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Sample records for patch test series

  1. Patch tests*

    PubMed Central

    Lazzarini, Rosana; Duarte, Ida; Ferreira, Alessandra Lindmayer

    2013-01-01

    Patch tests were introduced as a diagnostic tool in the late nineteenth century. Since then, they have improved considerably becoming what they are today. Patch tests are used in the diagnostic investigation of contact dermatitis worldwide. Batteries or series previously studied and standardized should be used in patch testing. The methodology is simple, but it requires adequate training for the results to be correctly interpreted and used. Despite having been used for over a century, it needs improvement like all other diagnostic techniques in the medical field. PMID:24474094

  2. Evaluation of patch test results with denture material series.

    PubMed

    Gebhart, M; Geier, J

    1996-03-01

    791 patients, among them 59 dental technicians and 732 other patients, were tested with the denture material series (DMS) recommended by the German Contact Dermatitis Research Group (DKG) in the hospitals of the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology (IVDK) between January 1990 and July 1993. Most frequently, positive reactions occurred to cadmium chloride in both groups. However, there was no evidence at all for relevance of these reactions. Benzoyl peroxide (BPO) ranked 2nd in patch test positivity. Although not statistically significant, reactions were more frequent in dental technicians, who might be exposed to BPO the in working environment. Methyl methacrylate (MMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) were common sensitizers in dental technicians but not in other patients. This finding, too, has its explanation in the working process of manufacturing dental prostheses.

  3. The Spanish standard patch test series: 2016 update by the Spanish Contact Dermatitis and Skin Allergy Research Group (GEIDAC).

    PubMed

    Hervella-Garcés, M; García-Gavín, J; Silvestre-Salvador, J F

    2016-09-01

    The Spanish standard patch test series, as recommended by the Spanish Contact Dermatitis and Skin Allergy Research Group (GEIDAC), has been updated for 2016. The new series replaces the 2012 version and contains the minimum set of allergens recommended for routine investigation of contact allergy in Spain from 2016 onwards. Four haptens -clioquinol, thimerosal, mercury, and primin- have been eliminated owing to a low frequency of relevant allergic reactions, while 3 new allergens -methylisothiazolinone, diazolidinyl urea, and imidazolidinyl urea- have been added. GEIDAC has also modified the recommended aqueous solution concentrations for the 2 classic, major haptens methylchloroisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone, which are now to be tested at 200ppm in aqueous solution, and formaldehyde, which is now to be tested in a 2% aqueous solution. Updating the Spanish standard series is one of the functions of GEIDAC, which is responsible for ensuring that the standard series is suited to the country's epidemiological profile and pattern of contact sensitization.

  4. [Contact allergens in the standard patch test series from 1980-2004 at the University Clinic Aachen].

    PubMed

    Hoeller Obrigkeit, D; Vens, N; Merk, H F; Schroeder, C M

    2005-12-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a common disease whose specific therapy is avoidance of allergens. It is critical to identify frequency of occurrence of allergic reactions to initiate preventive measures (e.g. elimination of substances with an especially high allergic potential). This study analyzes results of patch testing performed between 1980 and 1993 at the University Clinic of the RWTH Aachen. Additionally, age and sex-related distribution was evaluated. The data is compared to published patch test results covering the years 1995-2001 and patch test results from 2004 in the University Clinic Aachen.

  5. Patch Test Negative Generalized Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Spiker, Alison; Mowad, Christen

    2016-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a common condition in dermatology. Patch testing is the criterion standard for diagnosis. However, dermatitis is not always caused by an allergen, and patch testing does not identify a culprit in every patient. Generalized dermatitis, defined as eczematous dermatitis affecting greater than 3 body sites, is often encountered in dermatology practice, especially patch test referral centers. Management for patients with generalized dermatitis who are patch test negative is challenging. The purpose of this article is to outline an approach to this challenging scenario and summarize the paucity of existing literature on patch test negative generalized dermatitis.

  6. The "edge effect" with patch test materials.

    PubMed

    Fyad, A; Masmoudi, M L; Lachapelle, J M

    1987-03-01

    A positive "edge effect", i.e., the accumulation on the skin of a chemical solution (such as fluorescein 0.01% in a 50/50 water-ethanol solution) at the periphery of the patch test sites has been demonstrated. It occurs with different test materials (Finn Chamber; Silver Patch Test; Patch Test Chamber). Practical implications are discussed: this observation could be important when discussing results of laboratory investigations. In clinical practice, it could explain the occurrence of "ring-shaped" positive allergic patch test reactions to chemicals used in solution, i.e., Kathon CG or hydrocortisone.

  7. [Glossodynia--indication for patch testing?].

    PubMed

    Bäurle, G; Schönberger, A

    1986-08-15

    100 patients suffering from glossodynia without pathologic changes of the oral mucosa and 16 patients with suspected allergic contact stomatitis underwent patch testing using standard patch test and dental materials. The results were compared with those of patients in dental occupations suffering from hand eczema. As there is no clinical relevance of allergens in patients with glossodynia, patch testing seems to be unnecessary. On the other hand, patch test results of patients with stomatitis and dentures often suggest a causal allergy. In most of those cases, this was confirmed by complete healing after changing the denture bases, whereas in glossodynia such replacements never brought about a convincing improvement of the symptoms.

  8. Aeroallergen Patch Testing in Patients of Suspected Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Bisen, Nelee; Shenoi, Shrutakirthi D; Balachandran, C

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aeroallergens are airborne substances present in the environment with the potential to trigger an allergic reaction in the respiratory tract, mucosae, or skin of susceptible individuals. The relevance of aeroallergens in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis has been reported by many investigators. However, very few studies have been conducted to investigate their role in the production of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Aims: To determine the prevalence of aeroallergen patch test positivity in patients of suspected ACD and to study the clinical characteristics of patients testing positive with aeroallergens. Materials and Methods: Patients presenting to our department with suspected contact allergy and undergoing patch testing with Indian Standard Series (ISS) between January 2010 and June 2011 were studied. After a detailed history and clinical examination, patients were patch tested with ISS and aeroallergen series. Based on the history and clinical suspicion, patients were additionally patch tested with 15% Parthenium. Prior tape stripping was done in some patients. Results: Out of total 114 patients, 26 (22.8%) showed sensitivity to aeroallergen series. Parthenium was the commonest aeroallergen being positive in all 26 patients followed by Xanthium in two. None reacted to other allergens. Although positivity was more in patients with prior tape stripping, the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Most common aeroallergen found to be positive in our study was Parthenium hysterophorus. In view of low positivity to other allergens, routine aeroallergen patch testing in patients with suspected contact dermatitis may not be necessary. PMID:24891655

  9. Photopatch and UV-irradiated patch testing in photosensitive dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Reena; Thomas, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background: The photopatch test is used to detect photoallergic reactions to various antigens such as sunscreens and drugs. Photosensitive dermatitis can be caused due to antigens like parthenium, fragrances, rubbers and metals. The photopatch test does not contain these antigens. Therefore, the Indian Standard Series (ISS) along with the Standard photopatch series from Chemotechnique Diagnostics, Sweden was used to detect light induced antigens. Aim: To detect light induced antigens in patients with photosensitive dermatitis. Methods: This study was done in a descriptive, observer blinded manner. Photopatch test and ISS were applied in duplicate on the patient's back by the standard method. After 24 hours, readings were recorded according to ICDRG criteria. One side was closed and other side irradiated with 14 J/cm2 of UVA and a second set of readings were recorded after 48 hrs. Result: The highest positivity was obtained with parthenium, with 18 out of 35 (51%) patients showing a positive patch test reaction with both photoallergic contact dermatitis and photoaggravation. Four patients (11%) showed positive patch test reaction suggestive of contact dermatitis to potassium dichromate and fragrance mix. Six patients had contact dermatitis to numerous antigens such as nickel, cobalt, chinoform and para-phenylenediamine. None of these patients showed photoaggravation on patch testing. Conclusion: Parthenium was found to cause photoallergy, contact dermatitis with photoaggravation and contact allergy. Hence, photopatch test and UV irradiated patch test can be an important tool to detect light induced antigens in patients with photosensitive dermatitis. PMID:26955581

  10. A Practical Guide to Patch Testing.

    PubMed

    Fonacier, Luz

    2015-01-01

    Contact dermatitis is a common disease seen by allergists, dermatologists, and primary care physicians. The gold standard for diagnosing allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is patch testing and is indicated in any patient with a chronic, pruritic, eczematous, or lichenified dermatitis if underlying or secondary ACD is suspected. Patients with acute generalized dermatitis who have extensive eczema on the back, are on immunosuppressant medications, and have applied topical corticosteroids, topical calcineurin inhibitors, or ultraviolet radiation to the patch test (PT) site may have suppressed PT reactions. The procedure of patch testing is not a difficult one to perform, but the interpretation of the PT needs some critical components, including having an appropriate level of suspicion for the diagnosis of ACD, testing the relevant allergens in their proper vehicle and concentration, and the necessary experience to properly interpret the results. Careful history and physical examination must be correlated with the result of the PT to establish clinical relevance. Once the PT is completed, allergens are identified, and relevance has been established, educating the patient about the avoidance of exposure is critical. The Joint Task Force of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology and American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology has developed updated practice parameters for contact dermatitis and patch testing, and their recommendations will be discussed (Fonacier LF, Bernstein DI, Pacheco K, Holness DL. Contact dermatitis: a practice parameter update 2015. J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015; 3(3S):S1-S40.).

  11. Investigation of contact allergy to dental materials by patch testing

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Reena; Dinakar, Devina; Kurian, Swetha S.; Bindoo, Y. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dental products are widely used by patients and dental personnel alike and may cause problems for both. Dental materials could cause contact allergy with varying manifestations such as burning, pain, stomatitis, cheilitis, ulcers, lichenoid reactions localized to the oral mucosa in patients, and hand dermatitis in dental personnel. Patch testing with the dental series comprising commonly used materials can be used to detect contact allergies to dental materials. Aim: This study aimed to identify contact allergy among patients who have oral mucosal lesions after dental treatment and among dental personnel who came in contact with these materials. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients who had undergone dental procedures with symptoms of oral lichen planus, oral stomatitis, burning mouth, and recurrent aphthosis, were included in the study. Dental personnel with history of hand dermatitis were also included in the study. Patch testing was performed using Chemotechnique Dental Series and results interpreted as recommended by the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group (ICDRG). Results: Out of 13 patients who had undergone dental treatment/with oral symptoms, six patients with stomatitis, lichenoid lesions, and oral ulcers showed positive patch tests to a variety of dental materials, seven patients with ulcers had negative patch tests, seven dental personnel with hand dermatitis showed multiple allergies to various dental materials, and most had multiple positivities. Conclusion: The patch test is a useful, simple, noninvasive method to detect contact allergies among patients and among dental personnel dealing with these products. Long term studies are necessary to establish the relevance of these positive patch tests by eliminating the allergic substances, identifying clinical improvement, and substituting with nonallergenic materials. PMID:25165644

  12. Patch Test as a Diagnostic Tool in Hand Eczema

    PubMed Central

    Vigneshkarthik, Natarajan; Kuruvila, Sheela

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Allergic contact dermatitis is an important cause of hand eczema. Patch testing is the only investigation available to prove the diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis. Exposures to allergens differ according to geographical, occupational, economic and social factors. Accordingly, patterns of allergic contact dermatitis differ in different parts of the world and different regions of the same country. Aim To study the causes of allergic contact dermatitis in adult patients with hand eczema with the help of patch testing. Materials and Methods This was a cross-sectional study involving 54 hand eczema patients conducted between October 2013 and June 2015, at a tertiary care centre in Southern India. After a detailed history including history of occupational exposure and detailed examination, patch test was done on these patients with Indian standard series. The patches were removed after 48 hours. Another reading was taken after 72 hours. The readings were interpreted according to International Contact Dermatitis Research Group criteria and noted down. The data were summarized using mean and standard deviation for continuous variables and percentages for categorical and dichotomous variables. The test of association was done with Fisher’s-exact test. Results Hyperkeratotic hand eczema was the commonest morphological type (29%), followed by discoid eczema. Pompholyx was significantly more common among patients with history of atopy. A total of 20 patients (37%) showed patch test positivity to a total of 25 allergens. Nickel was the most common allergen (11.11%) followed by para-phenylenediamine (PPD) (7.4%). Nickel (6 patients) and cobalt (3 patients) were the common allergens among women, while potassium dichromate (3 patients) and parthenium (2 patients) were the common allergens among men. Potassium dichromate allergy was significantly more common among masons and PPD allergy was significantly more common among hair dye users. Discoid pattern of

  13. Patch testing for noncontact dermatitis: the atopy patch test for food and inhalants.

    PubMed

    Wollenberg, Andreas; Vogel, Sandra

    2013-10-01

    The atopy patch test (APT) is defined as a patch test procedure to assess delayed type hypersensitivity reactions against those protein allergens known to elicit IgE-mediated type I reactions in atopic patients. This patch test procedure uses intact protein allergens instead of haptens in an optimized test setting and with a special reading key. It may be clinically useful especially for atopic dermatitis, as the currently available test procedures either target the wrong reaction type (type I and not type IV) or use the wrong allergens (haptens and not protein allergen). A positive APT reaction correlates with a positive lymphocyte transformation test and allergen-specific Th2 cells in the peripheral blood. As even small changes in the test procedure influence the sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of the APT, the European Task Force on Atopic Dermatitis (ETFAD) has developed a standardized APT technique: Intact protein allergens, purified in petrolatum, are applied in 12-mm-diameter Finn chambers mounted on Scanpor tape for 48 h to non-irritated, non-abraded, or tape-stripped skin of the upper back for 48 h; the evaluation of the test reaction is done after 48 and 72 h using the ETFAD reading key, assessing erythema as well as number and distribution pattern of the papules. The APT may reveal type IV sensitization in patients who are negative for the respective type I tests. Limited availability of the expensive test substances and limited reimbursement is among the factors restricting the routine use of the APT.

  14. Priming and testing silicon patch-clamp neurochips.

    PubMed

    Py, Christophe; Denhoff, Michael W; Sabourin, Nicaulas; Weber, John; Shiu, Matthew; Zhao, Ping

    2014-09-25

    We report on the systematic and automated priming and testing of silicon planar patch-clamp chips after their assembly in Plexiglas packages and sterilization in an air plasma reactor. We find that almost 90% of the chips are successfully primed by our automated setup, and have a shunt capacitance of between 10 pF and 30 pF. Blocked chips are mostly due to glue invasion in the well, and variability in the manual assembly process is responsible for the distribution in shunt capacitance value. Priming and testing time with our automated setup is less than 5 min per chip, which is compatible with the production of large series for use in electrophysiology experiments.

  15. Unusual edge effect in patch testing with silver nitrate.

    PubMed

    Iliev, D; Elsner, P

    1998-03-01

    Silver nitrate is a widely used substance and has been applied topically for cauterizing bleeding and healing wounds. In the past it has even been used to mark patch test sites, when no one knew that the substance itself might be a sensitizer. However, there are also toxic reactions to that substance. We report a case in which a positive "edge effect" at the periphery of the patch test site could be shown. It can be explained by the unequal distribution of patch test solutions in the different patch test systems with a concentration at the rim. Distinguishing between allergic and toxic reactions may be difficult when an edge effect occurs. Therefore, in certain rare cases a biopsy or a lymphocyte transformation test might be of help.

  16. Dermatotoxicologic clinical solutions: textile dye dermatitis patch testing.

    PubMed

    Coman, Garrett; Blickenstaff, Nicholas; Edwards, Ashley; Maibach, Howard

    2015-03-01

    The authors provide a framework for working up and counseling a patient with suspected textile dermatitis, focusing on identifying which textile materials are most likely to be the cause of the eczematous lesions, the current clinical guidelines, the utility and appropriateness of patch testing, the limitations of these guidelines, and our pro tempore recommendations. While there are many challenges to correctly identify and counsel patients on how to avoid the offending textile products in a patient with suspected textile dye dermatitis, there is value in following the guidelines set forth to help identify the causative textile(s). Although patch tests can be useful, dermatologists should understand the limitations of standardized patch testing for patients with suspected textile dye-induced dermatitis. These guidelines are expected to increase the likelihood of identifying the causative textile(s), so that patch testing can be supplemented with swatch testing and chemical dye extraction to help discover the allergenic dye.

  17. Membrane Vibration Tests Using Surface-Bonded Piezoelectric Patch Actuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasper, James L.; Pappa, Richard S.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the status of on-going work at the NASA Langley Research Center to measure the dynamics of thin membranes. The test article is a one-meter square pre-tensioned Kapton membrane that incorporates small surface-bonded piezoelectric patches strategically positioned to excite many modes. It is shown that PVDF (polyvinylidene fluoride) and MFC (macro fiber composite) piezoelectric patch actuators provide adequate excitation energy to obtain modal frequencies and mode shapes. Results from modal tests performed on the membrane using piezoelectric patches of different sizes and positions are discussed.

  18. [Should metal alloy discs be used for patch testing in suspected metal implant intolerance reaction?].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Geier, J; Dickel, H; Diepgen, T; Hillen, U; Kreft, B; Schnuch, A; Szliska, C; Mahler, V

    2015-11-01

    Intolerance reactions to metal implants may be caused by metal allergy. However, prior to implantation, patch testing should not be done in a prophylactic-prophetic approach. Pre-implant patch testing should only be performed to verify or exclude metal allergy in patients with a reported respective history. In the case of implant-in particular arthroplasty-related complications like, for example, pain, effusion, skin changes, reduced range of motion, or loosening, orthopedic-surgical differential diagnostics should be performed first. Allergological workup of suspected metal implant allergy should be done with the DKG baseline series which contains nickel-, cobalt- and chromium-preparations. Various studies assessing the usefulness of metal alloy discs for patch testing proved that this approach does not give reliable information about metal allergy. Positive patch test reactions to the discs cannot be assigned to a specific metal within the disc alloy components. Furthermore, availability of such metal discs might be an invitation to uncritical testing. Accordingly, due to lack of benefit in comparison to patch testing with standardized metal salt preparations, we do not recommend patch testing with metal alloy discs.

  19. Atopy patch testing for foods: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Kathryn P; Martinez, Barbara A

    2014-01-01

    The atopy patch test (APT) was first reported in 1895 by the German dermatologist, Jadassohn and was used for evaluation of contact dermatitis. The first documented epicutaneous application of aeroallergens was by Rostenberg and Sulzbergen in 1937. Although others including Mitchell and Platts-Mills, further described patch testing with aeroallergens, Langeland et al. initially described the use of patch testing with foods by testing atopic patients against egg white. Subsequently, food patch testing has gained popularity and has been included as a potential test to assess for food allergy not only for atopic dermatitis (AD) but also eosinophilic esophagitis and food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome, although its role still remains unclear. Through a comprehensive literature review, this article addresses the use of APT for foods and its application in AD and other allergic diseases. There will be inclusion of some data from aeroallergen and hapten patch testing as a basis from which our knowledge for food APT is derived. The data, in particular the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values, vary widely from 0 to 100%, depending on the study. Given this large variation in test results, food APT use in isolation is not recommended at this time. Additional studies are needed to standardize, improve accuracy and reproducibility, and determine its role in the evaluation of allergic diseases.

  20. Fixed drug eruption by etoricoxib confirmed by patch test*

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, Aline Soares; Cardoso, José Carlos; Gouveia, Miguel Pinto; Gameiro, Ana Rita; Teixeira, Vera Barreto; Gonçalo, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory drugs, followed by antibiotics, are the main causes of fixed drug eruption. They provoke one or several round erythematous or bullous lesions that recur in the same place after taking the causative medication. A positive patch test on residual, lesional skin can replace satisfactorily oral reintroduction. We describe the case of a 74-year-old woman with numerous, rounded, erythematous lesions on the trunk and recurrent blistering on the fifth right-hand finger, which developed a few hours after taking etoricoxib. Lesional patch testing with etoricoxib was positive and reproduced the typical pattern of a fixed drug eruption upon histopathology. We emphasize the specific reactivity of the etoricoxib patch test, and the capacity to reproduce the histologic pattern of the reaction. PMID:27828643

  1. Fixed drug eruption by etoricoxib confirmed by patch test.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Aline Soares de; Cardoso, José Carlos; Gouveia, Miguel Pinto; Gameiro, Ana Rita; Teixeira, Vera Barreto; Gonçalo, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory drugs, followed by antibiotics, are the main causes of fixed drug eruption. They provoke one or several round erythematous or bullous lesions that recur in the same place after taking the causative medication. A positive patch test on residual, lesional skin can replace satisfactorily oral reintroduction. We describe the case of a 74-year-old woman with numerous, rounded, erythematous lesions on the trunk and recurrent blistering on the fifth right-hand finger, which developed a few hours after taking etoricoxib. Lesional patch testing with etoricoxib was positive and reproduced the typical pattern of a fixed drug eruption upon histopathology. We emphasize the specific reactivity of the etoricoxib patch test, and the capacity to reproduce the histologic pattern of the reaction.

  2. Extending the Alternating Series Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsuura, Hidefumi

    2012-01-01

    Alternating series have the simplest of sign patterns. What about series with more complicated patterns? By inspecting the alternating series test closely, we find a theorem that applies to more complicated sign patterns, and beyond.

  3. DRESS Syndrome Following Levofloxacin Exposure With Positive Patch-test.

    PubMed

    Charfi, Ons; Lakhoua, Ghozlane; Sahnoun, Rim; Badri, Talel; Daghfous, Riadh; El Aidli, Sihem; Kastalli, Sarah; Zaïem, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS syndrome) in a severe cutaneous drug reaction, which can be life threatening. Levofloxacin has not been reported in literature as a causative drug. We are presenting an exceptional case of levofloxacin-induced DRESS without eosinophilia and with positive patch-tests to levofloxacin.

  4. Comparison of Marketed Cosmetic Products Constituents with the Antigens Included in Cosmetic-related Patch Test

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Seung Hyun; Choi, You Won; Myung, Ki Bum

    2010-01-01

    Background Currently, cosmetic series (Chemotechnique Diagnostics, Sweden) is the most widely used cosmetic-related patch test in Korea. However, no studies have been conducted on how accurately it reflects the constituents of the cosmetics in Korea. Objective We surveyed the constituents of various cosmetics and compare with the cosmetic series, to investigate whether it is accurate in determining allergic contact dermatitis caused by cosmetics sold in Korea. Methods Cosmetics were classified into 11 categories and the survey was conducted on the constituents of 55 cosmetics, with 5 cosmetics in each category. The surveyed constituents were classified by chemical function and compared with the antigens of cosmetic series. Results 155 constituents were found in 55 cosmetics, and 74 (47.7%) of constituents were included as antigen. Among them, only 20 constituents (27.0%) were included in cosmetic series. A significant number of constituents, such as fragrance, vehicle and surfactant were not included. Only 41.7% of antigens in cosmetic series were found to be in the cosmetics sampled. Conclusion The constituents not included in the patch test but possess antigenicity are widely used in cosmetics. Therefore, the patch test should be modified to reflect ingredients in the marketed products that may stimulate allergies. PMID:20711261

  5. Patch testing for allergic contact dermatitis in the allergist office.

    PubMed

    Fonacier, Luz; Charlesworth, Ernest N

    2003-07-01

    The identification of allergens responsible for allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is key to the management of this disease. The patch test (PT) is the only safe, objective, scientific, and practical method for the diagnosis of ACD. There is no single PT panel that will screen all the relevant allergens in a patient's environment. It is generally thought that 20 to 30 allergens in routine screening tests can identify 50% to 70% of clinically relevant ACD. However, the usefulness of patch testing is enhanced with the number of allergens tested. Although the PT might be simple to apply, it might be difficult to read, interpret, and correlate to the patient's symptoms. A familiarity with the patient's environment, the process of the industry in that environment, and the uses of various chemicals in the industry is needed in most cases.

  6. Impulse Testing of Corporate-Fed Patch Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses a novel method for detecting faults in antenna arrays. The method, termed Impulse Testing, was developed for corporate-fed patch arrays where the element is fed by a probe and is shorted at its center. Impulse Testing was devised to supplement conventional microwave measurements in order to quickly verify antenna integrity. The technique relies on exciting each antenna element in turn with a fast pulse (or impulse) that propagates through the feed network to the output port of the antenna. The resulting impulse response is characteristic of the path through the feed network. Using an oscilloscope, a simple amplitude measurement can be made to detect faults. A circuit model of the antenna elements and feed network was constructed to assess various fault scenarios and determine fault-detection thresholds. The experimental setup and impulse measurements for two patch array antennas are presented. Advantages and limitations of the technique are discussed along with applications to other antenna array topologies

  7. A clinical and patch test study in a tall-oil rosin factory.

    PubMed

    Färm, G; Lidén, C; Karlberg, A T

    1994-08-01

    Rosin of different sources is commonly used in many technical products and is known to cause contact allergy. The aim of the present investigation was to study the frequency of occupational dermatoses and of contact allergy to rosin in a factory producing tall-oil rosin. 163/180 present employees and 17/35 former employees participated in the study, which consisted of interview, clinical examination and patch testing with a standard series and additional rosins. 1/4 of those examined had some kind of current skin lesion. There were 10 cases of hand eczema. 7 subjects were patch-test-positive to gum rosin in the standard series. This frequency is about the same as among dermatitis patients at our clinic. Only 1 reaction to tall-oil rosin and none to the modified rosins tested were found. No relation between a positive patch test reaction to rosin and current skin disease could be established. No case of ongoing occupational skin disease was proved.

  8. Comparison of urine to sweat patch test results in court ordered testing.

    PubMed

    Levisky, J A; Bowerman, D L; Jenkins, W W; Johnson, D G; Levisky, J S; Karch, S B

    2001-10-15

    A former cocaine and methamphetamine abuser was continuously monitored with both sweat patch and urine testing for approximately 6 months. Thirteen sweat patches were applied and collected, five were positive for cocaine and/or methamphetamine, but all the urine specimens collected were negative at the analytical cut-off levels. The high incidence of false positive sweat patch tests in relation to the sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of the sweat patch assay is discussed. Possible mechanisms, which can lead to false positive results, are presented. The results of our study raise further questions about the preferential use of the sweat patch in detecting new episodes of drug use in formerly chronic drug users.

  9. Photopatch testing: recommendations for a European photopatch test baseline series.

    PubMed

    Gonçalo, Margarida; Ferguson, James; Bonevalle, Annie; Bruynzeel, Derk P; Giménez-Arnau, Ana; Goossens, An; Kerr, Alastair; Lecha, Mario; Neumann, Norbert; Niklasson, Bo; Pigatto, Paolo; Rhodes, Lesley E; Rustemeyer, Thomas; Sarkany, Robert; Thomas, Pierre; Wilkinson, Mark

    2013-04-01

    In order to establish a consensus recommendation for performing photopatch testing, a photopatch test taskforce group was established under the joint umbrella of the European Society for Contact Dermatitis and the European Society for Photodermatology in 2000. After proposing the most adequate methodology in 2004 and completing a European multicentre photopatch test study in 2011, this taskforce is recommending a list of photoallergens that should form part of a baseline series for photopatch testing in Europe. It contains mainly ultraviolet filters and drugs, mostly non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The choice of chemicals was based on the results of a recent multicentre study, previous published cases of photoallergy, and use of the substances in the European market. It is suggested that an extended list of photoallergens should be photopatch tested in selected cases, along with patients' own products. Two contact allergens, cinnamyl alcohol and decyl glucoside, should be simultaneously patch tested in order to clarify photopatch and patch test reactions, respectively, to ketoprofen and methylene bis-benzotriazolyl tetramethylbutylphenol (Tinosorb M™).

  10. [Atopy patch test--when is it useful?].

    PubMed

    Toncić, Ruzica Jurakić; Lipozencić, Jasna

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the article is to introduce the atopy patch test (APT) as a model of cellular immunity reaction. APT is epicutaneous test performed with food and aeroallergens, and represents a good model for T lymphocyte hypersensitivity. It is compared with skin prick test (SPT). Its value is supported by the fact that atopic dermatitis is the result of complex immune interactions and involves both Coombs and Gell reactions type IV and I. In this review, we shortly discuss the etiopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis, distinction of extrinsic and intrinsic issues, and compare the value of APT with SPT and IgE determination. APT includes epicutaneous application of type I allergens known to elicit IgE mediated reactions, followed by evaluation of eczematous skin reaction after 48 and 72 hours. The limitations of ATP include the lack of test standardization, but there also are comparative advantages over SPT and specific IgE determination. We also briefly discuss the most important food and aeroallergens. APT has been recognized as a diagnostic tool in the evaluation of food allergy and aeroallergens such as house dust mite, pollen and animal dander. APT is a useful diagnostic procedure in patients with atopic dermatitis allergic to inhalant allergens and in children with food allergy younger than 2 years. The sensitivity and specificity of the test greatly depend on the allergen tested and patient age.

  11. DKG statement on the use of metal alloy discs for patch testing in suspected intolerance to metal implants.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Peter; Geier, Johannes; Dickel, Heinrich; Diepgen, Thomas; Hillen, Uwe; Kreft, Burkhard; Schnuch, Axel; Szliska, Christiane; Mahler, Vera

    2015-10-01

    Intolerance reactions to metal implants may be caused by metal allergy. However, prior to implantation, 'prophetic'/prophylactic patch testing should not be performed. Pre-implant patch testing should only be done to verify or exclude metal allergy in patients with a corresponding history. In case of implant-related complications - in particular following replacement arthroplasty - such as pain, effusion, skin lesions, reduced range of motion or implant loosening, orthopedic causes should be ruled out first. Workup of suspected metal implant allergy should then be done using the DKG standard series, which includes nickel, cobalt, and chromium preparations. Various studies assessing the usefulness of metal alloy discs for patch testing have shown this particular approach to be ineffective with respect to providing reliable information on metal allergy. Any positive reaction in such tests cannot be assigned to a specific metal contained within the alloy. Furthermore, there is a risk of broad and indiscriminate use of these readily available discs. Accordingly, given the lack of additional benefit compared to patch testing with standardized metal salt preparations, we do not recommend patch testing with metal alloy discs.

  12. Metal patch test results from 1990-2009.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Hiromitsu; Nakada, Tokio; Iijima, Masafumi; Maibach, Howard I

    2011-03-01

    Although metals are common contact allergens, clinical findings of metal contact dermatitis have varied. Such patients have subsequently become rare in Japan as gold dermatitis caused by ear piercing or baboon syndrome by broken thermometers. To evaluate such clinical findings and to determine the frequency of metal allergy, we analyzed the results of patch testing with 18 metals from 1990-2009. Nine hundred and thirty-one patients (189 men and 742 women, mean age 39.0years [standard deviation±17.8]) were tested. Metals were applied on the back for 2days, and the results read with the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group (ICDRG) scoring system 3days after application. Reactions of + to +++ were regarded as positive. Differences of positive rates between men and women, and patients from 1990-1999 and those from 2000-2009 were analyzed with the χ(2) -test. Differences were considered significant at P<0.05. The metal to which the most patients reacted was 5% nickel sulfate (27.2%), irrespective of sex and phase. Significantly more women reacted to nickel sulfate (P<0.01), mercuric chloride (P<0.05) and gold chloride (P<0.01) than men. Significantly more patients in the 1990s reacted to palladium chloride, mercuric chloride and gold chloride (all P<0.01) than from 2000-2009. Nickel has been the most common metal allergen and mercury-sensitivity has decreased over 19years in Japan.

  13. Immunoglobulin E-Mediated Allergy Plays a Role in Atopic Eczema as Shown in the Atopy Patch Test

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Although the pathophysiology of immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and bronchial asthma is rather well established, the role of allergy in atopic eczema (AE) is still controversial. By a technique called atopy patch test, aeroallergens like house dust mite, animal dander, or pollen were proven as relevant trigger factors in a subgroup of patients with AE. The atopy patch test is an epicutaneous patch test with such allergens known to elicit IgE-mediated reactions, and used for the evaluation of eczematous skin reactions. In a series of single-center and multicenter studies, a method was developed, standardized, and compared with other diagnostic techniques (radioallergosorbent test, skin prick test) in AE patients. With regard to clinical history, the most specific results were obtained with the atopy patch test (allergen-dependent, 69%-92%), whereas sensitivity was higher for skin prick test (range, 69%-82%) and specific IgE (range, 65%-94%). The characterization of a patient subgroup with relevant IgE-mediated allergy may lead to more efficient avoidance and eventually even specific immunotherapy strategies in the management of AE. PMID:23283386

  14. Flight Test Series 3: Flight Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Mike; Sternberg, Daniel; Valkov, Steffi

    2015-01-01

    This document is a flight test report from the Operational perspective for Flight Test Series 3, a subpart of the Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) project. Flight Test Series 3 testing began on June 15, 2015, and concluded on August 12, 2015. Participants included NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, NASA Glenn Research Center, NASA Langley Research center, General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., and Honeywell. Key stakeholders analyzed their System Under Test (SUT) in two distinct configurations. Configuration 1, known as Pairwise Encounters, was subdivided into two parts: 1a, involving a low-speed UAS ownship and intruder(s), and 1b, involving a high-speed surrogate ownship and intruder. Configuration 2, known as Full Mission, involved a surrogate ownship, live intruder(s), and integrated virtual traffic. Table 1 is a summary of flights for each configuration, with data collection flights highlighted in green. Section 2 and 3 of this report give an in-depth description of the flight test period, aircraft involved, flight crew, and mission team. Overall, Flight Test 3 gathered excellent data for each SUT. We attribute this successful outcome in large part from the experience that was acquired from the ACAS Xu SS flight test flown in December 2014. Configuration 1 was a tremendous success, thanks to the training, member participation, integration/testing, and in-depth analysis of the flight points. Although Configuration 2 flights were cancelled after 3 data collection flights due to various problems, the lessons learned from this will help the UAS in the NAS project move forward successfully in future flight phases.

  15. Allergy to tea tree oil: retrospective review of 41 cases with positive patch tests over 4.5 years.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Tim; Nixon, Rosemary; Tam, Mei; Tate, Bruce

    2007-05-01

    Tea tree oil use is increasing, with considerable interest in it being a 'natural' antimicrobial. It is found in many commercially available skin and hair care products in Australia. We retrospectively reviewed our patch test data at the Skin and Cancer Foundation Victoria over a 4.5-year period and identified 41 cases of positive reactions to oxidized tea tree oil of 2320 people patch-tested, giving a prevalence of 1.8%. The tea tree oil reaction was deemed relevant to the presenting dermatitis in 17 of 41 (41%) patients. Of those with positive reactions, 27 of 41 (66%) recalled prior use of tea tree oil and eight of 41 (20%) specified prior application of neat (100%) tea tree oil. Tea tree oil allergic contact dermatitis is under-reported in the literature but is sufficiently common in Australia to warrant inclusion of tea tree oil, at a concentration of 10% in petrolatum, in standard patch-test series. Given tea tree oil from freshly opened tea tree oil products elicits no or weak reactions, oxidized tea tree oil should be used for patch testing.

  16. The spectrum of cutaneous patch-test reactions in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Hanifin, J M; Klas, P A

    1996-01-01

    We have outlined rationale and problems associated with three types of patch tests that may provide diagnostic help in patients with difficult-to-manage AD. Each of these methods is imperfect and in need of greater study using a critical approach, better techniques, more attention to irritant controls, and better definition of atopic populations. Proof of validity for aeroallergen patch testing will necessarily require large quantities of purified antigens. In spite of all these problems, patch testing can be useful and sometimes essential for the diagnosis and management of difficult AD.

  17. Patch-test reaction patterns in patients with a predisposition to atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Brasch, Jochen; Schnuch, Axel; Uter, Wolfgang

    2003-10-01

    Patients with a predisposition to atopic dermatitis often need to be patch tested in order to detect possible contact sensitization. However, it is unknown whether immunologic or other peculiarities of atopic skin are related to altered patch-test reaction patterns. Our study was aimed at answering this question, because patch-test reaction patterns are of considerable practical importance in the reading and interpretation of patch tests. Therefore, we compared patterns of patch-test reactions in patients with a predisposition to atopic dermatitis and in control patients matched for sex, age, reason for testing and test centre. Patch-test results from 9 centres (2322 patients with a disposition to atopic dermatitis and 2126 matched controls) were evaluated retrospectively. All patients were tested with nickel sulfate, fragrance mix, potassium dichromate, lanolin alcohol, formaldehyde and mercury ammonium chloride. Patch tests applied for 1 day with readings on days 1, 2 and 3 were evaluated in order to cover the early phase of the reactions. Not unexpectedly, we found that, compared to the matched controls, patients with a predisposition to atopic dermatitis tended to have more doubtful and irritant reactions on day 1. As a new observation, it turned out that they had less reactions of crescendo pattern and more strong reactions on day 3. All these differences were slight/insignificant. A higher skin irritability in patients with a predisposition to atopic dermatitis is a likely explanation. In conclusion, standard methods for patch testing can be applied in patients with a predisposition to atopic dermatitis, but minor differences in reaction patterns should be considered.

  18. Assessment criteria for MEG/EEG cortical patch tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Chang-Hwan; An, Kwang-Ok; Jung, Hyun-Kyo; Kwon, Hyukchan; Lee, Yong-Ho

    2003-08-01

    To validate newly developed methods or implemented software for magnetoencephalography/electroencephalography (MEG/EEG) source localization problems, many researchers have used human skull phantom experiments or artificially constructed forward data sets. Between the two methods, the use of an artificial data set constructed with forward calculation attains superiority over the use of a human skull phantom in that it is simple to implement, adjust and control various conditions. Nowadays, for the forward calculation, especially for the cortically distributed source models, generating artificial activation patches on a brain cortical surface has been popularized instead of activating some point dipole sources. However, no well-established assessment criterion to validate the reconstructed results quantitatively has yet been introduced. In this paper, we suggest some assessment criteria to compare and validate the various MEG/EEG source localization techniques or implemented software applied to the cortically distributed source model. Four different criteria can be used to measure accuracy, degrees of focalization, noise-robustness, existence of spurious sources and so on. To verify the usefulness of the proposed criteria, four different results from two different noise conditions and two different reconstruction techniques were compared for several patches. The simulated results show that the new criteria can provide us with a reliable index to validate the MEG/EEG source localization techniques.

  19. Attitudes about Advances in Sweat Patch Testing in Drug Courts: Insights from a Case Study in Southern California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polzer, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Drug courts are reinventing the drug testing framework by experimenting with new methods, including use of the sweat patch. The sweat patch is a band-aid like strip used to monitor drug court participants. The validity and reliability of the sweat patch as an effective testing method was examined, as well as the effectiveness, meaning how likely…

  20. 365 Patch Testing Results in Contact Dermatitis from the Allergist's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, Marcella; Michelis, Mary Ann; Lighvani, Sebastian; Davis-Lorton, Mark; Fonacier, Luz

    2012-01-01

    Background Contact Dermatitis (CD) is a frequently encountered skin disease by allergists and dermatologists that results from contact with external allergens. Patch Testing (PT) remains the gold standard in the diagnosis of allergic CD. Studies evaluating PT from allergy practices are lacking. Methods A multi-center, retrospective chart review of PT within the last 5 years at allergy practices in 3 institutions. We report PT results using allergens in the Thin-Layer Rapid-Use Epicutaneous Test (TT) and additional supplemental allergens [North American Contact Dermatitis (NACD) Panel, Dormer Cosmetic Panel, hairdresser's panel, corticosteroid panel and personal products]. Additionally, patient characteristics including age, gender, occupation, dermatitis site, history of atopic disease and final diagnosis were also obtained. Results A total of 427 patients (mean age = 49.8 years) were patch tested, 82% were female, 54% reported an atopic history (history of asthma, atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis or food allergy), 30% were tested with TT, 60% with NACD panel, 30% with cosmetic series, 15% with corticosteroid series and 35% with personal products. The 5 most common positive PT allergens were nickel sulfate, fragrance mix I, P-phenylenediamine, thimerosal and cobalt chloride. The most common dermatitis sites were eyelid/periorbital (31%), facial (25%) and trunk (21%). 56.9% of patients were positive to at least one TT allergen. 25.6% of patients were positive to both a TT and a supplemental allergen (these patients would have been “partially evaluated” with TT allergens alone as they are positive to at least 1 TT allergen and 1 supplemental allergen). 12.5% of patients were negative to a TT allergen and positive to at least 1 supplemental allergen only (these patients would have been “missed” as they are negative to all TT allergens, but positive to at least 1 supplemental allergen). Conclusions Nickel remains the most common allergen. When evaluating

  1. Distributions-per-level: a means of testing level detectors and models of patch-clamp data.

    PubMed

    Schröder, I; Huth, T; Suitchmezian, V; Jarosik, J; Schnell, S; Hansen, U P

    2004-01-01

    Level or jump detectors generate the reconstructed time series from a noisy record of patch-clamp current. The reconstructed time series is used to create dwell-time histograms for the kinetic analysis of the Markov model of the investigated ion channel. It is shown here that some additional lines in the software of such a detector can provide a powerful new means of patch-clamp analysis. For each current level that can be recognized by the detector, an array is declared. The new software assigns every data point of the original time series to the array that belongs to the actual state of the detector. From the data sets in these arrays distributions-per-level are generated. Simulated and experimental time series analyzed by Hinkley detectors are used to demonstrate the benefits of these distributions-per-level. First, they can serve as a test of the reliability of jump and level detectors. Second, they can reveal beta distributions as resulting from fast gating that would usually be hidden in the overall amplitude histogram. Probably the most valuable feature is that the malfunctions of the Hinkley detectors turn out to depend on the Markov model of the ion channel. Thus, the errors revealed by the distributions-per-level can be used to distinguish between different putative Markov models of the measured time series.

  2. Inferring local competition intensity from patch size distributions: a test using biological soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowker, Matthew A.; Maestre, Fernando T.

    2012-01-01

    Dryland vegetation is inherently patchy. This patchiness goes on to impact ecology, hydrology, and biogeochemistry. Recently, researchers have proposed that dryland vegetation patch sizes follow a power law which is due to local plant facilitation. It is unknown what patch size distribution prevails when competition predominates over facilitation, or if such a pattern could be used to detect competition. We investigated this question in an alternative vegetation type, mosses and lichens of biological soil crusts, which exhibit a smaller scale patch-interpatch configuration. This micro-vegetation is characterized by competition for space. We proposed that multiplicative effects of genetics, environment and competition should result in a log-normal patch size distribution. When testing the prevalence of log-normal versus power law patch size distributions, we found that the log-normal was the better distribution in 53% of cases and a reasonable fit in 83%. In contrast, the power law was better in 39% of cases, and in 8% of instances both distributions fit equally well. We further hypothesized that the log-normal distribution parameters would be predictably influenced by competition strength. There was qualitative agreement between one of the distribution's parameters (μ) and a novel intransitive (lacking a 'best' competitor) competition index, suggesting that as intransitivity increases, patch sizes decrease. The correlation of μ with other competition indicators based on spatial segregation of species (the C-score) depended on aridity. In less arid sites, μ was negatively correlated with the C-score (suggesting smaller patches under stronger competition), while positive correlations (suggesting larger patches under stronger competition) were observed at more arid sites. We propose that this is due to an increasing prevalence of competition transitivity as aridity increases. These findings broaden the emerging theory surrounding dryland patch size distributions

  3. Soap-scented oil skin patch in the treatment of fibromyalgia: A case series.

    PubMed

    Ough, Yon Doo

    2008-09-01

    Treatment for fibromyalgia is largely empiric and supportive, and favors a multidisciplinary approach. Despite treatment, symptomatic relief is often inadequate and temporary. Over 90% of fibromyalgia patients seek alternative medical care. There is much anecdotal evidence that applying a bar of soap to the skin can relieve leg cramps. Expanding on this idea, I created a skin patch from soap-scented oil, which was used to treat muscular pain and spasms. After receiving positive feedback from several patients, I hypothesized that the scent of the oil itself, applied directly to the skin, is responsible for the pain-relieving and muscle-relaxant properties of the skin patch. Furthermore, I hypothesize that this soap-scented oil skin patch is an effective treatment for the pain associated with fibromyalgia.

  4. Skin biopsy and quantitative sensory testing do not predict response to lidocaine patch in painful neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, David N; Pannoni, Valerie; Barbano, Richard L; Pennella-Vaughan, Janet; Dworkin, Robert H

    2006-01-01

    Predictors of response to neuropathic pain treatment in patients with painful distal sensory neuropathies are lacking. The 5% lidocaine patch is believed to exert its effects on neuropathic pain via a local stabilizing effect on cutaneous sensory afferents. As such, it provides a model to assess whether the status of epidermal innervation as determined by skin biopsy or quantitative sensory testing (QST) of small- and large-diameter sensory afferents might serve as predictors of response to topical, locally active treatment. In this study we assessed associations between epidermal nerve fiber (ENF) densities, sensory nerve conduction studies (NCS), QST, and response to a 5% lidocaine patch in patients with painful distal sensory neuropathies. We observed no association between distal leg epidermal and subepidermal innervation and response to the lidocaine patch. Several patients with complete loss of distal leg ENF showed a response to the lidocaine patch. Similarly we observed no consistent association between treatment response and QST for vibration, cooling, warm, heat-pain, and cold-pain thresholds, or distal sensory NCS. Thus, distal-leg skin biopsy, QST, and sensory NCS cannot be used to identify patients with painful polyneuropathy likely to respond to a lidocaine patch in clinical practice. Further studies are required to clarify precisely the mechanism and site of action of the lidocaine patch in patients with peripheral neuropathic pain.

  5. Item Banking. Basic Testing Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Roy

    This pamphlet describes the exciting potential of item banking--a new approach to testing which combines both comparability of scores with flexibility of test format. Item banks are collections of items where the characteristics of each item is known and these characteristics can be summated to described a test made from such items. The principle…

  6. Allergy to cocamidopropyl betaine may be due to amidoamine: a patch test and product use test study.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J F; Fowler, L M; Hunter, J E

    1997-12-01

    Cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) is an amphoteric surfactant commonly used in personal care products and surface cleaners. Patch testing with commercially-available CAPB has yielded occasional reactions indicative of allergic contact dermatitis. To determine if subjects with previous positive patch tests would react in provocative use tests of products containing CAPB, and to study various contaminants in commercial CAPB supplies for allergenicity in these subjects, 10 subjects previously positive to CAPB on patch testing used a hair shampoo, hand soap, and body wash containing CAPB for 1-6 weeks or until a reaction developed. Later, they were patch tested to 2 different purity grades of CAPB and 3 possible manufacturing contaminants (dimethylaminopropylamine, amidoamine, and sodium monochloroacetate). 7 of the 10 subjects developed dermatitis from 1 or more CAPB-containing products at some point during the study. 9 of the 10 use-test subjects were then patch tested, and 6 of these subjects showed a reaction to amidoamine (0.1% aq.). None reacted to dimethylaminopropylamine (0.1% pet.). 1 subject reacted to CAPB but not to amidoamine. In the follow-up patch testing with CAPB that was free of amidoamine, there were no positive reactions. Most subjects who were patch-test-positive showed a reaction when using CAPB-containing skin and hair care products. The chemical amidoamine, which is used in the synthesis of CAPB and which is a known contaminant of CAPB preparations, is likely to be the actual sensitizer in most cases rather than CAPB itself. The results do not rule out the possibility that CAPB itself may be an allergen in rare cases.

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of an oral base-metal contact lesion following negative dermatologic patch tests.

    PubMed

    Lyzak, W A; Flaitz, C M; McGuckin, R S; Eichmiller, F; Brown, R S

    1994-08-01

    We report a confirmed case of intraoral contact mucositis secondary to nickel dental alloy hypersensitivity. The lesion resolved after removal of the offending prosthesis. The patient responded negatively to dermatologic patch tests, but a positive intraoral rechallenge confirmed the mucositis diagnosis. A nonreactive, gold alloy prosthesis was inserted for a successful result.

  8. Hydroxychloroquine-induced acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis with positive patch-testing.

    PubMed

    Charfi, Ons; Kastalli, Sarrah; Sahnoun, Rym; Lakhoua, Ghozlane

    2015-01-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a severe cutaneous adverse reaction, mostly induced by drugs. Hydroxychloroquine have been rarely reported in literature as a causative drug of this reaction. We report a case of AGEP induced by hydroxychloroquine with systemic involvement and confirmed by positive patch testing.

  9. A subsequent fit of time series and amplitude histogram of patch-clamp records reveals rate constants up to 1 per microsecond.

    PubMed

    Schröder, I; Harlfinger, P; Huth, T; Hansen, U P

    2005-01-01

    Fast gating in time series of patch-clamp current demands powerful tools to reveal the rate constants of the adequate Hidden Markov model. Here, two approaches are presented to improve the temporal resolution of the direct fit of the time series. First, the prediction algorithm is extended to include intermediate currents between the nominal levels as caused by the anti-aliasing filter. This approach can reveal rate constants that are about 4 times higher than the corner frequency of the anti-aliasing filter. However, this approach is restricted to time series with very low noise. Second, the direct fit of the time series is combined with a beta fit, i.e., a fit of the deviations of the amplitude histogram from the Gaussian distribution. Since the "theoretical" amplitude histograms for higher-order Bessel filters cannot be calculated by analytical tools, they are generated from simulated time series. In a first approach, a simultaneous fit of the time series and of the Beta fit is tested. This simultaneous fit, however, inherits the drawbacks of both approaches, not the benefits. More successful is a subsequent fit: The fit of the time series yields a set of rate constants. The subsequent Beta fit uses the slow rate constants of the fit of the time series as fixed parameters and the optimization algorithm is restricted to the fast ones. The efficiency of this approach is illustrated by means of time series obtained from simulation and from the dominant K+ channel in Chara. This shows that temporal resolution can reach the microsecond range.

  10. Mighty Eagle 'Rocks' Flight Testing Series

    NASA Video Gallery

    The "Mighty Eagle," a NASA robotic prototype lander, recently completed a series of test objectives – even going as high as 100 feet for several free flights. The vehicle is a three-legged protot...

  11. Multi-frac test series. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R A; Warpinski, N R; Finley, S J; Shear, R C

    1981-11-01

    This paper describes a series of five full-scale tests performed to evaluate various multi-frac concepts. The tests were conducted at the Nevada Test Site in horizontal boreholes drilled in ash-fall tuff from a tunnel under 1300 ft of overburden.

  12. Permeability test for transdermal and local therapeutic patches using Skin PAMPA method.

    PubMed

    Vizserálek, Gábor; Berkó, Szilvia; Tóth, Gergő; Balogh, Réka; Budai-Szűcs, Mária; Csányi, Erzsébet; Sinkó, Bálint; Takács-Novák, Krisztina

    2015-08-30

    Using the skin as absorption site presents unique advantages that have facilitated the progression of transdermal drug delivery in the past decades. Efforts in drug research have been devoted to find a quick and reproducible model for predicting the skin permeation of molecules. The Parallel Artificial Membrane Permeability Assay (PAMPA) has been extended for prediction of transdermal permeation by developing a model with completely artificial membrane, which can mimic the permeation through the stratum corneum. The present study aims to extend the Skin PAMPA method for testing transdermal and local therapeutic patches. The original method was modified and seven commercially available transdermal and local therapeutic patches with four different active pharmaceutical ingredients (nicotine, fentanyl, rivastigmine and ketoprofen) were studied. Data were compared to the declared delivery rates that are indicated by the manufacturers. Ex vivo permeation study was also performed in order to compare the permeated amount of the released drugs obtained by the two methods. The flux across the artificial membrane as well as the human skin (ex vivo) has been calculated and compared to the in vivo flux deduced from the labelled delivery rate and the active area of the patches. The results suggest that Skin PAMPA system can serve as a useful tool for evaluation and classification of the transdermal patches.

  13. Patch test results in children and adolescents. Study from the Santa Casa de Belo Horizonte Dermatology Clinic, Brazil, from 2003 to 2010*

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Dulcilea Ferraz; Goulart, Eugênio Marcos Andrade

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patch testing is an efficient method to identify the allergen responsible for allergic contact dermatitis. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the results of patch tests in children and adolescents comparing these two age groups' results. METHODS Cross-sectional study to assess patch test results of 125 children and adolescents aged 1-19 years, with suspected allergic contact dermatitis, in a dermatology clinic in Brazil. Two Brazilian standardized series were used. RESULTS Seventy four (59.2%) patients had "at least one positive reaction" to the patch test. Among these positive tests, 77.0% were deemed relevant. The most frequent allergens were nickel (36.8%), thimerosal (18.4%), tosylamide formaldehyde resin (6.8%), neomycin (6.4%), cobalt (4.0%) and fragrance mix I (4.0%). The most frequent positive tests came from adolescents (p=0.0014) and females (p=0.0002). There was no relevant statistical difference concerning contact sensitizations among patients with or without atopic history. However, there were significant differences regarding sensitization to nickel (p=0.029) and thimerosal (p=0.042) between the two age groups under study, while adolescents were the most affected. CONCLUSION Nickel and fragrances were the only positive (and relevant) allergens in children. Nickel and tosylamide formaldehyde resin were the most frequent and relevant allergens among adolescents. PMID:26560213

  14. The importance of checking for delayed reactions in pediatric patch testing.

    PubMed

    Matiz, Catalina; Russell, Kathryn; Jacob, Sharon E

    2011-01-01

    Patch testing is often performed with the final reading being completed at 72 hours. Studies in adults have shown that performing an additional reading several days later increases the yield of relevant positive reactions. We report a study of this matter in children. We conducted a prospective patch test study of 38 affected children aged 6 to 17 (mean 11.6 years), with presumed allergic contact dermatitis between April and July 2009. The patients were required to return at 48 hours for patch test removal and assessment of early reactions, at 72 to 96 hours (3-4 days) for evaluation of delayed reactions, and again at 168 to 216 hours (7-9 days) for a final late delayed reading. We tallied the number of patients with "equivocal" (+/?), +, ++, and +++ reactions and noted these as potential positive reactions by reading date. Twenty-five of the 38 children (66%) had a positive reaction at 48 hours; 32 children (84%) had a positive reaction at 72 hours (day 3); 19 children (50%) had a positive reaction at 168 to 216 hours (day 7-9). Of those 19, 16 (42%) had persistent reactions, while 5 children (13%) had new late delayed reactions. Among the new late delayed reactions, there were six allergens identified, four of which were considered of probable clinical relevance. When patch testing with Thin Layer Rapid-Use Epicutaneous test panels, a delayed reading beyond 72 hours may be needed to identify the offending agent(s) responsible for allergic contact dermatitis in some children. Additional studies are needed to assess optimal readings schedules.

  15. Comparison of European Standard Patch Test Results of 330 Patients from an Occupational Diseases Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Aytekin, Aslı; Tutkun, Engin; Yılmaz, Hınç

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim. Contact dermatitis (CD) is the most prevalent occupational skin disease with a significant impact on quality of life. Patch testing is used for the identification of responsible allergens which may improve protective and preventive measures in the workplace. Herein, we aim to identify the demographic characteristics and occupation of patients with early diagnosis of occupational CD and compare patch test results. Materials and Methods. The study included 330 patients referred to our clinic between April 2009 and April 2011 and who were patch-tested with 28-allergen European Standard Test. Results. 126 (38%) patients were female and 204 (62%) were male with a mean age of 36.12 (±13.13) years. Positive allergic reactions were observed in 182 (55%) patients. Nickel sulphate (41/126) and potassium dichromate (39/204) were significantly the most common allergens in women and men, respectively (P < 0.005). Additionally, the most common occupation in women was household activities (83/126) and in men was manufacturing (80/204). Conclusion. The allergens to which people become sensitized differ according to their working environment and occupation. Classification of occupations is important for identification of sensitization risks and monitoring of changes in allergen distribution of different occupations. PMID:27807445

  16. Clinical experience and patch testing using colophony (rosin) from different sources.

    PubMed

    Karlberg, A T; Lidén, C

    1985-10-01

    Patients with suspected allergy to colophony were patch-tested with colophony (rosin) of different kinds (gum rosin, tall oil rosin). More cases of allergy were detected by testing with more than one type of colophony. Tall oil rosin produced a smaller number of positive reactions than the gum rosins tested, which suggests a lower allergenic activity. Venice turpentine was a useful additional screening substance. When different test concentrations were compared (20% and 5%) the lower concentration failed to reveal four of 30 cases. The patients' eczema had been caused chiefly by contact with colophony in their work.

  17. Allergic contact dermatitis from exotic woods: importance of patch-testing with patient-provided samples.

    PubMed

    Podjasek, Joshua O; Cook-Norris, Robert H; Richardson, Donna M; Drage, Lisa A; Davis, Mark D P

    2011-01-01

    Exotic woods from tropical and subtropical regions (eg, from South America, south Asia, and Africa) frequently are used occupationally and recreationally by woodworkers and hobbyists. These exotic woods more commonly provoke irritant contact dermatitis reactions, but they also can provoke allergic contact dermatitis reactions. We report three patients seen at Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN) with allergic contact dermatitis reactions to exotic woods. Patch testing was performed and included patient-provided wood samples. Avoidance of identified allergens was recommended. For all patients, the dermatitis cleared or improved after avoidance of the identified allergens. Clinicians must be aware of the potential for allergic contact dermatitis reactions to compounds in exotic woods. Patch testing should be performed with suspected woods for diagnostic confirmation and allowance of subsequent avoidance of the allergens.

  18. Patch-testing with serial dilutions of tixocortol pivalate and potential cross-reactive substances.

    PubMed

    Isaksson, M; Bruze, M; Goossens, A; Lepoittevin, J P

    2000-01-01

    Of patch-tested patients with dermatitis, 4-5% are allergic to corticosteroids. Four groups of corticosteroids are recognized (A-D), where substances from the same group may cross-react. We investigated the potential cross-reactivity pattern and dose-response relationship for several corticosteroids from group A. We also included the corresponding aldehyde to hydrocortisone, as this degradation product has been proposed to be immunogenic. Eleven patients shown to be allergic to tixocortol pivalate were patch-tested with several corticosteroids from group A, as well as with the aldehyde, all in serial dilutions. All 11 reacted to both tixocortol pivalate and hydrocortisone. The dose-response relationship for the corticosteroids tended to be similar to sensitizers lacking anti-inflammatory potential. Patients with simultaneous reactions to many substances had high patch-test reactivity to tixocortol pivalate and hydrocortisone, while patients with few such reactions showed low reactivity (p=0.001 and 0.003, respectively). Several patients reacted to the aldehyde, supporting the theory that it is an intermediate in sensitization.

  19. Patch testing for allergic contact dermatitis to cigarettes: smoked/unsmoked components and formaldehyde factors.

    PubMed

    Carew, Benjamin; Muir, Jim

    2014-08-01

    A patient with hand dermatitis reported that switching her smoking hand resulted in reduced symptoms. When allergy to cigarettes is suspected the literature supports standard allergy testing as well as testing the individual components of cigarettes. Initial standard patch testing revealed an allergy to formaldehyde and the formaldehyde releasing agent, quaternium-15. The patient did not react to her usual roll-your-own cigarette components but reacted to the smoked filter paper of a particular brand of cigarette she frequently borrowed from a friend. Possible explanations include either a variation of ingredients between cigarettes that alters the formaldehyde concentration or another unidentified allergen in the branded cigarette causing allergic contact dermatitis.

  20. Test/analysis comparison of piezoelectric patch local behavior for vibroacoustic active control application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florens, Corine; Balmes, Etienne; Clero, Franck

    2007-04-01

    To predict the effect of active control on aircraft or helicopter trim panels, made with honeycomb sandwich composite, one approach consists in modeling the panel by Finite Element Method. FEM with shell elements for the laminate and volume elements for the core is classically used in industry; in a previous study the homogenized modeling approach has been validated. The aim of the present paper is to make a test/analysis comparison of the dynamic behavior of a honeycomb core sandwich beam actuated by a piezoelectric patch. More precisely, the behavior in the vicinity of the piezoelectric actuator is characterized, in order to validate the modeling approach of honeycomb sandwich composite equipped with piezoelectric patches.

  1. Determinism test for very short time series.

    PubMed

    Binder, P-M; Igarashi, Ryu; Seymour, William; Takeishi, Candy

    2005-03-01

    A test for determinism suitable for time series shorter than 100 points is presented, and applied to numerical and observed data. The method exploits the linear d(d(0)) dependence in the expression d(t) approximately d(0)e(lambda t) which describes the growth of small separations between trajectories in chaotic systems.

