Science.gov

Sample records for patellar tendinopathy caused

  1. Patellar Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Aaron; Watson, Jonathan N.; Hutchinson, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Patellar tendinopathy is a common condition. There are a wide variety of treatment options available, the majority of which are nonoperative. No consensus exists on the optimal method of treatment. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed spanning 1962-2014. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: The majority of cases resolve with nonoperative therapy: rest, physical therapy with eccentric exercises, cryotherapy, anti-inflammatories, corticosteroid injections, extracorporeal shockwave therapy, glyceryl trinitrate, platelet-rich plasma injections, and ultrasound-guided sclerosis. Refractory cases may require either open or arthroscopic debridement of the patellar tendon. Corticosteroid injections provide short-term pain relief but increase risk of tendon rupture. Anti-inflammatories and injectable agents have shown mixed results. Surgical treatment is effective in many refractory cases unresponsive to nonoperative modalities. Conclusion: Physical therapy with an eccentric exercise program is the mainstay of treatment for patellar tendinopathy. Platelet-rich plasma has demonstrated mixed results; evidence-based recommendations on its efficacy cannot be made. In the event that nonoperative treatment fails, surgical intervention has produced good to excellent outcomes in the majority of patients. PMID:26502416

  2. Open Patellar Tendon Debridement for Treatment of Recalcitrant Patellar Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Thomas J.; Carroll, Kaitlin M.; Hariri, Sonaz

    2013-01-01

    Background: Patellar tendinopathy can be treated surgically for patients that have failed at least 1 year of nonoperative treatment who continue to have debilitating symptoms. Patellar tendinopathy can cause significant functional deficits, yet little has been reported about the operative treatment of patellar tendinopathy. Hypothesis: A combined arthroscopic and open surgical technique for the treatment of recalcitrant patellar tendinopathy results in an improvement in function and pain at a minimum 2-year follow-up. The purpose of this study was to present the indications, combined surgical technique, rehabilitation protocol, and the 2-year minimum follow-up results of the operative treatment of recalcitrant patellar tendinopathy. Study Design: Retrospective case series. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all patients who underwent a surgical primary patellar tendon debridement for recalcitrant patellar tendinopathy by a single surgeon between July 1999 and December 2005. Every patient failed at least 1 year of nonoperative treatment. Patients were excluded from the study if they had previous open knee surgery. Validated patient-reported outcome scores were used to assess function and pain levels pre- and postoperatively (Lysholm, International Knee Documentation Committee, Tegner activity, and visual analog pain score). Results: Thirty-four consecutive patients (37 consecutive cases) with mean follow-up 3.8 ± 1.6 years (range, 2-7.6 years) underwent the procedure with no complications. The mean age at surgery was 29 years (range, 14-51 years). Postoperatively, the visual analog score decreased by an mean of 6 points (range, 1 to −10, P < 0.001), and patients were able to return to their preinjury Tegner activity level. When asked if they were satisfied by the overall outcome of their surgery, 28 patients (82%) were completely or mostly satisfied with their surgical outcome on a particular knee; 6 (18%) were somewhat satisfied; and 2 (6%) were

  3. EVIDENCE–SUPPORTED REHABILITATION OF PATELLAR TENDINOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Dennis; Brismée, Jean-Michel; Sizer, Phil; Apte, Gail; O'Connell, Janelle

    2010-01-01

    Chronic tendinopathy is a common musculoskeletal disorder that frequently affects athletes who train and compete at all levels. This Clinical Commentary presents a review of the etiology, incidence, and contributory factors related specifically to patellar tendinopathy. Examination and differential diagnosis considerations are provided, and an evidence-based, staged rehabilitation program is described. PMID:21589672

  4. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN THE TREATMENT OF PATELLAR TENDINOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Patellar tendon pain is a significant problem in athletes who participate in jumping and running sports and can interfere with athletic participation. This clinical commentary reviews patellar tendon anatomy and histopathology, the language used to describe patellar tendon pathology, risk factors for patellar tendinopathy and common interventions used to address patellar tendon pain. Evidence is presented to guide clinicians in their decision-making regarding the treatment of athletes with patellar tendon pain. Level of Evidence 5 PMID:27904789

  5. Patellar tendinopathy - recent developments toward treatment.

    PubMed

    Christian, Robert A; Rossy, William H; Sherman, Orrin H

    2014-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy (PT) is a clinical and chronic overuse condition of unknown pathogenesis and etiology marked by anterior knee pain typically manifested at the inferior pole of the patella. PT has been referred to as "jumper's knee" since it is particularly common among populations of jumping athletes, such as basketball and volleyball players. Due to its common refractory response to conservative treatment, a variety of new treatments have emerged recently that include dry-needling, sclerosing injections, platelet-rich plasma therapy, arthroscopic surgical procedures, surgical resection of the inferior patellar pole, extracorporeal shock wave treatment, and hyperthermia thermotherapy. Since PT has an unknown pathogenesis and etiology, PT treatment is more a result of physician experience than evidence-based science. This review will summarize the current literature on this topic, identify current research efforts aimed to understand the pathological changes in abnormal tendons, provide exposure to the emerging treatment techniques, and provide suggested direction for future research.

  6. The anterior recurrent peroneal nerve entrapment syndrome: a patellar tendinopathy differential diagnosis case report.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Eric

    2013-12-01

    Patellar tendinopathy which is a cause of pain in the inferior patellar region is a relatively common pathology among sports enthusiasts. This paper describes a new pain syndrome identified from clinical observations which is a differential diagnosis to patellar tendinopathy. The pattern is specific and recognizable among many individuals, and it should be considered as its own entity. The new syndrome is discussed in terms of the pain experienced, the diagnostic criteria, treatment and the rationale to explain it. As it is a differential diagnosis to patellar tendinopathy, many sports enthusiasts might benefit from this diagnosis. If identified correctly, treatment might be directed to the correct structures and with the appropriate modalities, ensuring the patients a fast return to their past occupations without pain and without unwarranted treatments.

  7. Clinical Applications of Platelet-Rich Plasma in Patellar Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, D. U.; Lee, C.-R.; Lee, J. H.; Pak, J.; Kang, L.-W.; Jeong, B. C.

    2014-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP), a blood derivative with high concentrations of platelets, has been found to have high levels of autologous growth factors (GFs), such as transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblastic growth factor (FGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and epidermal growth factor (EGF). These GFs and other biological active proteins of PRP can promote tissue healing through the regulation of fibrosis and angiogenesis. Moreover, PRP is considered to be safe due to its autologous nature and long-term usage without any reported major complications. Therefore, PRP therapy could be an option in treating overused tendon damage such as chronic tendinopathy. Here, we present a systematic review highlighting the clinical effectiveness of PRP injection therapy in patellar tendinopathy, which is a major cause of athletes to retire from their respective careers. PMID:25136568

  8. Clinical applications of platelet-rich plasma in patellar tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Jeong, D U; Lee, C-R; Lee, J H; Pak, J; Kang, L-W; Jeong, B C; Lee, S H

    2014-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP), a blood derivative with high concentrations of platelets, has been found to have high levels of autologous growth factors (GFs), such as transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblastic growth factor (FGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and epidermal growth factor (EGF). These GFs and other biological active proteins of PRP can promote tissue healing through the regulation of fibrosis and angiogenesis. Moreover, PRP is considered to be safe due to its autologous nature and long-term usage without any reported major complications. Therefore, PRP therapy could be an option in treating overused tendon damage such as chronic tendinopathy. Here, we present a systematic review highlighting the clinical effectiveness of PRP injection therapy in patellar tendinopathy, which is a major cause of athletes to retire from their respective careers.

  9. Patellar tendinopathy: late-stage results from surgical treatment☆

    PubMed Central

    Cenni, Marcos Henrique Frauendorf; Silva, Thiago Daniel Macedo; do Nascimento, Bruno Fajardo; de Andrade, Rodrigo Cristiano; Júnior, Lúcio Flávio Biondi Pinheiro; Nicolai, Oscar Pinheiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the late-stage results from surgical treatment of patellar tendinopathy (PT), using the Visa score (Victorian Institute of Sport Tendon Study Group) and the Verheyden method. Methods This was a retrospective study in which the postoperative results from 12 patients (14 knees) who were operated between July 2002 and February 2011 were evaluated. The patients included in the study presented patellar tendinopathy that was refractory to conservative treatment, without any other concomitant lesions. Patients who were not properly followed up during the postoperative period were excluded. Results Using the Verheyden method, nine patients were considered to have very good results, two had good results and one had poor results. In relation to Visa, the mean was 92.4 points and only two patients had scores less than 70 points (66 and 55 points). Conclusion When surgical treatment for patellar tendinopathy is correctly indicated, it has good long-term results. PMID:26535202

  10. Ultrasound-Guided Scraping for Chronic Patellar Tendinopathy: A Case Presentation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mederic M; Rajasekaran, Sathish

    2016-06-01

    Chronic patellar tendinopathy is a common complaint among athletes who repetitively stress the extensor mechanism of the knee. Multiple treatment options have been described, but evidence is lacking, specifically when eccentric loading has failed. Debate continues regarding the patho-etiology of chronic patellar tendon pain. There has been recent interest regarding the neurogenic influences involved in chronic tendinopathy, and interventions targeting neovessels and accompanying neonerves have shown promise. This is the first description of an ultrasound-guided technique in which the neovessels and accompanying neonerves in patellar tendinopathy were targeted using a needle scraping technique of the posterior surface of the patellar tendon.

  11. The role of tendon microcirculation in Achilles and patellar tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Karsten

    2008-04-30

    Tendinopathy is of distinct interest as it describes a painful tendon disease with local tenderness, swelling and pain associated with sonographic features such as hypoechogenic texture and diameter enlargement. Recent research elucidated microcirculatory changes in tendinopathy using laser Doppler flowmetry and spectrophotometry such as at the Achilles tendon, the patellar tendon as well as at the elbow and the wrist level. Tendon capillary blood flow is increased at the point of pain. Tendon oxygen saturation as well as tendon postcapillary venous filling pressures, determined non-invasively using combined Laser Doppler flowmetry and spectrophotometry, can quantify, in real-time, how tendon microcirculation changes over with pathology or in response to a given therapy. Tendon oxygen saturation can be increased by repetitive, intermittent short-term ice applications in Achilles tendons; this corresponds to 'ischemic preconditioning', a method used to train tissue to sustain ischemic damage. On the other hand, decreasing tendon oxygenation may reflect local acidosis and deteriorating tendon metabolism. Painful eccentric training, a common therapy for Achilles, patellar, supraspinatus and wrist tendinopathy decreases abnormal capillary tendon flow without compromising local tendon oxygenation. Combining an Achilles pneumatic wrap with eccentric training changes tendon microcirculation in a different way than does eccentric training alone; both approaches reduce pain in Achilles tendinopathy. The microcirculatory effects of measures such as extracorporeal shock wave therapy as well as topical nitroglycerine application are to be studied in tendinopathy as well as the critical question of dosage and maintenance. Interestingly it seems that injection therapy using color Doppler for targeting the area of neovascularisation yields to good clinical results with polidocanol sclerosing therapy, but also with a combination of epinephrine and lidocaine.

  12. Dancers with patellar tendinopathy exhibit higher vertical and braking ground reaction forces during landing.

    PubMed

    Fietzer, Abbigail Lynn; Chang, Yu-Jen; Kulig, Kornelia

    2012-01-01

    Dancers are exposed to the effects of repetitive jumping and leaping as are other athletes that tend to develop patellar tendinopathy. Greater vertical ground reaction forces occur during landing from a dance leap than during takeoff and during other common athletic activities. The purposes of this study were: (1) to compare the landing ground reaction force profiles of participants with and without clinically diagnosed patellar tendinopathy, and (2) to determine the strength of the relationship between landing angle, and braking impulse. Eighteen elite pre-professional dancers (12 healthy, 6 with patellar tendinopathy; both groups 50% male) performed sauts de chat for kinetic and kinematic analysis. Dancers with patellar tendinopathy demonstrated greater peak vertical ground reaction force and impulse (36% and 15% greater, respectively). Dancers with patellar tendinopathy demonstrated greater peak braking ground reaction force and impulse (82% and 126% greater, respectively). Landing angle explained 67% of the braking impulse. Dancers with patellar tendinopathy exhibited greater vertical and braking impulses than healthy dancers. Braking impulse was strongly correlated with landing angle. While there was no difference between groups in landing angle, dancers with patellar tendinopathy exhibited greater braking impulse than their non-tendinopathic counterparts, even at similar landing angles.

  13. Feasibility and reliability of pain pressure threshold measurements in patellar tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    van Wilgen, Paul; van der Noord, Robert; Zwerver, Johannes

    2011-11-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is a common and often difficult to treat overuse injury which is characterized by activity-related anterior knee and focal palpation tenderness of the patellar tendon. The clinical diagnosis is mainly based on clinical examination, in which the yardstick is a non-standardized manual palpation. To standardize this palpation procedure the use of an algometer seems applicable. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility and reliability of the algometer in patellar tendinopathy. A cross sectional study was carried out.The algometer was applied to the patellar tendon in 20 asymptomatic volleyball players to measure the 'normal' pressure pain threshold. The inter-rater reliability was analyzed in 54 athletes with symptomatic patellar tendinopathy, the intra-rater reliability was analyzed in 48 athletes with symptomatic patellar tendinopathy. During the procedure difficulties were described, the SEM, intra class correlations and limits of agreement were determined using the Bland and Altman method. The feasibility of the algometer is adequate. The PPT of asymptomatic athletes differs significantly (p<.001) from athletes with a diagnosis of patellar tendinopathy. The inter-rater (ICC 0.93) and intra-rater (ICC 0.60) reliability of the pain pressure threshold are adequate to moderate. Although further research is warranted PPT algometry seems to be a feasible, reliable and useful tool in the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of athletes with patellar tendinopathy.

  14. Relationship between landing strategy and patellar tendinopathy in volleyball

    PubMed Central

    Bisseling, Rob W; Hof, At L; Bredeweg, Steef W; Zwerver, Johannes; Mulder, Theo

    2007-01-01

    Objective The aetiology of patellar tendinopathy (jumper's knee) remains unclear. To see whether landing strategy might be a risk factor for the development of this injury, this study examined whether landing dynamics from drop jumps differed among healthy volleyball players (CON) and volleyball players with a jumper's knee. The patients with jumper's knee were divided into an asymptomatic group with a previous jumper's knee (PJK) and a symptomatic group with a recent jumper's knee (RJK). Methods Inverse dynamics analyses were used to estimate lower extremity joint dynamics from 30, 50 and 70 cm drop jumps in the three groups (CON, n = 8; PJK, n = 7; RJK, n = 9). A univariate repeated measures analysis of variance was used to compare the different landing techniques. Results Data analysis of the landing dynamics revealed that PJK showed higher knee angular velocities (p<0.01), and higher ankle plantar flexion moment loading rate (p<0.01). Furthermore, strong tendencies of higher loading rate of vertical ground reaction force (p = 0.05) and higher knee extensor moment loading rate (p = 0.08) were found compared with CON. Higher values for peak knee moment, peak knee power and knee work (all p<0.01) were found for CON compared with RJK. The comparison of the two jumper's knee groups yielded higher knee angular velocities (p<0.01), together with higher ankle plantar flexion and knee extensor moment loading rate (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively). Conclusion Where RJK used a landing technique to avoid high patellar tendon loading, PJK used a stiffer landing strategy, which may be a risk factor in the development of patellar tendinopathy. PMID:17224437

  15. Patellar tendon morphology in volleyball athletes with and without patellar tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Kulig, K; Landel, R; Chang, Y-J; Hannanvash, N; Reischl, S F; Song, P; Bashford, G R

    2013-03-01

    Appropriate management of patellar tendinopathy requires distinguishing between inflammatory and degenerative conditions, often difficult because tendon thickening can be a normal or pathological adaptation, and micromorphology is not observable on clinical imaging. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively examine patellar tendon micro- and macromorphology in volleyball athletes and relate those findings to reported symptoms. Longitudinal ultrasound images of proximal and distal patellar tendons were acquired from 84 male elite volleyball athletes (44 symptomatic, 40 asymptomatic) and 10 asymptomatic nonathlete controls. Micromorphology was determined using two-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform analysis providing a discriminating peak spatial frequency parameter (PSF). Macromorphology (patellar tendon thickness) was measured using Image J software. All athletes regardless of symptoms had thicker proximal tendons compared to nonathletes, suggesting a normal adaptation to training loads. However, symptomatic athletes demonstrated lower PSF than asymptomatic athletes and nonathletes at the proximal tendon, suggesting greater collagen disorganization, and tendon degeneration rather than inflammation. Only symptomatic athletes had thicker distal tendons than nonathletes, but there was no difference in PSF distally. Diagnostic ultrasound enhances the understanding of the micromorphology of patellar tendons, supporting the rationale for management that remodels the degenerated tendon instead of treating inflammation.

  16. Prevalence of Achilles and patellar tendinopathy and their association to intratendinous changes in adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Cassel, M; Baur, H; Hirschmüller, A; Carlsohn, A; Fröhlich, K; Mayer, F

    2015-06-01

    Achilles (AT) and patellar tendons (PT) are commonly affected by tendinopathy in adult athletes but prevalence of symptoms and morphological changes in adolescents is unclear. The study aimed to determine prevalence of tendinopathy and intratendinous changes in ATs and PTs of adolescent athletes. A total of 760 adolescent athletes (13.0 ± 1.9 years; 160 ± 13 cm; 50 ± 14 kg) were examined. History, local clinical examination, and longitudinal Doppler ultrasound analysis for both ATs and PTs were performed including identification of intratendinous echoic changes and vascularization. Diagnosis of tendinopathy was complied clinically in case of positive history of tendon pain and tendon pain on palpation. Achilles tendinopathy was diagnosed in 1.8% and patellar tendinopathy in 5.8%. Vascularizations were visible in 3.0% of ATs and 11.4% of PTs, hypoechogenicities in 0.7% and 3.2% as well as hyperechogenicities in 0% and 0.3%, respectively. Vascularizations and hypoechogenicities were statistically significantly more often in males than in females (P ≤ 0.02). Subjects with patellar tendinopathy had higher prevalence of structural intratendinous changes than those without PT symptoms (P ≤ 0.001). In adolescent athletes, patellar tendinopathy is three times more frequent compared with Achilles tendinopathy. Longitudinal studies are necessary to investigate physiological or pathological origin of vascularizations and its predictive value in development of tendinopathy.

  17. Patellar Tendinopathy: Clinical Diagnosis, Load Management, and Advice for Challenging Case Presentations.

    PubMed

    Malliaras, Peter; Cook, Jill; Purdam, Craig; Rio, Ebonie

    2015-11-01

    Synopsis The hallmark features of patellar tendinopathy are (1) pain localized to the inferior pole of the patella and (2) load-related pain that increases with the demand on the knee extensors, notably in activities that store and release energy in the patellar tendon. While imaging may assist in differential diagnosis, the diagnosis of patellar tendinopathy remains clinical, as asymptomatic tendon pathology may exist in people who have pain from other anterior knee sources. A thorough examination is required to diagnose patellar tendinopathy and contributing factors. Management of patellar tendinopathy should focus on progressively developing load tolerance of the tendon, the musculoskeletal unit, and the kinetic chain, as well as addressing key biomechanical and other risk factors. Rehabilitation can be slow and sometimes frustrating. This review aims to assist clinicians with key concepts related to examination, diagnosis, and management of patellar tendinopathy. Difficult clinical presentations (eg, highly irritable tendon, systemic comorbidities) as well as common pitfalls, such as unrealistic rehabilitation time frames and overreliance on passive treatments, are also discussed. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2015;45(11):887-898. Epub 21 Sep 2015. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.5987.

  18. Differences in tendon properties in elite badminton players with or without patellar tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Couppé, C; Kongsgaard, M; Aagaard, P; Vinther, A; Boesen, M; Kjaer, M; Magnusson, S P

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the structural and mechanical properties of the patellar tendon in elite male badminton players with and without patellar tendinopathy. Seven players with unilateral patellar tendinopathy (PT group) on the lead extremity (used for forward lunge) and nine players with no current or previous patellar tendinopathy (CT group) were included. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess distal patellar tendon dimensions. Patellar tendon mechanical properties were assessed using simultaneous tendon force and deformation measurements. Distal tendon cross-sectional area (CSA) normalized for body weight (mm(2) /kg(2/3) ) was lower in the PT group compared with the CT group on both the non-lead extremity (6.1 ± 0.3 vs 7.4 ± 0.2, P < 0.05) and the lead extremity (6.5 ± 0.6 vs 8.4 ± 0.3, P < 0.05). Distal tendon stress was higher in the PT group compared with the CT group for both the non-lead extremity (31 ± 1 vs 27 ± 1 MPa, P < 0.05) and the lead extremity (32 ± 3 vs 21 ± 3 MPa, P < 0.01). Conclusively, the PT group had smaller distal patellar tendon CSA on both the injured (lead extremity) and the uninjured side (non-lead extremity) compared with the CT group. Subsequently, the smaller CSA yielded a greater distal patellar tendon stress in the PT group. Therefore, a small tendon CSA may predispose to the development of tendinopathy.

  19. Previously identified patellar tendinopathy risk factors differ between elite and sub-elite volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Janssen, I; Steele, J R; Munro, B J; Brown, N A T

    2015-06-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is the most common knee injury incurred in volleyball, with its prevalence in elite athletes more than three times that of their sub-elite counterparts. The purpose of this study was to determine whether patellar tendinopathy risk factors differed between elite and sub-elite male volleyball players. Nine elite and nine sub-elite male volleyball players performed a lateral stop-jump block movement. Maximum vertical jump, training history, muscle extensibility and strength, three-dimensional landing kinematics (250 Hz), along with lower limb neuromuscular activation patterns (1500 Hz), and patellar tendon loading were collected during each trial. Multivariate analyses of variance (P < 0.05) assessed for between-group differences in risk factors or patellar tendon loading. Significant interaction effects were further evaluated using post-hoc univariate analysis of variance tests. Landing kinematics, neuromuscular activation patterns, patellar tendon loading, and most of the previously identified risk factors did not differ between the elite and sub-elite players. However, elite players participated in a higher training volume and had less quadriceps extensibility than sub-elite players. Therefore, high training volume is likely the primary contributor to the injury discrepancy between elite and sub-elite volleyball players. Interventions designed to reduce landing frequency and improve quadriceps extensibility are recommended to reduce patellar tendinopathy prevalence in volleyball players.

  20. Region-specific tendon properties and patellar tendinopathy: a wider understanding.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Stephen John; Hussain, Syed Robiul

    2014-08-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is a common painful musculoskeletal disorder with a very high prevalence in the athletic population that can severely limit or even end an athletic career. To date, the underlying pathophysiology leading to the condition remains poorly understood, although reports suggesting that patellar tendinopathy most frequently concerns the proximal posterior region of the tendon has prompted some researchers to examine region-specific tendon properties for a better understanding of the etiology and potential risk factors associated with the condition. However, to date, research concerning the in vivo region-specific tendon properties in relation to patellar tendinopathy is very scarce, perhaps due to the lack of validated techniques that can determine such properties in vivo. In recent years, a technique has been developed involving an automated tendon-tracking program that appears to be very useful in the determination of region-specific tendon properties in vivo. In terms of regional variations in tendon properties, previous research has demonstrated differences in structural, mechanical, and biochemical properties between the discrete regions of the patellar tendon, but the extent to which these regional variations contribute to patellar tendinopathy remains elusive. In addition, with respect to treatment strategies for patellar tendinopathy, previous research has utilized a wide range of interventions, but the use of eccentric exercise (EE) and/or heavy-slow resistance (HSR) training appear to be most promising. However, the optimal program design variables of EE and HSR training that induce the most favorable effects are yet to be determined. This review article provides a detailed discussion of all of the above to allow a better understanding of the etiology and potential risk factors associated with the condition as well as the most effective treatment strategies. First, a comprehensive literature review is provided with respect to region

  1. Jumper's knee or lander's knee? A systematic review of the relation between jump biomechanics and patellar tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Van der Worp, H; de Poel, H J; Diercks, R L; van den Akker-Scheek, I; Zwerver, J

    2014-07-01

    Patellar tendinopathy (jumper's knee) is a common injury in sports that comprise jump actions. This article systematically reviews the literature examining the relation between patellar tendinopathy and take-off and landing kinematics in order to uncover risk factors and potential prevention strategies. A systematic search of the Pubmed, Embase and Amed databases was performed to identify studies that reported kinematics of sport specific jumps in relation to patellar tendinopathy. A quantitative analysis was performed on 4 indentified studies. Differences were found only between controls and asymptomatic subjects with patellar tendon abnormalities. Most differences were found during horizontal landing after forward acceleration. A synthesis of the literature suggests that horizontal landing poses the greatest threat for developing patellar tendinopathy. A stiff movement pattern with a small post-touchdown range of motion and short landing time is associated with the onset of patellar tendinopathy. Accordingly, employing a flexible landing pattern seems to be an expedient strategy for reducing the risk for (re-) developing patellar tendinopathy. Together, these findings indicate that improving kinetic chain functioning, performing eccentric exercises and changing landing patterns are potential tools for preventive and/or therapeutic purposes.

  2. Platelet-rich plasma: evidence for the treatment of patellar and Achilles tendinopathy--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Di Matteo, B; Filardo, G; Kon, E; Marcacci, M

    2015-04-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been introduced in the clinical practice to treat a growing number of different musculoskeletal pathologies. It is currently applied in the treatment of Achilles and patellar tendinopathies, which are common sport-related injuries very challenging to manage. Aim of the present paper was to review systematically the available clinical evidence concerning the application of PRP in the treatment of patellar and Achilles tendinopathy. A systematic review of the literature was performed according to the following inclusion criteria for relevant articles: (1) clinical reports of any level of evidence, (2) written in the English language, (3) with no time limitation and (4) on the use of PRP to treat conservatively Achilles and patellar tendinopathy. Twenty-two studies were included and analyzed. Two studies on patellar tendinopathy were randomized controlled trials (RCTs), whereas just one RCT was published on Achilles tendon. All the papers concerning patellar tendon reported positive outcome for PRP, which proved to be superior to other traditional approaches such as shock-wave therapy and dry needling. In the case of Achilles tendon, despite the encouraging findings reported by case series, the only RCT available showed no significant clinical difference between PRP and saline solution. The main finding of this study was the paucity of high-level literature regarding the application of PRP in the management of patellar and Achilles tendinopathy. However, the clinical data currently available, although not univocal, suggest considering PRP as a therapeutic option for recalcitrant patellar and Achilles tendinopathies.

  3. The impact of physically demanding work of basketball and volleyball players on the risk for patellar tendinopathy and on work limitations.

    PubMed

    van der Worp, H; Zwerver, J; Kuijer, P P F M; Frings-Dresen, M H W; van den Akker-Scheek, I

    2011-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is a common injury in jumping athletes. Little is known about work-related etiological factors for patellar tendinopathy and related work limitations. The aim of this study was to identify work-related etiological factors for patellar tendinopathy and to determine the relation between patellar tendinopathy and work limitations. Basketball and volleyball players between 18 and 35 years were invited to complete an online-questionnaire concerning knee complaints, etiological risk factors for patellar tendinopathy and related work limitations. A total of 1505 subjects were included in the analysis. Risk factors for patellar tendinopathy were gender and heavy physically demanding work. The odds for having patellar tendinopathy were significantly higher for heavy physically demanding occupations compared to mentally demanding occupations. 30% of subjects with patellar tendinopathy with a physically demanding job reported to be impaired in their work and 17% reported to be less productive. Basketball and volleyball players with heavy physically demanding work seem to have an increased risk for developing patellar tendinopathy. This finding has important clinical relevance in the treatment of this injury. Working activities should be adjusted in order to reduce the total load on the patellar tendon and help prevention and recovery.

  4. The patellar tendinopathy in athletes: a sonographic grading correlated to prognosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Gemignani, Michele; Busoni, Francesco; Tonerini, Michele; Scaglione, Mariano

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine in the athletes a sonographic grading of the patellar tendinopathy correlated to prognosis and therapy. The 298 patellar overuse tendinopathies were divided in four grades according to the extension of the injured area of the tendon in the axial sonograms. Grades 1, 2, and 3 were managed with medical and physical therapy. A surgical treatment was performed in grade 4 and in grades 1, 2, and 3 tendinopathies not responding to our conservative therapy. There were 21.8% injuries in grade 1 (100% responding; prognosis 20 days), 61.2% injuries in grade 2 (94.5% responding; prognosis 40 days), 16.4% injuries in grade 3 (85.7% responding; prognosis 90 days), and 0.6% injuries in grade 4. The sonographic study is fundamental to characterize adequately the patellar tendinopathy. The conservative therapy is the first option for grades 1, 2, and 3 as it determines a complete healing in most of cases.

  5. Arthroscopic treatment of chronic patellar tendinopathy in high-level athletes

    PubMed Central

    Alaseirlis, Dimosthenis Artemis; Konstantinidis, George Athanasios; Malliaropoulos, Nikolaos; Nakou, Lamprini Stefanos; Korompilias, Anastasios; Maffulli, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Summary To present the results of arthroscopic treatment of patellar tendinopathy in high-level competition athletes. Eleven high-level athletes presented chronic patellar tendinopathy which did not respond to long term conservative treatment. Average age of the patients was 24.8 ±3.4 years old. All patients received an arthroscopic procedure with osteoplasty of the distal patellar pole, debridement of the underlying Hoffa fat pad and of the degenerated areas of the proximal posterior patella tendon and cauterization of the visible neo-vessels. Mean duration of follow-up was 17.4±4 months. Patients showed a major improvement in the Lysholm score from 49.9±5.2 to 92.5±7 and in the VISA P score from 41.2±5.2 to 86.8±14.9 on tenth post-operative week. All patients had returned to sports activities by the twelfth postoperative week. Arthroscopic treatment of chronic patellar tendinopathy found to be a minimal invasive and safe technique which produced satisfactory results. PMID:23738308

  6. Increase in passive muscle tension of the quadriceps muscle heads in jumping athletes with patellar tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z J; Ng, G Y F; Lee, W C; Fu, S N

    2016-08-19

    To investigate the passive muscle tension of the quadriceps muscle heads in male athletes clinically diagnosed with patellar tendinopathy (PT) with those of healthy controls and explore the interplay between passive muscle tension and patellar tendon stiffness. Between November 2012 and December 2013, 66 male athletes (mean age of 21.1 ± 4.4 years) were examined using supersonic shear wave imaging technology. The passive tension of the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles and patellar tendon stiffness were assessed. The shear elastic modulus of the VL muscle was increased by 26.5% (P < 0.001) in the subjects with PT when compared with the controls. Greater passive tension in the VL was associated with higher patellar tendon stiffness (r = 0.38; P = 0.001). The vastus lateralis muscle of the quadriceps shows increase in passive muscle tension in jumping athletes with patellar tendinopathy. These findings suggest that increase in muscle tension is not similar in the individual muscles of the quadriceps muscle. Traditional stretching of the whole quadriceps muscle might not be targeted to the tight muscle heads.

  7. Neovascularity in patellar tendinopathy and the response to eccentric training: a case report using Power Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    McCreesh, Karen M; Riley, Sara J; Crotty, James M

    2013-12-01

    This report describes the case of an amateur soccer player with chronic patellar tendinopathy who underwent ultrasound imaging before and after engaging in an 8-week programme of eccentric exercise. On initial assessment, greyscale ultrasound imaging demonstrated tendon thickening and reduced echogenicity, while Power Doppler imaging demonstrated a large amount of neovascularity. After 8 weeks of an eccentric loading programme, the patient reported significantly improved symptoms and functional scores, while follow-up imaging demonstrated improvement in the echo appearance of the tendon and complete resolution of the neovascularity. The association between neovascularity and symptoms in tendinopathy research is conflicting, with a paucity of research in the area of patellar tendinopathy. While further research is needed to clarify the significance of greyscale and Power Doppler ultrasound changes in relation to symptoms in patellar tendinopathy, ultrasound imaging was shown to be a useful adjunct to diagnosis and outcome assessment in this case.

  8. Rehabilitation protocol for patellar tendinopathy applied among 16- to 19-year old volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Biernat, Ryszard; Trzaskoma, Zbigniew; Trzaskoma, Lukasz; Czaprowski, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy of rehabilitation protocol applied during competitive period for the treatment of patellar tendinopathy. A total of 28 male volleyball players were divided into two groups. Fifteen from experimental group (E) and 13 from control group (C) fulfilled the same tests 3 times: before the training program started (first measurement), after 12 weeks (second measurement) and after 24 weeks (third measurement). The above-mentioned protocol included the following: USG imagining with color Doppler function, clinical testing, pain intensity evaluation with VISA-P questionnaire, leg muscle strength and power and jumping ability measurements. The key element of the rehabilitation program was eccentric squat on decline board with additional unstable surface. The essential factor of the protocol was a set of preventive functional exercises, with focus on eccentric exercises of hamstrings. Patellar tendinopathy was observed in 18% of the tested young volleyball players. Implementation of the presented rehabilitation protocol with eccentric squat on decline board applied during sports season lowered the pain level of the young volleyball players. Presented rehabilitation protocol applied without interrupting the competitive period among young volleyball players together with functional exercises could be an effective method for the treatment of patellar tendinopathy.

  9. ggstThe role of tendon microcirculation in Achilles and patellar tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Knobloch, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    Tendinopathy is of distinct interest as it describes a painful tendon disease with local tenderness, swelling and pain associated with sonographic features such as hypoechogenic texture and diameter enlargement. Recent research elucidated microcirculatory changes in tendinopathy using laser Doppler flowmetry and spectrophotometry such as at the Achilles tendon, the patellar tendon as well as at the elbow and the wrist level. Tendon capillary blood flow is increased at the point of pain. Tendon oxygen saturation as well as tendon postcapillary venous filling pressures, determined non-invasively using combined Laser Doppler flowmetry and spectrophotometry, can quantify, in real-time, how tendon microcirculation changes over with pathology or in response to a given therapy. Tendon oxygen saturation can be increased by repetitive, intermittent short-term ice applications in Achilles tendons; this corresponds to 'ischemic preconditioning', a method used to train tissue to sustain ischemic damage. On the other hand, decreasing tendon oxygenation may reflect local acidosis and deteriorating tendon metabolism. Painful eccentric training, a common therapy for Achilles, patellar, supraspinatus and wrist tendinopathy decreases abnormal capillary tendon flow without compromising local tendon oxygenation. Combining an Achilles pneumatic wrap with eccentric training changes tendon microcirculation in a different way than does eccentric training alone; both approaches reduce pain in Achilles tendinopathy. The microcirculatory effects of measures such as extracorporeal shock wave therapy as well as topical nitroglycerine application are to be studied in tendinopathy as well as the critical question of dosage and maintenance. Interestingly it seems that injection therapy using color Doppler for targeting the area of neovascularisation yields to good clinical results with polidocanol sclerosing therapy, but also with a combination of epinephrine and lidocaine. PMID:18447938

  10. Physical therapists' role in prevention and management of patellar tendinopathy injuries in youth, collegiate, and middle-aged indoor volleyball athletes

    PubMed Central

    Kulig, Kornelia; Noceti-DeWit, Lisa M.; Reischl, Stephen F.; Landel, Rob F.

    2015-01-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is highly prevalent in all ages and skill levels of volleyball athletes. To illustrate this, we discuss the clinical, biomechanical, and ultrasound imaging presentation and the intervention strategies of three volleyball athletes at different stages of their athletic career: youth, middle-aged, and collegiate. We present our examination strategies and interpret the data collected, including visual movement analysis and dynamics, relating these findings to the probable causes of their pain and dysfunction. Using the framework of the EdUReP concept, incorporating Education, Unloading, Reloading, and Prevention, we propose intervention strategies that target each athlete's specific issues in terms of education, rehabilitation, training, and return to sport. This framework can be generalized to manage patellar tendinopathy in other sports requiring jumping, from youth to middle age, and from recreational to elite competitive levels. PMID:26537811

  11. Landing limb posture in volleyball athletes with patellar tendinopathy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kulig, K; Joiner, D G; Chang, Y-J

    2015-05-01

    The aims of this pilot study were to investigate how a novel sagittal plane kinematic measurement - the lower extremity contact angle (LECA) - relates to the landing dynamics of elite male volleyball athletes with and without patellar tendinopathy. The LECA was defined as the angle between the ground and the line connecting the center of pressure to the L5S1 marker. 18 athletes (9 with patellar tendinopathy and 9 with asymptomatic tendons) completed simulated spike jumps while instrumented for kinetic and kinematic analysis using a force platform and 3D motion analysis system. The patellar tendinopathic group demonstrated a significantly more acute LECA compared to the asymptomatic group (65.3°±2.2° vs. 69.1°±4.5°) and was the only kinematic or kinetic variable measured to discriminate between the 2 groups. The LECA further demonstrated less variability between trials than sagittal plane hip, knee, and ankle kinematics. Additionally, the LECA's - and not individual joints' - high correlation with the braking impulse ensures its predictive value for landing dynamics (r=- 0.890). The LECA has the potential to be a valuable tool to help assess jumping athletes in both injury prevention screening and as a variable that, if modified, could help alter the maladaptive behavior observed in symptomatic athletes.

  12. Effects of In-Season Inertial Resistance Training With Eccentric Overload in a Sports Population at Risk for Patellar Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Gual, Gabriel; Fort-Vanmeerhaeghe, Azahara; Romero-Rodríguez, Daniel; Tesch, Per A

    2016-07-01

    Gual, G, Fort-Vanmeerhaeghe, A, Romero-Rodríguez, D, and Tesch, PA. Effects of in-season inertial resistance training with eccentric overload in a sports population at risk for patellar tendinopathy. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1834-1842, 2016-Volleyball and basketball players can be considered as a population at risk for patellar tendinopathy. Given the paradox that eccentric training elicits therapeutic benefits yet might provoke such injury, we investigated the influence of a weekly bout of inertial squat resistance exercise offering eccentric overload on lower limb muscle power and patellar tendon complaints. Players of 8 (4 basketball and 4 volleyball) teams (38 women and 43 men) were randomly assigned to either the intervention (IG) or control (CG) group. Although IG and CG maintained scheduled in-season training routines over 24 weeks, IG, in addition, performed 1 weekly session of eccentric overload by 4 sets of 8 repetitions of the squat using flywheel inertial resistance. Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment patellar tendinopathy questionnaire (VISA-p), vertical countermovement jump, and squat power, both concentric (Squat-Con) and eccentric (Squat-Ecc), tests were performed before (T1), during (T2), and after (T3) the 24 weeks of intervention. Neither group suffered from patellar tendinopathy during the study period. VISA-p displayed no differences across groups at any measurement period. Countermovement jump scores significantly (p ≤ 0.05) differed between groups in favor of the IG. Both Squat-Con and Squat-Ecc mean scores from the IG were significantly (p < 0.01) higher than the CG. Adding a weekly eccentric overload squat training bout to a regular basketball and volleyball exercise routine enhances lower limb muscle power without triggering patellar tendon complaints. Future studies, using the current exercise paradigm, aim to explore its efficacy to prevent or combat patellar tendinopathy in sports calling for frequent explosive jumps.

  13. [Patellar tendinopathy ('jumper's knee'); a common and difficult-to-treat sports injury].

    PubMed

    Zwerver, J

    2008-08-16

    Patellar tendinopathy is a common and difficult-to-treat overuse injury of the patellar tendon with a very negative impact on the careers of many athletes. It appears to involve a failed healing process in the tendon--not inflammation--and has consequences for the treatment strategy. Rehabilitation programs are based on the principles of load reduction and an eccentric exercise program to improve muscle-tendon function and optimize the kinetic chain. Prolonged rehabilitation is necessary because of slow tendon recovery. Anti-inflammatory treatment is often unsuccessful. Surgery does not guarantee a quick symptom-free return to sport at the original level either. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy, ultrasound-guided sclerosing of new vessels and tendinous and peritendinous injections of aprotinin and autologous growth factors seem to be promising new treatment options.

  14. A multidisciplinary approach including the use of platelet-rich plasma to treat an elite athlete with patellar tendinopathy – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Tracy L.; Drouin, Jillian L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Patellar tendinopathy affects a substantial proportion of athletes involved in jumping or kicking activities. Platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections may be a promising treatment used in conjunction with common traditional therapies. Clinical Features: Patellar tendinopathy is often the result of repetitive or excessive overload on the patellar tendon. Activity modification, cryotherapy, eccentric exercises, shockwave therapy, and PRP have been indicated as treatment options during various stages of this condition. Intervention and Outcome: A 23 year old female, elite track and field athlete was managed for patellar tendinopathy with a combination of traditional therapeutic interventions as well as a PRP injection. This athlete returned to pre-injury level of competition six months post-injection. Conclusion: Emerging literature on PRP appears to be promising for patellar tendinopathy, however, it remains unclear which patients may benefit most and whether the stage of the disorder has an impact on the clinical outcome. PMID:24302777

  15. Treatment of Patellar Tendinopathy Refractory to Surgical Management Using Percutaneous Ultrasonic Tenotomy and Platelet-Rich Plasma Injection: A Case Presentation.

    PubMed

    Nanos, Katherine N; Malanga, Gerard A

    2015-12-01

    Chronic proximal patellar tendinopathy is a common condition in sports medicine that may be refractory to nonoperative treatments, including activity modification, medications, and comprehensive rehabilitation. Percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy is a recently developed technique designed to cut and debride tendinopathic tissue, thus promoting pain relief and functional recovery. We present a case of a collegiate athlete with chronic proximal patellar tendinopathy who was effectively treated with percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy after not responding to extensive nonoperative treatment, surgical debridement, and platelet-rich plasma injections. Percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy can be considered as a treatment option in patients presenting with refractory proximal patellar tendinopathy, including those who do not respond to previous operative intervention.

  16. Asymptomatic Achilles, patellar, and quadriceps tendinopathy: a longitudinal clinical and ultrasonographic study in elite fencers.

    PubMed

    Giombini, A; Dragoni, S; Di Cesare, A; Di Cesare, M; Del Buono, A; Maffulli, N

    2013-06-01

    Lower limb tendon changes detected at imaging are common among asymptomatic athletes. We aimed to prospectively assess the clinical status, tendon structure, and vascularity of lower limb tendons of elite fencers, and predict the risk of developing symptoms over time. Clinical examination, changes at ultrasonography (US), and Power Doppler (PD) flow of both the Achilles, patellar, and quadriceps tendon were assessed in 37 elite fencers in January 2007 and 3 years after. Two hundred and twenty-two tendons were examined. At the last appointment, patellar tendons diagnosed as abnormal at baseline were more likely to develop symptoms than those normal at baseline (P < 0.05, Fisher's exact test), while US and PD abnormalities on Achilles and quadriceps tendons were no predictive for development of symptoms over years. A very low percentage of tendons diagnosed as normal at baseline (1.45%) showed US abnormalities at 3-year follow-up. In asymptomatic elite fencers, structural changes are relatively common at US and PD assessment of Achilles, quadriceps, and patellar tendons. It seems unlikely that additional PD investigations provide further information or change prognosis in patients with US diagnosis of tendinopathy.

  17. Patellar Tendinitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... for more than a few weeks, it's called tendinopathy. A combination of factors may contribute to the ... you may progress to the more serious patellar tendinopathy. If you have knee pain during or after ...

  18. High volume image-guided Injections for patellar tendinopathy: a combined retrospective and prospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Sarah; Chan, Otto; King, John; Perry, David; Crisp, Tom; Maffulli, Nicola; Morrissey, Dylan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: the aim was to quantify the effect of a novel high volume-image guided injection (HVIGI) technique for recalcitrant patellar tendinopathy (PT). Methods: twenty patients (8 prospective; 12 retrospective) with ultrasonographically confirmed proximal PT were recruited. A HVIGI under ultra-sound guidance of 10 ml 0.5% Bupivacaine, 25 mg Hydrocortisone and 30 ml normal saline at the interface of the patellar tendon and Hoffa’s fat pad was administered. A standardised eccentric loading rehabilitation protocol was prescribed. Results: the VISA-P score improved from 45.0 to 64.0 (p<0.01) for all subjects, likely to be clinically significant. There was no statistically significant difference between the increase in the retrospective group of 19.9 (± 23.5) and the prospective of 16.4 (± 11.3) p = 0.7262.5% of prospective subjects agreed that they had significantly improved, with 37.5% returning to sport within 12 weeks. Conclusions: HVIGI should be considered in the management of recalcitrant PT. Randomised controlled trials are warranted. PMID:25332938

  19. Do patients with chronic patellar tendinopathy have an altered somatosensory profile? A Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) study.

    PubMed

    van Wilgen, C P; Konopka, K H; Keizer, D; Zwerver, J; Dekker, R

    2013-03-01

    The prevalence of tendinopathies in sports is high. The etiology and pain mechanisms of tendinopathies are not completely understood. Currently, little is known whether, or to which degree, somatosensory changes within the nervous system may contribute to the pain in tendinopathies. We conducted a patient controlled study in which we used the standardized QST protocol developed by the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain. This protocol consists of seven different tests that measures 13 somatosensory parameters and can be seen as the gold standard to measure somatosensory function. Twelve athletes with clinically diagnosed chronic patellar tendinopathy (PT) mean duration 30 months (range 6-120) and 20 controls were included in the study. In two of the 13 QST parameters namely Mechanical Pain Threshold (P < 0.05) and Vibration Disappearance Threshold (P < 0.5) injured athletes were significantly more sensitive for the applied stimuli. None of the athletes had signs of Dynamic Mechanical Allodynia. Reduced mechanical pain thresholds or pinprick allodynia reflects the involvement of central sensitization upon the myelinated (Aδ-fibre) nociceptive input. From this explorative study, we conclude that sensitization may play a prominent role in the pain during and after sports activity in patella tendinopathy patients.

  20. Efficacy of autologous leukocyte-reduced platelet-rich plasma therapy for patellar tendinopathy in a rat treadmill model

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Mamoru; Funasaki, Hiroki; Marumo, Keishi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background An autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy has currently been applied for the tendinopathy; however, its efficacy and an optimal platelets concentration in PRP were uncertain. We analyzed them in an animal model prepared using a repetitive running exercise. Methods We made the tendinopathy rat model of patellar tendon using a rodent treadmill machine. Rats with tendinopathy were injected with leukocyte-reduced PRP at the platelets concentration of 1.0×106/μL (P10 group), PRP at the platelets concentration of 5.0×105/μL (P5 group) or normal saline (control group) into the space between the patellar tendon and the fat pad bilaterally or were multiply dry-needled at the tibial insertion site (MN group) at once. To assess the pain-reliving effect, the spontaneous locomotor activities at night (12 h) were measured every day. Histological sections of the patellar tendon stained with hematoxylineosin or prepared by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling were microscopically analyzed. Results The numbers of spontaneous locomotor activities in the P10 group were significantly larger than those in the P5, MN or control groups and they recovered up to a healthy level. On histologic examinations, the numbers of microtears, laminations, or apoptotic cells in the patellar tendons in the P10 or P5 groups were significantly lower than those in the MN or control groups, although no significant differences were observed between the P10 and P5 groups. Conclusions The injections of an autologous leukocyte-reduced PRP were effective for pain relief and for partial restoration of the patellar tendon in the tendinopathy rat model. The injections of a PRP at the platelets concentration of 1.0×106/μL completely relieved the pain and were more effective than those at the platelets concentration of 5.0×105/μL whereas there was no difference for the effect of histological restoration or apoptosis inhibition between them. PMID:27900294

  1. Equivalence of online and clinician administration of a patellar tendinopathy risk factor and severity questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Morton, S; Morrissey, D; Valle, X; Chan, O; Langberg, H; Malliaras, P

    2015-10-01

    The VISA-P is a questionnaire for assessing the severity of patellar tendinopathy (PT). Our study aim was to evaluate the equivalence of self-administration of the VISA-P online with the addition of risk factor questions to develop a tool suitable for high-volume remote use. A crossover study design with 107 subjects was used to determine equivalence between online and clinician administration. Three population groups were used to ensure construct validity. Online vs clinician administration revealed an intraclass correlation (ICC) of 0.79 [confidence interval (CI): 0.68-0.86] for the VISA-P with a systematic significant difference of 4.99, which is not clinically meaningful. Poor ICCs were seen for questions 7 and 8 of the VISA-P (0.37 and 0.47, respectively) in comparison with earlier questions. There were statistically significant differences between population groups for the VISA-P. The ICC for risk factor questions was excellent at 0.89 (CI: 0.84-0.93) with no mean difference (P = 1.00). The online questionnaire enables equivalent collection of VISA-P data and risk factor information and may well improve further with the suggested modifications to the instructions for questions 7 and 8. There is potential to use this questionnaire electronically to generate large databases in future research.

  2. Risk factors for patellar tendinopathy in basketball and volleyball players: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    van der Worp, H; van Ark, M; Zwerver, J; van den Akker-Scheek, I

    2012-12-01

    Patellar tendinopathy (PT) has a multifactorial etiology, and many possible risk factors have been described in the literature. The findings are conflicting, though, and most research has been conducted on elite athletes. The aim of the current study is to determine the risk factors for PT in a large representative sample of basketball and volleyball players. Separate risk factors for men and women, basketball and volleyball players, and athletes with unilateral and bilateral PT were identified. All basketball and volleyball players between ages 18 and 35 from the Dutch Basketball Association and the Dutch Volleyball Association were invited to complete an online questionnaire on knee complaints and risk factors for PT. The logistic regression analyses included 2224 subjects. The risk factors for PT were age, playing at the national level, being male and playing volleyball (compared with playing basketball). The risk factors for men and women were comparable. Among volleyball players, outside hitters and middle blockers/hitters had an increased risk compared with setters. For basketball players, no risk factors could be identified. No differences in the risk factors were found between athletes with unilateral and bilateral PT. These findings should be taken into account for prevention and rehabilitation purposes.

  3. Platelet-rich plasma as a treatment for chronic patellar tendinopathy: comparison of a single versus two consecutive injections

    PubMed Central

    Zayni, Rachad; Thaunat, Mathieu; Fayard, Jean-Marie; Hager, Jean-Philippe; Carrillon, Yannick; Clechet, Julien; Gadea, François; Archbold, Pooler; Sonnery Cottet, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background platelet-rich-plasma is increasingly used in chronic patellar tendinopathy. Ideal number of PRP injections needed is not yet established. This study compares the clinical outcomes of a single versus two consecutive PRP injections. Method between December 2009 and January 2012, 40 athletes with proximal patellar tendinopathy were treated by PRP injection. Patients received single (20 patients) or two PRP injections 2 weeks apart (20 patients). All patients underwent prospective clinical evaluation, including Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Patella (VISA-P) score, visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, and Tegner scale before PRP and after a minimum of 2 year follow-up. Results 9 patients failed PRP treatment and needed surgery. 1 patient was lost to follow-up. For the remaining patients, the VISA-P, VAS, and Tegner scores all significantly improved from 35.2 to 78.5 (p = 0.0001), 6.6 to 2.4 (p = 0.0001), and 4.8 to 6.9 (p = 0.0003). Patients who received two injections had better scores than those who received single injection with VAS of 1.07 versus 3.7 (p = 0.0005), Tegner score of 8.1 versus 5.9 (p = 0.0003) and VISA-P of 93.2 versus 65.7 (p = 0.0001). Conclusions two consecutive PRP injections in chronic patellar tendinopathy showed better improvement in outcomes when compared to single injection. Level of evidence randomized prospective consecutive series, Level 2. PMID:26261787

  4. Eccentric treatment for patellar tendinopathy: a prospective randomised short‐term pilot study of two rehabilitation protocols

    PubMed Central

    Frohm, Anna; Saartok, Tönu; Halvorsen, Kjartan; Renström, Per

    2007-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of two eccentric rehabilitation protocols for patients with symptomatic patellar tendinopathy. A new eccentric overload training device was compared with the present standard eccentric rehabilitation programme on a decline board. Design Prospective, randomised clinical trial. Setting Sports rehabilitation clinic, university sports laboratory, supplemented with home exercises. Patients 20 competitive and recreational athletes, all with clinical diagnosis of patellar tendinopathy, verified by MRI or ultrasound imaging. Interventions A 12‐week rehabilitation period, either with bilateral eccentric overload strength training using the Bromsman device twice a week or with unilateral eccentric body load training using a decline board twice a week, supplemented with daily home exercises. Outcome measures The primary outcome was pain and function, assessed by the Swedish Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment for Patella (VISA‐P) score. Secondary outcome measures were isokinetic muscle torque, dynamic function and muscle flexibility, as well as pain level estimations using visual analogue scale (VAS). Side effects were registered. Results Both treatment groups improved in the short term according to the VISA‐P scores during the 12‐week rehabilitation period. However, there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of pain and function. After a 3‐month rehabilitation period, most patients could be regarded as improved enough to be able to return to training and sports. No serious side effects were detected in either group. Conclusion In patients with patellar tendinopathy pain, two‐legged eccentric overload training twice per week, using the new device (Bromsman), was as efficient and safe as the present standard daily eccentric one‐legged rehabilitation‐training regimen using a decline board. PMID:17289855

  5. The evolution of eccentric training as treatment for patellar tendinopathy (jumper's knee): a critical review of exercise programmes

    PubMed Central

    Visnes, Håvard; Bahr, Roald

    2007-01-01

    Background and aim: Eccentric training has become a popular treatment for patellar tendinopathy. Our purpose was to review the evolution of eccentric strength training programmes for patellar tendinopathy with a focus on the exercise prescriptions used, to help clinicians make appropriate choices and identify areas needing further research. Methods: A computerised search of the entire MEDLINE database was performed on 1 September 2006 to identify prospective and randomised clinical trials with a focus on clinical outcome of eccentric training for patellar tendinopathy. Results: 7 articles with a total of 162 patients and in which eccentric training was one of the interventions, all published after 2000, were included. The results were positive, but study quality was variable, with small numbers or short follow‐up periods. The content of the different training programmes varied, but most were home‐based programmes with twice daily training for 12 weeks. A number of potentially significant differences were identified in the eccentric programmes used: drop squats or slow eccentric movement, squatting on a decline board or level ground, exercising into tendon pain or short of pain, loading the eccentric phase only or both phases, and progressing with speed then loading or simply loading. Conclusion: Most studies suggest that eccentric training may have a positive effect, but our ability to recommend a specific protocol is limited. The studies available indicate that the treatment programme should include a decline board and should be performed with some level of discomfort, and that athletes should be removed from sports activity. However, these aspects need further study. PMID:17261559

  6. The effect of mild symptomatic patellar tendinopathy on the quadriceps contractions and the Fente motion in elite fencers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taegyu; Kim, Eunkuk; Park, Jongchul; Kang, Hyunyong

    2011-01-01

    To investigate how mild symptomatic patellar tendinopathy (PT) affects quadriceps contractions and the Fente motion, this case-control study examined elite fencers who continue to train and play fully with mild tendon pains. Twenty-four elite fencers (10 women) with mild symptomatic PT and 24 controls (10 women) participated in the study. Concentric/eccentric isokinetic strength of the quadriceps was tested, and peak torque and total work were recorded. Kinematic data from the knee during the Fente motion were collected. The first analysis period (P1) was after heel contact to the maximal flexion of the knee, and the second (P2) was right after P1 to heel-off. Normalized peak torque and work of concentric/eccentric contractions were not significantly different. Affected fencers demonstrated significantly reduced angular velocities at P2 (p = 0.042). The male fencers did not demonstrate any differences. The affected female fencers demonstrated significantly weaker concentric peak torque at 60°·s-1 (p = 0. 009) and 180°·s-1 (p = 0.047) and less concentric work at 60°·s-1 (p = 0.020). They also demonstrated significantly reduced average angular velocities at P2 (p = 0.001). Therefore, mild symptomatic PT seems to have an effect on the isokinetic concentric contraction of the quadriceps and the angular velocity of the knee during the backward Fente motion in elite female fencers who are participating fully in training and competition. Key points It is likely that even mild symptomatic patellar tendinopathy could affect the athletic performances in elite fencers. Elite female fencers are more likely to be affected substantially by symptomatic patellar tendinopathy in their sporting ability than male fencers. Because weak concentric knee extensors may affect the performance in fencing, not only eccentric training for symptomatic patellar tendinopathy but also proper concentric training of the quadriceps may be helpful in a rehabilitation program of elite female

  7. Changes in Morphological and Elastic Properties of Patellar Tendon in Athletes with Unilateral Patellar Tendinopathy and Their Relationships with Pain and Functional Disability

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi Jie; Ng, Gabriel Yin-fat; Lee, Wai Chun; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2014-01-01

    Background Patellar tendinopathy (PT) is one of the most common knee disorders among athletes. Changes in morphology and elasticity of the painful tendon and how these relate to the self-perceived pain and dysfunction remain unclear. Objectives To compare the morphology and elastic properties of patellar tendons between athlete with and without unilateral PT and to examine its association with self-perceived pain and dysfunction. Methods In this cross-sectional study, 33 male athletes (20 healthy and 13 with unilateral PT) were enrolled. The morphology and elastic properties of the patellar tendon were assessed by the grey and elastography mode of supersonic shear imaging (SSI) technique while the intensity of pressure pain, self-perceived pain and dysfunction were quantified with a 10-lb force to the most painful site and the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-patella (VISA-P) questionnaire, respectively. Results In athletes with unilateral PT, the painful tendons had higher shear elastic modulus (SEM) and larger tendon than the non-painful side (p<0.05) or the dominant side of the healthy athletes (p<0.05). Significant correlations were found between tendon SEM ratio (SEM of painful over non-painful tendon) and the intensity of pressure pain (rho  = 0.62; p = 0.024), VISA-P scores (rho  = −0.61; p = 0.026), and the sub-scores of the VISA-P scores on going down stairs, lunge, single leg hopping and squatting (rho ranged from −0.63 to −0.67; p<0.05). Conclusions Athletes with unilateral PT had stiffer and larger tendon on the painful side than the non-painful side and the dominant side of healthy athletes. No significant differences on the patellar tendon morphology and elastic properties were detected between the dominant and non-dominant knees of the healthy control. The ratio of the SEM of painful to non-painful sides was associated with pain and dysfunction among athletes with unilateral PT. PMID:25303466

  8. Eccentric decline squat protocol offers superior results at 12 months compared with traditional eccentric protocol for patellar tendinopathy in volleyball players

    PubMed Central

    Young, M; Cook, J; Purdam, C; Kiss, Z; Alfredson, H

    2005-01-01

    Background: Conservative treatment of patellar tendinopathy has been minimally investigated. Effective validated treatment protocols are required. Methods: This was a prospective randomised controlled trial of 17 elite volleyball players with clinically diagnosed and imaging confirmed patellar tendinopathy. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups: a decline group and a step group. The decline group were required to perform single leg squats on a 25° decline board, exercising into tendon pain and progressing their exercises with load. The step group performed single leg squats on a 10 cm step, exercising without tendon pain and progressing their exercises with speed then load. All participants completed a 12 week intervention programme during their preseason. Outcome measures used were the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment (VISA) score for knee function and 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) for tendon pain with activity. Measures were taken throughout the intervention period and at 12 months. Results: Both groups had improved significantly from baseline at 12 weeks and 12 months. Analysis of the likelihood of a 20 point improvement in VISA score at 12 months revealed a greater likelihood of clinical improvements in the decline group than the step group. VAS scores at 12 months did not differ between the groups. Conclusions: Both exercise protocols improved pain and sporting function in volleyball players over 12 months. This study indicates that the decline squat protocol offers greater clinical gains during a rehabilitation programme for patellar tendinopathy in athletes who continue to train and play with pain. PMID:15665207

  9. Rehabilitation of Patellar Tendinopathy Using Hip Extensor Strengthening and Landing-Strategy Modification: Case Report With 6-Month Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Scattone Silva, Rodrigo; Ferreira, Ana Luisa G; Nakagawa, Theresa H; Santos, José E M; Serrão, Fábio V

    2015-11-01

    Study Design Case report. Background Although eccentric exercises have been a cornerstone of the rehabilitation of athletes with patellar tendinopathy, the effectiveness of this intervention is sometimes less than ideal. Athletes with patellar tendinopathy have been shown to have different jump-landing patterns and lower hip extensor strength compared to asymptomatic athletes. To our knowledge, the effectiveness of an intervention addressing these impairments has not yet been investigated. Case Description The patient was a 21-year-old male volleyball athlete with a 9-month history of patellar tendon pain. Pain was measured with a visual analog scale. Disability was measured with the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-patella questionnaire. These assessments were conducted before and after an 8-week intervention, as well as at 6 months after the intervention. Hip and knee kinematics and kinetics during drop vertical jump and isometric strength were also measured before and after the 8-week intervention. The intervention consisted of hip extensor muscle strengthening and jump landing strategy modification training. The patient did not interrupt volleyball practice/competition during rehabilitation. Outcomes After the 8-week intervention and at 6 months postintervention, the athlete was completely asymptomatic during sports participation. This favorable clinical outcome was accompanied by a 50% increase in hip extensor moment, a 21% decrease in knee extensor moment, and a 26% decrease in patellar tendon force during jump landing measured at 8 weeks. Discussion This case report provides an example of how an 8-week intervention of hip muscle strengthening and jump-landing modification decreased pain and disability and improved jump-landing biomechanics in an athlete with patellar tendinopathy. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 4. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2015;45(11):899-909. Epub 21 Sep 2015. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.6242.

  10. Simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Moura, Diogo Lino; Marques, José Pedro; Lucas, Francisco Manuel; Fonseca, Fernando Pereira

    2017-01-01

    Bilateral patellar tendon rupture is a rare entity, often associated with systemic diseases and patellar tendinopathy. The authors report a rare case of a 34-year-old man with simultaneous bilateral rupture of the patellar tendon caused by minor trauma. The patient is a retired basketball player with no past complaints of chronic knee pain and a history of steroid use. Surgical management consisted in primary end-to-end tendon repair protected temporarily with cerclage wiring, followed by a short immobilization period and intensive rehabilitation program. Five months after surgery, the patient was able to fully participate in sport activities.

  11. Effectiveness of the Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis (EPI®) technique and isoinertial eccentric exercise in the treatment of patellar tendinopathy at two years follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Abat, Ferran; Diesel, Wayne-J; Gelber, Pablo-E; Polidori, Fernando; Monllau, Joan-Carles; Sanchez-Ibañez, Jose-Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aim: to show the effect of Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis (EPI®) combined with eccentric programme in the treatment of patellar tendinopathy. Methods: prospective study of 33 athlete-patients consecutively treated for insertional tendinopathy with Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis (EPI®) and followed for 2 years. Functional assessment was performed at the first visit, at three months and two years with the Tegner scale and VISA-P. Results: an average improvement in the VISA-P of 35 points was obtained. The mean duration of treatment was 4.5 weeks. Some 78.8% of the patients returned to the same level of physical activity as before the injury by the end of treatment, reaching 100% at two years. Conclusions: intratissue percutaneous electrolysis (EPI®) combined with an eccentric-based rehab program offers excellent results in terms of the clinical and functional improvement of the patellar tendon with low morbidity in a short-term period. Level of Evidence: Therapy, level 4. PMID:25332934

  12. Cross-cultural Adaptation and Validation of the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Patella Questionnaire for French-Speaking Patients With Patellar Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Kaux, Jean-François; Delvaux, François; Oppong-Kyei, Julian; Beaudart, Charlotte; Buckinx, Fanny; Croisier, Jean-Louis; Forthomme, Bénédicte; Crielaard, Jean-Michel; Bruyère, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    Study Design Clinical measurement study. Background The Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Patella (VISA-P), originally developed in English, assesses the severity of patellar tendinopathy symptoms. To date, no French version of the questionnaire exists. Objectives The aim of our study was to translate the VISA-P into French and verify its psychometric properties. Methods The translation and cultural adaptation were performed according to international recommendations in 6 steps: initial translation, translation merging, back translation to the original language, use of an expert committee to reach a prefinal version, test of the prefinal version, and expert committee appraisal of a final version. Afterward, the psychometric properties of the final French version (VISA-PF) were assessed in 92 subjects, divided into 3 groups: pathological subjects (n = 28), asymptomatic subjects (n = 22), and sports-risk subjects (n = 42). Results All members of the expert committee agreed with the final version. On a scale ranging from 0 to 100, with 100 representing an asymptomatic subject, the average ± SD scores on the VISA-PF were 53 ± 17 for the pathological group, 99 ± 2 for the healthy group, and 86 ± 14 for the sports-risk group. The test-retest reliability of the VISA-PF was excellent, with good internal consistency. Correlations between the VISA-PF and divergent validity of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) were low, and the correlation coefficient values measured between the VISA-PF scores and converged items of the SF-36 were higher. Conclusion The VISA-PF is understandable, valid, and suitable for French-speaking patients with patellar tendinopathy. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(5):384-390. Epub 21 Mar 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.5937.

  13. Lateral Elbow Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bhabra, Gev; Wang, Allan; Ebert, Jay R.; Edwards, Peter; Zheng, Monica; Zheng, Ming H.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral elbow tendinopathy, commonly known as tennis elbow, is a condition that can cause significant functional impairment in working-age patients. The term tendinopathy is used to describe chronic overuse tendon disorders encompassing a group of pathologies, a spectrum of disease. This review details the pathophysiology of tendinopathy and tendon healing as an introduction for a system grading the severity of tendinopathy, with each of the 4 grades displaying distinct histopathological features. Currently, there are a large number of nonoperative treatments available for lateral elbow tendinopathy, with little guidance as to when and how to use them. In fact, an appraisal of the clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses studying these treatment modalities reveals that no single treatment reliably achieves outstanding results. This may be due in part to the majority of clinical studies to date including all patients with chronic tendinopathy rather than attempting to categorize patients according to the severity of disease. We relate the pathophysiology of the different grades of tendinopathy to the basic science principles that underpin the mechanisms of action of the nonoperative treatments available to propose a treatment algorithm guiding the management of lateral elbow tendinopathy depending on severity. We believe that this system will be useful both in clinical practice and for the future investigation of the efficacy of treatments. PMID:27833925

  14. Studies on the importance of sympathetic innervation, adrenergic receptors, and a possible local catecholamine production in the development of patellar tendinopathy (tendinosis) in man.

    PubMed

    Danielson, Patrik; Alfredson, Håkan; Forsgren, Sture

    2007-04-01

    Changes in the patterns of production and in the effects of signal substances may be involved in the development of tendinosis, a chronic condition of pain in human tendons. There is no previous information concerning the patterns of sympathetic innervation in the human patellar tendon. In this study, biopsies of normal and tendinosis patellar tendons were investigated with immunohistochemical methods, including the use of antibodies against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and neuropeptide Y, and against alpha1-, alpha2A-, and beta1-adrenoreceptors. It was noticed that most of the sympathetic innervation was detected in the walls of the blood vessels entering the tendon through the paratendinous tissue, and that the tendon tissue proper of the normal and tendinosis tendons was very scarcely innervated. Immunoreactions for adrenergic receptors were noticed in nerve fascicles containing both sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers. High levels of these receptors were also detected in the blood vessel walls; alpha1-adrenoreceptor immunoreactions being clearly more pronounced in the tendinosis tendons than in the tendons of controls. Interestingly, immunoreactions for adrenergic receptors and TH were noted for the tendon cells (tenocytes), especially in tendinosis tendons. The findings give a morphological correlate for the occurrence of sympathetically mediated effects in the patellar tendon and autocrine/paracrine catecholamine mechanisms for the tenocytes, particularly, in tendinosis. The observation of adrenergic receptors on tenocytes is interesting, as stimulation of these receptors can lead to cell proliferation, degeneration, and apoptosis, events which are all known to occur in tendinosis. Furthermore, the results imply that a possible source of catecholamine production might be the tenocytes themselves

  15. Midsubstance Tendinopathy, Surgical Management.

    PubMed

    DeCarbo, William T; Bullock, Mark J

    2017-04-01

    Noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy often responds to nonoperative treatment. When nonoperative treatment fails, the clinician must distinguish between paratendinopathy and noninsertional tendinopathy. In paratendinopathy, myofibroblasts synthesize collagen, causing adhesions, and the paratenon may be released or excised. If a core area of tendinopathy is identified on MRI, the area is excised longitudinally and repaired with a side-to-side suture. If greater than 50% of the tendon diameter is excised, the authors recommend a short flexor hallucis longus tendon transfer with an interference screw. A turndown flap of the gastrocnemius aponeurosis is also described with good results.

  16. Eccentric training as a new approach for rotator cuff tendinopathy: Review and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Paula R; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco; Salvini, Tania F

    2014-01-01

    Excessive mechanical loading is considered the major cause of rotator cuff tendinopathy. Although tendon problems are very common, they are not always easy to treat. Eccentric training has been proposed as an effective conservative treatment for the Achilles and patellar tendinopathies, but less evidence exists about its effectiveness for the rotator cuff tendinopathy. The mechanotransduction process associated with an adequate dose of mechanical load might explain the beneficial results of applying the eccentric training to the tendons. An adequate load increases healing and an inadequate (over or underuse) load can deteriorate the tendon structure. Different eccentric training protocols have been used in the few studies conducted for people with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Further, the effects of the eccentric training for rotator cuff tendinopathy were only evaluated on pain, function and strength. Future studies should assess the effects of the eccentric training also on shoulder kinematics and muscle activity. Individualization of the exercise prescription, comprehension and motivation of the patients, and the establishment of specific goals, practice and efforts should all be considered when prescribing the eccentric training. In conclusion, eccentric training should be used aiming improvement of the tendon degeneration, but more evidence is necessary to establish the adequate dose-response and to determine long-term follow-up effects. PMID:25405092

  17. Are Tendinopathies really a common injury in volleyball?

    PubMed Central

    Bustos, Aldo; Locaso, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To perform a description of tendinopathies as an injury in volleyball high performance. Methods: An observational and prospective study was conducted from 2014-2016 in the senior Argentinian volleyball team. The same was held by two observers. Moreover, 78 athletes were evaluated. We support Dvorak’s claims that an injury is determined by the loss of at least one training session or a match. Results: 78 players were exposed to 21812 hours of training and matches. As a result 37 injuries were evaluated in 31 players. Taking into account tendinopathies, it can be said that 34 players consulted 412 times, showing a prevalence of 43.5% of the whole enquires but when we refer to the same pathology as injury the average lowers, presenting 8 lesions in 6 players and showing a prevalence of 7.6% as injuries. Incidence of tendon injuries is 0.32 per 1000 hours of exposure Tendon Injuries: 5 were patellar, 2 supraspinatus, 1 aquiles. 5 Slight, 2 moderate, 1 severe. Conclusion: Clearly, tendinopathy is a common problem in this sport but it is not a common cause of injury. This is demonstrated in prevalence rates whereas 43.5 % just consulted and 7,6 % suffer from real injuries. We think this might be due to several factors such as, advances in medical therapy, preventive protocols and increase in thresholds of pain that high-performance athletes can bear. In our experience this pathology was shown to be the third leading cause of injuries. In 2016 we did not deal with any case of injury for tendinopathy.

