2(-)), organic nitrogen (N), oxidation reduction potential (ORP), pH, sulfate and total volatile solids (TVS). The criteria parameters and the significant explanatory parameters were most important in modeling the dynamics of the passive treatment system during the study period. Such techniques and

  12. Performance evaluation of a hybrid-passive landfill leachate treatment system using multivariate statistical techniques.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Jack; Champagne, Pascale; Monnier, Anne-Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    A pilot-scale hybrid-passive treatment system operated at the Merrick Landfill in North Bay, Ontario, Canada, treats municipal landfill leachate and provides for subsequent natural attenuation. Collected leachate is directed to a hybrid-passive treatment system, followed by controlled release to a natural attenuation zone before entering the nearby Little Sturgeon River. The study presents a comprehensive evaluation of the performance of the system using multivariate statistical techniques to determine the interactions between parameters, major pollutants in the leachate, and the biological and chemical processes occurring in the system. Five parameters (ammonia, alkalinity, chemical oxygen demand (COD), "heavy" metals of interest, with atomic weights above calcium, and iron) were set as criteria for the evaluation of system performance based on their toxicity to aquatic ecosystems and importance in treatment with respect to discharge regulations. System data for a full range of water quality parameters over a 21-month period were analyzed using principal components analysis (PCA), as well as principal components (PC) and partial least squares (PLS) regressions. PCA indicated a high degree of association for most parameters with the first PC, which explained a high percentage (>40%) of the variation in the data, suggesting strong statistical relationships among most of the parameters in the system. Regression analyses identified 8 parameters (set as independent variables) that were most frequently retained for modeling the five criteria parameters (set as dependent variables), on a statistically significant level: conductivity, dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrite (NO2(-)), organic nitrogen (N), oxidation reduction potential (ORP), pH, sulfate and total volatile solids (TVS). The criteria parameters and the significant explanatory parameters were most important in modeling the dynamics of the passive treatment system during the study period. Such techniques and

  13. Performance evaluation of a hybrid-passive landfill leachate treatment system using multivariate statistical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Jack; Champagne, Pascale; Monnier, Anne-Charlotte

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Performance of a hybrid passive landfill leachate treatment system was evaluated. • 33 Water chemistry parameters were sampled for 21 months and statistically analyzed. • Parameters were strongly linked and explained most (>40%) of the variation in data. • Alkalinity, ammonia, COD, heavy metals, and iron were criteria for performance. • Eight other parameters were key in modeling system dynamics and criteria. - Abstract: A pilot-scale hybrid-passive treatment system operated at the Merrick Landfill in North Bay, Ontario, Canada, treats municipal landfill leachate and provides for subsequent natural attenuation. Collected leachate is directed to a hybrid-passive treatment system, followed by controlled release to a natural attenuation zone before entering the nearby Little Sturgeon River. The study presents a comprehensive evaluation of the performance of the system using multivariate statistical techniques to determine the interactions between parameters, major pollutants in the leachate, and the biological and chemical processes occurring in the system. Five parameters (ammonia, alkalinity, chemical oxygen demand (COD), “heavy” metals of interest, with atomic weights above calcium, and iron) were set as criteria for the evaluation of system performance based on their toxicity to aquatic ecosystems and importance in treatment with respect to discharge regulations. System data for a full range of water quality parameters over a 21-month period were analyzed using principal components analysis (PCA), as well as principal components (PC) and partial least squares (PLS) regressions. PCA indicated a high degree of association for most parameters with the first PC, which explained a high percentage (>40%) of the variation in the data, suggesting strong statistical relationships among most of the parameters in the system. Regression analyses identified 8 parameters (set as independent variables) that were most frequently retained for modeling

  14. History of Passive Antibody Administration for Prevention and Treatment of Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Barney S.; Ambrosino, Donna M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the review We describe the history of passive immunization to provide context for the series of articles to follow. The history of passive immunization with antibodies to prevent or treat infectious diseases is a story of different eras. There was an extraordinary era of discovery and clinical implementation before the chemical nature of antibodies was even known. This empirical process provided the resources and reagents used to describe and characterize humoral immunity, better define the chemical properties and structure of antibodies, and extend the clinical use of immunoglobulin products to treat or prevent multiple viral and bacterial diseases over the ensuing several decades. The next distinct era came with the discovery of processes to produce monoclonal antibodies (mAb), and development of more specific therapies. Interestingly, mAb technology resulted in many products to treat autoimmune and allergic diseases, but only one common infectious disease, respiratory syncytial virus, and only in a restricted population of high-risk infants. Recent findings The current era began with a series of publications in 2008 demonstrating processes for rapidly producing human mAbs. Summary This technology combined with new sequencing technology, advances in structural biology, atomic-level molecular design, and increased capacity for synthetic biology, promises new opportunities to apply passive immunization to the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases. PMID:25760933

  15. Semi-passive, chemical oxidation schemes for the long-term treatment of contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Frank W.; Lee, Eung Seok; Ibaraki, Motomu

    2003-06-15

    This study aims to provide basic research on a new passive remediation concept based on an in situ chemical oxidation scheme. The first objective is to use laboratory experiments and computer simulations to develop a new semi-passive delivery system for the controlled release of KMnO4. A system is required to facilitate the slow release of KMnO4 into flowing ground water in a manner that maximizes the lateral spreading, and minimizes the number of wells. The second objective is to use laboratory experiments to assess whether chemical mixtures or cyclic chemical renovation schemes are capable of providing both contaminant destruction and plugging control. Preliminary experiments have identified compounds capable of delaying precipitation or dissolving precipitates. We have hopes that even in with a passive scheme that plugging can be controlled in the immediate vicinity of wells. The third objective is to evaluate the kinetics of interactions among treatment chemicals and the porous medium in order to optimize design. It is well known that natural, oxidizable compounds in aquifer materials utilize KMnO4. The well design requires knowledge concerning the fate and transport of KMnO4.

  16. The biological rationale for use of vitamin d analogs in combination with corticosteroids for the topical treatment of plaque psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Segaert, Siegfried; Ropke, Mads

    2013-08-01

    Topical corticosteroids and vitamin D analogs are well established as safe and effective first-line treatments for mild to moderate plaque psoriasis. They act via distinct and complementary mechanisms of action: vitamin D analogs primarily counter epidermal dysregulation, inhibiting epidermal hyperproliferation and inducing keratinocyte differentiation, whereas corticosteroids act primarily as immunosuppressors, targeting pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Furthermore, both agents have additional activity that may complement their main effects: vitamin D analogs have some immunomodulatory properties and corticosteroids may impact on keratinocyte differentiation. Based on their dominant mechanisms of action, there is a strong scientific rationale for the combination of corticosteroids and vitamin D analogs in the treatment of plaque psoriasis. Indeed, the combination has been shown to have a greater effect on the immune-mediated mechanisms of psoriasis than either monotherapy used alone. There is also a strong biological rationale for decreased side effects with the combination. Vitamin D may restore epidermal barrier function, which is impaired with corticosteroid use, and counteract steroid-induced skin atrophy. Corticosteroids may reduce perilesional skin irritation induced by vitamin D analogs. Although clinical data strongly support improved efficacy and tolerability with a combination of calcipotriol and betamethasone dipropionate, additional studies are needed to further investigate their underlying mechanisms.

  17. Evaluation of layered and mixed passive treatment systems for acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Jeen, Sung-Wook; Mattson, Bruce

    2016-11-01

    Laboratory column tests for passive treatment systems for mine drainage from a waste rock storage area were conducted to evaluate suitable reactive mixture, system configuration, effects of influent water chemistry, and required residence time. Five columns containing straw, chicken manure, mushroom compost, and limestone (LS), in either layered or mixed configurations, were set up to simulate the treatment system. The results showed that all of the five columns removed metals of concern (i.e. Al, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Zn) with a residence time of 15 h and greater. Reaction mechanisms responsible for the removal of metals may include sulfate reduction and subsequent sulfide precipitation, precipitation of secondary carbonates and hydroxides, co-precipitation, and sorption on organic substrates and secondary precipitates. The results suggest that the mixed systems containing organic materials and LS perform better than the layered systems, sequentially treated by organic and LS layers, due to the enhanced pH adjustment, which is beneficial to bacterial activity and precipitation of secondary minerals. The column tests provide a basis for the design of a field-scale passive treatment system, such as a reducing and alkalinity producing system or a permeable reactive barrier. PMID:26998668

  18. The status of the passive treatment systems for acid mine drainage in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Sangwoo; Kim, Sunjoon; Ko, Juin

    2008-09-01

    This study was performed to investigate the operating status, evaluate the problems, and discuss possible improvement methods of passive treatment systems for acid mine drainage (AMD) in South Korea. Thirty-five passive treatment systems in 29 mines have been constructed from 1996 to 2002 using successive alkalinity producing systems (SAPS) as the main treatment process. We investigated 29 systems (two for metal mines), 19 of which revealed various problems. Overflows of drainage from SAPS, wetland, or oxidation ponds were caused by the flow rate exceeding the capacities of the facilities or by the reduced permeability of the organic substance layer. Leakages occurred at various parts of the systems. In some cases, clogged and broken pipes at the mouths of the mine adits made the whole system unusable. Some systems showed very low efficiencies without apparent leakage or overflow. Even though the systems showed fairly good efficiencies in metal removal ratios (mainly iron) and pH control; sulfate removal rates were very poor except in three systems, which may indicate very poor sulfate reductions with sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) as a means.

  19. True precocious puberty complicating congenital adrenal hyperplasia: treatment with a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analog.

    PubMed

    Pescovitz, O H; Comite, F; Cassorla, F; Dwyer, A J; Poth, M A; Sperling, M A; Hench, K; McNemar, A; Skerda, M; Loriaux, D L

    1984-05-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a recognized cause of precocious pseudopuberty. Some children with CAH also develop true precocious puberty with early maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. We have seen four such children (three boys and one girl) who had the diagnosis of CAH made between the ages of 3 and 6 yr. These patients were treated with standard doses of hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone. A diagnosis of true precocious puberty was made because of testicular enlargement in the boys, breast development in the girl, progressive pubic hair development, rapid growth, and rapid bone age maturation. Plasma steroid levels were elevated for age, and gonadotropin levels were within the normal pubertal range, both basally and in response to LHRH stimulation. We treated these children with daily sc injections of a LHRH analog (LHRHa) for 6-18 months in addition to the standard hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone therapy for CAH. LHRHa significantly decreased basal plasma LH and FSH, peak LH and FSH responses to native LHRH, and testosterone levels. Testis size decreased in the males, and breast development regressed in the female. LHRHa therapy led to significant decreases in linear growth rate, ulnar growth rate, and rate of bone age advancement. These results suggest that LHRHa is an effective adjunct to hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone in the treatment of true precocious puberty complicating CAH.

  20. Passivation of silicon surfaces by heat treatment in liquid water at 110 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Tomohiko; Sameshima, Toshiyuki; Hasumi, Masahiko; Mizuno, Tomohisa

    2015-10-01

    We report the effective passivation of silicon surfaces by heating single-crystalline silicon substrates in liquid water at 110 °C for 1 h. High photo-induced effective minority carrier lifetimes τeff were obtained ranging from 8.3 × 10-4 to 3.1 × 10-3 s and from 1.2 × 10-4 to 6.0 × 10-4 s for the n- and p-type samples, respectively, under 635 nm light illumination, while the τeff values of the initial bare samples were lower than 1.2 × 10-5 s. The heat treatment in liquid water at 110 °C for 1 h resulted in low surface recombination velocities ranging from 7 to 34 cm/s and from 49 to 250 cm/s for the n- and p-type samples, respectively. The photo-conductivity of the n-type sample was increased from 3.8 × 10-3 (initial) to 1.4 × 10-1 S/cm by the present heat treatment under air-mass (AM) 1.5 light illumination at 100 mW/cm2. The thickness of the passivation layer was estimated to be only approximately 0.7 nm. Metal-insulator-semiconductor-type solar cells were demonstrated with Al and Au metal formation on the passivated surface. Rectified current voltage and solar cell characteristics were observed. The open circuit voltages were obtained to be 0.52 and 0.49 V under AM 1.5 light illumination at 100 mW/cm2 for the n- and p-type samples, respectively.

  1. Analysis of substrate leachate from an innovative vertical flow AMD passive treatment system

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, M.N.; Nairn, R.W.

    1999-07-01

    Although many organic substrate-based acid mine drainage (AMD) passive treatment systems have been constructed, analyses of initial leachate components has been limited. Labile organic materials, although providing an effective substrate for important bacterial processes in AMD treatment, may leach organic compounds, nutrients and other substances into receiving waters. Decreased dissolved oxygen levels, discoloration, nutrient enrichment and subsequent eutrophication may result. In this study, organic and inorganic components of substrate leachate from an innovative vertical flow acid mine drainage (AMD) passive treatment systems were determined during initial operation. A portion (approximately 17 L/minute) of an AMD discharge from an abandoned underground mine in southeastern Oklahoma was directed to a pilot-scale treatment system. The treatment system consists of four 185 m{sup 2} in-series cells and is comprised of alternating vertical flow anaerobic compost wetlands (VFs) and surface flow aerobic settling ponds (APs). the substrate in the VFs consists of spent mushroom substrate (SMS), high CaCO{sub 3} limestone gravel, and hydrated fly ash (HFA) in a 2:1:0.1 ratio by volume. HFA is a coal combustion product and has been identified as an effective alkalinity generating material in laboratory studies. Field data (pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, conductivity and alkalinity) and water samples for subsequent analyses were collected at the discharge, at the inflow to each cell, and at several locations in the receiving waters. Initial data indicate pH increase to 7.3, and generation of approximately 150 mg/L alkalinity as CaCO{sub 3} eq. by the second aerobic settling pond. Total organic carbon, chemical oxygen demand, color, metals, and concentrations of other significant components were measured at all sampling locations.

  2. Novel passive co-treatment of acid mine drainage and municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Strosnider, William H J; Winfrey, Brandon K; Nairn, Robert W

    2011-01-01

    A laboratory-scale, four-stage continuous-flow reactor system was constructed to test the viability of high-strength acid mine drainage (AMD) and municipal wastewater (MWW) passive co-treatment. Synthetic AMD of pH 2.6 and acidity of 1870 mg L(-1) as CaCO3 equivalent containing a mean 46, 0.25, 2.0, 290, 55, 1.2, and 390 mg L(-1) of Al, As, Cd, Fe, Mn, Pb, and Zn, respectively, was added at a 1:2 ratio with raw MWW from the City of Norman, OK, to the system which had a total residence time of 6.6 d. During the 135-d experiment, dissolved Al, As, Cd, Fe, Mn, Pb, and Zn concentrations were consistently decreased by 99.8, 87.8, 97.7, 99.8, 13.9, 87.9, and 73.4%, respectively, pH increased to 6.79, and net acidic influent was converted to net alkaline effluent. At a wasting rate of 0.69% of total influent flow, the system produced sludge with total Al, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, and Zn concentrations at least an order of magnitude greater than the influent mix, which presents a metal reclamation opportunity. Results indicate that AMD and MWW passive co-treatment is a viable approach to use wastes as resources to improve water quality with minimal use of fossil fuels and refined materials. PMID:21488509

  3. Acute lethal toxicity following passive immunization for treatment of murine cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Savoy, A C; Lupan, D M; Manalo, P B; Roberts, J S; Schlageter, A M; Weinhold, L C; Kozel, T R

    1997-05-01

    Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the major capsular polysaccharide of Cryptococcus neoformans alters the course of murine cryptococcosis. During studies of passive immunization for treatment of murine cryptococcosis, we noted the occurrence of an acute, lethal toxicity. Toxicity was characterized by scratching, lethargy, respiratory distress, collapse, and death within 20 to 60 min after injection of antibody. The toxic effect was observed only in mice with a cryptococcal infection and was reduced or absent in the early and late stages of disease. The clinical course and histopathology were consistent with those for shock. There was considerable variation between mouse strains in susceptibility to toxicity. Swiss Webster mice from the Charles River colony were most susceptible, followed by C3H/He, BALB/c, and C57BL/6 mice. DBA/2 mice and Swiss Webster mice from the Simonsen colony were resistant. Acute toxicity was mimicked by injection of preformed complexes of MAb and purified polysaccharide. The toxic effect was also produced by injection of MAbs into mice that were preloaded with polysaccharide. The toxic effect was not blocked by treatment of mice with chloropheniramine or anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha antibodies or by depletion of complement components via pretreatment with cobra venom factor. Toxicity was reduced by treatment of mice with high doses of epinephrine, dexamethasone, or chlorpromazine. Finally, the toxic effect was completely blocked by treatment of mice with the platelet-activating factor antagonist WEB 2170 BS or by pretreatment of mice with the liposome-encapsulated drug dichloromethylene diphosphonate, a procedure which depletes macrophages from the spleen and liver.

  4. Bioactive Ti metal analogous to human cancellous bone: Fabrication by selective laser melting and chemical treatments.

    PubMed

    Pattanayak, Deepak K; Fukuda, A; Matsushita, T; Takemoto, M; Fujibayashi, S; Sasaki, K; Nishida, N; Nakamura, T; Kokubo, T

    2011-03-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is a useful technique for preparing three-dimensional porous bodies with complicated internal structures directly from titanium (Ti) powders without any intermediate processing steps, with the products being expected to be useful as a bone substitute. In this study the necessary SLM processing conditions to obtain a dense product, such as the laser power, scanning speed, and hatching pattern, were investigated using a Ti powder of less than 45 μm particle size. The results show that a fully dense plate thinner than 1.8 mm was obtained when the laser power to scanning speed ratio was greater than 0.5 and the hatch spacing was less than the laser diameter, with a 30 μm thick powder layer. Porous Ti metals with structures analogous to human cancellous bone were fabricated and the compressive strength measured. The compressive strength was in the range 35-120 MPa when the porosity was in the range 75-55%. Porous Ti metals fabricated by SLM were heat-treated at 1300 °C for 1h in an argon gas atmosphere to smooth the surface. Such prepared specimens were subjected to NaOH, HCl, and heat treatment to provide bioactivity. Field emission scanning electron micrographs showed that fine networks of titanium oxide were formed over the whole surface of the porous body. These treated porous bodies formed bone-like apatite on their surfaces in a simulated body fluid within 3 days. In vivo studies showed that new bone penetrated into the pores and directly bonded to the walls within 12 weeks after implantation into the femur of Japanese white rabbits. The percentage bone affinity indices of the chemical- and heat-treated porous bodies were significantly higher than that of untreated implants.

  5. New prostaglandin analog formulation for glaucoma treatment containing cyclodextrins for improved stability, solubility and ocular tolerance.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Aller, Marta; Guinchard, Sylvie; Guillarme, Davy; Pupier, Marion; Jeannerat, Damien; Rivara-Minten, Elisabeth; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Gurny, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Latanoprost is a practically insoluble prostaglandin F2α analog considered a first-line agent for glaucoma treatment. From a pharmaceutical point of view, latanoprost is challenging to be formulated as an eye drop due to its poor water solubility and the presence of an ester bond that needs to be cleaved in vivo but maintained unchanged during storage. Cyclodextrins (CDs) are known to form complexes with hydrophobic drugs, influencing their stability, availability, solubility, and tolerance in a non-predictable manner. A variety of CDs including native α, β, and γCDs as well as substituted hydroxypropylβCD, hydroxypropylγCD, dimethylβCD, sulphatedβCD, and propylaminoβCD were screened and the most appropriate CD for the formulation of latanoprost for an ocular topical application was selected. Among the tested CDs, propylaminoβCD had the best trade-off between latanoprost stability and availability, which was confirmed by its complex constant value of 3129M(-1). Phase-solubility and NMR investigations demonstrated that the propylaminoβCD effectively formed a complex involving the ester group of latanoprost providing protection to its ester bond, while ensuring proper latanoprost solubilization. Furthermore, in vivo experiments demonstrated that the latanoprost-propylaminoβCD formulation led to lower ocular irritation than the commercial latanoprost formulation used as a reference. The latanoprost-propylaminoβCD formulation was demonstrated to successfully address the main stability, solubility, and tolerance limitations of topical ocular latanoprost therapy for glaucoma.

  6. Bioactive Ti metal analogous to human cancellous bone: Fabrication by selective laser melting and chemical treatments.

    PubMed

    Pattanayak, Deepak K; Fukuda, A; Matsushita, T; Takemoto, M; Fujibayashi, S; Sasaki, K; Nishida, N; Nakamura, T; Kokubo, T

    2011-03-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is a useful technique for preparing three-dimensional porous bodies with complicated internal structures directly from titanium (Ti) powders without any intermediate processing steps, with the products being expected to be useful as a bone substitute. In this study the necessary SLM processing conditions to obtain a dense product, such as the laser power, scanning speed, and hatching pattern, were investigated using a Ti powder of less than 45 μm particle size. The results show that a fully dense plate thinner than 1.8 mm was obtained when the laser power to scanning speed ratio was greater than 0.5 and the hatch spacing was less than the laser diameter, with a 30 μm thick powder layer. Porous Ti metals with structures analogous to human cancellous bone were fabricated and the compressive strength measured. The compressive strength was in the range 35-120 MPa when the porosity was in the range 75-55%. Porous Ti metals fabricated by SLM were heat-treated at 1300 °C for 1h in an argon gas atmosphere to smooth the surface. Such prepared specimens were subjected to NaOH, HCl, and heat treatment to provide bioactivity. Field emission scanning electron micrographs showed that fine networks of titanium oxide were formed over the whole surface of the porous body. These treated porous bodies formed bone-like apatite on their surfaces in a simulated body fluid within 3 days. In vivo studies showed that new bone penetrated into the pores and directly bonded to the walls within 12 weeks after implantation into the femur of Japanese white rabbits. The percentage bone affinity indices of the chemical- and heat-treated porous bodies were significantly higher than that of untreated implants. PMID:20883832

  7. Effect of Cinacalcet and Vitamin D Analogs on Fibroblast Growth Factor-23 during the Treatment of Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Wetmore, James B.; Gurevich, Konstantin; Da Roza, Gerald; Buerkert, John; Reiner, Maureen; Goodman, William; Cooper, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Cinacalcet and vitamin D are often combined to treat secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) in patients on dialysis. Independent effects on fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) concentrations in patients on hemodialysis administered cinacalcet or vitamin D analogs as monotherapies during treatment of SHPT are evaluated. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A multicenter, randomized, open-label study to compare the efficacy of cinacalcet versus traditional vitamin D therapy for management of secondary hyperparathyroidism among subjects undergoing hemodialysis (PARADIGM) was a prospective, phase 4, multicenter, randomized, open-label study conducted globally. Participants (n=312) were randomized 1:1 to cinacalcet (n=155) or vitamin D analog (n=157) for 52 weeks. Levels of FGF-23 were measured at baseline and weeks 20 and 52. The absolute and percentage changes from baseline in plasma FGF-23, parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), and calcium-phosphorus product (Ca×P) were assessed. Correlations and logistic regression were used to explore relationships between changes in FGF-23 and changes in PTH, Ca, P, and Ca×P from baseline to week 52 by treatment arm. Results Median (quartiles 1, 3) decrease in FGF-23 concentrations was observed in the cinacalcet arm (−40%; −63%, 16%) compared with median increase in the vitamin D analog arm (47%; 0%, 132%) at week 52 (P<0.001). Changes in FGF-23 in both arms were unrelated to changes in PTH (cinacalcet: r=0.17, P=0.11; vitamin D analog: r=−0.04, P=0.70). Changes in FGF-23 in the vitamin D analog but not the cinacalcet arm were correlated with changes in Ca (cinacalcet: r=0.11, P=0.30; vitamin D analog: r=0.32, P<0.01) and P (cinacalcet: r=0.19, P=0.07; vitamin D analog: r=0.49, P<0.001). Changes in FGF-23 were correlated with changes in Ca×P in both arms (cinacalcet: r=0.26, P=0.01; vitamin D analog: r=0.57, P<0.001). Independent of treatment arm, participants with

  8. Passive treatment using coal combustion products: An innovative vertical flow constructed wetland field study

    SciTech Connect

    Nairn, R.W.; Mercer, M.N.; Everett, J.W.

    1999-07-01

    Designs of constructed wetlands for acid mine drainage (AMD) treatment have evolved substantially during the past decade. Current research focuses on the study of vertical-flow treatment systems containing labile organic substrates. Also known as successive alkalinity producing systems (SAPS), these systems emphasize contact of acidic waters with the substrate, thus maximizing biological alkalinity generation, via bacterial sulfate reduction, and abiotic alkalinity generation via carbonate dissolution processes. in this study, a coal combustion product (CCP) was utilized to generate supplementary alkalinity in addition to that provided by traditional substrate materials of spent mushroom substrate (SMS) and high CaCO{sub 3} content limestone. Although limestone is commonly utilized for abiotic alkalinity generation in AMC treatment wetlands, CCPs are not. The preliminary effectiveness of this innovative vertical flow passive treatment system was evaluated during the initial year of operation. The wetlands are successfully retaining iron, aluminum and manganese and are increasing pH, alkalinity, dissolved oxygen (from ,1.0 to >13 mg/L, due to biological productivity), and calcium (from 31 to 385 mg/L, presumably due to limestone and hydrated fly ash dissolution). No hydraulic conductivity problems have been encountered in the initial year of operation. CCPs may offer an attractive alternative, or supplementary, alkalinity generating source for AMD treatment wetlands.

  9. Crown lengthening to facilitate restorative treatment in the presence of incomplete passive eruption.

    PubMed

    Hempton, T J; Esrason, F

    1999-01-01

    The following clinical case involves subgingival caries noted in the presence of incomplete passive eruption in the maxillary anterior sextant. Understand the clinical entity known as incomplete passive eruption and discover utilization of crown lengthening surgery to treat this condition.

  10. An orthotropic viscoelastic model for the passive myocardium: continuum basis and numerical treatment.

    PubMed

    Gültekin, Osman; Sommer, Gerhard; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2016-11-01

    This study deals with the viscoelastic constitutive modeling and the respective computational analysis of the human passive myocardium. We start by recapitulating the locally orthotropic inner structure of the human myocardial tissue and model the mechanical response through invariants and structure tensors associated with three orthonormal basis vectors. In accordance with recent experimental findings the ventricular myocardial tissue is assumed to be incompressible, thick-walled, orthotropic and viscoelastic. In particular, one spring element coupled with Maxwell elements in parallel endows the model with viscoelastic features such that four dashpots describe the viscous response due to matrix, fiber, sheet and fiber-sheet fragments. In order to alleviate the numerical obstacles, the strictly incompressible model is altered by decomposing the free-energy function into volumetric-isochoric elastic and isochoric-viscoelastic parts along with the multiplicative split of the deformation gradient which enables the three-field mixed finite element method. The crucial aspect of the viscoelastic formulation is linked to the rate equations of the viscous overstresses resulting from a 3-D analogy of a generalized 1-D Maxwell model. We provide algorithmic updates for second Piola-Kirchhoff stress and elasticity tensors. In the sequel, we address some numerical aspects of the constitutive model by applying it to elastic, cyclic and relaxation test data obtained from biaxial extension and triaxial shear tests whereby we assess the fitting capacity of the model. With the tissue parameters identified, we conduct (elastic and viscoelastic) finite element simulations for an ellipsoidal geometry retrieved from a human specimen. PMID:27146848

  11. A spectroscopic method for the evaluation of surface passivation treatments on metal-oxide-semiconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Lee A.; Hurley, Paul K.; Lin, Jun; Cockayne, Eric; O'Regan, T. P.; Woicik, Joseph C.; Hughes, Greg

    2014-05-01

    Combined hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) and electrical characterisation measurements have been shown to provide complementary information on the electrical performance of Si and GaAs based metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures. The results obtained indicate that surface potential changes at the semiconductor/dielectric interface due to the presence of different work function metals can be detected from HAXPES measurements. Changes in the semiconductor band bending at zero gate voltage and the flat band voltage values derived from C-V measurements are in agreement with the semiconductor core level shifts measured from the HAXPES spectra. These results highlight the potential application of this measurement approach in the evaluation of the efficacy of surface passivation treatments: HAXPES—hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; C-V—capacitance voltage; Dit—interface state density; BE—binding energy, at reducing defect states densities in MOS structures.

  12. Treatment of nitrosamine-induced pancreatic tumors in hamsters with analogs of somatostatin and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Bouza, J.I.; Redding, T.W.; Schally, A.V.

    1987-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma was induced in female Syrian golden hamsters by injecting N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) once a week at a dose of 10 mg per kg of body weight for 18 weeks. Hamsters were then treated with somatostatin analog (RC-160) or with (6-D-tryptophan)luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ((D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH) delayed delivery systems. After 18 weeks of BOP administration, the hamsters were divided into three groups of 10-20 animals each. Group I consisted of untreated controls, group II was injected with RC-160, and group III was injected with (D-Trp/sub 2/)LH-RH. A striking decrease in tumor weight and volume was obtained in animals treated with (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH or with the somatostatin analog RC-160. After 45 days of treatment with either analog, the survival rate was significantly higher in groups II and III (70%), as compared with the control group (35%). The studies, done by light microscopy, high-resolution microscopy, and electron microscopy, showed a decrease in the total number of cancer cells and changes in the epithelium, connective tissue, and cellular organelles in groups II and III treated with the hypothalamic analogs as compared to controls. These results in female hamsters with induced ductal pancreatic tumors confirm and extend the authors findings, obtained in male animals with transplanted tumors, that (D-Trp/sub 6/)LH-RH and somatostatin analogs inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancers.

  13. Fate of As, Se, and Hg in a Passive Integrated System for Treatment of Fossil Plant Wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Terry Yost; Paul Pier; Gregory Brodie

    2007-12-31

    TVA is collaborating with EPRI and DOE to demonstrate a passive treatment system for removing SCR-derived ammonia and trace elements from a coal-fired power plant wastewater stream. The components of the integrated system consist of trickling filters for ammonia oxidation, reaction cells containing zero-valent iron (ZVI) for trace contaminant removal, a settling basin for storage of iron hydroxide floc, and anaerobic vertical-flow wetlands for biological denitrification. The passive integrated treatment system will treat up to 0.25 million gallons per day (gpd) of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) pond effluent, with a configuration requiring only gravity flow to obviate the need for pumps. The design of the system will enable a comparative evaluation of two parallel treatment trains, with and without the ZVI extraction trench and settling/oxidation basin components. One of the main objectives is to gain a better understanding of the chemical transformations that species of trace elements such as arsenic, selenium, and mercury undergo as they are treated in passive treatment system components with differing environmental conditions. This progress report details the design criteria for the passive integrated system for treating fossil power plant wastewater as well as performance results from the first several months of operation. Engineering work on the project has been completed, and construction took place during the summer of 2005. Monitoring of the passive treatment system was initiated in October 2005 and continued until May 18 2006. The results to date indicate that the treatment system is effective in reducing levels of nitrogen compounds and trace metals. Concentrations of both ammonia and trace metals were lower than expected in the influent FGD water, and additions to increase these concentrations will be done in the future to further test the removal efficiency of the treatment system. In May 2006, the wetland cells were drained of FGD water, refilled with

  14. A passive acoustic device for real-time monitoring of the efficacy of shockwave lithotripsy treatment.

    PubMed

    Leighton, T G; Fedele, F; Coleman, A J; McCarthy, C; Ryves, S; Hurrell, A M; De Stefano, A; White, P R

    2008-10-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is the preferred modality for the treatment of renal and ureteric stone disease. Currently X-ray or ultrasound B-scan imaging are used to locate the stone and to check that it remains targeted at the focus of the lithotripter during treatment. Neither imaging modality is particularly effective in allowing the efficacy of treatment to be judged during the treatment session. A new device is described that, when placed on the patient's skin, can passively monitor the acoustic signals that propagate through the body after each lithotripter shock, and which can provide useful information on the effectiveness of targeting. These acoustic time histories are analyzed in real time to extract the two main characteristic peak amplitudes (m(1) and m(2)) and the time between these peaks (t(c)). A set of rules based on the acoustic parameters was developed during a clinical study in which a complete set of acoustic and clinical data was obtained for 30 of the 118 subjects recruited. The rules, which complied with earlier computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and in vitro tests, allow each shock to be classified as "effective" or "ineffective." These clinically-derived rules were then applied in a second clinical study in which complete datasets were obtained for 49 of the 85 subjects recruited. This second clinical study demonstrated almost perfect agreement (kappa = 0.94) between the number of successful treatments, defined as >50% fragmentation as determined by X-ray at the follow-up appointment, and a device-derived global treatment score, TS(0), a figure derived from the total number of effective shocks in any treatment. The acoustic system is shown to provide a test of the success of the treatment that has a sensitivity of 91.7% and a specificity of 100%. In addition to the predictive capability, the device provides valuable real-time feedback to the lithotripter operator by indicating the effectiveness of each shock, plus

  15. Semi-passive, Chemical Oxidation Schemes for the Long-term Treatment of Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Frank W. Schwartz

    2005-12-13

    This research involves a combined experimental and modeling study that builds on our previous DOE-sponsored work in investigating how KMnO{sub 4} can be better used with in situ remediation of groundwater contaminated by chlorinated ethylenes (e.g., PCE, TCE, DCE). This study aims to provide scientific basis for developing a new long-term, semi-passive ISCO scheme that uses controlled release KMnO{sub 4} as a reactive barrier component. Specific objectives of the study are (1) to construct controlled release KMnO{sub 4} as a new reactive barrier component that could deliver permanganate at a controlled rate over long time periods of years, (2) to quantitatively describe release mechanisms associated with the controlled release KMnO{sub 4}, (3) to demonstrate efficacy of the new remediation scheme using proof-of-concept experiments, and (4) to design advanced forms of controlled release systems through numerical optimization. The new scheme operates in a long-term, semi-passive manner to control spreading of a dissolved contaminant plume with periodic replacement of the controlled release KMnO{sub 4} installed in the subsurface. As a first step in developing this remedial concept, we manufactured various prototype controlled release KMnO{sub 4} forms. Then we demonstrated using column experiments that the controlled release KMnO{sub 4} could deliver small amount of permanganate into flowing water at controlled rates over long time periods of years. An analytical model was also used to estimate the diffusivities and durations of the controlled release KMnO{sub 4}. Finally, proof-of-concept flow-tank experiments were performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the controlled release KMnO{sub 4} scheme in controlling dissolved TCE plume in a long-term, semi-passive manner. Another important thrust of our research effort involved numerical optimization of controlled release systems. This study used a numerical model that is capable of describing release patterns of active

  16. Bear Creek Valley characterization area mixed wastes passive in situ treatment technology demonstration project - status report

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D.; Leavitt, M.; Moss, D.

    1997-03-01

    Historical waste disposal activities within the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Characterization Area (CA), at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 plant, have contaminated groundwater and surface water above human health risk levels and impacted the ecology of Bear Creek. Contaminates include nitrate, radioisotopes, metals, volatile organic chemicals (VOCS), and common ions. This paper provides a status report on a technology demonstration project that is investigating the feasibility of using passive in situ treatment systems to remove these contaminants. Although this technology may be applicable to many locations at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the project focuses on collecting the information needed to take CERCLA removal actions in 1998 at the S-3 Disposal Ponds site. Phase 1 has been completed and included site characterization, laboratory screening of treatment media (sorbents; and iron), and limited field testing of biological treatment systems. Batch tests using different Y-12 Plant waters were conducted to evaluate the removal efficiencies of most of the media. Phase 1 results suggest that the most promising treatment media are Dowex 21 k resin, peat moss, zero-valent iron, and iron oxides. Phase 2 will include in-field column testing of these media to assess loading rates, and concerns with clogging, by-products, and long-term treatment efficiency and media stability. Continued testing of wetlands and algal mats (MATs) will be conducted to determine if they can be used for in-stream polishing of surface water. Hydraulic testing of a shallow trench and horizontal well will also be completed during Phase 2. 4 refs., 3 tabs.

  17. Heat treatment in 110 °C liquid water used for passivating silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Tomohiko; Motoki, Takayuki; Ubukata, Junya; Sameshima, Toshiyuki; Hasumi, Masahiko; Mizuno, Tomohisa

    2016-04-01

    The simple passivation method of heat treatment in liquid water is discussed. Photo-induced effective minority carrier lifetime τ eff increased to 3.3 × 10-3 s above 110 °C for 1 h for 17-Ωcm n-type crystalline silicon. Increase in τ eff was observed ranging from 3.5 × 10-4 to 3.7 × 10-3 s for n-type silicon with resistivity ranging from 2 to 17 Ωcm. τ eff maintained high values ranging from 1.5 × 10-4 to 1.4 × 10-3 s for 1270 h. The metal-insulator-semiconductor-type diodes were formed on the top surfaces of the n-type and p-type substrates by forming Al and Au metals on the 0.7-nm-thin passivated layers. Rectified and Fowler-Nordheim current characteristics were observed in the dark field because of the difference of the work function between Al and Au. High photo-induced current density of 31.1 mA/cm2 and photovoltaic effect were observed in case of light illumination of AM 1.5 at 100 mW/cm2 to the rear surface. The recombination velocity in the regions under the metal electrode in the MIS structure was determined by lateral diffusion of photo-induced carriers. They were 1000 and 11,000 cm/s under Al and Au, respectively, in the n-type Si substrate.

  18. CHALLENGES OF PASSIVE TREATMENT OF METAL MINE DRAINAGE IN THE IBERIAN PYRITE BELT (SOUTHERN SPAIN): PRELIMINARY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    AMD in the Iberian Pyrite Belt is a problem of global scale. Successful implementation of passive treatment systems could remediate at least part of this problem at reasonable costs. However, initial trials with ALD and RAPS based on gravel size limestone failed due to rapid loss...

  19. DEMONSTRATION OF AQUAFIX AND SAPS PASSIVE MINE WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES AT SUMMITVILLE MINE SITE, INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency evaluated two passive water treatment (PWT) technologies for metals removal from acid mine drainage (AMD) at the Summitville Mine Superfund Site in southern Colorado...

  20. Time-related effects of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog treatment in experimentally induced endometriosis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Zanagnolo, V L; Beck, R; Schlaff, W D; Damewood, M D; Bobbie, D; Rock, J A

    1991-02-01

    The purpose of our study was to characterize the time-dependent effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRH-a) therapy on endometriosis explant using the rat model. Endometriosis was induced in 60 mature female rats. One group of treated animals as well as controls were killed at 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks of treatment at which time the explant was evaluated. Explant volume was significantly reduced in all treatment groups, an effect that was more significant in animals treated for greater than or equal to 4 weeks compared with those treated for only 2 weeks. We conclude that GnRH-a treatment caused gradual regression of endometrial explant that was effectively complete by 4 weeks of treatment. We further conclude that this experimental model may be useful in the evaluation of other modes of endometriosis therapy.

  1. Lunar Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.

    2009-01-01

    In this viewgraph presentation, a ground-based lunar analog is developed for the return of manned space flight to the Moon. The contents include: 1) Digital Astronaut; 2) Bed Design; 3) Lunar Analog Feasibility Study; 4) Preliminary Data; 5) Pre-pilot Study; 6) Selection of Stockings; 7) Lunar Analog Pilot Study; 8) Bed Design for Lunar Analog Pilot.

  2. The Controlled Ecological Life Support System Antarctic Analog Project: Prototype Crop Production and Water Treatment System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, David L.; Flynn, Michael T.; Bates, Maynard; Schlick, Greg; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Antarctic Analog Project (CAAP), is a joint endeavor between the National Science Foundation, Office of Polar Programs (NSF-OPP) and the NASA. The fundamental objective is to develop, deploy, and operate a testbed of advanced life support technologies at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station that enable the objectives of both the NSF and NASA. The functions of food production, water purification, and waste treatment, recycle and reduction provided by CAAP will improve the quality of life for the South Pole inhabitants, reduce logistics dependence, enhance safety and minimize environmental impacts associated with human presence on the polar plateau. Because of the analogous technical, scientific, and mission features with Planetary missions such as a mission to Mars, CAAP provides NASA with a method for validating technologies and overall approaches to supporting humans. Prototype systems for sewage treatment, water recycle and crop production are being evaluated at Ames Research Center. The product water from sewage treatment using a Wiped-Film Rotating Disk is suitable for input to the crop production system. The crop production system has provided an enhanced level of performance compared with projected performance for plant-based life support: an approximate 50% increase in productivity per unit area, more than a 65% decrease in power for plant lighting, and more than a 75% decrease in the total power requirement to produce an equivalent mass of edible biomass.

  3. Digital and analog communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanmugam, K. S.

    1979-01-01

    The book presents an introductory treatment of digital and analog communication systems with emphasis on digital systems. Attention is given to the following topics: systems and signal analysis, random signal theory, information and channel capacity, baseband data transmission, analog signal transmission, noise in analog communication systems, digital carrier modulation schemes, error control coding, and the digital transmission of analog signals.

  4. Hydrologic Education and Undergraduate Research in a Passive Wetland Treatment System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredrick, K. C.; Lohr, L.

    2012-12-01

    Legacy coal mine drainage has been found to impair surface water throughout southwestern Pennsylvania. Though few of our incoming students know what "acid mine drainage" is, nearly all have seen the orange streams and seeps that are its most obvious characteristic. On the other end of the spectrum, our geology majors are typically finding jobs in the oil and gas industry related to shale gas, or in environmental fields especially related to local and regional surface water. To take advantage of their early familiarity with local stream impacts and the likelihood they will have to deal with mine effluent during their post-academic careers, we have leveraged a local passive wetland treatment system to bring a relevant, real-life scenario into the classroom and lab. Moraine State Park, in western PA, is centered on Lake Arthur, an artificial reservoir of Muddy Creek. The park, particularly the lake, is a destination for recreational visitors, including boating and fishing enthusiasts. There is concern among visitors and park administrators about the health of the local streams and the lake. The area has been extensively undermined, with most coal mines sealed prior to the damming of the reservoir. One such instance of these sealed mine ports failed along one of the many embayments of Lake Arthur and a passive treatment system was installed. It was used as an example of the environmental impacts to the area for park guests, with an access road and signage. However, at this time, the three-pond system may be failing, five years beyond its projected life span and showing signs of stress and downstream contamination. Though the system is small, it provides a robust opportunity for hydrologic and geochemical analyses. We have used the pond system extensively for undergraduate research. Over the past five years, a Master's thesis was completed, and numerous undergraduate projects followed. Students have measured precipitate thickness and deposition rates, endeavored to

  5. The importance of biological oxidation of iron in the aerobic cells of the Wheal Jane pilot passive treatment system.

    PubMed

    Hall, G; Swash, P; Kotilainen, S

    2005-02-01

    The passive treatment system designed to treat the mine water discharge of the abandoned Wheal Jane tin mine in Cornwall consisted of a sequence of artificial wetland cells, an anaerobic cell and a final series of rock filters. Three systems were operated which differed only in the pre-treatment of the mine water before discharge to the aerobic wetland cells. The aerobic cells were designed to promote aerobic oxidation and precipitation of iron which could exceed a concentration of 100 mg/l in the raw mine water discharge. The largest investment of land area was to the artificial wetland cells and it was important to understand the processes of oxidation and precipitation of iron so that the performance of this aspect the pilot passive treatment plant (PPTP) could be managed as efficiently as possible. The generally low pH of the influent mine water and inevitable trend of decreasing pH due to hydrolysis of Fe(III) meant that distinguishing between biotic and abiotic mechanisms was fundamental for further design planning of passive treatment systems. This paper describes these observations. PMID:15680627

  6. Curcumin Analog DM-1 in Monotherapy or Combinatory Treatment with Dacarbazine as a Strategy to Inhibit In Vivo Melanoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Faião-Flores, Fernanda; Quincoces Suarez, José Agustín; Fruet, Andréa Costa; Maria-Engler, Silvya Stuchi; Pardi, Paulo Celso; Maria, Durvanei Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is a highly aggressive form of skin cancer with a high mortality rate if not discovered in early stages. Although a limited number of treatment options for melanoma currently exist, patients with a more aggressive form of this cancer frequently decline treatment. DM-1 is a sodium phenolate and curcumin analog with proven anticancer, anti-proliferative and anti-metastatic properties. In this paper, the DM-1 compound showed in vivo antitumor activity alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic DTIC in B16F10 melanoma-bearing mice. Beneficial effects such as melanoma tumor burden reduction with pyknotic nuclei, decreased nuclei/cytoplasmic ratio and nuclear degradation occurred after DM-1 treatment. No toxicological changes were observed in the liver, kidneys, spleen and lungs after DM-1 monotherapy or DTIC combined therapy. DTIC+DM-1 treatment induced the recovery of anemia arising from melanoma and immunomodulation. Both DM-1 treatment alone and in combination with DTIC induced apoptosis with the cleavage of caspase-3, -8 and -9. Furthermore, melanoma tumors treated with DM-1 showed a preferential apoptotic intrinsic pathway by decreasing Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Considering the chemoresistance exhibited by melanoma towards conventional chemotherapy drugs, DM-1 compound in monotherapy or in combination therapy provides a promising improvement in melanoma treatment with a reduction of side effects. PMID:25742310

  7. Spatial distribution of iron oxidation in the aerobic cells of the Wheal Jane Pilot Passive Treatment Plant.

    PubMed

    Hall, G H; Puhlmann, T

    2005-02-01

    The wetland cells of the Wheal Jane Pilot Passive Treatment Plant (PPTP) were designed to promote aerobic oxidation and precipitation of iron which could exceed a concentration of 100 mg l-1 in the raw mine water. The largest investment of land area was to the wetland (also called aerobic) cells and it was important to understand the processes of oxidation and precipitation of iron so that the performance of this part of the pilot passive treatment plant (PPTP) could be managed efficiently. The results of a high-resolution sampling programme on the distribution of Fe(II) within the first wetland cell of each treatment system are described. Comparison of inflow and outflow concentrations of iron adequately described the performance of the lime-dosed (LD) system. However, precipitation of iron in the anoxic limestone drain (ALD) and lime-free systems (LFS) was more efficient. On average, about 90% of the iron present in the inflow was removed using only 50% and 33% of the first aerobic cells of the ALD and LFS systems, respectively. As the concentration of iron approached 20 mg l-1, the rate of oxidation slowed considerably. This was probably due to be due to low pH levels caused by hydrolysis of Fe(III). With the introduction of passive pH control mechanisms, there was capacity to increase the volume of mine water treated by the ALD and LDS systems by 10 and 15 times, respectively, but it is uncertain as to whether or not other aspects of the passive treatment system would have sufficient capacity to deal with the increased volumes of mine water. PMID:15680628

  8. Coupled-channel Treatment of Isobaric Analog Resonances in (p,p‧) Capture Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, I. J.; Arbanas, G.

    2014-04-01

    With the advent of nuclear reactions on unstable isotopes, there has been a renewed interest in using isobaric analogue resonances (IAR) as a tool for probing the nuclear structure. The position and width of isobaric analogue resonances in nucleon-nucleus scattering are accurate and detailed indicators of the positions of resonances and bound states with good single-particle characters. We report on implementation within our coupled-channels code FRESCO of the charge-exchange interaction term that transforms an incident proton into a neutron. Isobaric analog resonances are seen as peaks in γ-ray spectrum when the proton is transformed into a neutron at an energy near a neutron bound state. The Lane coupled-channels formalism was extended to follow the non-orthogonality of this neutron channel with that configuration of an inelastic outgoing proton, and the target being left in a particle-hole excited state. This is tested for 208Pb, for which good (p,p'γ) coincidence data exists.

  9. Coupled-channel treatment of Isobaric Analog Resonances in (p,p') Capture Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, I J; Arbanas, Goran

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nuclear reactions on unstable isotopes, there has been a renewed interest in using isobaric analogue resonances (IAR) as a tool for probing the nuclear structure. The position and width of isobaric analogue resonances in nucleon-nucleus scattering are accurate and detailed indicators of the positions of resonances and bound states with good single-particle characters. We report on implementation within our coupled-channels code FRESCO of the charge-exchange interaction term that transforms an incident proton into a neutron. Isobaric analog resonances are seen as peaks in gamma-ray spectrum when the proton is transformed into a neutron at an energy near a neutron bound state. The Lane coupled-channels formalism was extended to follow the nonorthogonality of this neutron channel with that configuration of an inelastic outgoing proton, and the target being left in a particle-hole excited state. This is tested for 208Pb, for which good (p,p g)

  10. Protective effect of in ovo treatment with the chicken cathelicidin analog D-CATH-2 against avian pathogenic E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; van Dijk, Albert; Matthijs, Mieke G. R.; Veldhuizen, Edwin J. A.; Haagsman, Henk P.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance and ever stricter control on antibiotic use are a driving force to develop alternatives to antibiotics. One such strategy is the use of multifunctional Host Defense Peptides. Here we examined the protective effect of prophylactic treatment with the D analog of chicken cathelicidin-2 (D-CATH-2) against a respiratory E. coli infection. Chickens were treated with D-CATH-2 in ovo at day 18 of embryonic development or intramuscularly at days 1 and 4 after hatch. At 7 days of age, birds were challenged intratracheally with avian pathogenic E. coli. Protection was evaluated by recording mortality, morbidity (Mean Lesion Score) and bacterial swabs of air sacs at 7 days post-infection. In ovo D-CATH-2 treatment significantly reduced morbidity (63%) and respiratory bacterial load (>90%), while intramuscular treatment was less effective. D-CATH-2 increased the percentage of peripheral blood lymphocytes and heterophils by both administration routes. E. coli specific IgM levels were lower in in ovo treated animals compared to intramuscular D-CATH-2 treatment. In short, in ovo treatment with the Host Defense Peptide derived D-CATH-2 can partially protect chickens from E. coli infection, making this peptide an interesting starting point to develop alternatives to antibiotics for use in the poultry sector. PMID:27229866

  11. Protective effect of in ovo treatment with the chicken cathelicidin analog D-CATH-2 against avian pathogenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; van Dijk, Albert; Matthijs, Mieke G R; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Haagsman, Henk P

    2016-01-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance and ever stricter control on antibiotic use are a driving force to develop alternatives to antibiotics. One such strategy is the use of multifunctional Host Defense Peptides. Here we examined the protective effect of prophylactic treatment with the D analog of chicken cathelicidin-2 (D-CATH-2) against a respiratory E. coli infection. Chickens were treated with D-CATH-2 in ovo at day 18 of embryonic development or intramuscularly at days 1 and 4 after hatch. At 7 days of age, birds were challenged intratracheally with avian pathogenic E. coli. Protection was evaluated by recording mortality, morbidity (Mean Lesion Score) and bacterial swabs of air sacs at 7 days post-infection. In ovo D-CATH-2 treatment significantly reduced morbidity (63%) and respiratory bacterial load (>90%), while intramuscular treatment was less effective. D-CATH-2 increased the percentage of peripheral blood lymphocytes and heterophils by both administration routes. E. coli specific IgM levels were lower in in ovo treated animals compared to intramuscular D-CATH-2 treatment. In short, in ovo treatment with the Host Defense Peptide derived D-CATH-2 can partially protect chickens from E. coli infection, making this peptide an interesting starting point to develop alternatives to antibiotics for use in the poultry sector. PMID:27229866

  12. Characterization of the olfactory impact around a wastewater treatment plant: optimization and validation of a hydrogen sulfide determination procedure based on passive diffusion sampling.

    PubMed

    Colomer, Fernando Llavador; Espinós-Morató, Héctor; Iglesias, Enrique Mantilla; Pérez, Tatiana Gómez; Campos-Candel, Andreu; Lozano, Caterina Coll

    2012-08-01

    A monitoring program based on an indirect method was conducted to assess the approximation of the olfactory impact in several wastewater treatment plants (in the present work, only one is shown). The method uses H2S passive sampling using Palmes-type diffusion tubes impregnated with silver nitrate and fluorometric analysis employing fluorescein mercuric acetate. The analytical procedure was validated in the exposure chamber. Exposure periods ofat least 4 days are recommended. The quantification limit of the procedure is 0.61 ppb for a 5-day sampling, which allows the H2S immission (ground concentration) level to be measured within its low odor threshold, from 0.5 to 300 ppb. Experimental results suggest an exposure time greater than 4 days, while recovery efficiency of the procedure, 93.0+/-1.8%, seems not to depend on the amount of H2S collected by the samplers within their application range. The repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation, is lower than 7%, which is within the limits normally accepted for this type of sampler. Statistical comparison showed that this procedure and the reference method provide analogous accuracy. The proposed procedure was applied in two experimental campaigns, one intensive and the other extensive, and concentrations within the H2S low odor threshold were quantified at each sampling point. From these results, it can be concluded that the procedure shows good potential for monitoring the olfactory impact around facilities where H2S emissions are dominant. PMID:22916433

  13. Pharmacology of topical prostaglandin F2 α analogs and their place in the treatment of glaucoma in small animals.

    PubMed

    Maślanka, T

    2015-04-01

    A distinguishing feature of the most common types of glaucoma is an increased intra-ocular pressure (IOP), which has a damaging effect on optic nerve axons, leading to the progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells. Therefore, IOP-lowering medications are the mainstay of glaucoma therapy. Topical prostaglandin F2 α analogs (PGAs) are a relatively new class of ocular hypotensive drugs, which have made a huge impact on the treatment of glaucoma in dogs. This study summarizes the current state of knowledge on the mechanism of action of these agents and their effect on IOP in dogs and cats. It also discusses potential harmful side effects of PGAs and presents contemporary opinions about their role and place in the medical management of glaucoma in small animals.