  2. Use of the cytosensor microphysiometer to predict results of a 21-day cumulative irritation patch test in humans.

    PubMed

    Landin, Wendell E; Mun, Greg C; Nims, Raymond W; Harbell, John W

    2007-09-01

    The cytosensor microphysiometer (mu phi) was investigated as a rapid, relatively inexpensive test to predict performance of skin cleansing wipes on the human 21-day cumulative irritation patch test (21CIPT). It indirectly measures metabolic rate changes in L929 cells as a function of test article dose, by measuring the acidification rate in a low-buffer medium. The dose producing a 50% reduction in metabolic rate (MRD50), relative to the baseline rate, is used as a measure of toxicity. The acute toxicity of the mu phi assay can be compared to the chronic toxicity of the 21CIPT, which is based largely on the exposure of test agents to the epidermal cells, resulting in damage and penetration of the stratum corneum leading to cell toxicity. Two series of surfactant-based cleansing wipe products were tested via the mu phi assay and 21CIPT. The first series, consisting of 20 products, was used to determine a prediction model. The second series of 38 products consisted of routine product development formulas or marketed products. Comparing the results from both tests, samples with an MRD50 greater than 50 mg/ml provided a 21CIPT score consistent with a product that performs satisfactorily in the market. When the MRD50 was greater than 78 mg/ml, the 21CIPT score was usually zero. The mu phi may be more sensitive than the 21CIPT for ranking minimally irritating materials. The mu phi assay is useful as a screen for predicting the performance of a wet wipes formula on the 21CIPT, and concurrently reduces the use of animals for safety testing in a product development program for cleansing wipes.

  3. Testing metapopulation concepts: effects of patch characteristics and neighborhood occupancy on the dynamics of an endangered lagomorph

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eaton, Mitchell J.; Hughes, Phillip T.; Hines, James E.; Nichols, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Metapopulation ecology is a field that is richer in theory than in empirical results. Many existing empirical studies use an incidence function approach based on spatial patterns and key assumptions about extinction and colonization rates. Here we recast these assumptions as hypotheses to be tested using 18 years of historic detection survey data combined with four years of data from a new monitoring program for the Lower Keys marsh rabbit. We developed a new model to estimate probabilities of local extinction and colonization in the presence of nondetection, while accounting for estimated occupancy levels of neighboring patches. We used model selection to identify important drivers of population turnover and estimate the effective neighborhood size for this system. Several key relationships related to patch size and isolation that are often assumed in metapopulation models were supported: patch size was negatively related to the probability of extinction and positively related to colonization, and estimated occupancy of neighboring patches was positively related to colonization and negatively related to extinction probabilities. This latter relationship suggested the existence of rescue effects. In our study system, we inferred that coastal patches experienced higher probabilities of extinction and colonization than interior patches. Interior patches exhibited higher occupancy probabilities and may serve as refugia, permitting colonization of coastal patches following disturbances such as hurricanes and storm surges. Our modeling approach should be useful for incorporating neighbor occupancy into future metapopulation analyses and in dealing with other historic occupancy surveys that may not include the recommended levels of sampling replication.

  4. Analysis of skin patch test results and metalloproteinase-2 levels in a patient with contact dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Czajkowski, Rafał; Kowaliszyn, Bogna; Żbikowska-Gotz, Magdalena; Bartuzi, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The complex course of skin reactions that contact eczema involves is due in part to abnormalities of the extracellular matrix function. Proteins that degrade extracellular matrix components include metalloproteinases (MMP), which are divided into subcategories depending on the chemical structure and substrate specificity. Aim To analyse patch test results in contact dermatitis patients and to assess MMP-2 levels during skin lesion exacerbation and remission. Material and methods Fifty patients suffering from contact eczema were qualified to the study and 20 healthy volunteers as a control group. The study group patients had epidermal skin tests performed with the “European Standard” set. To assess the MMP-2 level in serum, venous blood was drawn, twice from study group patients – during contact dermatitis exacerbation and remission periods – and once from control group patients. Assessment of MMP-2 in serum was done with ELISA immunoassay. To verify the proposed hypotheses, parametric and nonparametric significance tests were used. Results Hands were the most frequent location of contact dermatitis. Nickel (II) sulphate was the most frequent sensitizing substance. Mean MMP-2 levels were statistically higher in the study group both in contact dermatitis exacerbation and remission periods than in the control group. There was no statistically significant difference between MMP-2 levels and skin patch test results. Conclusions Nickel is one of the most allergenic contact allergens in patients with contact dermatitis. Metalloproteinase-2 is a good marker of contact dermatitis in various stages of the disease. PMID:26161054

  5. Patch-test results in children and adolescents: systematic review of a 15-year period*

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Dulcilea Ferraz; Goulart, Eugênio Marcos Andrade

    2016-01-01

    The number of studies on patch-test results in children and adolescents has gradually increased in recent years, thus stimulating reviews. This paper is a systematic review of a 15-year period devoted to studying the issue. Variations pertaining to the number and age groups of tested children and/or adolescents, the number of subjects with atopy/atopic dermatitis history, the quantity, type and concentrations of the tested substances, the test technique and type of data regarding clinical relevance, must all be considered in evaluating these studies, as they make it harder to formulate conclusions. The most common allergens in children were nickel, thimerosal, cobalt, fragrance, lanolin and neomycin. In adolescents, they were nickel, thimerosal, cobalt, fragrance, potassium dichromate, and Myroxylon pereirae. Knowledge of this matter aids health professionals in planning preventive programs aimed at improving children's quality of life and ensuring that their future prospects are not undermined. PMID:26982781

  6. Patch testing with budesonide in serial dilutions: the significance of dose, occlusion time and reading time.

    PubMed

    Isaksson, M; Bruze, M; Goossens, A; Lepoittevin, J P

    1999-01-01

    Budesonide is advocated as a marker molecule for corticosteroid contact allergy. When patch testing corticosteroids, one must consider their sensitizing potential but also their anti-inflammatory properties, as well as the possibility of different time courses for such properties. The dose-response relationship for budesonide was therefore investigated with regard to dose, occlusion time, and reading time. 10 patients were patch tested with budesonide in ethanol in serial dilutions from 2.0% down to 0.0002% with occlusion times of 48, 24, and 5 h. Readings were on D2, D4, and D7. The 48-h occlusion picked up most positive reactors, 8/10. The D4 reading (48-h occlusion) detected most positive reactors, 8/10, and here 0.002% picked up most contact allergies. Late readings favoured high concentrations. The "edge effect" was noted for several concentrations at early readings. Due to the individual corticosteroid reactivity, the dose-response relationship and the time courses of the elicitation and the anti-inflammatory capacity, several features may be explained, i.e., that lower concentrations may detect budesonide allergy better at early readings, that patients with an "edge reaction" can have positive reactions to lower concentrations.

  7. Immunophenotyping of the cutaneous cellular infiltrate after atopy patch testing in cats with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Roosje, P J; Thepen, T; Rutten, V P M G; van den Brom, W E; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C A F M; Willemse, T

    2004-10-01

    Cats with spontaneously occurring atopic dermatitis have clinical and immunocytochemical characteristics compatible with these in humans with atopic dermatitis (AD). The atopy patch test (APT) has proven to be a valuable tool in elucidating the disease process in humans. Additionally, the APT is very specific and bypasses the problem of conflicting results due to differences in chronicity of lesions of AD patients. We adapted the APT for use in cats to explore the suitability of the APT as a tool to study the onset of allergic inflammation in cats with atopic dermatitis. APT were performed in AD cats (n = 6) and healthy cats (n = 10). All cats were patch tested with two allergens in three different dilutions and a diluent control. The allergens for the APT were selected from positive intradermal test and /or prick test results and consisted of: Dermatophagoides farinae, D. pteronyssinus, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, and a grass pollen mixture. APT were read after 10, 24 and 48 h, and punch biopsies for immunohistochemical evaluation were collected at these time points. Macroscopically positive APT reactions were observed in three out of six cats at 24 and/or 48 h with allergen concentrations of 25,000 and 100,000 NU/ml. Reactions were not observed at negative control sites and neither in control animals. A significantly increased number of IL-4+, CD4+, CD3+, MHC class II+ and CD1a+ cells was found in one AD cat with positive APT reactions. Five out of six AD cats had significantly increased IL-4+ T cell numbers at 24 and/or 48 h. Our data indicate that in cats, macroscopically positive patch test reactions can be induced, which have a cellular infiltrate similar to that in lesional skin. We found a high specificity and a macroscopically positive APT reaction in half of the cats, which is similar to what is seen in humans. Hence, the APT in cats might be a useful tool in studying the immunopathogenesis of feline atopic dermatitis.

  8. Using a spatio-temporal dynamic state-space model with the EM algorithm to patch gaps in daily riverflow series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amisigo, B. A.; van de Giesen, N. C.

    2005-09-01

    A spatio-temporal linear dynamic model has been developed for patching short gaps in daily river runoff series. The model was cast in a state-space form in which the state variable was estimated using the Kalman smoother (RTS smoother). The EM algorithm was used to concurrently estimate both parameter and missing runoff values. Application of the model to daily runoff series in the Volta Basin of West Africa showed that the model was capable of providing good estimates of missing runoff values at a gauging station from the remaining time series at the station and at spatially correlated stations in the same sub-basin.

  9. Clutter sensitivity test under controlled field conditions Resonant Microstrip Patch Antenna (RMPA) sensor technology

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-27

    Theoretical research, controlled laboratory tests, and these field test results show that nonmetallic (and metallic) shallowly buried objects can be detected and imaged with the Resonant Microstrip Patch Antenna (RMPA) sensor. The sensor can be modeled as a high Q cavity which capitalizes on its resonant condition sensitivity to scattered waves from buried objects. When the RMPA sensor is swept over a shallowly buried object, the RMPA fed-point impedance (resistance), measured with a Maxwell bridge, changes by tens of percent. The significant change in unprocessed impedance data can be presented in two-dimensional and three-dimensional graphical displays over the survey area. This forms silhouette images of the objects without the application of computationally intensive data processing algorithms. Because RMPA employed electromagnetic waves to illuminate the shallowly buried object, a number of questions and issues arise in the decision to fund or deny funding of the reconfiguration of the RMPA technology into a nonmetallic (metallic) land mine detector.

  10. Cocamidopropyl betaine: the significance of positive patch test results in twelve patients.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J F

    1993-11-01

    Cocamidopropyl betaine is a surfactant coming into wide use in shampoos and other cleansing products. Recent reports have implicated it as a potential allergen, although it is less irritating than other surfactants such as sodium lauryl sulfate. Twelve positive patch test results were seen over a period of fifteen months of testing in selected patients. Of these, seven results were thought to be relevant. All seven patients with relevant reactions and four of the five with uncertain relevance had dermatitis of the head and neck area. It is concluded that although cocamidopropyl betaine is not a common allergen, it may be at least partially responsible for some cases of allergic dermatitis of the head and neck.

  11. Results of patch testing with a specialized collection of plastic and glue allergens.

    PubMed

    Holness, D L; Nethercottdagger, J R

    1997-06-01

    Patch testing was performed on 235 patients with a specialized collection of plastic and glue components. Thirteen percent had a positive response to at least one of the allergens. Seventy-four percent of the responses were relevant to either the present or a past problem, and 64% were occupationally related. The substances that yielded the greater percentage of positive responses were ethylenediamine, triethylenetetramine, diethylenetriamine, diaminodiphenylmethane, melamine formaldehyde resin, phenol formaldehyde resin, cresylglycidylether, phenylglycidylether, and N, N-dimethyl-p-toluidine. Of the 47 agents used, 26 did not elicit any positive responses. There were few distinguishing characteristics between those who exhibited a positive response to these agents and those who did not. In 12 cases (5% of those tested), the diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis would have been missed if the plastics and glues components were not used.

  12. Multicentre patch testing with compositae mix by the Swedish Contact Dermatitis Research Group.

    PubMed

    Isaksson, Marléne; Hansson, Christer; Inerot, Annica; Lidén, Carola; Matura, Mihaly; Stenberg, Berndt; Möller, Halvor; Bruze, Magnus

    2011-05-01

    Sesquiterpene lactone mix detects contact allergy to these compounds present in the plant family Asteraceae. This marker is present in many baseline series. An additional marker is Compositae mix, which is not present in many baseline series. To investigate whether this allergen should be inserted into the Swedish baseline series, six dermatology centres representing the Swedish Contact Dermatitis Research Group included Compositae mix into their baseline series for 1.5 years. Of 2818 patients tested, 31 (1.1%) reacted to Compositae mix and 26 (0.9%) to Sesquiterpene lactone mix. Active sensitization to Compositae mix was noted in two cases. Only 0.4% of Asteraceae contact allergy cases would have been missed if Compositae mix had not been tested, a frequency too low to merit its inclusion in the baseline series. Due to obvious geographical differences in frequency in frequency of simultaneous allergic reactions to Compositae mix and Sesquiterpene lactone mix, the question as to whether specific baseline series (including Compositae mix or not as a "tail" substance) should be used in the different centres must be addressed. Another option could be to remove Sesquiterpene lactone mix from the baseline series and substitute it with Compositae mix.

  13. Identification and testing of early indicators for N leaching from urine patches.

    PubMed

    Vogeler, Iris; Cichota, Rogerio; Snow, Val

    2013-11-30

    Nitrogen leaching from urine patches has been identified as a major source of nitrogen loss under intensive grazing dairy farming. Leaching is notoriously variable, influenced by management, soil type, year-to-year variation in climate and timing and rate of urine depositions. To identify early indicators for the risk of N leaching from urine patches for potential usage in a precision management system, we used the simulation model APSIM (Agricultural Production Systems SIMulator) to produce an extensive N leaching dataset for the Waikato region of New Zealand. In total, nearly forty thousand simulation runs with different combinations of soil type and urine deposition times, in 33 different years, were done. The risk forecasting indicators were chosen based on their practicality: being readily measured on farm (soil water content, temperature and pasture growth) or that could be centrally supplied to farms (such as actual and forecast weather data). The thresholds of the early indicators that are used to forecast a period for high risk of N leaching were determined via classification and regression tree analysis. The most informative factors were soil temperature, pasture dry matter production, and average soil water content in the top soil over the two weeks prior to the urine N application event. Rainfall and air temperature for the two weeks following urine deposition were also important to fine-tune the predictions. The identified early indicators were then tested for their potential to predict the risk of N leaching in two typical soils from the Waikato region in New Zealand. The accuracy of the predictions varied with the number of indicators, the soil type and the risk level, and the number of correct predictions ranged from about 45 to over 90%. Further expansion and fine-tuning of the indicators and the development of a practical N risk tool based on these indicators is needed.

  14. Winter season, frequent hand washing, and irritant patch test reactions to detergents are associated with hand dermatitis in healthcare workers

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Adrienne; Baron, Elma; Fekedulegn, Desta; Kashon, Michael; Yucesoy, Berran; Johnson, Victor J.; Santo Domingo, Diana; Kirkland, Brent; Luster, Michael I.; Nedorost, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Background Irritant hand dermatitis (IHD) is common in healthcare workers. Objective We studied endogenous irritant contact dermatitis threshold by patch testing, and exogenous factors such as season and hand washing for their association with IHD in healthcare workers. Methods Irritant patch testing with sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and benzalkonium chloride (BAK) at varying concentrations was measured in 113 healthcare workers. Examination for hand dermatitis occurred at one month intervals for a period of six months in the Midwestern US. Results Positive patch testing to low concentration SLS was associated with IHD (p=0.0310) after adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, season, history of childhood flexural dermatitis, mean indoor relative humidity, glove and hand sanitizer usage). Subjects with a positive patch test to SLS were 78% more likely to have occurrence of IHD (IRR=1.78, 95% CI: 0.92, 3.45). Hand washing frequency (≥ 10 times a day; IRR=1.55, 95% CI: 1.01, 2.39) and cold season (IRR=2.76, 95% CI: 1.35, 5.65) were associated with IHD. No association was found between history of childhood flexural dermatitis and IHD in this population. Conclusions Both genetic and environmental factors are important in the etiology of IHD and should be considered in designing strategies to protect, educate and treat susceptible individuals. PMID:23857011

  15. Patch testing and cross sensitivity study of adverse cutaneous drug reactions due to anticonvulsants: A preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Shiny, T N; Mahajan, Vikram K; Mehta, Karaninder S; Chauhan, Pushpinder S; Rawat, Ritu; Sharma, Rajni

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the utility of patch test and cross-sensitivity patterns in patients with adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) from common anticonvulsants. METHODS Twenty-four (M:F = 13:11) patients aged 18-75 years with ACDR from anticonvulsants were patch tested 3-27 mo after complete recovery using carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbitone, lamotrigine, and sodium valproate in 10%, 20% and 30% conc. in pet. after informed consent. Positive reactions persisting on D3 and D4 were considered significant. RESULTS Clinical patterns were exanthematous drug rash with or without systemic involvement (DRESS) in 18 (75%), Stevens-Johnsons syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) overlap and TEN in 2 (8.3%) patients each, SJS and lichenoid drug eruption in 1 (4.2%) patient each, respectively. The implicated drugs were phenytoin in 14 (58.3%), carbamazepine in 9 (37.5%), phenobarbitone in 2 (8.3%), and lamotrigine in 1 (4.7%) patients, respectively. Twelve (50%) patients elicited positive reactions to implicated drugs; carbamazepine in 6 (50%), phenytoin alone in 4 (33.3%), phenobarbitone alone in 1 (8.3%), and both phenytoin and phenobarbitone in 1 (8.33%) patients, respectively. Cross-reactions occurred in 11 (92%) patients. Six patients with carbamazepine positive patch test reaction showed cross sensitivity with phenobarbitone, sodium valproate and/or lamotrigine. Three (75%) patients among positive phenytoin patch test reactions had cross reactions with phenobarbitone, lamotrigine, and/or valproate. CONCLUSION Carbamazepine remains the commonest anticonvulsant causing ACDRs and cross-reactions with other anticonvulsants are possible. Drug patch testing appears useful in DRESS for drug imputability and cross-reactions established clinically.

  16. UAS-NAS Flight Test Series 3: Test Environment Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoang, Ty; Murphy, Jim; Otto, Neil

    2016-01-01

    The desire and ability to fly Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS) is of increasing urgency. The application of unmanned aircraft to perform national security, defense, scientific, and emergency management are driving the critical need for less restrictive access by UAS to the NAS. UAS represent a new capability that will provide a variety of services in the government (public) and commercial (civil) aviation sectors. The growth of this potential industry has not yet been realized due to the lack of a common understanding of what is required to safely operate UAS in the NAS. NASA's UAS Integration in the NAS Project is conducting research in the areas of Separation Assurance/Sense and Avoid Interoperability (SSI), Human Systems Integration (HSI), and Communications (Comm), and Certification to support reducing the barriers of UAS access to the NAS. This research is broken into two research themes namely, UAS Integration and Test Infrastructure. UAS Integration focuses on airspace integration procedures and performance standards to enable UAS integration in the air transportation system, covering Detect and Avoid (DAA) performance standards, command and control performance standards, and human systems integration. The focus of Test Infrastructure is to enable development and validation of airspace integration procedures and performance standards, including integrated test and evaluation. In support of the integrated test and evaluation efforts, the Project will develop an adaptable, scalable, and schedulable relevant test environment capable of evaluating concepts and technologies for unmanned aircraft systems to safely operate in the NAS. To accomplish this task, the Project is conducting a series of human-in-the-loop (HITL) and flight test activities that integrate key concepts, technologies and/or procedures in a relevant air traffic environment. Each of the integrated events will build on the technical achievements, fidelity, and

  17. Survey of Occupational Allergic Contact Dermatitis and Patch Test among Clothing Employees in Beijing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Xin; Gao, Bing-Ai; Cheng, Hai-Yan

    2017-01-01

    Occupational population-based epidemiological data relating to occupational contact allergies in the Chinese clothing industry are limited. To investigate the prevalence of occupational allergic contact dermatitis (OACD) and to identify the causative allergens among clothing employees in China, a cross-sectional study was conducted in 529 clothing employees at 12 clothing factories in Beijing. All employees were subjected to an interview using self-administered questionnaire and skin examination, and those who were diagnosed with occupational contact dermatitis (OCD) were patch tested. In the present survey, we found that the overall 1-year prevalence of OACD among the clothing employees was 8.5%. The 1-year prevalence of OACD among workers (10.8%) was significantly higher than that among managers (3.2%). The lesions were primarily on the hands and wrists in workers, but the face and neck in managers. The major allergens were nickel sulfate and cobalt dichloride in workers and colophony and p-tert-butylphenol formaldehyde resin in managers. In conclusion, workers are at a higher risk of OACD compared with managers in the Chinese clothing industry. In addition to hand dermatitis in workers, airborne contact dermatitis on the face and neck should be also addressed in managers.

  18. Survey of Occupational Allergic Contact Dermatitis and Patch Test among Clothing Employees in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Xin; Gao, Bing-Ai; Cheng, Hai-Yan; Li, Lin-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Occupational population-based epidemiological data relating to occupational contact allergies in the Chinese clothing industry are limited. To investigate the prevalence of occupational allergic contact dermatitis (OACD) and to identify the causative allergens among clothing employees in China, a cross-sectional study was conducted in 529 clothing employees at 12 clothing factories in Beijing. All employees were subjected to an interview using self-administered questionnaire and skin examination, and those who were diagnosed with occupational contact dermatitis (OCD) were patch tested. In the present survey, we found that the overall 1-year prevalence of OACD among the clothing employees was 8.5%. The 1-year prevalence of OACD among workers (10.8%) was significantly higher than that among managers (3.2%). The lesions were primarily on the hands and wrists in workers, but the face and neck in managers. The major allergens were nickel sulfate and cobalt dichloride in workers and colophony and p-tert-butylphenol formaldehyde resin in managers. In conclusion, workers are at a higher risk of OACD compared with managers in the Chinese clothing industry. In addition to hand dermatitis in workers, airborne contact dermatitis on the face and neck should be also addressed in managers.

  19. Crude 4-methylcyclohexanemethanol (MCHM) did not cause skin irritation in humans in 48-h patch test.

    PubMed

    Monnot, Andrew D; Novick, Rachel M; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2017-03-13

    Crude 4-methylcyclohexanemethanol (MCHM) is an industrial chemical used to wash and clean coal. On January 9th, 2014 approximately 10,000 gallons of a mixture containing crude MCHM were released into the Elk River near Charleston, West Virginia, contaminating the local water supply. Following the spill, residents reported numerous health complaints, and sought medical attention for ailments including rashes and itching. The relationship between the complaints and the spill were unknown, as such symptoms are reported frequently in the background. In this study, the primary irritation potential of crude MCHM was evaluated in 206 individuals who underwent 48 hour semi-occluded patch testing. MCHM concentrations assessed in this study were 1, 5, 15, and 100 ppm. No appreciable skin reactions were observed in individuals at any concentration. Three of the five concentrations evaluated were above the highest measured concentration of MCHM in the tap water of residents in West Virginia (3.7 ppm). The results of this study suggest that crude MCHM would not be a dermal irritant for the vast majority, if not all, potentially exposed persons at the concentrations in the water reported after the spill.

  20. UAS in the NAS Flight Test Series 3 Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The UAS Integration in the NAS Project is conducting a series of flight tests to acheive the following objectives: 1.) Validate results previously collected during project simulations with live data 2.) Evaluate TCAS IISS interoperability 3.) Test fully integrated system in a relevant live test environment 4.) Inform final DAA and C2 MOPS 5.) Reduce risk for Flight Test Series 4.

  1. Space shuttle orbiter test flight series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, D.; Gordon, R.; Jackson, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    The proposed studies on the space shuttle orbiter test taxi runs and captive flight tests were set forth. The orbiter test flights, the approach and landing tests (ALT), and the ground vibration tests were cited. Free flight plans, the space shuttle ALT crews, and 747 carrier aircraft crew were considered.

  2. Determination of acid base balance and oil water partition coefficient of an atopy patch test of levofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Lecordier, Julien; Lahet, Jean-Jacques; Courderot-Masuyer, Carol; Beaudoin, Etienne; Chaillot, Bernard

    2008-02-01

    Levofloxacin, a quinolone used in the treatment of an upper respiratory tract infection is involved in skin reactions. Patch tests are helpful for the aetiological diagnosis. Unfortunately, they are known for their lack of sensibility. A weak transcutaneous penetration due to the physicochemical characteristics of tested drugs is a well-known cause of false negative results but these characteristics are usually unknown. The aim of the present study was to evaluate physicochemical parameters by potentiometric method in order to optimize the transcutaneous penetration of a preparation for patch test. This method is applicable to a medium such as the preparation for patch test. In order to value the stability of the preparation, qualitative and quantitative analysis of the level of levofloxacin was effectuated. In our study, spectrophotometric and potentiometric data at T0 and six months later with the preparation showed the stability of the preparation. The proportions of non-ionized (45%) and ionized levofloxacin (55%) were not modified. Further experiments are needed to choose the minimal efficient dose of the suspected molecule able to detect a positive reaction in cases of allergic reaction. In addition, this method could be useful in qualitative and quantitative control of preparations made at hospital.

  3. Positive atopy patch test reaction to Malassezia furfur in atopic dermatitis correlates with a T helper 2-like peripheral blood mononuclear cells response.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Catharina; Eshaghi, Hojjat; Linder, Maria Tengvall; Jakobson, Eva; Scheynius, Annika

    2002-06-01

    The yeast Malassezia furfur belongs to the normal cutaneous flora, but is also a triggering allergen that can contribute to atopic dermatitis. To illuminate the effect of circulating allergen-specific T cells in atopic dermatitis, the peripheral mononuclear cell response was correlated with the in vivo skin prick test and atopy patch test reactivity to M. furfur. None of 16 healthy controls showed any positive in vivo reaction. The 40 atopic dermatitis patients, of whom 18 had serum IgE reactivity to M. furfur, were subdivided according to their in vivo reaction to M. furfur extract into three groups: skin prick test positive/atopy patch test positive (n = 12), skin prick test positive/atopy patch test negative (n = 12), and skin prick test negative/atopy patch test negative (n = 16). The skin prick test positive/atopy patch test positive and the skin prick test positive/atopy patch test negative groups had a significantly higher peripheral mononuclear cell stimulation index than the healthy controls. Interestingly, the stimulation index values in the skin prick test positive/atopy patch test positive group were significantly higher than in the skin prick test positive/atopy patch test negative group. In the M. furfur skin prick test positive atopic dermatitis patients (n = 24) a correlation was found between stimulation index and the M. furfur atopy patch test reactions, but not between stimulation index and M. furfur-specific serum IgE levels. Skin prick test positive and/or atopy patch test positive reactions to the recombinant M. furfur allergens rMal f 1, rMal f 5, and rMal f 6 were observed in 7, 14, and 16 of the 40 atopic dermatitis patients, respectively. Further, there was a correlation between production of the T helper 2-related cytokines interleukins 4, 5, and 13 and stimulation index to M. furfur extract, but not between the T helper 1-related interferon-gamma and stimulation index to M. furfur extract. Our data strongly suggest a relationship between

  4. Comparative assessment of the acute skin irritation potential of detergent formulations using a novel human 4-h patch test method.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael K; Kruszewski, Francis H; Al-Atrash, Jenan; Blazka, Mark E; Gingell, Ralph; Heitfeld, Fred A; Mallon, David; Snyder, Neil K; Swanson, Judith E; Casterton, Phillip L

    2005-12-01

    Predictive skin irritation test methods, which do not require use of animals, are needed for the pre-market assessment of detergent formulations. The utility of a novel and ethical human acute skin irritation patch test method, originally developed for chemical skin irritation assessment, was evaluated. In this IRB-approved method, subjects were patched under occlusion for increasing periods of time up to 4h in duration. The total incidence of positive skin reactions for test products was compared to a positive control (20% aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS]). Acutely irritating formulas were defined as those showing a significantly increased or equal incidence of positive responders compared with that of SDS. The time of exposure required for 50% of subjects to show a positive skin reaction (TR50 value) was calculated for each product and enabled test product comparisons within and between studies. Using this approach, 24 detergent formulations of various types were tested in seven individual studies. The skin irritation profiles were generally consistent within product types, which could be categorized as follows (by decreasing irritancy): mold/mildew removers (average TR50 = 0.37 h) > disinfectants/sanitizers (0.64 h) > fabric softener concentrate (1.09 h) = aluminum wash (1.20 h) > 20% SDS (1.81 h) > liquid laundry detergents (3.48 h) > liquid dish detergents (4.16 h) = liquid fabric softeners (4.56 h) = liquid hand soaps (4.58 h) = shampoos (5.40 h) = hard surface cleaners (6.34 h) > powder automatic dish detergents (>16 h) = powder laundry detergents (>16 h). In addition to formulation effects, some seasonal effects were noted; particularly greater winter-time reactivity to 20% SDS and the hard surface cleaner and liquid laundry formulations. These results demonstrate the utility of this patch test method for the comparative skin irritation assessment of these different product types.

  5. Series and parallel arc-fault circuit interrupter tests.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jay Dean; Fresquez, Armando J.; Gudgel, Bob; Meares, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    While the 2011 National Electrical Codeª (NEC) only requires series arc-fault protection, some arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) manufacturers are designing products to detect and mitigate both series and parallel arc-faults. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has extensively investigated the electrical differences of series and parallel arc-faults and has offered possible classification and mitigation solutions. As part of this effort, Sandia National Laboratories has collaborated with MidNite Solar to create and test a 24-string combiner box with an AFCI which detects, differentiates, and de-energizes series and parallel arc-faults. In the case of the MidNite AFCI prototype, series arc-faults are mitigated by opening the PV strings, whereas parallel arc-faults are mitigated by shorting the array. A range of different experimental series and parallel arc-fault tests with the MidNite combiner box were performed at the Distributed Energy Technologies Laboratory (DETL) at SNL in Albuquerque, NM. In all the tests, the prototype de-energized the arc-faults in the time period required by the arc-fault circuit interrupt testing standard, UL 1699B. The experimental tests confirm series and parallel arc-faults can be successfully mitigated with a combiner box-integrated solution.

  6. Testing for intracycle determinism in pseudoperiodic time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Mara C. S.; Mendes, Eduardo M. A. M.; Aguirre, Luis A.

    2008-06-01

    A determinism test is proposed based on the well-known method of the surrogate data. Assuming predictability to be a signature of determinism, the proposed method checks for intracycle (e.g., short-term) determinism in the pseudoperiodic time series for which standard methods of surrogate analysis do not apply. The approach presented is composed of two steps. First, the data are preprocessed to reduce the effects of seasonal and trend components. Second, standard tests of surrogate analysis can then be used. The determinism test is applied to simulated and experimental pseudoperiodic time series and the results show the applicability of the proposed test.

  7. Contact allergy to acid and neutral fractions of rosins. Sensitization experiments in guinea pigs and patch testing in patients.

    PubMed

    Karlberg, A T; Boman, A; Holmbom, B; Lidén, C

    1986-01-01

    The allergenicity of two different types of rosins (gum rosin and tall oil rosin) was compared. The rosins were divided into their neutral and acid fractions. The neutral fraction of tall oil rosin failed to induce contact sensitivity in animals tested according to the Guinea pig maximization test method (GPMT). The neutral fraction of gum rosin as well as the two acid fractions gave significant responses. Relatively fewer dermatitis patients reacted to the neutral fraction compared with reactions to the unfractionated gum rosin when patch tested. Fewer reactions to tall oil rosin than to gum rosin (p less than 0.05) were observed. It is concluded that tall oil rosin is less allergenic than gum rosin, which may be due to the absence of allergens in its neutral fraction.

  8. Skin irritation to glass wool or continuous glass filaments as observed by a patch test among human Japanese volunteers.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Masashi; Kido, Takamasa; Mogi, Sachiyo; Sugiura, Yumiko; Miyajima, Eriko; Kudo, Yuichiro; Kumazawa, Tatenao; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2014-01-01

    Glass wool and continuous glass filaments have been used in industry. We examined the irritability of those among Japanese. A patch test was performed on 43 volunteers for the followings: glass wool for non-residential use with and without a urea-modified phenolic resin binder, that for residential use with and without the binder, and continuous glass filaments with diameters of 4, 7, 9, and 13 µm. Materials were applied to an upper arm of each volunteer for 24 h. The skin was observed at 1 and 24 h after the removal. At 1 h after removal, slight erythema was observed on the skin of a woman after the exposure to glass wool for residential use without the binder. Erythema was observed on the skin of another woman at 1 h after a 24-h exposure to glass wool for non-residential use without the binder. There were no reactions at 24 h after the removal. The low reactions in the patch test suggested that the irritability caused by glass wool, irrespective of a resin component, could be induced mechanically, and that the irritability caused by continuous glass filaments with resin could be slight and either mechanical or chemical.

  9. Integrated Test and Evaluation (ITE) Flight Test Series 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The integrated Flight Test 4 (FT4) will gather data for the UAS researchers Sense and Avoid systems (referred to as Detect and Avoid in the RTCA SC 228 ToR) algorithms and pilot displays for candidate UAS systems in a relevant environment. The technical goals of FT4 are to: 1) perform end-to-end traffic encounter test of pilot guidance generated by DAA algorithms; 2) collect data to inform the initial Minimum Operational Performance Standards (MOPS) for Detect and Avoid systems. FT4 objectives and test infrastructure builds from previous UAS project simulations and flight tests. NASA Ames (ARC), NASA Armstrong (AFRC), and NASA Langley (LaRC) Research Centers will share responsibility for conducting the tests, each providing a test lab and critical functionality. UAS-NAS project support and participation on the 2014 flight test of ACAS Xu and DAA Self Separation (SS) significantly contributed to building up infrastructure and procedures for FT3 as well. The DAA Scripted flight test (FT4) will be conducted out of NASA Armstrong over an eight-week period beginning in April 2016.

  10. UAS in the NAS Flight Test Series 4 Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Flight Test Series 4 (FT4) provides the researchers with an opportunity to expand on the data collected during the first flight tests. Following Flight Test Series 3, additional scripted encounters with different aircraft performance and sensors will be conducted. FT4 is presently planned for Spring of 2016 to ensure collection of data to support the validation of the final RTCA Phase 1 DAA (Detect and Avoid) Minimum Operational Performance Standards (MOPS). There are three research objectives associated with this goal: Evaluate the performance of the DAA system against cooperative and non-cooperative aircraft encounters Evaluate UAS (Unmanned Aircraft Systems) pilot performance in response to DAA maneuver guidance and alerting with live intruder encounters Evaluate TCAS/DAA (Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System/Detect and Avoid) interoperability. This flight test series will focus on only the Scripted Encounters configuration, supporting the collection of data to validate the interoperability of DAA and collision avoidance algorithms.

  11. Reactivity initiated accident test series Test RIA 1-4

    SciTech Connect

    Martinson, Z.R.; El-Genk, M.S.; Fukuda, S.K.; LaPointe, R.E.; Osetek, D.J.

    1980-05-01

    The Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) Test RIA 1-4, the first 9-rod fuel rod bundle RIA Test to be performed at BWR hot startup conditions, was completed on April 16, 1980. The test was performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF). Objective for Test RIA 1-4 was to provide information regarding loss-of-coolable fuel rod geometry following a RIA event for a peak fuel enthalpy equivalent to the present licensing criteria of 280 cal/g. The most severe RIA is the postulated Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) control rod drop during reactor startup. Therefore the test was conducted at BWR hot startup coolant conditions (538 K, 6.45 MPa, 0.8 1/sec). The test sequence began with steady power operation to condition the fuel, establish a short-lived fission product inventory, and calibrate the calorimetric measurements and core power chambers, neutron flux and gamma flux detectors. The test train was removed from the in-pile tube (IPT) to replace one of the fuel rods with a nominally identical irradiated rod and twelve flux wire monitors. A 2.8 ms period power burst was then performed. Coolant flow measurements were made before and after the power burst to characterize the flow blockage that occurred as a result of fuel rod failure.

  12. Testing time series irreversibility using complex network methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donges, Jonathan F.; Donner, Reik V.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    The absence of time-reversal symmetry is a fundamental property of many nonlinear time series. Here, we propose a new set of statistical tests for time series irreversibility based on standard and horizontal visibility graphs. Specifically, we statistically compare the distributions of time-directed variants of the common complex network measures degree and local clustering coefficient. Our approach does not involve surrogate data and is applicable to relatively short time series. We demonstrate its performance for paradigmatic model systems with known time-reversal properties as well as for picking up signatures of nonlinearity in neuro-physiological data.

  13. Atopy patch tests in young adult patients with atopic dermatitis and controls: dose-response relationship, objective reading, reproducibility and clinical interpretation.

    PubMed

    Bygum, Anette; Mortz, Charlotte Gotthard; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2003-01-01

    The clinical interpretation and reproducibility of atopy patch tests was studied in 23 selected young adult patients with atopic dermatitis and 25 healthy controls using standard inhalant allergens. Non-invasive measurements were used for objective assessment of test reactions and the participants were retested after 6 weeks. Ten of 19 (53%) evaluable patients with atopic dermatitis had at least one positive atopy patch test. However, there was no clear clinical relevance of the atopy patch test results when related to patient history and distribution of dermatitis. Reproducible and dose-dependent results were obtained with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, grass and cat with a reproducibility rate of 0.69 to 0.81 in patients and 0.60-0.96 in controls. A unique finding was a significant positive correlation between a positive atopy patch test, allergen dose and increase in transepidermal water loss and erythema, while measurement of capacitance did not distinguish between positive and negative reactions. The results of the present study do not support the routine use of atopy patch tests in the evaluation of adult patients with atopic dermatitis.

  14. Results of tests of K5NA and a revised formulation of EPDM/cork patch material in MSFC Hot Gas Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, W. G.

    1982-01-01

    During prelaunch procedures at Kennedy Space Center some of the EPDM Thermal Protection System material was damaged on the Solid Rocket Booster stiffener stubs. The preferred solution was to patch the damaged areas with a cork-filled epoxy patching compound. Before this was done, however, it was requested that this patching technique be checked out by testing it in the MSFC Hot Gas Facility. Two tests were run in the HFG in 1980. The results showed the patch material to be adequate. Since that time, the formulation of the cork-filled epoxy material has been changed. It became necessary to retest this concept to be sure that the new material is as good as or better than the original material. In addition to the revised formulation material, tests were also made using K5NA as the patch material. The objectives of the tests reported herein were to: (1) compare the thermal performance of the original and the new cork-filled epoxy formulations, and (2) compare the K5NA closeout material to these epoxy materials. Material specifications are also discussed.

  15. An experimental test of the effects of food resources and hydraulic refuge on patch colonization by stream macroinvertebrates during spates.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Junjiro N; Richardson, John S

    2006-01-01

    1. The passive or active movement of organisms between habitat patches plays important roles in achieving ecosystem resilience to disturbance and long-term control of population levels. However, causal mechanisms of disturbance-induced movements of mobile biota across heterogeneous habitat patches at a relatively short time-scale are little understood. 2. We experimentally tested the effects of food resource values on macroinvertebrate colonization of hydraulic refugia from spates in a second-order creek. Experimental cages were colonized by macroinvertebrates with combinations of resource types (natural or polyester leaves), and extent of exposure to stream flow (exposed to or sheltered from current); one half of each set was collected before and after a spate. This experiment was repeated over three spates of varying magnitude and seasonal contexts. 3. Pre-spate colonization was consistently greater for the cages with natural leaves relative to artificial leaves regardless of the extent of flow exposure. Two autumn spates with relatively low and stable antecedent flow conditions caused large movements of organic matter and macroinvertebrates across the stream, showing community-level accumulations into hydraulically sheltered patches independent of food treatment. The smallest spate with high and variable antecedent flows during winter resulted in negligible responses, which we interpret to be a result of depletion of easily transportable organic matter and organisms. 4. Two detritivorous taxa, the mayfly Paraleptophlebia spp. and stonefly Despaxia augusta (Banks) were the most responsive to autumn spates, and had disproportionately higher colonization rates of cages when provided with natural leaves during the largest autumn spate. Preferential settlement in food-enriched hydraulic refugia was attributable to taxon-specific mobility related to efficient acquisition of detritus resource, whose availability varies spatially and temporally. 5. Our findings suggest

  16. Using a spatio-temporal dynamic state-space model with the EM algorithm to patch gaps in daily riverflow series, with examples from the Volta Basin, West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amisigo, B. A.; van de Giesen, N. C.

    2005-04-01

    A spatio-temporal linear dynamic model has been developed for patching short gaps in daily river runoff series. The model was cast in a state-space form in which the state variable was estimated using the Kalman smoother (RTS smoother). The EM algorithm was used to concurrently estimate both parameter and missing runoff values. Application of the model to daily runoff series in the Volta Basin of West Africa showed that the model was capable of providing good estimates of missing runoff values at a gauging station from the remaining series at the station and at spatially correlated stations in the same sub-basin.

  17. Phototoxicity of bergamot oil assessed by in vitro techniques in combination with human patch tests.

    PubMed

    Kejlová, K; Jírová, D; Bendová, H; Kandárová, H; Weidenhoffer, Z; Kolárová, H; Liebsch, M

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the differences in the phototoxicity of bergamot oil obtained from four different suppliers. Spectral and chemical analyses were performed to identify presence of photoactive compounds in the test samples. The phototoxicity was assessed in vitro by the 3T3 NRU phototoxicity test (PT) and subsequently in a phototoxicity test on reconstructed human skin model (H3D PT). Confirmatory photopatch tests in a group of volunteers were performed using the first non-phototoxic concentration determined in the H3D PT. The spectral and chemical analyses revealed, that two samples of bergamot oil exhibited a potential for photoactivation. These oils were subsequently classified as phototoxic in the 3T3 NRU PT, however, only on the basis of borderline results and depending on the solvent used. H3D PT revealed clear classifications, correlating well with the findings of spectral and chemical analysis. The test was, however, not yet capable of precise prediction of safe, non-phototoxic concentrations. Additional endpoints, e.g. interleukin determination might be employed to increase the sensitivity of the test. Although the study showed the usefulness of the tiered testing strategy, currently, the extrapolation of in vitro results to human situation may be performed only to a limited extent.

  18. Multiple (Two) Met Bel 601 In Series Ultimate Vacuum Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Restivo, M.

    2016-09-30

    SRNL Environmental and Chemical Process Technology (E&CPT) was requested to perform testing of vacuum pumps per a verbal request from the Customer, SRNL Hydrogen Processing Technology. Tritium Operations is currently having difficulties procuring the Normetex™® Model 15 m3/hr (9 CFM) vacuum pump (formerly Normetex Pompes, now EumecaSARL). One possible solution proposed by Hydrogen Processing Technology personnel is to use two Senior Aerospace Metal Bellows MB-601 vacuum pumps piped with the heads in series, and the pumps in series (Figure 1 below). This memorandum documents the ultimate vacuum testing that was performed to determine if this concept was a viable alternate vacuum pump strategy. This testing dovetails with previous pump evaluations documented in references 1 and 2.

  19. Permutation test for periodicity in short time series data

    PubMed Central

    Ptitsyn, Andrey A; Zvonic, Sanjin; Gimble, Jeffrey M

    2006-01-01

    Background Periodic processes, such as the circadian rhythm, are important factors modulating and coordinating transcription of genes governing key metabolic pathways. Theoretically, even small fluctuations in the orchestration of circadian gene expression patterns among different tissues may result in functional asynchrony at the organism level and may contribute to a wide range of pathologic disorders. Identification of circadian expression pattern in time series data is important, but equally challenging. Microarray technology allows estimation of relative expression of thousands of genes at each time point. However, this estimation often lacks precision and microarray experiments are prohibitively expensive, limiting the number of data points in a time series expression profile. The data produced in these experiments carries a high degree of stochastic variation, obscuring the periodic pattern and a limited number of replicates, typically covering not more than two complete periods of oscillation. Results To address this issue, we have developed a simple, but effective, computational technique for the identification of a periodic pattern in relatively short time series, typical for microarray studies of circadian expression. This test is based on a random permutation of time points in order to estimate non-randomness of a periodogram. The Permutated time, or Pt-test, is able to detect oscillations within a given period in expression profiles dominated by a high degree of stochastic fluctuations or oscillations of different irrelevant frequencies. We have conducted a comprehensive study of circadian expression on a large data set produced at PBRC, representing three different peripheral murine tissues. We have also re-analyzed a number of similar time series data sets produced and published independently by other research groups over the past few years. Conclusion The Permutated time test (Pt-test) is demonstrated to be effective for detection of periodicity in

  20. Test to determine the Markov order of a time series.

    PubMed

    Racca, E; Laio, F; Poggi, D; Ridolfi, L

    2007-01-01

    The Markov order of a time series is an important measure of the "memory" of a process, and its knowledge is fundamental for the correct simulation of the characteristics of the process. For this reason, several techniques have been proposed in the past for its estimation. However, most of this methods are rather complex, and often can be applied only in the case of Markov chains. Here we propose a simple and robust test to evaluate the Markov order of a time series. Only the first-order moment of the conditional probability density function characterizing the process is used to evaluate the memory of the process itself. This measure is called the "expected value Markov (EVM) order." We show that there is good agreement between the EVM order and the known Markov order of some synthetic time series.

  1. Effects of different base agents on prediction of skin irritation by sodium lauryl sulfate using patch testing and repeated application test.

    PubMed

    Horita, Kotomi; Horita, Daisuke; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Yasoshima, Mitsue; Yagami, Akiko; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2017-03-06

    Animal testing for cosmetics was banned in the European Union (EU) in 2013; therefore, human tests to predict and ensure skin safety such as the patch test or usage test are now in demand in Japan as well as in the EU. In order to investigate the effects of different bases on the findings of tests to predict skin irritation, we performed patch testing (PT) and the repeated application test (RAT) using sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), a well-known irritant, dissolved in 6 different base agents to examine the effects of these bases on skin irritation by SLS. The bases for PT were distilled water, 50% ethanol, 100% ethanol, a gel containing 50% ethanol, white petrolatum, and hydrophilic cream. The concentrations of SLS were 0.2% and 0.5%. Twelve different base combinations were applied to the normal back skin of 19 individuals for 24h. RAT was performed with distilled water, 50% ethanol, 100% ethanol, a gel containing 50% ethanol, white petrolatum, and hydrophilic cream containing SLS at concentrations of 0.2%, 2%, and 5%, being applied to the arms of the same PT subjects. The test preparation of each base was applied at the same site, with 0.2% SLS being used in the first week, 2% SLS in the following week, and 5% SLS in the final week. The results of PT revealed that skin irritation scores varied when SLS at the same concentration was dissolved in a different base. The results of RAT showed that although skin irritation appeared with every base at a concentration of 5%, the positive rate was approximately the same. In conclusion, our results suggest that skin irritation elicited in PT depends on the base, while in RAT, it does not depend on the type of base employed.

  2. Science Library of Test Items. Volume Eleven. Mastery Testing Programme. [Mastery Tests Series 3.] Tests M27-M38.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New South Wales Dept. of Education, Sydney (Australia).

    As part of a series of tests to measure mastery of specific skills in the natural sciences, copies of tests 27 through 38 include: (27) reading a grid plan; (28) identifying common invertebrates; (29) characteristics of invertebrates; (30) identifying elements; (31) using scientific notation part I; (32) classifying minerals; (33) predicting the…

  3. Science Library of Test Items. Volume Ten. Mastery Testing Programme. [Mastery Tests Series 2.] Tests M14-M26.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New South Wales Dept. of Education, Sydney (Australia).

    As part of a series of tests to measure mastery of specific skills in the natural sciences, copies of tests 14 through 26 include: (14) calculating an average; (15) identifying parts of the scientific method; (16) reading a geological map; (17) identifying elements, mixtures and compounds; (18) using Ohm's law in calculation; (19) interpreting…

  4. Science Library of Test Items. Volume Twelve. Mastery Testing Programme. [Mastery Tests Series 4.] Tests M39-M50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New South Wales Dept. of Education, Sydney (Australia).

    As part of a series of tests to measure mastery of specific skills in the natural sciences, copies of tests 39 through 50 include: (39) using a code; (40) naming the parts of a microscope; (41) calculating density and predicting flotation; (42) estimating metric length; (43) using SI symbols; (44) using s=vt; (45) applying a novel theory; (46)…

  5. SPE5 Sub-Scale Test Series Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersall, Kevin S.; Reeves, Robert V.; DeHaven, Martin R.; Strickland, Shawn L.

    2016-01-14

    A series of 2 SPE5 sub-scale tests were performed to experimentally confirm that a booster system designed and evaluated in prior tests would properly initiate the PBXN-110 case charge fill. To conduct the experiments, a canister was designed to contain the nominally 50 mm diameter booster tube with an outer fill of approximately 150 mm diameter by 150 mm in length. The canisters were filled with PBXN-110 at NAWS-China Lake and shipped back to LLNL for testing in the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF). Piezoelectric crystal pins were placed on the outside of the booster tube before filling, and a series of piezoelectric crystal pins along with Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) probes were placed on the outer surface of the canister to measure the relative timing and magnitude of the detonation. The 2 piezoelectric crystal pins integral to the booster design were also utilized along with a series of either piezoelectric crystal pins or piezoelectric polymer pads on the top of the canister or outside case that utilized direct contact, gaps, or different thicknesses of RTV cushions to obtain time of arrival data to evaluate the response in preparation for the large-scale SPE5 test. To further quantify the margin of the booster operation, the 1st test (SPE5SS1) was functioned with both detonators and the 2nd test (SPE5SS2) was functioned with only 1 detonator. A full detonation of the material was observed in both experiments as observed by the pin timing and PDV signals. The piezoelectric pads were found to provide a greater measured signal magnitude during the testing with an RTV layer present, and the improved response is due to the larger measurement surface area of the pad. This report will detail the experiment design, canister assembly for filling, final assembly, experiment firing, presentation of the diagnostic results, and a discussion of the results.

  6. Time-series Deployment of Chemical Sensor Data-logger in a Riftia Patch at Tica Vent (EPR 9\\deg50'N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, K.; Seyfried, W. E.; Zhang, Z.; Yang, C.; Foustoukos, D.

    2004-12-01

    An in-situ chemical sensor array was deployed in a Riftia pachyptila patch at Tica diffuse flow vent area during a recent submersible investigation with Atlantis/Alvin (At-11-7) to the EPR 9\\deg50'N region. Chemical and temperature data were recorded continuously during the 13-day study to quantify short-term time series trends. Biological activity at Tica is unusually robust, which likely relates to a combination of chemical and physical factors in the vent ecosystem. The electrochemical array in the sensor unit consisted of pH, dissolved H2 and H2S electrodes, which made use of Ir, Pt and Ag base metal components respectively. The sensor measurements were referenced to dissolved Cl in the fluid using a junctioned Ag/AgCl electrode. A Ti sheathed E-type thermocouple was included to provide simultaneous temperature data. Moreover, the sensor array was coupled to a data-logging system through a high pressure conducting cable, which allowed continuous data scanning and recording at an interval of 5 seconds. Owing to the functionality of the inductively coupled communication link (ICL) between the sensor and the data logger, we were able to use real time temperature readings in the submersible to guide deployment. The warmest temperatures were observed at the fractured rock base of the tubeworm colony, which is where the sensor package was deployed. Temperature, however, varied systematically from approximately 10 to 20\\deg C throughout the 13-day experiment. Chemical data were generally in phase with temperature with the more extreme departures from ambient conditions associated with temperature maxima. In general, the lowest pH values were approximately 0.5 units less than ambient seawater, while dissolved H2S concentrations ranged from 10 and 100 μ mol/kg. The mean value of dissolved H2S was in the range of 20-30 μ mol/kg in excellent agreement with that actually measured using conventional approaches. Dissolved H2 concentrations, in contrast, were orders of

  7. Epidural Blood Patch Performed for Severe Intracranial Hypotension Following Lumbar Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage for Intracranial Aneurysm Surgery. Retrospective Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Tanweer, Omar; Kalhorn, Stephen P.; Snell, Jamaal T.; Lieber, Bryan A.; Agarwal, Nitin; Huang, Paul P.; Sutin, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial hypotension (IH) can occur following lumbar drainage for clipping of an intracranial aneurysm. We observed 3 cases of IH, which were all successfully treated by epidural blood patch (EBP). Herein, the authors report our cases. PMID:27065093

  8. Application of Near-Field Microwave and Millimeter Wave Nondestructive Testing for Evaluation of Fiber Breakage and Orientation Evaluation in CFRP Composite Patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharkovsky, S.; Zoughi, R.

    2005-04-01

    Near-field microwave and millimeter wave nondestructive testing and evaluation techniques have been successfully used for detecting defects such as disbond and delamination in complex composite structures. This paper presents the results of fiber breakage detection and fiber orientation determination in carbon fiber reinforced polymer patches which are used in aerospace industry and civil infrastructure.

  9. Design and testing of the Series III AMTEC cell

    SciTech Connect

    Mital, R.; Sievers, R.K.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes the design and testing of the Series III (S3) Alkali Metal Thermal to Electric Converter (AMTEC) cell which is capable of high efficiency (15--25%) and high power density (100--150 W/kg). Compared to the Series 2 cell which is being developed primarily for space power systems, the Series III cell design provides a significantly higher beta{double_prime}-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) tube packing density around the heat source thereby increasing cell power and minimizing heat loss. The prototype S3 cell will have 96 BASE tubes and is expected to produce about 150 We. In this cell design the BASE tube assemblies are mounted on a cylindrical tube support plate. The BASE tubes are arranged like spokes on a wheel. The inner cylinder, concentric to the tube support plate, is the hot side of the cell and the outer cylinder is the condenser. Since the prototype S3 cell will be the first of its kind, an engineering cell with same dimensions as the prototype but with 24 BASE tubes was built first. The purpose of this cell was to identify and resolve structural, thermal, manufacturing and sodium management issues before launching into the build of a complete 96 BASE tube cell. The engineering cell has been successfully built and tested. The data of the engineering cells have been used to calibrate the SINDA/FLUINT code to predict the prototype cell performance more accurately. The build of the prototype 96 BASE tube cells is now in progress. This paper presents the design and development of the prototype S3 cell. The fabrication and testing of the first S3 engineering cell is discussed next. Based on the test data of the engineering cell, the anticipated thermal performance of the prototype cells predicted by the calibrated SINDA model are also presented.

  10. Allergic contact stomatitis to dodecyl gallate? A review of the relevance of positive patch test results to gallates.

    PubMed

    Gamboni, Sarah E; Palmer, Amanda M; Nixon, Rosemary L

    2013-08-01

    Gallic acid esters or gallates are antioxidants used as preservatives in food and cosmetics. Few cases of gallates causing allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) have been reported in the literature. We present a case report of a 42-year-old beauty therapist who presented with a swollen tongue. Patch testing was positive to dodecyl gallate, commonly reported as being present in edible oil and oily foods such as margarine. Our patient avoided foods presumed to contain gallates and at the 6-week review reported a substantial improvement in her tongue symptoms. We reviewed our database and found 16 (7%) definitely or possibly relevant reactions to dodecyl gallate, seven (15%) definitely or possibly relevant reactions to propyl gallate and six (3%) definitely or possibly relevant reactions to octyl gallate. Most reactions were attributed to margarine, moisturising cream and lipstick. These products are often mentioned in the literature as containing gallates; however, ingredient labelling and discussions with manufacturers made it difficult to establish whether they are currently present in foods. Ascertaining relevance for these reactions is not always possible.

  11. Patch test reactions to mite antigens: a GERDA multicentre study. Groupe d'Etudes et de Recherches en Dermato-Allergie.

    PubMed

    Castelain, M; Birnbaum, J; Castelain, P Y; Ducombs, G; Grosshans, E; Jelen, G; Lacroix, M; Meynadier, J; Mougeolle, J M; Lachapelle, J M

    1993-11-01

    We performed patch tests with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp) antigens from 2 different sources in 355 non-randomly selected patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) and 398 subjects of a control group. The study demonstrated that contact sensitization to mites occurred in an appreciable % of AD cases (20.8%), using commonly available assay products. The differences recorded between the 2 materials tested were related to the concentration of P1 antigen. Non-atopic patients rarely showed positive reactions to Dp (0.75%), when strict criteria for readings were applied and if 2 readings were performed. Patients with positive patch tests did not necessarily show positive immediate skin tests. It would be useful to carry out tests systematically in atopic patients, even if it is not yet known what modern treatment would be best for the patient. Laboratories still do not provide standardized house dust mite preparations--measuring and codifying their biological activity--for use in patch tests. It is to be hoped that the extension of this type of test will lead to the production of better test materials, in syringes with homogeneous dispersion and concentration.

  12. In vitro testing of tensides employing monolayer cultures: a comparison with results of patch tests on human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Benassi, L; Bertazzoni, G; Seidenari, S

    1999-01-01

    Evaluation of the irritant potential of new products or ingredients prior to human testing is generally performed in vivo on animals. However, according to the 6th amendment and following updates of the European Community directive on cosmetic products (93/35/EEC), animal testing will be banned when suitable substitutes will be available. To know whether in vitro tests for assessment of skin irritancy provide results approaching human conditions, comparisons have to be made between data deriving from in vitro tests and skin response in humans. The aim of our study was to assess the validity of the monolayer culture system of normal human keratinocytes as a model for the evaluation of the irritant effects of detergents, by comparing in vitro cell culture data to in vivo acute skin irritancy effects of cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB), an amphoteric compound, Tween 20 (TW20) (polysorbate 20) and Tween 80 (TW80) (polysorbate 80), representing nonionic compounds, applied to the skin of 24 healthy volunteers at a concentration similar to that employed in commercial products. As parameters for cytotoxicity, cell proliferation, cell membrane integrity and cell metabolism were assessed by cell counts, thymidine incorporation, MTT conversion, and Neutral Red uptake. In order to increase the sensitivity of the in vivo evaluation, bioengineering methods for assessment of the effects of test products on the skin were employed. Whereas all 4 in vitro methods ranked the tensides according to their toxicity in the following order: CAPB>SLS>TW20>TW80, both in vivo methods agreed in identifying SLS as the most irritating substance. Moreover, as compared with the irritation potential on human skin, all 4 in vitro tests overestimated the toxicity of CAPB. This suggests that the keratinocyte monolayer cell culture technique cannot directly replace in vivo methods, and that data obtained by this method should be interpreted cautiously.

  13. 77 FR 15750 - Final Test Guidelines; OCSPP 810 Series; Notice of Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ... AGENCY Final Test Guidelines; OCSPP 810 Series; Notice of Availability AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: EPA is announcing the availability of the final test guidelines for Series 810--Product Performance Test Guidelines, specifically public health uses of...

  14. Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges - Series II Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Samuel A.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2001-03-14

    This report describes work to examine the gas generation behavior of actual K East (KE) Basin floor, pit and canister sludge. Mixed and unmixed and fractionated KE canister sludge were tested, along with floor and pit sludges from areas in the KE Basin not previously sampled. The first report in this series focused on gas generation from KE floor and canister sludge collected using a consolidated sampling technique. The third report will present results of gas generation testing of irradiated uranium fuel fragments with and without sludge addition. The path forward for management of the K Basin Sludge is to retrieve, ship, and store the sludge at T Plant until final processing at some future date. Gas generation will impact the designs and costs of systems associated with retrieval, transportation and storage of sludge.

  15. Materials Evaluation Test Series (METS) 04, 05, and 06

    SciTech Connect

    Zalk, D; Ingram, C; Simmons, L; Arganbright, R; Lyle, J; Wong, K

    2006-03-23

    The purpose of this work is to examine the environmental, safety, health and operational aspects of detonating a confined explosive test apparatus that has been designed to maximize the dynamics of impact on beryllium metal components for Contained Firing Facility (CFF) applications. A combination of experimental collection and evaluation methods were designed and implemented to provide an evaluation of immediately postdetonation by-products reflecting a potential worst-case scenario beryllium aerosolization explosive event. The collective Material Evaluation Test Series (METS) 04 - 06 provided explosive devices designed to scale for the dedicated METS firing tank that would provide a post-detonation internal environment comparable to the CFF. The experimental results provided appropriate information to develop operational parameters to be considered for conducting full-scale beryllium-containing experimental tests with similar designs within CFF and B801A. These operational procedures include the inclusion of chelating agents in pre-shot CFF cardboard containers with a minimum of 600 gallons content, an extended time period post-test before purging the CFF chamber, and an adaptation of approaches toward applications of the scrubber and HEPA systems during the post-shot sequence for an integrated environmental, safety, and health approach. In addition, re-entry and film retrieval procedures will be adapted, in line with abatement techniques for cleaning the chamber, that will be required for work inside a CFF that will contain an elevated concentration of spherical and highly aerosolizable beryllium particulate.

  16. Test plan for Enraf Series 854 level gauge testing in Tank 241-S-106

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, G.A.

    1994-08-23

    An Enraf Series 854 level gauge was installed on Tank 241-S-106 (S-106) during the first week of June 1994. On August 11, 1994, the gauge`s measuring wire broke. An investigation has been started to determine how the wire broke. This test plan identifies a qualification test that is part of this investigation. This test will also provide evidence as to the location and extent of potential corrosion on the measuring wire due to tank environment. The results from this testing will provide data for better material selections. This test will involve placing the existing Enraf Series 854 level gauge back into service with the same type of measuring wire (316 stainless steel) that originally broke on August 11, 1994. The gauge will be operated for 14 days. At the end of the 14-day test, the wire shall be sent to Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for analysis.

  17. Ecotoxicological test systems proceedings of a series of workshops

    SciTech Connect

    Hammons, A.S.