  18. Obesity as a Risk Factor for Tendinopathy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Franceschi, Francesco; Papalia, Rocco; Franceschetti, Edoardo; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. In the last few years, evidence has emerged to support the possible association between increased BMI and susceptibility to some musculoskeletal diseases. We systematically review the literature to clarify whether obesity is a risk factor for the onset of tendinopathy. Methods. We searched PubMed, Cochrane Central, and Embase Biomedical databases using the keywords “obesity,” “overweight,” and “body mass index” linked in different combinations with the terms “tendinopathy,” “tendinitis,” “tendinosis,” “rotator cuff,” “epicondylitis,” “wrist,” “patellar,” “quadriceps,” “Achilles,” “Plantar Fascia,” and “tendon.” Results. Fifteen studies were included. No level I study on this subject was available, and the results provided are ambiguous. However, all the 5 level II studies report the association between obesity measured in terms of BMI and tendon conditions, with OR ranging between 1.9 (95% CI: 1.1–2.2) and 5.6 (1.9–16.6). Conclusions. The best evidence available to date indicates that obesity is a risk factor for tendinopathy. Nevertheless, further studies should be performed to establish the real strength of the association for each type of tendinopathy, especially because the design of the published studies does not allow identifying a precise cause-effect relationship and the specific role of obesity independently of other metabolic conditions. PMID:25214839

  19. Advanced Ultrasound-Guided Interventions for Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Peck, Evan; Jelsing, Elena; Onishi, Kentaro

    2016-08-01

    Tendinopathy is increasingly recognized as an important cause of musculoskeletal pain and disability. Tendinopathy is thought to be principally a degenerative process, rather than inflammatory as was traditionally believed. Consequently, traditional tendinopathy treatments focused solely on decreasing inflammation have often been ineffective or even harmful. The advancement of ultrasonography as for guidance of outpatient musculoskeletal procedures has facilitated the development of novel percutaneous procedures for the treatment of tendinopathy, mostly by using mechanical intervention to stimulate regeneration. Several of these techniques, including percutaneous needle tenotomy, percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy, high-volume injection, and percutaneous needle scraping, are reviewed in this article.

  20. Association of Achilles tendinopathy and plantar spurs.

    PubMed

    Vulcano, Ettore; Mani, Sriniwasan B; Mani, Sriniwasan; Do, Huong; Bohne, Walter H; Ellis, Scott J

    2014-10-01

    Plantar spurs and Achilles tendinopathy are common causes of heel pain. In the authors' practice, it was anecdotally noted that patients with Achilles tendinopathy often presented with plantar spurs. Nonetheless, there is a shortage of studies investigating whether Achilles tendinopathy and plantar spurs exist concomitantly. A better understanding of the association between the 2 pathologies might help physicians recognize and treat both conditions, educate patients about Achilles tendinopathy and plantar spurs, and ultimately investigate possible underlying causes of both pathologies that could be addressed together. The authors examined the prevalence of plantar spurs in patients diagnosed with Achilles tendinopathy as well as demographic differences within the unilateral and bilateral Achilles tendinopathy populations. A total of 785 patient records were retrospectively reviewed. Mean patient age was 56.2±15.5 years (46.9% men and 53.1% women). Seventy-two (9.2%) patients were affected bilaterally by Achilles tendinopathy. Lateral radiographs were reviewed by an orthopedic surgeon to identify the presence of plantar spurs. A total of 329 (41.9%) patients with Achilles tendinopathy were found to have a concomitant plantar spur. Patients with unilateral Achilles tendinopathy and a plantar spur were more likely to be women (58.7% vs 49.8%, P=.020) and older (62.7 vs 51.7 years, P<.001). In the bilateral Achilles tendinopathy group, there were 46 (63.9%) patients with at least one foot presenting with a plantar spur. The study's findings suggest a significant association between Achilles tendinopathy and plantar spurs. Older women with Achilles tendinopathy are at greater risk of being affected by plantar spurs.

  1. Patellar stress fracture: a complication of knee joint arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Reed, M R; Farhan, M J; Chaudhuri, C

    1999-04-01

    A case of patellar stress fracture after total knee arthroplasty in a man with gout and previous osteonecrosis of the tali is reported. The combination of fat pad excision and lateral release causing disruption to the patellar blood supply during primary total knee arthroplasty resulted in the development of a patellar fracture. Avascular necrosis, caused by gout, may form part of the pathogenesis.

  2. Infiltration of Autologous Growth Factors in Chronic Tendinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Crescibene, Antonio; Napolitano, Marcello; Sbano, Raffaella; Costabile, Enrico; Almolla, Hesham

    2015-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy and patellar tendinopathy are among the most frequent diagnoses in sports medicine. Therapeutic treatment of the disease is difficult, particularly in chronic cases. In literature, several studies suggest the employment of Platelet-Rich Plasma as a therapeutic alternative in tendinopathies. The choice of employing this method is based on the activity of growth factors contained in platelets which activate, amplify, and optimize the healing process. We selected 14 patients affected by Achilles tendinopathy and 7 patients affected by patellar tendinopathy, with a two-year final follow-up. These patients underwent a cycle of three tendinous infiltrations, after clinical and instrumental evaluation carried out by means of specific questionnaires and repeated ultrasound scans. Ultrasound scans of 18 patients showed signs of reduction in insertional irregularities. The result is confirmed by complete functional recovery of the patients, with painful symptomatology disappearing. The patients showed a clear pain reduction, along with an enhanced VISA score after the 24-month follow-up, equal to 84.2 points on a scale of 0 to 100. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence to suggest that PRP infiltration is a valid option to patients with chronic tendinopathy who did not benefit from other treatments. PMID:26171277

  3. Achilles Impingement Tendinopathy on Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Mark J; Mourelatos, Jan; Mar, Alice

    2017-02-28

    Haglund's syndrome is impingement of the retrocalcaneal bursa and Achilles tendon caused by a prominence of the posterosuperior calcaneus. Radiographic measurements are not sensitive or specific for diagnosing Haglund's deformity. Localization of a bone deformity and tendinopathy in the same sagittal section of a magnetic resonance imaging scan can assist with the diagnosis in equivocal cases. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of Haglund's syndrome in patients presenting with Achilles tendinopathy and note any associated findings to determine the criteria for a diagnosis of Haglund's syndrome. We reviewed 40 magnetic resonance imaging scans with Achilles tendinopathy and 19 magnetic resonance imaging scans with Achilles high-grade tears and/or ruptures. Achilles tendinopathy was often in close proximity to the superior aspect of the calcaneal tuberosity, consistent with impingement (67.5%). Patients with Achilles impingement tendinopathy were more often female (p < .04) and were significantly heavier than patients presenting with noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy (p = .014) or Achilles tendon rupture (p = .010). Impingement tendinopathy occurred medially (8 of 20) and centrally (10 of 20) more often than laterally (2 of 20) and was associated with a posterior prominence or hyperconvexity with a loss of calcaneal recess more often than a superior projection (22 of 27 versus 8 of 27; p < .001). Haglund's deformity should be reserved for defining a posterior prominence or hyperconvexity with loss of calcaneal recess because this corresponds with impingement. Achilles impingement tendinopathy might be more appropriate terminology for Haglund's syndrome, because the bone deformity is often subtle. Of the 27 images with Achilles impingement tendinopathy, 10 (37.0%) extended to a location prone to Achilles tendon rupture. Given these findings, insertional and noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy are not mutually

  4. Risk Factors for Lower Extremity Tendinopathies in Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Brett D.; Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis; Seelig, Amber D.; Jacobson, Isabel G.; Boyko, Edward J.; Smith, Besa; Ryan, Margaret A.K.; Gackstetter, Gary D.; Smith, Tyler C.; Bagnell, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Background: Overuse injuries have a significant impact on United States military service members, but research to date has been limited in its ability to assess occupational and behavioral risk factors. Hypothesis/Purpose: To prospectively identify risk factors for the development of lower extremity tendinopathy and plantar fasciitis in United States military personnel. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Baseline data from the Millennium Cohort Study, a long-term observational cohort of military personnel, were utilized. Service members were enrolled in the cohort in 2001, 2004, and 2007. A total of 80,106 active-duty personnel were followed over 1 year for the development of patellar tendinopathy, Achilles tendinopathy, and plantar fasciitis. Regression analyses were used to estimate significant associations between each tendinopathy, plantar fasciitis, and demographic, behavioral, and occupational characteristics. Results: Using medical records, 450 cases of Achilles tendinitis, 584 cases of patellar tendinopathy, and 1228 cases of plantar fasciitis were identified. Recent deployment was associated with an increased risk for developing plantar fasciitis (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-1.56). Moderate weekly alcohol consumption was marginally associated with an increased risk for Achilles tendinopathy (AOR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.00-1.76). Overweight or obese individuals were more likely to develop Achilles tendinopathy and plantar fasciitis. Conclusion: Lower extremity tendinopathies and plantar fasciitis are common among military service members, and this study identified several modifiable risk factors for their occurrence. These potential risk factors could serve as the focus for future preventive and intervention studies. PMID:26535232

  5. Exercise for tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrios, Stasinopoulos

    2015-01-01

    Tendinopathies are one of the most common sports/musculoskeletal injury in modern western societies. Many physiotherapy approaches have been recommended in the literature for the management of tendinopathy. The most effective treatment in the management of tendinopathy is the eccentric training. Load, speed and frequency of contractions are the three principles of eccentric exercises, discussed in this report. However, eccentric training is not effective for all patients with tendinopathy and the effectiveness of this approach when applied as monotherapy is lower than it is applied as part of the rehabilitation process. For this reason, clinicians combine eccentric training with other physiotherapy techniques such as stretching, isometric and lumbar stability exercises, electrotherapy, manual therapy, soft tissue manipulation techniques, taping and acupuncture in the management of tendinopathies. Further research is needed to find out which treatment strategy combined with eccentric training will provide the best results in the rehabilitation of tendinopathy. PMID:26140271

  6. Patellar osteochondroma: case report.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Frederico Barra; de Melo, Mariana Christino; Rocha, Allan Vieira; Dos Santos, Mauro Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to report on a rare case of patellar osteochondroma. A 60-year-old man presented a tumor on his left patella that had developed over a 10-year period, which is a rare occurrence, considering the patient's age and the site at which the tumor appeared. The clinical condition comprised mild pain and the presence of a mass, without limitation of flexion-extension or any neurovascular deficit. The tumor dimensions were 8 cm longitudinally × 6 cm transversally × 3 cm anteroposteriorly. It was hardened and was adhering to the patellar bone plane. On radiographs and tomographic scans, we observed areas of greater density corresponding to bone and other less dense areas that could correspond to slow-growing cartilage, with irregularities on the patellofemoral joint surface. Simple resection of the tumor was performed, and the anatomopathological examination confirmed that it was a patellar osteochondroma. Osteochondroma, or osteocartilaginous exostosis, includes a large proportion of the benign bone tumors. It results from cell alterations that trigger unregulated production of spongy bone. It is basically treated by means of surgical removal of the tumor mass. This is not essential, but is recommended in order to avoid lesions caused by contiguity and the risk of malignant transformation.

  7. Histopathology of common tendinopathies. Update and implications for clinical management.

    PubMed

    Khan, K M; Cook, J L; Bonar, F; Harcourt, P; Astrom, M

    1999-06-01

    Tendon disorders are a major problem for participants in competitive and recreational sports. To try to determine whether the histopathology underlying these conditions explains why they often prove recalcitrant to treatment, we reviewed studies of the histopathology of sports-related, symptomatic Achilles, patellar, extensor carpi radialis brevis and rotator cuff tendons. The literature indicates that healthy tendons appear glistening white to the naked eye and microscopy reveals a hierarchical arrangement of tightly packed, parallel bundles of collagen fibres that have a characteristic reflectivity under polarised light. Stainable ground substance (extracellular matrix) is absent and vasculature is inconspicuous. Tenocytes are generally inconspicuous and fibroblasts and myofibroblasts absent. In stark contrast, symptomatic tendons in athletes appear grey and amorphous to the naked eye and microscopy reveals discontinuous and disorganised collagen fibres that lack reflectivity under polarised light. This is associated with an increase in the amount of mucoid ground substance, which is confirmed with Alcian blue stain. At sites of maximal mucoid change, tenocytes, when present, are plump and chondroid in appearance (exaggerated fibrocartilaginous metaplasia). These changes are accompanied by the increasingly conspicuous presence of cells within the tendon tissue, most of which have a fibroblastic or myofibroblastic appearance (smooth muscle actin is demonstrated using an avidin biotin technique). Maximal cellular proliferation is accompanied by prominent capillary proliferation and a tendency for discontinuity of collagen fibres in this area. Often, there is an abrupt discontinuity of both vascular and myofibroblastic proliferation immediately adjacent to the area of greatest abnormality. The most significant feature is the absence of inflammatory cells. These observations confirm that the histopathological findings in athletes with overuse tendinopathies are

  8. Bilateral Patellar Tendon Rupture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    within the tendon or systemic disorders such as lupus erythematosus , diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, rheumatologic disease, and local or...factors for patellar tendon rupture include obesity, male gender, age 30-40, activities that increase patellar stress, systemic lupus erythematosus ...patellar tendon rupture is a rare occurrence usually associated with chronic degeneration of tendon fibers, use of steroids, or systemic illness. Our

  9. Platelet-rich plasma application in the management of chronic tendinopathies.

    PubMed

    Kaux, Jean-François; Crielaard, Jean-Michel

    2013-02-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may represent a new therapeutic option for chronic tendinopathies. Platelets release various cytokines and growth factors which promote angiogenesis, tissue remodeling, and wound healing. We made an extended literature review of the use of PRP in chronic tendinopathies: epicondylitis, rotator cuff, patellar and calcaneal tendinopathies, and plantar fasciitis. Medline, Embase and Google Scholar were used (until July 31, 2012). Clinical studies on PRP and tendinopathies published in English and French language peer-reviewed journals were included. Articles with a high level of evidence were given special consideration. Despite the proven efficacy of PRP on tissue regeneration in experimental studies, there is currently scanty tangible clinical evidence with respect to its efficacy in chronic tendon disorders. The few studies that have been performed appear unlikely to be comparable. Randomized controlled studies with appropriate placebo groups are needed to determine the real effectiveness of PRP for treating chronic musculoskeletal injuries.

  10. Autologous Growth Factor Injections in Chronic Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sandrey, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Reference: de Vos RJ, van Veldhoven PLJ, Moen MH, Weir A, Tol JL. Autologous growth factor injections in chronic tendinopathy: a systematic review. Br Med Bull. 2010;95:63–77. Clinical Question: The authors of this systematic review evaluated the literature to critically consider the effects of growth factors delivered through autologous whole-blood and platelet-rich–plasma (PRP) injections in managing wrist-flexor and -extensor tendinopathies, plantar fasciopathy, and patellar tendinopathy. The primary question was, according to the published literature, is there sufficient evidence to support the use of growth factors delivered through autologous whole-blood and PRP injections for chronic tendinopathy? Data Sources: The authors performed a comprehensive, systematic literature search in October 2009 using PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane library without time limits. The following key words were used in different combinations: tendinopathy, tendinosis, tendinitis, tendons, tennis elbow, plantar fasciitis, platelet rich plasma, platelet transfusion, and autologous blood or injection. The search was limited to human studies in English. All bibliographies from the initial literature search were also viewed to identify additional relevant studies. Study Selection: Studies were eligible based on the following criteria: (1) Articles were suitable (inclusion criteria) if the participants had been clinically diagnosed as having chronic tendinopathy; (2) the design had to be a prospective clinical study, randomized controlled trial, nonrandomized clinical trial, or prospective case series; (3) a well-described intervention in the form of a growth factor injection with either PRP or autologous whole blood was used; and (4) the outcome was reported in terms of pain or function (or both). Data Extraction: All titles and abstracts were assessed by 2 researchers, and all relevant articles were obtained. Two researchers independently read the full text of

  11. Tendinopathy in diabetes mellitus patients-Epidemiology, pathogenesis, and management.

    PubMed

    Lui, Pauline Po Yee

    2017-01-20

    Chronic tendinopathy is a frequent and disabling musculo-skeletal problem affecting the athletic and general populations. The affected tendon is presented with local tenderness, swelling, and pain which restrict the activity of the individual. Tendon degeneration reduces the mechanical strength and predisposes it to rupture. The pathogenic mechanisms of chronic tendinopathy are not fully understood and several major non-mutually exclusive hypotheses including activation of the hypoxia-apoptosis-pro-inflammatory cytokines cascade, neurovascular ingrowth, increased production of neuromediators, and erroneous stem cell differentiation have been proposed. Many intrinsic and extrinsic risk/causative factors can predispose to the development of tendinopathy. Among them, diabetes mellitus is an important risk/causative factor. This review aims to appraise the current literature on the epidemiology and pathology of tendinopathy in diabetic patients. Systematic reviews were done to summarize the literature on (a) the association between diabetes mellitus and tendinopathy/tendon tears, (b) the pathological changes in tendon under diabetic or hyperglycemic conditions, and (c) the effects of diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia on the outcomes of tendon healing. The potential mechanisms of diabetes mellitus in causing and exacerbating tendinopathy with reference to the major non-mutually exclusive hypotheses of the pathogenic mechanisms of chronic tendinopathy as reported in the literature are also discussed. Potential strategies for the management of tendinopathy in diabetic patients are presented.

  12. Does the adolescent patellar tendon respond to 5 days of cumulative load during a volleyball tournament?

    PubMed

    van Ark, M; Docking, S I; van den Akker-Scheek, I; Rudavsky, A; Rio, E; Zwerver, J; Cook, J L

    2016-02-01

    Patellar tendinopathy (jumper's knee) has a high prevalence in jumping athletes. Excessive load on the patellar tendon through high volumes of training and competition is an important risk factor. Structural changes in the tendon are related to a higher risk of developing patellar tendinopathy. The critical tendon load that affects tendon structure is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate patellar tendon structure on each day of a 5-day volleyball tournament in an adolescent population (16-18 years). The right patellar tendon of 41 players in the Australian Volleyball Schools Cup was scanned with ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC) on every day of the tournament (Monday to Friday). UTC can quantify structure of a tendon into four echo types based on the stability of the echo pattern. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to test for change of echo type I and II over the tournament days. Participants played between eight and nine matches during the tournament. GEE analysis showed no significant change of echo type percentages of echo type I (Wald chi-square = 4.603, d.f. = 4, P = 0.331) and echo type II (Wald chi-square = 6.070, d.f. = 4, P = 0.194) over time. This study shows that patellar tendon structure of 16-18-year-old volleyball players is not affected during 5 days of cumulative loading during a volleyball tournament.

  13. Current Opinions on Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kaux, Jean-François; Forthomme, Bénédicte; Goff, Caroline Le; Crielaard, Jean-Michel; Croisier, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Tendinopathy is characterized by pain in the tendon and impaired performance sometimes associated with swelling of the tendon. Its diagnosis is usually clinical but ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging can refine the diagnosis. Tendinopathy is highly prevalent and is one of the most frequently self reported musculoskeletal diseases in physical workers and sports people. Nevertheless, it is very difficult to carry out general epidemiologic studies on tendinopathy because of the varying sports cultures and sports habits in different countries. The aetiology of tendinopathy seems to be multi-factorial, involving intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The role of inflammation is still debated but the absence of inflammatory cells does not mean that inflammatory mediators are not implicated. Different theories have been advanced to explain pain and chronicity mechanisms, but these mechanisms remain largely unknown. “Conventional ”treatments are generally employed empirically to fight pain and inflammation but they do not modify the histological structure of the tendon. However, these treatments are not completely satisfactory and the recurrence of symptoms is common. Currently, eccentric training remains the treatment of choice for tendinopathy, even though some studies are contradictory. Moreover, many interesting new treatments are now being developed to treat tendinopathy, but there is little evidence to support their use in clinical practice. Key points The word “tendinopathy ”is the correct term for the clinical diagnosis of pain accompanied by impaired performance, and sometimes swelling in the tendon. The aetiology of tendinopathy seems to be a multi-factorial process, involving promoting factors that are intrinsic or extrinsic, working either alone or in combination. US (with color Doppler) and MRI are usually prescribed when tendinopathy is unresponsive to treatment and entails lingering symptoms. Eccentric training is currently considered to be the

  14. Models for the study of tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Dirks, R C; Warden, S J

    2011-06-01

    Tendinopathy refers to the clinical presentation of activity-related pain, focal tendon tenderness, and intratendinous imaging changes. The underlying pathology was once thought to be due to inflammation ('tendinitis'), but is now considered to predominantly result from degeneration ('tendinosis'). While some progress has been made in understanding tendinosis, the condition remains poorly understood and a need exists for suitable exploratory preclinical models. It is unlikely that one suitable model exists because of the complexity of the underlying pathology and myriad of possible causes. This paper provides an overview of current models utilized in tendinopathy research. It progresses hierarchically from in vitro and ex vivo models to in vivo models. For each model, rationale for use, pertinent findings, and advantages and disadvantages are discussed. By improving on these models, new methods for the prevention and treatment of tendinopathy may be explored with the ultimate outcome being a reduction in the occurrence and effects of the condition in humans.

  15. TENDINOPATHY AND OBESITY

    PubMed Central

    CASTRO, Adham do Amaral e; SKARE, Thelma Larocca; NASSIF, Paulo Afonso Nunes; SAKUMA, Alexandre Kaue; BARROS, Wagner Haese

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Tendinopathies and tendon tears account for over 30% of all musculoskeletal consultations. Obesity, which is becoming one of the world´s most prevalent public health issues, may be associated with this condition. Objective: To review the literature about tendinopathies and obesity association. Methods: This is a descriptive exploratory study using the portal Medline. Literature in English language from 2006 to 2014 were reviewed. Results: The pathogenesis of tendinopathies includes inflammatory, regenerative and degenerative processes that happen simultaneously from early to late phases of the disease. Mechanical stress upon tendons seems to be one of the most important factors to initiate the inflammatory response, but it´s not the only one that can deflagrate it: there are other extrinsic, genetic and metabolic factors that may be involved. Therefore, tendinopathies in obese patients can be due to tendon overload because of the excess of weight, but also because of increased production of pro-inflammatory mediators related to fat tissue such as adipokines. This pro-inflammatory state that obese people can suffer is known as adiposopathy, or sick fat syndrome. Weight loss is associated with decrease in adipokines and improvement of musculoskeletal symptoms. Conclusion: The relation of obesity and tendinopathies is supported by evidences of recent studies, exemplified in this review of literature. PMID:27683789

  16. Tendinopathies and platelet-rich plasma (PRP): from pre-clinical experiments to therapeutic use

    PubMed Central

    Kaux, Jean-François; Drion, Pierre; Croisier, Jean-Louis; Crielaard, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The restorative properties of platelets, through the local release of growth factors, are used in various medical areas. This article reviews fundamental and clinical research relating to platelet-rich plasma applied to tendinous lesions. Materials and method: Articles in French and English, published between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2014. dealing with PRP and tendons were searched for using the Medline and Scopus data bases. Results: Forty-seven articles were identified which addressed pre-clinical and clinical studies: 27 relating to in vitro and in vivo animal studies and 20 relating to human studies. Of these, five addressed lateral epicondylitis, two addressed rotator cuff tendinopathies, ten dealt with patellar tendinopathies and three looked at Achilles tendinopathies. Conclusions: The majority of pre-clinical studies show that PRP stimulates the tendon’s healing process. However, clinical series remain more controversial and level 1, controlled, randomised studies are still needed. PMID:26195890

  17. Fluoroquinolone-associated tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Chung; Yang, Yun-Ming

    2011-01-01

    The fluoroquinolones (FQs) are used to treat a wide range of infections because of their excellent gastrointestinal absorption, superior tissue penetration and broad-spectrum activity. Recently, FQ-associated tendinopathy and tendon rupture have been reported, especially in the elderly and patients with diabetes and renal failure. However, these adverse effects do not appear to be widely known among physicians. Because of the frequent use of FQs in clinical practice, physicians should be aware of their potential for severe disability from tendon rupture. Achilles tendinopathy or rupture is among the most serious side effects associated with FQ use, with reports markedly increasing, especially with the use of ciprofloxacin. The histopathologic findings include degenerative lesions, fissures, interstitial edema without cellular infiltration, necrosis and neovascularization. There are possible molecular mechanisms accounting for FQ-associated tendinopathy. First, ciprofloxacin mediates inhibition of cell proliferation and G2/M cell cycle arrest in tendon cells by down-regulation of cyclin B and cyclin-dependent kinase 1. Second, ciprofloxacin inhibits the spead and migration of tenocytes by down-regulation of focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation. Third, ciprofloxacin enhances the enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 with degradation of type I collagen. Management of FQ-associated tendinopathy includes immediate discontinuation of FQs, rest, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physical modalities and eccentric strengthening exercise. Tendon rupture may require surgical intervention.

  18. Evaluation and Management of Elbow Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Samuel A.; Hannafin, Jo A.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Elbow tendinopathy is a common cause of pain and disability among patients presenting to orthopaedic surgeons, primary care physicians, physical therapists, and athletic trainers. Prompt and accurate diagnosis of these conditions facilitates a directed treatment regimen. A thorough understanding of the natural history of these injuries and treatment outcomes will enable the appropriate management of patients and their expectations. Evidence Acquisitions: The PubMed database was searched in December 2011 for English-language articles pertaining to elbow tendinopathy. Results: Epidemiologic data as well as multiple subjective and objective outcome measures were investigated to elucidate the incidence of medial epicondylitis, lateral epicondylitis, distal biceps and triceps ruptures, and the efficacy of various treatments. Conclusions: Medial and lateral epicondylitis are overuse injuries that respond well to nonoperative management. Their etiology is degenerative and related to repetitive overuse and underlying tendinopathy. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and localized corticosteroid injections yield moderate symptomatic relief in short term but do not demonstrate benefit on long-term follow-up. Platelet-rich plasma injections may be advantageous in cases of chronic lateral epicondylitis. If 6 to 12 months of nonoperative treatment fails, then surgical intervention can be undertaken. Distal biceps and triceps tendon ruptures, in contrast, have an acute traumatic etiology that may be superimposed on underlying tendinopathy. Prompt diagnosis and treatment improve outcomes. While partial ruptures confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging can be treated nonoperatively with immobilization, complete ruptures should be addressed with primary repair within 3 to 4 weeks of injury. PMID:23016111

  19. Tendinopathy in Sport

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Paul W.; Renström, Per

    2012-01-01

    Context: Tendinopathy is increasing in prevalence and accounts for a substantial part of all sports injuries and occupational disorders. Despite the magnitude of the disorder, high-quality scientific data on etiology and available treatments have been limited. Evidence Acquisition: The authors conducted a MEDLINE search on tendinopathy, or “tendonitis” or “tendinosis” or “epicondylitis” or “jumpers knee” from 1980 to 2011. The emphasis was placed on updates on epidemiology, etiology, and recent patient-oriented Level 1 literature. Results: Repetitive exposure in combination with recently discovered intrinsic factors, such as genetic variants of matrix proteins, and metabolic disorders is a risk factor for the development of tendinopathy. Recent findings demonstrate that tendinosis is characterized by a fibrotic, failed healing response associated with pathological vessel and sensory nerve ingrowth. This aberrant sensory nerve sprouting may partly explain increased pain signaling and partly, by release of neuronal mediators, contribute to the fibrotic alterations observed in tendinopathy. The initial nonoperative treatment should involve eccentric exercise, which should be the cornerstone (basis) of treatment of tendinopathy. Eccentric training combined with extracorporeal shockwave treatment has in some reports shown higher success rates compared to any therapies alone. Injection therapies (cortisone, sclerosing agents, blood products including platelet-rich plasma) may have short-term effects but have no proven long-term treatment effects or meta-analyses to support them. For epicondylitis, cortisone injections have demonstrated poorer long-time results than conservative physiotherapy. Today surgery is less indicated because of successful conservative therapies. New minioperative procedures that, via the endoscope, remove pathologic tissue or abnormal neoinnervation demonstrate promising results but need confirmation by Level 1 studies. Conclusions

  20. The pathogenesis of Achilles tendinopathy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Magnan, Bruno; Bondi, Manuel; Pierantoni, Silvia; Samaila, Elena

    2014-09-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a degenerative, not an inflammatory, condition. It is prevalent in athletes involved in running sports. A systematic literature review on Achilles tendon tendinopathy has been performed according to the intrinsic (age, sex, body weight, tendon temperature, systemic diseases, muscle strength, flexibility, previous injuries and anatomical variants, genetic predisposition and blood supply) and extrinsic risk factors (drugs and overuse), which can cause tendon suffering and degeneration. Different theories have been found: Neurogenic, Angiogenic, Impingement and "Iceberg" Hypotheses. Multiple databases were utilized for articles published between 1964 and 2013. The different hypothesis were analyzed, differently considering those concerning the pathogenesis of tendinopathy and those concerning the etiology of complaints in patients. This review of the literature demonstrates the heterogeneity of Achilles tendinopathy pathogenesis. Various risk factors have been identified and have shown an interaction between them such as genes, age, circulating and local cytokine production, sex, biomechanics and body composition.

  1. Metalloproteases and tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Del Buono, Angelo; Oliva, Francesco; Osti, Leonardo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) are involved in the development of tendinopathy. These potent enzymes completely degrade all components of the connective tissue, modify the extracellular matrix (ECM), and mediate the development of painful tendinopathy. To control the local activity of activated proteinases, the same cells produce tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP). These latter bind to the enzyme and prevent degradation. The balance between the activities of MMPs and TIMPs regulates tendon remodeling, whereas an imbalance produces a collagen dis-regulation and disturbances in tendons. ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) are cell membrane-linked enzymes with proteolytic and cell signaling functions. ADAMTSs (ADAM with thrombospondin motifs) are secreted into the circulation and constitute a heterogenous family of proteases with both anabolic and catabolic functions. Further studies are needed to better define the mechanism of action, and whether these new strategies are safe and effective in larger models.

  2. Cell death and tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jun; Wang, Min-Xia; Murrell, George A C

    2003-10-01

    Apoptosis and necrosis are presently recognized as the two major types of physiological and pathological cell death. Apoptosis is a tightly regulated cell deletion process that differs morphologically and biochemically from necrotic cell death. Tendinopathy is defined as a tendon injury that originates from intrinsic and extrinsic etiological factors. Excessive apoptosis has recently been described in degenerative tendon. The increased number of apoptotic tendon cells in degenerative tendon tissue could affect the rate of collagen synthesis and repair. Impaired or dysfunctional protein synthesis may lead to weaker tendon tissue and eventually increase the risk for tendon rupture. Clearly, there are many details to insert into this pathway, but there is hope that if the fine details of the pathway can be fleshed out, then strategies may be able to be developed to break the cycle at one or more points and prevent or treat tendinopathy more effectively.

  3. Ciprofloxacin-induced tendinopathy of the gluteal tendons.

    PubMed

    Shimatsu, Kaumakaokalani; Subramaniam, Somasundaram; Sim, Helen; Aronowitz, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Fluoroquinolone-induced tendinopathy most commonly affects the Achilles tendon; however, involvement of several other tendons has been described. This is a case report of ciprofloxacin-induced tendinopathy of the gluteal tendons with MRI findings. An obese 25-year-old woman with no significant past medical history was diagnosed with acute pyelonephritis and was treated with intravenous ciprofloxacin. Shortly after her first dose of ciprofloxacin, she developed severe left hip pain and decreased range of motion. MRI of the hips showed bilateral tendinopathy of the gluteal muscle insertion. A diagnosis of ciprofloxacin-induced tendinopathy was made based on her MRI and a Naranjo score of 7. Ciprofloxacin was stopped and her pain quickly resolved. Fluoroquinolones cause tendinopathy in 0.14 % to 0.4 % of patients using these agents. Fluoroquinolone-associated tendinopathy is a serious adverse reaction that can affect many tendons and should be considered in any patient presenting with new musculoskeletal complaints and in whom there is a history of fluoroquinolone use within the preceding 6 months.

  4. Trochanteric Micropuncture: Treatment for Gluteus Medius Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, John M.; Cregar, William M.; Gupta, Asheesh; Hammarstedt, Jon E.; Martin, Timothy J.; Domb, Benjamin G.

    2015-01-01

    Lateral hip pain along with tenderness of the greater trochanter has been associated with greater trochanteric pain syndrome. Radiographically, this has been associated with gluteus medius pathology on magnetic resonance imaging. This has led some surgeons to conclude that abductor pathology is a primary cause of lateral hip pain. Failure of conservative treatment in the setting of gluteus medius pathology may lead to surgical intervention. In some patients a focal tear of the gluteus medius cannot be visualized and likely represents more diffuse tendinopathy. In these patients we propose micropuncture of the greater trochanter. Similar procedures have shown effectiveness in the elbow and shoulder by eliciting a healing response. Our experience suggests that trochanteric micropuncture at the insertion of the gluteus medius tendon can be effectively performed endoscopically for gluteus medius tendinopathy. PMID:25973381

  5. Change of patellar height with age and sex.

    PubMed

    Kar, Maitreyee Nandi; Bhakta, Abhijit; Mondal, Gopal Chandra; Bandyopadhyay, Maitreyi; Kar, Chinmaya; Nandi, Sujit Narayan

    2012-12-01

    Patellar height is one of the important parameter in patellar stability. Growth spurt or excessive physical strain can lead to high-riding patella or patella alta. But this is not yet proved. This study was mainly targeted at eliciting the influence of age on Insall-Salvati index, one of the important index to measure patellar height. As the present study is meant for measuring the patellar height separately in male and female, it is also to find out the effect of gender on patellar height if any. The study was been conducted in North Bengal Medical College and Hospital among 93 subjects covering both adult and adolescent age groups. Patellar height of respective subjects was measured radiologically using Insall-Salvati Index; results were extrapolated for statistical analysis. It revealed that value of Insall-Salvati index was higher in adult compared to adolescent group but the difference was not statistically significant. Statistical tests shows no significant difference in Insall-Salvati index according to sex. While screening the athletes patella alta must be kept in mind as this can be associated with patellofemoral pain syndrome, chondromalacia patellae, knees with apophysitis of tibial tubercle (Osgood-Schiatter disease). Not only that, significant cause of recurrent patellar dislocation can be associated with patella alta

  6. Sonoelastography in the diagnosis of tendinopathies: an added value

    PubMed Central

    Galletti, Stefano; Oliva, Francesco; Masiero, Stefano; Frizziero, Antonio; Galletti, Riccardo; Schiavone, Cosima; Salini, Vincenzo; Abate, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background sonoelastography helps in the detection of abnormalities not yet evident on B-mode exam. Methods in this observational study, we report a collection of cases of symptomatic patients without alterations at ultrasound imaging but with evidence of pathological findings at sonoelastography. Patients, with clinical history suggestive for tendinopathies or surgically treated, and negative at the ultrasound exam, were submitted to sonoelastography. Out of 846, 632 patients with positive ultrasound exam were excluded. Sonoelastography was therefore performed in the remaining 214. Results the examination was positive in 168 cases: 78 patients were affected with shoulder diseases, while elbow pathology was observed in 31 subjects; patellar, Achilles and plantar fascia disorders were reported in 19, 27, and 13 patients, respectively. Conclusion sonoelastography can reveal tendon abnormalities of clinical relevance in a high percentage of cases, where the ultrasound exam was negative, making the method a complementary tool to ultrasound evaluation. PMID:26958544

  7. Fluoroscopically Guided Peritendinous Corticosteroid Injection for Proximal Hamstring Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Luke T.; DiSegna, Steven; Newman, Joel S.; Miller, Suzanne L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Proximal hamstring tendinopathy is an uncommon but debilitating cause of posterior thigh pain in athletes subjected to repetitive eccentric hamstring contraction, such as runners. Minimal data exist evaluating treatment options for proximal hamstring tendinopathy. Purpose: This retrospective study evaluates the effectiveness of fluoroscopically guided corticosteroid injections in treating proximal hamstring tendinopathy. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Eighteen athletes with 22 cases of magnetic resonance imaging–confirmed proximal hamstring tendinopathy were treated with corticosteroid injection and later contacted to evaluate the efficacy of the injection with the use of a questionnaire. Results: The visual analog score decreased from 7.22 preinjection to 3.94 postinjection (P < .001), level of athletic participation increased from 28.76% to 68.82% (P < .001) at a mean follow-up of 21 months, and 38.8% of patients experienced complete resolution at a mean follow-up of 24.8 months. The mean lower extremity function score at the time of follow-up was 60. Conclusion: A trial of fluoroscopically guided corticosteroid injection is warranted in patients presenting with symptoms of proximal hamstring tendinopathy refractory to conservative therapy. PMID:26535310

  8. Effect of prostaglandin E2 injection on the structural properties of the rat patellar tendon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Increased tendon production of the inflammatory mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has been suggested to be a potential etiologic agent in the development of tendinopathy. Repeated injection of PGE2 into tendon has been proposed as a potential animal model for studying treatments for tendinopathy. In contrast, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) which inhibit PGE2 production and are commonly prescribed in treating tendinopathy have been shown to impair the healing of tendon after acute injury in animal models. The contradictory literature suggests the need to better define the functional effects of PGE2 on tendon. Our objective was to characterize the effects of PGE2 injection on the biomechanical and biochemical properties of tendon and the activity of the animals. Our hypothesis was that weekly PGE2 injection to the rat patellar tendon would lead to inferior biomechanical properties. Methods Forty rats were divided equally into four groups. Three groups were followed for 4 weeks with the following peritendinous injection procedures: No injection (control), 4 weekly injections of saline (saline), 4 weekly injections of 800 ng PGE2 (PGE2-4 wks). The fourth group received 4 weekly injections of 800 ng PGE2 initially and was followed for a total of 8 weeks. All animals were injected bilaterally. The main outcome measurements included: the structural and material properties of the patellar tendon under tensile loading to failure, tendon collagen content, and weekly animal activity scores. Results The ultimate load of PGE2-4 wks tendons at 4 weeks was significantly greater than control or saline group tendons. The stiffness and elastic modulus of the PGE2 injected tendons at 8 weeks was significantly greater than the control or saline tendons. No differences in animal activity, collagen content, or mean fibril diameter were observed between groups. Conclusions Four weekly peritendinous injections of PGE2 to the rat patellar tendon were not found to

  9. Tendinopathy: Update on Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alex; Backman, Ludvig J; Speed, Cathy

    2015-11-01

    Synopsis Tendinopathy has become the accepted term to describe a spectrum of changes that occur in damaged and/or diseased tendons. Over the past 2 decades, there have been new insights into tendon pathophysiology of relevance to clinicians, including (1) better characterization of the overuse injury process and the resultant structural and functional disruption in chronically painful tendons, (2) improved understanding of the pathomechanics associated with chronic tendon injury, and (3) greater knowledge about the influence of lifestyle factors and drugs on tendon pathology. The implications of these new insights are discussed. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2015;45(11):833-841. Epub 21 Sep 2015. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.5884.

  10. Bilateral patellar tuberculosis masquerading as infected infrapatellar bursitis.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, Ravi; Haq, Rehan Ul

    2017-01-01

    A 30-year-old woman presented to our outpatient department with complaints of pain and swelling in bilateral infrapatellar regions and a discharging sinus in the right knee over the duration of one year. Radiographs showed lytic regions in bilateral patellae. Samples sent from material curetted from sinus yielded no organism but histopathology reported granulomatous inflammation. Following a fresh magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan that revealed the infrapatellar pad of fat communicating with the patellar lesions, an exploration and evacuation was done. Material sent revealed epithelioid cell granulomas with caseous necrosis consistent with tuberculosis (TB). The patient was put on first line anti-tubercular treatment (ATT) and has responded favourably with healing of sinus and patellar lesions. Bilateral infrapatellar bursitis is not rare. However patellar TB as a cause for OMIT is not a common diagnosis. A bilateral patellar involvement has not been reported in literature to the best of our knowledge.

  11. Endothelial dysfunction and tendinopathy: how far have we come?

    PubMed

    Papalia, R; Moro, L; Franceschi, F; Albo, E; D'Adamio, S; Di Martino, A; Vadalà, G; Faldini, C; Denaro, V

    2013-12-01

    Symptomatic tendon tears are one of the most important causes of pain and joint dysfunction. Among the intrinsic causes, vascularization recently gained a major role. Endothelial function is indeed a key factor, as well as vascular tone and thrombotic factors, in the regulation of vascular homeostasis and the composition of vascular wall. In this review, we studied systematically whether there is a relationship between endothelial dysfunction and tendinopathy. A literature search was performed using the isolated or combined keywords endothelial dysfunction and tendon,' 'nitric oxide (NO) and tendinopathy,' and 'endothelial dysfunction in tendon healing.' We identified 21 published studies. Of the selected studies, 9 were in vivo studies, 2 focusing on animals and 7 on humans, while 12 reported about in vitro evaluations, where 7 were carried out on humans and 5 on animals. The evidence about a direct relationship between tendinopathy and endothelial dysfunction is still poor. As recent studies have shown, there is no significant improvement in clinical and functional assessments after treatment with NO in patients suffering from tendinopathy in different locations. No significant differences were identified in the outcomes reported for experiment group when compared with controls treated with conventional surgical procedures or rehabilitation programs. Nitric oxide could be a marker to quantify the response of the endothelium to mechanical stress or hypoxia indicating the final balance between vasodilatating and vasoconstricting factors and their effects, but more ad stronger evidence is still needed to fully support this practice.

  12. Ultrasound characteristics of the patellar and quadriceps tendons among young elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Visnes, H; Tegnander, A; Bahr, R

    2015-04-01

    Tendons adapt in response to sports-specific loading, but sometimes develop tendinopathy. If the presence of ultrasound changes like hypoechoic areas and neovascularization in asymptomatic tendons precede (and predict) future tendon problems is unknown. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to investigate the relationship between the development of ultrasound changes in the patellar and quadriceps tendons and symptoms of jumper's knee, as well to examine the medium-term effects of intensive training on tendon thickness among adolescent athletes. Elite junior volleyball athletes were followed with semi-annual ultrasound and clinical examinations (average follow-up: 1.7 years). Of the 141 asymptomatic athletes included, 22 athletes (35 patellar tendons) developed jumper's knee. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, a baseline finding of a hypoechoic tendon area (odds ratio 3.3, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 9.2) increased the risk of developing symptoms of jumper's knee. Patellar tendon thickness among healthy athletes did not change (Wilk's lambda, P = 0.07) while quadriceps tendon thickness increased (P = 0.001). In conclusion, ultrasound changes at baseline were risk factors for developing symptoms of jumper's knee. Also, among healthy athletes, we observed a 7-11% increase in quadriceps tendon thickness, while there was no increase in patellar tendon thickness.

  13. Management of chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    2012-08-01

    Tendons transmit force between muscles and bones and, when stretched, store elastic energy that contributes to movement.(1) The tendinous portion of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles merge to form the Achilles tendon, which is the largest and strongest in the body, but one of the most frequently injured.(2,3) Conservative management options for chronic Achilles tendinopathy include eccentric (lengthening) exercises, extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT), topical nitroglycerin, low level laser therapy, orthoses, splints or injections (e.g. corticosteroids, hyperosmolar dextrose, polidocanol, platelet-rich plasma), while a minority of patients require surgery (using open, percutaneous or endoscopic methods).(4-8) Here we assess the management options for patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy (lasting over 6 weeks).

  14. Similar patient-reported outcomes and performance after total knee arthroplasty with or without patellar resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdulemir; Lindstrand, Anders; Nilsdotter, Anna; Sundberg, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Knee pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is not uncommon. Patellar retention in TKA is one cause of postoperative knee pain, and may lead to secondary addition of a patellar component. Patellar resurfacing in TKA is controversial. Its use ranges from 2% to 90% worldwide. In this randomized study, we compared the outcome after patellar resurfacing and after no resurfacing. Patients and methods We performed a prospective, randomized study of 74 patients with primary osteoarthritis who underwent a Triathlon CR TKA. The patients were randomized to either patellar resurfacing or no resurfacing. They filled out the VAS pain score and KOOS questionnaires preoperatively, and VAS pain, KOOS, and patient satisfaction 3, 12, and 72 months postoperatively. Physical performance tests were performed preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. Results We found similar scores for VAS pain, patient satisfaction, and KOOS 5 subscales at 3, 12, and 72 months postoperatively in the 2 groups. Physical performance tests 3 months postoperatively were also similar in the 2 groups. No secondary resurfacing was performed in the group with no resurfacing during the first 72 months Interpretation Patellar resurfacing in primary Triathlon CR TKA is of no advantage regarding pain, physical performance, KOOS 5 subscales, or patient satisfaction compared to no resurfacing. None of the patients were reoperated with secondary addition of a patellar component within 6 years. According to these results, routine patellar resurfacing in primary Triathlon TKA appears to be unnecessary. PMID:27212102

  15. Peritendinous elastase treatment induces tendon degeneration in rats: A potential model of tendinopathy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yen-Ting; Wu, Po-Ting; Jou, I-Ming

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of elastase on tendinopathy, as well as to evaluate the potential for peritendinous injections of elastase into rats to cause tendinopathy. We first investigated the expression of elastase in the tendons of patients with tendinopathy, and then established the effects of elastase injection on the Achilles tendons of rats. Ultrasonographic and incapacitance testing was used to conduct tests for 8 weeks. Tendon tissues were collected for histological observation and protein levels of collagen type I and type III were detected using Western blotting. The percentage of elastase-positive cells increased in human specimens with grades II and III tendinopathy. The rat model demonstrated that the thickness of the tendon increased after elastase injection during Week 2-8. Hypercellularity and focal lesions were detected after Week 2. The expression of elastase was increased and elastin was decreased in Week 8. Collagen type I expression was decreased, but type III was increased in Week 4. These results suggested that elastase may be involved in the development of chronic tendinopathy, and that peritendinous injection of elastase may result in tendinopathy in rats.

  16. Ligamentum teres tendinopathy and tears

    PubMed Central

    Kraeutler, Matthew J.; Garabekyan, Tigran; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The ligamentum teres (LT) consists of two bands that originate on the ischial and pubic sides of the acetabular notch and insert on the fovea capitis of the femoral head. Recent studies have established the LT as an important hip stabilizer in a squatting position, particularly in patients with osseous instability. Purpose This review aims to concisely present the literature on LT tendinopathy and tears in order to guide health care professionals in the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of these disorders. Methods We reviewed the literature on the diagnosis and surgical management of ligamentum teres tendinopathy and tears. Conclusions The ligamentum teres is an important stabilizer to the hip joint, particularly with hip flexion and external rotation. Older age and acetabular bony pathomorphology are two of the known risk factors for LT tears. Symptoms of LT tendinopathy are largely non-specific, mimicking a wide range of other hip disorders including impingement and instability. Debridement of LT tears or reactive tissue has been reported with good outcomes, with more recent studies describing reconstruction of a completely torn, nonfunctional, or absent LT using various graft sources including synthetic grafts, autografts, and allografts. Level of evidence II. PMID:28066738

  17. Imaging of Tendinopathy: A Physician's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Bley, Bradley; Abid, Waqas

    2015-11-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the clinical evaluation of patients with musculoskeletal-related pain, but its utility for the management of tendinopathy is debatable. Findings on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging may not correlate with clinical symptoms, and it is not uncommon to find anatomical changes associated with tendinopathy in tendons of asymptomatic individuals. Likewise, patients with clinical symptoms of tendinopathy can present with normal imaging evaluation. The use of diagnostic and interventional ultrasound has significantly increased over the past decade in a bid for better treatments of tendinopathy. Despite the limitations of traditional imaging in the diagnosis and management of tendinopathy, interventional procedures that utilize ultrasound hold promise. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2015;45(11):826-828. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.0113.

  18. Tendinopathies Around the Elbow Part 2: Medial Elbow, Distal Biceps and Triceps Tendinopathies.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Oliver; Vannet, Nicola; Gosens, Taco; Kulkarni, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    In the second part of this review article the management of medial elbow tendinopathy, distal biceps and distal triceps tendinopathy will be discussed. There is a scarcity of publications concerning any of these tendinopathies. This review will summarise the current best available evidence in their management. Medial elbow tendinopathy, also known as Golfer's elbow, is up to 6 times less common than lateral elbow tendinopathy. The tendinopathy occurs in the insertion of pronator teres and flexor carpi radialis. Diagnosis is usually apparent through a detailed history and examination but care must be made to exclude other conditions affecting the ulnar nerve or less commonly the ulnar collateral ligament complex. If doubt exists then MRI/US and electrophysiology can be used. Treatment follows a similar pattern to that of lateral elbow tendinopathy. Acute management is with activity modification and topical NSAIDs. Injection therapy and surgical excision are utilised for recalcitrant cases. Distal biceps and triceps tendinopathies are very rare and there is limited evidence published. Sequelae of tendinopathy include tendon rupture and so it is vital to manage these tendinopathies appropriately in order to minimise this significant complication. Their management and that of partial tears will be considered.

  19. Proteomics Perspectives in Rotator Cuff Research: A Systematic Review of Gene Expression and Protein Composition in Human Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sejersen, Maria Hee Jung; Frost, Poul; Hansen, Torben Bæk; Deutch, Søren Rasmussen; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff

    2015-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tendinopathy including tears is a cause of significant morbidity. The molecular pathogenesis of the disorder is largely unknown. This review aimed to present an overview of the literature on gene expression and protein composition in human rotator cuff tendinopathy and other tendinopathies, and to evaluate perspectives of proteomics – the comprehensive study of protein composition - in tendon research. Materials and Methods We conducted a systematic search of the literature published between 1 January 1990 and 18 December 2012 in PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. We included studies on objectively quantified differential gene expression and/or protein composition in human rotator cuff tendinopathy and other tendinopathies as compared to control tissue. Results We identified 2199 studies, of which 54 were included; 25 studies focussed on rotator cuff or biceps tendinopathy. Most of the included studies quantified prespecified mRNA molecules and proteins using polymerase chain reactions and immunoassays, respectively. There was a tendency towards an increase of collagen I (11 of 15 studies) and III (13 of 14), metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 (6 of 12), -9 (7 of 7), -13 (4 of 7), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 (4 of 7), and vascular endothelial growth factor (4 of 7), and a decrease in MMP-3 (10 of 12). Fourteen proteomics studies of tendon tissues/cells failed inclusion, mostly because they were conducted in animals or in vitro. Conclusions Based on methods, which only allowed simultaneous quantification of a limited number of prespecified mRNA molecules or proteins, several proteins appeared to be differentially expressed/represented in rotator cuff tendinopathy and other tendinopathies. No proteomics studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria, although proteomics technologies may be a way to identify protein profiles (including non-prespecified proteins) that characterise specific tendon disorders or stages of tendinopathy. Thus

  20. Tendon injury and tendinopathy: healing and repair.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pankaj; Maffulli, Nicola

    2005-01-01

    Tendon disorders are frequent and are responsible for substantial morbidity both in sports and in the workplace. Tendinopathy, as opposed to tendinitis or tendinosis, is the best generic descriptive term for the clinical conditions in and around tendons arising from overuse. Tendinopathy is a difficult problem requiring lengthy management, and patients often respond poorly to treatment. Preexisting degeneration has been implicated as a risk factor for acute tendon rupture. Several physical modalities have been developed to treat tendinopathy. There is limited and mixed high-level evidence to support the, albeit common, clinical use of these modalities. Further research and scientific evaluation are required before biological solutions become realistic options.

  1. Increased versican content is associated with tendinosis pathology in the patellar tendon of athletes with jumper's knee.

    PubMed

    Scott, A; Lian, Ø; Roberts, C R; Cook, J L; Handley, C J; Bahr, R; Samiric, T; Ilic, M Z; Parkinson, J; Hart, D A; Duronio, V; Khan, K M

    2008-08-01

    Expansion of the extracellular matrix is a prominent but poorly characterized feature of tendinosis. The present study aimed to characterize the extent and distribution of the large aggregating proteoglycan versican in patients with patellar tendinosis. We obtained tendon from tendinopathy patients undergoing debridement of the patellar tendon and from controls undergoing intramedullary tibial nailing. Versican content was investigated by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Microvessel thickness and density were determined using computer-assisted image analysis. Markers for smooth muscle actin, endothelial cells (CD31) and proliferating cells (Ki67) were examined immunohistochemically. Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining revealed elevated versican content in the proximal patellar tendon of tendinosis patients (P=0.042). Versican content was enriched in regions of fibrocartilage metaplasia and fibroblast proliferation, as well as in the perivascular matrix of proliferating microvessels and within the media and intima of arterioles. Microvessel density was higher in tendinosis tissue compared with control tissue. Versican deposition is a prominent feature of patellar tendinosis. Because this molecule is not only a component of normal fibrocartilagenous matrices but also implicated in a variety of soft tissue pathologies, future studies should further detail both pathological and adaptive roles of versican in tendons.

  2. Does platelet-rich plasma deserve a role in the treatment of tendinopathy?

    PubMed

    Nourissat, Geoffroy; Ornetti, Paul; Berenbaum, Francis; Sellam, Jérémie; Richette, Pascal; Chevalier, Xavier

    2015-07-01

    Although tendinopathies constitute a heterogeneous group of conditions, they are often treated by similar combinations of local and systemic symptomatic interventions. The vast number of causes, pathophysiological mechanisms, and histological changes that characterizes tendinopathies may explain that the standard treatment fails in some patients. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP), which contains a host of soluble mediators including growth factors, has been suggested as a second-line treatment for refractory tendinopathy, with the goal of expediting tendon healing or remodeling. Here, we report a systematic literature review of basic research data from humans and animals that support the clinical use of PRP in tendinopathies and of clinical studies in the most common tendinopathies (elbow, knee, shoulder, and Achilles tendon). Our objective is to clarify the role for this new injectable treatment, which is garnering increasing attention. The level of evidence remains low, as few well-designed randomized controlled trials have been published. The available scientific evidence does not warrant the use of PRP for the first-line treatment of tendinopathy. PRP therapy may deserve consideration in specific tendinopathy subtypes, after failure of ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injections. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to define these potential indications and the optimal treatment protocols. A key point is that the complexity of the tendon healing process cannot be replicated simply by injecting a subset of growth factors, whose effects may occur in opposite directions over time. Topics not discussed in this review are the regulatory framework for PRP therapy, PRP nomenclature, and precautions for use, which are described in a previous article (Does platelet-rich plasma have a role in the treatment of osteoarthritis, Ornetti P, et al. [1]).

  3. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy and therapeutic exercise for supraspinatus and biceps tendinopathies in 29 dogs.

    PubMed

    Leeman, J J; Shaw, K K; Mison, M B; Perry, J A; Carr, A; Shultz, R

    2016-10-15

    Supraspinatus tendinopathy (ST) and biceps tendinopathy (BT) are common causes of forelimb lameness in large-breed dogs and have historically been treated with conservative management or surgery. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) and therapeutic exercise (TE) are thought to be treatment options for these conditions. The objectives of this study were to report the clinical presentations of dogs treated with ESWT for shoulder tendinopathies, to determine the association between shoulder lesion severity identified on ultrasonography or MRI and outcome, and to compare the outcomes of dogs treated with ESWT with and without TE. Medical records of 29 dogs diagnosed with shoulder tendinopathies and treated with ESWT were reviewed, and 24 dogs were diagnosed with either unilateral BT or BT and ST. None were found to have unilateral ST. Five dogs were diagnosed with bilateral disease. Eighty-five per cent of dogs had good or excellent outcomes determined by owner assessment 11-220 weeks after therapy. Outcomes were found to be better as tendon lesion severity increased (P=0.0497), regardless if ESWT was performed with or without TE (P=0.92). ESWT should be considered a safe primary therapeutic option for canine shoulder tendinopathies. Larger controlled prospective studies are needed to adequately assess these findings.

  4. Evidence-based soft tissue rheumatology: epicondylitis and hand stenosing tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Nemegyei, Jose; Canoso, Juan J

    2004-02-01

    Lateral and medial epicondylitis represent overuse tendinopathies of wrist extensor and wrist flexor muscles, respectively. In lateral epicondylitis, a short-term therapeutic efficacy of glucocorticoid injection and limited evidence on the efficacy of acupuncture has been shown. De Quervain tendinopathy is caused by tendinous impingement by a thickened retinaculum. There is limited evidence on the efficacy of glucocorticoid injection in this condition.Trigger finger usually results from tendon entrapment beneath a thickened A1 flexor pulley. An association with hand tool use and diabetes has been shown in this condition, and there is evidence on the therapeutic efficacy of glucocorticoid injection. No other therapeutic modality has shown efficacy or has been assessed in a placebo-controlled clinical trial in these conditions.It can be concluded that epicondylitis and stenosing tendinopathy are readily diagnosed, and most patients recover with current therapies. However, still unsolved issues preclude a purely evidence-based approach to these entities.

  5. Animal models for the study of tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Warden, S J

    2007-04-01

    Tendinopathy is a common and significant clinical problem characterised by activity-related pain, focal tendon tenderness and intratendinous imaging changes. Recent histopathological studies have indicated the underlying pathology to be one of tendinosis (degeneration) as opposed to tendinitis (inflammation). Relatively little is known about tendinosis and its pathogenesis. Contributing to this is an absence of validated animal models of the pathology. Animal models of tendinosis represent potential efficient and effective means of furthering our understanding of human tendinopathy and its underlying pathology. By selecting an appropriate species and introducing known risk factors for tendinopathy in humans, it is possible to develop tendon changes in animal models that are consistent with the human condition. This paper overviews the role of animal models in tendinopathy research by discussing the benefits and development of animal models of tendinosis, highlighting potential outcome measures that may be used in animal tendon research, and reviewing current animal models of tendinosis. It is hoped that with further development of animal models of tendinosis, new strategies for the prevention and treatment of tendinopathy in humans will be generated.

  6. Histopathological changes in tendinopathy--potential roles of BMPs?

    PubMed

    Lui, Pauline Po Yee

    2013-12-01

    The pathogenesis of tendinopathy remains unclear. Chondro-osteogenic BMPs such as BMP-2, BMP-4 and BMP-7 have been reported in clinical samples and animal models of tendinopathy. As chondrocyte-like cells and ossified deposits have been observed in both clinical samples and animal models of failed tendon healing tendinopathy, chondro-osteogenic BMPs might contribute to tissue metaplasia and other histopathological changes in tendinopathy. In this review I have summarized the current evidence supporting the roles of chondro-osteogenic BMPs in the histopathological changes of tendinopathy. The potential targets, effects and sources of these BMPs are discussed. I have also provided directions for future studies about the potential roles of BMPs in the pathogenesis of tendinopathy. Better understanding of the roles of these BMPs in the histopathological changes of tendinopathy could provide new options for the prevention and treatment of this disabling tendon disorder.

  7. Chronic tendinopathy: effectiveness of eccentric exercise

    PubMed Central

    Woodley, Brett L; Newsham‐West, Richard J; Baxter, G David

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of eccentric exercise (EE) programmes in the treatment of common tendinopathies. Data sources: Relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were sourced using the OVID website databases: MEDLINE (1966–Jan 2006), CINAHL (1982–Jan 2006), AMED (1985–Jan 2006), EMBASE (1988–Jan 2006), and all EBM reviews – Cochrane DSR, ACP Journal Club, DARE, and CCTR (Jan 2006). The Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) was also searched using the keyword: eccentric. Review methods: The PEDro and van Tulder scales were employed to assess methodological quality. Levels of evidence were then obtained according to predefined thresholds: Strong–consistent findings among multiple high‐quality RCTs. Moderate–consistent findings among multiple low‐quality RCTs and/or clinically controlled trials (CCTs) and/or one high‐quality RCT. Limited–one low‐quality RCT and/or CCT. Conflicting–inconsistent findings among multiple trials (RCTs and/or CCTs). No evidence–no RCTs or CCTs. Results: Twenty relevant studies were sourced, 11 of which met the inclusion criteria. These included studies of Achilles tendinopathy (AT), patella tendinopathy (PT) and tendinopathy of the common wrist extensor tendon of the lateral elbow (LET). Limited levels of evidence exist to suggest that EE has a positive effect on clinical outcomes such as pain, function and patient satisfaction/return to work when compared to various control interventions such as concentric exercise (CE), stretching, splinting, frictions and ultrasound. Levels of evidence were found to be variable across the tendinopathies investigated. Conclusions: This review demonstrates the dearth of high‐quality research in support of the clinical effectiveness of EE over other treatments in the management of tendinopathies. Further adequately powered studies that include appropriate randomisation procedures, standardised outcome measures and long‐term follow‐up are required

  8. Pathogenesis of tendinopathies: inflammation or degeneration?

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Michele; Gravare-Silbernagel, Karin; Siljeholm, Carl; Di Iorio, Angelo; De Amicis, Daniele; Salini, Vincenzo; Werner, Suzanne; Paganelli, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    The intrinsic pathogenetic mechanisms of tendinopathies are largely unknown and whether inflammation or degeneration has the prominent role is still a matter of debate. Assuming that there is a continuum from physiology to pathology, overuse may be considered as the initial disease factor; in this context, microruptures of tendon fibers occur and several molecules are expressed, some of which promote the healing process, while others, including inflammatory cytokines, act as disease mediators. Neural in-growth that accompanies the neovessels explains the occurrence of pain and triggers neurogenic-mediated inflammation. It is conceivable that inflammation and degeneration are not mutually exclusive, but work together in the pathogenesis of tendinopathies. PMID:19591655

  9. Patellar Dislocations and Reduction Procedure.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Acute patellar dislocations are a common injury occurring in adolescents involved in sports and dancing activities. This injury usually occurs when the knee is in full extension and sustains a valgus stress on the knee. The medial patellofemoral ligament is the medial restraint that assists in stabilizing the patella from lateral dislocations. The patella usually dislocates laterally and is usually not difficult to reduce after patient evaluation and prereduction radiographs. After postreduction radiographs confirm proper position of the patella postreduction and the absence of fractures, the patient is usually treated conservatively with initial immobilization, orthopedic referral, and physical therapy.

  10. Fluoroquinolones and Tendinopathy: A Guide for Athletes and Sports Clinicians and a Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Trevor; Cook, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Context: Fluoroquinolone antibiotics have been used for several decades and are effective antimicrobials. Despite their usefulness as antibiotics, a growing body of evidence has accumulated in the peer-reviewed literature that shows fluoroquinolones can cause pathologic lesions in tendon tissue (tendinopathy). These adverse effects can occur within hours of commencing treatment and months after discontinuing the use of these drugs. In some cases, fluoroquinolone usage can lead to complete rupture of the tendon and substantial subsequent disability. Objective: To discuss the cause, pharmacology, symptoms, and epidemiology of fluoroquinolone-associated tendinopathy and to discuss the clinical implications with respect to athletes and their subsequent physiotherapy. Data Sources: We searched MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), and SPORTDiscus databases for available reports of fluoroquinolone-related tendinopathy (tendinitis, tendon pain, or rupture) published from 1966 to 2012. Search terms were fluoroquinolones or quinolones and tendinopathy, adverse effects, and tendon rupture. Included studies were written in or translated into English. Non—English–language and non-English translations of abstracts from reports were not included (n = 1). Study Selection: Eligible studies were any available reports of fluoroquinolone-related tendinopathy (tendinitis, tendon pain, or rupture). Both animal and human histologic studies were included. Any papers not focusing on the tendon-related side effects of fluoroquinolones were excluded (n = 71). Data Extraction: Data collected included any cases of fluoroquinolone-related tendinopathy, the particular tendon affected, type of fluoroquinolone, dosage, and concomitant risk factors. Any data outlining the adverse histologic effects of fluoroquinolones also were collected. Data Synthesis: A total of 175 papers, including 89 case reports and 8

  11. Therapeutic Roles of Tendon Stem/Progenitor Cells in Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Lin, Yu-cheng; Rui, Yun-feng; Xu, Hong-liang; Chen, Hui; Wang, Chen; Teng, Gao-jun

    2016-01-01

    Tendinopathy is a tendon disorder characterized by activity-related pain, local edema, focal tenderness to palpation, and decreased strength in the affected area. Tendinopathy is prevalent in both athletes and the general population, highlighting the need to elucidate the pathogenesis of this disorder. Current treatments of tendinopathy are both conservative and symptomatic. The discovery of tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSPCs) and erroneous differentiation of TSPCs have provided new insights into the pathogenesis of tendinopathy. In this review, we firstly present the histopathological characteristics of tendinopathy and explore the cellular and molecular cues in the pathogenesis of tendinopathy. Current evidence of the depletion of the stem cell pool and altered TSPCs fate in the pathogenesis of tendinopathy has been presented. The potential regulatory factors for either tenogenic or nontenogenic differentiation of TSPCs are also summarized. The regulation of endogenous TSPCs or supplementation with exogenous TSPCs as therapeutic targets for the treatment of tendinopathy is proposed. Therefore, inhibiting the erroneous differentiation of TSPCs and regulating the differentiation of TSPCs into tendon cells might be important areas of future research and could provide new clinical treatments for tendinopathy. The current evidence suggests that TSPCs are promising therapeutic targets for the management of tendinopathy. PMID:27195010

  12. Ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma injection for distal biceps tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Simon N; Connell, David; Coghlan, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Background Distal biceps tendinopathy is an uncommon cause of elbow pain. The optimum treatment for cases refractory to conservative treatment is unclear. Platelet-rich plasma has been used successfully for other tendinopathies around the elbow. Methods Six patients with clinical and radiological evidence of distal biceps tendinopathy underwent ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection. Clinical examination findings, visual analogue score (VAS) for pain and Mayo Elbow Performance scores were recorded. Results The Mayo Elbow Performance Score improved from 68.3 (range 65 to 85) (fair function) to 95 (range 85 to 100) (excellent function). The VAS at rest improved from a mean of 2.25 (range 2 to 5) pre-injection to 0. The VAS with movement improved from a mean of 7.25 (range 5 to 8) pre-injection to 1.3 (range 0 to 2). No complications were noted. Discussion Ultrasound-guided PRP injection appears to be a safe and effective treatment for recalcitrant cases of distal biceps tendinopathy. Further investigation with a randomized controlled trial is needed to fully assess its efficacy. PMID:27582965

  13. Tendinopathy: a review of the pathophysiology and evidence for treatment.

    PubMed

    Goldin, Michael; Malanga, Gerard A

    2013-09-01

    The understanding of tendinopathy has evolved over the past several decades. Initially thought to be a primarily inflammatory process, histologic evaluation has revealed that there is an absence of inflammatory cells, and rather, tendinopathy is more of a degenerative process. Various types of medications, rehabilitation, modalities, injections, and minimally invasive procedures have been described as treatment for this condition. The purpose of our article is to describe the pathophysiology of tendinopathy as currently understood and the evidence for the various available treatments. We performed a literature search to determine the types of reviews that have been performed previously regarding treatment for tendinopathy, and summarized these reviews. We then performed a systematic review of randomized controlled trials for treating patients with tendinopathy. It is our hope that our review of trial data will help providers to determine optimal management for their patients with tendinopathy.

  14. Selective Patellar Resurfacing: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Antholz, Casey R; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Elmallah, Randa K; Jauregui, Julio J; Pierce, Todd P; Mont, Micael A

    2015-05-01

    Whether to resurface the patella during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains a controversial topic among orthopaedic surgeons, and we are still no closer to identifying which technique provides the best outcomes. Advocates for patellar resurfacing have adopted this technique in order to avoid the potential for post-operative anterior knee pain that may be associated with the need for future reoperations. However, reports have indicated that patellar resurfacing may be associated with increased complications such as patellar implant loosening, fracture, osteonecrosis, tendon injury, wear, and instability. More recently, studies have highlighted possible patient-specific and surgical factors, such as weight, body mass index, degree of chondromalacia, and patellar alignment, which may influence functional outcomes, and thus surgical decision making. However, currently there are minimal clear guidelines to help surgeons decide whether or not to resurface the patella. Our aim was to assess the current literature and present the evidence for and against patellar resurfacing, as well as to assess factors that may aid in deciding which procedure is more suitable for the specific patient. Ultimately, we believe there is a need for further research to identify the most appropriate candidates for patellar resurfacing.

  15. Total knee arthroplasty with subvastus approach in patient with chronic post-traumatic patellar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Jader Joel Machado; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Pécora, Jose Ricardo; Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lateral dislocation of the patella is a rare condition and acquired causes are usually secondary to knee trauma. The neglected chronic dislocation leads to progressive genu valgum and external tibial torsion deformities with subsequent gonarthrosis, which becomes painful and debilitating. There is no consensus regarding treatment of these patients, but total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a useful therapy in cases of painful symptomatic gonarthrosis. Few reports have shown that subvastus approach and lateral release may be a valid option for TKA, since it allows the correction of valgus deformity and patellar tracking without interrupting vascular blood supply of patella. This article reports a case of TKA and extensor mechanism realignment without patellar resurfacing in a patient with genu valgum and chronic post-traumatic patellar dislocation with satisfactory results after two years of follow-up.

  16. Tendinopathies of the Hand and Wrist.

    PubMed

    Adams, Julie E; Habbu, Rohan

    2015-12-01

    Tendinopathies involving the hand and wrist are common. Many are diagnosed easily, and in many cases, the management is straightforward, provided the pathology and principles are understood. Common conditions involving the tendons of the hand and wrist include trigger finger, tenosynovitis of the first through sixth dorsal extensor compartments, and flexor carpi radialis tendonitis. Management strategies include nonsurgical treatments, such as splinting, injection, or therapy, and surgical techniques such as tendon release.

  17. Nonsurgical Management of Midsubstance Achilles Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    McClinton, Shane; Luedke, Lace; Clewley, Derek

    2017-04-01

    Midsubstance Achilles tendinopathy is one of the most common lower leg conditions. Most patients can recover with nonsurgical treatment that focuses on tendon loading exercises and, when necessary, symptom modulating treatments such as topical, oral, or injected medication, ice, shoe inserts, manual therapy, stretching, taping, or low-level laser. If unresponsive to initial management, a small percentage of patients may consider shockwave or sclerosing treatment and possibly surgery.

  18. Conservative management of tendinopathies around hip

    PubMed Central

    Frizziero, Antonio; Vittadini, Filippo; Pignataro, Andrea; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Biz, Carlo; Ruggieri, Pietro; Masiero, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The anatomy of hip is widely complex and several anatomical structures interact and contribute to its functioning. For position and role, hip and the surrounding tendons, which have their insertion around, are overstressed and often overloaded, especially in athletes. This could lead to the developing of several tendinopathies, among which the differential diagnosis is often complicated. Many conservative treatments are used in clinical practice, while actually, no defined conservative protocol is recommended. Methods This is a review article. The aim of this manuscript is to evaluate the current evidences about the effectiveness of conservative management in hip tendinopathies. Conclusion Conservative treatment is effective in the management of hip tendinopathies and may be considered the first-line approach for patients affected. However, there is lack of evidences about which is the most effective treatment. Exercise therapy seems to provide long-term pain relief, but the literature is still lacking about the correct type, dose, posology, intensity of exercise prescribed. Further studies about different local approaches, as PRP or hyaluronic acid injections, may be encouraged. Level of evidence I. PMID:28066732

  19. Patellar options in revision total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Rorabeck, Cecil H; Mehin, Ramin; Barrack, Robert L

    2003-11-01

    There are numerous options that need to be considered by the surgeon at the time of revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). One needs to consider the reason for the revision, the type of patella in place, and the length of time the patella has been in place. The surgeon also needs to consider the status of the patellar bone stock, the stability of the patellar component (well-fixed or loose), and the component type (cemented or metal-backed). Assuming that the existing prosthesis is not metal-backed and has minimal PE wear, then it is preferable to retain a well-fixed all-PE cemented patellar button. However, if the button is metal-backed, then it probably is best to remove the button and replace it with an all-PE domed patellar component. Assuming more than 8 mm of patellar bone stock is remaining, it usually is best to cement an all-PE dome-shaped patella. However, if less than 8 mm is remaining, then that patient can be left with a patelloplasty, recognizing that this individual is going to continue with a high likelihood of anterior knee pain, subluxation, and poor functional results. In that situation, it may be preferable to consider a bone stock augmentation.

  20. Overuse injuries: tendinopathies, stress fractures, compartment syndrome, and shin splints.

    PubMed

    Wilder, Robert P; Sethi, Shikha

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 50% of all sports injuries are secondary to overuse and result from repetitive microtrauma that causes local tissue damage. Injuries are most likely with changes in mode, intensity, or duration of training and can accumulate before symptoms appear. Intrinsic factors contributing to injuries are individual bio-mechanical abnormalities such as malalignments, muscle imbalance, inflexibility, weakness, and instability. Contributing extrinsic (avoidable) factors include poor technique, improper equipment, and improper changes in duration or frequency of activity. Injuries are often related to biomechanical abnormalities removed from the specific injury site, requiring evaluation of the entire kinetic chain. This article discusses common overuse injuries of the lower leg, ankle, and foot: tendinopathies, stress fractures, chronic exertional compartment syndrome, and shin splints.