  14. Proteomics Suggests a Role for APC-Survivin in Response to Somatostatin Analog Treatment of Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kjellin, Hanna; Hashemi, Jamileh; Barriuso, Jorge; Juhlin, C. Christofer; Lu, Ming; Höög, Anders; Pastrián, Laura G.; Lamarca, Angela; Soto, Victoria Heredia; Zedenius, Jan; Mendiola, Marta; Lehtiö, Janne; Kjellman, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Context: Somatostatin analogs are established in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) including small intestinal NET; however, the molecular mechanisms are not well known. Here, we examined the direct effects of lanreotide in NET cell line models. Setting and Design: The cell lines HC45 and H727 were treated with 10nM lanreotide for different time periods and alterations of the proteome were analyzed by in-depth high-resolution isoelectric focusing tandem liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We next investigated whether the observed suppression of survivin was mediated by adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and possible effects on tumor proliferation in vitro. Expression of survivin was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 112 NET cases and compared with patient outcome. Results: We quantified 6451 and 7801 proteins in HC45 and H727, respectively. After short time lanreotide treatment APC was increased and survivin reduced. Overexpression of APC in H727 cells decreased, and APC knock-down elevated the survivin level. The lanreotide regulation of APC-survivin could be suppressed by small interfering RNA against somatostatin receptor 2. Although lanreotide only gave slight inhibition of proliferation, targeting of survivin with the small molecule YM155 dramatically reduced proliferation. Moderate or high as compared with low or absent total survivin expression was associated with shorter progression-free survival, independent of tumor stage, grade, and localization. Conclusions: We report a proteome-wide analysis of changes in response to lanreotide in NET cell lines. This analysis suggests a connection between somatostatin analog, APC, and survivin levels. Survivin is a possible prognostic factor and a new potential therapeutic target in NETs. PMID:27459532

  15. Passive treatment of acid mine drainage in down-flow limestone systems

    SciTech Connect

    Watzlaf, G.R.

    1997-12-31

    Passive down-flow systems, consisting of compost and/or limestone layers, may be well suited for treatment of acidic mine drainage containing ferric iron and/or aluminum. Two columns were constructed and operated in the laboratory. The first column simulated a downward, vertical-flow anaerobic wetland, also referred to as successive alkalinity-producing systems (SAPS), and has received mine drainage for 97 weeks. The 0.16-m diameter column was vertically oriented and (from bottom to top) consisted of a 0.30-m thick layer of limestone, a 0.76-m thick layer of spent mushroom compost, and 0.91 m of free standing water. Water flowed vertically downward through the system. A second column, filled with only limestone, received water from the same source as the first column. This limestone column contained a 1.06-m thick layer of limestone and 0.91 m of free standing water and has received water for 55 weeks. Actual acid mine drainage (pH = 3.1, acidity = 200 mg/L (as CaCO{sub 3}), SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} = 600 mg/L, Total Fe = 10 mg/L, Mn = 14 mg/L, and Al = 18 mg/L) was collected every two weeks from a nearby abandoned deep mine and applied to these columns at a rate of 3.8 mL/min. For the compost/limestone column, effluent pH remained above 6.2 (6.2-7.9); however, pH at a depth of 0.38 m in the compost (halfway) dropped to < 4 after 28 weeks (net acidic). At the bottom of the compost pH remained > 4.5 for all 97 weeks. Alkalinity was generated by a combination of limestone dissolution and sulfate reduction. Over the 97 week period, the column generated an average of 330 mg/L of alkalinity, mostly due to limestone dissolution. Bacterial sulfate reduction displayed an ever decreasing trend, initially accounting for more than 200 mg/L of alkalinity and after 40 weeks only accounting for about 50 mg/L.

  16. Passive treatment of acid mine drainage in systems containing compost and limestone: Laboratory and field results

    SciTech Connect

    Watzlaf, G.R.; Pappas, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    Passive, down-flow systems, consisting of compost and limestone layers, termed successive alkalinity producing systems (SAPS), may be well suited for treatment of mine drainage containing ferric iron and/or aluminum. A column, simulating a SAPS, has been operated in the laboratory for 52 weeks. The 0.16-m diameter column consisted of a 0.30-m thick layer of limestone, a 0.76-m thick layer of spent mushroom compost thick layer of limestone, a 0.76-m thick layer of spent mushroom compost and 0.91 m of free standing water. Actual AMD (pH = 3.02, acidity = 218 mg/L (as CaCO{sub 3}), SO{sub 4} = 600 mg/L, Fe = 16.0 mg/L, Mn = 12.1 mg/L, and Al = 17.1 mg/L) was applied to the column at a rate of 3.8 mL/min. Effluent pH has remained above 6.2 (6.2-7.9) in the column system. A SAPS located in Jefferson County, PA has been monitored for the past 4.5 years. The SAPS has an approximate area of 1000 m{sup 2} and contains a 0.4-m thick layer of limestone, a 0.2-m thick layer of spent mushroom compost, and 1.5 m of free standing water. Mine water (acidity = 335 mg/L (as CaCO{sub 3}), SO{sub 4} = 1270 mg/L, Fe = 246 mg/L, Mn = 38.4 mg/L, and Al = <0.2 mg/L) flowed into the SAPS at a rate of 140 L/min. Water samples from the field and laboratory systems have been collected at strategic locations on a regular basis and analyzed for pH, alkalinity, acidity, Fe{sup 2+}, total Fe, Mn, Al, SO{sub 4}, Ca, Mg, Na, Co, Ni, and Zn. Alkalinity has been generated in both field and laboratory systems by a combination of limestone dissolution and sulfate reduction. The column generated an average of 378 mg/L of alkalinity; 74% due to limestone dissolution and 26% due to bacterial reduction of sulfate. The field SAPS generated an average of 231 mg/L of alkalinity and exhibited seasonal trends.

  17. Electrical and Optical Characterization of MoS2 with Sulfur Vacancy Passivation by Treatment with Alkanethiol Molecules.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyungjune; Min, Misook; Kim, Tae-Young; Jeong, Hyunhak; Pak, Jinsu; Kim, Jae-Keun; Jang, Jingon; Yun, Seok Joon; Lee, Young Hee; Hong, Woong-Ki; Lee, Takhee

    2015-08-25

    We investigated the physical properties of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) atomic crystals with a sulfur vacancy passivation after treatment with alkanethiol molecules including their electrical, Raman, and photoluminescence (PL) characteristics. MoS2, one of the transition metal dichalcogenide materials, is a promising two-dimensional semiconductor material with good physical properties. It is known that sulfur vacancies exist in MoS2, resulting in the n-type behavior of MoS2. The sulfur vacancies on the MoS2 surface tend to form covalent bonds with sulfur-containing groups. In this study, we deposited alkanethiol molecules on MoS2 field effect transistors (FETs) and then characterized the electrical properties of the devices before and after the alkanethiol treatment. We observed that the electrical characteristics of MoS2 FETs dramatically changed after the alkanethiol treatment. We also observed that the Raman and PL spectra of MoS2 films changed after the alkanethiol treatment. These effects are attributed to the thiol (-SH) end groups in alkanethiols bonding at sulfur vacancy sites, thus altering the physical properties of the MoS2. This study will help us better understand the electrical and optical properties of MoS2 and suggest a way of tailoring the properties of MoS2 by passivating a sulfur vacancy with thiol molecules.

  18. Chronic treatment with the somatostatin analog octreotide improves cardiac abnormalities in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Merola, B; Cittadini, A; Colao, A; Ferone, D; Fazio, S; Sabatini, D; Biondi, B; Saccá, L; Lombardi, G

    1993-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a 6-month octreotide treatment on cardiac mass and function by means of Doppler echocardiography in 11 normotensive patients affected with active acromegaly. The GH and insulin-like growth factor-I levels were normalized during octreotide therapy from 34 +/- 6.5 and 767.4 +/- 72.4 micrograms/L to 4.6 +/- 0.9 and 235 +/- 10.3 micrograms/L, respectively (P < 0.001; mean +/- SEM). After the 6-month treatment, we observed a significant decrease in the left ventricular mass index from 138 +/- 11 to 116 +/- 13 g/m2 (P < 0.001) and in the mean wall thickness/internal end-diastolic radius ratio from 0.47 +/- 0.1 to 0.44 +/- 0.1 (P < 0.001). No significant differences were found in systolic function indices, whereas diastolic filling indices improved over the course of the therapy; the isovolumic relaxation time decreased from 115 +/- 6 to 100 +/- 6 ms (P < 0.05), tricuspid late diastolic filling velocities decreased from 41 +/- 3 to 36 +/- 2 cm/s (P < 0.03), and tricuspid deceleration time decreased from 280 +/- 28 to 198 +/- 15 ms (P < 0.005); the ratio of early to late peak velocity of the right ventricular filling significantly increased from 1 +/- 0.01 to 1.3 +/- 0.1 (P < 0.03). A significant correlation was detected between left ventricular mass regression and increase in the early to late peak velocity ratio of the left ventricular filling (r = 0.62; P < 0.05). The results of this study show an improvement in cardiac structural and functional abnormalities during chronic treatment with octreotide, thus supporting the hypothesis of a specific heart disease secondary to high circulating GH levels.

  19. [Rectal temperature in active and passive rats during desynchronosis and under melatonin treatment ].

    PubMed

    Pertsov, S S

    2005-03-01

    Effects of phase shifts in circadian rhythms and of melatonin administration on rectal temperature in rats with different activity were studied in the open-field test on 176 Wistar rats kept under conditions of natural or shifted light-darkness period. Under normal light-darkness conditions, the amplitude of diurnal variation in rectal temperature was higher in active rats as compared with passive ones. A shift in the light-darkness conditions inverted the circadian rhythm of rectal temperature and augmented the difference between daytime and night time temperatures in passive and, particularly, in active rats. Melatonin effect depended on dose and time of administration. 1 mg/kg Melatonin enhanced the amplitude of diurnal rhythms of energy metabolism in behaviourally active rats. These changes seem to contribute to adaptive reconstruction in the organism during desynchronosis. PMID:15881881

  20. Real-time computer treatment of THz passive device images with the high image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate real-time computer code improving significantly the quality of images captured by the passive THz imaging system. The code is not only designed for a THz passive device: it can be applied to any kind of such devices and active THz imaging systems as well. We applied our code for computer processing of images captured by four passive THz imaging devices manufactured by different companies. It should be stressed that computer processing of images produced by different companies requires using the different spatial filters usually. The performance of current version of the computer code is greater than one image per second for a THz image having more than 5000 pixels and 24 bit number representation. Processing of THz single image produces about 20 images simultaneously corresponding to various spatial filters. The computer code allows increasing the number of pixels for processed images without noticeable reduction of image quality. The performance of the computer code can be increased many times using parallel algorithms for processing the image. We develop original spatial filters which allow one to see objects with sizes less than 2 cm. The imagery is produced by passive THz imaging devices which captured the images of objects hidden under opaque clothes. For images with high noise we develop an approach which results in suppression of the noise after using the computer processing and we obtain the good quality image. With the aim of illustrating the efficiency of the developed approach we demonstrate the detection of the liquid explosive, ordinary explosive, knife, pistol, metal plate, CD, ceramics, chocolate and other objects hidden under opaque clothes. The results demonstrate the high efficiency of our approach for the detection of hidden objects and they are a very promising solution for the security problem.

  1. Synergistic Nanomedicine: Passive, Active, and Ultrasound-Triggered Drug Delivery in Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Elkhodiry, Mohamed A; Momah, Christian C; Suwaidi, Shaima R; Gadalla, Dina; Martins, Ana M; Vitor, Rute F; Husseini, Ghaleb A

    2016-01-01

    Nanocarriers are heavily researched as drug delivery vehicles capable of sequestering antineoplastic agents and then releasing their contents at the desired location. The feasibility of using such carriers stems from their ability to produce a multimodel delivery system whereby passive, ligand and triggered targeting can be applied in the fight against cancer. Passive targeting capitalizes on the leaky nature of tumor tissue which allows for the extravasation of particles with a size smaller than 0.5 µm into the tumors. Ligand targeting utilizes the concept of receptor-mediated endocytosis and involves the conjugation of ligands onto the surface of nanoparticles, while triggered targeting involves the use of external and internal stimuli to release the carriers contents upon reaching the diseased location. In this review, micelles and liposomes have been considered due to the promising results they have shown in vivo and in vitro and their potential for advancements into clinical trials. Thus, this review focuses on the most recent advancements in the field of micellar and liposomal drug delivery and considers the synergistic effect of passive- and ligand-targeting strategies, and the use of ultrasound in triggering drug release at the tumor site. PMID:27398430

  2. An XPS study of bromine in methanol etching and hydrogen peroxide passivation treatments for cadmium zinc telluride radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babar, S.; Sellin, P. J.; Watts, J. F.; Baker, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    The performance of single crystal CdZnTe radiation detectors is dependent on both the bulk and the surface properties of the material. After single crystal fabrication and mechanical polishing, modification of the surface to remove damage and reduce the surface leakage current is generally achieved through chemical etching followed by a passivation treatment. In this work, CdZnTe single crystals have been chemically etched using a bromine in methanol (BM) treatment. The BM concentrations employed were 0.2 and 2.0 (v/v) % and exposure times varied between 5 and 120 s. Angle resolved XPS and sputter depth profiling has been employed to characterize the surfaces for the different exposure conditions. A Te rich surface layer was formed for all exposures and the layer thickness was found to be independent of exposure time. The enriched Te layer thickness was accurately determined by calibrating the sputter rate against a CdTe layer of known thickness. For BM concentrations of 0.2 (v/v) % and 2 (v/v) %, the Te layer thickness was determined to be 1.3 ± 0.2 and 1.8 ± 0.2 nm, respectively. The BM etched surfaces have subsequently been passivated in a 30 wt.% H2O2 solution employing exposure time of 15 s. The oxide layer thickness has been calculated using two standard XPS methodologies, based on the Beer-Lambert expression. The TeO2 thickness calculated from ARXPS data are slightly higher than the thickness obtained by the simplified Beer-Lambert expression. For BM exposures of 30-120 s followed by a passivation treatment of 30 wt. % H2O2 solution employing an exposure time 15 s, the ARXPS method gave an average TeO2 thickness value of 1.20 nm and the simplified Beer-Lambert expression gave an average thickness value of 0.99 nm.

  3. Rapidly Progressive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in an Infant with Noonan syndrome with multiple Lentigines. Palliative Treatment with a Rapamycin Analog

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Andreas; Lauriol, Jessica; Thul, Josef; Behnke-Hall, Kachina; Logeswaran, Tushiha; Schänzer, Anne; Böğürcü, Nuray; Garvalov, Boyan K.; Zenker, Martin; Gelb, Bruce D.; von Gerlach, Susanne; Kandolf, Reinhard; Kontaridis, Maria I.; Schranz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML) frequently manifests with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Recently, it was demonstrated that mTOR inhibition reverses HCM in NSML mice. We report for the first time on the effects of treatment with a rapamycin analog in an infant with LS and a malignant form of HCM. In the boy, progressive HCM was diagnosed during the first week of life and diagnosis of NSML was established at age 20 weeks by showing a heterozygous Q510E mutation in the PTPN11 gene. Immunoblotting with antibodies against pERK, pAkt, and pS6RP in fibroblasts demonstrated reduced RAS/MAPK and enhanced Akt/mTOR pathway activities. Because of the patient’s critical condition, everolimus therapy was started at age 24 weeks and continued until heart transplantation at age 36 weeks. Prior to surgery, heart failure improved from NYHA stage IV to II and brain natriuretic peptide values decreased from 9600 to <1000 pg/ml, but no reversal of cardiac hypertrophy was observed. Examination of the explanted heart revealed severe hypertrophy and myofiber disarray with extensive perivascular fibrosis. These findings provide evidence that Akt/mTOR activity is enhanced in NSML with HCM and suggest that rapamycin treatment could be principally feasible for infantile NSML. But the preliminary experiences made in this single patient indicate that therapy should start early to prevent irreversible cardiac remodelling. PMID:25708222

  4. Water-Mediated Photochemical Treatments for Low-Temperature Passivation of Metal-Oxide Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jae Sang; Jo, Jeong-Wan; Kang, Jingu; Jeong, Chan-Yong; Jeong, Hu Young; Kim, Sung Kyu; Kim, Kwanpyo; Kwon, Hyuck-In; Kim, Jaekyun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Myung-Gil; Park, Sung Kyu

    2016-04-27

    The low-temperature electrical passivation of an amorphous oxide semiconductor (AOS) thin-film transistor (TFT) is achieved by a deep ultraviolet (DUV) light irradiation-water treatment-DUV irradiation (DWD) method. The water treatment of the first DUV-annealed amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin film is likely to induce the preferred adsorption of water molecules at the oxygen vacancies and leads to subsequent hydroxide formation in the bulk a-IGZO films. Although the water treatment initially degraded the electrical performance of the a-IGZO TFTs, the second DUV irradiation on the water-treated devices may enable a more complete metal-oxygen-metal lattice formation while maintaining low oxygen vacancies in the oxide films. Overall, the stable and dense metal-oxygen-metal (M-O-M) network formation could be easily achieved at low temperatures (below 150 °C). The successful passivation of structural imperfections in the a-IGZO TFTs, such as hydroxyl group (OH-) and oxygen vacancies, mainly results in the enhanced electrical performances of the DWD-processed a-IGZO TFTs (on/off current ratio of 8.65 × 10(9), subthreshold slope of 0.16 V/decade, an average mobility of >6.94 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), and a bias stability of ΔVTH < 2.5 V), which show more than a 30% improvement over the simple DUV-treated a-IGZO TFTs.

  5. Water-Mediated Photochemical Treatments for Low-Temperature Passivation of Metal-Oxide Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jae Sang; Jo, Jeong-Wan; Kang, Jingu; Jeong, Chan-Yong; Jeong, Hu Young; Kim, Sung Kyu; Kim, Kwanpyo; Kwon, Hyuck-In; Kim, Jaekyun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Myung-Gil; Park, Sung Kyu

    2016-04-27

    The low-temperature electrical passivation of an amorphous oxide semiconductor (AOS) thin-film transistor (TFT) is achieved by a deep ultraviolet (DUV) light irradiation-water treatment-DUV irradiation (DWD) method. The water treatment of the first DUV-annealed amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin film is likely to induce the preferred adsorption of water molecules at the oxygen vacancies and leads to subsequent hydroxide formation in the bulk a-IGZO films. Although the water treatment initially degraded the electrical performance of the a-IGZO TFTs, the second DUV irradiation on the water-treated devices may enable a more complete metal-oxygen-metal lattice formation while maintaining low oxygen vacancies in the oxide films. Overall, the stable and dense metal-oxygen-metal (M-O-M) network formation could be easily achieved at low temperatures (below 150 °C). The successful passivation of structural imperfections in the a-IGZO TFTs, such as hydroxyl group (OH-) and oxygen vacancies, mainly results in the enhanced electrical performances of the DWD-processed a-IGZO TFTs (on/off current ratio of 8.65 × 10(9), subthreshold slope of 0.16 V/decade, an average mobility of >6.94 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), and a bias stability of ΔVTH < 2.5 V), which show more than a 30% improvement over the simple DUV-treated a-IGZO TFTs. PMID:27035796

  6. Brain insulin resistance in Alzheimer's disease and its potential treatment with GLP-1 analogs.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of Alzheimer's disease is increasing rapidly in the absence of truly effective therapies. A promising strategy for developing such therapies is the treatment of brain insulin resistance, a common and early feature of Alzheimer's disease, closely tied to cognitive decline and capable of promoting many biological abnormalities in the disorder. The proximal cause of brain insulin resistance appears to be neuronal elevation in the serine phosphorylation of IRS-1, most likely due to amyloid-β-triggered microglial release of proinflammatory cytokines. Preclinically, the first line of defense is behavior-lowering peripheral insulin resistance (e.g., physical exercise and a Mediterranean diet supplemented with foods rich in flavonoids, curcumin and ω-3 fatty acids). More potent remediation is required, however, at clinical stages. Fortunately, the US FDA-approved antidiabetics exenatide (Byetta; Amylin Pharmaceuticals, Inc., CA, USA) and liraglutide (Victoza; Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsvaerd, Denmark) are showing much promise in reducing Alzheimer's disease pathology and in restoring normal brain insulin responsiveness and cognitive function. PMID:24640977

  7. Seasonal and long-term performance of alkalinity-producing passive systems for the treatment of mine drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Watzlaf, G.R.

    1998-12-31

    Eight passive treatment systems, located in Pennsylvania and Maryland, have been intensively monitored for up to seven years. Influent and effluent water quality data from ten anoxic limestone drains (ALDs) and five reducing and alkalinity producing systems (RAPS) have been analyzed to determine seasonal and long-term performance for each of these specific unit operations. The water quality data were also analyzed to determine the performance of each of the eight complete passive treatment systems. The generation of alkalinity in ALDs has not exhibited significant seasonal variations. ALDs that received mine water containing less than 1 mg/L of both ferric iron and aluminum have continued to produce consistent concentrations of alkalinity since their construction. However, an ALD that received 20 mg/L of aluminum experienced a rapid reduction in permeability and failed within five months. The generation of alkalinity in the RAPS has displayed seasonal variations, with significantly more sulfate reduction occurring in the warmer months. Most of these RAPS have been recently constructed, however, one system has been monitored for over six years. A gradual decline in the generation of alkalinity has been observed in this system which can be attributed to a decrease in sulfate reduction rates.

  8. Analogs of the sea anemone potassium channel blocker ShK for the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Beeton, Christine; Pennington, Michael W; Norton, Raymond S

    2011-10-01

    CCR7- effector memory T (TEM) lymphocytes are involved in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis. These cells express Kv1.3 potassium channels that play a major role in their activation. Blocking these channels preferentially inhibits the activation of CCR7- TEM cells, with little or no effects on CCR7+ naïve and central memory T cells. Blockers of lymphocyte Kv1.3 channels therefore show considerable potential as therapeutics for autoimmune diseases. ShK, a 35-residue polypeptide isolated from the Caribbean sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus, blocks Kv1.3 channels at picomolar concentrations. Although ShK was effective in treating rats with delayed type hypersensitivity and a model of multiple sclerosis, it lacks selectivity for Kv1.3 channels over closely-related Kv1 channels. Extensive mutagenesis studies combined with elucidation of the structure of ShK led to models of ShK docked with the channel. This knowledge was valuable in the development of new ShK analogs with improved selectivity and increasing stability, which have proven efficacious in preventing and/or treating animal models of delayed type hypersensitivity, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis without inducing generalized immunosuppression. They are currently undergoing further evaluation as potential immunomodulators for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:21824083

  9. Effective ligand passivation of Cu₂O nanoparticles through solid-state treatment with mercaptopropionic acid.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Hamed; Kuhri, Susanne; Osvet, Andres; Matt, Gebhard; Khanzada, Laraib S; Lemmer, Mario; Luechinger, Norman A; Larsson, Mats I; Zeira, Eitan; Guldi, Dirk M; Brabec, Christoph J

    2014-05-21

    In colloidal nanoparticle (NPs) devices, trap state densities at their surface exert a profound impact on the rate of charge carrier recombination and, consequently, on the deterioration of the device performance. Here, we report on the successful application of a ligand exchange strategy to effectively passivate the surface of cuprite (Cu2O) NPs. Cu2O NPs were prepared by means of a novel synthetic route based on flame spray pyrolysis. FTIR, XRD, XPS, and HRTEM measurements corroborate the formation of cubic cuprite Cu2O nanocrystals, excluding the possible presence of undesired CuO or Cu phases. Most importantly, steady-state emission and transient absorption assays document that surface passivation results in substantial changes in the intensity of emissive excitonic states--centered at copper and oxygen vacancies--and in the lifetime of excitons near the band edge. To shed light onto ultrafast processes in Cu2O nanocrystals additional pump probe experiments on the femtosecond and nanosecond time scales were carried out. Two discernible species were observed: on one hand, an ultrafast component (~ps) that relates to the excitons; on the other hand, a long-lived component (~μs) that originates from the defects/trap states. PMID:24798869

  10. Effects of combined chelation treatment with pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone analogs and deferoxamine in hypertransfused rats and in iron-loaded rat heart cells.

    PubMed

    Link, Gabriela; Ponka, Prem; Konijn, Abraham M; Breuer, William; Cabantchik, Z Ioav; Hershko, Chaim

    2003-05-15

    Although iron chelation therapy with deferoxamine (DFO) results in improved life expectancy of patients with thalassemia, compliance with parenteral DFO treatment is unsatisfactory, underlining the need for alternative drugs and innovative ways of drug administration. We examined the chelating potential of pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone (PIH) analogs, alone or in combination with DFO, using hypertransfused rats with labeled hepatocellular iron stores and cultured iron-loaded rat heart cells. Our in vivo studies using 2 representative PIH analogs, 108-o and 109-o, have shown that PIH analogs given orally are 2.6 to 2.8 times more effective in mobilizing hepatocellular iron in rats, on a weight-per-weight basis, than parenteral DFO administered intraperitoneally. The combined effect of DFO and 108-o on hepatocellular iron excretion was additive, and response at a dose range of 25 to 200 mg/kg was linear. In vitro studies in heart cells showed that DFO was more effective in heart cell iron mobilization than all PIH analogs studied. Response to joint chelation with DFO and PIH analogs was similar to an increase in the equivalent molar dose of DFO alone, rather than the sum of the separate effects of the PIH analog and DFO. This finding was most likely the result of iron transfer from PIH analogs to DFO, a conclusion supported directly by iron-shuttle experiments using fluorescent DFO. These findings provide a rationale for the combined, simultaneous use of iron-chelating drugs and may have useful, practical implications for designing novel strategies of iron chelation therapy.

  11. Treatment with insulin analogs, especially Glargine and Lispro, associates with better renal function and higher hemoglobin levels in Type 1 diabetic patients with impaired kidney function

    PubMed Central

    Hasslacher, Christoph; Kulozik, Felix; Lorenzo Bermejo, Justo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The influence of type of insulin treatment - insulin analogs versus human insulin - on the development of diabetes related vascular complications has been sparsely investigated. We examine here possible differences regarding kidney function and hemoglobin levels. Methods: Multiple linear regression was used to investigate the relationship between the following characteristics measured in 509 type 1 diabetic patients who were recruited in an outpatient practice: current clinical status and treatment modalities, type of injected insulin and the routine laboratory parameters hemoglobin, HbA1c, serum creatinine, eGFR, hs CRP and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio. Results: Compared with human insulin, multiple regression analysis taking into account possible confounders revealed that treatment with insulin analogs was associated with increased eGFR (+7.1 ml/min; P=0.0002), lower urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ratio logarithm -0.4; P=0.003) and higher hemoglobin concentration (+0.31 g/dl; P=0.04). Stratification by type of insulin showed the best renal status for treatment with insulins Glargine and Lispro. Differences were consistent both for patients with normal (eGFR → 90 ml/min) and with an impaired (eGFR ← 90 ml/min) kidney function. Conclusions: Present results suggest that treatment of type 1 diabetic patients with normal and impaired renal function with insulin analogs, especially Glargine and Lispro, is associated with better kidney function, lower urinary albumin/creatinine ratio and lower hemoglobin concentration compared to therapy with human insulin. If confirmed by other studies, treatment with insulin analogs may be a further possibility in delaying progression of nephropathy and in preventing early hemoglobin decline. PMID:27540462

  12. Combination of Successive Alkalinity Producing System (SAPS) and Aeration for Passive Treatment of Highly Acidic Mine Drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, C.; Ji, S.

    2015-12-01

    Passive treatment system has been widely used for remediation of mine drainage since its advantage of low installation and maintenance cost. The system, however, has also a disadvantage in assuring remediation and management efficiency if the drainage is highly acidic mine drainage. To remediate acid mine drainage (AMD) especially showing high acidity, passive treatment system which consists of successive alkalinity producing system (SAPS) and subsequent aeration pond was proposed and its mechanisms and efficiency was evaluated in this research. Target AMD was obtained from Waryong coal mine and showed typical characteristics of AMD having high metal concentration and low pH (acidity > 300 mg/L as CaCO3). Four experimental cases were conducted; untreated, treated with SAPS, treated with aeration, treated with SAPS and aeration to compare role and mechanism of each unit. Between organic matter and limestone layer which constitute SAPS, the former eliminated most of Fe(III) and Al in the AMD so that the latter was kept from being clogged by precipitates. Net acidity of the AMD rapidly decreased by supplement of alkalinity at the limestone layer. A primary function of SAPS, producing alkalinity constantly without clogging, was attained due to addition a portion of limestone particle into the organic matter layer. The discharge from SAPS had low ORP and DO values because of an anaerobic environment formed at the organic matter layer although its alkalinity was increased. This water quality was unfavorable for Fe(II) to be oxidized. Installation of aeration pond after SAPS, therefore, could be effective way of enhancing oxidation rate of Fe(II). Among the experimental cases, the combination of SAPS and aeration pond was only able to remediate the AMD. This concluded that to remediate highly acidic mine drainage with passive treatment system, three critical conditions were required; pre-precipitation of Fe(III) and Al at organic matter layer in SAPS, constant alkalinity

  13. Analog earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, R.B.

    1995-09-01

    Analogs are used to understand complex or poorly understood phenomena for which little data may be available at the actual repository site. Earthquakes are complex phenomena, and they can have a large number of effects on the natural system, as well as on engineered structures. Instrumental data close to the source of large earthquakes are rarely obtained. The rare events for which measurements are available may be used, with modfications, as analogs for potential large earthquakes at sites where no earthquake data are available. In the following, several examples of nuclear reactor and liquified natural gas facility siting are discussed. A potential use of analog earthquakes is proposed for a high-level nuclear waste (HLW) repository.

  14. A Phase II Multicenter Trial With Rivaroxaban in the Treatment of Livedoid Vasculopathy Assessing Pain on a Visual Analog Scale

    PubMed Central

    Drabik, Attyla; Hillgruber, Carina

    2014-01-01

    Background Livedoid vasculopathy is an orphan skin disease characterized by recurrent thrombosis of the cutaneous microcirculation. It manifests itself almost exclusively in the ankles, the back of the feet, and the distal part of the lower legs. Because of the vascular occlusion, patients suffer from intense local ischemic pain. Incidence of livedoid vasculopathy is estimated to be around 1:100,000. There are currently no approved treatments for livedoid vasculopathy, making off-label therapy the only option. In Europe, thromboprophylactic treatment with low-molecular-weight heparins has become widely accepted. Objective The aim of this trial is the statistical verification of the therapeutic effects of the anticoagulant rivaroxaban in patients suffering from livedoid vasculopathy. Methods We performed a therapeutic phase IIa trial designed as a prospective, one-armed, multicenter, interventional series of cases with a calculated sample size of 20 patients. The primary outcome is the assessment of local pain on the visual analog scale (VAS) as an intraindividual difference of 2 values between baseline and 12 weeks. Results Enrollment started in December 2012 and was still open at the date of submission. The study is expected to finish in November 2014. Conclusions Livedoid vasculopathy is associated with increased thrombophilia in the cutaneous microcirculation and the continuous use of anticoagulants helps improve the symptoms. The causes of cutaneous infarctions are heterogenous, but ultimately follow the known mechanisms of the coagulation cascade. Rivaroxaban affects the coagulation cascade and inhibits the factor Xa–dependent conversion of prothrombin to thrombin, thereby considerably reducing the risk of thrombosis. Trial Registration Trial Registration EudraCT Number: 2012-000108-13-DE; https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/ctr-search/search?query=eudract_number:2012-000108-13 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6UCktWVCA); German Clinical

  15. The Effects of Acid Passivation, Tricresyl Phosphate Presoak, and UV/Ozone Treatment on the Tribology of Perfluoropolyether-Lubricated 440C Stainless Steel Couples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shogrin, Bradley A.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Herrera-Fierro, Pilar; Jansen, Mark J.

    2001-01-01

    The boundary-lubrication performance of two perfluoropolyether (PFPE) thin films in the presence of passivated 440C stainless steel is presented. The study used a standard ball on disk (BoD) tribometer in dry nitrogen and a vacuum spiral orbit tribometer (SOT). Stainless steel surfaces were passivated with one of four techniques: high and low temperature chromic acid bath, a tricresyl phosphate (TCP) soak, or UV/Ozone treated for 15 min. After passivation, each BoD disk had a 400A film of Krytox 16256 (PFPE) applied to it. The lifetimes of these films were quantified by measuring the number of sliding cycles before an increase in friction occurred. The lubricated lifetime of the 440C couple was not altered as a result of the various passivation techniques. The resulting surface chemistry of each passivation technique was examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The SOT was used to examine the effects of the TCP treatment on the lubricated lifetime of another PFPE, Brayco 815Z, under rolling conditions. None of the passivation techniques were found to dramatically increase the oxide film thickness or lubricated lifetimes.

  16. Iron-mineral accretion from acid mine drainage and its application in passive treatment

    PubMed Central

    Florence, K.; Sapsford, D.J.; Johnson, D.B.; Kay, C.M.; Wolkersdorfer, C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study demonstrates substantial removal of iron (Fe) from acid mine drainage (pH ≈3) in a passive vertical flow reactor (VFR) with an equivalent footprint of 154 m2 per L/s mine water and residence times of >23 h. Average Fe removal rate was 67% with a high of 85% over the 10-month trial. The fraction of Fe passing a 0.22 µm filter (referred to here as Fe-filt) was seen to be removed in the VFR even when Fe(II) was absent, indicating that the contribution of microbial Fe(II) oxidation and precipitation was not the dominant removal mechanism in the VFR. Removal rates of Fe-filt in the VFR were up to 70% in residence times as low as 8 h compared with laboratory experiments where much smaller changes in Fe-filt were observed over 60 h. Centrifugation indicated that 80–90% of the influent Fe had particle sizes <35 nm. Together with analyses and geochemical modelling, this suggests that the Fe-filt fraction exists as either truly aqueous (but oversaturated) Fe(III) or nanoparticulate Fe(III) and that this metastability persists. When the water was contacted with VFR sludge, the Fe-filt fraction was destabilized, leading to an appreciably higher removal of this fraction. Heterogeneous precipitation and/or aggregation of nanoparticulate Fe(III) precipitates are considered predominant removal mechanisms. Microbial analyses of the mine water revealed the abundance of extracellular polymeric substance-generating Fe-oxidizing bacterium ‘Ferrovum myxofaciens’, which may aid the removal of iron and explain the unusual appearance and physical properties of the sludge. PMID:26675674

  17. Passive secondary biological treatment systems reduce estrogens in dairy shed effluent.

    PubMed

    Gadd, Jennifer B; Northcott, Grant L; Tremblay, Louis A

    2010-10-01

    Steroid estrogens are found at high concentrations in untreated dairy shed effluents. Reduction of estrogenic activity and steroid estrogen concentrations was assessed in two systems used to treat dairy shed effluents: the two-pond system and the advanced pond system. Both include anaerobic and aerobic treatment stages. Samples of effluent were collected from the systems and analyzed for free estrogens, conjugated estrogens and total estrogenic activity using E-Screen assay. Both systems showed increases of up to 8000% in aqueous free estrogens and estrogenic activity after anaerobic treatment, followed by decreases after aerobic treatment (36-83%). The complete systems decreased total steroid estrogen concentrations by 50-100% and estrogen activity by 62-100%, with little difference between systems. Removal rates were lower in winter for both systems. Final effluents from the advanced pond system contained total estrogens at <15-1400 ng/L and estrogenic activity at 3.2-43 ng/L. Final effluent from the two-pond system contained total estrogens at <15-300 ng/L and estrogenic activity at 3.3-25 ng/L. At times the final effluent EEQs exceeded guideline values for protection of freshwater fish and suggest further treatment may be required.

  18. Effective spatially fractionated GRID radiation treatment planning for a passive grid block

    PubMed Central

    Mohiuddin, M; Devic, S; Moftah, B

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To commission a grid block for spatially fractionated grid radiation therapy (SFGRT) treatments and describe its clinical implementation and verification through the record and verify (R&V) system. Methods: SFGRT was developed as a treatment modality for bulky tumours that cannot be easily controlled with conventionally fractionated radiation. Treatment is delivered in the form of open–closed areas. Currently, SFGRT is performed by either using a commercially available grid block or a multileaf collimator (MLC) of a linear accelerator. In this work, 6-MV photon beam was used to study dosimetric characteristics of the grid block. We inserted the grid block into a commercially available treatment planning system (TPS), and the feasibility of delivering such treatment plans on a linear accelerator using a R&V system was verified. Dose measurements were performed using a miniature PinPointTM ion chamber (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) in a water phantom and radiochromic film within solid water slabs. PinPoint ion chamber was used to measure the output factors, percentage depth dose (PDD) curves and beam profiles at two depths, depth of maximum dose (zmax) and 10 cm. Film sheets were used to measure dose profiles at zmax and 10-cm depth. Results: The largest observed percentage difference between output factors for the grid block technique calculated by the TPS and measured with the PinPoint ion chamber was 3.6% for the 5 × 5-cm2 field size. Relatively significant discrepancies between measured and calculated PDD values appear only in the build-up region, which was found to amount to <4%, while a good agreement (differences <2%) at depths beyond zmax was observed. Dose verification comparisons performed between calculated and measured dose distributions were in clinically acceptable agreements. When comparing the MLC-based with the grid block technique, the advantage of treating large tumours with a single field reduces treatment time by at least 3–5

  19. Development and Operation of a Passive-Flow Treatment System for (Sup 90)Sr-Contaminated Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkham, P.S.; Taylor, P.A.

    1999-02-28

    Seep C was a free-flowing stream of groundwater that emerged in a narrow valley below the old low-level waste (LLW) disposal trenches in Solid Waste Storage Area 5 (SWSA 5) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The flow rate of the seep water was strongly influenced by rainfall, and typically ranged from 0.5 to 8 L/min. The seep water entered Melton Branch, a small stream that joins White Oak Creek before exiting the ORNL boundary. The seep water contained high concentrations of {sup 90}Sr (10,000 to 20,000 Bq/L) and, before the full-scale treatment system was installed, contributed about 25% of all the {sup 90}Sr leaving ORNL. Seep C was identified as a primary source of off-site contaminant transport and was designated for an early removal action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response and Liability Act (CERCLA). A passive flow treatment system was chosen as the most cost-effective method for treating the water.

  20. Triptycene analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy (Inventor); Perchellet, Jean-Pierre (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    This invention provides analogs of triptycene which are useful as anticancer drugs, as well as for other uses. The potency of these compounds is in a similar magnitude as daunomycin, a currently used anticancer drug. Each compound of the invention produces one or more desired effects (blocking nucleoside transport, inhibiting nucleic acid or protein syntheses, decreasing the proliferation and viability of cancer cells, inducing DNA fragmentation or retaining their effectiveness against multidrug-resistant tumor cells).

  1. Treatment compliance, passive smoking, and asthma control: a three year cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Soussan, D; Liard, R; Zureik, M; Touron, D; Rogeaux, Y; Neukirch, F

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To study the role of treatment compliance and parents' smoking on asthma control in children with recently diagnosed mild or moderate persistent asthma who were prescribed inhaled anti-inflammatory treatment. Methods: Prospective cohort study of 167 children aged 6–12 years (64% boys). Patients were examined at inclusion and followed up for three years with a visit every four months. Peak expiratory flow (PEF) was measured twice a day during the week before each visit. Two control criteria were monitored: (1) symptom control = having diurnal or nocturnal exacerbations less than once a week and no symptoms between exacerbations, at all visits; and (2) PEF control = daily PEF variability <20% on each of the seven days before each visit. Results: Symptom control was achieved by 25.1% of children and PEF control by 53.3%. Symptom control was positively related to having understood the way in which the medication worked and taking the prescribed doses (odds ratios (OR) = 3.38 and 4.82 respectively). It was inversely related to smoking within the home (OR = 0.34). PEF control was positively related to taking the prescribed doses (OR = 3.58). It was less frequently achieved if the mother smoked within the home (OR = 0.34). Conclusions: Results suggest that, to maximise the benefits of available asthma medication and to improve health outcomes, further efforts should be made to convince the parents of asthmatic children not to smoke in the house, and to improve compliance by increasing the patients' understanding of the disease and its treatment. PMID:12598385

  2. Promotion of Mn(II) Oxidation and Remediation of Coal Mine Drainage in Passive Treatment Systems by Diverse Fungal and Bacterial Communities ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Santelli, Cara M.; Pfister, Donald H.; Lazarus, Dana; Sun, Lu; Burgos, William D.; Hansel, Colleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Biologically active, passive treatment systems are commonly employed for removing high concentrations of dissolved Mn(II) from coal mine drainage (CMD). Studies of microbial communities contributing to Mn attenuation through the oxidation of Mn(II) to sparingly soluble Mn(III/IV) oxide minerals, however, have been sparse to date. This study reveals a diverse community of Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi and bacteria existing in several CMD treatment systems. PMID:20495049

  3. Applicability of passive compost bioreactors for treatment of extremely acidic and saline waters in semi-arid climates.

    PubMed

    Biermann, Vera; Lillicrap, Adam M; Magana, Claudia; Price, Barry; Bell, Richard W; Oldham, Carolyn E

    2014-05-15

    Extremely acidic and saline groundwater occurs naturally in south-western Australia. Discharge of this water to surface waters has increased following extensive clearing of native vegetation for agriculture and is likely to have negative environmental impacts. The use of passive treatment systems to manage the acidic discharge and its impacts is complicated by the region's semi-arid climate with hot dry summers and resulting periods of no flow. This study evaluates the performance of a pilot-scale compost bioreactor treating extremely acidic and saline drainage under semi-arid climatic conditions over a period of 2.5 years. The bioreactor's substrate consisted of municipal waste organics (MWO) mixed with 10 wt% recycled limestone. After the start-up phase the compost bioreactor raised the pH from ≤3.7 to ≥7 and produced net alkaline outflow for 126 days. The bioreactor removed up to 28 g/m(2)/d CaCO3 equivalent of acidity and acidity removal was found to be load dependent during the first and third year. Extended drying over summer combined with high salinity caused the formation of a salt-clay surface layer on top of the substrate, which was both beneficial and detrimental for bioreactor performance. The surface layer prevented the dehydration of the substrate and ensured it remained waterlogged when the water level in the bioreactor fell below the substrate surface in summer. However, when flow resumed the salt-clay layer acted as a barrier between the water and substrate decreasing performance efficiency. Performance increased again when the surface layer was broken up indicating that the negative climatic impacts can be managed. Based on substrate analysis after 1.5 years of operation, limestone dissolution was found to be the dominant acidity removal process contributing up to 78-91% of alkalinity generation, while bacterial sulfate reduction produced at least 9-22% of the total alkalinity. The substrate might last up to five years before the limestone

  4. In Alzheimer's Disease, 6-Month Treatment with GLP-1 Analog Prevents Decline of Brain Glucose Metabolism: Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Gejl, Michael; Gjedde, Albert; Egefjord, Lærke; Møller, Arne; Hansen, Søren B; Vang, Kim; Rodell, Anders; Brændgaard, Hans; Gottrup, Hanne; Schacht, Anna; Møller, Niels; Brock, Birgitte; Rungby, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    In animal models, the incretin hormone GLP-1 affects Alzheimer's disease (AD). We hypothesized that treatment with GLP-1 or an analog of GLP-1 would prevent accumulation of Aβ and raise, or prevent decline of, glucose metabolism (CMRglc) in AD. In this 26-week trial, we randomized 38 patients with AD to treatment with the GLP-1 analog liraglutide (n = 18), or placebo (n = 20). We measured Aβ load in brain with tracer [(11)C]PIB (PIB), CMRglc with [(18)F]FDG (FDG), and cognition with the WMS-IV scale (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01469351). The PIB binding increased significantly in temporal lobe in placebo and treatment patients (both P = 0.04), and in occipital lobe in treatment patients (P = 0.04). Regional and global increases of PIB retention did not differ between the groups (P ≥ 0.38). In placebo treated patients CMRglc declined in all regions, significantly so by the following means in precuneus (P = 0.009, 3.2 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 5.45; 0.92), and in parietal (P = 0.04, 2.1 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 4.21; 0.081), temporal (P = 0.046, 1.54 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 3.05; 0.030), and occipital (P = 0.009, 2.10 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 3.61; 0.59) lobes, and in cerebellum (P = 0.04, 1.54 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 3.01; 0.064). In contrast, the GLP-1 analog treatment caused a numerical but insignificant increase of CMRglc after 6 months. Cognitive scores did not change. We conclude that the GLP-1 analog treatment prevented the decline of CMRglc that signifies cognitive impairment, synaptic dysfunction, and disease evolution. We draw no firm conclusions from the Aβ load or cognition measures, for which the study was underpowered. PMID:27252647

  5. In Alzheimer’s Disease, 6-Month Treatment with GLP-1 Analog Prevents Decline of Brain Glucose Metabolism: Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gejl, Michael; Gjedde, Albert; Egefjord, Lærke; Møller, Arne; Hansen, Søren B.; Vang, Kim; Rodell, Anders; Brændgaard, Hans; Gottrup, Hanne; Schacht, Anna; Møller, Niels; Brock, Birgitte; Rungby, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    In animal models, the incretin hormone GLP-1 affects Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We hypothesized that treatment with GLP-1 or an analog of GLP-1 would prevent accumulation of Aβ and raise, or prevent decline of, glucose metabolism (CMRglc) in AD. In this 26-week trial, we randomized 38 patients with AD to treatment with the GLP-1 analog liraglutide (n = 18), or placebo (n = 20). We measured Aβ load in brain with tracer [11C]PIB (PIB), CMRglc with [18F]FDG (FDG), and cognition with the WMS-IV scale (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01469351). The PIB binding increased significantly in temporal lobe in placebo and treatment patients (both P = 0.04), and in occipital lobe in treatment patients (P = 0.04). Regional and global increases of PIB retention did not differ between the groups (P ≥ 0.38). In placebo treated patients CMRglc declined in all regions, significantly so by the following means in precuneus (P = 0.009, 3.2 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 5.45; 0.92), and in parietal (P = 0.04, 2.1 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 4.21; 0.081), temporal (P = 0.046, 1.54 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 3.05; 0.030), and occipital (P = 0.009, 2.10 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 3.61; 0.59) lobes, and in cerebellum (P = 0.04, 1.54 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 3.01; 0.064). In contrast, the GLP-1 analog treatment caused a numerical but insignificant increase of CMRglc after 6 months. Cognitive scores did not change. We conclude that the GLP-1 analog treatment prevented the decline of CMRglc that signifies cognitive impairment, synaptic dysfunction, and disease evolution. We draw no firm conclusions from the Aβ load or cognition measures, for which the study was underpowered. PMID:27252647

  6. Passive coping response to depressive symptoms among low-income homebound older adults: does it affect depression severity and treatment outcome?

    PubMed

    Choi, Namkee G; Hegel, Mark T; Sirrianni, Leslie; Marinucci, Mary Lynn; Bruce, Martha L

    2012-11-01

    Due to their homebound state, lack of financial resources, and/or other life demands, a significant proportion of depressed, low-income homebound older adults experience depression. Because of their limited access to psychotherapy, most of these older adults self-manage their depressive symptoms. The purposes of this study were to examine (1) the relationship between homebound older adults' coping responses to depressed mood and the severity of their depressive symptoms at baseline (n = 121), and (2) the moderating effect of passive coping responses on the relationship between participation in problem-solving therapy (PST: in-person or telehealth delivery) and depressive symptoms at 12- and 24-week follow-ups. Controlling for the effects of demographic and disability characteristics, cognitive passive coping was significantly associated with baseline depressive symptoms, while behavioral passive coping was not. The main effect of baseline cognitive passive coping response was also significant in mixed-effects regression analysis, but the interaction between coping pattern and group was not significant. The results point to a possibility that cognitive passive copers may have benefited as much from PST as the rest of the PST participants. Further research needs to examine the moderating effect of coping responses to depressive symptoms on treatment efficacy of PST and other psychosocial interventions for late-life depression.

  7. Semi-Passive Chemical Oxidation Schemes for the Long-Term Treatment of Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Frank

    2004-12-01

    In situ chemical oxidation or ISCO schemes involve the addition of a chemical oxidant, such as potassium permanganate (KMnO4), which destroys chlorinated solvents like TCE in a straightforward reaction. Although ISCO is now regarded as a developing technology in an industrial sense, beyond active flushing schemes, there have been relatively limited investigations in how ISCO might be better used. Our previous study showed that KMnO4 flushing approaches often would be frustrated by the inability to control the delivery of the treatment fluid due to precipitation of low-permeability reaction by-product like MnO2 and other problems. It was therefore suggested that development of a new ISCO scheme that can provide both destruction efficiencies and plugging control would be required.

  8. Passive microrheology of normal and cancer cells after ML7 treatment by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyapunova, Elena; Nikituk, Alexander; Bayandin, Yuriy; Naimark, Oleg; Rianna, Carmela; Radmacher, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    Mechanical properties of living cancer and normal thyroidal cells were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cell mechanics was compared before and after treatment with ML7, which is known to reduce myosin activity and induce softening of cell structures. We recorded force curves with extended dwell time of 6 seconds in contact at maximum forces from 500 pN to 1 nN. Data were analyzed within different frameworks: Hertz fit was applied in order to evaluate differences in Young's moduli among cell types and conditions, while the fluctuations of the cantilever in contact with cells were analyzed with both conventional algorithms (probability density function and power spectral density) and multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). We found that cancer cells were softer than normal cells and ML7 had a substantial softening effect on normal cells, but only a marginal one on cancer cells. Moreover, we observed that all recorded signals for normal and cancer cells were monofractal with small differences between their scaling parameters. Finally, the applicability of wavelet-based methods of data analysis for the discrimination of different cell types is discussed.

  9. Oxidation of organic contaminants by manganese oxide geomedia for passive urban stormwater treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Grebel, Janel E; Charbonnet, Joseph A; Sedlak, David L

    2016-01-01

    To advance cost-effective strategies for removing trace organic contaminants from urban runoff, the feasibility of using manganese oxides as a geomedia amendment in engineered stormwater infiltration systems to oxidize organic contaminants was evaluated. Ten representative organic chemicals that have previously been detected in urban stormwater were evaluated for reactivity in batch experiments with birnessite. With respect to reactivity, contaminants could be classified as: highly reactive (e.g., bisphenol A), moderately reactive (e.g., diuron) and unreactive (e.g., tris(2-chloro-1-propyl)phosphate). Bisphenol A and diuron reacted with birnessite to produce a suite of products, including ring-cleavage products for bisphenol A and partially dechlorinated products for diuron. Columns packed with manganese oxide-coated sand were used evaluate design parameters for an engineered infiltration system, including necessary contact times for effective treatment, as well as the impacts of stormwater matrix variables, such as solution pH, concentration of natural organic matter and major anions and cations. The manganese oxide geomedia exhibited decreased reactivity when organic contaminants were oxidized, especially in the presence of divalent cations, bicarbonate, and natural organic matter. Under typical conditions, the manganese oxides are expected to retain their reactivity for 25 years.

  10. An analysis of manganese as an indicator for heavy metal removal in passive treatment using laboratory spent mushroom compost columns

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, B.A.; Unz, R.F.; Dempsey, B.A.

    1999-07-01

    The National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) dictates removal of manganese in mine drainage to less than 4 mg/1 daily or less than 2 mg/1 on a monthly average. Owing to its high solubility at low and circumneutral pH, removal of manganese is often the most difficult of the NPDES discharge standards. This has lead to the use of Mn(II) as a surrogate for metal removal. However, recent studies concluded that zinc or nickel may be more appropriate indicators for removal of other metals. Previous field studies showed zinc removal to be highly correlated to the removal of copper, cobalt, and nickel in a sulfate reducing subsurface loaded wetland, whereas manganese removal was poorly correlated. The objective of this study was to evaluate zinc and manganese retention under sulfate reducing conditions in bench scale columns containing fresh spent mushroom compost. Column effluent data were analyzed using an EPA geochemical computer model (MINTEQ) over the pH range of 6.0 to 6.8. Under these conditions, zinc and manganese displayed distinctly reactivities. Zn(II) was supersaturated with respect to ZnS{sub s} and the Zn(HS){sub 2}{degree} and Zn(HS){sub 3}{sup minus} complexes dominated solubility. Soluble zinc concentrations were inversely correlated to sulfide. Mn(II) remained as soluble Mn{sup +2}. During early column operation at pH > 7, MnCO{sup 3(s)} was supersaturated. Manganese concentrations did not correlate with pH or sulfide. Given these fundamental differences in removal mechanisms between Zn and Mn under sulfate reducing conditions, the use of manganese removal as a surrogate for heavy metal removal in passive treatment of mine drainage seems unjustified.