    1981-06-01

    A series of six workshops was conducted by the Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, to identify laboratory methods and data evaluation techniques for predicting the environmental effects of chemical substances. Methods were evaluated for their potential for standardization and for use in the ecological hazard and risk assessment processes under the Toxic Substances Control Act. The workshops addressed assessment and policy requirements of multispecies toxicology test procedures, mathematical models useful in hazard and risk assessments, and methods for measuring effects of chemicals on terrestrial and aquatic population interactions and ecosystem properties. The workshops were primarily used as a mechanism to gather information about research in progress. This information was part of the data base used to prepare a critical review of laboratory methods for ecological toxicology.

  18. A case of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis due to amoxicillin-clavulanate with multiple positivity to beta-lactam patch testing.

    PubMed

    Bomarrito, L; Zisa, G; Delrosso, G; Farinelli, P; Galimberti, M

    2013-09-01

    We present a case of acute generalized exanthematous pustolosis (AGEP) induced by amoxicillin-clavulanate. Clinical diagnosis was confirmed by symptoms presentation and  histological features (Euroscar score point compatible with definite diagnosis). Patch testing performer six months later confirmed sensitization to the culprit drug and showed positivity also to other beta-lactam antibiotics (penicillin G and cephalexin). We believe that a T cell delayed response to betalactams common ring could be involved.

  19. Science Library of Test Items. Volume Sixteen. Mastery Testing Program. Series 6. Tests M66-M91.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New South Wales Dept. of Education, Sydney (Australia).

    As part of a series of tests to measure mastery of specific skills in the natural sciences, print masters of tests 66 through 91 are provided. Among the areas covered are: carbon compounds; evolution; map reading; genetics; energy; chemical formulae; electricity; graphs; metric measures; solubility; and physical separations. Many tests contain…

  20. Polar Cap Patch Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-25

    3 . Campaign periods for the 2010/2011 winter 3.1 Operation periods Ny-Ålesund 29 Nov - 13 Dec 2010 28 Dec - 10 Jan 2011 25 Jan - 8 Feb...dominated by a stable interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B z < 0 and by an IMF B y > 0 situation. The aurora was characterized by a series of PMAFs...Svalbard Radar of two intense polar cap patch events on 6 February 2001. The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was dominated by a large positive By

  1. Analysis of Stub Loaded Microstrip Patch Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.; Deshpande, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    A microstrip patch antenna fed by a coaxial probe and reactively loaded by a open circuited microstrip line has been used previously to produce circular polarization[ l] and also as a building block for a series fed microstrip patch array [2]. Rectangular and circular patch antennas loaded with a microstrip stub were previously analyzed using the generalized Thevenin theorem [2,3]. In the Thevenin theorem approach, the mutual coupling between the patch current and the surface current on the stub was not taken into account. Also, the Thevenin theorem approach neglects continuity of current at the patch-stub junction. The approach in this present paper includes the coupling between the patch and stub currents as well as continuity at the patch-stub junction.

  2. Granisetron Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... patch. Each patch is stuck onto a thin plastic liner and a separate rigid plastic film. Do not open the pouch in advance, ... cut the patch into pieces. Peel the thin plastic liner off of the printed side of the ...

  3. Spin Glass Patch Planting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Wenlong; Mandra, Salvatore; Katzgraber, Helmut G.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a patch planting method for creating arbitrarily large spin glass instances with known ground states. The scaling of the computational complexity of these instances with various block numbers and sizes is investigated and compared with random instances using population annealing Monte Carlo and the quantum annealing DW2X machine. The method can be useful for benchmarking tests for future generation quantum annealing machines, classical and quantum mechanical optimization algorithms.

  4. Cabbage Patch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This Sojourner rover image of the Cabbage Patch shows small rounded objects on the surface that are about 3-4 cm across. Some of these are within excavations, which are about 0.5 cm wide. Several questions arise about the pebbles: Why are they rounded? Where did they come from? What do they mean?

    Geologists use MULTIPLE WORKING HYPOTHESES when attempting to explain observations. Some hypotheses that could account for the pebbles are: They were rounded during transport by waters of catastrophic floods and deposited on the Ares Vallis floodplain They were rounded by wave action on an ancient Martian beach They were rounded during glacial transport They are glasses that were produced by melting during impact cratering. The glass was first ejected from the crater, then molded into spherical shapes or drops as it traveled through the atmosphere, and finally was deposited at the sites They are spatter from lava flows They are nodules brought up from the deep Martian interior by lava flows or pyroclastic eruptions. They are concretions formed in sedimentary rocks They came from ancient conglomerate rocks. The pebbles were rounded by water action and subsequently lithified into conglomerate rocks. Later, the waters of catastrophic floods transported the conglomerates and deposited them on the Ares floodplain. The pebbles were then freed from the rocks by weathering. A combination of the above

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  5. Patch definition in metapopulation analysis: a graph theory approach to solve the mega-patch problem.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, Kyle C; Siegel, David A; Raimondi, Peter T; Alberto, Filipe

    2014-02-01

    The manner in which patches are delineated in spatially realistic metapopulation models will influence the size, connectivity, and extinction and recolonization dynamics of those patches. Most commonly used patch-definition methods focus on identifying discrete, contiguous patches of habitat from a single temporal observation of species occurrence or from a model of habitat suitability. However, these approaches are not suitable for many metapopulation systems where entire patches may not be fully colonized at a given time. For these metapopulation systems, a single large patch of habitat may actually support multiple, interacting subpopulations. The interactions among these subpopulations will be ignored if the patch is treated as a single unit, a situation we term the "mega-patch problem." Mega-patches are characterized by variable intra-patch synchrony, artificially low inter-patch connectivity, and low extinction rates. One way to detect this problem is by using time series data to calculate demographic synchrony within mega-patches. We present a framework for identifying subpopulations in mega-patches using a combination of spatial autocorrelation and graph theory analyses. We apply our approach to southern California giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) forests using a new, long-term (27 years), satellite-based data set of giant kelp canopy biomass. We define metapopulation patches using our method as well as several other commonly used patch delineation methodologies and examine the colonization and extinction dynamics of the metapopulation under each approach. We find that the relationships between patch characteristics such as area and connectivity and the demographic processes of colonizations and extinctions vary among the different patch-definition methods. Our spatial-analysis/graph-theoretic framework produces results that match theoretical expectations better than the other methods. This approach can be used to identify subpopulations in metapopulations

  6. Release of nickel ions from stainless steel alloys used in dental braces and their patch test reactivity in nickel-sensitive individuals.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Christian Stab; Lisby, Steen; Baadsgaard, Ole; Byrialsen, Kirsten; Menné, Torkil

    2003-06-01

    Nickel ions leached in sufficient quantities from nickel-containing alloys may induce nickel sensitization or elicit allergic contact dermatitis. Nickel-containing stainless steel alloys are generally considered safe for nickel-sensitive individuals to use. The study summarized in this paper investigated 3 parameters. First, the release of nickel was estimated in artificial saliva and sweat from 4 different stainless steel alloys frequently used in dental braces. Second, in a pilot study, oral mucosa cells harvested from 3 dental patients before and after the attachment of dental braces were analysed for possible nickel content. Third, patch test reactivity of the 4 stainless steel alloys was tested on 31 nickel-sensitive subjects. All 4 stainless steel alloys released small amounts of nickel ions into artificial saliva (<0.13 micro g/cm2/week) and artificial sweat (<0.05 micro g/cm2/week), but no measurable amounts of nickel were found in any of the oral mucosa samples. None of the 31 nickel-sensitive subjects reacted to patch testing with the 4 stainless steel alloys, indicating that these stainless steel alloys would be safe to use in direct and prolonged contact with the skin.

  7. General-Purpose Heat Source Development: Safety Verification Test Program. Flyer plate test series

    SciTech Connect

    Cull, T.A.; Pavone, D.

    1986-09-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a modular component of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that will provide electric power for space missions. The initial RTG applications will be for the NASA Galileo and the ESA Ulysses missions. Each of the 18 GPHS modules in an RTG contains four /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-fueled clads and generates 250 W/sub (t)/. A series of Safety Verification Tests (SVTs) has been conducted to assess the ability of the GPHS fueled clads to contain the plutonia in accident environments. Because a launch pad or postlaunch explosion of the Space Transportation System Vehicle (space shuttle) is one conceivable accident, the SVT plan included a series of tests to simulate the fragment environment that the RTG and GPHS modules would experience in such an event. These tests deal specifically with the flat-on collision of flyer-plate-type fragments with bare, simulant-fueled (depleted UO/sub 2/) clads. Results of these tests suggest that the fueled clad is only minimally breached by collision with 3.53-mm-thick flyer-plate-type fragments of space shuttle alloy at velocities up to 1170 m/s. However, collision of a 38.1-mm-thick plate with a bare GPHS clad, at a velocity of 270 m/s, results in a total release of fuel.

  8. General-purpose heat source development: Extended series test program SRB fragment/fuselage tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cull, Theresa A.

    1989-06-01

    General-Purpose Heat Source radioisotope thermoelectric generators (GPHS-RTGs) will provide electrical power for the NASA Galileo and European Space Agency (ESA) Ulysses missions. Each GPHS-RTG comprises two major components: GPHS modules, which provide thermal energy, and a thermoelectric converter, which converts the thermal energy into electrical power. Each of the 18 GPHS modules in a GPHS-RTG contains four Pu-238O2-fueled capsules. LANL conducted a series of safety verification tests on the GPHS-RTG before the scheduled May 1986 launch of the Galileo spacecraft to assess the ability of the GPHS modules to contain plutonia in potential accident environments. As a result of the Challenger 51-L accident in January 1986, NASA postponed the launch of Galileo; the spacecraft launch vehicle was reconfigured and the spacecraft trajectory modified. These actions prompted NASA to reevaluate potential mission accidents and the extended series safety test program was initiated. This program included a series of solid rocket booster (SRB) fragment/fuselage tests that simulated the interaction of SRB fragments generated in an SRB motor case rupture (or resulting from a range safety officer SRB destruct action) with sections of the Shuttle Orbiter. The test data helped verify and refine the analytical models of the SRB fragment/fuselage interaction. The results showed that the fragment velocity decreased significantly (up to 40 percent) after penetrating the Orbiter section(s). The interactions also reduced, and in some cases eliminated, the original fragment rotational rate and direction and initiated rotation in other directions.

  9. Test Series 4: seismic-fragility tests of naturally-aged Exide EMP-13 battery cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bonzon, L.L.; Hente, D.B.; Kukreti, B.M.; Schendel, J.; Tulk, J.D.; Janis, W.J.; Black, D.A.; Paulsen, G.D.; Aucoin, B.D.

    1985-03-01

    This report, the fourth in a test series of an extensive seismic research program, covers the testing of a 27-year old lead-antimony Exide EMP-13 cells from the recently decommissioned Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The Exide cells were tested in two configurations using a triaxial shake table: single-cell tests, rigidly mounted; and multicell (five-cell) tests, mounted in a typical battery rack. A total of nine electrically active cells was used in the two different cell configurations. None of the nine cells failed during the actual seismic tests when a range of ZPAs up to 1.5 g was imposed. Subsequent discharge capacity tests of five of the cells showed, however, that none of the cells could deliver the accepted standard of 80% of their rated electrical capacity for 3 hours. In fact, none of the 5 cells could deliver more than a 33% capacity. Two of the seismically tested cells and one untested, low capacity cell were disassembled for examination and metallurgical analyses. The inspection showed the cells to be in poor condition. The negative plates in the vicinity of the bus connections were extremely weak, the positive buses were corroded and brittle, negative and positive active material utilization was extremely uneven, and corrosion products littered the cells.

  10. What Makes a Coursebook Series Stand the Test of Time?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illes, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Intriguingly, at a time when the ELT market is inundated with state-of-the-art coursebooks teaching modern-day English, a 30-year-old series enjoys continuing popularity in some secondary schools in Hungary. Why would teachers, several of whom are school-based teacher-mentors in the vanguard of the profession, purposefully choose materials which…

  11. HARD PAN I Test Series Test and Instrumentation Plans. Volume I. Test Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-01

    structure in a layered geology due to a simulated neer-surface nuclear detonation. The test geology was clay over interbedded limtstone and shale ...a geology characterized by a layer of clay over a competent rock layer composed of interbedded limestone and shales . Certain portions of the test...and shale has much higher seismic velocities. A downward propagating shock wave is formed in the upper medium due to the interaction of the

  12. Explosion overpressure test series: General-Purpose Heat Source development: Safety Verification Test program

    SciTech Connect

    Cull, T.A.; George, T.G.; Pavone, D.

    1986-09-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a modular, radioisotope heat source that will be used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) to supply electric power for space missions. The first two uses will be the NASA Galileo and the ESA Ulysses missions. The RTG for these missions will contain 18 GPHS modules, each of which contains four /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-fueled clads and generates 250 W/sub (t)/. A series of Safety Verification Tests (SVTs) was conducted to assess the ability of the GPHS modules to contain the plutonia in accident environments. Because a launch pad or postlaunch explosion of the Space Transportation System vehicle (space shuttle) is a conceivable accident, the SVT plan included a series of tests that simulated the overpressure exposure the RTG and GPHS modules could experience in such an event. Results of these tests, in which we used depleted UO/sub 2/ as a fuel simulant, suggest that exposure to overpressures as high as 15.2 MPa (2200 psi), without subsequent impact, does not result in a release of fuel.

  13. A Surrogate Test for Pseudo-periodic Time Series Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Michael; Harrison, Robert G.; Tse, C. K.

    2002-07-01

    Standard (linear) surrogate methods are only useful for time series exhibiting no pseudo-periodic structure. We describe a new algorithm that can distinguish between a noisy periodic orbit and deterministic non-periodic inter-cycle dynamics. Possible origins of deterministic non-periodic inter-cycle dynamics include: non-periodic linear or nonlinear dynamics, or chaos. This new algorithm is based on mimicking the large-scale dynamics with a local model, but obliterating the fine scale features with dynamic noise. We demonstrate the application of this method to artificial data and experimental time series, including human electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings during sinus rhythm and ventricular tachycardia (VT). The method is able to successfully differentiate between the chaotic Rössler system and a pseudo periodic realization of the Rössler equations with dynamic noise. Application to ECG data demonstrates that both sinus rhythm and VT exhibit nontrivial inter-cycle dynamics.

  14. Patching. Restitching business portfolios in dynamic markets.

    PubMed

    Eisenhardt, K M; Brown, S L

    1999-01-01

    In turbulent markets, businesses and opportunities are constantly falling out of alignment. New technologies and emerging markets create fresh opportunities. Converging markets produce more. And of course, some markets fade. In this landscape of continuous flux, it's more important to build corporate-level strategic processes that enable dynamic repositioning than it is to build any particular defensible position. That's why smart corporate strategists use patching, a process of mapping and remapping business units to create a shifting mix of highly focused, tightly aligned businesses that can respond to changing market opportunities. Patching is not just another name for reorganizing; patchers have a distinctive mindset. Traditional managers see structure as stable; patching managers believe structure is inherently temporary. Traditional managers set corporate strategy first, but patching managers keep the organization focused on the right set of business opportunities and let strategy emerge from individual businesses. Although the focus of patching is flexibility, the process itself follows a pattern. Patching changes are usually small in scale and made frequently. Patching should be done quickly; the emphasis is on getting the patch about right and fixing problems later. Patches should have a test drive before they're formalized but then be tightly scripted after they've been announced. And patching won't work without the right infrastructure: modular business units, fine-grained and complete unit-level metrics, and companywide compensation parity. The authors illustrate how patching works and point out some common stumbling blocks.

  15. J-2X Engine Ready For Second Test Series

    NASA Video Gallery

    Time-lapse video of the installation of J-2X engine 10001 in the A-2 test-stand at Stennis, complete with clamshell assembly and nozzle extension. With these enhancements test engineers will measur...

  16. Current Developments in Language Testing. Anthology Series 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anivan, Sarinee, Ed.

    The selection of papers on language testing includes: "Language Testing in the 1990s: How Far Have We Come? How Much Further Have We To Go?" (J. Charles Alderson); "Current Research/Development in Language Testing" (John W. Oller, Jr.); "The Difficulties of Difficulty: Prompts in Writing Assessment" (Liz Hamp-Lyons,…

  17. Scopolamine Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... patch from its protective pouch. To expose the adhesive surface of the patch, the clear plastic protective ... peeled off and discarded. Contact with the exposed adhesive layer should be avoided to prevent contamination of ...

  18. SafePatch

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, M.; Elko, S.

    2000-10-01

    Authenticating and upgrading system software plays a critical role in information security, yet practical tools for assessing and installing software are lacking in today's marketplace. The SafePatch tool provides the mechanism of performing automated analysis, notification, distribution, and installation of security patches and related software to network-based computer systems in a vendor-independent fashion. SafePatch assists in the authentication of software by comparing the system's objects with the patch's objects. SafePatch will monitor vendor's sites to determine when new patches are released and will upgrade system software on target systems automatically. This paper describes the design of SafePatch, motivations behind the project and the advantages of SafePatch over existing tools.

  19. Metal Patch Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil F. (Inventor); Hodges, Richard E. (Inventor); Zawadzki, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a patch antenna comprises a planar conductive patch attached to a ground plane by a support member, and a probe connector in electrical communication with the conductive patch arranged to conduct electromagnetic energy to or from the conductive patch, wherein the conductive patch is disposed essentially parallel to the ground plane and is separated from the ground plane by a spacing distance; wherein the support member comprises a plurality of sides disposed about a central axis oriented perpendicular to the conductive patch and the ground plane; wherein the conductive patch is solely supported above the ground plane by the support member; and wherein the support member provides electrical communication between the planer conductive patch and the ground plane.

  20. The Building Blocks of State Testing Programs. Statement Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Arnold; Pedulla, Joseph; Clarke, Marguerite

    To ensure that educational tests do the least harm and bring the greatest good to the education of elementary and secondary school students, it is important that parents, teachers, educational administrators, and policy makers be actively involved in test construction and use. The purpose of this Statement is to provide a checklist of some…

  1. Test Information: A Selective Annotated Bibliography. Bibliography Series Fourteen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockman, Ilene F., Comp.

    Developed as a guide to resources in the Robert E. Kennedy Library at California Polytechnic State University, this bibliography includes a selective listing of books, microfiche, and reference materials on the topic of educational and psychological testing. The publications included either contain sample or entire test items, and…

  2. Birth Control Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Birth Control Patch KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Patch A A A What's in this article? ... Much Does It Cost? What Is It? The birth control patch is a thin, beige, 1¾-inch (4½- ...

  3. Birth Control Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Birth Control Patch KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Patch Print A A A What's in this ... Much Does It Cost? What Is It? The birth control patch is a thin, beige, 1¾-inch (4½- ...

  4. Biostatistics Series Module 7: The Statistics of Diagnostic Tests.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Avijit; Gogtay, Nithya

    2017-01-01

    Crucial therapeutic decisions are based on diagnostic tests. Therefore, it is important to evaluate such tests before adopting them for routine use. Although things such as blood tests, cultures, biopsies, and radiological imaging are obvious diagnostic tests, it is not to be forgotten that specific clinical examination procedures, scoring systems based on physiological or psychological evaluation, and ratings based on questionnaires are also diagnostic tests and therefore merit similar evaluation. In the simplest scenario, a diagnostic test will give either a positive (disease likely) or negative (disease unlikely) result. Ideally, all those with the disease should be classified by a test as positive and all those without the disease as negative. Unfortunately, practically no test gives 100% accurate results. Therefore, leaving aside the economic question, the performance of diagnostic tests is evaluated on the basis of certain indices such as sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value. Likelihood ratios combine information on specificity and sensitivity to expresses the likelihood that a given test result would occur in a subject with a disorder compared to the probability that the same result would occur in a subject without the disorder. Not all test can be categorized simply as "positive" or "negative." Physicians are frequently exposed to test results on a numerical scale, and in such cases, judgment is required in choosing a cutoff point to distinguish normal from abnormal. Naturally, a cutoff value should provide the greatest predictive accuracy, but there is a trade-off between sensitivity and specificity here - if the cutoff is too low, it will identify most patients who have the disease (high sensitivity) but will also incorrectly identify many who do not (low specificity). A receiver operating characteristic curve plots pairs of sensitivity versus (1 - specificity) values and helps in selecting an optimum cutoff

  5. Biostatistics Series Module 7: The Statistics of Diagnostic Tests

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Avijit; Gogtay, Nithya

    2017-01-01

    Crucial therapeutic decisions are based on diagnostic tests. Therefore, it is important to evaluate such tests before adopting them for routine use. Although things such as blood tests, cultures, biopsies, and radiological imaging are obvious diagnostic tests, it is not to be forgotten that specific clinical examination procedures, scoring systems based on physiological or psychological evaluation, and ratings based on questionnaires are also diagnostic tests and therefore merit similar evaluation. In the simplest scenario, a diagnostic test will give either a positive (disease likely) or negative (disease unlikely) result. Ideally, all those with the disease should be classified by a test as positive and all those without the disease as negative. Unfortunately, practically no test gives 100% accurate results. Therefore, leaving aside the economic question, the performance of diagnostic tests is evaluated on the basis of certain indices such as sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value. Likelihood ratios combine information on specificity and sensitivity to expresses the likelihood that a given test result would occur in a subject with a disorder compared to the probability that the same result would occur in a subject without the disorder. Not all test can be categorized simply as “positive” or “negative.” Physicians are frequently exposed to test results on a numerical scale, and in such cases, judgment is required in choosing a cutoff point to distinguish normal from abnormal. Naturally, a cutoff value should provide the greatest predictive accuracy, but there is a trade-off between sensitivity and specificity here - if the cutoff is too low, it will identify most patients who have the disease (high sensitivity) but will also incorrectly identify many who do not (low specificity). A receiver operating characteristic curve plots pairs of sensitivity versus (1 − specificity) values and helps in selecting an

  6. The NASA B-757 HIRF test series: Low power on-the-ground tests

    SciTech Connect

    Poggio, A.J.; Zacharias, R.A.; Pennock, S.T.; Avalle, C.A.; Carney, H.

    1995-07-01

    The data acquisition phase of a program intended to provide data for the validation of computational, analytical and experimental for the assessment of electromagnetic effects i n transports, for the checkout of instrumentation for following test programs, and for the support of protection engineering of airborne systems has been completed. Funded by the NASA Fly-By-Light/Power-By-Wire Program, the initial phase involved on-the-ground electromagnetic measurements using the NASA Boeing 757 and was executed in the LESLI Facility at the USAF Phillips Laboratory. The major participants were LLNL, NASA Langley Research Center, Phillips Laboratory, and UIE, Inc. Measurements were made of the fields coupled into the aircraft interior and signals induced in select structures and equipment under controlled illumination by RF fields. A characterization of the ground was also performed to permit ground effects to be included in forthcoming validation exercises. A series of fly-by experiments were conducted in early 1995 in which the NASA B-757 was flown in the vicinity of a Voice of America station ({approximately}25 MHz), a fixed transmitter driving an LP array (172 MHz), and an ASRF radar at Wallops Island (430 MHz). In this paper, the overall test program is defined with particular attention to the on-the-ground portion. It is described in detail with presentation of the test rationale, test layout, and samples of the data. Samples of some inferences from the data that will be useful in protection engineering and EM effects mitigation will also be presented.

  7. Positive patch- and photopatch-test reactions to methylene bis-benzotriazolyl tetramethylbutylphenol in patients with both atopic dermatitis and chronic actinic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Mercedes E; Soter, Nicholas A; Cohen, David E

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet filters are the most common topical photoallergens. Although currently not available on the US market, methylene bis-benzotriazolyl tetramethylbutylphenol (referred to as bisoctrizole on product labels) represents a new class of UV filters that have both organic and inorganic properties and are widely available in different preparations in Europe, South America, and Asia. We report two patients with atopic dermatitis and chronic actinic dermatitis who had positive patch- and photopatch-test reactions, which suggested both an allergic contact and a photoallergic contact dermatitis from bisoctrizole. Neither patient could identify previous or current contact with the chemical; nonetheless, it is possible that either the allergic contact or photoallergic contact dermatitis from bisoctrizole led to their chronic actinic dermatitis.

  8. General-Purpose Heat Source development: Safety Verification Test Program. Bullet/fragment test series

    SciTech Connect

    George, T.G.; Tate, R.E.; Axler, K.M.

    1985-05-01

    The radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that will provide power for space missions contains 18 General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. Each module contains four /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-fueled clads and generates 250 W/sub (t)/. Because a launch-pad or post-launch explosion is always possible, we need to determine the ability of GPHS fueled clads within a module to survive fragment impact. The bullet/fragment test series, part of the Safety Verification Test Plan, was designed to provide information on clad response to impact by a compact, high-energy, aluminum-alloy fragment and to establish a threshold value of fragment energy required to breach the iridium cladding. Test results show that a velocity of 555 m/s (1820 ft/s) with an 18-g bullet is at or near the threshold value of fragment velocity that will cause a clad breach. Results also show that an exothermic Ir/Al reaction occurs if aluminum and hot iridium are in contact, a contact that is possible and most damaging to the clad within a narrow velocity range. The observed reactions between the iridium and the aluminum were studied in the laboratory and are reported in the Appendix.

  9. Volume Sensor Development Test. Series 5 - Multi-Compartment System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-30

    bag is approximately half filled with trash (20 crumpled paper towels, 20 crumpled tissues, three 16 oz plastic soda bottles, a 3 oz stick of deodorant ...spray interval at multiple locations in the test space by 8 Spray aerosol two aerosols. The aerosols used are: 1) Old Spice High Endurance deodorant 2

  10. Biostatistics Series Module 2: Overview of Hypothesis Testing

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Avijit; Gogtay, Nithya

    2016-01-01

    Hypothesis testing (or statistical inference) is one of the major applications of biostatistics. Much of medical research begins with a research question that can be framed as a hypothesis. Inferential statistics begins with a null hypothesis that reflects the conservative position of no change or no difference in comparison to baseline or between groups. Usually, the researcher has reason to believe that there is some effect or some difference which is the alternative hypothesis. The researcher therefore proceeds to study samples and measure outcomes in the hope of generating evidence strong enough for the statistician to be able to reject the null hypothesis. The concept of the P value is almost universally used in hypothesis testing. It denotes the probability of obtaining by chance a result at least as extreme as that observed, even when the null hypothesis is true and no real difference exists. Usually, if P is < 0.05 the null hypothesis is rejected and sample results are deemed statistically significant. With the increasing availability of computers and access to specialized statistical software, the drudgery involved in statistical calculations is now a thing of the past, once the learning curve of the software has been traversed. The life sciences researcher is therefore free to devote oneself to optimally designing the study, carefully selecting the hypothesis tests to be applied, and taking care in conducting the study well. Unfortunately, selecting the right test seems difficult initially. Thinking of the research hypothesis as addressing one of five generic research questions helps in selection of the right hypothesis test. In addition, it is important to be clear about the nature of the variables (e.g., numerical vs. categorical; parametric vs. nonparametric) and the number of groups or data sets being compared (e.g., two or more than two) at a time. The same research question may be explored by more than one type of hypothesis test. While this may be

  11. X-0557 modified Steven tests : series I and II /.

    SciTech Connect

    Straight, J. W.; Osborn, M. A.; Coulter, W. L.; Mang, J. T.; Anderson, M. C.; Idar, D. J.

    2002-01-01

    Low-velocity mechanical impact leading to unintentional reaction is of concern in accident scenarios involving the handling, transport, and storage of high explosives (HE). These have been investigated using different experimental techniques, from small- to large-scale, including, but not limited to the drop weight impact, Taylor anvil impact, Susan,1 and more recently, the Steven and Modified Steven tests.2-8 Ideally, the data will be used to further advance 3-D finite element analysis predictive capability with improved bulk constitutive HE models for the assessment of HE response to mechanical insult. Our overall objectives for these experiments were to (1) evaluate the HE reaction threshold behavior for two different lots of X-0557, and (2) characterize the degree of reaction violence relative to a detonation. This report summarizes our single impact test results on the two different lots of X-0557 in Modified Steven targets.

  12. Uniaxial and triaxial compression test series on Calico Hills tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, R. H.; Jones, A. K.

    1982-10-01

    Forty-four uniaxial and triaxial compression experiments were performed on samples of the Tuffaceous beds of Calico Hills obtained from drill hole USW-G1 at Yucca Mountain on the Nevada Test Site. Water saturated and room dry test specimens were deformed at nominal strain rates of 0.001,0.00001, 10 to the minus 7th power, s(1), confining pressures of 0.1, 10 and 20 MPa; and room temperature. Resultant unconfined compressive strengths, axial strains to failure, Young's moduli and Poisson's ratios ranged from 14.2 to 42.0 MPa, 0.0037 to 0.0087, 2.52 to 9.72 GPA and 0.17 to 0.37, respectively.

  13. Uniaxial and triaxial compression test series on Calico Hills tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.H.; Jones, A.K.

    1982-10-01

    Forty-four uniaxial and triaxial compression experiments were performed on samples of the Tuffaceous beds of Calico Hills obtained from drill hole USW-G1 at Yucca Mountain on the Nevada Test Site. Water saturated and room dry test specimens were deformed at nominal strain rates of 10{sup -3}, 10{sup -5} and 10{sup -7} s{sup -1}; confining pressures of 0.1, 10 and 20 MPa; and room temperature. Resultant unconfined compressive strengths, axial strains to failure, Young`s moduli and Poisson`s ratios ranged from 14.2 to 42.0 MPa, 0.0037 to 0.0087, 2.52 to 9.72 GPA and 0.17 to 0.37, respectively.

  14. Operation TEAPOT, 1955 Continental Nuclear Weapons Test Series

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-23

    Rock VI observer programs, troop tests, and technical service programs; AEC scientific and diagnostic experiments to evaluate the effects of the nuclear...TESLA, TURK, BEE, ESS, APPLE 1, and APPLE 2, generally involved instruction on the effects of nuclear weapons, observation of a nuclear detonation, and a...militar4 equipment and structures to withstand nuclear detonations. Scientific experiments studying the effects of each nuclear detona- tion were conducted

  15. Material Evaluation Test Series 07, 08A, and 09A

    SciTech Connect

    Zalk, D; Ingram, C; Simmons, L; Arganbright, R; Koester, C; Lyle, J

    2006-04-11

    This research effort examines the post-detonation environmental, safety, health and operational aspects of experimental explosive tests with mercury. Specific experimental information is necessary for the evaluation of post-detonation by-products in comparison with those potentially resulting from mercury-bearing material accumulation in biomass accumulation areas, such as landfills, from batteries, electrical switches, thermometers, and fluorescent lights (Lindberg et al 2001). This will assist in determining appropriate abatement techniques for cleaning the work environment and environmental mitigation to determine waste stream components and risk assessment protocol. Determination of the by-products for personal protection equipment and personal exposure monitoring parameters are also part of this experimental work.

  16. Dispersal, patch leaving, and distribution of Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae).

    PubMed

    Northfield, Tobin D; Mizell, Russell F; Paini, Dean R; Andersen, Peter C; Brodbeck, Brent V; Riddle, T Charles; Hunter, Wayne B

    2009-02-01

    Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar) and related species have caused millions of dollars in damage to southern California vineyards in recent years through the vectoring of Pierce's disease. However, the effects of surrounding vegetation on the dispersal and distribution of H. vitripennis are poorly understood. Therefore, the relationship between dispersal rates and patch quality was tested, as well as the basic predictions of the marginal value theorem. Additional experiments were conducted to compare the H. vitripennis distribution in an isolated crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica) patch and a L. indica patch bordering two alternative host patches. In mark-release-recapture tests, H. vitripennis dispersed farther from the release point in a patch of low-quality host plants (Prunus persica) than in patches of high-quality host plants (L. indica). In addition, H. vitripennis remained in L. indica patches longer than in P. persica patches and adjusted patch residence times in P. persica in correlation with known changes in plant physiology. These data suggest that H. vitripennis follows the basic predictions of marginal value theorem. In distribution tests, H. vitripennis were more abundant in the patch center than patch edges in the isolated L. indica patch, but in a patch bordering cottonwood (Populus sp.) and peach (P. persica), H. vitripennis numbers were generally higher along the edges of the patch. These data suggest that alternate hosts bordering cropping systems may be important to the spatial dynamics of H. vitripennis. Implications of these spatial observations on the biology of H. vitripennis and potential control methods are discussed.

  17. Perseus B Taxi Tests in Preparation for a New Series of Flight Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft taxis on the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, California, before a series of development flights at NASA's Dryden flight Research Center. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation of the Perseus

  18. Corridor Length and Patch Colonization by a Butterfly Junonia coenia

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Haddad

    2000-06-01

    Habitat corridors have been proposed to reduce patch isolation and increase population persistence in fragmented landscapes. This study tested whether patch colonization was increased by the presence and various length corridors. The specific butterfly species tested has been shown to use corridors, however, the results indicate that neither the distance between patches or the presence of a corridor influenced colonization.

  19. Noninvasive measuring methods for the investigation of irritant patch test reactions. A study of patients with hand eczema, atopic dermatitis and controls.

    PubMed

    Agner, T

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the susceptibility of clinically normal skin to a standard irritant trauma under varying physiological and patophysiological conditions. Evaluation of skin responses to patch tests with sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) was used for assessment of skin susceptibility. The following noninvasive measuring methods were used for evaluation of the skin before and after exposure to irritants: measurement of transepidermal water loss by an evaporimeter, measurement of electrical conductance by a hydrometer, measurement of skin blood flow by laser Doppler flowmetry, measurement of skin colour by a colorimeter and measurement of skin thickness by ultrasound A-scan. The studies were carried out on healthy volunteers and patients with eczema. In the first studies the standard irritant patch test for assessment of skin susceptibility was characterized and validated. SLS was chosen among other irritants because of its ability to penetrate and impair the skin barrier. The implications of use of different qualities of SLS was investigated. The applied noninvasive measuring methods were evaluated, and for quantification of SLS-induced skin damage measurement of TEWL was found to be the most sensitive method. Application of the standard test on clinically normal skin under varying physiological and patophysiological conditions lead to the following main results: Seasonal variation in skin susceptibility to SLS was found, with increased susceptibility in winter, when the hydration state of the stratum corneum was also found to be decreased. A variation in skin reactivity to SLS during the menstrual cycle was demonstrated, with an increased skin response at day 1 as compared to days 9-11 in the menstrual cycle. The presence of active eczema distant from the test site increased skin susceptibility to SLS, indicating a generalized hyperreactivity of the skin. Taking these sources of variation into account healthy volunteers and patients with hand eczema and

  20. Perseus B Taxi Tests in Preparation for a New Series of Flight Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft taxis on the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, California, before a series of development flights at NASA's Dryden flight Research Center. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation of the Perseus

  1. Spotlight on High-Stakes Testing. No. 1 in the Harvard Education Letter Spotlight Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Education Press, 2003

    2003-01-01

    This inaugural volume of our Spotlight Series features recent "Harvard Education Letter" articles on testing and new reports never before published on this important topic. Contributors address such issues as how educators can manage the "avalanche" of tests; whether the benefits of high-stakes tests justify the risks to…

  2. Perseus B Taxi Tests in Preparation for a New Series of Flight Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft on the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, California at the conclusion of a development flight at NASA's Dryden flight Research Center. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation of the Perseus

  3. Time Series Analysis in Flight Flutter Testing at the Air Force Flight Test Center: Concepts and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenz, R. W.; Mckeever, B.

    1976-01-01

    The Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC) flight flutter facility is described. Concepts of using a minicomputer-based time series analyzer and a modal analysis software package for flight flutter testing are examined. The results of several evaluations of the software package are given. The reasons for employing a minimum phase concept in analyzing response only signals are discussed. The use of a Laplace algorithm is shown to be effective for the modal analysis of time histories in flutter testing. Sample results from models and flight tests are provided. The limitations inherent in time series analysis methods are discussed, and the need for effective noise reduction techniques is noted. The use of digital time series analysis techniques in flutter testing is shown to be fast, accurate, and cost effective.

  4. Perseus B Taxi Tests in Preparation for a New Series of Flight Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft on the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, California at the conclusion of a development flight at NASA's Dryden flight Research Center. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation of the Perseus

  5. Nickel-Related Intestinal Mucositis in IBS-Like Patients: Laser Doppler Perfusion Imaging and Oral Mucosa Patch Test in Use.

    PubMed

    Borghini, Raffaele; Puzzono, Marta; Rosato, Edoardo; Di Tola, Marco; Marino, Mariacatia; Greco, Francesca; Picarelli, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Nickel (Ni) is often the trigger of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-like gastrointestinal disorders: its ingestion may cause allergic contact mucositis, identifiable by means of oral mucosa patch test (omPT). OmPT effectiveness has been proven, but it is still an operator-dependent method. Laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) was tested to support omPT in Ni allergic contact mucositis diagnosis. Group A: 22 patients with intestinal/systemic symptoms related to the ingestion of Ni-containing foods. Group B: 12 asymptomatic volunteers. Ni-related symptoms and their severity were tested by a questionnaire. All patients underwent Ni omPT with clinical evaluation at baseline (T0), after 30 min (T1), after 2 h (T2), and after 24-48 h (T3). LDPI was performed to evaluate the mean mucosal perfusion at T0, T1, and T2. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA test and Bonferroni multiple-comparison test. All 22 Ni-sensitive patients (group A) presented oral mucosa hyperemia and/or edema at T2. Eight out of the same 22 patients presented a local delayed vesicular reaction at T3 (group A1), unlike the remaining 14 out of 22 patients (group A2). All 12 patients belonging to control group B did not show any alteration. The mean mucosal perfusion calculated with LDPI showed an increase in both subgroups A1 and A2. In group B, no significant perfusion variations were observed. LDPI may support omPT for diagnostic purposes in Ni allergic contact mucositis. This also applies to symptomatic Ni-sensitive patients without aphthous stomatitis after 24-48 h from omPT and that could risk to miss the diagnosis.

  6. Reliability Analysis for the Internationally Administered 2002 Series GED Tests. GED Testing Service[R] Research Studies, 2009-3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Setzer, J. Carl; He, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Reliability Analysis for the Internationally Administered 2002 Series GED (General Educational Development) Tests Reliability refers to the consistency, or stability, of test scores when the authors administer the measurement procedure repeatedly to groups of examinees (American Educational Research Association [AERA], American Psychological…

  7. Results of the mission profile life test. [for J-series mercury ion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechtel, R. T.; Trump, G. E.; James, E. L.

    1982-01-01

    Seven J series 30-cm diameter thrusters have been tested in segments of up to 5,070 hr, for 14,541 hr in the Mission Profile Life Test facility. Test results have indicated the basic thruster design to be consistent with the lifetime goal of 15,000 hr at 2-A beam. The only areas of concern identified which appear to require additional verification testing involve contamination of mercury propellant isolators, which may be due to facility constituents, and the ability of specially covered surfaces to contain sputtered material and prevent flake formation. The ability of the SCR, series resonant inverter power processor to operate the J series thruster and autonomous computer control of the thruster/processor system were demonstrated.

  8. 77 FR 38280 - Final Test Guidelines; 810 Series 2000 Product Performance; Notice of Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... Coordination Staff (7101M), Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention, Environmental Protection Agency... Administrator, Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention. BILLING CODE 6560-50-P .... These test guidelines are part of a series of test guidelines established by the Office of...

  9. The Impact of Time-Series Diagnostic Tests on the Writing Ability of Iranian EFL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atashgahi, Bahareh Molazem

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to show whether administering a battery of time-series diagnostic tests (screening) has any impact on Iranian EFL learners' writing ability. The study was conducted on the intermediate EFL learners at Islamic Azad University North Tehran branch. The researcher administered a homogenizing test in order to exclude the exceptional…

  10. SERIES-X test results. [for measuring TOPEX earth satellite orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crow, R. B.; Bletzacker, F. R.; Najarian, R. J.; Purcell, G. H., Jr.; Statman, J. I.; Thomas, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    The SERIES-X project which demonstrates the feasibility of a method involving measurements of the distance from the TOPEX earth satellite and various points on the ground to Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites is described. The features of SERIES-X are compared with three better-known geodetic-quality GPS systems (Geostar, Macrometer, and SERIES). It is shown that the system is capable of measuring the positions of isolated stations, but its accuracy is improved when it measures baselines. Test results of some measurements of baselines ranging in length from 15 to 171,000 m are presented and discussed.

  11. Frequent occurrence of T cell–mediated late reactions revealed by atopy patch testing with hypoallergenic rBet v 1 fragments

    PubMed Central

    Campana, Raffaela; Moritz, Katharina; Marth, Katharina; Neubauer, Angela; Huber, Hans; Henning, Rainer; Blatt, Katharina; Hoermann, Gregor; Brodie, Tess M.; Kaider, Alexandra; Valent, Peter; Sallusto, Federica; Wöhrl, Stefan; Valenta, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Background Late allergic reactions are common in the course of allergen-specific immunotherapy and even occur with allergy vaccines with reduced IgE reactivity. Objective We sought to study atopy patch test (APT) reactions and T-cell responses to the recombinant birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 and recombinant hypoallergenic T-cell epitope–containing Bet v 1 fragments in patients with birch pollen allergy with and without atopic dermatitis (AD). Methods A clinical study was conducted in 15 patients with birch pollen allergy with AD (group 1), 5 patients with birch pollen allergy without AD (group 2), 5 allergic patients without birch pollen allergy (group 3), and 5 nonallergic subjects (group 4) by performing skin prick tests and APTs with rBet v 1 and hypoallergenic rBet v 1 fragments. T-cell, cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA)+ and CCR4+ T-cell and cytokine responses were studied by thymidine uptake, carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester staining, and Luminex technology, respectively. Results rBet v 1 and hypoallergenic rBet v 1 fragments induced APT reactions in not only most of the patients with birch pollen allergy with AD (11/15) but also in most of those without AD (4/5). Patients with birch pollen allergy with AD had higher Bet v 1–specific proliferation of CLA+ and CCR4+ T cells compared with patients with birch pollen allergy without AD. There were no differences in Bet v 1–specific CLA+ and CCR4+ proliferation and cytokine secretion in patients with and without APT reactions. Conclusion Hypoallergenic rBet v 1 fragments induce T cell–dependent late reactions not only in patients with birch pollen allergy with AD but also in those without AD, which can be determined based on APT results but not based on in vitro parameters. PMID:26518092

  12. Peripheral blood lymphocyte typing as a useful tool to objectify the oral mucosa patch test in the diagnosis of allergic contact mucositis to nickel.

    PubMed

    Di Tola, Marco; Amodeo, Rachele; Marino, Mariacatia; Tabacco, Fabio; Casale, Rossella; Bove, Maurizio; Rossi, Alfredo; Cardelli, Patrizia; Picarelli, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    Nickel (Ni) exposure through the intestinal mucosa may cause a hypersensitivity reaction recently defined as allergic contact mucositis (ACM). This condition is identifiable by the oral mucosa patch test (omPT), a qualitative and subjective examination that requires clinical expertise. Our aim was to evaluate if a peripheral blood lymphocyte typing performed before and after the omPT for Ni may be able to objectify this examination for diagnostic purposes. Thirty patients with symptoms referable to the ingestion of Ni-rich foods were subjected to omPT for Ni. Before and after the omPT, each patient underwent blood sampling for the typing of total lymphocytes and their subsets (T, T helper or Th, T cytotoxic or Tc, B, natural killer or NK). Statistical analysis was performed by Student t test and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. According to the omPT outcomes, 18 patients were defined as Ni-sensitive and the remaining 12 as controls. In Ni-sensitive patients, the number of total, T, Th, Tc, and B lymphocytes/μL whole blood increased after the omPT (p<0.0001 for the first three, p=0.0004 and p=0.0001 for the last two lymphocyte types). No omPT-dependent lymphocyte increase was observed in controls. The post/pre omPT cell ratio, especially if calculated for Th lymphocytes, appears to be an effective index for diagnostic purposes (sensitivity=100%, specificity=83.3%, Youden index=0.833, area under curve (AUC)=0.926, p<0.0001). In conclusion, the peripheral blood lymphocyte typing with calculation of post/pre omPT cell ratio has the potential to support the omPT in diagnosing ACM, with the advantage of providing quantitative and objective data.

  13. Patches with links: a unified system for processing faces in the macaque temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Sebastian; Freiwald, Winrich A; Tsao, Doris Y

    2008-06-06

    The brain processes objects through a series of regions along the ventral visual pathway, but the circuitry subserving the analysis of specific complex forms remains unknown. One complex form category, faces, selectively activates six patches of cortex in the macaque ventral pathway. To identify the connectivity of these face patches, we used electrical microstimulation combined with simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging. Stimulation of each of four targeted face patches produced strong activation, specifically within a subset of the other face patches. Stimulation outside the face patches produced an activation pattern that spared the face patches. These results suggest that the face patches form a strongly and specifically interconnected hierarchical network.

  14. Lidocaine Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    Lidocaine patches are used to relieve the pain of post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN; the burning, stabbing pains, ... for months or years after a shingles infection). Lidocaine is in a class of medications called local ...

  15. DyninstAPI Patches

    SciTech Connect

    LeGendre, M.

    2012-04-01

    We are seeking a code review of patches against DyninstAPI 8.0. DyninstAPI is an open source binary instrumentation library from the University of Wisconsin and University of Maryland. Our patches port DyninstAPI to the BlueGene/P and BlueGene/Q systems, as well as fix DyninstAPI bugs and implement minor new features in DyninstAPI.

  16. Patch-clamp amplifiers on a chip.

    PubMed

    Weerakoon, Pujitha; Culurciello, Eugenio; Yang, Youshan; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph; Kindlmann, Peter J; Sigworth, Fred J

    2010-10-15

    We present the first, fully integrated, two-channel implementation of a patch-clamp measurement system. With this "PatchChip" two simultaneous whole-cell recordings can be obtained with rms noise of 8pA in a 10kHz bandwidth. The capacitance and series-resistance of the electrode can be compensated up to 10pF and 100MΩ respectively under computer control. Recordings of hERG and Na(v) 1.7 currents demonstrate the system's capabilities, which are on par with large, commercial patch-clamp instrumentation. By reducing patch-clamp amplifiers to a millimeter size micro-chip, this work paves the way to the realization of massively parallel, high-throughput patch-clamp systems for drug screening and ion-channel research. The PatchChip is implemented in a 0.5μm silicon-on-sapphire process; its size is 3×3mm(2) and the power consumption is 5mW per channel with a 3.3V power supply.

  17. Identification of causative chemicals of allergic contact dermatitis using a combination of patch testing in patients and chemical analysis. Application to cases from rubber footwear.

    PubMed

    Kaniwa, M A; Isama, K; Nakamura, A; Kantoh, H; Itoh, M; Miyoshi, K; Saito, S; Shono, M

    1994-01-01

    5 cases of allergic contact dermatitis from rubber footwear were investigated by a combination of patch testing in patients and chemical analysis of causative rubber products. Our studies revealed 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) and benzothiazyl disulfide (MBTS) (typical allergenic accelerators) as causative chemicals in 3 cases from children's rubber shoes, ladies' rubber boots and ladies' canvas shoes. These 3 patients reacted to mercaptobenzothiazole-type accelerators including MBT and MBTS. MBT and MBTS were determined in each item of causative footwear by chemical analysis, including extraction by shaking with acetone-chloroform (1:1) mixture at room temperature and determination using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Subsequently, we identified styrenated phenol (SP), a newly found allergenic antioxidant, as a causative chemical in a case from ladies' canvas shoes. The patient reacted to SP but not to MBT and MBTS, though SP, MBT and MBTS were determined in the causative shoes by gas chromatography (GC), GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and HPLC. We also identified p-tert-butylphenol-formaldehyde resin (PTBP-F-R), (a known allergenic adhesive ingredient) as a causative chemical in a case from ladies' sneakers. The patient reacted to PTBP-F-R but not to p-tert-butylphenol (PTBP), MBT and MBTS. These 4 compounds were determined in the causative sneakers by GC, GC-MS and HPLC. Thus, our studies revealed that not only known allergens, such as MBT, MBTS and PTBP-F-R, but also a newly found one, such as SP, were important causes of allergic contact dermatitis from rubber footwear.

  18. Testing for homogeneity of variance in time series: Long memory, wavelets, and the Nile River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitcher, B.; Byers, S. D.; Guttorp, P.; Percival, D. B.

    2002-05-01

    We consider the problem of testing for homogeneity of variance in a time series with long memory structure. We demonstrate that a test whose null hypothesis is designed to be white noise can, in fact, be applied, on a scale by scale basis, to the discrete wavelet transform of long memory processes. In particular, we show that evaluating a normalized cumulative sum of squares test statistic using critical levels for the null hypothesis of white noise yields approximately the same null hypothesis rejection rates when applied to the discrete wavelet transform of samples from a fractionally differenced process. The point at which the test statistic, using a nondecimated version of the discrete wavelet transform, achieves its maximum value can be used to estimate the time of the unknown variance change. We apply our proposed test statistic on five time series derived from the historical record of Nile River yearly minimum water levels covering 622-1922 A.D., each series exhibiting various degrees of serial correlation including long memory. In the longest subseries, spanning 622-1284 A.D., the test confirms an inhomogeneity of variance at short time scales and identifies the change point around 720 A.D., which coincides closely with the construction of a new device around 715 A.D. for measuring the Nile River. The test also detects a change in variance for a record of only 36 years.

  19. Full-scale aircraft cabin flammability tests of improved fire-resistant materials, test series 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuckey, R. N.; Bricker, R. W.; Kuminecz, J. F.; Supkis, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Full-scale aircraft flammability tests in which the effectiveness of new fire-resistant materials was evaluated by comparing their burning characteristics with those of other fire-resistant aircraft materials were described. New-fire-resistant materials that are more economical and better suited for aircraft use than the previously tested fire-resistant materials were tested. The fuel ignition source for one test was JP-4; a smokeless fuel was used for the other test. Test objectives, methods, materials, and results are presented and discussed. The results indicate that, similar to the fire-resistant materials tested previously, the new materials decompose rather than ignite and do not support fire propagation. Furthermore, the new materials did not produce a flash fire.

  20. Test results on direct containment heating by high-pressure melt ejection into the Surtsey vessel: The TDS test series

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.D.; Blanchat, T.K.; Pilch, M.M.

    1994-08-01

    The Technology Development and Scoping (TDS) test series was conducted to test and develop instrumentation and procedures for performing steam-driven, high-pressure melt ejection (HPME) experiments at the Surtsey Test Facility to investigate direct containment heating (DCH). Seven experiments, designated TDS-1 through TDS-7, were performed in this test series. These experiments were conducted using similar initial conditions; the primary variable was the initial pressure in the Surtsey vessel. All experiments in this test series were performed with a steam driving gas pressure of {approx_equal} 4 MPa, 80 kg of lumina/iron/chromium thermite melt simulant, an initial hole diameter of 4.8 cm (which ablated to a final hole diameter of {approx_equal} 6 cm), and a 1/10th linear scale model of the Surry reactor cavity. The Surtsey vessel was purged with argon (<0.25 mol% O{sub 2}) to limit the recombination of hydrogen and oxygen, and gas grab samples were taken to measure the amount of hydrogen produced.

  1. Progress report on LLTR Series II Test A-2 (Part 1). [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Freede, W.J.; Neely, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    This document contains a complete set of valid and final digital and analog data plots for LLTR Series II, Test A-2. Included is an Accuracy Statement regarding this data as required by Revision 0 of the GE Test Request, Specification No. 23A2062. The Series II, Sodium-Water Reaction Test A-2 was performed in the Large Leak Test Rig (LLTR) at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC). This was the third of three planned double-edged guillotine (DEG) rupture tests of a single tube which will be followed by a number of small leak tests. The test article is the LLTI which is a full-size diameter internals, shortened in length and prototypic of the CRBR steam generator. It is installed in the Large Leak Test Vessel (LLTV). The overall test program was formulated by General Electric (GE) as Test Requester to establish steam generator design and to verify analytical models/codes to estimate the effect of large leak accidents in an LMFBR demonstration plant steam generator and system.

  2. Semiautomatic validation of RR time series in an ECG stress test database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armijos, Jairo; García, David; Astudillo, Darwin; Palacio-Baus, Kenneth; Medina, Rubén.; Wong, Sara

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports an automatic method for characterizing the quality of the RR-time series in the stress test database known as DICARDIA. The proposed methodology is simple and consists in subdividing the RR time series in a set of windows for estimating the quantity of artifacts based on a threshold value that depends on the standard deviation of RR-time series for each recorded lead. In a first stage, a manual annotation was performed considering four quality classes for the RR-time series (Reference lead, Good Lead, Low Quality Lead and Useless Lead). Automatic annotation was then performed varying the number of windows and threshold value for the standard deviation of the RR-time series. The metric used for evaluating the quality of the annotation was the Matching Ratio. The best results were obtained using a higher number of windows and considering only three classes (Good Lead, Low Quality Lead and Useless). The proposed methodology allows the utilization of the online available DICARDIA Stress Test database for different types of research.

  3. Development and evaluation of a tampering resistant transdermal fentanyl patch.

    PubMed

    Cai, Bing; Engqvist, Håkan; Bredenberg, Susanne

    2015-07-05

    With the increasing number of misuse and abuse of opioids, the resistance to tampering becomes an important attribute for transdermal opioid patches. In this study, drug-containing geopolymer granules were integrated into an adhesive matrix to improve the resistance of fast drug release against some common abuse techniques. Bench testing showed that fentanyl loaded geopolymer granules had better resistance to tampering compared to a commercial fentanyl patch. Moreover, in a pilot in vivo study on a few rats, the granules showed potential to give similar drug plasma concentrations as the commercial fentanyl patch. After integrating geopolymer granules into an adhesive matrix, the new patch showed a better resistance against the investigated tampering tests compared with the commercially available patch. In this study, we showed that incorporating drug loaded geopolymer granules into a patch adhesive has potential to improve the resistance of the fentanyl patch against tampering without compromising the drug release.

  4. Hospital waste shredder test series at the DONLEE Pilot Test Facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This report describes the coal firing and coal and noninfectious hospital waste co-firing testing and emissions rates for the tests conducted at the DONLEE pilot plant facility during mid-December 1991 through early March 1992. The emissions obtained during these tests are in turn used to predict the emission rates for the proof-of-concept facility that is to be built at the Lebanon Veterans Affairs Medical Center. In addition, the reliability and performance of the waste shredding/feeding system were evaluated from this testing.

  5. Hospital waste shredder test series at the DONLEE Pilot Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Robert; Sak, James

    1992-09-01

    This report describes the coal firing and coal and noninfectious hospital waste co-firing testing and emissions rates for the tests conducted at the DONLEE pilot plant facility during mid-December 1991 through early March 1992. The emissions obtained during these tests are in turn used to predict the emission rates for the proof-of-concept facility that is to be built at the Lebanon Veterans Affairs Medical Center. In addition, the reliability and performance of the waste shredding/feeding system were evaluated from this testing.

  6. NASA Boeing 757 HIRF test series low power on-the-ground tests

    SciTech Connect

    Poggio, A.J.; Pennock, S.T.; Zacharias, R.A.; Avalle, C.A.; Carney, H.L.

    1996-08-01

    The data acquisition phase of a program intended to provide data for the validation of computational, analytical, and experimental techniques for the assessment of electromagnetic effects in commercial transports; for the checkout of instrumentation for following test programs; and for the support of protection engineering of airborne systems has been completed. Funded by the NASA Fly-By-Light/ Power-By-Wire Program, the initial phase involved on-the-ground electromagnetic measurements using the NASA Boeing 757 and was executed in the LESLI Facility at the USAF Phillips Laboratory. The major participants in this project were LLNL, NASA Langley Research Center, Phillips Laboratory, and UIE, Inc. The tests were performed over a five week period during September through November, 1994. Measurements were made of the fields coupled into the aircraft interior and signals induced in select structures and equipment under controlled illumination by RF fields. A characterization of the ground was also performed to permit ground effects to be included in forthcoming validation exercises. This report and the associated test plan that is included as an appendix represent a definition of the overall on-the-ground test program. They include descriptions of the test rationale, test layout, and samples of the data. In this report, a detailed description of each executed test is provided, as is the data identification (data id) relating the specific test with its relevant data files. Samples of some inferences from the data that will be useful in protection engineering and EM effects mitigation are also presented. The test plan which guided the execution of the tests, a test report by UIE Inc., and the report describing the concrete pad characterization are included as appendices.

  7. Sperm Patch-Clamp

    PubMed Central

    Lishko, Polina; Clapham, David E.; Navarro, Betsy; Kirichok, Yuriy

    2014-01-01

    Sperm intracellular pH and calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) are two central factors that control sperm activity within the female reproductive tract. As such, the ion channels of the sperm plasma membrane that alter intracellular sperm [Ca2+] and pH play important roles in sperm physiology and the process of fertilization. Indeed, sperm ion channels regulate sperm motility, control sperm chemotaxis toward the egg in some species, and may trigger the acrosome reaction. Until recently, our understanding of these important molecules was rudimentary due to the inability to patch-clamp spermatozoa and directly record the activity of these ion channels under voltage clamp. Recently, we overcame this technical barrier and developed a method for reproducible application of the patch-clamp technique to mouse and human spermatozoa. This chapter covers important aspects of application of the patch-clamp technique to spermatozoa, such as selection of the electrophysiological equipment, isolation of spermatozoa for patch-clamp experiments, formation of the gigaohm seal with spermatozoa, and transition into the whole-cell mode of recording. We also discuss potential pitfalls in application of the patch-clamp technique to flagellar ion channels. PMID:23522465

  8. Chamber Tests with Human Subjects XX. Hypersensitivity to H as Demonstrated by Patch Tests Before and After Chamber Exposure to H Vapor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1946-05-15

    intense erythema 4 a. erythema with edema b. dry scaling of scrotum c. maceration of axillary skin 5 a. vesicle b. numerous pinpoint vesicles c. crusting... skin reaction following exposure to H vapor in the man-chamber are discussed. Eight kodachrone prints, illustrating pertinent features, are included...Reactions for a Given Test Dose - 12 F. Changes in Threshold ------------------ 12 G. Abnormal Skin Reactions Following Chamber Exposures to H Vapor

  9. Test Series 2: seismic-fragility tests of naturally-aged Class 1E Exide FHC-19 battery cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bonzon, L. L.; Hente, D. B.; Kukreti, B. M.; Schendel, J.; Tulk, J. D.; Janis, W. J.; Black, D. A.; Paulsen, G. D.; Aucoin, B. D.

    1985-03-01

    The seismic-fragility of naturally-aged nuclear station safety-related batteries is of interest for two reasons: (1) to determine actual failure modes and their thresholds and (2) to determine the validity of using the electrical capacity of individual cells as an indicator of the ''end-of-life'' of a battery if subjected to a seismic event. This report, the second in a test series of an extensive seismic research program, covers the testing of 10-year old lead-calcium Exide FHC-19 cells from the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station operated by the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company. The Exide cells were tested in two configurations using a triaxial shake table: single-cell tests, both rigidly and loosely mounted; and multicell (three-cell) tests, mounted in a typical battery rack. A total of six electrically active cells was used in the two different cell configurations.

  10. Testing for nonlinearity in time series: The method of surrogate data

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, J.; Galdrikian, B.; Longtin, A. ); Eubank, S.; Farmer, J.D. Santa Fe Inst., NM )

    1991-01-01

    We describe a statistical approach for identifying nonlinearity in time series; in particular, we want to avoid claims of chaos when simpler models (such as linearly correlated noise) can explain the data. The method requires a careful statement of the null hypothesis which characterizes a candidate linear process, the generation of an ensemble of surrogate'' data sets which are similar to the original time series but consistent with the null hypothesis, and the computation of a discriminating statistic for the original and for each of the surrogate data sets. The idea is to test the original time series against the null hypothesis by checking whether the discriminating statistic computed for the original time series differs significantly from the statistics computed for each of the surrogate sets. We present algorithms for generating surrogate data under various null hypotheses, and we show the results of numerical experiments on artificial data using correlation dimension, Lyapunov exponent, and forecasting error as discriminating statistics. Finally, we consider a number of experimental time series -- including sunspots, electroencephalogram (EEG) signals, and fluid convection -- and evaluate the statistical significance of the evidence for nonlinear structure in each case. 56 refs., 8 figs.

  11. A periodogram-based test for weak stationarity and consistency between sections in time series.

    PubMed

    Halliday, D M; Rosenberg, J R; Rigas, A; Conway, B A

    2009-05-30

    In one approach to spectral estimation, a sample record is broken into a number of disjoint sections, or data is collected over a number of discrete trials. Spectral parameters are formed by averaging periodograms across these discrete sections or trials. A key assumption in this approach is that of weak stationarity. This paper describes a simple test that checks if periodogram ordinates are consistent across sections as a means of assessing weak stationarity. The test is called the Periodogram Coefficient of Variation (PCOV) test, and is a frequency domain test based on a technique of spectral analysis. Application of the test is illustrated to both simulated and experimental data (EMG, physiological tremor, EEG). An additional role for the test as a useful tool in exploratory analysis of time series is highlighted.