  1. Tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Garrett M; Mair, Scott D; Lattermann, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps is a common cause of anterior shoulder pain. As such, the anatomy and function of the tendon as well as its pathophysiology and different treatment methods have been studied extensively. The pathophysiology is a spectrum beginning with inflammation and leading to tendon degeneration. Different clinical tests and imaging modalities may all be employed to help aid in diagnosis. Conservative management is the first-line treatment, but surgical intervention may be warranted. In general, tenotomy or tenodesis is performed depending, among other things, on the age and activity level of the patient. There are several different methods for tenodesis, each with certain advantages and disadvantages. Patient factors must be considered when choosing the optimal treatment.

  2. Intramuscular migration of calcific tendinopathy in the rotator cuff: ultrasound appearance and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Becciolini, Marco; Bonacchi, Giovanni; Galletti, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    Calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder is a common condition caused by calcium hydroxyapatite crystals, affecting the tendons of the rotator cuff. Among uncommon complication, one is the migration of the calcium in the subacromion-subdeltoid bursa. More rare is the intraosseous migration. We present four cases of an even more rare condition, not well described in literature yet, the intramuscular migration of calcium.

  3. Comparison of Radiological Parameters between Normal and Patellar Dislocation Groups in Korean Population: A Rotational Profile CT-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Jatin; Seon, Jong-Keun; Woo, Seong-Hwan; Jin, Cheng; Song, Eun-Kyoo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patellofemoral instability is a common cause of anterior knee pain in adolescents and young adults. Most normal and pathological values for diagnosing patellofemoral instability are based on Western literature. We conducted this radiological study to determine normal values for different patellofemoral parameters in a Korean population and to evaluate their usefulness in diagnosis. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the rotational profile computerized tomography (CT) scans of the patellar dislocation and control groups. Trochlear, patellar, rotational profile, and trochleo-patellar alignment parameters were compared between the groups. Receiver operating characteristic curves were drawn for significant parameters, and sensitivity and specificity were calculated for the cut-off values. Results There were 48 patients in the patellar dislocation group and 87 patients in the control group. In the control group and patellar dislocation group, the mean sulcus angle was 132.5° and 143.3°, respectively, trochlear depth was 6.04 mm and 3.6 mm, bisect offset was 56.4% and 99.9%, lateral patellar tilting was 9.8° and 19.2°, patellar facet asymmetry was 63.5% and 45.16%, and the tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance was 10.91 mm and 27.16 mm, respectively. Conclusions The trochlear depth, bisect offset, patella tilting, and TT-TG distance were parameters that significantly contributed to patellar instability. Rotational profile CT can be considered a good diagnostic tool to assess all these parameters that help to identify anatomical aberration resulting in patellofemoral instability, thereby helping in formulating the most effective treatment plan. PMID:27894178

  4. In vivo biological response to extracorporeal shockwave therapy in human tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Waugh, C M; Morrissey, D; Jones, E; Riley, G P; Langberg, H; Screen, H R C

    2015-05-15

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is a non-invasive treatment for chronic tendinopathies, however little is known about the in-vivo biological mechanisms of ESWT. Using microdialysis, we examined the real-time biological response of healthy and pathological tendons to ESWT. A single session of ESWT was administered to the mid-portion of the Achilles tendon in thirteen healthy individuals (aged 25.7 ± 7.0 years) and patellar or Achilles tendon of six patients with tendinopathies (aged 39.0 ± 14.9 years). Dialysate samples from the surrounding peri-tendon were collected before and immediately after ESWT. Interleukins (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-17A, vascular endothelial growth factor and interferon-γ were quantified using a cytometric bead array while gelatinase activity (MMP-2 and -9) was examined using zymography. There were no statistical differences between the biological tissue response to ESWT in healthy and pathological tendons. IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-8 were the cytokines predominantly detected in the tendon dialysate. IL-1β and IL-2 did not change significantly with ESWT. IL-6 and IL-8 concentrations were elevated immediately after ESWT and remained significantly elevated for four hours post-ESWT (p < 0.001). Pro-forms of MMP-2 and -9 also increased after ESWT (p < 0.003), whereas there were no significant changes in active MMP forms. In addition, the biological response to ESWT treatment could be differentiated between possible responders and non-responders based on a minimum 5-fold increase in any inflammatory marker or MMP from pre- to post-ESWT. Our findings provide novel evidence of the biological mechanisms underpinning ESWT in humans in vivo. They suggest that the mechanical stimulus provided by ESWT might aid tendon remodelling in tendinopathy by promoting the inflammatory and catabolic processes that are associated with removing damaged matrix constituents. The non-response of some individuals may help to

  5. Escobar syndrome mimicing congenital patellar syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ezirmik, Naci; Yildiz, Kadri; Can, Cahit Emre

    2012-08-01

    Multiple pterygium syndrome (MPS) is a syndrome that is characterized abnormal face, short length and skin pterygiums on some body legions (servical, antecubital, popliteal, interdigital and on neck). It is also called as Pterygium Colli syndrome, Escobar syndrome or Pterygium syndrome. Escobar (multyple pterygium) syndrome is a rare syndrome. Intrauterin growth reterdation, abnormal face, wide-spead pterygiums that resulted in joint contractures, ptosis, chryptoorchidism, patellar dysplasia and foot deformities are seen on this syndrome. Primarly autosomal resesive crossing are observed; also autosomal dominant and X-linked crossing. This case were presented as it has components of Escobar syndrome and Isolated Patellar Aplasia syndrome in same time.

  6. [Guideline 'Chronic Achilles tendinopathy, in particular tendinosis, in sportsmen/sportswomen'].

    PubMed

    van Linschoten, R; den Hoed, P T; de Jongh, A C

    2007-10-20

    --Chronic Achilles tendinopathy in sports often leads to various therapeutic strategies, medical shopping and frequently to inability to perform at the desired level. --Although it is clear that this chronic tendinopathy is not an inflammatory disease of the tendon, the cause of the degeneration of the tendon fibres is not understood. --The main therapeutic measure--based on scientific evidence--is eccentric calf-muscle training for at least 3 months. --Recent therapies such as sclerotherapy ofneovascularizations in and around the Achilles tendon appear to be promising, but more studies are required. --About 20% of the patients tend to be refractive to conservative measures. --In selected cases surgery can be undertaken, with percutaneous longitudinal tenotomy proving effective in 75-80% of the cases.

  7. Tendinopathy of the tendon of the long head of the biceps.

    PubMed

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Marineo, Gianluca; Khan, Wasim S; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2011-12-01

    Pathologies of tendon of the long head of the biceps (LHB) are an important cause of shoulder pain. They include tendinopathy, rupture, superior labrum anterior and posterior lesions, pulley tears, and tendon instability. Conservative management of symptomatic LHB tendinopathy is commonly accepted as the first-line treatment. It consists of rest, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroid injections, and physical therapy. Biceps tenotomy and tenodesis are the most common surgical procedures to manage both isolated LHB pathology and biceps-glenoid complex tears combined with rotator cuff tears. However, controversy persists about the superiority of one of them because there is no evidence of significant differences in functional scores or patient satisfaction between the 2 techniques. This article provides an overview on biomechanical function of the LHB and current strategies for treatment of LHB disorders.

  8. Grossly apparent cartilage erosion of the patellar articular surface in dogs with congenital medial patellar luxation.

    PubMed

    Daems, R; Janssens, L A; Béosier, Y M

    2009-01-01

    One hundred and forty-five stifles of client-owned dogs that underwent corrective surgery for congenital medial patellar luxation were inspected for cartilage erosion on the articular surface of the patella. The lesions were mapped in surface percentage ranges of 20% and by location. Two-thirds of the patellae had cartilage erosion. Cartilage erosion varied between 0 and 100% of the total patellar articular surface and was localised mainly on the medial and distal side of the patella. Dogs with Grade IV patellar luxations and heavier dogs were more affected. The majority of dogs in our study with congenital medial patellar luxation had grossly apparent cartilage erosion on the articular surface of the patella, which may help to explain why certain patients do not function well clinically after technically successful corrective surgery.

  9. Superior Patellar Dislocation Misdiagnosed as Patellar Tendon Rupture: The Value of Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Sumanont, Sermsak; Boonard, Manusak; Boonrod, Arunnit

    2016-01-01

    Superior dislocation of the patella with intact patellar tendon is a rare condition. Most cases in literatures were diagnosed by clinical examination and plain radiography; however there are many cases that were misdiagnosed as patellar tendon rupture. In this case, we demonstrate the use of ultrasound for diagnosis of superior dislocation of the patella in the emergency department. We also include a literature review of similar cases and discuss the advantages of different types of imaging for diagnosis in this condition. PMID:28101389

  10. Kinematics and Mechanical Properties of Knees following Patellar Replacing and Patellar Retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rongying; Liu, Yanqiang; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Knee injury is a common medical issue. A full understanding of the kinematics and mechanical properties of knees following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) repair utilizing patellar replacement (only the base of the patella is replaced) versus patellar retaining surgical techniques is still lacking. In the current paper, we investigated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging data from knees repaired by these two methods and evaluated total knee models created using imaging reconstruction technology that simulated gait conditions. Results revealed that patellar replacement had little influence on tibiofemoral kinematics, although the tibia-surface equivalent stress increased slightly. By contrast, patellar replacement had a significant influence on the patellofemoral joint; patellar internal rotation, external rotation, and medial-lateral translation were all increased. Moreover, the stress distribution on patellar prostheses was altered, resulting in an increased surface maximal equivalent stress on the corresponding area. Moreover, during the gait cycle, we found that the area with maximal equivalent stress shifted its position. Finally, the patellofemoral joint showed decreased motion stability. From the view of kinematics and mechanics, this paper suggests that patella should be retained during TKA if it is possible. The present study presented approaches and technologies for evaluating kinematics and mechanical properties of total knee joint after TKA under gait loads. PMID:27057134

  11. Lateral elbow tendinopathy: Evidence of physiotherapy management

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrios, Stasinopoulos

    2016-01-01

    Lateral elbow tendinopathy (LET) is a common musculoskeletal/sports injury. A plethora of physiotherapy techniques has been proposed in the management of LET. The exercise programme is the most common treatment in the management of LET. The optimal protocol of exercise programme is still unknown. The effectiveness of the exercise programme is low when it is applied as monotherapy. Therefore, exercise programme is combined with other physiotherapy modalities such as soft tissue techniques, external support, acupuncture, manual therapy and electrotherapy, in the treatment of LET. Future research is needed to determine which treatment strategy combined with exercise programme will provide the best results in LET rehabilitation. PMID:27622145

  12. A treatment algorithm for managing Achilles tendinopathy: new treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Alfredson, Håkan; Cook, J

    2007-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy affects athletes, recreational exercisers and even inactive people. The pathology is not inflammatory; it is a failed healing response. The source of pain in tendinopathy could be related to the neurovascular ingrowth seen in the tendon's response to injury. The treatment of Achilles tendinopathy is primarily conservative with an array of effective treatment options now available to the primary care practitioner. If conservative treatment is not successful, then surgery relieves pain in the majority of cases. Directing a patient through the algorithm presented here will maximise positive treatment outcomes. PMID:17311806

  13. Symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cyst of the patellar tendon.

    PubMed

    Jose, Jean; O'Donnell, Kevin; Lesniak, Bryson

    2011-01-01

    Ganglion cysts have been previously described throughout the body, most commonly about the wrist, hand, knee, ankle, and feet. When symptomatic, they may interfere with joint mechanics, resulting in snapping, catching, and locking. Intratendinous ganglion cysts lack a synovial epithelial lining and are thought to develop from the mucoid degeneration of connective tissue caused by chronic irritation, chronic repetitive injury, and chronic ischemia. On magnetic resonance imaging, ganglion cysts originating from tendons, ligaments, tendon sheaths, menisci, or joint capsules appear as well-defined lobulated masses that follow simple or complex fluid signal intensity on all pulse sequences, with enhancing walls and internal septations on post-contrast images. There may be appreciable degeneration and partial tearing of the structure of origin, particularly if associated with tendons. On ultrasonography, they present as hypoechoic masses, with internal septations and lobulations of varying sizes, without significant vascularity on power or color Doppler sampling. A thin fluid neck extending from the structure of origin (tail sign), when present, is a reliable sign of a ganglion cyst. This article describes a sonographically guided technique to treat symptomatic ganglion cysts within the patellar tendon. Complete evacuation of the ganglion cyst, with disappearance of the tail sign, is considered the determining factor for a successful procedure. A similar technique can be used for the treatment of other symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cysts elsewhere in the body. To our knowledge, symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cysts within the patellar tendon and their treatment have not been previously reported.

  14. Use of computed tomography to determine the risk of patellar dislocation in 921 patients with patellar instability

    PubMed Central

    Schueda, Marco Antonio; Astur, Diego Costa; Bier, Rodrigo Schueda; Bier, Debora Schueda; Astur, Nelson; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify reliable tomographic measurements that can detect patellofemoral abnormality and allow quantification of the risk of patellar dislocation in patients with potential patellar instability. A cross-sectional study in 921 patients with anterior pain or knee instability of at least 6 months’ duration was conducted from July 2001 to December 2009. All subjects were clinically evaluated and underwent radiography and computed tomography of their knees. According to their degree of dislocating patellar dysplasia, the subjects were classified into groups for statistical comparison. There was a statistically significant difference in all measurements when the groups were compared, except for external tibial torsion angle. The most sensitive and specific measurements for determining patellar instability were the trochlear groove angle, tibial tubercle-trochlear groove distance, average patellar tilt, and average patellar height. Patients with potential patellar instability, increased tibial tubercle-trochlear groove distance, and patellar height, tilt, and deviation measurements had a greater risk for patellar dislocation. The clinical relevance of this study is to determine measurements that are able to tell us about patellar dislocation risk. PMID:25784822

  15. Incidence of Peroneal Tendinopathy After Application of a Posterior Antiglide Plate for Repair of Supination External Rotation Lateral Malleolar Fractures.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jungtae; Kim, Sehun; Lee, Jung-Soo; Woo, Kyungjei; Sung, Ki-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Posterior antiglide plating is widely used to treat lateral malleolar fractures caused by supination-external rotation injuries. Despite its widespread use, this technique can be associated with postoperative peroneal tendinopathy. The purpose of the present observational review was to report the incidence of peroneal tendinopathy after the use of posterior antiglide plating to treat lateral malleolar fractures caused by a supination-external rotation injury. A total of 70 patients were followed up for a minimum of 12 (mean 55, range 12 to 109) months. Bony union was obtained in all cases after a mean of 57 (range 37 to 81) days. The median number of screw holes in the plate was 4.9 (range 4 to 7), and the median number of screws used to fixate the fibula was 6.58 (range 5 to 10). The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hindfoot-ankle score at the final follow-up examination was 90.8 (range 55 to 100). Clinically, 3 (4.29%) of the 70 patients had lateral or posterolateral ankle pain indicative of peroneal tendinopathy after the index surgery, without any objective evidence. Of the 70 patients, 41 (58.57%) underwent surgical removal of the fibular hardware, 2 (4.87%) because of lateral ankle discomfort. At removal, inspection of the peroneal tendon sheath and/or tendons showed no gross evidence of tendinopathy in any of the patients. We concluded that the incidence of clinically evident peroneal tendon symptoms associated with posterior antiglide plating is low (4.3%), and direct operative inspection revealed no gross evidence of tendinopathy.

  16. A short consideration of exercise for gluteal tendinopathies.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Warrick

    2016-07-01

    Gluteal tendinopathies have become significantly better understood over the past few years, primarily due to the work of Alison Grimaldi and her research associates. This brief summary highlights some key points of their work and some exercise suggestions for treatment.

  17. Elbow tendinopathy and tendon ruptures: epicondylitis, biceps and triceps ruptures.

    PubMed

    Rineer, Craig A; Ruch, David S

    2009-03-01

    Lateral and medial epicondylitis are common causes of elbow pain in the general population, with the lateral variety being more common than the medial by a ratio reportedly ranging from 4:1 to 7:1. Initially thought to be an inflammatory condition, epicondylitis has ultimately been shown to result from tendinous microtearing followed by an incomplete reparative response. Numerous nonoperative and operative treatment options have been employed in the treatment of epicondylitis, without the emergence of a single, consistent, universally accepted treatment protocol. Tendon ruptures about the elbow are much less frequent, but result in more significant disability and loss of function. Distal biceps tendon ruptures typically occur in middle-aged males as a result of an event that causes a sudden, eccentric contraction of the biceps. Triceps tendon ruptures are exceedingly rare but usually have a similar etiology with a forceful eccentric contraction of the triceps that causes avulsion of the tendon from the olecranon. The diagnosis of these injuries is not always readily made. Complete ruptures of the biceps or triceps tendons have traditionally been treated surgically with good results. With regard to biceps ruptures, there continues to be debate about the best surgical approach, as well as the best method of fixation of tendon to bone. This article is not meant to be an exhaustive review of the broad topics of elbow tendinopathy and tendon ruptures, but rather is a review of recently published information on the topics that will assist the clinician in diagnosis and management of these conditions.

  18. Fluoroquinolone-induced tendinopathy: etiology and preventive measures.

    PubMed

    Kaleagasioglu, Ferda; Olcay, Ercan

    2012-01-01

    Tendinopathy is a serious health problem and its etiology is not fully elucidated. Among intrinsic and extrinsic predisposing factors of tendinopathy, the impact of therapeutic agents, especially fluoroquinolone (FQ) group antibiotics, is recently being recognized. FQs are potent bactericidal agents widely used in various infectious diseases, including community acquired pneumonia and bronchitis, chronic osteomyelitis, traveler's diarrhea, typhoid fever, shigellosis, chronic bacterial prostatitis, uncomplicated cervical and urethral gonorrhea and prophylaxis of anthrax. FQs have an acceptable tolerability range. However, many lines of evidence for developing tendinitis and tendon rupture during FQ use have resulted in the addition of a warning in patient information leaflets. FQ-induced tendinopathy presents a challenge for the clinician because healing response is poor due to low metabolic rate in mature tendon tissue and tendinopathy is more likely to develop in patients who are already at high risk, such as elderly, solid organ transplant recipients and concomitant corticosteroid users. FQs become photo-activated under exposure to ultraviolet light, and this process results in formation and accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). The subsequent FQ-related oxidative stress disturbs mitochondrial functions, leading to apoptosis. ROS overproduction also has direct cytotoxic effects on extracellular matrix components. Understanding the mechanisms of the FQ-associated tendinopathy may enable designing safer therapeutic strategies, hence optimization of clinical response. In this review, we evaluate multi-factorial etiology of the FQ-induced tendinopathy and discuss proposed preventive measures such as antioxidant use and protection from natural sunlight and artificial ultraviolet exposure.

  19. Chondromalacia induced by patellar subluxation: morphological and morphometrical aspects in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, M M S; Apfel, M I R

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe morphologically and quantify the changes of the articular cartilage in chondromalacia, concerning both the chondrocytes and extracellular matrix. Eight rabbits were submitted daily to patellar subluxation, causing chondromalacia after two weeks. The knee fragments obtained were processed by the standard methods. These experimental conditions caused degenerative alterations of the articular cartilage, varying from a slight decrease of proteoglycans, to fibrillations, clefts, and horizontal splitting. The results showed a significantly increase number of chondrocytes (p < 0,000139), although smaller in size (p < 0,000109). The immobilization for 2 weeks and the intermittent passive daily motion afterwards for a period of 2 weeks, was effective to cause patellar chrondomalacia in rabbits.

  20. Vertical Patellar Dislocation: Reduction by the Push Up and Rotate Method, A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad Khan, Hayat; Bashir Shah, Adil; Kamal, Younis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patellar dislocation is an emergency. Vertical patellar dislocation is rare, often seen in adolescents and mostly due to sports injuries or high-velocity trauma. Few cases have been reported in the literature. Closed or open reduction under general anesthesia is often needed. We report a case of vertical locked patellar dislocation in a 26-year-old male, which was reduced by a simple closed method under spinal anaesthesia. A literature review regarding the various methods of treatment is also discussed. Case Presentation A 26-year-old male experienced a trivial accident while descending stairs, sustaining patellar dislocation. The closed method of reduction was attempted, using a simple technique. Reduction was confirmed and postoperative rehabilitation was started. Follow-up was uneventful. Conclusions Vertical patellar dislocations are encountered rarely in the emergency department. Adolescents are not the only victims, and high-velocity trauma is not the essential cause. Unnecessary manipulation should be avoided. The closed reduction method is simple, but the surgeon should be prepared for open reduction. PMID:28184358

  1. Autologous Tenocyte Injection for the Treatment of Chronic Recalcitrant Gluteal Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, Thomas A.; Ebert, Jay R.; Smith, Anne; Breidahl, William; Fallon, Michael; Wang, Tao; Zheng, Ming-Hao; Janes, Gregory C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Gluteal tendinopathy is a common cause of lateral hip pain, and existing conservative treatment modalities demonstrate high symptom recurrence rates. Autologous tenocyte injection (ATI) is a promising cell therapy that may be useful for the treatment of gluteal tendinopathy. Purpose: To investigate the safety and effectiveness of ATI, specifically in patients with chronic recalcitrant gluteal tendinopathy. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Twelve female patients with a clinical and radiological diagnosis of gluteal tendinopathy were recruited. Patients demonstrated a mean duration of symptoms of 33 months (range, 6-144 months), had undergone a mean 3.2 prior corticosteroid injections (range, 2-5), and had failed to respond to existing conservative treatments including physiotherapy and injections. In an initial procedure, tendon cells were harvested from a needle biopsy of the patella tendon and propagated in a certified Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) laboratory. In a secondary procedure, a single injection of 2 mL autologous tenocytes (2-5 × 106 cells/mL) suspended in patient serum was injected into the site of the pathological gluteal tendons under ultrasound guidance. Patients were assessed pre- and postinjection (3, 6, 12, and 24 months) using the Oxford Hip Score (OHS), a visual analog pain scale (VAS), the Short Form–36 (SF-36), and a satisfaction scale. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was undertaken at 8.7 months (range, 6-12 months) postinjection. Results: Molecular characterization of autologous tendon cells showed a profile of growth factor production in all cases, including platelet-derived growth factor α, fibroblast growth factor β, and transforming growth factor β. The OHS (mean, 24.0 preinjection to 38.9 at 12 months [14.9-point improvement]; 95% CI, 10.6-19.2; P < .001), VAS (mean, 7.2 preinjection to 3.1 at 12 months [4.1-point improvement]; 95% CI, 2.6-5.6; P < .001), and SF-36 (mean, 28.1 preinjection

  2. Changes of Gait Parameters and Lower Limb Dynamics in Recreational Runners with Achilles Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, SungJoong; Yu, JaeHo

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify the mechanical gait changes caused by achilles tendinopathy by comparing gait parameters and changes in hip, knee, and ankle moments between an experimental group (EG) and a control group (CG). Twenty runners with achilles tendinopathy were included in the EG (male/female: 10/10, age: 27.00 ± 4.63), and 20 CG (male/female: 10/10, age: 27.25 ± 4.33) participants were recruited. Subjects walked a 13-m distance at their normal walking speed 5 times to obtain motion analysis and joint moment data. Gait parameter analysis showed significant differences in double-limb support (EG: 22.65 ± 4.26%, CG: 20.37 ± 4.46%), step length (EG: 0.58 ± 0.0 7m, CG: 0.64 ± 0.08 m), step width (EG: 0.16 ± 0.04 m, CG: 0.14 ± 0.05 m), stride time (EG: 1.09 ± 0.10 second, CG: 1.05 ± 0.08 second), and walking speed (EG: 1.09±0.18 m·s-1, CG: 1.23 ± 0.17 m·s-1) between the 2 groups (p < 0.05). Significant differences were found in hip joint moment for initial contact, mid-stance, terminal stance, and pre-swing phases; knee joint moment for initial contact and pre-swing phases; and ankle joint moment for pre-swing and terminal swing phases (p < 0.05). Gait parameters and hip, knee, and ankle moments were altered in runners with achilles tendinopathy. Thus, clinical features of gait changes should be understood for optimal treatment of achilles tendinopathy; further research is required in this field. Key points A reduction in gait parameters, namely, step length, stride length, and walking speed, and an increase in double-limb support occurs in runners with achilles tendinopathy. A reduction in the hip extension moment occurs during the initial contact, as well as a reduction in the knee flexion moment from the mid-stance to pre-swing phases, a continuous decrease in the knee flexion moment from the early stance phase, and a reduction in the extension moment during the terminal stance phase. A reduction in the ankle plantar flexion moment occurs from

  3. Healing of patellar fractures in two kittens.

    PubMed

    Hermer, J V; Bush, M A; Whiting, C; Langley-Hobbs, S J

    2012-01-01

    Two kittens aged between four and five months were presented having sustained patellar fractures. In both cases, healing was subsequently documented radiographically; this has not been reported previously in the literature. One kitten had bilateral patellar fractures - the symptomatic right stifle was treated with a pin and tension-band-wire which later failed, at which point partial patellectomy was performed. The fracture of the left patella was minimally displaced and was treated conservatively. A radiograph of the left patella taken eleven months after initial presentation showed complete healing of the fracture. The second case was treated surgically with a circumferential wire; healing of the fracture was demonstrated radiographically at twelve weeks postoperatively. Radiographic images taken five weeks postoperatively had shown some narrowing of the fracture gap. These two cases demonstrate that bony union of patellar fractures can be documented, given a long enough duration of radiographic follow-up; circumferential wire was an effective treatment in a displaced fracture, and conservative treatment resulted in complete healing of a minimally displaced fracture.

  4. Expert opinion: diagnosis and treatment of proximal hamstring tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lempainen, Lasse; Johansson, Kristian; Banke, Ingo J.; Ranne, Juha; Mäkelä, Keijo; Sarimo, Janne; Niemi, Pekka; Orava, Sakari

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background: proximal hamstring tendinopathy (PHT) is a disabilitating disease often causing underperformance in the athletically demanding patients. The main symptom of PHT is lower gluteal pain especially during running or while prolonged sitting. Mainly affecting athletically active individuals, PHT is a considerable challenge for treating health care professionals. Purpose: this paper aims to concisely present the literature on PHT to guide health care professionals treating these patients and doing research on the subject. Methods: we reviewed the literature on PHT through literature search of scientific journal databases. Conclusions: as a tendinopathic pathology, it is a rather recently discovered exertion injury. As with other chronic tendon overuse injuries, current treatment strategies are unspecific with uncertain outcomes due to the unknown etiology of the tendon degeneration. Diagnostic features as well as both operative and non-operative treatments are evaluated from a clinical perspective, providing up to date information for clinicians and sports medicine therapists dealing with hamstring problems. Level of evidence: V. PMID:25878983

  5. Deciphering the pathogenesis of tendinopathy: a three-stages process

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenesis of "tendinopathy" is based on fragmented evidences like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle. We propose a "failed healing theory" to knit these fragments together, which can explain previous observations. We also propose that albeit "overuse injury" and other insidious "micro trauma" may well be primary triggers of the process, "tendinopathy" is not an "overuse injury" per se. The typical clinical, histological and biochemical presentation relates to a localized chronic pain condition which may lead to tendon rupture, the latter attributed to mechanical weakness. Characterization of pathological "tendinotic" tissues revealed coexistence of collagenolytic injuries and an active healing process, focal hypervascularity and tissue metaplasia. These observations suggest a failed healing process as response to a triggering injury. The pathogenesis of tendinopathy can be described as a three stage process: injury, failed healing and clinical presentation. It is likely that some of these "initial injuries" heal well and we speculate that predisposing intrinsic or extrinsic factors may be involved. The injury stage involves a progressive collagenolytic tendon injury. The failed healing stage mainly refers to prolonged activation and failed resolution of the normal healing process. Finally, the matrix disturbances, increased focal vascularity and abnormal cytokine profiles contribute to the clinical presentations of chronic tendon pain or rupture. With this integrative pathogenesis theory, we can relate the known manifestations of tendinopathy and point to the "missing links". This model may guide future research on tendinopathy, until we could ultimately decipher the complete pathogenesis process and provide better treatments. PMID:21144004

  6. Patellar Maltracking Persists in Adolescent Females With Patellofemoral Pain

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Victor R.; Boden, Barry P.; Shen, Aricia; Jackson, Jennifer N.; Alter, Katharine E.; Sheehan, Frances T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Patellofemoral pain is one of the most common conditions seen in sports medicine practices, particularly among adolescent females. However, the natural history of the underlying pathology in patellofemoral pain during puberty remains poorly understood. Purpose: The purpose of this longitudinal study is to assess changes in patellar maltracking patterns in subjects with patellofemoral pain as they mature from mid- to late adolescence. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Three-dimensional patellofemoral kinematic data were acquired during active knee extension-flexion using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in 6 girls (10 knees; mean age, 14.0 years) with clinically diagnosed patellofemoral pain. The subjects then returned as late adolescents (mean age, 18.5 years) for follow-up scanning. Three-dimensional patellofemoral kinematic parameters were evaluated across the range of motion, but comparison between time points was restricted to 10° of flexion. Participation in impact and nonimpact physical activities, pain score based on the visual analog scale, and the anterior knee pain score were also compared across initial and follow-up visits. Results: All subjects reported improved patellofemoral pain symptoms at follow-up, and one subject reported complete resolution. However, relative to the initial visit, no differences were found in patellar maltracking. There was a decrease in hours engaged in impact physical activities for all subjects at follow-up. Conclusion: This study provides insight into the natural history of patellofemoral pain in adolescent females. The relatively unchanged patellofemoral maltracking across subjects suggests that potential anatomic and kinematic abnormalities contributing to patellofemoral pain during mid-adolescence persist during skeletal maturation. Symptom improvement for these subjects did not result from a change in patellofemoral tracking, but rather from other causes. PMID:28210658

  7. [Conservative treatment of congenital patellar dislocation].

    PubMed

    Zajonz, D; Schumann, E; Wojan, M; Moche, M; Heyde, C-E

    2017-02-01

    This article presents the rare case of a boy who was born in our hospital with valgus deformity and external rotation of the right lower leg because of congenital patellar dislocation. In the case presented a stable repositioning of the patella could be achieved by redressment with a plaster cast and leg brace. During a 4-year follow-up there were no tendencies towards dislocation during the clinical examination and no dislocation events were documented. In selected cases an attempt at conservative repositioning and retention treatment appears to be worthwhile before surgical treatment is indicated.

  8. Gluteal Tendinopathy: Integrating Pathomechanics and Clinical Features in Its Management.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Alison; Fearon, Angela

    2015-11-01

    Synopsis Gluteal tendinopathy is now believed to be the primary local source of lateral hip pain, or greater trochanteric pain syndrome, previously referred to as trochanteric bursitis. This condition is prevalent, particularly among postmenopausal women, and has a considerable negative influence on quality of life. Improved prognosis and outcomes in the future for those with gluteal tendinopathy will be underpinned by advances in diagnostic testing, a clearer understanding of risk factors and comorbidities, and evidence-based management programs. High-quality studies that meet these requirements are still lacking. This clinical commentary provides direction to assist the clinician with assessment and management of the patient with gluteal tendinopathy, based on currently limited available evidence on this condition and the wider tendon literature and on the combined clinical experience of the authors. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2015;45(11):910-922. Epub 17 Sep 2015. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.5829.

  9. Musculoskeletal regeneration and its implications for the treatment of tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Sereysky, Jedd B; Flatow, Evan L; Andarawis-Puri, Nelly

    2013-08-01

    Tendinopathies are common muskoloskeletal injuries that lead to pain and disability. Development and pathogenesis of tendinopathy is attributed to progressive pathological changes to the structure, function, and biology of tendon. The nature of this disease state, whether acquired by acute or chronic injury, is being actively investigated. Scarring, disorganized tissue, and loss of function characterize adult tendon healing. Recent work from animal models has begun to reveal the potential for adult mammalian tendon regeneration, the replacement of diseased with innate tissue. This review discusses what is known about musculoskeletal regeneration from a molecular perspective and how these findings can be applied to tendinopathy. Non-mammalian and mammalian models are discussed with emphasis on the potential of Murphy Roths Large mice to serve as a model of adult tendon regeneration. Comparison of regeneration in non-mammals, foetal mammals and adult mammals emphasizes distinctly different contributing factors to effective regeneration.

  10. Musculoskeletal regeneration and its implications for the treatment of tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sereysky, Jedd B; Flatow, Evan L; Andarawis-Puri, Nelly

    2013-01-01

    Tendinopathies are common muskoloskeletal injuries that lead to pain and disability. Development and pathogenesis of tendinopathy is attributed to progressive pathological changes to the structure, function, and biology of tendon. The nature of this disease state, whether acquired by acute or chronic injury, is being actively investigated. Scarring, disorganized tissue, and loss of function characterize adult tendon healing. Recent work from animal models has begun to reveal the potential for adult mammalian tendon regeneration, the replacement of diseased with innate tissue. This review discusses what is known about musculoskeletal regeneration from a molecular perspective and how these findings can be applied to tendinopathy. Non-mammalian and mammalian models are discussed with emphasis on the potential of Murphy Roths Large mice to serve as a model of adult tendon regeneration. Comparison of regeneration in non-mammals, foetal mammals and adult mammals emphasizes distinctly different contributing factors to effective regeneration. PMID:23772908

  11. Treatment of supraspinatus tendinopathy with ultrasound guided dry needling

    PubMed Central

    Settergren, Roy

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case study is to describe the treatment of a patient with tendinopathy using sonographically guided dry needling. Tendinopathies are a highly prevalent problem in musculoskeletal medicine, and no one form of treatment has gained universal acceptance as being superior to another. Clinical Features A 30-year-old woman with a 4-month history of anterolateral right shoulder pain was diagnosed with supraspinatus tendinopathy upon physical examination, which was confirmed with diagnostic sonography. Intervention and Outcome Sonography was used to guide an acupuncture needle into the pathologic tissue to induce a humoral healing response. Therapeutic exercise was also prescribed. At 10-day follow-up, increased echogenicity was found in the previously heterogenous hypoechoic areas. The patient also experienced a subjective resolution of her shoulder pain, which did not return with increased physical activity. Conclusions Sonographically guided dry needling was shown to be beneficial for this patient as evident by sonographic changes pre- and postprocedure. PMID:23997721

  12. Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy: Navigating the Diagnosis-Management Conundrum.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jeremy; McCreesh, Karen; Roy, Jean-Sébastien; Ginn, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Synopsis The hallmark characteristics of rotator cuff (RC) tendinopathy are pain and weakness, experienced most commonly during shoulder external rotation and elevation. Assessment is complicated by nonspecific clinical tests and the poor correlation between structural failure and symptoms. As such, diagnosis is best reached by exclusion of other potential sources of symptoms. Symptomatic incidence and prevalence data currently cannot be determined with confidence, primarily as a consequence of a lack of diagnostic accuracy, as well as the uncertainty as to the location of symptoms. People with symptoms of RC tendinopathy should derive considerable comfort from research that consistently demonstrates improvement in symptoms with a well-structured and graduated exercise program. This improvement is equivalent to outcomes reported in surgical trials, with the additional generalized benefits of exercise, less sick leave, a faster return to work, and reduced costs to the health care system. This evidence covers the spectrum of conditions that include symptomatic RC tendinopathy and atraumatic partial- and full-thickness RC tears. The principles guiding exercise treatment for RC tendinopathy include relative rest, modification of painful activities, an exercise strategy that initially does not exacerbate pain, controlled reloading, and gradual progression from simple to complex shoulder movements. Evidence also exists for a specific exercise program being beneficial for people with massive inoperable tears of the RC. Education is an essential component of rehabilitation, and attention to lifestyle factors (smoking cessation, nutrition, stress, and sleep management) may enhance outcomes. Outcomes may also be enhanced by subgrouping RC tendinopathy presentations and directing treatment strategies according to the clinical presentation and the patient's response to shoulder symptom modification procedures outlined herein. There are substantial deficits in our knowledge

  13. The Dose That Works: Low Level Laser Treatment of Tendinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Tumilty, Steve; Munn, Joanne; David Baxter, G.; McDonough, Suzanne; Hurley, Deirdre A.; Basford, Jeffrey R.

    2010-05-31

    Background: Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) is used in the treatment of tendon injuries. However, the clinical effectiveness of this modality remains controversial with limited agreement on the most efficacious dosage and parameter choices. Purpose: To assess the clinical effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of tendinopathy and the validity of current dosage recommendations for treatment. Method: Medical databases were searched from inception to 1st August 2008. Controlled clinical trials evaluating LLLT as a primary intervention for any tendinopathy were included in the review. Methodological quality was classified using the PEDro scale. Appropriateness of treatment parameters were assessed using established guidelines. Results: Twenty five trials met the inclusion criteria. There was conflicting findings from multiple trials: 12 showed positive effects and 13 were inconclusive or showed no effect. Dosages used in the 12 positive studies support the existence of an effective dosage window that closely resembled current guidelines. Where pooling of data was possible, LLLT showed a positive effect size; in high quality studies of lateral epicondylitis, participants' grip strength was 9.59 Kg higher than the control group; for participants with Achilles tendinopathy, the effect was 13.6 mm less pain on a 100 mm visual analogue scale. Conclusion: This study found conflicting evidence as to the effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of tendinopathy. However, an effective dosage window emerged showing benefit in the treatment of tendinopathy. Strong evidence exists from the 12 positive studies that positive outcomes are associated with the use of current dosage recommendations for the treatment of tendinopathy.

  14. The Dose That Works: Low Level Laser Treatment of Tendinopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumilty, Steve; Munn, Joanne; McDonough, Suzanne; Hurley, Deirdre A.; Basford, Jeffrey R.; David Baxter, G.

    2010-05-01

    Background: Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) is used in the treatment of tendon injuries. However, the clinical effectiveness of this modality remains controversial with limited agreement on the most efficacious dosage and parameter choices. Purpose: To assess the clinical effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of tendinopathy and the validity of current dosage recommendations for treatment. Method: Medical databases were searched from inception to 1st August 2008. Controlled clinical trials evaluating LLLT as a primary intervention for any tendinopathy were included in the review. Methodological quality was classified using the PEDro scale. Appropriateness of treatment parameters were assessed using established guidelines. Results: Twenty five trials met the inclusion criteria. There was conflicting findings from multiple trials: 12 showed positive effects and 13 were inconclusive or showed no effect. Dosages used in the 12 positive studies support the existence of an effective dosage window that closely resembled current guidelines. Where pooling of data was possible, LLLT showed a positive effect size; in high quality studies of lateral epicondylitis, participants' grip strength was 9.59 Kg higher than the control group; for participants with Achilles tendinopathy, the effect was 13.6 mm less pain on a 100 mm visual analogue scale. Conclusion: This study found conflicting evidence as to the effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of tendinopathy. However, an effective dosage window emerged showing benefit in the treatment of tendinopathy. Strong evidence exists from the 12 positive studies that positive outcomes are associated with the use of current dosage recommendations for the treatment of tendinopathy.

  15. Treatment of tendinopathies with platelet-rich plasma.

    PubMed

    Mautner, Ken; Kneer, Lee

    2014-11-01

    Pain and dysfunction related to tendinopathy are often refractory to traditional treatments and offer a unique challenge to physicians, because no gold standard treatment exists. Injectable biologics may represent a new modality in conjunction with a multifaceted treatment approach. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections are not associated with the systemic or tendon degradation risks of corticosteroids or the inherent risks of surgery. Studies are promising but have not been replicated with high-powered evidence at the clinical level. Further evidence to expand understanding of the role of PRP in the treatment of tendinopathy is needed.

  16. Evaluation and nonsurgical management of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Greis, Ari C; Derrington, Stephen M; McAuliffe, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    Rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy is a common finding that accounts for about 7% of patients with shoulder pain. There are numerous theories on the pathogenesis of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy. The diagnosis is confirmed with radiography, MRI or ultrasound. There are numerous conservative treatment options available and most patients can be managed successfully without surgical intervention. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and multiple modalities are often used to manage pain and inflammation; physical therapy can help improve scapular mechanics and decrease dynamic impingement; ultrasound-guided needle aspiration and lavage techniques can provide long-term improvement in pain and function in these patients.

  17. BET 2: Do fluoroquinolones increase the incidence of tendinopathy?

    PubMed

    Baombe, Janos P; Ford, Rebecca

    2016-07-01

    A shortcut review of the literature was carried out to establish whether the use of fluoroquinolones was associated with an increased risk of tendinopathy in adult patients. 10 trials were found to be directly relevant to the three-part question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these papers are tabulated. The clinical bottom line is that there is an association between the use of fluoroquinolones and a broad range of tendinopathies.

  18. How Accurate Are We in Detecting Biceps Tendinopathy?

    PubMed

    Carr, Ryan M; Shishani, Yousef; Gobezie, Reuben

    2016-01-01

    Biceps tendon pain is frequently called biceps "tendinitis," or inflammation of the biceps tendon. Histologic analysis of biceps tendon biopsies demonstrates changes in tenocyte size, ground substance, collagen organization, and vascularity observed with many different tendinopathies. There are distinct symptoms of biceps tendinopathy and a few provocative maneuvers can help make the diagnosis. Imaging studies (eg, MRI) can show changes in signal sequence or tears. However, MRI has a low sensitivity and frequently results in missed or misdiagnosed biceps pathology. Clinical decision making is best guided by a strong clinical suspicion based on patient history, physical examination, and MRI.

  19. Achilles tendinopathy following Kaletra (lopinavir/ritonavir) use.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, F V; Tomlins, J; Churchill, D R; Walker-Bone, K; Richardson, D

    2014-10-01

    A multitude of rheumatologic manifestations have been associated with HIV infection and protease inhibitors use. We describe two cases that display a temporal relationship between initiating Kaletra and developing Achilles tendinopathy. Immediate and dramatic resolution of symptoms occurred on switching from Kaletra to an alternative agent. Clinicians may want to consider a trial of an alternative agent in individuals on Kaletra who experience Achilles tendinopathy. Adverse events must be formally reported so that our understanding of antiretrovirals may continually evolve and aid decisions about antiretroviral prescribing.

  20. Do surgical patellar interventions restore patellar kinematics in fixed-bearing, cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty?: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Keshmiri, Armin; Maderbacher, Günther; Baier, Clemens; Müller, Werner; Grifka, Joachim; Springorum, Hans Robert

    2014-11-01

    Despite different surgical patellar interventions, the decision how to treat the patella during TKA remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of different reconstructive patellar interventions on patellar kinematics during TKA using optical computer navigation. We implanted ten navigated TKAs in full body specimens. During passive motion, the effect of different surgical patellar interventions on patellar kinematics was analysed. A contrarily tilt behaviour was observed in the TKA group without patellar intervention compared to the natural knee. Lateral release led to similar tilt values (P < 0.05). All surgical interventions led to a 3 to 5mm medial shift of the patella (P < 0.05). None of the analysed surgical patellar interventions could restore natural patellar kinematics after TKA.

  1. Lateral patellar dislocation: mechanism of disease, radiographic presentation, and management.

    PubMed

    Abramov, Michael; Stock, Harlan

    2013-04-01

    Lateral patellar dislocation is a common injury occurring in young active adults. The mechanism is that of twisting injury to the knee on a planted foot with valgus stress. Several predisposing factors, including femoral trochlear dysplasia, patella alta, and lateralization of the tibial tuberosity, contribute to patellar instability and lateral patellar dislocation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the knee is the modality of choice to evaluate underlying bone contusion patterns, associated soft-tissue injuries, and additional complex ligamentous and osteochondral injuries, many of which are not apparent on conventional radiographs.

  2. Two-Tension-Band Technique in Revision Surgery for Fixation Failure of Patellar Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Zichao; Qin, Hui; Ding, Haoliang; Xu, Haitao; An, Zhiquan

    2016-01-01

    Background Failed patellar fracture fixation is rare, and is usually attributed to technical errors. There are no specific details available on how to address this problem. We present our two-tension-band technique for fixing patellar fractures. Material/Methods Between March 2010 and March 2013, 4 men and 2 women with failed fixation patellar fractures were treated in our department. Their average age was 34 years (range 23–49 years). The initial fracture type was C1 in 3, C2 in 1, and C3 in 2, according to the AO classification. The initial fracture patterns included 3 transverse and 3 comminuted fractures. There were no open fractures. All patients underwent internal fixation with a modified anterior tension band (MATB) supplemented with cerclage wiring. All failures were caused by tension bands sliding past the tip of the Kirschner wires. The mean time between the primary and revision operations was 16.2 months (range 2–63 months). We revised the fractures by two-separate-tension-band technique. Results The mean follow-up was 52 months (range 31–67 months). All patients healed radiographically without complications at an average of 14.7 weeks (range 8–20 weeks). The Bostman knee score was excellent in 3 and good in 3. All patients regained full extension and the mean range of flexion was 147.5° (135–155°). Conclusions Use of this two-tension-band technique can avoid technical errors and provide more secure fixation. We recommend it for both primary and revision surgery of patellar fractures. PMID:27485104

  3. Gadolinium Enhanced MRI Assessment of Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone Graft Harvest on Patellar Vascularity

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kristofer J.; Lazaro, Lionel E.; Taylor, Samuel; Pardee, Nadine C.; Dyke, Jonathan P.; Hannafin, Jo A.; Warren, Russell F.; Lorich, Dean G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft remains a favored graft source for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction despite problems related to donor-site morbidity. Patellar devascularization has been proposed as a source of anterior knee pain following vascular disruption from traumatic injury (fracture) or surgical procedures involving the patella (total knee arthroplasty); however, no study has investigated the effect of BPTB harvest on patellar vascularity. Recent anatomic studies have suggested that the dominant arterial supply enters the patella through the inferior pole. We hypothesized that BPTB harvest can significantly diminish patellar vascularity following graft harvest. Methods: Nine matched pair cadaveric knee specimens (mean age 47.4 years) were dissected and cannulated at the superficial femoral, anterior tibialis, and posterior tibialis arteries. A single knee was randomly selected to undergo bone graft harvest. The contralateral knee was left intact to serve as a control. Gadolinium (Gd-DPTA) was injected into each knee and MRI signal enhancement was quantified to determine differences in osseous uptake between the two knees. Following MRI assessment, each matched pair was injected with a urethane polymer compound and dissected to correlate vessel disruption with MRI findings. Results: Graft harvest resulted in a mean 31% (range, 7.1-69.5%) decrease in signal enhancement when compared to the matched control. MRI assessment revealed two predominant patterns of vessel entry for the dominant inferior arterial supply. In one pattern, the vessel entered the inferomedial aspect (∼7 o’clock) of the distal patellar pole and was disrupted by bone graft harvest in two matched pairs (2/9, 22%). In the second pattern, the predominant vessel entered further medial (∼8 o’clock) and was not disrupted in 7 matched pairs. The mean decrease in gadolinium uptake following disruption of the predominant vessel measured 56% (range, 42

  4. Clinical and Radiologic Outcomes of Partial Lateral Patellar Facetectomy in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Wan; Lee, Chang-Rack; Seo, Seung-Suk; Gwak, Heui-Chul; Kim, Jung-Han; Park, Joon-Ho

    2017-02-01

    Recently, some authors have performed partial lateral patellar facetectomy in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and reported good results. However, research on partial lateral patellar facetectomy in TKA is still lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiologic results of partial lateral patellar facetectomies in patellar non-resurfacing and resurfacing TKAs. Total 251 TKAs (patellar non-resurfacing: 131; resurfacing: 120) that were followed up for at least 24 months to evaluate the clinical and radiologic results of partial lateral patellar facetectomies in patellar non-resurfacing and resurfacing TKAs were retrospectively reviewed. The radiologic evaluations involved assessments of the patellar tilt angle and the lateral patellar displacement, and the clinical evaluations involved assessments of the Knee Society knee score, Knee Society function score, Feller patellar score, and Kujala score. In patellar non-resurfacing TKA, the average postoperative patellar tilt angle and lateral patellar displacement of the group that did not undergo facetectomy were 7.0 ± 4.8 degrees and 2.4 ± 3.6 mm, respectively, and the average postoperative patellar tilt angle and lateral patellar displacement of the group that did undergo facetectomy were 4.0 ± 3.8 degrees and 0.7 ± 2.5 mm, respectively. Significant differences were observed in the postoperative patellar tilt angle and lateral patellar displacement (p < 0.001 and p = 0.004, respectively). In patellar resurfacing TKA, while the patellar tilt angle showed a significant difference between the group that underwent facetectomy (6.7 ± 3.1 degrees) and the group that did not (8.3 ± 4.4 degrees) (p = 0.023), it exhibited no difference in the lateral patellar displacement between the two groups. In both patellar non-resurfacing TKA and resurfacing TKA, the postoperative clinical results did not show any difference between no-facetectomy group and facetectomy

  5. Patellar Articular Overlap on MRI Is a Simple Alternative to Conventional Measurements of Patellar Height

    PubMed Central

    Munch, Jacqueline L.; Sullivan, Jaron P.; Nguyen, Joseph T.; Mintz, Douglas; Green, Daniel W.; Shubin Stein, Beth E.; Strickland, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patella alta describes an abnormally high-riding patella in relationship to the femur and has been shown to correlate with patellofemoral pain, instability, chondromalacia, and arthrosis. Conventional measurements of patella alta involve multiple measurements and are often not defined on cross-sectional imaging as related to radiographs. Hypothesis: Patellar articular overlap on sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will correlate well with conventional measurements of patella alta as measured by a standardized technique defined by our group. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: MRIs of 239 knees were reviewed by 3 attending surgeons with practices focusing on patellofemoral disease, as well as 2 sports medicine fellows and 1 musculoskeletal radiologist. Measurements included articular overlap, percentage of articular coverage, Caton-Deschamps index, Blackburne-Peel index, and modified Insall-Salvati index. Results: Interrater reliability was high for Caton-Deschamps, Blackburne-Peel, and modified Insall-Salvati indices (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC], 0.877, 0.828, and 0.787, respectively). Articular overlap and percentage articular coverage correlated well with each other (ICC, 0.961; P < .001) and with the Caton-Deschamps (overlap r = –0.271, P < .001; coverage r = –0.131, P = .037) and Blackburne-Peel (overlap r = 0.343, P < .001; coverage r = –0.238, P < .001) indices. Articular overlap and percentage coverage failed to correlate with the modified Insall-Salvati index (overlap r = –0.117, P = .091; coverage r = 0.007, P = .918). Conclusion: Patellar articular overlap and percentage of patellar articular coverage show promise as a simpler alternative to conventional, ratio-based measurements of patellar height. Future studies are needed to evaluate the range of normal and the relationship to our traditionally used measurements. PMID:27482530

  6. Drug-induced tendinopathy: from physiology to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Kirchgesner, Thomas; Larbi, Ahmed; Omoumi, Patrick; Malghem, Jacques; Zamali, Nadia; Manelfe, Julien; Lecouvet, Frédéric; Vande Berg, Bruno; Djebbar, Sahlya; Dallaudière, Benjamin

    2014-12-01

    Drug-induced tendon toxicity is rare but often underestimated. To date, four main drug classes have been incriminated in tendinopathies. Quinolones and long-term glucocorticoids are the most widely known, but statins and aromatase inhibitors can also induce tendon damage. The specific pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for drug-induced tendinopathies remain unknown. Proven risk factors have been identified, such as age older than 60 years, pre-existing tendinopathy, and potentiation of toxic effects when several drug classes are used in combination. Mean time to symptom onset varies from a few days with quinolones to several months with statins and several years for long-term glucocorticoid therapy. The most common sites of involvement are the lower limb tendons, most notably the body of the Achilles tendon. The first part of this review discusses tendon anatomy and the pathophysiology and radiological manifestations of tendinopathies. The second part provides details on the main characteristics of each of the drugs classes associated with tendon toxicity.

  7. CALCIFYING TENDINOPATHY: A LOCAL OR A SYSTEMIC CONDITION?

    PubMed Central

    Ejnisman, Benno; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Monteiro, Gustavo Cará; Pocchini, Alberto de Castro; Cohen, Carina; Tortato, Simone; Franklin, Marcelo Marques Khede; Machado, Arthur Beber; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between cases of calcifying tendinopathy of the shoulder and symptomatic metabolic diseases such as kidney stones, gallstones and gout. Methods: Calcifying tendinopathy of the shoulder was diagnosed in 63 patients between May 2007 and September 2011. All the patients were treated by the same orthopedic surgeon and were interviewed to gather the following data: age at diagnosis, sex, affected side, dominant side, body mass index (BMI), smoking status and previous histories of kidney stones, gallstones or gout. For statistical analysis, a control group of 63 patients with similar demographic characteristics was used. Results: Among the 63 patients with calcifying tendinopathy of the shoulder, 35 (56%) were male. The right side was affected in 38 patients (60%) and the average age was 48.2 years. Thirty-one patients (49%) had histories involving some of the metabolic diseases investigated: 20 patients (32%) reported kidney stones, six (9.5%) gallstones, four (6.3%) gout and one (2%) concurrent diagnoses of kidney stones and gout. In the control group, eleven patients (17%) had histories involving some of the metabolic diseases investigated: six patients (9.5%) reported kidney stones, four (6.3%) gallstones and one (1.6 %) gout. Conclusions: The high frequency of nephrolithiasis in patients with calcifying tendinopathy of the shoulder in our study suggests that there are common mechanisms in the pathophysiology of these disorders. Better understanding of these diseases may enable improvement of diagnostics and treatments. PMID:27047854

  8. Direct Repair without Augmentation of Patellar Tendon Avulsion following TKA

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nishikant; Yadav, Chandrashekhar; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Complications involving the extensor mechanism after TKA are potentially disastrous. We are reporting a case of patellar tendon rupture from tibial tuberosity following total knee arthroplasty. We managed it by direct repair with fiberwire using Krackow suture technique without augmentation. Our long term result has been very encouraging. Our method is a safe and better method of management of patellar tendon avulsion following TKA when it happens without any tissue loss. PMID:25632362

  9. Degradation of elastic fiber and elevated elastase expression in long head of biceps tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yen-Ting; Su, Wei-Ren; Wu, Po-Ting; Shen, Po-Chuan; Jou, I-Ming

    2016-12-09

    Tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps (TLHB) involves various types of extracellular matrix degeneration, but previous studies have not evaluated elastic fibers. The purpose of this study was to investigate elastic fiber distribution in long head of the biceps (LHB). The TLHB tendons of 16 consecutive patients (eight men and eight women; average age of 55.75 years; age range of 40-71 years) were transected and harvested. Three cadaveric LHB tendons were used as the control group. The expression of collagen type I was decreased, but type III was increased in TLHB. Disruption of elastic fibers was particularly observed in grade II specimens where the level of elastase-positive staining was significantly higher than in grade I specimens. Elastic fibers were not observed in the grade III area, implying a higher expression of elastase than in the grade I area. Results of Western blotting showed that the expression of elastin was higher in the control group and the levels of elastin significantly decreased in grades II and III of TLHB. Levels of osteopontin and elastase were increased in primary culture of human tenocytes after experiencing elastic derived peptide treatment. These results suggested that elastase may be caused by the disruption of elastic fibers in the development of chronic tendinopathy and that elastic derived peptide may enhance elastase and osteopontin expression. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  10. Outcome Evaluation in Tendinopathy: Foundations of Assessment and a Summary of Selected Measures.

    PubMed

    Macdermid, Joy C; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare

    2015-11-01

    Synopsis Clinical measurement studies that address outcome evaluation for patients with tendinopathy should consider conceptual, clinical, practical, and measurement issues to guide the selection of valid measures. Clinical outcomes reported in research studies can provide benchmarks that assist with interpretation of scores during clinical decision making. Given the pathophysiology and functional impacts of tendinopathy, there is a need for outcome measures that assess physical impairments, activity performance, and patient-reported symptoms and function. Tendinopathy-specific patient-reported outcome measures have been shown to be superior to more generic tools for some conditions, such as lateral epicondyle tendinopathy (Patient-Rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation) and Achilles tendinopathy (Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles), whereas both generic shoulder outcome measures and disease-specific measures perform similarly in individuals with rotator cuff tendinopathy. A patient-reported outcome measure that captures pain and limitation in function should be fundamental to outcome evaluation in patients with tendinopathy. The current measurement literature does not yet provide comprehensive empirical data to define optimal outcome measures for all types of tendinopathy. This article reviews concepts, instruments, and measurement properties that should provide clinicians with a foundation for assessment of condition severity and treatment outcomes in patients with tendinopathy. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2015;45(11):950-964. Epub 15 Oct 2015. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.6054.

  11. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... degenerative and posttraumatic patellar arthritis. (2) Class III when intended for uses other than treatment of degenerative and posttraumatic patellar arthritis. (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required....

  12. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  16. Achilles tendinopathy: A review of the current concepts of treatment.

    PubMed

    Roche, A J; Calder, J D F

    2013-10-01

    The two main categories of Achilles tendon disorder are broadly classified by anatomical location to include non-insertional and insertional conditions. Non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy is often managed conservatively, and many rehabilitation protocols have been adapted and modified, with excellent clinical results. Emerging and popular alternative therapies, including a variety of injections and extracorporeal shockwave therapy, are often combined with rehabilitation protocols. Surgical approaches have developed, with minimally invasive procedures proving popular. The management of insertional Achilles tendinopathy is improved by recognising coexisting pathologies around the insertion. Conservative rehabilitation protocols as used in non-insertional disorders are thought to prove less successful, but such methods are being modified, with improving results. Treatment such as shockwave therapy is also proving successful. Surgical approaches specific to the diagnosis are constantly evolving, and good results have been achieved.

  17. Heat Shock Proteins in Tendinopathy: Novel Molecular Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Neal L.; Murrell, George A. C.

    2012-01-01

    Tendon disorders—tendinopathies—are the primary reason for musculoskeletal consultation in primary care and account for up to 30% of rheumatological consultations. Whilst the molecular pathophysiology of tendinopathy remains difficult to interpret the disease process involving repetitive stress, and cellular load provides important mechanistic insight into the area of heat shock proteins which spans many disease processes in the autoimmune community. Heat shock proteins, also called damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), are rapidly released following nonprogrammed cell death, are key effectors of the innate immune system, and critically restore homeostasis by promoting the reconstruction of the effected tissue. Our investigations have highlighted a key role for HSPs in tendion disease which may ultimately affect tissue rescue mechanisms in tendon pathology. This paper aims to provide an overview of the biology of heat shock proteins in soft tissue and how these mediators may be important regulators of inflammatory mediators and matrix regulation in tendinopathy. PMID:23258952

  18. Intratendinous Tophaceous Gout Imitating Patellar Tendonitis in an Athletic Man

    PubMed Central

    Gililland, Jeremy M.; Webber, Nicholas P.; Jones, Kevin B.; Randall, R. Lor; Aoki, Stephen K.

    2013-01-01

    Patellar tendon-related pain is common in the athletic patient. When it occurs in skeletally mature patients participating in running, jumping, or kicking sports, the diagnosis of jumper’s knee patellar tendonitis is usually made. If patellar tendon pain is associated with a mass, the differential diagnosis should be broadened to include crystalline arthropathy. This article presents a case of a highly athletic 45-year-old man with a history of gout, anterior knee pain, and an enlarging mass in the region of the patellar tendon. Conservative management failed, and an excisional biopsy found it to be an intra-tendinous gouty tophus. To our knowledge, only 1 report exists documenting a patellar tendon mass secondary to gout, and no case report exists documenting this problem in an athlete. The interplay between athletics and gout has not been well described. Despite the long-term protective nature of fitness, transient elevations in uric acid associated with athletic endeavors may contribute acutely to manifestations of gout in some athletes. Resultant intra- or extra-articular pathology may present as, and easily be mistaken for, a sports-related injury. Without appropriate medical management, tophaceous deposition may continue to occur and treatment of the resultant mass may require surgical intervention. PMID:21410111

  19. Human patellar articular proportions: recent and Pleistocene patterns

    PubMed Central

    TRINKAUS, ERIK

    2000-01-01

    The degrees of mediolateral asymmetry of the patellar articular facet, as well as the median and lateral articular angles of the facet, were compared across samples of recent humans and of Pleistocene archaic and modern fossil humans. All samples exhibit considerable variability in these patellar proportions. The articular angles are similar across the different samples, but there is a trend towards decreasing lateral angles with decreasing robusticity. The archaic humans exhibit significantly more symmetry of the medial and lateral facets than do any of the recent human samples. However, given the variability in medial versus lateral patellofemoral contact forces documented for extant humans and the roles of the distal oblique portions of vastus medialis and vastus lateralis in patellar stabilisation, it is unclear to what extent this variation in patellar articular proportions may affect knee kinesiology. The contrasts may be related to different levels of patellar stability and/or musculoskeletal hypertrophy, but they appear unlikely to have affected primary knee function. PMID:10853969

  20. Factors of patellar instability: an anatomic radiographic study.

    PubMed

    Dejour, H; Walch, G; Nove-Josserand, L; Guier, C

    1994-01-01

    We analyzed the radiographs and computed tomography (CT) scans of 143 knees operated on for symptomatic patellar instability and 67 contralateral asymptomatic knees, together with 190 control knee radiographs and 27 control knee scans, to determine the factors affecting patellar instability. Four factors were relevant in knees with symptomatic patellar instability: (1) Trochlear dysplasia (85%), as defined by the crossing sign (96%) and quantitatively expressed by the trochlear bump, pathological above 3 mm or more (66%), and the trochlear depth, pathologic at 4 mm or less. (2) Quadriceps dysplasia (83%), defined a present when the patellar tilt in extension is more than 20% on the CT scans. (3) Patella alta (Caton-Deschamps) index greater than or equal to 1.2 (24%). (4) Tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove, pathological when greater than or equal to 20 mm (56%). The factors appeared in only 3%-6.5% of the control knees. The etiology of patellar instability is multifactorial. Determination of the factors permits an effective elective therapeutic plan which aims at correcting the anomalies present.

  1. Tendinopathy: Is Imaging Telling Us the Entire Story?

    PubMed

    Docking, Sean I; Ooi, Chin Chin; Connell, David

    2015-11-01

    Synopsis Tendinopathy is frequently associated with structural disorganization within the tendon. As such, the clinical use of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging for tendinopathy has been the focus of numerous academic studies and clinical discussions. However, similar to other musculoskeletal conditions (osteoarthritis and intervertebral disc degeneration), there is no direct link between tendon structural disorganization and clinical symptoms, with findings on imaging potentially creating a confusing clinical picture. While imaging shows the presence and extent of structural changes within the tendon, the clinical interpretation of the images requires context in regard to the features of pain and the aggravating loads. This review will critically evaluate studies that have investigated the accuracy and sensitivity of imaging in the detection of clinical tendinopathy and the methodological issues associated with these studies (subject selection, lack of a robust gold standard, reliance on subjective measures). The advent of new imaging modalities allowing for the quantification of tendon structure or mechanical properties has allowed new critical insight into tendon pathology. A strength of these novel modalities is the ability to quantify properties of the tendon. Research utilizing ultrasound tissue characterization and sonoelastography will be discussed. This narrative review will also attempt to synthesize current research on whether imaging can predict the onset of pain or clinical outcome, the role of monitoring tendon structure during rehabilitation (ie, does tendon structure need to improve to get a positive clinical outcome?), and future directions for research, and to propose the clinical role of imaging in tendinopathy. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2015;45(11):842-852. Epub 21 Sep 2015. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.5880.

  2. Gluteal Tendinopathy: A Review of Mechanisms, Assessment and Management.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Alison; Mellor, Rebecca; Hodges, Paul; Bennell, Kim; Wajswelner, Henry; Vicenzino, Bill

    2015-08-01

    Tendinopathy of the gluteus medius and gluteus minimus tendons is now recognized as a primary local source of lateral hip pain. The condition mostly occurs in mid-life both in athletes and in subjects who do not regularly exercise. Females are afflicted more than males. This condition interferes with sleep (side lying) and common weight-bearing tasks, which makes it a debilitating musculoskeletal condition with a significant impact. Mechanical loading drives the biological processes within a tendon and determines its structural form and load-bearing capacity. The combination of excessive compression and high tensile loads within tendons are thought to be most damaging. The available evidence suggests that joint position (particularly excessive hip adduction), together with muscle and bone elements, are key factors in gluteal tendinopathy. These factors provide a basis for a clinical reasoning process in the assessment and management of a patient presenting with localized lateral hip pain from gluteal tendinopathy. Currently, there is a lack of consensus as to which clinical examination tests provide best diagnostic utility. On the basis of the few diagnostic utility studies and the current understanding of the pathomechanics of gluteal tendinopathy, we propose that a battery of clinical tests utilizing a combination of provocative compressive and tensile loads is currently best practice in its assessment. Management of this condition commonly involves corticosteroid injection, exercise or shock wave therapy, with surgery reserved for recalcitrant cases. There is a dearth of evidence for any treatments, so the approach we recommend involves managing the load on the tendons through exercise and education on the underlying pathomechanics.

  3. Factors Associated with Operative Treatment of De Quervain Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kachooei, Amir Reza; Nota, Sjoerd P.F.T; Menendez, Mariano E; Dyer, George S.M.; Ring, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: Geographic and doctor-to-doctor variations in care are a focus of quality and safety efforts in medicine. This study addresses factors associated with variation in the rate of operative treatment of de Quervain tendinopathy. Methods: We used a database including all patient encounters at 2 large medical centers, to study the experience of 10 hand surgeons and 1 physiatrist working in a hand surgery office in the treatment of 2,513 patients with de Quervain tendinopathy over a 12-year period. Survival analysis using the Kaplan-Meier method was used to compare surgery rates and time to surgery. Cox multivariable regression analysis was applied to identify factors associated with operative treatment. Results: One hundred ninety nine (7.9%) patients had surgery. The odds of operative treatment were 1.7 times greater after corticosteroid injection and varied more than 10-fold among providers. There was substantial variation in the overall rate of surgery by provider. Corticosteroid injection delayed surgery slightly, but was associated with a higher rate of surgery. Conclusion: Providers have substantial influence on treatment of de Quervain tendinopathy. The use of decision aids and other methods that help involve the patient in decision-making merit investigation as interventions to help reduce doctor-to-doctor variation. PMID:26213704

  4. Therapeutic use of hormones on tendinopathies: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Michele; Guelfi, Matteo; Pantalone, Andrea; Vanni, Daniele; Schiavone, Cosima; Andia, Isabel; Salini, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Hormones can modify tendon homeostasis, some of them leading to tendon damage, while others are essentials for healing. This narrative review summarizes the current knowledge on the topic, focusing on the hormones normally secreted by endocrine glands. Methods A search in PubMed, Web of Knowledge and EMBASE, using the terms tendinopathy or tendon, combined with estrogens, testosterone, thyroid and parathyroid hormones, glucocorticoids and growth hormone, independently, was performed. Relevant articles focusing on the correlation between hormones and tendons, and their therapeutic use in tendinopathies, were selected. Results Tendon abnormalities observed in subjects with hyperparathyroidism, hypercortisolism and acromegaly are described. At present, experimental studies and preliminary observations in humans suggest that parathyroid and growth hormones, locally administered, are promising therapeutic tools in specific tendon disorders. Local injections of glucocorticoids are useful in several tendinopathies, exploiting their anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties, but carry the risk of further tendon degeneration and ruptures, due to the detrimental direct effect of glucocorticoids on the tendon structure. Conclusion Because tendons injuries are frequent, often with long lasting sequels, it is important to improve our understanding concerning the therapeutic potential of hormones on healing. Level of evidence IV. PMID:28217565

  5. Using Real-Time MRI to Quantify Altered Joint Kinematics in Subjects with Patellofemoral Pain and to Evaluate the Effects of a Patellar Brace or Sleeve on Joint Motion

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Christine E.; Besier, Thor F.; Santos, Juan M.; Jennings, Fabio; Fredericson, Michael; Gold, Garry E.; Beaupre, Gary S.; Delp, Scott L.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal patellofemoral joint motion is a possible cause of patellofemoral pain, and patellar braces are thought to alleviate pain by restoring normal joint kinematics. We evaluated whether females with patellofemoral pain exhibit abnormal patellofemoral joint kinematics during dynamic, weight-bearing knee extension and assessed the effects of knee braces on patellofemoral motion. Real-time magnetic resonance (MR) images of the patellofemoral joints of 36 female volunteers (13 pain-free controls, 23 patellofemoral pain) were acquired during weight-bearing knee extension. Pain subjects were also imaged while wearing a patellar-stabilizing brace and a patellar sleeve. We measured axial-plane kinematics from the images. Females with patellofemoral pain exhibited increased lateral translation of the patella for knee flexion angles between 0° and 50° (p = 0.03), and increased lateral tilt for knee flexion angles between 0° and 20° (p = 0.04). The brace and sleeve reduced the lateral translation of the patella; however, the brace reduced lateral displacement more than the sleeve (p = 0.006). The brace reduced patellar tilt near full extension (p = 0.001), while the sleeve had no effect on patellar tilt. Our results indicate that some subjects with patellofemoral pain exhibit abnormal weight-bearing joint kinematics and that braces may be effective in reducing patellar maltracking in these subjects. PMID:18985690

  6. Arthroscopic excision of distal pole of patella for refractory patellar tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John D

    2009-07-01

    This article examines the results of arthroscopic tendon debridement with excision of the distal pole of the patella for refractory patellar tendinitis. Nine patients failed at least 3 months of conservative therapy and underwent arthroscopic excision of the distal patellar pole with debridement of the deep proximal patella tendon. At least 3 months postoperatively (range, 3 months-5 years), 8 patients reported no distal patellar pole tenderness (Bassett sign), and 1 patient reported only mild tenderness. Arthroscopic excision of the distal patellar pole with tendon debridement holds promise for the treatment of refractory patellar tendinitis.

  7. Endoscopic Resection of Gouty Tophus of the Patellar Tendon.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-08-01

    Tophaceous deposition of tendon can result in spontaneous patellar tendon rupture. Surgical therapy may be needed to control symptoms and prevent tendon rupture. Open debridement of the lesion requires a lengthy incision over the lesion; this may result in symptomatic scar adhesion of the patellar tendon or an unhealed wound with persistent tophaceous discharge. Moreover, the other part of the patellar tendon cannot be examined through the incision. We describe a technique for endoscopic resection of a gouty tophus of the patellar tendon. It has the advantage of small incisions away from the lesion and tendon and minimizes wound problems. The whole patellar tendon can be examined endoscopically.

  8. Current evidence of extracorporeal shock wave therapy in chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Gerdesmeyer, Ludger; Mittermayr, Rainer; Fuerst, Martin; Al Muderis, Munjed; Thiele, Richard; Saxena, Amol; Gollwitzer, Hans

    2015-12-01

    Chronic Achilles tendinopathy has been described as the most common overuse injury in sports medicine. Several treatment modalities such as activity modification, heel lifts, arch supports, stretching exercises, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, and eccentric loading are known as standard treatment mostly without proven evidence. After failed conservative therapy, invasive treatment may be considered. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been successfully used in soft-tissue pathologies like lateral epicondylitis, plantar fasciitis, tendinopathy of the shoulder and also in bone and skin disorders. Conclusive evidence recommending ESWT as a treatment for Achilles tendinopathy is still lacking. In plantar fasciitis as well as in calcific shoulder tendinopathy shock wave therapy is recently the best evaluated treatment option. This article analysis the evidence based literature of ESWT in chronic Achilles tendinopathy. Recently published data have shown the efficacy of focused and radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy.