  11. Passive aerobic treatment of net-alkaline, iron-laden drainage from a flooded underground anthracite mine, Pennsylvania, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cravotta, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    This report evaluates the results of a continuous 4.5-day laboratory aeration experiment and the first year of passive, aerobic treatment of abandoned mine drainage (AMD) from a typical flooded underground anthracite mine in eastern Pennsylvania, USA. During 1991-2006, the AMD source, locally known as the Otto Discharge, had flows from 20 to 270 L/s (median 92 L/s) and water quality that was consistently suboxic (median 0.9 mg/L O2) and circumneutral (pH ??? 6.0; net alkalinity >10) with moderate concentrations of dissolved iron and manganese and low concentrations of dissolved aluminum (medians of 11, 2.2, and <0.2 mg/L, respectively). In 2001, the laboratory aeration experiment demonstrated rapid oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe 2+) without supplemental alkalinity; the initial Fe2+ concentration of 16.4 mg/L decreased to less than 0.5 mg/L within 24 h; pH values increased rapidly from 5.8 to 7.2, ultimately attaining a steady-state value of 7.5. The increased pH coincided with a rapid decrease in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) from an initial value of 10 -1.1atm to a steady-state value of 10-3.1atm. From these results, a staged aerobic treatment system was conceptualized consisting of a 2 m deep pond with innovative aeration and recirculation to promote rapid oxidation of Fe2+, two 0.3 m deep wetlands to facilitate iron solids removal, and a supplemental oxic limestone drain for dissolved manganese and trace-metal removal. The system was constructed, but without the aeration mechanism, and began operation in June 2005. During the first 12 months of operation, estimated detention times in the treatment system ranged from 9 to 38 h. However, in contrast with 80-100% removal of Fe2+ over similar elapsed times during the laboratory aeration experiment, the treatment system typically removed less than 35% of the influent Fe2+. Although concentrations of dissolved CO2 decreased progressively within the treatment system, the PCO2 values for treated effluent

  12. Long-term efficacy of psoriasis vulgaris treatments: analysis of treatment with topical corticosteroid and/or vitamin D3 analog, oral cyclosporin, etretinate and phototherapy over a 35-year period, 1975-2010.

    PubMed

    Akasaka, Emiko; Mabuchi, Tomotaka; Manabe, Yasuaki; Yahagi, Eiichiro; Yamada-Hiruma, Azusa; Yamaoka, Hanako; Kojima, Tomoko; Kato, Masayuki; Ikoma, Norihiro; Ozawa, Akira; Haruki, Yasuo

    2013-04-01

    Various therapies have been tried for psoriasis. In Japan, biologics began to be used for psoriasis treatment in January 2010. Their clinical efficacy is well known, but biologics cannot be used in all psoriasis patients for reasons such as side-effects and cost. It is necessary to evaluate the effect of long-term psoriasis treatment, but there have been no reports evaluating long-term treatment. Therefore, the outcomes of patients who had been treated at the Tokai University Hospital for more than 5 years, before biological agents were released, were examined. Three categories, classified by initial severity, changes in severity by method of treatment and background characteristics, were investigated. In conclusion, cases of long-term treatment with a combination of topical corticosteroid and topical vitamin D3 analog or oral cyclosporin were found to be effective therapies. Patients with a history of diabetes mellitus or cardiovascular disease of psoriasis were likely to be treatment resistant.

  13. Passivation of phosphorus diffused silicon surfaces with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}: Influence of surface doping concentration and thermal activation treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Armin Benick, Jan; Kimmerle, Achim; Hermle, Martin; Glunz, Stefan W.

    2014-12-28

    Thin layers of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are well known for the excellent passivation of p-type c-Si surfaces including highly doped p{sup +} emitters, due to a high density of fixed negative charges. Recent results indicate that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} can also provide a good passivation of certain phosphorus-diffused n{sup +} c-Si surfaces. In this work, we studied the recombination at Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivated n{sup +} surfaces theoretically with device simulations and experimentally for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposited with atomic layer deposition. The simulation results indicate that there is a certain surface doping concentration, where the recombination is maximal due to depletion or weak inversion of the charge carriers at the c-Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface. This pronounced maximum was also observed experimentally for n{sup +} surfaces passivated either with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} single layers or stacks of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} capped by SiN{sub x}, when activated with a low temperature anneal (425 °C). In contrast, for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiN{sub x} stacks activated with a short high-temperature firing process (800 °C) a significant lower surface recombination was observed for most n{sup +} diffusion profiles without such a pronounced maximum. Based on experimentally determined interface properties and simulation results, we attribute this superior passivation quality after firing to a better chemical surface passivation, quantified by a lower interface defect density, in combination with a lower density of negative fixed charges. These experimental results reveal that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiN{sub x} stacks can provide not only excellent passivation on p{sup +} surfaces but also on n{sup +} surfaces for a wide range of surface doping concentrations when activated with short high-temperature treatments.

  14. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel class of curcumin analogs as anti-inflammatory agents for prevention and treatment of sepsis in mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chengguang; Zhang, Yali; Zou, Peng; Wang, Jian; He, Wenfei; Shi, Dengjian; Li, Huameng; Liang, Guang; Yang, Shulin

    2015-01-01

    A novel class of asymmetric mono-carbonyl analogs of curcumin (AMACs) were synthesized and screened for anti-inflammatory activity. These analogs are chemically stable as characterized by UV absorption spectra. In vitro, compounds 3f, 3m, 4b, and 4d markedly inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 values in low micromolar range. In vivo, compound 3f demonstrated potent preventive and therapeutic effects on LPS-induced sepsis in mouse model. Compound 3f downregulated the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 MAPK and suppressed IκBα degradation, which suggests that the possible anti-inflammatory mechanism of compound 3f may be through downregulating nuclear factor kappa binding (NF-κB) and ERK pathways. Also, we solved the crystal structure of compound 3e to confirm the asymmetrical structure. The quantitative structure–activity relationship analysis reveals that the electron-withdrawing substituents on aromatic ring of lead structures could improve activity. These active AMACs represent a new class of anti-inflammatory agents with improved stability, bioavailability, and potency compared to curcumin. Our results suggest that 3f may be further developed as a potential agent for prevention and treatment of sepsis or other inflammation-related diseases. PMID:25834403

  15. Combining passive samplers and biomonitors to evaluate endocrine disrupting compounds in a wastewater treatment plant by LC/MS/MS and bioassay analyses.

    PubMed

    Liscio, C; Magi, E; Di Carro, M; Suter, M J-F; Vermeirssen, E L M

    2009-10-01

    Two types of integrative sampling approaches (passive samplers and biomonitors) were tested for their sampling characteristics of selected endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). Chemical analyses (LC/MS/MS) were used to determine the amounts of five EDCs (nonylphenol, bisphenol A, estrone, 17beta-estradiol and 17alpha-ethinylestradiol) in polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and freshwater mussels (Unio pictorum); both had been deployed in the influent and effluent of a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Genoa, Italy. Estrogenicity of the POCIS samples was assessed using the yeast estrogen screen (YES). Estradiol equivalent values derived from the bioassay showed a positive correlation with estradiol equivalents calculated from chemical analyses data. As expected, the amount of estrogens and EEQ values in the effluent were lower than those in the influent. Passive sampling proved to be the preferred method for assessing the presence of these compounds since employing mussels had several disadvantages both in sampling efficiency and sample analyses.

  16. Passivation process and the mechanism of packing particles in the Fe0/GAC system during the treatment of ABS resin wastewater.

    PubMed

    Lai, Bo; Zhou, Yuexi; Wang, Juling; Zhang, Yunhong; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    This study provides mechanistic insights into the passivation of the packing particles during the treatment of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) resin wastewater by the Fe0/GAC system. The granular-activated carbon (GAC) and iron chippings (Fe0) were mixed together with a volumetric ratio of 1:1. GAC has a mean particle size of approximately 3-5 mm, a specific surface of 748 m2 g(-1), a total pore volume of 0.48 mL g(-1) and a bulk density of 0.49 g cm(-3). The iron chippings have a compact and non-porous surface morphology. The results show that the packing particles in the Fe0/GAC system would lose their activity because the removal of TOC and PO4(3-) for ABS resin wastewater could not carried out by the Fe0/GAC system after 40 days continuous running. Meanwhile, the availability of O2 and intrinsic reactivity of Fe0 play a key role on the form of passive film with different iron oxidation states. The passive film on the surface of iron chippings was formed by two phases: (a) local corrosion phase (0-20 d) and (b) co-precipitation phase (20-40 d), while that of GAC was mainly formed by the co-precipitation of corrosion products with SO4(2-) and PO4(3-) because SO4(2-) and PO4(3-) would not easily reach the Fe0 surface. Therefore, in order to avoid the occurrence of filler passivation, high concentrations of SO4(2-) and PO4(3-) in wastewater should be removed before the treatment process of the Fe/GAC system.

  17. QSAR and pharmacophore study of Dyrk1A inhibitory meridianin analogs as potential agents for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Bharate, Sandip B; Yadav, Rammohan R; Vishwakarma, Ram A

    2013-02-01

    Dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (Dyrk1A) is a protein kinase with diverse functions in neuronal development and adult brain physiology. Elevated levels of Dyrk1A are associated with the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases and have been implicated in some neurobiological alterations of Down syndrome, such as mental retardation. Meridianins are marine derived indole alkaloids exhibiting anti-proliferative activity as well as are known to inhibit panel of kinases. In the present article, a descriptor based QSAR study was carried out for a series of meridianin analogs inhibiting Dyrk1A to find out structural features which are crucial for biological activity. Developed QSAR model showed good correlation coefficient (r > 0.9), higher F value (F > 20) and excellent predictive power (r2 cv and r2 pred > 0.6). Activity of naturally occurring meridianins was also predicted using developed model. The study indicated that kier Chi4 path/cluster, total lipole, VAMP polarization ZZ component, dipole moment Z component and log P plays important role in Dyrk1A inhibition. Further analysis of pharmacophore model using PHASE module of Schrodinger revealed that two hydrogen bond acceptors (A), two hydrogen bond donors (D) and two hydrophobic aromatic rings (R) are crucial molecular features that predict binding affinity for meridianins to the Dyrk1A enzyme. These observations provide important insights to the key structural requirements of meridianins for potent Dyrk1A inhibition. Excellent statistical results of developed models strongly suggest that these models are reasonable for prediction of the activity of new inhibitors and in future drug design. PMID:22920091

  18. Diphtheria Toxin- and GFP-Based Mouse Models of Acquired Hypoparathyroidism and Treatment With a Long-Acting Parathyroid Hormone Analog.

    PubMed

    Bi, Ruiye; Fan, Yi; Lauter, Kelly; Hu, Jing; Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Cradock, Jim; Yuan, Quan; Gardella, Thomas; Mannstadt, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Hypoparathyroidism (HP) arises most commonly from parathyroid (PT) gland damage associated with neck surgery, and is typically treated with oral calcium and active vitamin D. Such treatment effectively increases levels of serum calcium (sCa), but also brings risk of hypercalciuria and renal damage. There is thus considerable interest in using PTH or PTH analogs to treat HP. To facilitate study of this disease and the assessment of new treatment options, we developed two mouse models of acquired HP, and used them to assess efficacy of PTH(1-34) as well as a long-acting PTH analog (LA-PTH) in regulating blood calcium levels. In one model, we used PTHcre-iDTR mice in which the diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor (DTR) is selectively expressed in PT glands, such that systemic DT administration selectively ablates parathyroid cells. For the second model, we generated GFP-PT mice in which green fluorescent protein (GFP) is selectively expressed in PT cells, such that parathyroidectomy (PTX) is facilitated by green fluorescence of the PT glands. In the PTHcre-iDTR mice, DT injection (2 × 5 μg/kg, i.p.) resulted in moderate yet consistent reductions in serum PTH and sCa levels. The more severe hypoparathyroid phenotype was observed in GFP-PT mice following GFP-guided PTX surgery. In each model, a single subcutaneous injection of LA-PTH increased sCa levels more effectively and for a longer duration (>24 hours) than did a 10-fold higher dose of PTH(1-34), without causing excessive urinary calcium excretion. These new mouse models thus faithfully replicate two degrees of acquired HP, moderate and severe, and may be useful for assessing potential new modes of therapy. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26678919

  19. Passive Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J.; Baugher, Charles; Alexander, Iwan

    1992-01-01

    Motion of ball in liquid indicates acceleration. Passive accelerometer measures small accelerations along cylindrical axis. Principle of operation based on Stokes' law. Provides accurate measurements of small quasi-steady accelerations. Additional advantage, automatically integrates out unwanted higher-frequency components of acceleration.

  20. Removal of As, Mn, Mo, Se, U, V and Zn from groundwater by zero-valent iron in a passive treatment cell: reaction progress modeling.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Stan J; Metzler, Donald R; Dwyer, Brian P

    2002-05-01

    Three treatment cells were operated at a site near Durango, CO. One treatment cell operated for more than 3 years. The treatment cells were used for passive removal of contamination from groundwater at a uranium mill tailings repository site. Zero-valent iron [Fe(0)] that had been powdered, bound with aluminosilicate and molded into plates was used as a reactive material in one treatment cell. The others used granular Fe(0) and steel wool. The treatment cells significantly reduced concentrations of As, Mn, Mo, Se, U, V and Zn in groundwater that flowed through it. Zero-valent iron [Fe(0)], magnetite (Fe3O4), calcite (CaCO3), goethite (FeOOH) and mixtures of contaminant-bearing phases were identified in the solid fraction of one treatment cell. A reaction progress approach was used to model chemical evolution of water chemistry as it reacted with the Fe(0). Precipitation of calcite, ferrous hydroxide [Fe(OH)2] and ferrous sulfide (FeS) were used to simulate observed changes in major-ion aqueous chemistry. The amount of reaction progress differed for each treatment cell. Changes in contaminant concentrations were consistent with precipitation of reduced oxides (UO2, V2O3), sulfides (As2S3, ZnS), iron minerals (FeSe2, FeMoO4) and carbonate (MnCO3). Formation of a free gas phase and precipitation of minerals contributed to loss of hydraulic conductivity in one treatment cell.

  1. Analog current mode analog/digital converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadidi, Khayrollah (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An improved subranging or comparator circuit is provided for an analog-to-digital converter. As a subranging circuit, the circuit produces a residual signal representing the difference between an analog input signal and an analog of a digital representation. This is achieved by subdividing the digital representation into two or more parts and subtracting from the analog input signal analogs of each of the individual digital portions. In another aspect of the present invention, the subranging circuit comprises two sets of differential input pairs in which the transconductance of one differential input pair is scaled relative to the transconductance of the other differential input pair. As a consequence, the same resistor string may be used for two different digital-to-analog converters of the subranging circuit.

  2. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia complicated by central precocious puberty: linear growth during infancy and treatment with gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog.

    PubMed

    Soliman, A T; AlLamki, M; AlSalmi, I; Asfour, M

    1997-05-01

    Some children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) develop true precocious puberty with early maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. We have seen six such children who had the diagnosis of CAH with late initiation of corticosteroid treatment and/or poor compliance who developed central precocious puberty (CPP). These patients were treated with standard-dose hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone. Administration of depot leuprorelin (3.75 mg subcutaneously every 28 days) for 2 years or longer was effective in arresting the manifestations of puberty, decelerating the pretreatment growth velocity ([GV] 10.8 +/- 1.5 v3.65 +/- 0.95 cm/yr), increasing the predicted adult height ([PAHT] 147.5 +/- 7.8 v 153.4 +/- 8.3 cm), and decreasing the bone age to statural age ratio (1.26 +/- 0.13 v 1.16 +/- 0.09). Analysis of auxanological data during the first 2 years of life showed that linear growth was significantly accelerated and bone age was advanced in patients who developed CPP compared with 11 age-matched patients. It appears that proper glucocorticoid replacement to achieve adequate control of hyperandrogenemia during early life might prevent development of CPP in these patients. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) therapy can improve the final adult height, bringing it closer to that expected from the genetic potential.

  3. Biochemical passive reactors for treatment of acid mine drainage: Effect of hydraulic retention time on changes in efficiency, composition of reactive mixture, and microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Yaneth; Escobar, Maria C; Neculita, Carmen M; Arbeli, Ziv; Roldan, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Biochemical passive treatment represents a promising option for the remediation of acid mine drainage. This study determined the effect of three hydraulic retention times (1, 2, and 4 days) on changes in system efficiency, reactive mixture, and microbial activity in bioreactors under upward flow conditions. Bioreactors were sacrificed in the weeks 8, 17 and 36, and the reactive mixture was sampled at the bottom, middle, and top layers. Physicochemical analyses were performed on reactive mixture post-treatment and correlated with sulfate-reducing bacteria and cellulolytic and dehydrogenase activity. All hydraulic retention times were efficient at increasing pH and alkalinity and removing sulfate (>60%) and metals (85-99% for Fe(2+) and 70-100% for Zn(2+)), except for Mn(2+). The longest hydraulic retention time (4 days) increased residual sulfides, deteriorated the quality of treated effluent and negatively impacted sulfate-reducing bacteria. Shortest hydraulic retention time (1 day) washed out biomass and increased input of dissolved oxygen in the reactors, leading to higher redox potential and decreasing metal removal efficiency. Concentrations of iron, zinc and metal sulfides were high in the bottom layer, especially with 2 day of hydraulic retention time. Sulfate-reducing bacteria, cellulolytic and dehydrogenase activity were higher in the middle layer at 4 days of hydraulic retention time. Hydraulic retention time had a strong influence on overall performance of passive reactors.

  4. Biochemical passive reactors for treatment of acid mine drainage: Effect of hydraulic retention time on changes in efficiency, composition of reactive mixture, and microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Yaneth; Escobar, Maria C; Neculita, Carmen M; Arbeli, Ziv; Roldan, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Biochemical passive treatment represents a promising option for the remediation of acid mine drainage. This study determined the effect of three hydraulic retention times (1, 2, and 4 days) on changes in system efficiency, reactive mixture, and microbial activity in bioreactors under upward flow conditions. Bioreactors were sacrificed in the weeks 8, 17 and 36, and the reactive mixture was sampled at the bottom, middle, and top layers. Physicochemical analyses were performed on reactive mixture post-treatment and correlated with sulfate-reducing bacteria and cellulolytic and dehydrogenase activity. All hydraulic retention times were efficient at increasing pH and alkalinity and removing sulfate (>60%) and metals (85-99% for Fe(2+) and 70-100% for Zn(2+)), except for Mn(2+). The longest hydraulic retention time (4 days) increased residual sulfides, deteriorated the quality of treated effluent and negatively impacted sulfate-reducing bacteria. Shortest hydraulic retention time (1 day) washed out biomass and increased input of dissolved oxygen in the reactors, leading to higher redox potential and decreasing metal removal efficiency. Concentrations of iron, zinc and metal sulfides were high in the bottom layer, especially with 2 day of hydraulic retention time. Sulfate-reducing bacteria, cellulolytic and dehydrogenase activity were higher in the middle layer at 4 days of hydraulic retention time. Hydraulic retention time had a strong influence on overall performance of passive reactors. PMID:27016821

  5. Effective surface treatment for GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistors using HF plus N2 plasma prior to SiN passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shih-Chien; Trinh, Hai-Dang; Dai, Gu-Ming; Huang, Chung-Kai; Dee, Chang-Fu; Yeop Majlis, Burhanuddin; Biswas, Dhrubes; Chang, Edward Yi

    2016-01-01

    An effective surface cleaning technique is demonstrated for the GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistor (MIS-HEMT) passivation process. In this study, dilute HF solution and in situ N2 plasma treatments were adopted to remove the native oxide and recover the nitrogen-vacancy defects at the GaN surface before device passivation. To investigate the correlation between the properties of the SiN/GaN interface and the device performance, the GaN MIS-HEMTs were characterized using current-voltage (I-V) measurement, capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurement, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. With the application of this surface treatment technique, the device exhibits improved I-V characteristics with low leakage current, low dynamic ON-resistance, and good C-V response with a steep slope. Overall, the results reveal that the oxide-related bonds and nitrogen-vacancy defects at the SiN/GaN interface are the root cause of the GaN MIS-HEMTs performance degradation.

  6. Passivation Of High-Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    Surfaces of high-temperature superconductors passivated with native iodides, sulfides, or sulfates formed by chemical treatments after superconductors grown. Passivating compounds nearly insoluble in and unreactive with water and protect underlying superconductors from effects of moisture. Layers of cuprous iodide and of barium sulfate grown. Other candidate passivating surface films: iodides and sulfides of bismuth, strontium, and thallium. Other proposed techniques for formation of passivating layers include deposition and gas-phase reaction.

  7. Chronic Achilles tendinopathy: a case study of treatment incorporating active and passive tissue warm-up, Graston Technique®, ART®, eccentric exercise, and cryotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Miners, Andrew L.; Bougie, Tracy L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the subjective pain and functional improvements of a patient with chronic Achilles tendinopathy following a treatment plan incorporating active and passive tissue warm-up, followed respectively by soft tissue mobilization utilizing both Graston Technique® and Active Release Techniques®, eccentric exercise, and static stretching in combination with cryotherapy. Background The primary characterization of chronic Achilles tendinopathy is gradual onset of pain and dysfunction focused in one or both Achilles tendons arising secondary to a history of repetitive use or excessive overload. Intervention and Outcome Conservative treatment is commonly the initial strategy for patient management. Tissue heating, soft tissue mobilization, eccentric training, and static stretching with cryotherapy were implemented to reduce pain and improve function. Summary A specific protocol of heat, soft tissue mobilization, eccentric exercise, stretching, and cryotherapy appeared to facilitate a rapid and complete recovery from chronic Achilles tendinopathy. PMID:22131563

  8. [Passive smoking].

    PubMed

    Grandjean, E; Weber, A; Fischer, T

    1979-03-01

    Passive smoking is the involuntary inspiration of smoky indoor air. Based on the information available today, it may be assumed that passive smoking normally is no health hazard as far as the classical smoker's diseases (lung cancer, myocardial infarct, etc.) are concerned. Nevertheless, it is probable that irritations caused by tobacco smoke have an unfavorable influence on the health of small children and that of already sick persons. The main problem of passive smoking is annoyance due to odor and irritations of eyes and respiratory organs. Our investigations in a climatic chamber with healthy subjects show that air pollution caused by tobacco smoke as indicated by 5 ppm CO leads to marked eye irritations--objectively as well as subjectively--in 15 to 20% of the subjects. This corresponds to smoking 10 cigarettes per hour in a small room with an air ventilation rate of four times per hour. If air pollution caused by tobacco smoke lies below the level of 2 ppm CO, irritations and annoyance for healthy persons are regarded as low and tolerable. This corresponds to about four cigarettes per hour under the same circumstances.

  9. A combination therapy of neural and glial restricted precursor cells and chronic quipazine treatment paired with passive cycling promotes quipazine-induced stepping in adult spinalized rats

    PubMed Central

    Shumsky, Jed S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In order to develop optimal treatments to promote recovery from complete spinal cord injury (SCI), we examined the combination of: (1) a cellular graft of neural and glial restricted precursor (NRP/GRP) cells, (2) passive exercise, and (3) chronic quipazine treatment on behavioral outcomes and compared them with the individual treatment elements. NRP/GRP cells were transplanted at the time of spinalization. Methods Daily passive exercise began 1 week after injury to give sufficient time for the animals to recover. Chronic quipazine administration began 2 weeks after spinalization to allow for sufficient receptor upregulation permitting the expression of its behavioral effects. Behavioral measures consisted of the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor score and percent of weight-supported steps and hops on a treadmill. Results Rats displayed an increased response to quipazine (BBB ≥ 9) beginning at 8 weeks post-injury in all the animals that received the combination therapy. This increase in BBB score was persistent through the end of the study (12 weeks post-injury). Conclusion Unlike the individual treatment groups which never achieved weight support, the combination therapy animals were able to perform uncoordinated weight-supported stepping without a body weight support system while on a moving treadmill (6.5 m per minute) and were capable of supporting their own weight in stance during open field locomotion testing. No regeneration of descending serotonergic projections into and through the lesion cavity was observed. Furthermore, these results are a testament to the capacity of the lumbar spinal cord, when properly stimulated, to sustain functioning locomotor circuitry following complete SCI. PMID:25329574

  10. Use of prostaglandin I2 analog in treatment of massive hepatic necrosis associated with endothelial cell injury and diffuse sinusoidal fibrin deposition.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, K; Mochida, S; Ohno, A; Arai, M; Matsui, A; Masaki, N; Hirata, K; Tomiya, T; Yamaoka, M; Nagoshi, S

    1995-01-01

    Endothelial cell damage causes massive hepatic necrosis as a result of fibrin deposition in the hepatic sinusoids. When a stable analog of prostaglandin I2, beraprost sodium, was administered to rats given either dimethylnitrosamine, carbon tetrachloride, or endotoxin following Corynebacterium parvum administration, the hepatic necrosis produced in each was attenuated, but to a greater extent in the dimethylnitrosamine and endotoxin/Corynebacterium parvum models, where fibrin deposition in the hepatic sinusoids occurs, as compared to the carbon tetrachloride model, where such fibrin deposition does not occur. Beraprost sodium reduced the expected increase of portal venous pressure in the endotoxin/Corynebacterium parvum model without affecting plasma thrombin-antithrombin III complex levels. Beraprost sodium also significantly reduced cell killing of both isolated rat hepatocytes and hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells exposed to tert-butyl hydroperoxide when compared to controls. Beraprost sodium could prove to be a therapeutic candidate for the treatment of hepatic necrosis, particularly in cases associated with fibrin deposition in the hepatic sinusoids because of its fibrin clot-clearing action. PMID:7821117

  11. Influence of BAK-Preserved Prostaglandin Analog Treatment on the Ocular Surface Health in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Tomić, Martina; Kaštelan, Snježana; Metež Soldo, Kata; Salopek-Rabatić, Jasminka

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), a chronic, degenerative optic neuropathy, requires persistent decrease of intraocular pressure so as to prevent visual impairment and blindness. However, long-term use of topical ocular medications may affect ocular surface health. Purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of BAK-preserved prostaglandin analog treatment on the ocular surface health in patients with newly diagnosed POAG. Methods. 40 newly diagnosed POAG patients were included in this prospective study. Intraocular pressure (IOP), tear break-up time (TBUT), and ocular surface disease index (OSDI) were assessed at baseline and 3-month after starting treatment with BAK-preserved travoprost 0.004%. Results. IOP decreased in all patients from baseline to 3-month final visit (23.80 ± 1.73 mmHg versus 16.78 ± 1.27 mmHg; P < 0.001). Mean TBUT decreased from 11.70 ± 1.86 seconds at baseline to 8.30 ± 1.29 seconds at 3-month final visit (<0.001). Mean OSDI score increased from 31.63 ± 18.48 to 44.41 ± 16.48 (P < 0.001). Conclusions. This study showed that BAK-preserved travoprost 0.004% is an effective medication in newly diagnosed POAG patients, but its long-term use may negatively influence ocular surface health by disrupting the tear film stability. Further studies are needed to better understand the clinical effects of different preservative types and concentrations on the ocular surface. PMID:23971041

  12. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of treatment-refractory metastatic thyroid cancer using 90Yttrium and 177Lutetium labeled somatostatin analogs: toxicity, response and survival analysis

    PubMed Central

    Budiawan, Hendra; Salavati, Ali; Kulkarni, Harshad R; Baum, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    The overall survival rate of non-radioiodine avid differentiated (follicular, papillary, medullary) thyroid carcinoma is significantly lower than for patients with iodine-avid lesions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate toxicity and efficacy (response and survival) of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) in non-radioiodine-avid or radioiodine therapy refractory thyroid cancer patients. Sixteen non-radioiodine-avid and/or radioiodine therapy refractory thyroid cancer patients, including follicular thyroid carcinoma (n = 4), medullary thyroid carcinoma (n = 8), Hürthle cell thyroid carcinoma (n = 3), and mixed carcinoma (n = 1) were treated with PRRT by using 90Yttrium and/or 177Lutetium labeled somatostatin analogs. 68Ga somatostatin receptor PET/CT was used to determine the somatostatin receptor density in the residual tumor/metastatic lesions and to assess the treatment response. Hematological profiles and renal function were periodically examined after treatment. By using fractionated regimen, only mild, reversible hematological toxicity (grade 1) or nephrotoxicity (grade 1) were seen. Response assessment (using EORTC criteria) was performed in 11 patients treated with 2 or more (maximum 5) cycles of PRRT and showed disease stabilization in 4 (36.4%) patients. Two patients (18.2%) showed partial remission, in the remaining 5 patients (45.5%) disease remained progressive. Kaplan-Meier analysis resulted in a mean survival after the first PRRT of 4.2 years (95% CI, range 2.9-5.5) and median progression free survival of 25 months (inter-quartiles: 12-43). In non-radioiodine-avid/radioiodine therapy refractory thyroid cancer patients, PRRT is a promising therapeutic option with minimal toxicity, good response rate and excellent survival benefits. PMID:24380044

  13. Radioactive Decay - An Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeachy, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Presents an analog of radioactive decay that allows the student to grasp the concept of half life and the exponential nature of the decay process. The analog is devised to use small, colored, plastic poker chips or counters. Provides the typical data and a graph which supports the analog. (YP)

  14. Use of caustic magnesia to remove cadmium, nickel, and cobalt from water in passive treatment systems: column experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tobias Stefan Roetting; Jordi Cama; Carlos Ayora; Jose-Luis Cortina; Joan De Pablo

    2006-10-15

    In the present study caustic magnesia obtained from calcination of magnesium carbonate was tested in column experiments as an alternative material for passive remediation systems to remove divalent metals. Caustic magnesia reacts with water to form magnesium hydroxide, which dissolves increasing the pH to values higher than 8.5. At these pH values, cadmium is precipitated as otavite and to a minor amount as a hydroxide. Cobalt and nickel are precipitated as hydroxides which form isostructural solids with brucite. Thus, metal concentrations as high as 75 mg/L in the inflowing water are depleted to values below 10 {mu}g/L. Magnesia dissolution is sufficiently fast to treat flows as high as 0.5 m{sup 3}/m{sup 2} per day. For reactive grain size of 2-4 mm, the column efficiency ends due to coating of the grains by precipitates, especially when iron and aluminum are present in the solution. 23 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Treatment and prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia with PTH-CBD, a collagen-targeted parathyroid hormone analog, in a non-depilated mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Ponnapakkam, Tulasi; Matsushita, Osamu; Sakon, Joshua; Gensure, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Alopecia is a psychologically devastating complication of chemotherapy for which there is currently no effective therapy. PTH-CBD is a collagen-targeted parathyroid hormone analog that has shown promise as a therapy for alopecia disorders. To compare the efficacy of prophylactic versus therapeutic administration of PTH-CBD in chemotherapy-induced alopecia using a mouse model that mimics the cyclic chemotherapy dosing used clinically. C57BL/6J mice were treated with a single subcutaneous injection of PTH-CBD (320 mcg/kg) or vehicle control before or after hair loss developing from three courses of cyclophosphamide chemotherapy (50–150 mg/kg/week). Mice receiving chemotherapy alone developed hair loss and depigmentation over 6–12 months. Mice pretreated with PTH-CBD did not develop these changes and maintained a normal-appearing coat. Mice treated with PTH-CBD after development of hair loss showed a partial recovery. Observations of hair loss were confirmed quantitatively by gray scale analysis. Histological examination showed that in mice receiving chemotherapy alone, there were small, dystrophic hair follicles mostly in the catagen phase. Mice receiving PTH-CBD before chemotherapy showed a mix of normal-appearing telogen and anagen hair follicles with no evidence of dystrophy. Mice receiving PTH-CBD therapy after chemotherapy showed intermediate histological features. PTH-CBD was effective in both the prevention and the treatment of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in mice, but pretreatment appears to result in a better cosmetic outcome. PTH-CBD shows promise as an agent in the prevention of this complication of chemotherapy and improving the quality of life for cancer patients. PMID:24025564

  16. Interior design for passive solar homes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breen, J. C.

    1981-07-01

    The increasing emphasis on refinement of passive solar systems brought recognition to interior design as an integral part of passive solar architecture. Interior design can be used as a finetuning tool minimizing many of the problems associated with passive solar energy use in residential buildings. In addition, treatment of interior space in solar model homes may be a prime factor in determining sales success. A new style of interior design is evolving in response to changes in building from incorporating passive solar design features. The psychology behind passive solar architecture is reflected in interiors, and selection of interior components increasingly depends on the functional suitably of various interior elements.

  17. Interior design for passive solar homes

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, J. C.

    1981-07-01

    The increasing emphasis on refinement of passive solar systems has brought recognition to interior design as an integral part of passive solar architecture. Interior design can be used as a finetuning tool minimizing many of the problems associated with passive solar energy use in residential buildings. In addition, treatment of interior space in solar model homes may be a prime factor in determining sales success. A new style of interior design is evolving in response to changes in building form incorporating passive solar design features. The psychology behind passive solar architecture is reflected in interiors, and selection of interior components increasingly depends on the functional suitability of various interior elements.

  18. Predictors of Treatment Response to Tesamorelin, a Growth Hormone-Releasing Factor Analog, in HIV-Infected Patients with Excess Abdominal Fat

    PubMed Central

    Mangili, Alexandra; Falutz, Julian; Mamputu, Jean-Claude; Stepanians, Miganush; Hayward, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    Background Tesamorelin, a synthetic analog of human growth hormone-releasing factor, decreases visceral adipose tissue (VAT) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy. Objectives 1) To evaluate the utility of patient characteristics and validated disease-risk scores, namely indicator variables for the metabolic syndrome defined by the International Diabetes Federation (MetS-IDF) or the National Cholesterol Education Program (MetS-NCEP) and the Framingham Risk Score (FRS), as predictors of VAT reduction during tesamorelin therapy at 3 and 6 months, and 2) To explore the characteristics of patients who reached a threshold of VAT <140 cm2, a level associated with lower risk of adverse health outcomes, after 6 months of treatment with tesamorelin. Methods Data were analyzed from two Phase 3 studies in which HIV-infected patients with excess abdominal fat were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive tesamorelin 2 mg (n = 543) or placebo (n = 263) subcutaneously daily for 6 months, using ANOVA and ANCOVA models. Results Metabolic syndrome (MetS-IDF or MetS-NCEP) and FRS were significantly associated with VAT at baseline. Presence of metabolic syndrome ([MetS-NCEP), triglyceride levels >1.7 mmol/L, and white race had a significant impact on likelihood of response to tesamorelin after 6 months of therapy (interaction p-values 0.054, 0.063, and 0.025, respectively). No predictive factors were identified at 3 months. The odds of a VAT reduction to <140 cm2 for subjects treated with tesamorelin was 3.9 times greater than that of subjects randomized to placebo after controlling for study, gender, baseline body mass index (BMI) and baseline VAT (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.03; 7.44). Conclusions Individuals with baseline MetS-NCEP, elevated triglyceride levels, or white race were most likely to experience reductions in VAT after 6 months of tesamorelin treatment. The odds of response of VAT <140 cm2 was 3.9 times greater for tesamorelin

  19. Passivated niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Hjorvarsson, Bjorgvin; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2006-12-19

    A niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided by treating a niobium cavity through a process comprising: 1) removing surface oxides by plasma etching or a similar process; 2) removing hydrogen or other gases absorbed in the bulk niobium by high temperature treatment of the cavity under ultra high vacuum to achieve hydrogen outgassing; and 3) assuring the long term chemical stability of the niobium cavity by applying a passivating layer of a superconducting material having a superconducting transition temperature higher than niobium thereby reducing losses from electron (cooper pair) scattering in the near surface region of the interior of the niobium cavity. According to a preferred embodiment, the passivating layer comprises niobium nitride (NbN) applied by reactive sputtering.

  20. Population pharmacokinetics, brain distribution, and pharmacodynamics of 2nd generation dopamine transporter selective benztropine analogs developed as potential substitute therapeutics for treatment of cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Syed, Shariq A; Newman, Amy H; Othman, Ahmed A; Eddington, Natalie D

    2008-05-01

    A second generation of N-substituted 3alpha-[bis(4'-fluorophenyl)methoxy]-tropanes (GA 1-69, JHW 005 and JHW 013) binds with high affinity to the dopamine transporter (DAT) and are highly selective toward DAT compared to muscarinic receptor binding (M1). The objective of this study was to characterize brain distribution, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics [extracellular brain dopamine (DA) levels] of three novel N-substituted benztropine (BZT) analogs in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The BZT analogs displayed a higher distribution (Vd = 8.69-34.3 vs. 0.9 L/kg) along with longer elimination (t l/2: 4.1-5.4 vs. 0.5 h) than previously reported for cocaine. Brain-to-plasma partition coefficients were 1.3-2.5 vs. 2.1 for cocaine. The effect of the BZT analogs on extracellular brain (DA) levels ranged from minimal effects (GA 1-69) to several fold elevation (approximately 850% of basal DA for JHW 013) at the highest dose evaluated. PK/PD analysis of exposure-response data resulted in lower IC50 values for the BZT analogs compared to cocaine indicating their higher potency to inhibit DA reuptake (0.1-0.3 vs. 0.7 mg/L). These BZT analogs possess significantly different PK and PD profiles as compared to cocaine suggesting that further evaluation as cocaine abuse therapeutics is warranted.

  1. TU-C-17A-12: Towards a Passively Optimized Phase-Space Monte Carlo (POPMC) Treatment Planning Method: A Proof of Principle

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y M; Bednarz, B; Zankowski, C; Svatos, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The advent of on-line/off-line adaptive, and biologically-conformal radiation therapy has led to a need for treatment planning solutions that utilize voxel-specific penalties, requiring optimization over a large solution space that is performed quickly, and the dose in each voxel calculated accurately. This work proposes a “passive” optimization framework, which is executed concurrently during Monte Carlo dose calculation, evaluating the cost/benefit of each history during transport, and creates a passively optimized fluence map. Methods: The Monte Carlo code Geant4 v9.6 was used for this study. The standard voxel geometry implementation was modified to support the passive optimization framework, with voxel-specific optimization parameters. Dose-benefit functions, which will increase a particle history’s weight upon dose deposition, were defined in a central collection of voxels to effectively create target structures. Histories that deposit energy to voxels are reweighted based on a voxel’s dose multiplied by its cost/benefit value. Upon full termination of each history, the dose contributions of that history are reweighted to reflect a contribution proportional to the history’s final weight. A parallel-planar 1.25 MeV photon fluence is transported through the geometry, and re-weighted at each dose deposition step. The resulting weight is tallied with the incident spatial and directional coordinates in a phase-space distribution. Results: A uniform incident fluence was reweighted during MC dose calculations to create an optimized fluence map which would generate dose profiles in target volumes that exhibit the same dose characteristics as the prescribed optimization parameters. An optimized dose profile, calculated concurrently with the phase-space, reflects the resulting dose distribution. Conclusion: This study demonstrated the feasibility of passively optimizing an incident fluence map during Monte Carlo dose calculations. The flexibility of

  2. All-passive nonreciprocal metastructure

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Davoyan, Arthur R.; Engheta, Nader

    2015-01-01

    One-way propagation of light, analogous to the directional flow of electrons in the presence of electric potential difference, has been an important goal in the wave–matter interaction. Breaking time-reversal symmetry in photonic flows is faced with challenges different from those for electron flows. In recent years several approaches and methods have been offered towards achieving this goal. Here we investigate another systematic approach to design all-passive relatively high-throughput metastructures that exhibit nonreciprocal properties and achieve wave-flow isolation. Moreover, we build on those findings and propose a paradigm for a quasi-two-dimensional metastructure that mimics the nonreciprocal property of Faraday rotation without using any magnetic or electric biasing. We envision that the proposed approaches may serve as a building block for all-passive time-reversal symmetry breaking with potential applications for future nonreciprocal systems and devices PMID:26414528

  3. Analog, still without fear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delagrange, A. D.

    1984-09-01

    This report is an update of one issued in 1977 which predicted that the predicted death of analog circuitry (also called linear) would not occur; in fact, the patient appeared remarkably healthy. The report proved correct. We have the same situation again today: the same predictions and counter-prediction. Each year brings significant advances in the field of analog integrated circuitry. Many of the traditional arguments against analog circuitry are no longer valid. This report attempts to summarize what is available now, and what can (and cannot) be done with analog integrated circuits. It defines analog and makes some comparisons with digital. The most common types of analog integrated circuits are then listed and discussed. Lastly, some design and trouble-shooting hints are given, and the state-of-the-art is discussed.

  4. Nonvolatile Analog Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A nonvolatile analog memory uses pairs of ferroelectric field effect transistors (FFETs). Each pair is defined by a first FFET and a second FFET. When an analog value is to be stored in one of the pairs, the first FFET has a saturation voltage applied thereto, and the second FFET has a storage voltage applied thereto that is indicative of the analog value. The saturation and storage voltages decay over time in accordance with a known decay function that is used to recover the original analog value when the pair of FFETs is read.

  5. Analog synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Sarpeshkar, R

    2014-03-28

    We analyse the pros and cons of analog versus digital computation in living cells. Our analysis is based on fundamental laws of noise in gene and protein expression, which set limits on the energy, time, space, molecular count and part-count resources needed to compute at a given level of precision. We conclude that analog computation is significantly more efficient in its use of resources than deterministic digital computation even at relatively high levels of precision in the cell. Based on this analysis, we conclude that synthetic biology must use analog, collective analog, probabilistic and hybrid analog-digital computational approaches; otherwise, even relatively simple synthetic computations in cells such as addition will exceed energy and molecular-count budgets. We present schematics for efficiently representing analog DNA-protein computation in cells. Analog electronic flow in subthreshold transistors and analog molecular flux in chemical reactions obey Boltzmann exponential laws of thermodynamics and are described by astoundingly similar logarithmic electrochemical potentials. Therefore, cytomorphic circuits can help to map circuit designs between electronic and biochemical domains. We review recent work that uses positive-feedback linearization circuits to architect wide-dynamic-range logarithmic analog computation in Escherichia coli using three transcription factors, nearly two orders of magnitude more efficient in parts than prior digital implementations. PMID:24567476

  6. Passivation of high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The surface of high temperature superconductors such as YBa2Cu3O(7-x) are passivated by reacting the native Y, Ba and Cu metal ions with an anion such as sulfate or oxalate to form a surface film that is impervious to water and has a solubility in water of no more than 10(exp -3) M. The passivating treatment is preferably conducted by immersing the surface in dilute aqueous acid solution since more soluble species dissolve into the solution. The treatment does not degrade the superconducting properties of the bulk material.

  7. Hydraulic Capacitor Analogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baser, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    Students have difficulties in physics because of the abstract nature of concepts and principles. One of the effective methods for overcoming students' difficulties is the use of analogies to visualize abstract concepts to promote conceptual understanding. According to Iding, analogies are consistent with the tenets of constructivist learning…

  8. Analog synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Sarpeshkar, R.

    2014-01-01

    We analyse the pros and cons of analog versus digital computation in living cells. Our analysis is based on fundamental laws of noise in gene and protein expression, which set limits on the energy, time, space, molecular count and part-count resources needed to compute at a given level of precision. We conclude that analog computation is significantly more efficient in its use of resources than deterministic digital computation even at relatively high levels of precision in the cell. Based on this analysis, we conclude that synthetic biology must use analog, collective analog, probabilistic and hybrid analog–digital computational approaches; otherwise, even relatively simple synthetic computations in cells such as addition will exceed energy and molecular-count budgets. We present schematics for efficiently representing analog DNA–protein computation in cells. Analog electronic flow in subthreshold transistors and analog molecular flux in chemical reactions obey Boltzmann exponential laws of thermodynamics and are described by astoundingly similar logarithmic electrochemical potentials. Therefore, cytomorphic circuits can help to map circuit designs between electronic and biochemical domains. We review recent work that uses positive-feedback linearization circuits to architect wide-dynamic-range logarithmic analog computation in Escherichia coli using three transcription factors, nearly two orders of magnitude more efficient in parts than prior digital implementations. PMID:24567476

  9. Challenges in Using Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Singh, Chandralekha

    2011-01-01

    Learning physics requires understanding the applicability of fundamental principles in a variety of contexts that share deep features. One way to help students learn physics is via analogical reasoning. Students can be taught to make an analogy between situations that are more familiar or easier to understand and another situation where the same…

  10. Fly ash carbon passivation

    DOEpatents

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  11. Beyond passive immunization: toward a nanoparticle-based IL-17 vaccine as first in class of future immune treatments.

    PubMed

    Foerster, John; Bachman, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles occur naturally as part of repetitive molecular structures forming virus-like particles (VLPs). VLPs are powerful immune activators. Specifically, VLP can elicit a direct activation of B lymphocytes to trigger production of antibodies targeted at molecules chemically linked to the VLP. We here review recent data from genetics research, large-scale genomic sequencing, as well as clinical trials which suggest that a VLP-based vaccine against the signaling molecule IL-17 will be safe and effective in the common skin disease psoriasis, as well as other conditions. Active vaccination against IL-17 is capable of replacing the costly manufacture of antibodies currently in clinical use with huge implications for treatment availability and health economics.

  12. Geochemical and stable isotopic constraints on the generation and passive treatment of acidic, Fe-SO4 rich waters.

    PubMed

    Matthies, Romy; Aplin, Andrew C; Boyce, Adrian J; Jarvis, Adam P

    2012-03-15

    Reducing and Alkalinity Producing Systems (RAPS) remediate net-acidic metalliferous mine drainage by creating anoxic conditions in which bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) raises alkalinity and drives the precipitation of iron and other chalcophilic elements as sulfides. We report chemical and stable isotopic data from a study monitoring the biogeochemical processes involved in the generation of mine waters and their remediation by two RAPS. Sulfur isotopes show that sulfate in all mine waters has a common source (pyrite oxidation), whilst oxygen isotopes show that oxidation of pyritic sulfur is mediated by Fe(III)(aq). The isotopic composition of dissolved sulfide, combined with the sulfur and oxygen isotopic composition of sulfate in RAPS effluents, proves BSR and details its dual isotope systematics. The occurrence and isotopic composition of solid phase iron sulfides indicate the removal of reduced sulfur within the RAPS, with significant amounts of elemental sulfur indicating reoxidation steps. However, only 0 to 9% of solid phase iron occurs as Fe sulfides, with approximately 70% of the removed iron occurs as Fe(III) (hydr)oxides. Some of the (hydr)oxide is supplied to the wetland as solids and is simply filtered by the wetland substrate, playing no role in alkalinity generation or proton removal. However, the majority of iron is supplied as dissolved Fe(II), indicating that acid generating oxidation and hydrolysis reactions dominate iron removal. The overall contribution of BSR to the sulfur geochemistry in the RAPS is limited and sulfate retention is dominated by sulfate precipitation, comparable to aerobic treatment systems, and show that the proton acidity resulting from iron oxidation and hydrolysis must be subsequently neutralised by calcite dissolution and/or BSR deeper in the RAPS sediments. BSR is not as important as previously thought for metal removal in RAPS. The results have practical consequences for the design, treatment performance and long

  13. Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activities of Makaluvamine Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Nadkarni, Dwayaja H.; Wu, Hui; Velu, Sadanandan E.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a key etiological agent in the formation of dental caries. The major virulence factor is its ability to form biofilms. Inhibition of S. mutans biofilms offers therapeutic prospects for the treatment and the prevention of dental caries. In this study, 14 analogs of makaluvamine, a marine alkaloid, were evaluated for their antibacterial activity against S. mutans and for their ability to inhibit S. mutans biofilm formation. All analogs contained the tricyclic pyrroloiminoquinone core of makaluvamines. The structural variations of the analogs are on the amino substituents at the 7-position of the ring and the inclusion of a tosyl group on the pyrrole ring N of the makaluvamine core. The makaluvamine analogs displayed biofilm inhibition with IC50 values ranging from 0.4 μM to 88 μM. Further, the observed bactericidal activity of the majority of the analogs was found to be consistent with the anti-biofilm activity, leading to the conclusion that the anti-biofilm activity of these analogs stems from their ability to kill S. mutans. However, three of the most potent N-tosyl analogs showed biofilm IC50 values at least an order of magnitude lower than that of bactericidal activity, indicating that the biofilm activity of these analogs is more selective and perhaps independent of bactericidal activity. PMID:25767719

  14. Passive treatment of acid mine drainage using coal combustion by-products and spent mushroom substrate: Results of column study

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, T.E.; Nairn, R.W.; Strevett, K.A.; Everett, J.

    1998-12-31

    A column study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using of coal combustion by-products (CCB) as alkaline materials in a field scale downflow constructed wetlands for acid mine drainage treatment. Five columns (15.24 cm in diameter and 91.44 cm high) were constructed and filled with a combination of spent mushroom substrate (SMS) and one of three alkaline materials (limestone, hydrated fly ash, or fluidized bed ash). The five mixtures utilized were 10% fluidized bed ash/40% limestone (FBA/LS), 10% fluidized bed ash (FBA), 50% limestone (LS), 50% hydrated fly ash (HFA),m and 50% sieved (>1.5 cm) hydrated fly ash (S. HFA) with the remainder as SMS on a w/w basis. Column received synthetic acid mine drainage containing: 400 mg/L iron, 59 mg/L aluminum, 11 mg/L manganese, 50% mg/L magnesium, 40 mg/L calcium, and 1200 mg/L sulfate for 5 months. Anoxic conditions in the influent reservoirs were maintained by a positive nitrogen pressure head. Flow rates of 2.0 mL/minute to each column were maintained by a multichannel peristaltic pump. For all columns, effluent acidity concentrations were less than influent acidity concentration (877{sup {minus}}30, n = 75f). Mean effluent acidity concentrations were 241 mg/L (FBA/LS), 186 mg/L (FBA), 419 mg/L (LS), {minus}28.5 mg/L (HFA), and 351 mg/L (S. HFA), respectively. While all column produced measurable alkalinity, only the HFA column produced a net alkaline discharge. The results of these column studies are applicable to the design and sizing of innovative field scale systems using alkaline-rich CCB`s.

  15. Development of a passive-flow treatment system for {sup 90}Sr-contaminated seep water at Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.A.

    1994-08-01

    Seep C is a free-flowing stream of groundwater (typical flow of 0.2 to 2 L/min) that emerges in a narrow valley below the old low-level waste disposal trenches in Solid Waste Storage Area 5 (SWSA 5), which is part of Waste Area Grouping 5 (WAG 5). The seep water contains high concentrations of Sr-90 (10,000 to 20,000 Bq/L) and contributes about 25% of all the Sr-90 leaving Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Seep C was identified as a primary source of off-site contaminant transport and was designated for an early removal action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response and Liability Act (CERCLA). A passive-flow treatment system was chosen as the most cost-effective method for treating the seep water. The goal of the removal action is to have a system operational by November 1, 1994, that reduces the Sr-90 concentration in the water collected and treated by at least 90%. In order to provide design and operating data for the full-scale system, a pilot-scale system, consisting of a 5-gal bucket with an inlet connection in the lid and a screened outlet on the bottom filled with 16 L of chabazite zeolite, was used to treat the seep water. The test was started on March 17, 1994, and concluded on June 15, 1994. The system treated 63,470 L (3967 bed volumes) of water and 22.7 mCi of Sr-90 from the seep water. The system removed over 99.5% of the Sr-90 from the first 43,000 L of water treated, after which the removal efficiency slowly decreased as the zeolite became loaded until it reached 84% for the final sample. The passive system performed at least as well as comparable pumped zeolite systems in terms of removal efficiency and zeolite utilization. The test was terminated just before the construction crew mobilized at Seep C to build the full-scale system.

  16. Meat analog: a review.

    PubMed

    Malav, O P; Talukder, S; Gokulakrishnan, P; Chand, S

    2015-01-01

    The health-conscious consumers are in search of nutritious and convenient food item which can be best suited in their busy life. The vegetarianism is the key for the search of such food which resembles the meat in respect of nutrition and sensory characters, but not of animal origin and contains vegetable or its modified form, this is the point when meat analog evolved out and gets shape. The consumers gets full satisfaction by consumption of meat analog due to its typical meaty texture, appearance and the flavor which are being imparted during the skilled production of meat analog. The supplement of protein in vegetarian diet through meat alike food can be fulfilled by incorporating protein-rich vegetative food grade materials in meat analog and by adopting proper technological process which can promote the proper fabrication of meat analog with acceptable meat like texture, appearance, flavor, etc. The easily available vegetables, cereals, and pulses in India have great advantages and prospects to be used in food products and it can improve the nutritional and functional characters of the food items. The various form and functional characters of food items are available world over and attracts the meat technologists and the food processors to bring some innovativeness in meat analog and its presentation and marketability so that the acceptability of meat analog can be overgrown by the consumers.