  12. Overview of the 6 Meter HIAD Inflatable Structure and Flexible TPS Static Load Test Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Greg; Kazemba, Cole; Johnson, Keith; Calomino, Anthony; Hughes, Steve; Cassell, Alan; Cheatwood, Neil

    2014-01-01

    To support NASAs long term goal of landing humans on Mars, technologies which enable the landing of heavy payloads are being developed. Current entry, decent, and landing technologies are not practical for this class of payloads due to geometric constraints dictated by current launch vehicle fairing limitations. Therefore, past and present technologies are now being explored to provide a mass and volume efficient solution to atmospheric entry, including Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators (HIADs). At the beginning of 2014, a 6m HIAD inflatable structure with an integrated flexible thermal protection system (TPS) was subjected to a static load test series to verify the designs structural performance. The 6m HIAD structure was constructed in a stacked toroid configuration using nine inflatable torus segments composed of fiber reinforced thin films, which were joined together using adhesives and high strength textile woven structural straps to help distribute the loads throughout the inflatable structure. The 6m flexible TPS was constructed using multiple layers of high performance materials to protect the inflatable structure from heat loads that would be seen during atmospheric entry. To perform the static load test series, a custom test fixture was constructed. The fixture consisted of a structural tub rim with enough height to allow for displacement of the inflatable structure as loads were applied. The bottom of the tub rim had an airtight seal with the floor. The centerbody of the inflatable structure was attached to a pedestal mount as seen in Figure 1. Using an impermeable membrane seal draped over the test article, partial vacuum was pulled beneath the HIAD, resulting in a uniform static pressure load applied to the outer surface. During the test series an extensive amount of instrumentation was used to provide many data sets including: deformed shape, shoulder deflection, strap loads, cord loads, inflation pressures, and applied static load

  13. Systematic two-dimensional cascade tests of NACA 65-series compressor blades at low speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrig, L Joseph; Emery, James C; Erwin, John R

    1957-01-01

    A two-dimensional low-speed porous-wall cascade tunnel investigation has been conducted to establish the performance of the NACA 65-series compressor blade sections over the useful range of inlet angle, solidity, and section camber. Design points for optimum high-speed operation are presented. The loading limitation is determined for some conditions. Trends of section operating range with increasing section camber are determined for the four inlet angles tested.

  14. Test series 1: seismic-fragility tests of naturally-aged Class 1E Gould NCX-2250 battery cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bonzon, L. L.; Hente, D. B.; Kukreti, B. M.; Schendel, J. S.; Tulk, J. D.; Janis, W. J.; Black, D A; Paulsen, G. D.; Aucoin, B. D.

    1984-09-01

    The seismic-fragility response of naturally-aged, nuclear station, safety-related batteries is of interest for two reasons: (1) to determine actual failure modes and thresholds; and (2) to determine the validity of using the electrical capacity of individual cells as an indicator of the end-of-life of a battery, given a seismic event. This report covers the first test series of an extensive program using 12-year old, lead-calcium, Gould NCX-2250 cells, from the James A. Fitzpatrick Nuclear Power Station operated by the New York Power Authority. Seismic tests with three cell configurations were performed using a triaxial shake table: single-cell tests, rigidly mounted; multi-cell (three) tests, mounted in a typical battery rack; and single-cell tests specifically aimed towards examining propagation of pre-existing case cracks. In general the test philosophy was to monitor the electrical properties including discharge capacity of cells through a graduated series of g-level step increases until either the shake-table limits were reached or until electrical failure of the cells occurred. Of nine electrically active cells, six failed during seismic testing over a range of imposed g-level loads in excess of a 1-g ZPA. Post-test examination revealed a common failure mode, the cracking at the abnormally brittle, positive lead bus-bar/post interface; further examination showed that the failure zone was extremely coarse grained and extensively corroded. Presently accepted accelerated-aging methods for qualifying batteries, per IEEE Std. 535-1979, are based on plate growth, but these naturally-aged 12-year old cells showed no significant plate growth.

  15. Evaluation of dental material series from patients with dental prostheses and suspicion of delayed hypersensitivity*

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Fernanda Cortinhas; Cunha, Victor do Espirito Santo; Hahnstadt, Ruppert Ludwig; Pires, Mário Cezar

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with oral sensitivity are common in our practice. Allergic contact dermatitis is one of the most frequent etiologies. OBJECTIVES Evaluate oral contact dermatitis using the Brazilian standard series and complementary dental series in patients using dental prostheses, with or without oral complaints. Determine specific dental Brazilian series. METHODS Patients using dental prostheses with or without oral complaints realized patch tests. Brazilian standard series and complementary dental series were used according to ICDRG recommendations. The results were analysed according to age, sex, race, atopic conditions and symptoms associated. RESULTS From 54 patients tested, 34 (63%) were positive at least to one substance. Nineteen had oral complaints, such as burning mouth, itch or oral erythema. There was no association between atopic condition and tests results. Without the oral series, just 23(42,6%) patients had a positive result. Using the Brazilian standard series with the complementary dental series we improved the positivity of the patch test to 47%. CONCLUSION In patients using prostheses and with oral complaints, patch tests with Brazilian standard series with complementary dental series improve the tests positivity. PMID:27192511

  16. Misuse study of latch attachment: a series of frontal sled tests.

    PubMed

    Menon, Rajiv; Ghati, Yoganand

    2007-01-01

    This study was initiated to quantify the effects of the misuse in LATCH lower webbing. In the short period since the implementation of the LATCH system several cases of potential misuses have been reported. A series of sled tests in frontal impact mode were conducted with various misuse conditions (loose attachment of LATCH lower webbing, misrouting of LATCH lower webbing and child seat back inclination) for both forward and rearward facing child safety seats (FFCSS and RFCSS). Results from these tests are compared and discussed with that of the standard test with no misuse and showed that as the slack in the lower LATCH webbing increased, ATD injury measures exceeded the limits. The FFCSS tests in the reclined condition yielded lower injury values for all except the chest G's when compared to the standard upright test. In the misrouting tests the ATD kinematics depended on the routing pivot point, the lower the pivot point the better the ATD kinematics. Similar findings were also observed in the RFCSS tests. The use of top tether with the FFCSS substantially improved the performance of the Hybrid III 3 year old ATD in spite of misuse conditions and the injury values were lower than the corresponding tests with no top tether. The effective reduction was 37% in the HIC values, 6% in the chest G's, 30% in the head excursion, 22 % in the knee excursion and finally 37 % reduction in the Nij values.

  17. VISAR Validation Test Series at the Light Initiated High Explosive (LIHE) facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Covert, Timothy Todd

    2007-02-01

    A velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) was recently deployed at the light initiated high explosive facility (LIHE) to measure the velocity of an explosively accelerated flyer plate. The velocity data from the flyer plate experiments, using the vendor's fringe constant of 100m/s/fringe, were consistently lower than model predictions. The goal of the VISAR validation test series was to confirm the VISAR system fringe constant. A low velocity gas gun was utilized to impact and accelerate a target at the LIHE facility. VISAR velocity data from the accelerated target was compared against an independent velocity measurement. The data from this test series did in fact reveal the fringe constant was significantly higher than the vendor's specification. The correct fringe constant for the LIHE VISAR system has been determined to be 123 m/s/fringe. The Light Initiated High Explosive (LIHE) facility recently completed a Phase I test series to develop an explosively accelerated flyer plate (X-Flyer). The X-Flyer impulse technique consists of first spraying a thin layer of silver acetylide silver nitrate explosive onto a thin flyer plate. The explosive is then initiated using an intense flash of light. The explosive detonation accelerates the flyer across a small air gap towards the test item. The impact of the flyer with the test item creates a shock pulse and an impulsive load in the test unit. The goal of Phase I of the X-Flyer development series was to validate the technique theory and design process. One of the key parameters that control the shock pulse and impulsive load is the velocity of the flyer at impact. To measure this key parameter, a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) was deployed at the LIHE facility. The VISAR system was assembled by Sandia personnel from the Explosive Projects and Diagnostics department. The VISAR was a three leg, push-pull system using a fixed delay cavity. The primary optical components consisted of

  18. Research and analysis of patch shape on microstrip patch antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Ai-guo; Wang, Peng

    2017-01-01

    The shape of the radiating patch in the microstrip patch antenna is one of the many factors that affect the performance of the microstrip antenna.In this paper, on the premise of center frequency of 2.45 GHz, rectangular, circular and triangular microstrip patch antennas are designed and simulated respectively.The simulation results of the three microstrip patch antenna are analyzed, such as feed point position, return loss and radiation patterns.The influence of the shape of the radiation patch on the impedance bandwidth, gain and directivity of microstrip antennas is discussed.The simulation results show that the comprehensive performance of rectangular microstrip patch antenna is better than the other two, the comprehensive performance of triangular microstrip patch antenna is poor.

  19. Shot APPLE 2, A Test of the TEAPOT Series, 5 May 1955

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    volume: Shot BEE 9 Multi-shot volume: Shots ESS through MET and Shot ZUCCHINI , the Final TEAPOT ’rests. The volumes addressing the test events of...TURK "- TESLA ]2 \\ 91• POSTl -IL9 BEE ZUCCHINI APPLEl I -WS I -- ~L.. WASP S4 I7’I WASP PRIME APPLE 2 I MOTH HA ___ __ 0 HORNET HADR( I 1 31 I 1 S...roentgens, respectively. These officers were ordered not to enter contaminated areas for the one remaining shot of the series, ZUCCHINI . The other two

  20. Patch scales in coastal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broitman, Bernardo R.

    Quantifying the spatial and temporal scales over which ecological processes are coupled to environmental variability is a major challenge for ecologists. Here, I assimilate patterns of oceanographic variability with ecological field studies in an attempt to quantify spatial and temporal scales of coupling. Using coastal time series of chlorophyll-a concentration from remote sensing, the first chapter examines the alongshore extent of coastal regions subject to similar temporal patterns of oceanographic variability in Western North America (WNA) and North-Central Chile (Chile). I found striking interhemispherical differences in the length of coastal sections under similar oceanographic regimes, with the Chile region showing longshore coherency over much smaller spatial scales (˜60 km) than on the coast of WNA (˜140 km). Through a spatial analysis of coastal orientation I suggest that the characteristic length scales may be traced to the geomorphologic character of the ocean margins. The second chapter examines spatial patterns of primary production through long-term means of coastal chlorophyll-a concentration and kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) cover and explores their relationship with coastal geomorphology and sea surface temperature (SST). Spatial analyses showed a striking match in length scales around 180--250 km. Strong anticorrelations at small spatial lags and positive correlations at longer distances suggest little overlap between patches of kelp and coastal chlorophyll-a. In agreement with findings from the previous chapter, I found that coastal patches could be traced back to spatial patterns of coastal geomorphology. Through SST time series and long-term datasets of larval recruitment in Santa Cruz Island, California, the third chapter examines temporal patterns of oceanographic variability as determinants of ecological patterns. SST time series from sites experiencing low larval recruitment rates were dominated by strong temporal variability. These sites

  1. A test of uranium-series dating of fossil tooth enamel: results from Tournal Cave, France

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Tavoso, A.; de Lumley, Henry

    1988-01-01

    A series of well preserved mammal bones and horse teeth was analyzed from archaeological levels of Tournal Cave (Magdalenian, Aurignacian, and Mousterain) to test the hypothesis that well-crystallized enamel behaves more as a closed system than does whole bone. The isotopic composition of bones and tooth enamels from this deposit meet criteria for confidence, and gave no reasons to suspect contamination or open-system behavior. Two samples for which 231Pa could be analyzed showed internal concordance with the respective 230Th ages. In spite of the favourable isotopic criteria, however, comparison of the U-series ages of the bones and the tooth enamel with stratigraphic position and 14C control indicated the dates were not meaningful. In general, both bones and tooth enamels gave ages too young, although some were clearly too old. Neither group showed any systematic increase of age with stratigraphic depth. Tooth enamel, therefore, shows no advantage over bone for U-series dating for this site. In Tournal cave both bones and enamel are apparently open to U, which is probably cycling as a consequences of post-depositional groundwater movement. ?? 1988.

  2. General-Purpose Heat Source: Research and development program: Cold-Process Verification Test Series

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M.A.H.; George, T.G.

    1996-06-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. Because any space mission could experience a launch abort or return from orbit, the heat source must be designed and constructed to survive credible accident environments. Previous testing conducted in support of the Galileo and Ulysses missions documented the response of GPHSs and individual GPHS capsules fueled with {sup 238}UO{sub 2} ({sup 235}U-depleted) to a variety of explosive overpressure and impact events. In the early 1990s, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) resumed fabrication of {sup 238}UO{sub 2} GPHS pellets. The Cold-Process Verification (CPV) Test Series was designed to compare the response of GPHS heat sources loaded with recently fabricated hot- and cold-pressed {sup 238}UO{sub 2} pellets to the response of urania pellets used in the Galileo and Ulysses performance tests. This report documents eleven bare-capsule impacts and one impact of a fully loaded GPHS module. All of the failures observed in the bare-clad impact tests were similar to failures observed in previous safety tests. No failures occurred in the module impact test.

  3. Validity and reliability of the Newtest Powertimer 300-series testing system.

    PubMed

    Enoksen, Eystein; Tønnessen, Espen; Shalfawi, Shaher

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the reliability and validity of the Newtest Powertimer 300-series portable contact mat and photocells (Newtest Oy, Finland). The participants were 20 male soccer players aged 19.1+/-3.5 years. The validity and reliability of the Powertimer (contact mat and photocells) were assessed in a comparison of a laboratory testing method (force platform and photocells) and the Newtest Powertimer system. All participants were tested on 40-m sprint, countermovement jump, and squat jump. The results showed that the Powertimer was a reliable instrument for both jumping and running. The system did not show any marked systematic bias (P<0.05) and the random error associated with it was negligible. A comparison of the laboratory testing method with the Powertimer revealed that the Powertimer contact mat and photocells had poor validity and the bias in measurement differed from that of the laboratory testing method (P<0.05). The Newtest Powertimer testing system was shown to be a useful instrument for measuring jump height and running speed. However, if a comparison of overall values of jumping height is intended, it is important to use the same testing system, because different systems give different results. It is also advisable to use this equipment only if no other "gold standard" equipment is available.

  4. Understanding patch departure rules for large carnivores: lion movements support a patch-disturbance hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Valeix, Marion; Chamaillé-Jammes, Simon; Loveridge, Andrew J; Davidson, Zeke; Hunt, Jane E; Madzikanda, Hillary; Macdonald, David W

    2011-08-01

    We test two hypotheses that could account for patch departure by large mammalian carnivores. One hypothesis is the unsuccessful-hunt hypothesis, where carnivores leave an area after an unsuccessful hunt but continue hunting in the same area after a successful hunt. The second hypothesis is the patch-disturbance hypothesis, where carnivores depart the area after a successful hunt because of behavioral responses of prey to predator presence. We used global positioning system collars to monitor the movements of African lions (Panthera leo) and identified their kill sites to distinguish between these two hypotheses. Lions moved to a different area (≥ 5 km away) after 87% of the kills, which supports the patch-disturbance hypothesis for patch-departure behavior of large mammalian carnivores.

  5. Comparative study of patches for liquid cooled garments.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shitzer, A.; Chambers, A. B.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were performed on 12 cooling patches of various designs to establish criteria for the evaluation of their performance in liquid-cooled suits in industrial, military and aerospace applications. The thermal effectiveness value was 0.088 for patch designs with a double spiral flow pattern, and 0.075 for patch designs with a parallel flow pattern. The ratio of thermal energy transfer rate to cooling-medium pumping power requirement is indicated as the prime performance characteristic to be considered in the selection and rating of cooling patches.

  6. Accountability and Testing. NAESP School Leadership Digest Second Series, Number 5. ERIC/CEM Research Analysis Series, Number 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzarella, Jo Ann

    What is meant by "accountability" varies a great deal. It is not, however, the tools such as merit salary plans, voucher plans, and management techniques that are used to achieve accountability. Accountability has from its earliest days been tied to testing. In discussing testing, it is necessary to discuss the pros and cons of standardized, or…

  7. Fabrication and Test of LARP Technological Quadrupole Models of TQC Series

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, Rodger C.; Ambrosio, Giorgio; Andreev, Nilolai; Barzi, Emanuela; Chlachidze, Guram; Feher, Sandor; Kashikhin, Vladimir S.; Kashikhin, Vadim V.; Lamm, Michael; Nobrega, Alfred; Novitski, Igor; Orris, Darryl; Tartaglia, Michael; Zlobin, Alexander V.; Caspi, Shlomo; Dietderich, Daniel R.; Ferracin, Paolo; Hafalia, A. R.; Sabbi, GianLuca; Ghosh, Arup; Wanderer, Peter

    2008-08-17

    In support of the development of a large-aperture Nb3Sn superconducting quadrupole for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade, several two-layer technological quadrupole models of TQC series with 90 mm aperture and collar-based mechanical structure have been developed at Fermilab in collaboration with LBNL. This paper summarizes the results of fabrication and test of TQC02a, the second TQC model based on RRP Nb3Sn strand, and TQC02b, built with both MJR and RRP strand. The test results presented include magnet strain and quench performance during training, as well as quench studies of current ramp rate and temperature dependence from 1.9 K to 4.5 K.

  8. Multiple skin testing of Kenyan schoolchildren with a series of new tuberculins.

    PubMed Central

    Paul, R. C.; Stanford, J. L.; Misljenóvic, O.; Lefering, J.

    1975-01-01

    This study on Kenyan schoolchildren aims to elucidate the effect of contact with environmental mycobacteria on the development of specific delayed hypersensitivity. A series of 12 skin test reagents was employed; eleven of them were prepared from extracts of living mycobacteria and the last was the P.P.D. RT 23. Eight of the new tuberculins were prepared from mycobacteria recovered from the East African environment. A total of 8641 tests were carried out on 4320 children between the ages of 6 and 17 years in four townships. Two of these townships were in fertile agricultural areas and two were in the desert. Just over 80% of the children had received BCG immunization The results obtained showed that increasing age, geographical locality and BCG immunization all had a profound effect, and socioeconomic background had some effect, on the pattern of reactivity to the various reagents. The rationale behind the use of the series of new tuberculins and the results obtained with them are discussed in relation to the interacting effects of the factors complicating these results. PMID:1058246

  9. Test plan for long-term, low-temperature oxidation of spent fuel, Series 1

    SciTech Connect

    Einziger, R.E.

    1986-06-01

    Preliminary studies indicated the need for more spent fuel oxidation data in order to determine the probable behavior of spent fuel in a tuff repository. Long-term, low-temperature testing was recommended in a comprehensive technical approach to: (1) confirm the findings of the short-term thermogravimetric analyses scoping experiments; (2) evaluate the effects of variables such as burnup, atmospheric moisture and fuel type on the oxidation rate; and (3) extend the oxidation data base ot representative repository temperatures and better define the temperature dependence of the operative oxidation mechanisms. This document presents the Series 1 test plan to study, on a large number of samples, the effects of atmospheric moisture and temperature on oxidation rate and phase formation. Tests will run for up to two years, use characterized fragmented, and pulverized fuel samples, cover a temperature range of 110{sup 0}C to 175{sup 0}C and be conducted with an atmospheric moisture content rangeing from <-55{sup 0}C to {similar_to}80{sup 0}C dew point. After testing, the samples will be examined and made available for leaching testing.

  10. Patch antenna terahertz photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Palaferri, D.; Todorov, Y. Chen, Y. N.; Madeo, J.; Vasanelli, A.; Sirtori, C.; Li, L. H.; Davies, A. G.; Linfield, E. H.

    2015-04-20

    We report on the implementation of 5 THz quantum well photodetector exploiting a patch antenna cavity array. The benefit of our plasmonic architecture on the detector performance is assessed by comparing it with detectors made using the same quantum well absorbing region, but processed into a standard 45° polished facet mesa. Our results demonstrate a clear improvement in responsivity, polarization insensitivity, and background limited performance. Peak detectivities in excess of 5 × 10{sup 12} cmHz{sup 1/2}/W have been obtained, a value comparable with that of the best cryogenic cooled bolometers.

  11. Patched Conic Trajectory Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Brooke Anderson; Wright, Henry

    2012-01-01

    PatCon code was developed to help mission designers run trade studies on launch and arrival times for any given planet. Initially developed in Fortran, the required inputs included launch date, arrival date, and other orbital parameters of the launch planet and arrival planets at the given dates. These parameters include the position of the planets, the eccentricity, semi-major axes, argument of periapsis, ascending node, and inclination of the planets. With these inputs, a patched conic approximation is used to determine the trajectory. The patched conic approximation divides the planetary mission into three parts: (1) the departure phase, in which the two relevant bodies are Earth and the spacecraft, and where the trajectory is a departure hyperbola with Earth at the focus; (2) the cruise phase, in which the two bodies are the Sun and the spacecraft, and where the trajectory is a transfer ellipse with the Sun at the focus; and (3) the arrival phase, in which the two bodies are the target planet and the spacecraft, where the trajectory is an arrival hyperbola with the planet as the focus.

  12. Statistics for Patch Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hingee, K. L.

    2016-06-01

    In the application of remote sensing it is common to investigate processes that generate patches of material. This is especially true when using categorical land cover or land use maps. Here we view some existing tools, landscape pattern indices (LPI), as non-parametric estimators of random closed sets (RACS). This RACS framework enables LPIs to be studied rigorously. A RACS is any random process that generates a closed set, which encompasses any processes that result in binary (two-class) land cover maps. RACS theory, and methods in the underlying field of stochastic geometry, are particularly well suited to high-resolution remote sensing where objects extend across tens of pixels, and the shapes and orientations of patches are symptomatic of underlying processes. For some LPI this field already contains variance information and border correction techniques. After introducing RACS theory we discuss the core area LPI in detail. It is closely related to the spherical contact distribution leading to conditional variants, a new version of contagion, variance information and multiple border-corrected estimators. We demonstrate some of these findings on high resolution tree canopy data.

  13. Design and evaluation of a 3 million DN series-hybrid thrust bearing. [stability tests and fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scibbe, H. W.; Winn, L. W.; Eusepi, M.

    1976-01-01

    The bearing, consisting of a 150-mm ball bearing and a centrifugally actuated, conical, fluid-film bearing, was fatigue tested. Test conditions were representative of a mainshaft ball bearing in a gas turbine engine operating at maximum thrust load to simulate aircraft takeoff conditions. Tests were conducted up to 16000 rpm and at this speed an axial load of 15568 newtons (3500 lb) was safely supported by the hybrid bearing system. Through the series-hybrid bearing principle, the effective ball bearing speed was reduced to approximately one-half of the shaft speed. It was concluded that a speed reduction of this magnitude results in a ten-fold increase in the ball bearing fatigue life. A successful evaluation of fluid-film bearing lubricant supply failure was performed repeatedly at an operating speed of 10,000 rpm. A complete and smooth changeover to full-scale ball bearing operation was effected when the oil supply to the fluid-film bearing was cut off. Reactivation of the fluid-film oil supply system resulted in a flawless return to the original mode of hybrid operation.

  14. Economic downturns and male cesarean deliveries: a time-series test of the economic stress hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In light of the recent Great Recession, increasing attention has focused on the health consequences of economic downturns. The perinatal literature does not converge on whether ambient economic declines threaten the health of cohorts in gestation. We set out to test the economic stress hypothesis that the monthly count of cesarean deliveries (CD), which may gauge the level of fetal distress in a population, rises after the economy declines. We focus on male CD since the literature reports that male more than female fetuses appear sensitive to stressors in utero. Methods We tested our ecological hypothesis in California for 228 months from January 1989 to December 2007, the most recent data available to us at the time of our tests. We used as the independent variable the Bureau of Labor Statistics unadjusted total state employment series. Time-series methods controlled for patterns of male CD over time. We also adjusted for the monthly count of female CD, which controls for well-characterized factors (e.g., medical-legal environment, changing risk profile of births) that affect CD but are shared across infant sex. Results Findings support the economic stress hypothesis in that male CD increases above its expected value one month after employment declines (employment coefficient = -24.09, standard error = 11.88, p = .04). Additional exploratory analyses at the metropolitan level indicate that findings in Los Angeles and Orange Counties appear to drive the State-level relation. Conclusions Contracting economies may perturb the health of male more than female fetuses sufficiently enough to warrant more CD. Male relative to female CD may sensitively gauge the cohort health of gestations. PMID:24906208

  15. Acceptance tests and their results for 1st Pre-Series Cryoline (PTCL) of ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, H.; Garg, A.; Shah, N.; Muralidhara, S.; Choukekar, K.; Dash, B.; Gaur, V.; Madeenavalli, S.; Patel, P.; Kumar, U.; Jadon, M.; Shukla, V.; Sarkar, B.; Sarvaiya, Y.; Mukherjee, D.; Dutta, A.; Murugan, KV.; Gajera, S.; Joshi, B.; Panjwani, R.

    2017-02-01

    The Pre-Series Cryoline (PTCL) for ITER is a representative cryoline from the complicated network of all cryolines for the ITER project. It is ∼28 m in length with same cross-section (1:1) including main line (ML) and branch line (BL) as of ITER torus & cryostat cryoline. Geometrically; it has bends at different angles i.e. 90°, 120°, 135° & 160° comprising T-section & Z-section. The PTCL has been fabricated in 5 different elements based on the installation feasibility. The mechanical & instrumentation installation like sensors mounting, displacement sensors, etc. has been completed. The PTCL test has been performed after complete installation of PTCL and integration with the existing test facility at ITER-India cryogenics laboratory in order to verify the thermal performance and mechanical integrity. The primary objectives, which are evaluated during the PTCL test, are (i) Thermal performance of the PTCL (ii) Measurement of temperature profile on thermal shield of PTCL, (iii) Stress measurement at critical locations, (iv) Measurement of Outer Vacuum Jacket (OVJ) temperature during Break of Insulation Vacuum (BIV) test. The paper will summarize the methodology and observed results of PTCL.

  16. Tank Tests of NACA Model 40 Series of Hulls for Small Flying Boats and Amphibians

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, John B; Dawson, John R

    1937-01-01

    The NACA model 40 series of flying-boat hull models consists of 2 forebodies and 3 afterbodies combined to provide several forms suitable for use in small marine aircraft. One forebody is the usual form with hollow bow sections and the other has a bottom surface that is completely developable from bow to step. The afterbodies include a short pointed afterbody with an extension for the tail surfaces, a long afterbody similar to that of a seaplane float but long enough to carry the tail surfaces, and a third obtained by fitting a second step in the latter afterbody. The various combinations were tested in the NACA Tank by the general method over a suitable range of loadings. Fixed-trim tests were made for all speeds likely to be used and free-to-trim tests were made at low speeds to slightly beyond the hump speed. The characteristics of the hulls at best trim angles have been deduced from the data of the tests at fixed trim angles and are given in the form of nondimensional coefficients applicable to any size hull.

  17. Fuel performance improvement program: description and characterization of HBWR Series H-2, H-3, and H-4 test rods

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, R.J.; Barner, J.O.; Welty, R.K.

    1980-03-01

    The fabrication process and as-built characteristics of the HBWR Series H-2 and H-3 test rods, as well as the three packed-particle (sphere-pac) rods in HBWR Series H-4 are described. The HBWR Series H-2, H-3, and H-4 tests are part of the irradiation test program of the Fuel Performance Improvement Program. Fifteen rods were fabricated for the three test series. Rod designs include: (1) a reference dished pellet design incorporating chamfered edges, (2) a chamfered, annular pellet design combined with graphite-coated cladding, and (3) a sphere-pac design. Both the annular-coated and sphere-pac designs include internal pressurization using helium.

  18. Frozen Gaussian series representation of the imaginary time propagator theory and numerical tests

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Dong H.; Shao Jiushu; Pollak, Eli

    2009-07-28

    Thawed Gaussian wavepackets have been used in recent years to compute approximations to the thermal density matrix. From a numerical point of view, it is cheaper to employ frozen Gaussian wavepackets. In this paper, we provide the formalism for the computation of thermal densities using frozen Gaussian wavepackets. We show that the exact density may be given in terms of a series, in which the zeroth order term is the frozen Gaussian. A numerical test of the methodology is presented for deep tunneling in the quartic double well potential. In all cases, the series is observed to converge. The convergence of the diagonal density matrix element is much faster than that of the antidiagonal one, suggesting that the methodology should be especially useful for the computation of partition functions. As a by product of this study, we find that the density matrix in configuration space can have more than two saddle points at low temperatures. This has implications for the use of the quantum instanton theory.

  19. Improved Gain Microstrip Patch Antenna

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-06

    08-2015 Publication Improved Gain Microstrip Patch Antenna David A. Tonn Naval Under Warfare Center Division, Newport 1176 Howell St., Code 00L...Distribution A An antenna for mounting on a ground plane includes a dielectric substrate for mounting on the ground plane. A conductive patch...GAIN MICROSTRIP PATCH ANTENNA STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by or for the

  20. Early results from the thermal/structural in situ test series at the WIPP

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, D.E.; Torres, T.M.; Blankenship, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Thermal/Structural Interactions (TSI) In Situ Tests are a series of large-scale, well instrumented tests that have been constructed at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. As a precursor to the TSI tests, a ventilation drift (Room D) was mined, drilled and instrumented. This room provided the contractor an excellent area to practice controlled construction methods and was proving ground for construction monitoring and documentation methods. All gages in this first room have been monitored since their initial installation, which has provided a small, but representative, data base. These data also were the first to be available from any TSI area for analysis. This paper discusses the construction activities in Room D and the data generated from the construction and drilling. Deformation of the room is compared briefly to numerical calculations that used a rather simple creep model as a reference. The constitutive model for salt, it appears, must be improved before it can predict the underground deformations.

  1. Effects of coastal transport on larval patches: Models and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilburg, Charles E.; Houser, Letise T.; Steppe, Cecily N.; Garvine, Richard W.; Epifanio, Charles E.

    2006-03-01

    We used a combination of field observations and numerical modeling to examine the physical mechanisms responsible for the evolution and transport of patches of blue crab larvae in the mouth of Delaware Bay. The observations consisted of larval collections and surface salinity measurements taken along a moving spatial grid whose origin was determined by a satellite-tracked drifter. Examination of field observations revealed a slender larval patch that was aligned with salinity contours. Measurement of the salting rate of the larval patch indicated that the patch moved through the offshore edge of a buoyant plume due to wind-driven upwelling circulation. A numerical model that provided realistic simulations of the flow field at the mouth of Delaware Bay and the adjoining coastal ocean was used to examine the physical mechanisms responsible for the movement and evolution of the patch. We conducted a series of simulations in which we separately examined the effects of tides, buoyancy-driven flow, and wind-driven transport. Results showed that both tides and buoyancy-driven flow tend to elongate an initially square fluid element. Although winds alone have little effect on the shape of a patch, wind-driven flow can effectively move a patch through a complex flow field in which the deformation by tides and buoyancy-driven circulation can have significant effects. This study represents the first observation and analysis of a larval patch that remains intact while moving through the edge of a buoyant plume. It provides new insight into the shape of larval patches in Delaware Bay and any region with strong buoyancy- and tidally-driven flow, suggesting that typical larval patches may not be characterized by equal across- and alongshelf dimensions but instead tend to be slender shapes that are aligned with the flow field.

  2. Retrospective testing and case series study of porcine delta coronavirus in U.S. swine herds.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, Brian J; Haley, Charles; Rovira, Albert; Main, Rodger; Zhang, Yan; Barder, Sunny

    2016-01-01

    Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) was first reported in the United States (US) in February 2014. This was the second novel swine enteric coronavirus detected in the US since May 2013. In this study, we conducted retrospective testing of samples submitted to three veterinary diagnostic laboratories where qualifying biological samples were derived from previously submitted diagnostic case submissions from US commercial swine farms with a clinical history of enteric disease or from cases that had been previously tested for transmissible gastroenteritis virus, PEDV, or rotavirus. Overall, 2286 banked samples were tested from 27 States. Samples were collected in 3 separate years and in 17 different months. Test results revealed 4 positive samples, 3 collected in August 2013 and 1 collected in October 2013. In addition, a case series including 42 operations in 10 States was conducted through administration of a survey. Survey data collected included information on characteristics of swine operations that had experienced PDCoV clinical signs. Special emphasis was placed on obtaining descriptive estimates of biosecurity practices and disease status over time of each operation. Clinical signs of PDCoV were reported to be similar to those of PEDV. The average number of animals on each operation exhibiting clinical signs (morbidity) and the average number of case fatalities was greatest for suckling and weaned pigs. Average operation-level weaned pig morbidity was greatest in the first week of the outbreak while average operation-level suckling pig case fatality was greatest in the second week of the outbreak. The survey included questions regarding biosecurity practices for visitors and operation employees; trucks, equipment and drivers; and feed sources. These questions attempted to identify a likely pathway of introduction of PDCoV onto the operations surveyed.

  3. A benchmark test of accuracy and precision in estimating dynamical systems characteristics from a time series.

    PubMed

    Rispens, S M; Pijnappels, M; van Dieën, J H; van Schooten, K S; Beek, P J; Daffertshofer, A

    2014-01-22

    Characteristics of dynamical systems are often estimated to describe physiological processes. For instance, Lyapunov exponents have been determined to assess the stability of the cardio-vascular system, respiration, and, more recently, human gait and posture. However, the systematic evaluation of the accuracy and precision of these estimates is problematic because the proper values of the characteristics are typically unknown. We fill this void with a set of standardized time series with well-defined dynamical characteristics that serve as a benchmark. Estimates ought to match these characteristics, at least to good approximation. We outline a procedure to employ this generic benchmark test and illustrate its capacity by examining methods for estimating the maximum Lyapunov exponent. In particular, we discuss algorithms by Wolf and co-workers and by Rosenstein and co-workers and evaluate their performances as a function of signal length and signal-to-noise ratio. In all scenarios, the precision of Rosenstein's algorithm was found to be equal to or greater than Wolf's algorithm. The latter, however, appeared more accurate if reasonably large signal lengths are available and noise levels are sufficiently low. Due to its modularity, the presented benchmark test can be used to evaluate and tune any estimation method to perform optimally for arbitrary experimental data.

  4. Novel covariance-based neutrality test of time-series data reveals asymmetries in ecological and economic systems

    DOE PAGES

    Washburne, Alex D.; Burby, Joshua W.; Lacker, Daniel; ...

    2016-09-30

    Systems as diverse as the interacting species in a community, alleles at a genetic locus, and companies in a market are characterized by competition (over resources, space, capital, etc) and adaptation. Neutral theory, built around the hypothesis that individual performance is independent of group membership, has found utility across the disciplines of ecology, population genetics, and economics, both because of the success of the neutral hypothesis in predicting system properties and because deviations from these predictions provide information about the underlying dynamics. However, most tests of neutrality are weak, based on static system properties such as species-abundance distributions or themore » number of singletons in a sample. Time-series data provide a window onto a system’s dynamics, and should furnish tests of the neutral hypothesis that are more powerful to detect deviations from neutrality and more informative about to the type of competitive asymmetry that drives the deviation. Here, we present a neutrality test for time-series data. We apply this test to several microbial time-series and financial time-series and find that most of these systems are not neutral. Our test isolates the covariance structure of neutral competition, thus facilitating further exploration of the nature of asymmetry in the covariance structure of competitive systems. Much like neutrality tests from population genetics that use relative abundance distributions have enabled researchers to scan entire genomes for genes under selection, we anticipate our time-series test will be useful for quick significance tests of neutrality across a range of ecological, economic, and sociological systems for which time-series data are available. Here, future work can use our test to categorize and compare the dynamic fingerprints of particular competitive asymmetries (frequency dependence, volatility smiles, etc) to improve forecasting and management of complex adaptive systems.« less

  5. Novel covariance-based neutrality test of time-series data reveals asymmetries in ecological and economic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Washburne, Alex D.; Burby, Joshua W.; Lacker, Daniel; Allesina, Stefano

    2016-09-30

    Systems as diverse as the interacting species in a community, alleles at a genetic locus, and companies in a market are characterized by competition (over resources, space, capital, etc) and adaptation. Neutral theory, built around the hypothesis that individual performance is independent of group membership, has found utility across the disciplines of ecology, population genetics, and economics, both because of the success of the neutral hypothesis in predicting system properties and because deviations from these predictions provide information about the underlying dynamics. However, most tests of neutrality are weak, based on static system properties such as species-abundance distributions or the number of singletons in a sample. Time-series data provide a window onto a system’s dynamics, and should furnish tests of the neutral hypothesis that are more powerful to detect deviations from neutrality and more informative about to the type of competitive asymmetry that drives the deviation. Here, we present a neutrality test for time-series data. We apply this test to several microbial time-series and financial time-series and find that most of these systems are not neutral. Our test isolates the covariance structure of neutral competition, thus facilitating further exploration of the nature of asymmetry in the covariance structure of competitive systems. Much like neutrality tests from population genetics that use relative abundance distributions have enabled researchers to scan entire genomes for genes under selection, we anticipate our time-series test will be useful for quick significance tests of neutrality across a range of ecological, economic, and sociological systems for which time-series data are available. Here, future work can use our test to categorize and compare the dynamic fingerprints of particular competitive asymmetries (frequency dependence, volatility smiles, etc) to improve forecasting and management of complex adaptive systems.

  6. Novel Covariance-Based Neutrality Test of Time-Series Data Reveals Asymmetries in Ecological and Economic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Burby, Joshua W.; Lacker, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Systems as diverse as the interacting species in a community, alleles at a genetic locus, and companies in a market are characterized by competition (over resources, space, capital, etc) and adaptation. Neutral theory, built around the hypothesis that individual performance is independent of group membership, has found utility across the disciplines of ecology, population genetics, and economics, both because of the success of the neutral hypothesis in predicting system properties and because deviations from these predictions provide information about the underlying dynamics. However, most tests of neutrality are weak, based on static system properties such as species-abundance distributions or the number of singletons in a sample. Time-series data provide a window onto a system’s dynamics, and should furnish tests of the neutral hypothesis that are more powerful to detect deviations from neutrality and more informative about to the type of competitive asymmetry that drives the deviation. Here, we present a neutrality test for time-series data. We apply this test to several microbial time-series and financial time-series and find that most of these systems are not neutral. Our test isolates the covariance structure of neutral competition, thus facilitating further exploration of the nature of asymmetry in the covariance structure of competitive systems. Much like neutrality tests from population genetics that use relative abundance distributions have enabled researchers to scan entire genomes for genes under selection, we anticipate our time-series test will be useful for quick significance tests of neutrality across a range of ecological, economic, and sociological systems for which time-series data are available. Future work can use our test to categorize and compare the dynamic fingerprints of particular competitive asymmetries (frequency dependence, volatility smiles, etc) to improve forecasting and management of complex adaptive systems. PMID:27689714

  7. Novel Covariance-Based Neutrality Test of Time-Series Data Reveals Asymmetries in Ecological and Economic Systems.

    PubMed

    Washburne, Alex D; Burby, Joshua W; Lacker, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Systems as diverse as the interacting species in a community, alleles at a genetic locus, and companies in a market are characterized by competition (over resources, space, capital, etc) and adaptation. Neutral theory, built around the hypothesis that individual performance is independent of group membership, has found utility across the disciplines of ecology, population genetics, and economics, both because of the success of the neutral hypothesis in predicting system properties and because deviations from these predictions provide information about the underlying dynamics. However, most tests of neutrality are weak, based on static system properties such as species-abundance distributions or the number of singletons in a sample. Time-series data provide a window onto a system's dynamics, and should furnish tests of the neutral hypothesis that are more powerful to detect deviations from neutrality and more informative about to the type of competitive asymmetry that drives the deviation. Here, we present a neutrality test for time-series data. We apply this test to several microbial time-series and financial time-series and find that most of these systems are not neutral. Our test isolates the covariance structure of neutral competition, thus facilitating further exploration of the nature of asymmetry in the covariance structure of competitive systems. Much like neutrality tests from population genetics that use relative abundance distributions have enabled researchers to scan entire genomes for genes under selection, we anticipate our time-series test will be useful for quick significance tests of neutrality across a range of ecological, economic, and sociological systems for which time-series data are available. Future work can use our test to categorize and compare the dynamic fingerprints of particular competitive asymmetries (frequency dependence, volatility smiles, etc) to improve forecasting and management of complex adaptive systems.

  8. Ethinyl Estradiol and Norelgestromin Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... the skin. One patch is applied once a week for 3 weeks, followed by a patch-free week. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, ... new patch on the same day of the week (the Patch Change Day). Apply a new patch ...

  9. Analgesic Microneedle Patch for Neuropathic Pain Therapy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xi; Pascual, Conrado; Lieu, Christopher; Oh, Seajin; Wang, Ji; Zou, Bende; Xie, Julian; Li, Zhaohui; Xie, James; Yeomans, David C; Wu, Mei X; Xie, Xinmin Simon

    2017-01-24

    Neuropathic pain caused by nerve injury is debilitating and difficult to treat. Current systemic pharmacological therapeutics for neuropathic pain produce limited pain relief and have undesirable side effects, while current local anesthetics tend to nonspecifically block both sensory and motor functions. Calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), a neuropeptide released from sensory nerve endings, appears to play a significant role in chronic neuropathic pain. In this study, an analgesic microneedle (AMN) patch was developed using dissolvable microneedles to transdermally deliver selective CGRP antagonist peptide in a painless manner for the treatment of localized neuropathic pain. Local analgesic effects were evaluated in rats by testing behavioral pain sensitivity in response to thermal and mechanical stimuli using neuropathic pain models such as spared-nerve injury and diabetic neuropathy pain, as well as neurogenic inflammatory pain model induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. Unlike several conventional therapies, the AMN patches produced effective analgesia on neuropathic pain without disturbing the normal nociception and motor function of the rat, resulting from the high specificity of the delivered peptide against CGRP receptors. The AMN patches did not cause skin irritation or systemic side effects. These results demonstrate that dissolvable microneedle patches delivering CGRP antagonist peptide provide an effective, safe, and simple approach to mitigate neuropathic pain with significant advantages over current treatments.

  10. Pretest Report for the Full Span Propulsive Wing/Canard Model Test in the NASA Langley 4 x 7 Meter Low Speed Wind Tunnel Second Series Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, V. R.

    1986-01-01

    A full span propulsive wing/canard model is to be tested in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) 4 x 7 meter low speed wind tunnel. These tests are a continuation of the tests conducted in Feb. 1984, NASA test No.290, and are being conducted under NASA Contract NAS1-17171. The purpose of these tests is to obtain extensive lateral-directional data with a revised fuselage concept. The wings, canards, and vertical tail of this second test series model are the same as tested in the previous test period. The fuselage and internal flow path have been modified to better reflect an external configuration suitable for a fighter airplane. Internal ducting and structure were changed as required to provide test efficiency and blowing control. The model fuselage tested during the 1984 tests was fabricated with flat sides to provide multiple wing and canard placement variations. The locations of the wing and canard are important variables in configuration development. With the establishment of the desired relative placement of the lifting surfaces, a typically shaped fuselage has been fabricated for these tests. This report provides the information necessary for the second series tests of the propulsive wing/canard model. The discussion in this report is limited to that affected by the model changes and to the second series test program. The pretest report information for test 290 which is valid for the second series test was published in Rockwell report NR 83H-79. This report is presented as Appendix 1 and the modified fuselage stress report is presented as Appendix 2 to this pretest report.

  11. Patch forest: a hybrid framework of random forest and patch-based segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhongliu; Gillies, Duncan

    2016-03-01

    The development of an accurate, robust and fast segmentation algorithm has long been a research focus in medical computer vision. State-of-the-art practices often involve non-rigidly registering a target image with a set of training atlases for label propagation over the target space to perform segmentation, a.k.a. multi-atlas label propagation (MALP). In recent years, the patch-based segmentation (PBS) framework has gained wide attention due to its advantage of relaxing the strict voxel-to-voxel correspondence to a series of pair-wise patch comparisons for contextual pattern matching. Despite a high accuracy reported in many scenarios, computational efficiency has consistently been a major obstacle for both approaches. Inspired by recent work on random forest, in this paper we propose a patch forest approach, which by equipping the conventional PBS with a fast patch search engine, is able to boost segmentation speed significantly while retaining an equal level of accuracy. In addition, a fast forest training mechanism is also proposed, with the use of a dynamic grid framework to efficiently approximate data compactness computation and a 3D integral image technique for fast box feature retrieval.

  12. Metals Analysis Results for the Structural Qualification Test Series (SQTS) 01 - 05.

    SciTech Connect

    Zalk, D

    2006-04-11

    Enclosed is the report summarizing the metals analysis results at the Contained Firing Facility (CFF), during SQTS 01 - 05. This metals analysis includes evaluation of a bulk dust and surface swipe sampling protocol during the testing series that obtained samples at 3 primary locations in the CFF chamber area. The sampling protocol for each of the bulk dust samples involves an assessment of the concentration for 20 different metals, the oxidation state of selected metals, a particle size selective analysis, and morphological information. In addition, surface swipes were taken during SQTS 05 on the equipment and personnel door frames to indicate the characteristics of airborne metals due to leakage past the gasket seals. The bulk dust metals analysis indicates a nearly complete conversion of the aluminum casing to an oxide form with an even split between spherical and non-spherical morphology. Size selective analysis shows 83% of the particulates are in the inhalable size range of less than 100 microns and 46% are in the respirable range of less than 10 microns. Combining metals analysis and leakage results indicate the potential for a problematic personal exposure to metals external to the chamber unless modifications are made. Please feel free to call me at 2-8904 if you have any questions or if I may be of further service.

  13. Assessment of thermal gradient tube results from the HI series of fission product release tests

    SciTech Connect

    Norwood, K.S.

    1985-03-01

    A thermal gradient tube was used to analyze fission product vapors released from fuel heated in the HI test series. Complete deposition profiles were obtained for Cs, I, Ag, and Sb. The cesium profiles were complex and probably were dominated by Cs-S-O compounds formed by release of sulfur from furnace ceramics. The iodine profiles were simple, indicating that more than 99.5% of the released iodine behaved as a single nonvolatile species, probably CsI. Mass transfer coefficients for this species onto platinum were estimated to be 1.9 to 5.8 cm/s. Silver was probably released in elemental form, condensed to an aerosol, and captured by filters. Antimony was released as the element and reacted rapidly with platinum (or gold) as it deposited. Antimony profiles were calculated a priori with some success. A method was developed for isolating tellurium from platinum and mixed fission products in a form suitable for neutron activation analysis. The platinum samples were completely dissolved in acid (HCl/HNO/sub 3/), and the tellurium was precipitated on selenium carrier by reduction. Finally, tellurium was loaded onto Dowex 1X-4 ion-exchange resin for activation and analysis. Tellurium recovery was approx. 88%, and the theoretical sensitivity was approx. 30 ng.

  14. Metabolic and Subjective Results Review of the Integrated Suit Test Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, J.R.; Stroud, L.C.; Klein, J.; Desantis, L.; Gernhardt, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Crewmembers will perform a variety of exploration and construction activities on the lunar surface. These activities will be performed while inside an extravehicular activity (EVA) spacesuit. In most cases, human performance is compromised while inside an EVA suit as compared to a crewmember s unsuited performance baseline. Subjects completed different EVA type tasks, ranging from ambulation to geology and construction activities, in different lunar analog environments including overhead suspension, underwater and 1-g lunar-like terrain, in both suited and unsuited conditions. In the suited condition, the Mark III (MKIII) EVA technology demonstrator suit was used and suit pressure and suit weight were parameters tested. In the unsuited conditions, weight, mass, center of gravity (CG), terrain type and navigation were the parameters. To the extent possible, one parameter was varied while all others were held constant. Tests were not fully crossed, but rather one parameter was varied while all others were left in the most nominal setting. Oxygen consumption (VO2), modified Cooper-Harper (CH) ratings of operator compensation and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured for each trial. For each variable, a lower value correlates to more efficient task performance. Due to a low sample size, statistical significance was not attainable. Initial findings indicate that suit weight, CG and the operational environment can have a large impact on human performance during EVA. Systematic, prospective testing series such as those performed to date will enable a better understanding of the crucial interactions of the human and the EVA suit system and their environment. However, work remains to be done to confirm these findings. These data have been collected using only unsuited subjects and one EVA suit prototype that is known to fit poorly on a large demographic of the astronaut population. Key findings need to be retested using an EVA suit prototype better suited to a

  15. Whole-GUV patch-clamping.

    PubMed

    Garten, Matthias; Mosgaard, Lars D; Bornschlögl, Thomas; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Bassereau, Patricia; Toombes, Gilman E S

    2017-01-10

    Studying how the membrane modulates ion channel and transporter activity is challenging because cells actively regulate membrane properties, whereas existing in vitro systems have limitations, such as residual solvent and unphysiologically high membrane tension. Cell-sized giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) would be ideal for in vitro electrophysiology, but efforts to measure the membrane current of intact GUVs have been unsuccessful. In this work, two challenges for obtaining the "whole-GUV" patch-clamp configuration were identified and resolved. First, unless the patch pipette and GUV pressures are precisely matched in the GUV-attached configuration, breaking the patch membrane also ruptures the GUV. Second, GUVs shrink irreversibly because the membrane/glass adhesion creating the high-resistance seal (>1 GΩ) continuously pulls membrane into the pipette. In contrast, for cell-derived giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs), breaking the patch membrane allows the GPMV contents to passivate the pipette surface, thereby dynamically blocking membrane spreading in the whole-GMPV mode. To mimic this dynamic passivation mechanism, beta-casein was encapsulated into GUVs, yielding a stable, high-resistance, whole-GUV configuration for a range of membrane compositions. Specific membrane capacitance measurements confirmed that the membranes were truly solvent-free and that membrane tension could be controlled over a physiological range. Finally, the potential for ion transport studies was tested using the model ion channel, gramicidin, and voltage-clamp fluorometry measurements were performed with a voltage-dependent fluorophore/quencher pair. Whole-GUV patch-clamping allows ion transport and other voltage-dependent processes to be studied while controlling membrane composition, tension, and shape.

  16. Blockade of patch-based μ opioid receptors in the striatum attenuates methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference and reduces activation of the patch compartment.

    PubMed

    Horner, Kristen A; Logan, Mary Caroline; Fisher, Trevor J; Logue, Jordan B

    2017-02-05

    The behavioral effects of methamphetamine (METH) are mediated by the striatum, which is divided into the patch compartment, which mediates limbic and reward functions, and the matrix compartment, which mediates sensorimotor tasks. METH treatment results in repetitive behavior that is related to enhanced relative activation of the patch versus the matrix compartment. The patch, but not the matrix compartment contains a high density of μ opioid receptors, and localized blockade of patch-based μ opioid receptors attenuates METH-induced patch-enhanced activity and repetitive behaviors. Numerous studies have examined patch-enhanced activity and the contribution of patch-associated μ opioid receptors to METH-induced repetitive behavior, but it is not known whether patch-enhanced activity occurs during METH-mediated reward, nor is it known if patch-based μ opioid receptors contribute to METH reward. The goals of this study were to determine if blockade of patch-based μ opioid receptors alters METH-induced conditioned place preference (CPP), as well activation of the patch and matrix compartments following METH-mediated CPP. A biased conditioning paradigm was used to assess CPP, and conditioning occurred over an 8-d period. Animals were bilaterally infused in the striatum with the μ-specific antagonist CTAP or vehicle prior to conditioning. Animals were tested for preference 24h after the last day of conditioning, sacrificed and the brains processed for immunohistochemistry. Blockade of patch-based μ opioid receptors reduced METH-induced CPP, and reduced patch-enhanced c-Fos expression in the striatum following METH-mediated CPP. These data indicate that patch-enhanced activity is associated with METH-mediated reward and patch-based μ opioid receptors contribute to this phenomenon.

  17. Effect of patch borders on coercivity in amorphous rare earth-transition metal thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, G.; Fu, H.; Giles, R. C.; Mansuripur, M.

    1991-01-01

    The coercivity at the micron scale is a very important property of magneto-optical media. It is a key factor that determines the magnetic domain wall movement and domain reversal. How the coercivity is influenced by a special type of patch borders is discussed. Patch formation is a general phenomenon in growth processes of amorphous rare earth transition metal thin films. Different patches may stem from different seeds and the patch borders are formed when they merge. Though little is known about the exact properties of the borders, we may expect that the exchange interaction at the patch border is weaker than that within a patch, since there is usually a spatial gap between two patches. Computer simulations were performed on a 2-D hexagonal lattice consisting of 37 complete patches with random shape and size. From the series of simulations we may conclude that the domain in the patch with borders of 30 percent exchange strength can expand most easily to the whole lattice, because the exchange strength can expand most easily to the whole lattice, because the exchange strength of the border is not too high to prevent the domain from growing within the patch and it is not too low to prevent the domain from expanding beyond the patch.

  18. Periodic creation of polar cap patches from auroral transients in the cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, K.; Taguchi, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2016-06-01

    On 24 November 2012, an interval of polar cap patches was identified by an all-sky airglow imager located near the dayside cusp. During the interval, the successive appearance of poleward moving auroral forms (PMAFs) was detected, which are known to represent ionospheric manifestations of pulsed magnetic reconnections at the dayside magnetopause. All of the patches observed during the interval appeared from these transient auroral features (i.e., there was a one-to-one correspondence between PMAFs and newly created baby patches). This fact strongly suggests that patches can be directly and seamlessly created from a series of PMAFs. The optical intensities of the baby patches were 100-150 R, which is slightly lower than typical patch luminosity on the nightside and may imply that PMAF-induced patches are generally low density. The generation of such patches could be explained by impact ionization due to soft particle precipitation into PMAFs traces. In spite of the faint signature of the baby patches, two coherent HF radars of the SuperDARN network observed backscatter echoes in the central polar cap, which represented signatures of plasma irregularities associated with the baby patches. These indicate that patches created from PMAFs have the potential to affect the satellite communications environment in the central polar cap region.

  19. Formulating and testing a method for perturbing precipitation time series to reflect anticipated climatic changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jomo Danielsen Sørup, Hjalte; Georgiadis, Stylianos; Bülow Gregersen, Ida; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    Urban water infrastructure has very long planning horizons, and planning is thus very dependent on reliable estimates of the impacts of climate change. Many urban water systems are designed using time series with a high temporal resolution. To assess the impact of climate change on these systems, similarly high-resolution precipitation time series for future climate are necessary. Climate models cannot at their current resolutions provide these time series at the relevant scales. Known methods for stochastic downscaling of climate change to urban hydrological scales have known shortcomings in constructing realistic climate-changed precipitation time series at the sub-hourly scale. In the present study we present a deterministic methodology to perturb historical precipitation time series at the minute scale to reflect non-linear expectations to climate change. The methodology shows good skill in meeting the expectations to climate change in extremes at the event scale when evaluated at different timescales from the minute to the daily scale. The methodology also shows good skill with respect to representing expected changes of seasonal precipitation. The methodology is very robust against the actual magnitude of the expected changes as well as the direction of the changes (increase or decrease), even for situations where the extremes are increasing for seasons that in general should have a decreasing trend in precipitation. The methodology can provide planners with valuable time series representing future climate that can be used as input to urban hydrological models and give better estimates of climate change impacts on these systems.

  20. Structural health monitoring of composite repair patches in bridge rehabilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhanjun; Ghosh, Kumar; Qing, Xinlin; Karbhari, Vistasp; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2006-03-01

    In recent years, there are many issues involving safety on old bridges, aircrafts and other structures, which threaten the lives of the people using those structures, as well as the structures themselves. To prevent future failure, various measures are being taken. Structure rehabilitations with carbon fiber reinforced composite patches have been adopted and demonstrated to be an excellent way to enhance/repair the structures and prolong the service life. However, there are still many problems residing in this kind of technology that remain unsolved, for example, the failure of the interface between composite repair patches and their host structures. This is a critical issue that must be addressed in order to show the viability of composite patches. In order to study debond occurring between composite repair patches and their host structures, a structure health monitoring scheme was demonstrated on a concrete bridge model in the laboratory. The system is based on active sensing with diagnostic lamb waves, in which piezoelectric transducers are used as both sensors and actuators. In the test, six SMART Layers, each having eight piezoelectirc transducers, were integrated with two composite repair strips on the deck slab of the concrete bridge model. For the three diagnostic layers with each composite repair patch, two layers were bonded on the top surface of the patch, and the other is embedded at the interface between the composite repair patch and the deck slab of the concrete bridge model. The loading procedure of the test included three phases. First, the bridge model was preloaded to initiate cracks on the deck slabs and the repair patches were then implemented. Second, the load was raised to reach the shear capacity of the girders of the bridge model and then the repair patches were implemented on those girders. Lastly, the structure was loaded to damage the deck slabs. During the test, the initiation and development of debond between composite repair patches

  1. Allergy Skin Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... allergic rhinitis) Allergic asthma Dermatitis (eczema) Food allergies Penicillin allergy Bee venom allergy Latex allergy Skin tests are ... may recommend this test to check for an allergy to insect venom or penicillin. Patch test Patch testing is generally done to ...

  2. Taro corms mucilage/HPMC based transdermal patch: an efficient device for delivery of diltiazem hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Gunjan; Saha, Nayan Ranjan; Roy, Indranil; Bhattacharyya, Amartya; Bose, Madhura; Mishra, Roshnara; Rana, Dipak; Bhattacharjee, Debashis; Chattopadhyay, Dipankar

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work is to examine the effectiveness of mucilage/hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) based transdermal patch (matrix type) as a drug delivery device. We have successfully extracted mucilage from Colocasia esculenta (Taro) corms and prepared diltiazem hydrochloride incorporated mucilage/HPMC based transdermal patches using various wt% of mucilage by the solvent evaporation technique. Characterization of both mucilage and transdermal patches has been done by several techniques such as Molisch's test, organoleptic evaluation of mucilage, mechanical, morphological and thermal analysis of transdermal patches. Skin irritation test is studied on hairless Albino rat skin showing that transdermal patches are apparently free of potentially hazardous skin irritation. Fourier transform infrared analysis shows that there is no interaction between drug, mucilage and HPMC while scanning electron microscopy shows the surface morphology of transdermal patches. In vitro drug release time of mucilage-HPMC based transdermal patches is prolonged with increasing mucilage concentration in the formulation.

  3. A Model for Optimal Constrained Adaptive Testing. Law School Admission Council Computerized Testing Report. LSAC Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Reese, Lynda M.

    A model for constrained computerized adaptive testing is proposed in which the information on the test at the ability estimate is maximized subject to a large variety of possible constraints on the contents of the test. At each item-selection step, a full test is first assembled to have maximum information at the current ability estimate fixing…

  4. Changes to United Nations Test Series 7 for Hazard Division 1.6 Explosive Articles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    substances that pass the UN TS 7(c)(ii) Friability test and 7(e) EIDS external fire test unless their maximum cross-sectional dimension (e.g...response obtained during article tests. The logic behind the choice of boostering component tests is as follows: • The UN TS 7 (c)(ii) Friability ...c) (ii) Friability test • UN TS 7 Type 7 (e) EIDS External Fire test – Allow other EM containing components, e.g., explosive actuators or

  5. The effect of cell design and test criteria on the series/parallel performance of nickel cadmium cells and batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpert, G.; Webb, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Three batteries were operated in parallel from a common bus during charge and discharge. SMM utilized NASA Standard 20AH cells and batteries, and LANDSAT-D NASA 50AH cells and batteries of a similar design. Each battery consisted of 22 series connected cells providing the nominal 28V bus. The three batteries were charged in parallel using the voltage limit/current taper mode wherein the voltage limit was temperature compensated. Discharge occurred on the demand of the spacecraft instruments and electronics. Both flights were planned for three to five year missions. The series/parallel configuration of cells and batteries for the 3-5 yr mission required a well controlled product with built-in reliability and uniformity. Examples of how component, cell and battery selection methods affect the uniformity of the series/parallel operation of the batteries both in testing and in flight are given.

  6. Normal heartbeat series are nonchaotic, nonlinear, and multifractal: new evidence from semiparametric and parametric tests.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Richard T; Cecen, Aydin A; Erkal, Cahit

    2009-06-01

    We present new evidence that normal heartbeat series are nonchaotic, nonlinear, and multifractal. In addition to considering the largest Lyapunov exponent and the correlation dimension, the results of the parametric and semiparametric estimation of the long memory parameter (long-range dependence) unambiguously reveal that the underlying process is nonstationary, multifractal, and has strong nonlinearity.

  7. Minimum-test series for the intermediate-size inducer pump in SPTF at ETEC

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-04

    The overall test program includes pump assembly, installation, testing, removal from the test loop, disassembly and final inspection of the entire pump. Testing will include: checkout tests, head/flow and efficiency characterizations at design and two-loop flow/speed ratios and at selected sodium temperatures; suction performance determination; and a design point endurance test, up to 2000 hours, based on available time. The endurance test will be run at 100 percent NPSH margin. After testing, the pump will be cleaned of sodium, disassembled, and examined to determine the effects of operation at 100 percent NPSH margin for an extended period of time. The testing will be done at Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC). Assembly, sodium removal, disassembly, and initial inspection will be performed at Component Handling and Cleaning Facility (CHCF) and sodium testing will be done at Sodium Pump Test Facility (SPTF).