  9. Operative Management of Patellar Instability in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Arshi, Armin; Cohen, Jeremiah R.; Wang, Jeffrey C.; Hame, Sharon L.; McAllister, David R.; Jones, Kristofer J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Treatment of patellofemoral instability has evolved as our understanding of the relevant pathoanatomy has improved. In light of these developments, current practice patterns and management trends have likely changed to reflect these advancements; however, this has not been evaluated in a formal study. Purpose: To determine nationwide patient demographics, surgical trends, and postoperative complications associated with the operative management of patellar instability surgery. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiological study. Methods: A large private-payer database (PearlDiver) comprising patients covered by Humana and United Healthcare insurance policies was retrospectively reviewed using Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes to identify patients who underwent surgery for patellar instability. The study cohort was established by querying for patients billed under CPT codes 27420, 27422, or 27427 while satisfying the diagnostic requirement of patellar instability (International Classification of Diseases–9th Revision codes 718.36, 718.86, or 836.3). Patient demographics, surgical trends, concomitant procedures, and postoperative complications were determined. Results: A total of 6190 patients underwent surgical management for patellar instability. Adolescents (age range, 10-19 years) represented 51.5% of cases, and 59.6% were female. The number of patellar instability procedures increased annually over the study period in both the Humana (P = .004, R 2 = 0.76) and United Healthcare (P = .097, R 2 = 0.54) cohorts. The most common concomitant procedures were lateral retinacular release (43.7%), chondroplasty (31.1%), tibial tubercle osteotomy (13.1%), removal of loose bodies (10.5%), osteochondral grafting (9.5%), and microfracture surgery (9.5%). Manipulation under anesthesia was required in 4.6% of patients within 1 year. Patellar fracture within 1 year and infection within 30 days occurred in 2.1% and 1.2% of patients, respectively. Conclusion

  10. Lateral patellar luxation in nine small breed dogs

    PubMed Central

    Dona, F. Di; Valle, G. Della; Balestriere, C.; Lamagna, B.; Meomartino, L.; Napoleone, G.; Lamagna, F.; Fatone, G.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to describe the clinical features, the management and the outcome of nine small breed dogs affected with lateral patella luxation referred during the period between January 2010 and December 2014. Patellar luxations were classified according to: breed, age, sex, weight, and grade of patellar luxation, as well as if unilateral or bilateral, and concurrent cranial cruciate ligament lesion. In affected dogs, surgical correction consisted in the combination of tibial tuberosity transposition and soft tissue procedure. Adjunctive condroplasty or trochleoplasty was performed as needing. The outcome was found positive after surgical management with low complication rate and complications have been easily managed with high success rate. PMID:28116250

  11. Risk Factors for Lower Extremity Tendinopathies in Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-27

    Achilles tendinitis , 584 cases of patellar tendinitis , and 1228 cases plantar fasciitis were identified. Recent deployment was associated with an...consumption was marginally associated with an increased risk for Achilles tendinitis (AOR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.00, 1.76). Overweight or obese individuals...were more likely to develop both Achilles tendinitis and plantar fasciitis. Specific occupations, including health care workers, were at

  12. PHYSICAL THERAPY INTERVENTION FOR MEDIAL PATELLOFEMORAL LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION AFTER REPEATED LATERAL PATELLAR SUBLUXATION/DISLOCATION

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Brianne; Vitale, Ashley; Apergis, Demitra; Wirth, Stephen; Grossman, Mark G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The incidence of patellar subluxation or dislocation has been documented up to 43/100,000 with females more prevalent then males. There are many contributing factors involving the hip, knee, and ankle that lead to patellar subluxation. A patellar position of lateral tilt with lateral glide may indicate weakness of the vastus medialis oblique (VMO) and adductors, increased tightness in the iliotibial band, and overpowering of the vastus lateralis. Patella alta can predispose an individual to lateral dislocation due to the patella placement outside of the femoral trochlear groove with a disadvantage of boney stability. Other factors that may cause the patella to laterally sublux or dislocate during a functional activity or sporting activity include a position of femoral external rotation, tibial internal rotation, and excessive contraction of the vastus lateralis. The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) aids in the prevention of a lateral patellar subluxation or dislocation. In cases where there is recurrent subluxation/dislocation and Magnetic Resonance Imaging confirms a MPFL tear, a reconstruction may be the treatment of choice. Purpose The purpose of this case series is to describe the post-surgical physical therapy management of MPFL reconstructions, outcomes using the Modified Cincinnati Knee Outcome Measure (MCKOM) and to propose staged physical therapy interventions for this pathology in the form of a treatment progression. Methods Post-operative management data and outcomes were retrospectively collected using a detailed chart review methodology from seven subjects who underwent MPFL reconstruction. Findings The Modified Cincinnati Knee Outcome Measure (MCKOM) was analyzed for each participant in four sections that were most important to the return and maintenance of participation in sport. At follow-up the mean scores for the seven subjects in Section 3 (instability) was 19.3/20, Section 4 (overall activity level) was 17.3/20, Section

  13. Adductor T reflex abnormalities in patients with decreased patellar reflexes.

    PubMed

    Tataroglu, Cengiz; Deneri, Ersin; Ozkul, Ayca; Sair, Ahmet; Yaycioglu, Soner

    2009-08-01

    The adductor reflex (AR) is a tendon reflex that has various features that differ from other tendon reflexes. This reflex was tested in different disorders presenting with diminished patellar reflexes such as diabetic lumbosacral radiculoplexus neuropathy (DLRPN), L2-L4 radiculopathy, and distal symmetric diabetic neuropathy (diabetic PNP). The AR and crossed-AR (elicited by tapping the contralateral patellar tendon) were recorded using concentric needle electrodes. Additionally, the patellar T reflex (vm-TR) and vastus medialis H reflex (vm-HR) were recorded using surface electrodes. AR was recorded in only one out of eight patients with DLRPN, but it was recorded in 21 out of 22 patients with L2-L4 radiculopathy (95.5%). Of these reflexes, only AR showed prolonged latency in the L2-L4 radiculopathy group. The latencies of AR, vm-TR, and vm-HR were prolonged in patients with diabetic PNP. We conclude that AR can be useful in the differential diagnosis of some lower motor neuron disorders that present with patellar reflex disturbance. Muscle Nerve 40: 264-270, 2009.

  14. Operative treatment and arthroscopic findings in chronic patellar tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, G P; Selesnick, F H

    1998-01-01

    Patellar tendinitis is a well-described clinical entity that usually responds well to conservative treatment. However, a subset of patients continue with symptoms despite exhaustive nonoperative means. The objective of the study was to review the treatment course and operative results of seven patients (eight knees) with chronic patellar tendinitis treated surgically. Five (70%) of these patients were either professional or collegiate athletes. The average age was 30 years (range, 20 to 45 years). Duration of symptoms averaged 1.4 years (range, 3 months to 4 years) before surgical correction. Operative treatment included knee arthroscopy and open repair consisting of excision of degenerated tissue and stimulation of a healing response of the patellar tendon pathology. Operative findings and pathology reports consistently showed marked fibrotendinous degeneration. Follow-up averaged 3.6 years (range, 4 months to 8.5 years). Outcomes were measured subjectively with SF36 results and objectively with Biodex testing (Biodex, Shirley, NY) and return to previous level of competition. Overall, 86% of patients achieved an excellent result and 14% had a fair result. We recommend operative intervention in a patient with chronic patellar tendinitis who does not improve with well-supervised, comprehensive conservative treatment.

  15. Nutraceutical supplement in the management of tendinopathies: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fusini, Federico; Bisicchia, Salvatore; Bottegoni, Carlo; Gigante, Antonio; Zanchini, Fabio; Busilacchi, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background nutraceuticals are common support therapy for management of tendinopathies. Even if they are widely diffused, our knowledge is still poor. The aim of this systematic review is to analyze the most commonly used nutraceuticals and their effects on tendons. Methods glucosamine and chondroitin sulphate, vitamin C, hydrolazed type 1 collagen, arginine alpha-keto-glutarate, bromelain, curcumin, boswellic acid, and methil-sulfonil-methane were considered. During the last week of Dicember 2015 a comprehensive research of main databases for each substance was made in relation with tendinopathy. Repeated articles, articles not in English nor in Italian, not common nutraceuticals, and articles not related with tendons or tenocytes were excluded. Clinical article quality was assessed independently by two reviewers using the modified Coleman methodology score. Results preclinical and clinical data from 46 articles from all databases were analyzed. All these nutraceuticals demonstrated several effects on normal and pathological tendons. Preclinical and clinical studies showed a possible role on collagen synthesis, inflammation, mechanical properties, and maturation of collagen bundles, antioxidant effect, edema, and analgesia. The majority clinical studies had some methodological limitations with an average Modified Coleman Methodology Score of 51.3 points and SD of 20.5 points. In particular, there were very low values in power, error, outcome assessment, and clinical effect. Conclusion preclinical results are very encouraging, however they are not fully confirmed by clinical studies. There are few clinical papers on the use of nutraceuticals in tendon disorders, and their methodological quality is poor. Furthermore, in most of the studies more than one supplement was administered at the same time. This may bias the results, and the effect of each single component cannot be determined. Furthermore, the interactions between nutraceuticals and drugs, or other

  16. Achilles Tendinopathy: Current Concepts about the Basic Science and Clinical Treatments.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Yun; Hua, Ying-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is one of the most frequently ankle and foot overuse injuries, which is a clinical syndrome characterized by the combination of pain, swelling, and impaired performance. The two main categories of Achilles tendinopathy are classified according to anatomical location and broadly include insertional and noninsertional tendinopathy. The etiology of Achilles tendinopathy is multifactorial including both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Failed healing response and degenerative changes were found in the tendon. The failed healing response includes three different and continuous stages (reactive tendinopathy, tendon disrepair, and degenerative tendinopathy). The histological studies have demonstrated an increased number of tenocytes and concentration of glycosaminoglycans in the ground substance, disorganization and fragmentation of the collagen, and neovascularization. There are variable conservative and surgical treatment options for Achilles tendinopathy. However, there has not been a gold standard of these treatments because of the controversial clinical results between various studies. In the future, new level I researches will be needed to prove the effect of these treatment options.

  17. Achilles Tendinopathy: Current Concepts about the Basic Science and Clinical Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is one of the most frequently ankle and foot overuse injuries, which is a clinical syndrome characterized by the combination of pain, swelling, and impaired performance. The two main categories of Achilles tendinopathy are classified according to anatomical location and broadly include insertional and noninsertional tendinopathy. The etiology of Achilles tendinopathy is multifactorial including both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Failed healing response and degenerative changes were found in the tendon. The failed healing response includes three different and continuous stages (reactive tendinopathy, tendon disrepair, and degenerative tendinopathy). The histological studies have demonstrated an increased number of tenocytes and concentration of glycosaminoglycans in the ground substance, disorganization and fragmentation of the collagen, and neovascularization. There are variable conservative and surgical treatment options for Achilles tendinopathy. However, there has not been a gold standard of these treatments because of the controversial clinical results between various studies. In the future, new level I researches will be needed to prove the effect of these treatment options. PMID:27885357

  18. Pelvic limb alignment in small breed dogs: a comparison between affected and free subjects from medial patellar luxation.

    PubMed

    Olimpo, Matteo; Piras, Lisa Adele; Peirone, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Small breed dogs are 12 times more likely to develop medial patellar luxation (MPL) than large breed dogs and breed predisposition has been reported. Many surgical techniques are available for correction of patellar luxation in dogs. However, recent studies reported an 8% incidence of reluxation when traditional techniques are used. The relatively high frequency of major complications and patellar reluxation may be partially caused by inadequate appreciation of the underlying skeletal deformity and subsequent incorrect selection and application of traditional techniques. The aims of this study were to report the normal values of the anatomic and mechanical joint angles of the femur and tibia in small breed dogs and to compare these data to a population of small breed dogs affected by different degrees of MPL. Normal values of the anatomic and mechanical angles of the femur are similar to the ones reported in literature in Pomeranian dogs. Normal values of the anatomic and mechanical angles of the tibia have been described for the first time. Significant differences were found between normal population and dogs affected by grade 4 MPL in relation to anatomical Lateral Distal Femoral Angle (aLDFA), mechanical Medial Proximal Tibial Angle (mMPTA), and mechanical Caudal Proximal Tibial Angle (mCaPTA).

  19. Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Transfer for Calcific Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Howell, Michael A; Catanzariti, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Calcific insertional Achilles tendinopathy can result in significant pain and disability. Although some patients respond to nonoperative therapy, many patients are at risk for long-term morbidity and unpredictable clinical outcomes. There is no evidence-based data to support the timing of operative invention, choice of procedures, or whether equinus requires treatment. This article suggests the need for a classification system based on physical examination and imaging to help guide treatment. There is an obvious need for evidence-based studies evaluating outcomes and for properly conducted scientific research to establish appropriate treatment protocols.

  20. Chronic Achilles Tendon Disorders: Tendinopathy and Chronic Rupture.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Via, Alessio Giai; Oliva, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon involves clinical conditions in and around the tendon and it is the result of a failure of a chronic healing response. Although several conservative therapeutic options have been proposed, few of them are supported by randomized controlled trials. The management is primarily conservative and many patients respond well to conservative measures. If clinical conditions do not improve after 6 months of conservative management, surgery is recommended. The management of chronic ruptures is different from that of acute ruptures. The optimal surgical procedure is still debated. In this article chronic Achilles tendon disorders are debated and evidence-based medicine treatment strategies are discussed.

  1. Long head of the biceps tendinopathy: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Nho, Shane J; Strauss, Eric J; Lenart, Brett A; Provencher, Matthew T; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Verma, Nikhil N; Romeo, Anthony A

    2010-11-01

    Tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps brachii encompasses a spectrum of pathology ranging from inflammatory tendinitis to degenerative tendinosis. Disorders of the long head of the biceps often occur in conjunction with other shoulder pathology. A thorough patient history, physical examination, and radiographic evaluation are necessary for diagnosis. Nonsurgical management, including rest, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, and injections, is attempted first in patients with mild disease. Surgical management is indicated for refractory or severe disease. In addition to simple biceps tenotomy, a variety of tenodesis techniques has been described. Open biceps tenodesis has been used historically. However, promising results have recently been reported with arthroscopic tenodesis.

  2. Contractile dysfunction of the shoulder (rotator cuff tendinopathy): an overview.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, Chris

    2012-11-01

    It is now over a decade since the features defining a contractile dysfunction of the shoulder were first reported. Since this time, some progress has been made to better understand this mechanical syndrome. In response to these developments, this narrative review will explore current understanding in relation to pathology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of this syndrome with reference to literature specifically relating to contractile dysfunction but also literature relating to rotator cuff tendinopathy where necessary. The review not only identifies the strengths of the mechanical diagnosis and therapy approach with reference to a contractile dysfunction of the shoulder but also identifies where further progress needs to be made.

  3. Evaluation and Management of Patellar Instability in Pediatric and Adolescent Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Khormaee, Sariah; Kramer, Dennis E.; Yen, Yi-Meng; Heyworth, Benton E.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The rising popularity and intensity of youth sports has increased the incidence of patellar dislocation. These sports-related injuries may be associated with significant morbidity in the pediatric population. Treatment requires understanding and attention to the unique challenges in the skeletally immature patient. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed searches spanning 1970-2013. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Although nonoperative approaches are most often suitable for first-time patellar dislocations, surgical treatment is recommended for acute fixation of displaced osteochondral fractures sustained during primary instability and for patellar realignment in the setting of recurrent instability. While a variety of procedures can prevent recurrence, the risk of complications is not minimal. Conclusion: Patellar stabilization and realignment procedures in skeletally immature patients with recurrent patellar dislocation can effectively treat patellar instability without untoward effects on growth if careful surgical planning incorporates protection of growth parameters in the skeletally immature athlete. PMID:25984256

  4. Transient medial patellar dislocation: injury patterns at US and MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Le Corroller, Thomas; Dediu, Melania; Champsaur, Pierre

    2009-05-01

    Medial dislocation of the patella is an unusual entity. It is usually an iatrogenic complication of surgical lateral retinacular release. We describe the clinical, ultrasound (US), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of a transient medial patellar dislocation in a 19-year-old patient with trochlear groove dysplasia presenting no surgical history. US showed acute injury to the lateral patellar retinaculum with complete avulsion at its patellar insertion. MR imaging confirmed the complete tear of the lateral patellar retinaculum and disclosed contusion of the anteromedial portion of the medial femoral condyle and lateral patella. This case is noteworthy because the injury patterns of patellar soft tissue restraints differ markedly from the classical features of lateral patellar dislocation.

  5. Conservative management of Achilles Tendinopathy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Papa, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To chronicle the conservative treatment and management of a 77-year old female patient presenting with chronic pain of 8 months duration in the midportion of the achilles tendon diagnosed as achilles tendinopathy. Clinical features: The main clinical feature was pain in the midportion of the achilles tendon, 2 to 6 cm proximal to the calcaneal insertion. Symptom onset was gradual and unrelated to any acute trauma or overt injury mechanism. Intervention and outcome: The conservative treatment approach consisted of medical acupuncture with electrical stimulation, Graston Technique®, eccentric calf training, and rehabilitative exercise prescription. Outcome measures included verbal pain rating scale, lower extremity functional scale (LEFS), and a return to activities of daily living (ADLs). The patient attained long-term resolution of her complaint and at 12 month follow-up reported no recurrence of symptoms. Conclusion: A combination of conservative rehabilitation strategies may be used by chiropractors to treat midportion achilles tendinopathy and allow an individual to return to pain free ADLs in a timely manner. PMID:22997472

  6. High hamstring tendinopathy in 3 female long distance runners

    PubMed Central

    White, Kristin E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe and discuss the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of 3 female long distance runners with high hamstring tendinopathy. Clinical Features Three female runners presented to a chiropractic office with proximal hamstring pain that was aggravated by running. Increasing mileage, hills, and/or interval training preceded the onset of symptoms in each case. The subjects all displayed weakness of the hip abductors, pelvic joint dysfunction, hamstring tightness, and ischial tuberosity tenderness. Other clinical findings included overpronation, proprioceptive weakness, and lumbar dysfunction. Intervention and Outcome All 3 patients were treated with Graston Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization, lumbopelvic manipulation, and electrical muscle stimulation with ultrasound. Active exercise focused on hamstring stretching and strengthening, gluteal strengthening, and proprioceptive training. The 3 runners seen in this clinic had resolution of hamstring pain in an average of 13 treatments and were able to continue competing without restriction. Conclusion Runners with high hamstring tendinopathy may respond favorably to conservative chiropractic treatment and active rehabilitation with minimal time off of training. PMID:22014863

  7. Reliability and interobserver variability in radiological patellar height ratios.

    PubMed

    Seil, R; Müller, B; Georg, T; Kohn, D; Rupp, S

    2000-01-01

    This study evaluated the reliability and interobserver variability of five patellar height ratios as measured by two examiners on standard radiographs: Insall-Salvati (IS), modified Insall-Salvati (MIS), Blackburne-Peel (BP), Caton-Deschamps (CD), and Labelle-Laurin (LL). Plain lateral radiographs with a knee flexion angle of 20 degrees for IS, MIS, BP, and CD ratios and 90 degrees for the LL method of 22 knees of 21 patients with varying pathological knee conditions were analyzed. Statistical results revealed a low interobserver variability with high correlation coefficients (0.86 for IS, 0.82 for MIS, 0.86 for BP, 0.92 for CD, and 0.81 for LL; P > 0.3) and low mean interobserver errors. However, regarding the reliability of the radiographic results of the different methods for patella alta, baja, or norma we found varying results in 68% of the patients. In two patients the patellar height was classified as alta, norma, or baja depending on the ratio used. Regarding the definitions of patellar height used by the authors of these methods, we found the lowest number of normal patellae with the IS ratio and no patella alta for the CD ratio. The LL method revealed the highest number of patella alta. The BP ratio showed intermediate results for both patella alta and baja, being the most moderate method. This study showed that there was a good interobserver reliability for the evaluation of patellar height according to the common radiological ratios. However, the high frequency of differing results between the different radiographic ratios showed that patellar height classification as "alta," "norma," or "baja" depends heavily on the chosen index. The differing results were due mainly to the normative patellar height data and to anatomical differences. Based on these findings we recommend a ratio using the articular surface of the patella in relation to the joint line. We recommend the BP method because it revealed the lowest interobserver variability and discriminated

  8. Development of a self-managed loaded exercise programme for rotator cuff tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, Chris; Malliaras, Peter; Mawson, Sue; May, Stephen; Walters, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes a self-managed loaded exercise programme which has been designed to address the pain and disability associated with rotator cuff tendinopathy. The intervention has been developed with reference to current self-management theory and with reference to the emerging benefit of loaded exercise for tendinopathy. This self-managed loaded exercise programme is being evaluated within the mixed methods SELF study (ISRCTN 84709751) which includes a pragmatic randomised controlled trial conducted within the UK National Health Service.

  9. Growth arrest lines and recurrent patellar dislocation: a new sign.

    PubMed

    Abraham, A; Macnicol, M F

    2001-06-01

    The phenomenon of growth arrest lines has been widely described in the medical literature. They are usually found at the metaphysis of growing long bones and are the result of short periods of partial growth arrest. Recurrent dislocation of the patella is a well-recognised problem, particularly in adolescents. Several radiological features have been reported in association with patellar dislocation or instability. We have reported a hitherto undescribed radiological sign of patellar growth arrest lines on the skyline radiographs of two patients with this condition. The shape of the patella when symptoms were at their worst corresponded remarkably closely to the outline of the subsequent growth arrest line. We postulated that repeated dislocations adversely affect the process of normal maturation of the patella. With the resolution of symptoms, patella ossification resumes, leaving the telltale sign of previous injury in the form of a growth arrest line and an improvement in bone density once the patella has been stabilised and tracks normally.

  10. A novel method of reduction for first-time acute lateral patellar dislocations in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ong, Gene Yong-Kwang

    2016-03-01

    Five pediatric patients with acute traumatic "first-time" lateral patellar dislocations were successfully reduced using a novel, atraumatic, and simple technique. Uniquely, unlike the traditional method of patellar reduction, the patellar dislocations were reduced without any direct manipulation of the patella. In co-operative patients, no analgesia was required. Further validation of the reproducibility of the effectiveness of this method for successful patellar reduction in pediatric and adult populations are required.

  11. Total knee arthroplasty in a pseudoachondroplastic dwarfism patient with bilateral patellar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kwang-Jun; Yoon, Jung-Ro; Yang, Jae-Hyuk

    2013-01-01

    Late presentation of congenital patellar dislocation with advanced osteoarthritis is rare. This article presents a case of a 59-year-old man with underlying pseudoachondroplastic dwarfism. Advanced osteoarthritis due to bilateral neglected congenital patellar dislocation was treated with total knee arthroplasty without patella relocation surgery. Two years later, the patient had an improvement in Knee Society scores, painless function, and stability.

  12. Clinical results of single-session bilateral medial patellar luxation repair in 26 small breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Daniel G; Kramek, Betty

    2016-04-01

    Medical records of 26 small breed dogs treated with single-session bilateral medial patellar luxation repair were reviewed. Excluding dogs with complications associated with cranial cruciate ligament disease, 20/21 dogs with long-term follow-up achieved a complete or acceptable clinical recovery. The complication rate was not increased compared to that previously reported for unilateral patellar luxation repair.

  13. Physical therapies for Achilles tendinopathy: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Achilles tendinopathy (AT) is a common condition, causing considerable morbidity in athletes and non-athletes alike. Conservative or physical therapies are accepted as first-line management of AT; however, despite a growing volume of research, there remains a lack of high quality studies evaluating their efficacy. Previous systematic reviews provide preliminary evidence for non-surgical interventions for AT, but lack key quality components as outlined in the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) Statement. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis (where possible) of the evidence for physical therapies for AT management. Methods A comprehensive strategy was used to search 11 electronic databases from inception to September 2011. Search terms included Achilles, tendinopathy, pain, physical therapies, electrotherapy and exercise (English language full-text publications, human studies). Reference lists of eligible papers were hand-searched. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were included if they evaluated at least one non-pharmacological, non-surgical intervention for AT using at least one outcome of pain and/or function. Two independent reviewers screened 2852 search results, identifying 23 suitable studies, and assessed methodological quality and risk of bias using a modified PEDro scale. Effect size calculation and meta-analyses were based on fixed and random effects models respectively. Results Methodological quality ranged from 2 to 12 (/14). Four studies were excluded due to high risk of bias, leaving 19 studies, the majority of which evaluated midportion AT. Effect sizes from individual RCTs support the use of eccentric exercise. Meta-analyses identified significant effects favouring the addition of laser therapy to eccentric exercise at 12 weeks (pain VAS: standardised mean difference −0.59, 95% confidence interval −1.11 to −0.07), as well as no differences in effect

  14. Effect of patellar thickness on knee flexion in total knee arthroplasty: a biomechanical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Abolghasemian, Mansour; Samiezadeh, Saeid; Sternheim, Amir; Bougherara, Habiba; Barnes, C Lowry; Backstein, David J

    2014-01-01

    A biomechanical computer-based model was developed to simulate the influence of patellar thickness on passive knee flexion after arthroplasty. Using the computer model of a single-radius, PCL-sacrificing knee prosthesis, a range of patella-implant composite thicknesses was simulated. The biomechanical model was then replicated using two cadaveric knees. A patellar-thickness range of 15 mm was applied to each of the knees. Knee flexion was found to decrease exponentially with increased patellar thickness in both the biomechanical and experimental studies. Importantly, this flexion loss followed an exponential pattern with higher patellar thicknesses in both studies. In order to avoid adverse biomechanical and functional consequences, it is recommended to restore patellar thickness to that of the native knee during total knee arthroplasty.

  15. Re-revision of a patellar tendon rupture in a young professional martial arts athlete.

    PubMed

    Vadalà, A; Iorio, R; Bonifazi, A M; Bolle, G; Ferretti, A

    2012-09-01

    A 27-year-old professional martial arts athlete experienced recurrent right knee patellar tendon rupture on three occasions. He underwent two operations for complete patellar tendon rupture: an end-to-end tenorrhaphy the first time, and revision with a bone-patellar-tendon (BPT) allograft. After the third episode, he was referred to our department, where we performed a surgical reconstruction with the use of hamstring pro-patellar tendon, in a figure-of-eight configuration, followed by a careful rehabilitation protocol. Clinical and radiological follow-ups were realized at 1, 3, and 6 months and 1 and 2 years postop, with an accurate physical examination, the use of recognized international outcome scores, and radiograph and MRI studies. As far as we know, this is the first paper to report a re-revision of a patellar tendon rupture.

  16. Inflammatory and Metabolic Alterations of Kager's Fat Pad in Chronic Achilles Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fredberg, Ulrich; Kjær, Søren G.; Quistorff, Bjørn; Langberg, Henning; Hansen, Jacob B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Achilles tendinopathy is a painful inflammatory condition characterized by swelling, stiffness and reduced function of the Achilles tendon. Kager’s fat pad is an adipose tissue located in the area anterior to the Achilles tendon. Observations reveal a close physical interplay between Kager’s fat pad and its surrounding structures during movement of the ankle, suggesting that Kager’s fat pad may stabilize and protect the mechanical function of the ankle joint. Aim The aim of this study was to characterize whether Achilles tendinopathy was accompanied by changes in expression of inflammatory markers and metabolic enzymes in Kager’s fat pad. Methods A biopsy was taken from Kager’s fat pad from 31 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy and from 13 healthy individuals. Gene expression was measured by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Focus was on genes related to inflammation and lipid metabolism. Results Expression of the majority of analyzed inflammatory marker genes was increased in patients with Achilles tendinopathy compared to that in healthy controls. Expression patterns of the patient group were consistent with reduced lipolysis and increased fatty acid β-oxidation. In the fat pad, the pain-signaling neuropeptide substance P was found to be present in one third of the subjects in the Achilles tendinopathy group but in none of the healthy controls. Conclusion Gene expression changes in Achilles tendinopathy patient samples were consistent with Kager’s fat pad being more inflamed than in the healthy control group. Additionally, the results indicate an altered lipid metabolism in Kager’s fat pad of Achilles tendinopathy patients. PMID:25996876

  17. Extra-corporeal pulsed-activated therapy ("EPAT" sound wave) for Achilles tendinopathy: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Amol; Ramdath, Sona; O'Halloran, Patrick; Gerdesmeyer, Ludger; Gollwitzer, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is common and extracorporeal shockwaves have become a popular treatment for this condition, even though previous research has not provided conclusive results regarding its efficacy in cases of Achilles tendinopathy. Our aim was to evaluate 3 weekly shockwave treatments in patients with Achilles tendinopathy, as quantified by the Roles and Maudsley score. A total of 74 tendons in 60 patients were assessed at baseline and at least 1 year posttreatment, including 32 (43.24%) paratendinoses, 23 (31.08%) proximal tendinoses, and 19 (25.68%) insertional tendinoses. The mean age of the participants was 48.6 ± 12.94 years, and patients with paratendinosis (41.44 ± 14.01 years) were statistically significantly younger than those with proximal (53 ± 8.9 years) and insertional (54.26 ± 9.74 years) tendinopathy, and these differences were statistically significant (P = .0012 and P = .0063, respectively). Overall, 58 (78.38%) tendons improved by at least 1 year posttreatment, including 75% in the paratendinosis, 78.26% in the proximal tendinosis, and 84.21% in the insertional tendinosis groups, and no adverse effects were observed. The Roles and Maudsley score improved from 3.22 ± 0.55 to 1.84 ± 1.05 (P < .0001) in the paratendinosis group, 3.39 ± 0.5 to 1.57 ± 0.66 (P < .0001) in the proximal tendinopathy group, and 3.32 ± 0.58 to 1.47 ± 0.7 (P = .0001) in the insertional tendinopathy group. Based on these results, we believe that shockwave therapy serves as a safe, viable, and effective option for the treatment of Achilles tendinopathy.

  18. A DELPHI STUDY OF RISK FACTORS FOR ACHILLES TENDINOPATHY- OPINIONS OF WORLD TENDON EXPERTS

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Paul J.; Barry, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Achilles tendinopathy can be a debilitating chronic condition for both active and inactive individuals. The identification of risk facors is important both in preventing but also treating tendinopathy, many factors have been proposed but there is a lack of primary epidemiological data. The purpose of this study was to develop a statement of expert consensus on risk factors for Achilles tendinopathy in active and sedentary patient populations to inform a primary epidemiological study. Study design Delphi study Methods and Measures An online Delphi study was completed inviting participation from world tendon experts. The consensus was developed using three rounds of the Delphi technique. The first round developed a complete list of potential risk factors, the second round refined this list but also separated the factors into two population groups – active/athletic and inactive/sedentary. The third round ranked this list in order of perceived importance. Results Forty-four experts were invited to participate, 16 participated in the first round (response rate 40%) and two dropped out in the second round (resulting in a response rate of 35%). A total of 27 intrinsic and eight extrinsic risk factors were identified during round one. During round two only 12 intrinsic and five extrinsic risk factors were identified as important in active/athletic tendinopathy while 14 intrinsic and three extrinsic factors were identified as important for inactive/sedentary tendinopathy. Conclusions Risk factors for Achilles tendinopathy were identified based on expert consensus, and these factors provide a basis for primary epidemiological studies. Plantarflexor strength was identified as the primary modifiable factor in the active/athletic group while systemic factors were identified as important in the inactive/sedentary group, many of the potential factors suggested for either group were non-modifiable. Non-modifiable factors include: previous tendinopathy

  19. Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Looking for Health Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development ( ... area of the body). Constant jumping, landing, and changing direction can cause strains, tears, and damage to ...

  20. Ultrasound guided platelet-rich plasma injection for the treatment of rotator cuff tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tahririan, Mohammad Ali; Moezi, Mehdi; Motififard, Mahdi; Nemati, Mahdi; Nemati, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Degenerative changes and inflammation in the rotator cuff (RC) are the most important causes of shoulder pain. The aim of the present study was to determine the effectiveness of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in patients with chronic RC tendinopathy. Materials and Methods: This study was an open-label study performed at Kashani Hospital between April 2012 and June 2014. Patients with a <1 cm partial tearing of the bursal side of RC with no or little response to conservative management were included. PRP injection was done using ultrasonography guide via posterior subacromial approach. Demographic data were obtained in all patient before the study, and shoulder function was evaluated using Constant shoulder score (CSS) before and 3 months after PRP injection. Results: A total number of 17 patients were enrolled. The mean of CSS before and after intervention was 37.05 ± 11.03 and 61.76 ± 14.75, respectively (P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant correlation between the pain score before the study and the improvement in CSS (P = 0.45, r = 0.03). Significant relation was observed between the individuals’ age and improvement of CSS (P = 0.02, r = −0.49). There was no significant difference in CSS improvement between genders (P = 0.23). Conclusion: Single injection of PRP is effective to reduce pain and improve range of motion in patients with bursal side partial tearing of RC who failed to respond to conservative treatments. PMID:28217638

  1. Resolving an inflammatory concept: The importance of inflammation and resolution in tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dakin, Stephanie G.; Dudhia, Jayesh; Smith, Roger K.W.

    2014-01-01

    Injuries to the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in equine athletes, but the healing response is poorly understood. One important drive for the healing of connective tissues is the inflammatory cascade, but the role of inflammation in tendinopathy has been contentious in the literature. This article reviews the processes involved in the healing of tendon injuries in natural disease and experimental models. The importance of inflammatory processes known to be active in tendon disease is discussed with particular focus on recent findings related specifically to the horse. Whilst inflammation is necessary for debridement after injury, persistent inflammation is thought to drive fibrosis, a perceived adverse consequence of tendon healing. Therefore the ability to resolve inflammation by the resident cell populations in tendons at an appropriate time would be crucial for successful outcome. This review summarises new evidence for the importance of resolution of inflammation after tendon injury. Given that many anti-inflammatory drugs suppress both inflammatory and resolving components of the inflammatory response, prolonged use of these drugs may be contraindicated as a therapeutic approach. We propose that these findings have profound implications not only for current treatment strategies but also for the possibility of developing novel therapeutic approaches involving modulation of the inflammatory process. PMID:24556326

  2. Presence of a long accessory flexor tendon of the toes in surgical treatment for tendinopathy of the insertion of the calcaneal tendon: case report☆

    PubMed Central

    Gomes Júnior, Nelson Pelozo; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Raduan, Fernando Cipolini; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    The presence of accessory tendons in the foot and ankle needs to be recognized, given that depending on their location, they may cause disorders relating either to pain processes or to handling of the surgical findings. We describe the presence of an accessory flexor tendon of the toes, seen in surgical exposure for transferring the long flexor tendon of the hallux to the calcaneus, due to the presence of a disorder of tendinopathy of the insertion of the calcaneal tendon in association with Haglund's syndrome. PMID:26962495

  3. Presence of a long accessory flexor tendon of the toes in surgical treatment for tendinopathy of the insertion of the calcaneal tendon: case report.

    PubMed

    Gomes Júnior, Nelson Pelozo; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Raduan, Fernando Cipolini; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    The presence of accessory tendons in the foot and ankle needs to be recognized, given that depending on their location, they may cause disorders relating either to pain processes or to handling of the surgical findings. We describe the presence of an accessory flexor tendon of the toes, seen in surgical exposure for transferring the long flexor tendon of the hallux to the calcaneus, due to the presence of a disorder of tendinopathy of the insertion of the calcaneal tendon in association with Haglund's syndrome.

  4. Tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps tendon: histopathologic analysis of the extra-articular biceps tendon and tenosynovium

    PubMed Central

    Streit, Jonathan J; Shishani, Yousef; Rodgers, Mark; Gobezie, Reuben

    2015-01-01

    Background Bicipital tendinitis is a common cause of anterior shoulder pain, but there is no evidence that acute inflammation of the extra-articular long head of the biceps (LHB) tendon is the root cause of this condition. We evaluated the histologic findings of the extra-articular portion of the LHB tendon and synovial sheath in order to compare those findings to known histologic changes seen in other tendinopathies. Methods Twenty-six consecutive patients (mean age 45.4±13.7 years) underwent an open subpectoral biceps tenodesis for anterior shoulder pain localized to the bicipital groove. Excised tendons were sent for histologic analysis. Specimens were graded using a semiquantitative scoring system to evaluate tenocyte morphology, the presence of ground substance, collagen bundle characteristics, and vascular changes. Results Chronic inflammation was noted in only two of 26 specimens, and no specimen demonstrated acute inflammation. Tenocyte enlargement and proliferation, characterized by increased roundness and size of the cell and nucleus with proteoglycan matrix expansion and myxoid degenerative changes, was found in all 26 specimens. Abundant ground substance, collagen bundle changes, and increased vascularization were visualized in all samples. Conclusion Anterior shoulder pain attributed to the biceps tendon does not appear to be due to an inflammatory process in most cases. The histologic findings of the extra-articular portion of the LHB tendon and synovial sheath are similar to the pathologic findings in de Quervain tenosynovitis at the wrist, and may be due to a chronic degenerative process similar to this and other tendinopathies of the body. PMID:25792859

  5. The plantaris tendon and a potential role in mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy: an observational anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    van Sterkenburg, Maayke N; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J; Kleipool, Roeland P; Niek van Dijk, C

    2011-01-01

    The source of pain and the background to the pain mechanisms associated with mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy have not yet been clarified. Intratendinous degenerative changes are most often addressed when present. However, it is questionable if degeneration of the tendon itself is the main cause of pain. Pain is often most prominent on the medial side, 2–7 cm from the insertion onto the calcaneus. The medial location of the pain has been explained to be caused by enhanced stress on the calcaneal tendon due to hyperpronation. However, on this medial side the plantaris tendon is also located. It has been postulated that the plantaris tendon might play a role in these medially located symptoms. To our knowledge, the exact anatomy and relationship between the plantaris- and calcaneal tendon at the level of complaints have not been anatomically assessed. This was the purpose of our study. One-hundred and seven lower extremities were dissected. After opening the superficial fascia and paratendon, the plantaris tendon was bluntly released from the calcaneal tendon moving distally. The incidence of the plantaris tendon, its course, site of insertion and possible connections were documented. When with manual force the plantaris tendon could not be released, it was defined as a ‘connection’ with the calcaneal tendon. In all specimens a plantaris tendon was identified. Nine different sites of insertion were found, mostly medial and fan-shaped onto the calcaneus. In 11 specimens (10%) firm connections were found at the level of the calcaneal tendon mid-portion. Clinical and histological studies are needed to confirm the role of the plantaris tendon in mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy. PMID:21323916

  6. Comparison of Lower Limb Muscle Activity during Eccentric and Concentric Exercises in Runners with Achilles Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jaeho

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to identify changes in muscle activation by comparing muscle activities of the affected side (AS) and non-affected side (NAS) during eccentric and concentric exercises in runners with unilateral Achilles tendinopathy. [Subjects] The study included 18 participants consisting of men and women with chronic Achilles tendinopathy in a single leg who had more than 1 year of running experience. [Methods] All subjects performed concentric and eccentric exercise with the Achilles tendon moving from full plantar flexion to full dorsiflexion for 8 seconds, and electromyography data was obtained. [Results] All muscles examined showed a significant increase in %maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) with concentric exercise compared with eccentric exercise. Compared with the NAS, the AS showed significant increases in %MVC of the rectus femoris, tibialis anterior, and lateral gastrocnemius. All interaction effects of exercise methods and injuries showed statistically significant changes. [Conclusion] Runners with Achilles tendinopathy show increases in medial gastrocnemius activity when performing eccentric exercise. PMID:25276014

  7. Biomechanical evaluation of an adjustable patellar tendon bearing prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, J; Susak, Z; Bahar, A; Seliktar, R; Najenson, T

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relation between geometry of the patellar tendon (PT) insertion in the socket and the dynamic load transmitted through the PT, in a patellar tendon bearing (PTB) prosthesis. The dynamic load was measured by a specially constructed two-component load cell, which was mounted on the experimental prosthesis. Geometry of the PT insertion relative to the socket was altered by adjusting the location of the mounting frame-load cell assembly. Evaluation of performance of the prosthesis in the range of geometries investigated was made objectively by gait analysis of the patients. The latter was performed on a 10 m walkpath, including at halfway two forceplates, from which the foot-ground forces were recorded. Simultaneously, the PT forces on the prosthesis, as sensed by the load cell were monitored. Computer processing of the data included full analysis of the force-trace and the determination of criteria for optimization of the PT insertion. The resulting criteria were those which expressed minimization of abnormalities in the foot-ground forces of each patient, such as vertical and braking forces and their timings. The complete optimization procedure, which was undertaken for two below-knee male amputees, indicated the correct positioning of the PT insertion, actually taken in the final fitting procedure of the socket of the prosthesis.

  8. ACL reconstruction: in vivo measurement of patellar tendon graft elongation.

    PubMed

    Berruto, M; Howe, J G; Beynnon, B D; Johnson, R J; Nichols, C E; Pope, M H

    1991-06-01

    The implantation of a free autogenous patellar tendon graft is the surgical technique that currently offers the best results in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. However, numerous aspects regarding both technique and postoperative rehabilitation can still be improved. The aim of this study was to measure the elongation of the patellar tendon in vivo in the operating room after reconstructive surgery, subjecting the knee to normal strain such as passive mobilization or anterior displacement of the tibia. Three volunteers were studied. Our results were different from those reported in a previous study conducted in vivo on a normal anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). In spite of the isometric position of the tendon, passive mobilization provoked a progressive increase in the elongation of the graft within each cycle of flexion-extension and between one cycle and the next. This also occurred during the Lachman test. These findings suggest that the graft undergoes a process of tensile adjustment when it is first put under strain. Continued elongation once this process appears stabilized raises doubts as to the reliability of isometric measuring devices.

  9. Dose-Related and Time-Dependent Development of Collagenase-Induced Tendinopathy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Viganò, Marco; Stanco, Deborah; Bottagisio, Marta; Di Giancamillo, Alessia; Setti, Stefania; de Girolamo, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Tendinopathy is a big burden in clinics and it represents 45% of musculoskeletal lesions. Despite the relevant social impact, both pathogenesis and development of the tendinopathy are still under-investigated, thus limiting the therapeutic advancement in this field. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dose-dependent and time-related tissue-level changes occurring in a collagenase-induced tendinopathy in rat Achilles tendons, in order to establish a standardized model for future pre-clinical studies. With this purpose, 40 Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups, treated by injecting collagenase type I within the Achilles tendon at 1 mg/mL (low dose) or 3 mg/mL (high dose). Tendon explants were histologically evaluated at 3, 7, 15, 30 and 45 days. Our results revealed that both the collagenase doses induced a disorganization of collagen fibers and increased the number of rounded resident cells. In particular, the high dose treatment determined a greater neovascularization and fatty degeneration with respect to the lower dose. These changes were found to be time-dependent and to resemble the features of human tendinopathy. Indeed, in our series, the acute phase occurred from day 3 to day 15, and then progressed towards the proliferative phase from day 30 to day 45 displaying a degenerative appearance associated with a very precocious and mild remodeling process. The model represents a good balance between similarity with histological features of human tendinopathy and feasibility, in terms of tendon size to create lesions and costs when compared to other animal models. Moreover, this model could contribute to improve the knowledge in this field, and it could be useful to properly design further pre-clinical studies to test innovative treatments for tendinopathy. PMID:27548063

  10. Creating an Animal Model of Tendinopathy by Inducing Chondrogenic Differentiation with Kartogenin.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ting; Zhang, Jianying; Zhao, Guangyi; Zhou, Yiqin; Zhang, Chang-Qing; Wang, James H-C

    2016-01-01

    Previous animal studies have shown that long term rat treadmill running induces over-use tendinopathy, which manifests as proteoglycan accumulation and chondrocytes-like cells within the affected tendons. Creating this animal model of tendinopathy by long term treadmill running is however time-consuming, costly and may vary among animals. In this study, we used a new approach to develop an animal model of tendinopathy using kartogenin (KGN), a bio-compound that can stimulate endogenous stem/progenitor cells to differentiate into chondrocytes. KGN-beads were fabricated and implanted into rat Achilles tendons. Five weeks after implantation, chondrocytes and proteoglycan accumulation were found at the KGN implanted site. Vascularity as well as disorganization in collagen fibers were also present in the same site along with increased expression of the chondrocyte specific marker, collagen type II (Col. II). In vitro studies confirmed that KGN was released continuously from KGN-alginate in vivo beads and induced chondrogenic differentiation of tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSCs) suggesting that chondrogenesis after KGN-bead implantation into the rat tendons is likely due to the aberrant differentiation of TSCs into chondrocytes. Taken together, our results showed that KGN-alginate beads can be used to create a rat model of tendinopathy, which, at least in part, reproduces the features of over-use tendinopathy model created by long term treadmill running. This model is mechanistic (stem cell differentiation), highly reproducible and precise in creating localized tendinopathic lesions. It is expected that this model will be useful to evaluate the effects of various topical treatments such as NSAIDs and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for the treatment of tendinopathy.

  11. Neuropathic pain may be common in chronic lower limb tendinopathy: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Patrick C

    2016-01-01

    Background: To identify the prevalence of neuropathic pain, through the use of the painDETECT questionnaire, in a cohort of patients with chronic lower limb tendinopathy conditions. Methods: Patients with chronic lower limb tendinopathy conditions treated within a Sport and Exercise Medicine hospital clinic were identified from clinical records. At the time of the clinical consultation, pain and painDETECT scores were recorded. Results: In total, 282 suitable patients with chronic lower limb tendinopathy conditions were identified who had completed a painDETECT questionnaire. There was a median age of 51.9 years, 35% of patients were male and a median duration of symptoms of 24.0 months. There was a median score of 7.0/10 for self-reported ‘average’ pain and 8.0/10 for self-reported ‘worst’ pain. There was a median painDETECT score of 14.0, 28% of respondents scored 19 or higher with painDETECT (neuropathic component to pain may be likely), 29% scored 13–18 (equivocal result) and 43% of respondents scored 12 or less (neuropathic pain component was unlikely). Conclusions: This study suggests that neuropathic pain as identified by the painDETECT questionnaire may be common in patients with chronic lower limb tendinopathy conditions. It is unclear if patients with tendinopathy who have neuropathic pain may have poorer outcomes from initial treatments, contributing to the high proportion seen in secondary care. These are results from a single hospital clinic, and comparison with a control group is currently lacking. However, on the results to date, neuropathic pain should be considered in management strategies in patients with chronic tendinopathy. PMID:28386400

  12. Wrist circumference is related to patellar tendon thickness in healthy men and women.

    PubMed

    Nyland, John; Fried, Andrew; Maitra, Ranjan; Johnson, Darren L; Caborn, David N M

    2006-01-01

    The efficacy of dominant wrist circumference measurements to predict dominant lower extremity patellar tendon thickness at regions of interest for bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft harvest was studied among 24 healthy men and women. Dominant wrist circumference displayed good relationships with dominant lower extremity patellar tendon thickness as determined by two-dimensional diagnostic ultrasound. This initial screening method may assist surgeons as they consider graft selection for patients who may be at risk for developing or exacerbating preexisting patellofemoral joint or knee extensor mechanism conditions with BPTB autograft harvest.

  13. Increased Upper Trapezius Muscle Stiffness in Overhead Athletes with Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Hio Teng; Hug, François; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2016-01-01

    Although excessive tension of the upper trapezius (UT) is thought to contribute to rotator cuff tendinopathy, no study examined UT tension in athletes with and without rotator cuff tendinopathy. Here we used UT shear modulus measured using ultrasound shear wave elastography as an index of muscle stiffness/tension. The aims of this study were twofold: 1) to determine whether the UT muscle shear modulus is altered in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy compared to asymptomatic athletes, and 2) to detect optimal cut-off points of UT shear modulus in identifying athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Forty-three male volleyball players (17 asymptomatic and 26 with rotator cuff tendinopathy, mean age = 22.9±3.5 years) participated in the study. UT shear modulus was quantified during active arm holding at 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction and passive arm positioning at 0°, 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction. During the active tasks, the UT shear modulus was higher in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy than the asymptomatic athletes (p = 0.002), regardless the arm position. During the passive tasks, athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy exhibited a higher UT shear modulus than asymptomatic athletes only at 0° of shoulder abduction (13.0±2.5 kPa vs 10.2±1.8 kPa, p = 0.001). When considering the active task, an optimal cut-off shear modulus of 12.0 kPa at 30° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.84, specificity = 0.57, AUC = 0.757, p = 0.008) and 9.5 kPa at 60° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.88, specificity = 0.67, AUC = 0.816, p = 0.002) was detected. When considering the passive task at 0° of shoulder abduction, a cut-off of 12.2 kPa was found (sensitivity = 0.73, AUC = 0.817, p = 0.001). Findings from the present study show that monitoring passive and active UT muscle shear modulus may provide important information for the prevention/rehabilitation of rotator cuff tendinopathy. PMID:27159276

  14. [Tendinopathies of the hip : Treatment recommendations according to evidence-based medicine].

    PubMed

    Macke, C; Krettek, C; Brand, S

    2017-01-04

    Tendinopathies of the hip are a differential diagnostic challenge. The spatial proximity of these structures is challenging and many of the structures are located in very deep positions in an individual-specific manner and are covered by other tissues resulting in difficult accessibility for a clinical examination. Furthermore, the definition of the different syndromes is not consistent in the literature, which makes a comparability and assessment difficult. This article demonstrates the most frequent tendinopathies and associated syndromes with their typical clinical presentation, diagnostics and therapy options. Finally, a critical assessment of these aspects is presented based on the current literature.

  15. Reflections about the optimisation of the treatment of tendinopathies with PRP

    PubMed Central

    Kaux, Jean-François; Bouvard, Marc; Lecut, Christelle; Oury, Cécile; Gothot, André; Sanchez, Mikel; Crielaard, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background: platelet-rich plasma (PRP) infiltration represents a recent therapy for chronic tendinopathies. However, in the literature, this treatment remains controversial. Purpose: we suggest some ideas for improving this treatment. Methods: these suggestions were based on a review of published studies and our clinical experience. Conclusion: optimizing the technique for PRP collection is paramount. Different risk factors must be corrected before infiltration and chronic tendinopathies must be carefully selected. Finally, post-infiltration rehabilitation remains absolutely critical. Standardization of the use of PRP remains necessary in order to optimize the results. PMID:25878979

  16. Septic bursitis after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Randelli, Filippo; Sdao, Silvana; Sardanelli, Francesco; Randelli, Pietro

    2014-08-01

    Calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff is a common condition. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous aspiration is one of several options to treat this condition. The main advantages of this procedure are short duration, good outcome, and low cost. Furthermore, only minor complications have been reported in the literature, namely, vagal reactions during the procedure and mild postprocedural pain. We report the first case of septic bursitis after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of calcific tendinopathy. Although this is generally considered a very safe procedure, a risk of infection should be taken into account.

  17. Treating tendinopathy: perspective on anti-inflammatory intervention and therapeutic exercise.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Michael F; Denegar, Craig R

    2015-04-01

    Tendinopathy is a common and complex disorder. Once viewed as an inflammatory condition labeled tendinitis, it is now viewed along a continuum that can lead to tissue necrosis and risk of tendon rupture. Anti-inflammatory medications can alter symptoms but may also promote tissue degeneration. Loading of the tendon through exercise, especially exercise involving eccentric muscle contraction, has been shown to promote symptom resolution and functional recovery in many patients. This article reviews the pathoetiology of tendinopathy and the role anti-inflammatory interventions and therapeutic exercise in treatment of active patients.

  18. Femoral neuropathy due to patellar dislocation in a theatrical and jazz dancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shin, Chris S; Davis, Brian A

    2005-06-01

    This case report describes a teenage female, high-level modern dancer who suffered multiple left patellar dislocations. Her history is atypical in that after her fifth dislocation, her recovery was hindered secondary to persistent weakness and atrophy of her quadriceps out of proportion to disuse alone. Electrodiagnostic studies and magnetic resonance imaging showed evidence of a subacute femoral neuropathy correlating chronologically with her most recent patellar dislocation. This case suggests that further diagnostic study may be warranted in patients with persistent quadriceps weakness or atrophy after a patellar dislocation, because this may suggest the presence of a femoral neuropathy. This is important because the strength training goals and precautions differ in disuse atrophy and a neuropathy. We believe this is the first reported case of a femoral neuropathy associated with the mechanism of a patellar dislocation.

  19. SURGICAL CORRECTION OF TRAUMATIC PATELLAR LUXATION IN AN EURASIAN LYNX (LYNX LYNX).

    PubMed

    Devesa-Garcia, V; Bañeres-De la Torre, A; Cabezas-Salamanca, M A; Lucas-Lucas, N; Rodriguez-Quiros, J

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this report is to describe the successful surgical repair of a traumatic medial patellar luxation in a 4-yr-old female Eurasian lynx ( Lynx lynx ). The animal presented with hind limb lameness. Physical and radiographic examinations were performed under sedation. After diagnosing a medial patellar luxation, surgical repair was recommended. A combination of soft tissue reconstructive techniques was used to repair the medial patellar luxation. The limb was not immobilized postoperatively, but the animal was confined to a cage for 1 mo. The recovery was uneventful and return to normal activity was observed within 1 mo. Soft tissue reconstructive techniques can be used as the only surgical treatment for the repair of a traumatic patellar luxation in both domestic and wild animals.

  20. Clinical results of single-session bilateral medial patellar luxation repair in 26 small breed dogs

    PubMed Central

    Balogh, Daniel G.; Kramek, Betty

    2016-01-01

    Medical records of 26 small breed dogs treated with single-session bilateral medial patellar luxation repair were reviewed. Excluding dogs with complications associated with cranial cruciate ligament disease, 20/21 dogs with long-term follow-up achieved a complete or acceptable clinical recovery. The complication rate was not increased compared to that previously reported for unilateral patellar luxation repair. PMID:27041762

  1. Changes of synovial fluid protein concentrations in supra-patellar bursitis patients after the injection of different molecular weights of hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Carl P C; Hsu, Chih Chin; Pei, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Ruo Li; Zhou, Shaobo; Shen, Hsuan-Chen; Lin, Shih-Cherng; Tsai, Wen Chung

    2014-04-01

    Knee pain is commonly seen in orthopedic and rehabilitation outpatient clinical settings, and in the aging population. Bursitis of the knee joint, especially when the volume of the synovial fluid is large enough, can compress and distend the nearby soft tissues, causing pain in the knee joint. Out of all the bursae surrounding the knee joint, supra-patellar bursitis is most often associated with knee pain. Treatment strategies in managing supra-patellar bursitis include the aspiration of joint synovial fluid and then followed by steroid injection into the bursa. When supra-patellar bursitis is caused by degenerative disorders, the concept of viscosupplementation treatment may be effective by injecting hyaluronic acid into the bursa. However, the rheology or the changes in the concentrations of proteins (biomarkers) that are related to the development of bursitis in the synovial fluid is virtually unexplored. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the concentration changes in the synovial fluid total protein amount and individual proteins associated with supra-patellar bursitis using the Bradford protein assay and western immunoglobulin methods. A total of 20 patients were divided into two groups with 10 patients in each group. One group received the high molecular weight hyaluronic acid product of Synvisc Hylan G-F 20 and the other group received the low molecular weight hyaluronic acid product of Hya-Joint Synovial Fluid Supplement once per week injection into the bursa for a total of 3 weeks. Significant decreases in the synovial fluid total protein concentrations were observed after the second dosage of high molecular weight hyaluronic acid injections. Apolipoprotein A-I, interleukin 1 beta, alpha 1 antitrypsin, and matrix metalloproteinase 1 proteins revealed a trend of decreasing western immunoblotting band densities after hyaluronic acid injections. The decreases in apolipoprotein A-I and interleukin 1 beta protein band densities were significant in the high

  2. An exercise programme for the management of lateral elbow tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Stasinopoulos, D; Stasinopoulou, K; Johnson, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Home exercise programmes and exercise programmes carried out in a clinical setting are commonly advocated for the treatment of lateral elbow tendinopathy (LET), a very common lesion of the arm with a well-defined clinical presentation. The aim of this study is to describe the use and effects of strengthening and stretching exercise programmes in the treatment of LET. Eccentric exercises: Slow progressive eccentric exercises for LET should be performed with the elbow in extension, forearm in pronation, and wrist in extended position (as high as possible). However, it is unclear how the injured tendon, which is loaded eccentrically, returns to the starting position without experiencing concentric loading and how the "slowness" of eccentric exercises should be defined. Nor has the treatment regimen of the eccentric exercises of a supervised exercise programme been defined. Stretching exercises: Static stretching is defined as passively stretching a given muscle-tendon unit by slowly placing and maintaining it in a maximal position of stretch. We recommend the position should be held for 30–45 s, three times before and three times after eccentric exercises during each treatment session with a 30 s rest interval between each procedure. The treatment region of static stretching exercises when a supervised exercise programme is performed is unknown. Discussion: A well designed trial is needed to study the effectiveness of a supervised exercise programme for LET consisting of eccentric and static stretching exercises. The issues relating to the supervised exercise programme should be defined so that therapists can replicate the programme. PMID:16306504

  3. Sports and exercise-related tendinopathies: a review of selected topical issues by participants of the second International Scientific Tendinopathy Symposium (ISTS) Vancouver 2012

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Alex; Docking, Sean; Vicenzino, Bill; Alfredson, Håkan; Zwerver, Johannes; Lundgreen, Kirsten; Finlay, Oliver; Pollock, Noel; Cook, Jill L; Fearon, Angela; Purdam, Craig R; Hoens, Alison; Rees, Jonathan D; Goetz, Thomas J; Danielson, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    In September 2010, the first International Scientific Tendinopathy Symposium (ISTS) was held in Umeå, Sweden, to establish a forum for original scientific and clinical insights in this growing field of clinical research and practice. The second ISTS was organised by the same group and held in Vancouver, Canada, in September 2012. This symposium was preceded by a round-table meeting in which the participants engaged in focused discussions, resulting in the following overview of tendinopathy clinical and research issues. This paper is a narrative review and summary developed during and after the second ISTS. The document is designed to highlight some key issues raised at ISTS 2012, and to integrate them into a shared conceptual framework. It should be considered an update and a signposting document rather than a comprehensive review. The document is developed for use by physiotherapists, physicians, athletic trainers, massage therapists and other health professionals as well as team coaches and strength/conditioning managers involved in care of sportspeople or workers with tendinopathy. PMID:23584762

  4. Effect of leg press training on patellar realignment in patients with patellofemoral pain.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hsien-Te; Song, Chen-Yi

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of leg press and leg press with hip adduction exercise training on patellar alignment and pain in patients with patellofemoral pain (PFP). [Subjects and Methods] Seventeen patients participated in this study. Eight weeks of leg press or leg press with hip adduction training, including progressive lower-limb weight-training and stretching, was given. Patellar alignment (tilt and displacement) and pain measurements were conducted before and after leg press or leg press with hip adduction training. Patellar tilt angle and the bisect offset index were measured on axial computed tomography scans of the fully extended knee position with the quadriceps relaxed and contracted. Pain was assessed by using a 10-cm visual analog scale. [Results] No differences were found in patellar tilt and displacement with the quadriceps either relaxed or contracted after leg press and leg press with hip adduction. However, significant pain reduction was evident in both leg press and leg press with hip adduction. [Conclusion] The results indicated that patellar realignment does not appear to mediate pain alleviation. Furthermore, hip adduction in addition to leg press training had no additive beneficial effect on patellar realignment or pain reduction.

  5. Staged treatment of a chronic patellar sleeve fracture using the Taylor spatial frame.

    PubMed

    Potini, Vishnu C; Reilly, Mark C; Gehrmann, Robin M

    2015-12-01

    Patellar sleeve fractures are easily missed injuries since plain radiographs may not show a bony fragment at the time of injury. Failure to diagnose these injuries can result in patellar instability, extensor lag, and anterior knee pain. We report a novel treatment using a Taylor spatial frame as part of a staged reconstruction to regain length of the extensor mechanism and maintain knee motion prior to performing primary repair of the avulsed patellar sleeve fragment. In our case, an 11-year-old male presented to our institution six months after sustaining a patellar sleeve fracture. Radiographic examination with the knee in extension revealed a 23-mm gap between the inferior patellar pole fragment and the remaining patella. The patient was ultimately taken to the operating room twelve months after the initial injury for placement of a Taylor spatial frame to regain length of the extensor mechanism. The patient began immediate knee range-of-motion exercises, and performed daily soft tissue lengthening of two millimeters. After four weeks of treatment the patient underwent removal of the fixator and primary repair of the patella. At final follow up six years after patellar reconstruction, the patient had an active knee range-of-motion from five degrees of hyperextension to 140° of flexion. Where current literature reports suboptimal results even when treatment is delayed for two months, in our case the patient was able to obtain a high level of function after treatment with a two-stage reconstruction using a Taylor spatial frame.

  6. Effect of leg press training on patellar realignment in patients with patellofemoral pain

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hsien-Te; Song, Chen-Yi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of leg press and leg press with hip adduction exercise training on patellar alignment and pain in patients with patellofemoral pain (PFP). [Subjects and Methods] Seventeen patients participated in this study. Eight weeks of leg press or leg press with hip adduction training, including progressive lower-limb weight-training and stretching, was given. Patellar alignment (tilt and displacement) and pain measurements were conducted before and after leg press or leg press with hip adduction training. Patellar tilt angle and the bisect offset index were measured on axial computed tomography scans of the fully extended knee position with the quadriceps relaxed and contracted. Pain was assessed by using a 10-cm visual analog scale. [Results] No differences were found in patellar tilt and displacement with the quadriceps either relaxed or contracted after leg press and leg press with hip adduction. However, significant pain reduction was evident in both leg press and leg press with hip adduction. [Conclusion] The results indicated that patellar realignment does not appear to mediate pain alleviation. Furthermore, hip adduction in addition to leg press training had no additive beneficial effect on patellar realignment or pain reduction. PMID:26834371

  7. Surface Area of Patellar Facets: Inferential Statistics in the Iraqi Population

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zamili, Zaid; Omar, Rawan

    2017-01-01

    Background. The patella is the largest sesamoid bone in the body; its three-dimensional complexity necessitates biomechanical perfection. Numerous pathologies occur at the patellofemoral unit which may end in degenerative changes. This study aims to test the presence of statistical correlation between the surface areas of patellar facets and other patellar morphometric parameters. Materials and Methods. Forty dry human patellae were studied. The morphometry of each patella was measured using a digital Vernier Caliper, electronic balance, and image analyses software known as ImageJ. The patellar facetal surface area was correlated with patellar weight, height, width, and thickness. Results. Inferential statistics proved the existence of linear correlation of total facetal surface area and patellar weight, height, width, and thickness. The correlation was strongest for surface area versus patellar weight. The lateral facetal area was found persistently larger than the medial facetal area, the p value was found to be <0.001 (one-tailed t-test) for right patellae, and another significant p value of < 0.001 (one-tailed t-test) was found for left patellae. Conclusion. These data are vital for the restoration of the normal biomechanics of the patellofemoral unit; these are to be consulted during knee surgeries and implant designs and can be of an indispensable anthropometric, interethnic, and biometric value. PMID:28348891

  8. Management of Acute Patellar Dislocation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Enix, Dennis E.; Sudkamp, Kasey; Scali, Frank; Keating, Robbyn; Welk, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case study is to describe the evaluation and management of patellar dislocations and the different approaches used from providers in different countries. Clinical Features An individual dislocated her left patella while traveling abroad and received subsequent care in Thailand, China, and the United States. Intervention and Outcome Nonoperative treatment protocols including manual closed reduction of the patella, casting of the leg, and rehabilitation exercises were employed. Conclusion Receipt of care when abroad can be challenging. The patient’s knee range of motion and pain continued to improve when she was diligent about performing the home exercise program. This case highlights the importance of a thorough examination, a proper regimen of care, and patient counseling to ensure a full recovery and minimize the chance of re-injury. PMID:26778935

  9. Lung hypoplasia and patellar agenesis in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, P; Deb, J; Deb, R; Chakrabarti, S

    2009-12-01

    A 22-year-old male patient was admitted with severe cough associated with purulent expectoration, left-sided chest pain and breathlessness. There was a history of recurrent respiratory ailments since childhood. The patient appeared younger than his chronological age. His face and ears were both dysmorphic. Clinically, the patient was diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). Computed tomography of the thoracic region revealed hypoplasia of the left lung and hyperplasia of the right lung. Both the patellae were absent. However, ultrasonography of his abdomen, echocardiography and other routine blood and urine examination showed no gross abnormalities. Although other respiratory tract abnormalities with EDS are not uncommon, unilateral lung hypoplasia and patellar agenesis in EDS make this case unique.

  10. A Proposed Return-to-Sport Program for Patients With Midportion Achilles Tendinopathy: Rationale and Implementation.

    PubMed

    Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Crossley, Kay M

    2015-11-01

    Synopsis Achilles tendinopathy is a common overuse injury in athletes involved in running and jumping activities and sports. The intervention with the highest level of evidence is exercise therapy, and it is recommended that all patients initially be treated with exercise for at least 3 months prior to considering other treatment options. Recovery from Achilles tendinopathy can take up to a year, and there is a high propensity for recurrence, especially during the return-to-sport phase. The extent of the tendon injury, the age and sex of the athlete, the magnitude of pain/symptoms, the extent of impairments, and the demands of the sport all need to be considered when planning for return to sport. This clinical commentary describes an approach to return to sport for patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy. The aim of the return-to-sport program is to facilitate the decision-making process in returning an athlete with midportion Achilles tendinopathy back to full sport participation and to minimize the chances for recurrence of the injury. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2015;45(11):876-886. Epub 21 Sep 2015. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.5885.

  11. Therapeutic exercise for rotator cuff tendinopathy: a systematic review of contextual factors and prescription parameters.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, Chris; Malliaras, Peter; Chance-Larsen, Ken

    2015-06-01

    Exercise is widely regarded as an effective intervention for symptomatic rotator cuff tendinopathy but the prescription is diverse and the important components of such programmes are not well understood. The objective of this study was to systematically review the contextual factors and prescription parameters of published exercise programmes for rotator cuff tendinopathy, to generate recommendations based on current evidence. An electronic search of AMED, CiNAHL, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, PEDro and SPORTDiscus was undertaken from their inception to June 2014 and supplemented by hand searching. Eligible studies included randomized controlled trials evaluating the effectiveness of exercise in participants with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Included studies were appraised using the Cochrane risk of bias tool and synthesized narratively. Fourteen studies were included, and suggested that exercise programmes are widely applicable and can be successfully designed by physiotherapists with varying experience; whether the exercise is completed at home or within a clinic setting does not appear to matter and neither does pain production or pain avoidance during exercise; inclusion of some level of resistance does seem to matter although the optimal level is unclear, the optimal number of repetitions is also unclear but higher repetitions might confer superior outcomes; three sets of exercise are preferable to two or one set but the optimal frequency is unknown; most programmes should demonstrate clinically significant outcomes by 12 weeks. This systematic review has offered preliminary guidance in relation to contextual factors and prescription parameters to aid development and application of exercise programmes for rotator cuff tendinopathy.

  12. Relationship between neovascularization and clinical severity in Achilles tendinopathy in 556 paired measurements.

    PubMed

    De Jonge, S; Warnaars, J L F; De Vos, R J; Weir, A; van Schie, H T M; Bierma-Zeinstra, S M A; Verhaar, J A N; Tol, J L

    2014-10-01

    Neovascularization is frequently observed in tendinopathy. Previous studies have focused on the role of neovascularization in Achilles tendinopathy, but have been conducted in small series. It is still unclear whether the degree of neovascularization is related to severity of symptoms. The purpose was to study the relationship between ultrasonographic neovascularization and clinical severity in patients with Achilles tendinopathy. In this prospective cohort study, data on 127 patients (141 tendons) were assembled from databases of three clinical trials. All patients followed an eccentric exercise program. The Öhberg neovascularization score (0-4+) and Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A) score (split into domains: pain, function and activity) were collected during baseline and follow-up. The relationship between neovascularization and VISA-A score was calculated. At baseline, 107 tendons (76%) showed some degree of neovascularization. In 556 coupled measurements, neovascularization was weakly related to the VISA-A score [Exp (B) 1.017, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.007-1.026]. No significant relationship was found between neovascularization and the pain domain (P = 0.277) and the activity domain (P = 0.283), but there was between neovascularization and the function domain of the VISA-A score [Exp (B) = 1.067, 95% CI 1.018-1.119]. In conclusion, neovascularization in Achilles tendinopathy is weakly related to clinical severity, mainly based on the function domain of the VISA-A score.

  13. Analysing the outcome of surgery for chronic Achilles tendinopathy over the last 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Wasim S; Malvankar, Seema; Bhamra, Jagmeet S; Pengas, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine an association between when the study was performed, the robustness of the study and the outcomes for insertional and non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy surgery. METHODS: We performed a systematic review in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines to assess the methodology of studies investigating the outcome of surgery in chronic Achilles tendinopathy over the last 50 years to identify any trends that would account for the variable results. The Coleman Methodology Scores were correlated with the reported percentage success rates and with the publication year to determine any trends using Pearson’s correlation. RESULTS: We identified 62 studies published between 1964 and 2014 reporting on a total of 2923 surgically treated Achilles tendinopathies. The average follow-up time was 40 mo (range 5-204 mo), and the mean reported success rate was 83.5% (range 36%-100%). The Coleman Methodology Scores were highly reproducible (r = 0.99, P < 0.01), with a mean of 40.1 (SD 18.9, range 2-79). We found a negative correlation between reported success rate and overall methodology scores (r = -0.40, P < 0.001), and a positive correlation between year of publication and overall methodology scores (r = 0.46, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: We conclude that although the success rate of surgery for chronic Acilles tendinopathy described in the literature has fallen over the last 50 years, this is probably due to a more rigorous methodology of the studies. PMID:26191496

  14. Characterization of deposits in patients with calcific tendinopathy of the supraspinatus. Role of phytate and osteopontin.

    PubMed

    Grases, Felix; Muntaner-Gimbernat, Lorenzo; Vilchez-Mira, Mar; Costa-Bauzá, Antonia; Tur, Fernando; Prieto, Rafel Maria; Torrens-Mas, Margalida; Vega, Fabiana Gisela

    2015-04-01

    Calcific tendinopathy of the tendons of the rotator cuff is common in adults. These calcifications tend to be reabsorbed after a period of acute pain. This study evaluated the morphologic characteristics of calcific deposits and the participation of phytate and osteopontin (OPN) in their development. Calcific deposits were removed from 21 patients with calcific tendinopathy by ultrasound-guided needle puncture under local anesthesia. The removed deposits were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The amounts of calcium and phosphorus in the deposits were semi-quantitatively determined by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Phytate was determined in 2 h urine samples, and OPN was extracted from a pool of deposits. The calcific deposits consisted of amorphous and poorly crystalline carbonated hydroxyapatite containing molecular water and organic matter. OPN was associated with the hydroxyapatite deposits. Phytate concentrations were significantly lower in the urine of patients with calcific tendinopathy than in healthy controls. The deficit in crystallization inhibitors such as phytate, and the presence of regulators such as OPN, may play important roles in the development of calcific tendinopathy.