  17. Passive damping technology demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Robert E.; Spencer, Susan M.; Austin, Eric M.; Johnson, Conor D.

    1995-05-01

    A Hughes Space Company study was undertaken to (1) acquire the analytical capability to design effective passive damping treatments and to predict the damped dynamic performance with reasonable accuracy; (2) demonstrate reasonable test and analysis agreement for both baseline and damped baseline hardware; and (3) achieve a 75% reduction in peak transmissibility and 50% reduction in rms random vibration response. Hughes Space Company teamed with CSA Engineering to learn how to apply passive damping technology to their products successfully in a cost-effective manner. Existing hardware was selected for the demonstration because (1) previous designs were lightly damped and had difficulty in vibration test; (2) multiple damping concepts could be investigated; (3) the finite element model, hardware, and test fixture would be available; and (4) damping devices could be easily implemented. Bracket, strut, and sandwich panel damping treatments that met the performance goals were developed by analysis. The baseline, baseline with damped bracket, and baseline with damped strut designs were built and tested. The test results were in reasonable agreement with the analytical predictions and demonstrated that the desired reduction in dynamic response could be achieved. Having successfully demonstrated this approach, it can now be used with confidence for future designs as a means for reducing weight and enhancing reliability.

  18. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Song, H.; Biaggio-Rocha, S.; Searson, P.

    1991-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of our fundamental research program on passivity and passivity breakdown. During the past three and one half years in this program (including the three year incrementally-funded grant prior to the present grant), we developed and experimentally tested various physical models for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models belong to a general class termed point defects models'' (PDMs), in which the growth and breakdown of passive films are described in terms of the movement of anion and cation vacancies.

  19. Challenges in Using Analogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Singh, Chandralekha

    2011-11-01

    Learning physics requires understanding the applicability of fundamental principles in a variety of contexts that share deep features.1-7 One way to help students learn physics is via analogical reasoning. Students can be taught to make an analogy between situations that are more familiar or easier to understand and another situation where the same physics principle is involved but that is more difficult to handle. Here, we examine introductory physics students' ability to use analogies in solving problems involving Newton's second law. Students enrolled in an algebra-based introductory physics course were given a solved problem involving tension in a rope and were then asked to solve another problem for which the physics is very similar but involved a frictional force. They were asked to point out the similarities between the two problems and then use the analogy to solve the friction problem.

  20. Fatty acid analogs

    DOEpatents

    Elmaleh, David R.; Livni, Eli

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, a radioactively labeled analog of a fatty acid which is capable of being taken up by mammalian tissue and which exhibits an in vivo beta-oxidation rate below that with a corresponding radioactively labeled fatty acid.

  1. The effect of tibio-femoral traction mobilization on passive knee flexion motion impairment and pain: a case series.

    PubMed

    Maher, Sara; Creighton, Doug; Kondratek, Melodie; Krauss, John; Qu, Xianggui

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this case series was to explore the effects of tibio-femoral (TF) manual traction on pain and passive range of motion (PROM) in individuals with unilateral motion impairment and pain in knee flexion. Thirteen participants volunteered for the study. All participants received 6 minutes of TF traction mobilization applied at end-range passive knee flexion. PROM measurements were taken before the intervention and after 2, 4, and 6 minutes of TF joint traction. Pain was measured using a visual analog scale with the TF joint at rest, at end-range passive knee flexion, during the application of joint traction, and immediately post-treatment. There were significant differences in PROM after 2 and 4 minutes of traction, with no significance noted after 4 minutes. A significant change in knee flexion of 25.9°, which exceeded the MDC(95,) was found when comparing PROM measurements pre- to final intervention. While pain did not change significantly over time, pain levels did change significantly during each treatment session. Pain significantly increased when the participant's knee was passively flexed to end range; it was reduced, although not significantly, during traction mobilization; and it significantly decreased following traction. This case series supports TF joint traction as a means of stretching shortened articular and periarticular tissues without increasing reported levels of pain during or after treatment. In addition, this is the first study documenting the temporal aspects of treatment effectiveness in motion restoration.

  2. FGF growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua; Takahashi, Kazuyuki

    2012-07-24

    The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

  3. Rigorous Treatment of Multi-species Multi-mode Ligand-Receptor Interactions in 3D-QSAR: CoMFA Analysis of Thyroxine Analogs Binding to Transthyretin

    PubMed Central

    Natesan, Senthil; Wang, Tiansheng; Lukacova, Viera; Bartus, Vladimir; Khandelwal, Akash; Balaz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    For a rigorous analysis of the receptor-ligand binding, speciation of the ligands caused by ionization, tautomerism, covalent hydration, and dynamic stereoisomerism needs to be considered. Each species may bind in several orientations or conformations (modes), especially for flexible ligands and receptors. A thermodynamic description of the multi-species (MS), multi-mode (MM) binding events shows that the overall association constant is equal to the weighted sum of the sums of microscopic association constants of individual modes for each species, with the weights given by the unbound fractions of individual species. This expression is a prerequisite for a precise quantitative characterization of the ligand-receptor interactions in both structure-based and ligand-based structure-activity analyses. We have implemented the MS-MM correlation expression into the Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA), which deduces a map of the binding site from structures and binding affinities of a ligand set, in the absence of experimental structural information on the receptor. The MS-MM CoMFA approach was applied to published data for binding to transthyretin of 28 thyroxine analogs, each forming up to four ionization species under physiological conditions. The published X-ray structures of several analogs, exhibiting multiple binding modes, served as templates for the MS-MM superposition of thyroxine analogs. Additional modes were generated for compounds with flexible alkyl substituents, to identify bound conformations. The results demonstrate that the MS-MM modification improved predictive abilities of the CoMFA models, even for the standard procedure with MS-MM selected species and modes. The predicted prevalences of individual modes and the generated receptor site model are in reasonable agreement with the available X-ray data. The calibrated model can help in the design of inhibitors of transthyretin amyloid fibril formation. PMID:21476521

  4. Systemic treatments with the low-calcemic 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) analogs JKF or QW increase both the morphological and biochemical responses to estradiol-17beta in rat tibiae.

    PubMed

    Somjen, D; Katzburg, S; Posner, G H; Livne, E; Kaye, A M

    2007-04-15

    We demonstrated previously that daily injection for 3 days of the less calcemic vitamin D analogs: JK 1624 F(2)-2 (JKF) and QW 1624F(2)-2 (QW) followed by estradiol-17beta (E(2)) in female rats upregulated creatine kinase-specific activity (CK) in skeletal tissues. In this study, we evaluated both histomorphological and biochemical changes due to a regime of 4 days treatment with JKF or QW, followed by injection of E(2) on day 5, repeated for 2.5 months. Ovariectomized female rats (Ovx) were injected 2 weeks after surgery, with JKF or QW at 0.2 ng/g BW followed by injections of E(2) (1 microg/rat) on day 5 of each week for 2.5 months. Rats were sacrificed 24 h after the last injection and bones were analyzed. JKF alone decreased growth plate width, increased % total bone volume (%TBV), with no change in cortical thickness. In contrast, QW restored growth plate width and %TBV with no change in cortical thickness. Combined with E(2), JKF restored %TBV and growth plate width but with no change in cortical thickness, while QW restored significantly all parameters including cortical thickness. Moreover, there was also an increase in the responsiveness of CK to E(2) in epiphyseal cartilage and diaphyseal bone but not in uterus. Thus, vitamin D less calcemic analogs increased responsiveness to E(2) morphologically as well as biochemically. We, therefore, conclude that combined treatment of less calcemic analogs vitamin D and E(2) might be superior for treatment of bone damage caused by ovariectomy in female rats and might be applied for post-menopausal osteoporosis.

  5. Gravito-electromagnetic analogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, L. Filipe O.; Natário, José

    2014-10-01

    We reexamine and further develop different gravito-electromagnetic (GEM) analogies found in the literature, and clarify the connection between them. Special emphasis is placed in two exact physical analogies: the analogy based on inertial fields from the so-called "1+3 formalism", and the analogy based on tidal tensors. Both are reformulated, extended and generalized. We write in both formalisms the Maxwell and the full exact Einstein field equations with sources, plus the algebraic Bianchi identities, which are cast as the source-free equations for the gravitational field. New results within each approach are unveiled. The well known analogy between linearized gravity and electromagnetism in Lorentz frames is obtained as a limiting case of the exact ones. The formal analogies between the Maxwell and Weyl tensors are also discussed, and, together with insight from the other approaches, used to physically interpret gravitational radiation. The precise conditions under which a similarity between gravity and electromagnetism occurs are discussed, and we conclude by summarizing the main outcome of each approach.

  6. Electrical Circuits and Water Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Frederick A.; Wilson, Jerry D.

    1974-01-01

    Briefly describes water analogies for electrical circuits and presents plans for the construction of apparatus to demonstrate these analogies. Demonstrations include series circuits, parallel circuits, and capacitors. (GS)

  7. Fundamental studies on passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.

    1993-06-01

    Using photoelectrochemical impedance and admittance spectroscopies, a fundamental and quantitative understanding of the mechanisms for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal and alloy surfaces in contact with aqueous environments is being developed. A point defect model has been extended to explain the breakdown of passive films, leading to pitting and crack growth and thus development of damage due to localized corrosion.

  8. Pilot-scale passive bioreactors for the treatment of acid mine drainage: efficiency of mushroom compost vs. mixed substrates for metal removal.

    PubMed

    Song, Hocheol; Yim, Gil-Jae; Ji, Sang-Woo; Neculita, Carmen Mihaela; Hwang, Taewoon

    2012-11-30

    Pilot-scale field-testing of passive bioreactors was performed to evaluate the efficiency of a mixture of four substrates (cow manure compost, mushroom compost, sawdust, and rice straw) relative to mushroom compost alone, and of the effect of the Fe/Mn ratio, during the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) over a 174-day period. Three 141 L columns, filled with either mushroom compost or the four substrate mixture (in duplicate), were set-up and fed with AMD from a closed mine site, in South Korea, using a 4-day hydraulic retention time. In the former bioreactor, effluent deterioration was observed over 1-2 months, despite the good efficiency predicted by the physicochemical characterization of mushroom compost. Steady state effluent quality was then noted for around 100 days before worsening in AMD source water occurred in response to seasonal variations in precipitation. Such changes in AMD quality resulted in performance deterioration in all reactors followed by a slow recovery toward the end of testing. Both substrates (mushroom compost and mixtures) gave satisfactory performance in neutralizing pH (6.1-7.8). Moreover, the system was able to consistently reduce sulfate from day 49, after the initial leaching out from organic substrates. Metal removal efficiencies were on the order of Al (∼100%) > Fe (68-92%) > Mn (49-61%). Overall, the mixed substrates showed comparable performance to mushroom compost, while yielding better effluent quality upon start-up. The results also indicated mushroom compost could release significant amounts of Mn and sulfate during bioreactor operation.

  9. Somatostatin Analog Therapy in Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tartarone, Alfredo; Lerose, Rosa; Aieta, Michele

    2016-05-01

    Chemotherapy represents the cornerstone of treatment for patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC); however, standard therapy has reached a plateau in improving patient survival with overall disappointing results. The demonstration that SCLC expresses neuroendocrine markers, such as somatostatin (SST) receptors, has led to use SST analogs or radiolabeled SST analogs in the treatment of SCLC patients. In the current review, we would focus on the possible role of SST analogs in SCLC. PMID:27067504

  10. Tropospheric Passive Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keafer, L. S., Jr. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The long term role of airborne/spaceborne passive remote sensing systems for tropospheric air quality research and the identification of technology advances required to improve the performance of passive remote sensing systems were discussed.

  11. Synthesis of sulfonate analogs of bile acids.

    PubMed

    Kihira, K; Mikami, T; Ikawa, S; Okamoto, A; Yoshii, M; Miki, S; Mosbach, E H; Hoshita, T

    1992-04-01

    Sulfonate analogs of C23 and C24 bile acids were synthesized from norcholic, norchenodeoxycholic, norursodeoxycholic, nordeoxycholic, norhyodeoxycholic, cholic, deoxycholic, hyodeoxycholic, and lithocholic acids. The principal reactions used were (1) reduction of the bile acids with NaBH4 to the corresponding bile alcohols, (2) selective tosylation of the terminal hydroxyl group, (3) iodination of the tosyl esters with NaI, and (4) treatment of the iodides with Na2SO3 to form the sulfonate analogs of the bile acids. The sulfonate analogs showed polarity similar to that of taurine-conjugated bile acids on thin-layer chromatography. The carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectral data for the sulfonate analogs were tabulated.

  12. Interlanguage Passive Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simargool, Nirada

    2008-01-01

    Because the appearance of the passive construction varies cross linguistically, differences exist in the interlanguage (IL) passives attempted by learners of English. One such difference is the widely studied IL pseudo passive, as in "*new cars must keep inside" produced by Chinese speakers. The belief that this is a reflection of L1 language…

  13. Treatment of High Risk Sertoli–Leydig Cell Tumors of the Ovary Using a Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Analog

    PubMed Central

    Lashkari, Harsha Prasada; Nash, Ruth; Albanese, Assunta; Okoye, Bruce; Millar, Robert; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Sertoli–Leydig cell tumors are rare ovarian neoplasms. We report two unusual cases with bilateral SLCTs suggesting evidence of genetic predisposition and at high risk of recurrence. To reduce this risk, we exploited the use of GnRH analog to lower gondadotropin and potentially directly inhibit the tumors through expressed GnRH receptors. We used it as maintenance antitumor therapy for 2 years after completion of chemotherapy, to cover the period of risk for recurrence. Both patients remain in complete remission at >2 years after completing leuprorelin therapy. Of note, both patients carry DICER1 mutations, frequently found in pleuropulmonary blastoma syndrome. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2013; 60: E16–E18. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23193086

  14. Electrical analogous in viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala, Guido; Di Paola, Mario; Francomano, Elisa; Li, Yan; Pinnola, Francesco P.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, electrical analogous models of fractional hereditary materials are introduced. Based on recent works by the authors, mechanical models of materials viscoelasticity behavior are firstly approached by using fractional mathematical operators. Viscoelastic models have elastic and viscous components which are obtained by combining springs and dashpots. Various arrangements of these elements can be used, and all of these viscoelastic models can be equivalently modeled as electrical circuits, where the spring and dashpot are analogous to the capacitance and resistance, respectively. The proposed models are validated by using modal analysis. Moreover, a comparison with numerical experiments based on finite difference time domain method shows that, for long time simulations, the correct time behavior can be obtained only with modal analysis. The use of electrical analogous in viscoelasticity can better reveal the real behavior of fractional hereditary materials.

  15. Analogical Reasoning in Geometry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magdas, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    The analogical reasoning isn't used only in mathematics but also in everyday life. In this article we approach the analogical reasoning in Geometry Education. The novelty of this article is a classification of geometrical analogies by reasoning type and their exemplification. Our classification includes: analogies for understanding and setting a…

  16. [Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.

    1993-07-01

    We developed and experimentally tested physical models for growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models are ``point defect models,`` in which the growth and breakdown are described in terms of movement of anion and cation vacancies. The work during the past 5 years resulted in: theory of growth and breakdown of passive films, theory of corrosion-resistant alloys, electronic structure of passive films, and estimation of damage functions for energy systems. Proposals are give for the five ongoing tasks. 10 figs.

  17. Coronary Heart Disease Attributable to Passive Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Lightwood, James M.; Coxson, Pamela G.; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Williams, Lawrence W.; Goldman, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Background Passive smoking is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD), and existing estimates are out of date due to recent and substantial changes in the level of exposure. Objective To estimate the annual clinical burden and cost of CHD treatment attributable to passive smoking. Outcome measures Annual attributable CHD deaths, myocardial infarctions (MI), total CHD events, and the direct cost of CHD treatment. Methods A Monte Carlo simulation estimated the CHD events and costs as a function of the prevalence of CHD risk factors, including passive-smoking prevalence and a low (1.26) and high (1.65) relative risk of CHD due to passive smoking. Estimates were calculated using the CHD Policy Model, calibrated to reproduce key CHD outcomes in the baseline Year 2000 in the U.S. Results At 1999–2004 levels, passive smoking caused 21,800 (SE=2400) to 75,100 (SE=8000) CHD deaths and 38,100 (SE=4300) to 128,900 (SE=14,000) MIs annually, with a yearly CHD treatment cost of $1.8 (SE=$0.2) to $6.0 (SE=$0.7) billion. If recent trends in the reduction in the prevalence of passive smoking continue from 2000 to 2008, the burden would be reduced by approximately 25%–30%. Conclusions Passive smoking remains a substantial clinical and economic burden in the U.S. PMID:19095162

  18. Analogy, explanation, and proof

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, John E.; Licato, John; Bringsjord, Selmer

    2014-01-01

    People are habitual explanation generators. At its most mundane, our propensity to explain allows us to infer that we should not drink milk that smells sour; at the other extreme, it allows us to establish facts (e.g., theorems in mathematical logic) whose truth was not even known prior to the existence of the explanation (proof). What do the cognitive operations underlying the inference that the milk is sour have in common with the proof that, say, the square root of two is irrational? Our ability to generate explanations bears striking similarities to our ability to make analogies. Both reflect a capacity to generate inferences and generalizations that go beyond the featural similarities between a novel problem and familiar problems in terms of which the novel problem may be understood. However, a notable difference between analogy-making and explanation-generation is that the former is a process in which a single source situation is used to reason about a single target, whereas the latter often requires the reasoner to integrate multiple sources of knowledge. This seemingly small difference poses a challenge to the task of marshaling our understanding of analogical reasoning to understanding explanation. We describe a model of explanation, derived from a model of analogy, adapted to permit systematic violations of this one-to-one mapping constraint. Simulation results demonstrate that the resulting model can generate explanations for novel explananda and that, like the explanations generated by human reasoners, these explanations vary in their coherence. PMID:25414655

  19. Arterial Pressure Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heusner, A. A.; Tracy, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a simple hydraulic analog which allows students to explore some physical aspects of the cardiovascular system and provides them with a means to visualize and conceptualize these basic principles. Simulates the behavior of arterial pressure in response to changes in heart rate, stroke volume, arterial compliance, and peripheral…

  20. Quantum Analog Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum analog computing is based upon similarity between mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics and phenomena to be computed. It exploits a dynamical convergence of several competing phenomena to an attractor which can represent an externum of a function, an image, a solution to a system of ODE, or a stochastic process.

  1. Reasoning through Instructional Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapon, Shulamit; diSessa, Andrea A.

    2012-01-01

    This article aims to account for students' assessments of the plausibility and applicability of analogical explanations, and individual differences in these assessments, by analyzing properties of students' underlying knowledge systems. We developed a model of explanation and change in explanation focusing on knowledge elements that provide a…

  2. How Analogy Drives Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstadter, Doug

    2004-05-05

    Many new ideas in theoretical physics come from analogies to older ideas in physics. For instance, the abstract notion of 'isospin' (or isotopic spin) originated in the prior concept of 'spin' (quantized angular momentum); likewise, the concept of 'phonon' (quantum of sound, or quantized collective excitation of a crystal) was based on the prior concept of 'photon' (quantum of light, or quantized element of the electromagnetic field). But these two examples, far from being exceptions, in fact represent the bread and butter of inventive thinking in physics. In a nutshell, intraphysics analogy-making -- borrowing by analogy with something already known in another area of physics -- is central to the progress of physics. The aim of this talk is to reveal the pervasiveness -- indeed, the indispensability -- of this kind of semi-irrational, wholly intuitive type of thinking (as opposed to more deductive mathematical inference) in the mental activity known as 'doing physics'. Speculations as to why wild analogical leaps are so crucial to the act of discovery in physics (as opposed to other disciplines) will be offered.

  3. Analog signal isolation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, E.R.

    1992-12-31

    This paper discusses several techniques for isolating analog signals in an accelerator environment. The techniques presented here encompass isolation amplifiers, voltage-to-frequency converters (VIFCs), transformers, optocouplers, discrete fiber optics, and commercial fiber optic links. Included within the presentation of each method are the design issues that must be considered when selecting the isolation method for a specific application.

  4. Analog signal isolation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, E.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses several techniques for isolating analog signals in an accelerator environment. The techniques presented here encompass isolation amplifiers, voltage-to-frequency converters (VIFCs), transformers, optocouplers, discrete fiber optics, and commercial fiber optic links. Included within the presentation of each method are the design issues that must be considered when selecting the isolation method for a specific application.

  5. Resistance to somatostatin analogs in acromegaly: an evolving concept?

    PubMed

    Gola, M; Bonadonna, S; Mazziotti, G; Amato, G; Giustina, A

    2006-01-01

    The aim of acromegaly treatment is to control the disease by suppressing GH hyperactivity and reducing the size or impeding the growth of the pituitary GH secreting mass. Over recent years, many studies have emphasized the role of SS analogs in the treatment of acromegaly. In fact, SS analogs have been demonstrated to be an effective tool not only in the control of GH hypersecretion but also more recently in the control of tumor growth, in a relevant number of acromegalic patients both as primary or adjunctive treatment. In this context, the therapeutic failure of medical treatment with SS analogs needs to be accurately defined particularly when they are used as primary treatment but also when they are given to patients previously operated upon, since other effective therapeutic options are nowadays available. Current definition of resistance to SS analogs is based on their efficacy to control GH and IGF-I. However, due to the emerging significance of the shrinkage effect of SS analogs on pituitary adenomas as well as to the apparent dissociation between this effect and the biochemical effects of treatment with these analogs, an evolution in the concept of SS resistance is likely to be occurring. In this review, we will discuss the biological basis of the discordance between biochemical and volumetric effects of SS analogs, and we will address the intriguing clinical and therapeutic aspects related to a possible redefinition of the resistance to SS analogs. PMID:16553040

  6. Endovascular Treatment of Pelvic Congestion Syndrome: Visual Analog Scale (VAS) Long-Term Follow-up Clinical Evaluation in 202 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Laborda, Alicia Medrano, Joaquin; Blas, Ignacio de; Urtiaga, Ignacio; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; Gregorio, Miguel A. de

    2013-08-01

    PurposeThis study was designed to evaluate the clinical outcome and patients' satisfaction after a 5 year follow-up period for pelvic congestion syndrome (PCS) coil embolization in patients who suffered from chronic pelvic pain that initially consulted for lower limb venous insufficiency.MethodsA total of 202 patients suffering from chronic pelvic pain were recruited prospectively in a single center (mean age 43.5 years; range 27-57) where they were being treated for lower limb varices. Inclusion criteria were: lower limb varices and chronic pelvic pain (>6 months), >6 mm pelvic venous caliber in ultrasonography, and venous reflux or presence of communicating veins. Both ovarian and hypogastric veins were targeted for embolization. Pain level was assessed before and after embolotherapy and during follow-up using a visual analog scale (VAS). Technical and clinical success and recurrence of leg varices were studied. Patients completed a quality questionnaire. Clinical follow-up was performed at 1, 3, and 6 months and every year for 5 years.ResultsTechnical success was 100 %. Clinical success was achieved in 168 patients (93.85 %), with complete disappearance of symptoms in 60 patients (33.52 %). Pain score (VAS) was 7.34 {+-} 0.7 preprocedural versus 0.78 {+-} 1.2 at the end of follow-up (P < 0.0001). Complications were: groin hematoma (n = 6), coil migration (n = 4), and reaction to contrast media (n = 1). Twenty-three cases presented abdominal pain after procedure. In 24 patients (12.5 %), there was recurrence of their leg varices within the follow-up. The mean degree of patients' satisfaction was 7.4/9.ConclusionsCoil embolization of PCS is an effective and safe procedure, with high clinical success rate and degree of satisfaction.

  7. Citric Acid Passivation of Stainless Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasensky, David; Reali, John; Larson, Chris; Carl, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Passivation is a process for cleaning and providing corrosion protection for stainless steel. Currently, on Kennedy Space Center (KSC), only parts passivated with nitric acid are acceptable for use. KSC disposes of approximately 125gal of concentrated nitric acid per year, and receives many parts from vendors who must also dispose of used nitric acid. Unfortunately, nitric acid presents health and environmental hazards. As a result, several recent industry studies have examined citric acid as an alternative. Implementing a citric acid-based passivation procedure would improve the health and environmental safety aspects of passivation process. However although there is a lack of published studies that conclusively prove citric acid is a technically sound passivation agent. In 2007, NASA's KSC Materials Advisory Working Group requested the evaluation of citric acid in place of nitric acid for passivation of parts at KSC. United Space Alliance Materials & Processes engineers have developed a three-phase test plan to evaluate citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid on three stainless steels commonly used at KSC: UNS S30400, S41000, and S17400. Phases 1 and 2 will produce an optimized citric acid treatment based on results from atmospheric exposure at NASA's Beach Corrosion Facility. Phase 3 will compare the optimized solution(s) with nitric acid treatments. If the results indicate that citric acid passivates as well or better than nitric acid, NASA intends to approve this method for parts used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  8. Terrestrial Spaceflight Analogs: Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in immune cell distribution and function, circadian misalignment, stress and latent viral reactivation appear to persist during Antarctic winterover at Concordia Station. Some of these changes are similar to those observed in Astronauts, either during or immediately following spaceflight. Others are unique to the Concordia analog. Based on some initial immune data and environmental conditions, Concordia winterover may be an appropriate analog for some flight-associated immune system changes and mission stress effects. An ongoing smaller control study at Neumayer III will address the influence of the hypoxic variable. Changes were observed in the peripheral blood leukocyte distribution consistent with immune mobilization, and similar to those observed during spaceflight. Alterations in cytokine production profiles were observed during winterover that are distinct from those observed during spaceflight, but potentially consistent with those observed during persistent hypobaric hypoxia. The reactivation of latent herpesviruses was observed during overwinter/isolation, that is consistently associated with dysregulation in immune function.

  9. Analog storage integrated circuit

    DOEpatents

    Walker, J. T.; Larsen, R. S.; Shapiro, S. L.

    1989-01-01

    A high speed data storage array is defined utilizing a unique cell design for high speed sampling of a rapidly changing signal. Each cell of the array includes two input gates between the signal input and a storage capacitor. The gates are controlled by a high speed row clock and low speed column clock so that the instantaneous analog value of the signal is only sampled and stored by each cell on coincidence of the two clocks.

  10. Antarctic analogs for Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, A. E.; Andersen, D. T.; McKay, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Enceladus is a new world for Astrobiology. The Cassini discovery of the icy plume emanating from the South Polar region indicates an active world, where detection of water, organics, sodium, and nano-particle silica in the plume strongly suggests that the source is a subsurface salty ocean reservoir. Recent gravity data from Cassini confirms the presence of a regional sea extending north to 50°S. An ocean habitat under a thick ice cover is perhaps a recurring theme in the Outer Solar System, but what makes Enceladus unique is that the plume jetting out into space is carrying samples of this ocean. Therefore, through the study of Enceladus' plumes we can gain new insights not only of a possible habitable world in the Solar Systems, but also about the formation and evolution of other icy-satellites. Cassini has been able to fly through this plume - effectively sampling the ocean. It is time to plan for future missions that do more detailed analyses, possibly return samples back to Earth and search for evidence of life. To help prepare for such missions, the need for earth-based analog environments is essential for logistical, methodological (life detection) and theoretical development. We have undertaken studies of two terrestrial environments that are close analogs to Enceladus' ocean: Lake Vida and Lake Untersee - two ice-sealed Antarctic lakes that represent physical, chemical and possibly biological analogs for Enceladus. By studying the diverse biology and physical and chemical constraints to life in these two unique lakes we will begin to understand the potential habitability of Enceladus and other icy moons, including possible sources of nutrients and energy, which together with liquid water are the key ingredients for life. Analog research such as this will also enable us to develop and test new strategies to search for evidence of life on Enceladus.

  11. Analog storage integrated circuit

    DOEpatents

    Walker, J.T.; Larsen, R.S.; Shapiro, S.L.

    1989-03-07

    A high speed data storage array is defined utilizing a unique cell design for high speed sampling of a rapidly changing signal. Each cell of the array includes two input gates between the signal input and a storage capacitor. The gates are controlled by a high speed row clock and low speed column clock so that the instantaneous analog value of the signal is only sampled and stored by each cell on coincidence of the two clocks. 6 figs.

  12. The promise of analog computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLennan, B. J.

    2014-10-01

    Future computing paradigms and technologies will have to be more like the physical processes by which they are realized, and because these processes are primarily continuous, post-Moore's law computing will involve an increased use of analog computation. Traditionally analog computers have computed ordinary differential equations of time, but analog field computation permits massively parallel temporal integration of partial differential equations. In principle many different physical media - not just electronics - can be exploited to implement the basic operations of analog computing, a small number of which are sufficient to approximate a wide variety of analog computations, thus providing a basis for universal analog computation and general-purpose analog computers. The contentious issue of the computational power of analog computers is addressed best on its own terms, rather by asking it within the context of Church-Turing computation, which distorts the relevant questions and their answers.

  13. GS-9191 Is a Novel Topical Prodrug of the Nucleotide Analog 9-(2-Phosphonylmethoxyethyl)Guanine with Antiproliferative Activity and Possible Utility in the Treatment of Human Papillomavirus Lesions▿

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, Grushenka H. I.; Shibata, Riri; Wang, Jianying; Ray, Adrian S.; Wu, Sylvia; Doerrfler, Edward; Reiser, Hans; Lee, William A.; Birkus, Gabriel; Christensen, Neil D.; Andrei, Graciela; Snoeck, Robert

    2009-01-01

    GS-9191 is a novel double prodrug of the nucleotide analog 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)guanine (PMEG) designed as a topical agent to permeate skin and be metabolized to the active nucleoside triphosphate analog in the epithelial layer. The prodrug was shown to be metabolized intracellularly to 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)-N6-cyclopropyl-2,6,diaminopurine (cPrPMEDAP) and subsequently deaminated to PMEG. The active form, PMEG diphosphate, was shown to be a potent inhibitor of DNA polymerase α and ß while showing weaker activity against mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (50% enzyme inhibition observed at 2.5, 1.6, and 59.4 μM, respectively). GS-9191 was markedly more potent than PMEG or cPrPMEDAP in a series of human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive cell lines, with effective concentrations to inhibit 50% cell growth (EC50) as low as 0.03, 207, and 284 nM, respectively. In contrast, GS-9191 was generally less potent in non-HPV-infected cells and primary cells (EC50s between 1 and 15 nM). DNA synthesis was inhibited by GS-9191 within 24 h of treatment; cells were observed to be arrested in S phase by 48 h and to subsequently undergo apoptosis (between 3 and 7 days). In an animal model (cottontail rabbit papillomavirus), topical GS-9191 was shown to decrease the size of papillomas in a dose-related manner. At the highest dose (0.1%), cures were evident at the end of 5 weeks, and lesions did not recur in a 30-day follow-up period. These data suggest that GS-9191 may have utility in the treatment of HPV-induced lesions. PMID:19398642

  14. Efficacy of induction of luteolysis in superovulated cows is dependent on time of prostaglandin F2alpha analog treatment: effects on plasma progesterone and luteinizing hormone profiles.

    PubMed

    Viana, J H M; Vargas, M S B; Siqueira, L G B; Camargo, L S A; Figueiredo, A C S; Fernandes, C A C; Palhao, M P

    2016-09-01

    The objectives were to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of induction of luteolysis in superovulated (SOV) cows at two distinct time points after embryo flushing; and (2) compare the pattern of LH release after treatment with PGF in cows with single vs. multiple ovulations. In the first experiment, Holstein cows were SOV with 400 IU of FSH following standard procedures. Uterine flushing for embryo recovery was performed 7 days after artificial insemination (Day 0), and cows were randomly allocated into two groups to receive PGF (0.5-mg sodium cloprostenol, intramascular) either immediately after flushing (Day 7 group, N = 19) or 4 days later (Day 11 group, N = 20). Time of luteolysis was determined on the basis of plasma progesterone (P4) concentrations. There was no difference (P > 0.05) in plasma P4 before treatment between Day 7 and Day 11 groups. A decline in plasma P4 was observed 48 hours after PGF treatment in both the groups (P < 0.0001). In Day 11 cows, P4 continued to decrease thereafter, whereas Day 7 animals had no further reduction in plasma P4. Luteolysis (P4 < 1 ng/mL) occurred in all Day 11 cows. In the Day 7 group, however, luteolysis failure was observed for 11 of 19 cows (57.9%). In cows without luteolysis, plasma P4 increased after the initial PGF-induced decline. The second experiment compared luteolysis in (SOV, N = 6) vs. non-SOV (control, N = 8) cows. Both groups received a single PGF treatment on Day 11 after estrus, and luteolysis was monitored daily by ovarian ultrasonography and plasma P4 measurements. In addition, plasma LH was measured in blood samples taken every 20 minutes for 1 hour during five consecutive days after treatment. A similar percentage of reduction in P4 was observed in both groups 24 hours after treatment; however, SOV cows only reached plasma P4 values similar (P > 0.05) to controls 96 hours after treatment. There was no difference in initial LH values between SOV and controls (P > 0.05). The

  15. Promoting Learning through the Use of Analogies in High School Biology Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford, David L.

    A model for developing instructional analogies was used to produce experimental treatments that included text from a high school biology textbook to which was added extended verbal analogies written by the researcher linking each of two biology concepts to analogous familiar concepts. The control treatment was text from the biology textbook…

  16. Passive Grubenwasserreinigung als Alternative zu aktiven Systemen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolkersdorfer, Christian; Younger, Paul L.

    2002-06-01

    For the treatment of contaminated mine waters reliable treatment methods with low investment and operational costs are essential. Therefore, passive treatment systems recently have been installed in Great Britain and in Germany (e. g. anoxic limestone drains, constructed wetlands, reactive barriers, roughing filters) and during the last eight years such systems successfully treated mine waters, using up to 6 ha of space. In some cases with highly contaminated mine water, a combination of active and passive systems should be applied, as in any case the water quality has to reach the limits. Because not all the processes of passive treatment systems are understood in detail, current research projects (e. g. EU-project PIRAMID) were established to clarify open questions.

  17. Passive magnetic bearing configurations

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2011-01-25

    A journal bearing provides vertical and radial stability to a rotor of a passive magnetic bearing system when the rotor is not rotating and when it is rotating. In the passive magnetic bearing system, the rotor has a vertical axis of rotation. Without the journal bearing, the rotor is vertically and radially unstable when stationary, and is vertically stable and radially unstable when rotating.

  18. Overcoming Passive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Marilyn

    1986-01-01

    Passivity in learning disabled children is identified as either inborn or as "learned helplessness," and the role of the teacher in overcoming passivity is noted. Teachers can help students understand themselves, become active agents in learning, and use self monitoring devices. (CL)

  19. Remating behavior in Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae) females is affected by male juvenile hormone analog treatment but not by male sterilization.

    PubMed

    Abraham, S; Liendo, M C; Devescovi, F; Peralta, P A; Yusef, V; Ruiz, J; Cladera, J L; Vera, M T; Segura, D F

    2013-06-01

    The sterile insect technique (SIT) has been proposed as an area-wide method to control the South American fruit fly, Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann). This technique requires sterilization, a procedure that affects, along with other factors, the ability of males to modulate female sexual receptivity after copulation. Numerous pre-release treatments have been proposed to counteract the detrimental effects of irradiation, rearing and handling and increase SIT effectiveness. These include treating newly emerged males with a juvenile hormone mimic (methoprene) or supplying protein to the male's diet to accelerate sexual maturation prior to release. Here, we examine how male irradiation, methoprene treatment and protein intake affect remating behavior and the amount of sperm stored in inseminated females. In field cage experiments, we found that irradiated laboratory males were equally able to modulate female remating behavior as fertile wild males. However, females mated with 6-day-old, methoprene-treated males remated more and sooner than females mated with naturally matured males, either sterile or wild. Protein intake by males was not sufficient to overcome reduced ability of methoprene-treated males to induce refractory periods in females as lengthy as those induced by wild and naturally matured males. The amount of sperm stored by females was not affected by male irradiation, methoprene treatment or protein intake. This finding revealed that factors in addition to sperm volume intervene in regulating female receptivity after copulation. Implications for SIT are discussed.

  20. Passive solar heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, David E.; Mowris, Robert J.

    1985-11-01

    Buildings have been designed to use solar gains for winter heating for several millenia, but the quantitative basis for passive solar design has only been developed in the last decade. A simplified lumped capacitance model is used to provide insight into the physics of passive building behavior. Three passive design methods are described: the Solar Load Ratio (SLR) method based on correlations to simulation results; the Gordon/Zarmi closed form analytical mode;; and the ``unutilizability'' model of Monsen and Klein. Model predictions are compared with measured results; agreement is good if measured building characteristics are used. Numerous passive houses use less than 2 Btu/ft2-DD for auxiliary heating and consensus is developing that modest levels of passive glazing combined with superinsulation techniques can provide the best feature of both approaches.

  1. Passive solar construction handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, E.; Evans, D.; Gardstein, C.

    1981-08-01

    Many of the basic elements of passive solar design are reviewed. The unique design constraints presented in passive homes are introduced and many of the salient issues influencing design decisions are described briefly. Passive solar construction is described for each passive system type: direct gain, thermal storage wall, attached sunspace, thermal storage roof, and convective loop. For each system type, important design and construction issues are discussed and case studies illustrating designed and built examples of the system type are presented. Construction details are given and construction and thermal performance information is given for the materials used in collector components, storage components, and control components. Included are glazing materials, framing systems, caulking and sealants, concrete masonry, concrete, brick, shading, reflectors, and insulators. The Load Collector Ratio method for estimating passive system performance is appended, and other analysis methods are briefly summarized. (LEW)

  2. Neural Analog Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht-Nielsen, Robert

    1982-07-01

    Neural Analog Information Processing (NAIP) is an effort to develop general purpose pattern classification architectures based upon biological information processing principles. This paper gives an overview of NAIP and its relationship to the previous work in neural modeling from which its fundamental principles are derived. It also presents a theorem concerning the stability of response of a slab (a two dimensional array of identical simple processing units) to time-invariant (spatial) patterns. An experiment (via computer emulation) demonstrating classification of a spatial pattern by a simple, but complete NAIP architecture is described. A concept for hardware implementation of NAIP architectures is briefly discussed.

  3. Synergistic decrease of clonal proliferation, induction of differentiation, and apoptosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells after combined treatment with novel 20-epi vitamin D3 analogs and 9-cis retinoic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Elstner, E; Linker-Israeli, M; Le, J; Umiel, T; Michl, P; Said, J W; Binderup, L; Reed, J C; Koeffler, H P

    1997-01-01

    Patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) usually relapse after all-trans retinoic acid (RA) treatment because this therapy fails to eradicate the malignant clone. Our data showed that KH 1060 and other 20-epi vitamin D3 analogs alone were potent inhibitors of clonal growth of NB4 cells, an APL cell line (ED50, approximately 5 x 10(-11) M). The combination of KH 1060 and 9-cis-RA synergistically and irreversibly enhanced this effect. Neither KH 1060 nor 9-cis-RA (10(-6) M, 3 d) were strong inducers of differentiation of NB4 cells. However, 98% of the cells underwent differentiation to a mature phenotype with features of both granulocytes and monocytes after exposure to a combination of both compounds. Apoptosis only increased after incubation of NB4 cells with 9-cis-RA alone (28%) or with a combination of 9-cis-RA plus KH1060 (32%). Immunohistochemistry showed that the bcl-2 protein decreased from nearly 100% of the wild-type NB4 cells to 2% after incubation with a combination of KH 1060 and 9-cis-RA, and the bax protein increased from 50% of wild-type NB4 cells to 92% after culture with both analogs (5 x 10(-7) M, 3 d). Western blot analysis paralleled these results. Studies of APL cells from one untreated individual paralleled our results with NB4 cells. Taken together, the data demonstrated that nearly all of the NB4 cells can be irreversibly induced to differentiate terminally when exposed to the combination of KH 1060 and 9-cis-RA. PMID:9006004

  4. Antarctic Space Analog Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palinkas, Lawrence A; Gunderson, E. K. Eric; Johnson, Jeffrey C.; Holland, Albert W.

    1998-01-01

    The primary aim of this project was to examine group dynamics and individual performance in extreme, isolated environments and identify human factors requirements for long-duration space missions using data collected in an analog environment. Specifically, we wished to determine: 1) the characteristics of social relations in small groups of individuals living and working together in extreme, isolated environments, and 2) the environmental, social and psychological determinants of performance effectiveness in such groups. These two issues were examined in six interrelated studies using data collected in small, isolated research stations in Antarctica from 1963 to the present. Results from these six studies indicated that behavior and performance on long-duration space flights is likely to be seasonal or cyclical, situational, social, and salutogenic in nature. The project responded to two NASA program emphases for FY 1997 as described in the NRA: 1) the primary emphasis of the Behavior and Performance Program on determining long-term individual and group performance responses to space, identifying critical factors affecting those responses and understanding underlying mechanisms involved in behavior and performance, and developing and using ground-based models and analogs for studying space-related behavior and performance; and 2) the emphasis of the Data Analysis Program on extended data analysis. Results from the study were used to develop recommendations for the design and development of pre-flight crew training and in-flight psychological countermeasures for long-duration manned space missions.

  5. Mental arithmetic activates analogic representations of internally generated sums.

    PubMed

    Kallai, Arava Y; Schunn, Christian D; Fiez, Julie A

    2012-08-01

    The internal representation of numbers generated during calculation has received little attention. Much of the mathematics learning literature focuses on symbolic retrieval of math facts; in contrast, we critically test the hypothesis that internally generated numbers are represented analogically, using an approximate number system. In an fMRI study, the spontaneous processing of arithmetical expressions was tested. Participants passively viewed a sequence of double-digit addition expressions that summed to the same number. Adaptation was found in number-related regions in a fronto-parietal network. Following adaptation, arrays of dots were introduced, differing in their numerical distance from the sum of the addition expressions. Activation in voxels that showed adaptation to a repeated sum was also sensitive to the distance of the dot quantity from the sum. We conclude that participants exhibited adaptation to an internally generated number, that adapted representations were analogic in nature, and that these analogic representations may undergird arithmetic calculation. PMID:22732492

  6. From highly polluted Zn-rich acid mine drainage to non-metallic waters: implementation of a multi-step alkaline passive treatment system to remediate metal pollution.

    PubMed

    Macías, Francisco; Caraballo, Manuel A; Rötting, Tobias S; Pérez-López, Rafael; Nieto, José Miguel; Ayora, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    Complete metal removal from highly-polluted acid mine drainage was attained by the use of a pilot multi-step passive remediation system. The remediation strategy employed can conceptually be subdivided into a first section where the complete trivalent metal removal was achieved by the employment of a previously tested limestone-based passive remediation technology followed by the use of a novel reactive substrate (caustic magnesia powder dispersed in a wood shavings matrix) obtaining a total divalent metal precipitation. This MgO-step was capable to abate high concentrations of Zn together with Mn, Cd, Co and Ni below the recommended limits for drinking waters. A reactive transport model anticipates that 1 m(3) of MgO-DAS (1 m thick × 1 m(2) section) would be able to treat a flow of 0.5 L/min of a highly acidic water (total acidity of 788 mg/L CaCO(3)) for more than 3 years. PMID:22819882

  7. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of Merkel cell carcinoma using (177)lutetium-labeled somatostatin analogs in combination with radiosensitizing chemotherapy: a potential novel treatment based on molecular pathology.

    PubMed

    Salavati, Ali; Prasad, Vikas; Schneider, Claus-Peter; Herbst, Rudolf; Baum, Richard Paul

    2012-05-01

    Few studies have been published on the safety and feasibility of synchronous use of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRNT), as source of internal radiation therapy, in combination with chemotherapy. In this study we reported a 53-year-old man with stage IV Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), who underwent synchronous internal radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Based on presumable poor prognosis with chemotherapy only, functional similarities of MCC with other neuroendocrine tumors and available evidence of effectiveness and safety of synchronous use of external beam radiation therapy and chemotherapy in treatment of high-risk MCC patients, our interdisciplinary neuroendocrine tumor board recommended him to add PRRNT to his ongoing chemotherapy. He received 2 courses of (177)Lu-DOTATATE(1, 4, 7, 10-Tetraazacyclododecane-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraacetic acid-1-D-Phe1-Tyr3-Thr8-octreotide) in combination with ongoing 8 cycles of liposomal doxorubicin based on standard protocols. Response to therapy was evaluated by (18)F-FDG and (68)gallium-somatostatin-receptor PET/CT. There was an impressive improvement of the clinical symptoms. However, follow-up PET/CT studies showed mixed pattern of response. Synchronous use of PRRNT and radiosensitizing chemotherapy seems safe and feasible in high risk MCC patients, however, further prospective studies and clinical trials are warranted to provide reliable evidence of possible pitfalls and effectiveness of PRRNT and (68)Ga-somatostatin-receptor PET/CT in the management of MCC.

  8. Vorticity in analog gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cropp, Bethan; Liberati, Stefano; Turcati, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    In the analog gravity framework, the acoustic disturbances in a moving fluid can be described by an equation of motion identical to a relativistic scalar massless field propagating in curved space-time. This description is possible only when the fluid under consideration is barotropic, inviscid, and irrotational. In this case, the propagation of the perturbations is governed by an acoustic metric that depends algebrically on the local speed of sound, density, and the background flow velocity, the latter assumed to be vorticity-free. In this work we provide a straightforward extension in order to go beyond the irrotational constraint. Using a charged—relativistic and nonrelativistic—Bose-Einstein condensate as a physical system, we show that in the low-momentum limit and performing the eikonal approximation we can derive a d’Alembertian equation of motion for the charged phonons where the emergent acoustic metric depends on flow velocity in the presence of vorticity.

  9. Mars inflatable greenhouse analog.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Philip D; Giacomelli, Gene A

    2002-01-01

    Light intensities on the Martian surface can possibly support a bioregenerative life support system (BLSS) utilizing natural sunlight for hydroponic crop production, if a suitable controlled environment can be provided. Inflatable clear membrane structures offer low mass, are more easily transported than a rigid structure, and are good candidates for providing a suitable controlled environment for crop production. Cable culture is one hydroponic growing system that can take advantage of the beneficial attributes of the inflatable structure. An analog of a Mars inflatable greenhouse can provide researchers data on issues such as crew time requirements for operation, productivity for BLSS, human factors, and much more at a reasonable cost. This is a description of one such design.

  10. Mars inflatable greenhouse analog.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Philip D; Giacomelli, Gene A

    2002-01-01

    Light intensities on the Martian surface can possibly support a bioregenerative life support system (BLSS) utilizing natural sunlight for hydroponic crop production, if a suitable controlled environment can be provided. Inflatable clear membrane structures offer low mass, are more easily transported than a rigid structure, and are good candidates for providing a suitable controlled environment for crop production. Cable culture is one hydroponic growing system that can take advantage of the beneficial attributes of the inflatable structure. An analog of a Mars inflatable greenhouse can provide researchers data on issues such as crew time requirements for operation, productivity for BLSS, human factors, and much more at a reasonable cost. This is a description of one such design. PMID:11987303

  11. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2013-03-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  12. Analog and digital signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baher, H.

    The techniques of signal processing in both the analog and digital domains are addressed in a fashion suitable for undergraduate courses in modern electrical engineering. The topics considered include: spectral analysis of continuous and discrete signals, analysis of continuous and discrete systems and networks using transform methods, design of analog and digital filters, digitization of analog signals, power spectrum estimation of stochastic signals, FFT algorithms, finite word-length effects in digital signal processes, linear estimation, and adaptive filtering.

  13. [Analogies and analogy research in technical biology and bionics].

    PubMed

    Nachtigall, Werner

    2010-01-01

    The procedural approaches of Technical Biology and Bionics are characterized, and analogy research is identified as their common basis. The actual creative aspect in bionical research lies in recognizing and exploiting technically oriented analogies underlying a specific biological prototype to indicate a specific technical application.

  14. FET comparator detects analog signal levels without loading analog device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, H. L.

    1966-01-01

    FET comparator circuit detects discrete analog computer output levels without excessively loading the output amplifier of the computer. An FET common source amplifier is coupled by a differential amplifier to a bistable transistor flip-flop. This circuit provides a digital output for analog voltages above or below a predetermined level.

  15. A Novel cooked extruded lentils analog: physical and chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Abu-Ghoush, Mahmoud; Alavi, Sajid; Al-Shathri, Abdulaziz

    2015-07-01

    Developing an extruded lentil analog is our aim. Lentil analog with six formulations were produced using a pilot-scale single (SS) and twin screw (TS) extruders. Texture analysis of lentil analogs prepared for consumption revealed that the products formulated with 60:40 and 70:30 soy: wheat ratios exhibited a significantly higher hardness, adhesiveness and lower springiness as compared to all other treatments. Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) results indicated that all starches in dry blend are completely 100 % gelatinized by extrusion for all treatments at 100 °C. The maximum peak of viscosity for TS was formed after 5.58 min. from the run at 89.9 °C for the best treatment. However, this lentil analog product can provide a high quality lentil which can be used as a substitute for regular lentils.

  16. Targeting thyroid diseases with TSH receptor analogs.

    PubMed

    Galofré, Juan C; Chacón, Ana M; Latif, Rauf

    2013-12-01

    The thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor (TSHR) is a major regulator of thyroid function and growth, and is the key antigen in several pathological conditions including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and thyroid tumors. Various effective treatment strategies are currently available for many of these clinical conditions such as antithyroid drugs or radioiodine therapy, but they are not devoid of side effects. In addition, treatment of complications of Graves' disease such as Graves' ophthalmopathy is often difficult and unsatisfactory using current methods. Recent advances in basic research on both in vitro and in vivo models have suggested that TSH analogs could be used for diagnosis and treatment of some of the thyroid diseases. The advent of high-throughput screening methods has resulted in a group of TSH analogs called small molecules, which have the potential to be developed as promising drugs. Small molecules are low molecular weight compounds with agonist, antagonist and, in some cases, inverse agonist activity on TSHR. This short review will focus on current advances in development of TSH analogs and their potential clinical applications. Rapid advances in this field may lead to the conduct of clinical trials of small molecules related to TSHR for the management of Graves' disease, thyroid cancer, and thyroid-related osteoporosis in the coming years.

  17. Producing and Recognizing Analogical Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipkens, Regina; Hayes, Steven C.

    2009-01-01

    Analogical reasoning is an important component of intelligent behavior, and a key test of any approach to human language and cognition. Only a limited amount of empirical work has been conducted from a behavior analytic point of view, most of that within Relational Frame Theory (RFT), which views analogy as a matter of deriving relations among…

  18. Drawing Analogies in Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Affifi, Ramsey

    2014-01-01

    Reconsidering the origin, process, and outcomes of analogy-making suggests practices for environmental educators who strive to disengage humans from the isolating illusions of dichotomizing frameworks. We can view analogies as outcomes of developmental processes within which human subjectivity is but an element, threading our sense of self back…

  19. Natural analog studies: Licensing perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes the licensing perspective of the term {open_quotes}natural analog studies{close_quotes} as used in CFR Part 60. It describes the misunderstandings related to its definition which has become evident during discussions at the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission meetings and tries to clarify the appropriate applications of natural analog studies to aspects of repository site characterization.

  20. Wireless passive radiation sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

    2013-12-03

    A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

  1. Clinical utility of insulin and insulin analogs

    PubMed Central

    Sanlioglu, Ahter D.; Altunbas, Hasan Ali; Balci, Mustafa Kemal; Griffith, Thomas S.; Sanlioglu, Salih

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a pandemic disease characterized by autoimmune, genetic and metabolic abnormalities. While insulin deficiency manifested as hyperglycemia is a common sequel of both Type-1 and Type-2 diabetes (T1DM and T2DM), it does not result from a single genetic defect—rather insulin deficiency results from the functional loss of pancreatic β cells due to multifactorial mechanisms. Since pancreatic β cells of patients with T1DM are destroyed by autoimmune reaction, these patients require daily insulin injections. Insulin resistance followed by β cell dysfunction and β cell loss is the characteristics of T2DM. Therefore, most patients with T2DM will require insulin treatment due to eventual loss of insulin secretion. Despite the evidence of early insulin treatment lowering macrovascular (coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke) and microvascular (diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy) complications of T2DM, controversy exists among physicians on how to initiate and intensify insulin therapy. The slow acting nature of regular human insulin makes its use ineffective in counteracting postprandial hyperglycemia. Instead, recombinant insulin analogs have been generated with a variable degree of specificity and action. Due to the metabolic variability among individuals, optimum blood glucose management is a formidable task to accomplish despite the presence of novel insulin analogs. In this article, we present a recent update on insulin analog structure and function with an overview of the evidence on the various insulin regimens clinically used to treat diabetes. PMID:23584214

  2. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W.

    1990-01-01

    A method of passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  3. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1990-06-19

    A method is described for passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  4. Sulfonimidamide analogs of oncolytic sulfonylureas.