  8. Failure analysis and surety design of composite patching systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Hamoush, Sameer

    2004-08-01

    This work presents an experimental evaluation of patch repair of solid laminated composites. The study was focused on destructive and nondestructive tests of full-scale repaired panels under static tension loading conditions. The testing program consisted of ten panels: three pristine, three damaged, three repaired and one repaired with mismatched fiber orientation patch. The evaluated panels were (300 mm x 675 mm) in size and consisted of 6-ply ((-60 /60/0){sub s}) quasi-isotropic laminates. The destructive tests were performed by North Carolina A&T State University and the nondestructive tests were performed by Iowa State University using Pulse-echo C-scan, Air coupled TTU and Auto-Tap. Sandia National Laboratories validated the NDT tests by implementing NDE field methods. Based on the evaluation performed in this study, it appears that the patch repair is an effective means in retrofitting damaged solid composite laminates.

  9. TESTING FOR HIGHER EDUCATION, CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE AND FUTURE FOCUS. STUDENT PERSONNEL SERIES NO. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BARCLAY, JAMES R.

    THE ROLE OF TESTING AS A SPECIAL MODERN TECHNIQUE OF ASSESSMENT IN COLLEGE ADMISSIONS IS EXAMINED. THE EMPHASIS IS UPON THE USE OF TESTS AS PREDICTORS OF SUCCESS IN COLLEGE, THE CLARIFICATION OF CRITERIA USED TO EVALUATE HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN THIS SETTING, AND THE BROADER IMPLICATIONS OF CULTURAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL DIMENSIONS OF TESTING AND TEST USAGE.…

  10. The Language Testing Cycle: From Inception to Washback. Series S, Number 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wigglesworth, Gillian, Ed.; Elder, Catherine, Ed.

    A selection of essays on language testing includes: "Perspectives on the Testing Cycle: Setting the Scene" (Catherine Elder, Gillian Wigglesworth); "The Politicisation of English: The Case of the STEP Test and the Chinese Students" (Lesleyanne Hawthorne); "Developing Language Tests for Specific Populations" (Rosemary…

  11. Shape of patch edges affects edge permeability for meadow voles.

    PubMed

    Nams, Vilis O

    2012-09-01

    Human development typically fragments natural habitats into patches, affecting population and metapopulation dynamics via changes in animal behavior. Emigration from one habitat patch to another has a large effect on population and metapopulation dynamics. One factor that affects emigration is permeability of patch edges. This study looks at the effects of edge shape (convex, concave, and straight) on edge permeability for meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus).. I tested five hypotheses for responses of animal movement to patch shape: (1) neutral edge response; (2) edge attraction; (3) edge avoidance; (4) time-minimizing, in which an animal attempts to minimize the time spent in inhospitable matrix, and thus travels as far as possible in the patch before crossing the edge; and (5) protection, in which an animal attempts to maximize protection while in the inhospitable matrix by keeping the patch close by. These hypotheses were tested by an experimental manipulation of meadow vole habitats. A strip was mowed with different edge shapes through an old field, and vole response was measured by tracking plates. Voles crossed edges at concave treatments twice as often compared to convex and straight shapes. Hypotheses (2) and (5) were supported. Although edge attraction causes a passive effect of a decrease in edge-crossing at concavities, this effect was eclipsed by the active effect of voles choosing to cross at concavities. The results can be generalized to edge tortuosity in general. Conservation biologists should consider edge shapes when exploring the effects of habitat fragmentation on animal populations.

  12. Transdermal Buprenorphine Patches for Postoperative Pain Control in Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Singh, Prithvi Kumar; Verma, Reetu; Chandra, Girish; Bhatia, Vinod Kumar; Singh, Dinesh; Bogra, Jaishri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic derivative of thebaine; its low concentration is sufficient to provide effective pain relief. Aim To evaluate the efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine patch in postoperative pain management. Materials and Methods After ethical approval and taking informed consent from the patients, they were randomized into three groups (n=30 in each group) using a computer generated random number table. Group A: placebo patch; Group B: buprenorphine (10mg) patch and Group C: buprenorphine (20mg) patch. Haemodynamic and analgesic effects were compared by using analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Turkey’s post hoc test. The proportion of side effects was compared using the Chi-square test. Results Haemodynamic changes were not statistically different in all the three groups A, B and C, whereas at the end of surgery VAS score of Group A subjects was significantly higher (4.93±0.98) as compared to Group B (1.73±0.64) and Group C (1.40±0.50). On 2nd postoperative day, no pain was reported by the Group C patients and on 4th day after surgery, no pain was reported by Group B patients. Conclusion The transdermal buprenorphine patch (20mg) was effective in attenuating postoperative pain, maintaining haemodynamic stability requiring no rescue analgesia, with fewer postoperative rescue analgesic requirements in low dose of buprenorphine patch (10mg) group. PMID:27504383

  13. Patch Size and Isolation Predict Plant Species Density in a Naturally Fragmented Forest

    PubMed Central

    Munguía-Rosas, Miguel A.; Montiel, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    Studies of the effects of patch size and isolation on plant species density have yielded contrasting results. However, much of the available evidence comes from relatively recent anthropogenic forest fragments which have not reached equilibrium between extinction and immigration. This is a critical issue because the theory clearly states that only when equilibrium has been reached can the number of species be accurately predicted by habitat size and isolation. Therefore, species density could be better predicted by patch size and isolation in an ecosystem that has been fragmented for a very long time. We tested whether patch area, isolation and other spatial variables explain variation among forest patches in plant species density in an ecosystem where the forest has been naturally fragmented for long periods of time on a geological scale. Our main predictions were that plant species density will be positively correlated with patch size, and negatively correlated with isolation (distance to the nearest patch, connectivity, and distance to the continuous forest). We surveyed the vascular flora (except lianas and epiphytes) of 19 forest patches using five belt transects (50×4 m each) per patch (area sampled per patch = 0.1 ha). As predicted, plant species density was positively associated (logarithmically) with patch size and negatively associated (linearly) with patch isolation (distance to the nearest patch). Other spatial variables such as patch elevation and perimeter, did not explain among-patch variability in plant species density. The power of patch area and isolation as predictors of plant species density was moderate (together they explain 43% of the variation), however, a larger sample size may improve the explanatory power of these variables. Patch size and isolation may be suitable predictors of long-term plant species density in terrestrial ecosystems that are naturally and anthropogenically fragmented. PMID:25347818

  14. Development, testing, and certification of the Northrup, Inc., ML series concentrating solar collector model NSC-01-0732

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    A summary is presented of the additional development work on the existing ML Series concentrating solar collector for use with solar heating and cooling systems. The report discusses the intended use of the final report, describes the development hardware, lists deliverable end items, deals with problems encountered during fabrication and testing, and includes certification statements of performance. This report shows that the products developed are marketable and suitable for public use.

  15. Full-Scale Wind-Tunnel Tests of a Series of Metal Propellers on a VE-7 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weick, Fred E

    1929-01-01

    An adjustable blade metal propeller was tested at five different angle settings, forming a series varying in pitch. The propeller was mounted on a VE-7 airplane in the twenty-foot propeller research tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The efficiencies were found to be from 4 to 7 per cent higher than those of standard wood propellers operating under the same conditions. The results are given in convenient form for use in selecting propellers for aircraft.

  16. Some Psychometric and Legal Considerations in Cooperative Testing. Professional Series 74-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorham, William A.

    Cooperative testing is a rather specific and practical aspect of validity generalization or test transportability. It refers to two or more units of government combining their testing and/or recruiting efforts. The Intergovernmental Personnel Act of 1970 (P.L. 1-648) made specific provision for cooperative examining in stating that the Civil…

  17. A Review of State Test Security Laws in 2013. ACT Research Report Series, 2014 (1)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croft, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Test security has increased in importance in the last few years given high-profile cases of educator misconduct. This paper provides a review of state test security statutes and regulations related to statewide achievement testing using as a framework recent best practices reports by the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Education…

  18. National Tests and Education Reform: Are They Compatible? William H. Angoff Memorial Lecture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lyle V.

    The President and the Department of Education have advocated national testing, but they have not really justified their use. Most educators argue for the importance of multiple assessments, rather than a single test of achievement with great impact on the future of a student and an educational system. Misuses of test results would plague national…

  19. Effective Strategies for Dealing with Test Anxiety. Teacher to Teacher Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Lisa

    Test anxiety is exceedingly common among learners in adult basic education. Any one or more of the following can cause individuals to experience test anxiety: learned behavior resulting from the expectations of parents, teachers, or significant others; associations that students have built between grades or test performance and personal worth;…

  20. The Effect of Schooling and Ability on Achievement Test Scores. NBER Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Karsten; Heckman, James J.; Mullen, Kathleen J.

    This study developed two methods for estimating the effect of schooling on achievement test scores that control for the endogeneity of schooling by postulating that both schooling and test scores are generated by a common unobserved latent ability. The methods were applied to data on schooling and test scores. Estimates from the two methods are in…

  1. A Classical Test Theory Perspective on LSAT Local Item Dependence. LSAC Research Report Series. Statistical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Lynda M.

    This study extended prior Law School Admission Council (LSAC) research related to the item response theory (IRT) local item independence assumption into the realm of classical test theory. Initially, results from the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and two other tests were investigated to determine the approximate state of local item independence…

  2. Smart patch piezoceramic actuator issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Steven F.; Denoyer, Keith K.; Yost, Brad

    1993-01-01

    The Phillips Laboratory is undertaking the challenge of finding new and innovative ways to integrate sensing, actuation, and the supporting control and power electronics into a compact self-contained unit to provide vibration suppression for a host structure. This self-contained unit is commonly referred to as a smart patch. The interfaces to the smart patch will be limited to standard spacecraft power and possibly a communications line. The effort to develop a smart patch involves both contractual and inhouse programs which are currently focused on miniaturization of the electronics associated with vibrational control using piezoceramic sensors and actuators. This paper is comprised of two distinct parts. The first part examines issues associated with bonding piezoceramic actuators to a host structure. Experimental data from several specimens with varying flexural stiffness are compared to predictions from two piezoelectric/substructure coupling models, the Blocked Force Model and the Uniform Strain Model with Perfect Bonding. The second part of the paper highlights a demonstration article smart patch created using the insights gained from inhouse efforts at the Phillips Laboratory. This demonstration article has self contained electronics on the same order of size as the actuator powered by a voltage differential of approximately 32 volts. This voltage is provided by four rechargeable 8 volt batteries.

  3. MS lesion segmentation using a multi-channel patch-based approach with spatial consistency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechrez, Roey; Goldberger, Jacob; Greenspan, Hayit

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents an automatic method for segmentation of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) in Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of the brain. The approach is based on similarities between multi-channel patches (T1, T2 and FLAIR). An MS lesion patch database is built using training images for which the label maps are known. For each patch in the testing image, k similar patches are retrieved from the database. The matching labels for these k patches are then combined to produce an initial segmentation map for the test case. Finally a novel iterative patch-based label refinement process based on the initial segmentation map is performed to ensure spatial consistency of the detected lesions. A leave-one-out evaluation is done for each testing image in the MS lesion segmentation challenge of MICCAI 2008. Results are shown to compete with the state-of-the-art methods on the MICCAI 2008 challenge.

  4. Open-source Software for Demand Forecasting of Clinical Laboratory Test Volumes Using Time-series Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Emad A.; Naugler, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Background: Demand forecasting is the area of predictive analytics devoted to predicting future volumes of services or consumables. Fair understanding and estimation of how demand will vary facilitates the optimal utilization of resources. In a medical laboratory, accurate forecasting of future demand, that is, test volumes, can increase efficiency and facilitate long-term laboratory planning. Importantly, in an era of utilization management initiatives, accurately predicted volumes compared to the realized test volumes can form a precise way to evaluate utilization management initiatives. Laboratory test volumes are often highly amenable to forecasting by time-series models; however, the statistical software needed to do this is generally either expensive or highly technical. Method: In this paper, we describe an open-source web-based software tool for time-series forecasting and explain how to use it as a demand forecasting tool in clinical laboratories to estimate test volumes. Results: This tool has three different models, that is, Holt-Winters multiplicative, Holt-Winters additive, and simple linear regression. Moreover, these models are ranked and the best one is highlighted. Conclusion: This tool will allow anyone with historic test volume data to model future demand.

  5. Results from Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Series 3 spent fuel dissolution tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.N.

    1990-06-01

    The dissolution and radionuclide release behavior of spent fuel in groundwater is being studied by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), formerly the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. Specimens prepared from pressurized water reactor fuel rod segments were tested in sealed stainless steel vessels in Nevada Test Site J-13 well water at 85{degree}C and 25{degree}C. The test matrix included three specimens of bare-fuel particles plus cladding hulls, two fuel rod segments with artificially defected cladding and water-tight end fittings, and an undefected fuel rod section with watertight end fittings. Periodic solution samples were taken during test cycles with the sample volumes replenished with fresh J-13 water. Test cycles were periodically terminated and the specimens restarted in fresh J-13 water. The specimens were run for three cycles for a total test duration of 15 months. 22 refs., 32 figs., 26 tabs.

  6. Monocular Patching May Induce Ipsilateral “Where” Spatial Bias

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peii; Erdahl, Lillian; Barrett, Anna M.

    2009-01-01

    Spatial bias is an asymmetry of perception and/or representation of spatial information —“where” bias —, or of spatially directed actions — “aiming” bias. A monocular patch may induce contralateral “where” spatial bias (the Sprague effect; Sprague (1966) Science, 153, 1544–1547). However, an ipsilateral patch-induced spatial bias may be observed if visual occlusion results in top-down, compensatory re-allocation of spatial perceptual or representational resources toward the region of visual deprivation. Tactile distraction from a monocular patch may also contribute to an ipsilateral bias. To examine these hypotheses, neurologically normal adults bisected horizontal lines at baseline without a patch, while wearing a monocular patch, and while wearing tactile-only and visual-only monocular occlusion. We fractionated “where” and “aiming” spatial bias components using a video apparatus to reverse visual feedback for half of the test trials. The results support monocular patch-induced ipsilateral “where” spatial errors, which are not consistent with the Sprague effect. Further, the present findings suggested that the induced ipsilateral bias may be primarily induced by visual deprivation, consistent with compensatory “where” resource re-allocation. PMID:19100274

  7. Local spread of metamitron resistant Chenopodium album L. patches.

    PubMed

    Aper, J; De Riek, J; Mechant, E; Bulcke, R; Reheul, D

    2011-01-01

    Molecular markers can provide valuable information on the spread of resistant weed biotypes. In particular, tracing local spread of resistant weed patches will give details on the importance of seed migration with machinery, manure, wind or birds. This study investigated the local spread of metamitron resistant Chenopodium album L. patches in the southwest region of the province West-Flanders (Belgium). During the summer of 2009, leaf and seed samples were harvested in 27 patches, distributed over 10 sugar beet fields and 1 maize field. The fields were grouped in four local clusters. Each cluster corresponded with the farmer who cultivated these fields. A cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) procedure identified the Ser264 to Gly mutation in the D1 protein, endowing resistance to metamitron, a key herbicide applied in sugar beet. The majority of the sampled plants within a patch (97% on average) carried this mutation. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was performed with 4 primer pairs and yielded 270 molecular markers, polymorphic for the whole dataset (303 samples). Analysis of molecular variance revealed that a significant part of the genetic variability was attributed to variation among the four farmer locations (12 %) and variation among Chenopodium album patches within the farmer locations (14%). In addition, Mantel tests revealed a positive correlation between genetic distances (linearised phipt between pairs of patches) and geographic distances (Mantel-coefficient significant at p = 0.002), suggesting isolation-by-distance. In one field, a decreased genetic diversity and strong genetic relationships between all the patches in this field supported the hypothesis of a recent introduction of resistant biotypes. Furthermore, genetic similarity between patches from different fields from the same farmer and from different farmers indicated that seed transport between neighbouring fields is likely to have an important impact on the

  8. Fairness of Selection Tests: A Critical Analysis. Professional Series 76-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, John E.; Schmidt, Frank L.

    The first section of this paper defines three incompatible ethical positions in regard to the fair and unbiased use of psychological tests for selection in minority and majority groups. Also in this section, five statistical definitions of "test fairness" are reviewed and examined critically for technical, logical, and social weaknesses. In the…

  9. Factors in Performance on the Law School Admission Test. Statistical Report. LSAC Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Kenneth M.; Powers, Donald E.

    This study was undertaken to clarify the internal structure of the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and shed light on the ability or abilities measured by the three item types that make up the test (logical reasoning, analytical reasoning, and reading comprehension). The study used data for two forms of the LSAT for general samples of LSAT…

  10. Advances in Educational and Psychological Testing: Theory and Applications. Evaluation in Education and Human Services Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hambleton, Ronald K., Ed.; Zaal, Jac N., Ed.

    The 14 chapters of this book focus on the technical advances, advances in applied settings, and emerging topics in the testing field. Part 1 discusses methodological advances, Part 2 considers developments in applied settings, and Part 3 reviews emerging topics in the field of testing. Part 1 papers include: (1) "Advances in…

  11. Shot BEE, A Test of the TEAPOT Series, 22 March 1955.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-24

    Volume: Shot APPLE 2 * Multi-shot Volume: Shots ESS through MET and Shot ZUCCHINI , the Final TEAPOT Tests. All volumes addressing the test events of...I1w 1( ,I r ESS N TURK I TESLA POST 2 \\BEE A-------------,-’ ZUCCHINI AL 1 ’I IWASP WASP PRIME APPLE 2 t MOTH HORNET HA - _ _ _I HADR II 31 II I News

  12. Test Anxiety: Theory, Assessment, and Treatment. The Series in Clinical and Community Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielberger, Charles D., Ed.; Vagg, Peter R., Ed.

    It is not surprising that a broad array of treatment programs have been developed to reduce test anxiety, since the consequences can be serious. The contributions in this volume review and evaluate the theory of test anxiety, its measurement, its manifestations, and possible treatments and their outcomes. The following chapters are included: (1)…

  13. Statistical Considerations in Choosing a Test Reliability Coefficient. ACT Research Report Series, 2012 (10)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, David; Wu, Yi-Fang

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to illustrate alpha's robustness and usefulness, using actual and simulated educational test data. The sampling properties of alpha are compared with the sampling properties of several other reliability coefficients: Guttman's lambda[subscript 2], lambda[subscript 4], and lambda[subscript 6]; test-retest reliability;…

  14. Dynamic Testing with Tangible Electronics: Measuring Children's Change in Strategy Use with a Series Completion Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resing, Wilma C. M.; Elliott, Julian G.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: This study sought to explore the use of a novel approach that incorporates dynamic testing and tangible electronics in the assessment of children's learning potential and strategy use. Sample: A total of 77 children with a mean age 8.9 years participated in the study; half of them were dynamically tested using graduate prompt techniques; the…

  15. The Second Century of Ability Testing: Some Predictions and Speculations. William H. Angoff Memorial Lecture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Embretson, Susan E.

    This report asserts that rapid changes in many areas, such as technology and communications, marked the 20th century, the first century of ability testing. Predictions about the second century of testing seem difficult in such a context. Yet, looking back to the turn of the last century, E. Kirkpatrick (1900) in his American Psychological…

  16. On Giving Test Takers a Choice among Constructive Response Items. LSAC Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Xiang Bo

    The Law School Admission Council (LSAC) is currently investigating the feasibility and advisability of administering a computerized Law School Admission Test (LSAT). In this context, using data from the College Boards 1989 National Advanced Placement (AP) Chemistry Examination for 18,462 test takers and a survey of all AP Chemistry teachers in…

  17. Habitat patch size and isolation as predictors of occupancy and number of argyrodine spider kleptoparasites in Nephila webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnarsson, Ingi

    2011-02-01

    How fully a suitable habitat patch is utilized by organisms depends crucially on patch size and isolation. Testing this interplay is made difficult in many systems by the arbitrariness of defining a "habitat patch", measuring its boarders, and relatively low detection probability of the inhabitants. Spider webs as habitat patches for obligate web kleptoparasites are free from these problems. Each individual web is a highly discrete and readily measured habitat patch, and the detection probability of argyrodine spider kleptoparasites is very nearly 1. Hence, spider webs emerge as simple systems for ecological models such as patch occupancy and metapopulation biology. Recently, I showed that the distribution of kleptoparasites among host webs relates both to web (patch) size as well as patch connectivity. Here, I test the relative importance of patch size versus isolation in explaining patch occupancy and abundance of inhabitants. I find that (1) web size is the better predictor of patch occupancy and abundance. (2) Web size is overall positively correlated with abundance, but predicts it most precisely among interconnected webs and not at all among the most isolated webs. Hence, patch occupancy and inhabitant abundance is explained by a rather complex interplay between patch size and isolation.

  18. Habitat patch size and isolation as predictors of occupancy and number of argyrodine spider kleptoparasites in Nephila webs.

    PubMed

    Agnarsson, Ingi

    2011-02-01

    How fully a suitable habitat patch is utilized by organisms depends crucially on patch size and isolation. Testing this interplay is made difficult in many systems by the arbitrariness of defining a "habitat patch", measuring its boarders, and relatively low detection probability of the inhabitants. Spider webs as habitat patches for obligate web kleptoparasites are free from these problems. Each individual web is a highly discrete and readily measured habitat patch, and the detection probability of argyrodine spider kleptoparasites is very nearly 1. Hence, spider webs emerge as simple systems for ecological models such as patch occupancy and metapopulation biology. Recently, I showed that the distribution of kleptoparasites among host webs relates both to web (patch) size as well as patch connectivity. Here, I test the relative importance of patch size versus isolation in explaining patch occupancy and abundance of inhabitants. I find that (1) web size is the better predictor of patch occupancy and abundance. (2) Web size is overall positively correlated with abundance, but predicts it most precisely among interconnected webs and not at all among the most isolated webs. Hence, patch occupancy and inhabitant abundance is explained by a rather complex interplay between patch size and isolation.

  19. Note: Characterization and test of a high input impedance RF amplifier for series nanowire detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Chao; Pei, Yufeng; Jiang, Zhou; Kang, Lin; Wu, Peiheng

    2016-09-01

    We designed a high input impedance RF amplifier based on Tower Jazz's 0.18 μm SiGe BiCMOS process for series nanowire detector. The characterization of its gain and input impedance with a vector network analyzer is described in detail for its specificity. The actual 15 dB gain should be the measured value subtracts 6 dB, which is easy to be ignored. Its input impedance can be equivalent to 6.7 kΩ ∥ 3.4 pF though fitting the measurement, whose accuracy is verified. The process of measurement provides a good reference to characterize the similar special amplifier with unmatched impedance.

  20. Testing the Effectiveness of Cognitive Analytic Therapy for Hypersexuality Disorder: An Intensive Time-Series Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kellett, Stephen; Simmonds-Buckley, Mel; Totterdell, Peter

    2016-07-06

    The evidence base for treatment of hypersexuality disorder (HD) has few studies with appropriate methodological rigor. This study therefore conducted a single case experiment of cognitive analytic therapy (CAT) for HD using an A/B design with extended follow-up. Cruising, pornography usage, masturbation frequency and associated cognitions and emotions were measured daily in a 231-day time series. Following a three-week assessment baseline (A: 21 days), treatment was delivered via outpatient sessions (B: 147 days), with the follow-up period lasting 63 days. Results show that cruising and pornography usage extinguished. The total sexual outlet score no longer met caseness, and the primary nomothetic hypersexuality outcome measure met recovery criteria. Reduced pornography consumption was mediated by reduced obsessionality and greater interpersonal connectivity. The utility of the CAT model for intimacy problems shows promise. Directions for future HD outcome research are also provided.

  1. Profile of GMAT® Testing: Citizenship Report: Testing Years 2010 through 2014. GMAC® Data-to-Go Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chisholm, Alex

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes five-year global GMAT testing trends and includes: (1) GMAT exams taken by citizenship; (2) GMAT exams taken by gender; (3) Mean age of GMAT examinees; (4) Mean GMAT Total score; and (5) GMAT score-sending breakdowns by program type (MBA, non-MBA master's, and doctoral/other), TY2014. This data brief can help build candidate…

  2. Profile of GMAT® Testing: North American Report. Testing Years 2010 through 2014. GMAC® Data-to-Go Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chisholm, Alex

    2014-01-01

    This Data-to-Go brief summarizes five year GMAT testing trends for US and Canadian residents, and race/ethnicity breakdowns for US citizens. It includes: (1) GMAT exams taken by US region, US state of residence, and race/ethnicity of examinees (US citizens only), (2) GMAT exams taken by Canadian residents, by Canadian province, (3) GMAT exams…

  3. Bayesian and Empirical Bayes Approaches to Setting Passing Scores on Mastery Tests. Publication Series in Mastery Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huynh, Huynh; Saunders, Joseph C., III

    The Bayesian approach to setting passing scores, as proposed by Swaminathan, Hambleton, and Algina, is compared with the empirical Bayes approach to the same problem that is derived from Huynh's decision-theoretic framework. Comparisons are based on simulated data which follow an approximate beta-binomial distribution and on real test results from…

  4. Abrasion Testing of Products Containing Nanomaterials, SOP-R-2: Scientific Operating Procedure Series: Release (R)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    Possible applications include CNTs incorporated in epoxy or other polymer matrices and TiO2 embedded in concrete . The particle number/mass concentration...i.e., epoxy test samples, CNT reinforced epoxy test samples, commercially available CNTs, concrete disks, plates painted with ENM-containing...show possible release of 30 nm TiO2 particles from self-cleaning concrete . ERDC SR-16-2 13 Figure 3. Total particle concentration released

  5. Profile of GMAT® Testing: Residence Report. Testing Years 2010 through 2014. GMAC® Data-to-Go Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chisholm, Alex

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes five-year global GMAT testing trends and includes: (1) GMAT exams taken by residence; (2) GMAT exams taken by gender; (3) Mean age of GMAT examinees; (4) Mean GMAT Total score; and (5) GMAT score-sending breakdowns by program type (MBA, non-MBA master's, and doctoral/other), TY 2014. This data brief can be used to help build…

  6. AGARD Flight Test Instrumentation Series. Volume 12. Aircraft Flight Test Data Processing. A Review of the State of the Art

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    can be at very high frequen- cies. Test systems need to cover ranges up to tens of thousands of Hz and, in the case of radaz and similar equipment...the tracking is in progress, a camera records the telescope view at regular intervals nf one, five, ten , or twenty frames per second. Each fram contains...submission can prevent costly reruns. 3.2.3 Sophistication The flowv of data processing should be as straightforward and simple as i.. con- sistent

  7. Contact Hypersensitivity to European Baseline Series and Corticosteroid Series Haptens in a Population of Adult Patients with Contact Eczema.

    PubMed

    Kot, Marek; Bogaczewicz, Jarosław; Kręcisz, Beata; Woźniacka, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Contact eczema (CE) is one of the most common skin diseases and is regarded as a reaction pattern. However, the skin can react in the same way to different stimuli, some of which may act together. The golden standard in the diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is the patch test. Contact allergy to topical corticosteroids is known to be gradually rising, and this represents a significant problem in the treatment of contact eczema. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of contact allergy to European Baseline Series and Corticosteroid Series haptens in a population of patients with CE. A group of 126 patients with the clinical diagnosis of contact eczema were patch tested with 28 European Baseline Series allergens and 8 corticosteroid allergens in different concentrations and in different media: 80 (64.5%) women and 46 (36.5%) men, mean age 50.4 years. The average duration of CE was 6.9 years. In total, 65 patients (51.6%) demonstrated an allergic reaction to at least one European Baseline Series allergen, and 22 patients (17.4%) to at least one corticosteroid. The most common allergens giving positive results were nickel sulfate (26.2%), cobalt chloride (15.1%), budesonide (14.3%), potassium dichromate (13.5%), and myroxylon pereirae resin (MPR) (11.9%). According our data, the European Baseline Series tests allow the cause of ACD to be identified in over 50% of cases.

  8. A generalized Grubbs-Beck test statistic for detecting multiple potentially influential low outliers in flood series

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohn, T.A.; England, J.F.; Berenbrock, C.E.; Mason, R.R.; Stedinger, J.R.; Lamontagne, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    he Grubbs-Beck test is recommended by the federal guidelines for detection of low outliers in flood flow frequency computation in the United States. This paper presents a generalization of the Grubbs-Beck test for normal data (similar to the Rosner (1983) test; see also Spencer and McCuen (1996)) that can provide a consistent standard for identifying multiple potentially influential low flows. In cases where low outliers have been identified, they can be represented as “less-than” values, and a frequency distribution can be developed using censored-data statistical techniques, such as the Expected Moments Algorithm. This approach can improve the fit of the right-hand tail of a frequency distribution and provide protection from lack-of-fit due to unimportant but potentially influential low flows (PILFs) in a flood series, thus making the flood frequency analysis procedure more robust.

  9. Qualifciation test series of the indium needle FEEP micro-propulsion system for LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharlemann, C.; Buldrini, N.; Killinger, R.; Jentsch, M.; Polli, A.; Ceruti, L.; Serafini, L.; DiCara, D.; Nicolini, D.

    2011-11-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna project (LISA) is a co-operative program between ESA and NASA to detect gravitational waves by measuring distortions in the space-time fabric. LISA Pathfinder is the precursor mission to LISA designed to validate the core technologies intended for LISA. One of the enabling technologies is the micro-propulsion system based on field emission thrusters necessary to achieve the uniquely stringent propulsion requirements. A consortium consisting of Astrium GmbH and the University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt (formerly AIT) was commissioned by ESA to develop and qualify the micro-propulsion system based on the Indium Needle FEEP technology. Several successful tests have verified the proper Needle Field Emission Electric Propulsion (FEEP) operation and the thermal and mechanical design of subcomponents of the developed system. For all functional tests, the flight representative Power Control Unit developed by SELEX Galileo S.p.A (also responsible for the Micro-Propulsion Subsystem (MPS) development) was used. Measurements have shown the exceptional stability of the thruster. An acceptance test of one Thruster Cluster Assembly (TCA) over 3600 h has shown the stable long term operation of the developed system. During the acceptance test compliance to all the applicable requirements have been shown such as a thrust resolution of 0.1 μN, thrust range capability between 0 and 100 μN, thrust overshoot much lower than the required 0.3 μN+3% and many others. In particular important is the voltage stability of the thruster (±1% over the duration of the testing) and the confirmation of the very low thrust noise. Based on the acceptance test the lifetime of the thruster is expected to exceed 39,000 h generating a total impulse bit of 6300 Ns at an average thrust level of 50 μN. A flight representative qualification model of the Needle FEEP Cluster Assembly (DM1) equipped with one active TCA has performed a qualification program

  10. Tunable Patch Antennas Using Microelectromechanical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-11

    Tunable Microstrip Patch Antena Using RF MEMS Technology, IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagations, Vol. 55, Issue 4, April 2007, pp. 1193...capacitors co-fabricated in the same process. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Microstrip antennas, patch antennas, radio frequency microelectromechanical systems...resonant mode. Keywords: Microstrip antennas, patch antennas, radio frequency microelectromechanical systems, tunable circuits and devices 2

  11. Testing the impact of stratigraphic uncertainty on spectral analyses of sedimentary series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Mathieu; Kotov, Sergey; De Vleeschouwer, David; Pas, Damien; Pälike, Heiko

    2016-09-01

    Spectral analysis is a key tool for identifying periodic patterns in sedimentary sequences, including astronomically related orbital signals. While most spectral analysis methods require equally spaced samples, this condition is rarely achieved either in the field or when sampling sediment core. Here, we propose a method to assess the impact of the uncertainty or error made in the measurement of the sample stratigraphic position on the resulting power spectra. We apply a Monte Carlo procedure to randomise the sample steps of depth series using a gamma distribution. Such a distribution preserves the stratigraphic order of samples and allows controlling the average and the variance of the distribution of sample distances after randomisation. We apply the Monte Carlo procedure on two geological datasets and find that gamma distribution of sample distances completely smooths the spectrum at high frequencies and decreases the power and significance levels of the spectral peaks in an important proportion of the spectrum. At 5 % of stratigraphic uncertainty, a small portion of the spectrum is completely smoothed. Taking at least three samples per thinnest cycle of interest should allow this cycle to be still observed in the spectrum, while taking at least four samples per thinnest cycle of interest should allow its significance levels to be preserved in the spectrum. At 10 and 15 % uncertainty, these thresholds increase, and taking at least four samples per thinnest cycle of interest should allow the targeted cycles to be still observed in the spectrum. In addition, taking at least 10 samples per thinnest cycle of interest should allow their significance levels to be preserved. For robust applications of the power spectrum in further studies, we suggest providing a strong control of the measurement of the sample position. A density of 10 samples per putative precession cycle is a safe sampling density for preserving spectral power and significance level in the

  12. OpenSSO Project Patches

    SciTech Connect

    NEBERGALL, CHRISTOPHER

    2009-06-08

    These are patches to Sun Microsystems open source OpenSSO project to fix various bugs and incorporate changes for Sandia and NNSA to use the product including fixes to improve OpenSSO's authentication and authorization abilities. These fixes will then by incorporated by Sun into their Sun Access Manager product, which is used by various DOE/NNSA plants and labs. Having Sun maintain these changes will relieve SNL and DOE from the cost of maintaining the changes themselves.

  13. Difficulty and Discrimination Parameters of Boston Naming Test Items in a Consecutive Clinical Series

    PubMed Central

    Pedraza, Otto; Sachs, Bonnie C.; Ferman, Tanis J.; Rush, Beth K.; Lucas, John A.

    2011-01-01

    The Boston Naming Test is one of the most widely used neuropsychological instruments; yet, there has been limited use of modern psychometric methods to investigate its properties at the item level. The current study used Item response theory to examine each item's difficulty and discrimination properties, as well as the test's measurement precision across the range of naming ability. Participants included 300 consecutive referrals to the outpatient neuropsychology service at Mayo Clinic in Florida. Results showed that successive items do not necessarily reflect a monotonic increase in psychometric difficulty, some items are inadequate to distinguish individuals at various levels of naming ability, multiple items provide redundant psychometric information, and measurement precision is greatest for persons within a low-average range of ability. These findings may be used to develop short forms, improve reliability in future test versions by replacing psychometrically poor items, and analyze profiles of intra-individual variability. PMID:21593059

  14. Pressure Distribution Tests on a Series of Clark Y Biplane Cellules with Special Reference to Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noyes, Richard W

    1933-01-01

    The pressure distribution data discussed in this report represents the results of part of an investigation conducted on the factors affecting the aerodynamic safety of airplanes. The present tests were made on semispan, circular-tipped Clark Y airfoil models mounted in the conventional manner on a separation plane. Pressure readings were made simultaneously at all test orifices at each of 20 angles of attack between -8 degrees and +90 degrees. The results of the tests on each wing arrangement are compared on the bases of maximum normal force coefficient, lateral stability at a low rate of roll, and relative longitudinal stability. Tabular data are also presented giving the center of pressure location of each wing.

  15. ORNL rod-bundle heat-transfer test data. Volume 7. Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility experimental data report for test series 3. 07. 9 - steady-state film boiling in upflow

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, C.B.; Felde, D.K.; Sutton, A.G.; Gould, S.S.; Morris, D.G.; Robinson, J.J.

    1982-05-01

    Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF) test series 3.07.9 was conducted by members of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pressurized-Water Reactor (ORNL-PWR) Blowdown Heat Transfer (BDHT) Separate-Effects Program on September 11, September 18, and October 1, 1980. The objective of the program is to investigate heat transfer phenomena believed to occur in PWRs during accidents, including small- and large-break loss-of-coolant accidents. Test series 3.07.9 was designed to provide steady-state film boiling data in rod bundle geometry under reactor accident-type conditions. This report presents the reduced instrument responses for THTF test series 3.07.9. Also included are uncertainties in the instrument responses, calculated mass flows, and calculated rod powers.

  16. Testing the heterospecific attraction hypothesis with time-series data on species co-occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Sebastián-González, Esther; Sánchez-Zapata, José Antonio; Botella, Francisco; Ovaskainen, Otso

    2010-01-01

    The distributional patterns of actively moving animals are influenced by the cues that the individuals use for choosing sites into which they settle. Individuals may gather information about habitat quality using two types of strategies, either directly assessing the relevant environmental factors, or using the presence of conspecifics or heterospecifics as an indirect measure of habitat quality. We examined patterns of heterospecific attraction with observational time-series data on a community of seven waterbird species breeding in artificial irrigation ponds. We fitted to the data a multivariate logistic regression model, which attributes the presence–absence of each species to a set of environmental and spatial covariates, to the presence of con- and heterospecifics in the previous year and to the presence of heterospecifics in the same year. All species showed a clear tendency to continue breeding in the same sites where they were observed in the previous year. Additionally, the presence of heterospecifics, both in the previous year and in the same year, generally increased the probability that the focal species was found breeding on a given pond. Our data thus give support for the heterospecific attraction hypothesis, though causal inference should be confirmed with manipulative experiments. PMID:20462909

  17. Volume Sensor Development Test Series 4 Results - Multi-Component Prototype Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-25

    multiple locations in the test space by two aerosols, The aerosols used were: 1) Old Spice High Endurance deodorant 2) Lysol disinfectant spray. 9... Deodorant / Lysol and Old spice Deodorant (High Endurance) were sprayed Aerosol 5 seconds, off for 5 seconds, then sprayed for 5 seconds at spray

  18. Validity Evidence for ACT Compass® Placement Tests. ACT Research Report Series 2014 (2)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westrick, Paul A.; Allen, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    We examined the validity of using Compass® test scores and high school grade point average (GPA) for placing students in first-year college courses and for identifying students at risk of not succeeding. Consistent with other research, the combination of high school GPA and Compass scores performed better than either measure used alone. Results…

  19. Design, Fabrication, and Testing of a Scalable Series Augmented Railgun Research Platform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    Lawrence Livermore (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is underway in order to conduct in-bore testing of laser peened [13], ion-beam...ion beam surface treatments on pairs of each of these materials. Tania Zaleski, Project Leader for Laser Peening at LLNL, has 44 conducted

  20. Relationship of Bar Examinations to Performance Tests of Lawyering Skills. Rand Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Stephen P.

    The relationship between scores on a typical bar exam and the ability to practice law was investigated with 485 applicants who took the bar exam and a 2-day performance test involving basic oral and written legal tasks. These tasks consisted of simulated cases; each participant functioned as the attorney for the plantiff in one case and as the…

  1. Measured versus predicted performance of the SERI test house: A validation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judkoff, R.; Wortman, D.; Burch, J.

    1983-11-01

    The reliability of building energy analysis simulations was investigated by testing key algorithms against detailed thermal performance data collected under controlled building operating conditions. Comparative studies showed significant disagreement among several programs when used to simulate the performance of passive solar buildings. The sources of prediction errors were assessed.

  2. Urine Testing for Drugs of Abuse. NIDA Research Monograph Series 73.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawks, Richard L., Ed.; Chiang, C. Nora, Ed.

    In the past 5 years, a growing concern over the use of illicit drugs in the workplace has led to an interest in urinalysis as a way to detect and deter drug use. This monograph provides information that will assist those involved in the planning or implementation of drug testing programs in making informed choices. Articles include: (1)…

  3. 77 FR 38282 - Final Test Guidelines; OCSPP 850 Series; Notice of Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... modified to specify that young birds cannot survive 5 days without feeding. Additionally, when delayed... Toxicity Test'' and with FIFRA SAP comments. A method for immobilizing bees using cold temperature was... satisfying FIFRA data requirements either in data call-ins issued pursuant to FIFRA section 3(c)(2)(B) or...

  4. Foraging decisions, patch use, and seasonality in egrets (Aves: ciconiiformes)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    Feeding snowy (Egretta thula) and great (Casmerodius albus) egrets were observed during 2 breeding seasons in coastal New Jersey and 2 brief winter periods in northeast Florida (USA). A number of tests based on assumptions of foraging models, predictions from foraging theory, and earlier empirical tests concerning time allocation and movement in foraging patches was made. Few of the expectations based on foraging theory and/or assumptions were supported by the empirical evidence. Snowy egrets fed with greater intensity and efficiency during the breeding season (when young were being fed) than during winter. They also showed some tendency to leave patches when their capture rate declined, and they spent more time foraging in patches when other birds were present nearby. Great egrets showed few of these tendencies, although they did leave patches when their intercapture intervals increased. Satiation differences had some influence on feeding rates in snowy egrets, but only at the end of feeding bouts. Some individuals of both species revisited areas in patches that had recently been exploited, and success rates were usually higher after the 2nd visit. Apparently, for predators of active prey, short-term changes in resource availability ('resource depression') may be more important than resource depletion, a common assumption in most optimal foraging theory models.

  5. Multistage Adaptive Testing for a Large-Scale Classification Test: Design, Heuristic Assembly, and Comparison with Other Testing Modes. ACT Research Report Series, 2012 (6)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Yi; Nozawa, Yuki; Gao, Xiaohong; Chang, Hua-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Multistage adaptive tests (MSTs) have gained increasing popularity in recent years. MST is a balanced compromise between linear test forms (i.e., paper-and-pencil testing and computer-based testing) and traditional item-level computer-adaptive testing (CAT). It combines the advantages of both. On one hand, MST is adaptive (and therefore more…

  6. AGARD Flight Test Techniques Series. Volume 13. Reliability and Maintainability (Fiabilite’ et Maintenabilite’).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-02-01

    relatively new maintenance-free, sealed lead-acid battery is another example. When a fighter development program encountered problems with a...more conventional nickel-cadmium battery , the flight test reliability engineers convinced the manufacturer to adopt the new battery and improve...THIS STATION . RETURN TO VENDOR FOR FIX, FAILURE ANALYSIS AND CORRECTIVE ACTION. FADLEDITEM: 2A3 SERIAIJ: 00208004 ETI METER: 0095 INSTALLED

  7. Shot SMOKY, A Test of the PLUMBBOB Series, 31 August 1957.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-31

    the Federal Civil Defense Administration, the Lovelace Foundation for Medical Education and Research, and the Sandia Corporation . The CETG conducted 22...Displacement Potential of Blast DBM/FCDA 14 Lovelace Foundation 34.2 Comparison Tests of Reinforcing Steels AEC 1 Sandia Corporation 34.3 Comparative...Responses of Static and AEC 1 Sandia Corporation ; Dynamic Loadings Holmes and Narver 35.2 Decontamination Procedures in Residential Areas FCDA None FCDA

  8. An Analysis of Craters Produced by Artillery Munitions during Dusty Infrared Test Series.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    various military munitions. However, Mason and Carnes , show that craters formed by cased munitions are irregular in shape and have "troughs" on each side...crater. Carnes attributed this to the work exerted on the soil by the shell fragments. Further studies have indicated that there are different equivalences...Bruce W., B. I. Carnes , and James B. Mason, "Dusty Infrared Test II (DIRT-II)," presented to Smoke/Obscurant Symposium IV, Adelphl, MD, April 1980. 9

  9. Results from NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations] Series 2 bare fuel dissolution tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.N.

    1990-09-01

    The dissolution and radionuclide release behavior of spent fuel in groundwater is being studied by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. Two bare spent fuel specimens plus the empty cladding hulls were tested in NNWSI J-13 well water in unsealed fused silica vessels under ambient hot cell air conditions (25{degree}C) in the currently reported tests. One of the specimens was prepared from a rod irradiated in the H. B. Robinson Unit 2 reactor and the other from a rod irradiated in the Turkey Point Unit 3 reactor. Results indicate that most radionuclides of interest fall into three groups for release modeling. The first group principally includes the actinides (U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm), all of which reached solubility-limited concentrations that were orders of magnitude below those necessary to meet the NRC 10 CFR 60.113 release limits for any realistic water flux predicted for the Yucca Mountain repository site. The second group is nuclides of soluble elements such as Cs, Tc, and I, for which release rates do not appear to be solubility-limited and may depend on the dissolution rate of fuel. In later test cycles, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 129}I were continuously released at rates between about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} and 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} of inventory per year. The third group is radionuclides that may be transported in the vapor phase, of which {sup 14}C is of primary concern. Detailed test results are presented and discussed. 17 refs., 15 figs., 21 tabs.

  10. AGARD flight test techniques series. Volume 9: Aircraft exterior noise measurement and analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, H.

    1991-04-01

    Testing and analysis techniques to measure aircraft noise primarily for purposes of noise certification as specified by the 'International Civil Aviation Organization', ICAO are described. The relevant aircraft noise certification standards and recommended practices are presented in detail for subsonic jet aircraft, for heavy and light propeller-driven aircraft, and for helicopters. The practical execution of conducting noise certification tests is treated in depth. The characteristics and requirements of the acoustic and non-acoustic instrumentation for data acquisition and data processing are discussed, as are the procedures to determine the special noise measures - effective perceived noise level (EPNL) and maximum overall A-weighted noise level (L sub pA,max) - that are required for the noise certification of different types of aircraft. The AGARDograph also contains an extensive, although selective, discussion of test and analysis techniques for more detailed aircraft noise studies by means of either flight experiments or full-scale and model-scale wind tunnel experiments. Appendices provide supplementary information.

  11. "Patch"ing up our tumor signaling knowledge.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Scott X; Whitson, Ramon J; Oro, Anthony E

    2013-05-01

    The tumor suppressor Patched1 (Ptch1) possesses well-described roles in regulating sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling in the skin and preventing the formation of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). In this issue, Kang et al. extend their previous work to show that a naturally occurring allele of Ptch1 found in FVB mice promotes early squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) growth without aberrant activation of the SHH pathway. The study reveals new roles for Ptch1 that lie at the nexus between BCC and SCC formation.

  12. Mitral Valve Mechanics Following Posterior Leaflet Patch Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Azadeh; Rasmussen, Ann Q.; Honge, Jesper L.; Ostli, Bjorn; Levine, Robert A.; Hagège, Albert; Nygaard, Hans; Nielsen, Sten L.; Jensen, Morten O.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aim of the study Attention towards the optimization of mitral valve repair methods is increasing. Patch augmentation is one strategy used to treat functional ischemic mitral regurgitation (FIMR). The study aim was to investigate the force balance changes in specific chordae tendineae emanating from the posterior papillary muscle in a FIMR-simulated valve, following posterior leaflet patch augmentation. Methods Mitral valves were obtained from 12 pigs (body weight 80 kg). An in vitro test set-up simulating the left ventricle was used to hold the valves. The left ventricular pressure was regulated with water to simulate different static pressures during valve closure. A standardized oval pericardial patch (17 × 29 mm) was introduced into the posterior leaflet from mid P2 to the end of the P3 scallop. Dedicated miniature transducers were used to record the forces exerted on the chordae tendineae. Data were acquired before and after 12 mm posterior and 5 mm apical posterior papillary muscle displacement to simulate the effect from one of the main contributors of FIMR, before and after patch augmentation. Results The effect of displacing the posterior papillary muscle induced tethering on the intermediate chordae tendineae to the posterior leaflet, and resulted in a 39.8% force increase (p = 0.014). Posterior leaflet patch augmentation of the FIMR valve induced a 31.1% force decrease (p = 0.007). There was no difference in force between the healthy and the repaired valve simulations (p = 0.773). Conclusion Posterior leaflet patch augmentation significantly reduced the forces exerted on the intermediate chordae tendineae from the posterior papillary muscle following FIMR simulation. As changes in chordal tension lead to a redistribution of the total stress exerted on the valve, patch augmentation may have an adverse long-term influence on mitral valve function and remodeling. PMID:23610985

  13. A nanofibrous electrospun patch to maintain human mesenchymal cell stemness.

    PubMed

    Pandolfi, L; Furman, N Toledano; Wang, Xin; Lupo, C; Martinez, J O; Mohamed, M; Taraballi, F; Tasciotti, E

    2017-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been extensively investigated in regenerative medicine because of their crucial role in tissue healing. For these properties, they are widely tested in clinical trials, usually injected in cell suspension or in combination with tridimensional scaffolds. However, scaffolds can largely affect the fates of MSCs, inducing a progressive loss of functionality overtime. The ideal scaffold must delay MSCs differentiation until paracrine signals from the host induce their change. Herein, we proposed a nanostructured electrospun gelatin patch as an appropriate environment where human MSCs (hMSCs) can adhere, proliferate, and maintain their stemness. This patch exhibited characteristics of a non-linear elastic material and withstood degradation up to 4 weeks. As compared to culture and expansion in 2D, hMSCs on the patch showed a similar degree of proliferation and better maintained their progenitor properties, as assessed by their superior differentiation capacity towards typical mesenchymal lineages (i.e. osteogenic and chondrogenic). Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis and longitudinal non-invasive imaging of inflammatory response revealed no sign of foreign body reaction for 3 weeks. In summary, our results demonstrated that our biocompatible patch favored the maintenance of undifferentiated hMSCs for up to 21 days and is an ideal candidate for tridimensional delivery of hMSCs. The present work reports a nanostructured patch gelatin-based able to maintain in vitro hMSCs stemness features. Moreover, hMSCs were able to differentiate toward osteo- and chondrogenic lineages once induces by differentiative media, confirming the ability of this patch to support stem cells for a potential in vivo application. These attractive properties together with the low inflammatory response in vivo make this patch a promising platform in regenerative medicine.

  14. AGARD Flight Test Instrumentation Series. Volume 7. Strain Gauge Measurements on Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    Epoxy resin-glass fibre 4 550 650 Asbestos 100 670 700 The values refer to the supporting materials; the limits for the measuring grid materials are...AGARD publications. 13.Keywords/Descriptors 14.UDC Aircraft Flight tests Strain measurement Airborne equipment 620.17:5533.6.054:629.73.05 Loads (forces...3.5.4 A.C. voltage supply 28I 3.6 lImmunity from electrical and magnetic disturbances 29 3.6.1 Common-mode voltages 29 3.6.2 Electrical and magnetic

  15. AGARD Flight Test Instrumentation Series. Volume 11. Pressure and Flow Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    PdgPt-Pa pression qc,Pd dynamischer qc impact pressure pressure dynamique Druck 1 24 q 7k:v kinetic - pression q kinetischer q dynamic...number of parallel transducers may have to be used. To save weight and cost, up to 48 pressures of up to 200 bar press- ure scanners (scanivalves...control is accomplished following "ATLAS"-requirement5 by means of a scanner unit, giving access to designated test pins on the computer’s main

  16. Evaluation of a series hybrid thrust bearing at DN values to three million. 2: Fabrication and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eusepi, M.; Winn, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    Results of tests made to determine the experimental performance of a series hybrid bearing are reported. The bearing consists of a 150 mm ball bearing and a centrifugally actuated, conical, fluid film bearing fitting an envelope with an outer radius of 86.4 mm (3.4 in.) and inner radius of 71 mm (2.8 in.). Tests were conducted up to 16,500 rpm, at which speed an axial load of 15,568 N (3500 lb) was safely supported by the hybrid bearing system. Through the employment of the series hybrid bearing principle, it was possible to reduce the effective ball bearing speed to approximately one-half of the shaft speed. A reduction of this magnitude should result in a tenfold increase in the ball bearing fatigue life. A successful simulation of fluid film bearing lubricant supply failure, performed repeatedly at an operating speed of 10,000 rpm, resulted in complete and smooth change over to full scale ball bearing operation when the oil supply to the fluid film bearing was discontinued. Reactivation of the fluid film supply system produced a flawless return to the original mode of hybrid operation.

  17. Data-driven interactive 3D medical image segmentation based on structured patch model.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Hyun; Yun, Il Dong; Lee, Sang Uk

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel three dimensional interactive medical image segmentation method based on high level knowledge of training set. Since the interactive system should provide intermediate results to an user quickly, insufficient low level models are used for most of previous methods. To exploit the high level knowledge within a short time, we construct a structured patch model that consists of multiple corresponding patch sets. The structured patch model includes the spatial relationships between neighboring patch sets and the prior knowledge of the corresponding patch set on each local region. The spatial relationships accelerate the search of corresponding patch in test time, while the prior knowledge improves the segmentation accuracy. The proposed framework provides not only fast editing tool, but the incremental learning system through adding the segmentation result to the training set. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed method is useful for fast and accurate segmentation of target objects from the multiple medical images.

  18. Using power series expansions of moduli to interpolate between release curves from dynamic tests: Technique and application

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, M.D.

    1990-08-01

    Recently an appreciable number of continuous release profiles have been measured from dynamic experiments with geological materials. For each material an empirical generalization of the available release curves may be constructed to allow easy application of the experimental data to problems in much the same way as a linear shock velocity -- particle velocity fit allows easy application of Hugoniot data. This generalization is made in two steps. The first is to compute the Eulerian axial modulus at the Hugoniot pressure and its first three pressure derivatives along the release for each test. This corresponds to a partial Taylor series of the axial modulus, which integrates to give a very close match to the original release. An alternative formulation, which takes volume as the independent variable, fails because that Taylor series does not converge with the rapidity needed for these calculations. The second step is to plot each of these quantities against the Hugoniot pressure for the suite of tests, and fit these data. A release from an arbitrary pressure within the general range of the experimental data may be computed by using the interpolated modulus and its interpolated derivatives. This generalization, which allows volume to be computed as a function of pressure, reproduces the experimental curves fairly well. We present the results of applying this technique to release data for Mini Jade 2 grout, and briefly compare these results with those from several Nevada Test Site tuffs, saturated and dry Indiana Limestone, and aluminum. Finally, we use the generalized Mini Jade 2 data to solve a sample problem, that of estimating the error produced by making the release = Hugoniot'' assumption in the analysis of ground motion gauges in an underground test. 12 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. A large-scale deforestation experiment: Effects of patch area and isolation on Amazon birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferraz, G.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.; Stouffer, P.C.; Bierregaard, R.O.; Lovejoy, T.E.

    2007-01-01

    As compared with extensive contiguous areas, small isolated habitat patches lack many species. Some species disappear after isolation; others are rarely found in any small patch, regardless of isolation. We used a 13-year data set of bird captures from a large landscape-manipulation experiment in a Brazilian Amazon forest to model the extinction-colonization dynamics of 55 species and tested basic predictions of island biogeography and metapopulation theory. From our models, we derived two metrics of species vulnerability to changes in isolation and patch area. We found a strong effect of area and a variable effect of isolation on the predicted patch occupancy by birds.

  20. A large-scale deforestation experiment: effects of patch area and isolation on Amazon birds.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Gonçalo; Nichols, James D; Hines, James E; Stouffer, Philip C; Bierregaard, Richard O; Lovejoy, Thomas E

    2007-01-12

    As compared with extensive contiguous areas, small isolated habitat patches lack many species. Some species disappear after isolation; others are rarely found in any small patch, regardless of isolation. We used a 13-year data set of bird captures from a large landscape-manipulation experiment in a Brazilian Amazon forest to model the extinction-colonization dynamics of 55 species and tested basic predictions of island biogeography and metapopulation theory. From our models, we derived two metrics of species vulnerability to changes in isolation and patch area. We found a strong effect of area and a variable effect of isolation on the predicted patch occupancy by birds.

  1. Single-Event Transient Testing of Low Dropout PNP Series Linear Voltage Regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adell, Philippe; Allen, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    As demand for high-speed, on-board, digital-processing integrated circuits on spacecraft increases (field-programmable gate arrays and digital signal processors in particular), the need for the next generation point-of-load (POL) regulator becomes a prominent design issue. Shrinking process nodes have resulted in core rails dropping to values close to 1.0 V, drastically reducing margin to standard switching converters or regulators that power digital ICs. The goal of this task is to perform SET characterization of several commercial POL converters, and provide a discussion of the impact of these results to state-of-the-art digital processing IC through laser and heavy ion testing

  2. Omnidirectional Lamb waves by axisymmetrically-configured magnetostrictive patch transducer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Kyung; Kim, Hoe Woong; Kim, Yoon Young

    2013-09-01

    This work presents the generation of omnidirectional Lamb waves by a new magnetostrictive patch transducer (MPT) and investigates its generation mechanism. Although MPTs have been widely used for wave transduction in plates and pipes, no investigation reports the generation of omnidirectional Lamb waves in a plate by an MPT. For the generation, we propose an axisymmetrically-configured MPT that installs multiple axisymmetric turns of coil outside of a permanent cylindrical magnet located above the center of a circular magnetostrictive patch. After confirming the omnidirectivity of the proposed MPT experimentally, the mechanism of the Lamb wave generation and its frequency characteristics are investigated. It is also shown that the Lamb wave is most efficiently generated in a test plate when its wavelength is equal to two-thirds of the magnetostrictive patch diameter. If this wavelength¿patch diameter relation holds, the second radial extensional vibration mode of the patch of the proposed MPT is shown to be the mode responsible for generating the Lamb wave in a plate.

  3. Statistical geometry of a small surface patch in a developed sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.; Weichman, Peter B.

    1989-01-01

    The fractal and marginal fractal regimes in surface geometry are studied. The basic notions of fractal geometry are applied to a small surface patch in a developed sea, corresponding to the equilibrium wave number spectrum. Topothesy, outer and inner boundaries of the fractal range, and a cascade pattern in surface geometry are discussed. Theoretical predictions of whitecap and foam coverage are presented. A fractal decomposition for a surface patch is developed based on the Karhunen-Loeve expansion. The resulting series formalizes the cascade process of constructing realization of a Gaussian random patch. The implications of the research for microwave remote sensing signatures are considered.

  4. Temporary patching of damaged UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, A.L.

    1991-12-31

    Patching techniques based on application of epoxy resins have been developed for temporarily repairing UF{sub 6} cylinders which have sustained relatively minor damage and must be safely emptied. The method is considerably faster and simpler than metallurgical weld repairs. Laboratory tests, detailed operational procedures, and case histories of experience at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant are described.

  5. Face recognition under variable illumination via sparse representation of patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shouke; Liu, Rui; Feng, Weiguo; Zhu, Ming

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this work is to recognize faces under variations in illumination. Previous works have indicated that the variations in illumination can dramatically reduce the performance of face recognition. To this end - ;an efficient method for face recognition which is robust under variable illumination is proposed in this paper. First of all, a discrete cosine transform(DCT) in the logarithm domain is employed to preprocess the images, removing the illumination variations by discarding an appropriate number of low-frequency DCT coefficients. Then, a face image is partitioned into several patches, and we classify the patches using Sparse Representation-based Classification, respectively. At last, the identity of a test image can be determined by the classification results of its patches. Experimental results on the Yale B database and the CMU PIE database show that excellent recognition rates can be achieved by the proposed method.

  6. Wind-Tunnel Tests on a Series of Wing Models Through a Large Angle of Attack Range. Part I : Force Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Montgomery; Wenzinger, Carl J

    1930-01-01

    This investigation covers force tests through a large range of angle of attack on a series of monoplane and biplane wing models. The tests were conducted in the atmospheric wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The models were arranged in such a manner as to make possible a determination of the effects of variations in tip shape, aspect ratio, flap setting, stagger, gap, decalage, sweep back, and airfoil profile. The arrangements represented most of the types of wing systems in use on modern airplanes. The effect of each variable is illustrated by means of groups of curves. In addition, there are included approximate autorotational characteristics in the form of calculated ranges of "rotary instability." a correction for blocking in this tunnel which applies to monoplanes at large angles of attack has been developed, and is given in an appendix. (author)

  7. Adaptation of prey and predators between patches.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendi; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2009-06-21

    Mathematical models are proposed to simulate migrations of prey and predators between patches. In the absence of predators, it is shown that the adaptation of prey leads to an ideal spatial distribution in the sense that the maximal capacity of each patch is achieved. With the introduction of co-adaptation of predators, it is proved that both prey and predators achieve ideal spatial distributions when the adaptations are weak. Further, it is shown that the adaptation of prey and predators increases the survival probability of predators from the extinction in both patches to the persistence in one patch. It is also demonstrated that there exists a pattern that prey and predators cooperate well through adaptations such that predators are permanent in every patch in the case that predators become extinct in each patch in the absence of adaptations. For strong adaptations, it is proved that the model admits periodic cycles and multiple stability transitions.

  8. Slime moulds use heuristics based on within-patch experience to decide when to leave.

    PubMed

    Latty, Tanya; Beekman, Madeleine

    2015-04-15

    Animals foraging in patchy, non-renewing or slowly renewing environments must make decisions about how long to remain within a patch. Organisms can use heuristics ('rules of thumb') based on available information to decide when to leave the patch. Here, we investigated proximate patch-departure heuristics in two species of giant, brainless amoeba: the slime moulds Didymium bahiense and Physarum polycephalum. We explicitly tested the importance of information obtained through experience by eliminating chemosensory cues of patch quality. In P. polycephalum, patch departure was influenced by the consumption of high, and to a much lesser extent low, quality food items such that engulfing a food item increased patch-residency time. Physarum polycephalum also tended to forage for longer in darkened, 'safe' patches. In D. bahiense, engulfment of any food item increased patch residency irrespective of that food item's quality. Exposure to light had no effect on the patch-residency time of D. bahiense. Given that these organisms lack a brain, our results illustrate how the use of simple heuristics can give the impression that individuals make sophisticated foraging decisions.