  15. Plantaris Excision Reduces Pain in Midportion Achilles Tendinopathy Even in the Absence of Plantaris Tendinosis

    PubMed Central

    Calder, James D. F.; Stephen, Joanna M.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is becoming increasingly apparent that the plantaris can contribute to symptoms in at least a subset of patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy. However, the nature of its involvement remains unclear. Purpose: To determine whether excised plantaris tendons from patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy display tendinopathic changes and whether the presence of such changes affect clinical outcomes. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Sixteen plantaris tendons in patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy recalcitrant to conservative management underwent histological examination for the presence of tendinopathic changes. All patients had imaging to confirm the presence of the plantaris tendon adherent to or invaginated into the focal area of Achilles tendinosis. Visual analog scale (VAS) and Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) results were recorded pre- and postoperatively. Results: Sixteen patients (mean age, 26.2 years; range, 18-47 years) underwent surgery, with a mean follow-up of 14 months (range, 6-20 months). The plantaris tendon was histologically normal in 13 of 16 cases (81%). Inflammatory changes in the loose peritendinous connective tissue surrounding the plantaris tendon were evident in all cases. There was significant improvement in mean VAS scores (P < .05) and all domains of the FAOS postoperatively (P < .05). Conclusion: The absence of any tendinopathic changes in the excised plantaris of 13 patients who clinically improved suggests plantaris involvement with Achilles tendinopathy may not yet be fully understood and supports the concept that this may be a compressive or a frictional phenomenon rather than purely tendinopathic. PMID:28203584

  16. Astym treatment vs. eccentric exercise for lateral elbow tendinopathy: a randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Stegink-Jansen, Caroline W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Patients with chronic lateral elbow (LE) tendinopathy, commonly known as tennis elbow, often experience prolonged symptoms and frequent relapses. Astym treatment, evidenced in animal studies to promote the healing and regeneration of soft tissues, is hypothesized to improve outcomes in LE tendinopathy patients. This study had two objectives: (1) to compare the efficacy of Astym treatment to an evidence-based eccentric exercise program (EE) for patients with chronic LE tendinopathy, and (2) to quantify outcomes of subjects non-responsive to EE who were subsequently treated with Astym treatment. Study Design. Prospective, two group, parallel, randomized controlled trial completed at a large orthopedic center in Indiana. Inclusion criteria: age range of 18–65 years old, with clinical indications of LE tendinopathy greater than 12 weeks, with no recent corticosteriod injection or disease altering comorbidities. Methods. Subjects with chronic LE tendinopathy (107 subjects with 113 affected elbows) were randomly assigned using computer-generated random number tables to 4 weeks of Astym treatment (57 elbows) or EE treatment (56 elbows). Data collected at baseline, 4, 8, 12 weeks, 6 and 12 months. Primary outcome measure: DASH; secondary outcome measures: pain with activity, maximum grip strength and function. The treating physicians and the rater were blinded; subjects and treating clinicians could not be blinded due to the nature of the treatments. Results. Resolution response rates were 78.3% for the Astym group and 40.9% for the EE group. Astym subjects showed greater gains in DASH scores (p = 0.047) and in maximum grip strength (p = 0.008) than EE subjects. Astym therapy also resolved 20/21 (95.7%) of the EE non-responders, who showed improvements in DASH scores (p < 0.005), pain with activity (p = 0.002), and function (p = 0.004) following Astym treatment. Gains continued at 6 and 12 months. No adverse effects were reported. Conclusion. This study

  17. Reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon rupture using graft from contralateral patella graft together with reinforcement from flexor tendons. Case report.

    PubMed

    Frois Temponi, Eduardo; de Carvalho, Lúcio Honório; da Silva Bernardes, Cláudio Otávio; Presses Teixeira, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Chronic patellar tendon rupture is a rare disabling injury that is technically difficult to repair. The true prevalence of this injury is unknown. Delayed reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon rupture has yielded suboptimal clinical and functional results. Many different surgical methods for reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon injury have been reported. In this report, we present a case with chronic patellar tendon injury that was addressed using a technique that had not previously been described in the literature, through combining procedures that had been described separately. The reconstruction method presented in this article has the advantages of being easy and reproducible, without a requirement of allografts.

  18. The influence of ageing and exercise on tendon growth and degeneration--hypotheses for the initiation and prevention of strain-induced tendinopathies.

    PubMed

    Smith, R K W; Birch, H L; Goodman, S; Heinegård, D; Goodship, A E

    2002-12-01

    Strain-induced tendinopathy is a common injury in both human and equine athletes, with increasing incidence associated with greater involvement in sport and an increasingly aged population. This paper reviews our studies on the abundant non-collagenous protein, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), in equine tendons. Its variation between tendon type and site, age and exercise has provided an insight into how age and exercise influence tendon growth and maturation. Tendons can be broadly divided into two types, reflecting their different matrix composition and function: the energy-storing tendons used for weight-bearing and locomotion, which suffer a high incidence of strain-induced tendinopathy, and positional tendons involved in limb placement or manipulative skills. It would appear that while energy-storing tendon can respond to the mechanical forces applied to it during growth, there is no evidence that it can do so after skeletal maturity. Instead, cumulative fatigue damage causes degeneration at the molecular level, potentially weakening it and increasing the risk of clinical injury. Appropriate exercise regimes early in life may help to improve the quality of growing tendon, thereby reducing the incidence of injury during ageing or subsequent athletic career.

  19. Role of VEGF, Nitric Oxide, and Sympathetic Neurotransmitters in the Pathogenesis of Tendinopathy: A Review of the Current Evidences

    PubMed Central

    Vasta, Sebastiano; Di Martino, Alberto; Zampogna, Biagio; Torre, Guglielmo; Papalia, Rocco; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic tendinopathy is a painful common condition affecting athletes as well as the general population undergoing to tendon overuse. Although its huge prevalence, little is known about tendinopathy pathogenesis, and even cloudier is its treatment. Traditionally, tendinopathy has been defined as a lack of tendon ability to overcome stressing stimuli with appropriate adaptive changes. Histologic studies have demonstrated the absence of inflammatory infiltrates, as a consequence conventional antinflammatory drugs have shown little or no effectiveness in treating tendinopathies. New strategies should be therefore identified to address chronic tendon disorders. Angiofibroblastic changes have been highlighted as the main feature of tendinopathy, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been demonstrated as one of the key molecules involved in vascular hyperplasia. More recently, attention has been focused on new peptides such as Substance P, nitric oxide, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Those new findings support the idea of a nerve-mediated disregulation of tendon metabolism. Each of those molecules could be a target for new treatment options. This study aimed to systematically review the current available clinical and basic science in order to summarize the latest evidences on the pathophysiology and its effect on treatment of chronic tendinopathy, and to spread suggestions for future research on its treatment. PMID:27555817

  20. Low recurrence rate after mini surgery outside the tendon combined with short rehabilitation in patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Alfredson, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a general opinion that a structured and specific rehabilitation is needed after treatment of midportion Achilles tendinopathy to minimize recurrence of the condition. There is sparse knowledge about the recurrence rates in large patient materials after specific treatments for midportion Achilles tendinopathy. Aim This study aimed to investigate the recurrence rates in a large number of patients with chronic painful midportion Achilles tendinopathy that had been surgically treated with the ultrasound (US) and Doppler (DP)-guided mini-surgical scraping technique. Postoperatively, a relatively simple rehabilitation protocol, including a range of movement exercises and gradually increased walking and biking before allowing free activity, was used. Materials and methods From a database, information about the recurrence rates after US + DP-guided mini-surgical scraping, performed by a single surgeon on 519 tendons with US + DP-verified chronic painful midportion Achilles tendinopathy, was obtained. Results Recurrence of painful midportion Achilles tendinopathy was found in 26 of 519 (5%) operated tendons, 13 from women and 13 from men. In 13 tendons, a close by located plantaris tendon was extirpated during the reoperation. Conclusion In this large material on patients treated with US + DP-guided mini-surgical scraping for midportion Achilles tendinopathy, there were few recurrences, although only a simple and nonspecific rehabilitation protocol was used. PMID:27274323

  1. Semantic interrogation of a multi knowledge domain ontological model of tendinopathy identifies four strong candidate risk genes

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Colleen J.; Jalali Sefid Dashti, Mahjoubeh; Gamieldien, Junaid

    2016-01-01

    Tendinopathy is a multifactorial syndrome characterised by tendon pain and thickening, and impaired performance during activity. Candidate gene association studies have identified genetic factors that contribute to intrinsic risk of developing tendinopathy upon exposure to extrinsic factors. Bioinformatics approaches that data-mine existing knowledge for biological relationships may assist with the identification of candidate genes. The aim of this study was to data-mine functional annotation of human genes and identify candidate genes by ontology-seeded queries capturing the features of tendinopathy. Our BioOntological Relationship Graph database (BORG) integrates multiple sources of genomic and biomedical knowledge into an on-disk semantic network where human genes and their orthologs in mouse and rat are central concepts mapped to ontology terms. The BORG was used to screen all human genes for potential links to tendinopathy. Following further prioritisation, four strong candidate genes (COL11A2, ELN, ITGB3, LOX) were identified. These genes are differentially expressed in tendinopathy, functionally linked to features of tendinopathy and previously implicated in other connective tissue diseases. In conclusion, cross-domain semantic integration of multiple sources of biomedical knowledge, and interrogation of phenotypes and gene functions associated with disease, may significantly increase the probability of identifying strong and unobvious candidate genes in genetic association studies. PMID:26804977

  2. Semantic interrogation of a multi knowledge domain ontological model of tendinopathy identifies four strong candidate risk genes.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Colleen J; Jalali Sefid Dashti, Mahjoubeh; Gamieldien, Junaid

    2016-01-25

    Tendinopathy is a multifactorial syndrome characterised by tendon pain and thickening, and impaired performance during activity. Candidate gene association studies have identified genetic factors that contribute to intrinsic risk of developing tendinopathy upon exposure to extrinsic factors. Bioinformatics approaches that data-mine existing knowledge for biological relationships may assist with the identification of candidate genes. The aim of this study was to data-mine functional annotation of human genes and identify candidate genes by ontology-seeded queries capturing the features of tendinopathy. Our BioOntological Relationship Graph database (BORG) integrates multiple sources of genomic and biomedical knowledge into an on-disk semantic network where human genes and their orthologs in mouse and rat are central concepts mapped to ontology terms. The BORG was used to screen all human genes for potential links to tendinopathy. Following further prioritisation, four strong candidate genes (COL11A2, ELN, ITGB3, LOX) were identified. These genes are differentially expressed in tendinopathy, functionally linked to features of tendinopathy and previously implicated in other connective tissue diseases. In conclusion, cross-domain semantic integration of multiple sources of biomedical knowledge, and interrogation of phenotypes and gene functions associated with disease, may significantly increase the probability of identifying strong and unobvious candidate genes in genetic association studies.

  3. Growth changes in morphological and mechanical properties of human patellar tendon in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Keitaro; Teshima, Takanori; Hirose, Norikazu; Tsunoda, Naoya

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the morphological and mechanical properties of the human patellar tendon among elementary school children (prepubertal), junior high school students (pubertal), and adults. Twenty-one elementary school children, 18 junior high school students, and 22 adults participated in this study. The maximal strain, stiffness, Young's modulus, hysteresis, and cross-sectional area of the patellar tendon were measured using ultrasonography. No significant difference was observed in the relative length (to thigh length) or cross-sectional area (to body mass(2/3)) of the patellar tendon among the three groups. Stiffness and Young's modulus were significantly lower in elementary school children than in the other groups, while no significant differences were observed between junior high school students and adults. No significant differences were observed in maximal strain or hysteresis among the three groups. These results suggest that the material property (Young's modulus) of the patellar tendons of elementary school children was lower than that of the other groups, whereas that of junior high school students was already similar to that of adults. In addition, no significant differences were observed in the extensibility (maximal strain) or viscosity (hysteresis) of the patellar tendon among the three groups.

  4. PLATEAU-PATELLA ANGLE: AN OPTION FOR ASSESSING PATELLAR HEIGHT ON PROXIMAL TIBIA OSTEOTOMY

    PubMed Central

    BONADIO, MARCELO BATISTA; TORRES, JÚLIO AUGUSTO DO PRADO; MAZZARO, VICENTE; HELITO, CAMILO PARTEZANI; GOBBI, RICCARDO GOMES; DEMANGE, MARCO KAWAMURA

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To compare the plateau-patella angle method to the methods already established for patellar height measurement in patients undergoing high tibial osteotomy. Methods: This is a retrospective study of 13 patients undergoing medial opening tibial osteotomy. The patellar height was measured in pre and post-operative radiographs by the methods from Insall-Salvati, Caton-Deschamps, Blackburne-Peel and patella-plateau angle, as well as the tibial slope and length of the patellar tendon. Measurements were performed by two knee surgeons at two different times. Results: The mean age was 41.33 ± 01.09 years old. The average rates of Caton-Deschamps, Blackburne-Peel, Insall-Salvati and plateau-patella angle were, respectively, 1.00; 0.89; 1.10; and 23.15° preoperatively, and 0.89; 0.78; 1.11; and 20.46°, postoperatively. The correlation of Caton-Deschamps, Blackburne-Pell, and Insall-Salvati indexes and plateau-patellar angle interobserver was 0.72 (p <0.001), 0:54 (p <0.001), 0.65 (p <0.001), and 0.67 (w <0.001), respectively. Conclusion: The plateau-patella angle method undergoes changes that are correlated with changes in tibial slope after osteotomy, unlike the classical methods. This fact may lead to overestimate the reduction of patellar height after osteotomy. Level of evidence IV. Case Series. PMID:27217812

  5. Tibial tubercle osteotomy in patello-femoral instability and in patellar height abnormality.

    PubMed

    Caton, Jacques H; Dejour, David

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to present the different surgical procedures of tibial tubercle osteotomies for patellar instability or patellar mispositioning such as patella alta or patella infera. This study analysed the Caton-Deschamps index used for assessment of vertical patella height in order to make a precise plan for tibial tuberosity osteotomies. This study included 61 knees (50 patients) treated for patellar instability with patella alta and 24 patients treated for patella infera of mechanical origin. The results of medial transfer of the tibial tuberosity, with or without distal transfer in cases of patellar instability with patella alta, gives excellent results for stability in 76.8% of the cases. The results of the proximal transfer of the tibial tuberosity in cases of patella infera were excellent or good in 80% of the cases in our series of 24 patients. A precise preoperative plan is needed with determination of the vertical patellar height using the Caton-Deschamps index and the situation of the tibial tuberosity and the Tibial Tubercle to Trochlear Groove distance (TT-TG) of the knee on CT scan in order to obtain satisfactory results.

  6. PRP Treatment Efficacy for Tendinopathy: A Review of Basic Science Studies.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yiqin; Wang, James H-C

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) has been widely used in orthopaedic surgery and sport medicine to treat tendon injuries. However, the efficacy of PRP treatment for tendinopathy is controversial. This paper focuses on reviewing the basic science studies on PRP performed under well-controlled conditions. Both in vitro and in vivo studies describe PRP's anabolic and anti-inflammatory effects on tendons. While some clinical trials support these findings, others refute them. In this review, we discuss the effectiveness of PRP to treat tendon injuries with evidence presented in basic science studies and the potential reasons for the controversial results in clinical trials. Finally, we comment on the approaches that may be required to improve the efficacy of PRP treatment for tendinopathy.

  7. THE ROLE AND IMPLEMENTATION OF ECCENTRIC TRAINING IN ATHLETIC REHABILITATION: TENDINOPATHY, HAMSTRING STRAINS, AND ACL RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Reiman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The benefits and proposed physiological mechanisms of eccentric exercise have previously been elucidated and eccentric exercise has been used for well over seventy years. Traditionally, eccentric exercise has been used as a regular component of strength training. However, in recent years, eccentric exercise has been used in rehabilitation to manage a host of conditions. Of note, there is evidence in the literature supporting eccentric exercise for the rehabilitation of tendinopathies, muscle strains, and in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rehabilitation. The purpose of this Clinical Commentary is to discuss the physiologic mechanism of eccentric exercise as well as to review the literature regarding the utilization of eccentric training during rehabilitation. A secondary purpose of this commentary is to provide the reader with a framework for the implementation of eccentric training during rehabilitation of tendinopathies, muscle strains, and after ACL reconstruction. PMID:21655455

  8. PRP Treatment Efficacy for Tendinopathy: A Review of Basic Science Studies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) has been widely used in orthopaedic surgery and sport medicine to treat tendon injuries. However, the efficacy of PRP treatment for tendinopathy is controversial. This paper focuses on reviewing the basic science studies on PRP performed under well-controlled conditions. Both in vitro and in vivo studies describe PRP's anabolic and anti-inflammatory effects on tendons. While some clinical trials support these findings, others refute them. In this review, we discuss the effectiveness of PRP to treat tendon injuries with evidence presented in basic science studies and the potential reasons for the controversial results in clinical trials. Finally, we comment on the approaches that may be required to improve the efficacy of PRP treatment for tendinopathy. PMID:27610386

  9. JOINT MOBILIZATION IN THE MANAGEMENT OF PERSISTENT INSERTIONAL ACHILLES TENDINOPATHY: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Post, Andrew A.; Mischke, John J.; Sault, Josiah D.

    2017-01-01

    Background & Purpose Insertional Achilles tendinopathy (IAT) can be a challenging condition to manage conservatively. Eccentric exercise is commonly used in the management of chronic tendinopathy; however, it may not be as helpful for insertional tendon problems as compared to mid-portion dysfunction. While current evidence describing the physical therapy management of IAT is developing, gaps still exist in descriptions of best practice. The purpose of this case report is to describe the management of a patient with persistent IAT utilizing impairment-based joint mobilization, self-mobilization, and exercise. Case description A 51-year-old male was seen in physical therapy for complaints of posterior heel pain and reduced running capacity. He was seen by multiple physical therapists previously, but reported continued impairment, and functional restriction. Joint-based non-thrust mobilization and self-mobilization exercise were performed to enhance his ability to run and reduce symptoms. Outcomes The subject was seen for four visits over the course of two months. He made clinically significant improvements on the Foot and Ankle Activity Measure and Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles tendon outcomes, was asymptomatic, and participated in numerous marathons. Improvements were maintained at one-year follow-up. Discussion Mobility deficits can contribute to the development of tendinopathy, and without addressing movement restrictions, symptoms and functional decline related to tendinopathy may persist. Joint-directed manual therapy may be a beneficial intervention in a comprehensive plan of care in allowing patients with chronic tendon changes to optimize function. Level of Evidence Therapy, Level 4 PMID:28217424

  10. Laser Therapy in the Treatment of Achilles Tendinopathy: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumilty, Steve; Munn, Joanne; Haxby Abbott, J.; Mcdonough, Suzanne; Hurley, Deirdre A.; Basford, Jeffrey R.; David Baxter, G.

    2010-05-01

    Background: Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) has emerged as a possible treatment modality for tendinopathies. Human studies have investigated LLLT for Achilles Tendinopathy and the effectiveness remains contentious. Purpose: To assess the clinical effectiveness of Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) in the management of Achilles Tendinopathy. Method: Forty patients were randomised into an active laser or placebo group; all patients, therapists and investigator were blinded to allocation. All patients were given an eccentric exercise program and irradiated 3 times per week for 4 weeks with either an active or placebo laser at 6 standardized points over the affected tendons. Irradiation parameters in the active laser group were: 810 nm, 100 mW, applied to 6 points on the tendon for 30 seconds giving a dose of 3 J per point and 18 J per session; power density 100 mW/cm2. Outcome measures were the VISA-A questionnaire and a visual analogue scale of pain. Patients were measured before treatment, at 4 and 12 weeks. ANCOVA was used to analyze data, using the effects of baseline measurements as a covariate. Results: Within groups, there were significant improvements (p<0.05) at 4 and 12 weeks for all outcome measures, except pain for the laser group at 4 weeks (p = 0.13). Between groups differences at both 4 and 12 weeks showed no significant difference between groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: This use of the above parameters demonstrated no added benefit of LLLT over that of eccentric exercise in the treatment of Achilles Tendinopathy.

  11. PERI-INCISIONAL DYSESTHESIA FOLLOWING ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION USING CENTRAL THIRD OF PATELLAR TENDON

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Júnior, Lúcio Honório; Machado, Soares Luiz Fernando; Gonçalves, Matheus Braga Jacques; Júnior, Paulo Randal Pires; Baumfeld, Daniel Soares; Pereira, Marcelo Lobo; Lessa, Rodrigo Rosa; Costa, Lincoln Paiva; Bisinoto, Henrique Barra

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the prevalence and type of dysesthesia around the incision used to obtain the patellar tendon for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery. Methods: Out of a population of 1368 ACL reconstructions using the central third of the patellar tendon, 102 patients (111 knees) were evaluated by means of telephone interview. Results: The mean follow-up was 52 months (ranging from 12 to 88 months). The patients' ages ranged from 16 to 58 years (mean: 34.7 years). There was some degree of peri-incisional dysesthesia in 66 knees (59.46%). In 40.54% of the knees, this condition was not found. In all the cases of dysesthesia, the type encountered was Highet's type II. Conclusion: Peri-incisional dysesthesia following ACL reconstruction using the central third of the patellar tendon is highly prevalent. It affected more than half of the cases in this series. PMID:27026983

  12. Protecting a Patellar Ligament Reconstruction after Proximal Tibial Resection: A Simplified Approach

    PubMed Central

    Titus, Vijay

    2008-01-01

    Limb salvage in tumor surgery has encouraged the development of megaprostheses. However, reattaching the ligamentum patellae poses a particular problem: avulsion and/or extensor lag may lead to poor function. We describe a new technique of patellar ligament reconstruction. The technique involves reattachment of the patellar ligament to the tibial tuberosity of the proximal tibial megaprosthesis, which has a porous surface created, and the repair is protected with a cerclage wire through the patella and the prosthesis. In 10 consecutive patients, the range of motion averaged 95° (median, 90°; range, 70°–120°), and the mean extension lag averaged 4° (median, 0°; range, 0°–20°). We had one case of patellar ligament avulsion. This technique resulted in good quadriceps function and a low incidence of complications. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18425561

  13. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 Polymorphisms Have Protective Effect against the Development of Tendinopathy in Volleyball Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Salles, José Inácio; Duarte, Maria Eugenia Leite; Guimarães, João Matheus; Lopes, Lucas Rafael; Vilarinho Cardoso, Jessica; Aguiar, Diego Pinheiro; Machado Neto, João Olyntho; Machado, Daniel Escorsim; Perini, Jamila Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether genetic variants in VEGF and KDR genes can be correlated with susceptibility of tendinopathy in volleyball athletes. This study was conducted at the Brazilian Volleyball Federation, and comprised 179 volleyball athletes: 88 had a confirmed diagnosis of tendinopathy (cases), whereas 91 had no evidence of the disease (controls). The VEGF (-2578C>A, -460T>C and +936C>T) and KDR (-604C>T, 1192G>A and 1719T>A) polymorphisms were determined by TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction. The odds ratio (OR) with their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using an unconditional logistic regression model. The evaluation of demographic and clinical characteristics revealed the athlete age (P < 0.001), years of practice in volleyball (P < 0.001) and presence of pain (P = 0.001) were risk factors for tendinopathy. KDR 1192 GA and GA + AA genotypes were associated with lower risk of tendinopathy (OR: 0.41, 95% CI: 0.19–0.88 and OR: 0.47, 95% CI: 0.23–0.98, respectively). The KDR (-604C>T, 1192G>A and 1719T>A) haplotypes CGA and CAT were associated with decreased tendinopathy risk (OR: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.21–0.99 and OR: 0.23, 95% CI: 0.07–0.76, respectively). With regards to pain, traumatic lesion and away from training due to injury, VEGF and KDR polymorphisms were not associated with clinical symptoms complaints. The present results provide evidence that the KDR polymorphisms were associated with development of tendinopathy, and can contribute to identify new therapeutic targets or personalized training programs to avoid tendinopathy development in athletes. PMID:27930691

  14. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 Polymorphisms Have Protective Effect against the Development of Tendinopathy in Volleyball Athletes.

    PubMed

    Salles, José Inácio; Duarte, Maria Eugenia Leite; Guimarães, João Matheus; Lopes, Lucas Rafael; Vilarinho Cardoso, Jessica; Aguiar, Diego Pinheiro; Machado Neto, João Olyntho; Machado, Daniel Escorsim; Perini, Jamila Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether genetic variants in VEGF and KDR genes can be correlated with susceptibility of tendinopathy in volleyball athletes. This study was conducted at the Brazilian Volleyball Federation, and comprised 179 volleyball athletes: 88 had a confirmed diagnosis of tendinopathy (cases), whereas 91 had no evidence of the disease (controls). The VEGF (-2578C>A, -460T>C and +936C>T) and KDR (-604C>T, 1192G>A and 1719T>A) polymorphisms were determined by TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction. The odds ratio (OR) with their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using an unconditional logistic regression model. The evaluation of demographic and clinical characteristics revealed the athlete age (P < 0.001), years of practice in volleyball (P < 0.001) and presence of pain (P = 0.001) were risk factors for tendinopathy. KDR 1192 GA and GA + AA genotypes were associated with lower risk of tendinopathy (OR: 0.41, 95% CI: 0.19-0.88 and OR: 0.47, 95% CI: 0.23-0.98, respectively). The KDR (-604C>T, 1192G>A and 1719T>A) haplotypes CGA and CAT were associated with decreased tendinopathy risk (OR: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.21-0.99 and OR: 0.23, 95% CI: 0.07-0.76, respectively). With regards to pain, traumatic lesion and away from training due to injury, VEGF and KDR polymorphisms were not associated with clinical symptoms complaints. The present results provide evidence that the KDR polymorphisms were associated with development of tendinopathy, and can contribute to identify new therapeutic targets or personalized training programs to avoid tendinopathy development in athletes.

  15. The VISA-A questionnaire: a valid and reliable index of the clinical severity of Achilles tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, J; Cook, J; Purdam, C; Visentini, P; Ross, J; Maffulli, N; Taunton, J; Khan, K

    2001-01-01

    Background—There is no disease specific, reliable, and valid clinical measure of Achilles tendinopathy. Objective—To develop and test a questionnaire based instrument that would serve as an index of severity of Achilles tendinopathy. Methods—Item generation, item reduction, item scaling, and pretesting were used to develop a questionnaire to assess the severity of Achilles tendinopathy. The final version consisted of eight questions that measured the domains of pain, function in daily living, and sporting activity. Results range from 0 to 100, where 100 represents the perfect score. Its validity and reliability were then tested in a population of non-surgical patients with Achilles tendinopathy (n = 45), presurgical patients with Achilles tendinopathy (n = 14), and two normal control populations (total n = 87). Results—The VISA-A questionnaire had good test-retest (r = 0.93), intrarater (three tests, r = 0.90), and interrater (r = 0.90) reliability as well as good stability when compared one week apart (r = 0.81). The mean (95% confidence interval) VISA-A score in the non-surgical patients was 64 (59–69), in presurgical patients 44 (28–60), and in control subjects it exceeded 96 (94–99). Thus the VISA-A score was higher in non-surgical than presurgical patients (p = 0.02) and higher in control subjects than in both patient populations (p<0.001). Conclusions—The VISA-A questionnaire is reliable and displayed construct validity when means were compared in patients with a range of severity of Achilles tendinopathy and control subjects. The continuous numerical result of the VISA-A questionnaire has the potential to provide utility in both the clinical setting and research. The test is not designed to be diagnostic. Further studies are needed to determine whether the VISA-A score predicts prognosis. Key Words: Achilles; tendinopathy; tendinitis; outcome; questionnaire PMID:11579069

  16. Influence of Hyperlipidemia on the Treatment of Supraspinatus Tendinopathy With or Without Tear

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of hyperlipidemia on the treatment of supraspinatus tendinopathy, with or without tear. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the data of patients with shoulder pain and patients with supraspinatus tendinopathy, with or without tear, were included in the study. Exclusion criteria were prior shoulder surgery, prior steroid injection, neurological diseases that could lead to shoulder pain, and use of lipid-lowering medication. According to the serum lipid profiles, patients were assigned to either the hyperlipidemia or non-hyperlipidemia group. By analyzing the numeric rating scale (NRS) before treatment, and at 2 weeks and 8 weeks after treatment, we compared the difference in treatment effect between the two groups. Results No significant baseline difference was found among the two groups for age, gender, body mass index, duration of pain, side of pain, range of motion of affected shoulder, or physical examination. On the repeated-measures analysis of variance, NRS scores significantly decreased with time for both groups (p<0.001). When analyzing the effect of time between the subjects factor, there was significant difference in the treatment effect between the two groups (p<0.001), namely NRS was less decreased in the hyperlipidemia group. Conclusion We found that hyperlipidemia may be an adversely affecting factor in the treatment of supraspinatus tendinopathy with or without tear. PMID:27446783

  17. IL-17A mediates inflammatory and tissue remodelling events in early human tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Neal L.; Akbar, Moeed; Campbell, Abigail L.; Reilly, James H.; Kerr, Shauna C.; McLean, Michael; Frleta-Gilchrist, Marina; Fazzi, Umberto G.; Leach, William J.; Rooney, Brian P.; Crowe, Lindsay A. N.; Murrell, George A. C.; McInnes, Iain B.

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly, inflammatory mediators are considered crucial to the onset and perpetuation of tendinopathy. We sought evidence of interleukin 17A (IL-17A) expression in early human tendinopathy and thereafter, explored mechanisms whereby IL-17A mediated inflammation and tissue remodeling in human tenocytes. Torn supraspinatus tendon (established pathology) and matched intact subscapularis tendon (representing ‘early pathology’) along with control biopsies were collected from patients undergoing shoulder surgery. Markers of inflammation and IL-17A were quantified by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Human tendon cells were derived from hamstring tendon obtained during ACL reconstruction. In vitro effects of IL-17A upon tenocytes were measured using RT-PCR, multiplex cytokine assays, apoptotic proteomic profiling, immunohistochemistry and annexin V FACS staining. Increased expression of IL-17A was detected in ‘early tendinopathy’ compared to both matched samples and non-matched control samples (p < 0.01) by RT-PCR and immunostaining. Double immunofluoresence staining revealed IL-17A expression in leukocyte subsets including mast cells, macrophages and T cells. IL-17A treated tenocytes exhibited increased production of proinflammatory cytokines (p < 0.001), altered matrix regulation (p < 0.01) with increased Collagen type III and increased expression of several apoptosis related factors. We propose IL-17A as an inflammatory mediator within the early tendinopathy processes thus providing novel therapeutic approaches in the management of tendon disorders. PMID:27263531

  18. Treatment of Tendinopathy: What Works, What Does Not, and What is on the Horizon

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, George A. C.

    2008-01-01

    Tendinopathy is a broad term encompassing painful conditions occurring in and around tendons in response to overuse. Recent basic science research suggests little or no inflammation is present in these conditions. Thus, traditional treatment modalities aimed at controlling inflammation such as corticosteroid injections and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory medications (NSAIDS) may not be the most effective options. We performed a systematic review of the literature to determine the best treatment options for tendinopathy. We evaluated the effectiveness of NSAIDS, corticosteroid injections, exercise-based physical therapy, physical therapy modalities, shock wave therapy, sclerotherapy, nitric oxide patches, surgery, growth factors, and stem cell treatment. NSAIDS and corticosteroids appear to provide pain relief in the short term, but their effectiveness in the long term has not been demonstrated. We identified inconsistent results with shock wave therapy and physical therapy modalities such as ultrasound, iontophoresis and low-level laser therapy. Current data support the use of eccentric strengthening protocols, sclerotherapy, and nitric oxide patches, but larger, multicenter trials are needed to confirm the early results with these treatments. Preliminary work with growth factors and stem cells is promising, but further study is required in these fields. Surgery remains the last option due to the morbidity and inconsistent outcomes. The ideal treatment for tendinopathy remains unclear. Level of Evidence: Level II, systematic review. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18446422

  19. The Effect of Patellar Taping on Some Landing Characteristics During Counter Movement Jumps in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Cámara, Jesús; Díaz, Francisco; Anza, María Soledad; Mejuto, Gaizka; Puente, Asier; Iturriaga, Gorka; Fernández, Juan-Ramón

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of patellar taping (PT) on landing characteristics of the vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) and on flight time during a counter movement jump (CMJ). Eleven healthy male subjects (age: 31.1 ± 4.2 years) volunteered for the study. Each subject performed six CMJs under two different jumping conditions: with PT and without PT (WPT). The order of the two conditions was randomized. All of the measured variables had fair-to-good reliability (intra-class correlation coefficient > 0.75). When we compared the PT and WPT groups, we did not find a significant difference in the magnitude of the first (F1) and second (F2) peaks of the VGRF. We also did not find a significant difference in the time to production of these peaks (T1 and T2), and the time to stabilization (TTS) (p < 0. 05). Furthermore, the flight time was similar in the two groups (0.475 ± 0.046 and 0.474 ± 0.056 s, respectively, for PT and WPT). These results suggest that PT does not jeopardize performance during CMJ. Furthermore, it also does not soften the VGRF generated during the landing, indicating that PT may be of limited utility in preventing injuries associated with this type of movement. Key points We investigated whether patellar taping interferes with athletic performance, as has been suggested by previous studies. We also explored the effect of patellar taping on the forces generated during the landing phase of counter movement jumps. Patellar taping had no effect on the flight time during counter movement jumps. Patellar taping also had no effect on the vertical ground reaction force variables measured during the landing phase of counter movement jumps. This information may be relevant to athletes and trainers who are concerned about the effects of patellar taping on performance. PMID:24149562

  20. Patellar anthropometry in sex differentiation--a study ii the northern part of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Jana, Tapan Kumar; Giri, Susmita; Roy, Hironmoy; Kar, Maitreye; Santra, Sabyasachi; Das, Suvam

    2013-10-01

    As in many cases long bones get available in fragments, so gender determination from short as well as robust bones like patella paid importance now-a-days. So far the literature reviewed such records are little in Indians especially from West Bengal. The present study is aimed to demonstrate the gender differentiability of different patellar anthropometric parameters viz, length, breadth, surface areas of articular surfaces, patellar Index, etc, amongst population of northern part of West Bengal in India. A total 46 intact patellae of which 23 belonged to males and 23 belonged to females, were taken out from human corps of 20 to 50 years of age group, brought for postmortem in the forensic department, NB Medical College, Sushrutanagar. Patellar vertical length, width, different measurements of the individual articular facet, angulations at the vertical ridge, patellar index and total surface area of the posterior surface and articular part, etc, were measured. In males patellar height, diameter, index, dry weight, articular surface area would be more than 3.75cm, 4.1cm, 108.23, 18g and 11.67cm2 respectively and values less than those will be for females. But in contrary angulation at the vertical ridge between medial and lateral articular facets will be more than 119.28 degrees in females, and less than for males. The results of this study revealed that we can determine sex of North Bengal population just by using the patellar measurements, when other long bones, skull and pelvis get not available, or fragmented. But there remains a scope for multicentric study throughout the India to validate the fact.

  1. “Central” Quadriceps Tendon Harvest With Patellar Bone Plug: Surgical Technique Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Scully, William F.; Wilson, David J.; Arrington, Edward D.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this article is to review the surgical technique for quadriceps tendon graft harvest while highlighting an additional technical note that has not been previously emphasized. The quadriceps tendon typically inserts eccentrically on the superior pole of the patella. By shifting the soft-tissue harvest to a location just off the medial edge of the tendon, the adjoining patellar bone plug will be centered on the superior pole of the patella, reducing the risk of an iatrogenic patellar fracture. PMID:24400194

  2. Identification of differentially expressed genes and small molecule drugs for the treatment of tendinopathy using microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xinyu; Cai, Ming; Lou, Lieming

    2015-04-01

    Tendinopathy is a critical clinical problem as it is often asymptomatic at onset and during development, and is only recognized upon rupture of the tendon. It is common among recreational and competitive athletes. The present study sought to examine the molecular mechanism of the progression of tendinopathy by screening out differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and investigating their functions. In addition, the present study aimed to identify the small molecules, which exhibit potential effects, which could be utilized for the treatment of tendinopathy. The gene expression profile of tendinopathy, GSE26051 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, which included 23 control samples and 18 samples of tendinopathy. The DEGs were identified using the Limma package in the R programming language, and gene ontology and pathway enrichment analysis were performed. In addition, the potential regulatory microRNAs and the target sites of the transcription factors were screened out based on the molecular signature database. In addition, the DEGs were mapped to the connectivity map database to identify the potential small molecule drugs. A total of 318 genes were filtered as DEGs between diseased samples and normal control tendons. Additionally, genes, including laminin, α4, platelet‑derived growth factor α, laminin γ1 and Src homology 2 transforming protein 1 may induce tendinopathy through the focal adhesion pathway. Furthermore, the transcription factor, lymphoid enhancer‑binding factor 1 and its target genes, pantothenate kinase 2 and G protein‑coupled receptor kinase 5 were identified. The most significant microRNA, miR‑499, was screened and was found to regulate specific genes, including CUGBP2 and MYB. Additionally, the small molecules, Prestwick‑1082 and viomycin were identified to have the potential to repair disordered metabolic pathways and furthermore to remedy tendinopathy. The results of the present study assessed the mechanism of

  3. Novel use of a manual therapy technique and management of a patient with peroneal tendinopathy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hensley, Craig P; Kavchak, Alicia J Emerson

    2012-02-01

    Peroneal tendinopathy is an uncommon but underappreciated source of lateral hindfoot pain and dysfunction. There is a paucity of literature describing optimal intervention for those suffering with pain secondary to peroneal tendinopathy. The purpose of this case report is to describe the evaluation and treatment incorporating manual therapy and therapeutic exercise for a patient diagnosed with peroneal tendinopathy. The patient was a 50 year-old female with a history of chronic lateral ankle pain and whose presentation was consistent with peroneal tendinopathy. Despite attempts to improve pain and function with over-the-counter orthotics, manual therapy to a hypomobile talocrural joint, and strengthening of the peroneal tendons, successful response was not reported until a lateral calcaneal glide was added. Improvement in impairments (pain, talocrural dorsiflexion, unilateral heel raises, and Star Excursion Balance Test) and function (Lower Extremity Functional Scale and Global Rating of Change), were observed over a course of eight visits. The patient was able to return to work and her recreational work out routine without limitations. In conclusion a successful physical therapy intervention for a patient with peroneal tendinopathy included a unique manual therapy technique, the lateral calcaneal glide, in conjunction with other manual therapy techniques and a structured home exercise program.

  4. Patellar Skin Surface Temperature by Thermography Reflects Knee Osteoarthritis Severity

    PubMed Central

    Denoble, Anna E.; Hall, Norine; Pieper, Carl F.; Kraus, Virginia B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Digital infrared thermal imaging is a means of measuring the heat radiated from the skin surface. Our goal was to develop and assess the reproducibility of serial infrared measurements of the knee and to assess the association of knee temperature by region of interest with radiographic severity of knee Osteoarthritis (rOA). Methods: A total of 30 women (15 Cases with symptomatic knee OA and 15 age-matched Controls without knee pain or knee OA) participated in this study. Infrared imaging was performed with a Meditherm Med2000™ Pro infrared camera. The reproducibility of infrared imaging of the knee was evaluated through determination of intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for temperature measurements from two images performed 6 months apart in Controls whose knee status was not expected to change. The average cutaneous temperature for each of five knee regions of interest was extracted using WinTes software. Knee x-rays were scored for severity of rOA based on the global Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale. Results: The knee infrared thermal imaging procedure used here demonstrated long-term reproducibility with high ICCs (0.50–0.72 for the various regions of interest) in Controls. Cutaneous temperature of the patella (knee cap) yielded a significant correlation with severity of knee rOA (R = 0.594, P = 0.02). Conclusion: The skin temperature of the patellar region correlated with x-ray severity of knee OA. This method of infrared knee imaging is reliable and as an objective measure of a sign of inflammation, temperature, indicates an interrelationship of inflammation and structural knee rOA damage. PMID:21151853

  5. Comparative evaluation of patellar height methods in the Brazilian population☆

    PubMed Central

    Behrendt, Christian; Zaluski, Alexandre; e Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires; de Sousa, Eduardo Branco; Cavanellas, Naasson

    2015-01-01

    Objective The methods most used for patellar height measurement were compared with the plateau–patella angle method. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted, in which lateral-view radiographs of the knee were evaluated using the three methods already established in the literature: Insall–Salvati (IS), Blackburne–Peel (BP) and Caton–Deschamps (CD). These were compared with the plateau–patella angle method. One hundred and ninety-six randomly selected patients were included in the sample. Results The data were initially evaluated using the chi-square test. This analysis was deemed to be positive with p < 0.0001. We compared the traditional methods with the plateau–patella angle measurement, using Fisher's exact test. In comparing the IS index with the plateau–patella angle, we did not find any statistically significant differences in relation to the proportion of altered cases between the two groups. The traditional methods were compared with the plateau–patella angle with regard to the proportions of cases of high and low patella, by means of Fisher's exact test. This analysis showed that the plateau–patella angle identified fewer cases of high patella than did the IS, BP and CD methods, but more cases of low patella. In comparing pairs, we found that the IS and CD indices were capable of identifying more cases of high patella than was the plateau–patella angle. In relation to the cases of low patella, the plateau–patella angle was capable of identifying more cases than were the other three methods. Conclusions The plateau–patella angle found more patients with low patella than did the classical methods and showed results that diverged from those of the other indices studied. PMID:26962492

  6. Is latero-medial patellar mobility related to the range of motion of the knee joint after total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Ota, Susumu; Nakashima, Takeshi; Morisaka, Ayako; Omachi, Takaaki; Ida, Kunio; Kawamura, Morio

    2010-12-01

    Diminished range of motion (ROM) of the knee joint after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is thought to be related to reduced patellar mobility. This has not been confirmed clinically due to a lack of quantitative methods adequate for measuring patellar mobility. We investigated the relationship between patellar mobility by a reported quantitative method and knee joint ROM after TKA. Forty-nine patients [osteoarthritis--OA: 29 knees; rheumatoid arthritis--RA: 20 knees] were examined after TKA. Respective medial and lateral patellar mobility was measured 1 and 6 months postoperatively using a patellofemoral arthrometer (PFA). Knee joint ROM was also measured in each of those 2 sessions. Although the flexion and extension of the knee joints improved significantly from 1 to 6 months after TKA, the medial and lateral patellar displacements (LPDs) failed to improve during that same period. Moreover, only the changes in knee flexion and medial patellar displacement (MPD) between the two sessions were positively correlated (r = 0.31, p < 0.05). However, our findings demonstrated that medial and lateral patellar mobility had no sufficient longitudinal relationship with knee ROM after TKA.

  7. The results of adductor magnus tenodesis in adolescents with recurrent patellar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Malecki, Krzysztof; Fabis, Jaroslaw; Flont, Pawel; Niedzielski, Kryspin Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent dislocation of the patella is a common orthopaedic problem which occurs in about 44% of cases after first-time dislocation. In most cases of first-time patellar dislocation, the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) becomes damaged. Between 2010 and 2012, 33 children and adolescents (39 knees) with recurrent patellar dislocation were treated with MPFL reconstruction using the adductor magnus tendon. The aim of our study is to assess the effectiveness of this surgical procedure. The outcomes were evaluated functionally (Lysholm knee scale, the Kujala Anterior Knee Pain Scale, and isokinetic examination) and radiographically (Caton index, sulcus angle, congruence angle, and patellofemoral angle). Four patients demonstrated redislocation with MPFL graft failure, despite the fact that patellar tracking was found to be normal before the injury, and the patients had not reported any symptoms. Statistically significant improvements in Lysholm and Kujala scales, in patellofemoral and congruence angle, were seen (P < 0.001). A statistically significant improvement in the peak torque of the quadriceps muscle and flexor was observed for 60°/sec and 180°/sec angular velocities (P = 0.01). Our results confirm the efficacy of MPFL reconstruction using the adductor magnus tendon in children and adolescents with recurrent patellar dislocation.

  8. Finite element analysis to characterize how varying patellar loading influences pressure applied to cartilage: model evaluation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kushal S; Saranathan, Archana; Koya, Bharath; Elias, John J

    2015-01-01

    A finite element analysis (FEA) modeling technique has been developed to characterize how varying the orientation of the patellar tendon influences the patellofemoral pressure distribution. To evaluate the accuracy of the technique, models were created from MRI images to represent five knees that were previously tested in vitro to determine the influence of hamstrings loading on patellofemoral contact pressures. Hamstrings loading increased the lateral and posterior orientation of the patellar tendon. Each model was loaded at 40°, 60°, and 80° of flexion with quadriceps force vectors representing the experimental loading conditions. The orientation of the patellar tendon was represented for the loaded and unloaded hamstrings conditions based on experimental measures of tibiofemoral alignment. Similar to the experimental data, simulated loading of the hamstrings within the FEA models shifted the center of pressure laterally and increased the maximum lateral pressure. Significant (p < 0.05) differences were identified for the center of pressure and maximum lateral pressure from paired t-tests carried out at the individual flexion angles. The ability to replicate experimental trends indicates that the FEA models can be used for future studies focused on determining how variations in the orientation of the patellar tendon related to anatomical or loading variations or surgical procedures influence the patellofemoral pressure distribution.

  9. Metabolic and cytoprotective effects of in vivo peri-patellar hyaluronic acid injections in cultured tenocytes.

    PubMed

    Salamanna, F; Frizziero, A; Pagani, S; Giavaresi, G; Curzi, D; Falcieri, E; Marini, M; Abruzzo, P M; Martini, L; Fini, M

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate tenocyte mechanobiology after sudden-detraining and to examine the hypothesis that repeated peri-patellar injections of hyaluronic acid (HA) on detrained patellar tendon (PT) may reduce and limit detrained-associated damage in tenocytes. Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: Untrained, Trained and Detrained. In the Detrained rats, the left tendon was untreated while the right tendon received repeated peri-patellar injections of either HA or saline (NaCl). Tenocyte morphology, metabolism and synthesis of C-terminal-propeptide of type I collagen, collagen-III, fibronectin, aggrecan, tenascin-c, interleukin-1β, matrix-metalloproteinase-1 and-3 were evaluated after 1, 3, 7 and 10 days of culture. Transmission-electronic-microscopy showed a significant increase in mitochondria and rough endoplasmic reticulum in cultured tenocytes from Detrained-HA with respect to those from Detrained-NaCl. Additionally, Detrained-HA cultures showed a significantly higher proliferation rate and viability, and increased synthesis of C-terminal-Propeptide of type I collagen, fibronectin, aggrecan, tenascin-c and matrix-metalloproteinase-3 with respect to Detrained-NaCl ones, whereas synthesis of matrix-metalloproteinase-1 and interleukin-1β was decreased. Our study demonstrates that discontinuing training activity in the short-term alters tenocyte synthetic and metabolic activity and that repeated peri-patellar infiltrations of HA during detraining allow the maintenance of tenocyte anabolic activity.

  10. [Treatment of unrecent patellar tendon tear with semitendinous and gracilis tendons].

    PubMed

    Estrada-Malacón, C A; García-Estrada, G A

    2011-01-01

    The patellar tendon lesion is very important due to the role of this tendon on the conformation of the extensor mechanism of the quadriceps. When the terminal end of this mechanism is injured, the extensor function of the knee is completely lost and thus the functional capability of the involved limb is completely disrupted.

  11. Stress shielding of patellar tendon: effect on small-diameter collagen fibrils in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Majima, Tokifumi; Yasuda, Kazunori; Tsuchida, Takamasa; Tanaka, Kunio; Miyakawa, Kiyoshi; Minami, Akio; Hayashi, Kozaburo

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of stress shielding on the microstructure and ultrastructure of the patellar tendon using 40 mature female Japanese white rabbits. The patellar tendon was completely released from stress by drawing the patella toward the tibial tubercle with a stainless steel wire installed between them. Microstructurally, stress shielding for 3 and 6 weeks increased the number of cells approximately fivefold, to that of the control tendon. Collagen bundles were less well oriented in the stress-shielded tendon than in the control. Ultrastructurally, small collagen fibrils with a diameter of less than 90 nm increased in the stress-shielded tendon. The median collagen fibril diameter in 6-week stress-shielded tendon was significantly smaller ( P < 0.05) than in the control tendon (58.8% of control). The ratio of the total area of collagen fibrils to the whole visualized area in the stress-shielded patellar tendon was significantly smaller at 3 and 6 weeks than that in the control. This study demonstrated that complete stress shielding significantly affects the microstructure and ultrastructure of the patellar tendon

  12. Patellar ligament rupture in the dog: repair methods and patient outcomes in 43 cases.

    PubMed

    Das, S; Thorne, R; Lorenz, N D; Clarke, S P; Madden, M; Langley-Hobbs, S J; Perry, K L; Burton, N J; Moores, A L; Mosley, J R

    2014-10-18

    The medical records of dogs receiving surgery for unilateral patellar ligament rupture between 1999 and 2012 at 12 multidisciplinary referral centres were reviewed. Forty-three cases were identified; 26 were traumatic in origin; almost one-third were iatrogenic, of which over three-quarters occurred as a complication following surgical stabilisation of patellar luxation. Treatment involved primary reapposition of the ligament (36 cases). The repair was protected by circumpatellar and/or transpatellar loop(s) of orthopaedic wire, nylon, polypropylene or polydioxanone suture (34 cases). Wire loops were more likely to require surgical removal compared with loops of other materials (P=0.0014). The stifle joint was immobilised postoperatively by the applications of a transarticular external skeletal fixator (taESF) in 17 cases and by external coaptation (EC) in 8 cases; in 18 cases, no postoperative joint immobilisation was provided. Complications specific to the method of immobilisation occurred in seven of the cases with taESF and six of the cases with EC. Revision surgery to address failure of repair was required in five cases. Outcome was classified as acceptable or good in over three-quarters of the cases (31/40) and poor in less than a quarter (9/40). These data highlight patellar ligament rupture as a complication of surgical stabilisation of patellar luxation.

  13. Osteochondral grafting for cartilage defects in the patellar grooves of bilateral knee joints.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Matsusue, Yoshitaka; Suzuki, Takashi; Kuroki, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2004-07-01

    Autogenous osteochondral grafts have become popular recently for use in small, isolated, contained articular cartilage defects. We treated a 35-year-old man who had cartilage defects, which were the same shape and probably the result of overuse, in the patellar grooves of both knee joints. The left side was 30 x 25 mm, and the right side was 17 x 17 mm in his right patellar groove, and 15 x 7 mm in his right medial femoral condyle. Therefore, we performed multiple osteochondral grafting of the bilateral lesions. Thirty-two months after his right knee operation (37 months after his left one), he had no pain or symptoms in his left knee and occasional mild pain and catching in his right knee. At second-look arthroscopy, the joint surface of the articular cartilage in the bilateral patellar groove was almost completely smooth. However, the whole of the weight-bearing area around the grafted plugs in the medial femoral condyle showed cartilage degeneration. Approximately 3 years after implantation of osteochondral grafts into similarly shaped cartilage lesions in the bilateral patellar grooves, the operative results were good. However, careful follow up is needed.

  14. Effect of specimen thickness on fracture toughness of bovine patellar cartilage.

    PubMed

    Adams, D J; Brosche, K M; Lewis, J L

    2003-12-01

    Fracture toughness and crack tip opening angle were measured for bovine patellar cartilage using modified single-edged notch specimens of two thicknesses. There was no difference in fracture toughness between thin (0.7 mm) versus relatively thick (2.7 mm) specimens, but the crack tip opening angle at initiation of crack propagation was larger for the thin specimens (106 deg) than for the thick specimens (70 deg). Fracture toughness of the bovine patellar cartilage (1.03 kJ/m2) was not statistically different than that reported previously for canine patellar cartilage (1.07 kJ/m2) employing the same methods. Large variation in measurements for both bovine and canine cartilage are in part attributable to variation between individual animals, and are consistent with variation in other mechanical property measurements for articular cartilage. The observed reduction in crack tip opening angle with increased specimen thickness is consistent with behavior of some engineering materials, and demonstrates that specimen thickness influences fracture behavior for bovine patellar cartilage.

  15. Revision Surgery in Permanent Patellar Dislocation in DiGeorge Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Berruto, Massimo; Parente, Andrea; Ferrua, Paolo; Pasqualotto, Stefano; Uboldi, Francesco; Usellini, Eva

    2015-01-01

    A 29-year-old patient, suffering from DiGeorge syndrome, came to our attention with a history of persistent pain and patellar instability in the left knee after failure of arthroscopic lateral release and Elmslie-Trillat procedure. The patient was unable to walk without crutches and severely limited in daily living activities. Because of arthritic changes of the patellofemoral joint and the failure of previous surgeries it was decided to perform only an open lateral release and medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction using a biosynthetic ligament in order to obtain patellofemoral stability. At one year post-op range of motion (ROM) was 0–120 with a firm end point at medial patellar mobilization; patella was stable throughout the entire ROM. All the scores improved and she could be able to perform daily activity without sensation of instability. Bilateral patellar subluxation and systemic hyperlaxity are characteristics of syndromic patients and according to literature can be also present in DiGeorge syndrome. MPFL reconstruction with lateral release was demonstrated to be the correct solution in the treatment of patellar instability in this complex case. The choice of an artificial ligament to reconstruct the MPFL was useful in this specific patient with important tissue laxity due to her congenital syndrome. PMID:26783479

  16. Revision Surgery in Permanent Patellar Dislocation in DiGeorge Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Berruto, Massimo; Parente, Andrea; Ferrua, Paolo; Pasqualotto, Stefano; Uboldi, Francesco; Usellini, Eva

    2015-01-01

    A 29-year-old patient, suffering from DiGeorge syndrome, came to our attention with a history of persistent pain and patellar instability in the left knee after failure of arthroscopic lateral release and Elmslie-Trillat procedure. The patient was unable to walk without crutches and severely limited in daily living activities. Because of arthritic changes of the patellofemoral joint and the failure of previous surgeries it was decided to perform only an open lateral release and medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction using a biosynthetic ligament in order to obtain patellofemoral stability. At one year post-op range of motion (ROM) was 0-120 with a firm end point at medial patellar mobilization; patella was stable throughout the entire ROM. All the scores improved and she could be able to perform daily activity without sensation of instability. Bilateral patellar subluxation and systemic hyperlaxity are characteristics of syndromic patients and according to literature can be also present in DiGeorge syndrome. MPFL reconstruction with lateral release was demonstrated to be the correct solution in the treatment of patellar instability in this complex case. The choice of an artificial ligament to reconstruct the MPFL was useful in this specific patient with important tissue laxity due to her congenital syndrome.

  17. Autologous tenocyte implantation, a novel treatment for partial-thickness rotator cuff tear and tendinopathy in an elite athlete.

    PubMed

    Wang, Allan W; Bauer, Stefan; Goonatillake, Matthew; Breidahl, William; Zheng, Ming-Hao

    2013-01-11

    Tendinopathy and small partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff tendon are common presentations in sports medicine. No promising treatment has yet been established. Corticosteroid injections may improve symptoms in the short term but do not primarily treat the tendon pathology. Ultrasound-guided autologous tenocyte implantation (ATI) is a novel bioengineered treatment approach for treating tendinopathy. We report the first clinical case of ATI in a 20-year-old elite gymnast with a rotator cuff tendon injury. The patient presented with 12 months of increasing pain during gymnastics being unable to perform most skills. At 1 year after ATI the patient reported substantial improvement of clinical symptoms. Pretreatment and follow-up MRIs were reported and scored independently by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Tendinopathy was improved and the partial-thickness tear healed on 3 T MRI. The patient was able to return to national-level competition.

  18. Autologous tenocyte implantation, a novel treatment for partial-thickness rotator cuff tear and tendinopathy in an elite athlete

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Allan W; Bauer, Stefan; Goonatillake, Matthew; Breidahl, William; Zheng, Ming-Hao

    2013-01-01

    Tendinopathy and small partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff tendon are common presentations in sports medicine. No promising treatment has yet been established. Corticosteroid injections may improve symptoms in the short term but do not primarily treat the tendon pathology. Ultrasound-guided autologous tenocyte implantation (ATI) is a novel bioengineered treatment approach for treating tendinopathy. We report the first clinical case of ATI in a 20-year-old elite gymnast with a rotator cuff tendon injury. The patient presented with 12 months of increasing pain during gymnastics being unable to perform most skills. At 1 year after ATI the patient reported substantial improvement of clinical symptoms. Pretreatment and follow-up MRIs were reported and scored independently by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Tendinopathy was improved and the partial-thickness tear healed on 3 T MRI. The patient was able to return to national-level competition. PMID:23314880

  19. The reliability and validity of assessing medio-lateral patellar position: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Smith, Toby O; Davies, Leigh; Donell, Simon T

    2009-08-01

    Medio-lateral patellar position is regarded as a sign of patellofemoral pain syndrome and patellar instability. Its assessment is important in accurately performing patellofemoral therapeutic taping techniques. The purpose of this paper is to systematically review the literature to determine the reliability and validity of evaluating medio-lateral patellar position. An electronic database search was performed accessing AMED, British Nursing Index, CINAHL, the Cochrane database, EMBASE, Ovid Medline, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), PubMed and Zetoc to July 2008. Conference proceedings and grey literature were also scrutinised for future publications. All human subject, clinical trials, assessing the inter- or intra-tester reliability, or the criterion validity, were included. A CASP tool was employed to evaluate methodological quality. Nine papers including 237 patients (306 knees) were reviewed. The findings of this review suggest that the intra-tester reliability of assessing medio-lateral patellar position is good, but that inter-tester reliability is variable. The criterion validity of this test is at worse moderate. These are based on a limited evidence-base. Further study is recommended to compare the McConnell (1986) [McConnell J. The management of chondromalacia patellae: a long term solution. Australian Journal of Physiotherapy 1986;32(4):215-23] and Herrington (2002) [Herrington LC. The inter-tester reliability of a clinical measurement used to determine the medial/lateral orientation of the patella. Manual Therapy 2002;7(3):163-7] methods of assessing medio-lateral patellar position in patients with well-defined patellofemoral disorders.

  20. Evolution of the patellar sesamoid bone in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Mark E.; Regnault, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    The patella is a sesamoid bone located in the major extensor tendon of the knee joint, in the hindlimb of many tetrapods. Although numerous aspects of knee morphology are ancient and conserved among most tetrapods, the evolutionary occurrence of an ossified patella is highly variable. Among extant (crown clade) groups it is found in most birds, most lizards, the monotreme mammals and almost all placental mammals, but it is absent in most marsupial mammals as well as many reptiles. Here, we integrate data from the literature and first-hand studies of fossil and recent skeletal remains to reconstruct the evolution of the mammalian patella. We infer that bony patellae most likely evolved between four and six times in crown group Mammalia: in monotremes, in the extinct multituberculates, in one or more stem-mammal genera outside of therian or eutherian mammals and up to three times in therian mammals. Furthermore, an ossified patella was lost several times in mammals, not including those with absent hindlimbs: once or more in marsupials (with some re-acquisition) and at least once in bats. Our inferences about patellar evolution in mammals are reciprocally informed by the existence of several human genetic conditions in which the patella is either absent or severely reduced. Clearly, development of the patella is under close genomic control, although its responsiveness to its mechanical environment is also important (and perhaps variable among taxa). Where a bony patella is present it plays an important role in hindlimb function, especially in resisting gravity by providing an enhanced lever system for the knee joint. Yet the evolutionary origins, persistence and modifications of a patella in diverse groups with widely varying habits and habitats—from digging to running to aquatic, small or large body sizes, bipeds or quadrupeds—remain complex and perplexing, impeding a conclusive synthesis of form, function, development and genetics across mammalian evolution

  1. Evolution of the patellar sesamoid bone in mammals.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Mark E; Regnault, Sophie; Hutchinson, John R

    2017-01-01

    The patella is a sesamoid bone located in the major extensor tendon of the knee joint, in the hindlimb of many tetrapods. Although numerous aspects of knee morphology are ancient and conserved among most tetrapods, the evolutionary occurrence of an ossified patella is highly variable. Among extant (crown clade) groups it is found in most birds, most lizards, the monotreme mammals and almost all placental mammals, but it is absent in most marsupial mammals as well as many reptiles. Here, we integrate data from the literature and first-hand studies of fossil and recent skeletal remains to reconstruct the evolution of the mammalian patella. We infer that bony patellae most likely evolved between four and six times in crown group Mammalia: in monotremes, in the extinct multituberculates, in one or more stem-mammal genera outside of therian or eutherian mammals and up to three times in therian mammals. Furthermore, an ossified patella was lost several times in mammals, not including those with absent hindlimbs: once or more in marsupials (with some re-acquisition) and at least once in bats. Our inferences about patellar evolution in mammals are reciprocally informed by the existence of several human genetic conditions in which the patella is either absent or severely reduced. Clearly, development of the patella is under close genomic control, although its responsiveness to its mechanical environment is also important (and perhaps variable among taxa). Where a bony patella is present it plays an important role in hindlimb function, especially in resisting gravity by providing an enhanced lever system for the knee joint. Yet the evolutionary origins, persistence and modifications of a patella in diverse groups with widely varying habits and habitats-from digging to running to aquatic, small or large body sizes, bipeds or quadrupeds-remain complex and perplexing, impeding a conclusive synthesis of form, function, development and genetics across mammalian evolution. This

  2. Efficacy of exercise therapy in workers with rotator cuff tendinopathy: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Desmeules, François; Boudreault, Jennifer; Dionne, Clermont E.; Frémont, Pierre; Lowry, Véronique; MacDermid, Joy C.; Roy, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To perform a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the efficacy of therapeutic exercises for workers suffering from rotator cuff (RC) tendinopathy. Methods: A literature search in four bibliographical databases (Pubmed, CINAHL, EMBASE, and PEDro) was conducted from inception up to February 2015. RCTs were included if participants were workers suffering from RC tendinopathy, the outcome measures included work-related outcomes, and at least one of the interventions under study included exercises. The methodological quality of the studies was evaluated with the Cochrane Risk of Bias Assessment tool. Results: The mean methodological score of the ten included studies was 54.4%±17.2%. Types of workers included were often not defined, and work-related outcome measures were heterogeneous and often not validated. Three RCTs of moderate methodological quality concluded that exercises were superior to a placebo or no intervention in terms of function and return-to-work outcomes. No significant difference was found between surgery and exercises based on the results of two studies of low to moderate methodological quality. One study of low methodological quality, comparing a workplace-based exercise program focusing on the participants' work demands to an exercise program delivered in a clinical setting, concluded that the work-based intervention was superior in terms of function and return-to-work outcomes. Conclusion: There is low to moderate-grade evidence that therapeutic exercises provided in a clinical setting are an effective modality to treat workers suffering from RC tendinopathy and to promote return-to-work. Further high quality studies comparing different rehabilitation programs including exercises in different settings with defined workers populations are needed to draw firm conclusions on the optimal program to treat workers. PMID:27488037

  3. Variants within the COMP and THBS2 genes are not associated with Achilles tendinopathy in a case-control study of South African and Australian populations.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Colleen J; Van Der Merwe, Lize; Cook, Jill; Handley, Christopher J; Collins, Malcolm; September, Alison V

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein is a structural protein of the extracellular matrix, while thrombospondin-2 is a matricellular protein involved in cell-matrix interactions. Recent studies have shown that genetic variation is a significant risk factor for Achilles tendinopathy, and the genes encoding cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and thrombospondin-2 (THBS2) were identified as good candidate genes for association with Achilles tendinopathy. This study aimed to test the association of sequence variants within these candidate genes with the risk of Achilles tendinopathy in participants from South Africa (SA) and Australia (AUS). Three-hundred and forty (133 SA; 207 AUS) control participants with no history of Achilles tendinopathy and 178 (94 SA; 84 AUS) participants clinically diagnosed with Achilles tendinopathy were genotyped for five single nucleotide polymorphisms within the COMP and THBS2 genes in this case-control study. There was no difference in genotype distributions between control and tendinopathy groups for either the THBS2 variants rs9505888, rs6422747 and rs9283850, or the COMP variants rs730079 and rs28494505 in the SA and AUS populations. As the selection of COMP and THBS2 as candidate genes was hypothesis driven, based on biological function, the possibility that other variants within these genes are associated with Achilles tendinopathy cannot be excluded.

  4. Midsubstance Tendinopathy, Percutaneous Techniques (Platelet-Rich Plasma, Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy, Prolotherapy, Radiofrequency Ablation).

    PubMed

    Smith, William Bret; Melton, Will; Davies, James

    2017-04-01

    The focus of this article is to present the current options available for noninvasive and percutaneous treatment options for noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy. An attempt is made to offer recommendations for both the treatment techniques as well as postprocedure protocols to be considered. Additionally, because there are numerous treatment options in this category, the different techniques are summarized in a chart format with a short list of pros and cons as well as the levels of evidence in the literature to support the different modalities.

  5. Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections With Needle Tenotomy for Gluteus Medius Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James J.; Harrison, Julian R.; Boachie-Adjei, Kwadwo; Vargas, Elizabeth; Moley, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gluteal tendinopathy is a prevalent condition that can be associated with significant pain and disability. To date, no studies have prospectively assessed the efficacy of intratendinous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections as a minimally invasive treatment for gluteus medius tendinopathy. Purpose: To prospectively assess the efficacy of intratendinous PRP injections as treatment for chronic recalcitrant gluteus medius tendinopathy. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: During the study period between July 2011 and November 2015, data were collected from the Hospital for Special Surgery Center for Hip Preservation Outcomes Registry on participants who underwent ultrasound-guided intratendinous PRP injections for recalcitrant gluteus medius tendinosis and/or partial tears of the tendon associated with moderate to severe lateral hip pain for longer than 3 months. All participants were assessed pre- and postinjection with 4 outcome measures: modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), Hip Outcome Score–Activities of Daily Living subscale (HOS-ADL), Hip Outcome Score–Sport-Specific subscale (HOS-Sport), and the International Hip Outcome Tool–33 (iHOT-33). Demographic data, including age, sex, height, weight, body mass index, and smoking status, were also collected. Results: A total of 21 patients were included in the study, with a mean follow-up of 19.7 months (range, 12.1-32.3 months). The mean improvements from preinjection to postinjection follow-up were 56.73 to 74.17 for mHHS, 68.93 to 84.14 for HOS-ADL, 45.54 to 66.72 for HOS-Sport, and 34.06 to 66.33 for iHOT-33. All mean outcome measure improvements were clinically and statistically significant (P < .001). Length of follow-up was positively correlated with improvements in HOS-ADL (P = .021) and HOS-Sport (P = .004) scores. No adverse events were observed during or after the procedure. Conclusion: In this registry study with prospective follow-up, we found ultrasound

  6. Significance of Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Vastus Medialis Oblique in Recurrent Patellar Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li-Si; Zheng, Zhuo-Zhao; Yuan, Hui-Shu

    2017-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies have investigated the influence of osseous factors on patellofemoral joint instability, but research on the influence of dynamic muscle factors in vivo is still in the exploratory stage. This study aimed to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to evaluate vastus medialis oblique (VMO) fiber bundles in patients with recurrent patellar dislocation to explore the changes in muscle morphology and function. Methods: This prospective study involved 30 patients (7 males and 23 females; average age, 21.4 ± 3.8 years) clinically diagnosed with recurrent patellar dislocation in Peking University Third Hospital and 30 healthy volunteers matched for age, sex, and body mass index in our medical school between January 2014 and October 2014. None of the patients had a recent history of traumatic patellar dislocation or transient patellar dislocation. All patients underwent conventional MRI and DTI of the knee. The cross-sectional area of the VMO on MRI and the fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and primary (λ1), secondary (λ2), and three-level characteristic (λ3) values on DTI were measured. The independent-samples t-test was used to compare these parameters between the two groups. Results: Compared with the control group, the patient group showed significantly higher FA values (0.39 ± 0.05 vs. 0.33 ± 0.03) and significantly lower ADC (1.51 ± 0.13 vs. 1.58 ± 0.07), λ2 (4.96 ± 0.13 vs. 5.04 ± 0.07), and λ3 values (4.44 ± 0.14 vs. 4.58 ± 0.07; t = 5.99, t = –2.58, t = –3.02, and t = –4.88, respectively; all P < 0.05). Cross-sectional VMO area and λ1 values did not differ between the two groups (t = –1.82 and t = 0.22, respectively; both P > 0.05). Conclusions: The functional status of the VMO is closely associated with recurrent patellar dislocation. MRI, especially DTI (FA, ADC, λ2, and λ3), can detect early changes in VMO function and might facilitate the

  7. Vascular alterations in the rabbit patellar tendon after surgical incision

    PubMed Central

    DOSCHAK, M. R.; MATYAS, J. R.; HART, D. A.; BRAY, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    Open incision of the patellar tendon (PT) is thought to promote acute vascular responses which ultimately result in an enhanced degree of tendon repair. Such a clinical procedure is commonly applied to patients with refractory tendinitis. The objective of this study was to quantify the vascular adaptations (both anatomical and physiological) to longitudinal incision of the PT, and the resultant effects on tendon organisation. Fifty-four New Zealand White rabbits were separated into 3 experimental groups and 2 control groups. Experimental groups underwent surgical incision of the right PT, and were assessed 3 d, 10 d and 42 d following injury; normal unoperated controls were evaluated at time zero, and sham-operated controls were evaluated at 3 d to control for the effects of incising the overlying skin. Quantitative measures of PT blood supply (blood flow, microvascular volume) and geometric properties of PT substance were obtained for each PT. Histomorphology was assessed to evaluate vascular remodelling and matrix organisation in the healing PT. Longitudinal open incision surgery of the PT led to rapid increases in both blood flow and vascular volume. The incision of overlying tissues alone (sham-operated) contributed to this measurable increase, and accounted for 36% and 42% of the elevated blood flow and vascular volume respectively at the 3 d interval. In the incised PT, blood flow significantly increased by 3 d compared with both time zero and sham-operated controls, and remained significantly elevated at the 10 d interval. Similarly, vascular volume of the incised PT increased at 3 d compared both with time zero and sham-operated controls. At the 10 d interval, the increase in vascular volume was greatest in the central PT substance. By 42 d both blood flow and vascular volume of the incised tendon had diminished, with only blood flow remaining significantly different from controls. In the contralateral limb, a significant neurogenically mediated

  8. Risk factors for superficial digital flexor tendinopathy in Thoroughbred racehorses in steeplechase starts in the United Kingdom (2001-2009).

    PubMed

    Reardon, R J M; Boden, L A; Mellor, D J; Love, S; Newton, J R; Stirk, A J; Parkin, T D H

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for superficial digital flexor (SDF) tendinopathy in Thoroughbred horses in steeplechase races in the United Kingdom. Potential risk factors for SDF tendinopathy were studied between 1st January 2001 and 31st December 2009 using a cohort study design with 648 injuries sustained in 102,894 starts. Potential risk factors were screened using univariable logistic regression prior to multivariable model building. In the final multivariable model, 12 statistically significant risk factors were identified. Variables that increased the odds of SDF tendinopathy included firmer going, increased horse age, and racing in the summer compared to other seasons. Variables that decreased the odds included having a higher official rating and the number of starts in the preceding days. Fewer and different risk factors were identified than in an equivalent model of SDF tendinopathy in hurdle racing, highlighting potential differences between these disciplines. Further collection of training and racecourse information would be beneficial and may help to explain further some of the associations identified in this study. The results will facilitate the development of strategies to improve overall safety of horses in UK steeplechase racing.

  9. Microarray profiling analysis of long non-coding RNAs expression in tendinopathy: identification for potential biomarkers and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Ge, Heng'an; Jiang, Yuqing; Cheng, Biao; Zhou, Dong; Xu, Nanwei

    2015-12-01

    The role of lncRNAs in pathologies of tendinopathy has not been researched so far, this study aims to identify the role and potent mechanism of lncRNAs in tendinopathy with a bioinformatic analysis. The gene profile of GSE26051 based on the platform of Affymetrix Human Genome U133B Array condensed was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus. A total of 46 specimens (including 23 normal samples and 23 tendinopathy specimens) were available. Compared with the control samples, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) of tendinopathy was identified the by packages in R. The selected DEGs were further analysed using bioinformatics methods including co-expression and enrichment analysis to detect the potential role of lncRNAs. A total of 40 different expressed lncRNAs were identified. However, most of the identified lncRNAs have not been researched before. And this study only annotate one of the identified lncRNAs successfully, the LOC100507027 (myoregulin), with the potential role in regulating skeletal muscle tissue development and skeletal muscle organ development.

  10. Optical properties of human tendons characterized by PSOCT and their relation to tendinopathy: a clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnaninchi, P. O.; Churmakov, D.; Bonesi, M.; Yang, Y.; Phelan, C.; Maffulli, N.; Meglinski, I.; El Haj, A.