    PubMed

    Toth, J E; Grindey, G B; Ehlhardt, W J; Ray, J E; Boder, G B; Bewley, J R; Klingerman, K K; Gates, S B; Rinzel, S M; Schultz, R M; Weir, L C; Worzalla, J F

    1997-03-14

    A series of sulfonimidamide analogs of the oncolytic diarylsulfonylureas was synthesized and evaluated for (1) in vitro cytotoxicity against CEM cells, (2) in vivo antitumor activity against subaxillary implanted 6C3HED lymphosarcoma, and (3) metabolic breakdown to the o-sulfate of p-chloroaniline. The separated enantiomers of one sulfonimidamide analog displayed very different activities in the in vivo screening model. In general, several analogs demonstrated excellent growth inhibitory activity in the 6C3HED model when dosed orally or intraperitoneally. A correlative structure-activity relationship to the oncolytic sulfonylureas was not apparent.

  5. In vivo evaluation of the synthesized novel 2-benzyloxybenzaldehyde analog CCY-1a-E2 for the treatment of leukemia in the BALB/c mouse WEHI-3 allograft model

    PubMed Central

    LIN, CHINGJU; YANG, JAI-SING; TSAI, SHIH-CHANG; LIN, CHIN-FEN; LEE, MIAU-RONG

    2013-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that the 2-benzyloxybenzaldehyde analog CCY-1a-E2 is a potent compound against HL-60 human leukemia cell lines. To investigate the potential therapeutic application of CCY-1a-E2 for leukemia, we analyzed the antileukemic effects and safety of CCY-1a-E2 in the BALB/c mouse WEHI-3 allograft model. Our results showed that CCY-1a-E2 decreased the percentage of viable cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The IC50 of CCY-1a-E2 was 5 μM for the 24-h treatment of WEHI-3 cells. We examined the antileukemic activity of CCY-1a-E2 in the BALB/c mouse WEHI-3 allograft model. The CCY-1a-E2 (100 mg/kg) group was not found to have significantly decreased body weight compared with the control group, while the leukemia group was found to have significantly decreased body weight compared with the control mice. The CCY-1a-E2 (100 mg/kg) group showed no difference in spleen and liver weight, but significantly decreased levels of CD11b and CD45 compared with the leukemia group. In safety evaluation analysis, CCY-1a-E2 had no adverse effects on renal, hepatic and hematological parameters. Based on these observations, CCY-1a-E2 has efficacious antileukemic activity in the BALB/c mouse WEHI-3 allograft model. PMID:23426190

  6. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, David

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  7. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  8. Treatment of a Vadose Zone Plume Using Barometric Pumping: A Passive Soil Vapor Extraction Study at the Miscellaneous Chemicals Basin, Savannah River Site, S.C.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosze, S. L.; Riha, B.; Rossabi, J.; Hyde, K.

    2001-12-01

    A passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE) treatability study at the Miscellaneous Chemical Basin (MCB) of the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been progressing since September 1996. During this time more than 243 pounds of chlorinated organic contaminants (183 lbs of TCE and 61 lbs of PCE) have been removed by natural barometric pumping of wells fitted with BaroBall TM valves (low-pressure check valves). In addition, contour maps of the vadose zone contaminant gas plume made before the study and after 4.5 years of operation show a significant decrease in the extent of the gas plume and identify the source location. To date, over 86% of all PCE and 89% of all TCE have been removed from the system. By projecting the exponentially declining concentration curves it is estimated that 99% of all PCE and TCE will be removed from the system by 2007 and 2009 respectively. In addition, soil samples were collected in July 2001 at various depths within the previously defined plume source area. Analysis of VOC content in these samples confirms that barometric pumping has significantly remediated the contamination in the MCB area. Barometric pumping harnesses natural atmospheric fluctuations to move air in and out of the vadose zone. Barometric pressure fluctuations are transmitted through the vadose zone, however, these pressure waves are damped and delayed in phase to degrees dependent on the effective vertical permeability of the formation. As a result, there is a pressure differential between the atmospheric pressure at the surface and the soil gas pressure in the subsurface. By connecting these two zones with a vadose zone well, the differential pressure will cause gas flow either into or out of the well. If the soil gas in the subsurface contains VOC's (gas phase), than flow out of the well will remove contaminants from the subsurface without mechanical pumping. The Baroball uses a lightweight ball in a conical seat to allow gas flow in only one direction with little pressure

  9. Evaluating countermeasures in spaceflight analogs.

    PubMed

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2016-04-15

    Countermeasures are defined as solutions to prevent the undesirable physiologic outcomes associated with spaceflight. Spaceflight analogs provide a valuable opportunity for the evaluation of countermeasures because they allow for the evaluation of more subjects, more experimental control, and are considerably less expensive than actual spaceflight. The various human analogs have differing strengths and weaknesses with respect to the development and evaluation of countermeasures. The human analogs are briefly reviewed with a focus on their suitability for countermeasure evaluation. Bed rest is the most commonly used analog for evaluating countermeasures. While countermeasures are typically developed to target one or maybe two particular physiologic issues, it is increasingly important to evaluate all of the organ systems to discern whether they might be unintended consequences on nontargeted tissues. In preparation for Mars exploration it will be necessary to fully integrate countermeasures to protect all organ systems. The synergistic and antagonistic effects of multiple countermeasures needs to be the focus of future work. PMID:26662054

  10. Introduction to Analog Field Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA tests systems and operational concepts in analog environments, which include locations underwater, in the arctic, on terrestrial impact craters, in the desert, and on the International Space S...

  11. Flight Analogs (Bed Rest Research)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Flight Analogs / Bed Rest Research Projects provide NASA with a ground based research platform to complement space research. By mimicking the conditions of weightlessness in the human body here on ...

  12. The Robustness of Acoustic Analogies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, J. B.; Lele, S. K.; Wei, M.

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic analogies for the prediction of flow noise are exact rearrangements of the flow equations N(right arrow q) = 0 into a nominal sound source S(right arrow q) and sound propagation operator L such that L(right arrow q) = S(right arrow q). In practice, the sound source is typically modeled and the propagation operator inverted to make predictions. Since the rearrangement is exact, any sufficiently accurate model of the source will yield the correct sound, so other factors must determine the merits of any particular formulation. Using data from a two-dimensional mixing layer direct numerical simulation (DNS), we evaluate the robustness of two analogy formulations to different errors intentionally introduced into the source. The motivation is that since S can not be perfectly modeled, analogies that are less sensitive to errors in S are preferable. Our assessment is made within the framework of Goldstein's generalized acoustic analogy, in which different choices of a base flow used in constructing L give different sources S and thus different analogies. A uniform base flow yields a Lighthill-like analogy, which we evaluate against a formulation in which the base flow is the actual mean flow of the DNS. The more complex mean flow formulation is found to be significantly more robust to errors in the energetic turbulent fluctuations, but its advantage is less pronounced when errors are made in the smaller scales.

  13. Effectiveness of the 4-Poster passive topical treatment device in the control of Ixodes scapularis and Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae) in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Terry L; Jordan, Robert A; Hung, Robert W; Schulze, Christopher J

    2009-08-01

    Twenty-five "4-Poster" feeders were placed throughout a 5.2 km(2) study area within a secured military facility situated in a hyperendemic area for Lyme disease in central Monmouth County, New Jersey. Calculated levels of control, relative to untreated areas, peaked at 82.7%, 77.3%, and 94.2% for of host-seeking Ixodes scapularis Say larvae, nymphs, and adults, respectively, within 5 years of deployment. Control of host-seeking Amblyomma americanum (L.) peaked at 99.2%, 89.5%, and 96.9% for larvae, nymphs, and adults, respectively, during the treatment period. Tick burdens on hunter-killed deer were significantly reduced on deer harvested from the treatment area and on deer that had consumed bait corn. Populations of subadult I. scapularis and A. americanum demonstrated some rebound effect following the removal of 4-Posters, but treatment area tick populations remained lower than control area populations 2 years following withdrawal of the 4-Posters. However, control of I. scapularis adults declined to 20.7% by the third fall activity period following removal of the 4-Posters. The posttreatment phase of the study was of insufficient duration to evaluate continued population rebound of adults and subadults during subsequent activity periods. PMID:19650733

  14. Passive broadband acoustic thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Klin'shov, V. V.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Subochev, P. V.

    2016-04-01

    The 1D internal (core) temperature profiles for the model object (plasticine) and the human hand are reconstructed using the passive acoustothermometric broadband probing data. Thermal acoustic radiation is detected by a broadband (0.8-3.5 MHz) acoustic radiometer. The temperature distribution is reconstructed using a priori information corresponding to the experimental conditions. The temperature distribution for the heated model object is assumed to be monotonic. For the hand, we assume that the temperature distribution satisfies the heat-conduction equation taking into account the blood flow. The average error of reconstruction determined for plasticine from the results of independent temperature measurements is 0.6 K for a measuring time of 25 s. The reconstructed value of the core temperature of the hand (36°C) generally corresponds to physiological data. The obtained results make it possible to use passive broadband acoustic probing for measuring the core temperatures in medical procedures associated with heating of human organism tissues.

  15. Biomedical sensor design using analog compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balouchestani, Mohammadreza; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2015-05-01

    The main drawback of current healthcare systems is the location-specific nature of the system due to the use of fixed/wired biomedical sensors. Since biomedical sensors are usually driven by a battery, power consumption is the most important factor determining the life of a biomedical sensor. They are also restricted by size, cost, and transmission capacity. Therefore, it is important to reduce the load of sampling by merging the sampling and compression steps to reduce the storage usage, transmission times, and power consumption in order to expand the current healthcare systems to Wireless Healthcare Systems (WHSs). In this work, we present an implementation of a low-power biomedical sensor using analog Compressed Sensing (CS) framework for sparse biomedical signals that addresses both the energy and telemetry bandwidth constraints of wearable and wireless Body-Area Networks (BANs). This architecture enables continuous data acquisition and compression of biomedical signals that are suitable for a variety of diagnostic and treatment purposes. At the transmitter side, an analog-CS framework is applied at the sensing step before Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) in order to generate the compressed version of the input analog bio-signal. At the receiver side, a reconstruction algorithm based on Restricted Isometry Property (RIP) condition is applied in order to reconstruct the original bio-signals form the compressed bio-signals with high probability and enough accuracy. We examine the proposed algorithm with healthy and neuropathy surface Electromyography (sEMG) signals. The proposed algorithm achieves a good level for Average Recognition Rate (ARR) at 93% and reconstruction accuracy at 98.9%. In addition, The proposed architecture reduces total computation time from 32 to 11.5 seconds at sampling-rate=29 % of Nyquist rate, Percentage Residual Difference (PRD)=26 %, Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE)=3 %.

  16. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Hall, Earl T. (Inventor); Baker, Donald A. (Inventor); Bryant, Timothy D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  17. Passively actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Modro, S. Michael; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.

    2005-09-20

    A passively actuated valve for isolating a high pressure zone from a low pressure zone and discontinuing the isolation when the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below a preset threshold. If the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below the preset threshold, the valve opens and allows flow from the high pressure zone to the low pressure zone. The valve remains open allowing pressure equalization and back-flow should a pressure inversion between the two pressure zone occur.

  18. All-optical analog comparator.

    PubMed

    Li, Pu; Yi, Xiaogang; Liu, Xianglian; Zhao, Dongliang; Zhao, Yongpeng; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-01-01

    An analog comparator is one of the core units in all-optical analog-to-digital conversion (AO-ADC) systems, which digitizes different amplitude levels into two levels of logical '1' or '0' by comparing with a defined decision threshold. Although various outstanding photonic ADC approaches have been reported, almost all of them necessitate an electrical comparator to carry out this binarization. The use of an electrical comparator is in contradiction to the aim of developing all-optical devices. In this work, we propose a new concept of an all-optical analog comparator and numerically demonstrate an implementation based on a quarter-wavelength-shifted distributed feedback laser diode (QWS DFB-LD) with multiple quantum well (MQW) structures. Our results show that the all-optical comparator is very well suited for true AO-ADCs, enabling the whole digital conversion from an analog optical signal (continuous-time signal or discrete pulse signal) to a binary representation totally in the optical domain. In particular, this all-optical analog comparator possesses a low threshold power (several mW), high extinction ratio (up to 40 dB), fast operation rate (of the order of tens of Gb/s) and a step-like transfer function.

  19. Crows spontaneously exhibit analogical reasoning.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Anna; Zorina, Zoya; Obozova, Tanya; Wasserman, Edward

    2015-01-19

    Analogical reasoning is vital to advanced cognition and behavioral adaptation. Many theorists deem analogical thinking to be uniquely human and to be foundational to categorization, creative problem solving, and scientific discovery. Comparative psychologists have long been interested in the species generality of analogical reasoning, but they initially found it difficult to obtain empirical support for such thinking in nonhuman animals (for pioneering efforts, see [2, 3]). Researchers have since mustered considerable evidence and argument that relational matching-to-sample (RMTS) effectively captures the essence of analogy, in which the relevant logical arguments are presented visually. In RMTS, choice of test pair BB would be correct if the sample pair were AA, whereas choice of test pair EF would be correct if the sample pair were CD. Critically, no items in the correct test pair physically match items in the sample pair, thus demanding that only relational sameness or differentness is available to support accurate choice responding. Initial evidence suggested that only humans and apes can successfully learn RMTS with pairs of sample and test items; however, monkeys have subsequently done so. Here, we report that crows too exhibit relational matching behavior. Even more importantly, crows spontaneously display relational responding without ever having been trained on RMTS; they had only been trained on identity matching-to-sample (IMTS). Such robust and uninstructed relational matching behavior represents the most convincing evidence yet of analogical reasoning in a nonprimate species, as apes alone have spontaneously exhibited RMTS behavior after only IMTS training.

  20. All-optical analog comparator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pu; Yi, Xiaogang; Liu, Xianglian; Zhao, Dongliang; Zhao, Yongpeng; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-08-01

    An analog comparator is one of the core units in all-optical analog-to-digital conversion (AO-ADC) systems, which digitizes different amplitude levels into two levels of logical ‘1’ or ‘0’ by comparing with a defined decision threshold. Although various outstanding photonic ADC approaches have been reported, almost all of them necessitate an electrical comparator to carry out this binarization. The use of an electrical comparator is in contradiction to the aim of developing all-optical devices. In this work, we propose a new concept of an all-optical analog comparator and numerically demonstrate an implementation based on a quarter-wavelength-shifted distributed feedback laser diode (QWS DFB-LD) with multiple quantum well (MQW) structures. Our results show that the all-optical comparator is very well suited for true AO-ADCs, enabling the whole digital conversion from an analog optical signal (continuous-time signal or discrete pulse signal) to a binary representation totally in the optical domain. In particular, this all-optical analog comparator possesses a low threshold power (several mW), high extinction ratio (up to 40 dB), fast operation rate (of the order of tens of Gb/s) and a step-like transfer function.

  1. All-optical analog comparator

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pu; Yi, Xiaogang; Liu, Xianglian; Zhao, Dongliang; Zhao, Yongpeng; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-01-01

    An analog comparator is one of the core units in all-optical analog-to-digital conversion (AO-ADC) systems, which digitizes different amplitude levels into two levels of logical ‘1’ or ‘0’ by comparing with a defined decision threshold. Although various outstanding photonic ADC approaches have been reported, almost all of them necessitate an electrical comparator to carry out this binarization. The use of an electrical comparator is in contradiction to the aim of developing all-optical devices. In this work, we propose a new concept of an all-optical analog comparator and numerically demonstrate an implementation based on a quarter-wavelength-shifted distributed feedback laser diode (QWS DFB-LD) with multiple quantum well (MQW) structures. Our results show that the all-optical comparator is very well suited for true AO-ADCs, enabling the whole digital conversion from an analog optical signal (continuous-time signal or discrete pulse signal) to a binary representation totally in the optical domain. In particular, this all-optical analog comparator possesses a low threshold power (several mW), high extinction ratio (up to 40 dB), fast operation rate (of the order of tens of Gb/s) and a step-like transfer function. PMID:27550874

  2. All-optical analog comparator.

    PubMed

    Li, Pu; Yi, Xiaogang; Liu, Xianglian; Zhao, Dongliang; Zhao, Yongpeng; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-01-01

    An analog comparator is one of the core units in all-optical analog-to-digital conversion (AO-ADC) systems, which digitizes different amplitude levels into two levels of logical '1' or '0' by comparing with a defined decision threshold. Although various outstanding photonic ADC approaches have been reported, almost all of them necessitate an electrical comparator to carry out this binarization. The use of an electrical comparator is in contradiction to the aim of developing all-optical devices. In this work, we propose a new concept of an all-optical analog comparator and numerically demonstrate an implementation based on a quarter-wavelength-shifted distributed feedback laser diode (QWS DFB-LD) with multiple quantum well (MQW) structures. Our results show that the all-optical comparator is very well suited for true AO-ADCs, enabling the whole digital conversion from an analog optical signal (continuous-time signal or discrete pulse signal) to a binary representation totally in the optical domain. In particular, this all-optical analog comparator possesses a low threshold power (several mW), high extinction ratio (up to 40 dB), fast operation rate (of the order of tens of Gb/s) and a step-like transfer function. PMID:27550874

  3. Crows spontaneously exhibit analogical reasoning.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Anna; Zorina, Zoya; Obozova, Tanya; Wasserman, Edward

    2015-01-19

    Analogical reasoning is vital to advanced cognition and behavioral adaptation. Many theorists deem analogical thinking to be uniquely human and to be foundational to categorization, creative problem solving, and scientific discovery. Comparative psychologists have long been interested in the species generality of analogical reasoning, but they initially found it difficult to obtain empirical support for such thinking in nonhuman animals (for pioneering efforts, see [2, 3]). Researchers have since mustered considerable evidence and argument that relational matching-to-sample (RMTS) effectively captures the essence of analogy, in which the relevant logical arguments are presented visually. In RMTS, choice of test pair BB would be correct if the sample pair were AA, whereas choice of test pair EF would be correct if the sample pair were CD. Critically, no items in the correct test pair physically match items in the sample pair, thus demanding that only relational sameness or differentness is available to support accurate choice responding. Initial evidence suggested that only humans and apes can successfully learn RMTS with pairs of sample and test items; however, monkeys have subsequently done so. Here, we report that crows too exhibit relational matching behavior. Even more importantly, crows spontaneously display relational responding without ever having been trained on RMTS; they had only been trained on identity matching-to-sample (IMTS). Such robust and uninstructed relational matching behavior represents the most convincing evidence yet of analogical reasoning in a nonprimate species, as apes alone have spontaneously exhibited RMTS behavior after only IMTS training. PMID:25532894

  4. Are polymers suitable rock analogs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Grotenhuis, Saskia M.; Piazolo, Sandra; Pakula, T.; Passchier, Cees W.; Bons, Paul D.

    2002-05-01

    To evaluate if a polymer is suitable for analog modeling, it is essential to know the rheological properties of the material. Polymers used in analog modeling exhibit a complex rheological behavior; only part of which has been taken into account in most modeling studies. The mechanical behavior is strongly dependent on strain rate and temperature, and is characterized by specific dependencies of the storage and loss moduli, related to the elasticity and viscosity, on the deformation rate (frequency). We have measured the storage and loss moduli at a broad range of strain rates and strains, using an oscillatory parallel-disk rheometer. Investigated materials are polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), mixtures of PDMS and BaSO 4 (filler), Rhodorsil Gomme and mixtures of Rhodorsil Gomme and plastilina, all commonly used in analog experiments. Our measurements show that the rheological properties of mixtures of plastilina and Rhodorsil Gomme depend on its deformation history. Therefore, these mixtures are problematic for analog modeling. For mixtures of PDMS and BaSO 4, the significance of the elastic component increases with increasing filler content, and accordingly, these mixtures have a limited application for modeling of viscous deformation. Pure PDMS and Rhodorsil Gomme exhibit Newtonian flow behavior at strain rates commonly used in analog modeling.

  5. Synthesis and biological activity of Wuweizisu C and analogs.

    PubMed

    Chang, J B; Wang, Q; Li, Y F

    2009-01-01

    Lignans are widely distributed in nature. The earliest recorded medicinal use of lignans dated back to over 1000 years ago. Lignan-rich plant products were also active ingredients in Chinese and Japanese folk medicines for the treatment of various diseases. The dried root and stem of this plant are listed in the Chinese pharmacopoeia for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, gastric, duodenal ulcers and many other diseases. This review highlights synthetic strategies for the Wuweizisu C analogs and the important pharmacological activities as well as therapeutic findings related to the treatment of HBV and other diseases. Notably a significant and ongoing project on Wuweizisu C and its analogs has led to the discovery and development of two potent derivatives alpha-DDB and BICYCLOL which are currently in clinical trials against HBV, especially in lowering elevated SGPT levels. Further design, synthesis, and evaluation of Wuweizisu C analogs are discussed.

  6. Natural analogs for Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, W.M.

    1995-11-01

    High-level radioactive waste in the US, spent fuels from commercial reactors and nuclear materials generated by defense activities, will remain potentially hazardous for thousands of years. Demonstrable long-term stability of certain geologic and geochemical systems motivates and sustains the concept that high-level waste can be safely isolated in geologic repositories for requisite periods of time. Each geologic repository is unique in its properties and performance with reguard to isolation of nuclear wastes. Studies of processes analogous to waste-form alteration and radioelement transport in environments analogous to Yucca Mountain are being conducted at two sites, described in this article to illustrate uses of natural analog data: the Nopal I uranium deposit in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Mexico, and the Akrotiri archaeological site on the island of Santorini, Greece.

  7. Test Wiseness and Analogy Test Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, James C.

    1971-01-01

    Subjects received self instruction on how to approach analogy questions. Instruction was directed toward knowledge of the general format of analogy questions in standarized tests and the 15 types of relationships commonly asked for in analogy questions. An analogies post-test showed a significant effect for the group. (Author)

  8. Analogies in Science and Science Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Simon; Salter, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Analogies are often used in science, but students may not appreciate their significance, and so the analogies can be misunderstood or discounted. For this reason, educationalists often express concern about the use of analogies in teaching. Given the important place of analogies in the discourse of science, it is necessary that students are…

  9. Multilateral Collaborations in Analog Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, R. l.

    2016-01-01

    International collaborations in studies utilizing ground-based space flight analogs are an effective means for answering research questions common to participating agencies. These collaborations bring together worldwide experts to solve important space research questions. By collaborating unnecessary duplication of science is reduced, and the efficiency of analog use is improved. These studies also share resources among agencies for cost effective solutions to study implementation. Recently, NASA has engaged in collaborations with international partners at a variety of analog sites. The NASA Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) is currently hosting investigator studies from NASA and from the German Space Agency (DLR). These isolation studies will answer questions in the areas of team cohesion, sleep and circadian rhythms, and neurobehavioral correlates to function. Planning for the next HERA campaign is underway as proposal selections are being made from the International Life Sciences Research Announcement (ILSRA). Studies selected from the ILSRA will be conducted across 4 HERA missions in 2017. NASA is planning collaborative studies with DLR at the :envihab facility in Cologne, Germany. Investigations were recently selected to study the effects of 0.5% CO2 exposure over 30 days of bed rest. These studies will help to determine the fidelity of this ground-based analog for studying the visual impairment intracranial pressure syndrome. NASA is also planning a multilateral collaboration at :envihab with DLR and the European Space Agency (ESA) to examine artificial gravity as a countermeasure to mitigate the effects of 60 days of bed rest. NASA is also considering collaborations with the Russian Institute for Biomedical Problems (IBMP) in studies that will utilize their Ground-based Experimental Facility (NEK). The NEK is comprised of 4 interconnected modules and a Martian surface simulator. This isolation analog can support 3 -10 crew members for long duration

  10. Issues affecting advanced passive light-water reactor safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beelman, R.J.; Fletcher, C.D.; Modro, S.M.

    1992-08-01

    Next generation commercial reactor designs emphasize enhanced safety through improved safety system reliability and performance by means of system simplification and reliance on immutable natural forces for system operation. Simulating the performance of these safety systems will be central to analytical safety evaluation of advanced passive reactor designs. Yet the characteristically small driving forces of these safety systems pose challenging computational problems to current thermal-hydraulic systems analysis codes. Additionally, the safety systems generally interact closely with one another, requiring accurate, integrated simulation of the nuclear steam supply system, engineered safeguards and containment. Furthermore, numerical safety analysis of these advanced passive reactor designs wig necessitate simulation of long-duration, slowly-developing transients compared with current reactor designs. The composite effects of small computational inaccuracies on induced system interactions and perturbations over long periods may well lead to predicted results which are significantly different than would otherwise be expected or might actually occur. Comparisons between the engineered safety features of competing US advanced light water reactor designs and analogous present day reactor designs are examined relative to the adequacy of existing thermal-hydraulic safety codes in predicting the mechanisms of passive safety. Areas where existing codes might require modification, extension or assessment relative to passive safety designs are identified. Conclusions concerning the applicability of these codes to advanced passive light water reactor safety analysis are presented.

  11. Issues affecting advanced passive light-water reactor safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beelman, R.J.; Fletcher, C.D.; Modro, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Next generation commercial reactor designs emphasize enhanced safety through improved safety system reliability and performance by means of system simplification and reliance on immutable natural forces for system operation. Simulating the performance of these safety systems will be central to analytical safety evaluation of advanced passive reactor designs. Yet the characteristically small driving forces of these safety systems pose challenging computational problems to current thermal-hydraulic systems analysis codes. Additionally, the safety systems generally interact closely with one another, requiring accurate, integrated simulation of the nuclear steam supply system, engineered safeguards and containment. Furthermore, numerical safety analysis of these advanced passive reactor designs wig necessitate simulation of long-duration, slowly-developing transients compared with current reactor designs. The composite effects of small computational inaccuracies on induced system interactions and perturbations over long periods may well lead to predicted results which are significantly different than would otherwise be expected or might actually occur. Comparisons between the engineered safety features of competing US advanced light water reactor designs and analogous present day reactor designs are examined relative to the adequacy of existing thermal-hydraulic safety codes in predicting the mechanisms of passive safety. Areas where existing codes might require modification, extension or assessment relative to passive safety designs are identified. Conclusions concerning the applicability of these codes to advanced passive light water reactor safety analysis are presented.

  12. Terrestrial analogs for space exploration habitation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Paul D.; Brown, Jeri W.

    1992-01-01

    The Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) can use early earth-based analogs to simulate many aspects of space flight missions and system operation. These analogs can thus provide information supporting future missions to the moon and to Mars. A study was performed to investigate the potential of terrestrial analogs in simulating human space exploration missions. The study resulted in preliminary requirements and concepts for analog habitation systems, and further study in this area is necessary for SEI terrestrial analog development.

  13. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Song, H.; Biaggio-Rocha, S.; Searson, P.

    1991-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of our fundamental research program on passivity and passivity breakdown. During the past three and one half years in this program (including the three year incrementally-funded grant prior to the present grant), we developed and experimentally tested various physical models for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models belong to a general class termed ``point defects models`` (PDMs), in which the growth and breakdown of passive films are described in terms of the movement of anion and cation vacancies.

  14. Metastatic Insulinoma Managed with Radiolabeled Somatostatin Analog

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Ricardo; Bacchi, Carlos E.; Almeida Filho, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Insulinoma is a rare pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. Overproduction of insulin and associated hypoglycemia are hallmark features of this disease. Diagnosis can be made through demonstration of hypoglycemia and elevated plasma levels of insulin or C-Peptide. Metastatic disease can be detected through computerized tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy can be used not only to document metastatic disease but also as a predictive marker of the benefit from therapy with radiolabeled somatostatin analog. Unresectable metastatic insulinomas may present as a major therapeutic challenge for the treating physician. When feasible, resection is the mainstay of treatment. Prevention of hypoglycemia is a crucial goal of therapy for unresectable/metastatic tumors. Diazoxide, hydrochlorothiazide, glucagon, and intravenous glucose infusions have been used for glycemic control yielding temporary and inconsistent results. Sandostatin and its long-acting depot forms have occasionally been used in the treatment of Octreoscan-positive insulinomas. Herein, we report a case of metastatic insulinoma with very difficult glycemic control successfully treated with the radiolabeled somatostatin analog lutetium (177LU). PMID:24455330

  15. Analog Input Data Acquisition Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    DAQ Master Software allows users to easily set up a system to monitor up to five analog input channels and save the data after acquisition. This program was written in LabVIEW 8.0, and requires the LabVIEW runtime engine 8.0 to run the executable.

  16. Geometrical Analogies in Mathematics Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eid, Wolfram

    2007-01-01

    A typical form of thinking to approach problem solutions humanly is thinking in analogous structures. Therefore school, especially mathematical lessons should help to form and to develop corresponding heuristic abilities of the pupils. In the contribution, a summary of possibilities of mathematics lessons regarding this shall particularly be…

  17. Analogy of the Cell Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Scope, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In this project, students compare the makeup of a cell to an everyday working unit or system. They create a three-dimensional object that represents their analogy. For example, students could create a car motor or manufacturing plant. (Of course, this is totally hand-created by them, so it can be a homemade re-creation of a system, not an actual…

  18. Analog Simulation of a Laser.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Gary

    1982-01-01

    Presents an analog simulation of laser properties (finding time evolution of the intensity of a ruby laser pulse) which serves as the basis of a three-four hour laboratory experiment. Includes programs for solution to rate equations of a three-level laser and production of a giant pulse in a ruby laser. (Author/SK)

  19. Algicidal Activity of Stilbene Analogs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of our continuing search for natural product and natural product-based compounds for the control of off-flavor in catfish, a total of twenty nine stilbene analogs were synthesized and evaluated for algicidal activity against the 2-methylisoborneol (MIB)-producing cyanobacterium Oscillatoria ...

  20. Paper Analogies Enhance Biology Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stencel, John E.

    1997-01-01

    Describes how to use paper analogies as models to illustrate various concepts in biology, human anatomy, and physiology classes. Models include biochemical paper models, protein papergrams, a paper model of early brain development, and a 3-D paper model of a eukaryotic cell. (AIM)

  1. Mathematical Analogy and Metaphorical Insight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwicky, Jan

    2010-01-01

    How are we to understand the power of certain literary metaphors? The author argues that the apprehension of good metaphors is importantly similar to the apprehension of fruitful mathematical analogies: both involve a structural realignment of vision. The author then explores consequences of this claim, drawing conceptually significant parallels…

  2. Understanding & Teaching Genetics Using Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Scott; Himelblau, Ed

    2013-01-01

    We present a collection of analogies that are intended to help students better understand the foreign and often nuanced vocabulary of the genetics curriculum. Why is it called the "wild type"? What is the difference between a locus, a gene, and an allele? What is the functional (versus a rule-based) distinction between dominant and…

  3. International Alligator Rivers Analog Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bichard, G.F.

    1988-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO), the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, the U.K. Department of the Environment, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan are participating under the aegis of the Nuclear Energy Agency in the International Alligator Rivers Analog Project. The project has a duration of 3 yr, starting in 1988. The project has grown out of a research program on uranium ore bodies as analogs of high-level waste (HLW) repositories undertaken by ANSTO supported by the NRC. A primary objective of the project is to develop an approach to radionuclide transport model validation that may be used by the participants to support assessments of the safety of radioactive waste repositories. The approach involves integrating mathematical and physical modeling with hydrological and geochemical field and laboratory investigations of the analog site. The Koongarra uranium ore body has been chosen as the analog site because it has a secondary ore body that has formed over the past million years as a result of leaching by groundwater flowing through fractures in the primary ore body.

  4. Electrical analog to projectile motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondracek, Mark

    1998-04-01

    This article describes an electrical analog to traditional projectile problems given in high school and introductory college classes. It also discusses the importance of stressing the understanding of physical laws and principles to students, and that the physics behind a problem is more important than being able to memorize and use various equations.

  5. Analogy between Thermodynamics and Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Mark A.

    1979-01-01

    Establishes and illustrates a formal analogy between the motion of a particle and the "motion" of the equilibrium state of a homogeneous system in a quasistatic process. The purpose is to show that there is a much larger set of natural coordinate transformations in thermodynamics. (GA)

  6. Bayesian Analogy with Relational Transformations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Hongjing; Chen, Dawn; Holyoak, Keith J.

    2012-01-01

    How can humans acquire relational representations that enable analogical inference and other forms of high-level reasoning? Using comparative relations as a model domain, we explore the possibility that bottom-up learning mechanisms applied to objects coded as feature vectors can yield representations of relations sufficient to solve analogy…

  7. Treating the Passive in Children with Specific Language Impairment: A Usage-Based Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riches, Nick G.

    2013-01-01

    This study taught the passive to two children with specific language impairment (aged 8;1 and 8;2). It employed usage-based principles including "constructional grounding"; using short structures as the basis for acquiring long structures, and "construction conspiracy"; encouraging analogies between partially overlapping…

  8. Passive bistatic radar analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hagan, Daniel W.; Kuschel, H.; Schiller, Joachim

    2009-06-01

    Passive Bistatic Radar (PBR) research is at its zenith with several notable PBR systems currently operational, or available for deployment. Such PBRs include the Manastash Ridge Radar (MRR) developed for and by academia; Silent Sentry developed as a commercial concern by Lockheed Martin; and Homeland Alerter (HA100) also a commercial system developed by Thales. However at present, despite the existence of numerous PBR prototypes, take up of commercial passive radar technology remains slow. This is due in part to technology immaturity, in part to politics, and particularly due to the fact that monostatic radars perform so well. If PBRs are to enjoy longevity as a viable technology then it is imperative that they address certain niche application areas, with the aforementioned MRR being one prime example of this. The focus of this paper will be an analysis of a PBR system that utilised FM radio signals of opportunity to detect aircraft targets with an RCS generally not lower than 20 m2. The paper will demonstrate the theoretical detection coverage of an FM based PBR operating in a severe interference environment.

  9. Volcanic passive margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geoffroy, Laurent

    2005-12-01

    Compared to non-volcanic ones, volcanic passive margins mark continental break-up over a hotter mantle, probably subject to small-scale convection. They present distinctive genetic and structural features. High-rate extension of the lithosphere is associated with catastrophic mantle melting responsible for the accretion of a thick igneous crust. Distinctive structural features of volcanic margins are syn-magmatic and continentward-dipping crustal faults accommodating the seaward flexure of the igneous crust. Volcanic margins present along-axis a magmatic and tectonic segmentation with wavelength similar to adjacent slow-spreading ridges. Their 3D organisation suggests a connection between loci of mantle melting at depths and zones of strain concentration within the lithosphere. Break-up would start and propagate from localized thermally-softened lithospheric zones. These 'soft points' could be localized over small-scale convection cells found at the bottom of the lithosphere, where adiabatic mantle melting would specifically occur. The particular structure of the brittle crust at volcanic passive margins could be interpreted by active and sudden oceanward flow of both the unstable hot mantle and the ductile part of the lithosphere during the break-up stage. To cite this article: L. Geoffroy, C. R. Geoscience 337 (2005).

  10. Passive-solar construction handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, E.; Evans, D.; Gardstein, C.

    1981-02-01

    Many of the basic elements of passive solar design are reviewed. Passive solar construction is covered according to system type, each system type discussion including a general discussion of the important design and construction issues which apply to the particular system and case studies illustrating designed and built examples of the system type. The three basic types of passive solar systems discussed are direct gain, thermal storage wall, and attached sunspace. Thermal performance and construction information is presented for typical materials used in passive solar collector components, storage components, and control components. Appended are an overview of analysis methods and a technique for estimating performance. (LEW)

  11. A comprehensive dosimetric study of pancreatic cancer treatment using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT), and passive-scattering and modulated-scanning proton therapy (PT)

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Dionisi, Francesco; Tang, Shikui; Ingram, Mark; Hung, Chun-Yu; Prionas, Evangelos; Lichtenwalner, Phil; Butterwick, Ian; Zhai, Huifang; Yin, Lingshu; Lin, Haibo; Kassaee, Alireza; Avery, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    With traditional photon therapy to treat large postoperative pancreatic target volume, it often leads to poor tolerance of the therapy delivered and may contribute to interrupted treatment course. This study was performed to evaluate the potential advantage of using passive-scattering (PS) and modulated-scanning (MS) proton therapy (PT) to reduce normal tissue exposure in postoperative pancreatic cancer treatment. A total of 11 patients with postoperative pancreatic cancer who had been previously treated with PS PT in University of Pennsylvania Roberts Proton Therapy Center from 2010 to 2013 were identified. The clinical target volume (CTV) includes the pancreatic tumor bed as well as the adjacent high-risk nodal areas. Internal (iCTV) was generated from 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT), taking into account target motion from breathing cycle. Three-field and 4-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy, 2-arc volumetric-modulated radiation therapy, and 2-field PS and MS PT were created on the patients’ average CT. All the plans delivered 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). Overall, 98% of PTV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose and 99% of iCTV received 98% prescription dose. The results show that all the proton plans offer significant lower doses to the left kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), stomach (mean and V{sub 20} {sub Gy}), and cord (maximum dose) compared with all the photon plans, except 3-field 3DCRT in cord maximum dose. In addition, MS PT also provides lower doses to the right kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), liver (mean dose), total bowel (V{sub 20} {sub Gy} and mean dose), and small bowel (V{sub 15} {sub Gy} absolute volume ratio) compared with all the photon plans and PS PT. The dosimetric advantage of PT points to the possibility of treating tumor bed and comprehensive nodal areas while providing a more tolerable treatment course that could be used for dose

  12. Battery hydrometer with analog output

    SciTech Connect

    Patis, B.L.

    1982-09-21

    There is disclosed a battery hydrometer for providing an analog electrical signal having a magnitude related to the specific gravity of a battery electrolyte. The hydrometer includes a source of radiation for providing a detectable beam of radiation and a piston member arranged to be submerged within the electrolyte and to intercept and modulate the beam of radiation in response to the specific gravity of the electrolyte. The piston member is suspended within the electrolyte by a spring which exerts a compressive force upon the piston member against which the electrolyte must act. The hydrometer further includes a radiation detector aligned with the radiation source for providing an analog electrical signal having a magnitude responsive to the modulated beam of radiation.

  13. Analog Nonvolatile Computer Memory Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd

    2007-01-01

    In nonvolatile random-access memory (RAM) circuits of a proposed type, digital data would be stored in analog form in ferroelectric field-effect transistors (FFETs). This type of memory circuit would offer advantages over prior volatile and nonvolatile types: In a conventional complementary metal oxide/semiconductor static RAM, six transistors must be used to store one bit, and storage is volatile in that data are lost when power is turned off. In a conventional dynamic RAM, three transistors must be used to store one bit, and the stored bit must be refreshed every few milliseconds. In contrast, in a RAM according to the proposal, data would be retained when power was turned off, each memory cell would contain only two FFETs, and the cell could store multiple bits (the exact number of bits depending on the specific design). Conventional flash memory circuits afford nonvolatile storage, but they operate at reading and writing times of the order of thousands of conventional computer memory reading and writing times and, hence, are suitable for use only as off-line storage devices. In addition, flash memories cease to function after limited numbers of writing cycles. The proposed memory circuits would not be subject to either of these limitations. Prior developmental nonvolatile ferroelectric memories are limited to one bit per cell, whereas, as stated above, the proposed memories would not be so limited. The design of a memory circuit according to the proposal must reflect the fact that FFET storage is only partly nonvolatile, in that the signal stored in an FFET decays gradually over time. (Retention times of some advanced FFETs exceed ten years.) Instead of storing a single bit of data as either a positively or negatively saturated state in a ferroelectric device, each memory cell according to the proposal would store two values. The two FFETs in each cell would be denoted the storage FFET and the control FFET. The storage FFET would store an analog signal value

  14. Classical Analog to Entanglement Reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitambar, Eric; Fortescue, Ben; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu

    2015-08-01

    In this Letter we study the problem of secrecy reversibility. This asks when two honest parties can distill secret bits from some tripartite distribution pX Y Z and transform secret bits back into pX Y Z at equal rates using local operation and public communication. This is the classical analog to the well-studied problem of reversibly concentrating and diluting entanglement in a quantum state. We identify the structure of distributions possessing reversible secrecy when one of the honest parties holds a binary distribution, and it is possible that all reversible distributions have this form. These distributions are more general than what is obtained by simply constructing a classical analog to the family of quantum states known to have reversible entanglement. An indispensable tool used in our analysis is a conditional form of the Gács-Körner common information.

  15. Adaptive passive fathometer processing.

    PubMed

    Siderius, Martin; Song, Heechun; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S; Hursky, Paul; Harrison, Chris

    2010-04-01

    Recently, a technique has been developed to image seabed layers using the ocean ambient noise field as the sound source. This so called passive fathometer technique exploits the naturally occurring acoustic sounds generated on the sea-surface, primarily from breaking waves. The method is based on the cross-correlation of noise from the ocean surface with its echo from the seabed, which recovers travel times to significant seabed reflectors. To limit averaging time and make this practical, beamforming is used with a vertical array of hydrophones to reduce interference from horizontally propagating noise. The initial development used conventional beamforming, but significant improvements have been realized using adaptive techniques. In this paper, adaptive methods for this process are described and applied to several data sets to demonstrate improvements possible as compared to conventional processing.

  16. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, Paul F.; Cooke, Franklin E.; Fitch, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA.

  17. Passive Ball Capture Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cloyd, Richard A. (Inventor); Bryan, Thomas C. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A passive ball capture joint has a sleeve with a plurality of bores distributed about a circumference thereof and formed therethrough at an acute angle relative to the sleeve's longitudinal axis. A spring-loaded retainer is slidingly fitted in each bore and is biased such that, if allowed, will extend at least partially into the sleeve to retain a ball therein. A ring, rotatably mounted about the bores, has an interior wall defining a plurality of shaped races that bear against the spring-loaded retainers. A mechanized rotational force producer is coupled to the ring. The ring can be rotated from a first position (that presses the retainers into the sleeve to lock the ball in place) to a second position (that allows the retainers to springback out of the sleeve to release the ball).

  18. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, P.F.; Cooke, F.E.; Fitch, J.R.

    1994-01-25

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA. 1 figure.

  19. Passive focus sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Kai; Knop, Karl

    1995-05-01

    A focus-sensor module that could take the place of the visual-image control for professional large-format cameras was fabricated. In addition, a passive focus-sensing method was shown to work at arbitrary locations and orientations in the recording plane of large-format professional cameras. A focus resolution of better than 0.1 mm and a range of measurement of +/- 5 mm at the image side were obtained at a minimum level of illuminance and with an aperture f/5.6 of the imaging lens. In the current method, three out of four images that arose from various sections of the camera's objective lens were applied for triangulation. The demonstrated approach was based on a linear photodiode array and employed one-dimensional image information for focus sensing.

  20. Passive magnetic bearing system

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Richard F.

    2014-09-02

    An axial stabilizer for the rotor of a magnetic bearing provides external control of stiffness through switching in external inductances. External control also allows the stabilizer to become a part of a passive/active magnetic bearing system that requires no external source of power and no position sensor. Stabilizers for displacements transverse to the axis of rotation are provided that require only a single cylindrical Halbach array in its operation, and thus are especially suited for use in high rotation speed applications, such as flywheel energy storage systems. The elimination of the need of an inner cylindrical array solves the difficult mechanical problem of supplying support against centrifugal forces for the magnets of that array. Compensation is provided for the temperature variation of the strength of the magnetic fields of the permanent magnets in the levitating magnet arrays.

  1. Commentary on "Capturing the Evasive Passive"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillo-Martin, Diane; Snyder, William

    2009-01-01

    Passives has been the focus of much research in language acquisition since the 1970s. It has been clear from this research that young children seldom produce passives spontaneously, particularly "long" or "full" passives with a by-phrase; and they usually perform poorly on experimental tests of the comprehension of passives, especially passives of…

  2. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

  3. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1994-01-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

  4. Thermal analog device reduces machining errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Thermal analog devices predict thermal expansion and contraction of machine structures subjected to various heat inputs. Analog devices correct positioning of machine tools to compensate for distortion of machine frame.

  5. Simple Electronic Analog of a Josephson Junction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, R. W.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates that an electronic Josephson junction analog constructed from three integrated circuits plus an external reference oscillator can exhibit many of the circuit phenomena of a real Josephson junction. Includes computer and other applications of the analog. (Author/SK)

  6. Basic Electricity--a Novel Analogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Richard

    1996-01-01

    Uses the analogy of water flow to introduce concepts in basic electricity. Presents a demonstration that uses this analogy to help students grasp the relationship between current, voltage, and resistance. (JRH)

  7. Hegel, Analogy, and Extraterrestrial Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Joseph T.

    Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel rejected the possibility of life outside of the Earth, according to several scholars of extraterrestrial life. Their position is that the solar system and specifically the planet Earth is the unique place in the cosmos where life, intelligence, and rationality can be. The present study offers a very different interpretation of Hegel's statements about the place of life on Earth by suggesting that, although Hegel did not believe that there were other solar systems where rationality is present, he did in fact suggest that planets in general, not the Earth exclusively, have life and possibly also intelligent inhabitants. Analogical syllogisms are superficial, according to Hegel, insofar as they try to conclude that there is life on the Moon even though there is no evidence of water or air on that body. Similar analogical arguments for life on the Sun made by Johann Elert Bode and William Herschel were considered by Hegel to be equally superficial. Analogical arguments were also used by astronomers and philosophers to suggest that life could be found on other planets in our solar system. Hegel offers no critique of analogical arguments for life on other planets, and in fact Hegel believed that life would be found on other planets. Planets, after all, have meteorological processes and therefore are "living" according to his philosophical account, unlike the Moon, Sun, and comets. Whereas William Herschel was already finding great similarities between the Sun and the stars and had extended these similarities to the property of having planets or being themselves inhabitable worlds, Hegel rejected this analogy. The Sun and stars have some properties in common, but for Hegel one cannot conclude from these similarities to the necessity that stars have planets. Hegel's arguments against the presence of life in the solar system were not directed against other planets, but rather against the Sun and Moon, both of which he said have a different

  8. Simulation of a passive solar energy system. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Slate, M.P.

    1982-12-01

    A simple lumped capacitance-resistance model is used to simulate heat flow in a residential size structure heated passively by the sun. The model takes the form of an analogous electrical circuit. A computer program was written to analyse the circuit. By altering the input parameters of the program, the thermal performance of a wide variety of passive solar designs can be investigated for any geographical location. By comparing program generated data to data taken from experimental test cells in Los Alamos, New Mexico, it was found that the simulation program predicted energy use to within 4 percent of measured values. Also, the computer program predicted temperature swings to within 16 percent of measured swings. Correlation with empirical methods of calculating monthly and annual savings in fuel use for heating was poor. Using the simulation calculations as a base, the predictions of anual savings differed by as much as 76 percent.

  9. Science Teachers' Analogical Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mozzer, Nilmara Braga; Justi, Rosária

    2013-01-01

    Analogies can play a relevant role in students' learning. However, for the effective use of analogies, teachers should not only have a well-prepared repertoire of validated analogies, which could serve as bridges between the students' prior knowledge and the scientific knowledge they desire them to understand, but also know how to…

  10. [Passive euthanasia and living will].

    PubMed

    Julesz, Máté

    2014-07-01

    This article deals with the intentional distinction between murder of first degree and passive euthanasia. In Hungary, active euthanasia is considered to be a murder of first degree, whilst the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg and Switzerland have legalized the active form of mercy killing in Europe. The palliative terminal care, when e.g. giving pain-killer morphine to the patient, might result in decreasing the patient's life-span, and thus causing indirect euthanasia. However, the legal institution of living will exists in several counter-euthanasia countries. The living will allows future patients to express their decision in advance to refuse a life-sustaining treatment, e.g. in case of irreversible coma. The institution of living will exists in Germany and in Hungary too. Nevertheless, the formal criteria of living will make it hardly applicable. The patient ought to express his/her will before a notary public in advance, and he/she should hand it over when being hospitalized. If the patient is not able to present his/her living will to his/her doctor in the hospital, then his/her only hope remains that he/she has given a copy of the living will to the family doctor previously, and the family doctor will notify the hospital.

  11. The synthesis of spermine analogs of the shark aminosterol squalamine.

    PubMed

    Shu, Youheng; Jones, Stephen R; Kinney, William A; Selinsky, Barry S

    2002-03-01

    Aminosterols isolated from the dogfish shark Squalus acanthias are promising therapeutic agents in the treatment of infection and cancer. One of these, MSI-1436, has been shown to possess antimicrobial activity slightly better than squalamine. In this study, a series of analogs of MSI-1436 have been synthesized from stigmasterol. The 7 alpha-hydroxy substituent of MSI-1436 was either omitted or the stereochemistry modified to the 7 beta position. Also, analogs of MSI-1436 with 24-sulfate, 24-amino, and 24-hydroxy substituents were synthesized in order to assess the importance of the side chain functional group on antimicrobial activity. All of the analogs possess significant antimicrobial activity, suggesting that substitution at C7 and C24 of the aminosterols plays a minor role in their antimicrobial potency. PMID:11856553

  12. Passive blast pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

    2013-03-19

    A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

  13. New passive helicopter detector

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sandia has developed a new helicopter detector. The device relies on the correlation between the acoustic wave from the helicopter and the resulting coupled seismic wave. A significant feature of this approach is that the detector is completely passive; there is no radio frequency radiation. Intended for deployment as a perimeter sensor around a site, the unit offers a low nuisance/false alarm rate and a high probability of detection for a wide range of helicopters. Reliable detection occurs when the target is at high altitude and also very near the earth's surface. Detection ranges start at one kilometer for the small, four-place, civilian helicopter and approach five kilometers for heavier, military types. The system has two parts: a transducer package containing a microphone and a geophone and a digital processor. Development is underway for a model which will be AC powered and well suited to permanent facilities. A prototype unit using a lightweight, battery powered processor is being constructed for rapid-deployment applications. 6 figs.

  14. Passive-solar greenhouse

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Our project objective was to design, construct, and operate a commercialized (16' x 50') passive, solar greenhouse. The structure was originally intended as a vegetable forcing facility to produce vegetable crops in the off-season. Building and size constraints and economic considerations convinced us to use the greenhouse for producing bedding plants and vegetable starts in the spring, high value vegetables (tomatoes, cucumbers) in the fall and forced bulbs in the winter. This crop sequence allows us to use the greenhouse all year without additional heat as the crops are adopted to the temperature regime of the greenhouse during each particular season. In our first season, the greenhouse performed beautifully. The lowest temperature recorded was 38/sup 0/F after 4 cold, cloudy days in February. The production of bedding plants has allowed us to diversify our products and the early transplants we produced were a great asset to our vegetable farming operation. Although construction cost (4.57 sq. ft.) is higher than that of a conventional polyethylene-covered, quonset-type greenhouse (approx. $1.92 sq. ft.), our annual operating cost is cheaper than that of a conventional greenhouse (0.49 cents sq. ft. versus 0.67 cents sq. ft.) due to a longer usable lifetime of the structure and the elimination of heating costs. Our structure has been toured by interested individuals, school and farm groups. We plan to publicize the structure and its advantages by promoting more visits to the site.

  15. Passive Acoustic Vessel Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwal, Pasang Sherpa

    This thesis investigates the development of a low-cost passive acoustic system for localizing moving vessels to monitor areas where human activities such as fishing, snorkeling and poaching are restricted. The system uses several off-the-shelf sensors with unsynchronized clocks where the Time Difference of Arrival (TDOA) or time delay is extracted by cross-correlation of the signal between paired sensors. The cross-correlation function uses phase correlation or Phase Transform (PHAT) which whitens the cross-spectrum in order to de-emphasize dominant frequency components. Using the locations of pairs of sensors as foci, hyperbolic equations can be defined using the time delay between them. With three or more sensors, multiple hyperbolic functions can be calculated which intersect at a unique point: the boat's location. It is also found that increasing separation distances between sensors decreased the correlation between the signals. However larger separation distances have better localization capability than with small distances. Experimental results from the Columbia and Willamette Rivers are presented to demonstrate performance.

  16. Passive Vaporizing Heat Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, TImothy R.; Ashford, Victor A.; Carpenter, Michael G.; Bier, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    A passive vaporizing heat sink has been developed as a relatively lightweight, compact alternative to related prior heat sinks based, variously, on evaporation of sprayed liquids or on sublimation of solids. This heat sink is designed for short-term dissipation of a large amount of heat and was originally intended for use in regulating the temperature of spacecraft equipment during launch or re-entry. It could also be useful in a terrestrial setting in which there is a requirement for a lightweight, compact means of short-term cooling. This heat sink includes a hermetic package closed with a pressure-relief valve and containing an expendable and rechargeable coolant liquid (e.g., water) and a conductive carbon-fiber wick. The vapor of the liquid escapes when the temperature exceeds the boiling point corresponding to the vapor pressure determined by the setting of the pressure-relief valve. The great advantage of this heat sink over a melting-paraffin or similar phase-change heat sink of equal capacity is that by virtue of the =10x greater latent heat of vaporization, a coolant-liquid volume equal to =1/10 of the paraffin volume can suffice.