  9. Scale-dependent feedbacks between patch size and plant reproduction in desert grassland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Svejcar, Lauren N.; Bestelmeyer, Brandon T.; Duniway, Michael C.; James, Darren K.

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical models suggest that scale-dependent feedbacks between plant reproductive success and plant patch size govern transitions from highly to sparsely vegetated states in drylands, yet there is scant empirical evidence for these mechanisms. Scale-dependent feedback models suggest that an optimal patch size exists for growth and reproduction of plants and that a threshold patch organization exists below which positive feedbacks between vegetation and resources can break down, leading to critical transitions. We examined the relationship between patch size and plant reproduction using an experiment in a Chihuahuan Desert grassland. We tested the hypothesis that reproductive effort and success of a dominant grass (Bouteloua eriopoda) would vary predictably with patch size. We found that focal plants in medium-sized patches featured higher rates of grass reproductive success than when plants occupied either large patch interiors or small patches. These patterns support the existence of scale-dependent feedbacks in Chihuahuan Desert grasslands and indicate an optimal patch size for reproductive effort and success in B. eriopoda. We discuss the implications of these results for detecting ecological thresholds in desert grasslands.

  10. Patch-based iterative conditional geostatistical simulation using graph cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xue; Mariethoz, Gregoire; Lu, DeTang; Linde, Niklas

    2016-08-01

    Training image-based geostatistical methods are increasingly popular in groundwater hydrology even if existing algorithms present limitations that often make real-world applications difficult. These limitations include a computational cost that can be prohibitive for high-resolution 3-D applications, the presence of visual artifacts in the model realizations, and a low variability between model realizations due to the limited pool of patterns available in a finite-size training image. In this paper, we address these issues by proposing an iterative patch-based algorithm which adapts a graph cuts methodology that is widely used in computer graphics. Our adapted graph cuts method optimally cuts patches of pixel values borrowed from the training image and assembles them successively, each time accounting for the information of previously stitched patches. The initial simulation result might display artifacts, which are identified as regions of high cost. These artifacts are reduced by iteratively placing new patches in high-cost regions. In contrast to most patch-based algorithms, the proposed scheme can also efficiently address point conditioning. An advantage of the method is that the cut process results in the creation of new patterns that are not present in the training image, thereby increasing pattern variability. To quantify this effect, a new measure of variability is developed, the merging index, quantifies the pattern variability in the realizations with respect to the training image. A series of sensitivity analyses demonstrates the stability of the proposed graph cuts approach, which produces satisfying simulations for a wide range of parameters values. Applications to 2-D and 3-D cases are compared to state-of-the-art multiple-point methods. The results show that the proposed approach obtains significant speedups and increases variability between realizations. Connectivity functions applied to 2-D models transport simulations in 3-D models are used to

  11. Foil Patches Seal Small Vacuum Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiegel, Kirk W.; Reed, David W.

    1995-01-01

    Report discloses technique to patch holes in nickel-alloy rocket-engine nozzle parts prior to vacuum brazing. Technique involves lightly spot-welding nickel foil 0.002 in. thick over hole patched, then spot-welding corrosion-resistant steel foil of same thickness over nickel foil. Once patches subject to pressure and temperature of vacuum brazing, nickel foil diffuses to bond with nickel-alloy nozzle, making vacuum-tight seal.

  12. Measurement and control of electrostatic patch potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph L.; Munday, Jeremy N.

    Electrostatic patch potentials hinder many precision measurements, particularly measurements of the Casimir force. Despite the improved force sensitivity achieved over the last decade, only recently have attempts been made to measure and quantify the effects of patch potentials. Here we present an analysis of patch potentials measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and discuss methods to control these potentials (e.g. humidity, material choice, etc).

  13. Multi-Mode Broadband Patch Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A multi-mode broad band patch antenna is provided that allows for the same aperture to be used at independent frequencies such as reception at 19 GHz and transmission at 29 GHz. Furthermore, the multi-mode broadband patch antenna provides a ferroelectric film that allows for tuning capability of the multi-mode broadband patch antenna over a relatively large tuning range. The alternative use of a semiconductor substrate permits reduced control voltages since the semiconductor functions as a counter electrode.

  14. RF MEMS reconfigurable triangular patch antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Christodoulou, Christos George; Feldner, Lucas Matthew

    2005-01-01

    A Ka-band RF MEMS enabled frequency reconfigurable triangular microstrip patch antenna has been designed for monolithic integration with RF MEMS phase shifters to demonstrate a low-cost monolithic passive electronically scanned array (PESA). This paper introduces our first prototype reconfigurable triangular patch antenna currently in fabrication. The aperture coupled patch antenna is fabricated on a dual-layer quartz/alumina substrate using surface micromachining techniques.

  15. RF MEMS reconfigurable triangular patch antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Christodoulou, Christos George; Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Feldner, Lucas Matthew

    2005-07-01

    A Ka-band RF MEMS enabled frequency reconfigurable triangular microstrip patch antenna has been designed for monolithic integration with RF MEMS phase shifters to demonstrate a low-cost monolithic passive electronically scanned array (PESA). This paper introduces our first prototype reconfigurable triangular patch antenna currently in fabrication. The aperture coupled patch antenna is fabricated on a dual-layer quartz/alumina substrate using surface micromachining techniques.

  16. Mortality among military participants at the 1957 PLUMBBOB nuclear weapons test series and from leukemia among participants at the SMOKY test.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Glyn G; Zack, Matthew M; Mumma, Michael T; Falk, Henry; Heath, Clark W; Till, John E; Chen, Heidi; Boice, John D

    2016-09-01

    Health effects following low doses of ionizing radiation are uncertain. Military veterans at the Nevada test site (NTS) during the SMOKY atmospheric nuclear weapons test in 1957 were reported to be at increased risk for leukemia in 1979, but this increase was not evaluated with respect to radiation dose. The SMOKY test was one of 30 tests in 1957 within the PLUMBBOB test series. These early studies led to public laws where atomic veterans could qualify for compensation for presumptive radiogenic diseases. A retrospective cohort study was conducted of 12219 veterans at the PLUMBBOB test series, including 3020 at the SMOKY nuclear test. Mortality follow-up was through 2010 and observed causes of death were compared with expected causes based on general population rates. Radiation dose to red bone marrow was based on individual dose reconstructions, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate dose response for all leukemias other than chronic lymphocytic leukemia (non-CLL leukemia). Vital status was determined for 95.3% of the 12 219 veterans. The dose to red bone marrow was low (mean 3.2 mGy, maximum 500 mGy). Military participants at the PLUMBBOB nuclear test series remained relatively healthy after 53 years and died at a lower rate than the general population. In contrast, and in comparison with national rates, the SMOKY participants showed significant increases in all causes of death, respiratory cancer, leukemia, nephritis and nephrosis, and accidents, possibly related in part to lifestyle factors common to enlisted men who made up 81% of the SMOKY cohort. Compared with national rates, a statistically significant excess of non-CLL leukemia was observed among SMOKY participants (Standardized Mortality Ratio  =  1.89, 95% 1.24-2.75, n  =  27) but not among PLUMBBOB participants after excluding SMOKY (SMR  =  0.87, 95% 0.64-1.51, n  =  47). Leukemia risk, initially reported to be significantly increased among SMOKY

  17. Collection of analytes from microneedle patches.

    PubMed

    Romanyuk, Andrey V; Zvezdin, Vasiliy N; Samant, Pradnya; Grenader, Mark I; Zemlyanova, Marina; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2014-11-04

    Clinical medicine and public health would benefit from simplified acquisition of biological samples from patients that can be easily obtained at point of care, in the field, and by patients themselves. Microneedle patches are designed to serve this need by collecting dermal interstitial fluid containing biomarkers without the dangers, pain, or expertise needed to collect blood. This study presents novel methods to collect biomarker analytes from microneedle patches for analysis by integration into conventional analytical laboratory microtubes and microplates. Microneedle patches were made out of cross-linked hydrogel composed of poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic acid) and poly(ethylene glycol) prepared by micromolding. Microneedle patches were shown to swell with water up to 50-fold in volume, depending on degree of polymer cross-linking, and to collect interstitial fluid from the skin of rats. To collect analytes from microneedle patches, the patches were mounted within the cap of microcentrifuge tubes or formed the top of V-bottom multiwell microplates, and fluid was collected in the bottom of the tubes under gentle centrifugation. In another method, microneedle patches were attached to form the bottom of multiwell microplates, thereby enabling in situ analysis. The simplicity of biological sample acquisition using microneedle patches coupled with the simplicity of analyte collection from microneedles patches integrated into conventional analytical equipment could broaden the reach of future screening, diagnosis, and monitoring of biomarkers in healthcare and environmental/workplace settings.

  18. Two Holes in 'Wooly Patch'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The rock abrasion tool on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit ground two holes in a relatively soft rock called 'Wooly Patch' near the base of the 'Columbia Hills' inside Gusev Crater on Mars. This approximately true-color image from the panoramic camera was taken on sol 200 (July 25, 2004) and generated using the camera's 600-, 530-, and 480-nanometer filters. It shows the natural red and reddish-brown color of the rock. Scientists speculate that this relatively soft rock (compared to others analyzed by Spirit) may have been modified by water. Small cracks in the surface outside the drill holes may be the result of interactions with water-rich fluids.

  19. Fault detection using a two-model test for changes in the parameters of an autoregressive time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholtz, P.; Smyth, P.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes an investigation of a statistical hypothesis testing method for detecting changes in the characteristics of an observed time series. The work is motivated by the need for practical automated methods for on-line monitoring of Deep Space Network (DSN) equipment to detect failures and changes in behavior. In particular, on-line monitoring of the motor current in a DSN 34-m beam waveguide (BWG) antenna is used as an example. The algorithm is based on a measure of the information theoretic distance between two autoregressive models: one estimated with data from a dynamic reference window and one estimated with data from a sliding reference window. The Hinkley cumulative sum stopping rule is utilized to detect a change in the mean of this distance measure, corresponding to the detection of a change in the underlying process. The basic theory behind this two-model test is presented, and the problem of practical implementation is addressed, examining windowing methods, model estimation, and detection parameter assignment. Results from the five fault-transition simulations are presented to show the possible limitations of the detection method, and suggestions for future implementation are given.

  20. HotPatch Web Gateway: Statistical Analysis of Unusual Patches on Protein Surfaces

    DOE Data Explorer

    Pettit, Frank K.; Bowie, James U. [DOE-Molecular Biology Institute

    HotPatch finds unusual patches on the surface of proteins, and computes just how unusual they are (patch rareness), and how likely each patch is to be of functional importance (functional confidence (FC).) The statistical analysis is done by comparing your protein's surface against the surfaces of a large set of proteins whose functional sites are known. Optionally, HotPatch can also write a script that will display the patches on the structure, when the script is loaded into some common molecular visualization programs. HotPatch generates complete statistics (functional confidence and patch rareness) on the most significant patches on your protein. For each property you choose to analyze, you'll receive an email to which will be attached a PDB-format file in which atomic B-factors (temp. factors) are replaced by patch indices; and the PDB file's Header Remarks will give statistical scores and a PDB-format file in which atomic B-factors are replaced by the raw values of the property used for patch analysis (for example, hydrophobicity instead of hydrophobic patches). [Copied with edits from http://hotpatch.mbi.ucla.edu/

  1. Testing & Research, Part I. Options in Education: Program Transcripts of a Weekly Series Broadcast by Member Stations of National Public Radio. Program No. 78.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George Washington Univ., Washington, DC. Inst. for Educational Leadership.

    Several program transcripts on educational testing from the National Public Radio series, Options in Education, are included in this pamphlet. In "The I.Q. Controversy," Ned Block discusses culturally biased standardized tests. Dr. Harold Hodgkinson, former Director of the National Institute of Education, and Noel Epstein, Education Editor of the…

  2. Transdermal patches: history, development and pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Michael N; Kalia, Yogeshvar N; Horstmann, Michael; Roberts, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Transdermal patches are now widely used as cosmetic, topical and transdermal delivery systems. These patches represent a key outcome from the growth in skin science, technology and expertise developed through trial and error, clinical observation and evidence-based studies that date back to the first existing human records. This review begins with the earliest topical therapies and traces topical delivery to the present-day transdermal patches, describing along the way the initial trials, devices and drug delivery systems that underpin current transdermal patches and their actives. This is followed by consideration of the evolution in the various patch designs and their limitations as well as requirements for actives to be used for transdermal delivery. The properties of and issues associated with the use of currently marketed products, such as variability, safety and regulatory aspects, are then described. The review concludes by examining future prospects for transdermal patches and drug delivery systems, such as the combination of active delivery systems with patches, minimally invasive microneedle patches and cutaneous solutions, including metered-dose systems. PMID:25560046

  3. Immunoisolation Patch System for Cellular Transplantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An immunoisolation patch system, and particularly a patch system comprising multiple immunoisolation microcapsules, each encapsulating biological material such as cells for transplantation, which can be used in the prophylactic and therapeutic treatment of disease in large animals and humans without the need for immunosuppression.

  4. Formulation study of tea tree oil patches.

    PubMed

    Minghetti, Paola; Casiraghi, Antonella; Cilurzo, Francesco; Gambaro, Veniero; Montanari, Luisa

    2009-01-01

    The antimicrobial, antifungal and anti-inflammatory properties of tea tree oil (TTO), the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia are well documented. In order to optimize its therapeutic activity, TTO patches were designed. The aim of this work was the formulation of monolayer patches containing TTO. Moreover, the performance of oleic acid (OA) as a skin penetration enhancer in patches was evaluated. Terpinen-4-ol (T4OL), the main component of TTO, was the marker used to evaluate TTO skin permeability. The permeation study was performed through human epidermis by using Franz diffusion cells. Patches were prepared by using methacrylic copolymers, Eudragit E100 (EuE100) or Eudragit NE (EuNE), and a silicone resin, BioPSA7-4602 (Bio-PSA). TTO and OA contents were fixed at 10% w/w and 3% w/w, respectively. The patches were prepared by a casting method and characterised in terms of T4OL content and skin permeability. All the selected polymers were suitable as the main component of the patch matrix. Since the main critical issue in the use of TTO is related to its toxicity after absorption, the local administration of TTO can take advantage of the use of patches based on EuE100 because of the high retained amount and the low permeation of T4OL. In this matrix, OA slightly increased the T4OL retained amount, improving the efficacy and safety of TTO patches.

  5. Detecting Local Ligand-Binding Site Similarity in Non-Homologous Proteins by Surface Patch Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Sael, Lee; Kihara, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    Functional elucidation of proteins is one of the essential tasks in biology. Function of a protein, specifically, small ligand molecules that bind to a protein, can be predicted by finding similar local surface regions in binding sites of known proteins. Here, we developed an alignment free local surface comparison method for predicting a ligand molecule which binds to a query protein. The algorithm, named Patch-Surfer, represents a binding pocket as a combination of segmented surface patches, each of which is characterized by its geometrical shape, the electrostatic potential, the hydrophobicity, and the concaveness. Representing a pocket by a set of patches is effective to absorb difference of global pocket shape while capturing local similarity of pockets. The shape and the physicochemical properties of surface patches are represented using the 3D Zernike descriptor, which is a series expansion of mathematical 3D function. Two pockets are compared using a modified weighted bipartite matching algorithm, which matches similar patches from the two pockets. Patch-Surfer was benchmarked on three datasets, which consist in total of 390 proteins that bind to one of 21 ligands. Patch-Surfer showed superior performance to existing methods including a global pocket comparison method, Pocket-Surfer, which we have previously introduced. Particularly, as intended, the accuracy showed large improvement for flexible ligand molecules, which bind to pockets in different conformations. PMID:22275074

  6. Physics-Based Correction of Inhomogeneities in Temperature Series: Model Transferability Testing and Comparison to Statistical Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchmann, Renate; Brönnimann, Stefan; Croci-Maspoli, Mischa

    2016-04-01

    For the correction of inhomogeneities in sub-daily temperature series, Auchmann and Brönnimann (2012) developed a physics-based model for one specific type of break, i.e. the transition from a Wild screen to a Stevenson screen at one specific station in Basel, Switzerland. The model is based solely on physical considerations, no relationships of the covariates to the differences between the parallel measurements have been investigated. The physics-based model requires detailed information on the screen geometry, the location, and includes a variety of covariates in the model. The model is mainly based on correcting the radiation error, including a modification by ambient wind. In this study we test the application of the model to another station, Zurich, experiencing the same type of transition. Furthermore we compare the performance of the physics based correction to purely statistical correction approaches (constant correction, correcting for annual cycle using spline). In Zurich the Wild screen was replaced in 1954 by the Stevenson screen, from 1954-1960 parallel temperature measurements in both screens were taken, which will be used to assess the performance of the applied corrections. For Zurich the required model input is available (i.e. three times daily observations of wind, cloud cover, pressure and humidity measurements, local times of sunset and sunrise). However, a large number of stations do not measure these additional input data required for the model, which hampers the transferability and applicability of the model to other stations. Hence, we test possible simplifications and generalizations of the model to make it more easily applicable to stations with the same type of inhomogeneity. In a last step we test whether other types of transitions (e.g., from a Stevenson screen to an automated weather system) can be corrected using the principle of a physics-based approach.

  7. Image Quality Assessment Based on Inter-Patch and Intra-Patch Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fei; Lu, Zongqing; Wang, Can; Sun, Wen; Xia, Shu-Tao; Liao, Qingmin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a full-reference (FR) image quality assessment (IQA) scheme, which evaluates image fidelity from two aspects: the inter-patch similarity and the intra-patch similarity. The scheme is performed in a patch-wise fashion so that a quality map can be obtained. On one hand, we investigate the disparity between one image patch and its adjacent ones. This disparity is visually described by an inter-patch feature, where the hybrid effect of luminance masking and contrast masking is taken into account. The inter-patch similarity is further measured by modifying the normalized correlation coefficient (NCC). On the other hand, we also attach importance to the impact of image contents within one patch on the IQA problem. For the intra-patch feature, we consider image curvature as an important complement of image gradient. According to local image contents, the intra-patch similarity is measured by adaptively comparing image curvature and gradient. Besides, a nonlinear integration of the inter-patch and intra-patch similarity is presented to obtain an overall score of image quality. The experiments conducted on six publicly available image databases show that our scheme achieves better performance in comparison with several state-of-the-art schemes. PMID:25793282

  8. Reconfigurable Wideband Circularly Polarized Microstrip Patch Antenna for Wireless Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khidre, Ahmed

    vice versa, with the aid of two RF PIN diodes that act as RF switches. The proposed structure which is simple; consists of a single-layer single fed radiating E-shaped patch and RF switch placed on each of its slots at an appropriate location. The design targets WLAN IEEE 802.11b/g frequency band (2.4- 2.5 GHz) as one example of the wireless applications. The idea is based on the first proposed design. In other words, if one of the switches is ON and the other is OFF, the two slot lengths will become effectively unequal and circular polarization will be obtained. If the states of the two switches are reversed, circular polarization with opposite orientation will be obtained at the same frequency band. Full-wave simulator Ansoft HFSS is again used for the analysis. Complete detailed DC biasing circuit of the switches for integration with the antenna is presented. Also, characterizations of the microwave components used in the biasing circuit are discussed. Antenna prototype has been fabricated and tested. Simulation results along with the measured one, for the reflection coefficient, axial ratio, radiation pattern, and antenna gain agree well, showing wide bandwidth and high gain for the two circularly polarized modes.

  9. A case of secondary syphilis with mucous patches on the hard palate.

    PubMed

    Ban, M; Ohtani, M; Seishima, M

    1995-01-01

    A rare case of secondary syphilis showing mucous patches on the hard palate is reported. A 31-year-old male had two erosive patches which were slightly raised on his hard palate. A linear lesion was also present on the inside of his right alveolar process. Many red-brown macules on his abdomen and bilateral inguinal lymphadenopathy accompanied these symptoms. The serological tests for syphilis were positive: VDRL test 1:512, TPHA test 1:20,480, and IgM-FTA-ABS test 1:40. Immunohistochemical staining with rabbit monoclonal antibody to Treponema pallidum by the biotin-streptoavidin system detected treponemal organisms in the paraffin-embedded specimen from his mucous patch. A diagnosis of secondary syphilis was made, and he was given amoxicillin (AMPC) at 750 mg per day for 4 weeks. His eruptions, including the mucous patch, healed in a week.

  10. Evaluation of a mucoadhesive buccal patch for delivery of peptides: in vitro screening of bioadhesion.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Bhatt, P P; Johnston, T P

    1998-10-01

    We have assessed the bioadhesive properties of several different mucoadhesive buccal patches. The patches consisted of custom coformulations of silicone polymers and Carbopol 974P. The contact angle of water was measured for each of the test formulations, using an ophthalmic shadow scope. The corresponding work of adhesion between the water and the patches (W1), and between the patches and freshly-excised rabbit buccal mucosa (W2) was then calculated, using a modification of Dupre's equation. The bioadhesive strength between the patches and excised rabbit buccal mucosa was also assessed. The results of the contact-angle measurements indicated that the contact angle decreased with an increase in the amount of Carbopol in the formulation. Additionally, the calculated values of both W1 and W2 increased with an increase in the amount of Carbopol in the buccal-patch formulations. A correlation (r not equal to 0.9808) was found between the measured contact angle and the calculated values for W2. The direct measurement of the force required to separate a buccal patch from excised rabbit buccal mucosa with the INSTRON demonstrated that the adhesive strength increased with an increase in the amount of Carbopol. This preliminary study has shown that the measurement of contact angles alone may provide a useful technique for estimating the work of adhesion, and may serve as a convenient and rapid screening procedure to identify potential mucoadhesive buccal-patch formulations.

  11. Pairwise Operator Learning for Patch Based Single-image Super-resolution.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yi; Shao, Ling

    2016-12-14

    Motivated by the fact that image patches could be inherently represented by matrices, single-image super-resolution is treated as a problem of learning regression operators in a matrix space in this paper. The regression operators that map low-resolution image patches to high-resolution image patches are generally defined by left and right multiplication operators. The pairwise operators are respectively used to extract the raw and column information of low-resolution image patches for recovering high-resolution estimations. The patch based regression algorithm possesses three favorable properties. Firstly, the proposed super-resolution algorithm is efficient during both training and testing, because image patches are treated as matrices. Secondly, the data storage requirement of the optimal pairwise operator is far less than most popular single-image super-resolution algorithms because only two small sized matrices need to be stored. Lastly, the super-resolution performance is competitive with most popular single-image super-resolution algorithms because both raw and column information of image patches is considered. Experimental results show the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed patch-based single-image superresolution algorithm.

  12. Relative abundance of mesopredators and size of oak patches in the cross-timbers ecoregion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Disney, M.R.; Hellgren, E.C.; Davis, C.A.; Leslie, David M.; Engle, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Mesopredators (e.g., raccoon Procyon lotor, Virginia opossum Didelphis virginiana, striped skunk Mephitis mephitis) have received considerable attention because of links to population declines in birds via increased nest predation, especially in landscapes fragmented by anthropogenic forces. Relationships of abundance of mesopredators to size of habitat patches have received less attention than relationships to other metrics of fragmentation, particularly edge characteristics. We tested the hypothesis that relative abundance of mesopredators (e.g., raccoons and Virginia opossums) was related negatively to size of forest patch. We delineated 15 patches of oak (Quercus) forest ranging from 0.2 to 55.3 ha within a grassland-woodland mosaic in the cross-timbers ecoregion of Oklahoma. Scent stations and live traps within these patches were used to index relative abundance of mesopredators in summers 2003 and 2004. Both indices of relative abundance were related weakly and negatively to area of forest patch. However, rate of capture and visitation to scent station were not correlated consistently throughout the study. Our results suggested that the two methods to index abundance provided separate information on functional and numerical responses to size of patch. Our evidence that mesopredators within the cross timbers were more likely to be in smaller patches of oak forest may have implications to success of avian nesting in these patches.

  13. A procedure of landscape services assessment based on mosaics of patches and boundaries.

    PubMed

    Martín de Agar, Pilar; Ortega, Marta; de Pablo, Carlos L

    2016-09-15

    We develop a procedure for assessing the environmental value of landscape mosaics that simultaneously considers the values of land use patches and the values of the boundaries between them. These boundaries indicate the ecological interactions between the patches. A landscape mosaic is defined as a set of patches and the boundaries between them and corresponds to a spatial pattern of ecological interactions. The procedure is performed in two steps: (i) an environmental assessment of land use patches by means of a function that integrates values based on the goods and services the patches provide, and (ii) an environmental valuation of mosaics using a function that integrates the environmental values of their patches and the types and frequencies of the boundaries between them. This procedure allows us to measure how changes in land uses or in their spatial arrangement cause variations in the environmental value of landscape mosaics and therefore in that of the whole landscape. The procedure was tested in the Sierra Norte of Madrid (central Spain). The results show that the environmental values of the landscape depend not only on the land use patches but also on the values associated with the pattern of the boundaries within the mosaics. The results also highlight the importance of the boundaries between land use patches as determinants of the goods and services provided by the landscape.

  14. Effects of Spatial Patch Arrangement and Scale of Covarying Resources on Growth and Intraspecific Competition of a Clonal Plant

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Jian; Shi, Xue-Ping; Meng, Xue-Feng; Wu, Xiao-Jing; Luo, Fang-Li; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in two co-variable resources such as light and water availability is common and can affect the growth of clonal plants. Several studies have tested effects of spatial heterogeneity in the supply of a single resource on competitive interactions of plants, but none has examined those of heterogeneous distribution of two co-variable resources. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew one (without intraspecific competition) or nine isolated ramets (with competition) of a rhizomatous herb Iris japonica under a homogeneous environment and four heterogeneous environments differing in patch arrangement (reciprocal and parallel patchiness of light and soil water) and patch scale (large and small patches of light and water). Intraspecific competition significantly decreased the growth of I. japonica, but at the whole container level there were no significant interaction effects of competition by spatial heterogeneity or significant effect of heterogeneity on competitive intensity. Irrespective of competition, the growth of I. japonica in the high and the low water patches did not differ significantly in the homogeneous treatments, but it was significantly larger in the high than in the low water patches in the heterogeneous treatments with large patches. For the heterogeneous treatments with small patches, the growth of I. japonica was significantly larger in the high than in the low water patches in the presence of competition, but such an effect was not significant in the absence of competition. Furthermore, patch arrangement and patch scale significantly affected competitive intensity at the patch level. Therefore, spatial heterogeneity in light and water supply can alter intraspecific competition at the patch level and such effects depend on patch arrangement and patch scale. PMID:27375630

  15. Group-Living Herbivores Weigh Up Food Availability and Dominance Status when Making Patch-Joining Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Stears, Keenan; Kerley, Graham I. H.; Shrader, Adrian M.

    2014-01-01

    Two key factors that influence the foraging behaviour of group-living herbivores are food availability and individual dominance status. Yet, how the combination of these factors influences the patch-joining decisions of individuals foraging within groups has scarcely been explored. To address this, we focused on the patch-joining decisions of group-living domestic goats (Capra hircus). When individuals were tested against the top four ranked goats of the herd, we found that at patches with low food availability they avoided these dominant patch-holders and only joined subordinates (i.e. costs outweighed benefits). However, as the amount of food increased, the avoidance of the top ranked individuals declined. Specifically, goats shifted and joined the patch of an individual one dominance rank higher than the previous dominant patch holder when the initial quantity of food in the new patch was twice that of the lower ranking individual’s patch (i.e. benefits outweighed costs). In contrast, when individuals chose between patches held by dominant goats, other than the top four ranked goats, and subordinate individuals, we found that they equally joined the dominant and subordinate patch-holders. This joining was irrespective of the dominance gap, absolute rank of the dominant patch-holder, sex or food availability (i.e. benefits outweighed costs). Ultimately, our results highlight that herbivores weigh up the costs and benefits of both food availability and patch-holder dominance status when making patch-joining decisions. Furthermore, as the initial quantity of food increases, food availability becomes more important than dominance with regard to influencing patch-joining decisions. PMID:25271889

  16. Effects of Spatial Patch Arrangement and Scale of Covarying Resources on Growth and Intraspecific Competition of a Clonal Plant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Jian; Shi, Xue-Ping; Meng, Xue-Feng; Wu, Xiao-Jing; Luo, Fang-Li; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in two co-variable resources such as light and water availability is common and can affect the growth of clonal plants. Several studies have tested effects of spatial heterogeneity in the supply of a single resource on competitive interactions of plants, but none has examined those of heterogeneous distribution of two co-variable resources. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew one (without intraspecific competition) or nine isolated ramets (with competition) of a rhizomatous herb Iris japonica under a homogeneous environment and four heterogeneous environments differing in patch arrangement (reciprocal and parallel patchiness of light and soil water) and patch scale (large and small patches of light and water). Intraspecific competition significantly decreased the growth of I. japonica, but at the whole container level there were no significant interaction effects of competition by spatial heterogeneity or significant effect of heterogeneity on competitive intensity. Irrespective of competition, the growth of I. japonica in the high and the low water patches did not differ significantly in the homogeneous treatments, but it was significantly larger in the high than in the low water patches in the heterogeneous treatments with large patches. For the heterogeneous treatments with small patches, the growth of I. japonica was significantly larger in the high than in the low water patches in the presence of competition, but such an effect was not significant in the absence of competition. Furthermore, patch arrangement and patch scale significantly affected competitive intensity at the patch level. Therefore, spatial heterogeneity in light and water supply can alter intraspecific competition at the patch level and such effects depend on patch arrangement and patch scale.

  17. A multicentre review of the hairdressing allergens tested in the UK.

    PubMed

    Katugampola, Ruwani P; Statham, Barry N; English, John S C; Wilkinson, Mark M; Foulds, Iain S; Green, Cathy M; Ormerod, Anthony D; Stone, Natalie M; Horne, Helen L; Chowdhury, Mahbub M U

    2005-09-01

    Allergens used for patch testing in the hairdressing series vary between dermatology centres in the UK. The aim of our study is to ascertain the hairdressing allergens currently in use and their test results in several dermatology centres in the UK. Data were obtained from databases in 9 dermatology departments. The allergens with positive results and current/past relevance were included in a new hairdressing series based on collective experience, for wider use and further evaluation.

  18. Patch shape, connectivity, and foraging by oldfield mice (Peromyscus polionotus).

    SciTech Connect

    Orrock, John, L.; Danielson, Brent J

    2005-06-01

    We examined how corridors and patch shape affect foraging by the oldfield mouse (Peromyscus polionotus) by deploying foraging trays and live traps in experimental landscapes with 3 different patch types: patches connected with a corridor, unconnected patches with projecting corridorlike portions (winged patches), and unconnected rectangular patches. Corridors did not lead to different levels of activity of P. polionotus among the 3 patch types. Rather, corridors influenced activity by changing patch shape: foraging in seed trays and total number of captures of P. polionotus tended to be greater at the patch center than at the patch edge, but only in connected and winged patches where corridors or wings increased the amount of patch edge relative to the amount of core habitat in the patch. P. polionotus avoided open microhabitats near the patch edge in winged and connected patches, but not open microhabitats near the patch interior, suggesting that predation risk caused shifts in foraging near edges in connected and winged patches. Foraging in corridors and wings was generally low, suggesting that both are high-risk habitats where predation risk is not ameliorated by proximity to vegetative cover. By changing patch shape, corridors caused changes in within-patch activity of P. polionotus, changing foraging patterns and potentially altering the dynamics of P. polionotus and the seeds they consume.

  19. Hands-On Approach to Structure Activity Relationships: The Synthesis, Testing, and Hansch Analysis of a Series of Acetylcholineesterase Inhibitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locock, Katherine; Tran, Hue; Codd, Rachel; Allan, Robin

    2015-01-01

    This series of three practical sessions centers on drugs that inhibit the enzyme acetylcholineesterase. This enzyme is responsible for the inactivation of acetylcholine and has been the target of drugs to treat glaucoma and Alzheimer's disease and for a number of insecticides and warfare agents. These sessions relate to a series of carbamate…

  20. Contact sensitization to cosmetic series of allergens in a general population in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Li, Lin-Feng

    2014-03-01

    Cosmetic allergic contact dermatitis (CACD) due to common cosmetic allergens in standard series has been extensively studied; however, the prevalence of contact allergy to other cosmetic allergens other than those in standard series is largely unknown. In this study, the frequency of contact sensitization to a European cosmetic series of allergens (Chemotechnique Diagnostics, Vellinge, Sweden) in healthy university student volunteers were detected in Beijing. Of 201 students studied, fifty-eight exhibited positive results, and 9 of them reported had cosmetics related dermatitis previously. The total positivity rate was not correlated to gender. The leading allergens were thimerosal (19.4%), shellac (3.0%), cocamidopropyl betaine (2.0%), hexamethylenetetramine (1.5%), dodecyl gallate (1.5%), hexahydro-1,3,5-tris-(2-hydroxyethyl)triazine (1.0%) and methyldibromo glutaronitrile (1.0%). The positivity rate of thimerosal patch test in men (9.8%) was lower than that of women (23.6%, P < 0.05, Chi square test), but no difference could be found between the prevalence of other cosmetic allergens in men and women (P > 0.05, Chi square test). These results suggested that some cosmetic-related contact allergies may be missed by just testing patients with the European standard series or T.R.U.E. test system only, we recommend shellac, cocamidopropyl betaine, hexamethylenetetramine and dodecyl gallate as the additionally candidates for patch testing in patients with suspected CACD.

  1. Historical estimates of external gamma exposure and collective external gamma exposure from testing at the Nevada Test Site. I. Test series through HARDTACK II, 1958

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Church, B.W.

    1986-07-01

    In 1959, the Test Manager's Committee to Establish Fallout Doses calculated estimated external gamma exposure at populated locations based upon measurements of external gamma-exposure rate. Using these calculations and estimates of population, we have tabulated the collective estimated external gamma exposures for communities within established fallout patterns. The total collective estimated external gamma exposure is 85,000 person-R. The greatest collective exposures occurred in three general areas: Saint George, UT; Ely, NV; and Las Vegas, NV. Three events, HARRY (19 May 1953), BEE (22 March 1955), and SMOKY (31 August 1957), accounted for more than half the total collective estimated external gamma exposure. The bases of the calculational models for external gamma exposure of infinite exposure, estimated exposure, and 1-yr effective biological exposure are explained.

  2. Historical estimates of external gamma exposure and collective external gamma exposure from testing at the Nevada Test Site. I. Test series through HARDTACK II, 1958

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Church, B.W.

    1985-12-01

    In 1959, the Test Manager's Committee to Establish Fallout Doses calculated estimated external gamma exposure at populated locations based upon measurements of external gamma-exposure rate. Using these calculations and estimates of population, we have tabulated the collective estimated external gamma exposures for communities within established fallout patterns. The total collective estimated external gamma exposure is 85,000 person-R. The greatest collective exposures occurred in three general areas: Saint George, Utah; Ely, Nevada; and Las Vegas, Nevada. Three events, HARRY (May 19, 1953), BEE (March 22, 1955), and SMOKY (August 31, 1957), accounted for over half of the total collective estimated external gamma exposure. The bases of the calculational models for external gamma exposure of ''infinite exposure,'' ''estimated exposure,'' and ''one year effective biological exposure'' are explained. 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Electrostatic patch potentials in Casimir force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy

    2015-03-01

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between interacting surfaces. The force can be minimized by applying a potential to one of the two surfaces. However, electrostatic patch potentials remain and contribute an additional force which can obscure the Casimir force signal. We will discuss recent measurements of patch potentials made with Heterodyne Amplitude-Modulated Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy that suggest patches could be responsible for >1% of the signal in some Casimir force measurements, and thus make the distinction between different theoretical models of the Casimir force (e.g. a Drude-model or a plasma-model for the dielectric response) difficult to discern.

  4. Preliminary Results of the Third Test Series of Nonmetal Material Flammability Evaluation In SKOROST Apparatus on the Space Station Mir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, A. V.; Alymov, V. F.; Smirnov, A. B.; Shalayev, S. P.; Ye.Belov, D.; Balashov, Ye.V.; Andreeva, T. V.; Semenov, A. V.; Melikhov, A. S.; Bolodyan, I. A.; Potyakin, V. I.

    1999-01-01

    The work has been done according to the US/Russian Joint Project "Experimental Evaluation of the Material Flammability in Microgravity" a continued combustion study in the SKOROST test apparatus on the OS Mir. The objective of the project was to evaluate the flammability and flame-spread rate for the selected polymer materials in low velocity flow in microgravity. Lately, the issue of nonmetal material combustion in microgravity has become of great importance, based on the necessity to develop the fire safety system for the new International Space Station (ISS). Lack of buoyant flow in microgravity reduces oxygen transfer into the combustion zone, which leads to flame extinction when the flow velocity is less than the limiting flow velocity V(sub lim) for the material. The ISS FGB fire-safety system was developed based on this phenomenon. The existence of minimum flow velocity V(sub lim) to sustain fire for the selected materials was determined both theoretically and experimentally. In the latter, it is shown that, even for thermally thin nonmetal materials with a very low oxygen index C(sub lim) of 12.5% (paper sheets with the thickness of 0.1 mm), a limiting flow velocity V(sub lim) exists at oxygen concentration Co(sub OX) = 17-21%, and is about 1.0 - 0.1 cm/sec. This might be explained by the relative increase in thermal losses due to radiation from the surface and from the gaseous phase. In the second series of experiments in Skorost apparatus on Orbital Station Mir the existence of the limiting flow velocity V(sub lim) for combustion was confirmed for PMMA and glass-epoxy composite strip samples 2 mm thick at oxygen concentration C(sub OX) = 21.5%. It was concluded that V(sub lim) depends on C(sub OX) for the PMMA sample with a low oxygen index of 15.5%, the limiting flow velocity V(sub lim) was less than 0.5 cm/sec, and for the glass-epoxy composite sample with a high oxygen index of 19%, the limiting flow velocity V(sub lim) was higher than 15 cm/sec. As of

  5. Change detection in a time series of polarimetric SAR data by an omnibus test statistic and its factorization (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Allan A.; Conradsen, Knut; Skriver, Henning

    2016-10-01

    Test statistics for comparison of real (as opposed to complex) variance-covariance matrices exist in the statistics literature [1]. In earlier publications we have described a test statistic for the equality of two variance-covariance matrices following the complex Wishart distribution with an associated p-value [2]. We showed their application to bitemporal change detection and to edge detection [3] in multilook, polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data in the covariance matrix representation [4]. The test statistic and the associated p-value is described in [5] also. In [6] we focussed on the block-diagonal case, we elaborated on some computer implementation issues, and we gave examples on the application to change detection in both full and dual polarization bitemporal, bifrequency, multilook SAR data. In [7] we described an omnibus test statistic Q for the equality of k variance-covariance matrices following the complex Wishart distribution. We also described a factorization of Q = R2 R3 … Rk where Q and Rj determine if and when a difference occurs. Additionally, we gave p-values for Q and Rj. Finally, we demonstrated the use of Q and Rj and the p-values to change detection in truly multitemporal, full polarization SAR data. Here we illustrate the methods by means of airborne L-band SAR data (EMISAR) [8,9]. The methods may be applied to other polarimetric SAR data also such as data from Sentinel-1, COSMO-SkyMed, TerraSAR-X, ALOS, and RadarSat-2 and also to single-pol data. The account given here closely follows that given our recent IEEE TGRS paper [7]. Selected References [1] Anderson, T. W., An Introduction to Multivariate Statistical Analysis, John Wiley, New York, third ed. (2003). [2] Conradsen, K., Nielsen, A. A., Schou, J., and Skriver, H., "A test statistic in the complex Wishart distribution and its application to change detection in polarimetric SAR data," IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing 41(1): 4-19, 2003. [3] Schou, J

  6. Scattering from arbitrarily shaped microstrip patch antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, David G.; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Cockrell, Capers R.

    1992-01-01

    The scattering properties of arbitrarily shaped microstrip patch antennas are examined. The electric field integral equation for a current element on a grounded dielectric slab is developed for a rectangular geometry based on Galerkin's technique with subdomain rooftop basis functions. A shape function is introduced that allows a rectangular grid approximation to the arbitrarily shaped patch. The incident field on the patch is expressed as a function of incidence angle theta(i), phi(i). The resulting system of equations is then solved for the unknown current modes on the patch, and the electromagnetic scattering is calculated for a given angle. Comparisons are made with other calculated results as well as with measurements.

  7. Can Stem Cell 'Patch' Help Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164475.html Can Stem Cell 'Patch' Help Heart Failure? Small improvement seen over ... Scientists report another step in the use of stem cells to help treat people with debilitating heart failure. ...

  8. The Smart Patches and Wearable Band (W-Band) for comfortable sleep monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seulki; Yan, Long; Roh, Taehwan; Hong, Sunjoo; Yoo, Hoi-Jun

    2011-01-01

    The Smart Patches and Wearable Band (W-Band) are proposed for comfortable sleep monitoring system which recognizes and diagnoses sleep disorders. By using Planar Fashionable Circuit Board (P-FCB) techniques, the Smart Patches are implemented with the plain fabric patch so that it can have light weight and small size. And the stretchability of the W-Band can achieve user convenience, low manufacturing cost, and low power consumption all at once. The data display program is developed on the external PC so that the user can check the monitoring result after wake-up. The proposed sleep monitoring system is fully implemented and tested on the human during normal sleep.

  9. Structural Health Monitoring of a Bonded Composite Patch Repair on a Fatigue-Cracked F-111C Wing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    fractographic observations just prior to failure of the wing in the fatigue test . For the patch system, based on the use of the bond-strength test as a...Environmental degradation of the adhesive bond would be manifested in the test as low strength and failure at the aluminium alloy surface - termed adhesive...34: Patch segments showing the bond test results. The location of the bond test plugs are shown together with the bond strength in MPa and failure

  10. Management of prosthetic patch infection after CEA.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Ross

    2016-04-01

    It has been reported that 0.5-1% of patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy with prosthetic patch closure of the arteriotomy will develop patch infection. One third occur within the first 2 months after surgery, while two-thirds occur after >6 months have elapsed. Wound infection and abscess formation is the commonest mode of presentation in early cases, while chronic sinus discharge and false aneurysm formation are the commonest presentations in late cases. The commonest infecting organisms are Staphylococci/Streptococci (90%) and this should be borne in mind when planning antibiotic therapy before cultures are available. Most patch infections present (semi)-electively and patch rupture is relatively rare (10%), thereby enabling the surgeon to undertake careful evaluation of the patients overall clinical and anatomical status, whilst planning the optimal treatment strategy. If necessary, the patient should be transferred to a tertiary center for treatment. This is not an operation to be undertaken by an inexperienced surgeon. Operative planning should involve checking the original operation note (did the patient tolerate carotid clamping under locoregional anesthesia and therefore might tolerate carotid ligation), is there evidence of contralateral cranial nerve lesions (a contraindication to major open surgery) and has the surgeon planned for adequate distal exposure of the internal carotid artery. Patch excision and autologous reconstruction (usually vein) is the current 'gold standard' treatment, but highly selected patients can be successfully treated by less invasive surgery (including insertion of a covered stent). Patch excision and prosthetic reconstruction should be avoided.

  11. Identifying Autocorrelation Generated by Various Error Processes in Interrupted Time-Series Regression Designs: A Comparison of AR1 and Portmanteau Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huitema, Bradley E.; McKean, Joseph W.

    2007-01-01

    Regression models used in the analysis of interrupted time-series designs assume statistically independent errors. Four methods of evaluating this assumption are the Durbin-Watson (D-W), Huitema-McKean (H-M), Box-Pierce (B-P), and Ljung-Box (L-B) tests. These tests were compared with respect to Type I error and power under a wide variety of error…

  12. Preparation of Mucoadhesive Oral Patches Containing Tetracycline Hydrochloride and Carvacrol for Treatment of Local Mouth Bacterial Infections and Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Obaidat, Rana M.; Bader, Ammar; Al-Rajab, Wafa; Abu Sheikha, Ghassan; Obaidat, Aiman A.

    2011-01-01

    The specific aim of this work was to prepare mucoadhesive patches containing tetracycline hydrochloride and carvacrol in an attempt to develop a novel oral drug delivery system for the treatment of mouth infections. The bilayered patches were prepared using ethyl cellulose as a backing layer and carbopol 934 as a matrix mucoadhesive layer. Patches were prepared with different loading amounts of tetracycline hydrochloride and carvacrol. The antimicrobial activity was assessed for the prepared patches using the disc-diffusion method against the yeast Candida albicans and five bacterial strains, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus bronchispti. In this work, we highlighted the possibility of occurrence of a synergistic action between carvacrol and tetracycline. The best formulation was selected based on microbiological tests, drug release, ex-vivo mucoadhesive performance, and swelling index. Physical characteristics of the selected formulations were determined. These included pH, patch thickness, weight uniformity, content uniformity, folding endurance, and patch stability. PMID:21617783

  13. Short-term monocular patching boosts the patched eye’s response in visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiawei; Baker, Daniel H.; Simard, Mathieu; Saint-Amour, Dave; Hess, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Several recent studies have demonstrated that following short-term monocular deprivation in normal adults, the patched eye, rather than the unpatched eye, becomes stronger in subsequent binocular viewing. However, little is known about the site and nature of the underlying processes. In this study, we examine the underlying mechanisms by measuring steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) as an index of the neural contrast response in early visual areas. Methods: The experiment consisted of three consecutive stages: a pre-patching EEG recording (14 minutes), a monocular patching stage (2.5 hours) and a post-patching EEG recording (14 minutes; started immediately after the removal of the patch). During the patching stage, a diffuser (transmits light but not pattern) was placed in front of one randomly selected eye. During the EEG recording stage, contrast response functions for each eye were measured. Results: The neural responses from the patched eye increased after the removal of the patch, whilst the responses from the unpatched eye remained the same. Such phenomena occurred under both monocular and dichoptic viewing conditions. Conclusions: We interpret this eye dominance plasticity in adult human visual cortex as homeostatic intrinsic plasticity regulated by an increase of contrast-gain in the patched eye. PMID:26410580

  14. The effects of patch shape and connectivity on nest site selection and reproductive success of the Indigo Bunting.

    SciTech Connect

    Weldon, Aimee Jean

    2004-07-01

    Description – Ph.D Dissertation. North Carolina State University. Raleigh, North Carolina. 135 pp. Abatract - Habitat fragmentation and its associated effects have been blamed for the recent population declines of many Neotropical migratory bird species. Increased predation and parasitism resulting from edge-related effects have been implicated for poor nesting success in many studies, mostly of forest interior species. However, little attention has been devoted to disturbance-dependent birds. In this study, I examine how patch shape and connectivity in fragmented landscapes affects the reproductive success of disturbance-dependent bird species, specifically the Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea). I conducted my study in a landscape-scale experimental system of similar-area habitat patches that differed in connectivity and in shape. Shapes differed between edgy and rectangular forms, where edgy patches contained 50% more edge than rectangular patches. I tested whether edgy patches function as ecological traps for species with strong edge preferences, by leading them to select dangerous habitats. Indigo Buntings preferentially selected edgy patches over rectangular patches, but experienced significantly lower reproductive success in edgy patches early in the season. Although predation pressure intensified in rectangular patches late in the season, seasonal fecundity was still significantly lower in edgy patches, providing the first empirical evidence that edges can function as ecological traps for Indigo Buntings. A second objective of my study was to evaluate the efficacy of conservation corridors for disturbance-dependent bird species. Conservation corridors have become a popular strategy to preserve biodiversity and promote gene flow in fragmented landscapes, but corridors may also have negative consequences. I tested the hypothesis that corridors can increase nest predation risk in connected patches relative to unconnected patches. Nest predation rates

  15. Effects of an emergent vegetation patch on channel reach bathymetry and stability during repeated unsteady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Kevin A.; Crowe Curran, Joanna

    2016-11-01

    While research into the interaction between in-channel vegetation, flow, and bed sediment has increased in recent years, there is still a need to understand how unsteady flows affect these processes, particularly in terms of channel bed adjustments. In this study, flume experiments tested two flood hydrograph sizes run over sand/gravel and sand/silt beds to evaluate reach scale impacts of a midchannel vegetation patch of variable stem density on channel bathymetry and stability. Alternating flood hydrographs with periods of low, steady flow created flow sequences reflective of an extended unsteady flow regime, thereby simulating time scales consisting of multiple flood events. Digital elevation models provided detailed measurements of channel change following each flood event to enable analysis over each unsteady flow sequence. The vegetation patch created characteristic channel bathymetries dependent on sediment mixture and patch density that in all cases resulted in a more variable bed structure than channels without a patch. Reach scale stability, quantified based on net volumetric bed change, only occurred with a sparse patch in the low flood sequence, corresponding with little variation in surface composition and structure. In most other cases, scour measured at the patch prevented stability at the reach scale, especially in the finer substrate. Overall, findings show that a channel may only adjust to a stable bathymetry upon addition of a midchannel vegetation patch within a limited range of flow regimes and patch stem densities, and that for the experimental conditions tested here, in-stream patches generally did not enhance reach scale bed stability.

  16. Truncated stacked elliptical patch antenna for broadband performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vijay; Sharma, Brajraj; Sharma, K. B.; Bhatnagar, D.

    2013-01-01

    A new design of a single-feed truncated elliptical patch antenna with and without slots for broadband performance with stacked arrangement is proposed in this paper and its performance is tested in free space. This multilayered rectangular microstrip antenna is designed and analyzed by using the ie3d simulation software. In between conducting and ground plane, designed antenna has two glass epoxy fr-4 substrates separated by an air substrate to attain broadband performance. The impedance bandwidth of designed antenna is better than 2.11GHz or 60% with respect to the central frequency. The simulated e plane co and cross radiation patterns are identical in shape for most of the part of bandwidth however at higher frequency side due to the presence of higher modes and cross polarization the radiation pattern are no more directive normal to patch geometry.

  17. Dredging displaces bottlenose dolphins from an urbanised foraging patch.

    PubMed

    Pirotta, Enrico; Laesser, Barbara Eva; Hardaker, Andrea; Riddoch, Nicholas; Marcoux, Marianne; Lusseau, David

    2013-09-15

    The exponential growth of the human population and its increasing industrial development often involve large scale modifications of the environment. In the marine context, coastal urbanisation and harbour expansion to accommodate the rising levels of shipping and offshore energy exploitation require dredging to modify the shoreline and sea floor. While the consequences of dredging on invertebrates and fish are relatively well documented, no study has robustly tested the effects on large marine vertebrates. We monitored the attendance of common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) to a recently established urbanised foraging patch, Aberdeen harbour (Scotland), and modelled the effect of dredging operations on site usage. We found that higher intensities of dredging caused the dolphins to spend less time in the harbour, despite high baseline levels of disturbance and the importance of the area as a foraging patch.

  18. Mental confusion associated with scopolamine patch in elderly with mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Won; Suh, Mee Kyung; Chin, Juhee; Na, Duk L

    2009-01-01

    Mental confusion or delirium can occur after application of scopolamine patch. However, predisposing factors for scopolamine-induced delirium are not known. It is expected that undetected incipient dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) may be prone to develop mental confusion after applying the scopolamine patch. For the past 5 years, we found seven elderly women who had experienced transdermal scopolamine-induced mental confusion. They underwent neuropsychological tests after recovery from mental confusion (mean duration from onset to the test: 66 days). The results showed that all the patients were impaired in at least one of cognitive domains, fulfilling the criteria of MCI. These findings suggest that scopolamine patch-induced mental confusion should be included in the differential diagnoses of mental confusion in elderly, especially in travel situation, and that older people with undetected MCI are prone to develop scopolamine patch-induced mental confusion.

  19. Design, fabrication, test, and evaluation of RF MEMS series switches using lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin film actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polcawich, Ronald G.

    The aim of this thesis was to design and prototype a robust, low voltage RF MEMS switch for use in military phased arrays. The frequencies of interest for this work include very low frequencies down to DC operation with the upper limit extending to at least 40 GHz. This broad frequency requirement requires a robust high frequency design and simulation using microwave transmission lines. With the aid of researchers at the US Army Research Laboratory, co-planar waveguide (CPW) transmission lines were chosen and designed to provide a low loss, 50 ohm impedance transmission line for the switch. CPW designs allow for both series and shunt switch configuration with this work focusing on a series switch. Furthermore, a series switch an ohmic contact was chosen as opposed to capacitive contacts. Piezoelectric actuation is chosen for the switch to enable operating voltages less than 10 volts while still maintaining a restoring force to prevent stiction. To meet these demands, lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films have been chosen for the piezoelectric actuator. Mechanical modeling of cantilevers comprised of an elastic layer and a Pt-PZT-Pt actuator were used to demonstrate feasibility of closing large gaps between switch contacts. Placement of the actuator to minimize perturbations to the RF transmission line is critical for broadband performance. Using fabrication design rules, electro-mechanical modeling, and high frequency design, the actuators were designed to fit with the RF gap between the RF conductor and ground planes of the CPW transmission line. Optimal performance was obtained with the actuators mechanically isolated from a majority of the RF transmission except for a small section that provides the contact pad to enable switch closure. The resulting switch is the first demonstrated first surface micromachined RF MEMS switch operating from DC to 65 GHz. This switch has a median actuation voltage below 5 volts with operation as low as 2 volts. Isolation in the

  20. Don't They All Measure the Same Thing? Consequences of Selecting Standardized Tests. Research Series No. 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floden, Robert E.; And Others

    The authors argue that personnel who select standardized achievement tests have been led to believe that the major achievement test batteries differ very little in terms of the topics they test; but that the content covered by these major tests is different, and that such differences have consequences for instructional content. To test this…

  1. Measuring Radiation Patterns of Reconfigurable Patch Antennas on Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2004-01-01

    An apparatus and technique have been devised for measuring the radiation pattern of a microwave patch antenna that is one of a number of identical units that have been fabricated in a planar array on a high-resistivity silicon wafer. The apparatus and technique are intended, more specifically, for application to such an antenna that includes a DC-controlled microelectromechanical system (MEMS) actuator for switching the antenna between two polarization states or between two resonance frequencies. Prior to the development of the present apparatus and technique, patch antennas on wafers were tested by techniques and equipment that are more suited to testing of conventional printed-circuit antennas. The techniques included sawing of the wafers to isolate individual antennas for testing. The equipment included custom-built test fixtures that included special signal launchers and transmission-line transitions. The present apparatus and technique eliminate the need for sawing wafers and for custom-built test fixtures, thereby making it possible to test antennas in less time and at less cost. Moreover, in a production setting, elimination of the premature sawing of wafers for testing reduces loss from breakage, thereby enhancing yield.

  2. Individual colour patches as multicomponent signals.

    PubMed

    Grether, Gregory F; Kolluru, Gita R; Nersissian, Karen

    2004-08-01

    Colour patches are complex traits, the components of which may evolve independently through a variety of mechanisms. Although usually treated as simple, two-dimensional characters and classified as either structural or pigmentary, in reality colour patches are complicated, three-dimensional structures that often contain multiple pigment types and structural features. The basic dermal chromatophore unit of fishes, reptiles and amphibians consists of three contiguous cell layers. Xanthophores and erythrophores in the outermost layer contain carotenoid and pteridine pigments that absorb short-wave light; iridophores in the middle layer contain crystalline platelets that reflect light back through the xanthophores; and melanophores in the basal layer contain melanins that absorb light across the spectrum. Changes in any one component of a chromatophore unit can drastically alter the reflectance spectrum produced, and for any given adaptive outcome (e.g. an increase in visibility), there may be multiple biochemical or cellular routes that evolution could take, allowing for divergent responses by different populations or species to similar selection regimes. All of the mechanisms of signal evolution that previously have been applied to single ornaments (including whole colour patches) could potentially be applied to the individual components of colour patches. To reach a complete understanding of colour patch evolution, however, it may be necessary to take an explicitly multi-trait approach. Here, we review multiple trait evolution theory and the basic mechanisms of colour production in fishes, reptiles and amphibians, and use a combination of computer simulations and empirical examples to show how multiple trait evolution theory can be applied to the components of single colour patches. This integrative perspective on animal colouration opens up a host of new questions and hypotheses. We offer specific, testable functional hypotheses for the most common pigmentary

  3. Methods of Making and Using Shape Memory Polymer Composite Patches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    A method of repairing a composite component having a damaged area including: laying a composite patch over the damaged area: activating the shape memory polymer resin to easily and quickly mold said patch to said damaged area; deactivating said shape memory polymer so that said composite patch retains the molded shape; and bonding said composite patch to said damaged part.

  4. Data book for 12.5-inch diameter SRB thermal model water flotation test: 14.7 psia, series P020

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allums, S. L.

    1974-01-01

    Data acquired from the initial series of tests conducted to determine how thermal conditions affect SRB (Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster) flotation are presented. Acceleration, pressure, and temperature data recorded from initial water impact to final flotation position using a 12.5-inch diameter thermal model of the SRB at ambient pressure are included. The model was 136.9 inches long and weighed 117.3 lbm. The tests indicated the following differences from ambient temperature tests: (1) significant negative static pressures can occur during penetration; (2) maximum penetration is increased; and (3) final flotation is in the spar buoy mode.

  5. Measles vaccination using a microneedle patch.

    PubMed

    Edens, Chris; Collins, Marcus L; Ayers, Jessica; Rota, Paul A; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2013-07-25

    Measles vaccination programs would benefit from delivery methods that decrease cost, simplify logistics, and increase safety. Conventional subcutaneous injection is limited by the need for skilled healthcare professionals to reconstitute and administer injections, and by the need for safe needle handling and disposal to reduce the risk of disease transmission through needle re-use and needlestick injury. Microneedles are micron-scale, solid needles coated with a dry formulation of vaccine that dissolves in the skin within minutes after patch application. By avoiding the use of hypodermic needles, vaccination using a microneedle patch could be carried out by minimally trained personnel with reduced risk of blood-borne disease transmission. The goal of this study was to evaluate measles vaccination using a microneedle patch to address some of the limitations of subcutaneous injection. Viability of vaccine virus dried onto a microneedle patch was stabilized by incorporation of the sugar, trehalose, and loss of viral titer was less than 1 log10(TCID50) after storage for at least 30 days at room temperature. Microneedle patches were then used to immunize cotton rats with the Edmonston-Zagreb measles vaccine strain. Vaccination using microneedles at doses equaling the standard human dose or one-fifth the human dose generated neutralizing antibody levels equivalent to those of a subcutaneous immunization at the same dose. These results show that measles vaccine can be stabilized on microneedles and that vaccine efficiently reconstitutes in vivo to generate a neutralizing antibody response equivalent to that generated by subcutaneous injection.

  6. Transdermal patch drug delivery interactions with exercise.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Thomas L; Gillespie, Nicole

    2011-03-01

    Transdermal drug delivery systems, such as the transdermal patch, continue to be a popular and convenient way to administer medications. There are currently several medications that use a transdermal patch drug delivery system. This article describes the potential untoward side effects of increased drug absorption through the use of a transdermal patch in individuals who exercise or participate in sporting events. Four studies have been reported that demonstrate a significant increase in the plasma concentration of nitroglycerin when individuals exercise compared with rest. Likewise, several case reports and two studies have been conducted that demonstrate nicotine toxicity and increased plasma nicotine while wearing a nicotine patch in individuals who exercise or participate in sporting events compared with rest. Healthcare providers, trainers and coaches should be aware of proper transdermal patch use, especially while exercising, in order to provide needed information to their respective patients and athletes to avoid potential untoward side effects. Particular caution should be given to individuals who participate in an extreme sporting event of long duration. Further research that includes more medications is needed in this area.

  7. Activated Membrane Patches Guide Chemotactic Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Inbal; Skoge, Monica L.; Charest, Pascale G.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Firtel, Richard A.; Loomis, William F.; Levine, Herbert; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2011-01-01

    Many eukaryotic cells are able to crawl on surfaces and guide their motility based on environmental cues. These cues are interpreted by signaling systems which couple to cell mechanics; indeed membrane protrusions in crawling cells are often accompanied by activated membrane patches, which are localized areas of increased concentration of one or more signaling components. To determine how these patches are related to cell motion, we examine the spatial localization of RasGTP in chemotaxing Dictyostelium discoideum cells under conditions where the vertical extent of the cell was restricted. Quantitative analyses of the data reveal a high degree of spatial correlation between patches of activated Ras and membrane protrusions. Based on these findings, we formulate a model for amoeboid cell motion that consists of two coupled modules. The first module utilizes a recently developed two-component reaction diffusion model that generates transient and localized areas of elevated concentration of one of the components along the membrane. The activated patches determine the location of membrane protrusions (and overall cell motion) that are computed in the second module, which also takes into account the cortical tension and the availability of protrusion resources. We show that our model is able to produce realistic amoeboid-like motion and that our numerical results are consistent with experimentally observed pseudopod dynamics. Specifically, we show that the commonly observed splitting of pseudopods can result directly from the dynamics of the signaling patches. PMID:21738453

  8. Characterizing the morphology of protein binding patches.

    PubMed

    Malod-Dognin, Noël; Bansal, Achin; Cazals, Frédéric

    2012-12-01

    Let the patch of a partner in a protein complex be the collection of atoms accounting for the interaction. To improve our understanding of the structure-function relationship, we present a patch model decoupling the topological and geometric properties. While the geometry is classically encoded by the atomic positions, the topology is recorded in a graph encoding the relative position of concentric shells partitioning the interface atoms. The topological-geometric duality provides the basis of a generic dynamic programming-based algorithm comparing patches at the shell level, which may favor topological or geometric features. On the biological side, we address four questions, using 249 cocrystallized heterodimers organized in biological families. First, we dissect the morphology of binding patches and show that Nature enjoyed the topological and geometric degrees of freedom independently while retaining a finite set of qualitatively distinct topological signatures. Second, we argue that our shell-based comparison is effective to perform atomic-level comparisons and show that topological similarity is a less stringent than geometric similarity. We also use the topological versus geometric duality to exhibit topo-rigid patches, whose topology (but not geometry) remains stable upon docking. Third, we use our comparison algorithms to infer specificity-related information amidst a database of complexes. Finally, we exhibit a descriptor outperforming its contenders to predict the binding affinities of the affinity benchmark. The softwares developed with this article are availablefrom http://team.inria.fr/abs/vorpatch_compatch/.