    2008-02-01

    Polarisation-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) is a non destructive technique with great potential for tendinopathy diagnosis. Functional optical assessment can be used in operating theatres to delineate in depth the margin of the non-healthy area, and limit the amount of tissue to be removed. A clinical study of 21 patients has been undertaken to correlate the optical properties of tendons to their clinical conditions. Tendons were scanned ex vivo with a fibre based time domain PSOCT. The beam from a superluminescent diode with a bandwidth of 52nm is sent through a polarizer and a polarizer modulator, and split into a sample and reference arm. After passing through polarization beam splitter, the interferences fringes are detected with two balanced detectors, for horizontal and vertical polarization. Scattering, birefringence and in depth stokes vectors are extracted from the measurements. Direct microstructural variation and changes in scattering properties are correlated with different tendinopathy and presence of scar tissue, which is cross-validated by histology. Lack of tissue organization, detected as the disappearance of the bands of birefringence, is representative of tendon degeneration. Special attention is paid to the difference between crimp patterns of different patient's tendons. As in polarization microscopy, the crimp pattern appears as extinction bands, and is particularly important as its alteration is generally symptomatic and could be used as an early diagnosis. Its optical origin is investigated by varying polarization and scanning conditions.

  11. Patellar fractures--a review of classification, genesis and evaluation of treatment.

    PubMed

    Neumann, M V; Niemeyer, P; Südkamp, N P; Strohm, P C

    2014-01-01

    The patellar bone is involved in repetitive, load bearing motion sequences every day and functions as a vectorial force translator. A fracture rate of 1% of all skeletal fractures is reported and surgical treatment often required. beside a direct trauma mechanism, indirect mechanism but as well as fatigue fractures after reconstructive knee surgery are published. The fracture management is dependent on the soft tissue condition and a variety of surgical options are known. new generation of low profile plates show promising results but the conventional cerclage wiring technique with K-wires is widely preferred. best functional results with sustainable stability are biomechanically seen after a combined fixation technique using anterior cerclage wiring with cannulated screw fixation. A definite algorithm of treatment of patellar bone fractures is yet not defied but a review of classification and surgical techniques should give assistance in decision making.

  12. Traumatic Rupture of an Intermediate Tendon in a Patient with Patellar Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Hébert, Mathieu; LeBlanc, Pierre-Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Patellar duplication is a rare asymptomatic condition. The diagnosis is often made following a traumatic event associated with an injury to the knee extensor mechanism. The treatment is often surgical and consists in removal of the smaller part of the patella with tendon reinsertion. The presence and rupture of an intermediate tendon between the two parts of the patella have not been reported in the modern literature. We present a traumatic rupture of an intermediate tendon in a patient with horizontal patellar duplication. The surgical management consisted of tenorrhaphy protected with a figure-of-eight tension band wire approximating the two parts of the patella. The patient recovered full knee range of motion and quadriceps strength at the last 8-month follow-up. PMID:28255488

  13. Radiographic visualization of patellar tendon grafts for the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, J; Vidal, C; Cubillo, A

    1997-12-01

    The new biodegradable interference screws offer very many advantages for anterior cruciate ligament replacement with patellar tendon. However, their radiolucency makes it impossible to identify the anchorage sites. We describe an imaging technique of the plasty and its anchorage sites by means of a radiopaque contrast that is commonly used in radiology (Iopamidol; Bracco, Milan, Italy). It is an easy technique that does not extend the time of surgery, it is harmless, and allows us to identify malpositioning or impingement of the plasty.

  14. Fixation of an osteochondral fragment after acute patellar dislocation in an immature skeleton☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires e; Félix dos Santos Neto, José; Albuquerque, Maria Isabel Pires e; Giordano, Vincenzo; Pecegueiro do Amaral, Ney

    2014-01-01

    Fixation of an osteochondral fracture after acute patellar dislocation is an infrequent form of treatment. Likewise, the location of this fragment in the lateral region of the lateral femoral condyle, functioning as a free body, is uncommon. The aim of this study was to present a case of osteochondral fracture of the patella at an unusual site, along with the therapy used and the clinical follow-up. PMID:26229800

  15. Patellar tracking during total knee arthroplasty: an in vitro feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Belvedere, C; Catani, F; Ensini, A; Moctezuma de la Barrera, J L; Leardini, A

    2007-08-01

    Abnormal patellar tracking results in patello-femoral (PF) joint disorders and frequently in failure of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It is fundamental to assess this tracking intra-operatively, i.e. since the implantation of the femoral and tibial components. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of three-dimensional anatomical-based patellar tracking intra-operatively in standard TKA. A surgical navigation system was utilized to test the new technique in-vitro. An original tracking device and a reference frame were designed and an articular convention for the description of PF joint kinematics was adopted. Six fresh-frozen amputated legs were analyzed with the new technique. Landmark digitations were used to define anatomical reference frames for the femur, tibia, and patella. Five trials of passive flexion were performed with 100 N force on the quadriceps, before and after standard knee arthroplasty. Patellar flexion, tilt, rotation and shift were calculated in addition to standard tibio-femoral (TF) joint kinematics. An intra-specimen repeatable path of motion over repetitions and a coupled path of motion throughout the flexion-extension cycle were observed in all intact knees, both at the TF and PF joints. Replication of the original PF motion in the intact knee was not fully accomplished in the replaced knee. These results revealed the feasibility and the necessity of patellar tracking during TKA. By monitoring intra-operatively also the PF kinematics, the surgeon has a more complete prediction of the performance of the final implant and therefore a valuable support for the most critical surgical decisions.

  16. Description of patellar movement by 3D parameters obtained from dynamic CT acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sá Rebelo, Marina; Moreno, Ramon Alfredo; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; de Ávila, Luiz Francisco Rodrigues; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Pecora, Jose Ricardo; Gutierrez, Marco Antonio

    2014-03-01

    The patellofemoral joint is critical in the biomechanics of the knee. The patellofemoral instability is one condition that generates pain, functional impairment and often requires surgery as part of orthopedic treatment. The analysis of the patellofemoral dynamics has been performed by several medical image modalities. The clinical parameters assessed are mainly based on 2D measurements, such as the patellar tilt angle and the lateral shift among others. Besides, the acquisition protocols are mostly performed with the leg laid static at fixed angles. The use of helical multi slice CT scanner can allow the capture and display of the joint's movement performed actively by the patient. However, the orthopedic applications of this scanner have not yet been standardized or widespread. In this work we present a method to evaluate the biomechanics of the patellofemoral joint during active contraction using multi slice CT images. This approach can greatly improve the analysis of patellar instability by displaying the physiology during muscle contraction. The movement was evaluated by computing its 3D displacements and rotations from different knee angles. The first processing step registered the images in both angles based on the femuŕs position. The transformation matrix of the patella from the images was then calculated, which provided the rotations and translations performed by the patella from its position in the first image to its position in the second image. Analysis of these parameters for all frames provided real 3D information about the patellar displacement.

  17. A case of bilateral patellar osteochondrosis and fracture in a cat. Clinical and histological findings.

    PubMed

    Palierne, S; Palissier, F; Raymond-Letron, I; Autefage, A

    2010-01-01

    Fracture of the patella associated with bilateral osteochondrosis of the superior pole of the patella in a 14-week-old cat is reported with histological findings. Patellar osteochondrosis has been described in humans, horses, pigs, and dogs and is characterised by incomplete union of the ossification centres related to an abnormal process of endochondral ossification. However this disease has not yet been described in cats. Macroscopically, two main fragments separated by interposed tissue were identified on the left patella. In contrast, no fracture but only a fissuration of the articular cartilage was observed on the right patella. Bilateral partial patellectomy was performed. Histological examination of the excised fragments from the left patella revealed two main areas of trabecular bone separated by a wide irregular band of hyaline cartilage. The microscopic aspect of the right patella was similar to that of the left. Serial sections showed the initial appearance of an area of necrosis in the central band of hyaline cartilage, and that this hyaline cartilage was subsequently replaced by fibrovascular connective tissue. These findings indicate that some patellar fractures may be due to patellar osteochondrosis.

  18. The effect of in situ freezing on rabbit patellar tendon. A histologic, biochemical, and biomechanical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, B. K.; Fujisaki, K.; Vanderby, R. Jr; Vailas, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    Cell necrosis has been well documented as one of the many changes that occur in autogenous tendon when it is used to reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament. The purpose of this experiment was to isolate cell necrosis as a variable and study its effect on the patellar tendon. To accomplish this, both knees of 25 New Zealand White rabbits were operated on. In one knee, a 5-mm wide band of patellar tendon was subjected to two rapid freeze-thaw cycles, while the other knee underwent sham surgery. Histologic evaluation showed a zone of necrosis at 2 and 4 weeks with cellular repopulation complete at 8 weeks. patellar tendon cross-sectional area was 0.118 cm2 at 8 weeks for the frozen specimens compared to 0.102 cm2 for the sham-operated controls. This difference was significant at the P = 0.025 level. Mechanical testing at 4 and 8 weeks revealed no significant changes in tendon length, maximum load, or stiffness. The collagen content was also unchanged at both 4 and 8 weeks.

  19. Dynamic medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction in recurrent patellar instability: A surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    Kiran, Kopuri Ravi; Srikanth, I Muni; Chinnusamy, Lenin; Deepti, K

    2015-01-01

    The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is the primary stabilizer of the patellofemoral joint; its reconstruction has been recommended in adults over the past decade after recurrent patellar instability. However, there has been no standardized technique for reconstruction, therefore, ideal graft and technique for reconstruction are yet undetermined. However, dynamic MPFL reconstruction studies claim to be superior to other procedures as it is more anatomical. This preliminary study aims at assessing the outcomes of MPFL reconstruction in a dynamic pattern using hamstring graft. We performed this procedure in four consecutive patients with chronic patellar instability following trauma. MPFL reconstruction was done with hamstring tendons detached distally and secured to patellar periosteum after being passed through a bony tunnel in the patella without an implant and using the medial collateral ligament as a pulley. In all 4 knees, the MPFL reconstruction was isolated and was not associated with any other realignment procedures. No recurrent episodes of dislocation or subluxation were reported at 24 months followup. PMID:26806970

  20. The effect of patellar taping on squat depth and the perception of pain in people with anterior knee pain.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Amanda M; Harrington, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Patellar taping is a treatment adjunct commonly used in the management of anterior knee pain. The aim of this cross sectional study was to investigate the effects of medial glide patellar taping on sagittal plane lower-limb joint kinematics and knee pain during a unilateral squat in a symptomatic population complaining of anterior knee pain. Ten participants with a history of unilateral or bilateral anterior knee pain were included in the study. Subjects were required to squat on the symptomatic leg under three conditions: placebo tape, patellar tape and no tape. Kinematic data was recorded using the CODA mpx64 motion analysis system and subjects' pain was assessed using the Numerical Rating Scale. Patellar taping resulted in a significantly greater single-legged squat depth compared to placebo tape (p=0.008) and no tape (p=0.001) and a statistically significant reduction in pain during a squat compared to placebo tape (p=0.001) or no tape (p=0.001). Significant differences were not identified for maximum knee flexion in the patella taping compared to the no tape condition. This study may have significant clinical implications as participants reported less pain and alterations in sagittal plane movement following the application of patellar tape.

  1. Incidence of patellar clunk syndrome in fixed versus high-flex mobile bearing posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Snir, Nimrod; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Diskin, Brian; Takemoto, Richelle; Hamula, Mathew; Meere, Patrick A

    2014-10-01

    The geometry of the intercondylar box plays a significant role in the development of patellar clunk syndrome. We reviewed the incidence of patella clunk at mid-to-long-term follow-up of a rotating high-flex versus fixed bearing posterior stabilized TKA design. 188-mobile and 223-fixed bearing TKAs were reviewed for complications, incidence of patellar clunk, treatment, recurrence rates, range of motion, and patient satisfaction. Patellar clunk developed in 22 knees in the mobile (11.7%) and in 4 (1.8%) in the fixed bearing group (P<0.001). 23 out of 26 cases resolved with a single arthroscopic treatment and 2 resolved with a second procedure. The mean postoperative range of motion was 122.4°. All but one patient reported overall satisfaction with the index procedure. In contrast with other recent studies we found a significant incidence of patellar clunk in high-flex mobile bearings. Despite the high rate of patellar clunk syndrome, overall patients did well and were satisfied with their outcomes.

  2. A comprehensive approach including a new enlargement technique to prevent complications after De Quervain tendinopathy surgery.

    PubMed

    Perno-Ioanna, D; Papaloïzos, M

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the outcome of our surgical approach aimed at preventing complications following surgery for De Quervain tendinopathy. Our stepwise surgical procedure is described in detail. We reviewed 56 cases operated by a senior surgeon over 5years, and re-evaluated them with a minimum 15months' follow-up. Complications mentioned in the literature (poor wound healing, adhesions, nerve injury, incomplete decompression, tendon subluxation) were not present in any of the cases; the satisfaction rate was very high. Slight residual discomfort was noted in 16 cases. Among them, 13 had an associated pathology. In summary, the outcome after the comprehensive approach presented here is highly predictable. Properly applied, good to excellent results can be expected in most patients. Potential postoperative complications are effectively prevented. Some caution is needed in cases of associated pathologies.

  3. Insertional tendinopathy of the adductors and rectus abdominis in athletes: a review

    PubMed Central

    Valent, Alessandro; Frizziero, Antonio; Bressan, Stefano; Zanella, Elena; Giannotti, Erika; Masiero, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Summary Insertional tendinopathy of the adductors and rectus abdominis is common in male athletes, especially in soccer players. It may be worsened by physical activity and it usually limits sport performance. The management goal in the acute phase consists of analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs and physical rehabilitation. In the early stages of rehabilitation, strengthening exercises of adductors and abdominal muscles, such as postural exercises, have been suggested. In the sub-acute phase, muscular strength is targeted by overload training in the gym or aquatherapy; core stability exercises seem to be useful in this phase. Finally, specific sport actions are introduced by increasingly complex exercises along with a preventive program to limit pain recurrences. PMID:23738289

  4. Is Sonographic Assessment of Intratendinous Blood Flow in Achilles Tendinopathy Patients Reliable?

    PubMed Central

    Risch, L.; Cassel, M.; Messerschmidt, J.; Intziegianni, K.; Fröhlich, K.; Kopinski, S.; Mayer, F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the consistency between different Doppler ultrasound (DU) modes as well as the intra- and inter-observer reliability of investigators with different experience level in assessing intratendinous blood flow (IBF) in Achilles tendinopathy patients. Material and Methods: 18 participants (36 Achilles tendons, AT) with Achilles tendinopathy (24 AT) were examined with power Doppler ultrasound (PDU), colour Doppler ultrasound (CDU) and “Advanced Dynamic Flow” (ADF) (Toshiba Xario SSA-660 A; 14MHz transducer) by 2 investigators (experienced, EI; inexperienced, II) in a test-retest design (M1/M2). A modified Öhberg score was used to quantify IBF. Data was analysed descriptively (absolute and relative). Consistency of the 3 modes was presented by Kendall’s Coefficient of Concordance (Kendall’s W). Intra- and inter-observer reliability were calculated by use of Kendall’s tau b correlation coefficient. Results: IBF was detected in 79–92% of symptomatic AT and in 33–50% of contralateral asymptomatic AT. Comparing the 3 modes, Kendall’s W ranged from 0.97–0.98. Analysis of intra-observer reliability resulted in Kendall’s tau 0.90–0.92 for EI and 0.84–0.87 for II. Inter-observer reliability resulted in Kendall’s tau 0.64–0.69 in M1 and 0.68–0.70 in M2. Conclusion: The very good consistency between PDU, CDU and ADF indicates a comparable applicability for assessing IBF in ATs. Intra-observer reliability was high for both investigators, independent of experience. The moderate inter-observer reliability reflects the challenge in sonographic detection of intratendinous blood flow (IBF) amount. PMID:27689161

  5. An isokinetic eccentric programme for the management of chronic lateral epicondylar tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Croisier, Jean‐Louis; Foidart‐Dessalle, Marguerite; Tinant, France; Crielaard, Jean‐Michel; Forthomme, Bénédicte

    2007-01-01

    Background Lateral epicondylitis represents a frequent overuse injury. In spite of many conservative treatment procedures, prolonged symptoms and relapse are frequently observed. Objective To compare the outcome of patients performing an isokinetic eccentric training with that of age‐, gender‐, activity‐matched patients receiving a non‐strengthening classical rehabilitation. Methods Ninety‐two patients with unilateral chronic lateral epicondylar tendinopathy (mean duration of symptoms 8±3 months) were assigned either to a control group (n = 46) or to an eccentrically trained group (n = 46). The control group underwent a passive standardised rehabilitation programme that excluded strengthening exercises. In addition to this programme, the trained group also performed eccentric exercises based on the repetitive lengthening of the active musculo‐tendinous unit. The latter exercises started with submaximal contraction intensity and slow speed movement. Modalities were progressively intensified (increase in intensity contraction and speed movement) over a long priod of treatment. Programme effectiveness was assessed through pain score evaluation, a disability questionnaire, muscle strength measurement and ultrasonographic examination. Results Compared to the non‐strengthening control group, the following observations were made in the eccentrically trained group: (1) a significantly more marked reduction of pain intensity, mainly after one month of treatment; (2) an absence of strength deficit on the involved side through bilateral comparison for the forearm supinator and wrist extensor muscles; (3) an improvement of the tendon image as demonstrated by decreasing thickness and a recovered homogenous tendon structure; and (4) a more marked improvement in disability status during occupational, spare time and sports activities. Conclusion These results highlight the relevance of implementing isokinetic adapted eccentric training in the management of

  6. Ultrasound assessment for grading structural tendon changes in supraspinatus tendinopathy: an inter-rater reliability study

    PubMed Central

    Hjarbaek, John; Eshoej, Henrik; Larsen, Camilla Marie; Vobbe, Jette; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the inter-rater reliability of measuring structural changes in the tendon of patients, clinically diagnosed with supraspinatus tendinopathy (cases) and healthy participants (controls), on ultrasound (US) images captured by standardised procedures. Methods A total of 40 participants (24 patients) were included for assessing inter-rater reliability of measurements of fibrillar disruption, neovascularity, as well as the number and total length of calcifications and tendon thickness. Linear weighted κ, intraclass correlation (ICC), SEM, limits of agreement (LOA) and minimal detectable change (MDC) were used to evaluate reliability. Results ‘Moderate—almost perfect’ κ was found for grading fibrillar disruption, neovascularity and number of calcifications (k 0.60–0.96). For total length of calcifications and tendon thickness, ICC was ‘excellent’ (0.85–0.90), with SEM(Agreement) ranging from 0.63 to 2.94 mm and MDC(group) ranging from 0.28 to 1.29 mm. In general, SEM, LOA and MDC showed larger variation for calcifications than for tendon thickness. Conclusions Inter-rater reliability was moderate to almost perfect when a standardised procedure was applied for measuring structural changes on captured US images and movie sequences of relevance for patients with supraspinatus tendinopathy. Future studies should test intra-rater and inter-rater reliability of the method in vivo for use in clinical practice, in addition to validation against a gold standard, such as MRI. Trial registration number NCT01984203; Pre-results. PMID:27221128

  7. Treatment of proximal hamstring tendinopathy-related sciatic nerve entrapment: presentation of an ultrasound-guided “Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis” application

    PubMed Central

    Mattiussi, Gabriele; Moreno, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Proximal Hamstring Tendinopathy-related Sciatic Nerve Entrapment (PHTrSNE) is a neuropathy caused by fibrosis interposed between the semimembranosus tendon and the sciatic nerve, at the level of the ischial tuberosity. Methods Ultrasound-guided Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis (US-guided EPI) involves galvanic current transfer within the treatment target tissue (fibrosis) via a needle 0.30 to 0.33 mm in diameter. The galvanic current in a saline solution instantly develops the chemical process of electrolysis, which in turn induces electrochemical ablation of fibrosis. In this article, the interventional procedure is presented in detail, and both the strengths and limits of the technique are discussed. Results US-guided EPI eliminates the fibrotic accumulation that causes PHTrSNE, without the semimembranosus tendon or the sciatic nerve being directly involved during the procedure. The technique is however of limited use in cases of compression neuropathy. Conclusion US-guided EPI is a technique that is quick to perform, minimally invasive and does not force the patient to suspend their activities (work or sports) to make the treatment effective. This, coupled to the fact that the technique is generally well-tolerated by patients, supports use of US-guided EPI in the treatment of PHTrSNE. PMID:27900300

  8. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using bone-patellar tendon-bone allografts. A biological and biomechanical evaluation in goats.

    PubMed

    Drez, D J; DeLee, J; Holden, J P; Arnoczky, S; Noyes, F R; Roberts, T S

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-eight goats underwent ACL reconstruction with freeze-dried bone-patellar tendon-bone allografts in one knee, the opposite knee serving as a control. One group of 16 knees was evaluated, in groups of four, at 6, 12, 26, and 52 weeks by histologic and vascular injection techniques. The other group of 12 knees was evaluated in two groups of six at 26 and 52 weeks by morphological and biomechanical techniques of analysis. Within the first 12 weeks these allografts were revascularized; in the first 26 weeks they had matured to resemble normal connective tissue. Graft stiffness was 29% of the control value and maximum force to failure was 43% of the control value. The results of this study indicated that freeze-dried bone-patellar tendon-bone allografts are biomechanically and biologically similar to patellar tendon autografts.

  9. Successful conservative management of symptomatic bilateral dorsal patellar defects presenting with cartilage involvement and bone marrow edema: MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Kwee, Thomas C; Sonneveld, Heleen; Nix, Maarten

    2016-05-01

    The dorsal patellar defect is a relatively rare entity that involves the superolateral quadrant of the patella. It is usually considered to represent a delayed ossification process, although its exact origin remains unclear. Because of its usually innocuous nature and clinical course, invasive interventions are generally deemed unnecessary, although curretage has been successfully performed on symptomatic cases. This case report presents a rather unusual case of symptomatic bilateral dorsal patellar defects with cartilage involvement and widespread surrounding bone marrow edema as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Both cartilage involvement and bone marrow edema should be considered part of the spectrum of associated MRI findings that can be encountered in this entity. Furthermore, the presented case shows that symptomatic dorsal patellar defects can be treated conservatively with success and that (decrease of) pain symptoms are likely related to (decrease of) bone marrow edema.

  10. Reconstruction and restoration of neglected ruptured patellar tendon using semitendinosus and gracilis tendons with preserved distal insertions: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Li, Runguang; Zhang, Sheng

    2012-08-01

    Neglected rupture of the patellar tendon is rare but becomes more difficult to repair the longer it is left untreated. The most common rupture sites are the inferior pole of the patella and distal insertion. Proximal retraction of the patella and extensor mechanism adhesions makes the treatment more difficult than acute tendon rupture. We report two patients with neglected patellar tendon rupture treated by reconstruction and restoration using semitendinosus-gracilis (STG) tendons with preserved distal insertions. Preserved distal insertion provided sufficient blood supply to accelerate healing, while combined fixation with tension-reducing wire, offered the initial stability of the closed-loop sutured tendon. Both patients reacquired near normal strength and stability of the patellar tendon and restoration of function after operation and rehabilitation.

  11. Efficacy of betamethasone valerate medicated plaster on painful chronic elbow tendinopathy: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Frizziero, Antonio; Causero, Araldo; Bernasconi, Stefano; Papalia, Rocco; Longo, Mario; Sessa, Vincenzo; Sadile, Francesco; Greco, Pasquale; Tarantino, Umberto; Masiero, Stefano; Rovati, Stefano; Frangione, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective to investigate the efficacy and safety of a medicated plaster containing betamethasone valerate (BMV) 2.25 mg in patients with chronic elbow tendinopathy. Methods randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study with assignment 2:2:1:1 to BMV medicated plaster applied daily for 12 hours, daily for 24 hours or matched placebo. 62 patients aged ≥18 years with chronic lateral elbow tendinopathy were randomized. The primary efficacy variable was pain reduction (VAS) at day 28. Secondary objectives included summed pain intensity differences (SPID), overall treatment efficacy and tolerability. Results mean reduction in VAS pain score at day 28 was greater in both BMV medicated plaster groups, −39.35±27.69 mm for BMV12-h and −36.91±32.50 mm for BMV24-h, than with placebo, −20.20±27.32 mm. Considering the adjusted mean decreases, there was a statistically significant difference between BMV12-h and placebo (p=0.0110). Global pain relief (SPID) and overall treatment efficacy were significantly better with BMV. BMV and placebo plasters had similar local tolerability and there were few treatment-related adverse events. Conclusions BMV plaster was significantly more effective than placebo at reducing pain in patients with chronic elbow tendinopathies. The BMV plaster was safe and well tolerated. PMID:27331041

  12. Mechanical properties of human patellar tendon at the hierarchical levels of tendon and fibril.

    PubMed

    Svensson, René B; Hansen, Philip; Hassenkam, Tue; Haraldsson, Bjarki T; Aagaard, Per; Kovanen, Vuokko; Krogsgaard, Michael; Kjaer, Michael; Magnusson, S Peter

    2012-02-01

    Tendons are strong hierarchical structures, but how tensile forces are transmitted between different levels remains incompletely understood. Collagen fibrils are thought to be primary determinants of whole tendon properties, and therefore we hypothesized that the whole human patellar tendon and its distinct collagen fibrils would display similar mechanical properties. Human patellar tendons (n = 5) were mechanically tested in vivo by ultrasonography. Biopsies were obtained from each tendon, and individual collagen fibrils were dissected and tested mechanically by atomic force microscopy. The Young's modulus was 2.0 ± 0.5 GPa, and the toe region reached 3.3 ± 1.9% strain in whole patellar tendons. Based on dry cross-sectional area, the Young's modulus of isolated collagen fibrils was 2.8 ± 0.3 GPa, and the toe region reached 0.86 ± 0.08% strain. The measured fibril modulus was insufficient to account for the modulus of the tendon in vivo when fibril content in the tendon was accounted for. Thus, our original hypothesis was not supported, although the in vitro fibril modulus corresponded well with reported in vitro tendon values. This correspondence together with the fibril modulus not being greater than that of tendon supports that fibrillar rather than interfibrillar properties govern the subfailure tendon response, making the fibrillar level a meaningful target of intervention. The lower modulus found in vitro suggests a possible adverse effect of removing the tissue from its natural environment. In addition to the primary work comparing the two hierarchical levels, we also verified the existence of viscoelastic behavior in isolated human collagen fibrils.

  13. SURGICAL CORRECTION OF BILATERAL PATELLAR LUXATION IN AN AMERICAN BLACK BEAR CUB (URSUS AMERICANUS).

    PubMed

    Bennett, Katarina R; Desmarchelier, Marion R; Bailey, Trina R

    2015-06-01

    A wild orphaned male American black bear cub ( Ursus americanus ) presented with hind limb gait abnormalities and was found to have bilateral grade 3 laterally luxating patellas. There were no other significant abnormalities detected on neurologic, radiographic, or hematologic examinations. The trochlear grooves were deepened with a chondroplasty, and the redundant soft tissues imbricated. There was a marked improvement in the bear's gait postoperatively, with an apparent full return to function. To the authors' knowledge, patellar luxation has not been reported in the Ursidae family, and the success in this case suggests that this technique may be used in large wild or captive carnivore cubs.

  14. Lesions in canine stifle joints due to trochleoplasties as treatment for medial patellar luxation.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, Johannes Hans

    2015-07-01

    Lesions in canine stifle joints after previous trochleoplasty surgery were documented. In four clinical cases arthrotomies were performed due to stifle pain after previous trochlear deepening procedures. A small area of hyaline cartilage remained in the groove of the stifles in cases where previous wedge trochleoplasties had been performed. All of the stifles had significant areas of eburnation on the axial aspect of the medial trochlear ridge. The stifle joints of a dog that was euthanased due to severe irreversible osteoarthritis were photographed. The dog had undergone previous surgery for patellar luxation and cranial cruciate ligament ruptures. The trochlear grooves in this dog had almost no visible articular cartilage left.

  15. Osteoarthritic cartilage lesions in the bovine patellar groove: a macroscopic, histological and immunohistological analysis.

    PubMed

    Heinola, T; Sukura, A; Virkki, L M; Sillat, T; Lekszycki, T; Konttinen, Y T

    2014-04-01

    A high percentage of osteoarthritis (OA)-like patellar groove lesions in the stifle joint in calcium-deficient bulls has been recently reported. The prevalence of these lesions in bulls deficient in or supplemented with calcium was compared to findings in culled and healthy bulls to determine whether they represent normal anatomical variations, developmental anomalies or OA. It was hypothesized that the patellar groove lesions may represent OA. Distal cartilage samples from 160 femurs were analysed using a macroscopic Société Française d'Arthroscopie (SFA) OA grading system. Samples representing different SFA grades were subjected to Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) histological and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) immunohistological OA grading. For a qualitative analysis three OA samples were immunostained for interleukin (IL)-1β, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and collagenase-produced COL2-3/4M neoepitopes. Patellar groove lesions were found in 48% of the femurs and were highest in calcium-deficient animals (71%, P<0.001). All three different grading systems disclosed OA in culled bulls, but no focal areas of cartilage necrosis. OARSI and HMGB1 grades were fairly concordant (Spearman's ρ=0.95, P<0.001; Cohen's κ=0.23, P<0.005), both with a slight disparity with the SFA grade (ρ=0.80 and 0.87, P<0.01; κ=0.36 and 0.46, P<0.001). IL-1β, MMP-13 and COL2-3/4M staining patterns were compatible with OA. The study showed that patellar groove lesions are common in bulls. In all SFA, OARSI and HMGB1 graded samples the lesions clearly demonstrated OA and showed OA-typical pathophysiology. Arthroscopic SFA grading showed similar changes in calcium-deficient and calcium-supplemented bulls, but in the absence of a time course study and histological data the primary nature of these lesions could not be established with certainty.

  16. Elbow tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Pitzer, Michael E; Seidenberg, Peter H; Bader, Dov A

    2014-07-01

    Overuse injuries of the lateral and medial elbow are common in sport, recreational activities, and occupational endeavors. They are commonly diagnosed as lateral and medial epicondylitis; however, the pathophysiology of these disorders demonstrates a lack of inflammation. Instead, angiofibroblastic degeneration is present, referred to as tendinosis. As such, a more appropriate terminology for these conditions is epicondylosis. This is a clinical diagnosis, and further investigations are only performed to rule out other clinical entities after conventional therapy has failed. Yet, most patients respond to conservative measures with physical therapy and counterforce bracing. Corticosteroid injections are effective for short-term pain control but have not demonstrated long-term benefit.

  17. [Elbow tendinopathy].

    PubMed

    Dumusc, A; Zufferey, P

    2015-03-11

    The lateral and medial epicondylitis is often manifested in a professional or in a sport context leading to repetitive wrist movements. The diagnosis is primarily clinical. Additional tests are indicated in chronic evolution and in searching for differential diagnoses. Elbow X-ray can be completed with ultrasound or MRI, the most efficient but expensive diagnostic procedure. There is no consensus on treatment. After a period of rest, stretching then strengthening exercises are recommended. Corticosteroid injections may provide a short-term beneficial effect. Platelet-Rich Plasma injections have recently gained notoriety. In case of failure of treatment, surgery is possible, but only in a minority of patients.

  18. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the VISA-A questionnaire for German-speaking Achilles tendinopathy patients

    PubMed Central

    Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja

    2009-01-01

    Background Achilles tendinopathy is the predominant overuse injury in runners. To further investigate this overload injury in transverse and longitudinal studies a valid, responsive and reliable outcome measure is demanded. Most questionnaires have been developed for English-speaking populations. This is also true for the VISA-A score, so far representing the only valid, reliable, and disease specific questionnaire for Achilles tendinopathy. To internationally compare research results, to perform multinational studies or to exclude bias originating from subpopulations speaking different languages within one country an equivalent instrument is demanded in different languages. The aim of this study was therefore to cross-cultural adapt and validate the VISA-A questionnaire for German-speaking Achilles tendinopathy patients. Methods According to the "guidelines for the process of cross-cultural adaptation of self-report measures" the VISA-A score was cross-culturally adapted into German (VISA-A-G) using six steps: Translation, synthesis, back translation, expert committee review, pretesting (n = 77), and appraisal of the adaptation process by an advisory committee determining the adequacy of the cross-cultural adaptation. The resulting VISA-A-G was then subjected to an analysis of reliability, validity, and internal consistency in 30 Achilles tendinopathy patients and 79 asymptomatic people. Concurrent validity was tested against a generic tendon grading system (Percy and Conochie) and against a classification system for the effect of pain on athletic performance (Curwin and Stanish). Results The "advisory committee" determined the VISA-A-G questionnaire as been translated "acceptable". The VISA-A-G questionnaire showed moderate to excellent test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.60 to 0.97). Concurrent validity showed good coherence when correlated with the grading system of Curwin and Stanish (rho = -0.95) and for the Percy and Conochie grade of severity (rho 0

  19. MECHANICAL RESISTANCE OF THE PATELLAR LIGAMENT AFTER REMOVAL OF THE MIDDLE THIRD THROUGH EITHER ONE LONGITUDINAL INCISION OR TWO MINI-TRANSVERSE INCISIONS

    PubMed Central

    De Lazari, Leandro Calil; Paccola, Cleber Antonio Jansen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the resistance and regeneration of the patellar ligament after harvesting a graft for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament, using the traditional technique of a single longitudinal skin incision or a technique of two transverse mini-incisions, in sheep. Methods: Ten sheep were used. In the right knee, we removed the graft using the traditional method, and in the left knee, using the two-incision method. The animals were observed for six months. The specimens (patellar ligament, tibia and patella) were adapted to the mechanical test machine for ligament resistance tests. Results: No difference was found between the two proposed techniques in relation to the regeneration and resistance of the patellar ligament. However, we observed that shortening of the patellar ligament occurred in both groups, and that suturing of the superficial fascia of the patellar ligament did not influence the regeneration of the patellar ligament, according to the histology. Conclusion: The technique using two incisions in the skin presents the same patterns of regeneration and resistance of the remaining patellar ligament as shown by the traditional technique of a single, longitudinal incision. PMID:27022540

  20. Volumetric characterization of human patellar cartilage matrix on phase contrast x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, Anas Z.; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Checefsky, Walter A.; Coan, Paola; Diemoz, Paul C.; Hobbs, Susan K.; Huber, Markus B.; Wismüller, Axel

    2015-03-01

    Phase contrast X-ray computed tomography (PCI-CT) has recently emerged as a novel imaging technique that allows visualization of cartilage soft tissue, subsequent examination of chondrocyte patterns, and their correlation to osteoarthritis. Previous studies have shown that 2D texture features are effective at distinguishing between healthy and osteoarthritic regions of interest annotated in the radial zone of cartilage matrix on PCI-CT images. In this study, we further extend the texture analysis to 3D and investigate the ability of volumetric texture features at characterizing chondrocyte patterns in the cartilage matrix for purposes of classification. Here, we extracted volumetric texture features derived from Minkowski Functionals and gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) from 496 volumes of interest (VOI) annotated on PCI-CT images of human patellar cartilage specimens. The extracted features were then used in a machine-learning task involving support vector regression to classify ROIs as healthy or osteoarthritic. Classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). The best classification performance was observed with GLCM features correlation (AUC = 0.83 +/- 0.06) and homogeneity (AUC = 0.82 +/- 0.07), which significantly outperformed all Minkowski Functionals (p < 0.05). These results suggest that such quantitative analysis of chondrocyte patterns in human patellar cartilage matrix involving GLCM-derived statistical features can distinguish between healthy and osteoarthritic tissue with high accuracy.

  1. Reduced Patellar Tendon Elasticity with Aging: In Vivo Assessment by Shear Wave Elastography.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Ming-Yen; Chen, Yi-Ching; Lin, Che-Yu; Chen, Wen-Shian; Wang, Tyng-Guey

    2015-11-01

    How aging affects the elasticity of tendons has long been debated, partly because of the limited methods for in vivo evaluation, which differ vastly from those for in vitro animal studies. In this study, we tested the reliability of shear wave elastography (SWE) in the evaluation of patellar tendons and their change in elasticity with age. We recruited 62 healthy participants in three age groups: 20-30 years (group 1), 40-50 years (group 2) and 60-70 years (group 3). Shear wave velocity and elastic modulus were measured at the proximal, middle and distal areas of the patellar tendon. Reliability was excellent at the middle area and fair to good at both ends. Compared with the other groups, group 3 had significantly decreased elastic modulus and shear wave velocity values (p ≤ 0.001 vs. group 1 or 2), with significant increased side-to-side differences. SWE may be valuable in detecting aging tendons before visible abnormalities are observed on B-mode ultrasonography.

  2. [Successive ruptures of patellar and Achilles tendons. Anabolic steroids in competitive sports].

    PubMed

    Isenberg, J; Prokop, A; Skouras, E

    2008-01-01

    Derivatives of testosterone or of 19-nor-testosterone are used as anabolics for the purpose of improving performance although the effect of anabolics is known still to be under discussion. The use of anabolic steroids continues among competitive athletes despite increased controls and increasingly frequent dramatic incidents connected with them. Whereas metabolic dysfunction during anabolic use is well documented, ruptures of the large tendons are rarely reported. Within 18 months, a 29-year-old professional footballer needed surgery for rupture of the patellar tendon and of both Achilles tendons. Carefully directed questioning elicited confirmation that he had taken different anabolic steroids regularly for 3 years with the intention of improving his strength. After each operation anabolic steroids were taken again at a high dosage during early convalescence and training. Minimally invasive surgery and open suturing techniques led to complete union of the Achilles tendons in good time. Training and anabolic use (metenolon 300 mg per week) started early after suturing of the patellar tendon including bone tunnels culminated in histologically confirmed rerupture after 8 weeks. After a ligament reconstruction with a semitendinosus tendon graft with subsequent infection, the tendon and reserve traction apparatus were lost. Repeated warnings of impaired healing if anabolic use was continued had been given without success. In view of the high number of unrecorded cases in competitive and athletic sports, we can assume that the use of anabolic steroids is also of quantitative relevance in the operative treatment of tendon ruptures.

  3. Avulsion fracture of the posterior cruciate ligament in an uncommon location associated with distal injury to the patellar ligament.

    PubMed

    E Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires; da Palma, Idemar Monteiro; Cobra, Hugo; de Paula Mozella, Alan; Vaques, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Avulsion fractures of the posterior cruciate ligament in unusual locations are rare injuries. We report the first case in the literature of an avulsion fracture of the posterior cruciate ligament associated with distal injury to the patellar ligament. The aim of this study was to present a novel case, the therapy used and the clinical follow-up.

  4. Relationship between bony tunnel and knee function in patients after patellar dislocation triple surgeries—a CT-based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Le; Li, Mei; Yao, Weiwu; Shen, Ji

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to assess the CT-based bony tunnel valuations and their correlation with knee function after patellar dislocation triple surgeries. A retrospective study was performed on 66 patients (70 knees) who underwent patellar dislocation triple surgeries. The surgery was MPFL reconstruction primarily, combined with lateral retinaculum release and tibial tubercle osteotomy. CT examinations were performed to determine the femoral tunnel position, along with the patellar and femoral tunnel width 3 days and more than 1 year after operation for follow-up. Functional evaluation based on Kujala and Lysholm scores was also implemented. We compared tunnel width of the first and last examinations and correlated femoral tunnel position of the last examination with knee function. At the last follow-up, femoral tunnel position in the anterior-posterior direction was moderately correlated with knee function. Femoral tunnel position in the proximal-distal direction was not associated with postoperative knee function. Patellar and femoral tunnel width increased significantly at the last follow-up. However, no significant functional difference was found between patients with and without femoral tunnel enlargement. Our results suggested that the tunnel malposition in anterior-posterior position based on CT was related to impaired knee function during the follow-ups.

  5. Relationship between bony tunnel and knee function in patients after patellar dislocation triple surgeries—a CT-based study

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Le; Li, Mei; Yao, Weiwu; Shen, Ji

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to assess the CT-based bony tunnel valuations and their correlation with knee function after patellar dislocation triple surgeries. A retrospective study was performed on 66 patients (70 knees) who underwent patellar dislocation triple surgeries. The surgery was MPFL reconstruction primarily, combined with lateral retinaculum release and tibial tubercle osteotomy. CT examinations were performed to determine the femoral tunnel position, along with the patellar and femoral tunnel width 3 days and more than 1 year after operation for follow-up. Functional evaluation based on Kujala and Lysholm scores was also implemented. We compared tunnel width of the first and last examinations and correlated femoral tunnel position of the last examination with knee function. At the last follow-up, femoral tunnel position in the anterior-posterior direction was moderately correlated with knee function. Femoral tunnel position in the proximal-distal direction was not associated with postoperative knee function. Patellar and femoral tunnel width increased significantly at the last follow-up. However, no significant functional difference was found between patients with and without femoral tunnel enlargement. Our results suggested that the tunnel malposition in anterior-posterior position based on CT was related to impaired knee function during the follow-ups. PMID:28120923

  6. The effect of patellar taping on EMG activity of vasti muscles during squatting in individuals with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mostamand, Javid; Bader, Dan L; Hudson, Zöe

    2011-01-01

    Although patellar taping has been shown to reduce pain in participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome, the mechanisms of pain reduction have not completely been established following its application. The purpose of this study was to evaluate EMG activity of vastus medialis and vastus lateralis following the application of patellar taping during a functional single leg squat. Both vastus medialis obliquus-vastus lateralis onset and vastus medialis obliquus/vastus lateralis amplitude of 18 participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome and 18 healthy participants as controls were measured using an EMG unit. This procedure was performed on the affected knee of participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome, before, during, and after patellar taping during unilateral squatting. The same procedure was also performed on the unaffected knees of both groups. The mean values of vastus medialis obliquus-vastus lateralis onset prior to taping (2.54 ms, s = 4.35) were decreased significantly following an immediate application of tape (-3.22 ms, s = 3.45) and after a prolonged period of taping (-6.00 ms, s = 3.40 s) (P < 0.05). There was also a significant difference between the mean values of vastus medialis obliquus-vastus lateralis onset among controls (-2.03 ms, s = 6.04) and participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome prior to taping (P < 0.05). However, there were no significant difference between the ranked values of vastus medialis obliquus/vastus lateralis amplitude of the affected and unaffected knees of participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome and controls during different conditions of taping (P > 0.05). Decreased values of vastus medialis obliquus-vastus lateralis onset may contribute to patellar realignment and explain the mechanism of pain reduction following patellar taping in participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

  7. Surgical versus non-surgical management for primary patellar dislocations: an up-to-date meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaozuo; Kang, Kai; Li, Tong; Lu, Bo; Dong, Jiangtao; Gao, Shijun

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this up-to-date meta-analysis was to compare the effects of surgical versus non-surgical treatment of patients following primary patellar dislocation and to provide the best evidence currently available. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using multiple databases, including Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Registry of Clinical Trials. All databases were searched from the earliest records to May 2013. Eligible studies were selected, and data were extracted by two independent investigators. The primary outcome variable was the frequency of recurrent patellar dislocation. The other outcomes included knee function scores, patient-rated outcomes, and radiographic examination. If appropriate, meta-analysis of these variables was performed. Nine independent trials were found to match the inclusion criteria. The pooled results demonstrated that the incidence of recurrent patellar dislocation and Hughston visual analog scale was significantly lower in the surgical treatment group than that in the non-surgical treatment group (P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the two treatment groups in frequency of subsequent surgical interventions, percentage of excellent or good subjective opinion, Kujala score, pain score on visual analog scale, and severity of patellofemoral joint osteoarthrosis (P > 0.05). This up-to-date meta-analysis indicates that surgical treatment was associated with a lower risk of recurrent patellar dislocation, but a lower Hughston VAS than non-surgical treatment for primary patellar dislocation. More large high-quality trials and further studies are needed to overcome the limitations of small sample sizes, and varieties of different surgical procedures or non-surgical management strategies adopted in the included trials.

  8. Failed medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction: Causes and surgical strategies

    PubMed Central

    Sanchis-Alfonso, Vicente; Montesinos-Berry, Erik; Ramirez-Fuentes, Cristina; Leal-Blanquet, Joan; Gelber, Pablo E; Monllau, Joan Carles

    2017-01-01

    Patellar instability is a common clinical problem encountered by orthopedic surgeons specializing in the knee. For patients with chronic lateral patellar instability, the standard surgical approach is to stabilize the patella through a medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction. Foreseeably, an increasing number of revision surgeries of the reconstructed MPFL will be seen in upcoming years. In this paper, the causes of failed MPFL reconstruction are analyzed: (1) incorrect surgical indication or inappropriate surgical technique/patient selection; (2) a technical error; and (3) an incorrect assessment of the concomitant risk factors for instability. An understanding of the anatomy and biomechanics of the MPFL and cautiousness with the imaging techniques while favoring clinical over radiological findings and the use of common sense to determine the adequate surgical technique for each particular case, are critical to minimizing MPFL surgery failure. Additionally, our approach to dealing with failure after primary MPFL reconstruction is also presented. PMID:28251062

  9. The effectiveness of kinesio taping for athletes with medial elbow epicondylar tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Chang, H-Y; Cheng, S-C; Lin, C-C; Chou, K-Y; Gan, S-M; Wang, C-H

    2013-11-01

    Kinesio taping has also been used for athletes with Medial Elbow Epicondylar Tendinopathy (MET) as an additional treatment method. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical effectiveness of Kinesio tape on maximal grip strength and absolute and related force sense in athletes with MET when applied to the medial forearm. 27 male athletes who voluntarily participated in this study were divided into a healthy group (n=17) and a MET group (n=10). All subjects were assessed for the maximal grip strength and grip force sense (absolute and related force sense) under 3 taping conditions: 1) without taping; 2) with placebo Kinesio taping; and 3) with Kinesio taping. No significant interaction was found between groups and taping condition in maximal grip force and related force sense error, except for absolute force sense error (p=0.04). Both groups with absolute force sense measurements had significantly decreased errors in the placebo Kinesio taping and Kinesio taping conditions. Both taping may enhance discrimination of magnitude of grip force control (absolute force sense) in both groups when applied to the forearm. However, Kinesio taping did not change maximal grip strength in either group. The effects of Kinesio taping on other muscle functions remain to be studied.

  10. Effectiveness of orthotic devices in the treatment of Achilles tendinopathy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Scott, Lisa A; Munteanu, Shannon E; Menz, Hylton B

    2015-01-01

    Orthotic devices such as foot orthoses, splints, taping and bracing are recommended for Achilles tendinopathy (AT). This systematic review was conducted to review the current evidence for the effectiveness of orthotic devices for the treatment of mid-portion or insertional AT. Electronic bibliographic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Current Contents, CINAHL and SPORTDiscus) were searched in May 2014. The methodological quality of included studies was evaluated using the Quality Index. Where possible, effects were determined using standardised mean differences. The strength of evidence for each intervention was determined according to the quality and number of studies. Twelve studies satisfied the inclusion criteria; nine studies investigated mid-portion AT, whilst three studies did not distinguish between mid-portion and insertional pathology. Weak evidence showed that foot orthoses were equivalent to physical therapy, and equivalent to no treatment. Very weak evidence supported the use of adhesive taping alone or when combined with foot orthoses. Moderate evidence showed that the AirHeel™ brace was as effective as a calf muscle eccentric exercise programme, and weak evidence showed that this intervention was not beneficial when added to a calf muscle eccentric exercise programme. Weak evidence showed that an ankle joint dorsiflexion night splint was equally effective to a calf muscle eccentric exercise programme, and strong evidence showed that this intervention was not beneficial when added to a calf muscle eccentric exercise programme. These findings may aid clinical decision making in the context of AT, however further high-quality studies are required.

  11. Effect of overuse-induced tendinopathy on tendon healing in a rat supraspinatus repair model.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Jennica J; Riggin, Corinne N; Connizzo, Brianne K; Mauck, Robert L; Steinberg, David R; Kuntz, Andrew F; Soslowsky, Louis J; Bernstein, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Supraspinatus tears often result in the setting of chronic tendinopathy. However, the typical repair model utilizes an acute injury. In recognition of that distinction, our laboratory developed an overuse animal model; however it is unclear whether induced overuse is necessary in the repair model. We studied the repair properties of overuse-induced tendons compared to normal tendons. We hypothesized that histological and mechanical properties would not be altered between the overuse-induced and normal tendons 1 and 4 weeks after repair. Thirty-one adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either overuse or cage activity for 4 weeks prior to bilateral supraspinatus tendon repair surgery. Rats were sacrificed at 1 and 4 weeks post-surgery and evaluated for histology and mechanics. Results at 1 week showed no clear histologic changes, but increased inflammatory protein expression in overuse tendons. At 4 weeks, percent relaxation was slightly increased in the overuse group. No other alterations in mechanics or histology were observed. Our results suggest that the effects of the surgical injury overshadow the changes evoked by overuse. Because clinically relevant mechanical parameters were not altered in the overuse group, we conclude that when examining tendons 4 weeks after repair in the classic rat supraspinatus model, inducing overuse prior to surgery is likely to be unnecessary.

  12. Utility of Ultrasonography in Assessing the Effectiveness of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy in Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of ultrasonography (US) for predicting and assessing the effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in insertional Achilles tendinopathy (IAT). Methods. A total of 42 patients with an established diagnosis of chronic IAT were examined by US before ESWT and at 4 weeks and 12 weeks after ESWT. The thickness and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the Achilles tendon, size of calcific plaques, tendon structure score, and neovascularization score were measured at each time point. Results. After therapy, Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A) scores increased significantly, and the size of calcific plaques decreased (P < 0.05). Neovascularization scores increased at the 4th week and then decreased at the 12th week (P < 0.05). The thickness, CSA, and structure of the Achilles tendon did not change. Variables observed by US at baseline were not associated with changes in VISA-A scores at follow-up. However, the changes in calcific plaque size and neovascularization scores were related to the improvement of VISA-A scores between pre- and posttherapy (P < 0.01). Conclusion. Ultrasonography can reveal some changes in the insertion of the Achilles tendon after ESWT, but the outcome of ESWT in IAT cannot be predicted by the variables observed by US. PMID:28004000

  13. Evidence for an Environmental and Inherited Predisposition Contributing to the Risk for Global Tendinopathies or Compression Neuropathies in Patients With Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Tashjian, Robert Z.; Farnham, James M.; Granger, Erin K.; Teerlink, Craig C.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tearing has been found to be clinically associated with other tendinopathies and compression neuropathies; a significant excess of these phenotypes has been seen in patients with rotator cuff tears. It is unclear if the association is secondary to environmental or genetic influences. Purpose: To examine population-based data for comorbid association of rotator cuff tearing and tendinopathies and compression neuropathies and to determine whether the association extends to relatives of patients with rotator cuff tears, which could suggest a genetic contribution. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: The Utah Population Database (UPDB) contains health and genealogical data on over 2 million Utah residents. Current Procedural Terminology, Fourth Revision, codes (CPT 4) and International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes (ICD-9) entered in patient records were used to identify patients with rotator cuff tearing and with comorbid tendinopathies and compression neuropathies. We tested the hypothesis of excess familial clustering of these other phenotypes with rotator cuff tearing using a well-established method (estimation of relative risks) in the overall study group of rotator cuff patients (N = 1889). Results: Significantly elevated risk for elbow, hand/wrist, foot/ankle, knee, and hip tendinopathies, as well as for all tendinopathies and compression neuropathies, was observed in rotator cuff tear cases themselves (P < 2.8e–13), in their spouses (P < .02), and in their first-degree relatives (P < 5.5e–4). A significant excess of elbow (P = .01), foot/ankle (P = .04), and all tendinopathies (P = 3.1e–3) was also observed in second-degree relatives, and a significant excess of compression neuropathies (P = .03) was observed in third-degree relatives. Conclusion: The current study shows strong evidence of familial clustering of rotator cuff tearing with other tendinopathies and with compression

  14. Comparison of complication rates of unilateral, staged bilateral, and single-session bilateral surgery for the treatment of bilateral medial patellar luxation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Fullagar, Bronwyn A; Rajala-Schultz, Päivi; Hettlich, Bianca F

    2017-01-01

    This retrospective study compared complication rates in 93 client-owned dogs (119 stifles) undergoing single-session bilateral, staged bilateral, or unilateral surgery for bilateral medial patellar luxation. Clinical characteristics and complication rates were compared and risk factors for major complications were explored. Sixty-five dogs had unilateral, 16 staged bilateral and 11 single-session bilateral surgery. Complications occurred in 28/119 stifles (24%), 11 (9%) of which required revision surgery. Patellar reluxation occurred in 7/119 (6%) stifles, with no revision required. There was no significant association between timing of surgery and incidence of complications. In dogs < 10 kg with bilateral medial patellar luxation, single-session bilateral surgery is a feasible treatment option with a complication rate comparable to staged bilateral or unilateral medial patellar luxation surgery.

  15. Conservative Treatment of Subacute Proximal Hamstring Tendinopathy Using Eccentric Exercises Performed With a Treadmill: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    CUSHMAN, DANIEL; RHO, MONICA E.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Case report. BACKGROUND Proximal hamstring tendinopathy in runners is characterized by pain with passive hip flexion with the knee extended, active hip extension, and pain with sitting. Relatively little literature exists on the condition, and publications on nonsurgical treatment protocols are even more scarce. Surgical intervention, which comprises the majority of literature for treatment of this condition, is an option for cases that fail to respond to nonsurgical treatment. CASE DESCRIPTION The patient was a 34-year-old, otherwise healthy male triathlete with unilateral proximal hamstring tendinopathy diagnosed by ultrasound, who had pain only with running and prolonged sitting. After he failed to respond to 4 weeks of eccentric knee flexion and lumbopelvic musculature strengthening exercises, an eccentric hip extensor strengthening program using a treadmill was initiated. This treadmill exercise was performed on a daily basis, in addition to a lumbopelvic musculature strengthening program. OUTCOMES The patient noted a decrease in pain within 2 weeks of initiating the new exercise, and was able to return to gradual running after 4 weeks and to speed training after 12 weeks. He returned to competition shortly thereafter and had no recurrence for 12 months after the initiation of therapy. His score on the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-proximal hamstring tendons improved from 23 on initial presentation to 83 at 12 weeks after the initiation of therapy. DISCUSSION We described the management of a triathlete with subacute proximal hamstring tendinopathy, who responded well to nonsurgical treatment using eccentric hip extension strengthening using a treadmill. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE Therapy, level 4. PMID:25996362

  16. High-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid attenuated matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -3 expression via CD44 in tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Po-Ting; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Su, Fong-Chin; Chen, Shih-Yao; Hsu, Tai-I; Li, Chung-Yi; Tsai, Kuen-Jer; Jou, I-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Evidence indicates that hyaluronic acid (HA) mitigates tendinopathy, but the effect of molecular weight is unclear. We investigated the effects of different concentrations and different molecular weights of HA (350 kDa, 1500 kDa, and 3000 kDa) on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and -3 expression in IL-1β-stimulated rat tenocytes, and on their dynamic expression in peritendinous effusion from patients with long head of biceps (LHB) tendinopathy after high-molecular-weight (HMW)-HA treatments. Reverse transcription PCR, real-time PCR, and ELISA were used to determine MMP-1 and -3expression. Because CD44 was clearly expressed in the plasma membranes of cultured tenocytes, OX-50, a CD44 antagonist, was used to inhibit CD44 to evaluate the HA mechanism. HA (3000 kDa) significantly (p < 0.001) downregulated the mRNA and protein expression of MMP-1 and -3 in IL-1β-stimulated tenocytes. Its attenuating effects were dose-dependent (p < 0.01). In OX-50-pretreated cells, the mRNA expression of CD44 was not significantly altered, but the mRNA expression of MMP-1 and -3 was significantly upregulated. Visual analogue scale scores were significantly lower, and MMP-1 and -3 expression was significantly (p < 0.05) lower one month posttreatment. HMW-HA attenuated tendinopathy by downregulating MMP-1 and -3 expression. Inhibiting CD44 blocked the effects of HMW-HA. PMID:28091588

  17. Simultaneous rupture of the patellar tendon and the anterior cruciate ligament: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Pier Paolo; Cerullo, Guglielmo; Iannella, Germano

    2013-12-01

    This study describes three cases of simultaneous ruptures of the patellar tendon (PT) and the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The treatment and the pathogenesis of this rare lesion are discussed. All three cases demonstrated lesions of all structures at the medial compartment. Unlike other reported cases, where an eccentric contraction of the quadriceps was present, the patients of the present study had sustained a forceful valgus injury with external rotation. We detected no displacements of the patella in any patients. All cases underwent a staged surgical procedure. Repair of the PT and of medial peripheral structures was performed immediately after injury; then, once the patients regained a full range of motion (ROM), they underwent an arthroscopic reconstruction of the ACL with ipsilateral hamstrings. At the follow-up stage, all cases showed a stable knee without restricted ROM.

  18. Studies on incidence and evaluation of the closed medial patellar desmotomy in lateral recumbency in bovines

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajit Kumar; Gangwar, A. K.; Devi, Kh. Sangeeta; Singh, H. N.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was conducted to find out the incidence and to evaluate the effectiveness of medial patellar desmotomy (MPD) in lateral recumbency in bovines. Material and Methods: One hundred and fifteen clinical cases of upward fixation of the patella in cattle and buffaloes were treated by closed MPD in lateral recumbency. Probable etiologies, symptoms and site of surgery including disease occurrence with respect to species, sex and season were also recorded. Results: In the present study, the highest incidence was reported in bullocks. A high success rate was obtained with the closed method in lateral recumbency. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, it can be concluded that the bullocks were more prone to upward fixation of patella and symptoms were exaggerated in winter season. Closed method of MPD was more suited in both cattle and buffaloes. PMID:27047077

  19. Pigmented villonodular synovitis diagnosed during revision total knee arthroplasty for flexion instability and patellar fracture.

    PubMed

    Camp, Christopher L; Yuan, Brandon J; Wood, Adam J; Lewallen, David G

    2016-03-01

    Occurring in either a localized or diffuse form, pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a disease of unknown etiology that typically presents with insidious onset of pain, swelling, stiffness, or mechanical symptoms as a result of synovial tissue proliferation. PVNS preferentially affects large joints, most commonly the knee. Currently there is no known association with PVNS and total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and to date, there are only a few cases reported in the orthopedic literature in which PVNS was diagnosed after primary TKA. To our knowledge, this is the first case of diffuse PVNS that was discovered at the time of revision TKA for flexion instability and patellar fracture. In this patient, with no known history of PVNS, the diagnosis of diffuse PVNS was made at the time of surgery. She underwent revision TKA, partial patellectomy, and extensive synovectomy. Level of evidence: V, Case Report.

  20. Histological comparison of patellar cartilage degeneration between chondromalacia in youth and osteoarthritis in aging.

    PubMed

    Mori, Y; Kubo, M; Okumo, H; Kuroki, Y

    1995-01-01

    The histological findings of the patellar cartilage were compared between cases of chondromalacia, which occurs predominantly in young persons (22 patients, average age 19.8 years) and cases of osteoarthritis, which is common among the elderly (21 patients, average age 65.4 years). The histological findings of cartilage in the chondromalacia were characterized by increased density and vigorous fibrous metaplasia of chondrocytes. These findings may be considered to represent a reactive change in the chondrocyte. Cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis, by contrast, is regressive and presents a clearly different histological picture from that of chondromalacia patellae. We conclude that chondromalacia does not easily lead to osteoarthritis. On the other hand, the cartilage was characteristically softened, as observed by gross inspection, and showed rarefaction of the cartilage matrix. It should be noted that the change was not observed in aging, but showed a pattern of cartilage degeneration peculiar to young patients with chondromalacia patellae.

  1. The Outerbridge Classification Predicts the Need for Patellar Resurfacing in TKA

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Cardero, Primitivo

    2009-01-01

    Patellar resurfacing (PR) in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is controversial. The Outerbridge classification of cartilage defects in the patella is commonly used in the literature. The purpose of this study was to determine if the Outerbridge classification can predict the need for PR as part of total knee arthroplasty. Between 1995 and 2000, we performed a prospective, randomized study of 500 TKAs. We carried out PR depending on the Outerbridge classification of the patella at the time of surgery. Patients with Outerbridge Grades I, II, and III formed Group A, whereas patients with Grade IV formed Group B. Within each group, resurfacing was completed on half of the patients. Group A had 328 patients (164 with PR, 164 without PR). In Group B, there were 172 patients (86 with PR, 86 without PR). An identical prosthetic design was used for both groups. The minimum followup was 5 years (average, 7.8 years) for both Group A and Group B. At the end of followup, we assessed the number of patients in each group that required secondary resurfacing as a result of patellofemoral pain. Patients in Group A required fewer revisions for PF pain. In Group A, only one patient required a secondary PR (0.6% rate), whereas in Group B, 10 patients needed PR (11.6% rate). In Group B, the risk of need of a patellar resurfacing was 21.5 times greater than in Group A. On the basis of these findings, we recommend PR in Outerbridge Grade IV patellae, but not in Grades I, II, and III. Level of Evidence: Level II, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19844770

  2. Genome-wide association screens for Achilles tendon and ACL tears and tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Thomas R.; Roos, Andrew K.; Kleimeyer, John P.; Ahmed, Marwa A.; Goodlin, Gabrielle T.; Fredericson, Michael; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Avins, Andrew L.; Dragoo, Jason L.

    2017-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy or rupture and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture are substantial injuries affecting athletes, associated with delayed recovery or inability to return to competition. To identify genetic markers that might be used to predict risk for these injuries, we performed genome-wide association screens for these injuries using data from the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) cohort consisting of 102,979 individuals. We did not find any single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with either of these injuries with a p-value that was genome-wide significant (p<5x10-8). We found, however, four and three polymorphisms with p-values that were borderline significant (p<10−6) for Achilles tendon injury and ACL rupture, respectively. We then tested SNPs previously reported to be associated with either Achilles tendon injury or ACL rupture. None showed an association in our cohort with a false discovery rate of less than 5%. We obtained, however, moderate to weak evidence for replication in one case; specifically, rs4919510 in MIR608 had a p-value of 5.1x10-3 for association with Achilles tendon injury, corresponding to a 7% chance of false replication. Finally, we tested 2855 SNPs in 90 candidate genes for musculoskeletal injury, but did not find any that showed a significant association below a false discovery rate of 5%. We provide data containing summary statistics for the entire genome, which will be useful for future genetic studies on these injuries. PMID:28358823

  3. Outcome of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy for Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy with and without Haglund's Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Wei; Chen, Shiyi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the results of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for insertional Achilles tendinopathy (IAT) with or without Haglund's deformity. Methods. Between September 2014 and May 2015, all patients who underwent ESWT were retrospectively enrolled in this study. A total of 67 patients were available for follow-up and assigned into nondeformtiy group (n = 37) and deformtiy group (n = 30). Clinical outcomes were evaluated by VISA-A Score and 6-point Likert scale. Results. The VISA-A score increased in both groups, from 49.57 ± 9.98 at baseline to 83.86 ± 8.59 at 14.5 ± 7.2 months after treatment in nondeformity group (P < 0.001) and from 48.70 ± 9.38 at baseline to 67.78 ± 11.35 at 15.3 ± 6.7 months after treatment in deformity group (P < 0.001). However, there was a greater improvement in VISA-A Score for the nondeformity group compared with deformity group (P = 0.005). For the 6-point Likert scale, there were decreases from 3.92 ± 0.80 at baseline to 1.57 ± 0.73 at the follow-up time point in nondeformity group (P < 0.001) and from 4.0 ± 0.76 at baseline to 2.37 ± 1.03 at the follow-up time point in deformity group (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in improvement of the 6-point Likert scale between both groups (P = 0.062). Conclusions. ESWT resulted in greater clinical outcomes in patients without Haglund's deformity compared with patients with Haglund's deformity. PMID:28042570

  4. Distribution of Platelet-rich Plasma after Ultrasound-Guided Injection for Chronic Elbow Tendinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gi-Young; Kwon, Dong Rak; Cho, Hee Kyung; Park, Jinyoung; Park, Jung Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Characteristics of the spreads of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) are not widely known despite commonly use. This study aims to evaluate whether PRP stays within the injected area by using ultrasonography, to improve understanding of the spreads of intratendinous injected PRP. Thirty-nine patients (15 males, 24 females; mean age, 49.3 years), who had symptoms on their elbows (> 6 months) and diagnosed as lateral (25 elbows) or medial (14 elbows) tendinopathies of elbow, were included. The severity of tendon pathology was assessed by ultrasonography as tear or no tear. Immediately after ultrasound-guided PRP injection, ultrasound images were evaluated to assess the area of PRP distribution, which was defined as the presence of fluid or microbubbles. Ultrasound revealed that 13 elbows had tendon tear and 26 had no tear, respectively. Post-injection ultrasound confirmed the injected PRP was within the tendon in all cases. The mean distance of distribution from the injection site was 12.6 mm (5.0–26.0 mm). There was no difference in the distance of PRP distribution between tendon tear and no tear. Injected PRP spread to soft tissue outside the tendon in 20 of 39 cases. Intra-articular extension of PRP was observed in 5 cases. Although PRP remained intratendinous after the injection in all cases, some portion tended to spread outside from the injection site in a short space of time. Postinjection ultrasonographic imaging has a value for observing the spreading patterns of intratendinous PRP injection. Key points This study aims to evaluate whether PRP stays within the injected area by using ultrasonography, to improve understanding of the spreads of intratendinous injected PRP. Although PRP remained intratendinous after the injection in all cases, some portion tended to spread outside from the injection site in a short space of time. PMID:28344444

  5. RANDOMIZED PROSPECTIVE STUDY ON TRAUMATIC PATELLAR DISLOCATION: CONSERVATIVE TREATMENT VERSUS RECONSTRUCTION OF THE MEDIAL PATELLOFEMORAL LIGAMENT USING THE PATELLAR TENDON, WITH A MINIMUM OF TWO YEARS OF FOLLOW-UP

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Alexandre Carneiro; D'Elia, Caio Oliveira; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Viegas, Alexandre Christo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the surgical results from reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) with non-operative treatment of primary patellar dislocation. Methods: Thirty-nine patients (41 knees) with patellar dislocation were randomized into two groups. One group was treated conservatively (immobilization and physiotherapy) and other was treated surgically with reconstruction of the MPFL, and the results were evaluated with a minimum follow-up of two years. The Kujala questionnaire was applied to assess pain and quality of life, and recurrences were evaluated. Pearson's chi-square test and Fisher's exact test were used in the statistical evaluation. Results: The statistical analysis showed that the mean Kujala score was significantly lower in the conservative group (70.8), compared with the mean value in the surgical group (88.9), with p = 0.001. The surgical group presented a higher percentage of “good/excellent” Kujala score results (71.43%) than in the conservative group (25.0%), with p = 0.003. The conservative group presented a greater number of recurrences (35% of the cases), while in the surgical group there were no reports of recurrences and/or subluxation. Conclusions: Treatment with reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the patellar tendon produced better results, based on the analysis of post-treatment recurrences and the better final results from the Kujala questionnaire after a minimum follow-up period of two years. PMID:27027072

  6. Conservative care of De Quervain’s tenosynovitis/ tendinopathy in a warehouse worker and recreational cyclist: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Emily R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This case study was conducted to evaluate the conservative management of a patient presenting with right sided wrist and thumb pain diagnosed as De Quervain’s tenosynovitis/tendinopathy. Clinical features A 49-year-old female warehouse worker and recreational cyclist with right-sided De Quervain’s tenosynovitis/tendinopathy that began after a long-distance cycling trip. Intervention and outcome Treatment included ultrasound, soft tissue and myofascial release therapy, tool assisted fascial stripping or “guasha”, acupuncture, mobilizations and kinesiology taping. Home advice included icing, rest, wrist bracing, elevation and eccentric rehabilitation exercises. The positive outcome was a complete resolution of the patient’s complaint. Summary This case demonstrates how De Quervain’s disease is a challenging condition to treat with conservative methods and can be aggravated with new exacerbating factors as treatment continues. In this case, the addition of the active care (including eccentric exercises and self-care) helped to reinforce the passive care given in the office and accelerate the recovery. PMID:22675225

  7. Low-Energy Extracorporeal Shock-Wave Therapy in the Treatment of Chronic Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Pavone, Vito; Di Stefano, Antonio; Testa, Gianluca; Costarella, Luciano; Sessa, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We report the results of a series of 40 patients with chronic insertional Achilles tendinopathy treated with low-energy ESWT after the failure of a 3-month program of eccentric exercises alone. Methods and Materials. 40 patients, 28 (70%) males and 12 (30%) females, were treated between January and December 2014. All patients were previously treated with only eccentric exercises for a 3-month period. The treatment protocol included 4 sessions of ESWT with a 2-week interval, from 800 shots in each one (4 Hz, 14 KeV), together with eccentric exercises. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Hindfoot score were recorded. Results. At the 12-month follow-up, 26 (65.0%) patients did not complain about pain (VAS < 2), 11 (27.5%) patients got back to normal activities despite residual pain (VAS 2–4), and 3 (7.5%) of the patients still complained about pain (VAS > 4). There was no significative improvement in both scores after eccentric exercises alone. Mean VAS improvement was 5.8 ± 1.3 SD points (P < 0.001). Mean AOFAS Hindfoot score improvement was 19.8 ± 5.0 SD points (P < 0.001). Conclusions. ESWT is recommended, in combination with an eccentric exercise program, in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy being both insertional and not. PMID:27843949

  8. Intense focused ultrasound stimulation of the rotator cuff: evaluation of the source of pain in rotator cuff tears and tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Gellhorn, Alfred C; Gillenwater, Cody; Mourad, Pierre D

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this preliminary study was to evaluate the ability of individual 0.1-s long pulses of intense focused ultrasound (iFU) emitted with a carrier frequency of 2 MHz to evoke diagnostic sensations when applied to patients whose shoulders have rotator cuff tears or tendinopathy. Patients were adults with painful shoulders and clinical and imaging findings consistent with rotator cuff disease. iFU stimulation of the shoulder was performed using B-mode ultrasound coupled with a focused ultrasound transducer that allowed image-guided delivery of precisely localized pulses of energy to different anatomic areas around the rotator cuff. The main outcome measure was iFU spatial average-temporal average intensity (I_SATA), and location required to elicit sensation. In control patients, iFU produced no sensation throughout the range of stimulation intensities (≤2000 W/cm(2) I_SATA). In patients with rotator cuff disease, iFU was able to induce sensation in the tendons of the rotator cuff, the subacromial bursa, and the subchondral bone in patients with chronic shoulder pain and rotator cuff disease, with an average ± standard deviation intensity equaling 680 ± 281 W/cm(2) I_SATA. This result suggests a primary role for these tissues in the pathogenesis of shoulder pain related to rotator cuff tendinopathy.