  17. Visual homing in analog hardware.

    PubMed

    Möller, R

    1999-10-01

    Insects of several species rely on visual landmarks for returning to important locations in their environment. The "average landmark vector model" is a parsimonious model which reproduces some aspects of the visual homing behavior of bees and ants. To gain insights in the structure and complexity of the neural apparatus that might underly the navigational capabilities of these animals, the average landmark vector model was implemented in analog hardware and used to control a mobile robot. The experiments demonstrate that the apparently complex task of visual homing might be realized by simple and mostly peripheral neural circuits in insect brains.

  18. Classical analog of quantum phase

    SciTech Connect

    Ord, G.N.

    1992-07-01

    A modified version of the Feynman relativistic chessboard model (FCM) is investigated in which the paths involved are spirals in the space-time. Portions of the paths in which the particle`s proper time is reversed are interpreted in terms of antiparticles. With this intepretation the particle-antiparticle field produced by such trajectories provides a classical analog of the phase associated with particle paths in the unmodified FCM. It is shwon that in the nonrelativistic limit the resulting kernel is the correct Dirac propagator and that particle-antiparticle symmetry is in this case responsible for quantum interference. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  19. In Situ Geophysical Exploration by Humans in Mars Analog Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiro, B. R.; Ferrone, K. L.

    2010-01-01

    We carried out three geophysical experiments in Mars analog environments in order to better understand the challenges future astronauts will face when conducting similar surveys on Mars or the Moon. The experiments included a passive seismometer deployment and a time-domain electromagnetic survey at the Flashline Mars Arctic Research Station (FMARS) on Devon Island, Canada and a seismic refraction survey in southeastern Utah at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS). FMARS is located on the rim of the 23 Ma Haughton Crater in a polar desert environment. MDRS is located in an area with sedimentary plateaus and canyons of Jurassic to Cretaceous age. Both facilities were built by The Mars Society to help develop key knowledge about human Mars exploration. Crews of six spend 2-4 weeks in the habitats and conduct eld research on simulated extravehicular activities (EVAs) wearing mock spacesuits. The work reported here was conducted in July 2009 at FMARS and February 2010 at MDRS.

  20. Orion Passive Thermal: Control Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez-Hermandez, Angel; Miller, Stephen W.

    2009-01-01

    A general overview of the NASA Orion Passive Thermal Control System (PTCS) is presented. The topics include: 1) Orion in CxP Hierarchy; 2) General Orion Description/Orientation; and 3) Orion PTCS Overview.

  1. [Passive smoking. Effects on health].

    PubMed

    Trédaniel, J; Zalcman, G; Boffetta, P; Hirsch, A

    1993-05-15

    Passive smoking--also called involuntary or environmental smoking--is the exposure of non-smokers to the tobacco smoke released by smokers. The physico-chemical composition of tobacco smoke, and notably its contents in toxic and carcinogenic substances, is the same in the secondary stream between puffs as in the primary stream released by the smoker. The pathogenic effects of passive smoking are increasingly well known and accepted. A high incidence of respiratory tract infections and of chronic respiratory and asthmatic symptoms is observed in children. In adults, passive smoking seems to be one of the main risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Its repercussions on the respiratory tracts is difficult to evaluate, but there are marked by an increase of respiratory symptoms and perhaps of chronic obstructive lung diseases. Finally, it is now recognized that passive smoking is a major risk factor for primary lung cancer in non-smokers exposed to tobacco smoke. PMID:8235360

  2. Passivating metals on cracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mckay, D.L.

    1980-01-15

    Metals such as nickel, vanadium and iron contaminating a cracking catalyst are passivated by contacting the cracking catalyst under elevated temperature conditions with antimony selenide, antimony sulfide, antimony sulfate, bismuth selenide, bismuth sulfide, or bismuth phosphate.

  3. Words on walls: Passive eating disorder education.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Mary E; Henkel, Kristin E

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effect of a short-term passive intervention on nursing students' beliefs about eating disorders (EDs). Before and after a weeklong ED education poster campaign, participants completed questionnaires assessing their attitudes about individuals with EDs. Results showed a reduction in the belief that people with EDs are almost always women, increased attribution to biological and genetic factors, and decreased attribution to society's thin ideal. Personal connection moderated response to the items: [people with EDs] "are putting their lives at risk" and "would not improve with treatment." This intervention shows promise for reducing ED-associated stereotype endorsement among medical professionals.

  4. GnRH analogs in reproductive medicine.

    PubMed

    Hodgen, G D

    1991-03-01

    The uses of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs in in vitro fertilization (IVF), gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) or related assisted reproductive technologies has advanced rapidly since initial efforts in the early 1980's. By making selective amino acid substitutions, often including the 6 and 10 position, the peptide chemists designed the compounds that we call the GnRH agonists of today. GnRH antagonists possess amino substitutions usually involving positions 1,2,3, 6 and 10, although others may be used. Moreover, recent versions are chemically very sophisticated, often having up to 5 D-amino acids (only L-amino acids occur naturally) and a variety of blocking groups that confer metabolic stability and reduced allergic side-effects. The first available formulation of a GnRH agonist product in the USA was an aqueous preparation for sc injection (usually once or twice daily). It has been studied for several years both in the treatment of prostatic carcinoma and for treatment of children presenting with true precocious puberty. More recently, a depo (monthly) preparation, which microencapulates the GnRH agonist in biodegradable microspheres, received registry approval for treatment of prostatic carcinoma. Also, an implant formulation aimed at chronic treatment indications, as well as nasal delivery products (usually applied multiple times daily) are in development. I will leave specific predictions of the future to those bearing higher powers, except to anticipate that when a safe and effective GnRH antagonist product is developed, it is likely to offer special advantages for IVF/GIFT treatment because of three apparent advantages over GnRH agonist products.

  5. Effect of passivator on Cu form transformation in pig manure aerobic composting and application in soil.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Ming; Lu, Peng-Zhen; Chen, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Hui; Fu, Jie

    2015-10-01

    A sequential extraction approach was used to evaluate the effects of various combinations of passivators (sepiolite, phosphate rock, and coal fly ash) on the concentration and speciation of Cu in swine manure aerobic compost along with soil to which the compost had been applied. The results indicate that the various passivators altered the bound forms of Cu in pig manure and soil; the concentrations of exchangeable and Fe-Mn-bound Cu decreased, whereas the residual Cu concentration increased, indicating that Cu transformed to low-availability forms after the passivator treatments. The concentrations of the carbonate-bound and organic-bound Cu varied widely. Among all treatments, the treatment of the control + straw + sepiolite + coal fly ash (2.5 %) + phosphate rock (5.0 %) resulted in the most efficient passivation of Cu; the percentage of residual Cu reached 3.91-21.14 %, obviously surpassing the percentage for the control without passivation. The treatment of the control + straw + sepiolite + phosphate rock (2.5 %) resulted in the lowest residual Cu fraction (0.85 %) among passivator treatments. These results show that the addition of suitable combinations of passivators to the composting process reduced the availability of Cu and the risk of Cu pollution during the application of composted pig manure to soil. Passivation also decreased the Cu content of Apium graveolens.

  6. Effect of passivator on Cu form transformation in pig manure aerobic composting and application in soil.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Ming; Lu, Peng-Zhen; Chen, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Hui; Fu, Jie

    2015-10-01

    A sequential extraction approach was used to evaluate the effects of various combinations of passivators (sepiolite, phosphate rock, and coal fly ash) on the concentration and speciation of Cu in swine manure aerobic compost along with soil to which the compost had been applied. The results indicate that the various passivators altered the bound forms of Cu in pig manure and soil; the concentrations of exchangeable and Fe-Mn-bound Cu decreased, whereas the residual Cu concentration increased, indicating that Cu transformed to low-availability forms after the passivator treatments. The concentrations of the carbonate-bound and organic-bound Cu varied widely. Among all treatments, the treatment of the control + straw + sepiolite + coal fly ash (2.5 %) + phosphate rock (5.0 %) resulted in the most efficient passivation of Cu; the percentage of residual Cu reached 3.91-21.14 %, obviously surpassing the percentage for the control without passivation. The treatment of the control + straw + sepiolite + phosphate rock (2.5 %) resulted in the lowest residual Cu fraction (0.85 %) among passivator treatments. These results show that the addition of suitable combinations of passivators to the composting process reduced the availability of Cu and the risk of Cu pollution during the application of composted pig manure to soil. Passivation also decreased the Cu content of Apium graveolens. PMID:25982987

  7. Analog computing by Brewster effect.

    PubMed

    Youssefi, Amir; Zangeneh-Nejad, Farzad; Abdollahramezani, Sajjad; Khavasi, Amin

    2016-08-01

    Optical computing has emerged as a promising candidate for real-time and parallel continuous data processing. Motivated by recent progresses in metamaterial-based analog computing [Science343, 160 (2014)SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1242818], we theoretically investigate the realization of two-dimensional complex mathematical operations using rotated configurations, recently reported in [Opt. Lett.39, 1278 (2014)OPLEDP0146-959210.1364/OL.39.001278]. Breaking the reflection symmetry, such configurations could realize both even and odd Green's functions associated with spatial operators. Based on such an appealing theory and by using the Brewster effect, we demonstrate realization of a first-order differentiator. Such an efficient wave-based computation method not only circumvents the major potential drawbacks of metamaterials, but also offers the most compact possible device compared to conventional bulky lens-based optical signal and data processors.

  8. QCD analogy for quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdom, Bob; Ren, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Quadratic gravity presents us with a renormalizable, asymptotically free theory of quantum gravity. When its couplings grow strong at some scale, as in QCD, then this strong scale sets the Planck mass. QCD has a gluon that does not appear in the physical spectrum. Quadratic gravity has a spin-2 ghost that we conjecture does not appear in the physical spectrum. We discuss how the QCD analogy leads to this conjecture and to the possible emergence of general relativity. Certain aspects of the QCD path integral and its measure are also similar for quadratic gravity. With the addition of the Einstein-Hilbert term, quadratic gravity has a dimensionful parameter that seems to control a quantum phase transition and the size of a mass gap in the strong phase.

  9. Passive Wake Vortex Control

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, J M

    2001-10-18

    works by placing shape memory alloy (SMA) control surfaces on the submarine's diving planes and periodically oscillating them. The modulated control vortices generated by these surfaces interact with the tip vortices on the diving planes, causing an instability to rapidly occur. Though several numerical simulations have been presented, experimental verification does not appear to be available in the open literature. The authors address this problem through a concept called passive wake vortex control (PWVC), which has been demonstrated to rapidly break apart a trailing vortex wake and render it incoherent. PWVC functions by introducing unequal strength, counter-rotating control vortices next to the tip vortices. The presence of these control vortices destabilizes the vortex wake and produces a rapidly growing wake instability.

  10. The Young Solar Analogs Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Richard O.; Saken, J. M.; Corbally, C. J.; Seeds, M. F.; Morrison, S. S.

    2012-01-01

    We are carrying out a long-term project of measuring chromospheric activity and brightness variations in 31 young solar analogs (YSAs) using the Dark Sky Observatory (DSO -- Appalachian State University) 32-inch telescope and the G/M spectrograph. These YSAs are solar-type (spectral types F8 - K2) stars with ages ranging from 0.3 - 1.5 Gyr. The goal of this project is to gain better understanding of the magnetic activity of the early Sun, and especially how that activity may have impacted the development of life on the Earth. This project will also yield insights into the space environments experienced by young Earth analogs. We are currently in our 5th year of obtaining Ca II K & H chromospheric flux measurements, and are beginning to see signs of long-term activity cycles in a number of our stars. In addition, rotational modulation of the chromospheric fluxes is detectable in our data, and we have determined rotational periods for many of our stars. Short timescale increases in the K & H fluxes have been observed in a number of our stars; these events may be related to stellar flares. VATTSpec, a new moderate-resolution spectrograph on the 1.8-m Vatican Telescope in Arizona, has recently become involved with the project. This spectrograph will increase our ability to detect short-term changes in stellar activity on timescales of hours to minutes. We have been monitoring the program stars for one year in a multi-band photometric system consisting of Stromgren-v, and Johnson B, V, and R filters. We will soon add a narrow-band H-alpha filter to the system. Photometry is being carried out with a small piggy-back telescope on the 32-inch, but a robotic photometric telescope is currently being installed at DSO for this purpose. This project is supported by the National Science Foundation.

  11. Children's use of analogy during collaborative reasoning.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Jung; Anderson, Richard C; Hummel, John E; Jadallah, May; Miller, Brian W; Nguyen-Jahiel, Kim; Morris, Joshua A; Kuo, Li-Jen; Kim, Il-Hee; Wu, Xiaoying; Dong, Ting

    2012-01-01

    This microgenetic study examined social influences on children's development of analogical reasoning during peer-led small-group discussions of stories about controversial issues. A total of 277 analogies were identified among 7,215 child turns for speaking during 54 discussions from 18 discussion groups in 6 fourth-grade classrooms (N = 120; age M=10.0, SD=0.6). Use of analogy was found to spread among the children in discussion groups and occur at an accelerating rate, primarily because of the increasing use of novel analogies. Relational analogies with shared surface features triggered purely relational analogies during the next 2 speaking turns, showing a trend of relational shift. These results provide distinctive new evidence for the importance of social interaction in an aspect of cognitive development. PMID:22670717

  12. An emergent approach to analogical inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibodeau, Paul H.; Flusberg, Stephen J.; Glick, Jeremy J.; Sternberg, Daniel A.

    2013-03-01

    In recent years, a growing number of researchers have proposed that analogy is a core component of human cognition. According to the dominant theoretical viewpoint, analogical reasoning requires a specific suite of cognitive machinery, including explicitly coded symbolic representations and a mapping or binding mechanism that operates over these representations. Here we offer an alternative approach: we find that analogical inference can emerge naturally and spontaneously from a relatively simple, error-driven learning mechanism without the need to posit any additional analogy-specific machinery. The results also parallel findings from the developmental literature on analogy, demonstrating a shift from an initial reliance on surface feature similarity to the use of relational similarity later in training. Variants of the model allow us to consider and rule out alternative accounts of its performance. We conclude by discussing how these findings can potentially refine our understanding of the processes that are required to perform analogical inference.

  13. Harnessing sloshing as a passive dampener

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killian, Taylor; Klaus, Robert; Truscott, Tadd

    2011-11-01

    This study investigates the impact dynamics of hollow elastic spheres partially filled with fluid, similar to roller hockey balls. Unlike an empty elastic ball, the fluid mitigates some of the rebound through an impulse driven exchange of energy wherein the fluid is forced into a jet inside the ball. Images gathered through experimentation show that the fluid reacts more quickly to the impact than the ball, which decouples the two masses (fluid and ball), imparts energy to the fluid, and removes rebound energy from the ball. The experimental results are compared to an energy method where energy is transferred from the external motion of the ball, to the internal flow of the fluid. Results suggest that while the internal liquid affects the fluid motion, the rebound characteristics of the ball are uniform for a given amount of fluid. Implications of this work on an analog to the roller hockey ball is a potential use of similar passive dampening systems in sports technology and marine engineering. BYU ORCA.

  14. The effects of passive stretching plus vibration on strength and activation of the plantar flexors.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jonathan D; Herda, Trent J; Trevino, Michael A; Mosier, Eric M

    2016-09-01

    This study examined the effects of passive stretching only (PS+CON) and passive stretching with the addition of continuous vibration (VIB) during post-passive stretching tests (PS+VIB) on peak torque (PT), percent voluntary inactivation (%VI), single stimulus twitch torque (TTSINGLE), and doublet stimuli twitch torque (TTDOUBLET) of the plantar flexors at a short (20° plantar flexion (PF)) and long muscle length (15° dorsiflexion (DF)). Fourteen healthy men (age = 22 ± 3 years) performed isometric maximal voluntary contractions at PF and DF, and passive range of motion (PROM) assessments before and after 8 × 30-s passive stretches without (PS+CON) or with VIB (PS+VIB) administered continuously throughout post-passive stretching tests. The passive properties of the muscle tendon unit were assessed pre- and post-passive stretching via PROM, passive torque (PASSTQ), and musculotendinous stiffness (MTS) measurements. PT, TTSINGLE, and TTDOUBLET decreased, whereas, %VI increased following passive stretching at PF and DF (P < 0.05) with no significant differences between PS+CON and PS+VIB. PASSTQ and MTS decreased while PROM increased post-passive stretching during both trials (P < 0.05). The stretching-induced force/torque deficit and increases in %VI were evident following passive stretching at short and long muscle lengths. Although not statistically significant, effect size calculations suggested large and moderate differences in the absolute changes in PT (Cohen's d = 1.14) and %VI (Cohen's d = 0.54) from pre- to post-passive stretching between treatments, with PS+VIB having greater decreases of PT and higher %VI than PS+CON. The decrement in PT following passive stretching may be primarily neural in origin. PMID:27512816

  15. Classical Analogs of a Diatomic Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, L.; Diaz-de-Anda, A.; Mendez-Sanchez, R. A.; Morales, A.; Flores, J.; Monsivais, G.

    2010-12-21

    Using one dimensional rods with different configurations classical analogs of quantum mechanical systems frequently used in solid state physics can be obtained. Among this analogs we have recently discussed locally periodic rods which lead to band spectra; the effect of a topological defect, and the Wannier Stark ladders. In this paper, we present an elastic analog of the diatomic chain and show how the acoustical and optical bands emerge, as well of the nature of the wave amplitudes.

  16. Resistance to somatostatin analogs in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Colao, Annamaria; Auriemma, Renata S; Lombardi, Gaetano; Pivonello, Rosario

    2011-04-01

    Somatostatin analogs (SA) are widely used in acromegaly, either as first-line or adjuvant treatment after surgery. First-line treatment with these drugs is generally used in the patients with macroadenomas or in those with clinical conditions so severe as to prevent unsafe reactions during anesthesia. Generally, the response to SA takes into account both control of GH and IGF-I excess, with consequent improvement of clinical symptoms directly related to GH and IGF-I excess, and tumor shrinkage. This latter effect is more prominent in the patients treated first-line and bearing large macroadenomas, but it is also observed in patients with microadenomas, even with little clinical implication. Predictors of response are patients' gender, age, initial GH and IGF-I levels, and tumor mass, as well as adequate expression of somatostatin receptor types 2 and 5, those with the highest affinity for octreotide and lanreotide. Only sporadic cases of somatostatin receptor gene mutation or impaired signaling pathways have been described in GH-secreting tumors so far. The response to SA also depends on treatment duration and dosage of the drug used, so that a definition of resistance based on short-term treatments using low doses of long-acting SA is limited. Current data suggest that response to these drugs is better analyzed taking together biochemical and tumoral effects because only the absence of both responses might be considered as a poor response or resistance. This latter evidence seems to occur in 25% of treated patients after 12 months of currently available long-acting SA. PMID:21123741

  17. Real World: Analog Testing in Extreme Environments

    NASA Video Gallery

    See how NASA uses analog testing to simulate space exploration. Explore extreme environments like the Aquarius underwater laboratory in Key Largo, Florida. Find out how scientists use mathematical ...

  18. Dynamic analysis to evaluate viscoelastic passive damping augmentation for the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alberts, Thomas E.; Xia, Houchun; Chen, Yung

    1992-01-01

    The effectiveness of constrained viscoelastic layer damping treatment designs is evaluated separately as passive control measures for low frequency joint dominated modes and higher frequency boom flexure dominated modes using a NASTRAN finite element analysis. Passive damping augmentation is proposed which is based on a constrained viscoelastic layer damping treatment applied to the surface of the manipulators's flexible booms. It is pointed out that even the joint compliance dominated modes can be damped to some degree through appropriate design of the treatment.

  19. Expert analogy use in a naturalistic setting

    PubMed Central

    Kretz, Donald R.; Krawczyk, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    The use of analogy is an important component of human cognition. The type of analogy we produce and communicate depends heavily on a number of factors, such as the setting, the level of domain expertise present, and the speaker's goal or intent. In this observational study, we recorded economics experts during scientific discussion and examined the categorical distance and structural depth of the analogies they produced. We also sought to characterize the purpose of the analogies that were generated. Our results supported previous conclusions about the infrequency of superficial similarity in subject-generated analogs, but also showed that distance and depth characteristics were more evenly balanced than in previous observational studies. This finding was likely due to the nature of the goals of the participants, as well as the broader nature of their expertise. An analysis of analogical purpose indicated that the generation of concrete source examples of more general target concepts was most prevalent. We also noted frequent instances of analogies intended to form visual images of source concepts. Other common purposes for analogies were the addition of colorful speech, inclusion (i.e., subsumption) of a target into a source concept, or differentiation between source and target concepts. We found no association between depth and either of the other two characteristics, but our findings suggest a relationship between purpose and distance; i.e., that visual imagery typically entailed an outside-domain source whereas exemplification was most frequently accomplished using within-domain analogies. Overall, we observed a rich and diverse set of spontaneously produced analogical comparisons. The high degree of expertise within the observed group along with the richly comparative nature of the economics discipline likely contributed to this analogical abundance. PMID:25505437

  20. The role of passive avian head stabilization in flapping flight

    PubMed Central

    Pete, Ashley E.; Kress, Daniel; Dimitrov, Marina A.; Lentink, David

    2015-01-01

    Birds improve vision by stabilizing head position relative to their surroundings, while their body is forced up and down during flapping flight. Stabilization is facilitated by compensatory motion of the sophisticated avian head–neck system. While relative head motion has been studied in stationary and walking birds, little is known about how birds accomplish head stabilization during flapping flight. To unravel this, we approximate the avian neck with a linear mass–spring–damper system for vertical displacements, analogous to proven head stabilization models for walking humans. We corroborate the model's dimensionless natural frequency and damping ratios from high-speed video recordings of whooper swans (Cygnus cygnus) flying over a lake. The data show that flap-induced body oscillations can be passively attenuated through the neck. We find that the passive model robustly attenuates large body oscillations, even in response to head mass and gust perturbations. Our proof of principle shows that bird-inspired drones with flapping wings could record better images with a swan-inspired passive camera suspension. PMID:26311316

  1. The role of passive avian head stabilization in flapping flight.

    PubMed

    Pete, Ashley E; Kress, Daniel; Dimitrov, Marina A; Lentink, David

    2015-09-01

    Birds improve vision by stabilizing head position relative to their surroundings, while their body is forced up and down during flapping flight. Stabilization is facilitated by compensatory motion of the sophisticated avian head-neck system. While relative head motion has been studied in stationary and walking birds, little is known about how birds accomplish head stabilization during flapping flight. To unravel this, we approximate the avian neck with a linear mass-spring-damper system for vertical displacements, analogous to proven head stabilization models for walking humans. We corroborate the model's dimensionless natural frequency and damping ratios from high-speed video recordings of whooper swans (Cygnus cygnus) flying over a lake. The data show that flap-induced body oscillations can be passively attenuated through the neck. We find that the passive model robustly attenuates large body oscillations, even in response to head mass and gust perturbations. Our proof of principle shows that bird-inspired drones with flapping wings could record better images with a swan-inspired passive camera suspension.

  2. The role of passive avian head stabilization in flapping flight.

    PubMed

    Pete, Ashley E; Kress, Daniel; Dimitrov, Marina A; Lentink, David

    2015-09-01

    Birds improve vision by stabilizing head position relative to their surroundings, while their body is forced up and down during flapping flight. Stabilization is facilitated by compensatory motion of the sophisticated avian head-neck system. While relative head motion has been studied in stationary and walking birds, little is known about how birds accomplish head stabilization during flapping flight. To unravel this, we approximate the avian neck with a linear mass-spring-damper system for vertical displacements, analogous to proven head stabilization models for walking humans. We corroborate the model's dimensionless natural frequency and damping ratios from high-speed video recordings of whooper swans (Cygnus cygnus) flying over a lake. The data show that flap-induced body oscillations can be passively attenuated through the neck. We find that the passive model robustly attenuates large body oscillations, even in response to head mass and gust perturbations. Our proof of principle shows that bird-inspired drones with flapping wings could record better images with a swan-inspired passive camera suspension. PMID:26311316

  3. Passivated ambipolar black phosphorus transistors.

    PubMed

    Yue, Dewu; Lee, Daeyeong; Jang, Young Dae; Choi, Min Sup; Nam, Hye Jin; Jung, Duk-Young; Yoo, Won Jong

    2016-07-01

    We report the first air-passivated ambipolar BP transistor formed by applying benzyl viologen, which serves as a surface charge transfer donor for BP flakes. The passivated BP devices exhibit excellent stability under both an ambient atmosphere and vacuum; their transistor performance is maintained semi-permanently. Unlike their intrinsic p-type properties, passivated BP devices present advantageous ambipolar properties with much higher electron mobility up to ∼83 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) from 2-terminal measurement at 300 K, compared to other reported studies on n-type BP transistors. On the basis of the n-type doping effect that originated from benzyl viologen, we also systematically investigated the BP thickness dependence of our devices on electrical properties, in which we found the best electron transport performance to be attained when an ∼10 nm thick BP flake was used. PMID:27283027

  4. Synthesis, Biological Evaluation, and Molecular Docking of 8-imino-2-oxo-2H,8H-pyrano[2,3-f]chromene Analogs: New Dual AChE Inhibitors as Potential Drugs for the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Jeelan Basha; Palaka, Bhagath Kumar; Penumala, Mohan; Eadlapalli, Siddhartha; Darla Mark, Manidhar; Ampasala, Dinakara Rao; Vadde, Ramakrishna; Amooru Gangaiah, Damu

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease onset and progression are associated with the dysregulation of multiple and complex physiological processes, and a successful therapeutic approach should therefore address more than one target. In line with this modern paradigm, a series of 8-imino-2-oxo-2H,8H-pyrano[2,3-f]chromene analogs (4a-q) were synthesized and evaluated for their multitarget-directed activity on acetylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical, and amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) specific targets for Alzheimer's disease therapy. Most of the synthesized compounds showed remarkable acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities in low nm concentrations and good ABTS radical scavenging activity, however, no evidence of BuChE inhibitory activity. Among them, 3-bromobenzylamide derivative 4m exhibited the best acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity with IC50 value of 13 ± 1.4 nm which is 51-fold superior to galantamine, a reference drug. Kinetic and molecular docking studies indicated 4m as mixed-type inhibitor, binding simultaneously to catalytic active and peripheral anionic sites of acetylcholinesterase. Five compounds 4e, 4f, 4g, 4j, and 4k have shown 1.4- to 2.5-fold of higher antioxidant activities than trolox. Interestingly, the most active compound 4m demonstrated dosage-dependent acceleration of Aβ1-42 aggregation, which may reduce toxicity of oligomers. Overall, these results lead to discovery of fused tricyclic coumarins as promising dual binding site inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase and afford multifunctional compounds with potential impact for further pharmacological development in Alzheimer's therapy. PMID:26833890

  5. A synthetic kisspeptin analog that triggers ovulation and advances puberty

    PubMed Central

    Decourt, C.; Robert, V.; Anger, K.; Galibert, M.; Madinier, J.-B.; Liu, X.; Dardente, H.; Lomet, D.; Delmas, A. F.; Caraty, A.; Herbison, A. E.; Anderson, G. M; Aucagne, V.; Beltramo, M.

    2016-01-01

    The neuropeptide kisspeptin and its receptor, KiSS1R, govern the reproductive timeline of mammals by triggering puberty onset and promoting ovulation by stimulating gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion. To overcome the drawback of kisspeptin short half-life we designed kisspeptin analogs combining original modifications, triazole peptidomimetic and albumin binding motif, to reduce proteolytic degradation and to slow down renal clearance, respectively. These analogs showed improved in vitro potency and dramatically enhanced pharmacodynamics. When injected intramuscularly into ewes (15 nmol/ewe) primed with a progestogen, the best analog (compound 6, C6) induced synchronized ovulations in both breeding and non-breeding seasons. Ovulations were fertile as demonstrated by the delivery of lambs at term. C6 was also fully active in both female and male mice but was completely inactive in KiSS1R KO mice. Electrophysiological recordings of GnRH neurons from brain slices of GnRH-GFP mice indicated that C6 exerted a direct excitatory action on GnRH neurons. Finally, in prepubertal female mice daily injections (0.3 nmol/mouse) for five days significantly advanced puberty. C6 ability to trigger ovulation and advance puberty demonstrates that kisspeptin analogs may find application in the management of livestock reproduction and opens new possibilities for the treatment of reproductive disorders in humans. PMID:27245315

  6. Anticancer activity of methyl-substituted oxaliplatin analogs.

    PubMed

    Jungwirth, Ute; Xanthos, Dimitris N; Gojo, Johannes; Bytzek, Anna K; Körner, Wilfried; Heffeter, Petra; Abramkin, Sergey A; Jakupec, Michael A; Hartinger, Christian G; Windberger, Ursula; Galanski, Markus; Keppler, Bernhard K; Berger, Walter

    2012-05-01

    Oxaliplatin is successfully used in systemic cancer therapy. However, resistance development and severe adverse effects are limiting factors for curative cancer treatment with oxaliplatin. The purpose of this study was to comparatively investigate in vitro and in vivo anticancer properties as well as the adverse effects of two methyl-substituted enantiomerically pure oxaliplatin analogs [[(1R,2R,4R)-4-methyl-1,2-cyclohexanediamine] oxalatoplatinum(II) (KP1537), and [(1R,2R,4S)-4-methyl-1,2-cyclohexanediamine]oxalatoplatinum(II) (KP1691)] and to evaluate the impact of stereoisomerism. Although the novel oxaliplatin analogs demonstrated in multiple aspects activities comparable with those of the parental compound, several key differences were discovered. The analogs were characterized by reduced vulnerability to resistance mechanisms such as p53 mutations, reduced dependence on immunogenic cell death induction, and distinctly attenuated adverse effects including weight loss and cold hyperalgesia. Stereoisomerism of the substituted methyl group had a complex and in some aspects even contradictory impact on drug accumulation and anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo. To summarize, methyl-substituted oxaliplatin analogs harbor improved therapeutic characteristics including significantly reduced adverse effects. Hence, they might be promising metal-based anticancer drug candidates for further (pre)clinical evaluation.

  7. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel peripherally active morphiceptin analogs.

    PubMed

    Gach, Katarzyna; do-Rego, Jean Claude; Fichna, Jakub; Storr, Martin; Delbro, Dick; Toth, Geza; Janecka, Anna

    2010-08-01

    Morphiceptin (Tyr-Pro-Phe-Pro-NH(2)), a tetrapeptide present in the enzymatic digest of bovine beta-casein, is a selective ligand of the mu-opioid receptor. In the present study, we describe the synthesis of a series of novel morphiceptin analogs modified in positions 1-3. Two of the obtained analogs, [Dmt(1), D-Ala(2), D-1-Nal(3)]morphiceptin and [Dmt(1), D-NMeAla(2), D-1-Nal(3)]morphiceptin (Dmt-2',6'-dimethyltyrosine and d-1-Nal-3-(1-naphthyl)-D-alanine)) displayed very high mu-receptor affinity, resistance to enzymatic degradation, and remarkable supraspinally mediated analgesia, as shown in the hot-plate test after intracerebroventricular but not intravenous administration, which indicated that they could not cross the blood-brain barrier. Therefore, these two analogs were further tested in vitro and in vivo towards their possible peripheral analgesic activity and inhibitory effect on gastrointestinal (GI) motility. We report that both peptides showed strong antinociceptive effect in the writhing test after intraperitoneal administration, inhibited smooth muscle contractility in vitro and GI motility in vivo. Taken together, these findings indicate that the novel morphiceptin analogs which induce peripheral, but not central antinociception, inhibit GI transit, and possess exceptional metabolic stability, may provide an interesting approach to the development of peripherally restricted agents for the treatment of GI motility disorders, such as diarrhea or diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.

  8. Performance Decrements Following Stress: Learned Helplessness, Passive Uncontrollability, or Distrust?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twiton, Elizabeth M.; Anderson, Ernest B.

    Three explanations for post-stress performance decrement were investigated--learned helplessness, passive uncontrollability, and distrust. A group of male and female undergraduates at Carthage College (N=112) were exposed to one of four stress treatment conditions: escapable noise (EN), inescapable noise (IN), noise experienced with no expectation…

  9. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid analog attenuates angiotensin II hypertension and kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Hye; Falck, John R; Manthati, Vijaya L; Campbell, William B; Imig, John D

    2014-01-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) contribute to blood pressure regulation leading to the concept that EETs can be therapeutically targeted for hypertension and the associated end organ damage. In the present study, we investigated anti-hypertensive and kidney protective actions of an EET analog, EET-B in angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced hypertension. EET-B was administered in drinking water for 14 days (10 mg/kg/d) and resulted in a decreased blood pressure elevation in ANG II hypertension. At the end of the two-week period, blood pressure was 30 mmHg lower in EET analog-treated ANG II hypertensive rats. The vasodilation of mesenteric resistance arteries to acetylcholine was impaired in ANG II hypertension; however, it was improved with EET-B treatment. Further, EET-B protected the kidney in ANG II hypertension as evidenced by a marked 90% decrease in albuminuria and 54% decrease in nephrinuria. Kidney histology demonstrated a decrease in renal tubular cast formation in EET analog-treated hypertensive rats. In ANG II hypertension, EET-B treatment markedly lowered renal inflammation. Urinary monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 excretion was decreased by 55% and kidney macrophage infiltration was reduced by 52% with EET-B treatment. Overall, our results demonstrate that EET-B has anti-hypertensive properties, improves vascular function, and decreases renal inflammation and injury in ANG II hypertension.

  10. Passivation of nitinol wire for vascular implants--a demonstration of the benefits.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, B; Carroll, W M; Kelly, M J

    2002-04-01

    This study investigated a passivation process for polished nitinol wires and vascular stent components, after being given a typical shape setting heat treatment. Heat treated samples were passivated in a nitric acid solution and a series of corrosion tests, surface analysis and chemical analysis was performed. Potentiodynamic polarization tests demonstrated a significant increase in breakdown potential for passivated samples, compared to heat treated surfaces. Surface analysis indicated that the passivation reduces Ni and NiO content in the oxide and increases TiO2 content. Chemical analysis of passivation solutions suggests that the improvement in corrosion resistance is proportional to the quantity of nickel removed. Long term immersion tests demonstrate that nickel release from the surface of the material decreases with time and the quantity of nickel released is lower for passivated samples. The improved corrosion resistance is maintained after extended periods of immersion in saline solution.

  11. Effect of Organic and Inorganic Passivation in Quantum-Dot-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Mauricio Solis; Sánchez, Rafael S; González-Pedro, Victoria; Boix, Pablo P; Mhaisalkar, S G; Rincón, Marina E; Bisquert, Juan; Mora-Seró, Iván

    2013-05-01

    The effect of semiconductor passivation on quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs) has been systematically characterized for CdS and CdS/ZnS. We have found that passivation strongly depends on the passivation agent, obtaining an enhancement of the solar cell efficiency for compounds containing amine and thiol groups and, in contrast, a decrease in performance for passivating agents with acid groups. Passivation can induce a change in the position of TiO2 conduction band and also in the recombination rate and nature, reflected in a change in the β parameter. Especially interesting is the finding that β, and consequently the fill factor can be increased with the passivation treatment. Applying this strategy, record cells of 4.65% efficiency for PbS-based QDSCs have been produced.

  12. Novel Analog For Muscle Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Ryder, Jeff; Buxton, Roxanne; Redd, Elizabeth; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa; Hackney, Kyle; Fiedler, James; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Existing models of muscle deconditioning are cumbersome and expensive (ex: bedrest). We propose a new model utilizing a weighted suit to manipulate strength, power or endurance (function) relative to body weight (BW). Methods: 20 subjects performed 7 occupational astronaut tasks while wearing a suit weighted with 0-120% of BW. Models of the full relationship between muscle function/BW and task completion time were developed using fractional polynomial regression and verified by the addition of pre- and post-flight astronaut performance data using the same tasks. Spline regression was used to identify muscle function thresholds below which task performance was impaired. Results: Thresholds of performance decline were identified for each task. Seated egress & walk (most difficult task) showed thresholds of: leg press (LP) isometric peak force/BW of 18 N/kg, LP power/BW of 18 W/kg, LP work/ BW of 79 J/kg, knee extension (KE) isokinetic/BW of 6 Nm/Kg and KE torque/BW of 1.9 Nm/kg. Conclusions: Laboratory manipulation of strength / BW has promise as an appropriate analog for spaceflight-induced loss of muscle function for predicting occupational task performance and establishing operationally relevant exercise targets.

  13. Novel Analog For Muscle Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Ryder, Jeff; Buxton, Roxanne; Redd. Elizabeth; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa; Hackney, Kyle; Fiedler, James; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Existing models (such as bed rest) of muscle deconditioning are cumbersome and expensive. We propose a new model utilizing a weighted suit to manipulate strength, power, or endurance (function) relative to body weight (BW). Methods: 20 subjects performed 7 occupational astronaut tasks while wearing a suit weighted with 0-120% of BW. Models of the full relationship between muscle function/BW and task completion time were developed using fractional polynomial regression and verified by the addition of pre-and postflightastronaut performance data for the same tasks. Splineregression was used to identify muscle function thresholds below which task performance was impaired. Results: Thresholds of performance decline were identified for each task. Seated egress & walk (most difficult task) showed thresholds of leg press (LP) isometric peak force/BW of 18 N/kg, LP power/BW of 18 W/kg, LP work/BW of 79 J/kg, isokineticknee extension (KE)/BW of 6 Nm/kg, and KE torque/BW of 1.9 Nm/kg.Conclusions: Laboratory manipulation of relative strength has promise as an appropriate analog for spaceflight-induced loss of muscle function, for predicting occupational task performance and establishing operationally relevant strength thresholds.

  14. Solar System Analog; WMO Statement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Scientists searching for extra-solar planets have discovered the closest known analog to our own Solar System. A planet with a mass about twice that of Jupiter is in a near-circular orbit of the star HD70642, a team of astronomers from Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States announced on 3 July at a conference in Paris on extra-solar planets.The planet measures about three-fifths the size of Jupiter, circles its star about every six years, and is in an orbit equivalent to being about halfway between Mars and Jupiter if it were located in our Solar System, according to the astronomers. The star is about 90 light years away from Earth in the constellation Puppis.Public concern about a spate of well-publicized, extreme weather events around the world this year has prompted the World Meteorological Organization to issue a statement that, as global temperatures continues to rise due to climate change, the number and intensity of extreme events might increase. The July 2 statement is based on scientific assessments by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and others, rather than on any new studies, according to Ken Davidson, director orf WMO's World Climate Program Department. The statement cites record high termperatures so far this summer in southern France and in Switzerland, an abnormally high number of tornadoes in the U.S. in May, and particularly heavy rains from tropical cyclones in Sri Lanka.

  15. The anodic passivation of lithium

    SciTech Connect

    James, S.D.

    1983-10-01

    The anodic passivation of Li has been characterized at room temperature in a variety of electrolytes (propylene carbonate, thionyl chloride, sulfur dioxide), as a function of convection and current density and in the presence of water and other impurities. In thionyl chloride the effect of salt concentration (0.5-4.5M, LiA1C1/sub 4/) and acidity (0.5-3M, A1C1/sub 3/) has been studied. The evidence accumulated suggests that anodic passivation is caused by anodic enrichment and eventual precipitation of electrolyte salt in superficial anolyte.

  16. The Pennies-as-Electrons Analogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmann, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Everyday experiences familiarize students with the ways in which electricity is used, but often the underlying concepts remain a mystery. Teachers often use analogies to help students relate the flow of electrons to other common systems, but many times these analogies are incomplete and lead to more student misconceptions. However, the "pass the…

  17. Piperazine-based nucleic acid analogs

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Jurgen; Silks, Louis A.; Michalczyk, Ryszard

    2005-01-11

    A novel nucleoside analog is disclosed which comprises a piperazine ring in the place of the ring ribose or deoxyribose sugar. Monomers utilizing a broad variety of nucleobases are disclosed, as well as oligomers comprising the monomers disclosed herein linked by a variety of linkages, including amide, phosphonamide, and sulfonamide linkages. A method of synthesizing the nucleoside analogs is also disclosed.

  18. An Analog Computer for Electronic Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, A. L.; Iu, H. H. C.; Lu, D. D. C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a compact analog computer and proposes its use in electronic engineering teaching laboratories to develop student understanding of applications in analog electronics, electronic components, engineering mathematics, control engineering, safe laboratory and workshop practices, circuit construction, testing, and maintenance. The…

  19. A Mechanical Analogy for the Photoelectric Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacevic, Milan S.; Djordjevich, Alexandar

    2006-01-01

    Analogy is a potent tool in the teacher's repertoire. It has been particularly well recognized in the teaching of science. However, careful planning is required for its effective application to prevent documented drawbacks when analogies are stretched too far. Befitting the occasion of the World Year of Physics commemorating Albert Einstein's 1905…

  20. Analogical Processes and College Developmental Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulson, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Although a solid body of research concerning the role of analogies in reading processes has emerged at a variety of age groups and reading proficiencies, few of those studies have focused on analogy use by readers enrolled in college developmental reading courses. The current study explores whether 232 students enrolled in mandatory (by placement…

  1. Children's Use of Analogy during Collaborative Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Tzu-Jung; Anderson, Richard C.; Hummel, John E.; Jadallah, May; Miller, Brian W.; Nguyen-Jahiel, Kim; Morris, Joshua A.; Kuo, Li-Jen; Kim, Il-Hee; Wu, Xiaoying; Dong, Ting

    2012-01-01

    This microgenetic study examined social influences on children's development of analogical reasoning during peer-led small-group discussions of stories about controversial issues. A total of 277 analogies were identified among 7,215 child turns for speaking during 54 discussions from 18 discussion groups in 6 fourth-grade classrooms (N = 120; age…

  2. Young Children's Analogical Reasoning in Science Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haglund, Jesper; Jeppsson, Fredrik; Andersson, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory study in a classroom setting investigates first graders' (age 7-8 years, N = 25) ability to perform analogical reasoning and create their own analogies for two irreversible natural phenomena: mixing and heat transfer. We found that the children who contributed actively to a full-class discussion were consistently successful at…

  3. The Structure of Analogical Models in Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentner, Dedre

    Analogical models can be powerful aids to reasoning, as when light is explained in terms of water waves; or they can be misleading, as when chemical processes are thought of in terms of life processes such as putrefaction. This paper proposes a structural characterization of good science analogy using a theoretical approach in which complex…

  4. Mathematical Analogs and the Teaching of Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Kathy; Nason, Rod; Cooper, Tom

    The literature has noted that some mathematical analogs are more effective than others for the teaching of fractions. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of seven mathematical analogs commonly used in the teaching of the partitive quotient fraction construct. A sample of twelve purposively selected Year Three children were presented with…

  5. 38 CFR 4.20 - Analogous ratings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analogous ratings. 4.20 Section 4.20 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES General Policy in Rating § 4.20 Analogous ratings. When an unlisted condition is encountered...

  6. Rotanone analogs: method of preparation and use

    DOEpatents

    VanBrocklin, Henry F; O& #x27; Neil, James P; Gibbs, Andrew R; Erathodiyil, Nandanan

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides rotenone analogs and methods of making and using them. Labeled with single photon and positron emitting isotopes, the rotenone analogs of the present invention are useful in, for example, clinical imaging applications as tracers to measure cardiac blood flow and detect regions of ischemia.

  7. Use of Analogy in Computer Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohl, Heidi L.; Nutter, Jane Terry

    1985-01-01

    Subjects in a study of analogic reasoning use in learning a computer language read text describing an invented LISP dialect and then solved problems and described language constructs. Five of six factors studied indicating use of analogy with a familiar computer language showed statistically significant results, supporting the hypothesis.…

  8. Passive Rotation Range of Motion and Shoulder Subluxation: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Stanish, William; Kozey, Cheryl

    2009-01-01

    Background Conflicting reports of range of motion (ROM) findings exist related to shoulder instability. Knowledge of range of motion findings among individuals with shoulder subluxation may aid in diagnosis and facilitate appropriate management. Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare passive rotation ROM and determine if a symptom-provoking activity alters ROM between patients with shoulder subluxations and healthy controls. Methods Seventeen symptomatic patients with shoulder subluxations and 14 healthy controls between the ages of 18 and 35 years were recruited. Lateral and medial rotation ROM measures were taken using a universal goniometer. Symptoms were assessed using a 10cm visual analog scale (VAS). Each group performed a symptom-provoking activity, and VAS and ROM measures were repeated. Results A two-factor analysis of variance with repeated measures on pre/post activity demonstrated lower medial rotation measures for the instability group, but no differences for lateral rotation or total range (p < 0.05). A “warm-up” effect was noted, with greater ROM found in each group post activity, with a greater increase noted among controls. Analysis of the ratio of lateral rotation to medial rotation ROM found a significantly greater ratio in the instability group. VAS pain scores were greater in the instability group. Conclusion Shoulder subluxation is not necessarily associated with increased rotation ROM, therefore total ROM findings should not be used to screen for instability. Imbalances in rotation ROM may be associated with symptomatic shoulder instability and may have implications for treatment. PMID:21509102

  9. Preservation of FFTF Data Related to Passive Safety Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wootan, David W.; Butner, R. Scott; Omberg, Ronald P.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Nielsen, Deborah L.

    2010-10-01

    One of the goals of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCRD) is to preserve the knowledge that has been gained in the United States on Liquid Metal Reactors (LMR). A key area deserving special attention for preservation is the data relating to passive safety testing that was conducted in FFTF and EBR-II during the 1980’s. Accidents at Unit 4 of the Chernobyl Station and Unit 2 at Three Mile Island changed the safety paradigm of the nuclear power industry. New emphasis was placed on assured safety based on intrinsic plant characteristics that protect not only the public, but the significant investment in the plant as well. Plants designated to perform in this manner are considered to be passively safe since no active sensor/alarm system or human intervention is required to bring the reactor to a safe shutdown condition. The liquid metal reactor (LMR) has several key characteristics needed for a passively safe reactor: reactor coolant with superior heat transfer capability and very high boiling point, low (atmospheric) system pressures, and reliable negative reactivity feedback. The credibility of the design for a passively safe LMR rests on two issues: the validity of analytic methods used to predict passive safety performance and the availability of relevant test data to calibrate design tools. Safety analysis methods used to analyze LMRs under the old safety paradigm were focused on calculating the source term for the Core Disruptive Accident. Passive safety design requires refined analysis methods for transient events because treatment of the detailed reactivity feedbacks is important in predicting the response of the reactor. Similarly, analytic tools should be calibrated against actual test experience in existing LMR facilities. The principal objectives of the combined FFTF natural circulation and Passive Safety Testing program were: 1) to verify natural circulation as a reliable means to safely remove decay heat, 2) to extend passive safety

  10. Passivation of fluorinated activated charcoal

    SciTech Connect

    Del Cul, G.D.; Trowbridge, L.D.; Simmons, D.W.; Williams, D.F.; Toth, L.M.

    1997-10-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE), at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been shut down since 1969 when the fuel salt was drained from the core into two Hastelloy N tanks at the reactor site. In 1995, a multiyear project was launched to remediate the potentially hazardous conditions generated by the movement of fissile material and reactive gases from the storage tanks into the piping system and an auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB). The top 12 in. of the ACB is known by gamma scan and thermal analysis to contain about 2.6 kg U-233. According to the laboratory tests, a few feet of fluorinated charcoal are believed to extend beyond the uranium front. The remainder of the ACB should consist of unreacted charcoal. Fluorinated charcoal, when subjected to rapid heating, can decompose generating gaseous products. Under confined conditions, the sudden exothermic decomposition can produce high temperatures and pressures of near-explosive characteristics. Since it will be necessary to drill and tap the ACB to allow installation of piping and instrumentation for remediation and recovery activities, it is necessary to chemically convert the reactive fluorinated charcoal into a more stable material. Ammonia can be administered to the ACB as a volatile denaturing agent that results in the conversion of the C{sub x}F to carbon and ammonium fluoride, NH{sub 4}F. The charcoal laden with NH{sub 4}F can then be heated without risking any sudden decomposition. The only consequence of heating the treated material will be the volatilization of NH{sub 4}F as a mixture of NH{sub 3} and HF, which would primarily recombine as NH{sub 4}F on surfaces below 200 C. The planned scheme for the ACB denaturing is to flow diluted ammonia gas in steps of increasing NH{sub 3} concentration, 2% to 50%, followed by the injection of pure ammonia. This report summarizes the planned passivation treatment scheme to stabilize the ACB and remove the potential hazards. It also includes basic information

  11. An Analog Earth Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varekamp, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    The earth climate is broadly governed by the radiative power of the sun as well as the heat retention and convective cooling of the atmosphere. I have constructed an analog earth model for an undergraduate climate class that simulates mean climate using these three parameters. The ‘earth’ is a hollow, black, bronze sphere (4 cm diameter) mounted on a thin insulated rod, and illuminated by two opposite optic fibers, with light focused on the sphere by a set of lenses. The sphere is encased in a large double-walled aluminum cylinder (34 cm diameter by 26 cm high) with separate water cooling jackets at the top, bottom, and sides. The cylinder can be filled with a gas of choice at a variety of pressures or can be run in vacuum. The exterior is cladded with insulation, and the temperature of the sphere, atmosphere and walls is monitored with thermocouples. The temperature and waterflow of the three cooling jackets can be monitored to establish the energy output of the whole system; the energy input is the energy yield of the two optic fibers. A small IR transmissive lens at the top provides the opportunity to hook up the fiber of a hyper spectrometer to monitor the emission spectrum of the black ‘earth’ sphere. A pressure gauge and gas inlet-outlet system for flushing of the cell completes it. The heat yield of the cooling water at the top is the sum of the radiative and convective components, whereas the bottom jacket only carries off the radiative heat of the sphere. Undergraduate E&ES students at Wesleyan University have run experiments with dry air, pure CO2, N2 and Ar at 1 atmosphere, and a low vacuum run was accomplished to calibrate the energy input. For each experiment, the lights are flipped on, the temperature acquisition routine is activated, and the sphere starts to warm up until an equilibrium temperature has been reached. The lights are then flipped off and the cooling sequence towards ambient is registered. The energy input is constant for a given

  12. Investigation of Celestial Solid Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sievers, A. J.

    2003-01-01

    Our far infrared studies of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic aerogel grains have demonstrated that the mm and sub-mm wave absorption produced by the fundamental two level systems (TLS) mechanism represents a more significant contribution for these open grain structures than for bulk amorphous silicate grains. We found that the region with the anomalous temperature dependence of the spectral index due to the TLS excitations can extend in a fluffy material up to 80 per cm, which is well beyond its typical upper limit for bulk glasses. Currently there is no theoretical explanation for this surprising result. The effects of reduced dimensionality on the optical properties of carbonaceous grains have been studied with a systematic investigation of carbon aerogels. This spectroscopic approach has permitted a more reliable determination of the single grain mass normalized absorption coefficient based on the experimentally determined characteristics of the fluffy material rather than on first principles calculations involving the bulk properties of the substance. Our finding is that the electrical connectivity of the material is the main factor affecting its far infrared absorption coefficient. Another one of the main constituents of the interstellar dust, amorphous ice, has been investigated in the mm-wave region both in the high (HDA) and low (LDA) density amorphous phases and as a function of impurities. We found that doping either phase with ionic (LiCl) or molecular (methanol) impurities decreases the difference in the mm-wave absorption coefficient between the HDA and LDA ice phases so that the HDA spectrum can be used as an analog for impure ice absorption in the far infrared spectral region.

  13. [Cell analogs of viral proteins].

    PubMed

    Blinov, V M; Gaĭsler, V; Krasnov, G S; Shargunov, A V; Shurdov, M A; Zverev, V V

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal transfer of genes between viruses and their hosts played an important role in the evolution of various eukaryotes including contemporary mammals as well as the pathogens themselves. Elements of viruses of various types can be found in the genome of animals. Endogenous retroviral elements composing up to 8% of human genome length not only determine its high flexibility and rapid adaptation potential. Many of virus genes such as Fv1, Lv1, Lv2 being analogues of capsid and other proteins determine effective suppression of viral replication after cell penetration by the causative agent. Introduction of these elements into genome of a wide variety of animals from fish to primates could have taken place against the background of global natural cataclysms of viral origin. Integration of retrovirus genes coding surface glycoproteins with immunosuppressing domains into genetic apparatus of animals served as an impetus to the development of viviparity and spread ofplacental mammals. Their cell analogs syncytins perform a dual function: take direct part in the formation of syncytiotrophoblast layer of placenta and ensure tolerance of immune system of mother to embryo. The acquisition of cell genes by viruses also played an important role in their evolution: various interleukins and other modulators of immune response introduced into viral genome from cell genetic apparatus became one of the most important factors of pathogenicity of a wide variety of causative agents including poxviruses, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and many others. Evolutionary pathways of the virus and host are thus inseparable from each other, and character of one of these directions is largely dictated by the vector of another. PMID:25051706

  14. The Passive Aggressive Conflict Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitson, Signe

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the Passive Aggressive Conflict Cycle (PACC) helps observers to be able to look beyond behavior and better understand what is occurring beneath the surface. This article presents a real-life example of a seemingly minor conflict between a teacher and child that elicited an apparent major overreaction by the adult. Also provided is a…

  15. Orion Passive Thermal Control Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Stephen W.

    2007-01-01

    An viewgraph presentation of Orion's passive thermal control system is shown. The topics include: 1) Orion in CxP Hierarchy; 2) General Orion Description/Orientation; 3) Module Descriptions and Images; 4) Orion PTCS Overview; 5) Requirements/Interfaces; 6) Design Reference Missions; 7) Natural Environments; 8) Thermal Models; 9) Challenges/Issues; and 10) Testing

  16. [Passive smoking--active killer].