  9. Microneedle patches for vaccination in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Arya, Jaya; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2016-10-28

    Millions of people die of infectious diseases each year, mostly in developing countries, which could largely be prevented by the use of vaccines. While immunization rates have risen since the introduction of the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI), there remain major challenges to more effective vaccination in developing countries. As a possible solution, microneedle patches containing an array of micron-sized needles on an adhesive backing have been developed to be used for vaccine delivery to the skin. These microneedle patches can be easily and painlessly applied by pressing against the skin and, in some designs, do not leave behind sharps waste. The patches are single-dose, do not require reconstitution, are easy to administer, have reduced size to simplify storage, transportation and waste disposal, and offer the possibility of improved vaccine immunogenicity, dose sparing and thermostability. This review summarizes vaccination challenges in developing countries and discusses advantages that microneedle patches offer for vaccination to address these challenges. We conclude that microneedle patches offer a powerful new technology that can enable more effective vaccination in developing countries.

  10. Surface patterning of nanoparticles with polymer patches

    SciTech Connect

    Choueiri, Rachelle M.; Galati, Elizabeth; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Klinkova, Anna; Larin, Egor M.; Querejeta-Fernández, Ana; Han, Lili; Xin, Huolin L.; Gang, Oleg; Zhulina, Ekaterina B.; Rubinstein, Michael; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-08-24

    Patterning of colloidal particles with chemically or topographically distinct surface domains (patches) has attracted intense research interest. Surface-patterned particles act as colloidal analogues of atoms and molecules serve as model systems in studies of phase transitions in liquid systems, behave as ‘colloidal surfactants’ and function as templates for the synthesis of hybrid particles. The generation of micrometre- and submicrometre-sized patchy colloids is now efficient but surface patterning of inorganic colloidal nanoparticles with dimensions of the order of tens of nanometres is uncommon. Such nanoparticles exhibit size- and shape-dependent optical, electronic and magnetic properties, and their assemblies show new collective properties. At present, nanoparticle patterning is limited to the generation of two-patch nanoparticles and nanoparticles with surface ripples or a ‘raspberry’ surface morphology. We demonstrate nanoparticle surface patterning, which utilizes thermodynamically driven segregation of polymer ligands from a uniform polymer brush into surface-pinned micelles following a change in solvent quality. Patch formation is reversible but can be permanently preserved using a photocrosslinking step. The methodology offers the ability to control the dimensions of patches, their spatial distribution and the number of patches per nanoparticle, in agreement with a theoretical model. The versatility of the strategy is demonstrated by patterning nanoparticles with different dimensions, shapes and compositions, tethered with various types of polymers and subjected to different external stimuli. Furthermore, these patchy nanocolloids have potential applications in fundamental research, the self-assembly of nanomaterials, diagnostics, sensing and colloidal stabilization.

  11. Surface patterning of nanoparticles with polymer patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choueiri, Rachelle M.; Galati, Elizabeth; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Klinkova, Anna; Larin, Egor M.; Querejeta-Fernández, Ana; Han, Lili; Xin, Huolin L.; Gang, Oleg; Zhulina, Ekaterina B.; Rubinstein, Michael; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-10-01

    Patterning of colloidal particles with chemically or topographically distinct surface domains (patches) has attracted intense research interest. Surface-patterned particles act as colloidal analogues of atoms and molecules, serve as model systems in studies of phase transitions in liquid systems, behave as ‘colloidal surfactants’ and function as templates for the synthesis of hybrid particles. The generation of micrometre- and submicrometre-sized patchy colloids is now efficient, but surface patterning of inorganic colloidal nanoparticles with dimensions of the order of tens of nanometres is uncommon. Such nanoparticles exhibit size- and shape-dependent optical, electronic and magnetic properties, and their assemblies show new collective properties. At present, nanoparticle patterning is limited to the generation of two-patch nanoparticles, and nanoparticles with surface ripples or a ‘raspberry’ surface morphology. Here we demonstrate nanoparticle surface patterning, which utilizes thermodynamically driven segregation of polymer ligands from a uniform polymer brush into surface-pinned micelles following a change in solvent quality. Patch formation is reversible but can be permanently preserved using a photocrosslinking step. The methodology offers the ability to control the dimensions of patches, their spatial distribution and the number of patches per nanoparticle, in agreement with a theoretical model. The versatility of the strategy is demonstrated by patterning nanoparticles with different dimensions, shapes and compositions, tethered with various types of polymers and subjected to different external stimuli. These patchy nanocolloids have potential applications in fundamental research, the self-assembly of nanomaterials, diagnostics, sensing and colloidal stabilization.

  12. The effect of direct interspecific competition on patch exploitation strategies in parasitoid wasps.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Rihab; Wajnberg, Eric; Monge, Jean-Paul; Goubault, Marlène

    2015-01-01

    The presence of competitors may affect the pay-off of individuals' foraging strategies. They should therefore modify their resource exploitation decisions accordingly. In such a direct competition situation, theory predicts that individuals should stay longer on a resource patch than when foraging alone. However, models predicting patch residence time focus on intraspecific competition without agonistic interactions. Here, we investigate the patch use strategies of females of two parasitoid species, Eupelmus vuilleti and Dinarmus basalis, attacking the same host, Callosobruchus maculatus, knowing that D. basalis is more aggressive and can exclude E. vuilleti during pairwise contests for single hosts. Our results showed that time allocation and oviposition strategies differed in relation to the species and type of competition (i.e., presence/absence of competitor, simultaneous/sequential female introduction or resident/intruder female). Eupelmus vuilleti females tended to wait in the patch surroundings for D. basalis females' departure to return and exploit hosts parasitized by the opponent (after destruction of her eggs). In contrast, D. basalis females tended to self-superparasitize and stay motionless near the hosts. After detecting an E. vuilleti female entering the patch, they attacked and chased her permanently from the patch. Females of both species spent less time in the patch when faced with a competitor than when alone. This study is the first to test the influence of direct interspecific competition and arrival order on patch exploitation strategies in parasitoid species, and highlights the necessity to include agonistic behaviors in theoretical models predicting optimal patch residence time in competitive situations.

  13. Plant community response to landscape connectivity and patch shape.

    SciTech Connect

    Damschen, Ellen I.

    2005-07-01

    Ph.D Dissertation. North Carolina State University. Raleigh, North Carolina. 135 pp. Abstract. Land transformation is the single most important factor promoting the global loss of terrestrial biological diversity. Remaining habitat fragments contain more edges, less interior habitat, and are more isolated from other habitat fragments, all of which decrease rates of colonization following local extinctions, reduce reproductive rates and gene flow between populations, and ultimately lead to species extinctions. The best approach to prevent species loss, therefore, is to preserve greater areas of habitat. In many cases, however, habitat has already been fragmented and strategies are needed to configure and manage the remaining land. Land managers often create reserve networks that incorporate the use of landscape corridors, linear strips of habitat connecting isolated patches, to reduce species loss by increasing colonizations and decreasing extinctions. Most empirical tests of corridors have been limited to individuals and populations, leaving corridor effects on diversity largely unknown, especially at large spatial scales. Additionally, only a handful of studies have examined corridor effects on plants, which may be especially sensitive to the abiotic changes resulting from alterations in patch shape due to dispersal limitation. Using one of the best-replicated, large-scale habitat fragmentation experiments, I tested explicitly for corridor effects on plant community diversity and composition by examining the established plant community and the soil seedbank. My experimental design distinguished among the three possible ways corridors can affect between-patch processes: by acting as a movement conduit between connected patches (“connectivity effects”), by increasing area alone (“area effects”), and by intercepting organisms moving across the landscape and filtering them into connected patches (“drift-fence effects”). Additionally, I tested for the

  14. Assessment of the effectiveness of nontransdermal energy patches on muscle endurance and power.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Bert H; Smith, Doug B; Stemm, John D; Warren, Aric J; O'Brien, Matt S; Glass, Rob G

    2008-05-01

    Claims of recently developed energy patches suggest that organic nanoscale biomolecular "antennas" produced by L and D-stereoisomers resonate at frequencies in unison with molecules in the cells inducing electron flow to assists in recruiting calcium ions, allowing greater muscle fiber recruitment during muscle contraction. The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of energy patches in the performance of selected muscle power and endurance measures. After a 5-minute warm-up and stretch, 41 college varsity football players (age, 20.37 +/- 1.24 years; height, 169.91 +/- 7.44 cm; weight, 109.45 +/- 19.85 kg) were pre-tested on 102-kg maximal bench press repetitions, standing vertical jump, grip strength, peak torque, torque to body weight, total work, average power, and average torque as measured by 50 repetitions of leg extensions at 180 degrees .s. The following week, the players were randomly assigned the experimental or placebo patches. After placement of the patches, the participants again completed a 5-minute warm-up, followed by the identical pre-test protocol. Repeated-measures ANOVAs were used to compare resultant data. No significant group interaction effects were found between experimental and placebo patches for maximal bench press repetitions (p = 0.48), vertical jump distance (p = 0.39), grip strength (p = 0.29), total work (p = 0.26), torque to body weight (p = 0.05), average peak torque (p = 0.08), and average power (p = 0.05). A significant increase occurred in the experimental group for peak torque (p = 0.04). It was concluded that the energy patches significantly improved performance over placebo patches in one of the eight variables tested and registered near significance in two additional variables. However, inconsistency in overall results demands further studies to determine the reliability in improvement of performance in the presence of energy patches.

  15. A Look at Computer-Assisted Testing Operations. The Illinois Series on Educational Application of Computers, No. 12e.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muiznieks, Viktors; Dennis, J. Richard

    In computer assisted test construction (CATC) systems, the computer is used to perform the mechanical aspects of testing while the teacher retains control over question content. Advantages of CATC systems include question banks, decreased importance of test item security, computer analysis and response to student test answers, item analysis…

  16. Adhesive RFID Sensor Patch for Monitoring of Sweat Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Rose, Daniel P; Ratterman, Michael E; Griffin, Daniel K; Hou, Linlin; Kelley-Loughnane, Nancy; Naik, Rajesh R; Hagen, Joshua A; Papautsky, Ian; Heikenfeld, Jason C

    2015-06-01

    Wearable digital health devices are dominantly found in rigid form factors such as bracelets and pucks. An adhesive radio-frequency identification (RFID) sensor bandage (patch) is reported, which can be made completely intimate with human skin, a distinct advantage for chronological monitoring of biomarkers in sweat. In this demonstration, a commercial RFID chip is adapted with minimum components to allow potentiometric sensing of solutes in sweat, and surface temperature, as read by an Android smartphone app with 96% accuracy at 50 mM Na(+) (in vitro tests). All circuitry is solder-reflow integrated on a standard Cu/polyimide flexible-electronic layer including an antenna, but while also allowing electroplating for simple integration of exotic metals for sensing electrodes. Optional paper microfluidics wick sweat from a sweat porous adhesive allowing flow to the sensor, or the sensor can be directly contacted to the skin. The wearability of the patch has been demonstrated for up to seven days, and includes a protective textile which provides a feel and appearance similar to a standard Band-Aid. Applications include hydration monitoring, but the basic capability is extendable to other mM ionic solutes in sweat (Cl(-), K(+), Mg(2+), NH4(+), and Zn(2+)). The design and fabrication of the patch are provided in full detail, as the basic components could be useful in the design of other wearable sensors.

  17. Evolution of density- and patch-size-dependent dispersal rates.

    PubMed Central

    Poethke, Hans Joachim; Hovestadt, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Based on a marginal value approach, we derive a nonlinear expression for evolutionarily stable (ES) dispersal rates in a metapopulation with global dispersal. For the general case of density-dependent population growth, our analysis shows that individual dispersal rates should decrease with patch capacity and-beyond a certain threshold-increase with population density. We performed a number of spatially explicit, individual-based simulation experiments to test these predictions and to explore further the relevance of variation in the rate of population increase, density dependence, environmental fluctuations and dispersal mortality on the evolution of dispersal rates. They confirm the predictions of our analytical approach. In addition, they show that dispersal rates in metapopulations mostly depend on dispersal mortality and inter-patch variation in population density. The latter is dominantly driven by environmental fluctuations and the rate of population increase. These conclusions are not altered by the introduction of neighbourhood dispersal. With patch capacities in the order of 100 individuals, kin competition seems to be of negligible importance for ES dispersal rates except when overall dispersal rates are low. PMID:11916481

  18. Role of Bacterial Communities in the Natural Suppression of Rhizoctonia solani Bare Patch Disease of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Chuntao; Hulbert, Scot H.; Schroeder, Kurtis L.; Mavrodi, Olga; Mavrodi, Dmitri; Dhingra, Amit; Schillinger, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Rhizoctonia bare patch and root rot disease of wheat, caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG-8, develops as distinct patches of stunted plants and limits the yield of direct-seeded (no-till) wheat in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. At the site of a long-term cropping systems study near Ritzville, WA, a decline in Rhizoctonia patch disease was observed over an 11-year period. Bacterial communities from bulk and rhizosphere soil of plants from inside the patches, outside the patches, and recovered patches were analyzed by using pyrosequencing with primers designed for 16S rRNA. Taxa in the class Acidobacteria and the genus Gemmatimonas were found at higher frequencies in the rhizosphere of healthy plants outside the patches than in that of diseased plants from inside the patches. Dyella and Acidobacteria subgroup Gp7 were found at higher frequencies in recovered patches. Chitinophaga, Pedobacter, Oxalobacteriaceae (Duganella and Massilia), and Chyseobacterium were found at higher frequencies in the rhizosphere of diseased plants from inside the patches. For selected taxa, trends were validated by quantitative PCR (qPCR), and observed shifts of frequencies in the rhizosphere over time were duplicated in cycling experiments in the greenhouse that involved successive plantings of wheat in Rhizoctonia-inoculated soil. Chryseobacterium soldanellicola was isolated from the rhizosphere inside the patches and exhibited significant antagonism against R. solani AG-8 in vitro and in greenhouse tests. In conclusion, we identified novel bacterial taxa that respond to conditions affecting bare patch disease symptoms and that may be involved in suppression of Rhizoctonia root rot and bare batch disease. PMID:24056471

  19. PL-PatchSurfer: A Novel Molecular Local Surface-Based Method for Exploring Protein-Ligand Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bingjie; Zhu, Xiaolei; Monroe, Lyman; Bures, Mark G.; Kihara, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Structure-based computational methods have been widely used in exploring protein-ligand interactions, including predicting the binding ligands of a given protein based on their structural complementarity. Compared to other protein and ligand representations, the advantages of a surface representation include reduced sensitivity to subtle changes in the pocket and ligand conformation and fast search speed. Here we developed a novel method named PL-PatchSurfer (Protein-Ligand PatchSurfer). PL-PatchSurfer represents the protein binding pocket and the ligand molecular surface as a combination of segmented surface patches. Each patch is characterized by its geometrical shape and the electrostatic potential, which are represented using the 3D Zernike descriptor (3DZD). We first tested PL-PatchSurfer on binding ligand prediction and found it outperformed the pocket-similarity based ligand prediction program. We then optimized the search algorithm of PL-PatchSurfer using the PDBbind dataset. Finally, we explored the utility of applying PL-PatchSurfer to a larger and more diverse dataset and showed that PL-PatchSurfer was able to provide a high early enrichment for most of the targets. To the best of our knowledge, PL-PatchSurfer is the first surface patch-based method that treats ligand complementarity at protein binding sites. We believe that using a surface patch approach to better understand protein-ligand interactions has the potential to significantly enhance the design of new ligands for a wide array of drug-targets. PMID:25167137

  20. Vegetation patches increase wind-blown litter accumulation in a semi-arid steppe of northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yuchun; Xin, Xiaoping; Xu, Xingliang; Wang, Xu; Yan, Ruirui; Murray, Philip J.

    2016-12-01

    Litter decomposition is an important source of soil organic matter and nutrients; however, few studies have explored how vegetation patches affect wind-driven litter mobility and accumulation. In this study, we aimed to test the following hypotheses: (1) vegetation patches can reduce litter removal and facilitate litter accumulation, (2) litter mobility results in the heterogeneous redistribution of carbon and nutrients over the land surface, and (3) litter removal rates differ among different litter types (e.g., leaf and stem). Four vegetation patch types and six litter types were used to investigate the impacts of vegetation patches on litter mobility and accumulation. The results show that compared with almost bare ground patches, patches with vegetation cover had significantly higher litter accumulation, with the shrub patch type having the highest accumulation amount. The rate of litter removal due to wind was highest for the almost bare surface type (P4) and lowest for the shrub patch (P1) and Stipa grandis community (P2) types. There were significant differences in the removal rate among the different litter types. These findings indicate that wind-based litter redistribution among bare, S. grandis-dominated, and shrub-dominated patches is at least partially responsible for increasing the spatial heterogeneity of resources on a landscape scale.

  1. Can we go beyond burned area assessment with fire patch metrics from global remote rensing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira Pereira Messias, Joana; Ruffault, Julien; Chuvieco, Emilio; Mouillot, Florent

    2016-04-01

    Fire is a major event influencing global biogeochemical cycles and contribute to the emissions of CO2 and other greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. Global burned area (BA) datasets from remote sensing have provided the fruitful information for quantifying carbon emissions in global biogeochemical models, and for DGVM's benchmarking. Patch level analysis from pixel level information recently emerged as an informative additional feature of the regime as fire size distribution. The aim of this study is to evaluate the ability of global BA products to accurately represent characteristics of fire patches (size, complexity shape and spatial orientation). We selected a site in the Brazilian savannas (Cerrado), one of the most fire prone biome and one of the validation test site for the ESA fire-Cci project. We used the pixel-level burned area detected by Landsat, MCD45A1 and the newly delivered MERIS ESA fire-Cci for the period 2002-2009. A flood-fill algorithm adapted from Archibald and Roy (2009) was used to identify the individual fire patches (patch ID) according to the burned date (BD). For each patch ID, we calculated a panel of patch metrics as area, perimeter and core area, shape complexity (shape index and fractal dimension) and the feature of the ellipse fitted over the spatial distribution of pixels composing the patch (eccentricity and direction of the main axis). Paired fire patches overlapping between each BA products were compared. The correlation between patch metrics were evaluated by linear regression models for each inter-product comparison according to fire size classes. Our results showed significant patch overlaps (>30%) between products for patches with areas larger than 270ha, with more than 90% of patches overlapping between MERIS and MCD45A1. Fire Patch metrics correlations showed R2>0.6 for all comparisons of patch Area and Core Area, with a slope of 0.99 between MERIS and MCD45A1 illustrating the agreement between the two global products. The

  2. Deformation of Polar Cap Patches During Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, S.; Ridley, A. J.; Nicolls, M. J.; Coster, A. J.; Thomas, E. G.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Hampton, D.

    2015-12-01

    Polar cap patches refer to the islands of high F-region plasma density within the polar cap. Their formation on the dayside and deformation on the nightside are not well understood. The F-layer ionosphere density is strongly influenced by electric field, thermospheric wind as well as soft particle precipitation. This study combines observations from multiple instruments, including Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar, GPS TEC and optical instruments, as well as the Global Ionosphere and Thermosphere Model (GITM), to investigate the effects of highly structured electric fields and winds on the deformation of polar cap patches during substorms. We will also discuss variations of the auroral emissions associated with the patch evolution.

  3. Tunable nano dispersed LC based patch antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Afaque; Yadav, Harsh; Ahmad, Shakeb

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents Patch antenna based on pure and Nano dispersed liquid crystals (LCs) for earth and space applications. Patch antenna are one of the most attractive antennas designed for RF frequency. To fulfill the demand of modern antenna i.e. tunability, a design of LC based patch antenna with optimum frequency of 15 GHz is investigated. In this design, NLC and ZnO doped NLC were used as a dielectric substrate. Its dielectric permittivity was controlled by biasing voltage. The dielectric properties of the 4-Cyano-4' -pentylbiphenyl (5CB) nematic liquid crystal (NLC), and NLC doped with Zinc oxide (ZnO) Nanoparticles was studied at room temperature. The concentration of doping material was 0.5% by w.t. in ZnO. Results shows that dielectric parameters are strong function of frequency and applied bias voltage. Moreover, Using doped NLC as dielectric substrate one gets more tunability or shift in resonant frequency in the proposed geometry.

  4. Cell repair: Revisiting the patch hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Nicholas R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plasma membrane damage elicits a complex and dynamic cellular response. A vital component of this response, membrane resealing, is thought to arise from fusion of intracellular membranous compartments to form a temporary, impermeant patch at the site of damage; however, this hypothesis has been difficult to confirm visually. By utilizing advanced microscopy technologies with high spatiotemporal resolution in wounded Xenopus laevis oocytes, we provide the first direct visualization of the membrane fusion events predicted by the patch hypothesis; we show the barrier formed by patching is capable of abating exchange of material across the plasma membrane within seconds. Profound changes also occur to the plasma membrane surrounding wounds; lipid remodeling is accompanied by membrane fusion events, both conventional (e.g., exocytosis) and novel (e.g., “explodosis”). Further, we reveal additional complexity in wound-induced subcellular patterning, supporting existing evidence that extensive interactions between lipid, protein, and ionic signaling pathways shape the cellular wound response. PMID:28042380

  5. Boolean Operations with Prism Algebraic Patches

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Chandrajit; Paoluzzi, Alberto; Portuesi, Simone; Lei, Na; Zhao, Wenqi

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a symbolic-numeric algorithm for Boolean operations, closed in the algebra of curved polyhedra whose boundary is triangulated with algebraic patches (A-patches). This approach uses a linear polyhedron as a first approximation of both the arguments and the result. On each triangle of a boundary representation of such linear approximation, a piecewise cubic algebraic interpolant is built, using a C1-continuous prism algebraic patch (prism A-patch) that interpolates the three triangle vertices, with given normal vectors. The boundary representation only stores the vertices of the initial triangulation and their external vertex normals. In order to represent also flat and/or sharp local features, the corresponding normal-per-face and/or normal-per-edge may be also given, respectively. The topology is described by storing, for each curved triangle, the two triples of pointers to incident vertices and to adjacent triangles. For each triangle, a scaffolding prism is built, produced by its extreme vertices and normals, which provides a containment volume for the curved interpolating A-patch. When looking for the result of a regularized Boolean operation, the 0-set of a tri-variate polynomial within each such prism is generated, and intersected with the analogous 0-sets of the other curved polyhedron, when two prisms have non-empty intersection. The intersection curves of the boundaries are traced and used to decompose each boundary into the 3 standard classes of subpatches, denoted in, out and on. While tracing the intersection curves, the locally refined triangulation of intersecting patches is produced, and added to the boundary representation. PMID:21516262

  6. Capuchin monkeys (Cebus nigritus) use spatial and visual information during within-patch foraging.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Daniela Fichtner; Bicca-Marques, Júlio César

    2012-01-01

    Foraging in large-scale (navigation between patches), small-scale (choice of within-patch feeding sites), and micro-scale (close inspection of food items) space presents variable cognitive challenges. The reliability and usefulness of spatial memory and perceptual cues during food search in a forest environment vary among these spatial scales. This research applied an experimental field design to test the ability of a free-ranging group composed of eight black-horned capuchin monkeys, Cebus nigritus, inhabiting a forest fragment in Porto Alegre, State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, to use food-associated spatial, visual, olfactory, and quantitative (amount of food) cues during small-scale foraging decisions. The experimental design involved the establishment of a feeding station composed of eight feeding platforms distributed in a circular arrangement. A series of six experiments, each lasting 20 days, was conducted from March to August 2005. Two feeding platforms in each experimental session contained a food reward (real banana), whereas the remaining six platforms contained either a sham banana or an inaccessible real banana. Data on capuchin monkey foraging behavior at the feeding stations were collected by the "all occurrences" sampling method. The performance of the capuchins in the experiments was analyzed based on the first two platforms inspected in each session. The study group inspected feeding platforms in 571 occasions during 113 sessions. Capuchins used visual cues and spatial information (and adopted a win-return strategy) for finding the platforms baited with real bananas and showed weak evidence of the integration of spatial and quantitative cues, but failed to show evidence of using olfactory cues. In addition, individual differences in social rank and foraging behavior affected opportunities for learning and the performance in the cognitive tasks.

  7. Dynamics of skimming flow in the wake of a vegetation patch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayaud, Jerome R.; Wiggs, Giles F. S.; Bailey, Richard M.

    2016-09-01

    Dryland vegetation is often spatially patchy, and so affects wind flow in complex ways. Theoretical models and wind tunnel testing have shown that skimming flow develops above vegetation patches at high plant densities, resulting in little or no wind erosion in these zones. Understanding the dynamics of skimming flow is therefore important for predicting sediment transport and bedform development in dryland areas. However, no field-based data are available describing turbulent airflow dynamics in the wake of vegetation patches. In this study, turbulent wind flow was examined using high-frequency (10 Hz) sonic anemometry at four measurement heights (0.30 m, 0.55 m, 1.10 m and 1.65 m) along a transect in the lee of an extensive patch of shrubs (z = 1.10 m height) in Namibia. Spatial variations in mean wind velocity, horizontal Reynolds stresses and coherent turbulent structures were analysed. We found that wind velocity in the wake of the patch effectively recovered over ∼12 patch heights (h) downwind, which is 2-5 h longer than previously reported recovery lengths for individual vegetation elements and two-dimensional wind fences. This longer recovery can be attributed to a lack of flow moving around the obstacle in the patch case. The step-change in roughness between the patch canopy and the bare surface in its wake resulted in an initial peak in resultant horizontal shear stress (τr) followed by significant decrease downwind. In contrast to τr , horizontal normal Reynolds stress (u‧2 ‾) progressively increased along the patch wake. A separation of the upper shear layer at the leeside edge of the patch was observed, and a convergence of τr curves implies the formation of a constant stress layer by ∼20 h downwind. The use of τr at multiple heights is found to be a useful tool for identifying flow equilibration in complex aerodynamic regimes. Quadrant analysis revealed elevated frequencies of Q2 (ejection) and Q4 (sweep) events in the immediate lee of the

  8. Epidural blood patch and acute varicella.

    PubMed

    Martin, David P; Bergman, Bradley D; Berger, Ines H

    2004-12-01

    We present the case of a 38-yr-old woman who required an epidural blood patch in the context of acute varicella (chickenpox). The unique risks in this case include the possible triggering of central nervous system complications after the introduction of viremic blood into the epidural or intrathecal space. However, the risk was believed to be acceptable because the patient was receiving antiviral coverage. She enjoyed complete relief of her headache but experienced transient back and leg pain. Leptomeningeal irritation caused by acute varicella infection may put patients at increased risk for pain after epidural blood patch.

  9. Patch Clamping Protoplasts from Vascular Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Elzenga, J. Theo M.; Keller, Christopher P.; Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    A method is described for the isolation of protoplasts (Pisum sativum, Phaseolus vulgaris, Avena sativa, Arabidopsis thaliana) in preparation for ion flux studies using patch clamp electrophysiology. Protoplasts that have been exposed to hydrolytic, cell wall degrading, enzymes for as little as 5 minutes form gigaseals (seal resistance higher than 10 giga Ohm) with the patch pipette with success rates greater than 40%. Sealing of these protoplasts is fast, averaging less than 2 minutes. This method yields high rates of gigaseal formation in a variety of tissues from both monocots and dicots and will enhance data collection in ion flux studies of plasma membranes of vascular plants. PMID:16668586

  10. Lightweight Material Patches Allow for Quick Repairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Cornerstone Research Group Inc., of Dayton, Ohio, has been the recipient of 16 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with NASA with a variety of different focuses, including projects like creating inflatable structures for radio frequency antennas and, most recently, healable polymer matrix composites for future space vehicles. One of its earlier SBIR contracts, with Kennedy Space Center, led to the development of a new type of structural patch for a variety of consumer uses: Rubbn Repair, for automotive uses; and Rec Repair for the outdoors and adventure market. Both are flexible, heat-activated structural patches.

  11. A wavelet-based estimator of the degrees of freedom in denoised fMRI time series for probabilistic testing of functional connectivity and brain graphs.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ameera X; Bullmore, Edward T

    2016-11-15

    Connectome mapping using techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become a focus of systems neuroscience. There remain many statistical challenges in analysis of functional connectivity and network architecture from BOLD fMRI multivariate time series. One key statistic for any time series is its (effective) degrees of freedom, df, which will generally be less than the number of time points (or nominal degrees of freedom, N). If we know the df, then probabilistic inference on other fMRI statistics, such as the correlation between two voxel or regional time series, is feasible. However, we currently lack good estimators of df in fMRI time series, especially after the degrees of freedom of the "raw" data have been modified substantially by denoising algorithms for head movement. Here, we used a wavelet-based method both to denoise fMRI data and to estimate the (effective) df of the denoised process. We show that seed voxel correlations corrected for locally variable df could be tested for false positive connectivity with better control over Type I error and greater specificity of anatomical mapping than probabilistic connectivity maps using the nominal degrees of freedom. We also show that wavelet despiked statistics can be used to estimate all pairwise correlations between a set of regional nodes, assign a P value to each edge, and then iteratively add edges to the graph in order of increasing P. These probabilistically thresholded graphs are likely more robust to regional variation in head movement effects than comparable graphs constructed by thresholding correlations. Finally, we show that time-windowed estimates of df can be used for probabilistic connectivity testing or dynamic network analysis so that apparent changes in the functional connectome are appropriately corrected for the effects of transient noise bursts. Wavelet despiking is both an algorithm for fMRI time series denoising and an estimator of the (effective) df of denoised

  12. Grid flexibility and patching techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, T. G.; Smith, L. W.; Yung, C. N.; Barthelson, S. H.; Dewitt, K. J.

    1984-01-01

    The numerical determination of combustor flowfields is of great value to the combustor designer. An a priori knowledge of the flow behavior can speed the combustor design process and reduce the number of experimental test rigs required to arrive at an optimal design. Even 2-D steady incompressible isothermal flow predictions are of use; many codes of this kind are available, each employing different techniques to surmount the difficulties arising from the nonlinearity of the governing equations and from typically irregular combustor geometries. Mapping techniques (algebraic and elliptic PDE), and adaptive grid methods (both multi-grid and grid embedding) as applied to axisymmetric combustors are discussed.

  13. Patches for Carotid Artery Endarterectomy: Current Materials and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Muto, Akihito; Nishibe, Toshiya; Dardik, Herbert; Dardik, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Patch angioplasty is commonly performed after carotid endarterectomy. Randomized prospective trials and meta-analyses have documented improved rates of perioperative and long-term stroke prevention as well as reduced rates of restenosis for patches compared to primary closure of the arteriotomy. Although use of vein patches is considered to be the “gold standard” for patch closure, newer generations of synthetic and biological materials rival outcomes associated with vein patches. Future bioengineered patches are likely to optimize patch performance, both by achieving minimal stroke risk and long-term rates of restenosis, as well as by minimizing the risk of unusual complications of prosthetic patches such as infection and pseudoaneurysm formation; in addition, lessons from bioengineered patches will likely enable construction of bioengineered and tissue-engineered bypass grafts. PMID:19563972

  14. Critical patch sizes for food-web modules.

    PubMed

    Martinson, Holly M; Fagan, William F; Denno, Robert F

    2012-08-01

    Because patch size and connectivity may strongly impact the assemblage of species that occur on a patch, the types of food-web interactions that occur among those species may also depend on spatial structure. Here, we identify whether food-web interactions among salt-marsh-inhabiting arthropods vary with patch size and connectivity, and how such changes in trophic structure might feed back to influence the spatial distribution of prey. In a multiyear survey, patch-restricted predators exhibited steeper occupancy-patch-size relationships than herbivores, and species' critical patch sizes were correlated with overall rarity. As a result, the presence of food-web modules depended strongly on patch size: large and well-connected patches supported complex food-web modules, but only the simplest modules involving the most abundant species were found on small patches. Habitat-generalist spiders dominated on small patches, and predation pressure from such species may contribute to the observed lower densities of mesopredators on small patches. Overall, patch size and connectivity influenced the types of modules present on a patch through differential loss of rare, patch-restricted predators, but predation by generalist predators may be a key mechanism influencing the spatial structure of certain prey species.

  15. AGARD Flight Test Instrumentation Series. Volume 19. Digital Signal Conditioning for Flight Test. (Le Traitement du Signal Numerique pour les Essais n Vol)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    for battery -operated equipment. However 4000 series CMOS lisvery slow when compard with the bipolar logic families (ftg 2-1). As technology has...only one direction at a time. The best example of this is a two-way radio, where each station can transmit over the same frequency by takling turns...transmission, resulting in wuatd bandwidth. The PCM trMamision following 0IG tandards i a unidirectional transfer. If the reiving station detects

  16. A periodic freshwater patch detachment process from the Block Island Sound estuarine plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qianqian; Rothstein, Lewis M.; Luo, Yiyong

    2017-01-01

    Previous observations suggest periodic freshwater patches separating from the Block Island Sound (BIS) estuarine plume. In this study, the dynamics of the separation process is investigated through a series of numerical experiments using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). In addition, we explore the seasonal variability of the freshwater patches and their response to river discharge and ambient current. The model results indicate that episodic freshwater patches are triggered by small changes in tidal currents over the spring-neap tidal cycle. The spring-neap variation in tidal currents causes significant, monthly fluctuations in turbulent mixing and vertical stratification in BIS, modulating the freshwater discharge thereby generating episodic freshwater patches that move both downstream along the southern shore of Long Island and toward Rhode Island Sound (RIS). The realistically configured model shows that the freshwater patches experience strong seasonal variability. They are largest in spring when the river discharge peaks, and smallest in summer due to the weak river discharge and a robust upstream ambient current from RIS. According to the analysis of the freshwater transport out of BIS, we conclude that such detachment occurs at tidal mixing fronts.

  17. Multimode Broad-Band Patch Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2003-01-01

    Microstrip patch antennas of a proposed type would be tunable over broad wavelength ranges. These antennas would be attractive for use in a variety of microwave communication systems in which there are requirements for transmission and/or reception at multiple, widely separated frequencies. Prior efforts to construct tunable microstrip patch antennas have involved integration of microstrip circuitry with, variously, ferrite films with magneticfield tuning, solid-state electronic tuning devices, or piezoelectric tuning actuators. Those efforts have been somewhat successful, but have yielded tuning ranges of 20 percent and smaller much smaller than needed in typical practical cases. Like prior microstrip patch antennas (both tunable and non-tunable), the proposed antennas would have instantaneous bandwidths of about 1 percent of their nominal or resonance frequencies. However, these would be tunable over much broader frequency ranges as much as several octaves, depending on specific designs. They could be fabricated relatively simply and inexpensively by use of conventional photolithography, and without need for integration with solid-state electronic or piezoelectric control devices. An antenna as proposed (see figure) would include a microstrip patch radiating element on a thin ferroelectric film on a semiconductor substrate with a ground-plane conductor on the underside of the substrate. The ferroelectric film could be, for example, SrTiO3 with a thickness of the order of 1 or 2 micrometers.

  18. Juno Microwave Radiometer Patch Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, N.; Chen, J.; Focardi, P.; Hodges, R.; Hughes, R.; Jakoboski, J.; Venkatesan, J.; Zawadzki, M.

    2009-01-01

    Juno is a mission in the NASA New Frontiers Program with the goal of significantly improving our understanding of the formation and structure of Jupiter. This paper discusses the modeling and measurement of the two patch array antennas. An overview of the antenna architecture, design and development at JPL is provided, along with estimates of performance and the results of measurements.

  19. Soil, Seeds, and the Pumpkin Patch!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Marianne; Vowell, Julie

    2013-01-01

    "Soil, Seeds, and the Pumpkin Patch!" is an integrated unit designed to provide elementary school teachers with ideas for using hands-on activities, fostering inquiry and valuable discussion, and using technology as a learning tool. This unit integrates science with language arts, mathematics, literature, and technology. During this unit, students…

  20. SERI Desiccant Cooling Test Facility. Status report. Preliminary data on the performance of a rotary parallel-passage silica-gel dehumidifier

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, K.J.

    1986-04-01

    This report describes the SERI Desiccant Cooling Test Facility. The facility can test bench-scale rotary dehumidifiers over a wide range of controlled conditions. We constructed and installed in the test loop a prototype parallel-passage rotary dehumidifier that has spirally wound polyester tape coated with silica gel. The initial tests gave satisfactory results indicating that approximately 90% of the silica gel was active and the overall Lewis number of the wheel was near unity. The facility has several minor difficulties including an inability to control humidity satisfactorily and nonuniform and highly turbulent inlet velocities. To completely validate the facility requires a range of dehumidifier designs. Several choices are available including constructing a second parallel-passage dehumidifier with the passage spacing more uniform.

  1. Surface patterning of nanoparticles with polymer patches

    DOE PAGES

    Choueiri, Rachelle M.; Galati, Elizabeth; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; ...

    2016-08-24

    Patterning of colloidal particles with chemically or topographically distinct surface domains (patches) has attracted intense research interest. Surface-patterned particles act as colloidal analogues of atoms and molecules serve as model systems in studies of phase transitions in liquid systems, behave as ‘colloidal surfactants’ and function as templates for the synthesis of hybrid particles. The generation of micrometre- and submicrometre-sized patchy colloids is now efficient but surface patterning of inorganic colloidal nanoparticles with dimensions of the order of tens of nanometres is uncommon. Such nanoparticles exhibit size- and shape-dependent optical, electronic and magnetic properties, and their assemblies show new collective properties.more » At present, nanoparticle patterning is limited to the generation of two-patch nanoparticles and nanoparticles with surface ripples or a ‘raspberry’ surface morphology. We demonstrate nanoparticle surface patterning, which utilizes thermodynamically driven segregation of polymer ligands from a uniform polymer brush into surface-pinned micelles following a change in solvent quality. Patch formation is reversible but can be permanently preserved using a photocrosslinking step. The methodology offers the ability to control the dimensions of patches, their spatial distribution and the number of patches per nanoparticle, in agreement with a theoretical model. The versatility of the strategy is demonstrated by patterning nanoparticles with different dimensions, shapes and compositions, tethered with various types of polymers and subjected to different external stimuli. Furthermore, these patchy nanocolloids have potential applications in fundamental research, the self-assembly of nanomaterials, diagnostics, sensing and colloidal stabilization.« less

  2. Surface patterning of nanoparticles with polymer patches

    PubMed Central

    Choueiri, Rachelle M.; Galati, Elizabeth; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Klinkova, Anna; Larin, Egor M.; Querejeta-Fernández, Ana; Han, Lili; Xin, Huolin L.; Gang, Oleg; Zhulina, Ekaterina B.; Rubinstein, Michael; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Patterning of colloidal particles with chemically or topographically distinct surface domains (patches) has attracted intense research interest1–3. Surface-patterned particles act as colloidal analogues of atoms and molecules4,5, serve as model systems in studies of phase transitions in liquid systems6, behave as ‘colloidal surfactants’7 and function as templates for the synthesis of hybrid particles8. The generation of micrometre- and submicrometre-sized patchy colloids is now efficient9–11, but surface patterning of inorganic colloidal nanoparticles with dimensions of the order of tens of nanometres is uncommon. Such nanoparticles exhibit size- and shape-dependent optical, electronic and magnetic properties, and their assemblies show new collective properties12. At present, nanoparticle patterning is limited to the generation of two-patch nanoparticles13–15, and nanoparticles with surface ripples16 or a ‘raspberry’ surface morphology17. Here we demonstrate nanoparticle surface patterning, which utilizes thermodynamically driven segregation of polymer ligands from a uniform polymer brush into surface-pinned micelles following a change in solvent quality. Patch formation is reversible but can be permanently preserved using a photocrosslinking step. The methodology offers the ability to control the dimensions of patches, their spatial distribution and the number of patches per nanoparticle, in agreement with a theoretical model. The versatility of the strategy is demonstrated by patterning nanoparticles with different dimensions, shapes and compositions, tethered with various types of polymers and subjected to different external stimuli. These patchy nanocolloids have potential applications in fundamental research, the self-assembly of nanomaterials, diagnostics, sensing and colloidal stabilization. PMID:27556943

  3. Issues and Consequences for State-Level Minimum Competency Testing Programs. State Assessment Series. Wyoming Report 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion, Scott F.; Sheinker, Alan

    This report reviews the current status, empirical findings, theoretical issues, and practical considerations related to state-level minimum competency testing programs. It finds that, although two-thirds of current testing programs now use direct writing prompts to assess writing achievement, essentially all programs rely on multiple choice tests…

  4. Effects of Scale Transformation and Test Termination Rule on the Precision of Ability Estimates in CAT. ACT Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yi, Qing; Wang, Tianyou; Ban, Jae-Chun

    Error indices (bias, standard error of estimation, and root mean square error) obtained on different scales of measurement under different test termination rules in a computerized adaptive test (CAT) context were examined. Four ability estimation methods were studied: (1) maximum likelihood estimation (MLE); (2) weighted likelihood estimation…

  5. Intelligence Testing and Minority Students: Foundations, Performance Factors, and Assessment Issues. Racial and Ethnic Minority Psychology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valencia, Richard R.; Suzuki, Lisa A.

    This book examines intelligence assessment among ethnic minority children. Part 1, "Foundations," includes: (1) "Historical Issues" (e.g., emergence of intelligence testing in Europe and ideology of the intelligence testing movement); and (2) "Multicultural Perspective of Intelligence: Theory and Measurement Issues"…

  6. Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study: 2000/01 Follow-Up Field Test Methodology Report. Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biber, Melissa R.; Link, Michael W.; Riccobono, John A.; Siegel, Peter H.

    This report describes and evaluates the methods and procedures used for the field test of the Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study (B&B:2000/01). The B&B:2000/01 field test included important changes from previous B&B surveys (conducted in 1994 and 1997) in its sample design and collection of data. The introductory chapter…

  7. Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study First Follow-up (BPS:96/98) Field Test Report. Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Daniel J.; Wine, Jennifer S.; Heuer, Ruth E.; Whitmore, Roy W.; Kelly, Janice E.; Doherty, John M.; Simpson, Joe B.; Marti, Norma

    This report describes the methods and procedures used for the field test of the Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study First Followup 1996-98 (BPS:96/98). Students in this survey were first interviewed during 1995 as part of the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study 1996 field test. The BPS:96/98 full-scale student sample includes…

  8. An Empirical Bayes Enhancement of Mantel-Haenszel DIF Analysis for Computer-Adaptive Tests. LSAC Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; Thayer, Dorothy T.

    This study investigated the applicability to computerized adaptive testing (CAT) data of a differential item functioning (DIF) analysis that involves an empirical Bayes (EB) enhancement of the popular Mantel Haenszel (MH) DIF analysis method. The computerized Law School Admission Test (LSAT) assumed for this study was similar to that currently…

  9. Multi-Band Miniaturized Patch Antennas for a Compact, Shielded Microwave Breast Imaging Array.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Suzette M; Al-Joumayly, Mudar A; Burfeindt, Matthew J; Behdad, Nader; Hagness, Susan C

    2013-12-18

    We present a comprehensive study of a class of multi-band miniaturized patch antennas designed for use in a 3D enclosed sensor array for microwave breast imaging. Miniaturization and multi-band operation are achieved by loading the antenna with non-radiating slots at strategic locations along the patch. This results in symmetric radiation patterns and similar radiation characteristics at all frequencies of operation. Prototypes were fabricated and tested in a biocompatible immersion medium. Excellent agreement was obtained between simulations and measurements. The trade-off between miniaturization and radiation efficiency within this class of patch antennas is explored via a numerical analysis of the effects of the location and number of slots, as well as the thickness and permittivity of the dielectric substrate, on the resonant frequencies and gain. Additionally, we compare 3D quantitative microwave breast imaging performance achieved with two different enclosed arrays of slot-loaded miniaturized patch antennas. Simulated array measurements were obtained for a 3D anatomically realistic numerical breast phantom. The reconstructed breast images generated from miniaturized patch array data suggest that, for the realistic noise power levels assumed in this study, the variations in gain observed across this class of multi-band patch antennas do not significantly impact the overall image quality. We conclude that these miniaturized antennas are promising candidates as compact array elements for shielded, multi-frequency microwave breast imaging systems.

  10. Predator-Prey Interactions Shape Thermal Patch Use in a Newt Larvae-Dragonfly Nymph Model

    PubMed Central

    Gvoždík, Lumír; Černická, Eva; Van Damme, Raoul

    2013-01-01

    Thermal quality and predation risk are considered important factors influencing habitat patch use in ectothermic prey. However, how the predator’s food requirement and the prey’s necessity to avoid predation interact with their respective thermoregulatory strategies remains poorly understood. The recently developed ‘thermal game model’ predicts that in the face of imminent predation, prey should divide their time equally among a range of thermal patches. In contrast, predators should concentrate their hunting activities towards warmer patches. In this study, we test these predictions in a laboratory setup and an artificial environment that mimics more natural conditions. In both cases, we scored thermal patch use of newt larvae (prey) and free-ranging dragonfly nymphs (predators). Similar effects were seen in both settings. The newt larvae spent less time in the warm patch if dragonfly nymphs were present. The patch use of the dragonfly nymphs did not change as a function of prey availability, even when the nymphs were starved prior to the experiment. Our behavioral observations partially corroborate predictions of the thermal game model. In line with asymmetric fitness pay-offs in predator-prey interactions (the ‘life-dinner’ principle), the prey’s thermal strategy is more sensitive to the presence of predators than vice versa. PMID:23755175

  11. Predator-prey interactions shape thermal patch use in a newt larvae-dragonfly nymph model.

    PubMed

    Gvoždík, Lumír; Černická, Eva; Van Damme, Raoul

    2014-01-01

    Thermal quality and predation risk are considered important factors influencing habitat patch use in ectothermic prey. However, how the predator's food requirement and the prey's necessity to avoid predation interact with their respective thermoregulatory strategies remains poorly understood. The recently developed 'thermal game model' predicts that in the face of imminent predation, prey should divide their time equally among a range of thermal patches. In contrast, predators should concentrate their hunting activities towards warmer patches. In this study, we test these predictions in a laboratory setup and an artificial environment that mimics more natural conditions. In both cases, we scored thermal patch use of newt larvae (prey) and free-ranging dragonfly nymphs (predators). Similar effects were seen in both settings. The newt larvae spent less time in the warm patch if dragonfly nymphs were present. The patch use of the dragonfly nymphs did not change as a function of prey availability, even when the nymphs were starved prior to the experiment. Our behavioral observations partially corroborate predictions of the thermal game model. In line with asymmetric fitness pay-offs in predator-prey interactions (the 'life-dinner' principle), the prey's thermal strategy is more sensitive to the presence of predators than vice versa.

  12. Effects of slits in a patch of omnidirectional Lamb-wave MPT on the transducer output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kiyean; Lee, Hyung Jin; Lee, Joo Kyung; Kim, Yoon Young

    2016-03-01

    An omnidirectional Lamb-wave magnetostrictive patch transducer (MPT) uses a thin circular magnetostrictive patch excited by the axisymmetric turns of a plane coil placed over it. Since the dynamic magnetic field applied by the coil induces an eddy current only on the top surface due to the skin effect, the mechanical deformation in the patch is confined only near the surface, considerably limiting the transducer output power. This study shows that if a radial slit is introduced in the patch, the circular flow of the eddy current on the top surface only becomes broken, and thus the eddy current flows on both the top and bottom surfaces. As a consequence, there is a substantial increase in the dynamic magnetic field in the patch and, in turn, an increased transducer output power. Interestingly, the material type, either metallic or nonmetallic, of the test waveguide plate affects the magnitude of the eddy current near the bottom surface and the overall magnetic field. If the number of slits is over a certain number, say, 8, and the slits are symmetrically made in the patch, the omni-directivity of the resulting MPT is virtually ensured. Finally, the present findings are verified both numerically and experimentally.

  13. Patching vs Atropine to Treat Amblyopia in Children Aged 7 to 12 Years: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective To compare patching with atropine eye drops in the treatment of moderate amblyopia (20/40 -20/100) in children age 7 to 12 years. Methods In a randomized multi-center clinical trial, 193 children with amblyopia were randomized to weekend atropine or patching 2 hours per day of the sound eye. Main Outcome Measure Masked assessment of amblyopic eye visual acuity using the EETDRS testing protocol at 17 weeks. Results At 17 weeks, visual acuity had improved from baseline by an average of 7.6 letters in the atropine group and 8.6 letters in the patching group. The mean difference (patching minus atropine) between groups adjusted for baseline acuity was 1.2 letters (ends of complementary 1-sided 95% confidence intervals for noninferiority = -0.7 and +3.1 letters). Based on the confidence intervals this difference met the pre-specified definition for equivalence (ends of confidence intervals <5 letters). Amblyopic eye visual acuity was 20/25 or better in 15 subjects (17%) in the atropine group and 20 subjects (24%) in the patching group (difference = 7%, 95% confidence interval = -3% to 17%). Conclusions Treatment with atropine or patching leads to similar degrees of improvement in 7 to 12 year old children with moderate amblyopia. About 1 in 5 achieves 20/25 or better visual acuity in the amblyopic eye. Application to Clinical Practice Treatment of older children with unilateral amblyopia. PMID:19064841

  14. Long-term stability of influenza vaccine in a dissolving microneedle patch.

    PubMed

    Mistilis, Matthew J; Joyce, Jessica C; Esser, E Stein; Skountzou, Ioanna; Compans, Richard W; Bommarius, Andreas S; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2017-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that optimized microneedle patch formulations can stabilize trivalent subunit influenza vaccine during long-term storage outside the cold chain and when exposed to potential stresses found during manufacturing and storage. Formulations containing combinations of trehalose/sucrose, sucrose/arginine, and arginine/heptagluconate were successful at retaining most or all vaccine activity during storage at 25 °C for up to 24 months as determined by ELISA assay. The best formulation of microneedle patches contained arginine/heptagluconate, which showed no significant loss of vaccine activity during the study. To validate these in vitro findings, mice were immunized using trivalent influenza vaccine stored in microneedle patches for more than 1 year at 25 °C, which elicited antibody titers greater than or equal to fresh liquid vaccine delivered by intradermal injection, indicating the retention of immunogenicity during storage. Finally, influenza vaccine in microneedle patches lost no significant activity during exposure to 60 °C for 4 months, multiple freeze-thaw cycles, or electron beam irradiation. We conclude that optimally formulated microneedle patches can retain influenza vaccine activity during extended storage outside the cold chain and during other environmental stresses, which suggests the possibility of microneedle patch storage on pharmacy shelves without refrigeration.

  15. Multi-Band Miniaturized Patch Antennas for a Compact, Shielded Microwave Breast Imaging Array

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Suzette M.; Al-Joumayly, Mudar A.; Burfeindt, Matthew J.; Behdad, Nader; Hagness, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of a class of multi-band miniaturized patch antennas designed for use in a 3D enclosed sensor array for microwave breast imaging. Miniaturization and multi-band operation are achieved by loading the antenna with non-radiating slots at strategic locations along the patch. This results in symmetric radiation patterns and similar radiation characteristics at all frequencies of operation. Prototypes were fabricated and tested in a biocompatible immersion medium. Excellent agreement was obtained between simulations and measurements. The trade-off between miniaturization and radiation efficiency within this class of patch antennas is explored via a numerical analysis of the effects of the location and number of slots, as well as the thickness and permittivity of the dielectric substrate, on the resonant frequencies and gain. Additionally, we compare 3D quantitative microwave breast imaging performance achieved with two different enclosed arrays of slot-loaded miniaturized patch antennas. Simulated array measurements were obtained for a 3D anatomically realistic numerical breast phantom. The reconstructed breast images generated from miniaturized patch array data suggest that, for the realistic noise power levels assumed in this study, the variations in gain observed across this class of multi-band patch antennas do not significantly impact the overall image quality. We conclude that these miniaturized antennas are promising candidates as compact array elements for shielded, multi-frequency microwave breast imaging systems. PMID:25392561

  16. Patch occupancy, number of individuals and population density of the Marbled White in a changing agricultural landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenda, Magdalena; Skórka, Piotr

    2010-09-01

    Metapopulation theory predicts the occurrence of animals in habitat patches. In this paper, we tested predictions based on this theory, including effects of spatial autocorrelation, to describe factors affecting the presence, local number of individuals and density of the Marbled White butterfly Melanargia galathea in habitat patches spread across the agricultural landscape of southern Poland. This agricultural landscape has undergone significant changes in recent decades due to the country's political transformation and is currently characterized by a large proportion of fallow (abandoned) land. We compared 48 occupied habitat patches with 60 unoccupied ones. Positive spatial autocorrelation was found in the number and density of individuals in habitat patches. The probability of patch occupancy was higher for patches that were larger, had a higher proportion of edges, were located closer to the nearest neighbouring local population and to the nearest piece of fallow, contained a smaller area of cut grass, and also had more nectar resources. The number of Marbled Whites in habitat patches was positively related to the patch area, the distance to the nearest fallow and the abundance of nectar resources, but was negatively related to the density of shrubs. The density of individuals was positively related to abundance of flowers, proportion of edge in a patch and distance to the nearest fallow, but it was negatively related to patch area, vegetation height and grass cover. These results indicate that recent land-use changes in agricultural landscapes have had both positive and negative effects on the presence and local number of individuals and density of the Marbled White. These changes affect the metapopulation of the species through changes in habitat quality and landscape connectivity in the area surrounding habitat patches.

  17. Relationships of habitat patch size to predator community and survival of duck nests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sovada, M.A.; Zicus, M.C.; Greenwood, R.J.; Rave, D.P.; Newton, W.E.; Woodward, R.O.; Beiser, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    We studied duck nest success and predator community composition in relation to size of discrete patches of nesting cover in the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of the United States in 1993-95. We focused on nests in uplands that were seeded to perennial grasses and forbs and enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) in Minnesota, North Dakota, and South Dakota. We estimated daily survival rates (DSRs) of upland duck nests and indices of activity for red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), coyotes (Canis latrans), American badgers (Taxidea taxus), striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis), and Franklin's ground squirrels (Spermophilus franklinii), and related these variables to habitat patch size. The effect of patch size (small vs. large) on estimated annual mean DSR was dependent on date of nest initiation (early vs. late) and year. Examination of within-year comparisons for early and late nests suggested that DSR was generally greater in larger habitat patches. Activity indices for the 5 mammalian nest predators were influenced differently by year, location, and patch size. Activity indices of the red fox were greatest in small patches. Coyote indices were the most inconsistent, demonstrating a year X location X patch size interaction. Activity indices of the striped skunk and American badger varied only among years. Franklin's ground squirrel indices were affected by study area location, with higher indices in the southeast than the northwest. Red fox activity was weakly correlated with that of the striped skunk and coyote. Although a positive relationship between habitat patch size and nest success probably exists, we believe the experiment to fully test this hypothesis will continue to be elusive.

  18. Emergent properties of patch shapes affect edge permeability to animals.

    PubMed

    Nams, Vilis O

    2011-01-01

    Animal travel between habitat patches affects populations, communities and ecosystems. There are three levels of organization of edge properties, and each of these can affect animals. At the lowest level are the different habitats on each side of an edge, then there is the edge itself, and finally, at the highest level of organization, is the geometry or structure of the edge. This study used computer simulations to (1) find out whether effects of edge shapes on animal behavior can arise as emergent properties solely due to reactions to edges in general, without the animals reacting to the shapes of the edges, and to (2) generate predictions to allow field and experimental studies to test mechanisms of edge shape response. Individual animals were modeled traveling inside a habitat patch that had different kinds of edge shapes (convex, concave and straight). When animals responded edges of patches, this created an emergent property of responding to the shape of the edge. The response was mostly to absolute width of the shapes, and not the narrowness of them. When animals were attracted to edges, then they tended to collect in convexities and disperse from concavities, and the opposite happened when animals avoided edges. Most of the responses occurred within a distance of 40% of the perceptual range from the tip of the shapes. Predictions were produced for directionality at various locations and combinations of treatments, to be used for testing edge behavior mechanisms. These results suggest that edge shapes tend to either concentrate or disperse animals, simply because the animals are either attracted to or avoid edges, with an effect as great as 3 times the normal density. Thus edge shape could affect processes like pollination, seed predation and dispersal and predator abundance.

  19. A Novel Miniaturization Technique of a Microstrip Patch Antenna using Patch Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakita, Katsutoshi; Morita, Norihiko; Horii, Yasushi

    Microstrip patch antennas have been widely used in mobile and satellite communication systems due to their great advantages of low cost, low profile, lightweight and easy fabrication. However, the dimensions of a classical patch antenna are on the order of half a wavelength. This paper proposes a new approach to reduce the size of the antenna by embedding several patch resonators in an antenna substrate. Periodically installed resonators are expected to exhibit slow-wave effects. First of all, a microstrip delay line having a train of patch resonators in its substrate is demonstrated theoretically by the conventional FDTD method, and the slow-wave effect is discussed. Next, a 2-dimentional patch resonator array is applied to a microstrip patch antenna, and the effectiveness of the proposed structure is evaluated in the respect of antenna dimensions. Also, several experiments have been carried out to confirm the theoretical predictions. Using a prototype model fabricated on an LTCC substrate, the size reduction of more the 50% is attained.

  20. NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA PATCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA PATCH ISLAND. REMAINS OF SEA WALL VISIBLE IN FOREGROUND AND RIGHT OF IMAGE - Fort Delaware, Pea Patch Island, Delaware City, New Castle County, DE

  1. Performance Analysis of Coaxial Fed Stacked Patch Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Satish K.; Jain, Shobha

    2014-01-01

    A performance analysis of coaxial fed stacked dual patch electromagnetic-coupled microstrip antenna useful for satellite communication working in X/Ku band is presented. A simplified structure of stacked dual patch antenna is proposed with adjustable foam-gap between patches. Few important geometrical parameters were chosen on which the performance of stacked dual patch antenna mainly depends. Dimension of lower square patch, upper square patch and height of foam-gap between two patches are the parameters, which were varied one by one keeping other parameters constant. The performance was observed through the reflection coefficient (dB) and smith chart impedance plot, obtained from the numerical simulator (IE3D) for the dual resonance frequency and bandwidth. Proposed geometry of stacked dual patch antenna was also analyzed with cavity model and artificial neural network modeling technique. Dual resonance frequencies and associated bandwidth were calculated through them and results were cross checked in the laboratory with a few experimental findings.

  2. [Responses of Caragana seed pests to host plant patch quality and patch pattern in desert regions of Ningxia, Northwest China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da-zhi; He, Da-han

    2011-07-01

    Taking the desert landscape in mid-eastern Ningxia of Northeast China as the background, eighteen patches of Caragana shrub lands (natural or manned) with the habitat types of manually-fixed sandy land, mobile sandy land, and silty-loam downland were selected as study sites to investigate the responses of three Caragana seed pest species (Kytorhinus immixtus, Etiella zinckenella, and Bruchophagus neocaraganae) to the host plant patch quality, patch area, and patch spatial pattern. The damaged rate of host plant by the pests had close relations to the patch quality, patch pattern, and the transferring capability of the pests. The responses of the pests to patch quality were affected by patch scale, and among the three habitat types, manually-fixed sandy land had the highest damaged rate, followed by mobile sandy land, and silty-loam downland, with significant differences among them (P<0.05). In small scale patch pattern, there existed definite correlations between the pest number and the patch area and its fragmentation degree. The decrease of patch area and the increase of the fragmentation degree reduced the damage rate of high transferring capability Etiella zinckenella (r = 0.365), but had less effects on low transferring capability K. immixtus (r = 0.160) and B. neocaraganae (r = 0.193). The strength of patch edge effect and the mutual complement of the resources around patches had positive effects on the population density of the pests.

  3. Corridor Length and Patch Colonization by a Butterfly, Junonia coenia

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, N.

    1999-01-22

    Study hypothesized that corridors increase patch colonization by Junonia coenia regardless of insects initial distance from patch, as the butterfly is known to move between patches preferentially through corridors. Neither corridor nor distance had significant effect on patch colonization, but significant interaction between presence or absence of corridors and distance. One critical factor is interpatch distance which may determine the relative effectiveness of corridors and other landscape configurations.