  9. Retrospective study of sonographic findings in bone involvement associated with rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy: preliminary results of a case series*

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H.; Gregio-Junior, Everaldo; Lorenzato, Mario Muller

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study was aimed at investigating bone involvement secondary to rotator cuff calcific tendonitis at ultrasonography. Materials and Methods Retrospective study of a case series. The authors reviewed shoulder ultrasonography reports of 141 patients diagnosed with rotator cuff calcific tendonitis, collected from the computer-based data records of their institution over a four-year period. Imaging findings were retrospectively and consensually analyzed by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists looking for bone involvement associated with calcific tendonitis. Only the cases confirmed by computed tomography were considered for descriptive analysis. Results Sonographic findings of calcific tendinopathy with bone involvement were observed in 7/141 (~ 5%) patients (mean age, 50.9 years; age range, 42-58 years; 42% female). Cortical bone erosion adjacent to tendon calcification was the most common finding, observed in 7/7 cases. Signs of intraosseous migration were found in 3/7 cases, and subcortical cysts in 2/7 cases. The findings were confirmed by computed tomography. Calcifications associated with bone abnormalities showed no acoustic shadowing at ultrasonography, favoring the hypothesis of resorption phase of the disease. Conclusion Preliminary results of the present study suggest that ultrasonography can identify bone abnormalities secondary to rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy, particularly the presence of cortical bone erosion. PMID:26811551

  10. Astym Therapy Improves Bilateral Hamstring Flexibility and Achilles Tendinopathy in a Child with Cerebral Palsy: A Retrospective Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Scheer, Nicole A.; Alstat, Lucas R.; Van Zant, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this case report was to describe the use of Astym therapy to improve hamstring flexibility and Achilles tendinopathy in a child with cerebral palsy. CASE DESCRIPTION An eight-year-old female with cerebral palsy was referred to physical therapy for the treatment of bilateral hamstring inflexibility and Achilles tendinopathy. Treatment focused on an Astym therapy protocol of eccentric exercise, stretching, active and passive range of motion, gait training, and a home exercise program. The patient underwent a total of 11 physical therapy treatment sessions. OUTCOMES At the conclusion of treatment, the patient demonstrated improved resting muscle tone in bilateral lower extremities with active 90/90 hamstring flexibility measured at 165° and ankle dorsiflexion active range of motion of 5° without pain at 0° and 90° knee flexion. The patient exhibited an improved gait pattern with even stride length and diminished genu recurvatum, decreased pain with standing and walking, discontinued use of ankle–foot orthoses, and improved activity tolerance and overall function for daily activities. DISCUSSION The results of this case report indicate that physical therapy rehabilitation utilizing an Astym therapy protocol can successfully achieve gains in flexibility and strength and allow for improved function of bilateral lower extremities in a patient with cerebral palsy. CONCLUSION Based on the findings of this case report, clinicians should consider the use of Astym therapy in treating musculoskeletal soft tissue dysfunction in pediatric patients with cerebral palsy. PMID:27790051

  11. Eccentric Exercise Protocols for Patella Tendinopathy: Should we Really be Withdrawing Athletes from Sport? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Saithna, Adnan; Gogna, Rajiv; Baraza, Njalalle; Modi, Chetan; Spencer, Simon

    2012-01-01

    The 2007 review by Visnes and Bahr concluded that athletes with patella tendinopathy should be withdrawn from sport whilst engaging in eccentric exercise (EE) rehabilitation programs. However, deprivation of sport is associated with a number of negative psychological and physiological effects. Withdrawal from sport is therefore a decision that warrants due consideration of the risk/benefit ratio. The aim of this study was to determine whether sufficient evidence exists to warrant withdrawal of athletes from sport during an eccentric exercise rehabilitation program. A systematic review of the literature was performed to identify relevant randomised trials. Data was extracted to determine whether athletes were withdrawn from sport, what evidence was presented to support the chosen strategy and whether this affected the clinical outcome. Seven studies were included. None of these reported high quality evidence to support withdrawal. In addition, three studies were identified in which athletes were not withdrawn from sport and still benefited from EE. This review has demonstrated that there is no high quality evidence to support a strategy of withdrawal from sport in the management of patella tendinopathy. PMID:23248727

  12. Patellar position in weight-bearing radiographs compared with non-weight-bearing: significance for the detection of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Skou, Nikolaj; Egund, Niels

    2017-03-01

    Background Diagnosis and treatment of patellofemoral disorders including osteoarthritis are currently often based on imaging and clinical assessment with patients in the supine position. Purpose To evaluate differences in patellar position in the trochlear groove and to assess the detection of medial and lateral patellofemoral (PF) osteoarthritis (OA) on axial radiographs in supine and standing positions, respectively. Material and Methods Thirty-five women and 23 men (mean age, 56 years; age range, 18-87 years) referred for routine radiographic examinations of the knees were included. Axial radiographs of the PF joint in both supine non-weight-bearing and standing weight-bearing position in 30° knee flexion were obtained of 111 knees. Measurements performed on the radiographs: patellar tilt, patellar displacement, joint space width, and grade of OA according to Ahlbäck. Results From supine to standing position the patella moved medially and medial joint space width and lateral patellar tilt angle decreased ( P < 0.0001 for the three measured parameters). In the standing position, medial PF OA was observed in 19 knees compared to three knees in the supine position. Fourteen knees had lateral PF OA with almost unchanged grade of OA irrespective of position. Conclusion In weight-bearing positions, the patella is positioned medially in the trochlear groove compared to supine non-weight-bearing positions. Therefore, this study suggests that the common occurrence of medial PF OA can generally not be detected on axial radiographs in supine non-weight-bearing positions and confirms the importance of imaging the PF joint in standing weight-bearing positions.

  13. Effects of prolonged patellar tendon vibration on force steadiness in quadriceps femoris during force-matching task.

    PubMed

    Saito, Akira; Ando, Ryosuke; Akima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle group plays an essential role in human movement, such as standing, walking and running. The ability to maintain a steady force during physical activity of the human lower limb is important for mobility, postural control and balance. Although prolonged mechanical vibration of the muscle-tendon unit can moderate the efficacy of synaptic input from Ia afferent onto the α-motor neuron pathway, the effect of prolonged tendon vibration on fluctuations of knee extensor force has received little attention. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of prolonged patellar tendon vibration on the force steadiness of the QF muscle. Nine healthy men performed a submaximal force-matching task involving isometric knee extension before and after patellar tendon vibration or quiet seated rest (n = 7, control condition) for 30 min. The target force was 2.5, 10 and 30 % of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Surface electromyography (EMG) of the four QF synergists was recorded and normalized to EMG amplitude during the MVC. The knee extension force and the EMG amplitude of vastus medialis during the MVC were significantly reduced after the vibration, but did not significantly decrease in the control condition. Fluctuations of force and normalized EMG of individual QF muscles at each submaximal force level did not significantly change after the vibration. We conclude that prolonged patellar tendon vibration does not influence the force steadiness of the QF muscle during an isometric force-matching task.

  14. Circumferential electrocautery of the patella in primary total knee replacement without patellar replacement: a meta-analysis and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lihong; Ge, Zhaogang; Zhang, Chen; Li, Jia; Yu, Zefeng; Dang, Xiaoqian; Wang, Kunzheng

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis and systematic review was to identify and assess whether circumferential electrocautery is useful for improving outcomes after primary total knee replacement(TKR). We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, SpringerLink, Web of Knowledge, OVID CINAHL, OVID EBM and Google Scholar and included articles published through January 2014. A total of 6 articles met the inclusion criteria. Of the 776 cases included in the analysis, 388 cases involved patellar denervation, and 388 cases were designated as the control group. The meta-analysis revealed no significant difference in the incidence of anterior knee pain (AKP, p = 0.18) or in the visual analogue scale score (VAS, p = 0.23) between the two groups. In addition, AKSS Function Score indicated no significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.28). However, the OKS (p = 0.02), patellar score (p = 0.01), AKSS-Knee Score (p = 0.004), range of motion (ROM, p < 0.0001) and WOMAC Score (p = 0.0003) indicated that circumpatellarelectrocautery improved clinical outcomes compared with non-electrocautery. The results indicate that circumferential electrocautery of the patella does not significantly improve AKP compared with non-electrocautery techniques but that circumferential electrocautery significantly improves patients' knee function after surgery. Therefore, we believe that circumferential electrocautery is beneficial to the outcome of primary TKR surgery without patellar replacement. PMID:25801456

  15. Circumferential electrocautery of the patella in primary total knee replacement without patellar replacement: a meta-analysis and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lihong; Ge, Zhaogang; Zhang, Chen; Li, Jia; Yu, Zefeng; Dang, Xiaoqian; Wang, Kunzheng

    2015-03-24

    The purpose of this meta-analysis and systematic review was to identify and assess whether circumferential electrocautery is useful for improving outcomes after primary total knee replacement(TKR). We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, SpringerLink, Web of Knowledge, OVID CINAHL, OVID EBM and Google Scholar and included articles published through January 2014. A total of 6 articles met the inclusion criteria. Of the 776 cases included in the analysis, 388 cases involved patellar denervation, and 388 cases were designated as the control group. The meta-analysis revealed no significant difference in the incidence of anterior knee pain (AKP, p = 0.18) or in the visual analogue scale score (VAS, p = 0.23) between the two groups. In addition, AKSS Function Score indicated no significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.28). However, the OKS (p = 0.02), patellar score (p = 0.01), AKSS-Knee Score (p = 0.004), range of motion (ROM, p < 0.0001) and WOMAC Score (p = 0.0003) indicated that circumpatellarelectrocautery improved clinical outcomes compared with non-electrocautery. The results indicate that circumferential electrocautery of the patella does not significantly improve AKP compared with non-electrocautery techniques but that circumferential electrocautery significantly improves patients' knee function after surgery. Therefore, we believe that circumferential electrocautery is beneficial to the outcome of primary TKR surgery without patellar replacement.

  16. Cyclic mechanical strain induces NO production in human patellar tendon fibroblasts--a possible role for remodelling and pathological transformation.

    PubMed

    van Griensven, Martijn; Zeichen, Johannes; Skutek, Michael; Barkhausen, Tanja; Krettek, Christian; Bosch, Ulrich

    2003-03-01

    The mechanism by which tendon fibroblasts can detect strain forces and respond to them is fairly unknown. Nitric oxide (NO) is a messenger molecule that among others can respond to shear stress in endothelial cells. Therefore, it was investigated whether cyclic mechanical strain induces NO in vitro in human patellar tendon fibroblasts. Human patellar tendon fibroblasts were cultured from remnants of patellar tendon transplants after reconstructive surgery. Fibroblasts were cultured on elastic silicone dishes. The cells were longitudinally strained (5%, 1 Hz) for 15' or 60'. As a control, no strain was applied. The experiments were finished after 0', 5', 15', and 30'. NO was determined using the Griess reaction. 15' strain showed at 0' and 5' 200% activation, which thereafter at 15' and 30' returned to normal levels. 60' strain showed a biphasic pattern. At 5' and 30', NO levels were increased to 175%. At 15', NO measurement displayed 120% increased levels. Mechanical strain induces NO production by tendon fibroblasts. Therefore, NO produced by tendon fibroblasts, as a response to alteration in their mechanical microenvironment, could modulate fibroblast function. The results of our study suggests that strain-related adaptive changes may, at least in part, be controlled by a process in which strain-related NO production from the fibroblast network may play a pivotal role. Moreover, these are basic findings that are important for further unravelling pathophysiology of tendon diseases.

  17. Circumferential electrocautery of the patella in primary total knee replacement without patellar replacement: a meta-analysis and systematic review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Lihong; Ge, Zhaogang; Zhang, Chen; Li, Jia; Yu, Zefeng; Dang, Xiaoqian; Wang, Kunzheng

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis and systematic review was to identify and assess whether circumferential electrocautery is useful for improving outcomes after primary total knee replacement(TKR). We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, SpringerLink, Web of Knowledge, OVID CINAHL, OVID EBM and Google Scholar and included articles published through January 2014. A total of 6 articles met the inclusion criteria. Of the 776 cases included in the analysis, 388 cases involved patellar denervation, and 388 cases were designated as the control group. The meta-analysis revealed no significant difference in the incidence of anterior knee pain (AKP, p = 0.18) or in the visual analogue scale score (VAS, p = 0.23) between the two groups. In addition, AKSS Function Score indicated no significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.28). However, the OKS (p = 0.02), patellar score (p = 0.01), AKSS-Knee Score (p = 0.004), range of motion (ROM, p < 0.0001) and WOMAC Score (p = 0.0003) indicated that circumpatellarelectrocautery improved clinical outcomes compared with non-electrocautery. The results indicate that circumferential electrocautery of the patella does not significantly improve AKP compared with non-electrocautery techniques but that circumferential electrocautery significantly improves patients' knee function after surgery. Therefore, we believe that circumferential electrocautery is beneficial to the outcome of primary TKR surgery without patellar replacement.

  18. Fetal and postnatal development of the patella, patellar tendon and suprapatella in the rabbit; changes in the distribution of the fibrillar collagens

    PubMed Central

    BLAND, YVETTE S.; ASHHURST, DOREEN E.

    1997-01-01

    The development of the patella, its associated tendons, and suprapatella of the rabbit knee joint is described from the 17 d fetus to the mature adult. The patellar tendon (ligament) with the patella on its posterior surface is seen in the 17 d fetus and is fully developed by 1 postnatal wk. It is composed of bundles of types I and V collagens separated by endotenons of types III and V collagens. Anteriorly there is an epitenon of types III and V collagens while synovium and a fat pad cover its posterior surface. In the 25 d fetus, the patella is cartilaginous and is separated from the femoral condyles. The cartilage contains type II collagen, but types I, III and V collagens are found along the articular surface. Ossification starts 1 postnatal wk and at 6 wk only the articular cartilage remains. In addition to type II, types III and V collagens are located around the chondrocyte lacunae. The long anterior junction between the patella and its tendon is fibrocartilaginous at 1 wk, but as ossification proceeds this is replaced by bone. Types I and V collagens are found in this region. The suprapatella on the posterior surface of the quadriceps tendon is first seen 1 wk postnatally as an area of irregularly organised fibres and chondrocyte-like cells. Types I, II, III and V collagens are present from 3 wk onwards. It is compared with the fibrocartilage of other tendons that are under compression. The arrangement of the collagens in the patellar tendon is discussed in relation to its use as a replacement for injured anterior cruciate ligaments. It is suggested that the structural differences between the patellar tendon and anterior cruciate ligament preclude the translocated tendon acquiring mechanical strength similar to that of a normal cruciate ligament. The designation ‘patellar ligament’ as opposed to ‘patellar tendon’ is questioned. It is argued that the term patellar tendon reflects its structure more accurately than patellar ligament. PMID:9147220

  19. Beneficial Effects of Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Naturally Occurring Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Roger Kenneth Whealands; Werling, Natalie Jayne; Dakin, Stephanie Georgina; Alam, Rafiqul; Goodship, Allen E.; Dudhia, Jayesh

    2013-01-01

    Tendon injuries are a common age-related degenerative condition where current treatment strategies fail to restore functionality and normal quality of life. This disease also occurs naturally in horses, with many similarities to human tendinopathy making it an ideal large animal model for human disease. Regenerative approaches are increasingly used to improve outcome involving mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), supported by clinical data where injection of autologous bone marrow derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) suspended in marrow supernatant into injured tendons has halved the re-injury rate in racehorses. We hypothesized that stem cell therapy induces a matrix more closely resembling normal tendon than the fibrous scar tissue formed by natural repair. Twelve horses with career-ending naturally-occurring superficial digital flexor tendon injury were allocated randomly to treatment and control groups. 1X107 autologous BM-MSCs suspended in 2 ml of marrow supernatant were implanted into the damaged tendon of the treated group. The control group received the same volume of saline. Following a 6 month exercise programme horses were euthanized and tendons assessed for structural stiffness by non-destructive mechanical testing and for morphological and molecular composition. BM-MSC treated tendons exhibited statistically significant improvements in key parameters compared to saline-injected control tendons towards that of normal tendons and those in the contralateral limbs. Specifically, treated tendons had lower structural stiffness (p<0.05) although no significant difference in calculated modulus of elasticity, lower (improved) histological scoring of organisation (p<0.003) and crimp pattern (p<0.05), lower cellularity (p<0.007), DNA content (p<0.05), vascularity (p<0.03), water content (p<0.05), GAG content (p<0.05), and MMP-13 activity (p<0.02). Treatment with autologous MSCs in marrow supernatant therefore provides significant benefits compared to untreated tendon repair in

  20. Full symptomatic recovery does not ensure full recovery of muscle‐tendon function in patients with Achilles tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Thomeé, Roland; Eriksson, Bengt I; Karlsson, Jon

    2007-01-01

    Objective To assess the relationship between muscle‐tendon function and symptoms in patients with Achilles tendinopathy using a validated test battery. Design A prospective non‐randomised trial. Setting Orthopaedic Department, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden. Patients 37 patients with a clinical diagnosis of Achilles tendinopathy in the midportion of the tendon, with symptoms for >2 months, were evaluated at the initiation of the study and after 1 year. Intervention The patients were treated using a rehabilitation programme, under the supervision of a physical therapist, for 6 months. Main outcome measurements The patients were evaluated using the Swedish version of the Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment—Achilles questionnaire (VISA‐A‐S) for symptoms, and a test battery for evaluation of the lower leg muscle‐tendon function. Results There were significant improvements in the VISA‐A‐S score (p<0.00, n = 37) and the test battery (p<0.02, n = 19) at the 1‐year follow‐up. The VISA‐A‐S questionnaire had an effect size of 2.1 and the test battery had an effect size of 0.73. A low correlation (r = 0.178, p>0.05) was found between the VISA‐A‐S score and the test battery. A high correlation (r = 0.611, p<0.05) was found between the drop counter movement jump and the VISA‐A‐S score. All other tests in the test battery had low correlations (r = −0.305 to 0.155, p>0.05) with the VISA‐A‐S score. Only 25% (4/16) of the patients who had full symptomatic recovery had achieved full recovery of muscle–tendon function as measured by the test battery. Conclusion Full symptomatic recovery in patients with Achilles tendinopathy does not ensure full recovery of muscle–tendon function. The VISA‐A‐S questionnaire and the test battery are sensitive to clinically relevant changes with treatment and can be recommended for use in both the clinic and research. PMID:17261555

  1. Biceps tendinitis as a cause of acute painful knee after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pandher, Dilbans Singh; Boparai, Randhir Singh; Kapila, Rajesh

    2009-12-01

    The case report highlights an unusual case of posterolateral knee pain after total knee arthroplasty. Tendinitis of the patellar tendon or pes anserinus is a common complication after total knee arthroplasty; however, there is no report in the literature regarding the biceps femoris tendinitis causing acute pain in the early postoperative period. In this case, the biceps tendinitis was diagnosed and treated by ultrasound-guided injection into the tendon sheath.

  2. Comparison of grafts for anatomical reconstruction of the ACL: patellar versus semitendinosus/gracilis☆

    PubMed Central

    Bitun, Patrícia Barros; Miranda, Carlos Roberto; Escudero, Ricardo Boso; Araf, Marcelo; de Souza, Daphnis Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the functional results from surgical treatment for anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with a single band, using two types of autologous grafts. Methods Twenty-seven patients who underwent anatomical reconstruction of the ACL by means of the Chambat technique were evaluated prospectively. They were divided into two groups: A, with 14 patients, using grafts from flexor tendons; and B, with 13 patients, using grafts from the patellar tendon. In both groups, fixation was performed using an absorbable interference screw. Results Based on the Lysholm score, group A presented a mean score of 71.6 in the first month, while B presented 75. At the end of the sixth month, both groups presented 96.6. Evaluation of the total IKDC showed that in the first month, the majority of the patients, both in group A (85.7%) and in group B (76.9%), presented a knee assessment that was close to normal. In the sixth month, 92.9% of group A had normal presentations, and 100% of group B. Conclusion According to the Lysholm functional evaluation and the IKDC subjective assessment, there was no statistically significant difference in the results between the groups, and the results were better in the sixth month. PMID:26229896

  3. Painful knee prosthesis: CT scan to assess patellar angle and implant malrotation

    PubMed Central

    Spinarelli, Antonio; Pesce, Vito; Campagna, Caterina; Maccagnano, Giuseppe; Moretti, Biagio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background According to literature, the incidence of pain in knee prostheses is on the increase. In the last decade Authors have focused attention on rotational alignment of the prosthetic components. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of a new angle, which we define as patellar angle, in order to achieve early diagnosis of malrotation. Methods We set up a retrospective observational study recruiting 100 subjects who had undergone total knee prosthesis. 50 subjects suffered from knee anterior pain and 50 without any symptoms. Through CAT scan and VITREA software®, we were able to study the rotation of prosthetic components. We defined a new angle, which links the tibial component and the patella margins. The angles were measured by two different orthopaedic surgeons blinded to the study. Results The patella angle ranged from 10 to 28°, with an average value of 23.2° in the control group; in the study group the angle ranged from 26 to 34°, with an average value of 29.9°. Conclusion Our data supported the reproducibility and efficacy of new angular value. It would represent a new method to detect tibial rotational malalignment. Level of evidence IV. PMID:28217567

  4. The effects of thermal capsulorrhaphy of medial parapatellar capsule on patellar lateral displacement

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Naiquan; Davis, Brent R; Andrews, James R

    2008-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of thermal shrinkage on the medial parapatellar capsule for treating recurrent patellar dislocation is controversial. One of reasons why it is still controversial is that the effectiveness is still qualitatively measured. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively determine the immediate effectiveness of the medial parapatellar capsule shrinkage as in clinical setting. Methods Nine cadaveric knees were used to collect lateral displacement data before and after medial shrinkage or open surgery. The force and displacement were recorded while a physician pressed the patella from the medial side to mimic the physical exam used in clinic. Ten healthy subjects were used to test the feasibility of the technique on patients and establish normal range of lateral displacement of the patella under a medial force. The force applied, the resulting displacement and the ratio of force over displacement were compared among four data groups (normal knees, cadaveric knees before medial shrinkage, after shrinkage and after open surgery). Results Displacements of the cadaveric knees both before and after thermal modification were similar to normal subjects, and the applied forces were significantly higher. No significant differences were found between before and after thermal modification groups. After open surgery, displacements were reduced significantly while applied forces were significantly higher. Conclusion No immediate difference was found after thermal shrinkage of the medial parapatellar capsule. Open surgery immediately improved of the lateral stiffness of the knee capsule. PMID:18826583

  5. Endoscopic Resection of Avulsed Fragment of Tibial Tuberosity and Endoscopic-Assisted Repair of Patellar Tendon.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    An avulsion fracture of part of the tibial tuberosity can occur as a result of a tophaceous tuberosity or Osgood-Schlatter disease. We describe an endoscopic technique of debridement, bone fragment resection, and tendon repair. This technique has the potential advantage of fewer wound complications. It is performed through proximal and distal portals on the sides of the patellar tendon. The working space is deep to the tendon. After debridement of the tendon and resection of the bone fragment, the tendon gap is assessed. Endoscopic-assisted side-by-side repair is performed to close the gap if the gap is less than 30% of the width of the tendon. If the gap is more than 30% of the width of the tendon, the proximal stump of the avulsed tendon can be retrieved through the proximal portal. Krackow suture with stay stitches is applied to the proximal stump. The stump is put back and sutured to the tibial insertion through a bone tunnel or suture anchor. This is augmented by side-by-side suturing of the avulsed tendon with the adjacent normal tendon.

  6. Calcific Tendinopathy of the Gluteus Medius Mimicking Lumbar Radicular Pain Successfully Treated With Barbotage: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Hannae; Kim, Gowun; Baek, Sora

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of calcific tendinopathy of the gluteus medius initially misdiagnosed as a lumbar herniated intervertebral disc. It was successfully treated with barbotage under ultrasonographic guidance finally. A 56-year-old woman was referred to interventional pain clinic for right hip pain due to an L5-S1 disc herniation. Serial L5 and S1 spinal nerve root blocks and epidural steroid injections were administered. However, pain relief was sustained only for a very short period. Plain radiography of the right hip revealed a solid calcific nodule at adjacent to the insertion site of the gluteus medius tendon. Physical modalities and extracorporeal shock wave therapy failed to improve the pain. Therefore, we attempted ultrasound-guided barbotage of the calcification. Barbotage was performed twice serially and her pain was considerably improved. At 6-month follow-up, the calcification was completely resolved. PMID:27152290

  7. Patients With Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy Exhibit Differences in Ankle Biomechanics as Opposed to Strength and Range of Motion.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Ruth L; Flemister, A Samuel; Tome, Joshua; McMahon, James M; Houck, Jeff R

    2016-12-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study; cross-sectional. Background Little is known about ankle range of motion (ROM) and strength among patients with insertional Achilles tendinopathy (IAT) and whether limited ankle ROM and plantar flexor weakness impact IAT symptom severity. Objectives The purposes of the study were (1) to examine whether participants with IAT exhibit limited non-weight-bearing dorsiflexion ROM, reduced plantar flexor strength, and/or altered ankle biomechanics during stair ascent; and (2) to determine which impairments are associated with symptom severity. Methods Participants included 20 patients with unilateral IAT (mean ± SD age, 59 ± 8 years; 55% female) and 20 individuals without tendinopathy (age, 58.2 ± 8.5 years; 55% female). A dynamometer was used to measure non-weight-bearing ROM and isometric plantar flexor strength. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to quantify ankle biomechanics during stair ascent. End-range dorsiflexion was quantified as the percentage of non-weight-bearing dorsiflexion used during stair ascent. Group differences were compared using 2-way and 1-way analyses of variance. Pearson correlations were used to test for associations among dependent variables and symptom severity. Results Groups differed in ankle biomechanics, but not non-weight-bearing ROM or strength. During stair ascent, the IAT group used greater end-range dorsiflexion (P = .03), less plantar flexion (P = .02), and lower peak ankle plantar flexor power (P = .01) than the control group. Higher end-range dorsiflexion and lower ankle power during stair ascent were associated with greater symptom severity (P<.05). Conclusion Patients with IAT do not experience restrictions in non-weight-bearing dorsiflexion ROM or isometric plantar flexor strength. However, altered ankle biomechanics during stair ascent were linked with greater symptom severity and likely contribute to decreased function. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(12):1051-1060. Epub

  8. The additional value of a night splint to eccentric exercises in chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    de Vos, R J; Weir, A; Visser, R J A; de Winter, ThC; Tol, J L

    2007-01-01

    Aim To assess whether the use of a night splint is of added benefit on functional outcome in treating chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy. Methods This was a single‐blind, prospective, single centre, randomised controlled trial set in the Sports Medical Department, The Hague Medical Centre, The Netherlands. Inclusion criteria were: age 18–70 years, active participation in sports, and tendon pain localised at 2–7 cm from distal insertion. Exclusion criteria were: insertional disorders, partial or complete ruptures, or systemic illness. 70 tendons were included and randomised into one of two treatment groups: eccentric exercises with a night splint (night splint group, n = 36) or eccentric exercises only (eccentric group, n = 34). Interventions Both groups completed a 12‐week heavy‐load eccentric training programme. One group received a night splint in addition to eccentric exercises. At baseline and follow‐up at 12 weeks, patient satisfaction, Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment–Achilles questionnaire (VISA‐A) score and reported compliance were recorded by a single‐blind trained researcher who was blinded to the treatment. Results After 12 weeks, patient satisfaction in the eccentric group was 63% compared with 48% in the night splint group. The VISA‐A score significantly improved in both groups; in the eccentric group from 50.1 to 68.8 (p = 0.001) and in the night splint group from 49.4 to 67.0 (p<0.001). There was no significant difference between the two groups in VISA‐A score (p = 0.815) and patient satisfaction (p = 0.261). Conclusion A night splint is not beneficial in addition to eccentric exercises in the treatment of chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy. PMID:17178774

  9. Bridge Tenodesis: A Secure Fixation Technique for Biceps Long Head Tendinopathy During Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Using a Suture-Bridge Technique.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Young; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Oh, Kyung-Soo; Chung, Seok-Won; Bang, Jin-Young; Noh, Young-Min

    2016-10-01

    Tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps is often found as an intra-articular pathology in the glenohumeral joint. Because long head of the biceps lesions are common, surgical intervention to properly manage the long head of the biceps has become an important issue. Both tenodesis and tenotomy have been shown to provide benefits in biceps long head tendinopathy. But because of concerns about muscle power reduction, cramping, and "Popeye's deformity," which may result from biceps tenotomy, biceps tenodesis is a good option for treating biceps lesions. Here, we describe a time-saving, simple, and secure biceps tenodesis method during rotator cuff repairs, which is a combination of an adjacent soft-tissue tenodesis and a bony suprapectoral tenodesis, by performing a combined tenodesis (soft + bony), and we believe that the shoulder joint will gain more strength and loosening complications will be reduced.

  10. The central nervous system--an additional consideration in 'rotator cuff tendinopathy' and a potential basis for understanding response to loaded therapeutic exercise.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, Chris; Malliaras, Peter; Bateman, Marcus; Stace, Richmond; May, Stephen; Walters, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Tendinopathy is a term used to describe a painful tendon disorder but despite being a well-recognised clinical presentation, a definitive understanding of the pathoaetiology of rotator cuff tendinopathy remains elusive. Current explanatory models, which relate to peripherally driven nocioceptive mechanisms secondary to structural abnormality, or failed healing, appear inadequate on their own in the context of current literature. In light of these limitations this paper presents an extension to current models that incorporates the integral role of the central nervous system in the pain experience. The role of the central nervous system (CNS) is described and justified along with a potential rationale to explain the favourable response to loaded therapeutic exercises demonstrated by previous studies. This additional consideration has the potential to offer a useful way to explain pain to patients, for clinicians to prescribe appropriate therapeutic management strategies and for researchers to advance knowledge in relation to this clinically challenging problem.

  11. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ACL RECONSTRUCTION WITH ANATOMICAL POSITIONING OF THE TUNNELS USING THE PATELLAR TENDON VERSUS HAMSTRING TENDON

    PubMed Central

    de Pádua, Vitor Barion Castro; Maldonado, Hilário; Vilela, Júlio César Rodrigues; Provenza, Alexandre Ribeira; Monteiro, Cleverson; de Oliveira Neto, Heleno Cavalcante

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare ACL reconstruction with anatomical positioning of the tunnels using the hamstring or patellar tendons. Methods: We prospectively evaluated 52 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction using the Chambat's technique, with anatomical positioning of the tunnels drilled outside in. They were divided into group A, with 27 patients, using the patellar tendon as a graft, and group B, with 25 patients, using the hamstring. Results: In group A 26 patients were very satisfied or satisfied and 1 unhappy, in group B. 25 patients were very satisfied or satisfied with the procedure (p = 0.990). According to the Lysholm scale, group A had a mean score of 96.11 and group B, 95.32 (p=0.594). In relation to preoperative IKDC, 100% of the patients in group A and 92% of those in group B were IKDC C or D (p = 0.221); in the assessment with a minimum of two-year follow-up, 96% of group A and 92% of group B were IKDC A or B (p = 0.256). The Lachman test, pivot shift, return to sports activities, and the comparative difference in anterior translation (RolimeterTM) also showed no statistically significant difference. In group A, 5 patients (18.5%) were unable to kneel on a hard surface, whereas no patient in group B had this complaint. Conclusion: The anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction presents similar results using the hamstring or patellar tendon with anatomical positioning of the tunnels. Drilling the femoral tunnel outside in is a reproducible and accurate option in the correct placement the femoral tunnel. PMID:27027082

  12. Diagnostic performance of axial-strain sonoelastography in confirming clinically diagnosed Achilles tendinopathy: comparison with B-mode ultrasound and color Doppler imaging.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chin Chin; Schneider, Michal Elisabeth; Malliaras, Peter; Chadwick, Martine; Connell, David Alister

    2015-01-01

    This primary aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of axial-strain sonoelastography (ASE), B-mode ultrasound (US) and color Doppler US in confirming clinically symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy. The secondary aim was to establish the relationship between the strain ratio during sonoelastography and Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A) scores. The VISA-A questionnaire is a validated clinical rating scale that evaluates the symptoms and dysfunction of the Achilles tendon. One hundred twenty Achilles tendons of 120 consecutively registered patients with clinical symptoms of Achilles tendinopathy and another 120 gender- and age-matched, asymptomatic Achilles tendons of 120 healthy volunteers were assessed with B-mode US, ASE and color Doppler US. Symptomatic patients had significantly higher strain ratio scores and softer Achilles tendon properties compared with controls (p < 0.001). The strain ratio was moderately correlated with VISA-A scores (r = -0.62, p < 0.001). The diagnostic accuracy of B-mode US, ASE and color Doppler US in confirming clinically symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy was 94.7%, 97.8% and 82.5% respectively. There was excellent correlation between the clinical reference standard and the grade of tendon quality on ASE (κ = 0.91, p < 0.05), compared with B-mode US (κ = 0.74, p < 0.05) and color Doppler imaging (κ = 0.49, p < 0.05). ASE is an accurate clinical tool in the evaluation of Achilles tendinopathy, with results comparable to those of B-mode US and excellent correlation with clinical findings. The strain ratio may offer promise as a supplementary tool for the objective evaluation of Achilles tendon properties.

  13. Quadriceps and patellar tendon pie-crusting as a treatment for limited flexion in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Burge, J Ross; Sanchez, Hugo B; Wagner, Russell A

    2014-04-01

    The pie-crusting method of ligament and tendon lengthening has been used successfully in various tissues but is not reported in the literature as an option for patellar or quadriceps tendons to address flexion limitation. Our case report discusses a patient with longstanding flexion limitation who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty. The report reviews the literature on intraoperative treatments, which primarily pertains to the condition of patella baja, and demonstrates that the pie-crusting technique should be included as a treatment option for a tight extensor mechanism while having some advantages over tibial tubercle osteotomy or Z-plasty.

  14. Reconstruction of medial patellofemoral ligament using quadriceps tendon combined with reconstruction of medial patellotibial ligament using patellar tendon: initial experience☆

    PubMed Central

    Hinckel, Betina Bremer; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe a surgical technique for anatomical reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the quadriceps tendon, combined with reconstruction of the medial patellotibial ligament using the patellar tendon; and to present the initial results from a case series. Method The proposed technique was used on a series of cases of patients with diagnoses of patellofemoral instability and indications for surgical treatment, who were attended by the Knee Group of HC-IOT, University of São Paulo. The following were evaluated before and after the operation: range of motion (ROM), apprehension test, lateral translation test, patellar inclination test, inverted J sign, subluxation upon extension, pain from compression of the patella and pain from contraction of the quadriceps. After the operation, the patients were asked whether any new episode of dislocation had occurred, what their degree of satisfaction with the surgery was (on a scale from 0 to 10) and whether they would be prepared to go through this operation again. Results Seven knees were operated, in seven patients, with a mean follow-up of 5.46 months (±2.07). Four patients who presented apprehension before the operation did not show this after the operation. The lateral translation test became normal for all the patients, while the patellar inclination test remained positive for two patients. The patients with an inverted J sign continued to be positive for this sign. Five patients were positive for subluxation upon extension before the operation, but all patients were negative for this after the operation. None of the patients presented any new episode of dislocation of the patella. All of them stated that they were satisfied: five gave a satisfaction score of 9 and two, a score of 10. All of them said that they would undergo the operation again. Only one patient presented a postoperative complication: dehiscence of the wound. Conclusion Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament

  15. Floating patella: combined quadriceps tendon, retinacula, and patellar tendon ruptures in a high-performance elite athlete.

    PubMed

    Langer, Phillip R; Selesnick, F Harlan

    2010-09-01

    Simultaneous quadriceps and patellar tendon rupture is rare. To our knowledge, we present the first known case of simultaneous quadriceps tendon, patella tendon, and retinacula rupture in the ipsilateral knee of a high-performance elite athlete. This disabling injury in the active person results in an inability to actively obtain and maintain full knee extension. When the tendons do not heal properly, at the correct length and tension, knee range of motion and strength can become significantly altered, leading to early fatigue, patellofemoral pain, and possibly instability, preventing return to preinjury status. Immediate surgical repair is recommended for optimal return of knee function and power.

  16. Differences in acoustic properties of intact and degenerated human patellar cartilage during compression.

    PubMed

    Kiviranta, Panu; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Töyräs, Juha; Nieminen, Heikki J; Julkunen, Petro; Kiviranta, Ilkka; Jurvelin, Jukka S

    2009-08-01

    Ultrasound indentation measurements have been shown to provide means to assess cartilage integrity and mechanical properties. To determine cartilage stiffness in the ultrasound indentation geometry, cartilage is compressed with an ultrasound transducer to determine the induced strain from the ultrasound signal using the time-of-flight principle. As the ultrasound speed in cartilage has been shown to vary during compression, the assumption of constant speed generates significant errors in the values of mechanical parameters. This variation in ultrasound speed has been investigated in intact cartilage, however, its existence and significance in degenerated tissue is unknown. In the present study, we investigate this issue with both intact and spontaneously degenerated human tissue. To accomplish this aim, we determined ultrasound speed and attenuation in human patellar cartilage (n=68) during mechanical loading. For reference, cartilage mechanical properties and proteoglycan, collagen and water contents were determined. The acoustic properties were related to the composition and mechanical properties of the samples. Ultrasound speed showed significant, site-dependent variation and it was significantly associated (r=0.79-0.81, p<0.01) with the mechanical properties of cartilage. The compression related decrease in ultrasound speed showed statistically significant variation between different stages of degeneration. Error simulations revealed that changes in ultrasound speed during 2% compression could generate errors up to 15% in the values of elastic moduli of samples with early degeneration, if determined with the ultrasound indentation technique. In samples with advanced degeneration, the error was significantly (p<0.05) smaller being 2% on average. As the compression related variation in ultrasound speed was lower in more degenerated samples, the mechanical parameters could be diagnosed more reliably in tissue showing advanced degeneration. The present results

  17. Measurement of rectus femoris muscle velocities during patellar tendon jerk using vector tissue doppler imaging.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Siddhartha; Lebiedowska, Maria; Eranki, Avinash; Garmirian, Lindsay; Damiano, Diane

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a vector tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) system based on a clinical scanner that can be used to measure muscle velocities independent of the direction of motion. This method overcomes the limitations of conventional Doppler ultrasound, which can only measure velocity components along the ultrasound beam. In this study, we utilized this method to investigate the rectus femoris muscle velocities during a patellar tendon jerk test. Our goal was to investigate whether the muscle elongation velocities during a brisk tendon tap fall within the normal range of velocities that are expected due to rapid stretch of limb segments. In a preliminary study, we recruited six healthy volunteers (three men and three women) following informed consent. The stretch reflex response to tendon tap was evaluated by measuring: (1) the tapping force using an accelerometer instrumented to the neurological hammer (2) the angular velocities of the knee extension and flexion using a electrogoniometer (3) reflex activation using electromyography (EMG) and (4) muscle elongation, extension and flexion velocities using vector TDI. The passive joint angular velocity was linearly related to the passive muscle elongation velocity (R(2)=0.88). The maximum estimated joint angular velocity corresponding to muscle elongation due to tendon tap was less than 8.25 radians/s. This preliminary study demonstrates the feasibility of vector TDI for measuring longitudinal muscle velocities and indicates that the muscle elongation velocities during a clinical tendon tap test are within the normal range of values for rapid limb stretch encountered in daily life. With further refinement, vector TDI could become a powerful method for quantitative evaluation of muscle motion in musculoskeletal disorders.

  18. Structure relates to elastic recoil and functional role in quadriceps tendon and patellar ligament.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Marco; Quaranta, Marilisa; Macciocca, Maria; De Pasquale, Viviana; Ottani, Vittoria; Ruggeri, Alessandro

    2009-04-01

    Tendons and ligaments have similar but slightly different structure and composition. Crimps of tendons and ligaments are morphological structures related to the elastic functional properties of these connective tissues. Aim of this study was to investigate the morphological arrangement of collagen fibres, fibrils and crimping pattern of suprapatellar (rectus femoris tendon-RFT and vastus intermedius tendon-VIT) and infrapatellar connective tissues (patellar ligament-PL) to relate their structural aspects to their common function role of leg extension. RFT, VIT and PL were removed from knees of Sprague-Dawley rats and light and electron microscopy (TEM and SEM) performed. Sagittal sections showed that collagen array and crimping pattern were similar in RFT and PL but differed from VIT. Morphometric analysis confirmed that crimp number was about the same in RFT and PL (5.4+/-1.4 and 6.1+/-2.8 respectively), but it was almost three times higher in VIT (14.5+/-4.7). Similarly crimp top angle in RFT and PL (141.5+/-15.0 degrees and 146.2+/-12.2 degrees respectively) was significantly higher than in VIT (122.3+/-14.8 degrees ) and the crimp base length was more than twice as wide in RFT (75.5+/-22.6microm) and PL (72.3+/-28.9microm) than in VIT (36+/-14.1microm). The smaller, fewer and most crimped crimps in VIT show that this tendon has a greater elastic recoil and responds to higher forces as among quadriceps muscles the vastus intermedius belly contributes the most during knee extension. By contrast, RFT acting as a "stopper" tendon also plays a ligament role by limiting an excessive flexion of the joint during postural rest position of the knee.

  19. A systematic review with procedural assessments and meta-analysis of Low Level Laser Therapy in lateral elbow tendinopathy (tennis elbow)

    PubMed Central

    Bjordal, Jan M; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo AB; Joensen, Jon; Couppe, Christian; Ljunggren, Anne E; Stergioulas, Apostolos; Johnson, Mark I

    2008-01-01

    Background Recent reviews have indicated that low level level laser therapy (LLLT) is ineffective in lateral elbow tendinopathy (LET) without assessing validity of treatment procedures and doses or the influence of prior steroid injections. Methods Systematic review with meta-analysis, with primary outcome measures of pain relief and/or global improvement and subgroup analyses of methodological quality, wavelengths and treatment procedures. Results 18 randomised placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) were identified with 13 RCTs (730 patients) meeting the criteria for meta-analysis. 12 RCTs satisfied half or more of the methodological criteria. Publication bias was detected by Egger's graphical test, which showed a negative direction of bias. Ten of the trials included patients with poor prognosis caused by failed steroid injections or other treatment failures, or long symptom duration or severe baseline pain. The weighted mean difference (WMD) for pain relief was 10.2 mm [95% CI: 3.0 to 17.5] and the RR for global improvement was 1.36 [1.16 to 1.60]. Trials which targeted acupuncture points reported negative results, as did trials with wavelengths 820, 830 and 1064 nm. In a subgroup of five trials with 904 nm lasers and one trial with 632 nm wavelength where the lateral elbow tendon insertions were directly irradiated, WMD for pain relief was 17.2 mm [95% CI: 8.5 to 25.9] and 14.0 mm [95% CI: 7.4 to 20.6] respectively, while RR for global pain improvement was only reported for 904 nm at 1.53 [95% CI: 1.28 to 1.83]. LLLT doses in this subgroup ranged between 0.5 and 7.2 Joules. Secondary outcome measures of painfree grip strength, pain pressure threshold, sick leave and follow-up data from 3 to 8 weeks after the end of treatment, showed consistently significant results in favour of the same LLLT subgroup (p < 0.02). No serious side-effects were reported. Conclusion LLLT administered with optimal doses of 904 nm and possibly 632 nm wavelengths directly to the lateral

  20. Photobiomodulation therapy on collagen type I and III, vascular endothelial growth factor, and metalloproteinase in experimentally induced tendinopathy in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Marques, Anna Cristina de Farias; Albertini, Regiane; Serra, Andrey Jorge; da Silva, Evela Aparecida Pereira; de Oliveira, Vanessa Lima Cavalcante; Silva, Luciana Miatto; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the effect of photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) on collagen type I and III, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in experimentally induced tendinopathy in female aged rats. Tendinopathy was induced by the Achilles tendoncollagenase peritendinous. Forty-two Wistar rats (Norvegicus albinus) were used; groups consisted of 36 aged animals (18 months old; mean body weight, 517.7 ± 27.54 g) and 6 adult animals (12 weeks old; mean body weight, 266± 19.30 g). The animals were divided into three groups: control, aged tendinopathy, and aged tendinopathy PBMT; the aged groups were subdivided based on time to euthanasia: 7, 14, and 21 days. PBMT involved a gallium-arsenide-aluminum laser (Theralaser, DMC®) with active medium operating at wavelength 830 ± 10 nm, 50 mW power, 0.028 cm(2) laser beam, 107 J/cm(2) energy density, 1.8 W/cm(2) power density, and an energy of 3 J per point. The laser was applied by direct contact with the left Achilles tendon during 60 s per point at a frequency of three times per week, until the euthanasia date (7, 14, and 21 days). VEGF, MMP-3, and MMP-9 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, and collagen type I and III by Sirius red. PBMT increased the deposition of collagen type I and III in a gradual manner, with significant differences relative to the group aged tendonitis (p < 0.001), and in relation to VEGF (p < 0.001); decreased expression of MMP-3 and 9 were observed in group aged tendinopathy (p < 0.001). PBMT, therefore, increased the production of collagen type I and III, downregulated the expression of MMP-3 and MMP-9, and upregulated that of VEGF, with age and age-induced hormonal deficiency.

  1. Anatomically remote muscle contraction facilitates patellar tendon reflex reinforcement while mental activity does not: a within-participants experimental trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Jendrassik maneuver (JM) is a remote facilitation muscular contraction shown to affect amplitude and temporal components of the human stretch reflex. Conflicting theoretical models exist regarding the neurological mechanism related to its ability to reinforce reflex parameters. One mechanism involves the gamma motoneurons of the fusimotor system, which are subject to both physical and mental activity. A second mechanism describes reduced alpha motoneuron presynaptic inhibition, which is not subject to mental activity. In the current study, we determined if mental activity could be used to create a reflex facilitation comparable to a remote muscle contraction. Method Using a within-participants design, we investigated the relative effect of the JM and a successfully employed mental task (Stroop task) on the amplitude and temporal components of the patellar tendon reflex. Results We found that the addition of mental activity had no influence on the patellar tendon reflex parameters measured, while the JM provided facilitation (increased reflex amplitude, decreased total reflex time). Conclusion The findings from this study support the view that the mechanism for the JM is a reduction in presynaptic inhibition of alpha motoneurons as it is influenced by physical and not mental activity. PMID:22958619

  2. Phase contrast imaging X-ray computed tomography: quantitative characterization of human patellar cartilage matrix with topological and geometrical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Coan, Paola; Huber, Markus B.; Diemoz, Paul C.; Wismüller, Axel

    2014-03-01

    Current assessment of cartilage is primarily based on identification of indirect markers such as joint space narrowing and increased subchondral bone density on x-ray images. In this context, phase contrast CT imaging (PCI-CT) has recently emerged as a novel imaging technique that allows a direct examination of chondrocyte patterns and their correlation to osteoarthritis through visualization of cartilage soft tissue. This study investigates the use of topological and geometrical approaches for characterizing chondrocyte patterns in the radial zone of the knee cartilage matrix in the presence and absence of osteoarthritic damage. For this purpose, topological features derived from Minkowski Functionals and geometric features derived from the Scaling Index Method (SIM) were extracted from 842 regions of interest (ROI) annotated on PCI-CT images of healthy and osteoarthritic specimens of human patellar cartilage. The extracted features were then used in a machine learning task involving support vector regression to classify ROIs as healthy or osteoarthritic. Classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). The best classification performance was observed with high-dimensional geometrical feature vectors derived from SIM (0.95 ± 0.06) which outperformed all Minkowski Functionals (p < 0.001). These results suggest that such quantitative analysis of chondrocyte patterns in human patellar cartilage matrix involving SIM-derived geometrical features can distinguish between healthy and osteoarthritic tissue with high accuracy.

  3. Effects of gamma irradiation on the initial mechanical and material properties of goat bone-patellar tendon-bone allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, M.J.; Butler, D.L.; Grood, E.S.; Bylski-Austrow, D.I.; Levy, M.S.; Noyes, F.R. )

    1991-03-01

    The effects of {sup 60}Co gamma irradiation on the initial mechanical properties of the composite bone-patellar tendon-bone unit (CU) and the tendon midsubstance (TM) were studied. Frozen specimens were exposed to either 2 or 3 Mrad of gamma irradiation. Paired frozen specimens served as intraanimal controls. Treatment effects on the CU were assessed using four mechanical parameters. Effects on the TM were assessed using four material parameters measured using an optical surface-strain analysis system. The maximum force and strain energy to maximum force of the composite unit were significantly reduced 27% and 40%, respectively, after 3 Mrad of irradiation (p less than .05). Mechanical properties of the CU were not significantly altered, however, following 2 Mrad of irradiation. Based on individual paired contrasts between treatment and control, significant differences were also found in the material properties of the tendon midsubstance. The maximum stress, maximum strain, and strain energy density to maximum stress were significantly reduced following 3 Mrad, but not 2 Mrad, of irradiation. The results provide important time zero material property data, which will be useful for later anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction studies using irradiated allograft patellar tendons in the goat model and other animal models as well.

  4. Effects of a peracetic acid disinfection protocol on the biocompatibility and biomechanical properties of human patellar tendon allografts.

    PubMed

    Lomas, R J; Jennings, L M; Fisher, J; Kearney, J N

    2004-01-01

    Patellar tendon allografts, retrieved from cadaveric human donors, are widely used for replacement of damaged cruciate ligaments. In common with other tissue allografts originating from cadaveric donors, there are concerns regarding the potential for disease transmission from the donor to the recipient. Additionally, retrieval and subsequent processing protocols expose the graft to the risk of environmental contamination. For these reasons, disinfection or sterilisation protocols are necessary for these grafts before they are used clinically. A high-level disinfection protocol, utilising peracetic acid (PAA), has been developed and investigated for its effects on the biocompatibility and biomechanics of the patellar tendon allografts. PAA disinfection did not render the grafts either cytotoxic or liable to provoke an inflammatory response as assessed in vitro . However, the protocol was shown to increase the size of gaps between the tendon fibres in the matrix and render the grafts more susceptible to digestion with collagenase. Biomechanical studies of the tendons showed that PAA treatment had no effect on the ultimate tensile stress or Young's modulus of the tendons, and that ultimate strain was significantly higher in PAA treated tendons.

  5. Treatment of patellar instability in a case of hereditary onycho-osteodysplasia (nail-patella syndrome) with medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction: A case report.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yubao; Yang, Chen; Liu, Yang; Liu, Jianguo; Qi, Xin

    2016-06-01

    Hereditary onycho-osteodysplasia, also known as nail-patella syndrome (NPS), is a rare genetic disorder that is primarily characterized by poorly developed nails and patella. Patients with NPS frequently suffer from patellar instability that requires surgical management. The present case report describes a 25-year-old man with NPS. The patient presented with left knee pain and was found to have recurrent left patellar dislocation. The knee pain was first reported 1-year after a minor knee trauma incident. Following complete evaluation, a diagnosis of NPS was reached. The patient underwent surgical intervention using medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction with a gracilis tendon autograft looped through two transverse 3.2-mm drill holes in the patella and fixed at the natural MPFL insertion site on the medial femoral condyle with an interference screw. The surgery resulted in stabilization of the patella in the femoral trochlea and the patient did not have any subsequent dislocations or subluxations. The patient had an excellent range of knee movement in the follow-up period. This case indicates that MPFL reconstruction in patients with patellar dislocation secondary to NPS can successfully restore normal patellar tracking and result in good range of movement and functional activity.

  6. Shear Elastic Modulus on Patellar Tendon Captured from Supersonic Shear Imaging: Correlation with Tangent Traction Modulus Computed from Material Testing System and Test-Retest Reliability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi Jie; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of the elastic properties of a tendon could enhance the diagnosis and treatment of tendon injuries. The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between the shear elastic modulus on the patellar tendon captured from a Supersonic Shear Imaging (SSI) and the tangent traction modulus computed from a Material testing system (MTS) on 8 fresh patellar pig tendons (Experiment I). Test-retest reliability of the shear elastic modulus captured from the SSI was established in Experiment II on 22 patellar tendons of 11 healthy human subjects using the SSI. Spearman Correlation coefficients for the shear elastic modulus and tangent traction modulus ranged from 0.82 to 1.00 (all p<0.05) on the 8 tendons. The intra and inter-operator reliabilities were 0.98 (95% CI: 0.93-0.99) and 0.97 (95% CI: 0.93-0.98) respectively. The results from this study demonstrate that the shear elastic modulus of the patellar tendon measured by the SSI is related to the tangent traction modulus quantified by the MTS. The SSI shows good intra and inter-operator repeatability. Therefore, the present study shows that SSI can be used to assess elastic properties of a tendon.

  7. COMPARISON BETWEEN THE RESULTS ACHIEVED IN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION WITH TWO KINDS OF AUTOLOGOUS GRAFTS: PATELLAR TENDON VERSUS SEMITENDINOUS AND GRACILIS

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Monteiro, Diego Antico; Dias, Leonardo; Correia, Dárcio Maurício; Cohen, Moisés; Forgas, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Objective: this study aims to compare the arthrometric and isokinetic examination results from two types of autologous grafts: the central third of the patellar ligament and a graft formed by the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles, within the same rehabilitation protocol, six months after the surgery. Methods: the results from examinations carried out on 63 patients were analyzed. These patients were divided in two groups: one group of 30 patients who received a patellar tendon graft and another group of 33 patients who received a graft from the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles. Both the grafts were attached in the same way, with Endobutton™ for suspensory fixation to the femur and a bioabsorbable interference screw for fixation in the tibial tunnel. Results: arthrometry 30 did not present any statistical difference between the two study groups. On the other hand, the isokinetic evaluation showed that the patellar tendon group had a larger mean peak torque of flexion and greater extension deficit, while the semitendinosus/gracilis group had a better mean flexion/extension ratio and greater percentage of flexion deficit. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups when measuring peak torque extension. Conclusion: therefore, when the patellar tendon was used, there was greater extensor deficit and, when the semitendinosus/gracilis tendons were used, there was greater flexor deficit. PMID:27004173

  8. Treatment of patellar instability in a case of hereditary onycho-osteodysplasia (nail-patella syndrome) with medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction: A case report

    PubMed Central

    GONG, YUBAO; YANG, CHEN; LIU, YANG; LIU, JIANGUO; QI, XIN

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary onycho-osteodysplasia, also known as nail-patella syndrome (NPS), is a rare genetic disorder that is primarily characterized by poorly developed nails and patella. Patients with NPS frequently suffer from patellar instability that requires surgical management. The present case report describes a 25-year-old man with NPS. The patient presented with left knee pain and was found to have recurrent left patellar dislocation. The knee pain was first reported 1-year after a minor knee trauma incident. Following complete evaluation, a diagnosis of NPS was reached. The patient underwent surgical intervention using medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction with a gracilis tendon autograft looped through two transverse 3.2-mm drill holes in the patella and fixed at the natural MPFL insertion site on the medial femoral condyle with an interference screw. The surgery resulted in stabilization of the patella in the femoral trochlea and the patient did not have any subsequent dislocations or subluxations. The patient had an excellent range of knee movement in the follow-up period. This case indicates that MPFL reconstruction in patients with patellar dislocation secondary to NPS can successfully restore normal patellar tracking and result in good range of movement and functional activity. PMID:27284321

  9. Comparison of a Novel Weightbearing Cone Beam Computed Tomography Scanner Versus a Conventional Computed Tomography Scanner for Measuring Patellar Instability

    PubMed Central

    Marzo, John; Kluczynski, Melissa; Notino, Anthony; Bisson, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Conventional computed tomography (CT) images are routinely used for diagnosing patellofemoral instability and are obtained with the patient in a supine position, nonweightbearing, with the knee in full extension, and with leg muscles relaxed. A new portable extremity cone beam CT (CBCT) scanner has been developed that may allow for more accurate diagnosis, as imaging can be performed with the patient standing, the knee flexed, and with leg muscles active. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to compare CT measurements of patellar alignment on a prototype scanner versus conventional scanner in patients with known patellar instability. The hypothesis was that the measurements obtained with the knee flexed and the patient weightbearing would be less than those obtained from the conventional CT scan. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Twenty patients with a diagnosis of lateral patellar instability were imaged on both a conventional CT scanner and on a prototype CBCT scanner. Objective measures of patellofemoral alignment (tilt angle, congruence angle, tibial tuberosity–trochlear groove [TT-TG] offset) were assessed on images obtained from the prototype and conventional CT scans by 2 independent reviewers. Paired t tests were calculated to compare the mean measurement of patellofemoral alignment obtained from the prototype versus conventional CT. Interrater reliability was assessed using a 2-way mixed-effects model intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for tilt angle, congruence angle, and TT-TG offset on the prototype and conventional CT scans. Results: Measurements of patellofemoral alignment were significantly less when acquired by the new prototype CBCT scanner while subjects were weightbearing on a flexed knee. On the images from the prototype CBCT scan, the tilt angle averaged 18.2° ± 11.6° compared with 28.1° ± 7.1° on the conventional CT scan (P < .0001). The congruence angle was 3.0° ± 30

  10. Extensive expression of markers for acetylcholine synthesis and of M2 receptors in tenocytes in therapy-resistant chronic painful patellar tendon tendinosis - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Danielson, Patrik; Andersson, Gustav; Alfredson, Håkan; Forsgren, Sture

    2007-05-30

    We have recently obtained evidence favoring the occurrence of an up-regulation of a non-neuronal cholinergic system in chronic painful patellar tendon tendinosis. It seems possible that this up-regulation to a certain degree may be involved in the manifestations of the disease. Today, there is a new, very successful, line of treatment of patellar tendinosis in the form of Doppler guided sclerosing injections. However, a few patients seem resistant to this therapy. Therefore, we have in this pilot study investigated biopsies from the patellar tendon of three such therapy-resistant patients, using immunohistochemistry. In situ hybridization was also applied. Comparisons were made with a material of specimens from both normal (n=16) and tendinosis (n=7) tendons, also previously examined. The study showed that there were extensive immunoreactions for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter, as well as for the M(2) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, in the overwhelming majority of the tenocytes. The immunoreactions were more pronounced than those generally obtained in the tendinosis tissue of the previously studied patients and clearly more pronounced than those of patellar tendon tissue of controls. Also, for the first time, we here present findings of mRNA for ChAT within tenocytes. In conclusion, it appears as if there is an excessive local acetylcholine (ACh) production and an occurrence of marked ACh effects in cases of severe tendinosis. An excessive production of local ACh might be related to pain sensation and the processes that occur in tendinosis development, such as cell proliferation. Thus, the results of this pilot study suggest that non-neuronal ACh is highly involved in the pathology of therapy-resistant patellar tendinosis.

  11. Autologous leukocyte-reduced platelet-rich plasma therapy for Achilles tendinopathy induced by collagenase in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    González, Juan C; López, Catalina; Álvarez, María E; Pérez, Jorge E; Carmona, Jorge U

    2016-01-19

    Leukocyte-reduced platelet-rich plasma (LR-PRP) is a therapy for tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon (TAT); however, there is scarce information regarding LR-PRP effects in rabbit models of TAT. We compared, at 4 and 12 weeks (w), the LR-PRP and placebo (PBS) effects on ultrasonography, histology and relative gene expression of collagen types I (COL1A1) and III (COL3A1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in 24 rabbits with TAT induced by collagenase. The rabbits (treated with both treatments) were euthanatised after either 4 or 12 w. A healthy group (HG (n = 6)) was included. At 4 and 12 w, the LR-PRP group had a no statistically different histology score to the HG. At w 4, the COL1A1 expression was significantly higher in the LR-PRP group when compared to HG, and the expression of COL3A1 from both LR-PRP and PBS-treated tendons was significantly higher when compared to the HG. At w 12, the expression of COL3A1 remained significantly higher in the PBS group in comparison to the LR-PRP group and the HG. At w 4, the LR-PRP group presented a significantly higher expression of VEGF when compared to the PBS group and the HG. In conclusion, LR-PRP treatment showed regenerative properties in rabbits with TAT.

  12. Autologous leukocyte-reduced platelet-rich plasma therapy for Achilles tendinopathy induced by collagenase in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    González, Juan C.; López, Catalina; Álvarez, María E.; Pérez, Jorge E.; Carmona, Jorge U.

    2016-01-01

    Leukocyte-reduced platelet-rich plasma (LR-PRP) is a therapy for tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon (TAT); however, there is scarce information regarding LR-PRP effects in rabbit models of TAT. We compared, at 4 and 12 weeks (w), the LR-PRP and placebo (PBS) effects on ultrasonography, histology and relative gene expression of collagen types I (COL1A1) and III (COL3A1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in 24 rabbits with TAT induced by collagenase. The rabbits (treated with both treatments) were euthanatised after either 4 or 12 w. A healthy group (HG (n = 6)) was included. At 4 and 12 w, the LR-PRP group had a no statistically different histology score to the HG. At w 4, the COL1A1 expression was significantly higher in the LR-PRP group when compared to HG, and the expression of COL3A1from both LR-PRP and PBS-treated tendons was significantly higher when compared to the HG. At w 12, the expression of COL3A1 remained significantly higher in the PBS group in comparison to the LR-PRP group and the HG. At w 4, the LR-PRP group presented a significantly higher expression of VEGF when compared to the PBS group and the HG. In conclusion, LR-PRP treatment showed regenerative properties in rabbits with TAT. PMID:26781753

  13. Short-Term Effects of Patellar Kinesio Taping on Pain and Hop Function in Patients With Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Scott R.; Brody, Lori Thein; Rosenthal, Michael; Wise, Justin C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is the most prevalent orthopaedic condition among physically active individuals, contributing to an estimated 30% to 40% of all sports medicine visits. Techniques using Kinesio Tape (KT) have become increasingly popular; however, there has been scant research supporting its use on patients with PFPS. Hypothesis: The use of patellar KT to treat patients with PFPS will provide a statistically significant improvement in short-term pain and single-leg hop measures as compared with sham placement of KT. Study Design: Nonrandomized controlled clinical trial with repeated-measures design. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Methods: Forty-nine subjects (41 females, 8 males) between the ages of 12 and 24 years with PFPS participated in this study. Each subject underwent patellar kinesio taping with both experimental and sham applications while completing 4 functional tasks and the single-leg triple jump test (STJT). The treatment outcome was analyzed using separate paired t tests to measure improvement on a numeric pain rating scale. A 2-way, 2 × 2 analysis of variance was used to analyze the relationship between taping condition (experimental vs sham) and side (involved vs uninvolved) for STJT scores. Results: Separate paired t tests found step-up, step-down, and STJT pain improvement statistically significant between taping conditions. The 2-factor analysis of variance yielded a significant main effect for taping condition, but the main effect for side was not significant. The interaction between taping condition and side was significant. This showed there was little change in STJT distance between repeated measures performed on the untaped, noninvolved leg. However, subjects’ STJT distances were significantly greater for the experimental KT application than the sham application for the involved side. Conclusion: Patellar kinesio taping provided an immediate and statistically significant improvement in pain and single-leg hop

  14. A Pilot Study Evaluating the Effectiveness of Platelet-Rich Plasma Therapy for Treating Degenerative Tendinopathies: A Randomized Control Trial with Synchronous Observational Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Wesner, Marni; Defreitas, Terry; Bredy, Heather; Pothier, Louisa; Qin, Ziling; McKillop, Ashley B.; Gross, Douglas P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This pilot study aimed to inform future research evaluating the effectiveness of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) injection for tendinopathy. Design Randomized control trial (RCT) and synchronous observational cohort studies. For the RCT, consecutive consenting patients treated at an academic sports medicine clinic were randomly assigned to either a PRP or placebo control group. Setting The Glen Sather Sport Medicine Clinic, Edmonton, Canada. Patients The RCT included 9 participants with rotator cuff tendinopathy. The cohort study included 178 participants with a variety of tendinopathies. Interventions Patients receiving PRP were injected with 4 ml of platelets into the supraspinatus and/or infraspinatus, while patients in the placebo group were injected with 4ml of saline. All participants undertook a 3-month standardized, home-based, daily exercise program. Main Outcome Measures Participants in the RCT were re-evaluated 3, and 6 months post-injection. Change scores before and after injection on pain, disability and MRI-documented pathology outcomes were compared. In the cohort study, pain and disability were measured at 1, 2 and 3 months post-injection. Results For the RCT, 7 participants received PRP and 2 received placebo injections. Patients receiving PRP reported clinically important improvements in pain (>1.5/10 on VAS), disability (>15 point DASH change), and tendon pathology while those receiving placebo injections did not. In the observational cohort, statistically and clinically significant improvements in pain and disability were observed. Conclusion This pilot study provides information for planning future studies of PRP effectiveness. Preliminary results indicate intratendinous, ultrasound-guided PRP injection may lead to improvements in pain, function, and MRI-documented tendon pathology. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN68341698 PMID:26849812

  15. Use of a Central Splitting Approach and Near Complete Detachment for Insertional Calcific Achilles Tendinopathy Repaired With an Achilles Bridging Suture.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Craig T; Lin, Jason S

    2016-01-01

    After 3 to 6 months of conservative management for insertional calcific Achilles tendinopathy, operative intervention might be warranted. Despite a success rate of 75% to 100% with surgery, no consensus has been reached on the amount of acceptable detachment of the Achilles tendon. The present case series reports on the results of a central splitting approach with 80% to 90% detachment of the Achilles insertion repaired with a double-row bridging suture device. A total of 14 patients (16 heels) for whom nonoperative management for insertional calcific Achilles tendinopathy had previously failed were enrolled in the present study they had undergone surgical management. The patients were followed up for a mean of 18 (range 11 to 25) months postoperatively and were evaluated using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Hind Foot scoring system, 36-item Short Form Health Survey questionnaire, and pre- and postoperative visual analog pain scale. The mean visual analog pain scale core had decreased 5.84 (range 1 to 9) points postoperatively (p < .001). The mean postoperative American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Hind Foot score was 87 ± 19.7 (range 52 to 105) points. One patient reported moderate pain with no limitation of activities. The mean 36-item Short-Form Health Survey score for physical functioning was 77.7 (range 30 to 100) points postoperatively in 11 patients. No patient reported incisional discomfort. All 14 patients (16 heels) reported being satisfied and had returned to their previous functional status. Thus, the central splitting Achilles approach with anchoring of the Achilles insertion using the double-row suture device is a safe and reasonable option in the operative treatment of insertional calcific Achilles tendinopathy.

  16. Platelet Rich Plasma Therapy in Non-insertional Achilles Tendinopathy: The Efficacy is Reduced in 60-years Old People Compared to Young and Middle-Age Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Salini, Vincenzo; Vanni, Daniele; Pantalone, Andrea; Abate, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Background: Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) has shown positive and long-lasting effects in patients with tendinopathies. However, information about age-related differences in the clinical outcome is limited. Aim of this retrospective study was to compare the efficacy of PRP therapy in young and elderly subjects suffering for Achilles tendinopathy. Materials and method: Patients with recalcitrant non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy were enrolled. Clinical (VISA-A) and instrumental (ultrasonography) data were collected at baseline and after 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. PRP injections (once a week for 3 weeks) were performed in sterile conditions and under ultrasound (US) control. Results: Forty-four subjects (29 young: mean age 39.5 ± 6.9; 15 elderly: mean age 61.5 ± 5.3) were retrospectively evaluated. At baseline, no significant differences were observed in the clinical and US parameters. Throughout the whole length of the study, a significant increase of VISA-A score was seen in both groups (from 50.3 ± 8.8 to 76.1 ± 6.6 in the young group, and from 48.7 ± 7.6 to 61.1 ± 9.4 in the elderly group); however, the infra-groups comparison showed better results in young patients, compared to the aged counterpart. Conclusion: Our results show that PRP is less effective in aged people. This finding can be ascribed to several biochemical and biomechanical differences documented in tendons of young and elderly subjects (reduced number and functionality of tenocytes and tenoblasts), which becomes more evident in the long-term tissue healing. However, prospective trials, using different PRP preparations and enrolling a larger number of subjects, are needed to draw more sound and definitive conclusions. PMID:26696880

  17. Changes in the mechanical properties of patellar tendon preparations of spontaneously diabetic dogs under long-term insulin therapy.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, R L; Haut, R C; DeCamp, C E

    1994-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is known to involve a wide range of musculoskeletal disorders including tendon contracture, tenosynovitis, joint stiffness, and osteoporosis. Recent studies with experimentally induced models of diabetes show that insulin therapy mitigates such alterations. These data are from relatively short-term experiments. This manuscript reports the results of tensile failure experiments on the canine patella-patellar tendon-tibia complex from a group of juvenile diabetic animals that received insulin therapy. The duration of the disease was 4-9 yr. The stiffness of the diabetic preparations in a physiological range of loading was approximately 13% greater than controls (P < 0.05). On the other hand, the strength of the tendon preparation from the diabetic population was not different from controls, but the mode of structural failure for controls was by substance and avulsion fractures while the diabetics failed by tensile fracture of the patella.

  18. Sport-Specific Capacity to Use Elastic Energy in the Patellar and Achilles Tendons of Elite Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Wiesinger, Hans-Peter; Rieder, Florian; Kösters, Alexander; Müller, Erich; Seynnes, Olivier R.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: During running and jumping activities, elastic energy is utilized to enhance muscle mechanical output and efficiency. However, training-induced variations in tendon spring-like properties remain under-investigated. The present work extends earlier findings on sport-specific profiles of tendon stiffness and cross-sectional area to examine whether years of distinct loading patterns are reflected by tendons' ability to store and return energy. Methods:Ultrasound scans were performed to examine the morphological features of knee extensor and plantar flexor muscle-tendon units in elite ski jumpers, distance runners, water polo players, and sedentary controls. Tendon strain energy and hysteresis were measured with combined motion capture, ultrasonography, and dynamometry. Results: Apart from the fractional muscle-to-tendon cross-sectional area ratio being lower in the knee extensors of ski jumpers (−31%) and runners (−33%) than in water polo players, no difference in the considered muscle-tendon unit morphological features was observed between groups. Similarly, no significant difference in tendon energy storage or energy return was detected between groups. In contrast, hysteresis was lower in the patellar tendon of ski jumpers (−33%) and runners (−30%) compared to controls, with a similar trend for the Achilles tendon (significant interaction effect and large effect sizes η2 = 0.2). Normalized to body mass, the recovered strain energy of the patellar tendon was ~50% higher in ski jumpers than in water polo players and controls. For the Achilles tendon, recovered strain energy was ~40% higher in ski jumpers and runners than in controls. Discussion: Advantageous mechanical properties related to tendon spring-like function are observed in elite athletes whose sport require effective utilization of elastic energy. However, the mechanisms underpinning the better tendon capacity of some athletes to retain elastic energy could not be ascribed to

  19. Effect of acute resistance exercise and sex on human patellar tendon structural and regulatory mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Bridget E; Carroll, Chad C; Jemiolo, Bozena; Trappe, Scott W; Magnusson, S Peter; Døssing, Simon; Kjaer, Michael; Trappe, Todd A

    2009-02-01

    Tendon is mainly composed of collagen and an aqueous matrix of proteoglycans that are regulated by enzymes called matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Although it is known that resistance exercise (RE) and sex influence tendon metabolism and mechanical properties, it is uncertain what structural and regulatory components contribute to these responses. We measured the mRNA expression of tendon's main fibrillar collagens (type I and type III) and the main proteoglycans (decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin, and versican) and the regulatory enzymes MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-3, and TIMP-1 at rest and after RE. Patellar tendon biopsy samples were taken from six individuals (3 men and 3 women) before and 4 h after a bout of RE and from a another six individuals (3 men and 3 women) before and 24 h after RE. Resting mRNA expression was used for sex comparisons (6 men and 6 women). Collagen type I, collagen type III, and MMP-2 were downregulated (P < 0.05) 4 h after RE but were unchanged (P > 0.05) 24 h after RE. All other genes remained unchanged (P > 0.05) after RE. Women had higher resting mRNA expression (P < 0.05) of collagen type III and a trend (P = 0.08) toward lower resting expression of MMP-3 than men. All other genes were not influenced (P > 0.05) by sex. Acute RE appears to stimulate a change in collagen type I, collagen type III, and MMP-2 gene regulation in the human patellar tendon. Sex influences the structural and regulatory mRNA expression of tendon.