    PubMed

    Palavra, Irena Rojnić; Franelić, Iva Pejnović; Milanović, Sanja Musić; Puljić, Kresimir

    2013-01-01

    Although still not perceived in this way, passive smoking is a public health issue of great importance. World Health Organization estimates that as a result of passive exposure to tobacco smoke each year 600,000 people die, of which 165,000 children. There are 33% of men, 35% of women and 40% of children who do not smoke, but are exposed to second hand smoke, and still only 11% of the world population is protected by adequate smoke-free legislation. Scientific literature provides evidence that passive exposure to tobacco smoke can result in numerous adverse health effects: asthma and allergies, respiratory infections and (middle) ear infections, cancers of various localization, accelerated atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases, retardation of growth and development in children, and in pregnancy it can lead to congenital anomalies and premature birth as well as lower body weight and length of the child. Certainly, the scariest consequence of all is sudden infant death syndrome, also called "death in the crib". Smoke-free policies have proven their effectiveness, but while implementing the laws, it is necessary to raise public awareness of the hazards of, both active and passive, exposure to tobacco smoke. PMID:24490334

  17. Monitored passive-solar buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. W.

    1982-06-01

    Selected performance results from six monitored passive and hybrid solar heated buildings are presented. These employ: a two story trombe wall; a thermosyphoning solar air heater with rock bin storage; a greenhouse; a composite concrete and water trombe wall; two story sunspace; and, for a mobile/modular home, direct gain and roof pond.

  18. Passivated ambipolar black phosphorus transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Dewu; Lee, Daeyeong; Jang, Young Dae; Choi, Min Sup; Nam, Hye Jin; Jung, Duk-Young; Yoo, Won Jong

    2016-06-01

    We report the first air-passivated ambipolar BP transistor formed by applying benzyl viologen, which serves as a surface charge transfer donor for BP flakes. The passivated BP devices exhibit excellent stability under both an ambient atmosphere and vacuum; their transistor performance is maintained semi-permanently. Unlike their intrinsic p-type properties, passivated BP devices present advantageous ambipolar properties with much higher electron mobility up to ~83 cm2 V-1 s-1 from 2-terminal measurement at 300 K, compared to other reported studies on n-type BP transistors. On the basis of the n-type doping effect that originated from benzyl viologen, we also systematically investigated the BP thickness dependence of our devices on electrical properties, in which we found the best electron transport performance to be attained when an ~10 nm thick BP flake was used.We report the first air-passivated ambipolar BP transistor formed by applying benzyl viologen, which serves as a surface charge transfer donor for BP flakes. The passivated BP devices exhibit excellent stability under both an ambient atmosphere and vacuum; their transistor performance is maintained semi-permanently. Unlike their intrinsic p-type properties, passivated BP devices present advantageous ambipolar properties with much higher electron mobility up to ~83 cm2 V-1 s-1 from 2-terminal measurement at 300 K, compared to other reported studies on n-type BP transistors. On the basis of the n-type doping effect that originated from benzyl viologen, we also systematically investigated the BP thickness dependence of our devices on electrical properties, in which we found the best electron transport performance to be attained when an ~10 nm thick BP flake was used. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Transfer characteristics of BP field effect transistors (BV1-BV4) (Fig. S1 and S2 and Table S1); output characteristics of BP field effect transistors in different directions (Fig. S3

  19. Passively Shunted Piezoelectric Damping of Centrifugally-Loaded Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Trudell, Jeffrey J.; Min, James B.

    2009-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center have been investigating shunted piezoelectric circuits as potential damping treatments for turbomachinery rotor blades. This effort seeks to determine the effects of centrifugal loading on passively-shunted piezoelectric - damped plates. Passive shunt circuit parameters are optimized for the plate's third bending mode. Tests are performed both non-spinning and in the Dynamic Spin Facility to verify the analysis, and to determine the effectiveness of the damping under centrifugal loading. Results show that a resistive shunt circuit will reduce resonant vibration for this configuration. However, a tuned shunt circuit will be required to achieve the desired damping level. The analysis and testing address several issues with passive shunt circuit implementation in a rotating system, including piezoelectric material integrity under centrifugal loading, shunt circuit implementation, and tip mode damping.

  20. Antenna for passive RFID tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiopu, Paul; Manea, Adrian; Cristea, Ionica; Grosu, Neculai; Vladescu, Marian; Craciun, Anca-Ileana; Craciun, Alexandru

    2015-02-01

    Minuscule devices, called RFID tags are attached to objects and persons and emit information which positioned readers may capture wirelessly. Many methods of identification have been used, but that of most common is to use a unique serial number for identification of person or object. RFID tags can be characterized as either active or passive [1,2]. Traditional passive tags are typically in "sleep" state until awakened by the reader's emitted field. In passive tags, the reader's field acts to charge the capacitor that powers the badge and this can be a combination of antenna and barcodes obtained with SAW( Surface Acoustic Wave) devices [1,2,3] . The antenna in an RFID tag is a conductive element that permits the tag to exchange data with the reader. The paper contribution are targeted to antenna for passive RFID tags. The electromagnetic field generated by the reader is somehow oriented by the reader antenna and power is induced in the tag only if the orientation of the tag antenna is appropriate. A tag placed orthogonal to the reader yield field will not be read. This is the reason that guided manufacturers to build circular polarized antenna capable of propagating a field that is alternatively polarized on all planes passing on the diffusion axis. Passive RFID tags are operated at the UHF frequencies of 868MHz (Europe) and 915MHz (USA) and at the microwave frequencies of 2,45 GHz and 5,8 GHz . Because the tags are small dimensions, in paper, we present the possibility to use circular polarization microstrip antenna with fractal edge [2].

  1. Genotoxic risk of passive smoking.

    PubMed

    Bos, R P; Henderson, P T

    1984-01-01

    More than 60 chemical components are identified in cigarette smoke which have shown to be carcinogenic. The presence of these chemicals is established in mainstream smoke. However, many of them also appear in sidestream smoke resulting in pollution of indoor air, as is shown by the presence of mutagenic substances. Some rather potent carcinogens like N-nitroso-dimethylamine and benzo(a)pyrene have been established in the air of smoke filled rooms. Only a few studies describe internal exposure of passive smokers. Deposition of sidestream smoke in the human respiratory tract has been established for passive smokers. On the other hand, it was shown that inhalation of air contaminated with sidestream smoke results in an increase in the urinary excretion of products mutagenic in the Salmonella/microsome assay. Three epidemiological studies showed an increased risk of lung cancer for non-smoking wives having smoking husbands. Since it is generally acknowledged that most of the genotoxic carcinogens can be detected by in vitro mutagenicity tests, mutagenicity in urine of passive smokers can be considered as an indication of exposure to carcinogens. This observation suggests that there is a causality in the association between increased cancer risk and passive smoking as was found in three epidemiological studies. It is generally accepted that genotoxic chemicals exert their effects in direct proportion to the level of exposure, which means that for these agents no safe thresholds can be established. Several studies clearly show the presence of genotoxic substances in indoor air as a consequence of smoking. Therefore, the outcome of the epidemiological studies is not surprising. As long as half of the human population persists in smoking, the problems of involuntary inhalation of genotoxic substances will continue for the other half. Strategies to control the environmental cancer problem can only be successful if the health hazards of passive smoking are taken seriously.

  2. Fostering Multilateral Involvement in Analog Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.

    2015-01-01

    International collaboration in space flight research is an effective means for conducting investigations and utilizing limited resources to the fullest extent. Through these multilateral collaborations mutual research questions can be investigated and resources contributed by each international partner to maximize the scientific benefits to all parties. Recently the international partners embraced this approach to initiate collaborations in ground-based space flight analog environments. In 2011, the International Analog Research Working Group was established, and later named the International Human Space Flight Analog Research Coordination Group (HANA). Among the goals of this working group are to 1) establish a framework to coordinate research campaigns, as appropriate, to minimize duplication of effort and enhance synergy; 2) define what analogs are best to use for collaborative interests; and 3) facilitate interaction between discipline experts in order to have the full benefit of international expertise. To accomplish these goals, HANA is currently engaged in developing international research campaigns in ground-based analogs. Plans are being made for an international solicitation for proposals to address research of common interest to all international partners. This solicitation with identify an analog environment that will best accommodate the types of investigations requested. Once selected, studies will be integrated into a campaign and implemented at the analog site. Through these combined efforts, research beneficial to all partners will be conducted efficiently to further address human risks of space exploration.

  3. Analogies: Explanatory Tools in Web-Based Science Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glynn, Shawn M.; Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Fowler, Shawn

    2007-01-01

    This article helps designers of Web-based science instruction construct analogies that are as effective as those used in classrooms by exemplary science teachers. First, the authors explain what analogies are, how analogies foster learning, and what form analogies should take. Second, they discuss science teachers' use of analogies. Third, they…

  4. Bacteriological evaluation of passive ultrasonic activation.

    PubMed

    Spoleti, Pablo; Siragusa, Martha; Spoleti, María Julia

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of passive ultrasonic activation on root canal disinfection. Sixty human teeth (group A: upper incisors, group B: upper canines, and group C: distobuccal root of first upper molars) were selected and sterilized in an autoclave. A standardized inoculum was placed into the canals, and they were incubated for 72 h at 37 degrees C. Then, they were divided into subgroup 1, which received sterile saline (SS) as an irrigant, and subgroup 2, which received sterile saline with passive ultrasonic activation (SU). The endodontic treatment was performed with a crown-down technique. Bacteriological identification of surviving colonies was carried out. Surviving colonies were higher when ultrasonics was not used (group A: SS: x 32.13, SU: x 13.53; group B: SS: x 53.70, SU: x 44.60; group C: SS: x 39.16, SU: x 29.40). The homogeneity proportion tests to compare the results of both subgroups showed that the surviving proportions were higher (p = 0.01) when the ultrasonic activation was not used. PMID:12540211

  5. Programmable Analog-To-Digital Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kist, Edward H., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    High-speed analog-to-digital converter with programmable voltage steps that can be changed during operation. Allows concentration of converter resolution over specific portion of waveform. Particularly useful in digitizing wind-shear radar and lidar return signals, in digital oscilloscopes, and other applications in which desirable to increase digital resolution over specific area of waveform while accepting lower resolution over rest of waveform. Effective increase in dynamic range achieved without increase in number of analog-to-digital converter bits. Enabling faster analog-to-digital conversion.

  6. Analog detection for cavity lifetime spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Harb, Charles C.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Spence, Thomas G.

    2001-05-15

    An analog detection system for determining a ring-down rate or decay rate 1/.tau. of an exponentially decaying ring-down beam issuing from a lifetime or ring-down cavity during a ring-down phase. Alternatively, the analog detection system determines a build-up rate of an exponentially growing beam issuing from the cavity during a ring-up phase. The analog system can be employed in continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CW CRDS) and pulsed CRDS (P CRDS) arrangements utilizing any type of ring-down cavity including ring-cavities and linear cavities.

  7. Analog detection for cavity lifetime spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Harb, Charles C.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Spence, Thomas G.

    2003-01-01

    An analog detection system for determining a ring-down rate or decay rate 1/.tau. of an exponentially decaying ring-down beam issuing from a lifetime or ring-down cavity during a ring-down phase. Alternatively, the analog detection system determines a build-up rate of an exponentially growing beam issuing from the cavity during a ring-up phase. The analog system can be employed in continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CW CRDS) and pulsed CRDS (P CRDS) arrangements utilizing any type of ring-down cavity including ring-cavities and linear cavities.

  8. Comparative conformational analysis of peptide T analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akverdieva, Gulnare; Godjayev, Niftali; Akyuz, Sevim

    2009-01-01

    A series of peptide T analogs were investigated within the molecular mechanics framework. In order to determine the role of the aminoacid residues in spatial formation of peptide T the conformational peculiarities of the glycine-substituted analogs were investigated. The conformational profiles of some biologically tested analogs of this peptide were determined independently. The received data permit to assess the active form of this peptide. It is characterized by β-turn at the C-terminal physiologically active pentapeptide fragment of peptide molecule. The received results are important for the investigation of the structure-activity relationship and may be used at design of a rigid-molecule drug against HIV.

  9. Infectious Diseases Are Analogous With Cancer. Hypothesis And Implications

    PubMed Central

    Benharroch, Daniel; Osyntsov, Lidia

    2012-01-01

    We propose to disclose first degree analogous features between cancer and infectious diseases and to find out whether these similarities are superficial and negligible, due to the use of the same bodily pathways by the two categories of disease or if they represent significantly parallel characteristics. We have found several primary analogous features, predominantly regarding pathways of spread, but to some extent also concerning the interaction with the immune system. Some of the implications to our hypothesis are probably available in the recent literature, at the experimental or clinical levels. For example endostatin, an angiogenic inhibitor has been used to prevent promotion of metastasis in cancer and to reduce granulomas formation in schistosomiasis. An ECFR antagonist employed to restrain bronchial vessels proliferation in pseudomonas infection, has also been used for the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:22408684

  10. Overcoming nucleoside analog chemoresistance of pancreatic cancer: A therapeutic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Sau Wai; Mody, Hardik R.; Govindarajan, Rajgopal

    2013-01-01

    Clinical refractoriness to nucleoside analogs (e.g., gemcitabine, capecitabine) is a major scientific problem and is one of the main reasons underlying the extremely poor prognostic state of pancreatic cancer. The drugs’ effects are suboptimal partly due to cellular mechanisms limiting their transport, activation, and overall efficacy. Nonetheless, novel therapeutic approaches are presently under study to circumvent nucleoside analog resistance in pancreatic cancer. With these new approaches come additional challenges to be addressed. This review describes the determinants of chemoresistance in the gemcitabine cytotoxicity pathways, provides an overview of investigational approaches for overcoming chemoresistance, and discusses new challenges presented. Understanding the future directions of the field may assist in the successful development of novel treatment strategies for enhancing chemotherapeutic efficacy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:22425961

  11. Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Treatment 2003 U.S. Outbreak African Rodent Importation Ban For Clinicians Clinical Recognition Specimen Collection Treatment Smallpox ... Examining Animals with Suspected Monkeypox African Rodent Importation Ban Resources Related Links Poxvirus Molluscum Contagiosum Orf Virus ( ...

  12. The Significance of Turning Passive Into Active in Control Mastery Theory

    PubMed Central

    FOREMAN, STEVEN A.

    1996-01-01

    Turning passive into active was first described by Freud but was later given expanded importance by Weiss. This new conceptualization of turning passive into active as an interpersonal communication and test has made a major contribution to the clinical treatment of difficult patients. This article reviews "control mastery" theory and puts its notion of passive-into-active testing into perspective with regard to Freud’s original conception as well as other conceptions, such as identification with the aggressor and projective identification. Formulation and the treatment of patients are illustrated with clinical examples. PMID:22700271

  13. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown. Final report, [September 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.

    1994-02-21

    Purpose is to understand the mechanisms for growth and breakdown of passive films on metal and alloy surfaces in aqueous medium; a secondary goal is to devise methods for predicting localized corrosion damage in industrial systems. Tasks currently being studied are: formation of bilayer structures in passive films on metals and alloys; passivity breakdown on solid vs. liquid gallium; roles of alloying elements in passivity breakdown; electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of passive films; electronic structure of passive oxide films; photoelectrochemical impedance spectroscopy of passive films; and kinetics of localized attack.

  14. Analog Computer Laboratory with Biological Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strebel, Donald E.

    1979-01-01

    The use of biological examples in teaching applications of the analog computer is discussed and several examples from mathematical ecology, enzyme kinetics, and tracer dynamics are described. (Author/GA)

  15. An Electrical Analog Computer for Poets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruels, Mark C.

    1972-01-01

    Nonphysics majors are presented with a direct current experiment beyond Ohms law and series and parallel laws. This involves construction of an analog computer from common rheostats and student-assembled voltmeters. (Author/TS)

  16. NASA Now: Exploring Asteroids: An Analog Mission

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA’s Extreme Environment Mission Operations, or NEEMO, project lead Bill Todd describes this analog mission and how aquanauts living and working in an undersea habitat are helping NASA prepare ...

  17. An Electronic Analog of the Diffraction Grating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLeod, A. M.

    1978-01-01

    Gives an outline description of electronic circuitry which is analogous to the optical diffraction grating or to crystals used in the Bragg reflection of X-rays or electron waves, and explains how to use it. (Author/GA)

  18. Computer Analogies: Teaching Molecular Biology and Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Stanley; McArthur, John

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that computer science analogies can aid the understanding of gene expression, including the storage of genetic information on chromosomes. Presents a matrix of biology and computer science concepts. (DDR)

  19. The Analog (Computer) As a Physiology Adjunct.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Peter A.

    1979-01-01

    Defines and discusses the analog computer and its use in a physiology laboratory. Includes two examples: (1) The Respiratory Control Function and (2) CO-Two Control in the Respiratory System. Presents diagrams and mathematical models. (MA)

  20. Optical analog-to-digital converter

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, G. Allen; Raring, James; Skogen, Erik J.

    2009-07-21

    An optical analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is disclosed which converts an input optical analog signal to an output optical digital signal at a sampling rate defined by a sampling optical signal. Each bit of the digital representation is separately determined using an optical waveguide interferometer and an optical thresholding element. The interferometer uses the optical analog signal and the sampling optical signal to generate a sinusoidally-varying output signal using cross-phase-modulation (XPM) or a photocurrent generated from the optical analog signal. The sinusoidally-varying output signal is then digitized by the thresholding element, which includes a saturable absorber or at least one semiconductor optical amplifier, to form the optical digital signal which can be output either in parallel or serially.

  1. AMiBA WIDEBAND ANALOG CORRELATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chao-Te; Kubo, Derek Y.; Lin, Kai-Yang; Chen, Ming-Tang; Ho, P. T. P.; Chen, Chung-Cheng; Han, Chih-Chiang; Oshiro, Peter; Martin-Cocher, Pierre; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chang, Shu-Hao; Altamirano, Pablo; Jiang, Homin; Wilson, Warwick; Chiueh, Tzi-Dar; Lien, Chun-Hsien; Wang, Huei; Wei, Ray-Ming; Yang, Chia-Hsiang; Peterson, Jeffrey B.

    2010-06-10

    A wideband analog correlator has been constructed for the Yuan-Tseh Lee Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy. Lag correlators using analog multipliers provide large bandwidth and moderate frequency resolution. Broadband intermediate frequency distribution, back-end signal processing, and control are described. Operating conditions for optimum sensitivity and linearity are discussed. From observations, a large effective bandwidth of around 10 GHz has been shown to provide sufficient sensitivity for detecting cosmic microwave background variations.

  2. ANALOG-TO-DIGITAL DATA CONVERTER

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, G.W.; Althouse, J.E.; Anderson, D.P.; Bussey, G.R.; Minnear, L.H.

    1960-09-01

    Electrical apparatus is described, particularly useful in telemetry work, for converting analog signals into electrical pulses and recording them. An electronic editor commands the taking of signal readings at a frequency which varies according to linearity of the analog signal being converted. Readings of information signals are recorded, along with time base readings and serial numbering, if desired, on magnetic tape and the latter may be used to operate a computer or the like. Magnetic tape data may be transferred to punched cards.

  3. Analog environments in space human factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connors, Mary M.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of what has been learned from space analog environments, which mimic such significant features of space as isolation, confinement, risk, and deprivation; emphasis is placed on the especially successful environments constituted by extended submarine research, undersea habitats, and Antarctic station wintering. Attention is also given to the advantages and limitations of the use of analog environments for space human factors research, and possibilities for such research efforts' management.

  4. AMiBA Wideband Analog Correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao-Te; Kubo, Derek Y.; Wilson, Warwick; Lin, Kai-Yang; Chen, Ming-Tang; Ho, P. T. P.; Chen, Chung-Cheng; Han, Chih-Chiang; Oshiro, Peter; Martin-Cocher, Pierre; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chang, Shu-Hao; Altamirano, Pablo; Jiang, Homin; Chiueh, Tzi-Dar; Lien, Chun-Hsien; Wang, Huei; Wei, Ray-Ming; Yang, Chia-Hsiang; Peterson, Jeffrey B.; Chang, Su-Wei; Huang, Yau-De; Hwang, Yuh-Jing; Kesteven, Michael; Koch, Patrick; Liu, Guo-Chin; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Umetsu, Keiichi; Wei, Tashun; Proty Wu, Jiun-Huei

    2010-06-01

    A wideband analog correlator has been constructed for the Yuan-Tseh Lee Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy. Lag correlators using analog multipliers provide large bandwidth and moderate frequency resolution. Broadband intermediate frequency distribution, back-end signal processing, and control are described. Operating conditions for optimum sensitivity and linearity are discussed. From observations, a large effective bandwidth of around 10 GHz has been shown to provide sufficient sensitivity for detecting cosmic microwave background variations.

  5. Analog hardware for learning neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, Silvio P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    This is a recurrent or feedforward analog neural network processor having a multi-level neuron array and a synaptic matrix for storing weighted analog values of synaptic connection strengths which is characterized by temporarily changing one connection strength at a time to determine its effect on system output relative to the desired target. That connection strength is then adjusted based on the effect, whereby the processor is taught the correct response to training examples connection by connection.

  6. Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2007-01-23

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  7. New England style passive solar

    SciTech Connect

    Kriescher, P.

    2000-06-01

    There are homeowners throughout New England who planned for and built homes that allow them to avoid the sting of winter's high heating bills. These climate-responsive homes rely on passive solar heating, cooling and lighting. An example of such a climate-responsive/passive solar house is the home that Arthur and Terry Becker build on 6 beautiful acres (2.4 hectares) of rolling farm and woodland southeast of Andover, Connecticut, in 1981. They worked very closely with their designer, Al Eggan of K.T. Lear and Associates, to ensure that they would never have to pay for home heating oil, and that they would enjoy a level of year-round comfort that they had not experienced in conventionally built homes.

  8. Analog modelling of obduction processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agard, P.; Zuo, X.; Funiciello, F.; Bellahsen, N.; Faccenna, C.; Savva, D.

    2012-04-01

    Obduction corresponds to one of plate tectonics oddities, whereby dense, oceanic rocks (ophiolites) are presumably 'thrust' on top of light, continental ones, as for the short-lived, almost synchronous Peri-Arabic obduction (which took place along thousands of km from Turkey to Oman in c. 5-10 Ma). Analog modelling experiments were performed to study the mechanisms of obduction initiation and test various triggering hypotheses (i.e., plate acceleration, slab hitting the 660 km discontinuity, ridge subduction; Agard et al., 2007). The experimental setup comprises (1) an upper mantle, modelled as a low-viscosity transparent Newtonian glucose syrup filling a rigid Plexiglas tank and (2) high-viscosity silicone plates (Rhodrosil Gomme with PDMS iron fillers to reproduce densities of continental or oceanic plates), located at the centre of the tank above the syrup to simulate the subducting and the overriding plates - and avoid friction on the sides of the tank. Convergence is simulated by pushing on a piston at one end of the model with velocities comparable to those of plate tectonics (i.e., in the range 1-10 cm/yr). The reference set-up includes, from one end to the other (~60 cm): (i) the piston, (ii) a continental margin containing a transition zone to the adjacent oceanic plate, (iii) a weakness zone with variable resistance and dip (W), (iv) an oceanic plate - with or without a spreading ridge, (v) a subduction zone (S) dipping away from the piston and (vi) an upper, active continental margin, below which the oceanic plate is being subducted at the start of the experiment (as is known to have been the case in Oman). Several configurations were tested and over thirty different parametric tests were performed. Special emphasis was placed on comparing different types of weakness zone (W) and the extent of mechanical coupling across them, particularly when plates were accelerated. Displacements, together with along-strike and across-strike internal deformation in all

  9. Passive immunization in murine mucormycosis.

    PubMed

    Waldorf, A R; Halde, C; Vedros, N A

    1983-11-25

    Antibody raised in mice against mycelial homogenates of Rhizomucor pusillus was effective in passive immunization against pulmonary and disseminated mucormycosis (phycomycosis) in immunocompromised mice. Mice intranasally inoculated and infected with Rh. pusillus and treated with antisera had a statistically significant increased resistance to infection and a diminished secondary dissemination of viable fungal fragments. Histological examination of infected lung tissues showed that antibody treated animals were apparently able to degrade hyphal fragments.

  10. Passive Neutron Detection at Borders

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Ely, James H.; Keller, Paul E.; McConn, Ronald J.

    2008-03-01

    Radiation portal monitor systems have been deployed to screen for illicit trafficking of radioactive materials at international border crossings. This report reviews some of the neutron detection requirements and capabilities of passive detection systems used for such applications. Simulations show the effects of cargo materials on neutron spectra, different detector geometries, using a large-array of neutron detectors, and the effects of backgrounds including “ship effect” neutrons.

  11. Active and Passive Hybrid Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carswell, James R.

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid ocean wind sensor (HOWS) can map ocean vector wind in low to hurricane-level winds, and non-precipitating and precipitating conditions. It can acquire active and passive measurements through a single aperture at two wavelengths, two polarizations, and multiple incidence angles. Its low profile, compact geometry, and low power consumption permits installation on air craft platforms, including high-altitude unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).

  12. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and European Space Agency (ESA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. It is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The primary objective of this effort is to qualify citric acid as an environmentally-preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys.

  13. Illegal Passive Smoking at Work

    PubMed Central

    Lesage, François-Xavier; Deschamps, Frédéric; Jurca, Denisa

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Exposure to passive smoking at work has been forbidden for few years in France. This study's aim is to estimate the prevalence of passive smoking at work (PSW), the characteristics of illegal passive smoking and to identify eventual respiratory effects. Methods. Occupational practitioners (OPs) of a French county of 320,000 wage earners were contacted by mail. Then OP answered questions from a standardized questionnaire. These questions concerned the practised job, exposure features linked to PSW and health effects in relationship with second-hand smoke in workplace, and the focus on nonsmoker encountered by OP during the most recent occupational medical examination. Results. Ninety-five percent of a total group of 172 OP of Champagne county filled the postal questionnaire. More than 80% of OP's replies identified illegal PSW. The average prevalence of PSW exposure was 0.7% of the total working population. Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) levels were considered between low and medium for most passive smokers (71%). Main features exposure to ETS at work for non-smokers was associated with female gender (69.5%), age between 40 and 49 years (41.2%) and belonging to tertiary sector (75.6%). Environmental tobacco smoke exposures at work was firstly in the office for 49.7% of the subjects and secondly in the restroom for 18% of them. Main medical symptoms encountered by non-smokers were respiratory tractus irritation (81.7%). Eighty-three percent of OPs indicated solution to eradicate PSW. Illegal PSW is really weaker than fifteen years ago. However, the findings support a real ban on smoking in the workplace in order to protect all workers. PMID:21991448

  14. Development of analogical problem-solving skill.

    PubMed

    Holyoak, K J; Junn, E N; Billman, D O

    1984-12-01

    3 experiments were performed to assess children's ability to solve a problem by analogy to a superficially dissimilar situation. Preschoolers and fifth and sixth graders were asked to solve a problem that allowed multiple solutions. Some subjects were first read a story that included an analogous problem and its solution. When the mapping between the relations involved in the corresponding solutions was relatively simple, and the corresponding instruments were perceptually and functionally similar, even preschoolers were able to use the analogy to derive a solution to the transfer problem (Experiment 1). Furthermore, salient similarity of the instruments was neither sufficient (Experiment 2) nor necessary (Experiment 3) for success by preschool subjects. When the story analog mapped well onto the transfer problem, 4-year-olds were often able to generate a solution that required transformation of an object with little perceptual or semantic similarity to the instrument used in the base analog (Experiment 3). The older children used analogies in a manner qualitatively similar to that observed in comparable studies with adults (Experiment 1), whereas the younger children exhibited different limitations.

  15. Structure-activity relationships of IKM-159: Diverted synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of C5-oxy analogs.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Manami; Fujimoto, Chikako; Sakai, Ryuichi; Oikawa, Masato

    2015-05-01

    Ligands for neuronal receptors are important for understanding the biological functions as well as for treatment of neuronal diseases associated with. Here, we report diverted synthesis and biological evaluation of four C-ring analogs of IKM-159, a subtype-selective inhibitor for (S)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA)-type ionotropic glutamate receptor. Starting from iodinated 7-oxanorbornene 7, those analogs 3-6 were successfully synthesized in 7.0-33% yields over 8-11 steps via a common intermediate 13. Intracerebroventricular injection of those analogs on mice showed that introduction of oxo group on the C-ring (analogs 4, 5) or cleavage of the C-ring (analog 6) caused significant loss of the activity, while the ether analog 3 still retain the suppressed motor activity, indicating the importance of the C-ring in the neuronal activity of IKM-159.

  16. Influences of Stocking Salmon Carcass Analogs on Salmonids in Klickitat River Tributaries, 2001-2005 Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Zendt, Joe; Sharp, Bill

    2006-09-01

    This report describes the work completed by the Yakama Nation Fisheries Program (YNFP) in the Klickitat subbasin in south-central Washington under BPA innovative project No.200105500--Influences of stocking salmon carcass analogs on salmonids in Columbia River Tributaries. Salmon carcasses historically provided a significant source of marine-derived nutrients to many stream systems in the Columbia basin, and decreased run sizes have led to a loss of this nutrient source in many streams. Partners in this project developed a pathogen-free carcass analog and stocked the analogs in streams with the following objectives: restoring food availability to streams with reduced anadromous salmon returns; mimicking the natural pathways and timing of food acquisition by salmonids; minimizing unintended negative ecological effects; and increasing the growth and survival of salmonids. In the Klickitat subbasin, carcass analogs were stocked in two streams in 2002 and 2003; a third stream was used as a control. Salmonid fish abundance, growth, and stomach contents were monitored in all three streams before and after carcass analog placement. Fish, invertebrate, and periphyton samples were also collected for stable isotope analysis (to determine if nutrients from carcass analogs were incorporated into the stream food web). Water quality samples were also collected to determine if nutrient overloading occurred in streams. Significant differences in growth were found between fish in treated and untreated stream reaches. Fish in treatment reaches exhibited higher instantaneous growth rates approximately one month after the first carcass analog stocking. Stomach contents sampling indicated that salmonid fish routinely consumed the carcass analog material directly, and that stomach fullness of fish in treatment reaches was higher than in untreated reaches in the first few weeks following carcass analog stockings. No significant differences were detected in fish abundance between

  17. Optical domain analog to digital conversion methods and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, Gregory A

    2014-05-13

    Methods and apparatus for optical analog to digital conversion are disclosed. An optical signal is converted by mapping the optical analog signal onto a wavelength modulated optical beam, passing the mapped beam through interferometers to generate analog bit representation signals, and converting the analog bit representation signals into an optical digital signal. A photodiode receives an optical analog signal, a wavelength modulated laser coupled to the photodiode maps the optical analog signal to a wavelength modulated optical beam, interferometers produce an analog bit representation signal from the mapped wavelength modulated optical beam, and sample and threshold circuits corresponding to the interferometers produce a digital bit signal from the analog bit representation signal.

  18. Evaluation of Alternate Surface Passivation Methods (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E

    2005-05-31

    Stainless steel containers were assembled from parts passivated by four commercial vendors using three passivation methods. The performance of these containers in storing hydrogen isotope mixtures was evaluated by monitoring the composition of initially 50% H{sub 2} 50% D{sub 2} gas with time using mass spectroscopy. Commercial passivation by electropolishing appears to result in surfaces that do not catalyze hydrogen isotope exchange. This method of surface passivation shows promise for tritium service, and should be studied further and considered for use. On the other hand, nitric acid passivation and citric acid passivation may not result in surfaces that do not catalyze the isotope exchange reaction H{sub 2} + D{sub 2} {yields} 2HD. These methods should not be considered to replace the proprietary passivation processes of the two current vendors used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facility.

  19. Synthesis of a novel carbocyclic analog of bredinin.

    PubMed

    Nair, Vasu; Zhang, Fan

    2013-09-17

    The natural nucleoside antibiotic, bredinin, exhibits antiviral and other biological activities. While various nucleosides related to bredinin have been synthesized, its carbocyclic analog has remained unknown. Synthesis of this heretofore unknown analog of bredinin is described. The key precursor, (3aS,4R,6R,6aR)-6-((methoxy-methoxy)methyl)-2,2-dimethyltetrahydro-3aH-cyclopenta[d][1,3]dioxol-4-amine (5), was prepared from the commercially available compound, (1R,4S)-2-azabicyclo[2.2.1] hept-5-en-3-one (4). Our initial approach used intermediate 6, derived in three transformations from 5, for the key photolytic step to produce the desired ring-opened precursor to the target compound. This photochemical transformation was unsuccessful. However, an appropriately protected and related precursor was synthesized from 5 through the following side-chain functional group transformations: elaboration of the amino group through malonyl ester formation, oximation at the central carbon, conversion of ester to amide and catalytic reduction of the oxime group. This precursor, on treatment with triethylorthoformate and catalytic acetic acid in ethanol, underwent cyclization to produce the desired 4-carbamoyl-imidazolium-5-olate ring. Deprotection of the latter product proceeded smoothly to give the carbocyclic analog of bredinin. This target molecule exhibits antiviral activity, albeit low, against a number of RNA viruses. Further biological evaluations are in progress.

  20. Topical vitamin D analogs available to treat psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Oquendo, Marcial; Abramovits, William; Morrell, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic and currently incurable inflammatory skin disease, affecting 2% to 3% of the US population. The cost of care in the United States for hospitalizations, outpatient physician visits, phototherapy, prescription therapies, and over-the-counter medications is estimated to be more than $650 million per year. Guidelines developed by the American Academy of Dermatology in 2009 state that approximately 80% of these patients with psoriasis have mild to moderate disease that can be managed with topical agents, including corticosteroids and vitamin D analogs. Topical vitamin D analogs provide "steroid-sparing" effects and a favorable safety profile. Many experts, including a recent consensus conference, classify topical vitamin D agents as first-line therapy for psoriasis either as monotherapy or in combination with topical steroids due to a synergistic, complementary effectiveness. Vitamin D analogs are an indispensable component of the current physician's armamentarium for psoriasis treatment. This review, therefore, is oriented to give a comprehensive understanding of this group of drugs and display the available clinical data for each formulation.

  1. Sidewall passivation for InGaN/GaN nanopillar light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Won Hyuck; Abraham, Michael; Yu, Shih-Ying; You, Guanjun; Liu, Jie; Wang, Li; Xu, Jian; Mohney, Suzanne E.

    2014-07-07

    We studied the effect of sidewall passivation on InGaN/GaN multiquantum well-based nanopillar light emitting diode (LED) performance. In this research, the effects of varying etch rate, KOH treatment, and sulfur passivation were studied for reducing nanopillar sidewall damage and improving device efficiency. Nanopillars prepared under optimal etching conditions showed higher photoluminescence intensity compared with starting planar epilayers. Furthermore, nanopillar LEDs with and without sulfur passivation were compared through electrical and optical characterization. Suppressed leakage current under reverse bias and four times higher electroluminescence (EL) intensity were observed for passivated nanopillar LEDs compared with unpassivated nanopillar LEDs. The suppressed leakage current and EL intensity enhancement reflect the reduction of non-radiative recombination at the nanopillar sidewalls. In addition, the effect of sulfur passivation was found to be very stable, and further insight into its mechanism was gained through transmission electron microscopy.

  2. Imparting passivity to vapor deposited magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Ryan C.

    electron microscope. The corrosion rate of the nonequilibrium sputtered alloys, as determined by polarization resistance, is significantly reduced compared to the most corrosion resistant commercial magnesium alloys. The open circuit potentials of the sputter deposited alloys are significantly more noble compared to commercial, equilibrium phase magnesium alloys. Galvanic corrosion susceptibility has also been considerably reduced. Nonequilibrium magnesium-yttrium-titanium alloys have been shown to achieve passivity autonomously by alteration of the composition chemistry of the surface oxide/hydroxide layer. Self-healing properties are also evident, as corrosion propagation can be arrested after initial pitting of the material. A clear relationship exists between the corrosion resistance of sputter vapor deposited magnesium alloys and the amount of ion bombardment incurred by the alloy during deposition. Argon pressure, the distance between the source and the substrate, and alloy morphology play important roles in determining the ability of the alloy to develop a passive film. Thermal effects, both during and after alloy deposition, alter the stress state of the alloys, precipitation of second phases, and the mechanical stability of the passive film. An optimal thermal treatment has been developed in order to maximize the corrosion resistance of the magnesium-yttrium-titanium alloys. The significance of the results includes the acquisition of electrochemical data for these novel materials, as well as expanding the utilization of magnesium alloys by the improvement in their corrosion resistance. The magnesium alloys developed in this work are more corrosion resistant than any commercial magnesium alloy. Structural components comprised of these alloys would therefore exhibit unprecedented corrosion performance. Coatings of these alloys on magnesium components would provide a corrosion resistant yet galvanically-compatible coating. The broad impact of these contributions is

  3. Imparting passivity to vapor deposited magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Ryan C.

    electron microscope. The corrosion rate of the nonequilibrium sputtered alloys, as determined by polarization resistance, is significantly reduced compared to the most corrosion resistant commercial magnesium alloys. The open circuit potentials of the sputter deposited alloys are significantly more noble compared to commercial, equilibrium phase magnesium alloys. Galvanic corrosion susceptibility has also been considerably reduced. Nonequilibrium magnesium-yttrium-titanium alloys have been shown to achieve passivity autonomously by alteration of the composition chemistry of the surface oxide/hydroxide layer. Self-healing properties are also evident, as corrosion propagation can be arrested after initial pitting of the material. A clear relationship exists between the corrosion resistance of sputter vapor deposited magnesium alloys and the amount of ion bombardment incurred by the alloy during deposition. Argon pressure, the distance between the source and the substrate, and alloy morphology play important roles in determining the ability of the alloy to develop a passive film. Thermal effects, both during and after alloy deposition, alter the stress state of the alloys, precipitation of second phases, and the mechanical stability of the passive film. An optimal thermal treatment has been developed in order to maximize the corrosion resistance of the magnesium-yttrium-titanium alloys. The significance of the results includes the acquisition of electrochemical data for these novel materials, as well as expanding the utilization of magnesium alloys by the improvement in their corrosion resistance. The magnesium alloys developed in this work are more corrosion resistant than any commercial magnesium alloy. Structural components comprised of these alloys would therefore exhibit unprecedented corrosion performance. Coatings of these alloys on magnesium components would provide a corrosion resistant yet galvanically-compatible coating. The broad impact of these contributions is

  4. Gibbs free energy assisted passivation layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salihoglu, Omer; Tansel, T.; Hostut, M.; Ergun, Y.; Aydinli, A.

    2016-05-01

    Reduction of surface leakage is a major challenge in most photodetectors that requires the elimination of surface oxides on etched mesas during passivation. Engineering the passivation requires close attention to chemical reactions that take place at the interface during the process. In particular, removal of surface oxides may be controlled via Gibbs reactivity. We have compared electrical performance of type-II superlattice photodetectors, designed for MWIR operation, passivated by different passivation techniques. We have used ALD deposited Al2O3, HfO2, TiO2, ZnO, PECVD deposited SiO2, Si3N4 and sulphur containing octadecanethiol (ODT) selfassembled monolayers (SAM) passivation layers on InAs/GaSb p-i-n superlattice photodetectors with cutoff wavelength at 5.1 μm. In this work, we have compared the result of different passivation techniques which are done under same conditions, same epitaxial structure and same fabrication processes. We have found that ALD deposited passivation is directly related to the Gibbs free energy of the passivation material. Gibbs free energies of the passivation layer can directly be compared with native surface oxides to check the effectiveness of the passivation layer before the experimental study.

  5. Understanding the synthesis, performance, and passivation of metal oxide photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Cory James

    Metal oxides are ubiquitous in semiconductor technologies for their ease of synthesis, chemical stability, and tunable optical/electronic properties. These properties are especially important to fabricating efficient photoelectrodes for solar-energy applications. To counter inherent problems in these materials, new strategies were developed and successfully implemented on the widely-utilized p-type semiconductor, NiO. As the size of semiconductor materials shrink, the surface-to-volume ratio increases and surface defects dominate the performance of the materials. Surface defects can alter the optical and electronic characteristics of materials by changing the Fermi level, charge-carrier mobility, and surface reactivity. We first present a strategy to increase the electrical mobility of mesoporous metal oxide electrode materials by optimizing shape morphology. Transitioning from nanospheres to hexagonal nanoplatelets increased the charge-carrier mobility by one order of magnitude. We then employed this improved material with a new vapor-phase deposition method termed targeted atomic deposition (TAD) to selectively passivate defect sites in semiconductor nanomaterials. We demonstrated the capabilities of this passivation method by applying a TAD of aluminum onto NiO. By exploiting a temperature-dependent deposition process, we selectively passivated the highly reactive sites in NiO: oxygen dangling bonds associated with Ni vacancies. The TAD treatment completely passivated all measurable surface defects, optically bleached the material, and significantly improved all photovoltaic performance metrics in dye-sensitized solar cells. The technique was proven to be generic to numerous forms of NiO. While the implementation of TAD of Al was successful, the process involved pulsing two precursors to passivate the material. Ideally, the TAD process should require only a single precursor and continuous exposure. We utilized a continuous flow of diborane to perform a TAD of B

  6. Analogy, higher order thinking, and education.

    PubMed

    Richland, Lindsey Engle; Simms, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Analogical reasoning, the ability to understand phenomena as systems of structured relationships that can be aligned, compared, and mapped together, plays a fundamental role in the technology rich, increasingly globalized educational climate of the 21st century. Flexible, conceptual thinking is prioritized in this view of education, and schools are emphasizing 'higher order thinking', rather than memorization of a cannon of key topics. The lack of a cognitively grounded definition for higher order thinking, however, has led to a field of research and practice with little coherence across domains or connection to the large body of cognitive science research on thinking. We review literature on analogy and disciplinary higher order thinking to propose that relational reasoning can be productively considered the cognitive underpinning of higher order thinking. We highlight the utility of this framework for developing insights into practice through a review of mathematics, science, and history educational contexts. In these disciplines, analogy is essential to developing expert-like disciplinary knowledge in which concepts are understood to be systems of relationships that can be connected and flexibly manipulated. At the same time, analogies in education require explicit support to ensure that learners notice the relevance of relational thinking, have adequate processing resources available to mentally hold and manipulate relations, and are able to recognize both the similarities and differences when drawing analogies between systems of relationships.

  7. An analog silicon retina with multichip configuration.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Seiji; Yagi, Tetsuya

    2006-01-01

    The neuromorphic silicon retina is a novel analog very large scale integrated circuit that emulates the structure and the function of the retinal neuronal circuit. We fabricated a neuromorphic silicon retina, in which sample/hold circuits were embedded to generate fluctuation-suppressed outputs in the previous study [1]. The applications of this silicon retina, however, are limited because of a low spatial resolution and computational variability. In this paper, we have fabricated a multichip silicon retina in which the functional network circuits are divided into two chips: the photoreceptor network chip (P chip) and the horizontal cell network chip (H chip). The output images of the P chip are transferred to the H chip with analog voltages through the line-parallel transfer bus. The sample/hold circuits embedded in the P and H chips compensate for the pattern noise generated on the circuits, including the analog communication pathway. Using the multichip silicon retina together with an off-chip differential amplifier, spatial filtering of the image with an odd- and an even-symmetric orientation selective receptive fields was carried out in real time. The analog data transfer method in the present multichip silicon retina is useful to design analog neuromorphic multichip systems that mimic the hierarchical structure of neuronal networks in the visual system.

  8. Analog forecasting with dynamics-adapted kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhizhen; Giannakis, Dimitrios

    2016-09-01

    Analog forecasting is a nonparametric technique introduced by Lorenz in 1969 which predicts the evolution of states of a dynamical system (or observables defined on the states) by following the evolution of the sample in a historical record of observations which most closely resembles the current initial data. Here, we introduce a suite of forecasting methods which improve traditional analog forecasting by combining ideas from kernel methods developed in harmonic analysis and machine learning and state-space reconstruction for dynamical systems. A key ingredient of our approach is to replace single-analog forecasting with weighted ensembles of analogs constructed using local similarity kernels. The kernels used here employ a number of dynamics-dependent features designed to improve forecast skill, including Takens’ delay-coordinate maps (to recover information in the initial data lost through partial observations) and a directional dependence on the dynamical vector field generating the data. Mathematically, our approach is closely related to kernel methods for out-of-sample extension of functions, and we discuss alternative strategies based on the Nyström method and the multiscale Laplacian pyramids technique. We illustrate these techniques in applications to forecasting in a low-order deterministic model for atmospheric dynamics with chaotic metastability, and interannual-scale forecasting in the North Pacific sector of a comprehensive climate model. We find that forecasts based on kernel-weighted ensembles have significantly higher skill than the conventional approach following a single analog.

  9. An analog integrated-circuit vocal tract.

    PubMed

    Keng Hoong Wee; Turicchia, L; Sarpeshkar, R

    2008-12-01

    We present the first experimental integrated-circuit vocal tract by mapping fluid volume velocity to current, fluid pressure to voltage, and linear and nonlinear mechanical impedances to linear and nonlinear electrical impedances. The 275 muW analog vocal tract chip includes a 16-stage cascade of two-port pi-elements that forms a tunable transmission line, electronically variable impedances, and a current source as the glottal source. A nonlinear resistor models laminar and turbulent flow in the vocal tract. The measured SNR at the output of the analog vocal tract is 64, 66, and 63 dB for the first three formant resonances of a vocal tract with uniform cross-sectional area. The analog vocal tract can be used with auditory processors in a feedback speech locked loop-analogous to a phase locked loop-to implement speech recognition that is potentially robust in noise. Our use of a physiological model of the human vocal tract enables the analog vocal tract chip to synthesize speech signals of interest, using articulatory parameters that are intrinsically compact and linearly interpolatable. PMID:23853134

  10. Analogy, higher order thinking, and education.

    PubMed

    Richland, Lindsey Engle; Simms, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Analogical reasoning, the ability to understand phenomena as systems of structured relationships that can be aligned, compared, and mapped together, plays a fundamental role in the technology rich, increasingly globalized educational climate of the 21st century. Flexible, conceptual thinking is prioritized in this view of education, and schools are emphasizing 'higher order thinking', rather than memorization of a cannon of key topics. The lack of a cognitively grounded definition for higher order thinking, however, has led to a field of research and practice with little coherence across domains or connection to the large body of cognitive science research on thinking. We review literature on analogy and disciplinary higher order thinking to propose that relational reasoning can be productively considered the cognitive underpinning of higher order thinking. We highlight the utility of this framework for developing insights into practice through a review of mathematics, science, and history educational contexts. In these disciplines, analogy is essential to developing expert-like disciplinary knowledge in which concepts are understood to be systems of relationships that can be connected and flexibly manipulated. At the same time, analogies in education require explicit support to ensure that learners notice the relevance of relational thinking, have adequate processing resources available to mentally hold and manipulate relations, and are able to recognize both the similarities and differences when drawing analogies between systems of relationships. PMID:26263071

  11. NaturAnalogs for the Unsaturated Zone

    SciTech Connect

    A. Simmons; A. Unger; M. Murrell

    2000-03-08

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document natural and anthropogenic (human-induced) analog sites and processes that are applicable to flow and transport processes expected to occur at the potential Yucca Mountain repository in order to build increased confidence in modeling processes of Unsaturated Zone (UZ) flow and transport. This AMR was prepared in accordance with ''AMR Development Plan for U0135, Natural Analogs for the UZ'' (CRWMS 1999a). Knowledge from analog sites and processes is used as corroborating information to test and build confidence in flow and transport models of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This AMR supports the Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR) and the Yucca Mountain Site Description. The objectives of this AMR are to test and build confidence in the representation of UZ processes in numerical models utilized in the UZ Flow and Transport Model. This is accomplished by: (1) applying data from Boxy Canyon, Idaho in simulations of UZ flow using the same methodologies incorporated in the Yucca Mountain UZ Flow and Transport Model to assess the fracture-matrix interaction conceptual model; (2) Providing a preliminary basis for analysis of radionuclide transport at Pena Blanca, Mexico as an analog of radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain; and (3) Synthesizing existing information from natural analog studies to provide corroborating evidence for representation of ambient and thermally coupled UZ flow and transport processes in the UZ Model.

  12. Atomistic study of macroscopic analogs to short-chain molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Kyle J.; Kilmer, Clayton S. G.; Corwin, Eric I.

    2015-02-01

    We use a bath of chaotic surface waves in water to mechanically and macroscopically mimic the thermal behavior of a short articulated chain with only nearest-neighbor interactions. The chaotic waves provide isotropic and random agitation to which a temperature can be ascribed, allowing the chain to passively explore its degrees of freedom in analogy to thermal motion. We track the chain in real time and infer end-to-end potentials using Boltzmann statistics. We extrapolate our results, by using Monte Carlo simulations of self-avoiding polymers, to lengths not accessible in our system. In the long-chain limit we demonstrate universal scaling of the statistical parameters of all chains in agreement with well-known predictions for self-avoiding walks. However, we find that the behavior of chains below a characteristic length scale fundamentally differs. We find that short chains have much greater compressional stiffness than would be expected. However, chains rapidly soften as length increases to meet with expected scalings.

  13. Novel Aza-resveratrol analogs: synthesis, characterization and anticancer activity against breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Areej; Dandawate, Prasad; Rub, Rukhsana; Padhye, Subhash; Aphale, Shama; Moghe, Alpana; Jagyasi, Amrit; Venkateswara Swamy, K; Singh, Bhupendra; Chatterjee, Anwesha; Ronghe, Amruta; Bhat, Hari K

    2013-02-01

    Novel Aza-resveratrol analogs were synthesized, structurally characterized and evaluated for cytotoxic activity against MDA-MB-231 and T47D breast cancer cell lines, which exhibited superior inhibitory activity than parent resveratrol compound. The binding mechanism of these compounds with estrogen receptor-α was rationalized by molecular docking studies which indicated additional hydrogen binding interactions and tight binding in the protein cavity. Induction of Beclin-1 protein expression in breast cancer cell lines after treatment with newly synthesized resveratrol analogs indicated inhibition of growth of these cell lines through autophagy. The study highlighted the advantage of introducing the imino-linkage in resveratrol motif in enhancing the anticancer potential of resveratrol suggesting that these analogs can serve as better therapeutic agents against breast cancer and can provide starting point for building more potent analogs in future.

  14. Not All Analogies Are Created Equal: Associative and Categorical Analogy Processing following Brain Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Gwenda L.; Cardillo, Eileen R.; Kranjec, Alexander; Lehet, Matthew; Widick, Page; Chatterjee, Anjan

    2012-01-01

    Current research on analogy processing assumes that different conceptual relations are treated similarly. However, just as words and concepts are related in distinct ways, different kinds of analogies may employ distinct types of relationships. An important distinction in how words are related is the difference between associative (dog-bone) and…

  15. Students' Pre- and Post-Teaching Analogical Reasoning when They Draw Their Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mozzer, Nilmara Braga; Justi, Rosaria

    2012-01-01

    Analogies are parts of human thought. From them, we can acquire new knowledge or change that which already exists in our cognitive structure. In this sense, understanding the analogical reasoning process becomes an essential condition to understand how we learn. Despite the importance of such an understanding, there is no general agreement in…

  16. Passive microwave soil moisture research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T. J.; Oneill, P. E.; Wang, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The AgRISTARS Soil Moisture Project has made significant progress in the quantification of microwave sensor capabilities for soil moisture remote sensing. The 21-cm wavelength has been verified to be the best single channel for radiometric observations of soil moisture. It has also been found that other remote sensing approaches used in conjunction with L-band passive data are more successful than multiple wavelength microwave radiometry in this application. AgRISTARS studies have also improved current understanding of noise factors affecting the interpretability of microwave emission data. The absorption of soil emission by vegetation has been quantified, although this effect is less important than absorption effects for microwave radiometry.

  17. Gravitoelectromagnetic analogy based on tidal tensors

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, L. Filipe O.; Herdeiro, Carlos A. R.