  4. An on-road shock and vibration response test series utilizing worst case and statistical analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Cap, J.S.

    1997-11-01

    Defining the maximum expected shock and vibration responses for an on-road truck transportation environment is strongly dependent on the amount of response data that can be obtained. One common test scheme consists of measuring response data over a relatively short prescribed road course and then reviewing that data to obtain the maximum response levels. The more mathematically rigorous alternative is to collect an unbiased ensemble of response data during a long road trip. This paper compares data gathered both ways during a recent on-road certification test for a tractor trailer van being designed by Sandia.

  5. A lab-on-a-chip for hypoxic patch clamp measurements combined with optical tweezers and spectroscopy- first investigations of single biological cells.

    PubMed

    Alrifaiy, Ahmed; Borg, Johan; Lindahl, Olof A; Ramser, Kerstin

    2015-04-18

    The response and the reaction of the brain system to hypoxia is a vital research subject that requires special instrumentation. With this research subject in focus, a new multifunctional lab-on-a-chip (LOC) system with control over the oxygen content for studies on biological cells was developed. The chip was designed to incorporate the patch clamp technique, optical tweezers and absorption spectroscopy. The performance of the LOC was tested by a series of experiments. The oxygen content within the channels of the LOC was monitored by an oxygen sensor and verified by simultaneously studying the oxygenation state of chicken red blood cells (RBCs) with absorption spectra. The chicken RBCs were manipulated optically and steered in three dimensions towards a patch-clamp micropipette in a closed microfluidic channel. The oxygen level within the channels could be changed from a normoxic value of 18% O 2 to an anoxic value of 0.0-0.5% O 2. A time series of 3 experiments were performed, showing that the spectral transfer from the oxygenated to the deoxygenated state occurred after about 227 ± 1 s and a fully developed deoxygenated spectrum was observed after 298 ± 1 s, a mean value of 3 experiments. The tightness of the chamber to oxygen diffusion was verified by stopping the flow into the channel system while continuously recording absorption spectra showing an unchanged deoxygenated state during 5400 ± 2 s. A transfer of the oxygenated absorption spectra was achieved after 426 ± 1 s when exposing the cell to normoxic buffer. This showed the long time viability of the investigated cells. Successful patching and sealing were established on a trapped RBC and the whole-cell access (Ra) and membrane (Rm) resistances were measured to be 5.033 ± 0.412 M Ω and 889.7 ± 1.74 M Ω respectively.

  6. Ceramic Paste for Patching High-Temperature Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adam, Steven J.; Tompkins, James V.; Toombs, Gordon R.; Hogensen, Pete; Soden, Douglas G.

    2007-01-01

    A ceramic paste that can be applied relatively easily, either by itself or in combination with one or more layer(s) of high-temperature ceramic fabrics, such as silicon carbide or zirconia, has been invented as a means of patching cracks or holes in the reinforced carbon-carbon forward surfaces of a space shuttle in orbit before returning to Earth. The paste or the paste/fabric combination could also be used to repair rocket-motor combustion chambers, and could be used on Earth to patch similar high-temperature structures. The specified chemical composition of the paste admits of a number of variations, and the exact proportions of its constituents are proprietary. In general, the paste consists of (1) silicon carbide, possibly with addition of (2) hafnium carbide, zirconium carbide, zirconium boride, silicon tetraboride, silicon hexaboride, or other metal carbides or oxides blended with (3) a silazane-based polymer. Because the paste is viscous and sticky at normal terrestrial and outer-space ambient temperatures, high-temperature ceramic fabrics such as silicon carbide or zirconia fabric impregnated with the paste (or the paste alone) sticks to the damaged surface to which it is applied. Once the patch has been applied, it is smoothed to minimize edge steps as required [forward-facing edge steps must be < or equal to 0.030 in. (< or equal to 0.76 mm) in the original intended space-shuttle application]. The patch is then heated to a curing temperature thereby converting it from a flexible material to a hard, tough material. The curing temperature is 375 to 450 F (approx.190 to 230 C). In torch tests and arc-jet tests, the cured paste was found to be capable of withstanding a temperature of 3,500 F (approx. 1,900 C) for 15 minutes. As such, the material appears to satisfy the requirement, in the original space-shuttle application, to withstand re-entry temperatures of approx.3,000 F (approx. 1,600 C).

  7. Novel Metamaterials for Patch Antennas Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zervos, Theodore; Lazarakis, Fotis; Alexandridis, Antonis; Dangakis, Kostas; Stamopoulos, Dimosthenis; Pissas, Michalis

    In this paper we introduce the incorporation of magneto-electric materials into antenna design and the potential of controlling the behavior of the antenna by means of an external magnetic field. After an intensive study of magneto-electric material properties, a ferrimagnetic compound called Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) was found to be the best candidate for the novel antenna design. We provide a metamaterial patch antenna design where a part of the substrate is replaced by the YIG compound. After several design modifications the final model includes a circular-shaped YIG substrate just under the metallic patch and offers sufficient performance in terms of resonance, bandwidth and radiation efficiency. Additionally, in the presence of an external magnetic field the polarization becomes elliptical and the sense of the polarization (left or right) can be controlled through the direction of the magnetic field. That latter characteristic confirms the metamaterial-nature of the antenna.

  8. Mesh saliency with adaptive local patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, Anass; Charrier, Christophe; Lézoray, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    3D object shapes (represented by meshes) include both areas that attract the visual attention of human observers and others less or not attractive at all. This visual attention depends on the degree of saliency exposed by these areas. In this paper, we propose a technique for detecting salient regions in meshes. To do so, we define a local surface descriptor based on local patches of adaptive size and filled with a local height field. The saliency of mesh vertices is then defined as its degree measure with edges weights computed from adaptive patch similarities. Our approach is compared to the state-of-the-art and presents competitive results. A study evaluating the influence of the parameters establishing this approach is also carried out. The strength and the stability of our approach with respect to noise and simplification are also studied.

  9. South Carolina Statewide Testing Program 1977-78. General Report. Office of Research Report Series. Volume One/Number 40.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busbee, Cyril B.

    The results and methodology of the South Carolina 1977-78 statewide spring testing program for grades 3, 6, and 11 are presented and discussed. The discussion of the results focuses on a comparison of the 1978 results to national norms, a comparison of 1978 to 1977 results, a performance comparison across grade levels, and a comparison of skill…

  10. Estimation of Item Dimensional Measurement Direction Using Conditional Covariance Patterns. Computerized Testing Report. LSAC Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolt, Daniel; Roussos, Louis; Stout, William

    Several nonparametric dimensionality assessment tools have demonstrated the usefulness of item pair conditional covariances as building blocks for investigating multidimensional test structure. Recently, J. Zhang and W. Stout (1999) have related the structural properties of conditional covariances in a generalized compensatory framework to a test…

  11. Compressive strain measurement using RFID patch antenna sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Chunhee; Yi, Xiaohua; Wang, Yang; Tentzeris, Manos M.; Leon, Roberto T.

    2014-04-01

    In this research, two radiofrequency identification (RFID) antenna sensor designs are tested for compressive strain measurement. The first design is a passive (battery-free) folded patch antenna sensor with a planar dimension of 61mm × 69mm. The second design is a slotted patch antenna sensor, whose dimension is reduced to 48mm × 44mm by introducing slots on antenna conducting layer to detour surface current path. A three-point bending setup is fabricated to apply compression on a tapered aluminum specimen mounted with an antenna sensor. Mechanics-electromagnetics coupled simulation shows that the antenna resonance frequency shifts when each antenna sensor is under compressive strain. Extensive compression tests are conducted to verify the strain sensing performance of the two sensors. Experimental results confirm that the resonance frequency of each antenna sensor increases in an approximately linear relationship with respect to compressive strain. The compressive strain sensing performance of the two RFID antenna sensors, including strain sensitivity and determination coefficient, is evaluated based on the experimental data.

  12. Aerodynamic and Hydrodynamic Tests of a Family of Models of Flying Hulls Derived from a Streamline Body -- NACA Model 84 Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, John B; Olson, Roland E; Draley, Eugene C; Luoma, Arvo A

    1943-01-01

    A series of related forms of flying-boat hulls representing various degrees of compromise between aerodynamic and hydrodynamic requirements was tested in Langley Tank No. 1 and in the Langley 8-foot high-speed tunnel. The purpose of the investigation was to provide information regarding the penalties in water performance resulting from further aerodynamic refinement and, as a corollary, to provide information regarding the penalties in range or payload resulting from the retention of certain desirable hydrodynamic characteristics. The information should form a basis for over-all improvements in hull form.

  13. AGARD Flight Test Techniques Series. Volume 14. Introduction to Flight Test Engineering (Introduction a la Technique d’essais en vol)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-01

    34Demonstration Requirements", 18 Mar 1971 with Amendment 1 of 30 Jun 1983 MIL-D-8708A( WEP ), "Demonstration Requirements for Airplanes", 13 Sep 1960 DoD...executed on full-scale airframes, mockups or airframe sections mounted atop heavy 3-axis positioners on outdoor antenna test ranges. The advantages...various design phases are subject to human engineering verification and validation tests beginning with rapid prototyping and mockups , extending through

  14. Patch Finder Plus (PFplus): a web server for extracting and displaying positive electrostatic patches on protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shazman, Shula; Celniker, Gershon; Haber, Omer; Glaser, Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2007-07-01

    Positively charged electrostatic patches on protein surfaces are usually indicative of nucleic acid binding interfaces. Interestingly, many proteins which are not involved in nucleic acid binding possess large positive patches on their surface as well. In some cases, the positive patches on the protein are related to other functional properties of the protein family. PatchFinderPlus (PFplus) http://pfp.technion.ac.il is a web-based tool for extracting and displaying continuous electrostatic positive patches on protein surfaces. The input required for PFplus is either a four letter PDB code or a protein coordinate file in PDB format, provided by the user. PFplus computes the continuum electrostatics potential and extracts the largest positive patch for each protein chain in the PDB file. The server provides an output file in PDB format including a list of the patch residues. In addition, the largest positive patch is displayed on the server by a graphical viewer (Jmol), using a simple color coding.

  15. Optimal patch code design via device characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wencheng; Dalal, Edul N.

    2012-01-01

    In many color measurement applications, such as those for color calibration and profiling, "patch code" has been used successfully for job identification and automation to reduce operator errors. A patch code is similar to a barcode, but is intended primarily for use in measurement devices that cannot read barcodes due to limited spatial resolution, such as spectrophotometers. There is an inherent tradeoff between decoding robustness and the number of code levels available for encoding. Previous methods have attempted to address this tradeoff, but those solutions have been sub-optimal. In this paper, we propose a method to design optimal patch codes via device characterization. The tradeoff between decoding robustness and the number of available code levels is optimized in terms of printing and measurement efforts, and decoding robustness against noises from the printing and measurement devices. Effort is drastically reduced relative to previous methods because print-and-measure is minimized through modeling and the use of existing printer profiles. Decoding robustness is improved by distributing the code levels in CIE Lab space rather than in CMYK space.

  16. Nanowired three-dimensional cardiac patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvir, Tal; Timko, Brian P.; Brigham, Mark D.; Naik, Shreesh R.; Karajanagi, Sandeep S.; Levy, Oren; Jin, Hongwei; Parker, Kevin K.; Langer, Robert; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2011-11-01

    Engineered cardiac patches for treating damaged heart tissues after a heart attack are normally produced by seeding heart cells within three-dimensional porous biomaterial scaffolds. These biomaterials, which are usually made of either biological polymers such as alginate or synthetic polymers such as poly(lactic acid) (PLA), help cells organize into functioning tissues, but poor conductivity of these materials limits the ability of the patch to contract strongly as a unit. Here, we show that incorporating gold nanowires within alginate scaffolds can bridge the electrically resistant pore walls of alginate and improve electrical communication between adjacent cardiac cells. Tissues grown on these composite matrices were thicker and better aligned than those grown on pristine alginate and when electrically stimulated, the cells in these tissues contracted synchronously. Furthermore, higher levels of the proteins involved in muscle contraction and electrical coupling are detected in the composite matrices. It is expected that the integration of conducting nanowires within three-dimensional scaffolds may improve the therapeutic value of current cardiac patches.

  17. Modular assembly of thick multifunctional cardiac patches

    PubMed Central

    Fleischer, Sharon; Shapira, Assaf; Feiner, Ron; Dvir, Tal

    2017-01-01

    In cardiac tissue engineering cells are seeded within porous biomaterial scaffolds to create functional cardiac patches. Here, we report on a bottom-up approach to assemble a modular tissue consisting of multiple layers with distinct structures and functions. Albumin electrospun fiber scaffolds were laser-patterned to create microgrooves for engineering aligned cardiac tissues exhibiting anisotropic electrical signal propagation. Microchannels were patterned within the scaffolds and seeded with endothelial cells to form closed lumens. Moreover, cage-like structures were patterned within the scaffolds and accommodated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticulate systems that controlled the release of VEGF, which promotes vascularization, or dexamethasone, an anti-inflammatory agent. The structure, morphology, and function of each layer were characterized, and the tissue layers were grown separately in their optimal conditions. Before transplantation the tissue and microparticulate layers were integrated by an ECM-based biological glue to form thick 3D cardiac patches. Finally, the patches were transplanted in rats, and their vascularization was assessed. Because of the simple modularity of this approach, we believe that it could be used in the future to assemble other multicellular, thick, 3D, functional tissues. PMID:28167795

  18. Carbon Nanotube Based Sensor to Monitor Crack Growth in Cracked Aluminum Structures Underneath Composite Patching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, T. M.; Kwon, Y. W.; Hart, D. C.; Loup, D. C.; Rasmussen, E. A.

    2015-10-01

    The paper investigates a carbon nanotube-based sensor to detect crack propagation in aluminum structures underneath composite patching. Initial tests are conducted to determine the correct procedure and materials to properly fabricate a carbon nanotube (CNT) based sensor, which is then placed in between a composite patch and the aluminum structure. The CNTs have been utilized as sensors in previous studies but only for sensing crack propagation within the composite itself. This study focuses on crack propagation in the base material and is not concerned with the composite. In this application, the composite is only a patch and can be replaced if damaged. The study conducts both tension and fatigue testing to determine the usefulness of the CNT sensor. The CNT sensor is shown to be effective in giving an indication of the crack propagation in the aluminum. Correlation is done between the crack propagation length and the increase in electrical resistance in the CNT sensor under tensile and cyclic loading, respectively.

  19. Data report on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Small-Scale Seal Performance Test, Series F grouting experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, E.H.; Dale, T.F.; Van Pelt, R.S.

    1996-03-01

    SSSPT-F was designed to evaluate sealing materials at WIPP. It demonstrated: (1) the ability to practically and consistently produce ultrafine cementitious grout at the grouting site, (2) successful, consistent, and efficient injection and permeation of the grout into fractured rock at the repository horizon, (3) ability of the grout to penetrate and seal microfractures, (4) procedures and equipment used to inject the grout. Also techniques to assess the effectiveness of the grout in reducing the gas transmissivity of the fractured rock were evaluated. These included gas-flow/tracer testing, post-grout coring, pre- and post-grout downhole televiewer logging, slab displacement measurements, and increased loading on jacks during grout injection. Pre- and post-grout diamond drill core was obtained for use in ongoing evaluations of grouting effectiveness, degradation, and compatibility. Diamond drill equipment invented for this test successfully prevented drill cuttings from plugging fractures in grout injection holes.

  20. Shots SUGAR and UNCLE, the Final Tests of the BUSTER-JANGLE Series 19 November - 29 November 1951.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-23

    survey (22). 2.3 RADIOLOGICA : PROTECTION AT SHOT SUGAR-4 The primary purpose of the radiological protection proce- dures developed for members of...characteristics of the one detonation, DOD * personnel activities in the training and scientific projects, and the radiological protection procedures. *The...Activities .. . . . 49 2.3 Radiological Protection at Shot SUGAR. .. ...... 51 2.3.1 Desert Rock Radiological Protection 2.3.2 Test Organization

  1. Single-event Effect Report for EPC Series eGaN FETs: Proton Testing for SEE and TNID Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheick, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Previous testing of the Enhanced Power Conversion (EPC) eGaN FETs showed sensitivity to destructive single-event effects (SEE) effects to heavy ions. The presence of tungsten plugs in the gate area raises concerns that the device may be vulnerable to SEE from protons. Irradiation of biased and unbiased devices with heavy ion has results in some damage suspected of being due to total non-ionizing dose (TNID). Proton irradiation is a better radiation type to study this effect. This study presents the results of testing device with protons for SEE and TNID. No SEE in the EPC2012 device, the most sensitive device to SEE, were seen with 53 MeV protons at several angles. The devices continued to function after 1.5 Mrad (Si) of proton dose with only a slight shift in parameters. These results suggest that gross TNID will not be a factor in using these devices nor suffer from SEE due to protons. However, the device should be tested at with 500 MeV protons to guarantee to immunity proton SEE.

  2. Test and evaluation of the Argonne BPAC10 Series air chamber calorimeter designed for 20 minute measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.B.; Fiarman, S.; Jung, E.A. ); Cremers, T. )

    1990-10-01

    This paper is the final report on DOE-OSS Task ANLE88002 Fast Air Chamber Calorimetry.'' The task objective was to design, construct, and test an isothermal air chamber calorimeter for plutonium assay of bulk samples that would meet the following requirements for sample power measurement: average sample measurement time less than 20 minutes. Measurement of samples with power output up to 10 W. Precision of better than 1% RSD for sample power greater than 1 W. Precision better than 0.010 watt SD, for sample power less than 1 W. This report gives a description of the calorimeter hardware and software and discusses the test results. The instrument operating procedure, included as an appendix, gives examples of typical input/output and explains the menu driven software. Sample measurement time of less than 20 minutes was attained by pre-equilibration of the samples in low cost precision preheaters and by prediction of equilibrium measurements. Tests at the TA55 Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, on typical samples, indicates that the instrument meets all the measurement requirements.

  3. Experimental Fatigue Study of Composite Patch Repaired Steel Plates with Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatzas, Vasileios A.; Kotsidis, Elias A.; Tsouvalis, Nicholas G.

    2015-10-01

    Cracks are among the most commonly encountered defects in metallic structures operating at sea. Composite patch repairing is a repair method which is gaining popularity as it counters most of the problems faced by conventional renewal repairs. Extensive studies can be found in the literature addressing the efficiency of this novel repair method using techniques which meet higher performance and monitoring standards than these commonly found in naval applications. In this work the efficiency of practices widely used in the ship repair industry for the implementation of composite patch repairing is addressed. To this end, steel plates repaired with composite patches were tested under fatigue loading. The composite patches consisted of carbon fibers in epoxy matrix and were directly laminated to the steel surface using the vacuum infusion method. Two different surface preparation methods, namely grit-blasting and mechanical treatment with the use of a needle gun were studied. In addition, in order to account for the harsh environmental conditions during the operating life of the structure and to study its effect on the repair, two different aging scenarios were considered. Non-destructive evaluation of the patches was performed so as to assess the quality of the repair, and the evolution of debonding during testing.

  4. Hyoscine Skin Patches for Drooling Dilate Pupils and Impair Accommodation: Spectacle Correction for Photophobia and Blurred Vision May Be Warranted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saeed, Manzar; Henderson, Gladys; Dutton, Gordon N.

    2007-01-01

    Hyoscine skin patches diminish salivation by their anticholinergic action. The aim of reporting this case series is to present the ophthalmic side effects in children, and to highlight the precautions to take. Five children (two males, three females; age range 8-18y) with quadriplegic cerebral palsy (Gross Motor Function Classification System…

  5. A hospital cost analysis of a fibrin sealant patch in soft tissue and hepatic surgical bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Corral, Mitra; Ferko, Nicole; Hogan, Andrew; Hollmann, Sarah S; Gangoli, Gaurav; Jamous, Nadine; Batiller, Jonathan; Kocharian, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite hemostat use, uncontrolled surgical bleeding is prevalent. Drawbacks of current hemostats include limitations with efficacy on first attempt and suboptimal ease-of-use. Evarrest® is a novel fibrin sealant patch that has demonstrated high hemostatic efficacy compared with standard of care across bleeding severities. The objective of this study was to conduct a hospital cost analysis of the fibrin sealant patch versus standard of care in soft tissue and hepatic surgical bleeding. Methods The analysis quantified the 30-day costs of each comparator from a hospital perspective. Published US unit costs were applied to resource use (ie, initial treatment, retreatment, operating time, hospitalization, transfusion, and ventilator) reported in four trials. A “surgical” analysis included resources clinically related to the hemostatic benefit of the fibrin sealant patch, whereas a “hospital” analysis included all resources reported in the trials. An exploratory subgroup analysis focused solely on coagulopathic patients defined by abnormal blood test results. Results The surgical analysis predicted cost savings of $54 per patient with the fibrin sealant patch compared with standard of care (net cost impact: −$54 per patient; sensitivity range: −$1,320 to $1,213). The hospital analysis predicted further cost savings with the fibrin sealant patch (net cost impact of −$2,846 per patient; sensitivity range: −$1,483 to −$5,575). Subgroup analyses suggest that the fibrin sealant patch may provide dramatic cost savings in the coagulopathic subgroup of $3,233 (surgical) and $9,287 (hospital) per patient. Results were most sensitive to operating time and product units. Conclusion In soft tissue and hepatic problematic surgical bleeding, the fibrin sealant patch may result in important hospital cost savings. PMID:27703386

  6. Computer-aided patch planning for treatment of complex coarctation of the aorta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietdorf, Urte; Riesenkampff, Eugénie; Kuehne, Titus; Huebler, Michael; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Wolf, Ivo

    2009-02-01

    Between five and eight percent of all children born with congenitally malformed hearts suffer from coarctations of the aorta. Some severe coarctations can only be treated by surgical repair. Untreated, this defect can cause serious damage to organ development or even lead to death. Patch repair requires open surgery. It can affect patients of any age: newborns with severe coarctation and/or hypoplastic aortic arch as well as older patients with late diagnosis of coarctation of the aorta. Another patient group are patients of varying age with re-coarctation of the aorta or hypoplastic aortic arch after surgical and/or interventional repair. If anatomy is complex and interventional treatment by catheterization, balloon angioplasty or stent placement is not possible, surgery is indicated. The choice of type of surgery depends not only on the given anatomy but also on the experience the surgical team has with each method. One surgical approach is patch repair. A patch of a suitable shape and size is sewed into the aorta to expand the aortic lumen at the site of coarctation. At present, the shape and size of the patch are estimated intra-operatively by the surgeon. We have developed a software application that allows planning of the patch pre-operatively on the basis of magnetic resonance angiographic data. The application determines the diameter of the coarctation and/or hypoplastic segment and constructs a patch proposal by calculating the difference to the normal vessel diameter pre-operatively. Evaluation of MR angiographic datasets from 12 test patients with different kinds of aortic arch stenosis shows a divergence of only (1.5+/-1.2) mm in coarctation diameters between manual segmentations and our approach, with comparable time expenditure. Following this proposal the patch can be prepared and adapted to the patient's anatomy pre-operatively. Ideally, this leads to shorter operation times and a better long-term outcome with a reduced rate of residual stenosis and

  7. A Latent Source Model for Patch-Based Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, George H; Shah, Devavrat; Golland, Polina

    2015-10-01

    Despite the popularity and empirical success of patch-based nearest-neighbor and weighted majority voting approaches to medical image segmentation, there has been no theoretical development on when, why, and how well these nonparametric methods work. We bridge this gap by providing a theoretical performance guarantee for nearest-neighbor and weighted majority voting segmentation under a new probabilistic model for patch-based image segmentation. Our analysis relies on a new local property for how similar nearby patches are, and fuses existing lines of work on modeling natural imagery patches and theory for nonparametric classification. We use the model to derive a new patch-based segmentation algorithm that iterates between inferring local label patches and merging these local segmentations to produce a globally consistent image segmentation. Many existing patch-based algorithms arise as special cases of the new algorithm.

  8. Movement of patches during thermoforming: Experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schell, J. S. U.; Amory, L.; Guillon, D.

    2016-10-01

    The application of local reinforcement like uni-directional patches can locally increase the strength of composite parts without adding much weight. During design through structural analysis, shape and position of local reinforcement can easily be determined. In the thermoforming process, patches can be integrated into the ply-stack by preassembling. During forming, these patches can move and change their position reducing the structural effect of the patch. The movement of patches has been investigated experimentally. Key factors that influence this movement are orientation, size, position in the pile and slope of the mold. The forming process is simulated using HYPERFORM. The results show that this complex process needs special models which can be computationally intensive. In this work, we model the movement of patches and compare with experiments. The final goal is to have a reasonable predictive capability for movement of patches and design the process to minimize it.

  9. A MULTI-PATCH MALARIA MODEL WITH LOGISTIC GROWTH POPULATIONS*

    PubMed Central

    GAO, DAOZHOU; RUAN, SHIGUI

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a multi-patch model to study the effects of population dispersal on the spatial spread of malaria between patches. The basic reproduction number R0 is derived and it is shown that the disease-free equilibrium is locally asymptotically stable if R0<1 and unstable if R0>1. Bounds on the disease-free equilibrium and R0 are given. A sufficient condition for the existence of an endemic equilibrium when R0>1 is obtained. For the two-patch submodel, the dependence of R0 on the movement of exposed, infectious, and recovered humans between the two patches is investigated. Numerical simulations indicate that travel can help the disease to become endemic in both patches, even though the disease dies out in each isolated patch. However, if travel rates are continuously increased, the disease may die out again in both patches. PMID:23723531

  10. Analysis of habitat selection studies with multiple patches within cover types

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otis, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    Current statistical methods are inadequate for evaluation of the relation between spatial pattern of the landscape and observed patterns of habitat use by individuals or populations. For example, traditional habitat selection analysis methods do not use information about the size and distribution of the several patches of each cover type that may exist within the study area. Statistical tests are presented for hypotheses about disproportional use of cover types and patches within cover types. These tests require that use of individual patches is recorded, as well as the size of individual patches. Different designs are considered in which there are (1) single or multiple samples of use, and (2) equal or unequal habitat availability. Formulas for calculating Type II statistical errors of the tests are presented and Monte Carlo simulation is used to assess the accuracy of the formulas and to check the Type I error rates of the proposed test statistics. With adequate sample sizes, Type II error formulas can be a useful tool for planning of habitat selection studies. An example analysis is presented of a hypothetical study of habitat selection by ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) in a Midwestern landscape. The proposed tests also represent a contribution toward bringing together concepts of landscape ecology and wildlife habitat selection.

  11. Endoventricular patch plasty improves results of LV aneurysmectomy.

    PubMed

    Jakob, H G; Zölch, B; Schuster, S; Iversen, S; Hake, U; Lippold, R; Erbel, R; Oelert, H

    1993-01-01

    From May 1985 to December 1991 52 patients were operated upon for postischemic left ventricular aneurysm (LV-A). Between May 1985 and July 1989 25 patients (group I) with a mean age of 59 (46-72) years underwent conventional aneurysmectomy with direct closure of the left ventricle (LV) and a mean of 1.9 (0-3) additional bypass grafts (54% triple-vessel disease). The hospital mortality was 8% (2/25) and the late mortality during a median follow-up time of 34 months was 28% (7/25) with a 4-year survival of 66%. Improvement in the quality of life (NYHA from 2.6 to 2.1, P = 0.078) and global left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) (from 35 to 38%) proved to be unsatisfactory in conjunction with the high late mortality rate. Between August 1989 and December 1991 a prospective series of 27 consecutive patients (group II) with a mean age of 61 (45-71) years underwent endoventricular patch plasty guided by two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) before and after surgery. The patch size and position were calculated preoperatively by measuring the distances from the mitral annulus to the infarct area which were reproduced during surgery with a simple ruler. A mean of 2.1 (0-4) bypass grafts were added with 62% of the patients having triple-vessel disease and 19% left main stenosis (P = 0.05, group I versus II). All patients have survived to date. One patient had to be excluded, giving a median follow-up time of 14 months for 26 patients. At the 6 months' control, the mean NYHA class was improved from 2.7 to 1.6, (P = 0.0001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Endovascular treatment of intracranial infectious aneurysms in eloquent cortex with super-selective provocative testing: Case series and literature review.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Matthew R; Stapleton, Christopher J; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Thomas, Ajith J; Ogilvy, Christopher S

    2016-04-01

    Intracranial infectious aneurysms (IIAs) are a rare subgroup of intracranial aneurysms. Often erroneously termed mycotic aneurysms, these lesions most often result from infectious endocarditis and involve the distal anterior cortical circulation. Diagnosis typically follows headaches or septic infarcts, although increasing numbers of lesions are found incidentally, during screening protocols for infectious endocarditis. Open surgical treatment was previously the mainstay of treatment; however, these IIAs are often fusiform and quite fragile, making open surgical obliteration difficult and typically requiring lesion trapping. Current treatment techniques more commonly involve endovascular coil embolization or parent vessel occlusion. Many of these lesions occur distally, in or around the eloquent cortex, making embolization potentially dangerous. We present cases that highlight the use of super-selective provocative testing with sodium amobarbital and lidocaine, to help clarify and predict the risk of parent vessel occlusion in IIAs located in the eloquent cortex.

  13. Deep patch technique for landslide repair. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Helwany, B.M.

    1994-10-01

    The report describes the laboratory testing of the `USFS deep patch` technique and a CTI modification of this technique for repairing landslides with geosynthetic reinforcement. The technique involves replacing sections of roadway lost due to landslides on top of a geosynthetically-reinforced embankment. The CTI modification involves replacing the reinforced slope with a geosynthetically-reinforced retaining wall with a truncated base. Both techniques rely on the cantilevering ability of the reinforced mass to limit the load on the foundation with a high slide potential. The tests with road base showed that (1) both the USFS and CTI repair reduced effectively the adverse effects of local landsliding on the highway pavement by preventing crack propagation; (2) the USFS repair increased the stability of the repaired slope, which was in progressive failure, by reducing the stresses exerted on it; and (3) the CTI repair produced substantially greater stresses on its foundation due to the truncated base of the reinforced mass.

  14. AGARD Flight Test Techniques Series. Volume 18. Flight Testing of Radio Navigation Systems. (Les Essais en Vol des Systemes de Radionavigation)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-04-01

    Space Administration SCIENTIFIC & TECHNICAL INFORMATION RTO-AG-300 Vol. 18 AC/323(SCI)TP/26 NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY ORGANIZATION I- 0 o RESEARCH AND... 18 Flight Testing of Radio Navigation Systems (les Essais en vol des systemes de radionavigation) This AGARDograph has been sponsored by the Systems...TO: Recipients of AG-300 Vol. 18 FROM: Executive, Information Policy and Publications SUBJECT: AG-300, Vol 18 , pages A-1, A-2 and A-3 We regret that

  15. Flying Qualities Flight Testing of Digital Flight Control Systems. Flight Test Techniques Series - Volume 21 (les Essais en vol des performances des systemes de ommande de vol numeriques)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-12-01

    next phase. This involved a full handling qualities assessment including high AOA testing where the stall departure and spin prevention function of the...Method 52 Figure 18 Nyquist Sampling Theory 54 Figure 19 Aliasing of High Frequency Data to a Lower Frequency 54 Figure 20 Typical Closed-Loop System...which have low stability, combined with low control surface power. This combination usually requires high -gain closed-loop systems, which can

  16. The time dependence of reversed archeomagnetic flux patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra-Nova, Filipe; Amit, Hagay; Hartmann, Gelvam A.; Trindade, Ricardo I. F.

    2016-04-01

    Archeomagnetic field models may provide important insights to the geodynamo. Here we investigate the existence and mobility of reversed flux patches (RFPs) in archeomagnetic field model CALS3k.4b of Korte and Constable (2011; PEPI, 188, 247-259). We introduce topological algorithms to define, identify and track RPFs. In addition, we explore the relations between RFPs and dipole changes, and apply robustness tests to the RFPs. In contrast to previous definitions, patches that reside on the geographic equator are adequately identified based on our RFPs definition that takes the magnetic equator as a reference. Most RFPs exhibit a westward drift and migrate towards higher latitudes. Undulations of the magnetic equator and RFPs oppose the axial dipole moment (ADM). Filtered models show a tracking behaviour similar to the non-filtered model, and surprisingly new RFPs occasionally emerge. The advection and diffusion of RFPs have worked in unison to yield the decrease of the ADM at recent times. The absence of RFPs in the period 550-1440 AD is related to a low in intermediate degrees of the geomagnetic power spectrum. We thus hypothesize that the RFPs are strongly dependent on intermediate spherical harmonic degrees 4 and above. Comparison of tracking of RFPs among various archeomagnetic field models was also performed and gives more complex results.

  17. The time dependence of reversed archeomagnetic flux patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra-Nova, Filipe; Amit, Hagay; Hartmann, Gelvam A.; Trindade, Ricardo I. F.

    2015-02-01

    Archeomagnetic field models may provide important insights to the geodynamo. Here we investigate the existence and mobility of reversed flux patches (RFPs) in an archeomagnetic field model. We introduce topological algorithms to define, identify, and track RFPs. In addition, we explore the relations between RFPs and dipole changes and apply robustness tests to the RFPs. In contrast to previous definitions, patches that reside on the geographic equator are adequately identified based on our RFPs definition. Most RFPs exhibit a westward drift and migrate toward higher latitudes. Undulations of the magnetic equator and RFPs oppose the axial dipole moment (ADM). Filtered models show a tracking behavior similar to the nonfiltered model, and surprisingly new RFPs occasionally emerge. The advection and diffusion of RFPs have worked in unison to yield the decrease of the ADM at recent times. The absence of RFPs in the period 550-1440 A.D. is related to a low in intermediate degrees of the geomagnetic power spectrum. We thus hypothesize that the RFPs are strongly dependent on intermediate spherical harmonic degrees 4 and above.

  18. Speed estimates from grating patches are not contrast-normalized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, P.; Stone, L. S.; Swash, S.

    1996-01-01

    We have previously shown that the perceived speed of a moving grating depends upon its contrast, with lower-contrast patterns appearing to move more slowly than otherwise identical higher-contrast patterns. To explain this finding while remaining consistent with the findings of McKee, Silverman and Nakayama [(1986) Vision Research, 26, 609-619], we proposed that this misperception might arise from a modified version of the contrast-normalization procedure, envisaged by Adelson and Bergen [(1986) The extraction of spatio-temporal energy in human and machine vision (pp. 135-139). Charleston, S.C.: IEEE Computer Society] as a necessary second stage of motion-energy models of human motion processing. Specifically, our previous results might be explained if the two gratings to be compared interfered with each other's normalization. To test this hypothesis we performed two experiments. Experiment 1 demonstrates that the contrast effects persist even when two grating patches to be compared are presented up to 5 sec apart so that they would not be expected to bias each other's normalization. Experiment 2 shows that the contrast effects are unchanged when the two grating patches are surrounded by a range of patterns whose contrast would be expected to interfere with any normalization process. These two results allow the rejection of the contrast-normalized motion-energy hypothesis as an explanation of human speed perception. We discuss the consequences of these results on models of speed processing in the human visual system.

  19. Summary of Adsorption Capacity and Adsorption Kinetics of Uranium and Other Elements on Amidoxime-based Adsorbents from Time Series Marine Testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Wood, Jordana R.; Schlafer, Nicholas J.; Janke, Christopher J.; Das, Sadananda; Mayes, Richard; Saito, Tomonori; Brown, Suree S.; Tsouris, Constantinos; Tsouris, Costas; Wai, Chien M.; Pan, Horng-Bin

    2016-09-29

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been conducting marine testing of uranium adsorbent materials for the Fuel Resources Program, Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) beginning in FY 2012. The marine testing program is being conducted at PNNL’s Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL), located at Sequim Bay, along the coast of Washington. One of the main efforts of the marine testing program is the determination of adsorption capacity and adsorption kinetics for uranium and selected other elements (e.g. vanadium, iron, copper, nickel, and zinc) for adsorbent materials provided primarily by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), but also includes other Fuel Resources Program participants. This report summarizes the major marine testing results that have been obtained to date using time series sampling for 42 to 56 days using either flow-through column or recirculating flume exposures. The major results are highlighted in this report, and the full data sets are appended as a series of Excel spreadsheet files. Over the four year period (2012-2016) that marine testing of amidoxime-based polymeric adsorbents was conducted at PNNL’s Marine Science Laboratory, there has been a steady progression of improvement in the 56-day adsorbent capacity from 3.30 g U/kg adsorbent for the ORNL 38H adsorbent to the current best performing adsorbent prepared by a collaboration between the University of Tennessee and ORNL to produce the adsorbent SB12-8, which has an adsorption capacity of 6.56 g U/kg adsorbent. This nearly doubling of the adsorption capacity in four years is a significant advancement in amidoxime-based adsorbent technology and a significant achievement for the Uranium from Seawater program. The achievements are evident when compared to the several decades of work conducted by the Japanese scientists beginning in the 1980’s (Kim et al., 2013). The best adsorbent capacity reported by the Japanese scientists was 3.2 g U/kg adsorbent for a

  20. Effect of stiffness and thickness ratio of host plate and piezoelectric patches on reduction of the stress concentration factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesharaki, Javad Jafari; Madani, Seyed Ghasem; Golabi, Sa'id

    2016-09-01

    This paper focuses on the effects of stiffness ratio and thickness ratio on reducing stress concentration factor using piezoelectric patches in a rectangular plate with a hole, as a classical shape. Various locations of actuators and induction of positive/negative strains into the host plate are investigated and the best location of patches is presented. The study investigated the ratio effects and piezoelectric patches bounded on a rectangular host plate having various thicknesses and materials. Results show that the best position of actuators varies based on values of thickness and stiffness ratios of the host plate and piezoelectric patches. Also, the location of maximum stress concentration is transmitted from top and bottom of the hole to another point around the edge by changing the location of the piezoelectric actuators. To verify the results, some experimental tests are applied. The results show good agreement between the finite element analysis and experimental tests.

  1. Development of Methodology and Technology for Identifying and Quantifying Emission Products from Open Burning and Open Detonatin Thermal Treatment Methods. Bangbox Test Series. Volume 1. Test Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    chamber’s fabric walls, it was suggested that a surrogate fireball-mitigating material ( aqueous foam) should be used to surround the TNT block on one of... Aqueous foam-attenuated (227-g) TNT OD data trial. 15 FEB 89 Midtiple tank sampling 227-g TNT OD data trial: simultaneous air sammple c -ection in 27 32-L...As shown in Figure 2.6 (on page 2-13) the BB test facility is an air-supported, rubber- coated fabric hemisphere with a radius of 7.6 meter5. Access

  2. Wideband Patch Antenna for Land based Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangwar, R. P. S.; Dutt, Sanjay

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, an irregular pentagon shaped patch antenna has been presented. The proposed antenna operates over a wide band in frequency range from 12 to 26 GHz with VSWR < 2. It has a partial ground plane with two-inverted L and one I shaped slots in the radiation patch to attain wide bandwidth. The antenna consists of FR4 epoxy as a dielectric substrate with dielectric constant 4.4 and loss tangent 0.002. The size of the antenna is 30 × 30 × 1.57 mm3 and is fed by the microstrip line. The size of the fabricated proposed antenna is smaller than that of the antenna under reference (elliptical radiating patch with defected ground plane). The simulation has been done using high frequency structure simulator (HFSS) which is a finite element method (FEM) based tool. The proposed antenna exhibits the return loss of 21.85, 28.03 and 29.14 dB and gain of 6.6, 5.67 and 7.0 dB at resonant frequencies 16.7, 19.00 and 21.4 GHz, respectively. The bandwidth of the antenna is 10 GHz with normalized radiation efficiencies of 65, 69 and 70 % at corresponding resonant frequencies. The measured results of the fabricated proposed antenna have been compared with the simulated results and there has been a close agreement between both the results. Also the simulated results of the proposed antenna have been compared with the antenna under reference and it is found that the performance of the proposed antenna is far better. The proposed antenna can be used for land based vehicles in both Ku-band (12-18 GHz) and K-band (18-26 GHz).

  3. Robust Nonnegative Patch Alignment for Dimensionality Reduction.

    PubMed

    You, Xinge; Ou, Weihua; Chen, Chun Lung Philip; Li, Qiang; Zhu, Ziqi; Tang, Yuanyan

    2015-11-01

    Dimensionality reduction is an important method to analyze high-dimensional data and has many applications in pattern recognition and computer vision. In this paper, we propose a robust nonnegative patch alignment for dimensionality reduction, which includes a reconstruction error term and a whole alignment term. We use correntropy-induced metric to measure the reconstruction error, in which the weight is learned adaptively for each entry. For the whole alignment, we propose locality-preserving robust nonnegative patch alignment (LP-RNA) and sparsity-preserviing robust nonnegative patch alignment (SP-RNA), which are unsupervised and supervised, respectively. In the LP-RNA, we propose a locally sparse graph to encode the local geometric structure of the manifold embedded in high-dimensional space. In particular, we select large p -nearest neighbors for each sample, then obtain the sparse representation with respect to these neighbors. The sparse representation is used to build a graph, which simultaneously enjoys locality, sparseness, and robustness. In the SP-RNA, we simultaneously use local geometric structure and discriminative information, in which the sparse reconstruction coefficient is used to characterize the local geometric structure and weighted distance is used to measure the separability of different classes. For the induced nonconvex objective function, we formulate it into a weighted nonnegative matrix factorization based on half-quadratic optimization. We propose a multiplicative update rule to solve this function and show that the objective function converges to a local optimum. Several experimental results on synthetic and real data sets demonstrate that the learned representation is more discriminative and robust than most existing dimensionality reduction methods.

  4. A series of low-altitude aerial radiological surveys of selected regions within Areas 3, 5, 8, 9, 11, 18, and 25 at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, D.P.

    1999-12-01

    A series of low-altitude, aerial radiological surveys of selected regions within Areas 3, 5, 8, 9, 11, 18,and 25 of the Nevada Test Site was conducted from December 1996 through June 1999. The surveys were conducted for the US Department of Energy by the Remote Sensing Laboratory, located in Las Vegas, Nevada, and maintained and operated by Bechtel Nevada. The flights were conducted at a nominal altitude of 15 meters above ground level along a set of parallel flight lines spaced 23 meters apart. The purpose of these low-altitude surveys was to measure, map, and define the areas of americium-241 activity. The americium contamination will be used to determine the areas of plutonium contamination. Americium-241 activity was detected within 8 of the 11 regions. The three regions where americium-241 was not detected were in the inactive Nuclear Rocket Development Station complex in Area 25, which encompassed the Test Cell A and Test Cell C reactor test stands and the Reactor Maintenance Assembly and Disassembly facility.

  5. Preparation of a ligustrazine ethosome patch and its evaluation in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xingyan; Liu, Hong; Liu, Jianqiang; He, Zhiwei; Ding, Congcong; Huang, Guoliang; Zhou, Weihua; Zhou, Leshan

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to develop a transdermal ligustrazine patch containing a stable formulation and with good entrapment efficiency, release rate, and transdermal absorption. Methods Ligustrazine ethosomes were prepared by ethanol injection-sonication, with entrapment efficiency as an indicator. Using acrylic resin as the primary constituent, the ligustrazine ethosome patch was prepared by adding succinic acid as a crosslinking agent and triethyl citrate as a plasticizer. In vitro release and transdermal permeation studies were carried out. Finally, a pharmacokinetic study was carried out in rats to explore relative bioavailability. The formulations of ligustrazine ethosome were 1% (w/v) phospholipid, 0.4% (w/v) cholesterol, and 45% (v/v) ethanol. Results Ligustrazine ethosomes were obtained with an average particle size of 78.71 ± 1.23 nm and an average entrapment efficiency of 86.42% ± 1.50%. In vitro transdermal testing of the ligustrazine ethosome patches showed that the cumulative 24-hour amount of ligustrazine was up to 183 ± 18 μg/cm2. The pharmacokinetic results revealed that the relative bioavailability was 209.45%. Conclusion Compared with conventional ligustrazine administration, ligustrazine ethosome patches could promote better drug absorption and increase bioavailability. This study demonstrates that the transdermal action of the ligustrazine ethosome patch was comparatively good. PMID:21499422

  6. Direct transfer trajectory design options for interplanetary orbiter missions using an iterative patched conic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvathi, S. P.; Ramanan, R. V.

    2017-04-01

    In a direct interplanetary transfer, the spacecraft moves from a parking orbit of the departure planet to a parking orbit of the arrival planet. The transfer trajectory must be designed such that the specified arrival parking orbit conditions are achieved. For a fixed departure epoch and flight duration, there are four distinct transfer trajectory design options in a direct transfer. The conventional patched conic method, the most widely used analytical trajectory design method, does not identify these design options. An iterative patched conic method that identifies these distinct design options is developed and presented in this paper. This method involves two iterative processes: (i) iteration on the hyperbolic orbit characteristics using an analytical tuning strategy to achieve the hyperbolic excess velocity vector at the patch point, (ii) iteration on the patch points at the sphere of influence. The performance of the proposed method is compared with the conventional and V-infinity tuned patched conic methods. A design analysis tool, based on the proposed method, is developed and tested in various orbiter mission scenarios.

  7. Disruptive coloration in woodland camouflage: evaluation of camouflage effectiveness due to minor disruptive patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selj, Gorm K.; Heinrich, Daniela H.

    2016-10-01

    We present results from an observer based photosimulation study of generic camouflage patterns, intended for military uniforms, where three near-identical patterns have been compared. All the patterns were prepared with similar effective color, but were different in how the individual pattern patches were distributed throughout the target. We did this in order to test if high contrast (black) patches along the outline of the target would enhance the survivability when exposed to human observers. In the recent years it has been shown that disruptive coloration in the form of high contrast patches are capable of disturbing an observer by creating false edges of the target and consequently enhance target survivability. This effect has been shown in different forms in the Animal Kingdom, but not to the same extent in camouflaged military targets. The three patterns in this study were i) with no disruptive preference, ii) with a disruptive patch along the outline of the head and iii) with a disruptive patch on the outline of one of the shoulders. We used a high number of human observers to assess the three targets in 16 natural (woodland) backgrounds by showing images of one of the targets at the time on a high definition pc screen. We found that the two patterns that were thought to have a minor disruptive preference to the remaining pattern were more difficult to detect in some (though not all) of the 16 scenes and were also better in overall performance when all the scenes were accounted for.

  8. Time-series analysis of ion and isotope geochemistry of selected springs of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, B.F.; Edkins, J.; Jacobson, R.L.; Hess, J.W.

    1990-11-01

    The temporal variations of ion and isotope geochemistry were observed at six selected springs on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada and included: Cane, Whiterock, Captain Jack, Topopah, Tippipah, and Oak Springs. The sites were monitored from 1980 to 1982 and the following parameters were measured: temperature, pH, electrical conductance, discharge, cations (Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}. Na{sup +}, K{sup +}), anions Cl{sup {minus}}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}. HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, silica, stable isotopes ({delta}{sup 18}O, {delta}D, {delta}{sup 13}C), and radioactive isotopes ({sup 3}H, {sup 14}C). A more detailed study was continued from 1982 to 1988 at Cane and Whiterock Springs. Field microloggers were installed at these sites in 1985 to measure the high frequency response of temperature, electrical conductance, and discharge to local precipitation. Stage fluctuations near the discharge point dissolve minerals/salts as groundwater inundates the mineralized zone immediately above the equilibrium water table. This phenomena was most noticeable at Whiterock Spring and lagged the discharge response by several hours. Stable isotope analysis of precipitation and groundwater suggests a 1.5 to 2 month travel time for meteoric water to migrate from the recharge area to the discharge point. Groundwater age determinations suggest a mean age of approximately 30 years at Whiterock Spring and possibly older at Cane Spring. However, the short travel time and geochemical integrity of recharge pulses suggest that the waters are poorly mixed along the flow paths. 25 refs., 25 figs., 24 tabs.

  9. Antibiotic treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis based on rapid urine test and local epidemiology: lessons from a primary care series

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute uncomplicated cystitis (AUC) is an ideal target of optimization for antibiotic therapy in primary care. Because surveillance networks on urinary tract infections (UTI) mix complicated and uncomplicated UTI, reliable epidemiological data on AUC lack. Whether the antibiotic choice should be guided by a rapid urine test (RUT) for leukocytes and nitrites has not been extensively studied in daily practice. The aim of this primary care study was to investigate local epidemiology and RUT-daily use to determine the optimal strategy. Methods General practitioners included 18–65 years women with symptoms of AUC, performed a RUT and sent urines for analysis at a central laboratory. Different treatment strategies were simulated based on RUT and resistance results. Results Among 347 enrolled patients, 78% had a positive urine culture. Escherichia coli predominated (71%) with high rates of susceptibility to nitrofurantoin (100%), fosfomycin (99%), ofloxacin (97%), and even pivmecillinam (87%) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (87%). Modelization showed that the systematic use of RUT would reduce by 10% the number of patients treated. Fosfomycin for patients with positive RUT offered a 90% overall bacterial coverage, compared to 98% for nitrofurantoin. 95% for ofloxacin, 86% for trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and 78% for pivmecillinam. Conclusion Local epidemiology surveillance data not biased by complicated UTI demonstrates that the worldwide increase in antibiotic resistance has not affected AUC yet. Fosfomycin first line in all patients with positive RUT seems the best treatment strategy for AUC, combining good bacterial coverage with expected low toxicity and limited effect on fecal flora. Trial registration The current study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00958295) PMID:24612927

  10. Patch-clamp array with on-chip electronics, optics, flow control and mechanical actuation.

    SciTech Connect

    James, Conrad D.; Okandan, Murat; Draper, Bruce Leroy; Mani, Seethambal S.

    2003-07-01

    Fast and quantitative analysis of cellular activity, signaling and responses to external stimuli is a crucial capability and it has been the goal of several projects focusing on patch clamp measurements. To provide the maximum functionality and measurement options, we have developed a patch clamp array device that incorporates on-chip electronics, mechanical, optical and microfluidic coupling as well as cell localization through fluid flow. The preliminary design, which integrated microfluidics, electrodes and optical access, was fabricated and tested. In addition, new designs which further combine mechanical actuation, on-chip electronics and various electrode materials with the previous designs are currently being fabricated.

  11. ATRIS Seafloor Images – West Turtle Shoal Patch Reef, Rawa Patch Reef, Dustan Rocks Patch Reef, and Thor Patch Reef, Florida, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zawada, David G.; Ruzicka, Rob; Colella, Michael A.; Resnick, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center developed the Along-Track Reef Imaging System (ATRIS) in order to capture high-resolution, geo-located images of the seafloor. The images in this data release were collected September 29-30, 2011 at West Turtle Shoal, Rawa, Dustan Rocks, and Thor patch reefs near Marathon, Florida. The transects below show the path of image collection.For further information regarding data collection methods, refer to DOI: 10.1016/j.jembe.2015.02.017.

  12. Analyzing Milestones in Smoking Cessation: Illustration in a Nicotine Patch Trial in Adult Smokers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiffman, Saul; Scharf, Deborah M.; Shadel, William G.; Gwaltney, Chad J.; Dang, Qianyu; Paton, Stephanie M.; Clark, Duncan B.

    2006-01-01

    Tests of addiction treatments seldom reveal where treatment exercises its effect (i.e., promoting initial abstinence, preventing lapses, and/or impeding progression from lapse to relapse). The authors illustrate analyses distinguishing effects on these milestones in a randomized trial of high-dose nicotine patch (35 mg; n = 188) versus placebo (n…

  13. Fatigue behavior of a thermally-activated NiTiNb SMA-FRP patch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Tahan, M.; Dawood, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the details of an experimental study that was conducted to characterize the fatigue behavior of a thermally-activated shape memory alloy (SMA)/carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) patch that can be used to repair cracked steel members. A total of 14 thermally-activated patches were fabricated and tested to evaluate the stability of the prestress under fatigue loading. The parameters considered in this study are the prestress level in the nickel-titanium-niobium SMA wires and the applied force range. An empirical model to predict the degradation of the prestress is also presented. The results indicate that patches for which the maximum applied loads in a fatigue cycle did not cause debonding of the SMA wires from the CFRP sustained two million loading cycles with less than 20% degradation of the prestress.

  14. Reduction in Stress Intensity Factor of a Compact Tension Specimen by Bonding Symmetrical GFRP Patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, P. S.; Tripathi, V. K.; Singh, K. K.; Sarkar, P. K.; Kumar, P.

    2013-10-01

    Reduction in stress intensity factor (SIF) of an acrylic compact tension (CT) specimen is studied by symmetrical bonding of glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) patches on both sides of the specimen. The CT specimen was designed and developed to satisfy all dimensional constraints for plane strain condition. A suitable load fixture using dead weight for higher accuracy was designed for the purpose. The numerical and experimental analysis of CT specimen with varying geometry of the GFRP patches was carried out to analyze their effect on SIF of the specimen. The strain near the crack tip was measured by bonding a small strain gauge to estimate the equivalent SIF of the CT specimen. The test data was compared with the results of numerical analysis carried out using ANSYS software. The variation in strain value determined through theoretical analysis, numerical evaluation and experimental measurement is within 7 %. The equivalent SIF was found to be drastically reduced after bonding the CT specimen with GFRP patches.

  15. Development of a self-stressing NiTiNb shape memory alloy (SMA)/fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) patch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Tahan, M.; Dawood, M.; Song, G.

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a self-stressing patch using a combination of shape memory alloys (SMAs) and fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. Prestressed carbon FRP patches are emerging as a promising alternative to traditional methods to repair cracked steel structures and civil infrastructure. However, prestressing these patches typically requires heavy and complex fixtures, which is impractical in many applications. This paper presents a new approach in which the prestressing force is applied by restraining the shape memory effect of NiTiNb SMA wires. The wires are subsequently embedded in an FRP overlay patch. This method overcomes the practical challenges associated with conventional prestressing. This paper presents the conceptual development of the self-stressing patch with the support of experimental observations. The bond between the SMA wires and the FRP is evaluated using pull-out tests. The paper concludes with an experimental study that evaluates the patch response during activation subsequent monotonic tensile loading. The results demonstrate that the self-stressing patch with NiTiNb SMA is capable of generating a significant prestressing force with minimal tool and labor requirements.

  16. Robust Observation Detection for Single Object Tracking: Deterministic and Probabilistic Patch-Based Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Zulkifley, Mohd Asyraf; Rawlinson, David; Moran, Bill

    2012-01-01

    In video analytics, robust observation detection is very important as the content of the videos varies a lot, especially for tracking implementation. Contrary to the image processing field, the problems of blurring, moderate deformation, low illumination surroundings, illumination change and homogenous texture are normally encountered in video analytics. Patch-Based Observation Detection (PBOD) is developed to improve detection robustness to complex scenes by fusing both feature- and template-based recognition methods. While we believe that feature-based detectors are more distinctive, however, for finding the matching between the frames are best achieved by a collection of points as in template-based detectors. Two methods of PBOD—the deterministic and probabilistic approaches—have been tested to find the best mode of detection. Both algorithms start by building comparison vectors at each detected points of interest. The vectors are matched to build candidate patches based on their respective coordination. For the deterministic method, patch matching is done in 2-level test where threshold-based position and size smoothing are applied to the patch with the highest correlation value. For the second approach, patch matching is done probabilistically by modelling the histograms of the patches by Poisson distributions for both RGB and HSV colour models. Then, maximum likelihood is applied for position smoothing while a Bayesian approach is applied for size smoothing. The result showed that probabilistic PBOD outperforms the deterministic approach with average distance error of 10.03% compared with 21.03%. This algorithm is best implemented as a complement to other simpler detection methods due to heavy processing requirement. PMID:23202226

  17. Interpatch movement of the red milkweed beetle, Tetraopes tetraophthalmus: individual responses to patch size and isolation.

    PubMed

    Matter, Stephen F

    1996-03-01

    Individual movement patterns and the effects of host plant patch size and isolation on patch occupancy were examined for red milkweed beetles, Tetraopes tetraophthalmus, residing in a heterogeneous landscape. Male beetles were found to move both more often and farther between host plant patches than female beetles, and this difference affected the patterns of patch occupancy observed. Overall, unoccupied milkweed patches were smaller and more isolated than patches occupied by beetles. Patches uninhabited by females tended to be more isolated, but not necessarily smaller, than patches with female beetles, indicating that females may be affected more by patch isolation than patch size. Presence of male beetles on patches showed a stronger response to patch size than to patch isolation. Differences in movement between males and females illustrate the need for demographically based dispersal data. Comparisons of Tetraopes interpatch movement patterns between landscapes composed of patches of different size revealed that landscapes with overall smaller patches may have greater rates of interpatch movement.

  18. Patch size and landscape effects on density and nesting success of grassland birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, M.; Johnson, D.H.; Shaffer, J.A.; Donovan, T.M.; Svedarsky, W.D.

    2006-01-01

    Current management recommendations for grassland birds in North America emphasize providing large patches of grassland habitat within landscapes that have few forest or shrubland areas. These Bird Conservation Areas are being proposed under the assumption that large patches of habitat in treeless landscapes will maintain viable populations of grassland birds. This assumption requires that patch size and landscape features affect density and nesting success of grassland birds, and that these effects are consistent among years and regions and across focal species. However, these assumptions have not yet been validated for grassland birds, and the relative importance of local vegetation structure, patch size, and landscape composition on grassland bird populations Is not well known. In addition, factors influencing grassland bird nesting success have been investigated mostly in small-scale and short-duration studies. To develop management guidelines for grassland birds, we tested the spatial and temporal repeatability of the influence of patch size and landscape composition on density and nesting success of 3 grassland passerines, after controlling for local-scale vegetation structure, climate, and-when analyzing nest success-bird density. We conducted our study during 4 years (1998-2001) in 44 study plots that were set up in 3 regions of the northern tallgrass prairie in Minnesota and North Dakota, USA. In these study plots we measured density and nesting success of clay-colored sparrows (Spizella pallida), Savannah sparrows (Passerculus sandwichensis), and bobolinks (Dolichonyx oryzivorusj. Statistical models indicated that density was influenced by patch size, landscape, region, and local vegetation structure more so than by local vegetation structure alone. Both magnitude and direction of the response of density to patch size varied among regions, years, and species. In contrast, the direction of landscape effects was consistent among regions, years, and between

  19. Sexual segregation of forage patch use: Support for the social-factors and predation hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Biggerstaff, Michael T; Lashley, Marcus A; Chitwood, M Colter; Moorman, Christopher E; DePerno, Christopher S

    2017-03-01

    Nearly all species of sexually dimorphic ungulates sexually segregate. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain this phenomenon, including the social-factors hypothesis (SFH) and the predation hypothesis (PH). Interestingly, previous studies have accepted and rejected each hypothesis within and across species but few studies have simultaneously tested both hypotheses in the same population. In August 2011 and 2012 using 7680 photographs taken with camera traps in standardized forage patches, we tested two predictions of the SFH: 1) foraging efficiency of both sexes would decrease when foraging rate in mixed-sex groups relative to single-sex groups, and 2) activity patterns (i.e., the pattern of temporal use of forage patches on a diel scale) of the sexes would decrease in temporal overlap at the forage patch level (i.e., social segregation) compared to the overall temporal overlap of activity patterns of the population. Also, we tested two predictions of the +PH : 1) the relationship between feeding rates of each sex, and 2) temporal activity overlap would change with changing risk level of forage patches as a result of differing risk perception between sexes. In support of the SFH for temporal segregation, when in mixed-sex groups, mature males and all females decreased feeding rate 30% and 10%, respectively; further, the sexes had similar activity patterns overall (94-95% overlap), though temporal overlap was lower in individual forage patches (68-74% overlap). In multi-male mixed sex groups, at least one male exhibited aggressive posture toward females during all foraging bouts suggesting intersex aggression was the cause of the observed decrease in foraging rates. In support of the PH , the sexes adjusted feeding rate differently in response to changing risk level of a forage patch, encouraging spatial segregation; however, the PH was not supported for temporal segregation because temporal activity pattern overlap did not vary as a function of predation

  20. Laser-assisted patch clamping: a methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, G. H.; Assmann, S. M.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Laser microsurgery can be used to perform both cell biological manipulations, such as targeted cell ablation, and molecular genetic manipulations, such as genetic transformation and chromosome dissection. In this report, we describe a laser microsurgical method that can be used either to ablate single cells or to ablate a small area (1-3 microns diameter) of the extracellular matrix. In plants and microorganisms, the extracellular matrix consists of the cell wall. While conventional patch clamping of these cells, as well as of many animal cells, requires enzymatic digestion of the extracellular matrix, we illustrate that laser microsurgery of a portion of the wall enables patch clamp access to the plasma membrane of higher plant cells remaining situated in their tissue environment. What follows is a detailed description of the construction and use of an economical laser microsurgery system, including procedures for single cell and targeted cell wall ablation. This methodology will be of interest to scientists wishing to perform cellular or subcellular ablation with a high degree of accuracy, or wishing to study how the extracellular matrix affects ion channel function.