  20. Volumetric quantitative characterization of human patellar cartilage with topological and geometrical features on phase contrast x-ray computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Coan, Paola; Huber, Markus B.; Diemoz, Paul C.; Wismüller, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Phase contrast X-ray computed tomography (PCI-CT) has attracted significant interest in recent years for its ability to provide significantly improved image contrast in low absorbing materials such as soft biological tissue. In the research context of cartilage imaging, previous studies have demonstrated the ability of PCI-CT to visualize structural details of human patellar cartilage matrix and capture changes to chondrocyte organization induced by osteoarthritis. This study evaluates the use of geometrical and topological features for volumetric characterization of such chondrocyte patterns in the presence (or absence) of osteoarthritic damage. Geometrical features derived from the scaling index method (SIM) and topological features derived from Minkowski Functionals were extracted from 1392 volumes of interest (VOI) annotated on PCI-CT images of ex vivo human patellar cartilage specimens. These features were subsequently used in a machine learning task with support vector regression to classify VOIs as healthy or osteoarthritic; classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). Our results show that the classification performance of SIM-derived geometrical features (AUC: 0.90 ± 0.09) significantly outperform Minkowski Functionals volume (AUC: 0.54 ± 0.02), surface (AUC: 0.72 ± 0.06), mean breadth (AUC: 0.74 ± 0.06) and Euler characteristic (AUC: 0.78 ± 0.04) (p < 10−4). These results suggest that such geometrical features can provide a detailed characterization of the chondrocyte organization in the cartilage matrix in an automated manner, while also enabling classification of cartilage as healthy or osteoarthritic with high accuracy. Such features could potentially serve as diagnostic imaging markers for evaluating osteoarthritis progression and its response to different therapeutic intervention strategies. PMID:26142112

  1. Functional results from reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using the central third of the patellar ligament and flexor tendons☆

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Leao, Marcos George; Pampolha, Abelardo Gautama Moreira; Orlando Junior, Nilton

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate knee function in patients undergoing reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using the central third of the patellar ligament or the medial flexor tendons of the knee, i.e. quadruple ligaments from the semitendinosus and gracilis (ST-G), by means of the Knee Society Score (KSS) and the Lysholm scale. Methods This was a randomized prospective longitudinal study on 40 patients who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction between September 2013 and August 2014. They comprised 37 males and three females, with ages ranging from 16 to 52 years. The patients were numbered randomly from 1 to 40: the even numbers underwent surgical correction using the ST-G tendons and the odd numbers, using the patellar tendon. Functional evaluations were made using the KSS and Lysholm scale, applied in the evening before the surgical procedure and six months after the operation. Results From the statistical analysis, it could be seen that the patients’ functional capacity was significantly greater after the operation than before the operation. There was strong evidence that the two forms of therapy had similar results (p = >0.05), in all the comparisons. Conclusions The results from the ACL reconstructions were similar with regard to functional recovery of the knee and improvement of quality of life, independent of the type of graft. It was not possible to identify the best method of surgical treatment. The surgeon's clinical and technical experience and the patient are the factors that determine the choice of graft type for use in ACL surgery. PMID:27218084

  2. Sport-Specific Capacity to Use Elastic Energy in the Patellar and Achilles Tendons of Elite Athletes.

    PubMed

    Wiesinger, Hans-Peter; Rieder, Florian; Kösters, Alexander; Müller, Erich; Seynnes, Olivier R

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: During running and jumping activities, elastic energy is utilized to enhance muscle mechanical output and efficiency. However, training-induced variations in tendon spring-like properties remain under-investigated. The present work extends earlier findings on sport-specific profiles of tendon stiffness and cross-sectional area to examine whether years of distinct loading patterns are reflected by tendons' ability to store and return energy. Methods:Ultrasound scans were performed to examine the morphological features of knee extensor and plantar flexor muscle-tendon units in elite ski jumpers, distance runners, water polo players, and sedentary controls. Tendon strain energy and hysteresis were measured with combined motion capture, ultrasonography, and dynamometry. Results: Apart from the fractional muscle-to-tendon cross-sectional area ratio being lower in the knee extensors of ski jumpers (-31%) and runners (-33%) than in water polo players, no difference in the considered muscle-tendon unit morphological features was observed between groups. Similarly, no significant difference in tendon energy storage or energy return was detected between groups. In contrast, hysteresis was lower in the patellar tendon of ski jumpers (-33%) and runners (-30%) compared to controls, with a similar trend for the Achilles tendon (significant interaction effect and large effect sizes η(2) = 0.2). Normalized to body mass, the recovered strain energy of the patellar tendon was ~50% higher in ski jumpers than in water polo players and controls. For the Achilles tendon, recovered strain energy was ~40% higher in ski jumpers and runners than in controls. Discussion: Advantageous mechanical properties related to tendon spring-like function are observed in elite athletes whose sport require effective utilization of elastic energy. However, the mechanisms underpinning the better tendon capacity of some athletes to retain elastic energy could not be ascribed to intrinsic or

  3. A comparison of different two-dimensional approaches for the determination of the patellar tendon moment arm length.

    PubMed

    Tsaopoulos, Dimitrios E; Baltzopoulos, Vasilios; Richards, Paula J; Maganaris, Constantinos N

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate and compare the moment arm length of the patellar tendon (d) during passive knee extension using three different reference landmarks; instant centre of rotation (ICR), tibiofemoral contact point (TFCP) and geometrical centre of the posterior femoral condyles (GCFC). Measurements were taken on the right leg on seven healthy males during passive knee rotation performed by the motor of a Cybex Norm isokinetic dynamometer. Moment arms lengths were obtained by analysing lateral X-ray images recorded using a GE FlexiView 8800 C-arm videofluoroscopy system. The d-knee joint angle relations with respect to GCFC and ICR were similar, with decreasing values from full knee extension (~5.8 cm for d (GCFC) and ~5.9 cm for d (ICR)) to 90 degrees of knee flexion (~4.8 cm for both d (GCFC) and d (ICR)). However, the d (TFCP)-knee joint angle relation had an ascending-descending shape, with the highest d (TFCP) value (~5 cm) at 60 degrees of knee flexion. There was no significant difference between the GCFC and ICR methods at any knee joint angle. In contrast, there were significant differences (P < 0.01) between d (ICR) and d (TFCP) at 0 degrees , 15 degrees , 30 degrees and 45 degrees of knee flexion and between d (GCFC) and d (TFCP) at 0 degrees , 15 degrees and 30 degrees of knee flexion (P < 0.01). This study shows that when using different knee joint rotation centre definitions, there are significant differences in the estimates of the patellar tendon moment arm length, especially in more extended knee joint positions. These differences can have serious implications for joint modelling and loading applications.

  4. Effect of androgenic-anabolic steroids and heavy strength training on patellar tendon morphological and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Seynnes, Olivier R; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Kairaitis, Ramutis; Helland, Christian; Campbell, Emma-Louise; Brazaitis, Marius; Skurvydas, Albertas; Narici, Marco V

    2013-07-01

    Combined androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS) and overloading affects tendon collagen metabolism and ultrastructure and is often associated with a higher risk of injury. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate whether such effects would be reflected in the patellar tendon properties of individuals with a history of long-term resistance training and AAS abuse (RTS group), compared with trained (RT) and untrained (CTRL) nonsteroids users. Tendon cross-sectional area (CSA), stiffness, Young's modulus, and toe limit strain were measured in vivo, from synchronized ultrasonography and dynamometry data. The patellar tendon of RT and RTS subjects was much stiffer and larger than in the CTRL group. However, stiffness and modulus were higher in the RTS group (26%, P < 0.05 and 30%, P < 0.01, respectively) than in the RT group. Conversely, tendon CSA was 15% (P < 0.05) larger in the RT group than in RTS, although differences disappeared when this variable was normalized to quadriceps maximal isometric torque. Yet maximal tendon stress was higher in RTS than in RT (15%, P < 0.05), without any statistical difference in maximal strain and toe limit strain between groups. The present lack of difference in toe limit strain does not substantiate the hypothesis of changes in collagen crimp pattern associated with AAS abuse. However, these findings indicate that tendon adaptations from years of heavy resistance training are different in AAS users, suggesting differences in collagen remodeling. Some of these adaptations (e.g., higher stress) could be linked to a higher risk of tendon injury.

  5. Shock wave therapy associated with eccentric strengthening versus isolated eccentric strengthening for Achilles insertional tendinopathy treatment: a double-blinded randomised clinical trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Mansur, Nacime Salomão Barbachan; Faloppa, Flávio; Belloti, João Carlos; Ingham, Sheila J McNeill; Matsunaga, Fabio Teruo; dos Santos, Paulo Roberto Dias; dos Santos, Bruno Schiefer; Carrazzone, Oreste Lemos; Peixoto, Gabriel; Aoyama, Bruno Takeshi; Tamaoki, Marcel Jun Sugawara

    2017-01-01

    Background There is no consensus regarding the treatment of Achilles insertional tendinopathies. Eccentric training remains the main choice in the conservative treatment of this illness; however, the good results in the management of non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy were not replicated in the insertional condition. Low energy shock wave therapy has been described as an alternative to these patients, but has yet to be empirically tested. Hypothesis Shock wave therapy, adjunctive to the eccentric strengthening protocol, will improve measures of pain and function. Design Double blind, placebo-controlled, parallel groups, randomised clinical trial. Materials and methods 93 patients with a diagnosis of chronic insertional tendinopathy, referred from primary or secondary healthcare services, will be assessed and enrolled in this study. They will be divided into two groups (randomised by sequentially numbered identical envelopes, which will be administered serially to participants), one containing the combination of low energy shock wave and eccentric exercises, as treatment and the other comprehending the exercises and the placebo treatment (an apparatus placed in the therapeutic head). The assessments will occur in 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 weeks. Patients will be evaluated primarily by the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles questionnaire and secondarily by the visual analogue scale, Algometry, the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society scale, the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score and the 12-item Short Form Health Survey. We will use comparison of two proportions via relative frequency analysis, the Pearson Correlation the χ2 test and the analysis of variance for statistical analyses. Discussion This study intends to demonstrate if the association of the eccentric exercise programme with the shock wave therapy can produce good results regarding the treatment of the Achilles insertional tendinopathy. In an attempt to prevent the high costs and complications

  6. Treatment of the calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff by ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle lavage. Two years prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Del Castillo-González, Federico; Ramos-Álvarez, Juan José; Rodríguez-Fabián, Guillermo; González-Pérez, José; Calderón-Montero, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Summary Purpose: to evaluate the short and long term effectiveness of ultrasonography (US)-guided percutaneous needle lavage in calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff. To study the evolution of the size of calcifications and pain in the two years after treatment. Methods: a 2 year longitudinal prospective study is carried out after applying the UGPL technique on a number of patients diagnosed with calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff. Clinical, ultrasound and radiology follow-up controls were performed, 3 months, 6 months, one year and two years after the treatment. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was used to assess the pain. The degree and point of pain is selected on a 10cm line, arranged horizontally or vertically. The “0” represents no pain and “10” represents worst pain. The population studied was made up of 121 patients that required our service as a result of suffering from a painful shoulder. Results: the pain (VAS) and the size of the calcification significantly decreased with the application of the technique (p< 0,001 in both cases) and regardless of the sex (p: 0.384 for pain and p: 0.578 for the size of the calcification). This occurred from the first check-up (3 months) and was maintained for two year. Conclusion: we consider this technique to be a valid alternative as a first-choice treatment of calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. The intervention is simple, cost-effective, does not require hospitalization, involves no complications, rehabilitation treatment is not required and it shows very few side effects without sequelae, significantly reducing the size of the calcification and pain in the majority of patients. PMID:25767776

  7. Capacity for sliding between tendon fascicles decreases with ageing in injury prone equine tendons: a possible mechanism for age-related tendinopathy?

    PubMed

    Thorpe, C T; Udeze, C P; Birch, H L; Clegg, P D; Screen, H Rc

    2013-01-08

    Age-related tendinopathy is common in both humans and horses; the initiation and progression of which is similar between species. The majority of tendon injuries occur to high-strain energy storing tendons, such as the human Achilles tendon and equine superficial digital flexor (SDFT). By contrast, the low-strain positional human anterior tibialis tendon and equine common digital extensor (CDET) are rarely injured. It has previously been established that greater extension occurs at the fascicular interface in the SDFT than in the CDET; this may facilitate the large strains experienced during locomotion in the SDFT without damage occurring to the fascicles. This study investigated the alterations in whole tendon, fascicle and interfascicular mechanical properties in the SDFT and CDET with increasing age. It was hypothesised that the amount of sliding at the fascicular interface in the SDFT would decrease with increasing horse age, whereas the properties of the interface in the CDET would remain unchanged with ageing. Data support the hypothesis; there were no alterations in the mechanical properties of the whole SDFT or its constituent fascicles with increasing age. However, there was significantly less sliding at the fascicular interface at physiological loads in samples from aged tendons. There was no relationship between fascicle sliding and age in the CDET. The increase in stiffness of the interfascicular matrix in aged SDFT may result in the fascicles being loaded at an earlier point in the stress strain curve, increasing the risk of damage. This may predispose aged tendons to tendinopathy.

  8. Biodegradable poly-L-lactide-co-glycolide copolymer pin fixation of a traumatic patellar osteochondral fragment in an 11-year-old child: A novel surgical approach

    PubMed Central

    Sinikumpu, Juha-Jaakko; Serlo, Willy

    2017-01-01

    Treating displaced patellar bone fractures in growing children remains a challenge for orthopedic surgeons. Removal of loose bone fragments may prolong healing time and result in early onset osteoarthrosis. Therefore, primary fixation of osteochondral fragments is preferred. Metallic pin and screw implants are typically used for fixation, as there is little evidence available regarding the use of modern biodegradable implants in traumatic patellar fractures of a premature skeleton. The present report describes a novel operative technique using headless poly-L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) pins in treating an 11-year-old girl with a patellar fracture from a cycling injury. The surgical technique of this procedure is described in detail in the current report. Excellent subjective outcomes were achieved from this surgery, with superb bone healing according to follow-up radiographic and computerized tomography scans. In conclusion, the results of this case indicate that, similarly to osteochondritis, intra-articular osteochondral fractures in children may be fixed using biodegradable PLGA pins. Randomized clinical trials should be performed to confirm this finding and evaluate the use of PLGA pins as a treatment for adolescent osteochondral fractures. PMID:28123496

  9. Iliotibial band release as an adjunct to the surgical management of patellar stress fracture in the athlete: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Keeley, Anthony; Bloomfield, Paul; Cairns, Peter; Molnar, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Stress fracture of the patella is rare. In this report, a case of patellar stress fracture occurring in an amateur athlete is presented, and an operative adjunct to the surgical management of this condition is proposed. A review of the English literature identified 21 previous cases of stress fracture of the patella, the majority in young athletes. None of these reports discussed treatment addressing the pathological process contributing to patellar stress fracture. The subject of this case report is a young male netballer who presented with a transverse stress fracture in the inferior third of his patella, on a background of patellofemoral overload. The patient underwent open reduction and internal fixation of his patella, combined with release of the iliotibial band. He returned to training after 6 weeks. The previous literature suggests that operative fixation is indicated for the treatment of displaced patellar stress fractures. Iliotibial band release, as a surgical adjunct to this treatment, may address the pathology of these fractures, and facilitate a return to sport at the highest level. PMID:19642974

  10. Long-Term Outcome and Factors Affecting Prognosis of Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy for Chronic Refractory Achilles Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the factors affecting prognosis of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) for chronic refractory Achilles tendinopathy (AT). Methods Thirty-six patients (48 consecutive feet) with chronic AT (>6 months) and who underwent ESWT for ‘poor’ or ‘fair’ grade in Roles-Maudsley Score (RMS) after unsuccessful conservative treatment were included in the present study. A maximum of 12 sessions of ESWT were conducted until treatment success: RMS reached ‘good’ or ‘excellent’. Termination of ESWT for no response, or ‘poor’ or ‘fair’ grade was regarded as treatment failure. Immediate outcome, long-term outcome (telephone interview after mean 26 months), and factors affecting treatment success were analyzed. Results Numeric Rating Scale was significantly decreased at immediate and long-term follow-up. Success rate was 71.1% and 90.3%, respectively. Univariate logistic regression identified that immediate treatment success was associated with retrocalcaneal enthesophyte on X-ray (odds ratio [OR], 0.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.01–0.28), pretreatment abnormal ultrasonography echogenicity within Achilles tendon (OR, 18.89; 95% CI, 2.08–171.96), mean duration of ‘post-treatment soreness’ (OR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.33–0.94), and duration of ‘post-treatment soreness after first ESWT’ (OR, 0.06; 95% CI, 0.01–0.34). The duration of ‘post-treatment soreness after first ESWT’ was found to be the only factor associated with long-term success (OR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.10–0.99). Conclusion ESWT appears to be effective in achieving long-term success in chronic refractory AT. Immediate success was associated with absence of retrocalcaneal enthesophyte on X-ray, presence of pretreatment abnormal ultrasonography echogenicity, shorter mean duration of ‘post-treatment soreness’, and shorter duration of ‘post-treatment soreness after first ESWT’. The shorter duration of ‘post-treatment soreness after first ESWT’ was

  11. Lipids, adiposity and tendinopathy: is there a mechanistic link? Critical review

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Alex; Zwerver, Johannes; Grewal, Navi; de Sa, Agnetha; Alktebi, Thuraya; Granville, David J; Hart, David A

    2015-01-01

    Being overweight or obese is associated with an elevated risk of tendon pathology. However, for sportspeople the epidemiological data linking weight or adiposity on one hand, and risk of tendon pathology on the other, are less consistent. Indeed, the mechanistic links between diet, adiposity and tendon pathology remain largely unexamined. Recent studies have begun to examine the effects of dietary interventions on outcomes such as tendon biomechanics or pain. Oxidised low-density lipoprotein has been shown to (A) accumulate in the tendon tissues of mice that eat a fatty diet and (B) induce a pathological phenotype in human tendon cells. This paper addresses the current debate: is excessive body mass index (causing increased load and strain on tendon tissue) per se the underlying mechanism? Or do local or systemic influences of fat on tendons predispose to tendon pathology? This narrative review argues that excessive blood lipids may be an important avenue for clinical investigations. PMID:25488953

  12. Lipids, adiposity and tendinopathy: is there a mechanistic link? Critical review.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alex; Zwerver, Johannes; Grewal, Navi; de Sa, Agnetha; Alktebi, Thuraya; Granville, David J; Hart, David A

    2015-08-01

    Being overweight or obese is associated with an elevated risk of tendon pathology. However, for sportspeople the epidemiological data linking weight or adiposity on one hand, and risk of tendon pathology on the other, are less consistent. Indeed, the mechanistic links between diet, adiposity and tendon pathology remain largely unexamined. Recent studies have begun to examine the effects of dietary interventions on outcomes such as tendon biomechanics or pain. Oxidised low-density lipoprotein has been shown to (A) accumulate in the tendon tissues of mice that eat a fatty diet and (B) induce a pathological phenotype in human tendon cells. This paper addresses the current debate: is excessive body mass index (causing increased load and strain on tendon tissue) per se the underlying mechanism? Or do local or systemic influences of fat on tendons predispose to tendon pathology? This narrative review argues that excessive blood lipids may be an important avenue for clinical investigations.

  13. Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using autologous graft from quadriceps tendon to treat recurrent patellar dislocation☆

    PubMed Central

    Calapodopulos, Constantino Jorge; Nogueira, Marcelo Corvino; Eustáquio, José Martins Juliano; Calapodopulos Júnior, Constantino Jorge; Rodrigues, Oreston Alves

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the surgical technique using the quadriceps tendon as a graft in static reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament. Methods This was a prospective case series study in which the participants were 22 patients with a diagnosis of recurrent patellar dislocation without any other anatomical alterations that required surgical treatment. The functional results from the technique were evaluated using clinical data and the Lysholm questionnaire, one year after the operation. Results It was observed that the patients were predominantly female (86%) and under 21 years of age (73%), just like in the literature. At the first annual return after the surgery, there was no significant pain on medium efforts, no loss of range of motion and a positive apprehension test. According to the questionnaire used, the results were graded as good. The patients who reported having severe pain on greater effort were involved in employment-related legal disputes. Conclusion This technique showed low morbidity and good functional results over the short term. PMID:27069888

  14. Supracondylar femoral extension osteotomy and patellar tendon advancement in the management of persistent crouch gait in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sakti Prasad; Pradhan, Sudhakar; Ganesh, Shankar; Sahu, Pabitra Kumar; Mohanty, Ram Narayan; Das, Sanjay Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Background: Severe crouch gait in adolescent cerebral palsy is a difficult problem to manage. The patients develop loading of patellofemoral joint, leading to pain, gait deviation, excessive energy expenditure and progressive loss of function. Patella alta and avulsion of patella are the other complications. Different treatment options have been described in the literature to deal with this difficult problem. We evaluated outcome of supracondylar femoral extension osteotomy (SCFEO) and patellar tendon advancement (PTA) in the treatment of crouch gait in patients with cerebral palsy. Materials and Methods: Fourteen adolescents with crouch gait were operated by SCFEO and PTA. All subjects were evaluated pre and postoperatively. Clinical, radiographic, observational gait analysis and functional measures were included to assess the changes in knee function. Results: Cases were followed up to 3 years. The patients walked with increased knee extension and improvement in quadriceps muscle strength. Knee pain was decreased and improvements in functional mobility and radiologic improvement were found. Conclusion: SCFEO and PTA for adolescent crouch gait is effective in improving knee extensor strength, reducing knee pain and improving function. PMID:22448063

  15. Effects of murine recombinant interleukin 1 on synovial joints in mice: measurement of patellar cartilage metabolism and joint inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    van de Loo, A A; van den Berg, W B

    1990-01-01

    Murine recombinant interleukin 1 was injected intra-articularly into mice. It induced a clear effect on patellar cartilage within 24 hours. A low dose of interleukin 1 (1 ng) elicited a significant reduction in [35S]sulphate incorporation (50%) into proteoglycans and an accelerated breakdown (twofold) of 35S prelabelled proteoglycan. Proteoglycan breakdown returned to normal rates (approximately 10%/day) 48 hours after a single interleukin 1 injection. Recovery of proteoglycan synthesis was delayed by up to 72 hours, however, which implies that repair of the depleted cartilage matrix is retarded. Interleukin 1 induced only minor joint inflammation, too slight to be held responsible for the strong suppression of proteoglycan synthesis. Vehement joint inflammation was found after repeated interleukin 1 injections. The plasma extravasation and massive infiltration and exudation of leucocytes, predominantly polymorphonuclear leucocytes, were not a mere summation of single interleukin 1 effects, but point to interleukin 1 induced local hypersensitivity. The cartilage matrices of patella and femur were heavily depleted. Measurement of the extent of loss of 35S prelabelled proteoglycan and the prolonged inhibition of [35S]sulphate incorporation indicate that both inhibition of proteoglycan synthesis and enhanced loss of proteoglycan contributed substantially to this depletion. Images PMID:2339905

  16. A randomised, controlled trial of circumpatellar electrocautery in total knee replacement without patellar resurfacing: a concise follow-up at a mean of 3.7 years.

    PubMed

    van Jonbergen, H P W; Scholtes, V A B; Poolman, R W

    2014-04-01

    In the absence of patellar resurfacing, we have previously shown that the use of electrocautery around the margin of the patella improved the one-year clinical outcome of total knee replacement (TKR). In this prospective randomised study we compared the mean 3.7 year (1.1 to 4.2) clinical outcomes of 300 TKRs performed with and without electrocautery of the patellar rim: this is an update of a previous report. The overall prevalence of anterior knee pain was 32% (95% confidence intervals [CI] 26 to 39), and 26% (95% CI 18 to 35) in the intervention group compared with 38% (95% CI 29 to 48) in the control group (chi-squared test; p = 0.06). The overall prevalence of anterior knee pain remained unchanged between the one-year and 3.7 year follow-up (chi-squared test; p = 0.12). The mean total Western Ontario McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Indices and the American Knee Society knee and function scores at 3.7 years' follow-up were similar in the intervention and control groups (repeated measures analysis of variance p = 0.43, p = 0.09 and p = 0.59, respectively). There were no complications. A total of ten patients (intervention group three, control group seven) required secondary patellar resurfacing after the first year. Our study suggests that the improved clinical outcome with electrocautery denervation compared with no electrocautery is not maintained at a mean of 3.7 years' follow-up.

  17. Outcome of medial patellar ligament desmoplasty for treatment of intermittent upward fixation of the patella in 24 horses (2005–2012)

    PubMed Central

    Peitzmeier, Maggie D.; Koontz, Zachary D.; Lynch, Timothy M.; Hughes, Faith E.; Slone, Donnie E.

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study provides long-term results of medial patellar ligament (MPL) desmoplasty in horses with intermittent upward fixation of the patella (UFP) that were treated at a single referral hospital over a 7-year period. Follow-up interviews were conducted with owners, trainers, or referring veterinarians using a standardized questionnaire. Overall, 71% of horses returned to their intended use with only 18% at a higher level. Recurrence of UFP was noted in 33% of cases. Satisfaction with the procedure was generally low, with only 50% of owners being completely satisfied. Further investigation is warranted to determine appropriate medical and/or surgical therapy. PMID:25694670

  18. Causes of Aseptic Persistent Pain after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hong-An; Seon, Jong-Keun; Park, Kyung-Soon; Shin, Young-Joo; Yang, Hong-Yeol

    2017-01-01

    Background Persistent pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is dissatisfying to the patient and frustrating to the surgeon. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the aseptic causes and clinical course of intractable pain following TKA. Methods Of the total 2,534 cases of primary TKA reviewed, 178 cases were classified as having aseptic persistent pain that was not resolved within 1 year after surgery. Except for the cases with periprosthetic fracture (56 knees), 122 cases of aseptic painful TKA were divided into two groups: intra-articular group (83 knees) and extra-articular group (39 knees). Results In the intra-articular group, the main reasons for pain were aseptic loosening (n = 40), polyethylene wear (n = 16), instability (n = 10), recurrent hemarthrosis (n = 5), patellar maltracking (n = 4), tendon ruptures (n = 4), and stiffness (n = 2). In the extraarticular group, 10 knees (25.6%) were found to have nerve entrapment in the spine, 6 knees (15.4%) were found to have hip osteoarthritis or femoral head avascular necrosis. The reasons for persistent knee pain in the remaining 23 knees (59.0%) still remain elusive. Conclusions Persistent pain after TKA originated from pathology of extra-articular origin in a considerable number of cases in this study. Therefore, it is important to perform thorough preoperative evaluations to reduce pain resulting from extra-articular causes. Furthermore, meticulous surgical procedures and optimal alignment are required to reduce pain of intra-articular origin related to implant wear, instability, and patellar maltracking. PMID:28261427

  19. Implementation of an iPod wireless accelerometer application using machine learning to classify disparity of hemiplegic and healthy patellar tendon reflex pair.

    PubMed

    LeMoyne, Robert; Kerr, Wesley T; Zanjani, Kevin; Mastroianni, Timothy

    2014-03-01

    The characteristics of the patellar tendon reflex provide fundamental insight regarding the diagnosis of neurological status. Based on the features of the tendon reflex response, a clinician may establish preliminary perspective regarding the global condition of the nervous system. Current techniques for quantifying the observations of the reflex response involve the application of ordinal scales, requiring the expertise of a highly skilled clinician. However, the reliability of the ordinal scale approach is debatable. Highly skilled clinicians have even disputed the presence of asymmetric reflex pairs. An alternative strategy was the implementation of an iPod wireless accelerometer application to quantify the reflex response acceleration waveform. An application enabled the recording of the acceleration waveform and later wireless transmission as an email attachment by connectivity to the Internet. A potential energy impact pendulum enabled the patellar tendon reflex to be evoked in a predetermined and targeted manner. Three feature categories of the reflex response acceleration waveform (global parameters, temporal organization, and spectral features) were incorporated into machine learning to distinguish a subject's hemiplegic and healthy reflex pair. Machine learning attained perfect classification of the hemiplegic and healthy reflex pair. The research findings implicate the promise of machine learning for providing increased diagnostic acuity regarding the acceleration waveform of the tendon reflex response.

  20. Computer-Aided Diagnosis in Phase Contrast Imaging X-Ray Computed Tomography for Quantitative Characterization of ex vivo Human Patellar Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Coan, Paola; Huber, Markus B.; Diemoz, Paul C.; Glaser, Christian; Wismüller, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of ex vivo human patellar cartilage matrix through the phase contrast imaging X-ray computed tomography (PCI-CT) has been previously demonstrated. Such studies revealed osteoarthritis-induced changes to chondrocyte organization in the radial zone. This study investigates the application of texture analysis to characterizing such chondrocyte patterns in the presence and absence of osteoarthritic damage. Texture features derived from Minkowski functionals (MF) and gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) were extracted from 842 regions of interest (ROI) annotated on PCI-CT images of ex vivo human patellar cartilage specimens. These texture features were subsequently used in a machine learning task with support vector regression to classify ROIs as healthy or osteoarthritic; classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). The best classification performance was observed with the MF features perimeter (AUC: 0.94 ± 0.08) and “Euler characteristic” (AUC: 0.94 ± 0.07), and GLCM-derived feature “Correlation” (AUC: 0.93 ± 0.07). These results suggest that such texture features can provide a detailed characterization of the chondrocyte organization in the cartilage matrix, enabling classification of cartilage as healthy or osteoarthritic with high accuracy. PMID:23744660

  1. Improved Biomechanical and Biological Outcomes in the MRL/MpJ Murine Strain Following a Full-Length Patellar Tendon Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lalley, Andrea L.; Dyment, Nathaniel A.; Kazemi, Namdar; Kenter, Keith; Gooch, Cynthia; Rowe, David W.; Butler, David L.; Shearn, Jason T.

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries greatly affect the U.S. population and current clinical approaches fail to restore long-term native tissue structure and function. Tissue engineering is a strategy advocated to improve tendon healing; however, the field still needs to establish biological benchmarks for assessing the effectiveness of tissue-engineered structures. Investigating superior healing models, such as the MRL/MpJ, offers the opportunity to first characterize successful healing and then apply experimental findings to tissue-engineered therapies. This study seeks to evaluate the MRL/MpJ’s healing response following a central patellar tendon injury compared to wildtype. Gene expression and histology were assessed at 3, 7, and 14 days following injury and mechanical properties were measured at 2, 5, and 8 weeks. Native patellar tendon biological and mechanical properties were not different between strains. Following injury, the MRL/MpJ displayed increased mechanical properties between 5 and 8 weeks; however, early tenogenic expression patterns were not different between the strains. Furthermore, expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21, was not different between strains, suggesting an alternative mechanism may be driving the healing response. Future studies will investigate collagen structure and alignment of the repair tissue and characterize the complete healing transcriptome to identify mechanisms driving the MRL/MpJ response. PMID:25982892

  2. Computer-aided diagnosis in phase contrast imaging X-ray computed tomography for quantitative characterization of ex vivo human patellar cartilage.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B; Coan, Paola; Huber, Markus B; Diemoz, Paul C; Glaser, Christian; Wismuller, Axel

    2013-10-01

    Visualization of ex vivo human patellar cartilage matrix through the phase contrast imaging X-ray computed tomography (PCI-CT) has been previously demonstrated. Such studies revealed osteoarthritis-induced changes to chondrocyte organization in the radial zone. This study investigates the application of texture analysis to characterizing such chondrocyte patterns in the presence and absence of osteoarthritic damage. Texture features derived from Minkowski functionals (MF) and gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) were extracted from 842 regions of interest (ROI) annotated on PCI-CT images of ex vivo human patellar cartilage specimens. These texture features were subsequently used in a machine learning task with support vector regression to classify ROIs as healthy or osteoarthritic; classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). The best classification performance was observed with the MF features perimeter (AUC: 0.94 ±0.08 ) and "Euler characteristic" (AUC: 0.94 ±0.07 ), and GLCM-derived feature "Correlation" (AUC: 0.93 ±0.07). These results suggest that such texture features can provide a detailed characterization of the chondrocyte organization in the cartilage matrix, enabling classification of cartilage as healthy or osteoarthritic with high accuracy.

  3. Patellar Subluxation With Early-Phase Synovial Chondromatosis of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Bashaireh, Khaldoon M

    2016-01-01

    Primary synovial chondromatosis is a rare, benign, monoarticular disease process that affects the synovial membrane of the joint, the synovial sheath, or the bursa around the joint. The etiology is unknown, but it has been associated with trauma in some cases. Although it is a benign lesion, if left untreated, it may lead to early secondary osteoarthritis of the joint. The knee joint is affected in 50% to 65% of cases, followed by the elbow and the hip. This article reports a 30-year-old active woman who presented to the author's clinic with a large infrapatellar mass that caused lateral subluxation of the patella, swelling, and episodic pain with crepitations 14 months after direct trauma to the knee. Clinical examination, magnetic resonance imaging, and arthroscopy revealed a large infrapatellar mass causing lateral subluxation of the patella with no loose bodies. Hoffa's disease, para-articular osteochondroma, and early-phase synovial chondromatosis were considered in the differential diagnosis. The histopathologic and clinical features were consistent with early synovial chondromatosis. The patient underwent local excision of the mass through a medial parapatellar arthrotomy. At 5 years of follow-up, she had no recurrence of the lesion or progression of the disease. Early diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis with local excision offers a reliable cure. However, long-term follow-up is advised because of the high recurrence rates as well as the risk of metaplastic transformation.

  4. MRI of anterior knee pain.

    PubMed

    Samim, Mohammad; Smitaman, Edward; Lawrence, David; Moukaddam, Hicham

    2014-07-01

    Anterior knee pain is the most common knee complaint. It may be due to a variety of soft tissue or osseous abnormalities. Knowledge of the radiologic appearance of the abnormalities allows more accurate diagnosis of the cause of the pain including chondral abnormalities, patellar instability and dislocation, femoral trochlear dysplasia, abnormal patellar location, bipartite patella, various tendinopathies, bursal inflammation, traction apophysitis in pediatric and adolescent patients, and miscellaneous diseases including mediopatellar plica syndrome and Hoffa's disease. Radiographs are often obtained to exclude acute osseous abnormalities, such as fractures. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers superior soft tissue contrast resolution and allows for more accurate evaluation of the underlying etiology and therefore may improve treatment and possible surgical planning.

  5. Acute patellar dislocation with multiple ligament injuries after knee dislocation and single session reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Gormeli, Gokay; Gormeli, Cemile Ayse; Karakaplan, Mustafa; Gurbuz, Sukru; Ozdemir, Zeynep; Ozer, Mustafa

    2016-06-01

    Knee dislocation is a relatively rare condition of all orthopaedic injuries. Accompanying multiple ligament injuries are common after knee dislocations. A 41-year-old male presented to the emergency department suffering from right knee dislocation in June 2013. The patient had anterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament (MCL), medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) rupture, and lateral meniscal tear. A single-bundle anatomic reconstruction, medial collateral ligament reconstruction, medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction and meniscus repair were performed in single session. At twelve months follow-up; there was 160º flexion and 10° extension knee range of motion. Lysholm knee score was 90. Extensive forces can cause both MCL and MPFL injury due to overload and the anatomical relationship between these two structures. Therefore, patients with valgus instability should be evaluated for both MPFL and MCL tears to facilitate successful treatment.

  6. Enhancing FTIR imaging capabilities with two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS): A study of concentration gradients of collagen and proteoglycans in human patellar cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Eric Y.; Rieppo, Jarno

    2006-11-01

    This paper explores a new application of two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) in FTIR spectroscopic imaging analysis of biological samples. A particular example demonstrated in this paper is the characterization of concentration gradients of collagen and proteoglycans in human patellar cartilage. A focal plane array detector-based FTIR imaging system has been proven to be an efficient tool to detect early collagen and proteoglycans degradation in developing osteoarthrosis through evaluating compositional changes of osteoarthritic cartilage along the depth. However, the closely overlapped bands of collagen and proteoglycans make normal spectral and spatial analysis difficult. With 2DCOS analysis of the imaging data, it is possible to enhance the spectral resolution and reveal distinctive compositional changes that are normally hidden with conventional approaches. The combined technique, FTIR imaging enhanced with 2DCOS, provides new possibilities to solve challenging problems in the analysis of complex biological systems.

  7. 2-year postoperative evaluation of a patient with a symptomatic full-thickness patellar cartilage defect repaired with particulated juvenile cartilage tissue.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Kevin F; Daner, William; Yao, Jian Q

    2010-06-01

    This case report describes the early results of a 36-year-old man who underwent repair of a symptomatic full-thickness patellar cartilage defect with transplanted particulated juvenile articular cartilage. At 2 years postoperatively, the patient has experienced substantial clinical improvement in both pain and function when evaluated with both International Knee Documentation Committee subjective evaluation and Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score outcome measures. Two-year postoperative magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates fill of the defect with repair tissue and near complete resolution of preoperative subchondral bone edema. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this case report is the first to report clinical results of this new technique at 2 years postoperatively.

  8. Allergic reaction to biodegradable interference poly-L-lactic acid screws after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone graft.

    PubMed

    Mastrokalos, Dimitrios S; Paessler, Hans H

    2008-06-01

    We report a case of a systemic allergic reaction to biodegradable poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) interference screws after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone graft. A 30-year-old patient complained of certain symptoms, such as an inability to focus mentally, rash on the right femur, chronic fatigue, decreased sex drive, and localized alopecia, 3 months after ACL reconstruction in the right knee. Two biodegradable PLLA interference screws had been used for proximal and distal graft fixation. Allergy testing showed a value of 7 in PLLA antigen. After removal of 1 screw in August 2000, the patient reported marked improvement, but some symptoms remained. In July 2001 he underwent arthroscopic revision ACL reconstruction with hamstrings via an implant-free technique with intensive debridement of the tunnels and removal of all scar tissue and screw rests. All symptoms disappeared, and the PLLA antigen number fell from 3 to "concentrate" 2 months postoperatively.

  9. Volumetric quantitative characterization of human patellar cartilage with topological and geometrical features on phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B; Coan, Paola; Huber, Markus B; Diemoz, Paul C; Wismüller, Axel

    2015-11-01

    Phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography (PCI-CT) has attracted significant interest in recent years for its ability to provide significantly improved image contrast in low absorbing materials such as soft biological tissue. In the research context of cartilage imaging, previous studies have demonstrated the ability of PCI-CT to visualize structural details of human patellar cartilage matrix and capture changes to chondrocyte organization induced by osteoarthritis. This study evaluates the use of geometrical and topological features for volumetric characterization of such chondrocyte patterns in the presence (or absence) of osteoarthritic damage. Geometrical features derived from the scaling index method (SIM) and topological features derived from Minkowski Functionals were extracted from 1392 volumes of interest (VOI) annotated on PCI-CT images of ex vivo human patellar cartilage specimens. These features were subsequently used in a machine learning task with support vector regression to classify VOIs as healthy or osteoarthritic; classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Our results show that the classification performance of SIM-derived geometrical features (AUC: 0.90 ± 0.09) is significantly better than Minkowski Functionals volume (AUC: 0.54 ± 0.02), surface (AUC: 0.72 ± 0.06), mean breadth (AUC: 0.74 ± 0.06) and Euler characteristic (AUC: 0.78 ± 0.04) (p < 10(-4)). These results suggest that such geometrical features can provide a detailed characterization of the chondrocyte organization in the cartilage matrix in an automated manner, while also enabling classification of cartilage as healthy or osteoarthritic with high accuracy. Such features could potentially serve as diagnostic imaging markers for evaluating osteoarthritis progression and its response to different therapeutic intervention strategies.

  10. Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Jumper's Knee KidsHealth > For Teens > Jumper's Knee A A A ... continued damage to the knee. How Does the Knee Work? To understand how jumper's knee happens, it ...

  11. Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... regularly play sports that involve a lot of repetitive jumping — like track and field (particularly high-jumping), basketball, volleyball, gymnastics, running, and soccer — can put a lot of strain on their knees. Jumper's knee can seem like a minor injury that isn't really that serious. Because of ...

  12. Arthroscopy and patellar chondropathy.

    PubMed

    Zollinger, H; Schmohl, P

    1980-11-01

    Arthroscopy has proved to be a reliable method to determine acute and chronic retropatellar damage to cartilaginous tissue. The discrepancy between clinical and radiological findings, subjective disorders, and the actual morphological changes, seem to make arthroscopy desirable in analysing an objective and documentable initial situation. Long-term examinations will have to show how reliable prognostic statements are, and how justifiable the operative or conservative measures indicated by arthroscopic examination can be.

  13. A controlled clinical pilot trial to study the effectiveness of ice as a supplement to the exercise programme for the management of lateral elbow tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Manias, P; Stasinopoulos, D

    2006-01-01

    Background The use of ice as a supplement to an exercise programme has been recommended for the management of lateral elbow tendinopathy (LET). No studies have examined its effectiveness. Objectives To investigate whether an exercise programme supplemented with ice is more successful than the exercise programme alone in treating patients with LET. Methods Patients with unilateral LET for at least four weeks were included in this pilot study. They were sequentially allocated to receive five times a week for four weeks either an exercise programme with ice or the exercise programme alone. The exercise programme consisted of slow progressive eccentric exercises of wrist extensors and static stretching of the extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon. In the exercise programme/ice group, the ice was applied after the exercise programme for 10 minutes in the form of an ice bag to the facet of the lateral epicondyle. Patients were evaluated at baseline, at the end of treatment, and three months after the end of treatment. Outcome measures used were the pain visual analogue scale and the dropout rate. Results Forty patients met the inclusion criteria. At the end of treatment there was a decline in visual analogue scale of about 7 units in both groups compared with baseline (p<0.0005, paired t test). There were no significant differences in the magnitude of reduction between the groups at the end of treatment and at the three month follow up (p<0.0005, independent t test). There were no dropouts. Conclusions An exercise programme consisting of eccentric and static stretching exercises had reduced the pain in patients with LET at the end of the treatment and at the follow up whether or not ice was included. Further research to establish the relative, absolute, and cost effectiveness as well as the mechanism of action of the exercise programme is needed. PMID:16371498

  14. STRENGTH EXERCISES COMBINED WITH DRY NEEDLING WITH ELECTRICAL STIMULATION IMPROVE PAIN AND FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC ROTATOR CUFF TENDINOPATHY: A RETROSPECTIVE CASE SERIES

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background and Purpose Rotator cuff tendinopathy (RTCT) is regularly treated by the physical therapist. Multiple etiologies for RTCT exist, leading an individual to seek treatment from their provider of choice. Strengthening exercises (SE) have been reported to be effective in the treatment of RTCT, but there is limited evidence on the effectiveness of dry needing (DN) for this condition. The purpose of this retrospective case series was to investigate DN to various non-trigger point-based anatomical locations coupled with strengthening exercises (SE) as a treatment strategy to decrease pain and increase function in healthy patients with chronic RTC pathology. Case Descriptions Eight patients with RTCT were treated 1-2 times per week for up to eight weeks, and no more than sixteen total treatment sessions of SE and DN. Outcomes were tested at baseline and upon completion of therapy. A long-term outcome measure follow up averaging 8.75 months (range 3 to 20 months) was also performed. The outcome measures included the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and the Quick Dash (QD). Outcomes Clinically meaningful improvements in disability and pain in the short term and upon long-term follow up were demonstrated for each patient. The mean VAS was broken down into best (VASB), current (VASC), and worst (VASW) rated pain levels and the mean was calculated for the eight patients. The mean VASB improved from 22.5 mm at the initial assessment to 2.36 mm upon completion of the intervention duration. The mean VASC improved from 28.36 mm to 5.0 mm, and the mean VASW improved from 68.88 mm to 13.25 mm. At the long-term follow up (average 8.75 months), The mean VASB, VASC, and VASW scores were 0.36 mm, 4.88 mm, and 17.88 mm respectively. The QDmean for the eight patients improved from 43.09 at baseline to 16.04 at the completion of treatment. At long-term follow-up, the QDmean was 6.59. Conclusion Clinically meaningful improvements in pain and disability were

  15. Patellar Tendon Properties and Lower Limb Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Ankylosing Spondylitis versus Healthy Controls: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Matschke, Verena; Jones, Jeremy G.; Lemmey, Andrew B.; Maddison, Peter J.; Thom, Jeanette M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) lead to inflammation in tendons and peritendinous tissues, but effects on biomechanical tendon function are unknown. This study investigated patellar tendon (PT) properties in stable, established RA and AS patients. Methods. We compared 18 RA patients (13 women, 59.0 ± 2.8 years, mean ± SEM) with 18 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (58.2 ± 3.2 years), and 12 AS patients (4 women, 52.9 ± 3.4 years) with 12 matched controls (54.5 ± 4.7 years). Assessments with electromyography, isokinetic dynamometry, and ultrasound included quadriceps muscle force and cross-sectional area (CSA), PT stiffness, and PT CSA. Additionally, measures of physical function and disease activity were performed. Results. PT stiffness and physical function were lower in RA and AS patients compared to healthy controls, without a significant difference in force production. PT CSA was significantly larger leading to reduction in Young's modulus (YM) in AS, but not in RA. Conclusion. The adverse changes in PT properties in RA and AS may contribute to their impaired physical function. AS, but not RA, leads to PT thickening without increasing PT stiffness, suggesting that PT thickening in AS is a disorganised repair process. Longitudinal studies need to investigate the time course of these changes and their response to exercise training. PMID:23844402

  16. Proprioception in the ACL-ruptured knee: the contribution of the medial collateral ligament and patellar ligament. An in vivo experimental study in the cat.

    PubMed

    Bonsfills, N; Raygoza, J J; Boemo, E; Garrido, J; Núñez, A; Gómez-Barrena, E

    2007-01-01

    In the absence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), secondary restraints such as menisci, ligaments, and tendons restrict anterior knee laxity. Strain detection at these sites could define the contribution of this alternative signalling system to knee proprioception after ACL injury. The hypothesis in this study questions if measurements of anterior tibial translation (ATT) from surface strain gauges on the insertions of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) and the patellar tendon (PT) are sufficiently sensitive and specific to differentiate normal, stable knees from acutely unstable knees due to ACL section. Twelve cats received miniaturized strain gauges on the surface of MCL and PT distal insertions. A purpose-made receiver transformed into measurements any voltage variation obtained during passive knee flexion-extension and anterior tibial translation manoeuvres. Variables under evaluation included first peak latency, normalized amplitude, and slope of voltage along time. Femorotibial displacements were video recorded, digitized, and used as the ATT reference. The proposed system detected significant changes in the slope of the voltage/time signal, with higher specificity and sensitivity during ATT after experimental ACL section. Changes were not significant during flexion or extension. It was found that a pattern of earlier and more intense strain in MCL and PT distal insertions was found during ATT in the ACL deficient knee. Enhanced pattern recognition learning from these structures could be a future target for proprioceptive training after ACL injury.

  17. Achilles tendinitis in ballet dancers.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Palazzi, F; Rivas, S; Mujica, P

    1990-08-01

    Overuse injuries of tendons are known to occur in persons whose activities submit the tendon to excessive stress. Classical ballet dancers performing en pointe, demie point, or plié exert forces that, although normal in magnitude, are increased in frequency, thus overusing the Achilles tendon. In the present study all cases of Achilles tendinopathy seen in a period of three years in three ballet companies were reviewed by a special orthopedic clinic. The cause, whether by abnormal tension or incorrect use, development, and progression to chronic tendinopathy, as well as measures to prevent it, were analyzed in 19 cases. The methods of treatment, including conservative treatment with rest and refraining from dancing, local treatment such as ice and adhesive strapping, antiinflammatory drugs, local injections, thermotherapy, and laser therapy, were compared, and the time of recovery and ability to resume dancing were evaluated. Two cases required surgical treatment to subside, and the patients had to retire from professional dancing. The roentgenographic diagnosis of stage and progression of the tendinopathy is emphasized as a valuable accessory sign. The similarity in lesions between Achilles and patellar tendon problems was observed and confirmed.

  18. Integrating Dimension Reduction and Out-of-Sample Extension in Automated Classification of Ex Vivo Human Patellar Cartilage on Phase Contrast X-Ray Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Coan, Paola; Huber, Markus B.; Diemoz, Paul C.; Wismüller, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Phase contrast X-ray computed tomography (PCI-CT) has been demonstrated as a novel imaging technique that can visualize human cartilage with high spatial resolution and soft tissue contrast. Different textural approaches have been previously investigated for characterizing chondrocyte organization on PCI-CT to enable classification of healthy and osteoarthritic cartilage. However, the large size of feature sets extracted in such studies motivates an investigation into algorithmic feature reduction for computing efficient feature representations without compromising their discriminatory power. For this purpose, geometrical feature sets derived from the scaling index method (SIM) were extracted from 1392 volumes of interest (VOI) annotated on PCI-CT images of ex vivo human patellar cartilage specimens. The extracted feature sets were subject to linear and non-linear dimension reduction techniques as well as feature selection based on evaluation of mutual information criteria. The reduced feature set was subsequently used in a machine learning task with support vector regression to classify VOIs as healthy or osteoarthritic; classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). Our results show that the classification performance achieved by 9-D SIM-derived geometric feature sets (AUC: 0.96 ± 0.02) can be maintained with 2-D representations computed from both dimension reduction and feature selection (AUC values as high as 0.97 ± 0.02). Thus, such feature reduction techniques can offer a high degree of compaction to large feature sets extracted from PCI-CT images while maintaining their ability to characterize the underlying chondrocyte patterns. PMID:25710875

  19. Sex-differences of the healthy infra-patellar (Hoffa) fat pad in relation to intermuscular and subcutaneous fat content--data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    PubMed

    Diepold, J; Ruhdorfer, A; Dannhauer, T; Wirth, W; Steidle, E; Eckstein, F

    2015-07-01

    The infra-patellar fat pad (IPFP) is composed of intra-articular adipose tissue; it represents a potential source of pro-inflammatory cytokines and has been associated with osteoarthritis of the knee. Yet, to what extent the size of the IPFP differs between healthy men and women, and how sex differences compare to those in inter-muscular and subcutaneous fat tissue content is unknown. We studied healthy reference subjects from the Osteoarthritis Initiative, without knee pain, without radiographic signs or without risk factors of femorotibial osteoarthritis. Sagittal magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of 99 right knees were used to segment the IPFP; in a subset, axial images of the thigh were available to segment inter-muscular and subcutaneous fat. Healthy men (n=40) displayed a 41% greater (p<0.001) IPFP volume and a 9% greater (p<0.01) ratio of IPFP volume/body weight than women (n=59). Men (n=13) displayed 15% greater intermuscular fat content (not significant), and a 50% lesser (p<0.01) subcutaneous fat content than women (n=12); when related to total thigh cross-sectional areas, these sex differences were +2% (not significant) and -53% (p<0.001). This is the first study to explore quantitative measures of the IPFP in healthy men and women, and to relate these to sex differences of inter-muscular and subcutaneous fat tissue content. Men displayed a significantly greater ratio of IPFP volume/body weight than women, similar amounts of inter-muscular fat, and strikingly less subcutaneous fat. These data provide a basis for further systematic studies of the variability of the IPFP with the body mass index and its role in knee osteoarthritis.

  20. Bilateral patellar tendon-bearing Symes-type prostheses in a severe case of Freeman-Sheldon syndrome in a 21-year-old woman presenting with uncorrectable equinovarus.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Rodger J; Poling, Mikaela I; Chamberlain, Robert L

    2015-07-15

    Described is the use of bilateral patellar tendon-bearing Symes-type prostheses in a severe case of Freeman-Sheldon syndrome (FSS) in a 21-year-old woman presenting with uncorrectable equinovarus and multiple surgical sequela of the lower extremities. FSS is considered a type of myopathic distal arthrogryposis; diagnosis requires the following: microstomia, whistling-face appearance, H-shaped chin dimpling, nasolabial folds, and multiple contractures of the hands and feet. Spinal deformities, metabolic and gastroenterological problems, other dysmorphic craniofacial characteristics, and visual and auditory impairments, are frequent findings. We highlight what we believe to be a unique approach to enhancing the patient's ability to ambulate and engage in physical activity, particularly critical determinates of wellness and long-term functional outcome in FSS, when the feet are non-correctable but not amputated. Important implications exist for physiatrists, other rehabilitation providers and surgeons regarding this likely under-diagnosed syndrome.

  1. What Causes Cardiomyopathy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and can damage the organs, including the heart. Sarcoidosis : A disease that causes inflammation and can affect ... believe that an abnormal immune response may cause sarcoidosis. This abnormal response causes tiny lumps of cells ...

  2. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert; Novack, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Space Launch System (SLS) Agenda: Objective; Key Definitions; Calculating Common Cause; Examples; Defense against Common Cause; Impact of varied Common Cause Failure (CCF) and abortability; Response Surface for various CCF Beta; Takeaways.

  3. Imaging of triathlon injuries.

    PubMed

    Tuite, Michael J

    2010-11-01

    Injuries in triathletes are common and are mostly overuse injuries. Rotator cuff tendinitis is the most common complaint from swimming, but the incidence of tendinopathy and rotator cuff tears on magnetic resonance imaging is comparable in triathletes without and with shoulder pain. Cycling injuries are mainly to the knee, including patellar tendinosis, iliotibial band syndrome, and patellofemoral stress syndrome, and to the Achilles tendon and the cervical and lumbar spine. Running is associated with most injuries in triathletes, during both training and racing, causing the athlete to discontinue the triathlon. In addition to knee injuries from running, triathletes may also develop foot and ankle, lower leg, and hip injuries similar to single-sport distance runners. Some injuries in triathletes may be mainly symptomatic during one of the three sports but are exacerbated by one or both of the other disciplines.

  4. Modern management of patellar instability.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Shin-Jae; Pavlou, George; Oakley, Jeremy; Barlow, David; Haddad, Farres

    2012-12-01

    Recurrent patellofemoral instability is a disabling condition, attributed to a variety of anatomical aetiologies. Trochlear dysplasia, patella alta, an increased tibial tubercle trochlear groove distance of greater than 20 mm and soft tissue abnormalities such as a torn medial patellofemoral ligament and inadequate vastus medialis obliquus are all factors to be considered. Management of this condition remains difficult and controversial and knowledge of the functional anatomy and biomechanics of the patellofemoral joint, a detailed history and clinical examination, and an accurate patient assessment are all imperative to formulate an appropriate management plan. Surgical treatment is based on the underlying anatomical pathology with an aim to restore normal patellofemoral kinematics. We summarise aspects of assessment, treatment and outcome of patellofemoral instability and propose an algorithm of treatment.

  5. Prosthetic joint infection caused by Trueperella bernardiae.

    PubMed

    Gilarranz, Raul; Chamizo, Francisco; Horcajada, Iballa; Bordes-Benítez, Ana

    2016-09-01

    Trueperella bernardiae is a Gram-positive coryneform bacilli which role as human pathogen is unknown because it has been usually considered a contaminant. Furthermore its identification by biochemical test was difficult. We describe a prosthetic joint infection in a women who years ago underwent a total knee replacement with superinfection and necrosis of the patellar tendon as major complications. In the sample of synovial fluid collected grew a gram-positive bacilli which was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) as T. bernardiae. The patient was treated with ciprofloxacin and currently preserves the prosthesis without signs of infection.

  6. Coracoid syndrome: a neglected cause of anterior shoulder pain

    PubMed Central

    GIGANTE, ANTONIO; BOTTEGONI, CARLO; BARBADORO, PAMELA

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the present prospective open-label study was designed to gain further insights into a condition thought to constitute a neglected but not uncommon syndrome characterized by anterior shoulder pain and tenderness to palpation over the apex of the coracoid process, not related to rotator cuff or pectoralis minor tendinopathy, long head of the biceps tendon disorders, or instability. The aim was to clarify its prevalence, clinical characteristics, differential diagnosis and response to corticosteroid injections. Methods patients with primary anterior shoulder pain precisely reproduced by deep pressure on the apex of the coracoid process were recruited. Patients with clinical or instrumental signs of other shoulder disorders were excluded. Patients were given an injection of triamcinolone acetonide 40 mg/ml 1 ml at the coracoid trigger point. They were evaluated after 15, 30 and 60 days and at 2 years using Equal Visual Analog Scale (EQ-VAS) and the Italian version of the Simple Shoulder Test (SST). Results between January 1 and December 31 2010, we treated 15 patients aged 26–66 years. The majority were women (86.67%). At 15 days, 6 (40%) patients reported complete resolution of their symptoms, while 9 (60%) complained of residual symptoms and received another injection. At 30 days, 14 (93.33%) patients were pain-free and very satisfied. At 2 years, the 14 patients who had been asymptomatic at 30 days reported that they had experienced no further pain or impaired shoulder function. The analysis of variance for repeated measures showed a significant effect of time on EQ-VAS and SST scores. Conclusions the present study documents the existence, and characteristics, of a “coracoid syndrome” characterized by anterior shoulder pain and tenderness to palpation over the apex of the coracoid process and showed that the pain is usually amenable to steroid treatment. This syndrome should be clearly distinguished from anterior shoulder pain due to other causes, in

  7. What Causes Polycythemia Vera?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Polycythemia Vera? Primary Polycythemia Polycythemia vera (PV) also is known as primary ... may play a role in causing PV. Secondary Polycythemia Another type of polycythemia, called secondary polycythemia, isn' ...

  8. What Causes Cardiogenic Shock?

    MedlinePlus

    ... pumping enough oxygen-rich blood to the body. Heart Attack Most heart attacks occur as a result of ... or completely block blood flow. Conditions Caused by Heart Attack Heart attacks can cause some serious heart conditions ...

  9. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis? A defect in the CFTR gene causes cystic ... in the severity of the disease. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Inherited? Every person inherits two CFTR genes—one ...

  10. What Causes Sarcoidosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Sarcoidosis? The cause of sarcoidosis isn't known. More ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sarcoidosis 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  11. What Causes Atherosclerosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Atherosclerosis? The exact cause of atherosclerosis isn't known. ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  12. What Causes Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Anemia? The three main causes of anemia are: Blood ... the blood and can lead to anemia. Aplastic Anemia Some infants are born without the ability to ...

  13. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth > For Teens > Do Allergies Cause Asthma? A A A en español ¿Las alergias provocan asma? Do allergies cause asthma? The answer to that question is: ...

  14. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth > For Teens > Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Print A A A en español ¿Las alergias provocan asma? Do allergies cause asthma? The answer to that question is: yes and ...

  15. CLASSIFYING RUNNING‐RELATED INJURIES BASED UPON ETIOLOGY, WITH EMPHASIS ON VOLUME AND PACE

    PubMed Central

    Nohr, Ellen Aagaard; Rasmussen, Sten; Sørensen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Many researchers acknowledge the importance of “training errors” as the main cause of running‐related injuries. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to present a theoretical framework for the assumption that some running‐related injuries among rear‐foot strikers develop due to rapidly changing running volume, while others develop due to rapidly changing running pace. Description of Topic with Related Evidence: Evidence from clinical and experimental studies is presented to support the assertion that rapid change in running volume may lead to the development of patellofemoral pain syndrome, iliotibial band syndrome, and patellar tendinopathy, while change in running pace may be associated with the development of achilles tendinopathy, gastrocnemius injuries, and plantar fasciitis. Discussion/Relation to Clinical Practice: If this assertion is correct, bias may be prevented in future studies by categorizing injuries into volume or pacing injuries. However, more work is needed to provide further evidence in support of this approach. Future investigations of the link between training patterns and injury development should be designed as large‐scale prospective studies using objective methods to quantify training patterns. Level of evidence: 5 PMID:23593555

  16. Causes and effects.

    PubMed

    Cone, Carol L; Feldman, Mark A; DaSilva, Alison T

    2003-07-01

    Most companies make charitable donations, but few approach their contributions with an eye toward enhancing their brands. Those that do take such an approach commit talent and know-how, not just dollars, to a pressing but carefully chosen social need and then tell the world about the cause and their service to it. Through the association, both the business and the cause benefit in ways they could not otherwise. Organizations such as Avon, ConAgra Foods, and Chevrolet have recognized that a sustained cause-branding program can improve their reputations, boost their employees' morale, strengthen relations with business partners, and drive sales. And the targeted causes receive far more money than they could have from direct corporate gifts alone. The authors examine these best practices and offer four principles for building successful cause-branding programs. First, they say, a company should select a cause that advances its corporate goals. That is, unless the competitive logic for supporting the cause is clear, a company shouldn't even consider putting its finite resources behind it. Second, a business should commit to a cause before picking its charitable partners. Otherwise, a cause-branding program may become too dependent on its partners. Third, a company should put all its assets to work, especially its employees. It should leverage the professional skills of its workers as well as its other assets such as distribution networks. And fourth, a company should promote its philanthropic initiatives through every possible channel. In addition to using the media, it should communicate its efforts through the Web, annual reports, direct mail, and so on. Cause branding is a way to turn the obligations of corporate citizenship into a valuable asset. When the cause is well chosen, the commitment genuine, and the program well executed, the cause helps the company, and the company helps the cause.

  17. Causes of Paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by a virus that attacks the nerves which control motor function. > Spina bifida A neural tube defect that causes incomplete closure in the spinal column. > Spinal cord injury Involves damage to the nerves within the bony protection of the spinal canal. > ...

  18. What Causes Bad Breath?

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness What Causes Bad Breath? KidsHealth > For Teens > What Causes Bad Breath? A A A en español ¿Qué es lo que provoca el mal aliento? Bad breath, or halitosis , can be a major problem, ...

  19. What Causes Angina?

    MedlinePlus

    ... a clot blocks an artery. Variant Angina A spasm in a coronary artery causes variant angina. The spasm causes the walls of the artery to tighten ... those who don’t. The coronary arteries can spasm as a result of: Exposure to cold Emotional ...

  20. The effect of defect localization on spontaneous repair of osteochondral defects in a Gottingen minipig model: a retrospective analysis of the medial patellar groove versus the medial femoral condyle.

    PubMed

    Jung, Martin; Breusch, Steffen; Daecke, Wolfgang; Gotterbarm, Tobias

    2009-04-01

    Various animal models for experimental osteochondral defect healing have been used in orthopaedic research. Two main defect locations were chosen: the patellar groove or the central part of the medial femoral condyles (MFC). To date, it is not clear whether both locations display similar patterns in critical size osteochondral defect healing. We retrospectively analysed both locations in our minipig model hypothesizing that they show similar healing pattern. Thirty-five defects were analysed after three or 12 months. Osteochondral defects were 10 mm deep and 6.3 mm (MFC, n = 19) in diameter or 8 mm and 5.4 mm, respectively (trochlear groove [TG], n = 16). Semi-quantitative histological scoring and histomorphological evaluation were carried out. Both defect locations showed fillings of fibrous and fibrocartilage-like repair tissue. The osseous defect was closed by endochondral bone formation in the MFC. Semi-quantitative scoring did not show differences, whereas qualitative histomorphological analysis more frequently showed cartilaginous repair tissue in MFC defects. There was more frequent subchondral bone cyst formation in MFC location (P = 0.05), TG defects resulted in lower postoperative pain. Both defect localizations are suitable for studies on osteochondral healing. Since regenerating with less hyaline-like repair tissue and less subchondral cyst formation, TG is more favourable for experimental osteochondral defect healing in this model.

  1. What Causes Hemochromatosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... each parent), you're at risk for iron overload and signs and symptoms of hemochromatosis. If you ... of another disease or condition that causes iron overload. Examples of such diseases and conditions include: Certain ...

  2. Leading Causes of Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cataract. Photo courtesy of National Eye Institute, NIH Cataracts Cataracts are a clouding of the lenses in your ... older people. More than 22 million Americans have cataracts. They are the leading cause of blindness in ...

  3. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... younger brother might develop it, too. He has seasonal allergies and I've heard that allergies can cause ... TOPIC Asthma Center Asthma Basics All About Allergies Seasonal Allergies (Hay Fever) If My Child Has Asthma, Can ...

  4. Viral causes of diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Goodgame, R W

    2001-09-01

    Viruses are important causes of diarrhea. In healthy adults, the main clinical manifestation is acute, self-limited gastroenteritis. Advances in molecular diagnostics have shown that epidemics of acute gastroenteritis most frequently are due to caliciviruses spread through contaminated food or through person-to-person contact. Application of similar technology is needed to make a definitive statement about the role of such candidate viruses as rotavirus, astrovirus, and adenovirus as the cause of nonepidemic acute gastroenteritis in adults. Rarely a previously healthy adult gets acute CMV colitis. CMV and EBV mainly cause diarrhea in immunocompromised patients, however. Advances in prophylaxis and treatment have reduced the frequency and severity of these diseases. Acute infantile gastroenteritis is caused by rotavirus, calcivirus, astrovirus, and adenovirus. These viral diseases of the gut are seen by the physician as routine and rare clinical problems.

  5. What Causes Atelectasis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & Clinical Studies NHLBI Trials Clinical Trial Websites News & ... and medical disorders that can cause atelectasis include pneumonia , lung ... tube from a ventilator. When a blockage occurs, the air that's already ...

  6. Causes of Ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Type 2 (AOA1 and AOA2). Affects the Nervous System The various abnormal genes that cause ataxia have ... cord. The details of which parts of the nervous system are most affected vary with the different types ...

  7. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... have symptoms worsen if she's exposed to specific allergens (things that cause an allergic reaction). In fact, ... type, which specifically recognizes and attaches to the allergen when the body is exposed to it. When ...

  8. What Causes Bronchitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... exposed to tobacco smoke, dust, fumes, vapors, or air pollution raises your risk for the condition. These lung ... the major cause of the condition. Breathing in air pollution and dust or fumes from the environment or ...

  9. What Causes Thrombocytopenia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... some conditions that cause too much blood clotting. Autoimmune Diseases Autoimmune diseases occur if the body's immune system mistakenly attacks healthy cells in the body. If an autoimmune disease destroys the body's platelets, thrombocytopenia can occur. One ...

  10. What Causes Pericarditis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Cough Heart Attack Heart Palpitations Heart Surgery Hypotension Send a link ...

  11. What causes bone loss?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Any treatment or condition that causes calcium or vitamin D to be poorly absorbed can also lead to weak bones. Some of these are: Gastric bypass (weight-loss surgery) Cystic fibrosis Other conditions that ...

  12. What Causes Varicose Veins?

    MedlinePlus

    ... weak or damaged, blood can back up and pool in your veins. This causes the veins to ... pressure in your veins due to overweight or obesity or pregnancy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: February ...

  13. What Causes Respiratory Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the lungs, airways, diaphragm, rib cage, pulmonary arteries, brain, and spinal cord ... STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG CONTACT US ...

  14. What Causes Lactose Intolerance?

    MedlinePlus

    ... FOIA Jobs at NICHD Meetings, Conferences & Events Partnering & Donating to the ... intolerance? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Not having enough lactase in the body is the cause of lactose intolerance. The names ...

  15. [Does vaccination cause disease?].

    PubMed

    Zingg, W

    2005-10-01

    Not many inventions in medical history have influenced our society as much as vaccination. The concept is old and simple. When Edward Jenner published his work on cowpox, "variolation" was quite common. In this procedure, pus of patients with mild smallpox was transferred to healthy individuals. Meanwhile smallpox has been eradicated worldwide. Diseases such as poliomyelitis, diphtheria or tetanus almost disappeared in industrialized countries. The same happened with epiglottitis and meningitis due to Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) after vaccination against Hib was introduced in Switzerland in 1990. This success was possible because of routine vaccination. Immunization is a save procedure and adverse events are much lower than complications in the natural course of the prevented diseases. However vaccinations were accused to cause diseases themselves such as asthma, multiple sclerosis, diabetes mellitus, chronic arthritis or autism. Hitherto no large cohort study or case-control-study was able to proof responsibility of vaccines in any of these diseases. Public media are eager to publish early data from surveillance reports or case reports which are descriptive and never a principle of cause and effect. In large controlled trials there was no proof that vaccination causes asthma, hepatitis-B-vaccination causes multiple sclerosis or macrophagic myofasciitis, Hib-vaccination causes diabetes mellitus, rubella-vaccination causes chronic arthritis, measles-mumps-rubella-vaccination causes gait disturbance or thiomersal causes autism. These results are rarely published in newspapers or television. Thus, many caring parents are left with negative ideas about immunization. Looking for the best for their children they withhold vaccination and give way to resurgence of preventable diseases in our communities. This must be prevented. There is more evidence than expected that vaccination is safe and this can and must be told to parents.

  16. Rare causes of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Marcucci, Gemma; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone disease characterized by loss of bone mass and strength, resulting in increased risk of fractures. It is classically divided into primary (post-menopausal or senile), secondary and idiopathic forms. There are many rare diseases, that cause directly or indirectly osteoporosis. The identification and classification of most of these rare causes of osteoporosis is crucial for the specialists in endocrinology and not, in order to prevent this bone complication and to provide for an early therapy. Several pathogenic mechanisms are involved, including various aspects of bone metabolism such as: decreased bone formation, increased bone resorption, altered calcium, phosphorus and/or vitamin D homeostasis, and abnormal collagen synthesis. In this review, less common forms of primary and secondary osteoporosis are described, specifying, if applicable: genetic causes, epidemiology, clinical features, and pathogenic mechanisms causing osteoporosis. A greater awareness of all rare causes of osteoporosis could reduce the number of cases classified as idiopathic osteoporosis and allow the introduction of appropriate and timely treatments. PMID:26604941

  17. Drying of open animal joints in vivo subsequently causes cartilage degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, S. I.; Eltawil, N. M.; Simpson, A. H. R. W.; Amin, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives During open orthopaedic surgery, joints may be exposed to air, potentially leading to cartilage drying and chondrocyte death, however, the long-term effects of joint drying in vivo are poorly understood. We used an animal model to investigate the subsequent effects of joint drying on cartilage and chondrocytes. Methods The patellar groove of anaesthetised rats was exposed (sham-operated), or exposed and then subjected to laminar airflow (0.25m/s; 60 minutes) before wounds were sutured and animals recovered. Animals were monitored for up to eight weeks and then sacrificed. Cartilage and chondrocyte properties were studied by histology and confocal microscopy, respectively. Results Joint drying caused extensive chondrocyte death within the superficial regions of cartilage. Histology of dried cartilage demonstrated a loss of surface integrity at four weeks, fibrillations at eight weeks, and an increased modified Mankin score (p < 0.001). Cartilage thickness increased (p < 0.001), whereas chondrocyte density decreased at four weeks (p < 0.001), but then increased towards sham-operated levels (p < 0.01) at eight weeks. By week eight, chondrocyte pairing/clustering and cell volume increased (p < 0.05; p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusions These in vivo results demonstrated for the first time that as a result of laminar airflow, cartilage degeneration occurred which has characteristics similar to those seen in early osteoarthritis. Maintenance of adequate cartilage hydration during open orthopaedic surgery is therefore of paramount importance. Cite this article: Dr A. Hall. Drying of open animal joints in vivo subsequently causes cartilage degeneration. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:137–144. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.54.2000594. PMID:27114348

  18. Common Cause Failure Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Jon; Heimann, Timothy J.; Anderson, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    High technology industries with high failure costs commonly use redundancy as a means to reduce risk. Redundant systems, whether similar or dissimilar, are susceptible to Common Cause Failures (CCF). CCF is not always considered in the design effort and, therefore, can be a major threat to success. There are several aspects to CCF which must be understood to perform an analysis which will find hidden issues that may negate redundancy. This paper will provide definition, types, a list of possible causes and some examples of CCF. Requirements and designs from NASA projects will be used in the paper as examples.

  19. [Mydocalm causing anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Kwaśniewski, Artur; Korbuszewska-Gontarz, Beata; Mika, Sylwia

    2003-01-01

    The case of anaphylactic shock due to Mydocalm administration is presented. 49-year-old woman suffered from spinal osteoarthritis and she was treated with NSAIDs and Mydocalm for many years. 6 weeks before admission to hospital the first anaphylactic shock was developed with loss of consciousness after oral administration of Mydocalm. Then she was admitted to the hospital in order to diagnose and verify the suspicion whether Mydocalm caused this reaction. Percutaneous test with Mydocalm was performed and it caused anaphylactic shock. Only thirteen cases like this one have been documented in the world literature. It is the first case reported in Poland.

  20. Landslides - Cause and effect

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radbruch-Hall, D. H.; Varnes, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Landslides can cause seismic disturbances; landslides can also result from seismic disturbances, and earthquake-induced slides have caused loss of life in many countries. Slides can cause disastrous flooding, particularly when landslide dams across streams are breached, and flooding may trigger slides. Slope movement in general is a major process of the geologic environment that places constraints on engineering development. In order to understand and foresee both the causes and effects of slope movement, studies must be made on a regional scale, at individual sites, and in the laboratory. Areal studies - some embracing entire countries - have shown that certain geologic conditions on slopes facilitate landsliding; these conditions include intensely sheared rocks; poorly consolidated, fine-grained clastic rocks; hard fractured rocks underlain by less resistant rocks; or loose accumulations of fine-grained surface debris. Field investigations as well as mathematical- and physical-model studies are increasing our understanding of the mechanism of slope movement in fractured rock, and assist in arriving at practical solutions to landslide problems related to all kinds of land development for human use. Progressive failure of slopes has been studied in both soil and rock mechanics. New procedures have been developed to evaluate earthquake response of embankments and slopes. The finite element method of analysis is being extensively used in the calculation of slope stability in rock broken by joints, faults, and other discontinuities. ?? 1976 International Association of Engineering Geology.