    2008-07-15

    We propose a new approach to a physical analogy between general relativity and electromagnetism, based on tidal tensors of both theories. Using this approach we write a covariant form for the gravitational analogues of the Maxwell equations, which makes transparent both the similarities and key differences between the two interactions. The following realizations of the analogy are given. The first one matches linearized gravitational tidal tensors to exact electromagnetic tidal tensors in Minkowski spacetime. The second one matches exact magnetic gravitational tidal tensors for ultrastationary metrics to exact magnetic tidal tensors of electromagnetism in curved spaces. In the third we show that our approach leads to a two-step exact derivation of Papapetrou's equation describing the force exerted on a spinning test particle. Analogous scalar invariants built from tidal tensors of both theories are also discussed.

  18. Analogy-Enhanced Instruction: Effects on Reasoning Skills in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remigio, Krisette B.; Yangco, Rosanelia T.; Espinosa, Allen A.

    2014-01-01

    The study examined the reasoning skills of first year high school students after learning general science concepts through analogies. Two intact heterogeneous sections were randomly assigned to Analogy-Enhanced Instruction (AEI) group and Non Analogy-Enhanced (NAEI) group. Various analogies were incorporated in the lessons of the AEI group for…

  19. The Importance of Explicitly Mapping Instructional Analogies in Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asay, Loretta Johnson

    2013-01-01

    Analogies are ubiquitous during instruction in science classrooms, yet research about the effectiveness of using analogies has produced mixed results. An aspect seldom studied is a model of instruction when using analogies. The few existing models for instruction with analogies have not often been examined quantitatively. The Teaching With…

  20. Polyurethane foam (PUF) passive samplers for monitoring phenanthrene in stormwater.

    PubMed

    Dou, Yueqin; Zhang, Tian C; Zeng, Jing; Stansbury, John; Moussavi, Massoum; Richter-Egger, Dana L; Klein, Mitchell R

    2016-04-01

    Pollution from highway stormwater runoff has been an increasing area of concern. Many structural Best Management Practices (BMPs) have been implemented for stormwater treatment and management. One challenge for these BMPs is to sample stormwater and monitor BMP performance. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using polyurethane foam (PUF) passive samplers (PSs) for sampling phenanthrene (PHE) in highway stormwater runoff and BMPs. Tests were conducted using batch reactors, glass-tube columns, and laboratory-scale BMPs (bioretention cells). Results indicate that sorption for PHE by PUF is mainly linearly relative to time, and the high sorption capacity allows the PUF passive sampler to monitor stormwater events for months or years. The PUF passive samplers could be embedded in BMPs for monitoring influent and effluent PHE concentrations. Models developed to link the results of batch and column tests proved to be useful for determining removal or sorption parameters and performance of the PUF-PSs. The predicted removal efficiencies of BMPs were close to the real values obtained from the control columns with errors ranging between -8.46 and 1.52%. This research showed that it is possible to use PUF passive samplers for sampling stormwater and monitoring the performance of stormwater BMPs, which warrants the field-scale feasibility studies in the future. PMID:26942631

  1. Polyurethane foam (PUF) passive samplers for monitoring phenanthrene in stormwater.

    PubMed

    Dou, Yueqin; Zhang, Tian C; Zeng, Jing; Stansbury, John; Moussavi, Massoum; Richter-Egger, Dana L; Klein, Mitchell R

    2016-04-01

    Pollution from highway stormwater runoff has been an increasing area of concern. Many structural Best Management Practices (BMPs) have been implemented for stormwater treatment and management. One challenge for these BMPs is to sample stormwater and monitor BMP performance. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using polyurethane foam (PUF) passive samplers (PSs) for sampling phenanthrene (PHE) in highway stormwater runoff and BMPs. Tests were conducted using batch reactors, glass-tube columns, and laboratory-scale BMPs (bioretention cells). Results indicate that sorption for PHE by PUF is mainly linearly relative to time, and the high sorption capacity allows the PUF passive sampler to monitor stormwater events for months or years. The PUF passive samplers could be embedded in BMPs for monitoring influent and effluent PHE concentrations. Models developed to link the results of batch and column tests proved to be useful for determining removal or sorption parameters and performance of the PUF-PSs. The predicted removal efficiencies of BMPs were close to the real values obtained from the control columns with errors ranging between -8.46 and 1.52%. This research showed that it is possible to use PUF passive samplers for sampling stormwater and monitoring the performance of stormwater BMPs, which warrants the field-scale feasibility studies in the future.

  2. Physical analogs that help to better understand the modern concepts on continental stretching, hyperextension and rupturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalan, Pedro

    2014-05-01

    Three facts helped to establish a revolution in the understanding of how mega-continents stretch, rupture and breakup to form new continents and related passive margins: (1) the penetration of the distal portions of the Iberia-Newfoundland conjugate margins by several ODP wells (late 70's/early 80's), with the discovery of hyperextended crust and exhumation of lower crust and mantle between typical continental and oceanic domains, (2) field works in the Alps and in the Pyrenees that re-interpreted sedimentary successions and associated "ophiolites" as remnants of old Tethyan passive margins that recorded structural domains similar to those found in Iberia-Newfoundland, and (3) the acquisition of long and ultra-deep reflection seismic sections that could image for the first time sub-crustal levels (25-40 km) in several passive margins around the world. The interpretation of such sections showed that the concepts developed in the Iberia-Newfoundland margins and in the Alps could be applied to a great extent to most passive margins, especially those surrounding the North and South Atlantic Oceans. The new concepts of (i) decoupled deformation (upper brittle X lower ductile) within the proximal domain of the continental crust, (ii) of coupled deformation (hyperextension) in the distal crust and, (iii) of exhumation of deeper levels in the outer domain, with the consequent change in the physical properties of the rising rocks, defined an end-member in the new classification of passive margins, the magma-poor type (as opposed to volcanic passive margins). These concepts, together with the new reflection seismic views of the entire crustal structure of passive margins, forced the re-interpretation of older refraction and potential field data and the re-drawing of long established models. Passive margins are prime targets for petroleum exploration, thus, the great interest raised by this subject in both the academy and in the industry. Interestingly enough, the deformation

  3. Space flight nutrition research: platforms and analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Uchakin, Peter N.; Tobin, Brian W.

    2002-01-01

    Conducting research during actual or simulated weightlessness is a challenging endeavor, where even the simplest activities may present significant challenges. This article reviews some of the potential obstacles associated with performing research during space flight and offers brief descriptions of current and previous space research platforms and ground-based analogs, including those for human, animal, and cell-based research. This review is intended to highlight the main issues of space flight research analogs and leave the specifics for each physiologic system for the other papers in this section.

  4. Analog graphic display method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-08-13

    Disclosed are an apparatus and method for using an output device such as an LED to show the approximate analog level of a variable electrical signal wherein a modulating AC waveform is superimposed either on the signal or a reference voltage, both of which are then fed to a comparator which drives the output device. Said device flashes at a constant perceptible rate with a duty cycle which varies in response to variations in the level of the input signal. The human eye perceives these variations in duty cycle as analogous to variations in the level of the input signal. 21 figures.

  5. Associative Pattern Recognition In Analog VLSI Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1995-01-01

    Winner-take-all circuit selects best-match stored pattern. Prototype cascadable very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit chips built and tested to demonstrate concept of electronic associative pattern recognition. Based on low-power, sub-threshold analog complementary oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) VLSI circuitry, each chip can store 128 sets (vectors) of 16 analog values (vector components), vectors representing known patterns as diverse as spectra, histograms, graphs, or brightnesses of pixels in images. Chips exploit parallel nature of vector quantization architecture to implement highly parallel processing in relatively simple computational cells. Through collective action, cells classify input pattern in fraction of microsecond while consuming power of few microwatts.

  6. Parallel Analog-to-Digital Image Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokerson, D. C.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed integrated-circuit network of many identical units convert analog outputs of imaging arrays of x-ray or infrared detectors to digital outputs. Converter located near imaging detectors, within cryogenic detector package. Because converter output digital, lends itself well to multiplexing and to postprocessing for correction of gain and offset errors peculiar to each picture element and its sampling and conversion circuits. Analog-to-digital image processor is massively parallel system for processing data from array of photodetectors. System built as compact integrated circuit located near local plane. Buffer amplifier for each picture element has different offset.

  7. Solid-phase synthesis of prenylcysteine analogs

    PubMed Central

    Donelson, James L.; Hodges-Loaiza, Heather B.; Henriksen, Brian S.; Hrycyna, Christine A.

    2009-01-01

    Prenylcysteine derivatives are of interest for a variety of different biological reasons, including probing the CaaX protein processing pathway. A solid-phase synthesis protocol for the preparation of prenylcysteines using 2-chlorotrityl chloride resin as a solid support has been developed. A series of novel amide-modified farnesylcysteine analogs were synthesized in both high purity and yield under mild conditions. The farnesylcysteine analogs were evaluated using human isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase (Icmt) as a biological target, and several new inhibitors, one with significantly enhanced potency, were identified. PMID:19320430

  8. Landauer bound for analog computing systems.

    PubMed

    Diamantini, M Cristina; Gammaitoni, Luca; Trugenberger, Carlo A

    2016-07-01

    By establishing a relation between information erasure and continuous phase transitions we generalize the Landauer bound to analog computing systems. The entropy production per degree of freedom during erasure of an analog variable (reset to standard value) is given by the logarithm of the configurational volume measured in units of its minimal quantum. As a consequence, every computation has to be carried on with a finite number of bits and infinite precision is forbidden by the fundamental laws of physics, since it would require an infinite amount of energy. PMID:27575108

  9. Landauer bound for analog computing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamantini, M. Cristina; Gammaitoni, Luca; Trugenberger, Carlo A.

    2016-07-01

    By establishing a relation between information erasure and continuous phase transitions we generalize the Landauer bound to analog computing systems. The entropy production per degree of freedom during erasure of an analog variable (reset to standard value) is given by the logarithm of the configurational volume measured in units of its minimal quantum. As a consequence, every computation has to be carried on with a finite number of bits and infinite precision is forbidden by the fundamental laws of physics, since it would require an infinite amount of energy.

  10. Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul O.; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2010-04-20

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  11. Analog graphic display method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus and method for using an output device such as an LED to show the approximate analog level of a variable electrical signal wherein a modulating AC waveform is superimposed either on the signal or a reference voltage, both of which are then fed to a comparator which drives the output device. Said device flashes at a constant perceptible rate with a duty cycle which varies in response to variations in the level of the input signal. The human eye perceives these variations in duty cycle as analogous to variations in the level of the input signal.

  12. Ground-water studies and analog models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinove, Charles Joseph

    1962-01-01

    Hydrologists make ground-water studies to aid managers and users of water resources in solving their problems in the development and management of ground water. Geologic and hydrologic information provides the basic knowledge for construction of electric analog models that portray the ground-water system in miniature. Analog models can be analyzed electrically, and the results of the analysis are presented in terms of the ground-water system so that the effects of alternative methods of water development can be assessed.

  13. Gap between active and passive solar heating

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The gap between active and passive solar could hardly be wider. The reasons for this are discussed and advantages to narrowing the gap are analyzed. Ten years of experience in both active and passive systems are reviewed, including costs, frequent problems, performance prediction, performance modeling, monitoring, and cooling concerns. Trends are analyzed, both for solar space heating and for service water heating. A tendency for the active and passive technologies to be converging is observed. Several recommendations for narrowing the gap are presented.

  14. Passive solar in China: traditional and new

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J D; Balcomb, S A

    1986-04-01

    The authors' observations of a tradition of passive solar architecture in northern China are described. Tendencies for modern buildings to depart from this tradition are noted. Major passive solar research programs are discussed and experimental buildings are illustrated. It is concluded that the Chinese could realize a major advantage by combining their strong tradition of passive solar architecture with modern insulation methods and improved glazing systems.

  15. Passive electroreception in aquatic mammals.

    PubMed

    Czech-Damal, Nicole U; Dehnhardt, Guido; Manger, Paul; Hanke, Wolf

    2013-06-01

    Passive electroreception is a sensory modality in many aquatic vertebrates, predominantly fishes. Using passive electroreception, the animal can detect and analyze electric fields in its environment. Most electric fields in the environment are of biogenic origin, often produced by prey items. These electric fields can be relatively strong and can be a highly valuable source of information for a predator, as underlined by the fact that electroreception has evolved multiple times independently. The only mammals that possess electroreception are the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and the echidnas (Tachyglossidae) from the monotreme order, and, recently discovered, the Guiana dolphin (Sotalia guianensis) from the cetacean order. Here we review the morphology, function and origin of the electroreceptors in the two aquatic species, the platypus and the Guiana dolphin. The morphology shows certain similarities, also similar to ampullary electroreceptors in fishes, that provide cues for the search for electroreceptors in more vertebrate and invertebrate species. The function of these organs appears to be very similar. Both species search for prey animals in low-visibility conditions or while digging in the substrate, and sensory thresholds are within one order of magnitude. The electroreceptors in both species are innervated by the trigeminal nerve. The origin of the accessory structures, however, is completely different; electroreceptors in the platypus have developed from skin glands, in the Guiana dolphin, from the vibrissal system. PMID:23187861

  16. Passive component manufacturing in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The serious downturn of optical fiber communication industry in the past three years speeds up the consolidation of passive component manufacturing. Automation activity and investment stopped due to no driving force from the volume demand. A lot of skillful but low cost labors must be needed in the future for manufacturing when the demand comes back. Except MEMS based VOA, most of components based on advanced technology seem to get delayed in most applications. Furthermore, the highly integrated products are also delayed and become uncertain, especially AWG technology. Most of the manufacturing of passive components already moved or are moving to Asia especially China. Browave already built its manufacturing factory and is almost doing all the manufacturing in Zhong Shan. Browave tries to optimize the value of Taiwan plus China, i.e., Tawan provides superior management system, quality systems and manufacturing engineering support where China provides a lot of skillful but low cost labors. Browave is now not only providing the basic elements like Couplers, Isolators, TFF add/drop filter, Thin Film based GFF (Gain Flattened Filters), but also providing "Dedicated Lines" for the components/modules/subsystems for the players who need the value as mentioned above.

  17. Applications of passivated silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyung, Richard; Park, Chan Ho

    2012-03-01

    We can postulate that dark matter are WIMPS, more specifically, Majorana particles called neutralinos floating through space. Upon neutralino-neutralino annihilation, they create a greater burst of other particles into space: these being all kinds of particles including anti-deuterons which are the indications of the existence of dark matter. For the study of the applications of passivated silicon detectors, this paper shows following procedures in two categories. Painting on little pieces of silicon (Polyimid and Boxcar Red) :Took clean paint brush and painted on Polyimid and Boxcar red samples onto little pieces of sample silicon and dried for a certain number of hours in different conditions. Cooling test : usually done in 7 cycles, cool until usually -35 degrees or -40 degrees Celsius with thermoelectric cooler, dry out, evapate the moisture in the fume hood, take pictures with the microscope and check for irregularities every 1, 4 and 7 times. The results show us how the passivated silicon will act in the real experiment--the vacuum chamber and x-rays (from the radioactive source), and different atmospheric pressures simulate what it will be like in space.

  18. Germanium oxide removal by citric acid and thiol passivation from citric acid-terminated Ge(100).

    PubMed

    Collins, Gillian; Aureau, Damien; Holmes, Justin D; Etcheberry, Arnaud; O'Dwyer, Colm

    2014-12-01

    Many applications of germanium (Ge) are underpinned by effective oxide removal and surface passivation. This important surface treatment step often requires H-X (X = Cl, Br, I) or HF etchants. Here, we show that aqueous citric acid solutions are effective in the removal of GeOx. The stability of citric acid-treated Ge(100) is compared to HF and HCl treated surfaces and analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Further Ge surface passivation was investigated by thiolation using alkane monothiols and dithiols. The organic passivation layers show good stability with no oxide regrowth observed after 3 days of ambient exposure.

  19. Passive tamper-indicating secure container

    SciTech Connect

    Bartberger, J.C.

    1993-07-01

    This paper describes a passive tamper-indicating secure container that has been designed to demonstrate concepts, features, and materials that can be used in passive container applications. (In a passive security system, physical phenomena provide visual indication of tampering.) The basic container {open_quotes}volume within a volume{close_quotes} assembly consists of a transparent plastic outer container and an aluminum inner container. Both containers incorporate passive, fingerprinted layers as part of the tamper-indicating container system. Many of the tamper-indicating features can be visually inspected without disassembling the container. The status of container development and potential applications for the container are addressed.

  20. Rumen degradation and availability of various amounts of liquid methionine hydroxy analog in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Koenig, K M; Rode, L M; Knight, C D; Vázquez-Añón, M

    2002-04-01

    Ruminal escape of various amounts of methionine hydroxy analog [D,L-2-hydroxy-4-(methylthio)-butanoic acid (HMB)] was measured in an experiment designed as a 4 x 4 Latin square using four lactating dairy cows with cannula in the rumen and duodenum. The cows were fed a diet composed of corn silage, alfalfa haylage, rolled barley grain, canola meal, and blood meal, three times per day. The cows were fed the liquid analog each day for 1 wk before the experiment was started. On the day of the experiment, each cow received an intraruminal bolus dose of 0, 25, or 50 g of the liquid analog (Alimet feed supplement, 88% HMB) or 51.2 g of a dry calcium salt of the analog (86% HMB; MHA) mixed with 0.5 kg of ground barley grain. A liquid phase marker (Co-EDTA) was administered as a bolus dose into the rumen at the time of administration of the methionine hydroxy analogs. Rumen and duodenal contents, and blood serum were collected at 0, 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 h relative to the time of dosing. Rumen and duodenal samples were analyzed for Co and HMB, and serum was analyzed for free methionine. Fractional rate constants for the passage of the liquid marker (k(p)) and the decline of HMB concentration in the rumen (k(rHMB)) were determined by nonlinear regression. Liquid passage from the rumen was similar among the four analog treatments (0.136 +/- 0.012/h; mean +/- SEM). Ruminal escape of HMB as a percentage of the dose (100% x k(p)/k(rHMB)) did not differ between cows receiving 25, 50, and 51.2 g of the methionine analogs (42.5, 41.0, and 34.9 +/- 9.0%, respectively) and averaged 39.5%. Duodenal appearance of HMB as a percentage also did not differ between cows receiving 25, 50, and 51.2 g of the methionine analogs (16.2, 26.8, and 22.7%, respectively) and averaged 22%. Omasal absorption of HMB was variable ranging from 12.3 to 26.3% and averaged 17.6%. Serum methionine concentration peaked at 3 and 6 h after dosing and increased in proportion to the amount of the analog

  1. Oral passive IgY-based immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Shofiqur; Van Nguyen, Sa; Icatlo Jr., Faustino C.; Umeda, Kouji; Kodama, Yoshikatsu

    2013-01-01

    This commentary summarizes the laboratory investigations and clinical trials published recently involving per-oral application of IgY supplemented food for specific orogastrointestinal disease prevention and control purposes. The prolonged use and misuse of conventional antibacterial drugs has spawned antibiotic resistant microbes prompting scientists to search for other germ-killing options. In particular, the use of IgY as a novel mode of immunotherapy using oral chicken immunoglobulin (IgY) to confer passive immunity has gained much interest as an inexpensive non-antibiotic alternative for the prophylaxis and treatment of a wide variety of infectious diseases. The stability of IgY in the orogastrointestinal tract and its safety profile has been well-documented. IgY has been used in the treatment or prevention of dental caries, periodontitis and gingivitis, gastritis and gastric ulcer, oral thrush and infant rotavirus diarrhea. The recent clinical trials on IgY with encouraging results has catapulted into the market novel nutraceutical or health supplements for therapeutic or prophylactic intervention based on the consumption of mono-specific or mixed IgY formulations. With recent trends in consumer preference for natural materials to alleviate health concerns, the increasing healthcare costs and the recent advances in drug delivery systems, IgY is likely to shift from its mainly functional food status toward pharmaceuticalization in the foreseeable future. PMID:23319156

  2. Effect of methionine hydroxy analog supplementation on dairy cattle hoof growth and composition.

    PubMed

    Clark, A K; Rakes, A H

    1982-08-01

    Fifty lactating Holstein cows were assigned randomly to one of two treatments, control and control plus approximately 30 g methionine hydroxy analog, and confined on concrete for 11 mo. The control diet consisted of sorghum silage and concentrate fed as a blended ration. Sulfur contents of dry matter were .12% and .16% for control and methionine hydroxy analog rations. Hoof growth and hardness were measured on front and rear right abaxial claws in the dorsal and lateral regions. Hoof growth rates were measured for four periods; summer-fall, fall-winter, winter-spring, and spring-summer, each 70 to 90 days. Hooves of cows fed methionine hydroxy analog grew faster than those of control cows during spring-summer in all regions. Variations of growth rates of hooves were seasonal and tended to follow variations in daily photoperiod. Wear rates were not affected significantly by treatment. Hooves of cows fed methionine hydroxy analog were softer in the top dorsal region at the end of winter-spring and in the dorsal toe region at the end of spring-summer. All other locations were not affected significantly by treatment. The toe region was harder than the top of the hoof. Cows fed methionine hydroxy analog had less cysteine and proline in hoof than control cows and greater percentages of methionine lysine, tyrosine, and glutamic acid. These results suggest that a decrease of disulfide bonding occurred in the hoof tissue of cows fed methionine hydroxy analog. Cows fed methionine hydroxy analog produced more actual milk, milk fat, and 4% fat-corrected milk during 180 days than did control cows. PMID:6183300

  3. Effect of methionine hydroxy analog supplementation on dairy cattle hoof growth and composition.

    PubMed

    Clark, A K; Rakes, A H

    1982-08-01

    Fifty lactating Holstein cows were assigned randomly to one of two treatments, control and control plus approximately 30 g methionine hydroxy analog, and confined on concrete for 11 mo. The control diet consisted of sorghum silage and concentrate fed as a blended ration. Sulfur contents of dry matter were .12% and .16% for control and methionine hydroxy analog rations. Hoof growth and hardness were measured on front and rear right abaxial claws in the dorsal and lateral regions. Hoof growth rates were measured for four periods; summer-fall, fall-winter, winter-spring, and spring-summer, each 70 to 90 days. Hooves of cows fed methionine hydroxy analog grew faster than those of control cows during spring-summer in all regions. Variations of growth rates of hooves were seasonal and tended to follow variations in daily photoperiod. Wear rates were not affected significantly by treatment. Hooves of cows fed methionine hydroxy analog were softer in the top dorsal region at the end of winter-spring and in the dorsal toe region at the end of spring-summer. All other locations were not affected significantly by treatment. The toe region was harder than the top of the hoof. Cows fed methionine hydroxy analog had less cysteine and proline in hoof than control cows and greater percentages of methionine lysine, tyrosine, and glutamic acid. These results suggest that a decrease of disulfide bonding occurred in the hoof tissue of cows fed methionine hydroxy analog. Cows fed methionine hydroxy analog produced more actual milk, milk fat, and 4% fat-corrected milk during 180 days than did control cows.

  4. Long-term assessment of prostaglandin analogs and timolol fixed combinations vs prostaglandin analogs monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ai-Wei; Gan, Lin-Yang; Yao, Xiang; Zhou, Jian

    2016-01-01

    AIM To draw a Meta-analysis over the comparison of the intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering efficacy and safety between the commonly used fixed-combinations of prostaglandin analogs and 0.5% timolol with prostaglandin analogs (PGAs) monotherapy. METHODS After searching the published reports from MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, all randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) comparing the fixed combination of PGAs/timolol therapy (FCs) and PGAs monotherapy with treatment duration at least 6mo were included. The efficacy outcomes were mean diurnal IOP, percentage of participants whose IOP were lower than 18 mm Hg, incidence of visual field change, while the safety outcomes included corneal side effects, hyperemia and eye irritation. The analysis was carried out in RevMan version 5.3 software. RESULTS After six-month medical intervention, the mean diurnal IOP of FCs was lower than PGAs (MD -1.14, 95% CI -1.82 to -0.46, P=0.001); the percentage of target IOP achieving between FCs and PGAs showed no significant difference (RR 1.18, 95% CI 0.97 to 1.43, P=0.10). No statistically significant differences of the incidence of hyperemia (RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.45 to 1.01, P=0.06) and eye irritation (RR 1.20, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.51, P=0.12) between the FCs and PGAs monotherapy were detected. Only one research involved in corneal events, result of this trial revealed no difference between two intervention groups regarding corneal effects (central endothelial cell density, MD -0.20, 95% CI -0.72 to 0.32, P=0.45; central corneal thickness, MD -0.01, 95% CI -0.02 to 0.00, P=0.23). The evaluation of visual field change was not performed due to the limited duration of the trials included in this Meta-analysis. CONCLUSION The long-term efficacy of the FCs overweighed the PGAs monotherapy in lowering IOP, but in the incidence of hyperemia and eye irritation syndromes, the differences are not statically significant. More RCTs with detailed and authentic data over the assessments of

  5. (-)-Botryodiplodin, A Unique Ribose Analog Toxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many toxins owe their mechanisms of action to being structural analogs of essential metabolites, messengers or structural components. Examples range from tubo-curare to penicillin. Ribose plays a unique role in the metabolism of living organisms, whether prokaryotes or eukaryotes. It and its deri...

  6. The GMO-Nanotech (Dis)Analogy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandler, Ronald; Kay, W. D.

    2006-01-01

    The genetically-modified-organism (GMO) experience has been prominent in motivating science, industry, and regulatory communities to address the social and ethical dimensions of nanotechnology. However, there are some significant problems with the GMO-nanotech analogy. First, it overstates the likelihood of a GMO-like backlash against…

  7. Invention through Form and Function Analogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.

    2015-01-01

    "Invention through Form and Function Analogy" is an invention book for teachers and other leaders working with youth who are involving students in the invention process. The book consists of an introduction and set of nine learning cycle formatted lessons for teaching the principles of invention through the science and engineering design…

  8. A Mechanical Analogy for Ohm's Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    do Couto Tavares, Milton; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A mechanical analogy between the microscopic motion of a charged carrier in an ordinary resistor and the macroscopic motion of a ball falling along a slanted board covered with a lattice of nails is introduced. The Drude model is also introduced to include the case of inelastic collisions. Computer simulation of the motion is described. (KR)

  9. Radiation Behavior of Analog Neural Network Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langenbacher, H.; Zee, F.; Daud, T.; Thakoor, A.

    1996-01-01

    A neural network experiment conducted for the Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV-1) 1-b launched in June 1994. Identical sets of analog feed-forward neural network chips was used to study and compare the effects of space and ground radiation on the chips. Three failure mechanisms are noted.

  10. An Analog Processor for Image Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a novel analog Vector Array Processor (VAP) that was designed for use in real-time and ultra-low power image compression applications. This custom CMOS processor is based architectually on the Vector Quantization (VQ) algorithm in image coding, and the hardware implementation fully exploits the inherent parallelism built-in the VQ algorithm.

  11. RF digital-to-analog converter

    DOEpatents

    Conway, P.H.; Yu, D.U.L.

    1995-02-28

    A digital-to-analog converter is disclosed for producing an RF output signal proportional to a digital input word of N bits from an RF reference input, N being an integer greater or equal to 2. The converter comprises a plurality of power splitters, power combiners and a plurality of mixers or RF switches connected in a predetermined configuration. 18 figs.

  12. Classical analog of electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido Alzar, C. L.; Martinez, M. A. G.; Nussenzveig, P.

    2002-01-01

    We present a classical analog of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). In a system of just two coupled harmonic oscillators subject to a harmonic driving force, we reproduce the phenomenology observed in EIT. We also describe a simple experiment with two linearly coupled RLC circuits which can be incorporated into an undergraduate laboratory.

  13. Analog Acoustic Expression in Speech Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shintel, Hadas; Nusbaum, Howard C.; Okrent, Arika

    2006-01-01

    We present the first experimental evidence of a phenomenon in speech communication we call "analog acoustic expression." Speech is generally thought of as conveying information in two distinct ways: discrete linguistic-symbolic units such as words and sentences represent linguistic meaning, and continuous prosodic forms convey information about…

  14. Radioiodinated fatty acid analogs for myocardial imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ruyan, M.K.

    1993-01-01

    Fatty acids are the preferred substrate for the normoxic heart. About sixty percent of the energy required by the myocardium is provided by fatty acid [beta]-oxidation. Many scientists have focused on the alterations in fatty acid metabolism in the ischemic heart for the development of radiolabelled fatty acids for functional imaging of the heart. Three main categories of compounds were synthesized: tetrazoles (1 and 2), glycidic and [alpha]-methylene acids (3-5), and analogs of oleic acid (6,7 and 7A). The tetrazole group has a similar pKa and size to that of a carboxyl group; however, such fatty acid analogs cannot undergo normal fatty acid metabolism. Glycidic and [alpha]-methylene analogs are potential irreversible inhibitors of fatty acid metabolism. Oleic acid analogs were investigated to assess the affect of stereochemical consequences on biodistribution. The key intermediates in the synthesis of the target compounds were [omega]-nitrophenyl alkylcarboxylic acids and alcohols, which were made using a variety of cross-coupling reactions. The Wittig reaction, which was used in the synthesis of tetrazole 1 and glycidic acid 3, gave low yields of the cross-coupled products. The remaining target compounds were synthesized by condensation of appropriate RCu (CN) ZnI and substituted benzyl bromides or by Pd[sup II] catalyzed cross-coupling of substituted arylhalides with suitable alkynes. The latter two reactions produced much higher yields of the desired products. All of the target compounds were radiolabeled with [sup 125]I by various Cu(I) catalyzed radioiodine exchange procedures and were then subjected to tissue biodistribution (TD) studies in rats. Except for the 15-(4-iodophenyl)-2-methylene-pentadecanoic acid (5), all of the fatty acid analogs failed to surpass clinically-used 15-(4-iodophenyl)pentadecanoic acid (IPPA) in their ability to be taken up and retained by the rat myocardium.

  15. A Passive Magnetic Bearing Flywheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siebert, Mark; Ebihara, Ben; Jansen, Ralph; Fusaro, Robert L.; Morales, Wilfredo; Kascak, Albert; Kenny, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    A 100 percent passive magnetic bearing flywheel rig employing no active control components was designed, constructed, and tested. The suspension clothe rotor was provided by two sets of radial permanent magnetic bearings operating in the repulsive mode. The axial support was provided by jewel bearings on both ends of the rotor. The rig was successfully operated to speeds of 5500 rpm, which is 65 percent above the first critical speed of 3336 rpm. Operation was not continued beyond this point because of the excessive noise generated by the air impeller and because of inadequate containment in case of failure. Radial and axial stiffnesses of the permanent magnetic bearings were experimentally measured and then compared to finite element results. The natural damping of the rotor was measured and a damping coefficient was calculated.

  16. Passive Phase Noise Cancellation Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Kenig, Eyal; Cross, M. C.; Lifshitz, Ron; Karabalin, R. B.; Villanueva, L. G.; Matheny, M. H.; Roukes, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new method for reducing phase noise in oscillators, thereby improving their frequency precision. The noise reduction is realized by a passive device consisting of a pair of coupled nonlinear resonating elements that are driven parametrically by the output of a conventional oscillator at a frequency close to the sum of the linear mode frequencies. Above the threshold for parametric instability, the coupled resonators exhibit self-oscillations which arise as a response to the parametric driving, rather than by application of active feedback. We find operating points of the device for which this periodic signal is immune to frequency noise in the driving oscillator, providing a way to clean its phase noise. We present results for the effect of thermal noise to advance a broader understanding of the overall noise sensitivity and the fundamental operating limits. PMID:23004985

  17. Passive Tracking System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor); Chen, Henry A. (Inventor); Phan, Chau T. (Inventor); Bourgeois, Brian A. (Inventor); Dusl, Jon (Inventor); Hill, Brent W. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Systems and methods are disclosed for passively determining the location of a moveable transmitter utilizing a pair of phase shifts at a receiver for extracting a direction vector from a receiver to the transmitter. In a preferred embodiment, a phase difference between the transmitter and receiver is extracted utilizing a noncoherent demodulator in the receiver. The receiver includes an antenna array with three antenna elements, which preferably are patch antenna elements spaced apart by one-half wavelength. Three receiver channels are preferably utilized for simultaneously processing the received signal from each of the three antenna elements. Multipath transmission paths for each of the three receiver channels are indexed so that comparisons of the same multipath component are made for each of the three receiver channels. The phase difference for each received signal is determined by comparing only the magnitudes of received and stored modulation signals to determine a winning modulation symbol.

  18. Passive adaptive imaging through turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofsted, David

    2016-05-01

    Standard methods for improved imaging system performance under degrading optical turbulence conditions typically involve active adaptive techniques or post-capture image processing. Here, passive adaptive methods are considered where active sources are disallowed, a priori. Theoretical analyses of short-exposure turbulence impacts indicate that varying aperture sizes experience different degrees of turbulence impacts. Smaller apertures often outperform larger aperture systems as turbulence strength increases. This suggests a controllable aperture system is advantageous. In addition, sub-aperture sampling of a set of training images permits the system to sense tilts in different sub-aperture regions through image acquisition and image cross-correlation calculations. A four sub-aperture pattern supports corrections involving five realizable operating modes (beyond tip and tilt) for removing aberrations over an annular pattern. Progress to date will be discussed regarding development and field trials of a prototype system.

  19. Promising alternative clinical uses of prostaglandin F2α analogs: beyond the eyelashes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young M; Diehl, Joseph; Levins, Paul C

    2015-04-01

    Prostaglandin F2α analogs, commonly prescribed for glaucoma treatment, have been shown to induce side effects such as cutaneous hypertrichosis and hyperpigmentation. Therefore, these medications have theoretic applications in the treatment of alopecia and disorders of hypopigmentation. We reviewed the literature to find original studies assessing the use of prostaglandin F2α analogs in these settings. Studies and reports were analyzed in regards to androgenic alopecia, alopecia areata, chemotherapy-induced alopecia, vitiligo, and hypopigmented scarring. Based on the results of these studies, and consideration of pathophysiologic mechanism, the most promising applications for prostaglandin F2α analogs include androgenic alopecia, chemotherapy-induced alopecia, and alopecia areata concurrently treated with corticosteroids. PMID:25601618

  20. Promising alternative clinical uses of prostaglandin F2α analogs: beyond the eyelashes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young M; Diehl, Joseph; Levins, Paul C

    2015-04-01

    Prostaglandin F2α analogs, commonly prescribed for glaucoma treatment, have been shown to induce side effects such as cutaneous hypertrichosis and hyperpigmentation. Therefore, these medications have theoretic applications in the treatment of alopecia and disorders of hypopigmentation. We reviewed the literature to find original studies assessing the use of prostaglandin F2α analogs in these settings. Studies and reports were analyzed in regards to androgenic alopecia, alopecia areata, chemotherapy-induced alopecia, vitiligo, and hypopigmented scarring. Based on the results of these studies, and consideration of pathophysiologic mechanism, the most promising applications for prostaglandin F2α analogs include androgenic alopecia, chemotherapy-induced alopecia, and alopecia areata concurrently treated with corticosteroids.

  1. Addressing Passive Smoking in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Sasha G.; Kuijlaars, Jennifer S.; Mesters, Ilse; Muris, Jean W. M.; van Schayck, Constant P.; Dompeling, Edward; Feron, Frans J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background A significant number of parents are unaware or unconvinced of the health consequences of passive smoking (PS) in children. Physicians could increase parental awareness by giving personal advice. Aim To evaluate the current practices of three Dutch health professions (paediatricians, youth health care physicians, and family physicians) regarding parental counselling for passive smoking (PS) in children. Methods All physicians (n = 720) representing the three health professions in Limburg, the Netherlands, received an invitation to complete a self-administered electronic questionnaire including questions on their: sex, work experience, personal smoking habits, counselling practices and education regarding PS in children. Results The response rate was 34%. One tenth (11%) of the responding physicians always addressed PS in children, 32% often, 54% occasionally and 4% reported to never attend to it. The three health professions appeared comparable regarding their frequency of parental counselling for PS in children. Addressing PS was more likely when children had respiratory problems. Lack of time was the most frequently mentioned barrier, being very and somewhat applicable for respectively 14% and 43% of the physicians. One fourth of the responders had received postgraduate education about PS. Additionally, 49% of the responders who did not have any education about PS were interested in receiving it. Conclusions Physicians working in the paediatric field in Limburg, the Netherlands, could more frequently address PS in children with parents. Lack of time appeared to be the most mentioned barrier and physicians were more likely to counsel parents for PS in children with respiratory complaints/diseases. Finally, a need for more education on parental counselling for PS was expressed. PMID:24809443

  2. CRC handbook of neurohypophyseal hormone analogs. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Jost, K.; Lebl, M.; Brtnik, F.

    1987-01-01

    This book is discussed in two parts. Part one discusses Introductory Remarks. Nomenclature. Natural Forms of Neurohypophyseal Hormones. Synthesis, Purification, and Stability of the Neurohypophyseal Hormone Analogs. Isotopically Modified Analogs. Studies of Analogs Using Physiocochemical and Theoretical Methods. Conformational properties of Neurohypophyseal Hormone Analogs in Solution as Determined bu NMR and Laser Raman Spectroscopies. Other Methods used in the Investigation of Neurohypophyseal Hormone Analog Conformations. Conformation Properties of Analogs in Solution as Revealed by Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy. Conformational Energy Calculations. Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships. References. Part 2 discusses The Use of Neurohypophyseal Hormone Analogs in the Study of Neurophysin-Hormone Interactions. Enzymatic Inactivation. Immunochemistry. Studies of Neurohypopophyseal Hormone Activities at the Cellular Level. Fundamental Biological Evaluation. Important Structural Modifications. Noncoded Amino Acids. Modification of ..cap alpha..-Amino Group; 1-Deamino and 1-Hydroxy Analogs. Modifications in the Issulfide Bridge (Carba-Analogs). Modification of Other Functional Groups. Changes in the Backbone. References. Index.

  3. [Recovery from total knee arthroplasty through continuous passive motion].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Mayo, B; Rodríguez-Mansilla, J; González Sánchez, B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to know the effects of continuous passive mobilization in patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty. A search strategy was developed to retrieve all clinical trials, written in English and/or Spanish, published in the electronic search databases PubMed, Cochrane Library Plus, Dialnet, CSIC and PEDro. The inclusion criteria were: clinical trials published from January 2000 until November 2014 in English or Spanish. Out of 537 clinical trials that were potentially relevant, a total of 12 were included in this review. The evaluation of 1,153 patients shows that there is no significant difference in improving the range of the joint, pain, balance, motion, healing and hospital stay using continuous passive mobilization against the regular physiotherapy treatment for total knee arthroplasty. The application of continuous passive mobilization in the long-term does not provide any benefit in terms of the breadth of the range of the joint, pain and improvement of standing and motion in comparison with conventional postoperative physiotherapy treatment in total knee arthroplasty. In the short term an improvement is obtained in the range of joint motion in knee flexion.

  4. [Recovery from total knee arthroplasty through continuous passive motion].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Mayo, B; Rodríguez-Mansilla, J; González Sánchez, B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to know the effects of continuous passive mobilization in patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty. A search strategy was developed to retrieve all clinical trials, written in English and/or Spanish, published in the electronic search databases PubMed, Cochrane Library Plus, Dialnet, CSIC and PEDro. The inclusion criteria were: clinical trials published from January 2000 until November 2014 in English or Spanish. Out of 537 clinical trials that were potentially relevant, a total of 12 were included in this review. The evaluation of 1,153 patients shows that there is no significant difference in improving the range of the joint, pain, balance, motion, healing and hospital stay using continuous passive mobilization against the regular physiotherapy treatment for total knee arthroplasty. The application of continuous passive mobilization in the long-term does not provide any benefit in terms of the breadth of the range of the joint, pain and improvement of standing and motion in comparison with conventional postoperative physiotherapy treatment in total knee arthroplasty. In the short term an improvement is obtained in the range of joint motion in knee flexion. PMID:26486536

  5. Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Gorski, Anthony J.; Schertz, William W.

    1982-01-01

    A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

  6. The So-Called Japanese Passive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Irwin

    The principal claim of this paper is that the Japanese passive consists of two different constructions, each derived from a distinct deep structure and each having associated with it a distinct set of syntactic and semantic properties. One of these constructions, the "adversative passive," implies that the grammatical subject of the sentence is…

  7. Passive Thermal Management of Foil Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods for passive thermal management of foil bearing systems are disclosed herein. The flow of the hydrodynamic film across the surface of bearing compliant foils may be disrupted to provide passive cooling and to improve the performance and reliability of the foil bearing system.

  8. Strong local passivity in finite quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Frey, Michael; Funo, Ken; Hotta, Masahiro

    2014-07-01

    Passive states of quantum systems are states from which no system energy can be extracted by any cyclic (unitary) process. Gibbs states of all temperatures are passive. Strong local (SL) passive states are defined to allow any general quantum operation, but the operation is required to be local, being applied only to a specific subsystem. Any mixture of eigenstates in a system-dependent neighborhood of a nondegenerate entangled ground state is found to be SL passive. In particular, Gibbs states are SL passive with respect to a subsystem only at or below a critical system-dependent temperature. SL passivity is associated in many-body systems with the presence of ground state entanglement in a way suggestive of collective quantum phenomena such as quantum phase transitions, superconductivity, and the quantum Hall effect. The presence of SL passivity is detailed for some simple spin systems where it is found that SL passivity is neither confined to systems of only a few particles nor limited to the near vicinity of the ground state.

  9. Evaluation of a passive self-treatment technology for pastured cattle with a doramectin-medicated molasses-based liquid feed supplement for the control of southern cattle ticks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The treatment of cattle every 14 days for the eradication of cattle fever ticks carries a high financial burden for producers. Thus, most producers who have ticks detected on their property hoose to vacate the premises of all livestock instead of dipping animals every 14 days. However, the vacation ...

  10. Vitamin E analog, alpha-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid analog, alone and in combination with celecoxib, reduces multiplicity of ultraviolet-induced skin cancers in mice.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Shelley B; Fischer, Susan M; Sanders, Bob G; Kline, Kimberly

    2008-02-01

    The goals of this study were to determine whether alpha-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid analog (alpha-TEA), a novel vitamin E analog, and celecoxib, alone or in combination, when administered as a late intervention can reduce the ultraviolet-induced nonmelanoma skin-tumor burden of established tumors, prevent additional tumors from developing, and prevent tumor recurrence once treatments are stopped. Hairless SKH-1 female mice were ultraviolet-irradiated for 24 weeks, divided into treatment groups so that each group had approximately 5.8 tumors/mouse, and then treated with 72 mug of liposome-formulated alpha-TEA by aerosol inhalation, 500 p.p.m. celecoxib in AIN-76 A diet, or a combination of alpha-TEA and celecoxib for 4 weeks. At the end of 4 weeks of treatment, each treatment group was subdivided, with one subgroup continuing to receive treatment and with treatment being stopped in the other. Skin-tumor development was monitored visually throughout the study and by histologic evaluation at the end. After 4 weeks of treatment, all treatments showed statistically significant reductions in tumor number when compared with controls. After termination of treatment, only alpha-TEA prevented a significant increase in tumor recurrence; however, continuous combination treatment resulted in the lowest total number of tumors. In conclusion alpha-TEA is an effective late-stage chemopreventive agent for nonmelanoma skin cancer that exhibits lasting benefits.

  11. Visuomotor learning by passive motor experience.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Takashi; Kondo, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Humans can adapt to unfamiliar dynamic and/or kinematic transformations through the active motor experience. Recent studies of neurorehabilitation using robots or brain-computer interface (BCI) technology suggest that passive motor experience would play a measurable role in motor recovery, however our knowledge of passive motor learning is limited. To clarify the effects of passive motor experience on human motor learning, we performed arm reaching experiments guided by a robotic manipulandum. The results showed that the passive motor experience had an anterograde transfer effect on the subsequent motor execution, whereas no retrograde interference was confirmed in the ABA paradigm experiment. This suggests that the passive experience of the error between visual and proprioceptive sensations leads to the limited but actual compensation of behavior, although it is fragile and cannot be consolidated as a persistent motor memory.

  12. Bismuth nickel passivation effective in FCCU

    SciTech Connect

    Heite, R.S. ); English, A.R. ); Smith, G.A. )

    1990-06-04

    Bismuth-based nickel passivation has been effective in Mapco Petroleum Inc.'s fluid catalytic cracking unit (FCCU) at its Memphis, Tenn., refinery for the past 2 years. Mapco switched to the bismuth passivator in 1988 after using antimony as a passivator since the early 1980s. Metals (nickel and vanadium) passivators help reduce the catalyst activity suppression that occurs from contamination of the catalyst with feed-born metals. With the switch to bismuth, a hazardous material has been eliminated. Antimony is on the U.S. Environmental protection Agency's lit of hazardous chemicals. The bismuth also reduced the deleterious effects of high nickel content in the feed to the FCCU, at a bismuth quantity equal to, or slightly greater than, the amount of antimony previously used. Trouble-free operation of the unit was maintained at a reduced passivation cost.

  13. Aerodynamic control with passively pitching wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravish, Nick; Wood, Robert

    Flapping wings may pitch passively under aerodynamic and inertial loads. Such passive pitching is observed in flapping wing insect and robot flight. The effect of passive wing pitch on the control dynamics of flapping wing flight are unexplored. Here we demonstrate in simulation and experiment the critical role wing pitching plays in yaw control of a flapping wing robot. We study yaw torque generation by a flapping wing allowed to passively rotate in the pitch axis through a rotational spring. Yaw torque is generated through alternating fast and slow upstroke and and downstroke. Yaw torque sensitively depends on both the rotational spring force law and spring stiffness, and at a critical spring stiffness a bifurcation in the yaw torque control relationship occurs. Simulation and experiment reveal the dynamics of this bifurcation and demonstrate that anomalous yaw torque from passively pitching wings is the result of aerodynamic and inertial coupling between the pitching and stroke-plane dynamics.

  14. Visuomotor learning by passive motor experience

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Takashi; Kondo, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Humans can adapt to unfamiliar dynamic and/or kinematic transformations through the active motor experience. Recent studies of neurorehabilitation using robots or brain-computer interface (BCI) technology suggest that passive motor experience would play a measurable role in motor recovery, however our knowledge of passive motor learning is limited. To clarify the effects of passive motor experience on human motor learning, we performed arm reaching experiments guided by a robotic manipulandum. The results showed that the passive motor experience had an anterograde transfer effect on the subsequent motor execution, whereas no retrograde interference was confirmed in the ABA paradigm experiment. This suggests that the passive experience of the error between visual and proprioceptive sensations leads to the limited but actual compensation of behavior, although it is fragile and cannot be consolidated as a persistent motor memory. PMID:26029091

  15. Solution-processed amorphous silicon surface passivation layers

    SciTech Connect

    Mews, Mathias Sontheimer, Tobias; Korte, Lars; Rech, Bernd; Mader, Christoph; Traut, Stephan; Wunnicke, Odo

    2014-09-22

    Amorphous silicon thin films, fabricated by thermal conversion of neopentasilane, were used to passivate crystalline silicon surfaces. The conversion is investigated using X-ray and constant-final-state-yield photoelectron spectroscopy, and minority charge carrier lifetime spectroscopy. Liquid processed amorphous silicon exhibits high Urbach energies from 90 to 120 meV and 200 meV lower optical band gaps than material prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Applying a hydrogen plasma treatment, a minority charge carrier lifetime of 1.37 ms at an injection level of 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 3} enabling an implied open circuit voltage of 724 mV was achieved, demonstrating excellent silicon surface passivation.

  16. Multilateral Research Opportunities in Ground Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbin, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    The global economy forces many nations to consider their national investments and make difficult decisions regarding their investment in future exploration. International collaboration provides an opportunity to leverage other nations' investments to meet common goals. The Humans In Space Community shares a common goal to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration within and beyond Low Earth Orbit. Meeting this goal requires efficient use of limited resources and International capabilities. The International Space Station (ISS) is our primary platform to conduct microgravity research targeted at reducing human health and performance risks for exploration missions. Access to ISS resources, however, is becoming more and more constrained and will only be available through 2020 or 2024. NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is actively pursuing methods to effectively utilize the ISS and appropriate ground analogs to understand and mitigate human health and performance risks prior to embarking on human exploration of deep space destinations. HRP developed a plan to use ground analogs of increasing fidelity to address questions related to exploration missions and is inviting International participation in these planned campaigns. Using established working groups and multilateral panels, the HRP is working with multiple Space Agencies to invite International participation in a series of 30- day missions that HRP will conduct in the US owned and operated Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) during 2016. In addition, the HRP is negotiating access to Antarctic stations (both US and non-US), the German :envihab and Russian NEK facilities. These facilities provide unique capabilities to address critical research questions requiring longer duration simulation or isolation. We are negotiating release of international research opportunities to ensure a multilateral approach to future analog research campaigns, hoping to begin multilateral campaigns in the

  17. Vitamin D analogs as modulators of vitamin D receptor action.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Sara; Posner, Gary H

    2003-01-01

    The natural calcium-regulating hormone 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25D(3)) is a secosteroid that offers organic chemists many sites for modifying structural and/or functional groups. Such modifications alter the chemistry, stereochemistry, and biological properties of the natural hormone. The resulting deltanoids (vitamin D analogs) have been used in the past two decades as molecular probes to investigate structure-function relationships based on their interactions with proteins that regulate deltanoid biostability (catabolic enzymes of the vitamin D endocrine system and vitamin D binding protein) and deltanoid transduction of biological activities (nuclear and membrane receptors). In this review we will focus on structural modifications of 1,25D(3) that selectively modulate the nuclear vitamin D receptor (VDR). We will discuss the structural requirements and modifications that create analogs with greater potency and efficacy than the natural hormone (superagonists). We will also identify the structural features of an emerging group of noncalcemic selective agonists and describe the pharmacokinetic properties and VDR-mediated actions that promote their tissue- and gene-selective responses. In addition, we will speculate on the possible structural requirements for vitamin D antagonists. We will also examine the evidence from studies in cell-free systems, in culture and in vivo that explain the mechanisms for the distinct actions of each group of analogs, with special emphasis on the relationship between their mode of interaction with the VDR and the molecular and cellular outcome of these interactions. Finally, we will describe the current and potential use of these selective modulators of the VDR for treatment of human diseases such as osteoporosis, cancer, and secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:14683515

  18. Not all analogies are created equal: Associative and categorical analogy processing following brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Gwenda L.; Cardillo, Eileen R.; Kranjec, Alexander; Lehet, Matthew; Widick, Page; Chatterjee, Anjan

    2012-01-01

    Current research on analogy processing assumes that different conceptual relations are treated similarly. However, just as words and concepts are related in distinct ways, different kinds of analogies may employ distinct types of relationships. An important distinction in how words are related is the difference between associative (dog-bone) and categorical (dog-cat) relations. To test the hypothesis that analogical mapping of different types of relations would have different neural instantiations, we tested patients with left and right hemisphere lesions on their ability to understand two types of analogies, ones expressing an associative relationship and others expressing a categorical relationship. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) and behavioral analyses revealed that associative analogies relied on a large left-lateralized language network while categorical analogies relied on both left and right hemispheres. The verbal nature of the task could account for the left hemisphere findings. We argue that categorical relations additionally rely on the right hemisphere because they are more difficult, abstract, and fragile; and contain more distant relationships. PMID:22402184

  19. Not all analogies are created equal: Associative and categorical analogy processing following brain damage.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Gwenda L; Cardillo, Eileen R; Kranjec, Alexander; Lehet, Matthew; Widick, Page; Chatterjee, Anjan

    2012-06-01

    Current research on analogy processing assumes that different conceptual relations are treated similarly. However, just as words and concepts are related in distinct ways, different kinds of analogies may employ distinct types of relationships. An important distinction in how words are related is the difference between associative (dog-bone) and categorical (dog-cat) relations. To test the hypothesis that analogical mapping of different types of relations would have different neural instantiations, we tested patients with left and right hemisphere lesions on their ability to understand two types of analogies, ones expressing an associative relationship and others expressing a categorical relationship. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) and behavioral analyses revealed that associative analogies relied on a large left-lateralized language network while categorical analogies relied on both left and right hemispheres. The verbal nature of the task could account for the left hemisphere findings. We argue that categorical relations additionally rely on the right hemisphere because they are more difficult, abstract, and fragile, and contain more distant relationships.

  20. Simulation of active and passive millimeter-wave (35 GHz) sensors by time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strenzwilk, D. F.; Maruyama, R. T.

    1982-11-01

    Analog voltage signals from a millimeter-wave (MMW) radiometer (passive sensor) and radar (active sensor) were collected over varying grassy terrains at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland in July 1980. These measurements were made as part of continuing studies of MMW sensors for smart munitions. The signals were digitized at a rate of 2,000 observations per second and then analyzed by the Box and Jenkins time series approach. This analysis reports on the characterization of these data sets. The passive time series signals resulted in a simple autoregressive-moving average process, similar to a previous set of data taken at Rome Air Development Center in Rome, N.Y. by Ballistic Research Laboratory. On the other hand, the radar data (active sensor) required a data transformation to enhance the analysis. In both cases the signals were well characterized using the Box-Jenkins time series approach.